WorldWideScience

Sample records for hypofractionated radiotherapy courses

  1. The role of split-course hypofractionated palliative radiotherapy in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kancherla, K N; Oksuz, D C; Prestwich, R J D; Fosker, C; Dyker, K E; Coyle, C C; Sen, M

    2011-03-01

    A significant proportion of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma are unsuitable for radical treatment due to factors including tumour stage, performance status and co-morbidity. Palliative radiotherapy has a useful role in the control of local symptoms. This study documented the outcome with split-course hypofractionated radiotherapy. Thirty-three previously untreated patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma were treated with palliative intent with split-course radiotherapy, with an initial 20 Gy in five fractions over 1 week, a 2 week gap, and then a further 20 Gy in five fractions over 1 week at the Yorkshire Cancer Centre between January 2004 and December 2007. Data were collected retrospectively from case notes and radiotherapy records. Thirty (91%) patients had stage IV A-B disease. World Health Organization performance status was 2 or 3 in 19 (58%) patients. The median age was 76 years (range 48-91 years). Twenty-five (76%) patients were men. Symptomatic improvement was reported in 26 (79%) patients at 4-6 weeks of follow-up. Thirteen (39%) patients had a complete tumour response and 11 (33%) patients had a partial response as assessed clinically, and in some cases radiologically. The median overall survival was 9 months (range 3-43 months). Progression-free survival at 1 and 2 years was 35 and 25%, respectively. Overall survival at 1 and 2 years was 42 and 34%, respectively. Treatment was generally well tolerated; admission for nasogastric feeding and/or supportive care was required in only six patients. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grade 3 toxicity was documented for skin in one patient, for mucosa in two patients and for oesophagitis in three patients. Split-course hypofractionated radiotherapy is an effective palliative regimen with acceptable toxicity. Copyright © 2010 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Combination of 5-FU Cisplatinum and hypofractionated irradiation followed by split-course radiotherapy in 47 patients with unresectable non small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolla, M.; Nagy-Mignotte, H.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, C.; Paramelle, B.; Vincent, F.; Kolodie, H.; Vrousos, C. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 38 - Grenoble (France))

    1992-11-01

    47 Patients with unresectable non small cell lung carcinoma, 15 stage IIIA, 31 stage IIIB, 1 stage IV (cervical lymphadenopathy) were treated with a combination of 3 courses of chemotherapy and hypofractionated irradiation followed after 3 weeks by split course radiotherapy. Each course was repeated every 3 weeks with the following sequence: Cisplatinum (CDDP) (20 mg/m[sup 2]) was given in a 20-min infusion, followed by a 2-h infusion of 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) (400 mg/m[sup 2]) on days 1, 2, 5 and 6. Radiation with a dose of 3 Gy on the target volume was given on days 3 and 4 -in one fraction for the former 27 patients, in 2 fractions of 1.5 Gy for the latter 20 patients with a 6-h interval- after a 2-h infusion of 5-FU (400 mg/m[sup 2]). The results remain disappointing: the objective response rate was 53%, the median survival was 10 months for the series, and the one-year survival 47%. The median survival was 14 months for IIIA, 10 months for IIIB and IV. Regarding the therapeutic regimen there seems to be less morbidity with 2 fractions per day for which the median survival is nearly the same at 10 months (1 fraction/day) versus 12 months (2 fractions/day). (author). 21 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  3. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoecht, Stefan [Xcare Gruppe, Radiologie, Nuklearmedizin und Strahlentherapie, Saarlouis (Germany); Aebersold, Daniel M. [University of Bern, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radio-Onkologie, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Albrecht, Clemens [Universitaetsklinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Strahlentherapie, Klinikum Nuernberg Nord, Nuremberg (Germany); Boehmer, Dirk [Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie, Berlin (Germany); Flentje, Michael [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wuerzburg (Germany); Ganswindt, Ute [Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Munich (Germany); Hoelscher, Tobias [Universitaetsklinikum Carl Gustav Carus, Technische Universitaet Dresden, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Dresden (Germany); Martin, Thomas [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Bremen (Germany); Sedlmayer, Felix [Universitaetsklinikum der Paracelsus Medizinischen Privatuniversitaet, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radiotherapie und Radio-Onkologie, Landeskrankenhaus, Salzburg (Austria); Wenz, Frederik [Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim, Universitaet Heidelberg, Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie, Mannheim (Germany); Zips, Daniel [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen, Universitaetsklinik fuer Radioonkologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Wiegel, Thomas [Universitaetsklinikum Ulm, Abteilung Strahlentherapie, Ulm (Germany)

    2017-01-15

    This article gives an overview on the current status of hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer with a special focus on the applicability in routine use. Based on a recently published systematic review the German Society of Radiation Oncology (DEGRO) expert panel added additional information that has become available since then and assessed the validity of the information on outcome parameters especially with respect to long-term toxicity and long-term disease control. Several large-scale trials on moderate hypofractionation with single doses from 2.4-3.4 Gy have recently finished recruiting or have published first results suggestive of equivalent outcomes although there might be a trend for increased short-term and possibly even long-term toxicity. Large phase 3 trials on extreme hypofractionation with single doses above 4.0 Gy are lacking and only very few prospective trials have follow-up periods covering more than just 2-3 years. Until the results on long-term follow-up of several well-designed phase 3 trials become available, moderate hypofractionation should not be used in routine practice without special precautions and without adherence to the highest quality standards and evidence-based dose fractionation regimens. Extreme hypofractionation should be restricted to prospective clinical trials. (orig.) [German] Diese Uebersichtsarbeit soll den aktuellen Status der hypofraktionierten Radiotherapie des Prostatakarzinoms mit dem Fokus auf die Anwendung in der Routinetherapie darstellen. Basierend auf einem kuerzlich erschienen systematischen Review zur Hypofraktionierung sind durch das DEGRO Expertengremium zusaetzliche, in der Zwischenzeit verfuegbar gewordene Informationen mit beruecksichtigt worden. Die Validitaet der Aussagen zu Ergebnissen wurde speziell im Hinblick auf die Langzeittoxizitaet und -erkrankungskontrolle bewertet. Mehrere grosse Phase-3-Studien zur moderaten Hypofraktionierung mit Dosen von 2,4-3,4 Gy pro Fraktion

  4. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for malignant tumors of the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. Ю. Аникеева

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was used for 26 patients at medically inoperable stage I of non-small cell lung cancer with dose escalation of 48-54 Gy prescribed at 90 or 95% isodose level in 3-4 fractions. Nine-months local control and cancer-specific survival were 82.0 and 66.8% respectively, with minimal toxicity. For metastatic lung tumors local control was obtained in 92% cases. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SBRT is safe and feasible for the treatment of inoperable primary lung cancer and single lung metastasis.

  5. Hypofractionated Adjuvant Whole Breast Radiotherapy: Progress and Prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarnold, John (Section of Radiotherapy, Inst. of Cancer Research, Royal Marsden Hospital, Sutton (United Kingdom)), E-mail: john.yarnold@icr.ac.uk; Haviland, Joanne (Clinical Trials and Statistics Unit (ICR-CTSU), Section of Clinical Trials, Inst. of Cancer Research, Sutton (United Kingdom))

    2010-11-15

    Published results of randomised trials involving >7000 women confirm the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated schedules of adjuvant radiotherapy for women with early breast cancer using fraction sizes between 2 and 3 Gy assuming appropriate downward adjustments to total dose. Unnecessary concerns relating to heart tolerance, suboptimal dose distribution and duration of follow up need not discourage the routine adoption of 15- or 16-fraction schedules in women treated by breast conservation surgery for early breast cancer. Regardless of fractionation regimen, dose escalation to the index quadrant in high risk subgroups will result in a greater relative increase in late adverse effects than tumour control, a therapeutic disadvantage that can only be overcome by exploiting a marked dose-volume effect. A 15-fraction schedule of whole breast radiotherapy is unlikely to represent the lower limits of hypofractionation, and the preliminary results of a 5-fraction regimen are encouraging

  6. Concurrent Boost with Adjuvant Breast Hypofractionated Radiotherapy and Toxicity Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mona M. Sayed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The use of shorter radiotherapy schedules has an economic and logistic advantage for radiotherapy departments, as well as a high degree of patient convenience. The aim of this study is to assess the acute and short-term late toxicities of a hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule with a concomitant boost. Methods: We enrolled 57 eligible patients as group A. These patients received 42.5 Gy in 16 fractions of 2.66 Gy each to the whole breast over 3.2 weeks. A concomitant electron boost of 12 Gy in 16 fractions was also administered which gave an additional 0.75 Gy daily to the lumpectomy area for a total radiation dose of 54.5 Gy. Toxicity was recorded at three weeks and at three months for this group as well as for a control group (group B. The control group comprised 76 eligible patients treated conventionally with 50 Gy to the whole breast over five weeks followed by a sequential electron boost of 12 Gy in 2 Gy per fraction. Results: There were no statistically significant differences observed in the incidence of acute skin toxicity, breast pain, and edema recorded at three weeks or pigmentation and fibrosis recorded at three months between the two groups (P0.05. Conclusion: The results of this study suggest there are no increased acute and shortterm late toxicities affiliated with the hypofractionated schedule plus a concomitant boost as prescribed compared to the conventional fractionation of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Large randomized trials and long-term follow-up are needed to confirm these favorable findings.

  7. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy after transarterial chemoembolisation failure in an unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma: a case presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorica, Francesco; Greco, Carlo; Boccia, Sergio; Sartori, Sergio; Stefanelli, Antonio; Cartei, Francesco; Ursino, Stefano

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Transarterial chemoembolization is the first-line treatment in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. There is no standard treatment after transarterial chemoembolization failure. We report the case of a patient with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma who showed a complete response and a long cancer control with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy after transarterial chemoembolization failure. Case Presentation. A 70-year-old Caucasian woman was treated with transarterial chemoembolization for advanced hepatocellular, but no cancer control was obtained. A hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy was planned delivering 40 Gy in 5 fractions. A dramatic reduction in alpha-fetoprotein was observed. Contrast-enhanced ultrasonography at 1 and 2 months showed large necrotic areas. Computerised tomography scan showed a 90% objective tumour response, then a complete remission at 3 and 6 months after treatment, respectively. Status of patient remained unchanged for 2 years. Conclusions. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy can improve survival and prognosis of unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma patient.

  8. Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy after Transarterial Chemoembolisation Failure in an Unresectable Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Case Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Fiorica; Carlo Greco; Sergio Boccia; Sergio Sartori; Antonio Stefanelli; Francesco Cartei; Stefano Ursino

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Transarterial chemoembolization is the first-line treatment in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma. There is no standard treatment after transarterial chemoembolization failure. We report the case of a patient with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma who showed a complete response and a long cancer control with hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy after transarterial chemoembolization failure. Case Presentation. A 70-year-old Caucasian woman was treated with transarterial ...

  9. Ablative hypofractionated radiotherapy normalizes tumor vasculature in lewis lung carcinoma mice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Jie; Wan, Xiao-Li; Deng, Lei; Xue, Jian-Xin; Wang, Li-Shuai; Meng, Mao-Bin; Ling, Hua; Zhang, Xi; Mo, Xian-Ming; Lu, You

    2013-04-01

    Ablative hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT) significantly improves the overall survival of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients compared with conventional radiation therapy. However, the radiobiological mechanisms of ablative HFRT remain largely unknown. The purpose of this study was to investigate the dynamic changes of tumor vessels and perfusion during and after ablative hypofractionated radiotherapy. Lewis lung carcinoma-bearing mice were treated with sham (control) and ablative hypofractionated radiotherapy of 12 Gy in 1 fraction (12 Gy/1F) and 36 Gy in 3 fractions (36 Gy/3F). Tumor microvessel density (MVD), morphology and function were examined at different times after irradiation. The results showed that, compared to the controls the MVD and hypoxia in ablative HFRT groups decreased, which were accompanied by an increase in the number of pericytes and their coverage of vessels. Functional tests revealed that tumor hypoxia and perfusion were improved, especially in the 36 Gy/3F group. Our results revealed that ablative hypofractionated radiotherapy not only repressed MVD and hypoxia, but also increased the vascular perfusion and the number of pericyte-covered vessels, suggesting that ablative HFRT normalized the tumor vasculature.

  10. Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Small-sized Hepatocellular Carcinoma as Salvage Therapy: Sustained Local Control and Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sun Hyun; Park, Hee Chul; Lim, Do Hoon; Lee, Jung Ae; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul [Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-15

    To evaluate the rate of tumor response, local control, and treatment-related complications after hypofractionated radiotherapy for recurrent hepatocelluar carcinoma (HCC) less than 5 cm in size. Among the HCC patients who were treated by radiotherapy (RT) between 2006 and 2007 after the failure of previous treatment, a total of 12 patients were treated with hypofractionated RT. The criteria for hypofractionated RT was as follows: 1) HCC less than 5 cm, 2) HCC not adjacent to a critical organ, 3) HCC without portal vein tumor thrombosis, and 4) less than 15% of normal liver volume that irradiated 50% of the prescribed dose. Hypofractionated RT was performed with 50 Gy delivered in 10 fractions, at a rate of 5 fractions per week. The evaluation of tumor response was determined by CT scans performed at 3 months after the cessation of RT, followed by the evaluation of toxicity by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. The median follow-up period after radiotherapy was 18 months. A complete response (CR) was achieved in 5 of 12 lesions (41.7%) at CT performed at 3 months after the cessation, whereas the overall complete response was observed in 7 of 12 cases (58.3%). In-field local control rate was sustained in 83.3% of patients. All patients developed intra-hepatic metastases except for 2 patients. The overall survival rate was 90.0% at 1 year and 67.5% at 2 years, respectively. Three patients developed Grade 1 nausea during RT and 1 patient showed a progression of ascites after RT. There was no grade 3 or greater treatment-related toxicities. Hypofractionated RT for small-sized HCC as a salvage therapy showed a 58.3% CR rate and 83.3% of local control. Fifty Gy administered in 10 fractions of partial liver irradiation is considered as a tolerable dose that does not cause severe complications.

  11. Effect of image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy on peripheral non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang SW

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Shu-wen Wang,1 Juan Ren,1 Yan-li Yan,2 Chao-fan Xue,2 Li Tan,2 Xiao-wei Ma2 1Department of Radiotherapy, First Affiliated Hospital of Xian Jiaotong University, 2Medical School of Xian Jiaotong University, Xi’an, Shaanxi, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The objective of this study was to compare the effects of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy and conventional fractionated radiotherapy on non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Fifty stage- and age-matched cases with NSCLC were randomly divided into two groups (A and B. There were 23 cases in group A and 27 cases in group B. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT and stereotactic radiotherapy were conjugately applied to the patients in group A. Group A patients underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (6–8 Gy/time three times per week, with a total dose of 64–66 Gy; group B received conventional fractionated radiotherapy, with a total dose of 68–70 Gy five times per week. In group A, 1-year and 2-year local failure survival rate and 1-year local failure-free survival rate were significantly higher than in group B (P<0.05. The local failure rate (P<0.05 and distant metastasis rate (P>0.05 were lower in group A than in group B. The overall survival rate of group A was significantly higher than that of group B (P=0.03, and the survival rate at 1 year was 87% vs 63%, (P<0.05. The median survival time of group A was longer than that of group B. There was no significant difference in the incidence of complications between the two groups (P>0.05. Compared with conventional fractionated radiation therapy, image-guided hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in NSCLC received better treatment efficacy and showed good tolerability. Keywords: non-small-cell lung cancer, hypofractionated radiotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, segmentation, intensity-modulated radiotherapy, image-guided radiation therapy technology

  12. Extreme Hypofractionated Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Greco

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An emerging body of data suggests that hypofractionated radiation schedules, where a higher dose per fraction is delivered in a smaller number of sessions, may be superior to conventional fractionation schemes in terms of both tumour control and toxicity profile in the management of adenocarcinoma of the prostate. However, the optimal hypofractionation scheme is still the subject of scientific debate. Modern computer-driven technology enables the safe implementation of extreme hypo fractionation (often referred to as stereotactic body radiation therapy [SBRT]. Several studies are currently being conducted to clarify the yet unresolved issues regarding treatment techniques and fractionation regimens. Recently, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO issued a model policy indicating that data supporting the use of SBRT for prostate cancer have matured to a point where SBRT could be considered an appropriate alternative for select patients with low-to-intermediate risk disease. The present article reviews some of the currently available data and examines the impact of tracking technology to mitigate intra-fraction target motion, thus, potentially further improving the clinical outcomes of extreme hypofractionated radiation therapy in appropriately selected prostate cancer patients. The Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown (CCU’s currently ongoing Phase I feasibility study is described; it delivers 45 Gy in five fractions using prostate fixation via a rectal balloon, and urethral sparing via catheter placement with on-line intra-fractional motion tracking through beacon transponder technology.

  13. Treatment of idiopathic hemifacial spasm with radiosurgery or hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraioli, M F; Moschettoni, L; Fraioli, C; Strigari, L

    2010-02-01

    Microvascular decompression in the posterior cranial fossa is the first treatment option for hemifacial spasm. For patients not suitable for surgery because of advanced age, poor general conditions or patients who refuse surgery, radiotherapeutic treatment could be an alternative. Only one case of resolution of hemifacial spasm in a patient undergoing radiosurgery for an intracanalicular vestibular schwannoma has been described in the literature. In this article we present three patients affected by idiopathic hemifacial spasm, refractory to medical therapy and botulinum toxin injections, who were treated by radiosurgery in one case and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in the other two. Radiosurgery, with a single dose of 8 Gy, was used in the first patient affected by idiopathic hemifacial spasm and autoimmune polyneuropathy with severe hypoacusia; hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, with 15 Gy in 5 fractions of 3 Gy each, was preferred in the other 2 cases. In all patients, the target consisted of the vestibulocochlear-facial bundle immediately before its entry into the internal acoustic foramen. A marked improvement of symptoms was observed in 2 patients, and almost complete disappearance in the other case, with no complications, particularly, auditory. The mean follow-up time of 24 months reported here could be judged too short, and our series too small, but the good results observed so far lead us to underline that, as in trigeminal neuralgia, radiosurgery or hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy could represent a therapeutic alternative to microvascular decompression for idiopathic hemifacial spasm for patients not suitable for surgery. (c) Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart . New York.

  14. Definitive hypofractionated radiotherapy for early glottic carcinoma: experience of 55Gy in 20 fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Ermiş, Ekin; Teo, Mark; Dyker, Karen E.; Fosker, Chris; Sen, Mehmet; Prestwich, Robin JD

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A wide variety of fractionation schedules have been employed for the treatment of early glottic cancer. The aim is to report our 10-year experience of using hypofractionated radiotherapy with 55Gy in 20 fractions at 2.75Gy per fraction. Methods Patients treated between 2004 and 2013 with definitive radiotherapy to a dose of 55Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks for T1/2 N0 squamous cell carcinoma of the glottis were retrospectively identified. Patients with prior therapeutic minor su...

  15. Image Guided Hypofractionated Radiotherapy by Helical Tomotherapy for Prostate Carcinoma: Toxicity and Impact on Nadir PSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvina Barra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the toxicity of a hypofractionated schedule for primary radiotherapy (RT of prostate cancer as well as the value of the nadir PSA (nPSA and time to nadir PSA (tnPSA as surrogate efficacy of treatment. Material and Methods. Eighty patients underwent hypofractionated schedule by Helical Tomotherapy (HT. A dose of 70.2 Gy was administered in 27 daily fractions of 2.6 Gy. Acute and late toxicities were graded on the RTOG/EORTC scales. The nPSA and the tnPSA for patients treated with exclusive RT were compared to an equal cohort of 20 patients treated with conventional fractionation and standard conformal radiotherapy. Results. Most of patients (83% did not develop acute gastrointestinal (GI toxicity and 50% did not present genitourinary (GU toxicity. After a median follow-up of 36 months only grade 1 of GU and GI was reported in 6 and 3 patients as late toxicity. Average tnPSA was 30 months. The median value of nPSA after exclusive RT with HT was 0.28 ng/mL and was significantly lower than the median nPSA (0.67 ng/mL of the conventionally treated cohort (P=0.02. Conclusions. Hypofractionated RT schedule with HT for prostate cancer treatment reports very low toxicity and reaches a low level of nPSA that might correlate with good outcomes.

  16. Short-course palliative radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Ju Hye; Ki, Yong Kan; Kim, Won Taek; Park, Dahl; Kim, Dong Won [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Biomedical Research Institute, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Ji Ho; Jeon, Sang Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of short-course hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for the palliation of uterine cervical cancer. Seventeen patients with cancer of the uterine cervix, who underwent palliative hypofractionated 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy between January 2002 and June 2012, were retrospectively analyzed. RT was delivered to symptomatic lesions (both the primary mass and/or metastatic regional lymph nodes). The total dose was 20 to 25 Gy (median, 25 Gy) in 5 Gy daily fractions. The median follow-up duration was 12.2 months (range, 4 to 24 months). The median survival time was 7.8 months (range, 4 to 24 months). Vaginal bleeding was the most common presenting symptom followed by pelvic pain (9 patients). The overall response rates were 93.8% and 66.7% for vaginal bleeding control and pelvic pain, respectively. Nine patients did not have any acute side effects and 7 patients showed minor gastrointestinal toxicity. Only 1 patient had grade 3 diarrhea 1 week after completion of treatment, which was successfully treated conservatively. Late complications occurred in 4 patients; however, none of these were of grade 3 or higher severity. Short-course hypofractionated RT was effective and well tolerated as palliative treatment for uterine cervical cancer.

  17. Hypofractionated Radiotherapy for Post-Operative Breast Cancer Patients at Delta Hospital - an Evaluation of Clinical Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Akhter Banu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As hypofractionated radiotherapy for post-operative breast cancer patients safe, effective and more convenient, it might be beneficial for patients of developing countries like ours. Objective: This study was done to evaluate the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated whole breast radiation therapy in patients who underwent breast conserving surgery and hypofractionated radiation therapy in patients who underwent mastectomy and axillary clearance. Materials and method: This cross sectional study was conducted in Delta Hospital Ltd, Dhaka, Bangladesh, including 50 postoperative patients, (12 patients in Breast Conservation Therapy group and 38 in Post Mastectomy Radiation Therapy group, with invasive ductal carcinoma of breast treated with this hypofractionated radiotherapy protocol during the last 1.5 year. The patients were treated with 3DCRT, LINAC, 6 MV photon and appropriate electron energy. Results: Minimal post treatment acute morbidity was observed. Forty seven patients (94% had grade-I acute skin toxicity and only 3 patients (6% developed grade-II acute skin toxicity. Conclusion: Hypofractionated radiotherapy is as safe and effective as conventional fractionated radiotherapy and superior in terms of convenience.

  18. Salvage Treatment With Hypofractionated Radiotherapy in Patients With Recurrent Small Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Sun Hyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Hee Chul, E-mail: rophc@skku.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Do Hoon; Lee, Jung Ae [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Gwak, Geum Yeon; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyoek; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul [Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the rates of tumor response and local control in patients with recurrent small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) as a salvage treatment and to evaluate treatment-related toxicities. Methods and Materials: Between 2006 and 2009, a total of 20 patients with recurrent small HCC were treated with hypofractionated RT after the failure of previous treatment. The eligibility criteria for hypofractionated RT were as follows: 1) HCC less than 5 cm, 2) HCC not adjacent to critical organs, 3) HCC without portal vein tumor thrombosis, and 4) less than 15% of normal liver volume that would be irradiated with 50% of prescribed dose. The RT dose was 50 Gy in 10 fractions. The tumor response was determined by CT scans performed 3 months after the end of RT. Results: The median follow-up period after RT was 22 months. The overall survival rates at 1 and 2 years were 100% and 87.9%, respectively. Complete response (CR) was achieved in seven of 20 lesions (35%) evaluated by CT scans performed 3 months after the end of RT. In-field local control was achieved in 85% of patients. Fourteen patients (70%) developed intra-hepatic metastases. Six patients developed grade 1 nausea or anorexia during RT, and two patients had progression of ascites after RT. There was no grade 3 or greater treatment-related toxicities. Conclusions: The current study showed a favorable outcome with respect to hypofractionated RT for small HCC. Partial liver irradiation with 50 Gy in 10 fractions is considered tolerable without severe complications.

  19. Outcomes in Newly Diagnosed Elderly Glioblastoma Patients after Concomitant Temozolomide Administration and Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ludovic T. [Neurology Department, CHU Hautepierre, rue Molière, Strasbourg 67000 (France); Touch, Socheat [Radiation Oncology University Department, Paul Strauss Center, 3, rue de la Porte de l’Hôpital, BP 42, Strasbourg cedex 67065 (France); Radiation Oncology Department, Soviet-Khmer Friendship Hospital, Pnom-Pehn 12400 (Cambodia); Nehme-Schuster, Hélène [Oncology Geriatric Department, Paul Strauss Center, 3, rue de la Porte de l’Hôpital, BP 42, Strasbourg cedex 67065 (France); Antoni, Delphine [Radiation Oncology University Department, Paul Strauss Center, 3, rue de la Porte de l’Hôpital, BP 42, Strasbourg cedex 67065 (France); Eav, Sokha [Radiation Oncology Department, Soviet-Khmer Friendship Hospital, Pnom-Pehn 12400 (Cambodia); Clavier, Jean-Baptiste; Bauer, Nicolas; Vigneron, Céline [Radiation Oncology University Department, Paul Strauss Center, 3, rue de la Porte de l’Hôpital, BP 42, Strasbourg cedex 67065 (France); Schott, Roland [Oncology Department, Paul Strauss Center, 3, rue de la Porte de l’Hôpital, BP 42, Strasbourg cedex 67065 (France); Kehrli, Pierre [Neurosurgery Department, CHU Hautepierre, rue Molière, Strasbourg 67000 (France); Noël, Georges, E-mail: gnoel@strasbourg.unicancer.fr [Radiation Oncology University Department, Paul Strauss Center, 3, rue de la Porte de l’Hôpital, BP 42, Strasbourg cedex 67065 (France); Laboratoire EA 3430, Fédération de Médecine Translationnelle de Strasbourg (FMTS), Université de Strasbourg, Strasbourg 67000 (France)

    2013-09-24

    This study aimed to analyze the treatment and outcomes of older glioblastoma patients. Forty-four patients older than 70 years of age were referred to the Paul Strauss Center for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. The median age was 75.5 years old (range: 70–84), and the patients included 18 females and 26 males. The median Karnofsky index (KI) was 70%. The Charlson indices varied from 4 to 6. All of the patients underwent surgery. O{sub 6}-methylguanine–DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation status was determined in 25 patients. All of the patients received radiation therapy. Thirty-eight patients adhered to a hypofractionated radiation therapy schedule and six patients to a normofractionated schedule. Neoadjuvant, concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy regimens were administered to 12, 35 and 20 patients, respectively. At the time of this analysis, 41 patients had died. The median time to relapse was 6.7 months. Twenty-nine patients relapsed, and 10 patients received chemotherapy upon relapse. The median overall survival (OS) was 7.2 months and the one- and two-year OS rates were 32% and 12%, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, only the Karnofsky index was a prognostic factor. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy with temozolomide are feasible and acceptably tolerated in older patients. However, relevant prognostic factors are needed to optimize treatment proposals.

  20. Treatment of brain metastases of renal cell cancer with combined hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy and whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrána, David; Študentová, Hana; Matzenauer, Marcel; Vlachová, Zuzana; Cwiertka, Karel; Gremlica, David; Kalita, Ondřej

    2016-06-01

    Renal cell cancer patients with brain metastatic disease generally have poor prognosis. Treatment options include surgery, radiotherapy, targeted therapy or best supportive care with respect to disease burden, patient preference and performance status. In the present case report the radiotherapy technique combining whole brain radiotherapy with hippocampal sparing (hippocampal avoidance whole brain radiotherapy HA-WBRT) and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) of the brain metastases is performed in a patient with metastatic renal cell carcinoma. HA-WBRT was administered to 30 Gy in 10 fractions with sparing of the hippocampal structures and SRT of 21 Gy in 3 fractions to brain metastases which has preceded the HA-WBRT. Two single arc volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) plans were prepared using Monaco planning software. The HA-WBRT treatment plan achieved the following results: D2=33.91 Gy, D98=25.20 Gy, D100=14.18 Gy, D50=31.26 Gy. The homogeneity index was calculated as a deduction of the minimum dose in 2% and 98% of the planning target volume (PTV), divided by the minimum dose in 50% of the PTV. The maximum dose to the hippocampus was 17.50 Gy and mean dose was 11.59 Gy. The following doses to organs at risk (OAR) were achieved: Right opticus Dmax, 31.96 Gy; left opticus Dmax, 30.96 Gy; chiasma D max, 32,76 Gy. The volume of PTV for stereotactic radiotherapy was 3,736 cm3, with coverage D100=20.95 Gy and with only 0.11% of the PTV being irradiated to dose below the prescribed dose. HA-WBRT with SRT represents a feasible technique for radiotherapy of brain metastatic disease, however this technique is considerably demanding on departmental equipment and staff time/experience.

  1. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases. Results from three different dose concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahrig, A.; Grabenbauer, G.; Sauer, R. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center of the Univ. of Erlangen (Germany); Ganslandt, O. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center of the Univ. of Erlangen (Germany); Dept. of Neurosurgery of the Univ. of Erlangen (Germany); Lambrecht, U. [Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center of the Univ. of Erlangen (Germany); Div. of Medical Physics of the Dept. of Radiation Therapy of the Univ. of Erlangen (Germany); Kleinert, G.; Hamm, K. [Dept. for Stereotactic Neurosurgery and Radiosurgery, Helios Klinikum Erfurt (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    Purpose: To evaluate efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (hfSRT) with three different dose concepts for irresectable brain metastases not amenable to radiosurgery (SRS) using non-invasive fixation of the skull. Patients and Methods: From 6/2000 to 6/2005, 150 patients with 228 brain metastases were treated at the dedicated stereotactic radiosurgery system Novalis trademark (BrainLAB, Feldkirchen, Germany) in two German treatment centers. Three different dose concepts were applied: 5 x 6-7 Gy (A: 72 brain metastases), 10 x 4 Gy (B: 59 brain metastases) and 7 x 5 Gy (C: 97 brain metastases). Median planning target volume (PTV) was 6.1 cm{sup 3} (range, 0.02-95.97). Results: Rates of complete remission (CR), partial remission (PR), no change (NC) and progressive disease (PD) were 42%, 30%, 21% and 7%, respectively (median follow-up 28 months). Median survival was 16 months. Survival at 6 and 12 months was 83% and 66%, respectively. Side effects were dependent on the PTV and on dose concept (median PTV in case of increasing edema or necrosis: 17 cm{sup 3}, A: 22%, C: 7%). HfSRT with 10 x 4 Gy (B) was well tolerated without side effects. Conclusion: Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy is an effective and safe treatment. In case of brain metastases > 15 cm{sup 3} (diameter > 3 cm) and concerning toxicity, 10 x 4 Gy seem to be more advantageous than shorter fractionation with higher doses while 5 x 6-7 Gy and 7 x 5 Gy were followed by higher response rates. Further specification of tolerance doses and tolerance according to the different brain regions has to be done. (orig.)

  2. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for palliation in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R K Spartacus

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In India, a considerable proportion of patients with head and neck cancer present with locoregionally advanced disease. Symptom palliation becomes a major objective in these cases when they could not be considered for a curative approach. Aims: The aim of this study is to assess the role of palliative radiotherapy for symptom control in patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer. Settings and Design: This was a retrospective study. Subjects and Methods: Between July 2015 and June 2016, 98 patients with stage IV head and neck cancer were treated with palliative radiotherapy 25 Gray (Gy/4 fractions (fr/1 fraction (6.25 Gy/week. Presenting symptoms were noted. The primary end point was relief of symptoms in the 4th week after radiotherapy. Percentage symptom relief was quantified by the patient using a rupee scale. Treatment response was noted using the WHO criteria. Acute toxicity was graded as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG criteria. Results: The most common presenting symptom was pain. At 4 weeks after radiotherapy completion, all patients had >50% pain relief. Dysphagia was improved in 82% of patients. Respiratory distress was improved in all the symptomatic patients. Tumor complete response (CR was seen in 2 patients, partial response in 89, stable disease in 3, and progressive disease in 4. RTOG Grade 2 and 3 acute skin and mucosal toxicities were seen in 29% and 27% cases, respectively. No patient had Grade 4 adverse effect. Conclusions: Hypofractionated radiation could provide effective symptom palliation in advanced head and neck cancers. The weekly schedule was well tolerated and found convenient by the patients.

  3. Definitive hypofractionated radiotherapy for early glottic carcinoma: experience of 55Gy in 20 fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermiş, Ekin; Teo, Mark; Dyker, Karen E; Fosker, Chris; Sen, Mehmet; Prestwich, Robin Jd

    2015-09-23

    A wide variety of fractionation schedules have been employed for the treatment of early glottic cancer. The aim is to report our 10-year experience of using hypofractionated radiotherapy with 55Gy in 20 fractions at 2.75Gy per fraction. Patients treated between 2004 and 2013 with definitive radiotherapy to a dose of 55Gy in 20 fractions over 4 weeks for T1/2 N0 squamous cell carcinoma of the glottis were retrospectively identified. Patients with prior therapeutic minor surgery (eg. laser stripping, cordotomy) were included. The probabilities of local control, ultimate local control (including salvage surgery), regional control, cause specific survival (CSS) and overall survival (OS) were calculated. One hundred thirty-two patients were identified. Median age was 65 years (range 33-89). Median follow up was 72 months (range 7-124). 50 (38 %), 18 (14 %) and 64 (48 %) of patients had T1a, T1b and T2 disease respectively. Five year local control and ultimate local control rates were: overall - 85.6 % and 97.3 % respectively, T1a - 91.8 % and 100 %, T1b - 81.6 and 93.8 %, and T2 - 80.9 % and 95.8 %. Five year regional control, CSS and OS rates were 95.4 %, 95.7 % and 78.8 % respectively. There were no significant associations of covariates (e.g. T-stage, extent of laryngeal extension, histological grade) with local control on univariate analysis. Only increasing age and transglottic extension in T2 disease were significantly associated with overall survival (both p cancers developed in 17 % of patients. 13 (9.8 %) of patients required enteral tube feeding support during radiotherapy; no patients required long term enteral nutrition. One patient required a tracheostomy due to a non-functioning larynx on long term follow up. Hypofractionated radiation therapy with a dose of 55Gy in 20 fractions for early stage glottic cancer provides high rates of local control with acceptable toxicity.

  4. Geometrical and dosimetrical uncertainties in hypofractionated radiotherapy of the lung: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Marco; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Marrazzo, Livia

    2017-04-01

    The application of high precision hypofractionated regimes (a.k.a. stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT)) to the treatment of lung cancer is a 'success story' of radiotherapy. From the technical perspective, lung SBRT is a challenging technique as all aspects of the treatment workflow, from imaging to dose calculation to treatment delivery, should be carefully handled in order to ensure consistency between planned and delivered dose. In this review such technical aspects are presented and discussed, looking at what has been developed over the years. The use of imaging techniques such as slow-CT, breath-hold CT, four-dimensional CT and mid-ventilation is reviewed, presenting the main characteristics of each approach but not necessarily to single out 'the best' solution. Concerning dose calculation, a number of studies clearly separate dose algorithms that should be considered inadequate for lung SBRT (e.g. simple pencil beam algorithms) from approaches such as convolution algorithms, Monte Carlo, and solution of the transport equation, that are much better at handling the combination of small fields and heterogenenous geometries that make dose calculation not trivial. Patient positioning and management of intrafraction motion have been two areas of significant developments, to the point where it is difficult to identify which solution represents the best compromise between technical complexity and clinical effectiveness. The review analyses several of these methods, outlining the residual uncertainties associated with each of them. Last but not least, two subjects are discussed, adaptive therapy and particle therapy, that may represent in the near future additional tools for the technical improvement of lung SBRT. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Feasibility evaluation of hypofractionated radiotherapy with concurrent temozolomide in elderly patients with glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uto, Megumi; Mizowaki, Takashi; Ogura, Kengo; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Mineharu, Yohei; Miyamoto, Susumu; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2016-12-01

    Although hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT) is preferred to conventionally fractionated radiotherapy when treating elderly patients with glioblastoma, the benefits and tolerability of HFRT with concurrent temozolomide (TMZ) remain unknown for such patients. We assessed the feasibility and outcomes of elderly patients with glioblastoma treated with HFRT and concurrent TMZ. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 11 patients aged ≥70 years who were treated with HFRT and concurrent TMZ. All patients had newly diagnosed and histologically confirmed glioblastoma and were treated at our institution between October 2011 and April 2015. The median age was 74 years (range, 70-85 years). Total resection/subtotal resection/biopsy were performed in 2/5/4 patients, respectively. The planning target volume included the T1-enhancing tumor and the resection cavity plus 2-cm margins, and all surrounding edema. The median prescription dose was 35 Gy (range, 35-42.5 Gy), delivered in 10 fractions. Seven patients received TMZ at 150 mg/m(2) for 5 days and 4 received TMZ at 75 mg/m(2) during HFRT. Overall survival (OS) was defined as the time from surgery to death or the last follow-up. The median follow-up period was 13.2 months. The median OS and progression-free survival (PFS) times were 13.2 and 7.0 months, respectively. One patient experienced grade 4 neutropenia, lymphocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. No grade 3 or higher nonhematological adverse event was noted. Our analysis demonstrated the feasibility of HFRT with concurrent TMZ used to treat elderly patients with glioblastoma. Further prospective clinical trials are needed to define therapies that balance efficacy with tolerability.

  6. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for breast cancers--preliminary results from a tertiary care center in eastern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Moujhuri; Mahata, Anurupa; Mallick, Indranil; Achari, Rimpa; Chatterjee, Sanjoy

    2014-01-01

    The standard radiotherapy (RT) fractionation practiced in India and worldwide is 50 Gy in 25 fractions over 5 weeks to the chest wall or whole breast followed by tumour bed boost in case of breast conservation (BCS). A body of validated data exists regarding hypofractionation in breast cancer. We here report initial results for 135 patients treated at our center with the START-B type of fractionation. From May 2011 till July 2012, women with all stages of breast cancer (excluding metastatic), who had undergone BCS or mastectomy were planned for 40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks to chest wall/whole breast and supraclavicular fossa (where indicated) followed by tumour bed boost in BCS patients. Planning was done using Casebow's technique. The primary end point was to assess the acute toxicity and the cosmetic outcomes. Using cosmetic scales; patients were assessed during radiotherapy and at subsequent follow up visits with the radiation oncologist. Of the 135 patients, 62 had undergone BCS and 73 mastectomy. Median age of the population was 52 years. Some 80% were T1 and T2 tumours in BCS whereas most patients in mastectomy group were T3 and T4 tumours (60%). 45% were node negative in BCS group whilst it was 23% in the mastectomy group. Average NPI scores were 3.9 and 4.9, respectively. Most frequently reported histopathology report was infiltrating ductal carcinoma (87%), grade III being most common (58%), and 69% were ER positive tumours, and 30% were Her 2 Neu positive. Triple negative tumours accounted for 13% and their mean age was young (43 yrs.) The maximum acute skin toxicity at the end of treatment was Grade 1 in 94% of the mastectomy group patients and 71% in BCS patients. Grade 2 toxicity was 6% in mast group and 23% in BCS group. Grade 3 was 6% in BCS group, no grade 3 toxicity in mastectomy patients and there was no grade 4 skin toxicity in any case. Post RT at 1 month; 39% of BCS patients had persisting Grade I skin reaction which was only 2% in

  7. Radiogenic Side Effects After Hypofractionated Stereotactic Photon Radiotherapy of Choroidal Melanoma in 212 Patients Treated Between 1997 and 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunavoelgyi, Roman [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Dieckmann, Karin [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Gleiss, Andreas [Section of Clinical Biometrics, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Sacu, Stefan; Kircher, Karl; Georgopoulos, Michael [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Georg, Dietmar [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Zehetmayer, Martin, E-mail: martin.zehetmayer@meduniwien.ac.at [Department of Ophthalmology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria); Poetter, Richard [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate side effects of hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy for patients with choroidal melanoma. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and twelve patients with choroidal melanoma unsuitable for ruthenium-106 brachytherapy or local resection were treated stereotactically at the Medical University of Vienna between 1997 and 2007 with a Linac with 6-MV photon beams in five fractions with 10, 12, or 14 Gy per fraction. Examinations for radiogenic side effects were performed at baseline and every 3 months in the first 2 years, then every 6 months until 5 years and then once a year thereafter until 10 years after radiotherapy. Adverse side effects were assessed using slit-lamp examination, funduscopy, gonioscopy, tonometry, and, if necessary, fundus photography and fluorescein angiography. Evaluations of incidence of side effects are based on an actuarial analysis. Results: One hundred and eighty-nine (89.2%) and 168 (79.2%) of the tumors were within 3 mm of the macula and the optic disc, respectively. The five most common radiotherapy side effects were retinopathy and optic neuropathy (114 cases and 107 cases, respectively), cataract development (87 cases), neovascular glaucoma (46 cases), and corneal epithelium defects (41 cases). In total, 33.6%, 38.5%, 51.2%, 75.5%, and 77.6% of the patients were free of any radiation retinopathy, optic neuropathy, cataract, neovascular glaucoma, or corneal epithelium defects 5 years after radiotherapy, respectively. Conclusion: In centrally located choroidal melanoma hypofractionated stereotactic photon radiotherapy shows a low to moderate rate of adverse long-term side effects comparable with those after proton beam radiotherapy. Future fractionation schemes should seek to further reduce adverse side effects rate while maintaining excellent local tumor control.

  8. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy to the rat hippocampus. Determination of dose response and tolerance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst-Stecken, A.; Roedel, F.; Grabenbauer, G.; Sauer, R. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Therapy and Novalis Shaped Beam Surgery Center; Jeske, I.; Bluemcke, I. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Neuropathology; Hess, A. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology; Ganslandt, O. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Brune, K. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ., Erlangen (Germany). Doerenkamp Professor for Innovations in Animal and Consumer Protection

    2007-08-15

    Purpose: To determine the effect of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (hfSRT) on adult rat brain tissue (necrosis, impact on blood-brain barrier, signal changes on high-field magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]). Material and Methods: Adult male Wistar rats underwent MRI and CT scanning of the brain and respective images were introduced into the Novalis trademark radiosurgery device (BrainLab, Feldkirchen, Germany). All animals (body weight 350 g) were irradiated weekly with doses of 2 x 10 Gy (n = 3 animals), 3 x 10 Gy (n = 3 animals) and 4 x 10 Gy (n = 3 animals), targeted to the left hippocampus after image-guided positioning. 4.7-T T2-weighted MRI scanning was performed in each animal. Animals were sacrificed 8, 12, and 16 weeks after hfSRT and brains were immersion-fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde for subsequent histopathologic analysis. Results: In concordance with isodose distributions, pathologic signal hyperintensities in MRI were recorded from 4 x 10 Gy after 8 weeks, 3 x 10 Gy after 12 weeks, while 2 x 10 Gy induced slight detectable alterations only after 16 weeks. Subsequent histopathologic analysis revealed hippocampal cell necrosis with significantly earlier and stronger occurrence for higher doses (40 Gy > 30 Gy > 20 Gy). Pial microvessel permeability also increased after 40 Gy, whereas 30 Gy induced moderate changes. Conclusion: Conclusion: Partial-brain irradiation with hfSRT (Novalis trademark System) was successfully adopted for small animals and histopathologic analysis confirmed its repositioning accuracy. The neuropathologic effects correlated with dose and observation time. The approach will be further developed for quality assurance in hfSRT of normal brain tissue, as well as novel treatment modalities in epileptic rats and orthotopic tumor models. (orig.)

  9. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for lung tumors with online cone beam CT guidance and active breathing control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To study the set-up errors, PTV margin and toxicity of cone beam CT (CBCT guided hypofractionated radiotherapy with active breathing control (ABC for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC or metastatic tumors in lung. Methods 32 tumors in 20 patients were treated. Based on the location of tumor, dose per fraction given to tumor was divided into three groups: 12 Gy, 8 Gy and 6 Gy. ABC is applied for every patient. During each treatment, patients receive CBCT scan for online set-up correction. The pre- and post-correction setup errors between fractions, the interfractional and intrafractional, set-up errors, PTV margin as well as toxicity are analyzed. Results The pre-correction systematic and random errors in the left-right (LR, superior-inferior (SI, anterior-posterior (AP directions were 3.7 mm and 5.3 mm, 3.1 mm and 2.1 mm, 3.7 mm and 2.8 mm, respectively, while the post-correction residual errors were 0.6 mm and 0.8 mm, 0.8 mm and 0.8 mm, 1.2 mm and 1.3 mm, respectively. There was an obvious intrafractional shift of tumor position. The pre-correction PTV margin was 9.5 mm in LR, 14.1 mm in SI and 8.2 mm in AP direction. After CBCT guided online correction, the PTV margin was markedly reduced in all three directions. The post-correction margins ranged 1.5 to 2.1 mm. The treatment was well tolerated by patients, of whom there were 4 (20% grade1-2 acute pneumonitis, 3 (15% grade1 acute esophagitis, 2 (10% grade1 late pneumonitis and 1 (5% grade 1 late esophagitis. Conclusion The positioning errors for lung SBRT using ABC were significant. Online correction with CBCT image guidance should be applied to reduce setup errors and PTV margin, which may reduce radiotherapy toxicity of tissues when ABC was used.

  10. Hypofractionated Dose Escalated 3D Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer: Outcomes from a Mono-Institutional Phase II Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tramacere, Francesco; Arcangeli, Stefano; Pignatelli, Antonietta; Castagna, Roberta; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2015-05-01

    Based on a radiobiological assumption of a low alpha/beta (α/β) ratio for prostate cancer, hypofractionated radiotherapy has increasingly gained traction in the clinical practice and recent guidelines have confirmed the non-inferiority of this approach. Nevertheless, the largest studies that have used hypofractionation so far, employed image-guided radiation therapy/intensity modulated radiation therapy (IGRT/IMRT) facilities that might have overcome the radiobiological advantages, which remain to be fully confirmed. The aim of this trial was to evaluate the feasibility of a hypofractionated schedule delivered with 3D-Conformal Radiotherapy to prostate and seminal vesicles in combination with hormonal therapy. The study included 97 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer (PCa), irrespective of risk class, treated with a schedule of 62 Gy in 20 fractions over 5 weeks (4 fractions of 3.1 Gy each per week). According to National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) prognostic classification, patients were divided into a favourable group (19%), intermediate group (41%) and unfavourable group (40%). Early and late toxicities were scored using the radiation toxicity grading/European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) criteria. Additionally, the international prostate symptom index (IPSS) for benign prostate hypertrophy was used to evaluate obstructive urinary symptoms. Biochemical outcome was reported according to the Phoenix definition for biochemical failure. Hormonal therapy (HT) was administrated in 92% of patients. After a median follow-up of 39 months (range=25-52), maximum ≥G2 late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities occurred in 8% and 11% patients, respectively. The corresponding figures for acute toxicities were 24% and 15%. Patients with higher IPSS score before enrolment had significantly worse urinary function after treatment. Only 2% of patients died from PCa. Biochemical non-evidence of disease

  11. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic boost with concurrent and adjuvant temozolamide for glioblastoma in good performance status elderly patients – early results of a phase II trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott eFloyd

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM is an aggressive primary brain neoplasm with dismal prognosis. Based on successful phase III trials, 60 Gy involved-field radiotherapy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks (Standard RT with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide is currently the standard of care. In this disease, age and Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS are the most important prognostic factors. For elderly patients, clinical trials comparing standard RT with radiotherapy abbreviated to 40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks demonstrated similar outcomes, indicating shortened radiotherapy may be an appropriate option for elderly patients. However, these trials did not include temozolomide chemotherapy, and included patients with poor KPS, possibly obscuring benefits of more aggressive treatment for some elderly patients. We conducted a prospective Phase II trial to examine the efficacy of a hypofractionated radiation course followed by a stereotactic boost with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide chemotherapy in elderly patients with good performance status. In this study, patients 65 years and older with a KPS >70 and histologically confirmed GBM received 40 Gy in 15 fractions with 3D conformal technique followed by a 1-3 fraction stereotactic boost to the enhancing tumor. All patients also received concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide. Patients were evaluated 1 month post-treatment and every 2 months thereafter. Between 2007 and 2010, 20 patients (9 males and 11 females were enrolled in this study. The median age was 75.4 years (range 65-87 years. At a median follow-up of 11 months (range 7-32 months, 12 patients progressed and 5 are alive. The median progression free survival was 11 months and the median overall survival was 13 months. There was no additional toxicity. These results indicate that elderly patients with good KPS can achieve outcomes comparable to the current standard of care using an abbreviated radiotherapy course, radiosurgery boost and

  12. Individualized Dose Prescription for Hypofractionation in Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Radiotherapy: An in silico Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, Aswin L.; Troost, Esther G.C.; Huizenga, Henk; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Bussink, Johan, E-mail: j.bussink@rther.umcn.nl [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Local tumor control and outcome remain poor in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) treated by external beam radiotherapy. We investigated the therapeutic gain of individualized dose prescription with dose escalation based on normal tissue dose constraints for various hypofractionation schemes delivered with intensity-modulated radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: For 38 Stage III NSCLC patients, the dose level of an existing curative treatment plan with standard fractionation (66 Gy) was rescaled based on dose constraints for the lung, spinal cord, esophagus, brachial plexus, and heart. The effect on tumor total dose (TTD) and biologic tumor effective dose in 2-Gy fractions (TED) corrected for overall treatment time (OTT) was compared for isotoxic and maximally tolerable schemes given in 15, 20, and 33 fractions. Rescaling was accomplished by altering the dose per fraction and/or the number of fractions while keeping the relative dose distribution of the original treatment plan. Results: For 30 of the 38 patients, dose escalation by individualized hypofractionation yielded therapeutic gain. For the maximally tolerable dose scheme in 33 fractions (MTD{sub 33}), individualized dose escalation resulted in a 2.5-21% gain in TTD. In the isotoxic schemes, the number of fractions could be reduced with a marginal increase in TED. For the maximally tolerable dose schemes, the TED could be escalated up to 36.6%, and for all patients beyond the level of the isotoxic and the MTD{sub 33} schemes (range, 3.3-36.6%). Reduction of the OTT contributed to the therapeutic gain of the shortened schemes. For the maximally tolerable schemes, the maximum esophageal dose was the dominant dose-limiting constraint in most patients. Conclusions: This modeling study showed that individualized dose prescription for hypofractionation in NSCLC radiotherapy, based on scaling of existing treatment plans up to normal tissue dose constraints, enables dose

  13. Rectal/urinary toxicity after hypofractionated vs conventional radiotherapy in low/intermediate risk localized prostate cancer: systematic review and meta analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Franco, Rossella; Borzillo, Valentina; Ravo, Vincenzo; Ametrano, Gianluca; Falivene, Sara; Cammarota, Fabrizio; Rossetti, Sabrina; Romano, Francesco Jacopo; D’Aniello, Carmine; Cavaliere, Carla; Iovane, Gelsomina; Piscitelli, Raffaele; Berretta, Massimiliano; Muto, Paolo; Facchini, Gaetano

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this review was to compare radiation toxicity in Localized Prostate Cancer (LPC) patients who underwent conventional fractionation (CV), hypofractionated (HYPO) or extreme hypofractionated (eHYPO) radiotherapy. We analyzed the impact of technological innovation on the management of prostate cancer, attempting to make a meta-analysis of randomized trials. Methods PubMed database has been explored for studies concerning acute and late urinary/gastrointestinal toxicity in low/intermediate risk LPC patients after receiving radiotherapy. Studies were then gathered into 5 groups: detected acute and chronic toxicity data from phase II non randomized trials were analyzed and Odds Ratio (OR) was calculated by comparing the number of patients with G0-1 toxicity and those with toxicity > G2 in the studied groups. A meta-analysis of prospective randomized trials was also carried out. Results The initial search yielded 575 results, but only 32 manuscripts met all eligibility requirements: in terms of radiation-induced side effects, such as gastrointestinal and genitourinary acute and late toxicity, hypofractionated 3DCRT seemed to be more advantageous than 3DCRT with conventional fractionation as well as IMRT with conventional fractionation compared to 3DCRT with conventional fractionation; furthermore, IMRT hypofractionated technique appeared more advantageous than IMRT with conventional fractionation in late toxicities. Randomized trials meta-analysis disclosed an advantage in terms of acute gastrointestinal and late genitourinary toxicity for Hypofractionated schemes. Conclusions Although our analysis pointed out a more favorable toxicity profile in terms of gastrointestinal acute side effects of conventional radiotherapy schemes compared to hypofractionated ones, prospective randomized trials are needed to better understand the real incidence of rectal and urinary toxicity in patients receiving radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. PMID:28129649

  14. Quality of Life After Hypofractionated Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost for High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quon, Harvey [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Cheung, Patrick C.F., E-mail: patrick.cheung@sunnybrook.ca [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Loblaw, D. Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Pang, Geordi; Szumacher, Ewa; Danjoux, Cyril [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Choo, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Kiss, Alex; Mamedov, Alexandre; Deabreu, Andrea [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the change in health-related quality of life (QOL) of patients with high-risk prostate cancer treated using hypofractionated radiotherapy combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy. Methods and Materials: A prospective Phase I-II study enrolled patients with any of the following: clinical Stage T3 disease, prostate-specific antigen level {>=}20 ng/mL, or Gleason score 8-10. Radiotherapy consisted of 45 Gy (1.8 Gy per fraction) to the pelvic lymph nodes with a concomitant 22.5 Gy intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost to the prostate, for a total of 67.5 Gy (2.7 Gy per fraction) in 25 fractions over 5 weeks. Daily image guidance was performed using three gold seed fiducials. Quality of life was measured using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC), a validated tool that assesses four primary domains (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal). Results: From 2004 to 2007, 97 patients were treated. Median follow-up was 39 months. Compared with baseline, at 24 months there was no statistically significant change in the mean urinary domain score (p = 0.99), whereas there were decreases in the bowel (p < 0.01), sexual (p < 0.01), and hormonal (p < 0.01) domains. The proportion of patients reporting a clinically significant difference in EPIC urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal scores at 24 months was 27%, 31%, 55%, and 60%, respectively. However, moderate and severe distress related to these symptoms was minimal, with increases of only 3% and 5% in the urinary and bowel domains, respectively. Conclusions: Hypofractionated radiotherapy combined with long-term androgen deprivation therapy was well tolerated. Although there were modest rates of clinically significant patient-reported urinary and bowel toxicity, most of this caused only mild distress, and moderate and severe effects on QOL were limited. Additional follow-up is ongoing to characterize long-term QOL.

  15. Impact of Ialuril Soft Gels in reducing urinary toxicity during radical hypofractionated radiotherapy in prostate cancer: a preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fersino, Sergio; Fiorentino, Alba; Giaj Levra, Niccolò; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Di Paola, Gioacchino; Cavalleri, Stefano; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of Ialuril Soft Gels in reducing acute genito-urinary (GU) toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with volumetric-modulated arc radiotherapy. Forty patients were prospectively recruited. A moderate hypofractionation in 28 fractions ("hypo-moderate") was prescribed in 20 patients, while an extreme hypofractionation ("hypo-extreme") in 5 fractions was prescribed in 20 patients. The International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire was administered in all cases before and after radiotherapy (RT). GU toxicity was evaluated according to CTCAE v4.0. Patients of each group ("hypo-moderate" and "hypo-extreme") were randomized (1:1) to receive RT alone or RT combined with Ialuril Soft Gels. In "hypo-moderate" patients treated with Ialuril Soft Gels the following GU toxicity was reported: G0 3, G1 6, G2 1, G3 0. In the arm treated without Ialuril Soft Gels: G0 0, G1 7, G2 2, G3 1. In "hypo-extreme" arm treated with Ialuril Soft Gels the following GU toxicity was recorded: G0 7, G1 2, G2 1, G3 in 0; while in the arm treated without Ialuril Soft Gels: G0 5, G1 2, G2 2, G3 1. IPSS was unchanged in "hypo-moderate" and "hypo-extreme" groups and patients treated with Ialuril Soft Gels, with a median value of 6 and 5 respectively. In patients treated without Ialuril Soft Gels an increased IPSS was reported in "hypo-moderate" and "hypo-extreme" from 6 to 8 and from 3.5 to 4.5, respectively. At statistical analysis (Fisher's exact text) Ialuril Soft Gels was associated with IPSS improvement (P=0.03). Ialuril Soft Gels seems to have a beneficial role in reducing GU toxicity without worsening the IPSS.

  16. Better compliance with hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Results of a single, institutional, retrospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, Alaa; Hammoud, Mohamed; Abou Ghaida, Salam [Saad Specialist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia)

    2017-05-15

    The aim of the study was to identify factors significantly associated with the occurrence of unintended treatment interruptions in adjuvant breast cancer radiotherapy. Patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy of the breast or chest wall between March 2014 and August 2016 were evaluated. The radiotherapy regimens and techniques applied were either conventional fractionation (CF; 28 daily fractions of 1.8 Gy or 25 fractions of 2.0 Gy) or hypofractionation (HF; 15 daily fractions of 2.67 Gy) with inverse planned intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or three-dimensional planned conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with noncompliance. Noncompliance was defined as the missing of at least one scheduled radiotherapy fraction. In all, 19 of 140 (13.6%) patients treated with HF and 39 of 146 (26.7%) treated with CF experienced treatment interruptions. Of 23 factors tested, the fractionation regimen emerged as the only independent significant prognostic factor for noncompliance on multivariate analysis (CF; p = 0.007; odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.3-4.2). No statistically significant differences concerning the reasons for treatment interruptions could be detected between patients treated with CF or HF. HF is significantly associated with a better patient compliance with the prescribed radiotherapy schedule compared with CF. The data suggest that this finding is basically related to the shorter overall treatment time of HF. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Untersuchung war es, Faktoren zu identifizieren, die mit ungeplanten Behandlungsunterbrechungen bei der adjuvanten Strahlentherapie des Mammakarzinoms assoziiert sind. Es wurden Patienten untersucht, die eine adjuvante Strahlentherapie der Mamma oder Brustwand zwischen Maerz 2014 und August 2016 erhielten. Zur Anwendung kamen als Fraktionierungsprotokoll und strahlentherapeutische Technik eine konventionell fraktionierte (CF; 28 Fraktionen mit

  17. Sci—Thur AM: YIS - 02: Radiogenomic Modeling of Normal Tissue Toxicities in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, J [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Unit, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Jeyaseelan, K; Ybarra, N; David, M; Faria, S; Souhami, L; Cury, F; Duclos, M; El Naqa, I [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Unit, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Department of Oncology, Radiation Oncology Division, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, QC Canada (Canada)

    2014-08-15

    Inter-patient radiation sensitivity variability has recently been shown to have a genetic component. This genetic component may play a key role in explaining the fluctuating rates of radiation-induced toxicities (RITs). Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have thus far yielded inconsistent results in delineating RITs while copy number variations (CNVs) have not yet been investigated for such purposes. We explore a radiogenomic modeling approach to investigate the association of CNVs and SNPs, along with clinical and dosimetric variables, in radiation induced rectal bleeding (RB) and erectile dysfunction (ED) in prostate cancer patients treated with curative hypofractionated irradiation. A cohort of 62 prostate cancer patients who underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (66 Gy in 22 fractions) between 2002 to 2010 were retrospectively genotyped for CNV and SNP rs5489 in the xrcc1 DNA repair gene. Late toxicity rates for RB grade 2 and 3 and grade 3 alone were 29.0% and 12.9%, respectively. ED toxicity was found to be 62.9%. Radiogenomic model performance was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC) and resampling by cross-validation. Binary variables were evaluated using Chi-squared contingency table analysis and multivariate models by Spearman's rank correlation coefficient (rs). Ten patients were found to have three copies of xrcc1 CNV (RB: χ{sup 2}=14.6, p<0.001 and ED: χ{sup 2}=4.88, p=0.0272) and twelve had heterozygous rs25489 SNP (RB: χ{sup 2}=0.278, p=0.599 and ED: χ{sup 2}=0.112, p=0.732). Radiogenomic modeling yielded significant, cross-validated NTCP models for RB (AUC=0.665) and ED (AUC=0.754). These results indicate that CNVs may be potential predictive biomarkers of both late ED and RB.

  18. [What type of hypofractionated radiotherapy of primary tumours in palliative care?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgier, C; Charissoux, M; Boisselier, P; Ducteil, A; Azria, D

    2015-10-01

    Palliative radiation therapy is well-known in the setting of metastatic lesions (haemostatic, analgesic, anti-inflammatory aims, etc.). Palliative primary tumour radiotherapy is less studied. Here we propose a review of palliative indications of primary tumours, the most studied in the literature, and their radiotherapy modalities (target volumes and fractionation). Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Survival and prognostic factors after moderately hypofractionated palliative thoracic radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oorschot, B. van; Assenbrunner, B.; Beckmann, G.; Flentje, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg, Interdisziplinaeres Zentrum Palliativmedizin, Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie, Wuerzburg (Germany); Schuler, M. [Universitaet Wuerzburg, Abteilung fuer Medizinische Psychologie und Psychotherapie, Medizinische Soziologie und Rehabilitationswissenschaften, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    Survival and prognostic variables in patients with advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) requiring thoracic palliative radiotherapy using a moderately hypofractionated regime (13-15 x 3 Gy) were evaluated. From March 2006 to April 2012, 120 patients with a physician estimated prognosis of 6-12 months were treated with this regime using CT-based 3D conformal radiotherapy. We collected data on patient characteristics, comorbidities, toxicity, and treatment parameters. Radiotherapy was completed as prescribed in 114 patients (95.0 %, premature termination 5.0 %). Acute grade 3 toxicity was seen in 6.4 % of patients. The median survival of all patients was 5.8 months. Nonmetastatic patients survived significantly longer than patients with metastatic disease (median 11.7 months vs 4.7 months, p = 0.0001) and 18.6 % of nonmetastatic patients survived longer than 2 years. In 12.7 % radiotherapy started less than 30 days before death and 14.2 % of patients received radiotherapy within 14 days before death. In the multivariate analysis, good general condition, nonmetastatic disease, and a stable or improved general condition at the end of radiotherapy were significant. The treatment parameters, age, and comorbidities were not statistically significant. Our data confirm considerable effectiveness of 13 x 3 Gy with conformal radiotherapy for patients with locally confined NSCLC not fit for radical treatment and raise doubt for this regimen in metastatic patients and ECOG ≥ 2 when burden, acute toxicity, and resources are considered. (orig.) [German] Analyse der Ueberlebenszeiten und prognoserelevanter Variablen von Patienten mit lokal fortgeschrittenem und metastasiertem nicht-kleinzelligen Lungenkrebs nach moderat hypofraktionierter Strahlentherapie (13- bis 15-mal 3 Gy). Zwischen Maerz 2006 und April 2012 wurden 120 Patienten mit aerztlich eingeschaetzter Lebenserwartung von 6-12 Monaten mit diesem Regime mittels CT-basierter 3-D

  20. Dose intensified hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy with synchronous cetuximab for intermediate stage head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, David J; Ho, Kean F; Ashcroft, Linda; Denton, Kim; Betts, Guy; Mais, Kathleen L; Garcez, Kate; Yap, Beng K; Lee, Lip W; Sykes, Andrew J; Rowbottom, Carl G; Slevin, Nicholas J

    2015-01-01

    For stage II and III head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with radiotherapy alone, loco-regional recurrence is the main cause of treatment failure. Strategies to improve loco-regional control should not be at the expense of increased late normal tissue toxicity. We investigated dose-intensified hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with synchronous cetuximab. In a phase I/II trial, 27 patients with stage III or high risk stage II HNSCC were recruited. They received three dose level simultaneous integrated boost IMRT, 62.5 Gy in 25 daily fractions to planning target volume one over five weeks with synchronous cetuximab. The primary endpoint was acute toxicity. Secondary endpoints included: late toxicity and quality of life; loco-regional control, cause-specific and overall survival. Radiotherapy was completed by 26/27 patients; for one (4%) the final fraction was omitted due to skin toxicity. All cycles of cetuximab were received by 23/27 patients. Grade 3 acute toxicities included: pain (81%), oral mucositis (78%) and dysphagia (41%). There were few grade 3 physician-recorded late toxicities, including: pain (11%), problems with teeth (8%) and weight loss (4%). At 12 months, only one (4%) patient required a feeding tube, inserted prior to treatment due to dysphagia. The maximal/peak rates of patient-reported late toxicities included: severe pain (11%), any dry mouth (89%) and swallowing dysfunction that required a soft/liquid diet (23%). At 12 months, all quality of life and most symptoms mean scores had resolved to baseline or were only a little worse; dry mouth, sticky saliva and dentition scores remained very much worse. At a median follow-up of 47 months, there were five (18.5%) loco-regional recurrences and the overall cause-specific survival was 79% (95% CI 53-92). This regimen is safe with acceptable acute toxicity, low rates of late toxicity and impact on quality of life at 12 months following treatment. Further

  1. Prone Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiotherapy Without a Boost to the Tumor Bed: Comparable Toxicity of IMRT Versus a 3D Conformal Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardee, Matthew E.; Raza, Shahzad; Becker, Stewart J.; Jozsef, Gabor; Lymberis, Stella C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Hochman, Tsivia; Goldberg, Judith D. [Division of Biostatistics, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); DeWyngaert, Keith J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: We report a comparison of the dosimetry and toxicity of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) vs. intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) among patients treated in the prone position with the same fractionation and target of the hypofractionation arm of the Canadian/Whelan trial. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved protocol identified a consecutive series of early-stage breast cancer patients treated according to the Canadian hypofractionation regimen but in the prone position. Patients underwent IMRT treatment planning and treatment if the insurance carrier approved reimbursement for IMRT; in case of refusal, a 3D-CRT plan was used. A comparison of the dosimetric and toxicity outcomes during the acute, subacute, and long-term follow-up of the two treatment groups is reported. Results: We included 97 consecutive patients with 100 treatment plans in this study (3 patients with bilateral breast cancer); 40 patients were treated with 3D-CRT and 57 with IMRT. IMRT significantly reduced the maximum dose (Dmax median, 109.96% for 3D-CRT vs. 107.28% for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) and improved median dose homogeneity (median, 1.15 for 3D-CRT vs. 1.05 for IMRT; p < 0.0001, Wilcoxon test) when compared with 3D-CRT. Acute toxicity consisted primarily of Grade 1 to 2 dermatitis and occurred in 92% of patients. Grade 2 dermatitis occurred in 13% of patients in the 3D-CRT group and 2% in the IMRT group. IMRT moderately decreased rates of acute pruritus (p = 0.03, chi-square test) and Grade 2 to 3 subacute hyperpigmentation (p = 0.01, Fisher exact test). With a minimum of 6 months' follow-up, the treatment was similarly well tolerated in either group, including among women with large breast volumes. Conclusion: Hypofractionated breast radiotherapy is well tolerated when treating patients in the prone position, even among those with large breast volumes. Breast IMRT significantly improves dosimetry but yields only a modest

  2. Adjuvant therapy after resection of brain metastases. Frameless image-guided LINAC-based radiosurgery and stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broemme, J.; Aebersold, D.M.; Pica, A. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Abu-Isa, J.; Beck, J.; Raabe, A. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Neurosurgery; Kottke, R.; Wiest, R. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Neuroradiology; Malthaner, M.; Schmidhalter, D. [Bern Univ., Bern Univ. Hospital (Switzerland). Div. of Medical Radiation Physics

    2013-09-15

    Background: Tumor bed stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) after resection of brain metastases is a new strategy to delay or avoid whole-brain irradiation (WBRT) and its associated toxicities. This retrospective study analyzes results of frameless image-guided linear accelerator (LINAC)-based SRS and stereotactic hypofractionated radiotherapy (SHRT) as adjuvant treatment without WBRT. Materials and methods: Between March 2009 and February 2012, 44 resection cavities in 42 patients were treated with SRS (23 cavities) or SHRT (21 cavities). All treatments were delivered using a stereotactic LINAC. All cavities were expanded by {>=} 2 mm in all directions to create the clinical target volume (CTV). Results: The median planning target volume (PTV) for SRS was 11.1 cm{sup 3}. The median dose prescribed to the PTV margin for SRS was 17 Gy. Median PTV for SHRT was 22.3 cm{sup 3}. The fractionation schemes applied were: 4 fractions of 6 Gy (5 patients), 6 fractions of 4 Gy (6 patients) and 10 fractions of 4 Gy (10 patients). Median follow-up was 9.6 months. Local control (LC) rates after 6 and 12 months were 91 and 77 %, respectively. No statistically significant differences in LC rates between SRS and SHRT treatments were observed. Distant brain control (DBC) rates at 6 and 12 months were 61 and 33 %, respectively. Overall survival (OS) at 6 and 12 months was 87 and 63.5 %, respectively, with a median OS of 15.9 months. One patient treated by SRS showed symptoms of radionecrosis, which was confirmed histologically. Conclusion: Frameless image-guided LINAC-based adjuvant SRS and SHRT are effective and well tolerated local treatment strategies after resection of brain metastases in patients with oligometastatic disease. (orig.)

  3. Accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy as adjuvant regimen after conserving surgery for early breast cancer: interim report of toxicity after a minimum follow up of 3 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Accelerated hypofractionation is an attractive approach for adjuvant whole breast radiotherapy. In this study we evaluated the adverse effects at least 3 years post an accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy schedule. Methods From October 2004 to March 2006, 39 consecutive patients aged over 18 years with pTis, pT1-2, pN0-1 breast adenocarcinoma who underwent conservative surgery were treated with an adjuvant accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy schedule consisting of 34 Gy in 10 daily fractions over 2 weeks to the whole breast, followed after 1 week by an electron boost dose of 8 Gy in a single fraction to the tumour bed. Skin and lung radiation toxicity was evaluated daily during therapy, once a week for one month after radiotherapy completion, every 3 months for the first year and from then on every six months. In particular lung toxicity was investigated in terms of CT density evaluation, pulmonary functional tests, and clinical and radiological scoring. Paired t-test, Chi-square test and non-parametric Wilcoxon test were performed. Results After a median follow-up of 43 months (range 36-52 months), all the patients are alive and disease-free. None of the patients showed any clinical signs of lung toxicity, no CT-lung toxicity was denoted by radiologist on CT lung images acquired about 1 year post-radiotherapy, no variation of pulmonary density evaluated in terms of normalised Hounsfield numbers was evident. Barely palpable increased density of the treated breast was noted in 9 out of 39 patients (in 2 patients this toxicity was limited to the boost area) and teleangectasia (radiotherapy schedule investigated in this study (i.e 34 Gy in 3.4 Gy/fr plus boost dose of 8 Gy in single fraction) is a feasible and safe treatment and does not lead to adjunctive acute and late toxicities. A longer follow up is necessary to confirm these favourable results. PMID:20100335

  4. Hypofractionated passively scattered proton radiotherapy for low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer is not associated with post-treatment testosterone suppression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kil, Whoon Jong; Nichols, Romaine C. Jr. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States); Univ. of Florida Proton Therapy Inst., Jacksonville (United States)], e-mail: rnichols@floridaproton.org; And others

    2013-04-15

    Background: To investigate post-treatment changes in serum testosterone in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with hypofractionated passively scattered proton radiotherapy. Material and methods: Between April 2008 and October 2011, 228 patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were enrolled into an institutional review board-approved prospective protocol. Patients received doses ranging from 70 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) to 72.5 CGE at 2.5 CGE per fraction using passively scattered protons. Three patients were excluded for receiving androgen deprivation therapy (n = 2) or testosterone supplementation (n = 1) before radiation. Of the remaining 226 patients, pretreatment serum testosterone levels were available for 217. Of these patients, post-treatment serum testosterone levels were available for 207 in the final week of treatment, 165 at the six-month follow-up, and 116 at the 12-month follow-up. The post-treatment testosterone levels were compared with the pretreatment levels using Wilcoxon's signed-rank test for matched pairs. Results: The median pretreatment serum testosterone level was 367.7 ng/dl (12.8 nmol/l). The median changes in post-treatment testosterone value were as follows: +3.0 ng/dl (+0.1 nmol/l) at treatment completion; +6.0 ng/dl (+0.2 nmol/l) at six months after treatment; and +5.0 ng/dl (0.2 nmol/l) at 12 months after treatment. None of these changes were statistically significant. Conclusion: Patients with low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated passively scattered proton radiotherapy do not experience testosterone suppression. Our findings are consistent with physical measurements demonstrating that proton radiotherapy is associated with less scatter radiation exposure to tissues beyond the beam paths compared with intensity-modulated photon radiotherapy.

  5. Treatment of Single or Multiple Brain Metastases by Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy Using Helical Tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiko Nagai

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the clinical outcomes of a 4-fraction stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT study using helical tomotherapy for brain metastases. Between August 2009 and June 2013, 54 patients with a total of 128 brain metastases underwent SRT using tomotherapy. A total dose of 28 or 28.8 Gy at 80% isodose was administered in 4 fractions for all tumors. The mean gross tumor volume (GTV was 1.9 cc. Local control (LC rates at 6, 12, and 18 months were 96%, 91%, and 88%, respectively. The 12-month LC rates for tumors with GTV ≤0.25, >0.25 and ≤1, and >1 cc were 98%, 82%, and 93%, respectively; the rates were 92% for tumors >3 cc and 100% for >10 cc. The 6-month rates for freedom from distant brain failure were 57%, 71%, and 55% for patients with 1, 2, and >3 brain metastases, respectively. No differences were significant. No major complications were observed. The 4-fraction SRT protocol provided excellent tumor control with minimal toxicity. Distant brain failure was not so frequent, even in patients with multiple tumors. The results of the current study warrant a prospective randomized study comparing single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS with SRT in this patient population.

  6. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in low- and intermediate-risk prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hun Jung; Phak, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Woo Chul [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) takes advantage of low α/β ratio of prostate cancer to deliver a large dose in few fractions. We examined clinical outcomes of SBRT using CyberKnife for the treatment of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. This study was based on a retrospective analysis of the 33 patients treated with SBRT using CyberKnife for localized prostate cancer (27.3% in low-risk and 72.7% in intermediate-risk). Total dose of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions of 7.25 Gy were administered. The acute and late toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response was monitored. Thirty-three patients with a median 51 months (range, 6 to 71 months) follow-up were analyzed. There was no biochemical failure. Median PSA nadir was 0.27 ng/mL at median 33 months and PSA bounce occurred in 30.3% (n = 10) of patients at median at median 10.5 months after SBRT. No grade 3 acute toxicity was noted. The 18.2% of the patients had acute grade 2 genitourinary (GU) toxicities and 21.2% had acute grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities. After follow-up of 2 months, most complications had returned to baseline. There was no grade 3 late GU and GI toxicity. Our experience with SBRT using CyberKnife in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer demonstrates favorable efficacy and toxicity. Further studies with more patients and longer follow-up duration are required.

  7. Different rectal toxicity tolerance with and without simultaneous conventionally-fractionated pelvic lymph node treatment in patients receiving hypofractionated prostate radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Andrew M; Baker, Christopher B; Popple, Richard A; Shekar, Kiran; Yang, Eddy S; Jacob, Rojymon; Cardan, Rex; Kim, Robert Y; Fiveash, John B

    2014-06-03

    To investigate added morbidity associated with the addition of pelvic elective nodal irradiation (ENI) to hypofractionated radiotherapy to the prostate. Two-hundred twelve patients, treated with hypofractionated radiotherapy to the prostate between 2004 and 2011, met the inclusion criteria for the analysis. All patients received 70 Gy to the prostate delivered over 28 fractions and 103 (49%) received ENI consisting of 50.4 Gy to the pelvic lymphatics delivered simultaneously in 1.8 Gy fractions. The mean dose-volume histograms were compared between the two subgroups defined by use of ENI, and various dose-volume parameters were analyzed for effect on late lower gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity. Acute grade 2 lower GI toxicity occurred in 38 (37%) patients receiving ENI versus 19 (17%) in those who did not (p = 0.001). The Kaplan-Meier estimate of grade ≥ 2 lower GI toxicity at 3 years was 15.3% for patients receiving ENI versus 5.3% for those who did not (p = 0.026). Each rectal isodose volume was increased for patients receiving ENI up to 50 Gy (p ≤ 0.021 for each 5 Gy increment). Across all patients, the absolute V70 of the rectum was the only predictor of late GI toxicity. When subgroups, defined by the use of ENI, were analyzed separately, rectal V70 was only predictive of late GI toxicity for patients who received ENI. For patients receiving ENI, V70 > 3 cc was associated with an increased risk of late GI events. Elective nodal irradiation increases the rates of acute and late GI toxicity when delivered simultaneously with hypofractioanted prostate radiotherapy. The use of ENI appears to sensitize the rectum to hot spots, therefore we recommend added caution to minimize the volume of rectum receiving 100% of the prescription dose in these patients.

  8. Exclusive radiotherapy and concurrent endocrine therapy for the management of elderly breast cancer patients: Case study and review of hypo-fractionated schemes; Hormonoradiotherapie exclusive dans la prise en charge du cancer du sein de la personne agee: cas clinique et revue de la litterature des schemas hypofractionnes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auberdiac, P.; Cartier, L.; Malkoun, N.; Chauleur, C.; De Laroche, G.; Magne, N. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut de cancerologie de la Loire, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, BP 60008, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex (France); Chargari, C. [Service d' oncologie radiotherapie, hopital d' instruction des armees du Val-de-Grace, 74, boulevard de Port-Royal, 75230 Paris cedex 5 (France); Melis, A.; Jacquin, J.P. [Departement d' oncologie medicale, institut de cancerologie de la Loire, 108 bis, avenue Albert-Raimond, BP 60008, 42271 Saint-Priest-en-Jarez cedex (France)

    2011-12-15

    Normo-fractionated radiotherapy is standard for adjuvant management of patients treated with breast conservative surgery for breast cancer. However, many elderly patients are not eligible to such strategy, either because of concurrent diseases, or because the tumor is inoperable. Several protocols of exclusive radiotherapy have been reported in the literature, frequently using hypo-fractionated radiotherapy and endocrine therapy. We report a case of a patient treated with exclusive endocrine and radiotherapy and address the state of the art on hypo-fractionated schemes for the management of elderly breast cancer patients. While hypo-fractionated radiotherapy does not compromise the oncologic or cosmetic outcome, there is no prospective data that assesses the place of radiotherapy for the exclusive treatment of elderly patients. This strategy should be further assessed in clinical randomized trial. (authors)

  9. Hypo-fractionated treatment in radiotherapy: radio-biological models Tcp and NTCP; Tratamiento hipofraccionado en radioterapia: modelos radiobiologicos TCP y NTCP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astudillo V, A. J.; Mitsoura, E. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Medicina, Paseo Tollocan s/n, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Paredes G, L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Resendiz G, G., E-mail: lydia.paredes@inin.gob.mx [Hospital Medica Sur, Departamento de Radioterapia, Puente de Piedra 150, Col. Toriello Guerra, 14050 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2014-08-15

    At the present time the breast cancer in Mexico has the first place of incidence of the malignant neoplasia s in the women, and represents 11.34% of all the cancer cases. On the other hand, the treatments for cancer by means of ionizing radiations have been dominated under the approaches of the medical radio-oncologists which have been based on test and error by many years. The radio-biological models, as the Tcp, NTCP and dosimetric variables, for their clinical application in the conventional radiotherapy with hypo-fractionation have as purpose predicting personalized treatment plans that they present most probability of tumor control and minor probability of late reactions, becoming this way support tools in the decisions taking for the patient treatments planning of Medical Physicists and Radio-oncologists. (Author)

  10. Evaluation of Acute Toxicity and Symptoms Palliation in a Hypofractionated Weekly Schedule of External Radiotherapy for Elderly Patients with Muscular Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilis Kouloulias

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim To evaluate acute toxicity and symptoms palliation of a weekly hypofractionated 3DCRT schedule as radical treatment in elderly patients with organ confined bladder cancer cT1-2N0. Materials and Methods Between February 2005 and June 2011, 58 prospectively selected patients diagnosed with organ confined bladder cancer were treated with external 3DCRT (4-field arrangement. All candidates were medically inoperable, with poor performance status, and with age ranged from 75 to 88 years (median 78. A dose of 36 Gy in 6 weekly fractions was prescribed. The primary study endpoints were the evaluation of haematuria, dysuria, frequency and pain palliation as well as the acute toxicity according to the RTOG/EORTC scale: an assessment was performed at baseline, during and 3 months after radiotherapy, while the maximum reported score was taken into account. Results The gastrointestinal acute toxicities were 13/58 (22.4% and 5/58 (5.6%, for grade I and II respectively. The genitourinary acute toxicities were 19/58 (32.7% and 10/58 (17.2%, for grade I and II respectively. In terms of clinical outcome, 55/58 patients (94.8% reported palliation of haematuria, while 19 out of 58 reported no change in frequency and dysuria. All patients reported significant improvement (P < 0.01 for pain, concerning the visual analogue score before and after radiotherapy. The median progression free survival was 14 months. CONCLUSIONS The incidence of patient-reported acute toxicity following weekly hypofractionated external 3DCRT is low while the symptom palliation compares very favorably with other reported outcomes.

  11. Transformation of Physical DVHs to Radiobiologically Equivalent Ones in Hypofractionated Radiotherapy Analyzing Dosimetric and Clinical Parameters: A Practical Approach for Routine Clinical Practice in Radiation Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoi Thrapsanioti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The purpose of this study was to transform DVHs from physical to radiobiological ones as well as to evaluate their reliability by correlations of dosimetric and clinical parameters for 50 patients with prostate cancer and 50 patients with breast cancer, who were submitted to Hypofractionated Radiotherapy. Methods and Materials. To achieve this transformation, we used both the linear-quadratic model (LQ model and the Niemierko model. The outcome of radiobiological DVHs was correlated with acute toxicity score according to EORTC/RTOG criteria. Results. Concerning the prostate radiotherapy, there was a significant correlation between RTOG acute rectal toxicity and ( and ( dosimetric parameters, calculated for  Gy. Moreover, concerning the breast radiotherapy there was a significant correlation between RTOG skin toxicity and dosimetric parameter, calculated for both  Gy ( and  Gy (. The new tool seems reliable and user-friendly. Conclusions. Our proposed model seems user-friendly. Its reliability in terms of agreement with the presented acute radiation induced toxicity was satisfactory. However, more patients are needed to extract safe conclusions.

  12. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy for brain metastases from lung cancer. Evaluation of indications and predictors of local control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Takeaki [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Division of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo (Japan); Seirei Mikatahara General Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka (Japan); Yamada, Kazunari; Isogai, Kenta; Tonosaki, Yoshihiro [Seirei Mikatahara General Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Shizuoka (Japan); Harada, Aya [Kobe Minimum Invasive Cancer Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo (Japan); Demizu, Yusuke [Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Hyogo (Japan); Miyawaki, Daisuke; Yoshida, Kenji; Ejima, Yasuo; Sasaki, Ryohei [Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine, Division of Radiation Oncology, Hyogo (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (HSRT) for brain metastases (BMs) from lung cancer, and to explore prognostic factors associated with local control (LC) and indication. We evaluated patients who were treated with linac-based HSRT for BMs from lung cancer. Lesions treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in the same patients during the same periods were analysed and compared with HSRT in terms of LC or toxicity. There were 53 patients with 214 lesions selected for this analysis (HSRT: 76 lesions, SRS: 138 lesions). For HSRT, the median prescribed dose was 35 Gy in 5 fractions. The 1-year LC rate was 83.6 % in HSRT; on multivariate analysis, a planning target volume (PTV) of <4 cm{sup 3}, biologically effective dose (BED{sub 10}) of ≥51 Gy, and adenocarcinoma were significantly associated with better LC. Moreover, in PTVs ≥ 4 cm{sup 3}, there was a significant difference in LC between BED{sub 10} < 51 Gy and ≥ 51 Gy (p = 0.024). On the other hand, in PTVs < 4 cm{sup 3}, both HSRT and SRS had good LC with no significant difference (p = 0.195). Radiation necrosis emerged in 5 of 76 lesions (6.6 %) treated with HSRT and 21 of 138 (15.2 %) lesions treated with SRS (p = 0.064). Linac-based HSRT was safe and effective for BMs from lung cancer, and hence might be particularly useful in or near an eloquent area. PTV, BED{sub 10}, and pathological type were significant prognostic factors. Furthermore, in BMs ≥ 4 cm{sup 3}, a dose of BED ≥ 51 Gy should be considered. (orig.) [German] Beurteilung von Wirksamkeit und Toxizitaet einer hypofraktionierten stereotaktischen Strahlentherapie (HSRT) zur Behandlung von Hirnmetastasen (HM) eines Lungenkarzinoms und Erforschung von mit der lokalen Kontrolle (LK) und der Indikation assoziierten Prognosefaktoren. Analysiert wurden Daten von Patienten (n = 53), die sich einer Linearbeschleuniger-basierten HSRT unterzogen (mit HSRT behandelte Laesionen n = 76; Median der

  13. Treatment of Cerebral Arteriovenous Malformations with Radiosurgery or Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy in a Consecutive Pooled Linear Accelerator Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Jan P; Bruckermann, Ruth; Pintea, Bogdan; Boström, Azize; Surber, Gunnar; Hamm, Klaus

    2016-10-01

    To review outcomes after linear accelerator stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (hfSRT) of arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) from a consecutive and pooled series of 2 Novalis centers and to analyze the influence of AVM size, Spetzler-Martin (SM) grade, pretreatment, and hemorrhagic versus nonhemorrhagic presentation. A subgroup analysis of A Randomized Trial of Unruptured Brain Arteriovenous Malformations (ARUBA)-eligible patients also was performed. Prospectively collected treatment and outcome data were supplemented by retrospectively collected follow-up data for 93.8% of all patients. A total of 129 patients with AVM had SRS or hfSRT between 2000 and 2014 with the same linear accelerator system in 2 centers. Data analysis included initial presentation, SM grade, occlusion rates assessed by magnetic resonance and/or digital subtraction angiography, neurologic and therapeutic complications, and pretreatments. Statistical analysis was performed for patient demographic data and for factors potentially influencing outcome. Initial presentation was hemorrhage in 43.8% or seizures/neurologic deficits in 46.2%. The series included 6 SM grade I (5%), 26 SM II (21.5%), 55 SM III (45.5%), 28 SM IV (23%), and 6 SM V cases (5%). Pre-embolization was used in 36 patients (29.8%), 8 patients had previous surgery (6.6%), and 6 patients were irradiated before elsewhere (5%); 5 patients (4.2%) received multimodal pretreatment. Mean follow-up was 43 months. The occlusion rate for the total series was 71.1%, for SM I/II cases 80.6%, and 67.4% for the SM ≥ subgroup. The occlusion rate was 75.0% for the small volume (10 cc) subgroup. There was no statistical difference between the occlusion rate of patients with or without pretreatment if taken all modalities together (72.7% and 69.7%, respectively). There was only a trend of a belated occlusion of pre-embolized AVMs. The occlusion rate for hemorrhagic AVM was with 77.4% better than for

  14. A phase 1 dose-escalation study of the oral histone deacetylase inhibitor abexinostat in combination with standard hypofractionated radiotherapy in advanced solid tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Eric; Moyal, Elizabeth Cohen-Jonathan; Gregorc, Vanesa; Zucali, Paolo Andrea; Menard, Jean; Soria, Jean-Charles; Kloos, Ioana; Hsu, Jeff; Luan, Ying; Liu, Emily; Vezan, Remus; Graef, Thorsten; Rivera, Sofia

    2017-01-01

    Current treatments for advanced solid tumors tend to be only palliative. Although radiotherapy is administered with a curative intent, radioresistance and dose-limiting toxicities pose limitations to treatment. Abexinostat, an oral pan-histone deacetylase inhibitor, demonstrated enhanced sensitivity to radiation in various solid tumor cell lines. We conducted an exploratory, phase 1, dose-escalation study of abexinostat in combination with standard hypofractionated radiotherapy in patients with advanced solid tumors treated in a palliative setting. Among 58 treated patients, the median age was 61.5 years (range, 20-82); 47% of the patients had M1 stage disease, and 95% had received previous chemotherapy alone or chemotherapy in combination with surgery and/or radiotherapy. The recommended phase 2 dose was determined to be 90 mg/m2 (140 mg). Of the 51 patients evaluable for response, best overall response was 8% (1 complete response [CR], 3 partial responses [PRs]), and best loco-regional response was 12% (1 CR and 5 PRs) at a median follow-up of 16 weeks. Of note, patients with target or non-target brain lesions showed encouraging responses, with 1 patient achieving a best loco-regional response of CR. Treatment-emergent grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs) were few, with most common being thrombocytopenia (17%), lymphopenia (12%), and hypokalemia (7%). Six patients (10%) discontinued treatment due to AEs. No grade ≥3 prolongation of the QTc interval was observed, with no treatment discontinuations due to this AE. Oral abexinostat combined with radiotherapy was well tolerated in patients with advanced solid tumors. The combination may have potential for treatment of patients with brain lesions. PMID:28915584

  15. Health-related quality of life in survivors of stage I-II breast cancer: randomized trial of post-operative conventional radiotherapy and hypofractionated tomotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Versmessen Harijati

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health-related quality of life (HRQOL assessment is a key component of clinical oncology trials. However, few breast cancer trials comparing adjuvant conventional radiotherapy (CR and hypofractionated tomotherapy (TT have investigated HRQOL. We compared HRQOL in stage I-II breast cancer patients who were randomized to receive either CR or TT. Tomotherapy uses an integrated computed tomography scanner to improve treatment accuracy, aiming to reduce the adverse effects of radiotherapy. Methods A total of 121 stage I–II breast cancer patients who had undergone breast conserving surgery (BCS or mastectomy (MA were randomly assigned to receive either CR or TT. CR patients received 25 × 2 Gy over 5 weeks, and BCS patients also received a sequential boost of 8 × 2 Gy over 2 weeks. TT patients received 15 × 2.8 Gy over 3 weeks, and BCS patients also received a simultaneous integrated boost of 15 × 0.6 Gy over 3 weeks. Patients completed the EORTC QLQ-C30 and BR23 questionnaires. The mean score (± standard error was calculated at baseline, the end of radiotherapy, and at 3 months and 1, 2, and 3 years post-radiotherapy. Data were analyzed by the 'intention-to-treat' principle. Results On the last day of radiotherapy, patients in both treatment arms had decreased global health status and functioning scores; increased fatigue (clinically meaningful in both treatment arms, nausea and vomiting, and constipation; decreased arm symptoms; clinically meaningful increased breast symptoms in CR patients and systemic side effects in TT patients; and slightly decreased body image and future perspective. At 3 months post-radiotherapy, TT patients had a clinically significant increase in role- and social-functioning scores and a clinically significant decrease in fatigue. The post-radiotherapy physical-, cognitive- and emotional-functioning scores improved faster in TT patients than CR patients. TT patients also had a better

  16. FEASIBILITY FOR USING HYPOFRACTIONATED STEREOTACTIC VOLUMETRIC MODULATED ARC RADIOTHERAPY (VMAT) WITH ADAPTIVE PLANNING FOR TREATMENT OF THYMOMA IN RABBITS: 15 CASES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolera, Mario; Malfassi, Luca; Mazza, Giovanni; Urso, Gaetano; Sala, Massimo; Marcarini, Silvia; Carrara, Nancy; Pavesi, Simone; Finesso, Sara; Kent, Michael S

    2016-05-01

    Thymoma is a relatively common tumor in rabbits. Treatment with surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy alone or in combination has been reported with varying outcomes. Stereotactic volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy delivered in a hypofractionated manner allows high doses of radiation to be delivered to the target volume while allowing sparing of adjacent critical structures. This therapy is ideally suited for thymomas in rabbits given their size, the difficulty of multiple anesthesia episodes and the complexity of the radiotherapy plans required due to the tumor's proximity to the heart, lungs, and mediastinal structures. Fifteen rabbits with thymoma were prospectively recruited for this observational, single institution, single arm clinical study. All rabbits were imaged with both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A total dose of 40 Gy in six fractions was delivered using a single arc over an 11-day period with repeat CT simulation done every other fraction for adaptive planning. Follow-up evaluation was done through repeat CT and MRI imaging and revealed complete responses using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Two rabbits had died at 618 and 718 days, 10 were alive and three were lost to follow-up. Observed acute and late effects were graded according to the Veterinary Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (VRTOG) criteria and were found to be minimal. © 2016 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  17. Hypo-fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of five fractions with linear accelerator for vestibular schwannomas: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thien; Duong, Courtney; Sheppard, John P; Lee, Seung Jin; Kishan, Amar U; Lee, Percy; Tenn, Stephen; Chin, Robert; Kaprealian, Tania B; Yang, Isaac

    2018-03-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VS) are benign tumors stemming from the eighth cranial nerve. Treatment options for VS include conservative management, microsurgery, stereotactic radiosurgery, and fractionated radiotherapy. Though microsurgery has been the standard of care for larger lesions, hypo-fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (hypo-FSRT) is an emerging modality. However, its clinical efficacy and safety have yet to be established. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of manuscripts indexed in PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, Embase, and Cochrane databases reporting outcomes of VS cases treated with hypo-FSRT. Five studies representing a total of 228 patients were identified. Across studies, the pooled rates of tumor control, hearing, facial nerve, and trigeminal nerve preservation were 95%, 37%, 97%, and 98%. No instances of malignant induction were observed at median follow-up of 34.8 months. Complications included trigeminal neuropathy (n = 3), maxillary paresthesia (n = 1), neuralgia (n = 1), vestibular dysfunction (n = 1), radionecrosis (n = 1), and hydrocephalus (n = 1). Hypo-FSRT may be another useful approach to manage VS, but studies with extended follow-up times are required to establish long-term safety. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Hypofractionated Prostate Radiotherapy with or without Conventionally Fractionated Nodal Irradiation: Clinical Toxicity Observations and Retrospective Daily Dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Andrew M; Bishop, Justin M; Jacob, Rojymon; Dobelbower, Michael C; Kim, Robert Y; Yang, Eddy S; Smith, Heather; Wu, Xingen; Fiveash, John B

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate toxicity associated with the addition of elective nodal irradiation (ENI) to a hypofractionated regimen for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials. Fifty-seven patients received pelvic image-guided IMRT to 50.4 Gy in 28 fractions with a hypofractionated simultaneous boost to the prostate to 70 Gy. Thirty-one patients received prostate-only treatment to 70 Gy in 28 fractions. Results. Median followup was 41.1 months. Early grade ≥2 urinary toxicity rates were 49% (28 of 57) for patients receiving ENI and 58% (18 of 31) for those not (P = 0.61). Early grade ≥2 rectal toxicity rates were 40% (23 of 57) and 23% (7 of 31), respectively (P = 0.09). The addition of ENI resulted in a 21% actuarial rate of late grade ≥2 rectal toxicity at 4 years, compared to 0% for patients treated to the prostate only (P = 0.02). Retrospective daily dosimetry of patients experiencing late rectal toxicity revealed an average increase of 2.67% of the rectal volume receiving 70 Gy compared to the original plan. Conclusions. The addition of ENI resulted in an increased risk of late rectal toxicity. Grade ≥2 late rectal toxicity was associated with worse daily rectal dosimetry compared to the treatment plan.

  19. Volumetric Modulated Arc-Based Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy for the Treatment of Selected Intracranial Arteriovenous Malformations: Dosimetric Report and Early Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subramanian, Sai; Srinivas, Chilukuri; Ramalingam, K.; Babaiah, M.; Swamy, S. Thirumalai; Arun, G.; Kathirvel, M.; Ashok, S. [Yashoda Super Specialty Hospital, Hyderabad (India); Clivio, Alessandro [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Fogliata, Antonella, E-mail: antonella.fogliata-cozzi@eoc.ch [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Nicolini, Giorgia [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland); Rao, K. Srinivasa; Reddy, T. Pratap; Amit, Jotwani [Yashoda Super Specialty Hospital, Hyderabad (India); Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca [Oncology Institute of Southern Switzerland, Bellinzona (Switzerland)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, with a dosimetric and clinical feasibility study, RapidArc (a volumetric modulated arc technique) for hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy treatment of large arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Methods and Materials: Nine patients were subject to multimodality imaging (magnetic resonance, computed tomography, and digital subtraction angiography) to determine nidus and target volumes, as well as involved organs at risk (optical structures, inner ear, brain stem). Plans for multiple intensity-modulated arcs with a single isocenter were optimized for a fractionation of 25 Gy in 5 fractions. All plans were optimized for 6-MV photon beams. Dose-volume histograms were analyzed to assess plan quality. Delivery parameters were reported to appraise technical features of RapidArc, and pretreatment quality assurance measurements were carried out to report on quality of delivery. Results: Average size of AVM nidus was 26.2 cm{sup 3}, and RapidArc plans provided complete target coverage with minimal overdosage (V{sub 100%} = 100% and V{sub 110%} < 1%) and excellent homogeneity (<6%). Organs at risk were highly spared. The D{sub 1%} to chiasm, eyes, lenses, optic nerves, and brainstem (mean {+-} SD) was 6.4 {+-} 8.3, 1.9 {+-} 3.8, 2.3 {+-} 2.2, 0.7 {+-} 0.9, 4.4 {+-} 7.2, 12.2 {+-} 9.6 Gy, respectively. Conformity index (CI{sub 95%}) was 2.2 {+-} 0.1. The number of monitor units per gray was 277 {+-} 45, total beam-on time was 2.5 {+-} 0.3 min. Planning vs. delivery {gamma} pass rate was 98.3% {+-} 0.9%. None of the patients developed acute toxicity. With a median follow-up of 9 months, 3 patients presented with deterioration of symptoms and were found to have postradiation changes but responded symptomatically to steroids. These patients continue to do well on follow-up. One patient developed headache and seizures, which was attributed to intracranial bleed, confirmed on imaging. Conclusion: Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy can be

  20. A new index comparable to BED for evaluating the biological efficacy of hypofractionated radiotherapy schemes on early stage non-small cell lung cancer: analysis of data from the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Cheng; Guo, Wen-jie; Zha, Wen-wu; Zhu, Xiang-zhi; Huang, Sheng-fu; Zhang, Ye-wei; Xu, Jian-hua; He, Xia

    2014-04-01

    Hypofractionated radiotherapy has been the principal curative treatment option for early stage NSCLC patients who are medically inoperable or those who refuse surgery and achieved favorable clinical outcomes. Evidence demonstrated that the linear quadratic model widely used in normally fractionated radiotherapy cannot work well to fit outcome data by use of BED to predict the effect of hypofractionation schemes. New models and the related metrics need to be developed to quantify the effect of high-dose ablative regimens for early stage NSCLC. Trials using hypofractionated radiotherapy without chemotherapy to treat early stage (T1 or T2N0M0) primary NSCLC and providing information on patient numbers, age, T stage and local control rates were eligible. The endpoint was local relapse and the covariates analyzed were total radiotherapy dose, dose per fraction or combinations of the two parameters, treatment duration, T stage and median age of patients within the trial. The model used was a multivariate logistic regression. 19 trials were included (767 patients) in which 90 patients suffered local relapse. Only total dose × dose per fraction (D × d) and stage T had statistically significant effect on local control. Smaller T stage (p=0.000) and increasing D × d (p=0.006) were associated with improved probability of local control. In contrast, BED10 had no significant impact on local control, which probably indicated that D × d might be a more effective metric than BED10 to predict tumor control rate and assess the efficacy of the large dose fractionation schemes for early stage NSCLC. BED was not an ideal metric to estimate the effect of the schemes of high-dose ablative radiotherapy for early stage NSCLC, and total dose × fraction dose could be considered as a comparable index, though the result need to be further validated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Moderate hypofractionated image-guided thoracic radiotherapy for locally advanced node-positive non-small cell lung cancer patients with very limited lung function: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manapov, Farkhad; Roengvoraphoj, Olarn; Li, Ming Lun; Eze, Chukwuka [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilian University of Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2017-06-15

    Patients with locally advanced lung cancer and very limited pulmonary function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1] ≤ 1 L) have dismal prognosis and undergo palliative treatment or best supportive care. We describe two cases of locally advanced node-positive non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with very limited lung function treated with induction chemotherapy and moderate hypofractionated image-guided radiotherapy (Hypo-IGRT). Hypo-IGRT was delivered to a total dose of 45 Gy to the primary tumor and involved lymph nodes. Planning was based on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/ CT) and four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Internal target volume (ITV) was defined as the overlap of gross tumor volume delineated on 10 phases of 4D-CT. ITV to planning target volume margin was 5 mm in all directions. Both patients showed good clinical and radiological response. No relevant toxicity was documented. Hypo-IGRT is feasible treatment option in locally advanced node-positive NSCLC patients with very limited lung function (FEV1 ≤ 1 L)

  2. Prevention of malignant seeding at drain sites after invasive procedures (surgery and/or thoracoscopy) by hypofractionated radiotherapy in patients with pleural mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Salvo, Maurizio; Gambaro, Giuseppina; Pagella, Simonetta; Manfredda, Irene; Casadio, Caterina; Krengli, Marco (Radiotherapy, Univ. of Piemonte Orientale-Hospital Maggiore della Carit, Novara (Italy))

    2008-07-15

    Introduction. Literature data show that mesothelioma cells can implant along the surgical pathway of invasive procedures such as thoracotomy and thoracoscopy. We investigated the use of hypofractionated radiotherapy for preventing such malignant seeding. Material and methods. Thirty-two consecutive patients diagnosed with pleural mesothelioma were included in the present retrospective study. All patients underwent surgery and/or thoracoscopy for diagnosis, staging or talc pleurodesis. They were treated with electron external beam radiation therapy (21 Gy in 3 fractions over 1 week), directed to the surgical pathway after the invasive procedure. After completion of radiation treatment, 20 of 32 patients (63%) underwent chemotherapy. Results. After a mean follow-up of 13.6 months (range 3-41) from the end of radiation therapy, no patient had tumour progression in the treated area. The treatment was well tolerated, as only erythema grade I (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, RTOG, scale) was noted in 11 patients. Seventeen patients died of disease with local progression after a mean survival time of 12.6 months (range 3-27); thirteen patients are alive with disease after a mean follow-up of 13.9 months (range 4-41); two patients are alive without evidence of disease after a mean follow-up of 16.50 months (range 6-27). Discussion. The present study shows the efficacy and safety of local radiotherapy in preventing malignant seeding after thoracoscopy in patients with pleural mesothelioma although larger prospective trials are probably still needed to validate this treatment approach.

  3. A prospective phase III randomized trial of hypofractionation versus conventional fractionation in patients with high-risk prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Saracino, Biancamaria; Gomellini, Sara; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Arcangeli, Stefano; Sentinelli, Steno; Marzi, Simona; Landoni, Valeria; Fowler, Jack; Strigari, Lidia

    2010-09-01

    To compare the toxicity and efficacy of hypofractionated (62 Gy/20 fractions/5 weeks, 4 fractions per week) vs. conventional fractionation radiotherapy (80 Gy/40 fractions/8 weeks) in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. From January 2003 to December 2007, 168 patients were randomized to receive either hypofractionated or conventional fractionated schedules of three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. All patients received a 9-month course of total androgen deprivation (TAD), and radiotherapy started 2 months thereafter. The median (range) follow-up was 32 (8-66) and 35 (7-64) months in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation arms, respectively. No difference was found for late toxicity between the two treatment groups, with 3-year Grade 2 rates of 17% and 16% for gastrointestinal and 14% and 11% for genitourinary in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation groups, respectively. The 3-year freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF) rates were 87% and 79% in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation groups, respectively (p = 0.035). The 3-year FFBF rates in patients at a very high risk (i.e., pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (iPSA) >20 ng/mL, Gleason score >or=8, or T >or=2c), were 88% and 76% (p = 0.014) in the former and latter arm, respectively. The multivariate Cox analysis confirmed fractionation, iPSA, and Gleason score as significant prognostic factors. Our findings suggest that late toxicity is equivalent between the two treatment groups and that the hypofractionated schedule used in this trial is superior to the conventional fractionation in terms of FFBF. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Radical hypo-fractionated radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy in lung cancer. A retrospective study of elderly patients with stage III disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franceschini, D. [Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Milan (Italy); Istituto Clinico Humanitas Cancer Center, Rozzano (Milan) (Italy); De Rose, F.; Navarria, P.; Clerici, E.; Franzese, C.; Comito, T.; Tozzi, A.; Iftode, C.; D' Agostino, G. [Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Milan (Italy); Cozzi, L.; Sorsetti, M. [Humanitas Cancer Center and Research Hospital, Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Department, Milan (Italy); Humanitas University, Department of Biomedical Sciences, Milan (Italy)

    2017-05-15

    This study aimed to analyse the feasibility and acute toxicity of radical hypo-fractionated radiotherapy (RT) for elderly patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We conducted a retrospective evaluation of treatment with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) of elderly patients affected by stage III inoperable NSCLC. The dose prescription was 56 Gy in 20 fractions, 55 Gy in 22 fractions, or 50 Gy in 20 fractions. Target volume included only the primary lesion and the infiltrated lymph nodes. The primary end point was acute and late toxicity, while secondary end points were progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS). In all, 41 patients were included in this analysis. The mean age of the patients was 78.6 years, and 22 patients had staged IIIA while 19 patients had stage IIIB disease. All but one patient had pathological nodal involvement; 15 patients received chemotherapy before RT. Acute grade 1-2 toxicity was recorded in 25 (61%) patients. Late toxicity was recorded in 13 (32%) patients. No cases of G3 or G4 toxicity were recorded. Complete response was obtained in two (5%) patients, 26 (63%) showed a partial response, and two (5%) experience disease progression. At a mean follow-up of 9.9 months (range, 1.1-25.4), 17 patients had died from disease progression, one died from other causes, and 23 were alive. Median OS was 13.7 ± 1.5 months (95% CI: 10.7-16.7), OS at 12 and 18 months was 51.3 ± 9.5% and 35.1 ± 10.1%, respectively. Median PFS was 13.7 ± 2.3 months (95% CI: 9.1-18.2), and PFS at 12 and 18 months was 50.1 ± 9.9% and 38.9 ± 10.4%, respectively. Radical hypo-fractionated VMAT is a promising treatment for locally advanced NSCLC in the elderly. The use of hypo-fractionated radiotherapy for lung cancer in older patients can be considered a valuable approach, particularly for patients with poor performance status or refusing other treatment approaches. (orig.) [German] Durchfuehrbarkeit und Nebenwirkungen der radikalen

  5. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy of acoustic neuroma. Volume changes and hearing results after 89-month median follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kranzinger, Manfred; Fastner, Gerd [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics (PMU), University Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg County Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Zehentmayr, Franz; Sedlmayer, Felix [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics (PMU), University Clinic of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, Salzburg County Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Salzburg County Hospital, Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, radART - Institute for Research and Development on Advanced Radiation Technologies, Salzburg (Austria); Oberascher, Gerhard [Paracelsus Medical University Clinics (PMU), University Clinic of Ear, Nose and Throat Diseases, Salzburg County Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Merz, Florian; Rahim, Hassan [Salzburg County Hospital, Paracelsus Medical University Clinics, Medical Radiation Protection Unit, Salzburg (Austria); Nairz, Olaf [Clinic Bad Trissl, Oberaudorf (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    The goal of this work was to evaluate toxicity and local control following hypofractionated stereotactic radiation treatment with special focus on changes in tumor volume and hearing capacity. In all, 29 patients with unilateral acoustic neuroma were treated between 2001 and 2007 within a prospective radiation protocol (7 x 4 Gy ICRU dose). Median tumor volume was 0.9 ml. Follow-up started at 6 months and was repeated annually with MRI volumetry and audiometry. Hearing preservation was defined as preservation of Class A/B hearing according to the guidelines of the American Academy of Otolaryngology (1995). No patient had any intervention after a median imaging follow-up of 89.5 months, one patient showed radiological progression. Transient increase of tumor volume developed in 17/29 patients, whereas 22/29 patients (75.9 %) presented with a volume reduction at last follow-up. A total of 21 patients were eligible for hearing evaluation. Mean pure tone average (PTA) deteriorated from 39.3 to 65.9 dB and mean speech discrimination score (SDS) dropped from 74.3 to 38.1 %. The 5-year actuarial Class A/B hearing preservation rate was 50.0 ± 14.4 %. Radiation increases only minimally, if at all, the hearing deterioration which emerges by observation alone. Presbyacusis is not responsible for this deterioration. Transient tumor enlargement is common. Today radiation of small- and medium-sized acoustic neuroma can be performed with different highly conformal techniques as fractionated treatment or single low-dose radiosurgery with equal results regarding tumor control, hearing preservation, and side effects. Hypofractionation is more comfortable for the patient than conventional regimens and represents a serious alternative to frameless radiosurgery. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war die Evaluierung der Toxizitaet und der lokalen Tumorkontrolle einer hypofraktionierten stereotaktischen Bestrahlung mit besonderem Augenmerk auf Veraenderungen von Tumorvolumen und

  6. High tech hypofractionation to optimise treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Hypofractionation has lately been implemented as standard treatment in the adjuvant setting as well as in radical radiotherapy for various solid tumors such as in breast and lung carcinomas. Also for metastatic disease in the liver or brain, hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy has proven...... related to toxicity. Elderly H&N patients with a low propensity for HPV-derived carcinomas have generally lower rates of neck metastases than younger patients (N0-1 below 20% vs 35%) which defines a smaller target area. With modern diagnostic procedures and cone-beam based adaptive IMRT techniques, both...

  7. Dosimetric effect of intrafraction motion and residual setup error for hypofractionated prostate intensity-modulated radiotherapy with online cone beam computed tomography image guidance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Adamson, Justus

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: To quantify the dosimetric effect and margins required to account for prostate intrafractional translation and residual setup error in a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT)-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy protocol. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Prostate position after online correction was measured during dose delivery using simultaneous kV fluoroscopy and posttreatment CBCT in 572 fractions to 30 patients. We reconstructed the dose distribution to the clinical tumor volume (CTV) using a convolution of the static dose with a probability density function (PDF) based on the kV fluoroscopy, and we calculated the minimum dose received by 99% of the CTV (D(99)). We compared reconstructed doses when the convolution was performed per beam, per patient, and when the PDF was created using posttreatment CBCT. We determined the minimum axis-specific margins to limit CTV D(99) reduction to 1%. RESULTS: For 3-mm margins, D(99) reduction was <\\/=5% for 29\\/30 patients. Using post-CBCT rather than localizations at treatment delivery exaggerated dosimetric effects by ~47%, while there was no such bias between the dose convolved with a beam-specific and patient-specific PDF. After eight fractions, final cumulative D(99) could be predicted with a root mean square error of <1%. For 90% of patients, the required margins were <\\/=2, 4, and 3 mm, with 70%, 40%, and 33% of patients requiring no right-left (RL), anteroposterior (AP), and superoinferior margins, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: For protocols with CBCT guidance, RL, AP, and SI margins of 2, 4, and 3 mm are sufficient to account for translational errors; however, the large variation in patient-specific margins suggests that adaptive management may be beneficial.

  8. Split-Course, High-Dose Palliative Pelvic Radiotherapy for Locally Progressive Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gogna, Nirdosh Kumar, E-mail: kumar_gogna@health.qld.gov.au [Radiation Oncology Services, Mater Centre, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Baxi, Siddhartha; Hickey, Brigid; Baumann, Kathryn [Radiation Oncology Services, Mater Centre, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Burmeister, Elizabeth [Princess Alexandra Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Holt, Tanya [Radiation Oncology Services, Mater Centre, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: Local progression, in patients with hormone-refractory prostate cancer, often causes significant morbidity. Pelvic radiotherapy (RT) provides effective palliation in this setting, with most published studies supporting the use of high-dose regimens. The aim of the present study was to examine the role of split-course hypofractionated RT used at our institution in treating this group of patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 34 men with locoregionally progressive hormone-refractory prostate cancer, treated with a split course of pelvic RT (45-60 Gy in 18-24 fractions) between 2000 and 2008 were analyzed. The primary endpoints were the response rate and actuarial locoregional progression-free survival. Secondary endpoints included overall survival, compliance, and acute and late toxicity. Results: The median age was 71 years (range, 53-88). Treatment resulted in an overall initial response rate of 91%, a median locoregional progression-free survival of 43 months, and median overall survival of 28 months. Compliance was excellent and no significant late toxicity was reported. Conclusions: The split course pelvic RT described has an acceptable toxicity profile, is effective, and compares well with other high-dose palliative regimens that have been previously reported.

  9. Hypofractionation does not increase radiation pneumonitis risk with modern conformal radiation delivery techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogelius, Ivan R; Westerly, David C; Cannon, George M

    2010-01-01

    To study the interaction between radiation dose distribution and hypofractionated radiotherapy with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) estimated from normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models.......To study the interaction between radiation dose distribution and hypofractionated radiotherapy with respect to the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) estimated from normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models....

  10. Phase I Trial of Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy With Temozolomide Chemotherapy for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Changhu, E-mail: changhu.chen@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Damek, Denise [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Waziri, Allen; Lillehei, Kevin [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Kleinschmidt-DeMasters, B.K. [Department of Pathology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States); Robischon, Monica; Stuhr, Kelly; Rusthoven, Kyle E.; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To determine the maximal tolerated biologic dose intensification of radiotherapy using fractional dose escalation with temozolomide (TMZ) chemotherapy in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme after biopsy or resection and with adequate performance status, bone marrow, and organ function were eligible. The patients underwent postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. All patients received a total dose of 60 Gy to the surgical cavity and residual tumor, with a 5-mm margin. IMRT biologic dose intensification was achieved by escalating from 3 Gy/fraction (Level 1) to 6 Gy/fraction (Level 4) in 1-Gy increments. Concurrent TMZ was given at 75 mg/m{sup 2}/d for 28 consecutive days. Adjuvant TMZ was given at 150-200 mg/m{sup 2}/d for 5 days every 28 days. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3, Grade 3-4 nonhematologic toxicity, excluding Grade 3 fatigue, nausea, and vomiting. A standard 3+3 Phase I design was used. Results: A total of 16 patients were accrued (12 men and 4 women, median age, 69 years; range, 34-84. The median Karnofsky performance status was 80 (range, 60-90). Of the 16 patients, 3 each were treated at Levels 1 and 2, 4 at Level 3, and 6 at Level 4. All patients received IMRT and concurrent TMZ according to the protocol, except for 1 patient, who received 14 days of concurrent TMZ. The median number of adjuvant TMZ cycles was 7.5 (range, 0-12). The median survival was 16.2 months (range, 3-33). One patient experienced vision loss in the left eye 7 months after IMRT. Four patients underwent repeat surgery for suspected tumor recurrence 6-12 months after IMRT; 3 had radionecrosis. Conclusions: The maximal tolerated IMRT fraction size was not reached in our study. Our results have shown that 60 Gy IMRT delivered in 6-Gy fractions within 2 weeks with

  11. WE-D-BRE-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (THERAPY) - Radiogenomic Modeling of Normal Tissue Toxicities in Prostate Cancer Patients Receiving Hypofractionated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, J; Jeyaseelan, K; Ybarra, N; David, M; Faria, S; Souhami, L; Cury, F; Duclos, M; Naqa, I El [McGill University, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: It has been realized that inter-patient radiation sensitivity variability is a multifactorial process involving dosimetric, clinical, and genetic factors. Therefore, we explore a new framework to integrate physical, clinical, and biological data denoted as radiogenomic modeling. In demonstrating the feasibility of this work, we investigate the association of genetic variants (copy number variations [CNVs] and single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) with radiation induced rectal bleeding (RB) and erectile dysfunction (ED) while taking into account dosimetric and clinical variables in prostate cancer patients treated with curative irradiation. Methods: A cohort of 62 prostate cancer patients who underwent hypofractionated radiotherapy (66 Gy in 22 fractions) was retrospectively genotyped for CNV and SNP rs25489 in the xrcc1 DNA repair gene. Dosevolume metrics were extracted from treatment plans of 54 patients who had complete dosimetric profiles. Treatment outcomes were considered to be a Result of functional mapping of radiogenomic input variables according to a logit transformation. Model orders were estimated using resampling by leave-one out cross-validation (LOO-CV). Radiogenomic model performance was evaluated using area under the ROC curve (AUC) and LOO-CV. For continuous univariate dosimetric and clinical variables, Spearmans rank coefficients were calculated and p-values reported accordingly. In the case of binary variables, Chi-squared statistics and contingency table calculations were used. Results: Ten patients were found to have three copies of xrcc1 CNV (RB: χ2=14.6 [p<0.001] and ED: χ2=4.88[p=0.0272]) and twelve had heterozygous rs25489 SNP (RB: χ2=0.278[p=0.599] and ED: χ2=0.112[p=0.732]). LOO-CV identified penile bulb D60 as the only significant QUANTEC predictor (rs=0.312 [p=0.0145]) for ED. Radiogenomic modeling yielded statistically significant, cross-validated NTCP models for RB (rs=0.243[p=0.0443], AUC=0.665) and ED (rs=0.276[p=0

  12. Choosing Wisely? Patterns and Correlates of the Use of Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Radiation Therapy in the State of Michigan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Griffith, Kent A. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Heimburger, David [Munson Medical Center, Traverse City, Michigan (United States); Walker, Eleanor M. [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Grills, Inga S. [Beaumont Health System, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Boike, Thomas [McLaren Northern Michigan, Petoskey, Michigan (United States); Feng, Mary; Moran, Jean M.; Hayman, James; Pierce, Lori J. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Given evidence from randomized trials that have established the non-inferiority of more convenient and less costly courses of hypofractionated radiotherapy to the whole breast in selected breast cancer patients who receive lumpectomy, we sought to investigate the use of hypofractionated radiation therapy and factors associated with its use in a consortium of radiation oncology practices in Michigan. We sought to determine the extent to which variation in use occurs at the physician or practice level versus the extent to which use reflects individualization based on potentially relevant patient characteristics (such as habitus, age, chemotherapy receipt, or laterality). Methods and Materials: We evaluated associations between receipt of hypofractionated radiation therapy and various patient, provider, and practice characteristics in a multilevel model. Results: Of 1477 patients who received lumpectomy and whole-breast radiation therapy and were registered by the Michigan Radiation Oncology Quality Consortium (MROQC) from October 2011 to December 2013, 913 had T1-2, N0 breast cancer. Of these 913, 283 (31%) received hypofractionated radiation therapy. Among the 13 practices, hypofractionated radiation therapy use ranged from 2% to 80%. On multilevel analysis, 51% of the variation in the rate of hypofractionation was attributable to the practice level, 21% to the provider level, and 28% to the patient level. On multivariable analysis, hypofractionation was more likely in patients who were older (odds ratio [OR] 2.16 for age ≥50 years, P=.007), less likely in those with larger body habitus (OR 0.52 if separation between tangent entry and exit ≥25 cm, P=.002), and more likely without chemotherapy receipt (OR 3.82, P<.001). Hypofractionation use was not higher in the last 6 months analyzed: 79 of 252 (31%) from June 2013 to December 2013 and 204 of 661 (31%) from October 2011 to May 2013 (P=.9). Conclusions: Hypofractionated regimens of whole

  13. Clinical outcome in 520 consecutive Danish rectal cancer patients treated with short course preoperative radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, L H; Altaf, R; Harling, H

    2010-01-01

    tumours in the lower two thirds of the rectum and were referred for preoperative radiotherapy with 5 x 5 Gy. The inclusion period was 56 months. Radiotherapy data was retrospectively collected. RESULTS: Of the 520 patients, 514 completed radiotherapy and 506 had surgery. Surgery was considered curative......AIM: The purpose of this study was to analyse the results of preoperative short course radiotherapy in a consecutive, national cohort of patients with rectal cancer. METHODS: Through a validated, prospective national database we identified 520 Danish patients who presented with high-risk mobile...

  14. Hypofractionation in postmastectomy breast irradiation. How safe are we in using standard tangentials?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindhu Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of this study suggest that there would be a significant benefit of using 3DCRT FIF plans for patients being considered for hypofractionated radiotherapy in the postmastectomy setup.

  15. Short-Course Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Boost in Women With Stages 0 to IIIa Breast Cancer: A Phase 2 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlawat, Stuti; Haffty, Bruce G.; Goyal, Sharad; Kearney, Thomas; Kirstein, Laurie [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Jersey (United States); Chen, Chunxia; Moore, Dirk F. [Rutgers School of Public Health, Piscataway, New Jersey (United States); Khan, Atif J., E-mail: khanat@cinj.rutgers.edu [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Jersey (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Conventionally fractionated whole-breast irradiation (WBI) with a boost takes approximately 6 to 7 weeks. We evaluated a short course of hypofractionated (HF), accelerated WBI in which therapy was completed in 3 weeks inclusive of a sequential boost. Methods and Materials: We delivered a whole-breast dose of 36.63 Gy in 11 fractions of 3.33 Gy over 11 days, followed by a lumpectomy bed boost in 4 fractions of 3.33 Gy delivered once daily for a total of 15 treatment days. Acute toxicities were scored using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4. Late toxicities were scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scale. Cosmesis was scored using the Harvard Cosmesis Scale. Our primary endpoint was freedom from locoregional failure; we incorporated early stopping criteria based on predefined toxicity thresholds. Cosmesis was examined as a secondary endpoint. Results: We enrolled 83 women with stages 0 to IIIa breast cancer. After a median follow-up of 40 months, 2 cases of isolated ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence occurred (2 of 83; crude rate, 2.4%). Three-year estimated local recurrence-free survival was 95.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 87.8%-98.7%). The 3-year estimated distant recurrence-free survival was 97.3% (95% CI: 89.8%-99.3%). Three-year secondary malignancy-free survival was 94.3% (95% CI: 85.3%-97.8%). Twenty-nine patients (34%) had grade 2 acute toxicity, and 1 patient had a late grade 2 toxicity (fibrosis). One patient had acute grade 3 dermatitis, whereas 2 patients experienced grade 3 late skin toxicity. Ninety-four percent of evaluable patients had good or excellent cosmesis. Conclusions: Our phase 2 institutional study offers one of the shortest courses of HF therapy, delivered in 15 fractions inclusive of a sequential boost. We demonstrated expected low toxicity and high local control rates with good to excellent cosmetic outcomes. This

  16. Patterns of care and course of symptoms in palliative radiotherapy. A multicenter pilot study analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oorschot, Birgitt van [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schuler, Michael [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Psychotherapy and Medical Psychology; Simon, Anke [HELIOS Klinikum Erfurt (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Schleicher, Ursula [Center for Radiotherapy, Dueren (Germany); Geinitz, Hans [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiooncology

    2011-08-15

    To evaluate patterns of care as well as effectiveness and side effects of palliative treatment in four German radiation oncology departments. All referrals in four German radiation oncology departments (two university hospitals, one academic hospital, one private practice) were prospective documented for 1 month in 2008 (2 months at one of the university hospitals). In palliatively irradiated patients, treatment aims and indications as well as treated sites and fractionation schedules were recorded. In addition, symptoms and side effects were analyzed with standardized questionnaires before and at the end of radiotherapy. During the observation period, 603 patients underwent radiation therapy in the four centers and 153 (24%, study popu-lation) were treated with palliative intent. Within the study, patients were most frequently treated for bone (34%) or brain (27%) metastases. 62 patients reported severe or very severe pain, 12 patients reported severe or very severe dyspnea, 27 patients reported neurological deficits or signs of cranial pressure, and 43 patients reported a poor or very poor sense of well-being. The most frequent goals were symptom relief (53%) or prevention of symptoms (46%). Life prolongation was intended in 37% of cases. A wide range of fractionation schedules was applied with total doses ranging from 3-61.2 Gy. Of the patients, 73% received a slightly hypofractionated treatment schedule with doses of > 2.0 Gy to ? 3.0 Gy per fraction and 12% received moderate to highly hypofractionated therapy with doses of > 3.0 Gy to 8.0 Gy. Radiation therapy led to a significant improvement of well-being (35% of patients) and reduction of symptoms, especially with regard to pain (66%), dyspnea (61%), and neurological deficits (60%). Therapy was very well tolerated with only 4.5% grade I or II acute toxicities being observed. Unscheduled termination was observed in 19 patients (12%). Palliative radiation therapy is effective in reducing symptoms, increases

  17. Long-Term Health-Related Quality of Life in Patients With Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Short-Course and Long-Course (Chemo) Radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiltink, Lisette M.; Nout, Remi A.; van der Voort van Zyp, Jochem R N|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/326982728; Ceha, Heleen M.; Fiocco, Marta; Meershoek-Klein Kranenbarg, Elma; Marinelli, Andreas W K S; van de Velde, Cornelis J H; Marijnen, Corrie A M

    2016-01-01

    Background Both preoperative short-course radiotherapy (SC-PRT) and preoperative long-course chemo radiotherapy (CRT) have shown to reduce local recurrence rates after total mesorectal excision (TME), but neither resulted in improved survival. This study compared the long-term health-related quality

  18. [Survey of potential improvements during the course of the radiotherapy treatment--a patient questionnaire].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momm, Felix; Jooss, David; Xander, Carola J; Adebahr, Sonja; Duncker-Rohr, Viola; Heinemann, Felix; Kirste, Simon; Messmer, Marc-Benjamin; Grosu, Anca-Ligia; Becker, Gerhild

    2011-11-01

    In the context of quality assurance, increasing demands are placed on the whole radiotherapy treatment process. The patients directly concerned generally do not realize most aspects of the quality assurance program (e.g., additional safety checks) during their daily therapy. It was the aim of this study to systematically ask patients about potential improvements during the course of radiotherapy treatment from their own perspective. In the defined time span (1 month), 624 radiotherapy patients (600 questionnaires were returned, 96.2%) were interviewed using a questionnaire newly developed to inquire about several aspects of their treatment. Furthermore, they were asked for their specific needs and suggestions for improvements that could be made during the course of radiotherapy treatment. Overall, the patients were satisfied with the course of their radiotherapy treatment and with patient care. As an example, about 90% agreed with the statement: "My first contact with the radiation oncology unit proceeded with kindness and competence so that I was given the impression that I will be well cared for in this clinic." Considering the organization of the course of radiotherapy, a large majority of patients attached great value to set appointments for the therapy fractions. A main point of criticism was waiting times or delays caused by servicing or machine failures. Small, low cost improvements as music in the therapy room were considered as important as expensive measures (e.g., daylight in the therapy room). The patients emphasized the importance of staff friendliness. The situation of radiotherapy patients was, in general, satisfactory. Future improvements can be mainly expected from smooth organisation of both planning and treatment which can be achieved by electronic scheduling systems. Many results of the survey could be easily implemented in daily practice. In matters of organization radiation oncology with its complex procedures can be used as a model for other

  19. Characteristics of response of oral and pharyngeal mucosa in patients receiving chemo-IMRT for head and neck cancer using hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhide, Shreerang A; Gulliford, Sarah; Fowler, Jack; Rosenfelder, Nicola; Newbold, Katie; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M

    2010-01-01

    ... the radiation dose [11,15] . It is, therefore, important to study the radiobiology of acute radiation damage to mucosa of the upper aero-digestive tract, which results in significant morbidity and altered quality of life (QOL) during radiotherapy [13] . Although several studies using altered fractionation have been described in the literature, there is a ...

  20. Rectal Bleeding After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Combined With Hypofractionated External-Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer: The Relationship Between Dose-Volume Histogram Parameters and the Occurrence Rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okamoto, Masahiko, E-mail: masaoka@showa.gunma-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Ishikawa, Hitoshi; Ebara, Takeshi; Kato, Hiroyuki; Tamaki, Tomoaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Akimoto, Tetsuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Kazuto; Miyakubo, Mai; Yamamoto, Takumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro [Department of Urology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan); Takahashi, Takeo; Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Gunma (Japan)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To determine the predictive risk factors for Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for prostate cancer using dose-volume histogram analysis. Methods and Materials: The records of 216 patients treated with HDR-BT combined with EBRT were analyzed. The treatment protocols for HDR-BT were 5 Gy Multiplication-Sign five times in 3 days or 7 Gy Multiplication-Sign three, 10.5 Gy Multiplication-Sign two, or 9 Gy Multiplication-Sign two in 2 days. The EBRT doses ranged from 45 to 51 Gy with a fractional dose of 3 Gy. Results: In 20 patients Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding developed, and the cumulative incidence rate was 9% at 5 years. By converting the HDR-BT and EBRT radiation doses into biologic effective doses (BED), the BED{sub 3} at rectal volumes of 5% and 10% in the patients who experienced bleeding were significantly higher than those in the remaining 196 patients. Univariate analysis showed that a higher rectal BED{sub 3-5%} and the use of fewer needles in brachytherapy were correlated with the incidence of bleeding, but BED{sub 3-5%} was found to be the only significant factor on multivariate analysis. Conclusions: The radiation dose delivered to small rectal lesions as 5% is important for predicting Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after HDR-BT combined with EBRT for prostate cancer.

  1. Hypofractionated radiation therapy for prostate cancer: The McGill University Health Center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa Neto, O; Souhami, L; Faria, S

    2015-10-01

    In 2002, at the McGill University Health Centre, we began a program of hypofractionated radiotherapy for patients with low risk prostate cancer as an alternative to conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. Our initial hypofractionation regimen was 66 Gy given in 22 fractions, prescribed to the isocenter, delivered with 3D-conformal radiotherapy plan. The clinical target volume was the prostate gland and the planning target volume consisted of the clinical target volume plus a 7-mm margin in all directions. Hormonal therapy was not given to any patient. The long-term results for this group of patients confirmed the feasibility, good tolerance and excellent disease control of the regimen with the extra-benefit of being convenient to both patients and the health system by shortening treatment duration. The outcomes of this approach stimulated us to use hypofractionation in patients with intermediate-risk. Analysis of 100 intermediate-risk patients receiving our hypofractionated radiotherapy regimen (no hormones) shows, at median follow-up of 75 months, 8-year biochemical recurrence free and cancer specific survival rates of 90% and 95%, respectively, with acceptable toxicity. Our technique changed from 3D to intensity modulated radiotherapy with the dose adjusted to 60 Gy in 20 fractions. Lastly, we have expanded the program to high-risk patients where IMRT treatments are given to the pelvic nodes (44 Gy in 20 fractions) with a simultaneous integrated boost delivery to the prostate (60 Gy in the same 20 fractions). Our long-term results have shown that moderate hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer is safe and provides good tumor control comparable to high-dose conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. This hypofractionated regimen has been routinely used in our institution. Copyright © 2015 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Response to treatment and interval to surgery after preoperative short-course radiotherapy in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Cabezas, Sonia; Rodríguez-Liñán, Milagrosa; Otero-Romero, Ana M; Bueno-Serrano, Carmen M; Gómez-Barbadillo, José; Palacios-Eito, Amalia

    2016-10-01

    Preoperative short-course radiotherapy with immediate surgery improves local control in patients with rectal cancer. Tumor responses are smaller than those described with radiochemotherapy. Preliminary data associate this lower response to the short period until surgery. The aim of this study is to analyze the response to preoperative short-course radiotherapy and its correlation with the interval to surgery especially analyzing patients with mesorectal fascia involvement. A total of 155 patients with locally advanced rectal cancer treated with preoperative radiotherapy (5×5Gy) were retrospectively analyzed. Tumor response in terms of rates of complete pathological response, downstaging, tumor regression grading and status of the circumferential resection margin were quantified. The mean interval from radiotherapy to surgery was 23 days. The rate of complete pathological response was 2.2% and 28% experienced downstaging (stage decreased). No differences between these rates and interval to surgery were detected. Eighty-eight patients had magnetic resonance imaging for staging (in 31 patients the mesorectal fascia was involved).The mean time to surgery in patients with involvement of the fascia and R0 surgery was 27 days and 16 days if R1 (P=.016). The cutoff of 20 days reached the highest probability of achieving a free circumferential resection margin between patients with mesorectal fascia involvement, with no statistically significant differences: RR 3.036 95% CI=(0.691-13.328), P=.06. After preoperative short-course radiotherapy, an interval>20 days enhances the likelihood of achieving a free circumferential resection margin in patients with mesorectal fascia involvement. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. [Late course conformal radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy for stage III and IV a nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hua; Lin, Qing; Yu, Zhong-hua; Yang, Zhi-xiong; Feng, Li-ping

    2005-07-06

    To evaluate the effect and acute toxicity of late course conformal radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy for stage III and IV a nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Ninety-six patients with stage III and IV a NPC were randomly divided into 2 groups: test group (n = 46, undergoing late course conformal radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy) and control group (n = 50, undergoing conventional radiotherapy). Both groups were treated with one-period chemotherapy, including cisplantin, 5-fluouracil, and calcium folinate, before and after the radiotherapy. The radiotherapy of the test group consisted of 2 phases: 36.0 approximately 40.0 Gy in 18 approximately 20 fractions over 3.5-4 weeks as the first phase using conventional technique was delivered with 2 lateral opposing faciocervical fields, and then 30.0-46.0 Gy in 15-23 fractions over 3-4.5 weeks as the second phase using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). The rates of complete remission (CR), partial remission (PR), and no change (NC) of the test group were 95.65%, 4.35%, and 0, not significantly different from those in the control group (90.00%, 10.00%, and 0, P = 0.287). The 1-year survival rate of the test group was 100%, not significantly different from that of the control group (96.00%, P = 0.170). The nasopharyngeal 1 year control rate of the test group was 97.83%, significantly higher than that of the control group (78.00%, P = 0.03). The distant metastasis rate of the test group was 8.70%, not significantly different from that of the control group (12.00%, P = 0.596). The incidence rates of radiological caries and irradiation-induced otitis media in the test group was 4.25% and 17.39% respectively, both significantly lower than those in the control group (26.00% and 42.00% respectively, P = 0.004 and P = 0.000). There was no significant difference in the incidence of nausea, vomiting, leukopenia, and severity of acute mucositis between these 2 groups. Late course conformal radiotherapy

  4. Hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy in breast conservation for early-stage breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Luca F; Agarwal, Surbhi; Bickel, Kathleen E; Herchek, Haley A; Nalepinski, David C; Kapadia, Nirav S

    2017-04-01

    Breast conservation therapy (BCT) for early-stage breast cancer involves lumpectomy followed by whole breast radiotherapy, which can involve either standard fractionation (SRT) or accelerated fractionation (ART). This systematic review and meta-analysis was performed to determine whether any benefit exists for ART or SRT. We searched MEDLINE (1966-2014), all seven databases of the Cochrane Library (1968-2014), EMBASE (1974-2014), clinicaltrials.gov, ISRCTN, WHO ICTRP, and meeting abstracts in the Web of Science Core Collection (1900-2014). RCTs comparing SRT to ART among women undergoing BCT with stage T1-T2 and/or N1 breast cancer or carcinoma in situ were included. Follow-up was 30 days for acute toxicity, or three years for disease control and late toxicity. 13 trials with 8189 participants were included. No differences were observed in local failure (n = 7 trials; RR 0.97; 95% CI 0.78-1.19, I (2) = 0%), locoregional failure, (n = 8 trials; RR 0.86; 95% CI 0.63-1.16, I (2) = 0%), or survival (n = 4 trials; RR 1.00; 95% CI 0.85-1.17, I (2) = 0%). ART was associated with significantly less acute toxicity (n = 5 trials; RR 0.36; 95% CI 0.21-0.62, I (2) = 20%), but no difference in late cosmesis (RR 0.95; 95% CI 0.81-1.12, I (2) = 54%). ART use does not reduce disease control or worsen long-term cosmetic outcome, and may decrease the risk of acute radiation toxicity as compared to SRT.

  5. TH-E-BRF-01: Exploiting Tumor Shrinkage in Split-Course Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unkelbach, J; Craft, D; Hong, T; Papp, D; Wolfgang, J; Bortfeld, T [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Ramakrishnan, J [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Salari, E [Wichita State University, Wichita, KS (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In split-course radiotherapy, a patient is treated in several stages separated by weeks or months. This regimen has been motivated by radiobiological considerations. However, using modern image-guidance, it also provides an approach to reduce normal tissue dose by exploiting tumor shrinkage. In this work, we consider the optimal design of split-course treatments, motivated by the clinical management of large liver tumors for which normal liver dose constraints prohibit the administration of an ablative radiation dose in a single treatment. Methods: We introduce a dynamic tumor model that incorporates three factors: radiation induced cell kill, tumor shrinkage, and tumor cell repopulation. The design of splitcourse radiotherapy is formulated as a mathematical optimization problem in which the total dose to the liver is minimized, subject to delivering the prescribed dose to the tumor. Based on the model, we gain insight into the optimal administration of radiation over time, i.e. the optimal treatment gaps and dose levels. Results: We analyze treatments consisting of two stages in detail. The analysis confirms the intuition that the second stage should be delivered just before the tumor size reaches a minimum and repopulation overcompensates shrinking. Furthermore, it was found that, for a large range of model parameters, approximately one third of the dose should be delivered in the first stage. The projected benefit of split-course treatments in terms of liver sparing depends on model assumptions. However, the model predicts large liver dose reductions by more than a factor of two for plausible model parameters. Conclusion: The analysis of the tumor model suggests that substantial reduction in normal tissue dose can be achieved by exploiting tumor shrinkage via an optimal design of multi-stage treatments. This suggests taking a fresh look at split-course radiotherapy for selected disease sites where substantial tumor regression translates into reduced

  6. Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Sonja; Debus, Jürgen; Neuhof, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Solitary plasmocytoma occurring in bone (solitary plasmocytoma of the bone, SBP) or in soft tissue (extramedullary plasmocytoma, EP) can be treated effectively and with little toxicity by local radiotherapy. Ten-year local control rates of up to 90% can be achieved. Patients with multiple myeloma often suffer from symptoms such as pain or neurological impairments that are amenable to palliative radiotherapy. In a palliative setting, short treatment schedules and lower radiation doses are used to reduce toxicity and duration of hospitalization. In future, low-dose total body irradiation (TBI) may play a role in a potentially curative regimen with nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by allogenic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

  7. The use of hypofractionated intensity-modulated irradiation in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme: preliminary results of a prospective trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultanem, Khalil; Patrocinio, Horacio; Lambert, Christine; Corns, Robert; Leblanc, Richard; Parker, William; Shenouda, George; Souhami, Luis

    2004-01-01

    Despite major advances in treatment modalities, the prognosis of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains poor. Exploring hypofractionated regimens to replace the standard 6-week radiotherapy schedule is an attractive strategy as an attempt to prevent accelerated tumor cell repopulation. There is equally interest in dose escalation to the gross tumor volume where the majority of failures occur. We report our preliminary results using hypofractionated intensity-modulated accelerated radiotherapy regimen in the treatment of patients with GBM. Between July 1998 and December 2001, 25 patients with histologically proven diagnosis of GBM, Karnofsky performance status > or =60, and a postoperative tumor volume < or =110 cm3 were treated with a hypofractionated accelerated course of radiotherapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV) was defined as the contrast-enhancing lesion on the postoperative MRI T1-weighted images with the latter fused with computed tomography images for treatment planning. The planning target volume was defined as GTV + 1.5-cm margin. Using forward-planning intensity modulation (step-and-shoot technique), 60 Gy in 20 daily fractions of 3 Gy each were given to the GTV, whereas the planning target volume received a minimum of 40 Gy in 20 fractions of 2 Gy each at its periphery. Treatments were delivered over a 4-week period using 5 daily fractions per week. Dose was prescribed at the isocenter (ICRU point). Three beam angles were used in all of the cases. Treatments were well tolerated. Acute toxicity was limited to increased brain edema during radiotherapy in 2 patients who were on tapering doses of corticosteroids. This was corrected by increasing the steroid dose. At a median follow-up of 8.8 months, no late toxicity was observed. One patient experienced visual loss at 9 months after completion of treatment. MRI suggested nonspecific changes to the optic chiasm. On review of the treatment plan, the total dose to the optic chiasm was confirmed to

  8. Short course radiotherapy with simultaneous integrated boost for stage I-II breast cancer, early toxicities of a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background TomoBreast is a unicenter, non-blinded randomized trial comparing conventional radiotherapy (CR) vs. hypofractionated Tomotherapy (TT) for post-operative treatment of breast cancer. The purpose of the trial is to compare whether TT can reduce heart and pulmonary toxicity. We evaluate early toxicities. Methods The trial started inclusion in May 2007 and reached its recruitment in August 2011. Women with stage T1-3N0M0 or T1-2N1M0 breast cancer completely resected by tumorectomy (BCS) or by mastectomy (MA) who consented to participate were randomized, according to a prescribed computer-generated randomization schedule, between control arm of CR 25x2 Gy/5 weeks by tangential fields on breast/chest wall, plus supraclavicular-axillary field if node-positive, and sequential boost 8x2 Gy/2 weeks if BCS (cumulative dose 66 Gy/7 weeks), versus experimental TT arm of 15x2.8 Gy/3 weeks, including nodal areas if node-positive and simultaneous integrated boost of 0.6 Gy if BCS (cumulative dose 51 Gy/3 weeks). Outcomes evaluated were the pulmonary and heart function. Comparison of proportions used one-sided Fisher's exact test. Results By May 2010, 70 patients were randomized and had more than 1 year of follow-up. Out of 69 evaluable cases, 32 were assigned to CR (21 BCS, 11 MA), 37 to TT (20 BCS, 17 MA). Skin toxicity of grade ≥1 at 2 years was 60% in CR, vs. 30% in TT arm. Heart function showed no significant difference for left ventricular ejection fraction at 2 years, CR 4.8% vs. TT 4.6%. Pulmonary function tests at 2 years showed grade ≥1 decline of FEV1 in 21% of CR, vs. 15% of TT and decline of DLco in 29% of CR, vs. 7% of TT (P = 0.05). Conclusions There were no unexpected severe toxicities. Short course radiotherapy of the breast with simultaneous integrated boost over 3 weeks proved feasible without excess toxicities. Pulmonary tests showed a slight trend in favor of Tomotherapy, which will need confirmation with longer

  9. SU-E-T-776: Use of Quality Metrics for a New Hypo-Fractionated Pre-Surgical Mesothelioma Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, S; Mehta, V [Swedish Cancer Institute, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The “SMART” (Surgery for Mesothelioma After Radiation Therapy) approach involves hypo-fractionated radiotherapy of the lung pleura to 25Gy over 5 days followed by surgical resection within 7. Early clinical results suggest that this approach is very promising, but also logistically challenging due to the multidisciplinary involvement. Due to the compressed schedule, high dose, and shortened planning time, the delivery of the planned doses were monitored for safety with quality metric software. Methods: Hypo-fractionated IMRT treatment plans were developed for all patients and exported to Quality Reports™ software. Plan quality metrics or PQMs™ were created to calculate an objective scoring function for each plan. This allows for an objective assessment of the quality of the plan and a benchmark for plan improvement for subsequent patients. The priorities of various components were incorporated based on similar hypo-fractionated protocols such as lung SBRT treatments. Results: Five patients have been treated at our institution using this approach. The plans were developed, QA performed, and ready within 5 days of simulation. Plan Quality metrics utilized in scoring included doses to OAR and target coverage. All patients tolerated treatment well and proceeded to surgery as scheduled. Reported toxicity included grade 1 nausea (n=1), grade 1 esophagitis (n=1), grade 2 fatigue (n=3). One patient had recurrent fluid accumulation following surgery. No patients experienced any pulmonary toxicity prior to surgery. Conclusion: An accelerated course of pre-operative high dose radiation for mesothelioma is an innovative and promising new protocol. Without historical data, one must proceed cautiously and monitor the data carefully. The development of quality metrics and scoring functions for these treatments allows us to benchmark our plans and monitor improvement. If subsequent toxicities occur, these will be easy to investigate and incorporate into the

  10. A national cohort study of long-course preoperative radiotherapy in primary fixed rectal cancer in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bülow, S; Jensen, L H; Altaf, R

    2010-01-01

    -7%), and the actuarial distant recurrence rate was 41% (95% CI: 35-47%). The cumulative 5-year disease-free survival was 27% (95% CI: 22-32%) and overall 5-year survival was 34% (95% CI: 29-39%). CONCLUSIONS: This study is the first population-based report on outcome of preoperative long-course radiotherapy in a large......OBJECTIVE: Preoperative radiotherapy has been shown to enable a fixed rectal cancer to become resectable which in turn may result in long-time survival. In this study, we analysed the outcome of long-course preoperative radiotherapy in fixed rectal cancer in a national cohort including all Danish...... patients registered with primary inoperable rectal cancer and treated in the period May 2001 to December 2005. METHOD: The study was based on surgical and demographic data from a continuously updated and validated national database. In addition, retrospective data were retrieved from all departments...

  11. Accelerated hypofractionated adjuvant whole breast radiation with simultaneous integrated boost using volumetric modulated arc therapy for early breast cancer: A phase I/II dosimetric and clinical feasibility study from a tertiary cancer care centre of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodul Mondal

    2017-03-01

    Mini abstract: Simultaneous integrated boost with accelerated hypofractionated whole breast radiotherapy using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy is a novel approach. Patient selection and technical considerations are of paramount importance. The present study describes successful implementation of this approach.

  12. Comparison of preoperative short-course radiotherapy and long-course radiochemotherapy for locally advanced rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guckenberger, M.; Saur, G.; Wehner, D.; Sweeney, R.A.; Flentje, M. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Thalheimer, A.; Germer, C.T. [Universitaetsklinikum Wuerzburg (Germany). Chirurgische Klinik I

    2012-07-15

    Background: The purpose of this work was to perform a single institution comparison between preoperative short-course radiotherapy (SC-RT) and long-course radiochemotherapy (LC-RCHT) for locally advanced rectal cancer. Methods: A total of 225 patients with clinical stage UICC II-III rectal cancer were treated with SC-RT (29 Gy in 10 twice daily fractions followed by immediate surgery; n = 108) or LC-RCHT (54 Gy in 28 fractions with simultaneous 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) {+-} oxaliplatin chemotherapy followed by delayed surgery; n = 117). All patients in the LC-RCHT cohort and patients in the SC-RT with pathological UICC stage {>=} II received adjuvant chemotherapy. Before 2004, the standard of care was SC-RT with LC-RCHT reserved for patients where downstaging was considered as required for sphincter preservation or curative resection. In the later period, SC-RT was practiced only for patients unfit for radiochemotherapy. Results: Patients in the LC-RCHT cohort had a significantly higher proportion of cT4 tumors, clinical node positivity, and lower tumor location. The 5-year local control (LC) and overall survival (OS) were 91% and 66% without differences between the SC-RT and LC-RCHT groups. Acute toxicity was increased during LC-RCHT (grade {>=} II 1% vs. 33%) and there were no differences in postoperative complications. Severe late toxicity grade {>=} III was increased after SC-RT (12% vs. 3%). Of patients aged > 80 years, 7 of 7 patients and 4 of 9 patients received curative surgery after SC-RT and LC-RCHT, respectively. Conclusion: Despite the fact that patients with worse prognostic factors were treated with LC-RCHT, there were no significant differences in LC and OS between the SC-RT and LC-RCHT group. Age > 80 years was identified as a significant risk factor for LC-RCHT and these patients could be treated preferably with SC-RT. (orig.)

  13. Experience of Low-Dose, Short-Course Palliative Radiotherapy for Bleeding from Unresectable Gastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Hideaki; Uno, Koji; Yasuda, Kenjiro; Yamashita, Masato

    2017-02-01

    The optimal regimen of radiotherapy (RT) for bleeding from gastric cancer (GC) has not yet been established. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of low-dose, short-course palliative RT (LSP-RT) for bleeding from GC. We reviewed the clinical data of 18 patients (26 courses) who received palliative RT for bleeding from GC between 2004 and 2014. The radiation dose was 6 Gy in three fractions. The total courses of RT for each patient were 1-4 (median, 1). The treatment success rate of the first and the additional RT at two weeks after RT was 55% and 75%, respectively. Regarding first RT, there was a statistically significant increase in the mean hemoglobin level for one month (p = 0.009) and a significant decrease in the mean number of transfused red blood cell units for one month (p = 0.012). Toxicities were observed in two patients: one patient who received chemotherapy developed grade 3 afebrile leukocytopenia and another who had a malignant stricture suffered from a gastric obstruction. The performance status was improved in 3 of the 12 evaluable patients (25%) and dietary intake became possible one month after RT in three of the four patients who had not been able to eat before RT. LSP-RT is expected to be not only an effective and safe treatment option for bleeding from GC, but also repeatable in cases of rebleeding. Furthermore, this treatment modality may be able to improve the patient's quality of life.

  14. Short-Course Accelerated Radiotherapy in Palliative Treatment of Advanced Pelvic Malignancies: A Phase I Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravatta, Luciana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Padula, Gilbert D.A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Lacks Cancer Center Saint Mary' s Health Care, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Macchia, Gabriella, E-mail: gmacchia@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Ferrandina, Gabriella [Department of Gynecologic Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Bonomo, Pierluigi; Deodato, Francesco; Massaccesi, Mariangela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Mignogna, Samantha; Tambaro, Rosa [Department of Palliative Therapies, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Rossi, Marco [Department of Anaesthesia, Intensive Care, and Pain Medicine, Fondazione di Ricercae Cura ' Giovanni Paolo II,' Universita Cattolica del S. Cuore, Campobasso (Italy); Flocco, Mariano [' Madre Teresa di Calcutta' Hospice, Larino (Italy); Scapati, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, ' San Francesco' Hospital, Nuoro (Italy); and others

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To define the maximum tolerated dose of a conformal short-course accelerated radiotherapy in patients with symptomatic advanced pelvic cancer. Methods and Materials: A phase I trial in 3 dose-escalation steps was designed: 14 Gy (3.5-Gy fractions), 16 Gy (4-Gy fractions), and 18 Gy (4.5-Gy fractions). The eligibility criteria included locally advanced and/or metastatic pelvic cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of {<=}3. Treatment was delivered in 2 days with twice-daily fractionation and at least an 8-hour interval. Patients were treated in cohorts of 6-12 to define the maximum tolerated dose. The dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any acute toxicity of grade 3 or greater, using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Pain was recorded using a visual analog scale. The effect on quality of life was evaluated according to Cancer Linear Analog Scale (CLAS). Results: Of the 27 enrolled patients, 11 were male and 16 were female, with a median age of 72 years (range 47-86). The primary tumor sites were gynecologic (48%), colorectal (33.5%), and genitourinary (18.5%). The most frequent baseline symptoms were bleeding (48%) and pain (33%). Only grade 1-2 acute toxicities were recorded. No patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity. With a median follow-up time of 6 months (range 3-28), no late toxicities were observed. The overall (complete plus partial) symptom remission was 88.9% (95% confidence interval 66.0%-97.8%). Five patients (41.7%) had complete pain relief, and six (50%) showed >30% visual analog scale reduction. The overall response rate for pain was 91.67% (95% confidence interval 52.4%-99.9%). Conclusions: Conformal short course radiotherapy in twice-daily fractions for 2 consecutive days was well tolerated up to a total dose of 18 Gy. A phase II study is ongoing to confirm the efficacy on symptom control and quality of life indexes.

  15. Radiotherapy for diffuse brainstem glioma in children and young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xin; Fang, Yuan; Hui, Xuhui; Jv, Yan; You, Chao

    2016-06-27

    Interventions. We identified two RCTs that fulfilled our inclusion criteria. The two trials tested different comparisons.One multi-institutional RCT included 130 participants and compared hyperfractionated radiotherapy (six-week course with twice a day treatment of 117 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 7020 cGy) with conventional radiotherapy (six-week course with once a day treatment of 180 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 5400 cGy). The median time overall survival (OS) was 8.5 months in the conventional group and 8.0 months in the hyperfractionated group. We detected no clear evidence of effect on OS or event-free survival (EFS) in participants receiving hyperfractionated radiotherapy compared with conventional radiotherapy (OS: hazard ratio (HR) 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.75 to 1.53; EFS: HR 1.26, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.90). Radiological response (risk ratio (RR) 0.94, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.63) and various types of toxicities were similar in the two groups. There was no information on other outcomes. According to the GRADE approach, we judged the quality of evidence to be low (i.e. further research is very likely to have an important impact on our confidence in the estimate of effect and is likely to change the estimate) for OS and EFS, and very low (i.e. we are very uncertain about the estimate) for radiological response and toxicities.The second RCT included 71 participants and compared hypofractionated radiotherapy (39 Gy in 13 fractions over 2.6 weeks, 3 Gy per fraction) with conventional radiotherapy (54 Gy in 30 fractions over six weeks, 1.8 Gy per fraction). This trial reported a median OS of 7.8 months for the hypofractionated group and 9.5 months for the conventional group. It reported a progression-free survival (PFS) of 6.3 months for the hypofractionated group and 7.3 months for the conventional group. We found no clear evidence of effect on OS (HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.53 to 2.01) or PFS (HR 1.19, 95% CI 0.63 to 2.22) in participants receiving hypofractionated

  16. Hypofractionated electron-beam radiation therapy for keloids: retrospective study of 568 cases with 834 lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jie; Lian, Xin; Sun, Yuliang; Wang, Xiaojun; Hu, Ke; Hou, Xiaorong; Sun, Shuai; Yan, Junfang; Yu, Lang; Sun, Xiansong; Li, Wenbo; Wang, Xinhai; Guan, Qiu; Pang, Tingtian; Zhang, Fuquan

    2015-09-01

    We aimed to analyze the outcomes of hypofractionated high-energy electron beam radiotherapy for the treatment of keloids. From February 1998 to January 2012, 568 patients with a total of 834 keloids underwent radiotherapy: 826 lesions with postoperative radiotherapy, and 36 with skin-grafting. Lesion size was >5 cm in 335 keloids. An electron-beam of 6 or 7 MeV was used, with a total dose of 18 Gy (two fractions with a 1-week interval) covering the lesion with a 1-cm margin. The time between surgery and radiotherapy was 24-48 h. Skin-grafted patients underwent radiotherapy 10-15 days after the operation. The median follow-up was 40 months (range: 12-160 months). The local control rate was 88.25% (736/834). The relapse rate was 9.59% (80/834), and the time to relapse was 6-28 months (median: 12 months). Univariate analyses showed that gender, age, keloid size, keloid site, skin grafting, and operation-to-irradiation interval influenced the local control rate. Multivariate analysis showed that the relapse rate was correlated with gender (P = 0.048), age (P irradiation interval (P electron beam radiotherapy for keloids yielded excellent outcomes, especially in cases without skin grafting. Early postoperative radiotherapy with limited hypofractionation could be a good choice for keloid treatment. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  17. Time course and predictive factors for lung volume reduction following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of lung tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Binkley, Michael S.; Shrager, Joseph B.; Chaudhuri, Aadel; Popat, Rita; Maxim, Peter G.; Shultz, David Benjamin; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Stereotactic ablative volume reduction (SAVR) is a potential alternative to lung-volume reduction surgery in patients with severe emphysema and excessive surgical risk. Having previously observed a dose-volume response for localized lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung tumors, we investigated the time course and factors associated with volume reduction. Methods We retrospectively identified 70 eligible patients receiving lung tumor SABR du...

  18. Adoption of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer After Publication of Randomized Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Falchook, Aaron D.; Hendrix, Laura H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Curry, Heather [Radiation Oncology, Eviti, Inc, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen, Ronald C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: Large randomized trials have established the noninferiority of shorter courses of “hypofractionated” radiation therapy (RT) to the whole breast compared to conventional courses using smaller daily doses in the adjuvant treatment of selected breast cancer patients undergoing lumpectomy. Hypofractionation is more convenient and less costly. Therefore, we sought to determine uptake of hypofractionated breast RT over time. Methods and Materials: In the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER)-Medicare-linked database, we identified 16,096 women with node-negative breast cancer and 4269 with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) who received lumpectomy followed by more than 12 fractions of RT between 2004 and 2010. Based on Medicare claims, we determined the number of RT treatments given and grouped patients into those receiving hypofractionation (13-24) or those receiving conventional fractionation (≥25). We also determined RT technique (intensity modulated RT or not) using Medicare claims. We evaluated patterns and correlates of hypofractionation receipt using bivariate and multivariable analyses. Results: Hypofractionation use was similar in patients with DCIS and those with invasive disease. Overall, the use of hypofractionation increased from 3.8% in 2006 to 5.4% in 2007, to 9.4% in 2008, and to 13.6% in 2009 and 2010. Multivariable analysis showed increased use of hypofractionation in recent years and in patients with older age, smaller tumors, increased comorbidity, higher regional education, and Western SEER regions. However, even in patients over the age of 80, the hypofractionation rate in 2009 to 2010 was only 25%. Use of intensity modulated RT (IMRT) also increased over time (from 9.4% in 2004 to 22.7% in 2009-2010) and did not vary significantly between patients receiving hypofractionation and those receiving traditional fractionation. Conclusions: Hypofractionation use increased among low-risk older US breast cancer patients with

  19. Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery in a Large Bilateral Thalamic and Basal Ganglia Arteriovenous Malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janet Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs in the basal ganglia and thalamus have a more aggressive natural history with a higher morbidity and mortality than AVMs in other locations. Optimal treatment—complete obliteration without new neurological deficits—is often challenging. We present a patient with a large bilateral basal ganglia and thalamic AVM successfully treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery (HFSRS with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT. Methods. The patient was treated with hypofractionated stereotactic radiosurgery to 30 Gy at margin in 5 fractions of 9 static fields with a minimultileaf collimator and intensity modulated radiotherapy. Results. At 10 months following treatment, digital subtraction angiography showed complete obliteration of the AVM. Conclusions. Large bilateral thalamic and basal ganglia AVMs can be successfully treated with complete obliteration by HFSRS with IMRT with relatively limited toxicity. Appropriate caution is recommended.

  20. Comparison of short-course versus long-course whole-brain radiotherapy in the treatment of brain metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rades, Dirk; Bohlen, Guenther; Dunst, Juergen; Lohynska, Radka; Veninga, Theo; Stalpers, Lukas; Schild, Steven E.; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen

    2008-01-01

    Whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) is the most common treatment for brain metastases. Most of these patients have a poor survival prognosis. Therefore, a short radiation program is preferred, if it provides a similar outcome as longer programs. This study compares 20 Gy in five fractions (treatment

  1. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for liver metastases. A retrospective analysis of 74 patients treated in the Klinikum rechts der Isar Munich; Die hypofraktionierte, stereotaktische Strahlentherapie von Lebermetastasen. Eine retrospektive Analyse von 74 Patienten des Klinikums rechts der Isar Muenchen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heppt, Franz Johannes

    2013-06-12

    Purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of liver metastases and prognostic factors for local control and overall survival. From 2000 to 2009 74 patients with 91 metastases were treated at the Department for Radiation Therapy and Oncology (TU Muenchen). With an observed local control rate of 75% after 1 year, SBRT proved as an effective local treatment option. Unfortunately, systemic tumor progression still dominates long term survival in many patients.

  2. IMRT with Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High Risk Malignant Salivary Gland Malignancies : A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana D Karam

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Patients with high risk salivary gland malignancies are at increased risk of local failure. We present our institutional experience with dose escalation using hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT in a subset of this rare disease. Over the course of 9 years, 10 patients presenting with skull base invasion, gross disease with one or more adverse features, or those treated with adjuvant radiation with three or more pathologic features were treated with intensity modulated radiation therapy followed by hypofractionated SBRT boost. Patients presented with variable tumor histologies, and in all but one, the tumors were classified as poorly differentiated high grade. Four patients had gross disease, 3 had gross residual disease, 3 had skull base invasion, and 2 patients had rapidly recurrent disease (≤ 6 months that had been previously treated with surgical resection. The median Stereotactic Radiosurgery boost dose was 17.5 Gy (range 10-30 Gy given in a median of 5 fractions (range 3-6 fractions for a total median cumulative dose of 81.2 Gy (range 73.2-95.6 Gy. The majority of the patients received platinum based concurrent chemotherapy with their radiation. At a median follow-up of 32 months (range 12-120 for all patients and 43 months for surviving patients (range 12-120, actuarial 3-year locoregional control, distant control, progression free survival, and overall survival were 88%, 81%, 68%, and 79%, respectively. Only one patient failed locally and two failed distantly. Serious late toxicity included graft ulceration in 1 patient and osteoradionecrosis in another patient, both of which underwent surgical reconstruction. Six patients developed fibrosis. In a subset of patients with salivary gland malignancies with skull base invasion, gross disease, or those treated adjuvantly with three or more adverse pathologic features, hypofractionated SBRT boost to Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy yields good local control rates and

  3. Survey of potential improvements during the course of the radiotherapy treatment. A patient questionnaire; Erfassung moeglicher Verbesserungen im Ablauf der Strahlentherapie. Eine Patientenbefragung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Momm, Felix; Jooss, David; Adebahr, Sonja; Duncker-Rohr, Viola; Heinemann, Felix; Kirste, Simon; Messmer, Marc-Benjamin; Grosu, Anca-Ligia [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Xander, Carola J.; Becker, Gerhild [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany). Palliativeinheit

    2011-11-15

    In the context of quality assurance, increasing demands are placed on the whole radiotherapy treatment process. The patients directly concerned generally do not realize most aspects of the quality assurance program (e.g., additional safety checks) during their daily therapy. It was the aim of this study to systematically ask patients about potential improvements during the course of radiotherapy treatment from their own perspective. In the defined time span (1 month), 624 radiotherapy patients (600 questionnaires were returned, 96.2%) were interviewed using a questionnaire newly developed to inquire about several aspects of their treatment. Furthermore, they were asked for their specific needs and suggestions for improvements that could be made during the course of radiotherapy treatment. Overall, the patients were satisfied with the course of their radiotherapy treatment and with patient care. As an example, about 90% agreed with the statement: ''My first contact with the radiation oncology unit proceeded with kindness and competence so that I was given the impression that I will be well cared for in this clinic.'' Considering the organization of the course of radiotherapy, a large majority of patients attached great value to set appointments for the therapy fractions. A main point of criticism was waiting times or delays caused by servicing or machine failures. Small, low cost improvements as music in the therapy room were considered as important as expensive measures (e.g., daylight in the therapy room). The patients emphasized the importance of staff friendliness. The situation of radiotherapy patients was, in general, satisfactory. Future improvements can be mainly expected from smooth organisation of both planning and treatment which can be achieved by electronic scheduling systems. Many results of the survey could be easily implemented in daily practice. In matters of organization radiation oncology with its complex procedures can be used

  4. Role of the Technical Aspects of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Treatment of Prostate Cancer: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemente, Stefania, E-mail: clemente_stefania@libero.it [Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata Rionero in Vulture, Potenza (Italy); Nigro, Roberta [Azienda Sanitaria Locale Rieti, Roma (Italy); Oliviero, Caterina [Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata Rionero in Vulture, Potenza (Italy); Marchioni, Chiara [Azienda Sanitaria Locale Rieti, Roma (Italy); Esposito, Marco [Azienda Sanitaria, Firenze (Italy); Giglioli, Francesca Romana [Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Torino (Italy); Mancosu, Pietro [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Marino, Carmelo [Humanitas Centro Catanese di Oncologia, Catania (Italy); Russo, Serenella [Azienda Sanitaria, Firenze (Italy); Stasi, Michele [Azienda Ospedaliera Ordine Mauriziano di Torino, Torino (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Veronese, Ivan [Universita' degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Landoni, Valeria [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena, Roma (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of moderate (<35 fractions) and extreme (<5 fractions) hypofractionated radiation therapy in prostate cancer is yielding favorable results, both in terms of maintained biochemical response and toxicity. Several hypofractionation (HF) schemes for the treatment of prostate cancer are available, although there is considerable variability in the techniques used to manage intra-/interfraction motion and deliver radiation doses. We performed a review of the published studies on HF regimens as a topic of interest for the Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy working group, which is part of the Italian Association of Medical Physics. Aspects of organ motion management (imaging for contouring, target volume definition, and rectum/bladder preparation) and treatment delivery (prostate localization, image guided radiation therapy strategy and frequency) were evaluated and categorized to assess outcome relative to disease control and toxicity. Despite the heterogeneity of the data, some interesting trends that emerged from the review might be useful in identifying an optimum HF strategy.

  5. Time course and predictive factors for lung volume reduction following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, Michael S; Shrager, Joseph B; Chaudhuri, Aadel; Popat, Rita; Maxim, Peter G; Shultz, David Benjamin; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W

    2016-03-15

    Stereotactic ablative volume reduction (SAVR) is a potential alternative to lung-volume reduction surgery in patients with severe emphysema and excessive surgical risk. Having previously observed a dose-volume response for localized lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung tumors, we investigated the time course and factors associated with volume reduction. We retrospectively identified 70 eligible patients receiving lung tumor SABR during 2007-2013. We correlated lobar volume reduction (relative to total, bilateral lung volume [TLV]) with volume receiving high biologically effective doses (VXXBED3) and other pre-treatment factors in all patients, and measured the time course of volume changes on 3-month interval CT scans in patients with large V60BED3 (n = 21, V60BED3 ≥4.1 % TLV). Median CT follow-up was 15 months. Median volume reduction of treated lobes was 4.5 % of TLV (range 0.01-13.0 %), or ~9 % of ipsilateral lung volume (ILV); median expansion of non-target adjacent lobes was 2.2 % TLV (-4.6-9.9 %; ~4 % ILV). Treated lobe volume reduction was significantly greater with larger VXXBED3 (XX = 20-100 Gy, R (2) = 0.52-0.55, p volume reduction was reached by ~12 months and persisted. We identified a multivariable model for lobar volume reduction after SABR incorporating dose-volume and pre-treatment FEV1% and characterized its time course.

  6. Predicting Rectal and Bladder Overdose During the Course of Prostate Radiotherapy Using Dose-Volume Data From Initial Treatment Fractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murthy, Vedang, E-mail: vmurthy@actrec.gov.in [Department of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital and Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai (India); Shukla, Pragya; Adurkar, Pranjal; Master, Zubin; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyamkishore [Department of Radiation Oncology and Medical Physics, Tata Memorial Hospital and Advanced Centre for Treatment, Research and Education in Cancer (ACTREC), Tata Memorial Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether information from the initial fractions can determine which patients are likely to consistently exceed their planning dose-volume constraints during the course of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Ten patients with high-risk prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy to a dose of 60 Gy in 20 fractions. The prostate, rectum, and bladder were recontoured on their daily megavoltage computed tomography scans and the dose was recalculated. The bladder and rectal volumes (in mL) receiving {>=}100% and {>=}70% of the prescribed dose in each fraction and in the original plans were recorded. A fraction for which the difference between planned and delivered was more than 2 mL was considered a volume failure. Similarly if the difference in the planned and delivered maximum dose (D{sub max}) was {>=}1% for the rectum and bladder, the fraction was considered a dose failure. Each patient's first 3 to 5 fractions were analyzed to determine if they correctly identified those patients who would consistently fail (i.e., {>=}20% of fractions) during the course of their radiotherapy. Results: Six parameters were studied; the rectal volume (RV) and bladder volumes (BV) (in mL) received {>=}100% and {>=}70% of the prescribed dose and maximum dose to 2 mL of the rectum and bladder. This was given by RV{sub 100}, RV{sub 70}, BV{sub 100}, BV{sub 70}, RD{sub max}, and BD{sub max}, respectively. When more than 1 of the first 3 fractions exceed the planning constraint as defined, it accurately predicts consistent failures through the course of the treatment. This method is able to correctly identify the consistent failures about 80% (RV{sub 70}, BV{sub 100}, and RV{sub 100}), 90% (BV{sub 70}), and 100% (RD{sub max} and BD{sub max}) of the times. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the feasibility of a method accurately identifying patients who are likely to consistently exceed the planning constraints during the course of

  7. The Role of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy with Photons, Protons and Heavy Ions for Treating Extracranial Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron Michael Laine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the ability to deliver large doses of ionizing radiation to a tumor has been limited by radiation induced toxicity to normal surrounding tissues. This was the initial impetus for the development of conventionally fractionated radiation therapy, where large volumes of healthy tissue received radiation and were allowed the time to repair the radiation damage. However, advances in radiation delivery techniques and image guidance have allowed for more ablative doses of radiation to be delivered in a very accurate, conformal and safe manner with shortened fractionation schemes. Hypofractionated regimens with photons have already transformed how certain tumor types are treated with radiation therapy. Additionally, hypofractionation is able to deliver a complete course of ablative radiation therapy over a shorter period of time compared to conventional fractionation regimens making treatment more convenient to the patient and potentially more cost-effective. Recently there has been an increased interest in proton therapy because of the potential further improvement in dose distributions achievable due to their unique physical characteristics. Furthermore, with heavier ions the dose conformality is increased and in addition there is potentially a higher biological effectiveness compared to protons and photons. Due to the properties mentioned above, charged particle therapy has already become an attractive modality to further investigate the role of hypofractionation in the treatment of various tumors. This review will discuss the rationale and evolution of hypofractionated radiation therapy, the reported clinical success with initially photon and then charged particle modalities, and further potential implementation into treatment regimens going forward.

  8. Quality controls in radiotherapy. From experiences of the first course-debate; Controlli di qualita' in radioterapia. Dalle esperienze del primo corso-dibattito

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosi, A.; Viti, V. [Istituto Superiore di Sanita' , Laboratorio di Fisica, Rome (Italy)

    2000-07-01

    The document reports the main issues discussed during the first course-debate on quality controls in radiotherapy, held in Rome in December 3-4, 1998 and May 3-5 1999 in collaboration between the Istituto Superiore di Sanita' and the Istituto Regina Elena. The points considered critical to the quality assurance in radiotherapy by the participants are presented in relation to the total radiotherapy procedure. [Italian] Questo documento e' dedicato al primo corso-dibattito sui controlli di qualita' in radioterapia svoltosi a Roma il 3-4 dicembre 1998 e il 3-5 maggio 1999 in collaborazione tra l'Istituto Superiore di Sanita' e l'Istituto Regina Elena. Esso presenta gli argomenti ritenuti critici per l'assicurazione di qualita' in radioterapia in relazione all'intera procedura radioterapica, in base alle esperienze dei partecipanti.

  9. Absence of toxicity with hypofractionated 3-dimensional radiation therapy for inoperable, early stage non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vuong Te

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Hypofractionated radiotherapy may overcome repopulation in rapidly proliferating tumors such as lung cancer. It is more convenient for the patients and reduces health care costs. This study reports our results on patients with medically inoperable, early stage, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC treated with hypofractionation. Materials and methods Stage T1-2N0 NSCLC patients were treated with hypofractionation alone, 52.5 Gy/15 fractions, in 3 weeks, with 3-dimensional conformal planning. T1-2N1 patients with the hilar lymphnode close to the primary tumor were also eligible for this treatment. We did not use any approach to reduce respiratory motion, but it was monitored in all patients. Elective nodal radiotherapy was not performed. Routine follow up included assessment for acute and late toxicity and radiological tumor response. Median follow up time was 29 months for the surviving patients. Results Thirty-two patients with a median age of 76 years, T1 = 15 and T2 = 17, were treated. Median planning target volume (PTV volume was 150cc and median V16 of both lungs was 13%. The most important finding of this study is that toxicity was minimal. Two patients had grade ≤ 2 acute pneumonitis and 3 had mild (grade 1 acute esophagitis. There was no late toxicity. Actuarial 1 and 2-year overall survival rates are 78% and 56%, cancer specific survival rates (CSS are 90% and 74%, and local relapse free survival rates are 93% and 76% respectively. Conclusion 3-D planning, involved field hypofractionation at a dose of 52.5 Gy in 15 daily fractions is safe, well tolerated and easy radiation treatment for medically inoperable lung cancer patients. It shortens by half the traditional treatment. Results compare favorably with previously published studies. Further studies are needed to compare similar technique with other treatments such as surgery and stereotactic radiotherapy.

  10. Phase II Study of Short-Course Radiotherapy Plus Concomitant and Adjuvant Temozolomide in Elderly Patients With Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minniti, Giuseppe, E-mail: Giuseppe.Minniti@ospedalesantandrea.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Lanzetta, Gaetano [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Scaringi, Claudia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Caporello, Paola [Department of Medical Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Salvati, Maurizio [Department of Neurosurgery, Umberto I Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Arcella, Antonella [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); De Sanctis, Vitaliana [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Giangaspero, Felice [Department of Neurological Sciences, Neuromed Institute, Pozzilli (Italy); Department of Pathology, Umberto I Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy); Enrici, Riccardo Maurizi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sant' Andrea Hospital, University ' La Sapienza,' Rome (Italy)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy may prolong survival in older patients (age {>=}70 years) with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), although the survival benefits remain poor. This Phase II multicenter study was designed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of an abbreviated course of RT plus concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) in older patients with GBM. Patients and Methods: Seventy-one eligible patients 70 years of age or older with newly diagnosed GBM and a Karnofsky performance status {>=}60 were treated with a short course of RT (40 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks) plus TMZ at the dosage of 75 mg/m{sup 2} per day followed by 12 cycles of adjuvant TMZ (150-200 mg/m{sup 2} for 5 days during each 28-day cycle). The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Secondary endpoints included progression-free survival and toxicity. Results: The Median OS was 12.4 months, and the 1-year and 2-year OS rates were 58% and 20%, respectively. The median and 1-year rates of progression-free survival were 6 months and 20%, respectively. All patients completed the planned programme of RT. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events occurred in 16 patients (22%). Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and/or thrombocytopenia occurred in 10 patients (15%), leading to the interruption of treatment in 6 patients (8%). Nonhematologic Grade 3 toxicity was rare, and included fatigue in 4 patients and cognitive disability in 1 patient. Conclusions: A combination of an abbreviated course of RT plus concomitant and adjuvant TMZ is well tolerated and may prolong survival in elderly patients with GBM. Future randomized studies need to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of different schedules of RT in association with chemotherapy.

  11. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juhler-Noettrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine S.; Pedersen, Anders N.; Persson, Gitte F.; Aarup, Lasse R.; Nystroem, Haakan; Olsen, Mikael; Tarnavski, Nikolai; Specht, Lena (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, The Finsen Centre, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    2008-08-15

    Introduction. With the purpose of implementing gated radiotherapy for lung cancer patients, this study investigated the interfraction variations in tumour size and internal displacement over entire treatment courses. To explore the potential of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) the variations were measured using a set-up strategy based on imaging of bony landmarks and compared to a strategy using in room lasers, skin tattoos and cupper landmarks. Materials and methods. During their six week treatment course of 60Gy in 2Gy fractions, ten patients underwent 3 respiratory gated CT scans. The tumours were contoured on each CT scan to evaluate the variations in volumes and position. The lung tumours and the mediastinal tumours were contoured separately. The positional variations were measured as 3D mobility vectors and correlated to matching of the scans using the two different strategies. Results. The tumour size was significantly reduced from the first to the last CT scan. For the lung tumours the reduction was 19%, p=0.03, and for the mediastinal tumours the reduction was 34%, p=0.0007. The mean 3D mobility vector and the SD for the lung tumours was 0.51cm (+-0.21) for matching using bony landmarks and 0.85cm (+-0.54) for matching using skin tattoos. For the mediastinal tumours the corresponding vectors and SD's were 0.55cm (+-0.19) and 0.72cm (+-0.43). The differences between the vectors were significant for the lung tumours p=0.004. The interfractional overlap of lung tumours was 80-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. Conclusions. Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were dependent on the set-up strategy. Set-up using IGRT was superior to set-up using skin tattoos.

  12. Re-treatment after full-course radiotherapy: is it a viable option?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, F.A. [Netherlands Cancer Inst., Amsterdam (Netherlands). Div. of Experimental Therapy

    1999-07-01

    Re-irradiation of previously treated areas may become necessary for recurrent cancer, new primary tumours (common in head and neck cancer patients), or nodal and metastatic disease. Factors that should be taken into account in the decision to re-treat include: (1) Previously treated volume (how much overlap is there with new treatment fields) and dose fractionation schedule; (2) which critical tissues or organs are at risk; (3) how much time has elapsed since first treatment; (4) whether there are any practical alternatives to re-irradiation? Rapidly proliferating tissues generally recover well from the initial radiotherapy and will tolerate re-irradiation to almost full doses. Some slowly proliferating tissues are also capable of partial proliferative and functional recovery, although this takes several months and some residual damage remains. Preclinical data demonstrate that re-irradiation with reduced doses is possible in lung and spinal cord after intervals of 3-6 months. Other slowly proliferating organs, e.g. the kidneys, do not appear to be capable of recovery, even after low, subtolerance doses. The largest clinical experience of re-irradiation is for head and neck cancers. A review of this literature reveals that the most frequent normal tissue complication seen is trismus (lockjaw), which occurs in 16 to 30% of re-treated cases, with lower incidences of soft tissue or bone necrosis and fibrosis. Myelitis is rarely reported, even in the re-treatment situation. In general the highest incidence of local control for the lowest incidence of serious complications is achieved for combinations of external beam and brachytherapy, and for small, well-differentiated, new primary tumours rather than recurrent disease. Re-treatment with total doses <55 Gy gives very poor local control rates. Re-treatment schedules with curative intent require a high re-treatment dose, which is accompanied by an increased risk of normal tissue damage. To minimize serious complications

  13. Feasibility of PET-CT based hypofractionated accelerated dose escalation in oropharyngeal cancers: Final dosimetric results of the VORTIGERN study. (Secondary endpoint of UK NCRI portfolio: MREC No: 08/H0907/127, UKCRN ID 7341

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjoy Chatterjee

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Hypofractionated, slightly accelerated dose escalation in oropharyngeal cancers is likely to be safe and the chance of trismus is not any higher than when standard dose radiotherapy is used. Active measures to reduce dose to the MA achieves acceptable dose volume parameters even at escalated doses.

  14. SBRT and extreme hypofractionation: A new era in prostate cancer treatments?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alongi, Filippo; Fiorentino, Alba; De Bari, Berardino

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is a standard therapeutic option for prostate cancer (PC). In the last decades, several innovative technology applications have been introduced. 3-Dimensional conformal RT, volumetric/rotational intensity modulated RT associated or not with image-guided RT, are becoming largely diffused in the treatment of PC. Considering that PC could have a low α/β ratio, similar to late-reacting normal tissues, it could also be highly responsive to fraction size. Thus, the reduction of the number of fractions and the increase of the dose/fraction seem to be reasonable choices in the treatment of this cancer. This review reported the technology evolution, the radiobiological and the clinical data about the role of extreme hypofractionated RT in the treatment approach of PC patients. Medline search and analysis of published studies containing key words: prostate cancer, radiotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy. Recent technological developments, combined with an improved knowledge of the radiobiological models in favor of a high sensitivity of PC to larger fraction sizes are opening a new scenario in its treatment, reporting favorable efficacy and acceptable toxicity, despite short follow-up. Thus, thanks to technological improvement and the recent radiobiological data, "extreme hypofractionated RT" has been strongly introduced in the last years as a potential solid treatment option for PC.

  15. IBPRO - A Novel Short-Duration Teaching Course in Advanced Physics and Biology Underlying Cancer Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Michael C; Tracey, Monica W; Kacin, Sara E; Burmeister, Jay W

    2017-06-01

    This article provides a summary and status report of the ongoing advanced education program IBPRO - Integrated course in Biology and Physics of Radiation Oncology. IBPRO is a five-year program funded by NCI. It addresses the recognized deficiency in the number of mentors available who have the required knowledge and skill to provide the teaching and training that is required for future radiation oncologists and researchers in radiation sciences. Each year, IBPRO brings together 50 attendees typically at assistant professor level and upwards, who are already qualified/certified radiation oncologists, medical physicists or biologists. These attendees receive keynote lectures and activities based on active learning strategies, merging together the clinical, biological and physics underpinnings of radiation oncology, at the forefront of the field. This experience is aimed at increasing collaborations, raising the level and amount of basic and applied research undertaken in radiation oncology, and enabling attendees to confidently become involved in the future teaching and training of researchers and radiation oncologists.

  16. Relationship of short-course preoperative radiotherapy and serum albumin level with postoperative complications in rectal cancer surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trifunović Bratislav

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The identification of risk factors could play a role in improving early postoperative outcome for rectal cancer surgery patients. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between short-course preoperative radiotherapy (RT, serum albumin level and the development of postoperative complications in patients after anterior rectal resection due to rectal cancer without creation of diverting stoma. Methods. This retrospective study included patients with histopathologically confirmed adenocarcinoma of the rectum by and the clinical stage of T2-T4 operated on between 2007 and 2012. All the patients underwent open anterior rectal resection with no diverting stoma creation. Preoperative serum albumin was measured in each patient. Tumor location was noted intraoperatively as the distance from the inferior tumor margin to the anal verge. Tumor size was measured and noted by the pathologist who assessed specimens. Some of the patients received short-course preoperative RT, and some did not. The patients were divided into two groups (group 1 with short-course preoperative RT, group 2 with no short-course preoperative RT. Postoperative complications included clinically apparent anastomotic leakage, wound infection, diffuse peritonitis and pneumonia. They were compared between the groups, in relation to preoperative serum albumin level, patients age, tumor size and location. Results. The study included 107 patients (51 in the group 1 and 56 in the group 2. There were no significant difference in age (p = 0.95, and gender (p = 0.12 and tumor distance from anal verge (p = 0.53. The size of rectal carcinoma was significantly higher in the group 1 than in the group 2 (51.37 ± 12.04 mm vs 45.57 ± 9.81 mm, respectively; p = 0.007. The preoperative serum albumin level was significantly lower in the group 1 than in the group 2 (34.80 ± 2.85 g/L vs 37.55 ± 2.74 g/L, respectively; p < 0.001. A significant correlation between the tumor

  17. The in vitro immunogenic potential of caspase-3 proficient breast cancer cells with basal low immunogenicity is increased by hypofractionated irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kötter, Bernhard; Frey, Benjamin; Winderl, Markus; Rubner, Yvonne; Scheithauer, Heike; Sieber, Renate; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S

    2015-09-17

    Radiotherapy is an integral part of breast cancer treatment. Immune activating properties of especially hypofractionated irradiation are in the spotlight of clinicians, besides the well-known effects of radiotherapy on cell cycle and the reduction of the clonogenic potential of tumor cells. Especially combination of radiotherapy with further immune stimulation induces immune-mediated anti-tumor responses. We therefore examined whether hypofractionated irradiation alone or in combination with hyperthermia as immune stimulants is capable of inducing breast cancer cells with immunogenic potential. Clonogenic assay, AnnexinA5-FITC/Propidium iodide assay and ELISA analyses of heat shock protein 70 and high mobility group box 1 protein were applied to characterize colony forming capability, cell death induction, cell death forms and release of danger signals by breast cancer cells in response to hypofractionated radiation (4x4Gy, 6x3Gy) alone and in combination with hyperthermia (41.5 °C for 1 h). Caspase-3 deficient, hormone receptor positive, p53 wild type MCF-7 and caspase-3 intact, hormone receptor negative, p53 mutated MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells, the latter in absence or presence of the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk, were used. Supernatants of the treated tumor cells were analyzed for their potential to alter the surface expression of activation markers on human-monocyte-derived dendritic cells. Irradiation reduced the clonogenicity of caspase deficient MCF-7 cells more than of MDA-B231 cells. In contrast, higher amounts of apoptotic and necrotic cells were induced in MDA-B231 cells after single irradiation with 4Gy, 10Gy, or 20Gy or after hypofractionated irradiation with 4x4Gy or 6x3Gy. MDA-B231 cells consecutively released higher amounts of Hsp70 and HMGB1 after hypofractionated irradiation. However, only the release of Hsp70 was further increased by hyperthermia. Both, apoptosis induction and release of the danger signals, was dependent on caspase-3. Only

  18. Post-radiotherapy hypothyroidism in dogs treated for thyroid carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amores-Fuster, I; Cripps, P; Blackwood, L

    2017-03-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common adverse event after head and neck radiotherapy in human medicine, but uncommonly reported in canine patients. Records of 21 dogs with histologically or cytologically confirmed thyroid carcinoma receiving definitive or hypofractionated radiotherapy were reviewed. Nine cases received 48 Gy in 12 fractions, 10 received 36 Gy in 4 fractions and 2 received 32 Gy in 4 fractions. Seventeen cases had radiotherapy in a post-operative setting. Ten cases developed hypothyroidism (47.6%) after radiotherapy. The development of hypothyroidism was not associated with the radiotherapy protocol used. Median time to diagnosis of hypothyroidism was 6 months (range, 1-13 months). Hypothyroidism is a common side effect following radiotherapy for thyroid carcinomas. Monitoring of thyroid function following radiotherapy is recommended. No specific risk factors have been identified. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. MS-27THE IMPACT OF HYPOFRACTIONATED LINAC-BASED STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY UPON EARLY AUDITORY FUNCTIONS IN THE TREATMENT OF VESTIBULAR SCHWANNOMAS

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fen; Roy, Amit; Badkul, Rajeev; John, Park; Kumar, Parvesh; Staecker, Hinrich

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the impact of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (fSRT) scheme upon early auditory functions in the treatment of vestibular schwannomas (VSs). MATERIALS AND METHODS: 21 VS patients treated with a Linac-based frameless fSRT to 25 Gy in 5 daily fractions were retrospectively reviewed. Serial audiometry tests including auditory thresholds and speech discrimination (SD) were conducted prior to fSRT and then at regular intervals post-fSRT to determine the impact of ou...

  20. Histopathologic effects of hypofractionated robotic radiation therapy on malignant and benign prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suy, Simeng; Oermann, Eric; Hanscom, Heather; Lei, Sue; Vahdat, Saloomeh; Yu, Xia; Park, Hyeon U; Chen, Viola; Collins, Brian T; McGeagh, Kevin; Dawson, Nancy; Jha, Reena; Azumi, Norio; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John; Collins, Sean P

    2010-12-01

    We describe the first histopathologic analysis of prostatic tissue following hypofractionated robotic radiation therapy. A 66 year-old man presented with stage II, low risk adenocarcinoma of the prostate and underwent elective conformal hypofractionated radiation therapy. His pretreatment evaluation revealed T1c adenocarcinoma, Gleason's grade 3 + 3 = 6 and a prostate specific antigen (PSA) level of 4.87 ng/ml. Hypofractionated radiation therapy (37.5 Gy in five daily fractions of 7.5 Gy) was completed on an Internal Review Board approved protocol. One year later, he developed progressive urinary retention. Transurethral prostatic resection was performed to alleviate obstructive symptoms. Bilobar hypertrophy was observed without evidence of stricture. Histolopathologic analyses of resected prostate tissues revealed changes consistent with radiation treatment, including cellular changes, inflammation, glandular atrophy and hyperplasia. There was no evidence of residual cancer, fibrosis or necrosis. The patient's postoperative course was uneventful with post-treatment PSA of 0.5 ng/ml and residual grade 1 stress incontinence.

  1. Is short-course radiotherapy with high doses per fraction the appropriate regimen for metastatic spinal cord compression in colorectal cancer patients?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rades, D. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Hamburg Eppendorf (Germany); Dahm-Daphi, J. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Medical Center Hamburg Eppendorf (Germany); Rudat, V. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, St. Josef Hospital, Ruhr Univ. Bochum (Germany); Schulte, R. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. Hospital Schleswig Holstein, Campus Luebeck (Germany); Stalpers, L.J.A. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Veninga, T. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Dr. Bernard Verbeeten Inst., Tilburg (Netherlands); Hoskin, P.J. [Dept. of Clinical Oncology, Mount Vernon Centre for Cancer Treatment, Northwood (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15

    Background and purpose: various radiotherapy (RT) schedules are used worldwide for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Every treatment session may cause discomfort to the mostly debilitated patients. A short overall treatment time appears beneficial, especially for MSCC patients with an extremely poor survival such as colorectal cancer patients. This study evaluates whether short-course RT (1 x 8 Gy given in 1 day, 5 x 4 Gy given in 1 week) is as effective as long-course RT (10 x 3 Gy given in 2 weeks, 15 x 2.5 Gy given in 3 weeks, 20 x 2 Gy given in 4 weeks) and whether higher doses per fraction (more cell kill) and shorter overall treatment time (less repopulation) can compensate for lower total doses. Patients and methods: 81 colorectal cancer patients with MSCC were retrospectively investigated. The following potential prognostic factors for functional outcome were analyzed: age, sex, performance status, number of involved vertebrae, ambulatory status before RT, time of developing motor deficits before RT, radiation regimen (short-course, n = 31, vs. long-course RT, n = 50). Results: improvement of motor function occurred in 14% of the patients, no change in 68%, and deterioration in 19%. There were no significant differences between short-course and long-course RT regarding improvement or deterioration of motor function (p = 0.50). Time of developing motor deficits before RT was the only significant prognostic parameter for functional outcome (> 7 days better than 1-7 days; p < 0.001). Conclusion: no significant difference was observed between short-course and long-course RT with respect to functional outcome. In the clinical situation, short-course RT may be considered preferable, as it means less patient discomfort. (orig.)

  2. Hypofractionated Irradiation Has Immune Stimulatory Potential and Induces a Timely Restricted Infiltration of Immune Cells in Colon Cancer Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Benjamin; Rückert, Michael; Weber, Julia; Mayr, Xaver; Derer, Anja; Lotter, Michael; Bert, Christoph; Rödel, Franz; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.

    2017-01-01

    In addition to locally controlling the tumor, hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) particularly aims to activate immune cells in the RT-modified microenvironment. Therefore, we examined whether hypofractionated RT can activate dendritic cells (DCs), induce immune cell infiltration in tumors, and how the chronology of immune cell migration into tumors occurs to gain knowledge for future definition of radiation breaks and inclusion of immunotherapy. Colorectal cancer treatments offer only limited survival benefit, and immunobiological principles for additional therapies need to be explored with preclinical models. The impact of hypofractionated RT on CT26 colon cancer tumor cell death, migration of DCs toward supernatants (SN) of tumor cells, and activation of DCs by SN were analyzed. The subcutaneous tumor of a BALB/c-CT26 mouse model was locally irradiated with 2 × 5 Gy, the tumor volume was monitored, and the infiltration of immune cells in the tumor was determined by flow cytometry daily. Hypofractionated RT induced a mixture of apoptotic and necrotic CT26 cells, which is known to be in particular immunogenic. DCs that migrated toward SN of CT26 cells particularly upregulated the activation markers CD80 and CD86 when in contact with SN of irradiated tumor cells. After hypofractionated RT, the tumor outgrowth was significantly retarded and in the irradiated tumors an increased infiltration of macrophages (CD11bhigh/F4-80+) and DCs (MHC-II+), but only between day 5 and 10 after the first irradiation, takes place. While CD4+ T cells migrated into non-irradiated and irradiated tumors, CD8+ T cells were only found in tumors that had been irradiated and they were highly increased at day 8 after the first irradiation. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells show regular turnover in irradiated and non-irradiated tumors. Tumor cell-specific anti-IgM antibodies were enhanced in the serum of animals with irradiated tumors. We conclude that

  3. COMPARISON OF HYPOFRACTIONATED RADIATION THERAPY VERSUS CONVENTIONAL RADIATION THERAPY IN POST MASTECTOMY BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide and a leading cause of cancer death in females and accounts for 1.8 million new cases and approximately 0.5 million deaths annually. Patients who present with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC require multidisciplinary team approach that incorporates diagnostic imaging, surgery, chemotherapy and histopathological assessment, including molecular-based studies, radiation, and, if indicated, biologic and hormonal therapies. Hypofractionated radiation therapy following mastectomy has been used in many institutions for several decades and have demonstrated equivalent local control, cosmetic and normal tissues between 50 Gy in 25 fractions and various hypofractionated radiotherapy prescriptions employing 13-16 fractions. Evidence suggests that hypofractionated radiotherapy may also be safe and effective for regional nodal disease. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES To compare the local control and side effects of hypofractionated radiation therapy with conventional radiation therapy in post mastectomy carcinoma breast with stage II and III and to compare the tolerability and compliance of both schedules. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was conducted on 60 histopathologically proven patients of carcinoma of breast, treated surgically with modified radical mastectomy. Group I patients were given external radiation to chest flap and drainage areas, a dose of 39 Gy/13 fractions/3.1 weeks, a daily dose 3 Gy for 13 fractions in 4 days a week schedule and Group II patients were given external radiation to chest flap and drainage areas, a dose of 50 Gy/25 fractions/5 weeks, to receive a daily dose 2 Gy for 25 fractions in a 5 days a week schedule. RESULTS The median age at presentation in Group I and II was 48 and 50 years respectively. Locoregional control after completion of radiotherapy in Group I vs. Group II was 26/30 (86.7% vs. 27/30 (90% respectively. Acute reactions and their grades in Group

  4. Five-Year Follow-Up of Concomitant Accelerated Hypofractionated Radiation in Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Buccal Mucosa: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Iqbal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In resource limited settings, induction chemotherapy with Gemcitabine and Cisplatinum and concurrent hypofractionated chemoradiation for locally advanced carcinoma of buccal mucosa (BMSCC are a cost effective option but remain under reported. The objective of this study was to report long term survival outcome after concurrent hypofractionated radiotherapy in locally advanced BMSCC. Between February 2005 and 2009, 63 patients received treatment. Induction chemotherapy (IC regimen consisted of two drugs: Gemcitabine and Cisplatin. All patients received 55 Gy of radiation in 20 fractions with concurrent single agent Cisplatin (75 mg/m2. Five-year overall survival (OS, disease-free survival (DFS, and progression-free survival (PFS were determined. Based on AJCC staging, 7 (11% patients were stage III, 31 (49% stage IV a, and 25 (40% stage IVb at presentation. After IC, 8 (18% patients had complete radiological response, 33 (73% had partial response, and 4 (9% had stable disease. After concurrent hypofractionated chemoradiation, thirty-nine (62% patients were complete responders and 24 (38% had stable disease. With a minimum follow-up of 60 months, 5-year OS, DFS, and PFS were 30%, 49%, and 30%, respectively. In locally advanced buccal mucosa squamous cell carcinoma, concurrent hypofractionated chemoradiation results in acceptable survival and regimen related toxicity.

  5. ACCELERATED REGIMENS OF ADJUVANT RADIOTHERAPY IN THE TREATMENT OF BREAST CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. V. Afonin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of breast cancer (BC is a complex multidisciplinary problem. Often, radiation therapy is an obligatory component of treatment of breast cancer patients. Numerous large randomized trials have proved the efficacy of adjuvant radiotherapy in both the standard fractionation regimen in a single focal dose of 2 Gy to a total focal dose of 50 Gy for 25 fractions and in modes of hypofractionation using radiation exposure at a larger daily dose with a reduction in the total treatment time. The presented review summarizes the data of the largest studies on the modes of hypofractionation of postoperative radiotherapy for breast cancer. Most of the studies comparing the standard mode of fractionation of postoperative radiotherapy with the modes of hypofractionation showed comparable results for the main oncological parameters with similar tolerability, frequency of complications and good cosmetic results. It also shows the economic feasibility of applying accelerated regimes in everyday practice. Despite the fact that radiotherapy in the mode of hypofractionation has already become the standard of treatment and is recommended for use by the largest European and American cancer associations, indications for its conduct, the criteria for selection in the studies and the range of recommended single focal doses differ. The obtained results do not give an opportunity to confidently judge the advantage of one or another regime. It is necessary to determine the factors of a favorable and unfavorable prognosis, to clarify the indications for the use of various radiotherapy techniques. Therefore, questions about the optimal mode of hypo-fractionation of adjuvant radiotherapy, the timing of its initiation and the criteria for selecting patients for this type of therapy as part of the comprehensive treatment of breast cancer have not yet been fully resolved. Also open is the choice of optimal single and total doses of radiation, its combination with drug

  6. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of Hypofractionated IMRT Field-in-Field Boost for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monjazeb, Arta M., E-mail: arta.monjazeb@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [U.C. Davis School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ayala, Deandra; Jensen, Courtney [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Case, L. Douglas [Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Bourland, J. Daniel; Ellis, Thomas L. [Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Chan, Michael D. [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Tatter, Stephen B. [Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lesser, Glen J. [Hematology Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Shaw, Edward G. [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: To describe the results of a Phase I dose escalation trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) using a hypofractionated concurrent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost. Methods: Twenty-one patients were enrolled between April 1999 and August 2003. Radiotherapy consisted of daily fractions of 1.8 Gy with a concurrent boost of 0.7 Gy (total 2.5 Gy daily) to a total dose of 70, 75, or 80 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was not permitted. Seven patients were enrolled at each dose and dose limiting toxicities were defined as irreversible Grade 3 or any Grade 4-5 acute neurotoxicity attributable to radiotherapy. Results: All patients experienced Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities. Acutely, 8 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 and 4 toxicities. Of these, only two reversible cases of otitis media were attributable to radiotherapy. No dose-limiting toxicities were encountered. Only 2 patients experienced Grade 3 delayed toxicity and there was no delayed Grade 4 toxicity. Eleven patients requiring repeat resection or biopsy were found to have viable tumor and radiation changes with no cases of radionecrosis alone. Median overall and progression-free survival for this cohort were 13.6 and 6.5 months, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 57% and 19%. At recurrence, 15 patients received chemotherapy, 9 underwent resection, and 5 received radiotherapy. Conclusions: Using a hypofractionated concurrent IMRT boost, we were able to safely treat patients to 80 Gy without any dose-limiting toxicity. Given that local failure still remains the predominant pattern for GBM patients, a trial of dose escalation with IMRT and temozolomide is warranted.

  7. SU-F-J-136: Impact of Audiovisual Biofeedback On Interfraction Motion Over a Course of Liver Cancer Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollock, S [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney (Australia); Tse, R; Martin, D; McLean, L; Pham, M; Tait, D; Estoesta, R; Whittington, G; Turley, J; Kearney, C; Cho, G; Pickard, S; Aston, P [Chris OBrien Lifehouse, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Hill, R [Chris OBrien Lifehouse Camperdown (Australia); Makhija, K [University of Sydney, Camperdown, NSW (Australia); O’Brien, R; Keall, P [University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: In abdominal radiotherapy inconsistent interfraction respiratory motion can result in deviations during treatment from what was planned in terms of target position and motion. Audiovisual biofeedback (AVB) is an interactive respiratory guide that produces a guiding interface that the patient follows over a course of radiotherapy to facilitate regular respiratory motion. This study assessed the impact of AVB on interfraction motion consistency over a course of liver cancer SBRT. Methods: Five liver cancer patients have been recruited into this study, 3 followed AVB over their course of SBRT and 2 were free breathing (FB). Respiratory signals from the Varian RPM were obtained during 4DCT and each treatment fraction. Respiratory signals were organized into 10 respiratory bins, and interfraction consistency was quantified by the difference between each treatment fraction respiratory bin and each respiratory bin from 4DCT. Interfraction consistency was considered as both the relative difference (as a percentage) and absolute difference (in centimeters) between treatment respiratory bins and 4DCT respiratory bins. Results: The relative difference between 4DCT and treatment respiratory bins was 22 ± 16% for FB, and 15 ± 10% for AVB, an improvement of 32% (p < 0.001) with AVB. The absolute difference between 4DCT and treatment respiratory bins was 0.15 ± 0.10 cm for FB, and 0.14 ± 0.13 cm for AVB, an improvement of 4% (p = 0.6) with AVB. Conclusion: This was the first study to compare the impact of AVB breathing guidance on interfraction motion consistency over a course of radiotherapy. AVB demonstrated to significantly reduce the relative difference between 4DCT and treatment respiratory motion, but the absolute differences were comparable, largely due to one AVB patient exhibiting a larger amplitude than the other patients. This study demonstrates the potential benefit of AVB in reducing motion variations during treatment from what was planned. Paul Keall

  8. The Emerging Role of Carbon-Ion Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K Ebner

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-ion radiotherapy (CIRT has progressed rapidly in technological delivery, indications, and efficacy. Owing to a focused dose distribution in addition to high linear energy transfer and subsequently high relative biological effect, CIRT is uniquely able to target otherwise untreatable hypoxic and radioresistant disease, while opening the door for substantially hypofractionated treatment of normal and radiosensitive disease. CIRT has increasingly garnered international attention, and is nearing the tipping point for international adoption.

  9. Long Term Results after 3 Courses of ABVD plus Subtotal Nodal Radiotherapy in 188 Adult Patients with Stage I, II and IIIA Hodgin Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Brice

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In patients with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL a continued improvement in outcome with a high cure rate is observed but with an increased treatment-induced late effects. We report the long-term results from 188 (stage I to IIIA patients treated during the period 1985-94 with 3 courses of ABVD-like chemotherapy and subtotal nodal radiotherapy. 10 year overall survival is of 88% and no secondary leukaemia was observed. The main long term toxicity was cardiac, mainly related to a mediastinal dose of 45 Grays in patients with partial remission. New strategies are aiming to reduce the mediastinal dose at 30 Grays after chemotherapy-induced complete remission.

  10. Palliative radiotherapy and oncology nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMenamin, Erin; Ross, Nicole; Jones, Joshua

    2014-11-01

    To describe indications and expected outcomes for palliative radiotherapy and to highlight opportunities for nurse involvement in palliative radiotherapy. Journal articles, clinical guidelines, case studies. Palliative radiotherapy is a safe, effective treatment modality for many symptoms of advanced cancer. Opportunities exist to help patients and families opt for shorter palliative radiotherapy courses when quality of life is the goal. Nurses involved in the care of patients receiving palliative radiotherapy must be aware of the indications and expected outcomes associated with therapy. Nurses can play an important role in the management of symptoms, education, and communication between the team and the patient and family.

  11. SU-E-QI-21: Iodinated Contrast Agent Time Course In Human Brain Metastasis: A Study For Stereotactic Synchrotron Radiotherapy Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obeid, L; Esteve, F; Adam, J [Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, La Tronche, Isere (France); Tessier, A; Balosso, J [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, La Tronche, Isere (France)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Synchrotron stereotactic radiotherapy (SSRT) is an innovative treatment combining the selective accumulation of heavy elements in tumors with stereotactic irradiations using monochromatic medium energy x-rays from a synchrotron source. Phase I/II clinical trials on brain metastasis are underway using venous infusion of iodinated contrast agents. The radiation dose enhancement depends on the amount of iodine in the tumor and its time course. In the present study, the reproducibility of iodine concentrations between the CT planning scan day (Day 0) and the treatment day (Day 10) was assessed in order to predict dose errors. Methods: For each of days 0 and 10, three patients received a biphasic intravenous injection of iodinated contrast agent (40 ml, 4 ml/s, followed by 160 ml, 0.5 ml/s) in order to ensure stable intra-tumoral amounts of iodine during the treatment. Two volumetric CT scans (before and after iodine injection) and a multi-slice dynamic CT of the brain were performed using conventional radiotherapy CT (Day 0) or quantitative synchrotron radiation CT (Day 10). A 3D rigid registration was processed between images. The absolute and relative differences of absolute iodine concentrations and their corresponding dose errors were evaluated in the GTV and PTV used for treatment planning. Results: The differences in iodine concentrations remained within the standard deviation limits. The 3D absolute differences followed a normal distribution centered at zero mg/ml with a variance (∼1 mg/ml) which is related to the image noise. Conclusion: The results suggest that dose errors depend only on the image noise. This study shows that stable amounts of iodine are achievable in brain metastasis for SSRT treatment in a 10 days interval.

  12. SU-F-J-81: Evaluation of Automated Deformable Registration Between Planning Computed Tomography (CT) and Daily Cone Beam CT Images Over the Course of Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matney, J; Hammers, J; Kaidar-Person, O; Wang, A; Chen, R; Das, S; Marks, L; Mavroidis, P [University North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compute daily dose delivered during radiotherapy, deformable registration needs to be relatively fast, automated, and accurate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of commercial deformable registration software for deforming between two modalities: planning computed tomography (pCT) images acquired for treatment planning and cone beam (CB) CT images acquired prior to each fraction of prostate cancer radiotherapy. Methods: A workflow was designed using MIM Software™ that aligned and deformed pCT into daily CBCT images in two steps: (1) rigid shifts applied after daily CBCT imaging to align patient anatomy to the pCT and (2) normalized intensity-based deformable registration to account for interfractional anatomical variations. The physician-approved CTV and organ and risk (OAR) contours were deformed from the pCT to daily CBCT over the course of treatment. The same structures were delineated on each daily CBCT by a radiation oncologist. Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) mean and standard deviations were calculated to quantify the deformable registration quality for prostate, bladder, rectum and femoral heads. Results: To date, contour comparisons have been analyzed for 31 daily fractions of 2 of 10 of the cohort. Interim analysis shows that right and left femoral head contours demonstrate the highest agreement (DSC: 0.96±0.02) with physician contours. Additionally, deformed bladder (DSC: 0.81±0.09) and prostate (DSC: 0.80±0.07) have good agreement with physician-defined daily contours. Rectum contours have the highest variations (DSC: 0.66±0.10) between the deformed and physician-defined contours on daily CBCT imaging. Conclusion: For structures with relatively high contrast boundaries on CBCT, the MIM automated deformable registration provided accurate representations of the daily contours during treatment delivery. These findings will permit subsequent investigations to automate daily dose computation from CBCT. However

  13. Immediate side effects of large fraction radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, S; Hatton, M Q; Macbeth, F R

    1997-01-01

    The use of hypofractionated radiotherapy regimens is becoming more widely recognized in the palliation of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Anecdotal reports of chest pain, rigors and fevers in the hours that follow radiotherapy led us to perform a survey estimating the frequency and severity of these symptoms following treatment to the thorax. One hundred and eighteen patients completed questionnaires 24 hours after palliative radiotherapy treatment; 84 were male. The median age was 67 years. One hundred and seven had histologically confirmed NSCLC. A parallel opposed technique was used in 113 patients. Doses ranged from 8 Gy in a single fraction to 60 Gy in 30 fractions. Chest pain was reported by 54 (45.8%) patients after the first radiotherapy fraction; in 42 it commenced within 12 hours of treatment. The pain varied in site, nature and duration; on 23 occasions, it lasted under 2 hours. Systemic symptoms (rigors, sweating, fevers) were documented on 43 questionnaires, starting within 12 hours of treatment in 33 patients and on 30 occasions lasting less than 2 hours. Chest pain and systemic symptoms occurred together in 28 patients. Only 49 (41.5%) patients reported no immediate side effects. We conclude that patients receiving palliative radiotherapy for bronchial carcinoma often develop significant symptoms in the hours following treatment. The timing and duration suggest a relationship with the radiotherapy, and we feel that patients should be warned of the possible occurrence of these symptoms.

  14. P13.11USAGE OF CYBER KNIFE HYPOFRACTIONATED RADIOSURGERY IN HIGH GRADE GLIOMAS COMPLEX TREATMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavatskyi, O.; Buryk, V.M.; Kardash, K.A.; Pylypas, O.P.; Chebotaryova, T.I.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: A complex approach to the treatment of malignant brain tumors includes maximum surgical resection, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The purpose of the current study is to review retrospectively the ability of Cyber Knife (“Accuray Incorporated”, Sunnyvale, CA, USA) radiosurgery to provide local tumor control of newly diagnosed or recurrent malignant brain tumors. MATERIAL AND METHOD: 26 patients with malignant brain tumors (glioblastoma multiform (GBM) - 14 patients, anaplastic astrocytoma (AA) - 12 patients) were treated in 2012-2013 with Cyber Knife stereotactic radiosurgery. Before radiosurgery 8 patients had complete removal of the tumor, 9 patients had subtotal resection and 9 patients had biopsy. 17 patients received adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide according to the different treatment protocols. 9 patients who were previously irradiated received re-irradiation. In all patients CT, MRI, PET (native, enhanced, CT-perfusion, MRI-diffusion (DWI) studies) before and after treatment were performed with (3, 6, 12, 18 month follow up). The volume of tumors ranged from 10-12 cm3 to 101,1 cm3. The maximum mean dose of irradiation applied was 36.99 Gy (ranged from 21,3 Gy to 48,8 Gy). 3-6 fractions of hypofractionated treatment were used. RESULTS: At this stage of the study, we assessed the absence of complications after stereotactic hypofractionated radiosurgery. Objective survival evaluation has being performed in 12-24 months after radiosurgical treatment. A significant decrease in the number and severity of seizures was seen in 7 patients out of 21 (33 %). 18 patients (64%) had regression of limb weakness. In case of biopsy 7 of 9 tumors (78 %) showed a decrease in volume. In patients with clinical deterioration (3 patients) repeated surgical treatment was performed. All of them had signs of post-irradiation necrosis and pathomorphosis in tumor tissue. Median overall survival and progression free survival were 17 months and 11 months

  15. Interfractional changes in tumour volume and position during entire radiotherapy courses for lung cancer with respiratory gating and image guidance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhler-Nøttrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders N

    2008-01-01

    measured using a set-up strategy based on imaging of bony landmarks and compared to a strategy using in room lasers, skin tattoos and cupper landmarks. MATERIALS AND METHODS: During their six week treatment course of 60Gy in 2Gy fractions, ten patients underwent 3 respiratory gated CT scans. The tumours...... landmarks and 0.85 cm (+/-0.54) for matching using skin tattoos. For the mediastinal tumours the corresponding vectors and SD's were 0.55 cm (+/-0.19) and 0.72 cm (+/-0.43). The differences between the vectors were significant for the lung tumours p=0.004. The interfractional overlap of lung tumours was 80......-87% when matched using bony landmarks and 70-76% when matched using skin tattoos. The overlap of the mediastinal tumours were 60-65% and 41-47%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the use of gating the tumours varied considerably, regarding both position and volume. The variations in position were...

  16. Accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy compared to conventionally fractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amini Arya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While conventionally fractionated radiation therapy alone is an acceptable option for poor prognostic patients with unresectable stage III NSCLC, we hypothesized that accelerated hypofractionated radiotherapy will have similar efficacy without increasing toxicity. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of 300 patients diagnosed with stage III NSCLC treated between 1993 and 2009. Patients included in the study were medically or surgically inoperable, were free of metastatic disease at initial workup and did not receive concurrent chemotherapy. Patients were categorized into three groups. Group 1 received 45 Gy in 15 fractions over 3 weeks (Accelerated Radiotherapy (ACRT while group 2 received 60-63 Gy (Standard Radiation Therapy 1 (STRT1 and group 3 received > 63 Gy (Standard Radiation Therapy (STRT2. Results There were 119 (39.7% patients in the ACRT group, 90 (30.0% in STRT1 and 91 (30.3% in STRT2. More patients in the ACRT group had KPS ≤ 60 (p 5% (p = 0.002, and had stage 3B disease (p Conclusions Despite the limitations of a retrospective analysis, our experience of accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy with 45 Gy in 15 fractions appears to be an acceptable treatment option for poor performance status patients with stage III inoperable tumors. Such a treatment regimen (or higher doses in 15 fractions should be prospectively evaluated using modern radiation technologies with the addition of sequential high dose chemotherapy in stage III NSCLC.

  17. Motion monitoring during a course of lung radiotherapy with anchored electromagnetic transponders : Quantification of inter- and intrafraction motion and variability of relative transponder positions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Daniela; Nill, Simeon; Roeder, Falk; Gompelmann, Daniela; Herth, Felix; Oelfke, Uwe

    2017-10-01

    Anchored electromagnetic transponders for tumor motion monitoring during lung radiotherapy were clinically evaluated. First, intrafractional motion patterns were analyzed as well as their interfractional variations. Second, intra- and interfractional changes of the geometric transponder positions were investigated. Intrafractional motion data from 7 patients with an upper or middle lobe tumor and three implanted transponders each was used to calculate breathing amplitudes, overall motion amount and motion midlines in three mutual perpendicular directions and three-dimensionally (3D) for 162 fractions. For 6 patients intra- and interfractional variations in transponder distances and in the size of the triangle defined by the transponder locations over the treatment course were determined. Mean 3D values of all fractions were up to 4.0, 4.6 and 3.4 mm per patient for amplitude, overall motion amount and midline deviation, respectively. Intrafractional transponder distances varied with standard deviations up to 3.2 mm, while a maximal triangle shrinkage of 36.5% over 39 days was observed. Electromagnetic real-time motion monitoring was feasible for all patients. Detected respiratory motion was on average modest in this small cohort without lower lobe tumors, but changes in motion midline were of the same size as the amplitudes and greater midline motion can be observed in some fractions. Intra- and interfractional variations of the geometric transponder positions can be large, so for reliable motion management correlation between transponder and tumor motion needs to be evaluated per patient.

  18. Scapula alata in early breast cancer patients enrolled in a randomized clinical trial of post-surgery short-course image-guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriaenssens Nele

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Scapula alata (SA is a known complication of breast surgery associated with palsy of the serratus anterior, but it is seldom mentioned. We evaluated the risk factors associated with SA and the relationship of SA with ipsilateral shoulder/arm morbidity in a series of patients enrolled in a trial of post-surgery radiotherapy (RT. Methods The trial randomized women with completely resected stage I-II breast cancer to short-course image-guided RT, versus conventional RT. SA, arm volume and shoulder-arm mobility were measured prior to RT and at one to three months post-RT. Shoulder/arm morbidities were computed as a post-RT percentage change relative to pre-RT measurements. Results Of 119 evaluable patients, 13 (= 10.9% had pre-RT SA. Age younger than 50 years old, a body mass index less than 25 kg/m2, and axillary lymph node dissection were significant risk factors, with odds ratios of 4.8 (P = 0.009, 6.1 (P = 0.016, and 6.1 (P = 0.005, respectively. Randomization group was not significant. At one to three months’ post-RT, mean arm volume increased by 4.1% (P = 0.036 and abduction decreased by 8.6% (P = 0.046 among SA patients, but not among non-SA patients. SA resolved in eight, persisted in five, and appeared in one patient. Conclusion The relationship of SA with lower body mass index suggests that SA might have been underestimated in overweight patients. Despite apparent resolution of SA in most patients, pre-RT SA portended an increased risk of shoulder/arm morbidity. We argue that SA warrants further investigation. Incidentally, the observation of SA occurring after RT in one patient represents the second case of post-RT SA reported in the literature.

  19. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer: five-year outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Hypofractionated, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is an emerging treatment approach for prostate cancer. We present the outcomes for low-risk prostate cancer patients with a median follow-up of 5 years after SBRT. Method and Materials Between Dec. 2003 and Dec. 2005, a pooled cohort of 41 consecutive patients from Stanford, CA and Naples, FL received SBRT with CyberKnife for clinically localized, low-risk prostate cancer. Prescribed dose was 35-36.25 Gy in five fractions. No patient received hormone therapy. Kaplan-Meier biochemical progression-free survival (defined using the Phoenix method and RTOG toxicity outcomes were assessed. Results At a median follow-up of 5 years, the biochemical progression-free survival was 93% (95% CI = 84.7% to 100%. Acute side effects resolved within 1-3 months of treatment completion. There were no grade 4 toxicities. No late grade 3 rectal toxicity occurred, and only one late grade 3 genitourinary toxicity occurred following repeated urologic instrumentation. Conclusion Five-year results of SBRT for localized prostate cancer demonstrate the efficacy and safety of shorter courses of high dose per fraction radiation delivered with SBRT technique. Ongoing clinical trials are underway to further explore this treatment approach.

  20. Late normal tissue effects in the arm and shoulder following lymphatic radiotherapy: Results from the UK START (Standardisation of Breast Radiotherapy) trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haviland, Joanne S; Mannino, Mariella; Griffin, Clare; Porta, Nuria; Sydenham, Mark; Bliss, Judith M; Yarnold, John R

    2018-01-01

    Adjuvant lymphatic radiotherapy (LNRT) is recommended for selected axillary node positive women with early breast cancer. We investigated whether hypofractionated LNRT is safe combined with similarly-hypofractionated breast/chest wall radiotherapy (RT). The Standardisation of Breast Radiotherapy (START) pilot, A and B trials randomised women with early breast cancer to schedules of 2.67-3.3 Gy versus 2.0 Gy fractions (control). RT adverse effects were assessed by patients using the EORTC QLQ-BR23 and protocol-specific questions, and by physicians. Rates of arm/shoulder effects were compared between schedules for patients given LNRT. 864/5861 (14.7%) patients received LNRT (385 START-pilot, 318 START-A, 161 START-B). Prevalences of moderate/marked arm/shoulder effects were low up to 10 years. There were no significant differences between the hypofractionated and control groups for patient- and physician-assessed symptoms in START-A or START-B. In START-pilot, adverse effect rates were higher after 13 fractions of 3.3 Gy, consistent with effects reported in the breast/chest wall (significant for shoulder stiffness, HR 3.07, 95%CI 1.62-5.83, p = 0.001). The START trial results suggest that appropriately-dosed hypofractionated LNRT is safe in the long-term, according to patient and physician-assessed arm and shoulder symptoms. These findings are consistent with those reported after the same schedules delivered to the breast/chest wall. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Phase 2 Trial of Once-Weekly Hypofractionated Breast Irradiation: First Report of Acute Toxicity, Feasibility, and Patient Satisfaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dragun, Anthony E., E-mail: aedrag01@louisville.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Quillo, Amy R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Riley, Elizabeth C. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Roberts, Teresa L.; Hunter, Allison M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Rai, Shesh N. [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Callender, Glenda G. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Jain, Dharamvir [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); McMasters, Kelly M. [Department of Surgical Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States); Spanos, William J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Louisville School of Medicine, James Graham Brown Cancer Center, Louisville, Kentucky (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Purpose: To report on early results of a single-institution phase 2 trial of a 5-fraction, once-weekly radiation therapy regimen for patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery (BCS). Methods and Materials: Patients who underwent BCS for American Joint Committee on Cancer stage 0, I, or II breast cancer with negative surgical margins were eligible to receive whole breast radiation therapy to a dose of 30 Gy in 5 weekly fractions of 6 Gy with or without an additional boost. Elective nodal irradiation was not permitted. There were no restrictions on breast size or the use of cytotoxic chemotherapy for otherwise eligible patients. Patients were assessed at baseline, treatment completion, and at first posttreatment follow-up to assess acute toxicity (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0) and quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-BR23). Results: Between January and September 2011, 42 eligible patients underwent weekly hypofractionated breast irradiation immediately following BCS (69.0%) or at the conclusion of cytotoxic chemotherapy (31.0%). The rates of grade ≥2 radiation-induced dermatitis, pain, fatigue, and breast edema were 19.0%, 11.9%, 9.5%, and 2.4%, respectively. Only 1 grade 3 toxicity—pain requiring a course of narcotic analgesics—was observed. One patient developed a superficial cellulitis (grade 2), which resolved with the use of oral antibiotics. Patient-reported moderate-to-major breast symptoms (pain, swelling, and skin problems), all decreased from baseline through 1 month, whereas breast sensitivity remained stable over the study period. Conclusions: The tolerance of weekly hypofractionated breast irradiation compares well with recent reports of daily hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation schedules. The regimen appears feasible and cost-effective. Additional follow-up with continued accrual is needed to assess late toxicity, cosmesis, and disease-specific outcomes.

  2. SU-F-J-130: Margin Determination for Hypofractionated Partial Breast Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geady, C [Ryerson University (Canada); Keller, B; Hahn, E; Vesprini, D; Soliman, H; Lee, J [University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ruschin, M; McCann, C [University of Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Makhani, N; Bosnic, S [Sunnybrook Health Sciences Center, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the Planning Target Volume (PTV) margin for Hypofractionated Partial Breast Irradiation (HPBI) using the van Herk formalism (M=2.5∑+0.7σ). HPBI is a novel technique intended to provide local control in breast cancer patients not eligible for surgical resection, using 40 Gy in 5 fractions prescribed to the gross disease. Methods: Setup uncertainties were quantified through retrospective analysis of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) data sets, collected prior to (prefraction) and after (postfraction) treatment delivery. During simulation and treatment, patients were immobilized using a wing board and an evacuated bag. Prefraction CBCT was rigidly registered to planning 4-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) using the chest wall and tumor, and translational couch shifts were applied as needed. This clinical workflow was faithfully reproduced in Pinnacle (Philips Medical Systems) to yield residual setup and intrafractional error through translational shifts and rigid registrations (ribs and sternum) of prefraction CBCT to 4DCT and postfraction CBCT to prefraction CBCT, respectively. All ten patients included in this investigation were medically inoperable; the median age was 84 (range, 52–100) years. Results: Systematic (and random) setup uncertainties (in mm) detected for the left-right, craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions were 0.4 (1.5), 0.8 (1.8) and 0.4 (1.0); net uncertainty was determined to be 0.7 (1.5). Rotations >2° in any axis occurred on 8/72 (11.1%) registrations. Conclusion: Preliminary results suggest a non-uniform setup margin (in mm) of 2.2, 3.3 and 1.7 for the left-right, craniocaudal and anteroposterior directions is required for HPBI, given its immobilization techniques and online setup verification protocol. This investigation is ongoing, though published results from similar studies are consistent with the above findings. Determination of margins in breast radiotherapy is a paradigm shift, but a necessary

  3. The efficacy of hemostatic radiotherapy for bladder cancer-related hematuria in patients unfit for surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Lacarriere

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective The aim of our study was to assess short and mid-term clinical efficacy of external beam radiation therapy to achieve hemostasis in patients with bladder-cancer related gross hematuria who were unfit for surgery. We also assessed hypofractionation as a possible alternative option for more severe patients. Patients and Methods Thirty-two patients were included for hemostatic radiation therapy, with two schedules based on Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status. The standard treatment was 30 Gy in 10 fractions over 2 weeks. More severe patients underwent a hypofractionated regimen, with 20 Gy in 5 fractions over a one week period. Clinical evaluation was performed at 2 weeks and 6 months. Results At 2 weeks, 69% of patients were hematuria-free. Subgroup analysis showed that 79% of patients undergoing hypofractionated regimen were hematuria-free. A total of 54% were hematuria-free with the standard regimen. Based on tumor stage, hematuria was controlled at 2 weeks for 57% of non-muscle invasive tumors and 72% of muscle-invasive tumors. After 6 months, 69% of patients had relapsed, regardless of tumor stage or therapy schedules. Conclusions Hemostatic radiotherapy is an effective option for palliative-care hematuria related to bladder cancer in patients unfit for surgery. Although it appears to be rapidly effective, its effect is of limited duration. Hypofractionation also seems to be an effective option; however larger cohorts and prospective trials are needed to evaluate its efficacy compared to standard schedules.

  4. Demand for radiotherapy in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A; Borrás, J M; López-Torrecilla, J; Algara, M; Palacios-Eito, A; Gómez-Caamaño, A; Olay, L; Lara, P C

    2017-02-01

    Assessing the demand for radiotherapy in Spain based on existing evidence to estimate the human resources and equipment needed so that every person in Spain has access to high-quality radiotherapy when they need it. We used data from the European Cancer Observatory on the estimated incidence of cancer in Spain in 2012, along with the evidence-based indications for radiotherapy developed by the Australian CCORE project, to obtain an optimal radiotherapy utilisation proportion (OUP) for each tumour. About 50.5 % of new cancers in Spain require radiotherapy at least once over the course of the disease. Additional demand for these services comes from reradiation therapy and non-melanoma skin cancer. Approximately, 25-30 % of cancer patients with an indication for radiotherapy do not receive it due to factors that include access, patient preference, familiarity with the treatment among physicians, and especially resource shortages, all of which contribute to its underutilisation. Radiotherapy is underused in Spain. The increasing incidence of cancer expected over the next decade and the greater frequency of reradiations necessitate the incorporation of radiotherapy demand into need-based calculations for cancer services planning.

  5. Psychological and physical distress of cancer patients during radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    König, A

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: patients undergoing radiotherapy have physical and psychological symptoms related to the underlying disease and the treatment. In order to give the best possible support to the patients, more knowledge about the amount and the changing of distress in the course of radiotherapy is of essentially importance. Methods: The distress was measured in a consecutive sample of cancer patients (n=82) undergoing radiotherapy. Each patient was given the EORTC-QLQ-C30, the HADS and a special questionnaire which ascertain radiotherapy-specific items before starting the radiotherapy, at the onset of radiotherapy, in the third week of radiotherapy and 3 weeks after the end of radiotherapy. Results: within the first week of treatment the psychological distress of the patients is increasing; 98.8 % of the patients are 'moderate distressed', 46 % 'severe distressed'. General physical symptoms seem not to be affected by the radiotherapy, there is no changing. The distress caused by the organization of the radiotherapy is...

  6. Translational and rotational intra- and inter-fractional errors in patient and target position during a short course of frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Josipovic, Mirjana; Persson, Gitte Fredberg; Logadottir, Ashildur

    2012-01-01

    Implementation of cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in frameless stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) of lung tumours enables setup correction based on tumour position. The aim of this study was to compare setup accuracy with daily soft tissue matching to bony anatomy matching and evaluate in...

  7. Is short-course radiotherapy with high doses per fraction the appropriate regimen for metastatic spinal cord compression in colorectal cancer patients?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rades, Dirk; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Rudat, Volker; Schulte, Rainer; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Veninga, Theo; Hoskin, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    Various radiotherapy (RT) schedules are used worldwide for metastatic spinal cord compression (MSCC). Every treatment session may cause discomfort to the mostly debilitated patients. A short overall treatment time appears beneficial, especially for MSCC patients with an extremely poor survival such

  8. [Novel irradiation techniques in the treatment of solid tumours. Radiotherapy for metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Arpád; Póti, Zsuzsa

    2014-02-23

    Novel developments in percutaneous radiotherapy, such as positron emission tomography/computed tomography, adaptive radiation planning, intensity modulation radiotherapy and intensity modulated arc therapy (RapidArc), as well as the newer generation of image control (cone-beam computed tomography) and image guided radiotherapy ensure increased dosages of planning target volume and clinical target volume of solid tumours without damaging surrounding tissues and providing maximal protection. By raising the dosages of planned target volume and clinical target volume, these novel technical developments have created new indications in the treatment of solid tumours. With the aid of the cone-beam computed tomography and image guided radiotherapy the organ metastasis (lung, liver, spinal cord) and the primary tumour can be treated safety and effectively. Hypofractionation, dose escalation and the use of stereotactic devices can probably decrease radiation damage. The authors review the most common forms of evidence-based fractionation schemes used in irradiation therapy.

  9. Adaptive hypofractionated gamma knife radiosurgery for a large brainstem metastasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinclair, Georges; Bartek, Jiri; Martin, Heather

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To demonstrate how adaptive hypofractionated radiosurgery by gamma knife (GK) can be successfully utilized to treat a large brainstem metastasis - a novel approach to a challenging clinical situation. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 42-year-old woman, diagnosed with metastatic nonsmall cell lung...... months and 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography of the brain at 13 months showed decreased edema with no signs of tumor recurrence. Despite disease progression during the last months of her life, the patient's condition remained overall acceptable. CONCLUSION: GK-based stereotactic...

  10. Big Data Analytics for Prostate Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, James; Souhami, Luis; El Naqa, Issam

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy is a first-line treatment option for localized prostate cancer and radiation-induced normal tissue damage are often the main limiting factor for modern radiotherapy regimens. Conversely, under-dosing of target volumes in an attempt to spare adjacent healthy tissues limits the likelihood of achieving local, long-term control. Thus, the ability to generate personalized data-driven risk profiles for radiotherapy outcomes would provide valuable prognostic information to help guide both clinicians and patients alike. Big data applied to radiation oncology promises to deliver better understanding of outcomes by harvesting and integrating heterogeneous data types, including patient-specific clinical parameters, treatment-related dose-volume metrics, and biological risk factors. When taken together, such variables make up the basis for a multi-dimensional space (the "RadoncSpace") in which the presented modeling techniques search in order to identify significant predictors. Herein, we review outcome modeling and big data-mining techniques for both tumor control and radiotherapy-induced normal tissue effects. We apply many of the presented modeling approaches onto a cohort of hypofractionated prostate cancer patients taking into account different data types and a large heterogeneous mix of physical and biological parameters. Cross-validation techniques are also reviewed for the refinement of the proposed framework architecture and checking individual model performance. We conclude by considering advanced modeling techniques that borrow concepts from big data analytics, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, before discussing the potential future impact of systems radiobiology approaches.

  11. Motion monitoring during a course of lung radiotherapy with anchored electromagnetic transponders. Quantification of inter- and intrafraction motion and variability of relative transponder positions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, Daniela [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology (NCRO), Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); Heidelberg University Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg (Germany); National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology (NCRO), Heidelberg Institute for Radiation Oncology (HIRO), Heidelberg (Germany); The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Joint Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); Roeder, Falk [German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Clinical Cooperation Unit Molecular Radiooncology, Heidelberg (Germany); University of Munich (LMU), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Gompelmann, Daniela; Herth, Felix [University of Heidelberg, Pneumology and Critical Care Medicine, Thoraxklinik, Heidelberg (Germany); German Center for Lung Research, Translational Lung Research Center Heidelberg (TLRC), Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Anchored electromagnetic transponders for tumor motion monitoring during lung radiotherapy were clinically evaluated. First, intrafractional motion patterns were analyzed as well as their interfractional variations. Second, intra- and interfractional changes of the geometric transponder positions were investigated. Intrafractional motion data from 7 patients with an upper or middle lobe tumor and three implanted transponders each was used to calculate breathing amplitudes, overall motion amount and motion midlines in three mutual perpendicular directions and three-dimensionally (3D) for 162 fractions. For 6 patients intra- and interfractional variations in transponder distances and in the size of the triangle defined by the transponder locations over the treatment course were determined. Mean 3D values of all fractions were up to 4.0, 4.6 and 3.4 mm per patient for amplitude, overall motion amount and midline deviation, respectively. Intrafractional transponder distances varied with standard deviations up to 3.2 mm, while a maximal triangle shrinkage of 36.5% over 39 days was observed. Electromagnetic real-time motion monitoring was feasible for all patients. Detected respiratory motion was on average modest in this small cohort without lower lobe tumors, but changes in motion midline were of the same size as the amplitudes and greater midline motion can be observed in some fractions. Intra- and interfractional variations of the geometric transponder positions can be large, so for reliable motion management correlation between transponder and tumor motion needs to be evaluated per patient. (orig.) [German] Verankerte, elektromagnetische Transponder fuer die Bewegungserkennung des Tumors waehrend der Strahlentherapie der Lunge wurden klinisch evaluiert. Dafuer wurden intrafraktionelle Bewegungsmuster und ihre interfraktionellen Variationen analysiert und intra- und interfraktionelle Veraenderungen der geometrischen Transponderpositionen untersucht. Intrafraktionelle

  12. Dose-Response Modeling of the Visual Pathway Tolerance to Single-Fraction and Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiniker, Susan M; Modlin, Leslie A; Choi, Clara Y; Atalar, Banu; Seiger, Kira; Binkley, Michael S; Harris, Jeremy P; Liao, Yaping Joyce; Fischbein, Nancy; Wang, Lei; Ho, Anthony; Lo, Anthony; Chang, Steven D; Harsh, Griffith R; Gibbs, Iris C; Hancock, Steven L; Li, Gordon; Adler, John R; Soltys, Scott G

    2016-04-01

    Patients with tumors adjacent to the optic nerves and chiasm are frequently not candidates for single-fraction stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) due to concern for radiation-induced optic neuropathy. However, these patients have been successfully treated with hypofractionated SRS over 2-5 days, though dose constraints have not yet been well defined. We reviewed the literature on optic tolerance to radiation and constructed a dose-response model for visual pathway tolerance to SRS delivered in 1-5 fractions. We analyzed optic nerve and chiasm dose-volume histogram (DVH) data from perioptic tumors, defined as those within 3mm of the optic nerves or chiasm, treated with SRS from 2000-2013 at our institution. Tumors with subsequent local progression were excluded from the primary analysis of vision outcome. A total of 262 evaluable cases (26 with malignant and 236 with benign tumors) with visual field and clinical outcomes were analyzed. Median patient follow-up was 37 months (range: 2-142 months). The median number of fractions was 3 (1 fraction n = 47, 2 fraction n = 28, 3 fraction n = 111, 4 fraction n = 10, and 5 fraction n = 66); doses were converted to 3-fraction equivalent doses with the linear quadratic model using α/β = 2Gy prior to modeling. Optic structure dose parameters analyzed included Dmin, Dmedian, Dmean, Dmax, V30Gy, V25Gy, V20Gy, V15Gy, V10Gy, V5Gy, D50%, D10%, D5%, D1%, D1cc, D0.50cc, D0.25cc, D0.20cc, D0.10cc, D0.05cc, D0.03cc. From the plan DVHs, a maximum-likelihood parameter fitting of the probit dose-response model was performed using DVH Evaluator software. The 68% CIs, corresponding to one standard deviation, were calculated using the profile likelihood method. Of the 262 analyzed, 2 (0.8%) patients experienced common terminology criteria for adverse events grade 4 vision loss in one eye, defined as vision of 20/200 or worse in the affected eye. One of these patients had received 2 previous courses of radiotherapy to the optic structures

  13. No association between excessive wound complications and preoperative high-dose, hypofractionated, image-guided radiation therapy for spine metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keam, Jennifer; Bilsky, Mark H; Laufer, Ilya; Shi, Weiji; Zhang, Zhigang; Tam, Moses; Zatcky, Joan; Lovelock, Dale M; Yamada, Yoshiya

    2014-04-01

    Radiation therapy is known to impair wound healing. Higher dose per fraction is believed to increase this risk. This study sought to quantify rates of wound complication in patients receiving preoperative conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (XRT) or high-dose hypofractionated image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) for spinal metastasis, and to identify predictors of wound complication. The records of 165 consecutive patients who underwent spine surgery for metastasis at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center between 1999 and 2010, with a history of prior radiation therapy, were reviewed. Patients with primary spine tumors, 2 courses of prior radiation therapy to the surgical site, total dose 3 Gy/fraction). The total dose prescribed to the 100% isodose line to treat the planning target volume was 18-30 Gy in 1-5 fractions. Clinical factors evaluated included age, Karnofsky Performance Scale score, body mass index, presence of diabetes, smoking, ambulatory status, prior surgery at same spinal site, preoperative laboratory results (hemoglobin, lymphocyte count, and albumin), perioperative chemotherapy or steroids, estimated blood loss, extent of stabilization hardware, time between radiation therapy and surgery, number of vertebral bodies irradiated, total radiation dose, and dose per fraction of radiation therapy. Wound complication was defined as poor healing, dehiscence, or infection. Potential predictors of wound complication were assessed by univariate analyses using competing-risk methods to adjust for risk of death. results: For XRT patients, median dose was 30 Gy (range 11.5-70 Gy) with 72% of them receiving 3 Gy × 10 fractions. For IGRT patients, 66% received 18-24 Gy × 1 fraction and 23% received 6 Gy × 5 fractions. Groups differed only by the mean number of vertebral bodies treated (4.6 XRT and 1.8 IGRT, p complications occurred at a median of 0.95 months (range 0.4-3.9 months). A total of 22 wound events occurred in the XRT group and 2 in the IGRT

  14. Adoption of Hypofractionated Whole-Breast Irradiation for Early-Stage Breast Cancer: A National Cancer Data Base Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Elyn H. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Mougalian, Sarah S. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Soulos, Pamela R. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Rutter, Charles E.; Evans, Suzanne B. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Haffty, Bruce G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Gross, Cary P. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey and Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Internal Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Yu, James B., E-mail: james.b.yu@yale.edu [Yale School of Medicine, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Cancer Outcomes, Public Policy, and Effectiveness Research Center at Yale, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the relationship of patient, hospital, and cancer characteristics with the adoption of hypofractionation in a national sample of patients diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective study of breast cancer patients in the National Cancer Data Base from 2004-2011 who were treated with radiation therapy and met eligibility criteria for hypofractionation. We used logistic regression to identify factors associated with receipt of hypofractionation (vs conventional fractionation). Results: We identified 13,271 women (11.7%) and 99,996 women (88.3%) with early-stage breast cancer who were treated with hypofractionation and conventional fractionation, respectively. The use of hypofractionation increased significantly, with 5.4% of patients receiving it in 2004 compared with 22.8% in 2011 (P<.001 for trend). Patients living ≥50 miles from the cancer reporting facility had increased odds of receiving hypofractionation (odds ratio 1.57 [95% confidence interval 1.44-1.72], P<.001). Adoption of hypofractionation was associated with treatment at an academic center (P<.001) and living in an area with high median income (P<.001). Hypofractionation was less likely to be used in patients with high-risk disease, such as increased tumor size (P<.001) or poorly differentiated histologic grade (P<.001). Conclusions: The use of hypofractionation is rising and is associated with increased travel distance and treatment at an academic center. Further adoption of hypofractionation may be tempered by both clinical and nonclinical concerns.

  15. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy as monotherapy for intermediate-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Andrew W

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT has been advanced as monotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer. We examined the dose distributions and early clinical outcomes using this modality for the treatment of intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods Forty-one sequential hormone-naïve intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients received 35–36.25 Gy of CyberKnife-delivered SBRT in 5 fractions. Radiation dose distributions were analyzed for coverage of potential microscopic ECE by measuring the distance from the prostatic capsule to the 33 Gy isodose line. PSA levels, toxicities, and quality of life (QOL measures were assessed at baseline and follow-up. Results All patients completed treatment with a mean coverage by the 33 Gy isodose line extending >5 mm beyond the prostatic capsule in all directions except posteriorly. Clinical responses were documented by a mean PSA decrease from 7.67 ng/mL pretreatment to 0.64 ng/mL at the median follow-up of 21 months. Forty patients remain free from biochemical progression. No Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed. Mean EPIC urinary irritation/obstruction and bowel QOL scores exhibited a transient decline post-treatment with a subsequent return to baseline. No significant change in sexual QOL was observed. Conclusions In this intermediate-risk patient population, an adequate radiation dose was delivered to areas of expected microscopic ECE in the majority of patients. Although prospective studies are needed to confirm long-term tumor control and toxicity, the short-term PSA response, biochemical relapse-free survival rate, and QOL in this interim analysis are comparable to results reported for prostate brachytherapy or external beam radiotherapy. Trial registration The Georgetown Institutional Review Board has approved this retrospective study (IRB 2009–510.

  16. Modeling of α/β for late rectal toxicity from a randomized phase II study: conventional versus hypofractionated scheme for localized prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcangeli Giorgio

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, the use of hypo-fractionated treatment schemes for the prostate cancer has been encouraged due to the fact that α/β ratio for prostate cancer should be low. However a major concern on the use of hypofractionation is the late rectal toxicity, it is important to be able to predict the risk of toxicity for alternative treatment schemes, with the best accuracy. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the response of rectum wall to changes in fractionation and to quantify the α/β ratio for late rectal toxicity Methods 162 patients with localized prostate cancer, treated with conformal radiotherapy, were enrolled in a phase II randomized trial. The patients were randomly assigned to 80 Gy in 40 fractions over 8 weeks (arm A or 62 Gy in 20 fractions over 5 weeks (arm B. The median follow-up was 30 months. The late rectal toxicity was evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG scale. It was assumed ≥ Grade 2 (G2 toxicity incidence as primary end point. Fit of toxicity incidence by the Lyman-Burman-Kutcher (LKB model was performed. Results The crude incidence of late rectal toxicity ≥ G2 was 14% and 12% for the standard arm and the hypofractionated arm, respectively. The crude incidence of late rectal toxicity ≥ G2 was 14.0% and 12.3% for the arm A and B, respectively. For the arm A, volumes receiving ≥ 50 Gy (V50 and 70 Gy (V70 were 38.3 ± 7.5% and 23.4 ± 5.5%; for arm B, V38 and V54 were 40.9 ± 6.8% and 24.5 ± 4.4%. An α/β ratio for late rectal toxicity very close to 3 Gy was found. Conclusion The ≥ G2 late toxicities in both arms were comparable, indicating the feasibility of hypofractionated regimes in prostate cancer. An α/β ratio for late rectal toxicity very close to 3 Gy was found.

  17. Hypofractionated helical tomotherapy (75 Gy at 2.5 Gy per fraction for localized prostate cancer: long-term analysis of gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong M

    2014-04-01

    toxicities, constraining the rectum maximum dose to less than 76.5 Gy, rectum V70 to less than 2.8%, bladder V40 to less than 17.3%, bladder V50 to less than 10.2%, bladder V70 to less than 2.8%, and bladder V75 to less than 1.0% would be necessary.Keywords: prostate cancer, helical tomotherapy, hypofractionated radiotherapy, radiation toxicity, predictive factor

  18. Mild Lung Restriction in Breast Cancer Patients After Hypofractionated and Conventional Radiation Therapy: A 3-Year Follow-Up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verbanck, Sylvia, E-mail: sylvia.verbanck@uzbrussel.be [Respiratory Division, University Hospital UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Hanon, Shane; Schuermans, Daniel [Respiratory Division, University Hospital UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Van Parijs, Hilde; Vinh-Hung, Vincent; Miedema, Geertje; Verellen, Dirk; Storme, Guy [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Fontaine, Christel; Lamote, Jan [Department of Senology and Oncologic Surgery, University Hospital UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); De Ridder, Mark [Department of Radiotherapy, University Hospital UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Vincken, Walter [Respiratory Division, University Hospital UZ Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To assess the effect of radiation therapy on lung function over the course of 3 years. Methods and Materials: Evolution of restrictive and obstructive lung function parameters was investigated in 108 breast cancer participants in a randomized, controlled trial comparing conventional radiation therapy (CR) and hypofractionated tomotherapy (TT) (age at inclusion ranging 32-81 years). Spirometry, plethysmography, and hemoglobin-corrected diffusing capacity were assessed at baseline and after 3 months and 1, 2, and 3 years. Natural aging was accounted for by considering all lung function parameters in terms of percent predicted values using the most recent reference values for women aged up to 80 years. Results: In the patients with negligible history of respiratory disease or smoking (n=77), the greatest rate of functional decline was observed during the initial 3 months, this acute decrease being more marked in the CR versus the TT arm. During the remainder of the 3-year follow-up period, values (in terms of percent predicted) were maintained (diffusing capacity) or continued to decline at a slower rate (forced vital capacity). However, the average decline of the restrictive lung function parameters over a 3-year period did not exceed 9% predicted in either the TT or the CR arm. Obstructive lung function parameters remained unaffected throughout. Including also the 31 patients with a history of respiratory disease or more than 10 pack-years showed a very similar restrictive pattern. Conclusions: In women with breast cancer, both conventional radiation therapy and hypofractionated tomotherapy induce small but consistent restrictive lung patterns over the course of a 3-year period, irrespective of baseline respiratory status or smoking history. The fastest rate of lung function decline generally occurred in the first 3 months.

  19. An online x-ray based position validation system for prostate hypofractionated radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arumugam, Sankar, E-mail: Sankar.Arumugam@sswahs.nsw.gov.au; Xing, Aitang [Department of Medical Physics, Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Sidhom, Mark [Department of Radiation Oncology, Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Holloway, Lois [Department of Medical Physics, Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres and Ingham Institute, New South Wales 2170 (Australia); Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong, Wollongong, New South Wales 2522 (Australia); South Western Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia); Institute of Medical Physics, School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: Accurate positioning of the target volume during treatment is paramount for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). In this work, the authors present the development of an in-house software tool to verify target position with an Elekta-Synergy linear accelerator using kV planar images acquired during treatment delivery. Methods: In-house software, SeedTracker, was developed in MATLAB to perform the following three functions: 1. predict intended seed positions in a planar view perpendicular to any gantry angle, simulating a portal imaging device, from the 3D seed co-ordinates derived from the treatment planning system; 2. autosegment seed positions in kV planar images; and 3. report the position shift based on the seed positions in the projection images. The performance of SeedTracker was verified using a CIRS humanoid phantom (CIRS, VA, USA) implanted with three Civco gold seed markers (Civco, IA, USA) in the prostate. The true positive rate of autosegmentation (TPR{sub seg}) and the accuracy of the software in alerting the user when the isocenter position was outside the tolerance (TPR{sub trig}) were studied. Two-dimensional and 3D static position offsets introduced to the humanoid phantom and 3D dynamic offsets introduced to a gel phantom containing gold seeds were used for evaluation of the system. Results: SeedTracker showed a TPR{sub seg} of 100% in the humanoid phantom for projection images acquired at all angles except in the ranges of 80°–100° and 260°–280° where seeds are obscured by anatomy. This resulted in a TPR{sub trig} of 88% over the entire treatment range for considered 3D static offsets introduced to the phantom. For 2D static offsets where the position offsets were only introduced in the anterior–posterior and lateral directions, the TPR{sub trig} of SeedTracker was limited by both seed detectability and positional offset. SeedTracker showed a false positive trigger in the projection angle range between 130°–170° and 310°–350° (a maximum of 24% of treatment time) due to limited information that can be derived from monoscopic images. The system accurately determined the dynamic trajectory of the isocenter position in the superior and inferior direction for the studied dynamic offset scenarios based on the seed position in monoscopic images. Conclusions: The developed software has been shown to accurately autosegment the seed positions in kV planar images except for two 20° arcs where seeds are obscured by anatomical structures. The isocenter trajectories determined by the system, based on the monoscopic images, provide useful information for monitoring the prostate position. The developed system has potential application for monitoring prostate position during treatment delivery in linear accelerator based SBRT.

  20. Study of relapse and course of 153 cases of Hodgkin's disease treated with radiotherapy alone or with adjuvant monochemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pene, F. (Hopital Tenon, Paris, France); Henry-Amar, M.; Le Bourgeois, J.P.; Hayat, M.; Gerard-Marchant, R.; Laugier, A.; Mathe, G.; Tubiana, M.

    1980-11-15

    Seventy-three relapses were observed among 153 patients with Hodgkin's disease, clinical Stages I and II, who underwent treatment between 1963 and 1970. Treatment consisted of radiotherapy to the involved side of the diaphragm alone or followed by two years of weekly injections of Vinblastine. The relapse-free rate was higher for the group receiving combination therapy; the difference in survival, although smaller than the difference in relapse-free rates, is significant. The survival rate after relapse was not significantly influenced by the type of initial treatment. Of the 32 splenectomies performed after relapse, 20 revealed splenic involvement. Histologic slides were initially classified and then reviewed blindly in 1975 by the same team of pathologists. The survival rate for those whose histologic type had changed between the first and second reading was significantly lower than that for those who remained in the same histologic group.

  1. Estimates of radiation doses in tissue and organs and risk of excess cancer in the single-course radiotherapy patients treated for ankylosing spondylitis in England and Wales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrikant, J.I.; Lyman, J.T.

    1982-02-01

    The estimates of absorbed doses of x rays and excess risk of cancer in bone marrow and heavily irradiated sites are extremely crude and are based on very limited data and on a number of assumptions. Some of these assumptions may later prove to be incorrect, but it is probable that they are correct to within a factor of 2. The excess cancer risk estimates calculated compare well with the most reliable epidemiological surveys thus far studied. This is particularly important for cancers of heavily irradiated sites with long latent periods. The mean followup period for the patients was 16.2 y, and an increase in cancers of heavily irradiated sites may appear in these patients in the 1970s in tissues and organs with long latent periods for the induction of cancer. The accuracy of these estimates is severely limited by the inadequacy of information on doses absorbed by the tissues at risk in the irradiated patients. The information on absorbed dose is essential for an accurate assessment of dose-cancer incidence analysis. Furthermore, in this valuable series of irradiated patients, the information on radiation dosimetry on the radiotherapy charts is central to any reliable determination of somatic risks of radiation with regard to carcinogenesis in man. The work necessary to obtain these data is under way; only when they are available can more precise estimates of risk of cancer induction by radiation in man be obtained.

  2. Phase II Trial of Hypofractionated IMRT With Temozolomide for Patients With Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Krishna [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Damek, Denise [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Gaspar, Laurie E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Ney, Douglas [Department of Neurology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Waziri, Allen; Lillehei, Kevin [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Stuhr, Kelly; Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Chen Changhu, E-mail: changhu.chen@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To report toxicity and overall survival (OS) in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) treated with hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (hypo-IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ). Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed GBM after biopsy or resection and with adequate performance status and organ or bone marrow function were eligible for this study. Patients received postoperative hypo-IMRT to the surgical cavity and residual tumor seen on T1-weighted brain MRI with a 5-mm margin to a total dose of 60 Gy in 10 fractions (6 Gy/fraction) and to the T2 abnormality on T2-weighted MRI with 5-mm margin to 30 Gy in 10 fractions (3 Gy/fraction). Concurrent TMZ was given at 75 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 28 consecutive days. Adjuvant TMZ was given at 150 to 200 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 5 days every 28 days. Toxicities were defined using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Results: Twenty-four patients were treated, consisting of 14 men, 10 women; a median age of 60.5 years old (range, 27-77 years); and a median Karnofsky performance score of 80 (range, 60-90). All patients received hypo-IMRT and concurrent TMZ according to protocol, except for 2 patients who received only 14 days of concurrent TMZ. The median number of adjuvant TMZ cycles was 6.5 (range, 0-14).With a median follow-up of 14.8 months (range, 2.7-34.2 months) for all patients and a minimum follow-up of 20.6 months for living patients, no instances of grade 3 or higher nonhematologic toxicity were observed. The median OS was 16.6 months (range, 4.1-35.9 months). Six patients underwent repeated surgery for suspected tumor recurrence; necrosis was found in 50% to 100% of the resected specimens. Conclusion: In selected GBM patients, 60 Gy hypo-IMRT delivered in 6-Gy fractions over 2 weeks with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ is safe. OS in this small cohort of patients was comparable to that treated with current standard of care

  3. Radiotherapy in prostate cancer. Innovative techniques and current controversies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geinitz, Hans [Krankenhaus der Barmherzigen Schwestern, Linz (Austria). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Linz Univ. (Austria). Medical Faculty; Roach, Mack III [California Univ., San Francisco, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Van As, Nicholas (ed.) [The Institute of Cancer Research, Sutton Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-01

    Examines in detail the role of innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer, including IMRT, IGRT, BART, and modern brachytherapy. Explores a range of current controversies in patient treatment. Intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists. Radiation treatment is rapidly evolving owing to the coordinated research of physicists, engineers, computer and imaging specialists, and physicians. Today, the arsenal of ''high-precision'' or ''targeted'' radiotherapy includes multimodal imaging, in vivo dosimetry, Monte Carlo techniques for dose planning, patient immobilization techniques, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), biologically adapted radiotherapy (BART), quality assurance methods, novel methods of brachytherapy, and, at the far end of the scale, particle beam radiotherapy using protons and carbon ions. These approaches are like pieces of a puzzle that need to be put together to provide the prostate cancer patient with high-level optimized radiation treatment. This book examines in detail the role of the above-mentioned innovative radiation techniques in the management of prostate cancer. In addition, a variety of current controversies regarding treatment are carefully explored, including whether prophylactic treatment of the pelvic lymphatics is essential, the magnitude of the effect of dose escalation, whether a benefit accrues from hypofractionation, and what evidence exists for the superiority of protons or heavy ions. Radiotherapy in Prostate Cancer: Innovative Techniques and Current Controversies is intended for both radiation oncologists and urologists with an interest in the up-to-date capabilities of modern radiation oncology for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  4. Macroscopic Hematuria After Conventional or Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy: Results From a Prospective Phase 3 Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Arcidiacono, Fabio; Landoni, Valeria; Saracino, Bianca Maria; Farneti, Alessia; Arcangeli, Stefano; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Gomellini, Sara; Strigari, Lidia; Arcangeli, Giorgio

    2016-10-01

    To assess the macroscopic hematuria rates within a single-institution randomized phase 3 trial comparing dose-escalated, conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (CFRT) and moderately hypofractionated radiation therapy (MHRT) for localized prostate cancer. Patients with intermediate- to high-risk localized prostate cancer were treated with conformal RT and short-course androgen deprivation. Both the prostate and the entire seminal vesicles were treated to 80 Gy in 40 fractions over 8 weeks (CFRT) or 62 Gy in 20 fractions over 5 weeks (MHRT). The endpoint of the present study was the development of any episode or grade of macroscopic hematuria. The median follow-up period was 93 months (range 6-143). Macroscopic hematuria was reported by 25 of 168 patients (14.9%). The actuarial estimate of hematuria at 8 years was 17.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] 10.7%-23.3%). The number of patients with hematuria was 6 and 19 in the CFRT and MHRT arms, respectively, for an actuarial 8-year estimate of 9.7% and 24.3%, respectively (hazard ratio 3.468, 95% CI 1.385-8.684; P=.008). Overall, 8 of 25 patients were found to have biopsy-proven urothelial carcinoma (3 in the CFRT arm and 5 in the MHRT arm; P=.27). Thus, the 8-year actuarial incidence of macroscopic hematuria (after censoring urothelial cancer-related episodes) was 4.1% and 18.2% after CFRT and MHRT, respectively (hazard ratio 4.961, 95% CI 1.426-17.263; P=.012). The results were confirmed by multivariate analysis after accounting for several patient-, treatment-, and tumor-related covariates. MHRT was associated with a statistically significant increased risk of macroscopic hematuria compared with CFRT. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Postmastectomy radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikama, Naoto; Koguchi, Masahiko; Sasaki, Shigeru; Kaneko, Tomoki; Shinoda, Atsunori; Nishikawa, Atsushi [Shinshu Univ., Matsumoto, Nagano (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Since there have been few reports on postmastectomy radiotherapy having a high evidence level in Japan, the significance of postoperative radiotherapy and the irradiation techniques were reviewed based on reports from Western countries. Authors focused on the indications for postoperative irradiation, irradiation methods (irradiation sites, irradiation techniques; prosthetics, methods of irradiating the chest wall and lymph nodes, timing of irradiation), and complications, and discuss them. The factors thought to be adaptable to postmastectomy radiotherapy have been listed. Axillary lymph node metastasis and the size of the primary focus are thought to be important factors in locoregional recurrence. The chest wall and the supraclavicular lymph nodes are the usual sites of irradiation after mastectomy. The irradiation method consists of tangential irradiation of the chest wall and single-field irradiation of the supraclavicular lymph nodes, with 46-50 Gy in fractional doses of 1.8-2 Gy x 5/w is administered for 4.5-5.5 weeks. The timing of irradiation in the West is generally after chemotherapy. Adverse radiation effects include ischemic heart disease, pneumonitis, arm edema, rib fractures, and brachial plexus paralysis. The frequency of these complications is increased by the combined use of chemotherapy or surgery. The breast cancer cure rate in Japan is generally better than in the West. It remains to be determined whether the clinical data from Europe and America are applicable to the treatment of breast cancer in Japan. To address this issue, a clinical investigation should be performed in Japan with close cooperation between surgeons, physicians, pathologists, and radiotherapists. (K.H.)

  6. Adaptive-predictive organ localization using cone-beam computed tomography for improved accuracy in external beam radiotherapy for bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalondrelle, Susan; Huddart, Robert; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark; McNair, Helen; Thomas, Karen; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Khoo, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    To examine patterns of bladder wall motion during high-dose hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy and to validate a novel adaptive planning method, A-POLO, to prevent subsequent geographic miss. Patterns of individual bladder filling were obtained with repeat computed tomography planning scans at 0, 15, and 30minutes after voiding. A series of patient-specific plans corresponding to these time-displacement points was created. Pretreatment cone-beam computed tomography was performed before each fraction and assessed retrospectively for adaptive intervention. In fractions that would have required intervention, the most appropriate plan was chosen from the patient's "library," and the resulting target coverage was reassessed with repeat cone-beam computed tomography. A large variation in patterns of bladder filling and interfraction displacement was seen. During radiotherapy, predominant translations occurred cranially (maximum 2.5 cm) and anteriorly (maximum 1.75 cm). No apparent explanation was found for this variation using pretreatment patient factors. A need for adaptive planning was demonstrated by 51% of fractions, and 73% of fractions would have been delivered correctly using A-POLO. The adaptive strategy improved target coverage and was able to account for intrafraction motion also. Bladder volume variation will result in geographic miss in a high proportion of delivered bladder radiotherapy treatments. The A-POLO strategy can be used to correct for this and can be implemented from the first fraction of radiotherapy; thus, it is particularly suited to hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy regimens. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Phase I/II trial evaluating carbon ion radiotherapy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer: the PANDORA-01 trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Combs Stephanie E

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment standard for patients with rectal cancer depends on the initial staging and includes surgical resection, radiotherapy as well as chemotherapy. For stage II and III tumors, radiochemotherapy should be performed in addition to surgery, preferentially as preoperative radiochemotherapy or as short-course hypofractionated radiation. Advances in surgical approaches, especially the establishment of the total mesorectal excision (TME in combination with sophisticated radiation and chemotherapy have reduced local recurrence rates to only few percent. However, due to the high incidence of rectal cancer, still a high absolute number of patients present with recurrent rectal carcinomas, and effective treatment is therefore needed. Carbon ions offer physical and biological advantages. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increase relative biological effectiveness (RBE, which can be calculated between 2 and 5 depending on the cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Japanese data on the treatment of patients with recurrent rectal cancer previously not treated with radiation therapy have shown local control rates of carbon ion treatment superior to those of surgery. Therefore, this treatment concept should also be evaluated for recurrences after radiotherapy, when dose application using conventional photons is limited. Moreover, these patients are likely to benefit from the enhanced biological efficacy of carbon ions. Methods and design In the current Phase I/II-PANDORA-01-Study the recommended dose of carbon ion radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer will be determined in the Phase I part, and feasibilty and progression-free survival will be assessed in the Phase II part of the study. Within the Phase I part, increasing doses from 12 × 3 Gy E to 18

  8. Phase I/II trial evaluating carbon ion radiotherapy for the treatment of recurrent rectal cancer: the PANDORA-01 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Kieser, Meinhard; Habermehl, Daniel; Weitz, Jürgen; Jäger, Dirk; Fossati, Piero; Orrechia, Roberto; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Pötter, Richard; Dosanjh, Manjit; Jäkel, Oliver; Büchler, Markus W; Debus, Jürgen

    2012-04-03

    Treatment standard for patients with rectal cancer depends on the initial staging and includes surgical resection, radiotherapy as well as chemotherapy. For stage II and III tumors, radiochemotherapy should be performed in addition to surgery, preferentially as preoperative radiochemotherapy or as short-course hypofractionated radiation. Advances in surgical approaches, especially the establishment of the total mesorectal excision (TME) in combination with sophisticated radiation and chemotherapy have reduced local recurrence rates to only few percent. However, due to the high incidence of rectal cancer, still a high absolute number of patients present with recurrent rectal carcinomas, and effective treatment is therefore needed.Carbon ions offer physical and biological advantages. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increase relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 2 and 5 depending on the cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed.Japanese data on the treatment of patients with recurrent rectal cancer previously not treated with radiation therapy have shown local control rates of carbon ion treatment superior to those of surgery. Therefore, this treatment concept should also be evaluated for recurrences after radiotherapy, when dose application using conventional photons is limited. Moreover, these patients are likely to benefit from the enhanced biological efficacy of carbon ions. In the current Phase I/II-PANDORA-01-Study the recommended dose of carbon ion radiotherapy for recurrent rectal cancer will be determined in the Phase I part, and feasibilty and progression-free survival will be assessed in the Phase II part of the study.Within the Phase I part, increasing doses from 12 × 3 Gy E to 18 × 3 Gy E will be applied.The primary endpoint in the Phase

  9. Changes in global function and regional ventilation and perfusion on SPECT during the course of radiotherapy in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Shuanghu Tiger; Frey, Kirk A; Gross, Milton D; Hayman, James A; Arenberg, Doug; Cai, Xu-Wei; Ramnath, Nithya; Hassan, Khaled; Moran, Jean; Eisbruch, Avraham; Ten Haken, Randall K; Kong, Feng-Ming Spring

    2012-03-15

    This study aimed to (1) examine changes in dyspnea, global pulmonary function test (PFT) results, and functional activity on ventilation (V)/perfusion (Q) single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) scans during the course of radiation (RT), and (2) factors associated with the changes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Fifty-six stage I to III NSCLC patients treated with definitive RT with or without chemotherapy were enrolled prospectively. Dyspnea was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 prior to and weekly during RT. V/Q SPECT-computed tomography (CT) and PFTs were performed prior to and during RT at approximately 45 Gy. Functions of V and Q activities were assessed using a semiquantitative scoring of SPECT images. Breathing improved significantly at the third week (mean dyspnea grade, 0.8 vs. 0.6; paired t-test p = 0.011) and worsened during the later course of RT (p > 0.05). Global PFT results did not change significantly, while regional lung function on V/Q SPECT improved significantly after ∼45 Gy. The V defect score (DS) was 4.9 pre-RT versus 4.3 during RT (p = 0.01); Q DS was 4.3 pre-RT versus 4.0 during RT (p lung (V DS, 1.9 pre-RT versus 1.4 during RT, p lung tumors had greater interval changes in V and Q than those with more peripheral tumors (p ventilation and perfusion improved during RT at 45 Gy. This suggests that adaptive planning based on V/Q SPECT during RT may allow sparing of functionally recoverable lung tissue. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Hypofractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of feline facial squamous cell carcinoma; Hypofractionated radiation therapy for the treatment of feline facial squamous cell carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, S.C.S.; Corgozinho, K.B.; Holguin, P.G.; Ferreira, A.M.R., E-mail: simonecsc@gmail.co [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Carvalho, L.A.V. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Canary, P.C.; Reisner, M. [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho (HUCFF/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Pereira, A.N.; Souza, H.J.M. [Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro (UFRRJ), Seropedica, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The efficacy of hypofractionated radiation protocol for feline facial squamous cell carcinoma was evaluated. Hypofractionated radiation therapy was applied to five cats showing single or multiple facial squamous cell carcinomas, in a total of ten histologically confirmed neoplastic lesions. Of the lesions, two were staged as T{sub 1}, four as T{sub 2}, two as T{sub 3}, and two as T{sub 4}. The animals were submitted to four radiation fractions from 7.6 to 10 grays each, with one week intervals. The equipment was a linear accelerator with electrons beam. The cats were evaluated weekly during the treatment and 30 and 60 days after the end of the radiation therapy. In this study, 40% of the lesions had complete remission, 40% partial remission, and 20% did not respond to the treatment. Response rates were lower as compared to other protocols previously used. However, hypofractionated radiation protocol was considered safe for feline facial squamous cell carcinoma. (author)

  11. Late side effects of short-course preoperative radiotherapy combined with total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer : Increased bowel dysfunction in irradiated patients - A dutch colorectal cancer group study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, KCMJ; van de Velde, CJH; Leer, JWH; Martijn, H; Junggeburt, JMC; Kranenbarg, EK; Steup, WH; Wiggers, T; Rutten, HJ; Marijnen, CAM

    2005-01-01

    Purpose Preoperative short-term radiotherapy improves local control in patients treated with total mesorectal excision (TME). This study was performed to assess the presence and magnitude of long-term side effects of preoperative 5 x 5 Gy radiotherapy and TME. Also, hospital treatment was recorded

  12. Late side effects of short-course preoperative radiotherapy combined with total mesorectal excision for rectal cancer: increased bowel dysfunction in irradiated patients--a Dutch colorectal cancer group study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peeters, K.C.; Velde, C.J. van de; Leer, J.W.H.; Martijn, H.; Junggeburt, J.M.; Kranenbarg, E.K.; Steup, W.H.; Wiggers, T.; Rutten, H.J.; Marijnen, C.A.M.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Preoperative short-term radiotherapy improves local control in patients treated with total mesorectal excision (TME). This study was performed to assess the presence and magnitude of long-term side effects of preoperative 5 x 5 Gy radiotherapy and TME. Also, hospital treatment was recorded

  13. Changes in Global Function and Regional Ventilation and Perfusion on SPECT During the Course of Radiotherapy in Patients With Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan Shuanghu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Shaexamndong Cancer Hospital and Institute, Jinan (China); Frey, Kirk A.; Gross, Milton D. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hayman, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Arenberg, Doug [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Cai Xuwei [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ramnath, Nithya; Hassan, Khaled [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moran, Jean; Eisbruch, Avraham; Ten Haken, Randall K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Kong Fengming, E-mail: fengkong@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Radiation Oncology, Veterans' Affairs Health Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: This study aimed to (1) examine changes in dyspnea, global pulmonary function test (PFT) results, and functional activity on ventilation (V)/perfusion (Q) single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) scans during the course of radiation (RT), and (2) factors associated with the changes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifty-six stage I to III NSCLC patients treated with definitive RT with or without chemotherapy were enrolled prospectively. Dyspnea was graded according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0 prior to and weekly during RT. V/Q SPECT-computed tomography (CT) and PFTs were performed prior to and during RT at approximately 45 Gy. Functions of V and Q activities were assessed using a semiquantitative scoring of SPECT images. Results: Breathing improved significantly at the third week (mean dyspnea grade, 0.8 vs. 0.6; paired t-test p = 0.011) and worsened during the later course of RT (p > 0.05). Global PFT results did not change significantly, while regional lung function on V/Q SPECT improved significantly after {approx}45 Gy. The V defect score (DS) was 4.9 pre-RT versus 4.3 during RT (p = 0.01); Q DS was 4.3 pre-RT versus 4.0 during RT (p < 0.01). Improvements in V and Q functions were seen primarily in the ipsilateral lung (V DS, 1.9 pre-RT versus 1.4 during RT, p < 0.01; Q DS, 1.7 pre-RT versus 1.5 during RT, p < 0.01). Baseline primary tumor volume was significantly correlated with pre-RT V/Q DS (p < 0.01). Patients with central lung tumors had greater interval changes in V and Q than those with more peripheral tumors (p <0.05 for both V and Q DS). Conclusions: Regional ventilation and perfusion improved during RT at 45 Gy. This suggests that adaptive planning based on V/Q SPECT during RT may allow sparing of functionally recoverable lung tissue.

  14. Hypofractionated IMRT of the Prostate Bed After Radical Prostatectomy: Acute Toxicity in the PRIAMOS-1 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Sonja, E-mail: sonja.katayama@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Striecker, Thorbjoern; Kessel, Kerstin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Sterzing, Florian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Habl, Gregor [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Edler, Lutz [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Herfarth, Klaus [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy as primary treatment for prostate cancer is currently being investigated in large phase 3 trials. However, there are few data on postoperative hypofractionation. The Radiation therapy for the Prostate Bed With or Without the Pelvic Lymph Nodes (PRIAMOS 1) trial was initiated as a prospective phase 2 trial to assess treatment safety and toxicity of a hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of the prostate bed. Methods and Materials: From February to September 2012, 40 patients with indications for adjuvant or salvage radiation therapy were enrolled. One patient dropped out before treatment. Patients received 54 Gy in 18 fractions to the prostate bed with IMRT and daily image guidance. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities (according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0) were recorded weekly during treatment and 10 weeks after radiation therapy. Results: Overall acute toxicity was favorable, with no recorded adverse events grade ≥3. Acute GI toxicity rates were 56.4% (grade 1) and 17.9% (grade 2). Acute GU toxicity was recorded in 35.9% of patients (maximum grade 1). Urinary stress incontinence was not influenced by radiation therapy. The incidence of grade 1 urinary urge incontinence increased from 2.6% before to 23.1% 10 weeks after therapy, but grade 2 urge incontinence remained unchanged. Conclusions: Postoperative hypofractionated IMRT of the prostate bed is tolerated well, with no severe acute side effects.

  15. Biological dose representation for carbon-ion radiotherapy of unconventional fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku

    2017-02-07

    In carbon-ion radiotherapy, single-beam delivery each day in alternate directions has been common practice for efficient operation, taking advantage of the Bragg peak and the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for uniform dose conformation to a tumor. Treatments are usually fractionated and treatment plans are evaluated with the total RBE-weighted dose; however, this is of limited relevance to the biological effect. In this study, we reformulate the biologically effective dose (BED) to normalize the dose-fractionation and cell-repopulation effects as well as the RBE of treating radiation, based on inactivation of a reference cell line by a reference carbon-ion radiation. The BED distribution virtually represents the biological effect of a treatment regardless of radiation modality or fractionation scheme. We applied the BED formulation to simplistic model treatments and to a preclinical survey for hypofractionation based on an actual prostate cancer treatment with carbon ions. The proposed formulation was demonstrated to be practical and to give theoretical implications. For a prostate cancer treatment in 12 fractions, the distributions of BED and of RBE-weighted dose were very similar. With hypofractionation, while the RBE-weighted dose distribution varied significantly, the BED distribution was nearly invariant, implying that carbon-ion radiotherapy would be effectively insensitive to fractionation. However, treatment evaluation with such a simplistic biological dose is intrinsically limited and must be complemented in practice by clinical experience and biological experiments.

  16. Technical Note: Introduction of variance component analysis to setup error analysis in radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this technical note is to introduce variance component analysis to the estimation of systematic and random components in setup error of radiotherapy. Balanced data according to the one-factor random effect model were assumed. Analysis-of-variance (anova)-based computation was applied to estimate the values and their confidence intervals (CIs) for systematic and random errors and the population mean of setup errors. The conventional method overestimates systematic error, especially in hypofractionated settings. The CI for systematic error becomes much wider than that for random error. The anova-based estimation can be extended to a multifactor model considering multiple causes of setup errors (e.g., interpatient, interfraction, and intrafraction). Variance component analysis may lead to novel applications to setup error analysis in radiotherapy.

  17. Optimizing radiotherapy protocols using computer automata to model tumour cell death as a function of oxygen diffusion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul-Gilloteaux, Perrine; Potiron, Vincent; Delpon, Grégory; Supiot, Stéphane; Chiavassa, Sophie; Paris, François; Costes, Sylvain V

    2017-05-23

    The concept of hypofractionation is gaining momentum in radiation oncology centres, enabled by recent advances in radiotherapy apparatus. The gain of efficacy of this innovative treatment must be defined. We present a computer model based on translational murine data for in silico testing and optimization of various radiotherapy protocols with respect to tumour resistance and the microenvironment heterogeneity. This model combines automata approaches with image processing algorithms to simulate the cellular response of tumours exposed to ionizing radiation, modelling the alteration of oxygen permeabilization in blood vessels against repeated doses, and introducing mitotic catastrophe (as opposed to arbitrary delayed cell-death) as a means of modelling radiation-induced cell death. Published data describing cell death in vitro as well as tumour oxygenation in vivo are used to inform parameters. Our model is validated by comparing simulations to in vivo data obtained from the radiation treatment of mice transplanted with human prostate tumours. We then predict the efficacy of untested hypofractionation protocols, hypothesizing that tumour control can be optimized by adjusting daily radiation dosage as a function of the degree of hypoxia in the tumour environment. Further biological refinement of this tool will permit the rapid development of more sophisticated strategies for radiotherapy.

  18. Vestibular schwannoma: an unusual post radiotherapy response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddin, Najam; Iqbal, Muhammad; Memon, Muhammad Ali; Farrukh, Salman

    2014-11-01

    Vestibular schwannoma is a relatively uncommon tumor. Although, it is benign but locally expansile and spreads to damage the adjacent structures. Treatment strategy includes surgery, Stereotactic Radiosurgery (SRS) either by standard or hypofractionated protocols. Due to its benign nature, radiation therapy cannot remove the tumor completely, instead radiation therapy halts the growth of vestibular schwannoma and inactivates this benign tumor. Response of radiation in the form of tumor shrinkage is seen 2 - 2.5 years after the radiations. We report a case of vestibular Schwannoma in which residual tumor of 3.1 cm size following subtotal resection was irradiated of the dose of 54 Gy in 30 equal fractions on 3-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy (3-DCRT). A follow-up CT scan brain after 2 months of radiotherapy showed complete disappearance of the disease categorized as complete response. This is an unusual phenomenon and is likely due to the very rarely seen malignant transformation or presence of malignant component in this benign tumor.

  19. Clinical Outcomes of Image Guided Adaptive Hypofractionated Weekly Radiation Therapy for Bladder Cancer in Patients Unsuitable for Radical Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hafeez, Shaista, E-mail: shaista.hafeez@icr.ac.uk [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McDonald, Fiona; Lalondrelle, Susan [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); McNair, Helen; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Jones, Kelly [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Harris, Victoria [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Taylor, Helen; Khoo, Vincent [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, Karen [The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom); Hansen, Vibeke; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Huddart, Robert [The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    Purpose and Objectives: We report on the clinical outcomes of a phase 2 study assessing image guided hypofractionated weekly radiation therapy in bladder cancer patients unsuitable for radical treatment. Methods and Materials: Fifty-five patients with T2-T4aNx-2M0-1 bladder cancer not suitable for cystectomy or daily radiation therapy treatment were recruited. A “plan of the day” radiation therapy approach was used, treating the whole (empty) bladder to 36 Gy in 6 weekly fractions. Acute toxicity was assessed weekly during radiation therapy, at 6 and 12 weeks using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. Late toxicity was assessed at 6 months and 12 months using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group grading. Cystoscopy was used to assess local control at 3 months. Cumulative incidence function was used to determine local progression at 1 at 2 years. Death without local progression was treated as a competing risk. Overall survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Median age was 86 years (range, 68-97 years). Eighty-seven percent of patients completed their prescribed course of radiation therapy. Genitourinary and gastrointestinal grade 3 acute toxicity was seen in 18% (10/55) and 4% (2/55) of patients, respectively. No grade 4 genitourinary or gastrointestinal toxicity was seen. Grade ≥3 late toxicity (any) at 6 and 12 months was seen in 6.5% (2/31) and 4.3% (1/23) of patients, respectively. Local control after radiation therapy was 92% of assessed patients (60% total population). Cumulative incidence of local progression at 1 year and 2 years for all patients was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 2%-17%) and 17% (95% CI 8%-29%), respectively. Overall survival at 1 year was 63% (95% CI 48%-74%). Conclusion: Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivered weekly with a plan of the day approach offers good local control with acceptable toxicity in a patient population not suitable for radical bladder treatment.

  20. Radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, Lena [Rigshospitalet Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Depts. of Oncology and Haematology; Yahalom, Joachim (eds.) [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer, New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2011-07-01

    This book deals in detail with all aspects of the best practice in modern radiotherapy for Hodgkin lymphoma. It provides the background and rationale for the inclusion of radiotherapy in today's combined-modality approach, including special clinical situations such as Hodgkin lymphoma in children, in the pregnant patient, and in the elderly. Radiotherapy planning using state-of-the-art imaging, target definition, planning software, and treatment equipment is expounded in detail. Acute and long-term side effects of radiotherapy are analyzed, and the implications for modern radiotherapy approaches in Hodgkin lymphomas are explained. (orig.)

  1. Five-year Local Control in a Phase II Study of Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With an Incorporated Boost for Early Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, Gary M., E-mail: Gary.Freedman@uphs.upenn.edu [Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Anderson, Penny R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bleicher, Richard J. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Litwin, Samuel; Li Tianyu [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Swaby, Ramona F. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ma, Chang-Ming Charlie; Li Jinsheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sigurdson, Elin R. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Morrow, Monica [Department of Surgical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Goldstein, Lori J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: Conventional radiation fractionation of 1.8-2 Gy per day for early stage breast cancer requires daily treatment for 6-7 weeks. We report the 5-year results of a phase II study of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), hypofractionation, and incorporated boost that shortened treatment time to 4 weeks. Methods and Materials: The study design was phase II with a planned accrual of 75 patients. Eligibility included patients aged {>=}18 years, Tis-T2, stage 0-II, and breast conservation. Photon IMRT and an incorporated boost was used, and the whole breast received 2.25 Gy per fraction for a total of 45 Gy, and the tumor bed received 2.8 Gy per fraction for a total of 56 Gy in 20 treatments over 4 weeks. Patients were followed every 6 months for 5 years. Results: Seventy-five patients were treated from December 2003 to November 2005. The median follow-up was 69 months. Median age was 52 years (range, 31-81). Median tumor size was 1.4 cm (range, 0.1-3.5). Eighty percent of tumors were node negative; 93% of patients had negative margins, and 7% of patients had close (>0 and <2 mm) margins; 76% of cancers were invasive ductal type: 15% were ductal carcinoma in situ, 5% were lobular, and 4% were other histology types. Twenty-nine percent of patients 29% had grade 3 carcinoma, and 20% of patients had extensive in situ carcinoma; 11% of patients received chemotherapy, 36% received endocrine therapy, 33% received both, and 20% received neither. There were 3 instances of local recurrence for a 5-year actuarial rate of 2.7%. Conclusions: This 4-week course of hypofractionated radiation with incorporated boost was associated with excellent local control, comparable to historical results of 6-7 weeks of conventional whole-breast fractionation with sequential boost.

  2. DEGRO practical guidelines. Radiotherapy of breast cancer I. Radiotherapy following breast conserving therapy for invasive breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlmayer, F. [Paracelsus Medical Univ. Hospital, Salzburg (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology; Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Staedtisches Klinium Karlsruhe (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie und Strahlentherapie; Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf (Germany)] [and others

    2013-10-15

    research lies in partial breast irradiation strategies as well as WBI hypofractionation schedules. The potential of both in replacing normofractionated WBI has not yet been finally clarified. Conclusion: After breast conserving surgery, no subgroup even in low risk patients has yet been identified for whom radiotherapy can be safely omitted without compromising local control and, hence, cancer-specific survival. In most patients, this translates into an overall survival benefit. (orig.)

  3. Hypofractionated high-dose-rate plesiotherapy in nonmelanoma skin cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Meritxell; Arguís, Monica; Díez-Presa, Lorena; Henríquez, Ivan; Murcia-Mejía, Mauricio; Gascón, Marina; Gómez, David; Lafuerza, Anna; Mur, Encarna; Azón, Antoni; Rovirosa, Àngels; Sabater, Sebastià

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the commonest cancer in humans. NMSC treatment currently includes surgery, radiation therapy, and topical approaches. The objective was to analyze and compare the outcomes, toxicity, and cosmesis of NMSC treated by two hypofractionated high-dose-rate (HDR) plesiotherapy techniques. A retrospective institutional clinical study of 134 basal cell or squamous cell skin carcinomas treated at Radiation Oncology Department. Lesions were treated from November 2006 to December 2011 with a moderate hypofractionated HDR plesiotherapy using a fixed applicator or a customized mold. After a median follow-up of 33 months, overall disease-free survival at 3 and 5 years was 95.12% and 93.36%, respectively. For Leipzig applicator, disease-free survival at 3 years was 94.9% and 94.9% at 5 years, for customized mold was 93.1% at 3 years and 88% at 5 years. Complete regression was achieved in 98% of lesions. Two lesions persisted after treatment; both had been treated by a Leipzig applicator. Six lesions suffered local recurrence (five Leipzig applicators and three molds, p = 0.404). Grade skin toxicity. The cosmesis outcomes were excellent or good in 82% of patients, fair in 13%, and not available in 5%. Hypofractionated HDR plesiotherapy is an effective and well-tolerated treatment for NMSC with different toxicity levels depending on the plesiotherapy technique used. Copyright © 2015 American Brachytherapy Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nomogram to predict rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Bernard Delobel

    Full Text Available To identify predictors of acute and late rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT, while integrating the potential impact of RT technique, dose escalation, and moderate hypofractionation, thus enabling us to generate a nomogram for individual prediction.In total, 972 patients underwent RT for localized prostate cancer, to a total dose of 70 Gy or 80 Gy, using two different fractionations (2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/day, by means of several RT techniques (3D conformal RT [3DCRT], intensity-modulated RT [IMRT], or image-guided RT [IGRT]. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of acute and late rectal toxicity. A nomogram was generated based on the logistic regression model used to predict the 3-year rectal toxicity risk, with its accuracy assessed by dividing the cohort into training and validation subgroups.Mean follow-up for the entire cohort was 62 months, ranging from 6 to 235. The rate of acute Grade ≥2 rectal toxicity was 22.2%, decreasing when combining IMRT and IGRT, compared to 3DCRT (RR = 0.4, 95%CI: 0.3-0.6, p<0.01. The 5-year Grade ≥2 risks for rectal bleeding, urgency/tenesmus, diarrhea, and fecal incontinence were 9.9%, 4.5%, 2.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. The 3-year Grade ≥2 risk for overall rectal toxicity increased with total dose (p<0.01, RR = 1.1, 95%CI: 1.0-1.1 and dose per fraction (2Gy vs. 2.5Gy (p = 0.03, RR = 3.3, 95%CI: 1.1-10.0, and decreased when combining IMRT and IGRT (RR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.3-0.8, p<0.01. Based on these three parameters, a nomogram was generated.Dose escalation and moderate hypofractionation increase late rectal toxicity. IMRT combined with IGRT markedly decreases acute and late rectal toxicity. Performing combined IMRT and IGRT can thus be envisaged for dose escalation and moderate hypofractionation. Our nomogram predicts the 3-year rectal toxicity risk by integrating total dose, fraction dose, and RT technique.

  5. The future of breast cancer radiotherapy: From one size fits all to taylor-made treatment; L'avenir de la radiotherapie du cancer du sein: de la taille unique au sur-mesure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hennequin, C. [Service de cancerologie-radiotherapie, hopital Saint-Louis, 1, avenue Claude-Vellefaux, 75475 Paris (France); Azria, D. [Departement de cancerologie radiotherapie, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, rue Croix-Verte, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France); Universite de Montpellier I, 5, boulevard Henri-IV, CS 19044, 34967 Montpellier cedex 2 (France); Inserm U896, institut de recherche en cancerologie de Montpellier, CRLC Val-d' Aurelle-Paul-Lamarque, rue Croix-Verte, 34298 Montpellier cedex 5 (France)

    2011-10-15

    Various subgroups of breast tumours have been identified during the last 10 years according to the risk of local relapse. Prognostic factors for local relapse are age, surgical margins, tumour size, Her2 expression and hormonal receptors status. For tumours with a high risk of local relapse, an increased in boost dose or the addition of new drugs (trastuzumab, anti-angiogenics, PARP inhibitors) could be considered. For low risk tumours, hypo-fractionated, accelerated partial breast and intraoperative radiotherapy are being evaluated. The classical schedule (45-50 Gy to the whole gland followed by a boost dose of 16 Gy) is no longer the universal rule. Treatment individualization, according to clinical and biological characteristics of the tumour and - possibly - to the radiobiological profile of the patient, is likely to be the future of breast cancer radiotherapy. (authors)

  6. Differential effect of surgery and radiotherapy on neurocognitive functioning and health-related quality of life in WHO grade I meningioma patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Nieuwenhuizen, David; Klein, Martin; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Leenstra, Sieger; Heimans, Jan J.; Reijneveld, Jaap C.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Potential treatment-related neurotoxicity and the indolent course of the disease mainly feed the controversy concerning the optimal timing of surgery and radiotherapy in meningioma patients. OBJECT: To quantify the additional negative effects of conventional radiotherapy compared to

  7. Geographic Disparity in the Use of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Among Elderly Women Undergoing Breast Conservation for Invasive Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillespie, Erin F.; Matsuno, Rayna K.; Xu, Beibei; Triplett, Daniel P.; Hwang, Lindsay; Boero, Isabel J.; Einck, John P.; Yashar, Catheryn; Murphy, James D., E-mail: j2murphy@ucsd.edu

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate geographic heterogeneity in the delivery of hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer among Medicare beneficiaries across the United States. Methods and Materials: We identified 190,193 patients from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Chronic Conditions Warehouse. The study included patients aged >65 years diagnosed with invasive breast cancer treated with breast conservation surgery followed by radiation diagnosed between 2000 and 2012. We analyzed data by hospital referral region based on patient residency ZIP code. The proportion of women who received hypofractionated RT within each region was analyzed over the study period. Multivariable logistic regression models identified predictors of hypofractionated RT. Results: Over the entire study period we found substantial geographic heterogeneity in the use of hypofractionated RT. The proportion of women receiving hypofractionated breast RT in individual hospital referral regions varied from 0% to 61%. We found no correlation between the use of hypofractionated RT and urban/rural setting or general geographic region. The proportion of hypofractionated RT increased in regions with higher density of radiation oncologists, as well as lower total Medicare reimbursements. Conclusions: This study demonstrates substantial geographic heterogeneity in the use of hypofractionated RT among elderly women with invasive breast cancer treated with lumpectomy in the United States. This heterogeneity persists despite clinical data from multiple randomized trials proving efficacy and safety compared with standard fractionation, and highlights possible inefficiency in health care delivery.

  8. Image Guided Hypofractionated Postprostatectomy Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Stephen L.; Patel, Pretesh; Song, Haijun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Freedland, Stephen J. [Surgery Section, Durham Veterans Administration, and Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Bynum, Sigrun; Oh, Daniel; Palta, Manisha; Yoo, David; Oleson, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Salama, Joseph K., E-mail: joseph.salama@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) has promising long-term biochemical relapse-free survival (bRFS) with comparable toxicity for definitive treatment of prostate cancer. However, data reporting outcomes after adjuvant and salvage postprostatectomy hypofractionated RT are sparse. Therefore, we report the toxicity and clinical outcomes after postprostatectomy hypofractionated RT. Methods and Materials: From a prospectively maintained database, men receiving image guided hypofractionated intensity modulated RT (HIMRT) with 2.5-Gy fractions constituted our study population. Androgen deprivation therapy was used at the discretion of the radiation oncologist. Acute toxicities were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. Late toxicities were scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scale. Biochemical recurrence was defined as an increase of 0.1 in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) from posttreatment nadir or an increase in PSA despite treatment. The Kaplan-Meier method was used for the time-to-event outcomes. Results: Between April 2008 and April 2012, 56 men received postoperative HIMRT. The median follow-up time was 48 months (range, 21-67 months). Thirty percent had pre-RT PSA <0.1; the median pre-RT detectable PSA was 0.32 ng/mL. The median RT dose was 65 Gy (range, 57.5-65 Gy). Ten patients received neoadjuvant and concurrent hormone therapy. Posttreatment acute urinary toxicity was limited. There was no acute grade 3 toxicity. Late genitourinary (GU) toxicity of any grade was noted in 52% of patients, 40% of whom had pre-RT urinary incontinence. The 4-year actuarial rate of late grade 3 GU toxicity (exclusively gross hematuria) was 28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16%-41%). Most grade 3 GU toxicity resolved; only 7% had persistent grade ≥3 toxicity at the last follow-up visit. Fourteen patients experienced biochemical recurrence at a

  9. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy for elderly patients with stage IIB–IV nonsmall cell lung cancer who are ineligible for or refuse other treatment modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karam SD

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sana D Karam,1 Zachary D Horne,2 Robert L Hong,2 Don McRae,2 David Duhamel,3 Nadim M Nasr2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado, Denver, CO, USA; 2Department of Radiation Oncology, 3Department of Pulmonary/Critical Care Medicine, Virginia Hospital Center, Arlington, VA, USA Objective: In elderly patients with stage IIB–IV nonsmall cell lung cancer who cannot tolerate chemotherapy, conventionally fractionated radiotherapy is the treatment of choice. We present our experience with hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT in the treatment of this patient population. Methods: Thirty-three patients with a median age of 80 years treated with fractionated SBRT were retrospectively analyzed. Most patients were smokers and had preexisting lung disease and either refused treatment or were ineligible. A median prescribed dose of 40 Gy was delivered to the prescription isodose line over a median of five treatments. The majority of patients (70% did not receive chemotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 9 months (range: 4–40 months, the actuarial median overall survival (OS and progression-free survival were 12 months for both. One year actuarial survival outcomes were 75%, 58%, 44%, and 48% for local control, regional control, progression-free survival, and OS, respectively. Increased volume of disease was a statistically significant predictor of worse OS. Three patients developed a grade 1 cough that peaked 3 weeks after treatment and resolved within 1 month. One patient developed grade 1 tracheal mucositis and three patients developed grade 1 pneumonitis. Both resolved 6 weeks after treatment. Three patients died within the first month of treatment, but the cause of death did not appear to be related to the treatment. Conclusion: Hypofractionated SBRT is a relatively safe and convenient treatment option for elderly patients with inoperable stage IIB–IV nonsmall cell lung cancer. However, given the small

  10. SU-F-J-124: Reduction in Dosimetric Impact of Motion Using VMAT Compared to IMRT in Hypofractionated Prostate Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindranath, B; Xiong, J; Happersett, L; Mageras, G; Zhang, P; Hunt, M [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the dosimetric impact of motion management correction strategies during VMAT and IMRT for hypofractionated prostate treatment. Methods: Two arc VMAT and 9 field IMRT plans were generated for two prostate cancer patients undergoing hypofractionated radiotherapy (7.5Gy × 5 and 8Gy × 5). 212 motion traces were retrospectively extracted from treatment records of prostate cancer patients with implanted Calypso beacons. Dose to the CTV and normal tissues was reconstructed for each trace and plan taking into account the actual treatment delivery time. Following motion correction scenarios were simulated: (1) VMAT plan – (a) No correction, (b) correction between arcs, (c) correction every 20 degrees of gantry rotation and (2) IMRT plan - (a) No correction,(b) correction between fields. Two mm action threshold for position correction was assumed. The 5–95% confidence interval (CI) range was extracted from the family of DVHs for each correction scenario. Results: Treatment duration for 8Gy plan (VMAT vs IMRT) was 3 vs 12 mins and for 7.5Gy plan was 3 vs 9 mins. In the absence of correction, the VMAT 5–−95% CI dose spread was, on average, less than the IMRT dose spread by 2% for CTVD95, 9% for rectalwall (RW) D1cc and 9% for bladderwall (BW) D53. Further, VMAT b/w arcs correction strategy reduced the spread about the planned value compared to IMRT b/w fields correction by: 1% for CTVD95, 2.6% for RW1cc and 2% for BWD53. VMAT 20 degree strategy led to greater reduction in dose spread compared to IMRT by: 2% for CTVD95, 4.5% for RW1cc and 6.7% for BWD53. Conclusion: In the absence of a correction strategy, the limited motion during VMAT’s shorter delivery times translates into less motion-induced dosimetric degradation than IMRT. Performing limited periodic motion correction during VMAT can yield excellent conformity to planned values that is superior to IMRT. This work was partially supported by Varian Medical Systems.

  11. [Radiotherapy of bone metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thureau, S; Vieillard, M-H; Supiot, S; Lagrange, J-L

    2016-09-01

    Radiotherapy plays a major role in palliative treatment of bone metastases. Recent developments of stereotactic radiotherapy and intensity modulated radiation therapy give the possibility to treat oligometastatic diseases. The objective of this paper is to report indications and treatment modalities of radiotherapy in these situations. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Breast interest group faculty of radiation oncology: Australian and New Zealand patterns of practice survey on breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kimberley; Mackenzie, Penny; Allen, Angela; Dreosti, Marcus; Morgia, Marita; Zissiadis, Yvonne; Lamoury, Gilian; Windsor, Apsara

    2017-08-01

    This patterns of practice study was conducted on behalf of the RANZCR Breast Interest Group in order to document current radiotherapy practices for breast cancer in Australia and New Zealand. The survey identifies variations and highlights potential contentious aspects of radiotherapy management of breast cancer. A fifty-eight question survey was disseminated via the Survey Monkey digital platform to 388 Radiation Oncologists in Australia and New Zealand. In total, 156 responses were received and collated. Areas of notable consensus among respondents included hypofractionation (77.3% of respondents would 'always' or 'sometimes' consider hypofractionation in the management of ductal carcinoma in-situ and 99.3% in early invasive breast cancer); margin status in early breast cancer (73.8% believe a clear inked margin is sufficient and does not require further surgery) and use of bolus in post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) (91.1% of participants use bolus in PMRT). Areas with a wider degree of variability amongst respondents included regional nodal irradiation and components of radiotherapy planning and delivery (examples include the technique used for delivery of boost and frequency of bolus application for PMRT). The results of these patterns of practice survey informs radiation oncologists in Australia and New Zealand of the current clinical practices being implemented by their peers. The survey identifies areas of consensus and contention, the latter of which may lead to a development of research trials and/or educational activities to address these areas of uncertainty. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  13. Radiotherapy in small countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Michael B; Zubizarreta, Eduardo H; Polo Rubio, J Alfredo

    2017-10-01

    To examine the availability of radiotherapy in small countries. A small country was defined as a country with a population less than one million persons. The economic status of each country was defined using the World Bank Classification. The number of cancers in each country was obtained from GLOBOCAN 2012. The number of cancer cases with an indication or radiotherapy was calculated using the CCORE model. There were 41 countries with a population of under 1 million; 15 were classified as High Income, 15 Upper Middle Income, 10 Lower Middle Income and one Low Income. 28 countries were islands. Populations ranged from 799 (Holy See) to 886450 (Fiji) and the total number of cancer cases occurring in small countries was 21,043 (range by country from 4 to 2476). Overall the total number of radiotherapy cases in small countries was 10982 (range by country from 2 to 1239). Radiotherapy was available in all HIC islands with 80 or more new cases of cancer in 2012 but was not available in any LMIC island. Fiji was the only LMIC island with a large radiotherapy caseload. Similar caseloads in non-island LMIC all had radiotherapy services. Most non-island HIC did not have radiotherapy services presumably because of the easy access to radiotherapy in neighbouring countries. There are no radiotherapy services in any LMIC islands. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Functional experiential hallucinosis after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, L; Leung, S; L. Chow

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To consider the relation between functional experiential hallucinosis and brain injury induced by radiotherapy.
METHODS—Single case report.
RESULTS—A female patient presented with a four year history of functional experiential hallucinosis after two courses of radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Brain MRI showed hyperintense changes over the left temporal lobe.
CONCLUSION— It is proposed that the hallucinosis was causally related to temporal lobe injury, a docu...

  15. Modern Hypofractionation Schedules for Tangential Whole Breast Irradiation Decrease the Fraction Size-corrected Dose to the Heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Vogelius, Ivan R; Bentzen, Søren M

    2013-01-01

    -corrected dose to the heart for four evidence-based hypofractionation regimens. Materials and methods: Dose plans for 60 left-sided breast cancer patients were analysed. All patients were planned with tangential fields for whole breast irradiation. Dose distributions were corrected to the equivalent dose in 2 Gy......, even for alpha/beta = similar to 1 Gy. Conclusion: For standard tangential field whole breast irradiation, most of the examined hypofractionation schedules are estimated to spare the heart when compared with normofractionation. The dose to the heart, adjusted for fraction size using the linear...

  16. Parotid gland sparing radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braam, P.M.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Radiotherapy is a common form of treatment for head-and-neck malignancies. One of the most prominent complaints after radiotherapy is a dry mouth, which is caused by irradiation of the salivary glands. The main contributors of saliva during stimulation are the parotid glands, which are

  17. Moderate hypofractionated radiotherapy with volumetric modulated arc therapy and simultaneous integrated boost for pelvic irradiation in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzese, C; Fogliata, A; D'Agostino, G R; Di Brina, L; Comito, T; Navarria, P; Cozzi, L; Scorsetti, M

    2017-07-01

    The optimal treatment for unfavourable intermediate/high-risk prostate cancer is still debated. In the present study, the pattern of toxicity and early clinical outcome of patients with localized prostate cancer was analyzed. A cohort of 90 patients treated on pelvic lymph nodes from 2010 to 2015 was selected. All patients were treated with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT), and Simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) in 28 fractions; the prostate, the seminal vesicle and the pelvic lymph node received total doses of 74.2, 65.5, and 51.8 Gy, respectively. End points were the detection of acute and late toxicities graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria CTCAE version 3, evaluating the rectal, genito-urinary and gastro-intestinal toxicity. Correlation of OARs dose parameters and related toxicities was explored. Preliminary overall survival and Progression-free survival (PFS) were evaluated. With a median follow-up of 25 months, no interruptions for treatment-related toxicity were recorded. Univariate analysis among dosimetric data and acute toxicities showed no correlations. Regarding late toxicity: the dose received by a rectal volume of 90 cm3 was found to be significant for toxicity prediction (p = 0.024). PFS was 90.6% and 60.2% at 2 and 4 years, respectively. PFS correlates with age (p = 0.011) and Gleason score (p = 0.011). Stratifying the PSA nadir in quartiles, its value was significant (p = 0.016) in predicting PFS, showing a reduction of PFS of 2 months for each PSA-nadir increase of 0.1 ng/ml. HRT with VMAT and SIB on the whole pelvis in unfavourable prostate cancer patients is effective with a mild pattern of toxicity.

  18. Rapidly alternating combination of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in split course for Stage IIIA and Stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer: results of a Phase I-II study by the GOTHA group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto, P.; Mermillod, B. [Hopital Cantonal Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Mirimanoff, R.O.; Leyvraz, S.; Nagy-Mignotte, H.; Bolla, M.; Wellmann, D.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, E. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-08-01

    The prognosis of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by a combination of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). In this study, the GOTHA group evaluated the feasibility, tolerance, tumour response, pattern of failure and effect on survival of a combination alternating accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) RT and CT in patients with tumour stage III NSCLC. Toxic effects were leucopenia, nausea and vomiting, mucositis, diarrhoea, alopecia and peripheral neuropathy. Alternating CT and AHRT, as used in this study, were well tolerated and allowed full dose delivery within less than 12 weeks. Initial response was not predictive of survival. The survival curve is encouraging and the 5 year survival is superior to the 5% generally observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. (author).

  19. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Injection of Hyaluronic Acid: Acute Toxicities in a Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); EMR3738, Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Decullier, Evelyne; Bin, Sylvie [Pole Information Médicale Evaluation Recherche, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); EA SIS, Université de Lyon, Lyon (France); Faix, Antoine [Department of Urology, Clinique Beausoleil, Montpellier (France); Ruffion, Alain [Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Department of Urology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Jalade, Patrice [Department of Medical Physics, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology and Physics, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France); Udrescu, Corina; Enachescu, Ciprian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology and Physics, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. Results: From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions: The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity.

  20. Hypofractionated radiation therapy for basal and squamous cell skin cancer: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaorsky, Nicholas G; Lee, Charles T; Zhang, Eddie; Keith, Scott W; Galloway, Thomas J

    2017-10-01

    To characterize the cosmetic outcomes and local recurrence (LR) rates of various hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) regimens for skin basal and squamous cell cancers (BCCs/SCCs). A PICOS/PRISMA/MOOSE selection protocol was performed to identify 344 articles published between 1985-2016 evaluating patients with T1-2 N0 SCCs/BCCs treated with definitive RT. Biologically equivalent doses with α/β=3 (BED3s) were calculated. The primary endpoint was post-treatment cosmesis. Mixed effects regression models were used to estimate weighted linear relationships between BED3 and cosmetic outcomes. A total of 21 studies were identified detailing the treatment of 9729 skin BCC/SCC patients, across seven countries, with external beam RT (n=9255) or brachytherapy (n=474). Median follow-up was 36months (range: 12-77). Median dose was 45Gy/11 fractions (interquartile range: 37.5Gy/6-55Gy/18) at 4Gy/fraction (interquartile range: 2.5-6Gy); most hypofractionated 18.75Gy/1. There was a trend to decreased "good" cosmesis with higher total dose: -3.4% "good" cosmesis/10Gy BED3, p=0.01. Similarly, there was a trend to increased "fair" cosmesis with higher dose: +3.8% "fair" cosmesis/10Gy BED3,p=0.006. At a BED3 of 100Gy, the expected rate of "good" cosmesis is 79% (95% confidence interval: 70%, 88%). Hypofractionated schedules produced similar cosmesis to conventionally fractionated schedules, at the same BED3. Fewer than 8% of patients experienced "poor" cosmesis, independent of dose or fractionation regimen. Hypofractionated RT has favorable cosmesis for patients with skin BCCs/SCCs. We recommend clinicians consider these commonly-used regimens, which all have BED3 of ∼100Gy: 50Gy/15 fractions, 36.75Gy/7 fractions, or 35Gy/5 fractions, as they result in "good" cosmesis in 80% of patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiotherapy: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vikrant Kasat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is the art of using ionizing radiation to destroy malignant cells while minimizing damage to normal tissue. Radiotherapy has become a standard treatment option for a wide range of malignancies. Several new imaging techniques, both anatomical and functional are currently being evaluated as well as practiced for treatment planning of cancer. These recent developments have allowed radiation oncologists to escalate the dose of radiation delivered to tumors while minimizing the dose delivered to surrounding normal tissue. In this update, we attempt to pen down important aspects of radiotherapy.

  2. Hypofractionated radiation therapy versus conventional radiation therapy in prostate cancer: A systematic review of its safety and efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Gómez, L M; Polo-deSantos, M; Rodríguez-Melcón, J I; Angulo, J C; Luengo-Matos, S

    2015-01-01

    New therapeutic alternatives can improve the safety and efficacy of prostate cancer treatment. To assess whether hypofractionated radiation therapy results in better safety and efficacy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Systematic review of the literature through searches on PubMed, Cochrane Library, CRD, ClinicalTrials and EuroScan, collecting indicators of safety and efficacy. We included 2 systematic reviews and a clinical trial. In terms of efficacy, there is considerable heterogeneity among the studies, and no conclusive results were found concerning the superiority of the hypofractionated option over the normal fractionated option. In terms of safety, there were no significant differences in the onset of acute genitourinary complications between the 2 treatments. However, one of the reviews found more acute gastrointestinal complications in patients treated with hypofractionated radiation therapy. There were no significant differences in long-term complications based on the type of radiation therapy used, although the studies did have limitations. To date, there are no conclusive results that show that hypofractionated radiation therapy is more effective or safer than normal fractionated radiation therapy in the treatment of localized prostate cancer. Copyright © 2014 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. The influence of simultaneous integrated boost, hypofractionation and oncoplastic surgery on cosmetic outcome and PROMs after breast conserving therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lansu, J.T.; Essers, M.; Voogd, A.C.; Luiten, E.J.; Buijs, C.; Groenendaal, N.; Poortmans, P.M.P.

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: We retrospectively investigated the possible influence of a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), hypofractionation and oncoplastic surgery on cosmetic outcome in 125 patients with stage I-II breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy (BCT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: The boost was

  4. Hypo-fractionated radiation, magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia and a viral immunotherapy treatment of spontaneous canine cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, P. Jack; Moodie, Karen L.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Petryk, James D.; Sechrist, Shawntel; Gladstone, David J.; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Veliz, Frank A.; Bursey, Alicea A.; Wagner, Robert J.; Rajan, Ashish; Dugat, Danielle; Crary-Burney, Margaret; Fiering, Steven N.

    2017-02-01

    It has recently been shown that cancer treatments such as radiation and hyperthermia, which have conventionally been viewed to have modest immune based anti-cancer effects, may, if used appropriately stimulate a significant and potentially effective local and systemic anti-cancer immune effect (abscopal effect) and improved prognosis. Using eight spontaneous canine cancers (2 oral melanoma, 3 oral amelioblastomas and 1 carcinomas), we have shown that hypofractionated radiation (6 x 6 Gy) and/or magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (2 X 43°C / 45 minutes) and/or an immunogenic virus-like nanoparticle (VLP, 2 x 200 μg) are capable of delivering a highly effective cancer treatment that includes an immunogenic component. Two tumors received all three therapeutic modalities, one tumor received radiation and hyperthermia, two tumors received radiation and VLP, and three tumors received only mNP hyperthermia. The treatment regimen is conducted over a 14-day period. All patients tolerated the treatments without complication and have had local and distant tumor responses that significantly exceed responses observed following conventional therapy (surgery and/or radiation). The results suggest that both hypofractionated radiation and hyperthermia have effective immune responses that are enhanced by the intratumoral VLP treatment. Molecular data from these tumors suggest Heat Shock Protein (HSP) 70/90, calreticulin and CD47 are targets that can be exploited to enhance the local and systemic (abscopal effect) immune potential of radiation and hyperthermia cancer treatment.

  5. Factors influencing conformity index in radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brennan, Sinead M

    2010-01-01

    The radiotherapy conformity index (CI) is a useful tool to quantitatively assess the quality of radiotherapy treatment plans, and represents the relationship between isodose distributions and target volume. A conformity index of unity implies high planning target volume (PTV) coverage and minimal unnecessary irradiation of surrounding tissues. We performed this analysis to describe the CI for lung cancer 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and to identify clinical and technical determinants of CI, as it is not known which factors are associated with good quality 3D conformal radiotherapy treatment planning. Radiotherapy treatment plans from a database of 52 patients with inoperable Stage 1 to 3b lung cancer, on a hypofractionated 3DCRT trial were evaluated. A CI was calculated for all plans using the definition of the ICRU 62:CI = (TV\\/PTV), which is the quotient of the treated volume (TV) and the PTV. Data on patient, tumor, and planning variables, which could influence CI, were recorded and analyzed. Mean CI was 2.01 (range = 1.06-3.8). On univariate analysis, PTV (p = 0.023), number of beams (p = 0.036), medial vs. lateral tumor location (p = 0.016), and increasing tumor stage (p = 0.041) were associated with improved conformity. On multiple regression analysis, factors found to be associated with CI included central vs. peripheral tumor location (p = 0.041) and PTV size (p = 0.058). The term 3DCRT is used routinely in the literature, without any indication of the degree of conformality. We recommend routine reporting of conformity indices. Conformity indices may be affected by both planning variables and tumor factors.

  6. Hypofractionation vs Conventional Radiation Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: A Matched-Cohort Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssens, Geert O., E-mail: g.janssens@rther.umcn.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Jansen, Marc H. [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Lauwers, Selmer J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Nowak, Peter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Centre, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Oldenburger, Foppe R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Centre, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Bouffet, Eric [Department of Hematology/Oncology, The Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Saran, Frank [Department of Pediatric Oncology, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton (United Kingdom); Kamphuis-van Ulzen, Karin [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Lindert, Erik J. van [Department of Neurosurgery, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Schieving, Jolanda H. [Department of Neurology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Boterberg, Tom [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ghent University Hospital, Ghent (Belgium); Kaspers, Gertjan J. [Pediatric Oncology/Hematology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Span, Paul N.; Kaanders, Johannes H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Gidding, Corrie E. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Hargrave, Darren [Department of Oncology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: Despite conventional radiation therapy, 54 Gy in single doses of 1.8 Gy (54/1.8 Gy) over 6 weeks, most children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) will die within 1 year after diagnosis. To reduce patient burden, we investigated the role of hypofractionation radiation therapy given over 3 to 4 weeks. A 1:1 matched-cohort analysis with conventional radiation therapy was performed to assess response and survival. Methods and Materials: Twenty-seven children, aged 3 to 14, were treated according to 1 of 2 hypofractionation regimens over 3 to 4 weeks (39/3 Gy, n=16 or 44.8/2.8 Gy, n=11). All patients had symptoms for {<=}3 months, {>=}2 signs of the neurologic triad (cranial nerve deficit, ataxia, long tract signs), and characteristic features of DIPG on magnetic resonance imaging. Twenty-seven patients fulfilling the same diagnostic criteria and receiving at least 50/1.8 to 2.0 Gy were eligible for the matched-cohort analysis. Results: With hypofractionation radiation therapy, the overall survival at 6, 9, and 12 months was 74%, 44%, and 22%, respectively. Progression-free survival at 3, 6, and 9 months was 77%, 43%, and 12%, respectively. Temporary discontinuation of steroids was observed in 21 of 27 (78%) patients. No significant difference in median overall survival (9.0 vs 9.4 months; P=.84) and time to progression (5.0 vs 7.6 months; P=.24) was observed between hypofractionation vs conventional radiation therapy, respectively. Conclusions: For patients with newly diagnosed DIPG, a hypofractionation regimen, given over 3 to 4 weeks, offers equal overall survival with less treatment burden compared with a conventional regimen of 6 weeks.

  7. [Radiotherapy of skin cancers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennequin, C; Rio, E; Mahé, M-A

    2016-09-01

    The indications of radiotherapy for skin cancers are not clearly defined because of the lack of randomised trials or prospective studies. For basal cell carcinomas, radiotherapy frequently offers a good local control, but a randomized trial showed that surgery is more efficient and less toxic. Indications of radiotherapy are contra-indications of surgery for patients older than 60, non-sclerodermiform histology and occurring in non-sensitive areas. Adjuvant radiotherapy could be proposed to squamous cell carcinomas, in case of poor prognostic factors. Dose of 60 to 70Gy are usually required, and must be modulated to the size of the lesions. Adjuvant radiotherapy seems beneficial for desmoplastic melanomas but not for the other histological types. Prophylactic nodal irradiation (45 to 50Gy), for locally advanced tumours (massive nodal involvement), decreases the locoregional failure rate but do not increase survival. Adjuvant radiotherapy (50 to 56Gy) for Merckel cell carcinomas increases also the local control rate, as demonstrated by meta-analysis and a large epidemiological study. Nodal areas must be included, if there is no surgical exploration (sentinel lymph node dissection). Kaposi sarcomas are radiosensitive and could be treated with relatively low doses (24 to 30Gy). Also, cutaneous lymphomas are good indications for radiotherapy: B lymphomas are electively treated with limited fields. The role of total skin electron therapy for T-lymphomas is still discussed; but palliative radiotherapy is very efficient in case of cutaneous nodules. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [Hippocampus, brainstem and brain dose-volume constraints for fractionated 3-D radiotherapy and for stereotactic radiation therapy: Limits and perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gérard, M; Jumeau, R; Pichon, B; Biau, J; Blais, E; Horion, J; Noël, G

    2017-10-01

    Cerebral radiation-induced toxicities after radiotherapy (RT) of brain tumors are frequent. The protection of organs at risk (OAR) is crucial, especially for brain tumors, to preserve cognition in cancer survivors. Dose constraints of cerebral OAR used in conventional RT, radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) are debated. In fact, they are based on historical cohorts or calculated with old mathematical models. Values of α/β ratio of cerebral OAR are also controversial leading to misestimate the equivalent dose in 2Gy fractions or the biological equivalent dose, especially during hypofractionated RT. Although recent progresses in medical imaging, the diagnosis of radionecrosis remains difficult. In this article, we propose a large review of dose constraints used for three major cerebral OAR: the brain stem, the hippocampus and the brain. Copyright © 2017 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Stereotactic radiotherapy of meningiomas. Symptomatology, acute and late toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henzel, M.; Gross, M.W.; Failing, T.; Strassmann, G.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Gisssen (Germany); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Marburg Univ. (Germany); Hamm, K.; Surber, G.; Kleinert, G. [Dept. of Stereotactic Neurosurgery and Radiosurgery, Helios Klinikum Erfurt (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    Background and purpose: stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is well established in the treatment of skull base meningiomas, but this therapy approach is limited to small tumors only. The fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) offers an alternative treatment option. This study aims at local control, symptomatology, and toxicity. Patients and methods: between 1997-2003, 224 patients were treated with SRT (n= 183), hypofractionated SRT (n = 30), and SRS (n = 11). 95/224 were treated with SRT/SRS alone. 129/224 patients underwent previous operations. Freedom from progression and overall survival, toxicity, and symptomatology were evaluated systematically. Additionally, tumor volume (TV) shrinkage was analyzed three-dimensionally within the planning system. Results: the median follow-up was 36 months (range, 12-100 months). Overall survival and freedom from progression for 5 years were 92.9% and 96.9%. Quantitative TV reduction was 26.2% and 30.3% 12 and 18 months after SRT/SRS (p < 0.0001). 95.9% of the patients improved their symptoms or were stable. Clinically significant acute toxicity (CTC III ) was rarely seen (2.5%). Clinically significant late morbidity (III -IV ) or new cranial nerve palsies did not occur. Conclusion: SRT offers an additional treatment option of high efficacy with only few side effects. In the case of large tumor size (> 4 ml) and adjacent critical structures (< 2 mm), SRT is highly recommended. (orig.)

  10. The Pattern of Use of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Early-Stage Breast Cancer in New South Wales, Australia, 2008 to 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delaney, Geoff P., E-mail: Geoff.delaney@swsahs.nsw.gov.au [Liverpool Cancer Therapy Centre, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia); Ingham Health and Medical Research Institute, Sydney (Australia); New South Wales Cancer Institute (Australia); Gandhidasan, Senthilkumar [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Walton, Richard; Terlich, Frances; Baker, Deborah; Currow, David [New South Wales Cancer Institute (Australia)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: Increasing phase 3 evidence has been published about the safety and efficacy of hypofractionated radiation therapy, in comparison with standard fractionation, in early-stage, node-negative breast cancer. However, uptake of hypofractionation has not been universal. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypofractionation regimen variations in practice across public radiation oncology facilities in New South Wales (NSW). Methods and Materials: Patients with early breast cancer registered in the NSW Clinical Cancer Registry who received radiation therapy for early-stage breast cancer in a publicly funded radiation therapy department between 2008 and 2012 were identified. Data extracted and analyzed included dose and fractionation type, patient age at first fraction, address (for geocoding), year of diagnosis, year of treatment, laterality, and department of treatment. A logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with fractionation type. Results: Of the 5880 patients fulfilling the study criteria, 3209 patients (55%) received standard fractionation and 2671 patients (45%) received hypofractionation. Overall, the use of hypofractionation increased from 37% in 2008 to 48% in 2012 (range, 7%-94% across departments). Treatment facility and the radiation oncologist prescribing the treatment were the strongest independent predictors of hypofractionation. Weaker associations were also found for age, tumor site laterality, year of treatment, and distance to facility. Conclusions: Hypofractionated regimens of whole breast radiation therapy have been variably administered in the adjuvant setting in NSW despite the publication of long-term trial results and consensus guidelines. Some factors that predict the use of hypofractionation are not based on guideline recommendations, including lower rates of left-sided treatment and increasing distance from a treatment facility.

  11. Comparison of Radiation-Induced Normal Lung Tissue Density Changes for Patients From Multiple Institutions Receiving Conventional or Hypofractionated Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diot, Quentin, E-mail: quentin.diot@ucdenver.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Marks, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of Maryland Greenbaum Cancer Center, and Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Senan, Suresh [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kavanagh, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Lawrence, Michael V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina (United States); Miften, Moyed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Palma, David A. [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: To quantitatively assess changes in computed tomography (CT)–defined normal lung tissue density after conventional and hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: The pre-RT and post-RT CT scans from 118 and 111 patients receiving conventional and hypofractionated RT, respectively, at 3 institutions were registered to each other and to the 3-dimensional dose distribution to quantify dose-dependent changes in normal lung tissue density. Dose-response curves (DRC) for groups of patients receiving conventional and hypofractionated RT were generated for each institution, and the frequency of density changes >80 Hounsfield Units (HU) was modeled depending on the fractionation type using a Probit model for different follow-up times. Results: For the pooled data from all institutions, there were significant differences in the DRC between the conventional and hypofractionated groups; the respective doses resulting in 50% complication risk (TD{sub 50}) were 62 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI] 57-67) versus 36 Gy (CI 33-39) at <6 months, 48 Gy (CI 46-51) versus 31 Gy (CI 28-33) at 6-12 months, and 47 Gy (CI 45-49) versus 35 Gy (32-37) at >12 months. The corresponding m values (slope of the DRC) were 0.52 (CI 0.46-0.59) versus 0.31 (CI 0.28-0.34) at <6 months, 0.46 (CI 0.42-0.51) versus 0.30 (CI 0.26-0.34) at 6-12 months, and 0.45 (CI 0.42-0.50) versus 0.31 (CI 0.27-0.35) at >12 months (P<.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion: Compared with conventional fractionation, hypofractionation has a lower TD{sub 50} and m value, both suggesting an increased degree of normal tissue density sensitivity with hypofractionation.

  12. Nanoparticle-guided radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and nano-sized particles for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of a target tissue. More specifically, the invention relates to nano-sized particles comprising X-ray-imaging contrast agents in solid form with the ability to block x-rays, allowing for simult......The present invention relates to a method and nano-sized particles for image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of a target tissue. More specifically, the invention relates to nano-sized particles comprising X-ray-imaging contrast agents in solid form with the ability to block x-rays, allowing...... for simultaneous or integrated external beam radiotherapy and imaging, e.g., using computed tomography (CT)....

  13. Stability of percutaneously implanted markers for lung stereotactic radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Gitte Bjørnsen Fredberg; Josipovic, Mirjana; Von Der Recke, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the stability of complex markers implanted into lung tumors throughout a course of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Fifteen patients referred for lung SBRT were prospectively included. Radio-opaque markers were implanted percutaneously, guided...

  14. Haemorrhagic cystitis after radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-02-07

    Sterile hemorrhagic cystitis may occur during or immediately after radiotherapy; a frequency of 4.6% has been reported at up to four weeks from the completion of 60-80 Gy. It is usually self-limiting. The frequency of late hemorrhagic cystitis is reported to be 2-9%, although less severe bleeding must be commoner. Combination of pelvic radiotherapy with systemic cyclophosphamide greatly increases the risk of serious bleeding, with a frequency of 18% being reported in one series of children. This note outlines the various treatment options, involving both drugs and surgery.

  15. Xerostomia induced by radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alimi D

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available David Alimi Department of Anesthesiology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAWe read with great interest the excellent review on xerostomia induced by radiotherapy, by Pinna et al.1 The authors should be congratulated for a very detailed review of the physiopathology, clinical symptoms, and therapeutic management of an extremely difficult condition. Although we agree that the use of anticholinergic medication represents treatment, it requires the patient to have residual salivary gland function. Unfortunately, it is well established that in most cases radiotherapy destroys most of the salivary gland and associated salivary secretions.     

  16. Hypofractionated Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combined Modality Treatment for Bladder Preservation in Elderly Patients With Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turgeon, Guy-Anne [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Souhami, Luis, E-mail: luis.souhami@muhc.mcgill.ca [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Cury, Fabio L.; Faria, Sergio L.; Duclos, Marie [Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Sturgeon, Jeremy [Department of Medical Oncology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Kassouf, Wassim [Department of Urology, McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To review our experience with bladder-preserving trimodality treatment (TMT) using hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of elderly patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Methods and Materials: Retrospective study of elderly patients treated with TMT using hypofractionated IMRT (50 Gy in 20 fractions) with concomitant weekly radiosensitizing chemotherapy. Eligibility criteria were as follows: age ≥70 years, a proven diagnosis of muscle-invasive transitional cell bladder carcinoma, stage T2-T3N0M0 disease, and receipt of TMT with curative intent. Response rate was assessed by cystoscopic evaluation and bladder biopsy. Results: 24 patients with a median age of 79 years were eligible. A complete response was confirmed in 83% of the patients. Of the remaining patients, 1 of them underwent salvage cystectomy, and no disease was found in the bladder on histopathologic assessment. After a median follow-up time of 28 months, of the patients with a complete response, 2 patients had muscle-invasive recurrence, 1 experienced locoregional failure, and 3 experienced distant metastasis. The overall and cancer-specific survival rates at 3 years were 61% and 71%, respectively. Of the surviving patients, 75% have a disease-free and functioning bladder. All patients completed hypofractionated IMRT, and 19 patients tolerated all 4 cycles of chemotherapy. Acute grade 3 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicities occurred in only 4% of the patients, and acute grade 3 or 4 hematologic toxicities, liver toxicities, or both were experienced by 17% of the cohort. No patient experienced grade 4 gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Hypofractionated IMRT with concurrent radiosensitizing chemotherapy appears to be an effective and well-tolerated curative treatment strategy in the elderly population and should be considered for patients who are not candidates for cystectomy or who wish to avoid

  17. The influence of simultaneous integrated boost, hypofractionation and oncoplastic surgery on cosmetic outcome and PROMs after breast conserving therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansu, J T P; Essers, M; Voogd, A C; Luiten, E J T; Buijs, C; Groenendaal, N; Poortmans, P M H

    2015-10-01

    We retrospectively investigated the possible influence of a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB), hypofractionation and oncoplastic surgery on cosmetic outcome in 125 patients with stage I-II breast cancer treated with breast conserving therapy (BCT). The boost was given sequentially (55%) or by SIB (45%); fractionation was conventional (83%) or hypofractionated (17%); the surgical technique was a conventional lumpectomy (74%) or an oncoplastic technique (26%). We compared cosmetic results subjectively using a questionnaire independently completed by the patient and by the physician and objectively with the BCCT.core software. Independent-samples T-tests were used to compare outcome in different groups. Patients also completed the EORTC QLQ C30 and BR23. Univariate analyses indicated no significant differences of the cosmetic results (P ≤ 0.05) for the type of boost or fractionation. However, the conventional lumpectomy group scored significantly better than the oncoplastic group in the BCCT.core evaluation, without a significant difference in the subjective cosmetic evaluation. Quality of life outcome was in favour of SIB, hypofractionation and conventional surgery. Our study indicates that the current RT techniques seem to be safe for cosmetic outcome and quality of life. Further investigation is needed to verify the possible negative influence of oncoplastic surgery on the cosmetic outcome and the quality of life as this technique is especially indicated for patients with an unfavourable tumour/breast volume ratio. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Radiotherapy for intrathoracic metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, P; Lacornerie, T; Mornex, F

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, and technique of radiotherapy, for intrathoracic metastases are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Innovations in Radiotherapy Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feain, I J; Court, L; Palta, J R; Beddar, S; Keall, P

    2017-02-01

    Many low- and middle-income countries, together with remote and low socioeconomic populations within high-income countries, lack the resources and services to deal with cancer. The challenges in upgrading or introducing the necessary services are enormous, from screening and diagnosis to radiotherapy planning/treatment and quality assurance. There are severe shortages not only in equipment, but also in the capacity to train, recruit and retain staff as well as in their ongoing professional development via effective international peer-review and collaboration. Here we describe some examples of emerging technology innovations based on real-time software and cloud-based capabilities that have the potential to redress some of these areas. These include: (i) automatic treatment planning to reduce physics staffing shortages, (ii) real-time image-guided adaptive radiotherapy technologies, (iii) fixed-beam radiotherapy treatment units that use patient (rather than gantry) rotation to reduce infrastructure costs and staff-to-patient ratios, (iv) cloud-based infrastructure programmes to facilitate international collaboration and quality assurance and (v) high dose rate mobile cobalt brachytherapy techniques for intraoperative radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. All rights reserved.

  20. [Radiotherapy of oropharynx carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servagi Vernat, S; Tochet, F; Vieillevigne, L; Pointreau, Y; Maingon, P; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy for oropharynx carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Neurocognitive Effects of Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    investigates the effect of radiotherapy using serial MRI imaging and a series of neuropsychological measurements on two groups of patients; (1) those with...demonstrated a significant change over time in the RT- treated group, although a comprehensive neuropsychological battery of repeatable measures...woman of child -bearing potential, a negative pregnancy test (urine) will be required before participation in this study. ABNORMAL FINDINGS

  2. Five Year Outcome of 145 Patients With Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) After Accelerated Breast Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciervide, Raquel [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Dhage, Shubhada; Guth, Amber; Shapiro, Richard L.; Axelrod, Deborah M.; Roses, Daniel F. [Department of Surgery, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Formenti, Silvia C., E-mail: silvia.formenti@nyumc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, New York University School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Background: Accelerated whole-breast radiotherapy (RT) with tumor bed boost in the treatment of early invasive breast cancer has demonstrated equivalent local control and cosmesis when compared with standard RT. Its efficacy in the treatment of ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) remains unknown. Methods and Materials: Patients treated for DCIS with lumpectomy and negative margins were eligible for 2 consecutive hypofractionated whole-breast RT clinical trials. The first trial (New York University [NYU] 01-51) prescribed to the whole breast 42 Gy (2.8 Gy in 15 fractions) and the second trial (NYU 05-181) 40.5 Gy (2.7 Gy in 15 fractions) with an additional daily boost of 0.5 Gy to the surgical cavity. Results: Between 2002 and 2009, 145 DCIS patients accrued, 59 to the first protocol and 86 to the second trial. Median age was 56 years and 65% were postmenopausal at the time of treatment. Based on optimal sparing of normal tissue, 79% of the patients were planned and treated prone and 21% supine. At 5 years' median follow-up (60 months; range 2.6-105.5 months), 6 patients (4.1%) experienced an ipsilateral breast recurrence in all cases of DCIS histology. In 3/6 patients, recurrence occurred at the original site of DCIS and in the remaining 3 cases outside the original tumor bed. New contralateral breast cancers arose in 3 cases (1 DCIS and 2 invasive carcinomas). Cosmetic self-assessment at least 2 years after treatment is available in 125 patients: 91% reported good-to-excellent and 9% reported fair-to-poor outcomes. Conclusions: With a median follow-up of 5 years, the ipsilateral local recurrence rate is 4.1%, comparable to that reported from the NSABP (National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project) trials that employed 50 Gy in 25 fractions of radiotherapy for DCIS. There were no invasive recurrences. These results provide preliminary evidence that accelerated hypofractionated external beam radiotherapy is a viable option for DCIS.

  3. Hypo-Fractionated Conformal Radiation Therapy to the Tumor Bed after Segmental Mastectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    include area code) tandard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) •rescribed by ANSI SW. Z39.18 "able of Contents ntroduction tody Cev Research Accomplishments...protocols. Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys. 2005 July :62(3):943-944. Formenti SC. Wernicke AG, DeWyngaert JK. External beam partial-breast radiotherapy...friendly regimen than the nandard 5-7 weeks of Dostoperative radiotherapy (RT) has ecenilv become an area of intense research, because in :enain

  4. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy and immunotherapy combinations: turning the future into systemic therapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walshaw, Richard C; Honeychurch, Jamie

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) is effective at cytoreducing tumours and until relatively recently the focus in radiobiology has been on the direct effects of RT on the tumour. Increasingly, however, the effect of RT on the tumour vasculature, tumour stroma and immune system are recognized as important to the overall outcome. RT is known to lead to the induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD), which can generate tumour-specific immunity. However, systemic immunity leading to “abscopal effects” resulting in tumour shrinkage outside of the RT treatment field is rare, which is thought to be caused by the immunosuppressive nature of the tumour microenvironment. Recent advances in understanding the nature of this immunosuppression and therapeutics targeting immune checkpoints such as programmed death 1 has led to durable clinical responses in a range of cancer types including malignant melanoma and non-small-cell lung cancer. The effects of RT dose and fraction on the generation of ICD and systemic immunity are largely unknown and are currently under investigation. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) provides an opportunity to deliver single or hypofractionated large doses of RT and potentially increase the amount of ICD and the generation of systemic immunity. Here, we review the interplay of RT and the tumour microenvironment and the rationale for combining SABR with immunomodulatory agents to generate systemic immunity and improve outcomes. PMID:27556933

  5. Survival Advantage Associated with Metformin Usage in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients Receiving Radiotherapy: A Propensity Score Matching Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Won Il; Kim, Mi-Sook; Lim, Jung Sub; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Seo, Young Seok; Han, Chul Ju; Park, Su Cheol; Kay, Chul Seung; Kim, Myungsoo; Jang, Hong Seok; Lee, Dong Soo; Chang, Ah Ram; Park, Hae Jin

    2015-09-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of metformin on the clinical outcomes of patients receiving radiotherapy for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma. The medical records of 217 patients treated with stereotactic body or hypofractionated radiotherapy for inoperable hepatocellular carcinoma were reviewed. Patients were divided into the metformin group (n=19) and the non-metformin group (n=198), including those with diabetes (n=29), and those without (n=169). We performed a propensity score-matching analysis comparing the two groups. In the propensity score-matched cohort (n=76), the overall survival rate of the metformin group was higher than that of the non-metformin group (2-year, 76% vs. 37%, p=0.022). The adjusted Cox proportional hazards model revealed that metformin usage was a significant factor for mortality (adjusted hazard ratio=0.361; 95% confidence interval=0.139-0.935). The use of metformin in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma receiving radiotherapy was associated with higher overall survival. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  6. Stereotactic radiotherapy of the prostate: fractionation and utilization in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiner, Josph P.; Schwartz, David; Shao, Meng; Osborn, Virginia; Schreiber, David [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Veterans Affairs New York Harbor Healthcare System, Brooklyn (United States); Choi, Kwang [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn (United States)

    2017-06-15

    To analyze the utilization and fractionation of extreme hypofractionation via stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in the treatment of prostate cancer. Data was analyzed on men diagnosed with localized prostate cancer between 2004–2012 and treated with definitive-intent radiation therapy, as captured in the National Cancer Database. This database is a hospital-based registry that collects an estimated 70% of all diagnosed malignancies in the United States. There were 299,186 patients identified, of which 4,962 (1.7%) were identified as receiving SBRT as primary treatment. Of those men, 2,082 had low risk disease (42.0%), 2,201 had intermediate risk disease (44.4%), and 679 had high risk disease (13.7%). The relative utilization of SBRT increased from 0.1% in 2004 to 4.0% in 2012. Initially SBRT was more commonly used in academic programs, though as time progressed there was a shift to favor an increased absolute number of men treated in the community setting. Delivery of five separate treatments was the most commonly utilized fractionation pattern, with 4,635 patients (91.3%) receiving this number of treatments. The most common dosing pattern was 725 cGy × 5 fractions (49.6%) followed by 700 cGy × 5 fractions (21.3%). Extreme hypofractionation via SBRT is slowly increasing acceptance. Currently 700-725 cGy × 5 fractions appears to be the most commonly employed scheme. As further long-term data regarding the safety and efficacy emerges, the relative utilization of this modality is expected to continue to increase.

  7. Updated Results and Patterns of Failure in a Randomized Hypofractionation Trial for High-risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arcangeli, Stefano [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Gomellini, Sara; Saracino, Biancamaria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Pinnaro, Paola; Pinzi, Valentina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Arcangeli, Giorgio, E-mail: arcangeli.gio@tiscali.it [Department of Radiation Oncology, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy)

    2012-12-01

    Purpose: To report long-term results and patterns of failure after conventional and hypofractionated radiation therapy in high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This randomized phase III trial compared conventional fractionation (80 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction in 8 weeks) vs hypofractionation (62 Gy at 3.1 Gy per fraction in 5 weeks) in combination with 9-month androgen deprivation therapy in 168 patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Freedom from biochemical failure (FFBF), freedom from local failure (FFLF), and freedom from distant failure (FFDF) were analyzed. Results: In a median follow-up of 70 months, biochemical failure (BF) occurred in 35 of the 168 patients (21%) in the study. Among these 35 patients, local failure (LF) only was detected in 11 (31%), distant failure (DF) only in 16 (46%), and both LF and DF in 6 (17%). In 2 patients (6%) BF has not yet been clinically detected. The risk reduction by hypofractionation was significant in BF (10.3%) but not in LF and DF. We found that hypofractionation, with respect to conventional fractionation, determined only an insignificant increase in the actuarial FFBF but no difference in FFLF and FFDF, when considering the entire group of patients. However, an increase in the 5-year rates in all 3 endpoints-FFBF, FFLF, and FFDF-was observed in the subgroup of patients with a pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (iPSA) level of 20 ng/mL or less. On multivariate analysis, the type of fractionation, iPSA level, Gleason score of 4+3 or higher, and T stage of 2c or higher have been confirmed as independent prognostic factors for BF. High iPSA levels and Gleason score of 4+3 or higher were also significantly associated with an increased risk of DF, whereas T stage of 2c or higher was the only independent variable for LF. Conclusion: Our results confirm the isoeffectiveness of the 2 fractionation schedules used in this study, although a benefit in favor of hypofractionation cannot be excluded in the subgroup of

  8. Application of biological effective dose (BED) to estimate the duration of symptomatic relief and repopulation dose equivalent in palliative radiotherapy and chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Bleddyn; Cominos, Matilda; Dale, Roger G

    2003-03-01

    To investigate the potential for mathematic modeling in the assessment of symptom relief in palliative radiotherapy and cytotoxic chemotherapy. The linear quadratic model of radiation effect with the overall treatment time and the daily dose equivalent of repopulation is modified to include the regrowth time after completion of therapy. The predicted times to restore the original tumor volumes after treatment are dependent on the biological effective dose (BED) delivered and the repopulation parameter (K); it is also possible to estimate K values from analysis of palliative treatment response durations. Hypofractionated radiotherapy given at a low total dose may produce long symptom relief in slow-growing tumors because of their low alpha/beta ratios (which confer high fraction sensitivity) and their slow regrowth rates. Cancers that have high alpha/beta ratios (which confer low fraction sensitivity), and that are expected to repopulate rapidly during therapy, are predicted to have short durations of symptom control. The BED concept can be used to estimate the equivalent dose of radiotherapy that will achieve the same duration of symptom relief as palliative chemotherapy. Relatively simple radiobiologic modeling can be used to guide decision-making regarding the choice of the most appropriate palliative schedules and has important implications in the design of radiotherapy or chemotherapy clinical trials. The methods described provide a rationalization for treatment selection in a wide variety of tumors.

  9. TU-A-BRD-01: Outcomes of Hypofractionated Treatments - Initial Results of the WGSBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, P [UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ohri, N [Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY (United States); Joiner, M [Wayne State University, Detroit, MI (United States); Kong, F [Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (Georgia); Jackson, A [Mem Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ctr, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) has emerged in recent decades as a treatment paradigm that is becoming increasingly important in clinical practice. Clinical outcomes data are rapidly accumulating. Although published relations between outcomes and dose distributions are still sparse, the field has progressed to the point where evidence-based normal tissue dose-volume constraints, prescription strategies, and Tumor Control Probability (TCP) and Normal Tissue Complication Probability (NTCP) models can be developed. The Working Group on SBRT (WGSBRT), under the Biological Effects Subcommittee of AAPM, is a group of physicists and physicians working in the area of SBRT. It is currently performing critical literature reviews to extract and synthesize usable data and to develop guidelines and models to aid with safe and effective treatment. The group is investigating clinically relevant findings from SBRT in six anatomical regions: Cranial, Head and Neck, Thoracic, Abdominal, Pelvic, and Spinal. In this session of AAPM 2014, interim results are presented on TCP for lung and liver, NTCP for thoracic organs, and radiobiological foundations:• Lung TCP: Detailed modeling of TCP data from 118 published studies on early stage lung SBRT investigates dose response and hypothesized mechanisms to explain the improved outcomes of SBRT. This is presented from the perspective of a physicist, a physician, and a radiobiologist.• Liver TCP: For primary and metastatic liver tumors, individual patient data were extracted from published reports to examine the effects of biologically effective dose on local control.• Thoracic NTCP: Clinically significant SBRT toxicity of lung, rib / chest wall and other structures are evaluated and compared among published clinical data, in terms of risk, risk factors, and safe practice.• Improving the clinical utility of published toxicity reports from SBRT and Hypofractionated treatments. What do we want, and how do we get it? Methods

  10. [Intraoperative radiotherapy. Preliminary results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maingon, P; Fraisse, J; Brun, O; Salas, S; Naudy, S; Bernard, A; Goudet, P; Chalencon, J L; Minello, C; Pillet, M

    1995-01-01

    We report a series of 40 patients treated by intraoperative radiotherapy between 1988 and 1992 (18 primary tumors, 13 local recurrences and 9 nodal extensions). The doses delivered were 15 Gy to 25 Gy, completed by external radiotherapy (15 to 45 Gy) in 13 cases. The local tumor control rate was 61% for initial therapy in primary tumors (70% for adenocarcinoma of the stomach) and 80.9% after complete en bloc surgery. The local control rate after palliative surgery for local recurrences is 38% and 33% for nodal extension. Two patients died (5%) during the postoperative period. We observed 2 hemorrhages and 3 cases of stone-free cholecystitis. The value of this approach must be confirmed in rigorous indications in comparison with surgery alone in controlled and randomised clinical trials.

  11. Radiotherapy of hemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauwerky, F.

    1982-10-11

    The findings about the regular, spontaneous and complete regression of cavernous skin hemangiomas occurring in infants and those findings about the damaging effects due to ionising radiation - here particularly local growth disturbances - led to the development of very cautious diagnostic methods and to a considerate individual dosage and radiotherapy, which always takes into consideration the spontaneous regression tendency of the hemangiomas. However, a function-impairing localisation at the orifices, fulminant macrosomia, tendency to hemorrhages and poly-infection with superficial ulceration and even thrombopenic syndromes of the Kasabach-Merritt type may become necessary, urgent and also vital indications for a particular radiotherapy. For the sake of the patients, irradiation methods, which do not provoke any risk of radiation hazards, have to be preserved and applied in practice. Certainly further research and the nosologic nature of hemangiomas is required. A general non-treatment of hemangiomas is refused.

  12. Postoperative radiotherapy for ependymoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Hong; Ahn, Seung Do; Park, Jin Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2012-12-15

    To evaluated the patterns of failure, survival rate, treatment-related toxicity and prognostic factors in postoperative radiotherapy of patients with ependymoma. Thirty patients who underwent surgery and postoperative radiotherapy for ependymoma between the period of June 1994 and June 2008 were reviewed retrospectively. The age of patients ranged from 21 months to 66 years (median, 19 years). Seventeen patients had grade II ependymoma, and 13 had grade III anaplastic ependymoma according to the World Health Organization grading system. The postoperative irradiation was performed with 4 or 6 MV photon beam with median dose of 52.8 Gy (range, 45 to 63 Gy), and radiation field including 2 cm beyond the preoperative tumor volume. Median follow-up period was 51 months (range, 12 to 172 months). Fourteen out of 30 (46.7%) patients experienced recurrence, and 12 of those died. Among those 14 patients who experienced recurrence, 11 were in-field and 3 were out-of-field recurrence. The 5-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates were 66.7% and 56.1%, respectively. On univariate analysis, tumor grade was a statistically significant prognostic factor for OS and PFS. There were two complications after surgery and postoperative radiotherapy, including short stature and facial palsy on the left side. We observed good survival rates, and histologic grade was a prognostic factor affecting the OS and PFS. Almost all recurrence occurred in primary tumor site, thus we suggest further evaluation on intensity-modulated radiotherapy or stereotatic radiosurgery for high-risk patients such as who have anaplastic ependymoma.

  13. Radiotherapy of vertebral hemangiomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakata, Kohichi; Hareyama, Masato; Oouchi, Atushi; Sido, Mitsuo; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Tamakawa, Mituharu; Akiba, Hidenari; Morita, Kazuo [Dept. of Radiology, Sapporo Medical Univ., School of Medicine (Japan)

    1997-12-31

    Between 1975 and 1996, 14 patients (11 females, 3 males) with vertebral hemangioma received treatment with radiotherapy. Thirteen patients had a history of back pain or lumbago and 2 patients had neurological symptoms such as sensory impairment or paraplegia. The standard dose administered was 36 Gy in 18 fractions (five treatments per week). In the 13 patients with pain, this was completely or partially relieved. The condition of a man with hypesthesia of the legs deteriorated and a woman with paraplegia who was treated with decompressive laminectomy followed by radiotherapy recovered completely after irradiation. CT scan before irradiation showed thickened trabeculae as small punctate areas of sclerosis in all patients. At MR imaging before irradiation, T2-weighted MR images showed areas of high intensity in all patients and MR images demonstrated lesion enhancement. However, none of the patients who were treated successfully with radiation demonstrated any changes of the affected vertebra in the conventional radiographic films, CT scan or MR imaging, even 5 years after irradiation. Radiological imaging is indispensable for the diagnosis of vertebral hemangiomas but does not appear to be useful for evaluating the effects of radiotherapy. (orig.).

  14. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy: Injection of Hyaluronic Acid to Better Preserve The Rectal Wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Udrescu, Corina [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Devonec, Marian [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Tanguy, Ronan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Sotton, Marie-Pierre [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Enachescu, Ciprian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Colombel, Marc [Department of Urology, Hopital Edouard Herriot, Lyon (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre Val d' Aurelle, Montpellier (France); Jalade, Patrice [Department of Medical Physics, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Ruffion, Alain [Department of Urology, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) between the rectum and the prostate for reducing the dose to the rectal wall in a hypofractionated irradiation for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In a phase 2 study, 10 cc of HA was injected between the rectum and prostate. For 16 patients, the same intensity modulated radiation therapy plan (62 Gy in 20 fractions) was optimized on 2 computed tomography scans: CT1 (before injection) and CT2 (after injection). Rectal parameters were compared: dose to 2.5 cc (D2.5), 5 cc (D5), 10 cc (D10), 15 cc (D15), and 20 cc (D20) of rectal wall and volume of rectum covered by the 90% isodose line (V90), 80% (V80), 70% (V70), 60% (V60), and 50% (V50). Results: The mean V90, V80, V70, V60, and V50 values were reduced by 73.8% (P<.0001), 55.7% (P=.0003), 43.0% (P=.007), 34% (P=.002), and 25% (P=.036), respectively. The average values of D2.5, D5, D10, D15, and D20 were reduced by 8.5 Gy (P<.0001), 12.3 Gy (P<.0001), 8.4 Gy (P=.005), 3.7 Gy (P=.026), and 1.2 Gy (P=.25), respectively. Conclusions: The injection of HA significantly limited radiation doses to the rectal wall.

  15. The effect of hypofractionated radiation and magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia on tumor immunogenicity and overall treatment response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, P. Jack; Wagner, Robert J.; Song, Ailin; Osterberg, Bjorn; Gladstone, David J.; Bursey, Alicea A.; Fiering, Steven N.; Giustini, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    It is now known that many tumors develop molecular signals (immune checkpoint modulators) that inhibit an effective tumor immune response. New information also suggest that even well-known cancer treatment modalities such as radiation and hyperthermia generate potentially beneficial immune responses that have been blocked or mitigated by such immune checkpoints, or similar molecules. The cancer therapy challenge is to; a) identify these treatment-based immune signals (proteins, antigens, etc.); b) the treatment doses or regimens that produce them; and c) the mechanisms that block or have the potential to promote them. The goal of this preliminary study, using the B6 mouse - B16 tumor model, clinically relevant radiation doses and fractionation schemes (including those used clinically in hypofractionated radiation therapy), magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPH) and sophisticated protein, immune and tumor growth analysis techniques and modulators, is to determine the effect of specific radiation or hyperthermia alone and combined on overall treatment efficacy and immunologic response mechanisms. Preliminary analysis suggests that radiation dose (10 Gy vs. 2 Gy) significantly alters the mechanism of cell death (apoptosis vs. mitosis vs. necrosis) and the resulting immunogenicity. Our hypothesis and data suggest this difference is protein/antigen and immune recognition-based. Similarly, our evidence suggest that radiation doses larger than the conventional 2 Gy dose and specific hyperthermia doses and techniques (including mNP hyperthermia treatment) can be immunologically different, and potentially superior to, the radiation and heat therapy regimens that are typically used in research and clinical practice.

  16. Image-guided stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for the liver: a safe and effective treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van De Voorde, L; Vanneste, B; Houben, R; Damen, P; van den Bogaard, J; Lammering, G; Dejong, K; de Vos-Geelen, J; Buijsen, J; Öllers, M; Berbée, M; Lambin, P

    2015-02-01

    Stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR) is a non-invasive treatment option for inoperable patients or patients with irresectable liver tumors. Outcome and toxicity were evaluated retrospectively in this single-institution patient cohort. Between 2010 and 2014, 39 lesions were irradiated in 33 consecutive patients (18 male, 15 female, median age of 68 years). All the lesions were liver metastases (n = 34) or primary hepatocellular carcinomas (n = 5). The patients had undergone four-dimensional respiration-correlated PET-CT for treatment simulation to capture tumor motion. We analyzed local control with a focus on CT-based response at three months, one year and two years after treatment, looking at overall survival and the progression pattern. All patients were treated with hypofractionated image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy. The equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions varied from 62.5 Gy to 150 Gy, delivered in 3-10 fractions (median dose 93.8 Gy, alpha/beta = 10). The CT-based regression pattern three months after radiotherapy revealed partial regression in 72.7% of patients with a complete remission in 27.3% of the cases. The site of first progression was predominantly distant. One- and two-year overall survival rates were 85.4% and 68.8%, respectively. No toxicity of grade 2 or higher according to the NCI Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 was observed. SABR is a safe and efficient treatment for selected inoperable patients or irresectable tumors of the liver. Future studies should combine SABR with systemic treatment acting in synergy with radiation, such as immunological interventions or hypoxic cell radiosensitizers to prevent distant relapse. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Postoperative radiotherapy of pterygium with Strontium-90 plaque

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Michinori; Hada, Yoshihiro; Akagi, Yasushi [National Hospital of Kure, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2000-06-01

    Between 1979 and 1998, radiotherapy with a Strontium (Sr)-90 plaque after pterygium excision was administered in 36 patients (40 eyes). All lesions were nasal (rt. eyes 21, lt. eyes 19). Thirty-eight were primary pterygia and 2 were recurrent ones. The study included 18 males and 18 females, 43 to 80 years of age (median: 64). The interval between pterygium excision and postoperative radiotherapy was less than 24 hours in 17 cases, 2 days in 1, 4 days in 3, 9 days in 5 and 10 days and more in 14. Although total radiation dose in all patients was 40 Gy in the Sr-90 plaque surface, the daily dose fraction was 8 Gy in 20 cases until 1985 and 10 Gy in 20 cases after 1985. All courses of radiotherapy were delivered using once-daily fractionation, 1 day per week. The median follow-up period was 43 months (range, 12-180 months). Of 40 lesions, 5 recurred. Of the 5 recurrent cases, 4 recurred within 5 months after treatment. The remaining 1 case recurred in 30 months. The local control rate at 2 years was 90% in all cases. No significant difference in local control rates was seen for the subgroups classified by age, gender, primary or recurrent, interval between pterygium excision and radiotherapy or treatment time. No patients had severe radiation-induced complications. Postoperative radiotherapy with a Sr-90 plaque was safe and effective in preventing local recurrence after pterygium excision. (author)

  18. Intra- and interfraction breathing variations during curative radiotherapy for lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhler Nøttrup, Trine; Korreman, Stine Sofia; Pedersen, Anders Navrsted

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: This study aimed at quantifying the breathing variations among lung cancer patients over full courses of fractionated radiotherapy. The intention was to relate these variations to the margins assigned to lung tumours, to account for respiratory motion, in fractionated...... radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eleven lung cancer patients were included in the study. The patients' chest wall motions were monitored as a surrogate measure for breathing motion during each fraction of radiotherapy by use of an external optical marker. The exhale level variations were evaluated...

  19. Multicenter, Phase 1, Dose Escalation Study of Hypofractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy With Bevacizumab for Recurrent Glioblastoma and Anaplastic Astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Jennifer; Neil, Elizabeth; Terziev, Robert; Gutin, Philip; Barani, Igor; Kaley, Thomas; Lassman, Andrew B; Chan, Timothy A; Yamada, Josh; DeAngelis, Lisa; Ballangrud, Ase; Young, Robert; Panageas, Katherine S; Beal, Kathryn; Omuro, Antonio

    2017-11-15

    To establish the maximum tolerated dose of a 3-fraction hypofractionated stereotactic reirradiation schedule when delivered with concomitant bevacizumab to treat recurrent high-grade gliomas. Patients with recurrent high-grade glioma with Karnofsky performance status ≥60, history of standard fractionated initial radiation, tumor volume at recurrence ≤40 cm3, and absence of brainstem or corpus callosum involvement were eligible. A standard 3+3 phase 1 dose escalation trial design was utilized, with dose-limiting toxicities defined as any grade 3 to 5 toxicities possibly, probably, or definitely related to radiation. Bevacizumab was given at a dose of 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks. Hypofractionated stereotactic reirradiation was initiated after 2 bevacizumab doses, delivered in 3 fractions every other day, starting at 9 Gy per fraction. A total of 3 patients were enrolled at the 9 Gy × 3 dose level cohort, 5 in the 10 Gy × 3 cohort, and 7 in the 11 Gy × 3 cohort. One dose-limiting toxicity of grade 3 fatigue and cognitive deterioration possibly related to hypofractionated stereotactic reirradiation was observed in the 11 Gy × 3 cohort, and this dose was declared the maximum tolerated dose in combination with bevacizumab. Although no symptomatic radionecrosis was observed, substantial treatment-related effects and necrosis were observed in resected specimens. The intent-to-treat median overall survival was 13 months. Reirradiation using a 3-fraction schedule with bevacizumab support is feasible and reasonably well tolerated. Dose-escalation was possible up to 11 Gy × 3, which achieves a near doubling in the delivered biological equivalent dose to normal brain, in comparison with our previous 6 Gy × 5 schedule. Promising overall survival warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Radiotherapy for eyelid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saika, Kazumi [Yokohama City Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-05-01

    Some studies on radiotherapy for eyelid cancer have been reported, but the optimal radiation doses for different histological types and tumor sizes have not been detailed. So I studied the optimal radiation doses in radiotherapy for eyelid cancer. The patients were fourteen and histological diagnoses were made on the basis of biopsies or surgery before radiotherapy. Surgical cut margins were positive in 10 cases. In 5 of these cases, tumors were visible. There were 9 sebaceous adenocarcinomas (SAC), 4 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), and 1 basal cell carcinoma (BCC). In 13 of 14 cases, radiation was applied to eyelids in which tumor-surgical cut margin distances were 3 mm or less. The eyeballs were covered with lead or tungsten shields, and the eyelids were irradiated with a total dose of 50 to 66.6 Gy. In 5 cases, radiation was applied prophylactically for ipsilateral pre-auricle lymph node areas. 11 of 13 cases were locally controlled. I gave greater radiation doses for SAC than for SCC or BCC. I also gave greater doses for in visible tumors than for invisible ones. In the acute phase dermatitis, inflammation of the cornea, conjunctivitis, etc. occurred but they were mild. Later reactions were decreased cilia, dry eye, inflammation of cornea, conjunctivitis, discomfort of the scar, etc. Cataracts were also seen, but they were of senile origen. Because 81.8% of the tumors were controlled, this radiation method was useful with salvage therapies to select an optimal radiation dose according to the differences among histological types and tumor sizes. 60% of visible tumors were also controlled so I think that radical therapy using radiation alone is possible. (author)

  1. Bystander effects and radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Alicia; Martín, Margarita; Liñán, Olga; Alvarenga, Felipe; López, Mario; Fernández, Laura; Büchser, David; Cerezo, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effects are defined as biological effects expressed after irradiation by cells whose nuclei have not been directly irradiated. These effects include DNA damage, chromosomal instability, mutation, and apoptosis. There is considerable evidence that ionizing radiation affects cells located near the site of irradiation, which respond individually and collectively as part of a large interconnected web. These bystander signals can alter the dynamic equilibrium between proliferation, apoptosis, quiescence or differentiation. The aim of this review is to examine the most important biological effects of this phenomenon with regard to areas of major interest in radiotherapy. Such aspects include radiation-induced bystander effects during the cell cycle under hypoxic conditions when administering fractionated modalities or combined radio-chemotherapy. Other relevant aspects include individual variation and genetics in toxicity of bystander factors and normal tissue collateral damage. In advanced radiotherapy techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), the high degree of dose conformity to the target volume reduces the dose and, therefore, the risk of complications, to normal tissues. However, significant doses can accumulate out-of-field due to photon scattering and this may impact cellular response in these regions. Protons may offer a solution to reduce out-of-field doses. The bystander effect has numerous associated phenomena, including adaptive response, genomic instability, and abscopal effects. Also, the bystander effect can influence radiation protection and oxidative stress. It is essential that we understand the mechanisms underlying the bystander effect in order to more accurately assess radiation risk and to evaluate protocols for cancer radiotherapy.

  2. [Radiotherapy of bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riou, O; Chauvet, B; Lagrange, J-L; Martin, P; Llacer Moscardo, C; Charissoux, M; Lauche, O; Aillères, N; Fenoglietto, P; Azria, D

    2016-09-01

    Surgery (radical cystectomy) is the standard treatment of muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Radiochemotherapy has risen as an alternative treatment option to surgery as part as organ-sparing combined modality treatment or for patients unfit for surgery. Radiochemotherapy achieves 5-year bladder intact survival of 40 to 65% and 5-year overall survival of 40 to 50% with excellent quality of life. This article introduces the French recommendations for radiotherapy of bladder cancer: indications, exams, technique, dosimetry, delivery and image guidance. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Imaging in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calandrino, R. [Medical Physics Department, Scientific Institute H. S. Raffaele, Vita-Salute University, Milan (Italy)], E-mail: calandrino.riccardo@hsr.it; Del Maschio, A. [Radiology Department, Scientific Institute H. S. Raffaele, Vita-Salute University, Milan (Italy); Cattaneo, G.M. [Medical Physics Department, Scientific Institute H. S. Raffaele, Vita-Salute University, Milan (Italy); Castiglioni, I. [IBFM-CNR, Nuclear Medicine Department, Scientific Institute H. S. Raffaele, Milan (Italy)

    2009-09-01

    The diagnostic methodologies used for the radiotherapy planning have undergone great developments in the last 30 years. Since the 1980s, after the introduction of the CT scanner, the modality for the planning moved beyond the planar 2D assessment to approach a real and more realistic volumetric 3D definition. Consequently the dose distribution, previously obtained by means of an overly simple approximation, became increasingly complex, better tailoring the true shape of the tumour. The final therapeutic improvement has been obtained by a parallel increase in the complexity of the irradiating units: the Linacs for therapy have, in fact, been equipped with a full accessory set capable to modulate the fluence (IMRT) and to check the correct target position continuously during the therapy session (IMRT-IGRT). The multimodal diagnostic approach, which integrates diagnostic information, from images of the patient taken with CT, NMR, PET and US, further improves the data for a biological and topological optimization of the radiotherapy plan and consequently of the dose distribution in the Planning Target Volume. Proteomic and genomic analysis will be the next step in tumour diagnosis. These methods will provide the planners with further information, for a true personalization of the treatment regimen and the assessment of the predictive essays for each tumour and each patient.

  4. Proton minibeam radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girst, Stefanie

    2016-03-08

    The risk of developing adverse side effects in the normal tissue after radiotherapy is often limiting for the dose that can be applied to the tumor. Proton minibeam radiotherapy, a spatially fractionated radiotherapy method using sub-millimeter proton beams, similar to grid therapy or microbeam radiation radiotherapy (MRT) using X-rays, has recently been invented at the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich. The aim of this new concept is to minimize normal tissue injuries in the entrance channel and especially in the skin by irradiating only a small percentage of the cells in the total irradiation field, while maintaining tumor control via a homogeneous dose in the tumor, just like in conventional broad beam radiotherapy. This can be achieved by optimizing minibeam sizes and distances according to the prevailing tumor size and depth such that after widening of the minibeams due to proton interactions in the tissue, the overlapping minibeams produce a homogeneous dose distribution throughout the tumor. The aim of this work was to elucidate the prospects of minibeam radiation therapy compared to conventional homogeneous broad beam radiotherapy in theory and in experimental studies at the ion microprobe SNAKE. Treatment plans for model tumors of different sizes and depths were created using the planning software LAPCERR, to elaborate suitable minibeam sizes and distances for the individual tumors. Radiotherapy-relevant inter-beam distances required to obtain a homogeneous dose in the target volume were found to be in the millimeter range. First experiments using proton minibeams of only 10 μm and 50 μm size (termed microchannels in the corresponding publication Zlobinskaya et al. 2013) and therapy-conform larger dimensions of 100 μm and 180 μm were performed in the artificial human in-vitro skin model EpiDermFT trademark (MatTek). The corresponding inter-beam distances were 500 μm, 1mm and 1.8 mm, respectively, leading to irradiation of only a few percent of the cells

  5. Brainwave for radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalmers, Matthew

    2003-11-01

    The award of this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) highlights the central role played by physics in medical imaging. Some 30 years after MRI produced its first 'slices' through the human body, researchers are now combining advanced versions of the technique with radiotherapy to improve the treatment of brain tumours. Roberto Garcia-Alvarez, Andy Beavis and Gary Liney at the University of Hull in the UK have developed a novel approach that combines functional MRI (fMRI) and intensity- modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Their technique significantly reduces the need to expose certain areas of the brain - such as those responsible for motor function - to radiation during treatment, and could help preserve the quality of life of cancer patients (J. Radiotherapy in Practice 3 55). In the November issue of Physics World Matthew Chalmers describes how by combining imaging techniques and radiation therapy leads to safer targeting of tumours. (U.K.)

  6. The Early Result of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High Risk Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei eLin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe rationale for hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer is based on the modern understanding of radiobiology and advances in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT techniques. Whole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk prostate cancer might escalate biologically effective dose without increasing toxicity. Here, we report our 4-year results of SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer.Methods and MaterialsFrom October 2009 to August 2012, 41 patients of newly diagnosed, high-risk or very high-risk (NCCN definition localized prostate cancer patients were treated with whole-pelvis irradiation and SBRT boost. The whole pelvis dose was 45Gy (25 fractions of 1.8Gy. The SBRT boost dose was 21 Gy (three fractions of 7 Gy. Ninety percent of these patients received hormone therapy. The toxicities of gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU tracts were scored by Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Effect (CTCAE v3.0. Biochemical failure was defined by Phoenix definition.ResultsMedian follow-up was 42 months. Mean PSA before treatment was 44.18 ng/ml. Mean PSA level at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months was 0.94, 0.44, 0.13, 0.12, and 0.05 ng/ml, respectively. The estimated 4-year biochemical failure-free survival was 91.9%. Three biochemical failures were observed. GI and GU tract toxicities were minimal. No grade 3 acute GU or GI toxicity was noted. During radiation therapy, 27% of the patient had grade 2 acute GU toxicity and 12% had grade 2 acute GI toxicity. At 3 months, most toxicity scores had returned to baseline. At the last follow up, there was no grade 3 late GU or GI toxicity.ConclusionsWhole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal toxicity and encouraging biochemical failure-free survival. Continued accrual and follow-up would be necessary to confirm the biochemical control rate and the toxicity profiles.

  7. Stromal-epithelial dynamics in response to fractionated radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Muqeem Abdul

    Radiotherapy is central to the management of a number of human cancers, either as an adjuvant or primary treatment modality. The principal objective in irradiating tumors is to permanently inhibit their proliferative ability. More than half of all malignancies are primarily treated with radiation, but the heterotypic nature of tumor cells greatly complicates their response to radiotherapy. The need for reliable parameters to predict tumor and normal tissue response to radiation is therefore a prime concern of clinical oncology. Post-operative radiotherapy has commonly been used for early stage breast cancer to treat residual disease. There is continued debate as to what might be the proper dose per fraction as well as the total dose of radiation that needs to be prescribed to prevent disease recurrence. Countries outside the US have adopted increased dose fractionation (i.e., hypofractionation) schemes for early stage breast cancer as a standard of practice; however there is a lack of confidence in these approaches in the United States. The tumor microenvironment plays a significant role in regulating the progression of carcinomas, although the mechanisms are not entirely clear. The primary objective of this work was to characterize, through mechanobiological and radiobiological modeling, a test bed for radiotherapy fractionation techniques assessment. Our goal is to understand how the tumor microenvironment responds to dose fractionation schemes for Breast Conserving Therapy (BCT). Although carcinomas are the major concern for oncology, in this project, the goal is to understand how the stromal microenvironment influences behavior of the cancer cell populations. By classifying 3-D cellular co-cultures as having a reactive or quiescent stroma using the mechanobiology profile (culture stiffness,cellular activation, differentiation, and proliferation) we aim to differentiate the effectiveness of various fractionation schemes. The benefits of understanding heterotypic

  8. Low Incidence of Fatigue after Hypofractionated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT for Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiranjeev eDash

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fatigue is a common side-effect of conventional prostate cancer radiation therapy. The increased delivery precision necessitated by the high dose per fraction of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT offers the potential of reduce target volumes and hence the exposure of normal tissues to high radiation doses. Herein, we examine the level of fatigue associated with SBRT treatment.Methods: Forty patients with localized prostate cancer treated with hypofractionated SBRT, and a minimum of 12 months follow-up were included in this analysis. Self-reported fatigue and other quality of life measures were assessed at baseline and at 1, 3, 6, 9, and 12 months post-SBRT.Results: Mean levels of fatigue were elevated at 1 month post-SBRT compared to baseline values (p=0.02. Fatigue at the 3-month follow-up and later were higher but not statistically significantly different compared to baseline. African-American patients reported higher fatigue post-SBRT than Caucasian patients. Fatigue was correlated with hormonal symptoms as measured by the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC quality of life questionnaire, but not with urinary, bowel, or sexual symptoms. Age, co-morbidities, smoking, prostate specific antigen (PSA levels, testosterone levels, and tumor stage were not associated with fatigue. Conclusion: This is the first study to investigate fatigue as a side-effect of SBRT. In contrast to standard radiation therapy, results suggest SBRT-related fatigue is short-term rather than a long-term side effect of SBRT. These results also suggest post-SBRT fatigue to be a more frequent complication in African-Americans than Caucasians.

  9. Effects of radiotherapy on the sense of taste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umeyama, Masayoshi; Suzaki, Harumi [Showa Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-07-01

    The adverse effects of radiotherapy for cancer in the head and neck region include impairment of the sense of taste and smell and dry mouth. The present study was conducted to examine the effects of such radiotherapy on the sense of taste, in view of its influence on the quality of life of patients with malignant tumors of the head and neck following treatment. In 18 patients with malignant tumors of the head and neck (mean age, 59.9 years) the sense of taste was tested using the filter-paper disc method, serially before and after radiotherapy with {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays, in order to analyze the changes in gustatory threshold after radiotherapy. The patients were also observed for subjective symptoms, including dry mouth and impairment of the sense of taste, and changes in the lingual surface over the course of radiotherapy. No increase in the gustatory threshold or subjective impairment of the sense of taste was noted after radiotherapy when the field of irradiation did not include the tongue (4 cases of laryngeal cancer). When the field of irradiation included a part of the tongue (3 cases of maxillary cancer, 3 cases of hypopharyngeal cancer, 1 case of epipharyngeal cancer) or the entire tongue (2 cases of lingual cancer, 2 cases of cancer of the floor of the mouth, 3 cases of mesopharyngeal cancer), dry mouth was noted after irradiation at 7.2-39.6 Gy, and the gustatory threshold increased after irradiation at 12-40 Gy. Subjective impairment of the sense of taste was also reported after irradiation at 10-25.2 Gy, which was restored to normal within 2-3 months after the end of radiotherapy. In relation to the quality of taste, the gustatory threshold for sweet tastes increased the slowest, and was restored rapidly. In contrast, the gustatory threshold for sour tastes increased most rapidly, and was restored slowly. The relationship between the serum zinc level and the increase in gustatory threshold was unclear. There was a tendency for the lingual surface to

  10. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Martin J

    2011-01-01

    External-beam radiotherapy has long been challenged by the simple fact that patients can (and do) move during the delivery of radiation. Recent advances in imaging and beam delivery technologies have made the solution--adapting delivery to natural movement--a practical reality. Adaptive Motion Compensation in Radiotherapy provides the first detailed treatment of online interventional techniques for motion compensation radiotherapy. This authoritative book discusses: Each of the contributing elements of a motion-adaptive system, including target detection and tracking, beam adaptation, and pati

  11. Radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokuuye, Koichi; Sumi, Minako; Kagami, Yoshikazu; Murayama, Shigeyuki [National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan). Radiation Oncology Div.; Kawashima, Mitsuhiko; Ikeda, Hiroshi [National Cancer Center Hospital East, Chiba (Japan). Radiation Div.; Ueno, Hideki; Okusaka, Takuji; Okada, Shuichi [National Cancer Center Hospital, Tokyo (Japan). Internal Medicine Div.

    2000-09-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness of radiotherapy with or without transarterial embolization (TAE) and/or percutaneous ethanol injection (PEI) in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who were ineligible for surgery. Patients and Methods: From October 1984 to November 1997, 62 patients underwent radiotherapy receiving 50 to 70 Gy in 25 to 35 treatments with or without transarterial embolization and/or percutaneous ethanol injection and were followed for a median period of 8.6 months (1.5 to 92 months). Results: Overall median survival rates were 9.5 months. Significant prognostic factors were the extent of pretreatment liver function impairment, radiation field size and the existence of tumor thrombosis. Six-month and 1-year local control rates were 67 and 54%, respectively. Seven of the 8 patients who suffered from hepatic failure had poor pretreatment liver functions. Conclusion: Radiotherapy with or without transarterial embolization and/or percutaneous ethanol injection appears effective in controlling hepatocellular carcinoma and prolonged survival. Individualized treatment strategies are presented depending on the tumor presentation and the degree of liver function impairment. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Retrospektive Evaluierung der Wirksamkeit einer Bestrahlung mit oder ohne transarterielle Embolisation oder perkutaner Alkoholinjektion bei Patienten mit inoperablem hepatozellulaeren Karzinom. Patienten und Methodik: Von Oktober 1984 bis November 1997 wurden 62 Patienten mit einer Gesamtdosis von 50 bis 70 Gy in 25 bis 35 Fraktionen mit oder ohne transarterielle Embolisation oder perkutane Alkoholinjektion behandelt. Der mediane Follow-up betrug 8,6 Monate (1,5 bis 92 Monate). Ergebnisse: Das mediane Gesamtueberleben betrug 9,5 Monate. Signifikante prognostische Einflussfaktoren waren das Ausmass der praetherapeutischen Leberfunktionseinschraenkung, die Bestrahlungsfeldgroesse und das Vorhandensein von Tumorthrombosen. Nach sechs

  12. Recommendations for safer radiotherapy: what’s the message?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eDunscombe

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy, with close to a million courses delivered per year in North America, is a very safe and effective intervention for a devastating disease. However, although rare, several deeply regrettable incidents have occurred in radiotherapy and have rightly been the subject of considerable public interest. Partly in response to reports of these incidents a variety of authoritative organizations across the globe has harnessed the expertise amongst their members in attempts to identify the measures that will make radiotherapy safer. While the intentions of all these organizations are clearly good it is challenging for the health care providers in the clinic to know where to start with so much advice coming from so many directions. Through a mapping exercise we have identified commonalities between recommendations made in seven authoritative documents and identified those issues most frequently cited. The documents reviewed contain a total of 117 recommendations. Using the 37 recommendations in Towards Safer Radiotherapy as the initial base layer, recommendations in the other documents were mapped, adding to the base layer to accommodate all the recommendations from the additional six documents as necessary. This mapping exercise resulted in the distillation of the original 117 recommendations down to 61 unique recommendations. Twelve topics were identified in three or more of the documents as being pertinent to the improvement of patient safety in radiotherapy. They are, in order of most to least cited: training, staffing, documentation, incident learning, communication, check lists, quality control and preventive maintenance, dosimetric audit, accreditation, minimizing interruptions, prospective risk assessment and safety culture. This analysis provides guidance for the selection of those activities most likely to enhance safety and quality in radiotherapy based on the frequency of citation in selected recent authoritative literature.

  13. [Radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maingon, P; Blanchard, P; Bidault, F; Calmels, L

    2016-09-01

    Nasapharyngeal carcinoma is a rare disease. Oftenly, the diagnostic is made for advanced disease. Localized tumors, T1 or T2 NO observed a good prognosis and are locally controlled in more than 90 % of the cases by radiotherapy alone. The standard treatment of locally advanced disease is combined chemoradiation. A special vigilance of fast decrease of the volume of the pathological lymph nodes, sometimes associated to loss of weight might indicate an adaptive dosimetric revision. The treatment of recurrent disease is of great importance. Surgical indications are limited but should be discussed in multidisciplinary tumor board when possible. Surgical nodal sampling has to be proposed for nodal recurrence as well as reirradiation, which could be indicated according to the technical issues. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  14. [Radiotherapy during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazeron, R; Barillot, I; Mornex, F; Giraud, P

    2016-09-01

    The diagnostic of cancer during pregnancy is a rare and delicate situation. As the developments of the embryo and the human fetus are extremely sensitive to ionizing radiations, the treatment of these tumors should be discussed. The studies - preclinical and clinical - based mostly on exposure accidents show that subdiaphragmatic treatments are possible during pregnancy. When radiotherapy is used, phantom estimations of the dose to the fetus, confirmed by in vivo measurements are required. Irradiation and imaging techniques should be arranged to decrease as much as possible the dose delivered to the fetus and hold below the threshold of 0.1Gy. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy in oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Keshtgar, Mohammed; Wenz, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Targeted intraoperative radiotherapy is a major advance in the management of cancer patients. With an emphasis on practical aspects, this book offers an ideal introduction to this innovative  technology for clinicians.

  16. [Combined radiotherapy of uveal melanoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovkina, A F; Kesheleva, V V; Fridman, F E; Fishkin, I G

    1997-01-01

    Fifteen patients with uveal melanoma were exposed to combined radiotherapy: transscleral exposure of melanoma using a ruthenium ophthalmoapplicator and intracorporeal administration of 59Fe. Radiation reaction of the tumor was potentiated by combined exposure.

  17. Hypofractionated image guided radiation therapy followed by prostate seed implant boost for men with newly diagnosed intermediate and high risk adenocarcinoma of the prostate: Preliminary results of a phase 2 prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Gresswell, MD

    2016-10-01

    Conclusions: Early results on the toxicity and efficacy of the combination of hypofractionated IG-IMRT and low-dose-rate brachytherapy boost are favorable. Longer follow-up is needed to confirm safety and effectiveness.

  18. Bone Health and Pelvic Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higham, C E; Faithfull, S

    2015-11-01

    Survivors who have received pelvic radiotherapy make up many of the long-term cancer population, with therapies for gynaecological, bowel, bladder and prostate malignancies. Individuals who receive radiotherapy to the pelvis as part of their cancer treatment are at risk of insufficiency fractures. Symptoms of insufficiency fractures include pelvic and back pain and immobility, which can affect substantially quality of life. This constellation of symptoms can occur within 2 months of radiotherapy up to 63 months post-treatment, with a median incidence of 6-20 months. As a condition it is under reported and evidence is poor as to the contributing risk factors, causation and best management to improve the patient's bone health and mobility. As radiotherapy advances, chronic symptoms, such as insufficiency fractures, as a consequence of treatment need to be better understood and reviewed. This overview explores the current evidence for the effect of radiotherapy on bone health and insufficiency fractures and identifies what we know and where gaps in our knowledge lie. The overview concludes with the need to take seriously complaints of pelvic pain from patients after pelvic radiotherapy and to investigate and manage these symptoms more effectively. There is a clear need for definitive research in this field to provide the evidence-based guidance much needed in practice. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Postmastectomy Hypofractionated and Accelerated Radiation Therapy With (and Without) Subcutaneous Amifostine Cytoprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koukourakis, Michael I., E-mail: targ@her.forthnet.gr [Department of Radiotherapy/Oncology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Panteliadou, Marianthi; Abatzoglou, Ioannis M.; Sismanidou, Kyriaki [Department of Radiotherapy/Oncology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Sivridis, Efthimios; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra [Department of Pathology, Democritus University of Thrace, Alexandroupolis (Greece)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Postmastectomy radiation therapy (PMRT) provides major local control and survival benefits. More aggressive radiation therapy schemes may, however, be necessary in specific subgroups, provided they are safely administered. We report the tolerance and efficacy of a highly accelerated and hypofractionated regimen (HypoARC). Methods and Materials: One hundred twelve high-risk patients who had undergone mastectomy received 10 consecutive fractions of 3.5 Gy in 12 days (thoracic wall and axillary/supraclavicular areas). Two consecutive additional fractions of 4 Gy were given to the surgical scar area (electrons 8-10 MeV) and 1 3.5-Gy fraction to the axilla (in cases with extensive nodal involvement). A minimum follow-up of 24 months (median, 44 months) was allowed before analysis. Of 112 patients, 21 (18.7%) refused to receive amifostine, the remaining receiving tolerance-based individualized doses (500-1000 mg/day subcutaneously). Results: By use of a dose individualization algorithm, 68.1%, 11%, and 18.7% of patients received 1000 mg, 750 mg, and 500 mg/day of amifostine. Patchy moist skin desquamation outside and inside the booster fields was noted in 14 of 112 (12.5%) and 26 of 112 (23.2%) patients, respectively. No case of acute pneumonitis was recorded. High amifostine dose offered a significant skin protection. Within a median follow-up time of 44 months, moderate subcutaneous edema outside and within the booster thoracic area was noted in 5 of 112 (4.4%) and 8 of 112 (7.1%) cases, respectively. Intense asymptomatic radiographic findings of in field lung fibrosis were noted in 4 of 112 (3.6%) patients. Amifostine showed a significant protection against lung and soft tissue fibrosis. A 97% projected 5-year local relapse free survival and 84% 5-year disease-specific survival were recorded. Lack of steroid receptor expression, simple human epidermal growth factor 2 positivity, or triple negative phenotype defined higher metastasis rates but had no effect on

  20. Radioprotectors in Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, C.K.K. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India); Parida, D.K.; Nomura, Taisei

    2001-03-01

    This review article focuses on clinically relevant radioprotectors and their mechanisms of radioprotection. Radiotherapy is the most common modality of human cancer therapy. Obtaining optimal results requires a judicious balance between the total dose of radiotherapy delivered and the threshold limit of critical surrounding normal tissues, and the normal tissues need to be protected against radiation injury to obtain better tumor control by using a higher dose. For this reason, radiation-protective agents play an important role in clinical radiotherapy. Radiation-protective agents can be classified into three groups: radioprotectors, adaptogens, and absorbents. The first group generally consists of sulfhydryl compounds and other antioxidants. They include several myelo-, entero-, and cerebro-protectors. Adaptogens act as promotors of radioresistance. They are natural protectors that offer chemical protection against low levels of ionizing radiation. Absorbents protect organs from internal radiation and chemicals. They include drugs that prevent incorporation of radioiodine by the thyroid gland and absorption of radionuclides. This article thoroughly describes the properties, mechanisms of action, and perspectives on clinical application of the following categories of radioprotectors: sulfhydryl compounds (e.g., cysteine, cysteamine, glutathione, AET, WR 2127, and other WR-compounds), antioxidants (e.g., tempace, Hoechst 33342, vitamin A, E, and C, TMG, melatonin), angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors (e.g., captopril, elanopril, penicillamine, pentoxifylline, L-158, 809), cytoprotective agents (mesna, dexrazoxane, and amifostin), metalloelements (e.g., manganese chloride, cadmium salts, bismuth subnitrate), immunomodulators (gamma-interferon, polysaccharides AM5, AM218, heat-killed lactobacillus cells, broncho-vaxom, trehalose dicorynomycolate, and AS101), lipopolysaccharides and prostaglandins, plant extracts and compounds isolated from plants (curcmin

  1. Technological advances in radiotherapy for esophageal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vosmik, Milan; Petera, Jiri; Sirak, Igor; Hodek, Miroslav; Paluska, Petr; Dolezal, Jiri; Kopacova, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Radiotherapy with concurrent chemotherapy and surgery represent the main treatment modalities in esophageal cancer. The goal of modern radiotherapy approaches, based on recent technological advances, is to minimize post-treatment complications by improving the gross tumor volume definition (positron emission tomography-based planning), reducing interfraction motion (image-guided radiotherapy) and intrafraction motion (respiratory-gated radiotherapy), and by better dose delivery to the precisely defined planning target volume (intensity-modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy). Reduction of radiotherapy-related toxicity is fundamental to the improvement of clinical results in esophageal cancer, although the dose escalation concept is controversial. PMID:21105188

  2. Adjuvant chemotherapy (Nedaplatin/UFT) after radiotherapy for locallu advanced head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota, Akira; Furukawa, Madoka; Kawano, Toshiro; Yamashita, Kohsuke; Sugiyama, Masato [Kanagawa Cancer Center (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate the toxicity and efficacy of adjuvant chemotherapy after radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cancer, 40 patients, previously untreated (6 with stage III and 34 with stage IV; 26 with resectable, 10 with unresectable and 4 patients with inoperable) were treated with radiotherapy followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (Nedaplatin /tegafur-uracil (UFT)) at our outpatient clinic. The primary site was identified in the larynx or hypopharynx in 15, oral cavity or oropharynx in 11, sinuses in 6, nasopharynx in 4, unknown primary in 3, and parotis in 1 patient. Treatment consisted of 6 courses of Nedaplatin 80 mg/m{sup 2} repeated at 4 weeks intervals, and one-year oral administration of UFTE 400mg/day, after radiotherapy. Toxicities included leukopenia (grade 3, 20.5%, grade 4, 2.6%), thrombocytopenia (grade 3, 7.7%). There was one death due to gastric ulcer. Twenty-five patients (62.5%) received 6 courses of adjuvant chemotherapy. Two-year overall survival rate was 100% for stage III and 61.1% for stage IV. Over the same period, the progression-free survival rate was 83.3% for stage III and 46.1% for stage IV. 85.7% of complete response (CR) (12/14 patients) and 63.6% of partial response (PR) (14/22 patients) to radiotherapy showed that the effect of radiotherapy was maintained during adjuvant chemotherapy. If the effect of radiotherapy was maintained during adjuvant chemotherapy, the two-year progression free survival rate was not different between 81.8% for CR to radiotherapy and 81.3% for PR. The rate of distant failure was 2.5%, which was lower than that citedin previous reports. This adjuvant chemotherapy regimen is tolerable at outpatient clinics and might suppress distant metastasis after radiotherapy. (author)

  3. Patterns of retreatment by radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, M B; Allen, S; Delaney, G P; Hudson, H M; Hao, Z; Allison, R W; van der Linden, Y M

    2014-10-01

    To describe patterns of treatment for those who receive more than one episode of megavoltage radiotherapy (retreatment) by cancer type for better service planning and benchmarking. Institutional databases of all patients who received their first megavoltage radiotherapy for any type of cancer at the Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres (LM), New South Wales, Australia, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital (RBWH), Queensland, Australia and Radiotherapeutic Institution Friesland (RIF), Leeuwarden, the Netherlands, over the period 1991-2009 were examined. Radiotherapy retreatment was defined as any radiotherapy episode, to any body site, after an initial episode of radiotherapy, for the same cancer diagnosis. The total retreatment rate was defined as the number of retreatment episodes of radiotherapy divided by the number of cases in the cohort. In total, 62,270 patients (RBWH 38581, LM 9654, RIF 14035) received 77,762 episodes of radiotherapy, giving a total retreatment rate of 0.25; 52,351 patients (84%) received only one episode of treatment and 9919 (16%) received two or more episodes of treatment. Overall retreatment rates for LM, RBWH and RIF were 0.24, 0.25 and 0.26, respectively. For the five most common cancer types treated, the median time between treatment episodes was longest for breast cancer (11.3 months), then head and neck cancer (9.7 months), colorectal cancer (7.2 months), prostate cancer (4.4 months) and lung cancer (4.1 months). Ninety-one per cent of all fractions were delivered in the first episode of treatment. The retreatment rate was very similar between the three facilities, suggesting agreement about the indications for retreatment. Copyright © 2014 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute and late toxicities of radiotherapy for patients with discoid lupus erythematosus: a retrospective case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Ajaykumar B

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate acute and late toxicities of radiotherapy for patients with discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE. Methods A retrospective review was performed of patients with DLE who received radiotherapy at our institution between 1980 and 2005. Patients with other connective tissue disorders were excluded. Control patients were matched 2:1 with the DLE treatment courses based on age, cancer diagnosis, year of treatment, radiotherapy dose, and sex. Acute (within 30 days from the completion of radiotherapy and late toxicities were evaluated for each treatment course using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 3.0. Results Twelve patients with DLE received a total of 15 radiotherapy courses. The median follow-up time was 2.6 years (range, 0.0-15.2 years. Acute toxicity of any organ was observed in 10 (67% treatment courses, of which 2 (13% were Grade 3 or higher. Acute Grade 1 or 2 dermatologic toxicity was observed in 8 courses (53%. Late toxicity of any organ was observed in 7 of 12 (58% evaluable treatment courses, of which 3 (23% were grade 3 or higher. Late grade 1 or 2 dermatologic toxicity was observed in 5 (42% courses. No patient experienced acute or late Grade 3 or higher dermatologic toxicity. The rates of any organ or dermatologic acute and late toxicity were not significantly different between DLE and control treatment courses. Conclusions Our findings do not suggest an increased risk of toxicity to the skin or other organs in patients with DLE receiving radiotherapy.

  5. Long-Term Outcomes From a Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Christopher R., E-mail: crking@mednet.ucla.edu [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Urology, University of California Los Angeles School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Brooks, James D.; Gill, Harcharan; Presti, Joseph C. [Department of Urology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiotherapy has an intrinsically different normal tissue and tumor radiobiology. The results of a prospective trial of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer with long-term patient-reported toxicity and tumor control rates are presented. Methods and Materials: From 2003 through 2009, 67 patients with clinically localized low-risk prostate cancer were enrolled. Treatment consisted of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions using SBRT with the CyberKnife as the delivery technology. No patient received hormone therapy. Patient self-reported bladder and rectal toxicities were graded on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale (RTOG). Results: Median follow-up was 2.7 years. There were no grade 4 toxicities. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Grade 3, 2, and 1 bladder toxicities were seen in 3% (2 patients), 5% (3 patients), and 23% (13 patients) respectively. Dysuria exacerbated by urologic instrumentation accounted for both patients with Grade 3 toxicity. Urinary incontinence, complete obstruction, or persistent hematuria was not observed. Rectal Grade 3, 2, and 1 toxicities were seen in 0, 2% (1 patient), and 12.5% (7 patients), respectively. Persistent rectal bleeding was not observed. Low-grade toxicities were substantially less frequent with QOD vs. QD dose regimen (p = 0.001 for gastrointestinal and p = 0.007 for genitourinary). There were two prostate-specific antigen (PSA), biopsy-proven failures with negative metastatic workup. Median PSA at follow-up was 0.5 {+-} 0.72 ng/mL. The 4-year Kaplan-Meier PSA relapse-free survival was 94% (95% confidence interval, 85%-102%). Conclusion: Significant late bladder and rectal toxicities from SBRT for prostate cancer are infrequent. PSA relapse-free survival compares favorably with other definitive treatments. The current evidence supports consideration of stereotactic body radiotherapy among the therapeutic options for localized prostate cancer.

  6. Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for comprehensive treatment of oligometastatic tumors (SABR-COMET: Study protocol for a randomized phase II trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palma David A

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR has emerged as a new treatment option for patients with oligometastatic disease. SABR delivers precise, high-dose, hypofractionated radiotherapy, and achieves excellent rates of local control. Survival outcomes for patients with oligometastatic disease treated with SABR appear promising, but conclusions are limited by patient selection, and the lack of adequate controls in most studies. The goal of this multicenter randomized phase II trial is to assess the impact of a comprehensive oligometastatic SABR treatment program on overall survival and quality of life in patients with up to 5 metastatic cancer lesions, compared to patients who receive standard of care treatment alone. Methods After stratification by the number of metastases (1-3 vs. 4-5, patients will be randomized between Arm 1: current standard of care treatment, and Arm 2: standard of care treatment + SABR to all sites of known disease. Patients will be randomized in a 1:2 ratio to Arm 1:Arm 2, respectively. For patients receiving SABR, radiotherapy dose and fractionation depends on the site of metastasis and the proximity to critical normal structures. This study aims to accrue a total of 99 patients within four years. The primary endpoint is overall survival, and secondary endpoints include quality of life, toxicity, progression-free survival, lesion control rate, and number of cycles of further chemotherapy/systemic therapy. Discussion This study will provide an assessment of the impact of SABR on clinical outcomes and quality of life, to determine if long-term survival can be achieved for selected patients with oligometastatic disease, and will inform the design of a possible phase III study. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01446744

  7. Predicting location of recurrence using FDG, FLT, and Cu-ATSM PET in canine sinonasal tumors treated with radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Tyler; Fu, Rau; Bowen, Stephen; Zhu, Jun; Forrest, Lisa; Jeraj, Robert

    2015-07-01

    Dose painting relies on the ability of functional imaging to identify resistant tumor subvolumes to be targeted for additional boosting. This work assessed the ability of FDG, FLT, and Cu-ATSM PET imaging to predict the locations of residual FDG PET in canine tumors following radiotherapy. Nineteen canines with spontaneous sinonasal tumors underwent PET/CT imaging with radiotracers FDG, FLT, and Cu-ATSM prior to hypofractionated radiotherapy. Therapy consisted of 10 fractions of 4.2 Gy to the sinonasal cavity with or without an integrated boost of 0.8 Gy to the GTV. Patients had an additional FLT PET/CT scan after fraction 2, a Cu-ATSM PET/CT scan after fraction 3, and follow-up FDG PET/CT scans after radiotherapy. Following image registration, simple and multiple linear and logistic voxel regressions were performed to assess how well pre- and mid-treatment PET imaging predicted post-treatment FDG uptake. R2 and pseudo R2 were used to assess the goodness of fits. For simple linear regression models, regression coefficients for all pre- and mid-treatment PET images were significantly positive across the population (P logistic regression models were similar. Multiple linear regression models resulted in better fits (median R2 = 0.31), but there was still large variability between patients in R2. The R2 from regression models for different predictor variables were highly correlated across patients (R ≈ 0.8), indicating tumors that were poorly predicted with one tracer were also poorly predicted by other tracers. In conclusion, the high inter-patient variability in goodness of fits indicates that PET was able to predict locations of residual tumor in some patients, but not others. This suggests not all patients would be good candidates for dose painting based on a single biological target.

  8. A New Model for Predicting Acute Mucosal Toxicity in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Radiotherapy With Altered Schedules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strigari, Lidia, E-mail: strigari@ifo.it [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Pedicini, Piernicola [Department of Medical Physics, Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); D' Andrea, Marco [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Pinnaro, Paola; Marucci, Laura; Giordano, Carolina [Department of Radiotherapy, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Department of Medical Physics, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei tumori, Meldola (Italy)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: One of the worst radiation-induced acute effects in treating head-and-neck (HN) cancer is grade 3 or higher acute (oral and pharyngeal) mucosal toxicity (AMT), caused by the killing/depletion of mucosa cells. Here we aim to testing a predictive model of the AMT in HN cancer patients receiving different radiotherapy schedules. Methods and Materials: Various radiotherapeutic schedules have been reviewed and classified as tolerable or intolerable based on AMT severity. A modified normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model has been investigated to describe AMT data in radiotherapy regimens, both conventional and altered in dose and overall treatment time (OTT). We tested the hypothesis that such a model could also be applied to identify intolerable treatment and to predict AMT. This AMT NTCP model has been compared with other published predictive models to identify schedules that are either tolerable or intolerable. The area under the curve (AUC) was calculated for all models, assuming treatment tolerance as the gold standard. The correlation between AMT and the predicted toxicity rate was assessed by a Pearson correlation test. Results: The AMT NTCP model was able to distinguish between acceptable and intolerable schedules among the data available for the study (AUC = 0.84, 95% confidence interval = 0.75-0.92). In the equivalent dose at 2 Gy/fraction (EQD2) vs OTT space, the proposed model shows a trend similar to that of models proposed by other authors, but was superior in detecting some intolerable schedules. Moreover, it was able to predict the incidence of {>=}G3 AMT. Conclusion: The proposed model is able to predict {>=}G3 AMT after HN cancer radiotherapy, and could be useful for designing altered/hypofractionated schedules to reduce the incidence of AMT.

  9. Pulmonary oligometastases : Metastasectomy or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, Joachim; Klinkenberg, Theo J.; Ubbels, Jan F.; Wiegman, Erwin M.; Groen, Harry J. M.; Langendijk, Johannes A.

    Background and purpose: Stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR; or stereotactic body radiotherapy, SBRT) emerges as treatment option for pulmonary oligometastatic disease (OMD), but there are no studies comparing SABR with pulmonary metastasectomy (PME). We analysed consecutive patients referred

  10. Radiotherapy for glomus jugulare paraganglioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran Ba Huy, P

    2014-09-01

    Surgery has been long considered to be the treatment of choice for glomus jugulare paragangliomas, as it is the only modality able to totally eradicate the tumour. However, despite considerable progress in interventional radiology and nerve monitoring, surgery is associated with an unacceptably high complication rate for a benign tumour, explaining the growing place of radiotherapy in the management of these tumours. This review of the literature confirms the efficacy of conformal radiotherapy with or without intensity modulation and stereotactic radiotherapy, which both achieve tumour control rates ranging from 90% to almost 100% of cases, but for different tumour volumes, almost constant stabilization or even improvement of symptoms, and a considerably lower rate of adverse effects than with surgery. However, radiotherapy remains contraindicated in the presence of intracranial invasion or extensive osteomyelitis. In the light of these results, together with the improved quality of life and a better knowledge of the natural history of this disease, many authors propose radiotherapy as first-line treatment for all glomus jugulare paragangliomas regardless of their size, particularly in patients with no preoperative deficits. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  11. Phase 1 Study of Dose Escalation in Hypofractionated Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gillin, Michael [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wei, Caimiao [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lin, Steven H.; Swanick, Cameron; Alvarado, Tina; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Chang, Joe Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Background: Many patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cannot undergo concurrent chemotherapy because of comorbidities or poor performance status. Hypofractionated radiation regimens, if tolerable, may provide an option to these patients for effective local control. Methods and Materials: Twenty-five patients were enrolled in a phase 1 dose-escalation trial of proton beam therapy (PBT) from September 2010 through July 2012. Eligible patients had histologically documented lung cancer, thymic tumors, carcinoid tumors, or metastatic thyroid tumors. Concurrent chemotherapy was not allowed, but concurrent treatment with biologic agents was. The dose-escalation schema comprised 15 fractions of 3 Gy(relative biological effectiveness [RBE])/fraction, 3.5 Gy(RBE)/fraction, or 4 Gy(RBE)/fraction. Dose constraints were derived from biologically equivalent doses of standard fractionated treatment. Results: The median follow-up time for patients alive at the time of analysis was 13 months (range, 8-28 months). Fifteen patients received treatment to hilar or mediastinal lymph nodes. Two patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity possibly related to treatment; 1 received 3.5-Gy(RBE) fractions and experienced an in-field tracheoesophageal fistula 9 months after PBT and 1 month after bevacizumab. The other patient received 4-Gy(RBE) fractions and was hospitalized for bacterial pneumonia/radiation pneumonitis 4 months after PBT. Conclusion: Hypofractionated PBT to the thorax delivered over 3 weeks was well tolerated even with significant doses to the lungs and mediastinal structures. Phase 2/3 trials are needed to compare the efficacy of this technique with standard treatment for locally advanced NSCLC.

  12. Pain and quality of life following palliative radiotherapy of bone metastases; Der Einfluss palliativer Strahlentherapie auf Schmerz und Lebensqualitaet bei Patienten mit Knochenmetastasen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauer, N.; Wild, B.; Henningsen, P.; Jakobsen, T. [Klinik fuer Psychosomatische und Allgemeine Klinische Medizin, Univ. Heidelberg (Germany); Leising, D. [Inst. fuer Psychologie, Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany); Treiber, M. [Radiologische Universitaetsklinik, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Pain and quality of life following palliative radiotherapy of bone metastases Background and purpose: palliative irradiation is used to provide pain relief and to increase quality of life. Most studies exclude patients with advanced cancer disease and, therefore, a positive selection results. This prospective clinical study investigates the effect of palliative radiotherapy on pain and quality of life of patients with painful bone metastases. Patients and methods: 263 patients with bone metastases due to advanced cancer were observed with respect to pain and quality of life during a 2-month course of radiotherapy. Missing data were substituted by the LOCF method (last observation carried forward) to prevent a biased reduction of data. Results: radiotherapy resulted in pain relief. In the complete group, pain medication was not increased. Quality of life was not affected positively. Side effects of radiotherapy increased remarkably. Conclusion: Radiotherapy leads to pain relief. However, risks and benefits must be considered critically due to side effects. (orig.)

  13. Outcome following surgical resection, or surgical resection plus adjunctive, hypofractionated radiotherapy, of oral squamous cell carcinoma and fibrosarcoma in 87 dogs (2000-2009)

    OpenAIRE

    Riggs, J; Adams, V.; Hermer, J; Dobson, J.; Murphy, S; Ladlow, JF

    2017-01-01

    Objective – To report the outcome of 87 dogs undergoing surgical treatment of oral, non-tonsillar, squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and fibrosarcomas (FSA) and to determine prognostic factors affecting survival. Design – Retrospective case series Animals – 39 client-owned dogs with oral SCC and 48 client-owned dogs with FSA undergoing maxillectomy or mandibulectomy between 2000 and 2009. Procedures – Data regarding patient signalment, tumor location and size, evidence of lymph node...

  14. Characteristics of response of oral and pharyngeal mucosa in patients receiving chemo-IMRT for head and neck cancer using hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhide, Shreerang A; Gulliford, Sarah; Fowler, Jack; Rosenfelder, Nicola; Newbold, Katie; Harrington, Kevin J; Nutting, Christopher M

    2010-10-01

    This study describes the acute response of oral and pharyngeal mucosa to chemo-IMRT schedules using different doses per fraction. Patients, treated in prospective trials of concomitant chemo-IMRT with 2.17 Gy, 2.25 Gy and 2.4 Gy per fraction and identical dose of cisplatin, were included in this study. Acute toxicity was recorded prospectively using the CTCAE v2.0. We describe the incidence and prevalence of grade 3 oral mucositis and dysphagia over time and report the influence of overall treatment time (OTT). The association between the lengths of pharyngeal mucosa receiving 50 Gy (L50) and 60 Gy (L60) and grade 3 dysphagia was tested. The incidence and the peak prevalence of grade 3 dysphagia were significantly higher in patients receiving 2.4 Gy per fraction. The peak prevalence of grade 3 dysphagia was higher and the recovery was slower in patients with lower OTT (median 38 days vs. 42 days) treatment. There was a significant correlation between L50, L60 and grade 3 dysphagia. A L50 and L60 greater than 8 cm resulted in greater than 60% and 70% incidence of grade 3 dysphagia, respectively. The length of pharyngeal mucosa receiving doses close to the prescription dose correlates with grade 3 dysphagia. It was observed that incidence of grade 3 dysphagia was lower and recovery from it was quicker in patients with greater OTT. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Long-term local control achieved after hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy for adrenal gland metastases: A retrospective analysis of 34 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scorsetti, Marta; Alongi, Filippo [Radiotherapy and Radiosurgery Dept., IRCCS Istituto Clinico Humanitas, Humanitas Cancer Center, Rozzano, Milano (Italy)], Email: filippo.alongi@humanitas.it; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo [Radiation Oncology Unit, Dept. of Medical and Surgical Sciences, Univ. of Turin, Turin (Italy)] [and others

    2012-05-15

    Aims and background. To describe feasibility, tolerability and clinical outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in the treatment of adrenal metastases in 34 consecutive cancer patients. Material and methods. Between March 2004 and July 2010, a total of 34 consecutive patients, accounting for 36 adrenal metastatic lesions, were treated with SBRT. SBRT treatments were delivered by a Linac Varian 600 with microMLC (3DLine, Elekta, Stockholm, Sweden) and a Linac ELEKTA Precise (Elekta). All 34 patients were clinically and radiologically evaluated during and after completion of SBRT. Following outcomes were taken into account: best clinical response at any time, local control, time to systemic progression, time to local progression, overall survival and toxicity. Survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and factor potentially affecting outcomes were analyzed with Cox regression analysis. Results. Total RT doses ranged from 20 Gy in 4 fractions to 45 Gy in 18 fractions (median dose: 32 Gy; median number of fractions: 4). All doses were prescribed to the 95% isodose line. No cases of Grade {>=} 3 toxicity were recorded. At a median follow-up time of 41 months (range, 12-75) 22 patients were alive. Three of 28 lesions (11%) showed complete response, 13/28 (46%) partial response, 10/28 (36%) stable disease and 2/28 (7%) progressed in the treated area. Local failure was observed in 13 cases. Actuarial local control rates at one and two years were 66% and 32%, respectively. Median time to local progression was 19 months. Median survival was 22 months. Conclusion. SBRT in adrenal gland metastasis is feasible without significant acute and late toxicities, with a good rate of local control. New SBRT fractionation schemes and the possibility to combine new systemic approaches should be investigated in order to further increase local control and reduce systemic disease progression.

  16. Kombinierte Angiogenese-/Vaskulogenese-Inhibition und Radiotherapie

    OpenAIRE

    Riesterer, O

    2011-01-01

    Im folgenden Artikel wird die Interaktion von Inhibitoren der Angiogenese oder Vaskulogenese in Kombination mit Radiotherapie vorgestellt und anhand des jeweiligen Interaktionsmechanismus aufgezeigt, wie diese Substanzen in klinische Studien zusammen mit Radiotherapie integriert werden können. Besonders wird dabei auf einen neuen Therapieansatz eingegangen: die ergänzende (adjuvante) Gabe von Angiogenese- oder Vaskulogenese-Inhibitoren nach Abschluss der fraktionierten Radiotherapie.

  17. Stereotactic radiotherapy for vestibular schwannoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muzevic, Dario; Legcevic, Jelena; Splavski, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vestibular schwannomas (acoustic neuromas) are common benign tumours that arise from the Schwann cells of the vestibular nerve. Management options include observation with neuroradiological follow-up, microsurgical resection and stereotactic radiotherapy. OBJECTIVES: To assess...... the effect of stereotactic radiotherapy compared to observation, microsurgical resection, any other treatment modality, or a combination of two or more of the above approaches for vestibular schwannoma. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials; PubMed; EMBASE; CINAHL......; Web of Science; CAB Abstracts; ISRCTN and additional sources for published and unpublished trials. The date of the search was 24 July 2014. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) exploring the efficacy of stereotactic radiotherapy compared with observation alone, microsurgical...

  18. Severe mitral regurgitation after radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzarín, Alberto; Cianciulli, Tomás F; Saccheri, María C; Lax, Jorge A; Simonetti, Mario E; Zappi, Andrea; Laguens, Rubén P

    2014-02-01

    We present the case of a 69-year-old patient with a history of gynecological neoplasia and a pulmonary metastasis, who in 1996 underwent chemotherapy and mediastinal radiotherapy followed by cancer remission. Ten years later she presented with heart failure and her Doppler echocardiogram showed severe mitral regurgitation with pulmonary hypertension. In 2011, she underwent a mitral valve replacement with a biological prosthesis and the pathology exam revealed valve damage consistent with radiotherapy-induced changes. This unusual mechanism of mitral regurgitation can be demonstrated clearly by echocardiography and should be disseminated among cardiology physicians and in patients who have survived for long periods after radiotherapy, it is important to remember that cardiac complications may indeed occur, and the treating physician is responsible for detecting them. © 2013, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Available evidence on re-irradiation with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy following high-dose previous thoracic radiotherapy for lung malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bari, Berardino; Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Mazzola, Rosario; Bonomo, Pierluigi; Trovò, Marco; Livi, Lorenzo; Alongi, Filippo

    2015-06-01

    Patients affected with intra-thoracic recurrences of primary or secondary lung malignancies after a first course of definitive radiotherapy have limited therapeutic options, and they are often treated with a palliative intent. Re-irradiation with stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) represents an appealing approach, due to the optimized dose distribution that allows for high-dose delivery with better sparing of organs at risk. This strategy has the goal of long-term control and even cure. Aim of this review is to report and discuss published data on re-irradiation with SABR in terms of efficacy and toxicity. Results indicate that thoracic re-irradiation may offer satisfactory disease control, however the data on outcome and toxicity are derived from low quality retrospective studies, and results should be cautiously interpreted. As SABR may be associated with serious toxicity, attention should be paid for an accurate patients' selection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. French Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. The next session will take place from 28 January to 5 April 2013. Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. The next session will take place from 28 January to 5 April 2013. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. The next session will take place from 28 January to 5 April 2013. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister.

  1. Clinical quality standards for radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Aim of the study The technological progress that is currently being witnessed in the areas of diagnostic imaging, treatment planning systems and therapeutic equipment has caused radiotherapy to become a high-tech and interdisciplinary domain involving staff of various backgrounds. This allows steady improvement in therapy results, but at the same time makes the diagnostic, imaging and therapeutic processes more complex and complicated, requiring every stage of those processes to be planned, organized, controlled and improved so as to assure high quality of services provided. The aim of this paper is to present clinical quality standards for radiotherapy as developed by the author. Material and methods In order to develop the quality standards, a comparative analysis was performed between European and Polish legal acts adopted in the period of 1980-2006 and the universal industrial ISO 9001:2008 standard, defining requirements for quality management systems, and relevant articles published in 1984-2009 were reviewed, including applicable guidelines and recommendations of American, international, European and Polish bodies, such as the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), the European Society for Radiotherapy & Oncology (ESTRO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) on quality assurance and management in radiotherapy. Results As a result, 352 quality standards for radiotherapy were developed and categorized into the following three groups: 1 – organizational standards; 2 – physico-technical standards and 3 – clinical standards. Conclusion Proposed clinical quality standards for radiotherapy can be used by any institution using ionizing radiation for medical purposes. However, standards are of value only if they are implemented, reviewed, audited and improved, and if there is a clear mechanism in place to monitor and address failure to meet agreed standards. PMID:23788854

  2. Treatment of primary brain lymphoma without immune deficiency, The importance of chemotherapy before radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keihani M

    1999-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to find a more efficacious treatment for patients with primary central nervous system Lymphoma using chemotherapy. The objective was to determine the optimal time for radiotherapy treatment in relation to chemotherapy. Retrospective evaluation in patients with brain lymphoma was conducted from 1992 to 1998. Twenty-three patients were evaluated. Patients were divided into two groups based on the timing of radiotherapy in relation to the chemotherapy. The first group of patients (n=13 initially received radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy. Five of these patients receied classic CHOP (cyclophosphamide, Doxorubicine, Vincistine and Prednisone, six patients received Cis-platin (60 Megs/M2 and Etoposide (120 Megs/M2 and two patients received Cis-platin (60 Megs/M2, Etoposide (120 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine (600 Megs/M2 every 2 to 3 weeks. The second group of patients (Group II, n=10 received the followeing treatment regimen: a course of BCNU 120 Megs/M2 with Ifosfamide 1200 Megs/M2, Mesna and Etoposide 120 Megs/M2 on the first day of treatment (course A. Two weeks later, treatment was continued with a course of Cis-platin 35 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine 600 Megs/M2 (course B. The treatment was continued 14 days later with a course of Mitoxantron 12 Megs/M2, Ifosfamide 1200 Megs/M2 puls Mesna (course C. After the fourth week of chemotherapy, these patients received radiotherapy to the brain (5000 RADS in 4 weeks. During radiotherapy and at the beginning of course chemotherapy, intrathecal therapy with Methorexate 12 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine 60 Megs/M2 was given. Immediately after radiotherapy, the same chemothotrexate 12 Megs/M2 and Cytarabine 60 Megs/M2 was given. Immediately after radiotherapy, the same chemotherapy treatment was repeated to a total of 3 times. After complete clearance of the tumor determined by MRI and absence of tumor cells in the spinal fluid, the chemotherapeutic regimen was repeated one last time. The

  3. Metrological Issues in Molecular Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D’Arienzo Marco

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic effect from molecular radiation therapy (MRT, on both tumour and normal tissue, is determined by the radiation absorbed dose. Recent research indicates that as a consequence of biological variation across patients the absorbed dose can vary, for the same administered activity, by as much as two orders of magnitude. The international collaborative EURAMET-EMRP project “Metrology for molecular radiotherapy (MetroMRT” is addressing this problem. The overall aim of the project is to develop methods of calibrating and verifying clinical dosimetry in MRT. In the present paper an overview of the metrological issues in molecular radiotherapy is provided.

  4. English courses

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    New courses University of Cambridge ESOL examination course We will be starting two new courses in October leading to the Cambridge First Certificate in English (level B2 of the European Framework) and the Cambridge Advanced English (level C1) examinations. These courses will consist of two semesters of 15 weeks with two two-hourly classes per week. There will be an average of eight students per class. Normally the examination will be taken in June 2011 but strong participants could take it earlier. People wishing to take these courses should enrol: http://cta.cern.ch/cta2/f?p=110:9:1927376177842004::NO::X_COURSE_ID,X_STATUS:4133%2CD and they will then be required to take a placement test to check that their level of English is of an appropriate level. Please note that we need a minimum of seven students enrolled to open a session. For further information please contact Tessa Osborne 72957. General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: From 4th October 2010 to 5th Feb...

  5. Impact of pelvic radiotherapy on gut microbiota of gynecological cancer patients revealed by massive pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Do Nam

    Full Text Available Although pelvic irradiation is effective for the treatment of various cancer types, many patients who receive radiotherapy experience serious complications. Gut microbial dysbiosis was hypothesized to be related to the occurrence of radiation-induced complications in cancer patients. Given the lack of clinical or experimental data on the impact of radiation on gut microbiota, a prospective observational study of gut microbiota was performed in gynecological cancer patients receiving pelvic radiotherapy. In the current study, the overall composition and alteration of gut microbiota in cancer patients receiving radiation were investigated by 454 pyrosequencing. Gut microbial composition showed significant differences (P < 0.001 between cancer patients and healthy individuals. The numbers of species-level taxa were severely reduced after radiotherapy (P < 0.045, and the abundance of each community largely changed. In particular, the phyla Firmicutes and Fusobacterium were significantly decreased by 10% and increased by 3% after radiation therapy, respectively. In addition, overall gut microbial composition was gradually remolded after the full treatment course of pelvic radiotherapy. In this set of cancer patients, dysbiosis of the gut microbiota was linked to health status, and the gut microbiota was influenced by pelvic radiotherapy. Although further studies are needed to elucidate the relationship between dysbiosis and complications induced by pelvic radiotherapy, the current study may offer insights into the treatment of cancer patients suffering from complications after radiation therapy.

  6. Parotid gland function after radiotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roesink, Judith Maria

    2005-01-01

    Radiotherapy is a common treatment for head and neck cancer patients. Unfortunately, it produces serious acute and long-term side effects to the oral cavity. One severe complication is the loss of salivary gland function, which can persists for many years. Saliva has multiple functions relating to

  7. [Bullous lichen sclerosus after radiotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tournillac, I; Dandurand, M; Guillot, B

    1998-02-01

    Bullous lichen sclerosus is an uncommon observation after radiotherapy and can be misdiagnosed as a radiodermitis or recurrence of the neoplasia. Two women developed bullous lichen sclerosus after radiotherapy. The delay after radiotherapy was 4 months and 10 years respectively. Irradiation dose was 60 and 64 grays. The lesions covered more than the irradiated zone in one case. Stabilization or regression of the lesions was obtained with cases I topical corticosteroids, with acitretine in one case. These cases, and similar cases reported in the literature, underline the fact that the condition has only been reported in women. This is probably because of the nature of the neoplasias treated (breast cancer in 20 cases and cervical cancer in 1). The delay to onset of the skin lesions are quite variable. Lichen sclerosus or morphea may be observed in the irradiated zone but may also appear at a distance. These lesions are not associated with recurrence of the initial cancer. As no association between breast cancer and localized sclerodermia has been found, the causal role is probably played by radiotherapy, producing a Koebner phenomena in predisposed tissue.

  8. Thalassaemic osteoarthropathy treated with radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davies, A.N. (King' s Coll. Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1993-11-01

    Patients with beta thalassaemia may develop a specific osteoarthropathy involving the feet. A number of different treatments for this condition have been tried, including rest, analgesia and hypertransfusion. We report a case of a patient with thalassaemic osteoarthropathy who responded to radiotherapy after failing conventional treatment. (author).

  9. Oral complications of cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreizen, S.; Daly, T.E.; Drane, J.B.; Brown, L.R.

    1977-02-01

    Injury to surrounding tissues during radiotherapy for oral cancer can have devastating physical and psychologic consequences for the patient. Oral complications include xerostomia, dental decay, mucositis, taste loss, osteoradionecrosis, infection, and trismus. In many instances, these problems can be eradicated or controlled with appropriate treatment.

  10. [Radiotherapy for primary lung carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, P; Lacornerie, T; Mornex, F

    2016-09-01

    Indication, doses, technique of radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy, for primary lung carcinoma are presented. The recommendations for delineation of the target volumes and organs at risk are detailed. Copyright © 2016 Société française de radiothérapie oncologique (SFRO). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Gradual Recovery from Nonambulatory Quadriparesis Caused by Metastatic Epidural Cervical Cord Compression in an Octogenarian Gallbladder Carcinoma Patient Treated with Image-Guided Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy Alone Using a Field-in-Field Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ohtakara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy for acute metastatic epidural spinal cord compression (MESCC involves conventional techniques and dose fractionation schemes, as it needs to be initiated quickly. However, even with rapid intervention, few paraplegic patients regain ambulation. Here, we describe the case of a mid-octogenarian who presented with severe pain and nonambulatory quadriparesis attributable to MESCC at the fifth cervical vertebra, which developed 10 months after the diagnosis of undifferentiated carcinoma of the gallbladder. Image-guided three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (IG-3DCRT was started with 25 Gy in 5 fractions followed by a boost of 12 Gy in 3 fractions, for which a field-in-field (FIF technique was used to optimize the dose distribution. Despite the fact that steroids were not administered, the patient reported significant pain reduction and showed improved motor function 3 and 4 weeks after the IG-3DCRT, respectively. Over the following 4 months, her neurological function gradually improved, and she was consequently able to eat and change clothes without assistance and to walk slowly for 10–20 m using a walker. She succumbed to progression of abdominal disease 8.5 months after the IG-3DCRT. This case demonstrates that image-guided FIF radiotherapy with a dose-escalated hypofractionated regimen can potentially improve functional outcome and local control.

  12. DEGRO practical guidelines: radiotherapy of breast cancer II. Radiotherapy of non-invasive neoplasia of the breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souchon, R. [University Hospital Tuebingen, Klinik fuer Radioonkologie, Tuebingen (Germany); Sautter-Bihl, M.L. [Municipal Hospital Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe (Germany); Sedlmayer, F. [LKH Salzburg, Paracelsus Medical University Hospital, Salzburg (Austria); Budach, W. [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Dunst, J. [University Hospital Schleswig-Holstein, Luebeck (Germany); Feyer, P. [Klinikum Neukoelln, Berlin (Germany); Fietkau, R.; Sauer, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Harms, W. [St. Clara Hospital, Basel (Switzerland); Wenz, F. [University Hospital Mannheim, Mannheim (Germany); Haase, W.

    2014-01-15

    . Randomized clinical trials and a huge number of mostly observational studies have unanimously demonstrated that RT significantly reduces recurrence risks of ipsilateral DCIS as well as invasive breast cancer independent of patient age in all subgroups. The recommended total dose is 50 Gy administered as whole breast irradiation (WBI) in single fractions of 1.8 or 2.0 Gy given on 5 days weekly. Retrospective data indicate a possible beneficial effect of an additional tumor bed boost for younger patients. Prospective clinical trials of different dose-volume concepts (hypofractionation, accelerated partial breast irradiation, boost radiotherapy) are still ongoing. Postoperative radiotherapy permits breast conservation for the majority of women by halving local recurrence as well as reducing progression rates into invasive cancer. New data confirmed this effect in all patient subsets - even in low risk subgroups (LoE 1a). (orig.) [German] Aktualisierung und Ergaenzung der 2007 von der DEGRO-Expertengruppe Mammakarzinom publizierten Leitlinie zur Radiotherapie (RT) des Mammakarzinoms. Aufgrund der zunehmenden klinischen Relevanz nicht-invasiver epithelialer Neoplasien der Brust wurde diesen in der aktuellen Version ein eigenes Kapitel gewidmet. Schwerpunkte der hier vorgelegten Empfehlungen sind - in Ergaenzung zu den S3-Leitlinien der Deutschen Krebsgesellschaft von 2012 - die Indikation und Technik der postoperativen RT nach brusterhaltender Operation. Die DEGRO-Expertengruppe fuehrte eine Literaturrecherche aktueller klinisch kontrollierter Studien, systematischer Reviews und Metaanalysen, orientiert an den Kriterien der evidenzbasierten Medizin, im Hinblick auf neue Aspekte gegenueber 2005 und 2007 durch. Die Recherche umfasst die Zeitspanne 2008 bis September 2012 und erstreckte sich auf in PubMed und Guidelines International Network (G-I-N) gelisteten Publikationen. Suchbegriffe waren ''non invasive breast cancer'', ''ductal carcinoma in situ

  13. MRI of occult sacral insufficiency fractures following radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammone, J.F. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, and Jefferson Medical Coll., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Schweitzer, M.E. [Dept. of Radiology, Thomas Jefferson Univ. Hospital, and Jefferson Medical Coll., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Following radiation therapy, marrow abnormalities noted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are frequent and may mimic metastases. Specific radiotherapy changes are usually easily identifiable; however, traumatic lesions cause more interpretive difficulties. We assessed the incidence and MRI characteristics of insufficiency fractures in this population. During a 5-year span (1987-1991), 546 patients received pelvic radiotherapy for primary malignancies. MRI was performed in 25 of these patients at least 3 months after treatment. The mean dose in this group was 53 Gy. These MRI scans were retrospectively reviewed for the appearance of the sacrum with particular attention to the presence of insufficiency fractures. This was correlated with clinical course and scintigraphic findings. Presumed insufficiency fractures on MRI paralleled the sacral side of the sacroiliac joint, enhanced with Gd-DTPA, were most prominent or initially seen anteriorly, and had ill-defined margins on all imaging sequences. The incidence of occult sacral insufficiency fractures was at least 20%. Insufficiency fractures of the sacrum in the post-radiotherapy patient are a relatively frequent occurrence which can mimic metastases. Consideration of this phenomenon and knowledge of differential features may avoid overdiagnosis of osseous metastases. (orig.)

  14. Clinical impact of FDG-PET/CT in the planning of radiotherapy for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Loft, Annika; Hansen, Mads

    2007-01-01

    of 2-[18F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography/computerised tomogrpahy (FDG-PET/CT) in the planning of involved field radiotherapy (IFRT). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Thirty patients received staging FDG-PET/CT before therapy, and IFRT after a short course of ABVD (adriamycin, bleomycin......, vinblastine, dacarbazine) chemotherapy. IFRT planning was performed using only the CT data from the FDG-PET/CT scan. Later, the IFRT planning was performed anew using the FDG-PET/CT data as basis for contouring. RESULTS: In 20 out of 30 patients, the radiotherapy (RT) course was unaffected by the addition...

  15. Language courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 5 May to 11 July 2014. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://hr-training.web.cern.ch/hr-training/ or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (kerstin.fuhrmeister@cern.ch). Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 5 May to 11 July 2014. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session...

  16. French courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 29 April to 5 July 2013. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (kerstin.fuhrmeister@cern.ch). Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 29 April to 5 July 2013. Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 29 April to 5 July...

  17. French courses

    CERN Document Server

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses The next session will take place from 2nd May to 6th July 2012. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister.   Oral Expression This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 2nd May to 6th July 2012.   Writing professional documents in French These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. Suitable candidates should contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister (70896) in order to arrange an appointment for a test. The next session will take place from 2nd May to ...

  18. English course

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2011-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next sessions will take place: From 3rd October 2011 to beginning of February 2012 (break at Christmas). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel. 70896. Oral Expression The next sessions will take place from 3rd October 2011 to beginning of February 2012 (break at Christmas). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel. 70896. Writing Professional Documents in English - Administrative Wr...

  19. Language Courses

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2010-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place: from 1st March to end of June 2010 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages or contact Nathalie Dumeaux, tel. 78144. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 1st March to end of June 2010 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students) More details Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will take place from 1st March to end of June 2010 (1/2 weeks break at Easter). This course is designed for people with a good le...

  20. NEW COURSES

    CERN Multimedia

    Technical Training; Tel. 74924

    2001-01-01

    Hands-on Training Support for the Windows 2000 Migration Please note that the set of hands-on courses listed below has been added to the Technical Training Programme to support the labwide migration to Windows 2000. If there is enough demand it is planned to organise sessions throughout the summer period. Anyone interested is asked to register for the course(s) of their choice by accessing the web course description from : http://training.web.cern.ch/Training/Welcome.html As soon as a minimum number of applications have been received dates will be fixed and published in the weekly bulletin and on the web. Please note that in order to get maximum benefit from these courses it is important to have Windows 2000 installed on your computer either before or immediately after you attend the session. People who do not have access to a Windows 2000 PC are strongly recommended to plan their training to coincide with the migration of their PC. A migration plan has been prepared in agreement with the NICE 2000 divisiona...

  1. Precision Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Poor Performing Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Phase 1 Dose Escalation Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westover, Kenneth D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Gerber, David E. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Iyengar, Puneeth; Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Diehn, Maximilian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Hughes, Randy; Schiller, Joan; Dowell, Jonathan [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wardak, Zabi [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sher, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Christie, Alana; Xie, Xian-Jin [Department of Clinical Science, Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Corona, Irma [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Sharma, Akanksha [School of Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Wadsworth, Margaret E. [Radiation Oncology of Mississippi, Jackson, Mississippi (United States); Timmerman, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Timmerman@utsouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: Treatment regimens for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) give suboptimal clinical outcomes. Technological advancements such as radiation therapy, the backbone of most treatment regimens, may enable more potent and effective therapies. The objective of this study was to escalate radiation therapy to a tumoricidal hypofractionated dose without exceeding the maximally tolerated dose (MTD) in patients with locally advanced NSCLC. Methods and Materials: Patients with stage II to IV or recurrent NSCLC and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2 or greater and not candidates for surgical resection, stereotactic radiation, or concurrent chemoradiation were eligible. Highly conformal radiation therapy was given to treat intrathoracic disease in 15 fractions to a total of 50, 55, or 60 Gy. Results: Fifty-five patients were enrolled: 15 at the 50-Gy, 21 at the 55-Gy, and 19 at the 60-Gy dose levels. A 90-day follow-up was completed in each group without exceeding the MTD. With a median follow-up of 12.5 months, there were 93 grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs), including 39 deaths, although most AEs were considered related to factors other than radiation therapy. One patient from the 55- and 60-Gy dose groups developed grade ≥3 esophagitis, and 5, 4, and 4 patients in the respective dose groups experienced grade ≥3 dyspnea, but only 2 of these AEs were considered likely related to therapy. There was no association between fraction size and toxicity (P=.24). The median overall survival was 6 months with no significant differences between dose levels (P=.59). Conclusions: Precision hypofractionated radiation therapy consisting of 60 Gy in 15 fractions for locally advanced NSCLC is generally well tolerated. This treatment regimen could provide patients with poor performance status a potent alternative to chemoradiation. This study has implications for the cost effectiveness of lung cancer therapy. Additional studies of long

  2. Hypofractionated Nodal Radiation Therapy for Breast Cancer Was Not Associated With Increased Patient-Reported Arm or Brachial Plexopathy Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Nelson; Truong, Pauline T; Tankel, Keith; Kwan, Winkle; Weir, Lorna; Olivotto, Ivo A

    2017-12-01

    To determine whether nodal radiation therapy (RT) for breast cancer using modest hypofractionation (HF) with 2.25 to 2.5 Gy per fraction (fx) was associated with increased patient-reported arm symptoms, compared with conventional fractionation (CF) ≤2 Gy/fx. Two cancer registries were used to identify subjects who received computed tomography-planned nodal RT for pT1-3, pN0-2, M0 breast cancer, from 2007 to 2010 at 2 cancer institutions. After ethics approval, patients were mailed an explanatory letter and the Self-reported Arm Symptom Scale, a validated instrument with 8 questions about arm symptoms and 5 related to activities of daily living. Clinicopathologic characteristics and Self-reported Arm Symptom Scale scores were compared between HF/CF cohorts using nonparametric analysis, χ2 analysis, and multivariate ordinal regression. Of 1759 patients, 800 (45.5%) returned a completed survey. A total of 708 eligible cases formed the study cohort. Of these, 406 (57%) received HFRT (40 Gy/16 fx, 45 Gy/20 fx), and 302 (43%) received CFRT (45-50 Gy/25 fx, 50.4 Gy/28 fx). Median time interval after RT was 5.7 years. Forty-three percent and 75% of patients received breast-conserving surgery and chemotherapy, respectively. Twenty-two percent received breast boost RT, independent of fractionation. Median age at diagnosis was 59 years (HF) and 53 years (CF) (Parm symptoms (P=.17) and activities of daily living (P=.85). Patients receiving HF reported lower rates of shoulder stiffness (P=.04), trouble moving the arm (P=.02), and difficulty reaching overhead (Parm swelling or symptoms related to brachial plexopathy. Nodal RT with hypofractionation was not associated with increased patient-reported arm symptoms or functional deficits compared with CF. Subjects treated with CF reported more disability in certain aspects of arm/shoulder function. These data support shorter fractionation utilization when regional nodes are within the therapeutic target. Copyright

  3. Radiotherapy-induced thyroid disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara A; Alterio, Daniela; Jassem, Jacek; Gibelli, Bianca; Tradati, Nicoletta; Orecchia, Roberto

    2004-06-01

    Despite their specific functional consequences, radiotherapy-induced thyroid abnormalities remain under-estimated and underreported. These sequelae may include primary or central hypothyroidism, thyroiditis, Graves' disease, euthyroid Graves' ophthalmopathy, benign adenomas, multinodular goitre and radiation-induced thyroid carcinoma. Primary hypothyroidism, the most common radiation-induced thyroid dysfunction, affects 20-30% of patients administered following curative radiotherapy to the neck region, with approximately half of the events occurring within the first 5 years after therapy. The relative risk of radiation-induced cancer (mainly well-differentiated tumours) is 15-53-fold higher than in non-irradiated population. The aetiology of radiation-induced thyroid injury includes vascular damage, parenchymal cell damage and auto-immune reactions. Total radiotherapy dose, irradiated volume of the thyroid gland, and the extent of prior thyroid resection are among the most important factors associated with the risk of hypothyroidism. The contribution of other treatment modalities (chemotherapy, endocrine therapy) as well as patient- and tumour-related factors is less clear. Reduction in radiation dose to the thyroid gland and hypothalamic/pituitary complex should be attempted whenever possible. New radiotherapy techniques, such as stereotactic radiosurgery, three-dimensional conformal irradiation, intensity modulated radiotherapy and proton therapy allow generally better dose distribution with lower dose to the non-target organs. The diagnostic approach to thyroid radiation injury includes baseline thyroid function assays in all patients undergoing thyroid or parasellar irradiation. Recommended follow-up procedures include at least annual evaluation with a history for symptoms of thyroid dysfunction, clinical examination, and measurement of thyroid hormones and thyrotropin. Management of overt hypothyroidism is based on hormone replacement therapy. Thyroid hormone

  4. Entrepreneurship Course

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    +++++++ Turn your idea into a company +++++++ Starting date: Thursday 23 October 2003 Timing: Every Thursday from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Venue: University of Geneva, Sciences II Duration: 1 semester Registration: http://www.startupcafe.ch/learn More Information: info@createswitzerland.ch Deadline to submit the application: 10 October 2003. Check the CREATE website for alternative dates and venues. The course is restricted to 30 pre-selected participants. The course covers important aspects of launching a business from initial idea to growth and international expansion and addresses two kind of skills requested to start a high tech company which are divided into personal skills (entrepreneur skills) and those to start a company (Start-up tools). The 14 week course is free of charge. For any question, please, contact Ilias.Goulas@cern.ch from the Technology Transfer Group (http://cern.ch/ttdb).

  5. National arrangements for radiotherapy; Mesures nationales pour la radiotherapie. Travail collectif des missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    After a presentation of several letters exchanged between the French health ministry and public agencies in charge of public health or nuclear safety after a radiotherapy accident in Epinal, this report comments the evolution of needs in cancerology care and the place given to radiotherapy. It outlines the technological and organisational evolution of radiotherapy and presents the distribution of radiotherapy equipment, of radio-therapists and other radiotherapy professionals in France. Within the context of radiotherapy accidents which occurred in 2007, it presents the regulatory arrangements which aimed at improving the safety, short term and middle term arrangements which are needed to support and structure radiotherapy practice quality. It stresses the fact that the system will deeply evolve by implementing a radiotherapy vigilance arrangement and a permanent follow-on and adaptation plan based on surveys and the creation of a national committee.

  6. Pediatric radiotherapy planning and treatment

    CERN Document Server

    Olch, Arthur J

    2013-01-01

    "This is a very well-written and -organized book covering the planning and delivery aspects unique to pediatric radiotherapy. The author is a respected and well-known medical physicist with extensive pediatric radiotherapy experience. … a very useful book for any clinical physicist treating pediatric cases and seeking contextual and historical perspective. … a great reference for medical physicists who may not see many pediatric cases and can look to this text as a one-stop shop for not only a comprehensive overview, but detailed explanation for specific pediatric disease sites. Overall, it is a great addition to the reference library of any radiation therapy physicist."-Medical Physics, April 2014.

  7. Gel dosimetry for conformal radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gambarini, G. [Department of Physics of the University and INFN, Milan (Italy)]. e-mail: grazia.gambarini@mi.infn.it

    2005-07-01

    With the continuum development of conformal radio therapies, aimed at delivering high dose to tumor tissue and low dose to the healthy tissue around, the necessities has appeared of suitable improvement of dosimetry techniques giving the possibility of obtaining dose images to be compared with diagnostic images. Also if wide software has been developed for calculating dose distributions in the fields of various radiotherapy units, experimental verifications are necessary, in particular in the case of complex geometries in conformal radiotherapy. Gel dosimetry is a promising method for imaging the absorbed dose in tissue-equivalent phantoms, with the possibility of 3D reconstruction of the spatial dose distribution, with milli metric resolution. Optical imaging of gel dosimeters, based on visible light absorbance analysis, has shown to be a reliable technique for achieving dose distributions. (Author)

  8. Proton Radiotherapy for Pediatric Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M. Ladra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric sarcomas represent a distinct group of pathologies, with approximately 900 new cases per year in the United States alone. Radiotherapy plays an integral role in the local control of these tumors, which often arise adjacent to critical structures and growing organs. The physical properties of proton beam radiotherapy provide a distinct advantage over standard photon radiation by eliminating excess dose deposited beyond the target volume, thereby reducing both the dose of radiation delivered to non-target structures as well as the total radiation dose delivered to a patient. Dosimetric studies comparing proton plans to IMRT and 3D conformal radiation have demonstrated the superiority of protons in numerous pediatric malignancies and data on long-term clinical outcomes and toxicity is emerging. In this article, we review the existing clinical and dosimetric data regarding the use of proton beam radiation in malignant bone and soft tissue sarcomas.

  9. Temporal lobe injury after re-irradiation of locally recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma using intensity modulated radiotherapy: clinical characteristics and prognostic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuai; Lu, Taixiang; Zhao, Chong; Shen, Jingxian; Tian, Yunming; Guan, Ying; Zeng, Lei; Xiao, Weiwei; Huang, Shaomin; Han, Fei

    2014-09-01

    Temporal lobe injury (TLI) is a debilitating complication after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), especially in patients who suffer treatment relapses and receive re-irradiation. We explored the clinical characteristics and prognostic factors of TLI in locally recurrent NPC (rNPC) patients after re-irradiation using intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). A total of 454 temporal lobes (TLs) from 227 locally rNPC patients were reviewed. The clinical characteristics of TLI were analyzed. In the two radiotherapy courses, the equivalent dose in 2 Gy per fraction (EQD2) for the TLs was recalculated to facilitate comparison of the individual data. The median follow-up time was 31 (range, 3-127) months. After re-irradiation using IMRT, 31.3 % (71/227) of patients developed TLI. The median latency of TLI was 15 (range, 4-100) months. Univariate and multivariate analysis showed that the interval time (IT) between the two courses of radiotherapy and the summation of the maximum doses of the two radiotherapy courses (EQD2 - ∑max) were independent factors influencing TLI. The 5-year incidence of TLI for an IT ≤26 or >26 months was 35.9 and 53.7 % respectively (p = 0.024). The median maximum doses delivered to the injured TLs were significantly higher than was the case for the uninjured TLs after two courses of radiotherapy (135.3 and 129.8 Gy, respectively: p 2-year interval was found to be relatively safe.

  10. Course Programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen

    2015-01-01

    Welcome to your first DESIGN course: ‘Mapping Meals and their Spaces’. I hope you are ready to learn about the emerging discipline of Food Design and the so‐called “Design Thinking” perspective, as well as how to implement the interdisciplinary knowledge characterizing your new education Integrat...

  11. Course Layout

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    present roll Presentation roll Interactive Media Element This is an interactive diagram of a MATLAB course layout covering 16 topics in 4 different main areas: Basics of MATLAB, Numerical Methods in MATLAB, Symbolic Manipulations in MATLAB, Mathematical Modeling in MATLAB and Simulink AE2440 Introduction to Digital Computation

  12. Language courses

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    General and Professional French Courses: The next session will take place from 7 October to 13 December 2013. These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. Oral Expression: This course is aimed for students with a good knowledge of French who want to enhance their speaking skills. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. The next session will take place from 7 October to 13 December 2013. Writing professional documents in French: These courses are designed for non-French speakers with a very good standard of spoken French. The next session will take place from 7 October to 13 December 2013. Cours d'anglais général et professionnel: La prochaine session se déroulera du 7 octobre 2013 au 31 janvier 2014 (interruption à Noël). Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Oral Expression: F...

  13. Language courses

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Tessa Osborne, tel.16 23 40. Oral Expression The next session will take place from beginning of October 2006 to beginning of February 2007 (3 weeks break at Christmas).This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next...

  14. Language Courses

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    General and Professional English Courses The next session will be held from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 week's break at Easter). These courses are open to all persons working on the CERN site, and to their spouses. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web pages: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Françoise Benz, tel. 73127. Oral Expression The next session will be held from 26 February or 5 March to end of June 2007 (1/2 week's break at Easter). This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be a maximum of 10 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-play, etc., depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 30 hours Price: 660 CHF (for a minimum of 8 students). Writing Professional Documents in English The next session will be held from 26 February or 5 March to e...

  15. Technological advances in radiotherapy of rectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Sebag-Montefiore, David

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes the available evidence for the use of modern radiotherapy techniques for chemoradiotherapy for rectal cancer, with specific focus on intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) techniques. RECENT FINDINGS: The dosimetric....... Overall results are encouraging, as toxicity levels - although varying across reports - appear lower than for 3D conformal radiotherapy. Innovative treatment techniques and strategies which may be facilitated by the use of IMRT/VMAT include simultaneously integrated tumour boost, adaptive treatment...

  16. Inflammatory Skin Conditions Associated With Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Aragüés, I; Pulido Pérez, A; Suárez Fernández, R

    2017-04-01

    Radiotherapy for cancer is used increasingly. Because skin cells undergo rapid turnover, the ionizing radiation of radiotherapy has collateral effects that are often expressed in inflammatory reactions. Some of these reactions-radiodermatitis and recall phenomenon, for example-are very familiar to dermatologists. Other, less common radiotherapy-associated skin conditions are often underdiagnosed but must also be recognized. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. [Stereotactic radiotherapy for prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quero, L; Hennequin, C

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic radiotherapy is a new option in the treatment of prostate cancer. However, only retrospective series and a few prospective phase II trials are available at this moment, including a few thousands of patients with a short follow-up. Most of the protocols delivered 33 to 38 Gy in four or five fractions. Acute toxicity seems to be similar to the one observed after conventional radiotherapy. Late toxicity is less evaluable because of the short follow-up: the rate of radiation-induced proctitis seems low in the published series. Urinary toxicities are not properly evaluated: some series reported a high incidence of urinary complications grade or higher. Most of the patients belong to the D'Amico's favourable group: biochemical controls are equivalent to those observed after conventional irradiation, but the follow-up is often shorter than 5 years and no definitive conclusion could be made about the efficiency of the technique. Data for the intermediate and high risk groups are not mature. In conclusion, stereotactic radiotherapy could strongly modified the management of prostate cancer: some phase III trials have started to confirm the good results reported in preliminary series. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  18. Hypnotherapy in radiotherapy patients: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalpers, Lukas J A; da Costa, Hanna C; Merbis, Merijn A E; Fortuin, Andries A; Muller, Martin J; van Dam, Frits S A M

    2005-02-01

    To determine whether hypnotherapy reduces anxiety and improves the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative radiotherapy (RT). After providing written informed consent, 69 patients were randomized between standard curative RT alone (36 controls) and RT plus hypnotherapy (33 patients). Patients in the hypnotherapy group received hypnotherapy at the intake, before RT simulation, before the first RT session, and halfway between the RT course. Anxiety was evaluated by the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory DY-1 form at six points. Quality of life was measured by the Rand Medical Outcomes Study 36-item Health Survey (SF-36) at five points. Additionally, patients answered a questionnaire to evaluate their experience and the possible benefits of this research project. No statistically significant difference was found in anxiety or quality of life between the hypnotherapy and control groups. However, significantly more patients in the hypnotherapy group indicated an improvement in mental (p Hypnotherapy did not reduce anxiety or improve the quality of life in cancer patients undergoing curative RT. The absence of statistically significant differences between the two groups contrasts with the hypnotherapy patients' own sense of mental and overall well-being, which was significantly greater after hypnotherapy. It cannot be excluded that the extra attention by the hypnotherapist was responsible for this beneficial effect in the hypnotherapy group. An attention-only control group would be necessary to control for this effect.

  19. Peculiarities of radiotherapy in the elderly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Michael Jenwei, E-mail: michael.chen@ig.com.b [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, Sao Paulo SP, (Brazil); Nadalin, Wladimir [Universidade de Sao Paulo (InRad/HC/FM/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Unit of Radiotherapy

    2010-09-15

    It is known that the aging of the world population during the twentieth century and the beginning of this new century is a first-order challenge for nations, especially in the socio-economic field. An important aspect of the aging of global population is that, for older age groups, the prevalence of degenerative diseases is also higher, including malignancies. On the other hand, among the population of patients with cancer, half of these patients will receive radiation therapy at some point in their illness and their individual characteristics can somehow influence the prognosis, the indication and daily doses of treatment prescriptions. In this context, the health assistance for the elderly patient with cancer should be seen as an important challenge, mainly due to two factors: an increased demand for treatments, in quantitative terms, and physiological characteristics unique to this population, which can influence the therapeutic decision-making. This review proposes a discussion of some relevant aspects of both the physiology of the elderly, which may influence the course of radiation therapy, as well as of some technical advances in radiotherapy, which can in turn benefit these patients by offering, for example, lower toxicity, greater effectiveness and speed. (author)

  20. Risk-adapted targeted intraoperative radiotherapy versus whole-breast radiotherapy for breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vaidya, Jayant S; Wenz, Frederik; Bulsara, Max

    2014-01-01

    The TARGIT-A trial compared risk-adapted radiotherapy using single-dose targeted intraoperative radiotherapy (TARGIT) versus fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) for breast cancer. We report 5-year results for local recurrence and the first analysis of overall survival....

  1. Radiotherapy and chemotherapy change vessel tree geometry and metastatic spread in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Frenzel

    Full Text Available Tumor vasculature is critical for tumor growth, formation of distant metastases and efficiency of radio- and chemotherapy treatments. However, how the vasculature itself is affected during cancer treatment regarding to the metastatic behavior has not been thoroughly investigated. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the influence of hypofractionated radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy on vessel tree geometry and metastasis formation in a small cell lung cancer xenograft mouse tumor model to investigate the spread of malignant cells during different treatments modalities.The biological data gained during these experiments were fed into our previously developed computer model "Cancer and Treatment Simulation Tool" (CaTSiT to model the growth of the primary tumor, its metastatic deposit and also the influence on different therapies. Furthermore, we performed quantitative histology analyses to verify our predictions in xenograft mouse tumor model.According to the computer simulation the number of cells engrafting must vary considerably to explain the different weights of the primary tumor at the end of the experiment. Once a primary tumor is established, the fractal dimension of its vasculature correlates with the tumor size. Furthermore, the fractal dimension of the tumor vasculature changes during treatment, indicating that the therapy affects the blood vessels' geometry. We corroborated these findings with a quantitative histological analysis showing that the blood vessel density is depleted during radiotherapy and cisplatin chemotherapy. The CaTSiT computer model reveals that chemotherapy influences the tumor's therapeutic susceptibility and its metastatic spreading behavior.Using a system biological approach in combination with xenograft models and computer simulations revealed that the usage of chemotherapy and radiation therapy determines the spreading behavior by changing the blood vessel geometry of the primary tumor.

  2. Improved radiotherapy for locally advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma (NSCLC) patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosson, Wiviann

    Lung cancer is worldwide one of the most common cancer diseases with a high mortality rate. There is thus an urgent need for improving radiotherapy for these patients. Radiotherapy for lung cancer patients is challenging because the tumor and organs at risk (OARs) move with the breathing motion...... in both FB and DIBH were evaluated. In adaptive radiotherapy (ART) the treatment plan is adapted to geometrical changes of the patient over the course of treatment. However, defining anatomical structures for treatment planning is a time consuming process prone to large uncertainties. In order to save....... Deep-Inspiration-Breath-Hold (DIBH) is a technique that potentially can improve the treatment for these patients. DIBH is frequently and routinely used for breast cancer treatments. However, it is still an experimental method for lung cancer patients e.g. due to preconceptions about their incapability...

  3. Radiotherapy in massive angiomatous osteolysis (Gorham-Stout's syndrome)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bek, V.; Haicl, Z.; Kolar, J.; Bednar, B.

    1981-12-01

    The cases of two young men with the Gorham-Stout's syndrome of massive angiomatous osteolysis are presented. Attempted surgical removal of the pathological angiomatous tissue proved unsuccessful. Telegammatherapy with each patient receiving total focal dose of 40.0 Gy fractionated over a period of 4 weeks resulted in speedy and complete arrest of osteolysis, and in partial recalcification of the bone tissue destroyed. In one patient the favourable condition has been lasting for 9 years, in the other for 8 months from the end of the course of radiotherapy. The authors discuss the cause of a central fracture of the first patient's left acetabulum which was noted 5 years after the radiotherapy. Proceeding from their experience so far, the authors describe radiotherapy in the Gorham-Stout's syndrome as a method of choice, and give a list of the therapeutical principles.

  4. Taking pain into care during radiotherapy: evaluation and return on experience; Prise en charge de la douleur en cours de radiotherapie: evaluation et retour d'experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marque, A.; Thureau, S.; Mezzani, S.; Nkhali, L.; Schulz, A.L.; Bulard, D.; Sebag, D.; Le Tallec, P.; Charrier, E.; Dubray, B. [CRLCC Henri-Becquerel, Rouen (France)

    2011-10-15

    The authors report the assessment of the proportion of patients suffering from pain in a radiotherapy department, and discuss the modalities to take them into care. The study is based on questionnaires given to more than 400 patients and addressing pain occurrence, intensity and treatment. It appears that pain has been under-evaluated and insufficiently treated. A training course has been implemented for physicians and operators for pain assessment, and painkiller or analgesic medicines have been made available. Short communication

  5. Noninvasive fluorescence diagnostics in radiotherapy of mucosal oral tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogatkin, Dmitrii A.; Polyakov, Pavel Y.; Bychenkov, Oleg A.; Stepanenko, Elena A.

    2002-07-01

    The efficiency of noninvasive laser fluorescent diagnostics for the real clinical practice is now widely discussed in special publications. One of the most perspective application area of this diagnostic technique is the oncology. For that the overwhelming majority of the research is concentrated now in the problem of the differential diagnostics of the 'normal tumor' case for different locations and clinical forms of the young tumors. Meanwhile, the fluorescent diagnostics can have high possibilities also as a monitoring of the efficiency for different methods of tumors treatment, the radiotherapy for instance. In this report the examples of the use of laser noninvasive fluorescent diagnostics in a real clinical practical of the Radiological Department of MONIKI are presented. There was under our investigation the group of around 100 patients with different oral mucosal tumors, for whom a course of a radiotherapy treatment was purposed and for whom the research background flourescent noninvasive monitoring was applied during the course of the care. In the report the efficiency of such laser fluorescent monitoring is discussed. It is shown that there were the strong differences in fluorescent spectra for both different forms of mucosal tumor and for het same one. In the number of clinical cases there were not marked any special fluorescent signal for a mucosal strong tumor before a treatment. During the radiotherapy treatment the different response in fluorescent spectra were observed as a reaction of tissues after the single (gamma) -ray exposure and daily one as well. All this presented results allow us to propose a not quite correct existed explanation of the nature of the biotissues fluorescent phenomenon in meaning of the diagnostics of soft tissue cancer cases.

  6. Role of radiotherapy in hospice care

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Tetsuo; Sugiyama, Akira; Shimizu, Teppei; Ichinohe, Kenji; Teshima, Takeshi; Kaneko, Masao; Hara, Yoshio; Chihara, Satoshi.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of palliative radiotherapy for the terminally ill is to improve the quality of the remaining span of life. From November 1982 to September 1987, 69 patients in the Seirei Hospice have been treated with such radiotherapy, and symptomatic relief was obtained in 64% of these patients. Radiotherapy also proved useful in achieving an improvement in their performance status. While the aim of hospice care is not directed towards treatment of the underlying disease, the use of radiotherapy is considered to have an important role in hospice care.

  7. In vivo skin dose measurement in breast conformal radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhozaman Soleymanifard

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: Accurate skin dose assessment is necessary during breast radiotherapy to assure that the skin dose is below the tolerance level and is sufficient to prevent tumour recurrence. The aim of the current study is to measure the skin dose and to evaluate the geometrical/anatomical parameters that affect it. Material and methods : Forty patients were simulated by TIGRT treatment planning system and treated with two tangential fields of 6 MV photon beam. Wedge filters were used to homogenise dose distribution for 11 patients. Skin dose was measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100 and the effects of beam incident angle, thickness of irradiated region, and beam entry separation on the skin dose were analysed. Results : Average skin dose in treatment course of 50 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV was 36.65 Gy. The corresponding dose values for patients who were treated with and without wedge filter were 35.65 and 37.20 Gy, respectively. It was determined that the beam angle affected the average skin dose while the thickness of the irradiated region and the beam entry separation did not affect dose. Since the skin dose measured in this study was lower than the amount required to prevent tumour recurrence, application of bolus material in part of the treatment course is suggested for post-mastectomy advanced breast radiotherapy. It is more important when wedge filters are applied to homogenize dose distribution.

  8. Art therapy using famous painting appreciation maintains fatigue levels during radiotherapy in cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koom, Woong Sub; Choi, Mi Yeon; Lee, Jeongshim; Park, Eun Jung; Kim, Ju Hye; Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Yong Bae

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of art therapy to control fatigue in cancer patients during course of radiotherapy and its impact on quality of life (QoL). Materials and Methods: Fifty cancer patients receiving radiotherapy received weekly art therapy sessions using famous painting appreciation. Fatigue and QoL were assessed using the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) Scale and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F) at baseline before starting radiotherapy, every week for 4 weeks during radiotherapy, and at the end of radiotherapy. Mean changes of scores over time were analyzed using a generalized linear mixed model. Results: Of the 50 patients, 34 (68%) participated in 4 sessions of art therapy. Generalized linear mixed models testing for the effect of time on mean score changes showed no significant changes in scores from baseline for the BFI and FACIT-F. The mean BFI score and FACIT-F total score changed from 3.1 to 2.7 and from 110.7 to 109.2, respectively. Art therapy based on the appreciation of famous paintings led to increases in self-esteem by increasing self-realization and forming social relationships. Conclusion: Fatigue and QoL in cancer patients with art therapy do not deteriorate during a period of radiotherapy. Despite the single-arm small number of participants and pilot design, this study provides a strong initial demonstration that art therapy of appreciation for famous painting is worthy of further study for fatigue and QoL improvement. Further, it can play an important role in routine practice in cancer patients during radiotherapy. PMID:27306778

  9. Acute and subacute cardiac complications following radiotherapy in patients with left breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salari

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Radiation to some parts of the heart is unavoidable in the therapeutic course of primary tumors in many kinds of cancer, including breast cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency of acute and subacute cardiac complications following radiotherapy in patients with left breast cancer. "nMethods: In this study, we enrolled 53 patients with left breast cancer who underwent mastectomy or lumpectomy between September 2005 and September 2006 in Imam Khomeini Hospital Complex, and subsequently underwent chemotherapy with anthracyclines (<450mg/m2 and Endoxan plus taxane/fFluorouracil followed by radiotherapy. In all patients, electrocardiography and echocardiography were performed before initiation of radiotherapy, immediately after radiotherapy and again three and six months later to check for radiotherapy-induced cardiac complications such as pericardial effusion, valvular lesions, left ventricular dysfunction, conduction system disturbances and other variables. "nResults: Thirty-nine patients completed the follow-up period. Among these, 10 (25.6% patients experienced cardiac complications following radiotherapy. Among these, mild pericardial effusion in seven (53.85% patients, mild mitral regurgitation in three cases (23.08% and Right Bundle Branch Block (RBBB in two cases (15.38% were the most common complications. We found no correlation between cardiac complication and tumor dose, dose fraction and type of chemotherapy protocol. We noted no cases of new or more serious complications, such as cardiomyopathies or coronary artery disease, nor any changes in ejection fraction by the end of the follow-up period. "nConclusion: In patients with left breast cancer, acute and subacute cardiac complications following radiotherapy are not serious and have no clinical significance. Further studies are needed for more assessments in this area.

  10. Art therapy using famous painting appreciation maintains fatigue levels during radiotherapy in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koom, Woong Sub; Choi, Mi Yeon; Lee, Jeongshim; Park, Eun Jung; Kim, Ju Hye; Kim, Sun-Hyun; Kim, Yong Bae

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of art therapy to control fatigue in cancer patients during course of radiotherapy and its impact on quality of life (QoL). Fifty cancer patients receiving radiotherapy received weekly art therapy sessions using famous painting appreciation. Fatigue and QoL were assessed using the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) Scale and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F) at baseline before starting radiotherapy, every week for 4 weeks during radiotherapy, and at the end of radiotherapy. Mean changes of scores over time were analyzed using a generalized linear mixed model. Of the 50 patients, 34 (68%) participated in 4 sessions of art therapy. Generalized linear mixed models testing for the effect of time on mean score changes showed no significant changes in scores from baseline for the BFI and FACIT-F. The mean BFI score and FACIT-F total score changed from 3.1 to 2.7 and from 110.7 to 109.2, respectively. Art therapy based on the appreciation of famous paintings led to increases in self-esteem by increasing self-realization and forming social relationships. Fatigue and QoL in cancer patients with art therapy do not deteriorate during a period of radiotherapy. Despite the single-arm small number of participants and pilot design, this study provides a strong initial demonstration that art therapy of appreciation for famous painting is worthy of further study for fatigue and QoL improvement. Further, it can play an important role in routine practice in cancer patients during radiotherapy.

  11. Art therapy using famous painting appreciation maintains fatigue levels during radiotherapy in cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Jeong Shin; Kim, Yong Bae [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Mi Yeon; Park, Eun Jung; Kim, Ju Hye; Kim, Sun Hyun [Graduate School of Clinical Art Therapy, CHA University, Pocheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of art therapy to control fatigue in cancer patients during course of radiotherapy and its impact on quality of life (QoL). Fifty cancer patients receiving radiotherapy received weekly art therapy sessions using famous painting appreciation. Fatigue and QoL were assessed using the Brief Fatigue Inventory (BFI) Scale and the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F) at baseline before starting radiotherapy, every week for 4 weeks during radiotherapy, and at the end of radiotherapy. Mean changes of scores over time were analyzed using a generalized linear mixed model. Of the 50 patients, 34 (68%) participated in 4 sessions of art therapy. Generalized linear mixed models testing for the effect of time on mean score changes showed no significant changes in scores from baseline for the BFI and FACIT-F. The mean BFI score and FACIT-F total score changed from 3.1 to 2.7 and from 110.7 to 109.2, respectively. Art therapy based on the appreciation of famous paintings led to increases in self-esteem by increasing self-realization and forming social relationships. Fatigue and QoL in cancer patients with art therapy do not deteriorate during a period of radiotherapy. Despite the single-arm small number of participants and pilot design, this study provides a strong initial demonstration that art therapy of appreciation for famous painting is worthy of further study for fatigue and QoL improvement. Further, it can play an important role in routine practice in cancer patients during radiotherapy.

  12. Evaluation of Thyroid Disorders During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy by Using Functional Analysis and Ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhshandeh, Mohsen [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hashemi, Bijan, E-mail: bhashemi@modares.ac.ir [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seyed Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nikoofar, Alireza [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hafte-Tir Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Edraki, Hamid Reza [Department of Radiology, Panzdahe-Khordad Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan [Department of Biostatistics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate thyroid function and vascular changes during radiotherapy for patients with head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Fifty patients treated with primary or postoperative radiotherapy for various cancers in the head and neck region were prospectively evaluated. The serum samples (triiodothyronine [T3], thyroxine [T4], thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], free triiodothyronine [FT3], and free thyroxine [FT4]), the echo level of the thyroid gland, and color Doppler ultrasonography (CDU) parameters of the right inferior thyroid artery (RITA) of the patients were measured before and at regular intervals during radiotherapy. The thyroid gland dose-volume histograms of the patients were derived from their computed tomography-based treatment plans. Results: There was a significant fall in TSH level (p < 0.0001) but an increase in FT4 (p < 0.0001) and T4 (p < 0.022) levels during the radiotherapy course. The threshold dose required to produce significant changes was 12 Gy (Biologically Effective Dose in 2-Gy fractions, BED{sub 2}). There were significant rises in the patients' pulsatility index, resistive index, peak systolic velocity, blood volume flow levels, and RITA diameter (p < 0.0001), as detected by CDU during radiotherapy, compared to those parameters measured before the treatment. Hypoechogenicity and irregular echo patterns (p < 0.0001) were seen during radiotherapy compared to those before treatment. There was significant Pearson's correlation between the CDU parameters and T4, FT4, and TSH levels. Conclusions: Radiation-induced thyroiditis is regarded as primary damage to the thyroid gland. Thyroiditis can subsequently result in hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Our results demonstrated that changes in thyroid vessels occur during radiotherapy delivered to patients. Vessel changes also can be attributed to the late effect of radiation on the thyroid gland. The hypoechogenicity and irregular echo patterns observed in patients

  13. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedicini, Piernicola; Strigari, Lidia; Benassi, Marcello; Caivano, Rocchina; Fiorentino, Alba; Nappi, Antonio; Salvatore, Marco; Storto, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new "toxicity index" (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V20 in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Medical Dosimetrists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Critical dose and toxicity index of organs at risk in radiotherapy: Analyzing the calculated effects of modified dose fractionation in non–small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Regina Elena National Cancer Institute, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Scientific Institute of Tumours of Romagna I.R.S.T., Meldola (Italy); Caivano, Rocchina [Service of Medical Physics, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [U.O. of Radiotherapy, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Nappi, Antonio [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. SDN Foundation, Naples (Italy); Storto, Giovanni [U.O. of Nuclear Medicine, I.R.C.C.S. Regional Cancer Hospital C.R.O.B., Rionero in Vulture (Italy)

    2014-04-01

    To increase the efficacy of radiotherapy for non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), many schemes of dose fractionation were assessed by a new “toxicity index” (I), which allows one to choose the fractionation schedules that produce less toxic treatments. Thirty-two patients affected by non resectable NSCLC were treated by standard 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) with a strategy of limited treated volume. Computed tomography datasets were employed to re plan by simultaneous integrated boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The dose distributions from plans were used to test various schemes of dose fractionation, in 3DCRT as well as in IMRT, by transforming the dose-volume histogram (DVH) into a biological equivalent DVH (BDVH) and by varying the overall treatment time. The BDVHs were obtained through the toxicity index, which was defined for each of the organs at risk (OAR) by a linear quadratic model keeping an equivalent radiobiological effect on the target volume. The less toxic fractionation consisted in a severe/moderate hyper fractionation for the volume including the primary tumor and lymph nodes, followed by a hypofractionation for the reduced volume of the primary tumor. The 3DCRT and IMRT resulted, respectively, in 4.7% and 4.3% of dose sparing for the spinal cord, without significant changes for the combined-lungs toxicity (p < 0.001). Schedules with reduced overall treatment time (accelerated fractionations) led to a 12.5% dose sparing for the spinal cord (7.5% in IMRT), 8.3% dose sparing for V{sub 20} in the combined lungs (5.5% in IMRT), and also significant dose sparing for all the other OARs (p < 0.001). The toxicity index allows to choose fractionation schedules with reduced toxicity for all the OARs and equivalent radiobiological effect for the tumor in 3DCRT, as well as in IMRT, treatments of NSCLC.

  15. Estimation of the optimal number of radiotherapy fractions for breast cancer: A review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Karen; Delaney, Geoff P; Barton, Michael B

    2015-08-01

    There is variation in radiotherapy fractionation practice, however, there is no evidence-based benchmark for appropriate activity. An evidence-based model was constructed to estimate the optimal number of fractions for the first course of radiotherapy for breast cancer to aid in services planning and performance benchmarking. The published breast cancer radiotherapy utilisation model was adapted. Evidence-based number of fractions was added to each radiotherapy indication. The overall optimal number of fractions was calculated based on the frequency of specific clinical conditions where radiotherapy is indicated and the recommended number of fractions for each condition. Sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the impact of uncertainties on the model. For the entire Australian breast cancer patient population, the estimated optimal number of fractions per patient was 16.8, 14.6, 13.7 and 0.8 for ductal carcinoma in situ, early, advanced and metastatic breast cancer respectively. Overall, the optimal number of fractions per patient was 14.4 (range 14.4-18.7). These results allow comparison with actual practices, and workload prediction to aid in services planning. The model can be easily adapted to other countries by inserting population-specific epidemiological data, and to future changes in cancer incidence, stage distribution and fractionation recommendations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Technical note: DIRART--A software suite for deformable image registration and adaptive radiotherapy research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deshan; Brame, Scott; El Naqa, Issam; Aditya, Apte; Wu, Yu; Goddu, S Murty; Mutic, Sasa; Deasy, Joseph O; Low, Daniel A

    2011-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in image guide radiotherapy technology and a growing interest in the possibilities for adapting treatment planning and delivery over the course of treatment. One obstacle faced by the research community has been the lack of a comprehensive open-source software toolkit dedicated for adaptive radiotherapy (ART). To address this need, the authors have developed a software suite called the Deformable Image Registration and Adaptive Radiotherapy Toolkit (DIRART). DIRART is an open-source toolkit developed in MATLAB. It is designed in an object-oriented style with focus on user-friendliness, features, and flexibility. It contains four classes of DIR algorithms, including the newer inverse consistency algorithms to provide consistent displacement vector field in both directions. It also contains common ART functions, an integrated graphical user interface, a variety of visualization and image-processing features, dose metric analysis functions, and interface routines. These interface routines make DIRART a powerful complement to the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR) and popular image-processing toolkits such as ITK. DIRART provides a set of image processing/registration algorithms and postprocessing functions to facilitate the development and testing of DIR algorithms. It also offers a good amount of options for DIR results visualization, evaluation, and validation. By exchanging data with treatment planning systems via DICOM-RT files and CERR, and by bringing image registration algorithms closer to radiotherapy applications, DIRART is potentially a convenient and flexible platform that may facilitate ART and DIR research. 0 2011 Ameri-

  17. Adaptive radiotherapy based on the daily regression of a tumor in carbon-ion beam irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Ai; Minohara, Shinichi; Kato, Shingo; Kiyohara, Hiroki; Ando, Ken

    2012-12-21

    We propose a new application of adaptive radiotherapy using a scanning beam, taking into account the daily regression of a tumor. No patient-specific hardware (such as collimators and compensating filters) is needed for the scanning technique; thus, it allows re-planning immediately before each fractional irradiation using the sophisticated conformations of dose distributions. We retrospectively modeled the tumor volume regression curves as a function of the dose from the CT images which were taken three times during the treatment course. The daily shape of the tumor was mathematically interpolated assuming constant continuity of the tumor deformation. We simulated the adaptive radiotherapy by optimizing the dose distribution on the estimated daily tumor volume for every fraction. The dose-volume histogram (DVH) for the organ at risk in the adaptive radiotherapy was compared with that of the current clinical protocol. We performed analysis using the CT images of cervical cancer patients who received carbon-ion radiotherapy in broad-beam irradiation. The DVH for the rectum and the sigmoid colon was improved by adaptive radiotherapy considering the inter-fractional tumor regression. The result shows that this approach has possible advantages.

  18. Radiotherapy and local control in rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentini, V; Rosetto, M E; Fares, C; Mantini, G; Salvi, G; Turriziani, A

    1998-01-01

    Recurrence is a stage in the natural history of rectal cancer. Preoperative radiotherapy or postoperative radiochemotherapy lower the rate of recurrence, improving local control. From 1980 to 1997, at the "Divisione di Radioterapia" of the "Università Cattolica del S. Cuore" of Rome 380 patients with rectal cancer of early clinical stage T2-3, candidates for surgery for cure, underwent radiation therapy. 119 patients underwent postoperative radiotherapy (45-50 Gy); 45 patients underwent "sandwich" radiotherapy (45 Gy:27 Gy before and 28 Gy after surgery), of whom 7 were treated with preoperative radiotherapy alone; 145 patients underwent preoperative concomitant radiochemotherapy according to 3 different protocols, radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with mitomycin C and 5-FU; radiotherapy (50.4 Gy) combined with cisplatin and 5-FU; radiotherapy (45 Gy) combined with 5-FU and folinic acid. 71 patients were treated with preoperative radiotherapy (38 Gy) combined with IORT (10 Gy). Median follow-up was 6 years. Overall local control was 85% at 3 years, 83% at 5 years, 81% at 10 years. The rate of local control at 5 years was: 76% for postoperative radiotherapy, 83% for "sandwich" radiotherapy, 84% for preoperative radiochemotherapy and 93% for preoperative radiotherapy combined with IORT. Local control was shown to be significantly better with preoperative treatment as compared to postoperative treatment (p = 0.02). The incidence of metastases was 35% in the patients with local recurrence and 16% in those with local control. The difference in survival was highly significant in patients with local control as compared to those with local recurrence: at 5 years 87% and 32% respectively. Patients with local control showed a lower incidence of metastasis and a better survival.

  19. New Methods for Targeted Alpha Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J. David

    2014-03-01

    Targeted radiotherapies based on alpha emitters are a promising alternative to beta emitting radionuclides. Because of their much shorter range, targeted α-radiotherapy (TAT) agents have great potential for application to small, disseminated tumors and micro metastases and treatment of hematological malignancies consisting of individual, circulating neoplastic cells. A promising approach to TAT is the use of the in vivo α-generator radionuclides 223 = 11.4 d) and 225Ac 1/2 = 10.0 d). In addition to their longer half-lives, these two isotopes have the potential of dramatically increasing the therapeutic efficacy of TAT as they each emit four α particles in their decay chain. This principle has recently been exploited in the development of Xofigo®, the first TAT agent approved for clinical use by the U.S. FDA. Xofigo, formulated as 223RaCl2, is used for treatment of metastatic bone cancer in men with castration-resistant prostate cancer. TAT with 223Ra works, however, only in the case of bone cancer because radium, as a chemical analogue of calcium, efficiently targets bone. In order to bring the benefits of TAT with 223Ra or 225Ac to other tumor types, a new delivery method must be devised. Retaining the in vivo α generator radionuclides at the target site through the decay process is one of the major challenges associated with the development of TAT. Because the recoil energy of the daughter radionuclides from the α-emission is ~ 100 keV - a value which is four orders of magnitude greater than the energy of a covalent bond - the daughters will not remain bound to the bioconjugate at the targeting site. Various approaches have been attempted to achieve retention of the α-generator daughter radionuclides at the target site, including incorporation of the in vivo generator into liposomes and fullerenes. Unfortunately, to date single wall liposomes and fullerenes are able to retain less than 10% of the daughter radionuclides. We have recently demonstrated that a

  20. Treatment outcome in patients with vulvar cancer: comparison of concurrent radiotherapy to postoperative radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ja Young; Kim, Sung Hwan; Kim, Ki Won; Park, Dong Choon; Yoon, Joo Hee; Yoon, Sei Chul [St. Vincent' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Mina [St. Mary' s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To evaluate outcome and morbidity in patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy, concurrent chemoradiotherapy or postoperative radiotherapy. The records of 24 patients treated with radiotherapy for vulvar cancer between July 1993 and September 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received once daily 1.8-4 Gy fractions external beam radiotherapy to median 51.2 Gy (range, 19.8 to 81.6 Gy) on pelvis and inguinal nodes. Seven patients were treated with primary concurrent chemoradiotherapy, one patient was treated with primary radiotherapy alone, four patients received palliative radiotherapy, and twelve patients were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Twenty patients were eligible for response evaluation. Response rate was 55% (11/20). The 5-year disease free survival was 42.2% and 5-year overall survival was 46.2%, respectively. Fifty percent (12/24) experienced with acute skin complications of grade III or more during radiotherapy. Late complications were found in 8 patients. 50% (6/12) of patients treated with lymph node dissection experienced severe late complications. One patient died of sepsis from lymphedema. However, only 16.6% (2/12) of patients treated with primary radiotherapy developed late complications. Outcome of patients with vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy showed relatively good local control and low recurrence. Severe late toxicities remained higher in patients treated with both node dissection and radiotherapy.

  1. Radiotherapy and Brachytherapy : Proceedings of the NATO Advanced Study Institute on Physics of Modern Radiotherapy & Brachytherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoigne, Yves

    2009-01-01

    This volume collects a series of lectures presented at the tenth ESI School held at Archamps (FR) in November 2007 and dedicated to radiotherapy and brachytherapy. The lectures focus on the multiple facets of radiotherapy in general, including external radiotherapy (often called teletherapy) as well as internal radiotherapy (called brachytherapy). Radiotherapy strategy and dose management as well as the decisive role of digital imaging in the associated clinical practice are developed in several articles. Grouped under the discipline of Conformal Radiotherapy (CRT), numerous modern techniques, from Multi-Leaf Collimators (MLC) to Intensity Modulated RadioTherapy (IMRT), are explained in detail. The importance of treatment planning based upon patient data from digital imaging (Computed Tomography) is also underlined. Finally, despite the quasi- totality of patients being presently treated with gamma and X-rays, novel powerful tools are emerging using proton and light ions (like carbon ions) beams, bound to bec...

  2. Post-mastectomy radiotherapy in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Mette S; Berg, Martin; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the procedure of changing from 2D to 3D treatment planning guidelines for post-mastectomy radiotherapy in Denmark. The aim of introducing 3D planning for post-mastectomy radiotherapy was to optimize the target coverage and minimize the dose to the normal tissues. Initially, i...

  3. Three dimensional conformal postoperative radiotherapy for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Postoperative radiotherapy of the parotid gland could be achieved with various radiotherapy techniques. However they irradiate differently the surrounding organs at risk (OARs) in particular the cochlea, oral cavity & contralateral parotid causing significant increase in the risk of oral mucositis, xerostomia, and ...

  4. Radiotherapy for Oligometastatic Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek P. Bergsma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC typically presents at an advanced stage, which is often felt to be incurable, and such patients are usually treated with a palliative approach. Accumulating retrospective and prospective clinical evidence, including a recently completed randomized trial, support the existence of an oligometastatic disease state wherein select individuals with advanced NSCLC may experience historically unprecedented prolonged survival with aggressive local treatments, consisting of radiotherapy and/or surgery, to limited sites of metastatic disease. This is reflected in the most recent AJCC staging subcategorizing metastatic disease into intra-thoracic (M1a, a single extra thoracic site (M1b, and more diffuse metastases (M1c. In the field of radiation oncology, recent technological advances have allowed for the delivery of very high, potentially ablative, doses of radiotherapy to both intra- and extra-cranial disease sites, referred to as stereotactic radiosurgery and stereotactic body radiotherapy (or SABR, in much shorter time periods compared to conventional radiation and with minimal associated toxicity. At the same time, significant improvements in systemic therapy, including platinum-based doublet chemotherapy, molecular agents targeting oncogene-addicted NSCLC, and immunotherapy in the form of checkpoint inhibitors, have led to improved control of micro-metastatic disease and extended survival sparking newfound interest in combining these agents with ablative local therapies to provide additive, and in the case of radiation and immunotherapy, potentially synergistic, effects in order to further improve progression-free and overall survival. Currently, despite the tantalizing potential associated with aggressive local therapy in the setting of oligometastatic NSCLC, well-designed prospective randomized controlled trials sufficiently powered to detect and measure the possible added benefit afforded by this approach are

  5. Postoperative radiotherapy for endometrial cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Eun Cheol; Kim, Jin Hee; Kim, Ok Bae; Byun, Sang Jun; Park, Seung Gyu; Kwon, Sang Hoon [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    To investigate the prognostic factors and effectiveness of postoperative radiotherapy alone for endometrial carcinoma. Sixty four patients with stage I?III endometrial cancer (EC) treated with postoperative radiotherapy alone between January 1989 and December 2008 at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center were chosen for the present study. Typically, total hysterectomy, salpingo-oophorectomy and lymphadenectomy were performed on the patient's pelvis. Total dose from 50.4 Gy to 63 Gy was irradiated at pelvis or extended fi eld. Thirteen patients were treated with Co-60 or Ir-192 intracavitary radiotherapy. Follow-up periods were from 7 to 270 months, with a median of 56 months. Five year overall survival (OS) rate was 58.7%, respectively. Five year disease-free survival (DFS) rate was 59.2%, respectively. In univariate analysis for OS and DFS, stage, menopausal age, type of operation, serosal invasion, and lymph node involvement were found to be statistically significant. Histologic type was marginally significant. In multivariate analysis for OS and DFS, stage, types of operation, histologic type were also found to be statistically significant. Treatment failure occurred in 14 patients. The main pattern of failure was found to be distant metastasis. Time to distant metastasis was from 3 to 86 months (median, 12 months). There were no grade 3 or 4 complications. Stage, types of operation, and histologic type could be the predictive prognostic factors in patients. We contemplated postoperative radiation as effective and safe treatment method for EC. Additional treatment would be needed to reduce distant metastasis.

  6. Basic radiotherapy physics and biology

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, David S; Das, Indra J; Mendonca, Marc S; Dynlacht, Joseph R

    2014-01-01

    This book is a concise and well-illustrated review of the physics and biology of radiation therapy intended for radiation oncology residents, radiation therapists, dosimetrists, and physicists. It presents topics that are included on the Radiation Therapy Physics and Biology examinations and is designed with the intent of presenting information in an easily digestible format with maximum retention in mind. The inclusion of mnemonics, rules of thumb, and reader-friendly illustrations throughout the book help to make difficult concepts easier to grasp. Basic Radiotherapy Physics and Biology is a

  7. Quality and safety in radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Pawlicki, Todd

    2010-01-01

    The first text to focus solely on quality and safety in radiotherapy, this work encompasses not only traditional, more technically oriented, quality assurance activities, but also general approaches of quality and safety. It includes contributions from experts both inside and outside the field to present a global view. The task of assuring quality is no longer viewed solely as a technical, equipment-dependent endeavor. Instead, it is now recognized as depending on both the processes and the people delivering the service. Divided into seven broad categories, the text covers: Quality Management

  8. Management of radiotherapy-induced skin reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trueman, Ellen

    2015-04-01

    Radiotherapy is a highly effective cancer treatment that not only offers cure but also excellent palliation of disease related symptoms and complications. Although radiotherapy is primarily an outpatient treatment, delivered within specialist centres, a diverse range of health professionals may be involved in the treatment pathway before, during and after treatment. Radiotherapy can, and does, make a significant contribution to improving a patient's wellbeing through effective symptom management. However, treatment-related side-effects do occur, with an acute skin reaction being one of the most common. It is imperative that radiotherapy-induced skin reactions are correctly assessed and appropriately managed in promoting patient comfort, treatment compliance and enhanced quality of life. This article describes how the use of a recognised assessment tool and evidence-based guidelines can facilitate consistent, high-quality care in the management of radiotherapy-induced skin reactions.

  9. Radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giaj-Levra, Niccolò; Sciascia, Savino; Fiorentino, Alba; Fersino, Sergio; Mazzola, Rosario; Ricchetti, Francesco; Roccatello, Dario; Alongi, Filippo

    2016-03-01

    The decision to offer radiotherapy in patients with connective tissue diseases continues to be challenging. Radiotherapy might trigger the onset of connective tissue diseases by increasing the expression of self-antigens, diminishing regulatory T-cell activity, and activating effectors of innate immunity (dendritic cells) through Toll-like receptor-dependent mechanisms, all of which could potentially lead to breaks of immune tolerance. This potential risk has raised some debate among radiation oncologists about whether patients with connective tissue diseases can tolerate radiation as well as people without connective tissue diseases. Because the number of patients with cancer and connective tissue diseases needing radiotherapy will probably increase due to improvements in medical treatment and longer life expectancy, the issue of interactions between radiotherapy and connective tissue diseases needs to be clearer. In this Review, we discuss available data and evidence for patients with connective tissue diseases treated with radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemo-radiotherapy induced oral mucositis during IMRT for head and neck cancer - An assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Karthika

    2015-05-01

    This study is conducted mainly to evaluate the changes in quality and quantity of oral epithelial cells during the course of IMRT. 30 Patients undergoing chemo-radiotherapy were followed through course of treatment. They were compared with a group of age- and sex-matched healthy individuals. The procedure involved WHO clinical scoring, collection of oral washings and preparation of buccal smears from both study group and control group. The changes occurred were recorded as a way of assessing the severity of oral mucositis. revealed a significant occurrence of oral mucositis in almost all patients during weekly follow up. There was a significant increase in percentage of viable buccal epithelial cells in study group when compared to normal controls (P<0.005) during and at the end of chemo-radiotherapy. quantification of oral mucositis can be done at cellular level by determining the oral mucosal cell viability and their maturation during IMRT.

  11. Linking CHHiP prostate cancer RCT with GP records: A study proposal to investigate the effect of co-morbidities and medications on long-term symptoms and radiotherapy-related toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Lemanska

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients receiving cancer treatment often have one or more co-morbid conditions that are treated pharmacologically. Co-morbidities are recorded in clinical trials usually only at baseline. However, co-morbidities evolve and new ones emerge during cancer treatment. The interaction between multi-morbidity and cancer recovery is significant but poorly understood. Purpose: To investigate the effect of co-morbidities (e.g. cardiovascular and diabetes and medications (e.g. statins, antihypertensives, metformin on radiotherapy-related toxicity and long-term symptoms in order to identify potential risk factors. The possible protective effect of medications such as statins or antihypertensives in reducing radiotherapy-related toxicity will also be explored. Methods: Two datasets will be linked. (1 CHHiP (Conventional or Hypofractionated High Dose Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer randomised control trial. CHHiP contains pelvic symptoms and radiation-related toxicity reported by patients and clinicians. (2 GP (General Practice data from RCGP RSC (Royal College of General Practitioners Research and Surveillance Centre. The GP records of CHHiP patients will be extracted, including cardiovascular co-morbidities, diabetes and prescription medications. Statistical analysis of the combined dataset will be performed in order to investigate the effect. Conclusions: Linking two sources of healthcare data is an exciting area of big healthcare data research. With limited data in clinical trials (not all clinical trials collect information on co-morbidities or medications and limited lengths of follow-up, linking different sources of information is increasingly needed to investigate long-term outcomes. With increasing pressures to collect detailed information in clinical trials (e.g. co-morbidities, medications, linkage to routinely collected data offers the potential to support efficient conduct of clinical trials. Keywords: Data

  12. Minibeam therapy with protons and light ions: physical feasibility and potential to reduce radiation side effects and to facilitate hypofractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilmanian, F Avraham; Eley, John G; Krishnan, Sunil

    2015-06-01

    Despite several advantages of proton therapy over megavoltage x-ray therapy, its lack of proximal tissue sparing is a concern. The method presented here adds proximal tissue sparing to protons and light ions by turning their uniform incident beams into arrays of parallel, small, or thin (0.3-mm) pencil or planar minibeams, which are known to spare tissues. As these minibeams penetrate the tissues, they gradually broaden and merge with each other to produce a solid beam. Broadening of 0.3-mm-diameter, 109-MeV proton pencil minibeams was measured using a stack of radiochromic films with plastic spacers. Monte Carlo simulations were used to evaluate the broadening in water of minibeams of protons and several light ions and the dose from neutron generated by collimator. A central parameter was tissue depth, where the beam full width at half maximum (FWHM) reached 0.7 mm, beyond which tissue sparing decreases. This depth was 22 mm for 109-MeV protons in a film stack. It was also found by simulations in water to be 23.5 mm for 109 MeV proton pencil minibeams and 26 mm for 116 MeV proton planar minibeams. For light ions, all with 10 cm range in water, that depth increased with particle size; specifically it was 51 mm for Li-7 ions. The ∼2.7% photon equivalent neutron skin dose from the collimator was reduced 7-fold by introducing a gap between the collimator and the skin. Proton minibeams can be implemented at existing particle therapy centers. Because they spare the shallow tissues, they could augment the efficacy of proton therapy and light particle therapy, particularly in treating tumors that benefit from sparing of proximal tissues such as pediatric brain tumors. They should also allow hypofractionated treatment of all tumors by allowing the use of higher incident doses with less concern about proximal tissue damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Intrafraction Prostate Translations and Rotations During Hypofractionated Robotic Radiation Surgery: Dosimetric Impact of Correction Strategies and Margins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Water, Steven van de, E-mail: s.vandewater@erasmusmc.nl [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Valli, Lorella [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Alma Mater Studiorum, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bologna University, Bologna (Italy); Aluwini, Shafak [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lanconelli, Nico [Alma Mater Studiorum, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Bologna University, Bologna (Italy); Heijmen, Ben; Hoogeman, Mischa [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the dosimetric impact of intrafraction prostate motion and the effect of robot correction strategies for hypofractionated CyberKnife treatments with a simultaneously integrated boost. Methods and Materials: A total of 548 real-time prostate motion tracks from 17 patients were available for dosimetric simulations of CyberKnife treatments, in which various correction strategies were included. Fixed time intervals between imaging/correction (15, 60, 180, and 360 seconds) were simulated, as well as adaptive timing (ie, the time interval reduced from 60 to 15 seconds in case prostate motion exceeded 3 mm or 2° in consecutive images). The simulated extent of robot corrections was also varied: no corrections, translational corrections only, and translational corrections combined with rotational corrections up to 5°, 10°, and perfect rotational correction. The correction strategies were evaluated for treatment plans with a 0-mm or 3-mm margin around the clinical target volume (CTV). We recorded CTV coverage (V{sub 100%}) and dose-volume parameters of the peripheral zone (boost), rectum, bladder, and urethra. Results: Planned dose parameters were increasingly preserved with larger extents of robot corrections. A time interval between corrections of 60 to 180 seconds provided optimal preservation of CTV coverage. To achieve 98% CTV coverage in 98% of the treatments, translational and rotational corrections up to 10° were required for the 0-mm margin plans, whereas translational and rotational corrections up to 5° were required for the 3-mm margin plans. Rectum and bladder were spared considerably better in the 0-mm margin plans. Adaptive timing did not improve delivered dose. Conclusions: Intrafraction prostate motion substantially affected the delivered dose but was compensated for effectively by robot corrections using a time interval of 60 to 180 seconds. A 0-mm margin required larger extents of additional rotational corrections than a 3

  14. Intrafraction prostate translations and rotations during hypofractionated robotic radiation surgery: dosimetric impact of correction strategies and margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Water, Steven; Valli, Lorella; Aluwini, Shafak; Lanconelli, Nico; Heijmen, Ben; Hoogeman, Mischa

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the dosimetric impact of intrafraction prostate motion and the effect of robot correction strategies for hypofractionated CyberKnife treatments with a simultaneously integrated boost. A total of 548 real-time prostate motion tracks from 17 patients were available for dosimetric simulations of CyberKnife treatments, in which various correction strategies were included. Fixed time intervals between imaging/correction (15, 60, 180, and 360 seconds) were simulated, as well as adaptive timing (ie, the time interval reduced from 60 to 15 seconds in case prostate motion exceeded 3 mm or 2° in consecutive images). The simulated extent of robot corrections was also varied: no corrections, translational corrections only, and translational corrections combined with rotational corrections up to 5°, 10°, and perfect rotational correction. The correction strategies were evaluated for treatment plans with a 0-mm or 3-mm margin around the clinical target volume (CTV). We recorded CTV coverage (V100%) and dose-volume parameters of the peripheral zone (boost), rectum, bladder, and urethra. Planned dose parameters were increasingly preserved with larger extents of robot corrections. A time interval between corrections of 60 to 180 seconds provided optimal preservation of CTV coverage. To achieve 98% CTV coverage in 98% of the treatments, translational and rotational corrections up to 10° were required for the 0-mm margin plans, whereas translational and rotational corrections up to 5° were required for the 3-mm margin plans. Rectum and bladder were spared considerably better in the 0-mm margin plans. Adaptive timing did not improve delivered dose. Intrafraction prostate motion substantially affected the delivered dose but was compensated for effectively by robot corrections using a time interval of 60 to 180 seconds. A 0-mm margin required larger extents of additional rotational corrections than a 3-mm margin but resulted in lower doses to rectum and bladder

  15. High-Dose Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy for Noncompressive Vertebral Metastases in Combination With Zoledronate: A Phase 1 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pichon, Baptiste [Department of Radiation Oncology, ICO Cancer Center, Saint-Herblain (France); Campion, Loïc [Department of Biostatistics, ICO Cancer Center, Saint-Herblain (France); Delpon, Grégory [Department of Medical Physics, ICO Cancer Center, Saint-Herblain (France); CRCNA, Inserm U892, CNRS UMR 6299, Nantes (France); Thillays, François [Department of Radiation Oncology, ICO Cancer Center, Saint-Herblain (France); Carrie, Christian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Léon Bérard Center, Lyon (France); Cellier, Patrice [Department of Radiation Oncology, ICO Cancer Center, Angers (France); Pommier, Pascal; Laude, Cécile [Department of Radiation Oncology, Léon Bérard Center, Lyon (France); Mervoyer, Augustin [Department of Radiation Oncology, ICO Cancer Center, Saint-Herblain (France); Hamidou, Hadji [Department of Radiation Oncology, ICO Cancer Center, Angers (France); Mahé, Marc-André [Department of Radiation Oncology, ICO Cancer Center, Saint-Herblain (France); Supiot, Stéphane, E-mail: stephane.supiot@ico.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, ICO Cancer Center, Saint-Herblain (France); CRCNA, Inserm U892, CNRS UMR 6299, Nantes (France)

    2016-11-15

    Introduction: Hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (HSRT) for vertebral metastases gives good results in terms of local control but increases the risk of fracture in the treated volume. Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that zoledronate not only reduces the risk of fracture and stimulates osteoclastic remodeling but also increases the immune response and radiosensitivity. This study aimed to evaluate the tolerability and effectiveness of zoledronate in association with radiation therapy. Patients and Methods: We conducted a multicenter phase 1 study that combined HSRT (3 × 9 Gy) and zoledronate in patients with vertebral metastasis ( (NCT01219790)). The principal objective was the absence of spinal cord adverse reactions at 1 year. The secondary objectives were acute tolerability, the presentation of a bone event, local tumor control, pain control, progression-free survival, and overall survival. Results: Thirty patients (25 male, 5 female), median age 66 years, who were followed up for a median period of 19.2 months, received treatment for 49 vertebral metastases. A grade 3 acute mucosal adverse event occurred in 1 patient during the treatment and in 2 more at 1 month. No late neurologic adverse events were reported at 1 year. The mean pain scores diminished significantly at 1 month (1.35; P=.0125) and 3 months (0.77; P<.0001) compared with pain scores at study entry (2.49). Vertebral collapse in the irradiated zone occurred in 1 (2%) treated vertebra. Control of local disease was achieved in 94% of irradiated patients (3 local recurrences). Conclusion: The combination of zoledronate and HSRT in the treatment of vertebral metastasis is well tolerated and seems to reduce the rate of vertebral collapse, effectively relieve pain, and achieve good local tumor control with no late neurologic adverse effects.

  16. Language courses

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    Cours d’anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera du 22 septembre au 12 décembre. Ces cours s’adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu’à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages web : http://cern.ch/Training. Oral Expression The next session will take place from 29 September to 5 December. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be an average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Writing Professional Documents in English – Administrative Writing Professional Documents in English – Technical The next session will take place from 29 September to 5 December. These courses are...

  17. English courses

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Cours d'anglais général et professionnel La prochaine session se déroulera du 4 mars jusqu’au 21 juin 2013. Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages web. Oral Expression The next sessions will take place from 4 March to 21 June 2013. This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. More information here. Writing Professional Documents in English - Administrative Writing Professional Documents in English - Technical The next sessions will take place from 4 March to 21 June 2013. These courses are designed for people with a goo...

  18. English Course

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2012-01-01

    Cours d'anglais général et professionnel : La prochaine session se déroulera : du 27 février au 22 juin 2012. Ces cours s'adressent à toute personne travaillant au CERN ainsi qu'à leur conjoint. Pour vous inscrire et voir tout le détail des cours proposés, consultez nos pages Web: http://cern.ch/Training Vous pouvez aussi contacter Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tél. 70896. Oral Expression The next sessions will take place from 27 February to 22 June, 2012.  This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to enhance their speaking skills. There will be on average of 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. For registration and further information on the courses, please consult our Web page: http://cern.ch/Training or contact Kerstin Fuhrmeister, tel. ...

  19. Optimization of human cancer radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Swan, George W

    1981-01-01

    The mathematical models in this book are concerned with a variety of approaches to the manner in which the clinical radiologic treatment of human neoplasms can be improved. These improvements comprise ways of delivering radiation to the malignan­ cies so as to create considerable damage to tumor cells while sparing neighboring normal tissues. There is no unique way of dealing with these improvements. Accord­ ingly, in this book a number of different presentations are given. Each presentation has as its goal some aspect of the improvement, or optimization, of radiotherapy. This book is a collection of current ideas concerned with the optimization of human cancer radiotherapy. It is hoped that readers will build on this collection and develop superior approaches for the understanding of the ways to improve therapy. The author owes a special debt of thanks to Kathy Prindle who breezed through the typing of this book with considerable dexterity. TABLE OF CONTENTS Chapter GENERAL INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Introduction 1...

  20. Craniospinal radiotherapy in adult medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selek, U.; Zorlu, F.; Hurmuz, P.; Cengiz, M.; Gurkaynak, M. [Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Turker, A. [Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Internal Medicine; Soylemezoglu, F. [Hacettepe Univ., Ankara (Turkey). Dept. of Pathology

    2007-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the outcome and prognostic factors of adult patients with medulloblastoma. Patients and Methods: 26 adult medulloblastoma patients with a median age of 27 were subjected to craniospinal radiotherapy. A dose of 30.6 Gy with 1.8 Gy/fraction/day was prescribed to M0 patients, while 36 Gy were to be applied in patients with positive cerebrospinal liquor findings. The posterior fossa was boosted to 54 Gy. While 20 patients underwent external-beam radiotherapy alone, only six received sequential adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: Male/female ratio was 1.2. Preradiotherapy Karnofsky performance status was recorded as median 100%. 50% were classified as poor risk (n = 10, subtotal resection; n = 3, M+). The median follow-up time was 46.5 months. The 5-year actuarial survival rates for recurrence-free, distant metastasis-free, disease-free, and overall survival were 82.5%, 90.8%, 73.5%, and 89.7%, respectively. Patient characteristics, treatment factors and tumor characteristics failed to show any significance in univariate analysis. Grade 3 or 4 late morbidities were not observed. Conclusion: Yet, the current standard of care seems to remain craniospinal irradiation after maximal surgical resection of the primary neoplasm without clear indications for adjuvant chemotherapy. (orig.)

  1. [Percutaneous radiotherapy of bone metastases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüller, H; Wisser, L; Pauleit, D

    1997-09-01

    Bone metastases causing pain syndromes and imminent pathologic fractures are among the main reasons for radiotherapy in patients suffering from malignant tumors. The indication is much influenced by the radiologic findings. Surgical methods are to be chosen in the first place in cases of pathologic fractures or patients with a high risk of such fractures. Different authors recommend various therapeutic regimens. Effective pain control can be achieved with one single dose of radiation. Doses of 6 to 40 Gy applied in one to 19 days are also efficient. Side effects, especially nausea and vomiting occur in 25% of cases; this number rises to 50% in cases of half body irradiation. Visible changes of bone mineral density may be noticed about 6 weeks after termination of radiotherapy. About 70% of osteolytic metastases show progressive sclerosis whereas osteosclerotic lesions may show both increase or decline of bone mass. In spite many years of experience the optimal strategy for radiation therapy of bone metastasis has not been defined; further studies are needed.

  2. Monte Carlo calculation of dose distribution in early stage NSCLC patients planned for accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy in the NCIC-BR25 protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moiseenko, V; Bergman, A M; Gill, B; Popescu, I A [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Vancouver, 600 W.10th Ave, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 4E6 (Canada); Liu, M; Kristensen, S [British Columbia Cancer Agency-Fraser Valley, 13750 96th Ave, Surrey, BC, V3V 1Z2 (Canada); Teke, T [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road Vancouver, BC, V6 T 1Z1 (Canada)], E-mail: vmoiseenko@bccancer.bc.ca

    2010-02-07

    The dosimetric consequences of plans optimized using a commercial treatment planning system (TPS) for hypofractionated radiation therapy are evaluated by re-calculating with Monte Carlo (MC). Planning guidelines were in strict accordance with the Canadian BR25 protocol which is similar to the RTOG 0236 and 0618 protocols in patient eligibility and total dose, but has a different hypofractionation schedule (60 Gy in 15 fractions versus 60 Gy in 3 fractions). A common requirement of the BR25 and RTOG protocols is that the dose must be calculated by the TPS without tissue heterogeneity (TH) corrections. Our results show that optimizing plans using the pencil beam algorithm with no TH corrections does not ensure that the BR25 planning constraint of 99% of the PTV receiving at least 95% of the prescription dose would be achieved as revealed by MC simulations. This is due to poor modelling of backscatter and lateral electronic equilibrium by the TPS. MC simulations showed that as little as 75% of the PTV was actually covered by the 95% isodose line. The under-dosage of the PTV was even more pronounced if plans were optimized with the TH correction applied. In the most extreme case, only 23% of the PTV was covered by the 95% isodose.

  3. Concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy for cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Martínez, A; Molano, F; Lloret, M; Falcón-Vizcaino, O; García-Hernández, J A

    2003-01-01

    To compare the results obtained following treatment, from a group of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer (Stage IB or higher) treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy in relation to a group of patients treated exclusively with radiotherapy. All patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy at the Gynaecologic Oncology Unit of the University Hospital Materno Infantil of the Canaries between 1999 and 2000, both inclusive, were included. The first group to be considered was formed by patients who received combined treatment. The second group of patients received radiotherapy exclusively, having been treated in previous years (1997-1998 period). The results were compared in relation to survival in the two following years from treatment (2000-2001) in the group of combined treatment and years 1999-2000 in the group that received only radiotherapy. To compare the survival of both groups the chi-square test and Odds Ratio were utilised. The groups compared are homogeneous when looking at the stage of the disease when diagnosed, the histological type of tumour and its degree of cellular differentiation, the CAT results and tumoral markers. Survival of more than two years was observed in the group treated with concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy in relation to the group treated exclusively with radiotherapy; chi-square 9.92, p < 0.01, OR: 0.1 (0.01-0.6).

  4. Predictors for trismus in patients receiving radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Geer, S Joyce; Kamstra, Jolanda I; Roodenburg, Jan L N; van Leeuwen, Marianne; Reintsema, Harry; Langendijk, Johannes A; Dijkstra, Pieter U

    2016-11-01

    Trismus, a restricted mouth opening in head and neck cancer patients may be caused by tumor infiltration in masticatory muscles, radiation-induced fibrosis or scarring after surgery. It may impede oral functioning severely. The aims of our study were to determine: (1) the incidence of trismus at various time points; and (2) the patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics that predict the development of trismus after radiotherapy in head and neck cancer patients using a large database (n = 641). Maximal mouth opening was measured prior to and 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, and 48 months after radiotherapy. Patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were analyzed as potential predictors for trismus using a multivariable logistic regression analysis. At six months after radiotherapy, 28.1% of the patients without trismus prior to radiotherapy developed trismus for the first time. At subsequent time points the incidence declined. Over a total period of 48 months after radiotherapy, the incidence of trismus was 3.6 per 10 person years at risk. Patients who had tumors located in the oral cavity, oropharynx or nasopharynx, and the salivary glands or ear, and who had a longer overall treatment time of radiotherapy, were more likely to develop trismus in the first six months after radiotherapy. Maximal mouth opening was a predictor for developing trismus at all time points. Incidence of trismus is 3.6 per 10 person years at risk. Tumor localization and overall treatment time of radiotherapy are predictors for developing trismus the first six months after radiotherapy. Maximal mouth opening is a significant predictor for developing trismus at all time points. Regular measurements of maximal mouth opening are needed to predict trismus.

  5. Carotid artery stenosis after neck radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimamura, Munehisa; Hashimoto, Yoichiro; Kasuya, Junji; Terasaki, Tadashi [Kumamoto City Hospital (Japan); Uchino, Makoto

    2000-02-01

    Carotid artery stenosis sometimes occurs after cervical radiotherapy. We report a 70-year-old woman with a history of radiotherapy for thyroid cancer at the age of 28 years. She had no signs and symptoms except the skin lesion at the irradiation site. Duplex ultrasonography revealed heterogeneous plaques showing 50% stenosis of bilateral common carotid arteries. Those lesions were observed within segment of irradiation, where atheromatous plaque usually seldom occurs. These indicated that the carotid stenosis was induced by radiotherapy. Although the efficacy of antiplatelet therapy for radiation-induced plaque is not clear, the plaques remained unchanged for 4 years in spite of aspirin administration. (author)

  6. Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for Advanced Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cronholm, Rickard

    This Ph.d. project describes the development of a workflow for Monte Carlo Treatment Planning for clinical radiotherapy plans. The workflow may be utilized to perform an independent dose verification of treatment plans. Modern radiotherapy treatment delivery is often conducted by dynamically...... modulating the intensity of the field during the irradiation. The workflow described has the potential to fully model the dynamic delivery, including gantry rotation during irradiation, of modern radiotherapy. Three corner stones of Monte Carlo Treatment Planning are identified: Building, commissioning...

  7. Radiotherapy versus combined modality in early stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L; Carde, P; Mauch, P

    1992-01-01

    In early stage Hodgkin's disease the optimal choice of treatment for the individual patient is still an unresolved issue. So far, twenty-two randomized trials of radiotherapy alone versus radiotherapy plus combination chemotherapy have been carried out worldwide. The preliminary results of a global...... be reduced, and that the stress of experiencing a relapse is avoided in many patients. The major argument against the use of chemotherapy up front is: that by careful staging and selection of patients and by careful radiotherapy techniques the number of patients exposed to potentially toxic chemotherapy may...

  8. Predicting compliance and survival in palliative whole-brain radiotherapy for brain metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater, Sebastià; Mur, Encarna; Müller, Katrin; Arenas, Meritxell

    2012-01-01

    Brain radiotherapy is the main treatment for patients with brain metastases but its goal is just symptom control. Our aim was to study if different performance tools, used in geriatric practice, could improve patient selection for decision-making in the palliative brain radiotherapy setting. Data from 61 consecutive patients were analysed. In addition to Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) their physical activity was assessed by means of the activity of daily living (ADL) and instrumental ADL (IADL) scales. A neurocognitive evaluation was performed with the Pfeiffer Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire (SPMSQ) and with the Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE). Radiotherapy compliance and short survival were the endpoints of the study. High rates of cognitive impairment were found by both neurocognitive tools (Pfeiffer: 19.7% of patients; MMSE: 30%). Dependence was also highly prevalent, either measured by the ADL (50.8%) or by the IADL (43.3%). Nearly one third (27.9%) of patients died soon after radiotherapy evaluation. Longer survival was related to female, younger than 60 years, breast cancer primary tumour, steroid response, RPA class, and higher performance and neurocognitive score tools. A premature death was associated with neurocognitive tools, IADL and longer interval from brain metastatic diagnosis to radiotherapy. Twenty-three percent of patients were not able to finish the WBRT course due to clinical deterioration. The only variable related to compliance was a low MMSE score. Results suggest that the geriatric tools analysed could offer information on brain palliative radiotherapy complementary to that offered by the more usual tools. It will be interesting to study if our data could be extrapolated to the general palliative oncological field.

  9. Introduction to Radiotherapy with Photon and Electron Beams and Treatment Planning from Conformal Radiotherapy to IMRT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkens, Jan J.

    2007-11-01

    Besides surgery and chemotherapy, radiation therapy is one of the three main treatment options for cancer patients. This paper provides an introduction to the basic principles of radiotherapy with photons and electrons. It includes a brief summary of the physical properties for photon and electron beams as well as a description of treatment machines used to create these beams. The second part introduces the treatment planning process as it is commonly employed in radiotherapy. It covers dose calculation algorithms, conventional planning strategies for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, and optimization techniques for intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT).

  10. Dermatologic radiotherapy and breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, H.; Gorson, R.O.; Lassen, M.

    1982-03-01

    This study was set up to provide quantitative data to evaluate unsubstantiated claims that improper dermatologic radiation techniques may cause breast cancer. A thin mylar window ionization rate meter placed at the location of the right breast of an Alderson-RANDO anthropomorphic phantom was used to measure direct and scatter radiation reaching the female breast during radiotherapy of the facial region (as given for acne). The results indicate that scatter doses are very small; they are influenced by radiation quality and the use or nonuse of a treatment cone. Quantitative risk estimates show that the very small risk of breast cancer induction can be reduced even further by the use of proper radiation protection measures.

  11. Tomodensitometry images: integration in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessy, F.; Hoornaert, M.T. [Jolimont Hospital, Haine Saint Paul (France). Cancer and Nuclear Medicine Dept.; Malchair, F. [Biomed Engineering, Boncelles (France)

    1995-12-01

    With a view to utilization of CT scan images in radiotherapy, the effective energy and the linearity of four different scanners (Siemens somatom CR, HiQS, Plus and Picker PQ 2000) and two non standard scanners, simulators with CT option (Webb 1990) (Varian Ximatron and Oldelft Simulx CT) has been measured using the method described by White and Speller in 1980. When the linearity relation in presented using the density or the electron density as the abscissa, a blurred area where two different components of equal density or electron density can have two different Hounsfield`s numbers. Using the linearity relation, the density of Rando`s lung heterogeneity is determined. We calculated a treatment planning (TP) using this value and made a comparison between the TP and the real absorbed dose with was measured using diodes. The comparison between the TP and the relative Absorbed doses showed a difference of up to 4.5%.

  12. Radiogenomics and radiotherapy response modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Naqa, Issam; Kerns, Sarah L.; Coates, James; Luo, Yi; Speers, Corey; West, Catharine M. L.; Rosenstein, Barry S.; Ten Haken, Randall K.

    2017-08-01

    Advances in patient-specific information and biotechnology have contributed to a new era of computational medicine. Radiogenomics has emerged as a new field that investigates the role of genetics in treatment response to radiation therapy. Radiation oncology is currently attempting to embrace these recent advances and add to its rich history by maintaining its prominent role as a quantitative leader in oncologic response modeling. Here, we provide an overview of radiogenomics starting with genotyping, data aggregation, and application of different modeling approaches based on modifying traditional radiobiological methods or application of advanced machine learning techniques. We highlight the current status and potential for this new field to reshape the landscape of outcome modeling in radiotherapy and drive future advances in computational oncology.

  13. How many new cancer patients in Europe will require radiotherapy by 2025? An ESTRO-HERO analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borras, Josep M; Lievens, Yolande; Barton, Michael; Corral, Julieta; Ferlay, Jacques; Bray, Freddie; Grau, Cai

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this HERO study was to assess the number of new cancer patients that will require at least one course of radiotherapy by 2025. European cancer incidence data by tumor site and country for 2012 and 2025 was extracted from the GLOBOCAN database. The projection of the number of new cases took into account demographic factors (age and size of the population). Population based stages at diagnosis were taken from four European countries. Incidence and stage data were introduced in the Australian Collaboration for Cancer Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CCORE) model. Among the different tumor sites, the highest expected relative increase by 2025 in treatment courses was prostate cancer (24%) while lymphoma (13%), head and neck (12%) and breast cancer (10%) were below the average. Based on the projected cancer distributions in 2025, a 16% expected increase in the number of radiotherapy treatment courses was estimated. This increase varied across European countries from less than 5% to more than 30%. With the already existing disparity in radiotherapy resources in mind, the data provided here should act as a leverage point to raise awareness among European health policy makers of the need for investment in radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-01

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases. This work was partly presented at the 58th Annual meeting of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system using cine EPID images and a log file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiinoki, Takehiro; Hanazawa, Hideki; Yuasa, Yuki; Fujimoto, Koya; Uehara, Takuya; Shibuya, Keiko

    2017-02-21

    A combined system comprising the TrueBeam linear accelerator and a new real-time tumour-tracking radiotherapy system, SyncTraX, was installed at our institution. The objectives of this study are to develop a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine electronic portal image device (EPID) images and a log file and to verify this treatment in clinical cases. Respiratory-gated radiotherapy was performed using TrueBeam and the SyncTraX system. Cine EPID images and a log file were acquired for a phantom and three patients during the course of the treatment. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were created for each treatment beam using a planning CT set. The cine EPID images, log file, and DRRs were analysed using a developed software. For the phantom case, the accuracy of the proposed method was evaluated to verify the respiratory-gated radiotherapy. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker used as an internal surrogate were calculated to evaluate the gating accuracy and set-up uncertainty in the superior-inferior (SI), anterior-posterior (AP), and left-right (LR) directions. The proposed method achieved high accuracy for the phantom verification. For the clinical cases, the intra- and inter-fractional variations of the fiducial marker were  ⩽3 mm and  ±3 mm in the SI, AP, and LR directions. We proposed a method for the verification of respiratory-gated radiotherapy with SyncTraX using cine EPID images and a log file and showed that this treatment is performed with high accuracy in clinical cases.

  16. Local recurrent and metastatic malignant melanoma. Long-term results and prognostic factors following percutaneous radiotherapy; Lokal rezidiviertes und metastasiertes malignes Melanom. Langzeitergebnisse und Prognosefaktoren nach perkutaner Radiotherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seegenschmiedt, M.H. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Alfried-Krupp-von-Bohlen-und-Halbach-Krankenhaus, Essen (Germany). Klinik fuer Radioonkologie, Strahlentherapie und Nuklearmedizin; Keilholz, L.; Pieritz, A.; Urban, A.; Sauer, R. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlentherapie; Altendorf-Hofmann, A.; Hohenberger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Chirurgie; Schell, H. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Dermatologie

    1999-09-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy (RT) is used as last resort for patients with advanced cutaneous malignant melanoma (MM). Herein our 20-year clinical experience is presented analyzing different endpoints and prognostic factors in patients with locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic MM. Patients and Methods: From 1977 to 1995, 2,917 consecutive patients were entered in the MM registry of our university hospital. RT was indicated in 121 patients (56 females, 65 males) for palliation in locally advanced recurrent and metastatic MM stages UICC IIB to IV. At the time of RT initiation, 11 patients had primary or recurrent lesions which were either not eligible for surgery or had residual disease (R2) after resection of a primary or recurrent MM lesion (UICC IIB); 57 patients had lymph node (n=33) or in-transit metastases (n=24) (UICC III), and 53 had distant organ metastases (7 M1a, 46 M1b) (UICC IV). The time from first diagnosis to on-study RT averaged overall 19 months (median: 18; range: 3 to 186 months). In 77 patients conventional RT and in 44 patients hypofractionated RT was applied with 2 to 6 Gy fractions up to a mean total RT dose of 45 (median: 48; range: 20 to 66) Gy. Results: At 3 months follow-up, complete response (CR) was achieved in 7 (64%), overall response (CR+PR) in all (100%) UICC IIB patients, in 25 (44%) and 44 (77%) of 57 UICC III patients, and in 9 (17%) and 26 (49%) of 53 UICC IV patients. Tumor progression during RT occurred in 25 (21%) patients. Patients with CR survived longer (median: 40 months) than those without CR (median 10 months) (p<0.01). At the time of evaluation and last FU (December 31, 1996), 26 patients were still alive: 6 (55%) stage UICC IIB, 17 (30%) stage UICC III, and 3 (6%) stage UICC IV patients (p<0.01). Univariate analysis revealed following prognostic factors for CR and long-term survival: UICC stage (p<0.001), primary location in the head and neck, total RT dose >40 Gy (all p<0.05), while age, gender and primary histological

  17. Stereotactic body radiotherapy a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Gaya, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Collecting the key information in this burgeoning field into a single volume, this handbook for clinical oncology trainees and consultants covers all of the basic aspects of stereotactic radiotherapy systems and treatment and includes plenty of case studies.

  18. Glioblastoma after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Young; Park, Kyung Ran; KIm, Jun Joo; Lee, Chong In; Kim, Myung Soon; Jung, Soon Hee [Wonju College of Medicine, Yonsei Univ., Wonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-12-01

    A 39-year-old woman developed a glioblastoma about 7 years and 10 months after local radiotherapy (45 Gy) for pituitary adenoma. Clinical and histopathological details are presented, and previously reported cases of radiation-induced glioma are reviewed.

  19. Estimating the Risks of Breast Cancer Radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Carolyn; Correa, Candace; Duane, Frances K

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Radiotherapy reduces the absolute risk of breast cancer mortality by a few percentage points in suitable women but can cause a second cancer or heart disease decades later. We estimated the absolute long-term risks of modern breast cancer radiotherapy. Methods First, a systematic literature...... review was performed of lung and heart doses in breast cancer regimens published during 2010 to 2015. Second, individual patient data meta-analyses of 40,781 women randomly assigned to breast cancer radiotherapy versus no radiotherapy in 75 trials yielded rate ratios (RRs) for second primary cancers...... and cause-specific mortality and excess RRs (ERRs) per Gy for incident lung cancer and cardiac mortality. Smoking status was unavailable. Third, the lung or heart ERRs per Gy in the trials and the 2010 to 2015 doses were combined and applied to current smoker and nonsmoker lung cancer and cardiac mortality...

  20. MRI-guided radiotherapy for renal tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stam, M.K.

    2013-01-01

    The current surgical treatment for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) experiences complications due to the invasiveness of the treatment. Minimally invasive alternative treatments, such as radiofrequency and cryogen ablation, have fewer complications but a lower local control. Radiotherapy is an established

  1. Radiotherapy staffing in the European countries: final results from the ESTRO-HERO survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Yolande; Defourny, Noémie; Coffey, Mary; Borras, Josep M; Dunscombe, Peter; Slotman, Ben; Malicki, Julian; Bogusz, Marta; Gasparotto, Chiara; Grau, Cai; Kokobobo, Arianit; Sedlmayer, Felix; Slobina, Elena; Coucke, Philippe; Gabrovski, Roumen; Vosmik, Milan; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Jaal, Jana; Dejean, Catherine; Polgar, Csaba; Johannsson, Jakob; Cunningham, Moya; Atkocius, Vydmantas; Back, Carlo; Pirotta, Martin; Karadjinovic, Vanja; Levernes, Sverre; Maciejewski, Boguslaw; Trigo, Maria Lurdes; Šegedin, Barbara; Palacios, Amalia; Pastoors, Bert; Beardmore, Charlotte; Erridge, Sara; Smyth, Gaile; Cleries Soler, Ramon

    2014-08-01

    The ESTRO Health Economics in Radiation Oncology (HERO) project has the overall aim to develop a knowledge base of the provision of radiotherapy in Europe and build a model for health economic evaluation of radiation treatments at the European level. The first milestone was to assess the availability of radiotherapy resources within Europe. This paper presents the personnel data collected in the ESTRO HERO database. An 84-item questionnaire was sent out to European countries, through their national scientific and professional radiotherapy societies. The current report includes a detailed analysis of radiotherapy staffing (questionnaire items 47-60), analysed in relation to the annual number of treatment courses and the socio-economic status of the countries. The analysis was conducted between February and July 2014, and is based on validated responses from 24 of the 40 European countries defined by the European Cancer Observatory (ECO). A large variation between countries was found for most parameters studied. Averages and ranges for personnel numbers per million inhabitants are 12.8 (2.5-30.9) for radiation oncologists, 7.6 (0-19.7) for medical physicists, 3.5 (0-12.6) for dosimetrists, 26.6 (1.9-78) for RTTs and 14.8 (0.4-61.0) for radiotherapy nurses. The combined average for physicists and dosimetrists is 9.8 per million inhabitants and 36.9 for RTT and nurses. Radiation oncologists on average treat 208.9 courses per year (range: 99.9-348.8), physicists and dosimetrists conjointly treat 303.3 courses (range: 85-757.7) and RTT and nurses 76.8 (range: 25.7-156.8). In countries with higher GNI per capita, all personnel categories treat fewer courses per annum than in less affluent countries. This relationship is most evident for RTTs and nurses. Different clusters of countries can be distinguished on the basis of available personnel resources and socio-economic status. The average personnel figures in Europe are now consistent with, or even more favourable than

  2. Outcomes and Toxicity for Hypofractionated and Single-Fraction Image-Guided Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Sarcomas Metastasizing to the Spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folkert, Michael R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Bilsky, Mark H. [Department of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Tom, Ashlyn K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Oh, Jung Hun [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Alektiar, Kaled M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Laufer, Ilya [Department of Neurosurgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Tap, William D. [Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Yamada, Yoshiya, E-mail: yamadaj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Conventional radiation treatment (20-40 Gy in 5-20 fractions, 2-5 Gy per fraction) for sarcoma metastatic to the spine provides subtherapeutic doses, resulting in poor durable local control (LC) (50%-77% at 1 year). Hypofractionated (HF) and/or single-fraction (SF) image-guided stereotactic radiosurgery (IG-SRS) may provide a more effective means of managing these lesions. Methods and Materials: Patients with pathologically proven high-grade sarcoma metastatic to the spine treated with HF and SF IG-SRS were included. LC and overall survival (OS) were analyzed by the use of Kaplan-Meier statistics. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed by the use of Cox regression with competing-risks analysis; all confidence intervals are 95%. Toxicities were assessed according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. Results: From May 2005 to November 11, 2012, 88 patients with 120 discrete metastases received HF (3-6 fractions; median dose, 28.5 Gy; n=52, 43.3%) or SF IG-SRS (median dose, 24 Gy; n=68, 56.7%). The median follow-up time was 12.3 months. At 12 months, LC was 87.9% (confidence interval [CI], 81.3%-94.5%), OS was 60.6% (CI, 49.6%-71.6%), and median survival was 16.9 months. SF IG-SRS demonstrated superior LC to HF IG-SRS (12-month LC of 90.8% [CI, 83%-98.6%] vs 84.1% [CI, 72.9%-95.3%] P=.007) and retained significance on multivariate analysis (P=.030, hazard ratio 0.345; CI, 0.132-0.901]. Treatment was well tolerated, with 1% acute grade 3 toxicity, 4.5% chronic grade 3 toxicity, and no grade >3 toxicities. Conclusions: In the largest series of metastatic sarcoma to the spine to date, IG-SRS provides excellent LC in the setting of an aggressive disease with low radiation sensitivity and poor prognosis. Single-fraction IG-SRS is associated with the highest rates of LC with minimal toxicity.

  3. SU-F-T-196: Hypo-Fractionation with Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Unilateral Metallic Prosthesis Prostate Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rana, S; Park, S [McLaren Proton Therapy Center, Karmanos Cancer Institute at McLaren-Flint, Flint, MI (United States); Zheng, Y [Procure Proton Therapy Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Zhang, Y [University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Liberty Township, OH (United States); Pokharel [21st Century Oncology, Estero, FL (United States); Cheng, C [Vantage Oncology, West Hills, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the dosimetric feasibility of hypo-fractionated intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for unilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer patients based on proton collaborative group (PCG)-GU002-10 (NCT01230866) protocol criteria. Methods: A total of five unilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer cases were included in this retrospective study. For each case, IMPT plans were generated for treatment to be delivered with 7.6 Gy[RBE] per fraction in 5 fractions per week for a total dose of 38 Gy(RBE). Each plan was generated using two anterior-oblique beams and one lateral beam. Treatment plans were optimized with an objective meeting PCG-GU002-10 (NCT01230866) protocol criteria: (i) planning target volume (PTV): D99.5% > 36.1 Gy[RBE], (ii) rectum: V24 < 35%, V33.6 < 10%, (iii) bladder: V39 < 8 cc, and (iv) femoral head: V23 < 1cc. Results: All five cases satisfied PTV D99.5% (average=36.82 Gy[RBE]; range, 36.36–37.13 Gy[RBE]). PTV D95% ranged from 36.66 Gy[RBE] to 38.65 Gy[RBE] and PTV V100 ranged from 95.47% to 97.95%. For the rectum, V24 was less than 35% (average=14.07 Gy[RBE]; range, 6.22–18.42%, whereas V33.6 Gy[RBE] was less than 10% (average=6.83; range, 3.06 – 9.15%). Rectal mean dose ranged from 4.22 Gy[RBE] to 9.97 Gy[RBE]. For the bladder, V39 was found to be less than 8 cc (average=3.69 cc; range, 0.19–7.68 cc). Bladder mean dose ranged from 4.22 Gy[RBE] to 18.83 Gy[RBE]. For the femoral head, V23 was 0 in all five cases. Conclusion: All five unilateral metallic prosthesis prostate cancer IMPT plans generated with one lateral and two anterior-oblique beams satisfied the dosimetric criteria of PCG-GU002-10 (NCT01230866) protocol.

  4. Clinical Pathways: A Catalyst for the Adoption of Hypofractionation for Early-Stage Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapman, Bhavana V.; Rajagopalan, Malolan S.; Heron, Dwight E.; Flickinger, John C.; Beriwal, Sushil, E-mail: beriwals@upmc.edu

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated whole-breast irradiation (HF-WBI) remains underutilized in the United States despite support by multiple clinical trials. We evaluated the success of iterative modifications of our breast cancer clinical pathway on the adoption of HF-WBI in a large, integrated radiation oncology network. Methods and Materials: The breast clinical pathway was modified in January 2011 (Amendment 1) to recommend HF-WBI as the first option for women ≥70 of age with stages 0 to IIA, while maintaining conventional fractionation (CF) as a pathway-concordant secondary option. In January 2013 (Amendment 2), the pathway's HF-WBI recommendation was extended to women ≥50 years of age. In January 2014 (Amendment 3), the pathway mandated HF-WBI as the only pathway-concordant option in women ≥50 years of age, and all pathway-discordant plans were subject to peer review and justification. Women ≥50 years of age with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive breast cancer who underwent breast conserving surgery and adjuvant WBI were included in this analysis. Results: We identified 5112 patients from 2009 to 2014 who met inclusion criteria. From 2009 to 2012, the overall HF-WBI use rate was 8.3%. Following Amendments 2 and 3 (2013 and 2014, respectively), HF-WBI use significantly increased to 21.8% (17.3% in the community, 39.7% at academic sites) and 76.7% (75.5% in the community, 81.4% at academic sites), respectively (P<.001). Compared to 2009 to 2012, the relative risk of using HF-WBI was 7.9 (95% confidence interval: 7.1-8.6, P<.001) and 10.7 (95% CI: 10.3-11.0, P<.001), respectively, after Amendments 2 and 3, respectively. Age ≥70 and treatment at an academic site increased the likelihood of receiving HF-WBI in 2009 to 2012 and following Amendment 2 (P<.001). Conclusions: This study demonstrates the transformative effect of a clinical pathway on patterns of care for breast radiation therapy. Although our initial HF-WBI use rate was low (8%-22%) and

  5. The result of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H. J.; Yang, K. M.; Suh, S. H. [Inje Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Coll. of Medicine; Cho, H. L.; Shon, S. C. [Pusan Paik Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    To evaluate the prognostic factors for disease-free survival and long-term results of radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma. The study involved a retrospective review of outcome in a series of 27 patients with pituitary adenoma, between 1984 and 1995 at Paik hospital. The study included 20 patients treated with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy and 7 with radiotherapy alone. The patients were followed for 12-146 months (median: 97 months). Seventeen were men and 10 were women. The numbers of functioning and non-functioning pituitary adenoma were 22 and 5 respectively and those of microadenoma and macroadenoma were 4 and 23 respectively. The radiation doses of 5040-5580cGy(median: 5040cGy) were delivered over 5-7 weeks, using 4MV LINAC. The prognostic factors were analyzed by log-rank test. For radiation therapy alone, the 5 YSR was 100% and progression free survival rate was 85.8%. The tumor was controlled in 6/7 (85.8%). For surgery and postoperative radiotherapy , the 5YSR, progression free survival rate and local control rate were 95%, 84.8%, and 89.5% respectively. The parameters of tumor size, hormone secretion, radiation dose, radiotherapy field size were evaluated in a uni- and multivariate analysis and all the factors were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Eleven of 12 (92%) with visual field defect experienced normalization or improvement, and 5 for 7 evaluable patients with hyperprolactinoma achieved normalization in 4 and decrement in 5 patients. Only 2 patients developed mild degree of panhypopituitarism. The radiotherapy appears to be effective in controlling clinical symptoms and signs resulting from pituitary adenoma. Local control rate with radiotherapy alone or with surgery and postoperative radiotherapy was comparable. There was a trend toward high recurrence rate in patients with nonfunctioning or prolactin secreting tumor and larger radiation field sizes. (author).

  6. Biological modelling of pelvic radiotherapy. Potential gains from conformal techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fenwick, J.D

    1999-07-01

    Models have been developed which describe the dose and volume dependences of various long-term rectal complications of radiotherapy; assumptions underlying the models are consistent with clinical and experimental descriptions of complication pathogenesis. In particular, rectal bleeding - perhaps the most common complication of modern external beam prostate radiotherapy, and which might be viewed as its principle dose-limiting toxicity - has been modelled as a parallel-type complication. Rectal dose-surface-histograms have been calculated for 79 patients treated, in the course of the Royal Marsden trial of pelvic conformal radiotherapy, for prostate cancer using conformal or conventional techniques; rectal bleeding data is also available for these patients. The maximum- likelihood fit of the parallel bleeding model to the dose-surface-histograms and complication data shows that the complication status of the patients analysed (most of whom received reference point doses of 64 Gy) was significantly dependent on, and almost linearly proportional to, the volume of highly dosed rectal wall: a 1% decrease in the fraction of rectal wall (outlined over an 11 cm rectal length) receiving a dose of 58 Gy or more lead to a reduction in the (RTOG) grade 1,2,3 bleeding rate of about 1.1% - 95% confidence interval [0.04%, 2.2%]. The parallel model fit to the bleeding data is only marginally biased by uncertainties in the calculated dose-surface-histograms (due to setup errors, rectal wall movement and absolute rectal surface area variability), causing the gradient of the observed volume-response curve to be slightly lower than that which would be seen in the absence of these uncertainties. An analysis of published complication data supports these single-centre findings and indicates that the reductions in highly dosed rectal wall volumes obtainable using conformal radiotherapy techniques can be exploited to allow escalation of the dose delivered to the prostate target volume, the

  7. [Role of radiotherapy in the treatment of multiple myeloma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mose, S; Pfitzner, D; Rahn, A; Nierhoff, C; Schiemann, M; Böttcher, H D

    2000-11-01

    Chemotherapy is the treatment of choice in multiple myeloma; but there are no curative options. Therefore, the treatment rationale is characterized by reduction of symptoms and inhibition of complications. Regarding reduction of pain, treatment of (impending) fractures, and spinal cord compression radiation is an important part of palliative treatment. In our retrospective study we report the effect of radiotherapy on reduction of pain, recalcification and the reduction of neurological symptoms and evaluate factors which have an impact on therapeutic outcome. From 1, Jan 1988 to 31, Dec 1998, 42 patients (19 women, 23 men; range of ages 46 to 85 years, median age 64.9 years) with 71 target volumes were irradiated (median dose 36 Gy, 2 to 3 Gy 5 times/week) because of symptomatic disease (67/71: osseous pain, 45/71: fractures/impending fractures, 13/71: spinal cord compression) (Tables 1 and 2). The median time from diagnosis to the first course of radiotherapy was 11.9 months (0.3 to 90 months). At the time of first irradiation, 5 and 37 patients were in tumor Stage II and III (Salmon/Durie), respectively. The median value of the Karnofsky performance was 70% (40 to 90%). During follow-up (at least 6 months) in 85% of target volumes complete and partial pain relief (measured by patients' perception and the use of analgetic medication) was achieved; recurrences were seen in 8.8%. In 26/56 (46.4%) lesions evaluable a recalcification was seen whereas 17.9% showed progressive disease (comparison of radiographs before and after radiation). In 22.3% of all lesions initially with impending fracture (4/18) radiotherapy failed because of fracture after treatment (Tables 3 and 4). Simultaneous chemotherapy and a Karnofsky performance > or = 70 had a significant impact on a positive response to treatment, respectively. Spinal cord compression symptoms were reduced in 7/13 (53.8%) of patients (scaled due to the classification by Findlay 1987). The median survival from

  8. Molecular PET imaging for biology-guided adaptive radiotherapy of head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoeben, Bianca A W; Bussink, Johan; Troost, Esther G C; Oyen, Wim J G; Kaanders, Johannes H A M

    2013-10-01

    Integration of molecular imaging PET techniques into therapy selection strategies and radiation treatment planning for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) can serve several purposes. First, pre-treatment assessments can steer decisions about radiotherapy modifications or combinations with other modalities. Second, biology-based objective functions can be introduced to the radiation treatment planning process by co-registration of molecular imaging with planning computed tomography (CT) scans. Thus, customized heterogeneous dose distributions can be generated with escalated doses to tumor areas where radiotherapy resistance mechanisms are most prevalent. Third, monitoring of temporal and spatial variations in these radiotherapy resistance mechanisms early during the course of treatment can discriminate responders from non-responders. With such information available shortly after the start of treatment, modifications can be implemented or the radiation treatment plan can be adapted tailing the biological response pattern. Currently, these strategies are in various phases of clinical testing, mostly in single-center studies. Further validation in multicenter set-up is needed. Ultimately, this should result in availability for routine clinical practice requiring stable production and accessibility of tracers, reproducibility and standardization of imaging and analysis methods, as well as general availability of knowledge and expertise. Small studies employing adaptive radiotherapy based on functional dynamics and early response mechanisms demonstrate promising results. In this context, we focus this review on the widely used PET tracer (18)F-FDG and PET tracers depicting hypoxia and proliferation; two well-known radiation resistance mechanisms.

  9. Testicular dose in prostate cancer radiotherapy. Impact on impairment of fertility and hormonal function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, D.; Badakhshi, H.; Budach, V. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Charite - Univ. Clinic - Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany); Kuschke, W.; Bohsung, J. [Dept. of Medical Physics, Charite - Univ. Clinic - Campus Mitte, Berlin (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    Purpose: to determine the dose received by the unshielded testicles during a course of 20-MV conventional external-beam radiotherapy for patients with localized prostate cancer. Critical evaluation of the potential impact on fertility and hormonal impairment in these patients according to the literature. Patients and methods: the absolute dose received by the testicles of 20 randomly selected patients undergoing radiotherapy of prostate cancer was measured by on-line thermoluminescence dosimetry. Patients were treated in supine position with an immobilization cushion under their knees. A flexible tube, containing three calibrated thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) was placed on top or underneath the testicle closest to the perineal region with a day-to-day alternation. The single dose to the planning target volume was 1.8 Gy. Ten subsequent testicle measurements were performed on each patient. The individual TLDs were then read out and the total absorbed dose was calculated. Results: the mean total dose ({+-} standard deviation) measured in a series of 10 subsequent treatment days in all patients was 49 cGy ({+-} 36 cGy). The calculated projected doses made on a standard series of 40 fractions of external-beam radiotherapy were 196 cGy ({+-} 145 cGy). The results of this study are appraised with the available data in the literature. Conclusion: the dose received by the unshielded testes can be assessed as a risk for permanent infertility and impairment of hormonal function in prostate cancer patients treated with external-beam radiotherapy. (orig.)

  10. Chronic oral mucositis after radiotherapy to the head and neck: a new insight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elad, Sharon; Zadik, Yehuda

    2016-11-01

    Oral mucositis is a major complication of anticancer therapy yet the literature focuses on immediate (acute) mucosal changes and hardly describes the chronic form. We aim to report the clinical manifestations of chronic mucositis. A retrospective chart review of oral mucositis referrals was performed. Inclusion/exclusion criteria defined the patients that were considered to have chronic mucositis. Four female patients treated for tongue/lower lip squamous cell carcinoma were included. Extensive painful oral mucositis lesions developed in all patients during the course of radiotherapy, with ulcers remaining for 5-24 months after completion of therapy. We describe two presentations, namely the persistent form (long-lasting ulcers continuing from acute ulcers) and the recurrent form (new discrete ulcers appearing on atrophic mucosa following the completion of radiotherapy). The long-term oral complications of radiotherapy to the head and neck may include chronic atrophic, erythematous, and/or ulcerated lesions. A diagnosis of chronic oral mucositis should be considered when the lesions are observed at least 3 months after radiotherapy, and other possible etiologies have been excluded. The influence of age and comorbidities (primarily diabetes mellitus) on chronic mucositis, the significance to patient's quality of life, and the management of chronic mucositis are important subjects for future research.

  11. Low incidence of new biochemical and clinical hypogonadism following hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT monotherapy for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pahira John

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CyberKnife is an appealing delivery system for hypofractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT because of its ability to deliver highly conformal radiation therapy to moving targets. This conformity is achieved via 100s of non-coplanar radiation beams, which could potentially increase transitory testicular irradiation and result in post-therapy hypogonadism. We report on our early experience with CyberKnife SBRT for low- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients and assess the rate of inducing biochemical and clinical hypogonadism. Methods Twenty-six patients were treated with hypofractionated SBRT to a dose of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. All patients had histologically confirmed low- to intermediate-risk prostate adenocarcinoma (clinical stage ≤ T2b, Gleason score ≤ 7, PSA ≤ 20 ng/ml. PSA and total testosterone levels were obtained pre-treatment, 1 month post-treatment and every 3 months thereafter, for 1 year. Biochemical hypogonadism was defined as a total serum testosterone level below 8 nmol/L. Urinary and gastrointestinal toxicity was assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria v3; quality of life was assessed using the American Urological Association Symptom Score, Sexual Health Inventory for Men and Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite questionnaires. Results All 26 patients completed the treatment with a median 15 months (range, 13-19 months follow-up. Median pre-treatment PSA was 5.75 ng/ml (range, 2.3-10.3 ng/ml, and a decrease to a median of 0.7 ng/ml (range, 0.2-1.8 ng/ml was observed by one year post-treatment. The median pre-treatment total serum testosterone level was 13.81 nmol/L (range, 5.55 - 39.87 nmol/L. Post-treatment testosterone levels slowly decreased with the median value at one year follow-up of 10.53 nmol/L, significantly lower than the pre-treatment value (p Conclusions Hypofractionated SBRT offers the radiobiological benefit of a large fraction size and is well-tolerated by

  12. Randomized phase II trial of hypofractionated proton versus carbon ion radiation therapy in patients with sacrococcygeal chordoma-the ISAC trial protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhl, Matthias; Edler, Lutz; Jensen, Alexandra D; Habl, Gregor; Oelmann, Jan; Röder, Falk; Jäckel, Oliver; Debus, Jürgen; Herfarth, Klaus

    2014-04-29

    Chordomas are relatively rare lesions of the bones. About 30% occur in the sacrococcygeal region. Surgical resection is still the standard treatment. Due to the size, proximity to neurovascular structures and the complex anatomy of the pelvis, a complete resection with adequate safety margin is difficult to perform. A radical resection with safety margins often leads to the loss of bladder and rectal function as well as motoric/sensoric dysfunction. The recurrence rate after surgery alone is comparatively high, such that adjuvant radiation therapy is very important for improving local control rates. Proton therapy is still the international standard in the treatment of chordomas. High-LET beams such as carbon ions theoretically offer biologic advantages in slow-growing tumors. Data of a Japanese study of patients with unresectable sacral chordoma showed comparable high control rates after hypofractionated carbon ion therapy only. This clinical study is a prospective randomized, monocentric phase II trial. Patients with histologically confirmed sacrococcygeal chordoma will be randomized to either proton or carbon ion radiation therapy stratified regarding the clinical target volume. Target volume delineation will be carried out based on CT and MRI data. In each arm the PTV will receive 64 GyE in 16 fractions. The primary objective of this trial is safety and feasibility of hypofractionated irradiation in patients with sacrococygeal chordoma using protons or carbon ions in raster scan technique for primary or additive treatment after R2 resection. The evaluation is therefore based on the proportion of treatments without Grade 3-5 toxicity (CTCAE, version 4.0) up to 12 months after treatment and/or discontinuation of the treatment for any reason as primary endpoint. Local-progression free survival, overall survival and quality of life will be analyzed as secondary end points. The aim of this study is to confirm the toxicity results of the Japanese data in raster scan

  13. Phase 2 Trial of Hypofractionated High-Dose Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy With Concurrent and Adjuvant Temozolomide for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iuchi, Toshihiko, E-mail: tiuchi@chiba-c.jp [Division of Neurological Surgery, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hatano, Kazuo; Kodama, Takashi [Division of Radiation Oncology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Sakaida, Tsukasa [Division of Neurological Surgery, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Yokoi, Sana [Division of Gene Diagnosis, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Kawasaki, Koichiro; Hasegawa, Yuzo [Division of Neurological Surgery, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hara, Ryusuke [Division of Radiation Oncology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose/Objectives: To assess the effect and toxicity of hypofractionated high-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) in 46 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: All patients underwent postsurgical hypofractionated high-dose IMRT. Three layered planning target volumes (PTVs) were contoured. PTV1 was the surgical cavity and residual tumor on T1-weighted magnetic resonance images with 5-mm margins, PTV2 was the area with 15-mm margins surrounding the PTV1, and PTV3 was the high-intensity area on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images. Irradiation was performed in 8 fractions at total doses of 68, 40, and 32 Gy for PTV1, PTV2, and PTV3, respectively. Concurrent TMZ was given at 75 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 42 consecutive days. Adjuvant TMZ was given at 150 to 200 mg/m{sup 2}/day for 5 days every 28 days. Overall and progression-free survivals were evaluated. Results: No acute IMRT-related toxicity was observed. The dominant posttreatment failure pattern was dissemination. During a median follow-up time of 16.3 months (range, 4.3-80.8 months) for all patients and 23.7 months (range, 12.4-80.8 months) for living patients, the median overall survival was 20.0 months after treatment. Radiation necrosis was diagnosed in 20 patients and was observed not only in the high-dose field but also in the subventricular zone (SVZ). Necrosis in the SVZ was significantly correlated with prolonged survival (hazard ratio, 4.08; P=.007) but caused deterioration in the performance status of long-term survivors. Conclusions: Hypofractionated high-dose IMRT with concurrent and adjuvant TMZ altered the dominant failure pattern from localized to disseminated and prolonged the survival of patients with GBM. Necrosis in the SVZ was associated with better patient survival, but the benefit of radiation to this area remains controversial.

  14. A Good Time to Dance? A Mixed-Methods Approach of the Effects of Dance Movement Therapy for Breast Cancer Patients During and After Radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rainbow T H; Lo, Phyllis H Y; Luk, Mai Yee

    2016-01-01

    Dance movement therapy (DMT) is premised on an interconnected body and mind. It has known benefits for cancer patients' physical and psychological health and quality of life. To offer greater insight into a previous randomized controlled trial, the present study qualitatively explored the beneficial elements of DMT over the course of radiotherapy. To better understand the uniqueness of DMT intervention for patients receiving radiotherapy, the study statistically compared them with patients who received DMT after treatment completion. Participants were randomized into radiotherapy and postradiotherapy control groups. The radiotherapy group received DMT (6 sessions at 90 minutes each) as they were undergoing radiotherapy. The postradiotherapy group was provided with the same DMT intervention at 1 to 2 months after completing radiotherapy. One hundred and four participants identified 5 main benefit categories. Dance movement therapy helped them (1) cope with cancer, treatment, and physical symptoms; (2) improve mental well-being, attention, and appreciation for the self and body; (3) improve total functioning; (4) bridge back to a normal and better life; and (5) participate in shared positive experiences. The radiotherapy group reported categories 1 and 2 more prominently than did the postradiotherapy group. The findings reinforced the benefits of DMT while adding the new perspective that delivering DMT intervention throughout cancer treatment can have different and even additional benefits for patients. The pleasure of dancing and the psychological and physical relief from DMT help patients cope with daily radiation treatments. This could decrease treatment dropout rates when administered in clinical settings.

  15. Role of radiotherapy fractionation in head and neck cancers (MARCH) : an updated meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacas, Benjamin; Bourhis, Jean; Overgaard, Jens; Zhang, Qiang; Grégoire, Vincent; Nankivell, Matthew; Zackrisson, Björn; Szutkowski, Zbigniew; Suwiński, Rafał; Poulsen, Michael; O'Sullivan, Brian; Corvò, Renzo; Laskar, Sarbani Ghosh; Fallai, Carlo; Yamazaki, Hideya; Dobrowsky, Werner; Cho, Kwan Ho; Garden, Adam S; Langendijk, Johannes A; Viegas, Celia Maria Pais; Hay, John; Lotayef, Mohamed; Parmar, Mahesh K B; Aupérin, Anne; van Herpen, Carla; Maingon, Philippe; Trotti, Andy M; Grau, Cai; Pignon, Jean-Pierre; Blanchard, Pierre

    BACKGROUND: The Meta-Analysis of Radiotherapy in squamous cell Carcinomas of Head and neck (MARCH) showed that altered fractionation radiotherapy is associated with improved overall and progression-free survival compared with conventional radiotherapy, with hyperfractionated radiotherapy showing the

  16. Role of radiotherapy fractionation in head and neck cancers (MARCH): an updated meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lacas, B.; Bourhis, J.; Overgaard, J.; Zhang, Q; Gregoire, V.; Nankivell, M.; Zackrisson, B.; Szutkowski, Z.; Suwinski, R.; Poulsen, M.; O'Sullivan, B.; Corvo, R.; Laskar, S.G.; Fallai, C.; Yamazaki, H.; Dobrowsky, W.; Cho, K.H.; Garden, A.S.; Langendijk, J.A.; Viegas, C.M.P.; Hay, J.; Lotayef, M.; Parmar, M.K.; Auperin, A.; Herpen, C.M. van; Maingon, P.; Trotti, A.M.; Grau, C.; Pignon, J.P.; Blanchard, P.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Meta-Analysis of Radiotherapy in squamous cell Carcinomas of Head and neck (MARCH) showed that altered fractionation radiotherapy is associated with improved overall and progression-free survival compared with conventional radiotherapy, with hyperfractionated radiotherapy showing the

  17. Radiotherapy for pain management of bone metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezende Junior, Ismar de; Mattos, Marcos Duarte de; Nakamura, Ricardo; Lemes Junior, Joaquim; Vanzelli, Talita Lozano, E-mail: rezende.med@terra.com.br [Radioterapia do Hospital de Cancer de Barretos, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: This is the first Brazilian study intended to evaluate the response of pain relief with radiotherapy in three different fractionation and the clinical differences in managing pain in patients with painful bone metastases. Methods: Prospective study of patients with painful bone metastases referred to the Radiotherapy Sector of the Hospital de Cancer de Barretos for pain-relieving radiotherapy between March and December 2010. It is known that radiotherapy seems to alter the activation of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, relieving pain in cases of painful bone metastases. Patients were assessed in relation to the status of pain intensity before and after the initiation of radiotherapy. Either a single fraction of 8Gy, five fractions of 4Gy or ten fractions of 3Gy were given. A visual analog scale (VAS) was applied by doctors, nurses and nursing technicians to assess pain intensity at each session of radiotherapy, and follow-up at 8, 30 and 90 days from the end of treatment. Results: We evaluated 92 consecutive patients, 48 male and 44 female, with a median age of 58 years. We found that 14% of patients referred from the Palliative Care or Clinical Oncology sectors need better pharmacological analgesia due to severe pain, compared with 40.5% of patients from the other sectors (p = 0.004). We also found that the onset of pain relief to patients receiving 10 fractions of 300cGy analgesia without changing the pre-radiotherapy analgesia occurred with significance after the fifth fraction. Improvement in pain experienced within 90 days of follow-up was found in eighty percent of patients, independent of fractionated radiotherapy, site of metastases and the clinical condition of the patient. Discussion/Conclusion: The Palliative Care and Clinical Oncology sectors expressed greater concern in regards to analgesia for the patient with painful bone metastases. Radiotherapy is an effective pain-relieving treatment in different fractionation studied, even though the

  18. Target position uncertainty during visually guided deep-inspiration breath-hold radiotherapy in locally advanced lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rydhog, Jonas Scherman; de Blanck, Steen Riisgaard; Josipovic, Mirjana

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to estimate the uncertainty in voluntary deep-inspiration breath hold (DISH) radiotherapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients.Methods: Perpendicular fluoroscopic movies were acquired in free breathing (FB) and DIBH during a course...... of visually guided DIBH radiotherapy of nine patients with NSCLC. Patients had liquid markers injected in mediastinal lymph nodes and primary tumours. Excursion, systematic- and random errors, and inter-breath-hold position uncertainty were investigated using an image based tracking algorithm.Results: A mean...... small in visually guided breath-hold radiotherapy of NSCLC. Target motion could be substantially reduced, but not eliminated, using visually guided DIBH. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  19. Intraoperative Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor E. R. Harris

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intraoperative radiotherapy (IORT for early stage breast cancer is a technique for partial breast irradiation. There are several technologies in clinical use to perform breast IORT. Regardless of technique, IORT generally refers to the delivery of a single dose of radiation to the periphery of the tumor bed in the immediate intraoperative time frame, although some protocols have performed IORT as a second procedure. There are two large prospective randomized trials establishing the safety and efficacy of breast IORT in early stage breast cancer patients with sufficient follow-up time on thousands of women. The advantages of IORT for partial breast irradiation include: direct visualization of the target tissue ensuring treatment of the high-risk tissue and eliminating the risk of marginal miss; the use of a single dose coordinated with the necessary surgical excision thereby reducing omission of radiation and the selection of mastectomy for women without access to a radiotherapy facility or unable to undergo several weeks of daily radiation; favorable toxicity profiles; patient convenience and cost savings; radiobiological and tumor microenvironment conditions which lead to enhanced tumor control. The main disadvantage of IORT is the lack of final pathologic information on the tumor size, histology, margins, and nodal status. When unexpected findings on final pathology such as positive margins or positive sentinel nodes predict a higher risk of local or regional recurrence, additional whole breast radiation may be indicated, thereby reducing some of the convenience and low-toxicity advantages of sole IORT. However, IORT as a tumor bed boost has also been studied and appears to be safe with acceptable toxicity. IORT has potential efficacy advantages related to overall survival related to reduced cardiopulmonary radiation doses. It may also be very useful in specific situations, such as prior to oncoplastic reconstruction to improve accuracy of

  20. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning for Testicular Seminoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: richardbwilder@yahoo.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Efstathiou, Jason A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Beard, Clair J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Virtually all patients with Stage I testicular seminoma are cured regardless of postorchiectomy management. For patients treated with adjuvant radiotherapy, late toxicity is a major concern. However, toxicity may be limited by radiotherapy techniques that minimize radiation exposure of healthy normal tissues. This article is an evidence-based review that provides radiotherapy treatment planning recommendations for testicular seminoma. The minority of Stage I patients who choose adjuvant treatment over surveillance may be considered for (1) para-aortic irradiation to 20 Gy in 10 fractions, or (2) carboplatin chemotherapy consisting of area under the curve, AUC = 7 Multiplication-Sign 1-2 cycles. Two-dimensional radiotherapy based on bony anatomy is a simple and effective treatment for Stage IIA or IIB testicular seminoma. Centers with expertise in vascular and nodal anatomy may consider use of anteroposterior-posteroanterior fields based on three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy instead. For modified dog-leg fields delivering 20 Gy in 10 fractions, clinical studies support placement of the inferior border at the top of the acetabulum. Clinical and nodal mapping studies support placement of the superior border of all radiotherapy fields at the top of the T12 vertebral body. For Stage IIA and IIB patients, an anteroposterior-posteroanterior boost is then delivered to the adenopathy with a 2-cm margin to the block edge. The boost dose consists of 10 Gy in 5 fractions for Stage IIA and 16 Gy in 8 fractions for Stage IIB. Alternatively, bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin chemotherapy for 3 cycles or etoposide and cisplatin chemotherapy for 4 cycles may be delivered to Stage IIA or IIB patients (e.g., if they have a horseshoe kidney, inflammatory bowel disease, or a history of radiotherapy).

  1. The impact of prostate gland dimension in genitourinary toxicity after definitive prostate cancer treatment with moderate hypofractionation and volumetric modulated arc radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, R; Fersino, S; Fiorentino, A; Ricchetti, F; Giaj Levra, N; Di Paola, G; Sicignano, G; Naccarato, S; Ruggieri, R; Alongi, F

    2016-03-01

    To analyze clinical-dosimetric predictors of genitourinary (GU) toxicity in a cohort of prostate cancer (PC) patients treated with moderate hypofractionation and simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique. 60 patients were selected. Patients were stratified into low (43 %), intermediate (30 %) and high-risk (27 %) groups. Low-risk patients received 73.5 Gy to PTV1; intermediate-risk received 73.5 Gy to PTV1 and 60 Gy to PTV2; high-risk received 73.5 Gy to PTV1, 60 Gy to PTV2, and 54 Gy to PTV3. All patients were treated in 30 fractions. Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) was prescribed upfront in intermediate and high-risk categories. Toxicity was scored according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0 scoring system. Median follow-up was 30 months (range 16-36 months). GU acute toxicity was recorded as followS: G0 = 16/60 (27 %), G1 = 18/60 (30 %); G2 = 26/60 (43 %). GU late toxicity was recorded as follows: G0 = 20/60 (34 %); G1 = 29/60 (48 %); G2 = 11/56 (18 %). The risk of acute G2 GU toxicity was three times higher for prostate volume ≥80 cc. In 60 % of the patients with a prostate volume ≥80 cc, the first 3 weeks are at particular risk for toxicity onset. In the late setting, no statistical significance was found between GU toxicity and prostate gland dimension. Prostate volume ≥80 cc resulted a predictive factor of acute G2 GU toxicity, in moderate hypofractionation and volumetric modulated arc radiation therapy for definitive PC.

  2. Post Pelvic Radiotherapy Bony Changes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huh, Seung Jae [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-03-15

    There has been recent interest in radiation-induced bone injury in clinical conditions, especially for pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF). A PIF is caused by the effect of normal or physiological stress on bone with demineralization and decreased elastic resistance. Pelvic radiotherapy (RT) can also contribute to the development of a PIF. A PIF has been regarded as a rare complication with the use of megavoltage equipment. However, recent studies have reported the incidence of PIFs as 8.2{approx}20% after pelvic RT in gynecological patients, an incidence that was higher than previously believed. The importance of understanding a PIF lies in the potential for misdiagnosis as a bony metastasis. If patients complain of pelvic pain after whole-pelvis radiation therapy, the presence of a PIF must be considered in the differential diagnosis. The use of multibeam arrangements and conformal RT to reduce the volume and dose of irradiated pelvic bone can be helpful to minimize the risk of fracture. In addition to a PIF, osteonecrosis and avascular necrosis of the femoral head can develop after radiation therapy. Osteoradionecrosis of the pelvic bone is a clinical diagnostic challenge that must be differentiated from an osseous metastasis. A post-radiation bone sarcoma can result as a long-term sequela of pelvic irradiation for uterine cervical cancer.

  3. Radiotherapy for the vulvar cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirota, Saeko; Soejima, Toshinori; Motohara, Tomofumi (Hyogo Medical Center for Adults, Akashi (Japan)) (and others)

    1993-03-01

    Fifteen patients who had primary vulvar cancer treated with radiotherapy as an initial treatment at Hyogo Medical Center for Adults and Hyogo Cancer Center from January 1971 to December 1990 are presented. Two patients were stage 0, one stage I, three stage II and nine stage III. Nine patients received electron irradiation with or without interstitial irradiation and intracavitary vaginal irradiation. Five patients received megavoltage X-ray irradiation using AP/PA parallel opposed fields including the pelvic nodes and perineum followed by boost irradiation of electrons, interstitial irradiation and intracavitary vaginal irradiation. The total dose delivered to the primary tumor ranged from 50 to 100 Gy (73 Gy on average). The actuarial 5-year survival rate of the patients was 43.6%. Complete regression (CR) was achieved in 60% of the patients. However, CR was not achieved in any of five patients with palpable inguinal nodes. In contrast, all the patients who had tumors of less than 2 cm in diameter achieved CR. Five of nine CR cases relapsed. First sites of failure were vagina, groin and vulvar region. Recurrence occurred more than four years after treatment in three cases. Necrosis occurred in five of nine CR cases. (author).

  4. Image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy for patients with vestibular schwannoma. A clinical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badakhshi, H.; Muellner, S.; Budach, V. [Charite School of Medicine and University Hospital of Berlin, Departments for Radiation Oncology, Berlin (Germany); Wiener, E. [School of Medicine and University Hospital of Berlin, Institute for Neuroradiology, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-06-15

    Local tumor control and functional outcome after linac-based stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT) for vestibular schwannoma (VS) were assessed. In all, 250 patients with VS were treated: 190 patients with tumors < 2 cm diameter underwent SRS and 60 patients with tumors >2 to 3.5 cm underwent FSRT. Dose prescription for all cases with SRS (n = 190, 76 %) was 13.5 Gy. For FSRT, mainly two hypofractionated schedules (n = 60, 24 %) with either 7 fractions of 5 Gy (total dose: 35 Gy; n = 35) or 11 fractions of 3.8 Gy (total dose: 41.8 Gy; n = 16) were used. The primary endpoint was local tumor control. Secondary endpoints were symptomatic control and morbidity. The median follow-up was 33.8 months. The 3-year local tumor control was 88.9 %. Local control for SRS and FSRT was 88 and 92 %, respectively. For FSRT with 35 and 41.8 Gy, local control was 90 and 100 %, respectively. There were no acute reactions exceeding grade I. In 61 cases (24.4 % of the entire cohort), trigeminal neuralgia was reported prior to treatment. At last follow-up, 16.3 % (10/61) of those patients reported relief of pain. Regarding facial nerve dysfunction, 45 patients (18 %) presented with symptoms prior to RT. At the last follow-up, 13.3% (6/45) of those patients reported a relief of dysesthesia. Using SRS to treat small VS results in good local control rates. FSRT for larger lesions also seems effective. Severe treatment-related complications are not frequent. Therefore, image-guided stereotactic radiotherapy is an appropriate alternative to microsurgery for patients with VS. (orig.) [German] Wir analysierten die lokale Kontrolle und die funktionellen Verlaeufe bei Patienten mit einem Vestibularisschwannom (VS), die sich einer linacbasierten stereotaktischen Radiochirurgie (SRS) oder einer fraktionierten stereotaktischen Radiotherapie (FSRT) unterzogen. Zwischen 1998 und 2008 wurden 250 Patienten mit einem VS behandelt. In dieser Kohorte wurden 190

  5. Review of the curative role of radiotherapy in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damstrup, L; Poulsen, H S

    1994-09-01

    The present paper is a comprehensive review of available data concerning the role of radiotherapy as an intended curative treatment in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCL). The following issues are reviewed (1) optimal dose, (2) optimal fractionation, (3) optimal treatment planning, (4) clinical results in terms of single treatment and combined treatment with either surgery or chemotherapy. In resectable NSCLC high dose radiotherapy to small localized tumours gives a 5-year survival rate of 7-38%. It is concluded that this treatment modality is appropriate for certain selected patients who refuse to have surgery, who have medical contradications for surgery, or who are of old age. It is discussed whether the treatment should be split course, continuous, hypo-og hyperfraction. A total dose of 55 Gy must be given. CT scanning should be mandatory for optimal planning and therapy. The literature does not give a conclusive answer to whether preoperative or postoperative radiotherapy is indicated. The data indicate that patients with Stage III NSCLC will benefit from a combined treatment modality in terms of chemotherapy based on high dose cisplatinum and radiotherapy. The main conclusion of the review is that many areas with randomized controlled trials are needed in order to answer the critical issue of the role of radiotherapy in the treatment of NSCLS.

  6. The evaluation of composite dose using deformable image registration in adaptive radiotherapy for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Chul Hwan; Ko, Seong Jin; Kim, Chang Soo; Kim, Jung Hoon; Kim, Dong Hyun; Choi, Seok Yoon; Ye, Soo Young; Kang, Se Sik [Dept. of Radiological Science, College of Health Sciences, Catholic University of Pusan, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    In adaptive radiotherapy(ART), generated composite dose of surrounding normal tissue on overall treatment course which is using deformable image registration from multistage images. Also, compared with doses summed by each treatment plan and clinical significance is considered. From the first of May, 2011 to the last of July, 2012. Patients who were given treatment and had the head and neck cancer with 3-dimension conformal radiotherapy or intensity modulated radiotherapy, those who were carried out adaptive radiotherapy cause of tumor shrinkage and weight loss. Generated composite dose of surrounding normal tissue using deformable image registration was been possible, statistically significant difference was showed to mandible(48.95±3.89 vs 49.10±3.55 Gy), oral cavity(36.93±4.03 vs 38.97±5.08 Gy), parotid gland(35.71±6.22 vs 36.12±6.70 Gy) and temporomandibular joint(18.41±9.60 vs 20.13±10.42 Gy) compared with doses summed by each treatment plan. The results of this study show significant difference between composite dose by deformable image registration and doses summed by each treatment plan, composite dose by deformable image registration may generate more exact evaluation to surrounding normal tissue in adaptive radiotherapy.

  7. Value of intraoperative radiotherapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferenschild, Floris T. J.; Vermaas, Maarten; Nuyttens, Joost J. M. E.; Graveland, Wilfried J.; Marinelli, Andreas W. K. S.; van der Sijp, Joost R.; Wiggers, Theo; Verhoef, Cornelis; Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; de Wilt, Johannes H. W.

    PURPOSE: This study was designed to analyze the results of a multimodality treatment using preoperative radiotherapy, followed by surgery and intraoperative radiotherapy in patients with primary locally advanced rectal cancer. METHODS: Between 1987 and 2002, 123 patients with initial unresectable

  8. Technical Note: DIRART – A software suite for deformable image registration and adaptive radiotherapy research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Deshan; Brame, Scott; El Naqa, Issam; Aditya, Apte; Wu, Yu; Murty Goddu, S.; Mutic, Sasa; Deasy, Joseph O.; Low, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Recent years have witnessed tremendous progress in image guide radiotherapy technology and a growing interest in the possibilities for adapting treatment planning and delivery over the course of treatment. One obstacle faced by the research community has been the lack of a comprehensive open-source software toolkit dedicated for adaptive radiotherapy (ART). To address this need, the authors have developed a software suite called the Deformable Image Registration and Adaptive Radiotherapy Toolkit (DIRART). Methods:DIRART is an open-source toolkit developed in MATLAB. It is designed in an object-oriented style with focus on user-friendliness, features, and flexibility. It contains four classes of DIR algorithms, including the newer inverse consistency algorithms to provide consistent displacement vector field in both directions. It also contains common ART functions, an integrated graphical user interface, a variety of visualization and image-processing features, dose metric analysis functions, and interface routines. These interface routines make DIRART a powerful complement to the Computational Environment for Radiotherapy Research (CERR) and popular image-processing toolkits such as ITK. Results: DIRART provides a set of image processing∕registration algorithms and postprocessing functions to facilitate the development and testing of DIR algorithms. It also offers a good amount of options for DIR results visualization, evaluation, and validation. Conclusions: By exchanging data with treatment planning systems via DICOM-RT files and CERR, and by bringing image registration algorithms closer to radiotherapy applications, DIRART is potentially a convenient and flexible platform that may facilitate ART and DIR research. PMID:21361176

  9. In vivo dosimetry in UK external beam radiotherapy: current and future usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Niall D; Graveling, Michael; Hansen, Vibeke N; Brownsword, Kevin; Morgan, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    Towards Safer Radiotherapy recommended that radiotherapy (RT) centres should have protocols in place for in vivo dosimetry (IVD) monitoring at the beginning of patient treatment courses (Donaldson S. Towards safer radiotherapy. R Coll Radiol 2008). This report determines IVD implementation in the UK in 2014, the methods used and makes recommendations on future use. Evidence from peer-reviewed journals was used in conjunction with the first survey of UK RT centre IVD practice since the publication of Towards Safer Radiotherapy. In March 2014, profession-specific questionnaires were sent to radiographer, clinical oncologist and physics staff groups in each of the 66 UK RT centres. Response rates from each group were 74%, 45% and 74%, respectively. 73% of RT centres indicated that they performed IVD. Diodes are the most popular IVD device. Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) is still in use in a number of centres but not as a sole modality, being used in conjunction with diodes and/or electronic portal imaging device (EPID). The use of EPID dosimetry is increasing and is considered of most potential value for both geometric and dosimetric verification. Owing to technological advances, such as electronic data transfer, independent monitor unit checking and daily image-guided radiotherapy, the overall risk of adverse treatment events in RT has been substantially reduced. However, the use of IVD may prevent a serious radiation incident. Point dose IVD is not considered suited to the requirements of verifying advanced RT techniques, leaving EPID dosimetry as the current modality likely to be developed as a future standard. Advances in knowledge: An updated perspective on UK IVD use and provision of professional guidelines for future implementation.

  10. Needs and financing of radiotherapy in France and Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Defourny, Noémie; Lievens, Yolande

    2016-01-01

    Access to high-quality and safe radiotherapy is a prerequisite to assure optimal oncology care in a multi-disciplinary environment. In view of supporting long-term radiotherapy planning, actual and predicted radiotherapy needs should be put in context of the nowadays' available resources. The present article reviews the existing data on radiotherapy resources and needs, along with the prevailing reimbursement systems in the different European countries, with a specific emphasis on France. It ...

  11. Clinical development of new drug–radiotherapy combinations

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Ricky A.; Plummer, Ruth; Stock, Julie K.; Greenhalgh, Tessa A.; Ataman, Ozlem; Kelly, Stephen; Clay, Robert; Adams, Richard Alexander; Baird, Richard D; Billingham, Lucinda; Brown, Sarah R; Buckland, Sean; Bulbeck, Helen; Chalmers, Anthony J.; Clack, Glen

    2016-01-01

    In countries with the best cancer outcomes, approximately 60% of patients receive radiotherapy as part of their treatment, which is one of the most cost-effective cancer treatments. Notably, around 40% of cancer cures include the use of radiotherapy, either as a single modality or combined with other treatments. Radiotherapy can provide enormous benefit to patients with cancer. In the past decade, significant technical advances, such as image-guided radiotherapy, intensity-modulated radiother...

  12. Câncer de mama estádio inicial e radioterapia: atualização Early stage breast cancer and radiotherapy: update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Nader Marta

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available O câncer de mama é a neoplasia maligna mais frequente entre as mulheres. A escolha terapêutica depende do estádio clínico da doença, das características anatomopatológicas, idade, entre outros. O objetivo do presente estudo é apresentar uma atualização dos conceitos e definições da radioterapia (RT no tratamento conservador do câncer de mama estádio inicial, enfatizando as indicações, contraindicações, dose e fracionamento da RT (esquema clássico, hipofracionado e irradiação parcial da mama, RT adjuvante no carcinoma ductal in situ (CDIS, irradiação das cadeias linfonodais e relação da RT com preditores moleculares de recorrência. Foram utilizadas as bases de dados MEDLINE, SciELO e Cochrane para a seleção dos principais artigos disponíveis sobre a temática proposta. A RT adjuvante tem um papel definido na abordagem das pacientes com câncer da mama submetidas à terapia cirúrgica conservadora. Em pacientes selecionadas, podem-se empregar esquemas de RT hipofracionada ou irradiação parcial das mamas. Todas as pacientes com CDIS devem receber RT adjuvante. Não se sabe a correlação do papel da RT com preditores moleculares de recorrência local e sistêmica.Breast cancer (BC is the most common malignancy among women. Therapeutic options are based on disease staging, histopathological characteristics, age, and others. The objective of the present study is to carry out an update of the concepts and definitions of radiotherapy (RT in conservative treatment of early-stage breast cancer, with emphasis on indications, contraindications, RT dose fractionation schedules (classic, hypofractionated and partial breast irradiation, adjuvant RT in ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS and molecular predictors of recurrence. MEDLINE, SciELO and Cochrane databases were used for article selection. Adjuvant RT is indicated for patients with BC who underwent conservative breast surgery. In selected patients, hypofractionated or partial

  13. The Erlangen Dose Optimization Trial for radiotherapy of benign painful shoulder syndrome. Long-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ott, O.J.; Hertel, S.; Gaipl, U.S.; Frey, B.; Schmidt, M.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-04-15

    To evaluate the long-term efficacy of pain reduction by two dose-fractionation schedules for radiotherapy of painful shoulder syndrome. Between February 2006 and February 2010, 312 evaluable patients were recruited for this prospective trial. All patients received low-dose orthovoltage radiotherapy. One course consisted of 6 fractions in 3 weeks. In the case of insufficient pain remission after 6 weeks, a second course was administered. Patients were randomly assigned to one of two groups to receive single doses of either 0.5 or 1.0 Gy. Endpoint was pain reduction. Pain was measured before radiotherapy, as well as immediately after (early response), 6 weeks after (delayed response) and approximately 3 years after (long-term response) completion of radiotherapy using a questionnaire-based visual analogue scale (VAS) and a comprehensive pain score (CPS). Median follow-up was 35 months (range 11-57). The overall early, delayed and long-term response rates for all patients were 83, 85 and 82%, respectively. The mean VAS scores before treatment and those for early, delayed and long-term response in the 0.5- and 1.0-Gy groups were 56.8±23.7 and 53.2±21.8 (p=0.16); 38.2±36.1 and 34.0±24.5 (p=0.19); 33.0±27.2 and 23.7±22.7 (p=0.04) and 27.9±25.8 and 32.1±26.9 (p=0.25), respectively. The mean CPS values before treatment and those for early, delayed and long-term response were 9.7±3.0 and 9.5±2.7 (p=0.31); 6.1±3.6 and 5.4±3.6 (p=0.10); 5.3±3.7 and 4.1±3.7 (p=0.05) and 4.0±3.9 and 5.3±4.4 (p=0.05), respectively. No significant differences in the quality of the long-term response were found between the 0.5- and 1.0-Gy arms (p=0.28). Radiotherapy is an effective treatment for the management of benign painful shoulder syndrome. For radiation protection reasons, the dose for a radiotherapy series should not exceed 3.0 Gy. (orig.)

  14. Radiotherapy-induced reactivation of neurotrophic human herpes viruses: Overview and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Fort, Marigdalia K; Zeng, Jianying; Feily, Amir; Ramirez-Pacheco, Luis A; Jenrette, Joseph M; Mayhew, David L; Syed, Talal; Cooper, S Lewis; Linden, Craig; Graybill, Witney S; French, Lars E; Lange, Christopher S

    2018-01-01

    Infection by Human Herpes Viruses (HHV) types 1-3, are prevalent throughout the world. It is known that radiotherapy can reactivate HHVs, but it is unclear how and to what extent reactivations can interact with or affect radiotherapeutic efficacy, patient outcomes and mortality risk. Herein, we aim to summarize what is known about Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV)-1,2 and Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV) pathophysiology as it relates to tumor biology, radiotherapy, chemo-radiotherapy, diagnosis and management so as to optimize cancer treatment in the setting of active HHV infection. Our secondary aim is to emphasize the need for further research to elucidate the potential adverse effects of active HHV infection in irradiated tumor tissue and to design optimal management strategies to incorporate into cancer management guidelines. The literature regarding herpetic infection, herpetic reactivation, and recurrence occurring during radiotherapy and that regarding treatment guidelines for herpetic infections are reviewed. We aim to provide the oncologist with a reference for the infectious dangers of herpetic reactivation in patients under their care and well established methods for prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of such infections. Pain management is also considered. In the radiotherapeutic setting, serologic assays for HSV-1 and HSV-2 are feasible and can alert the clinician to patients at risk for viral reactivation. RT-PCR is specific in identifying the exact viral culprit and is the preferred diagnostic method to measure interventional efficacy. It can also differentiate between herpetic infection and radionecrosis. The MicroTrak ® HSV1/HSV2/VZV staining kit has high sensitivity and specificity in acute lesions, is also the most rapid means to confirm diagnosis. Herpetic reactivation and recurrences during radiotherapy can cause interruptions, cessations, or prolongations of the radiotherapeutic course, thus decreasing the biologically effective dose, to sub

  15. Assessment of post-radiotherapy salivary glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, S C H; Wu, V W C; Kwong, D L W; Ying, M T C

    2011-01-01

    Salivary glands are usually irradiated during radiotherapy for head and neck cancers, which can lead to radiation-induced damage. Radiation-induced xerostomia (oral dryness) is the most common post-radiotherapy complication for head and neck cancer patients and can reduce the patient’s quality of life. Accurate and efficient salivary gland assessment methods provide a better understanding of the cause and degree of xerostomia, and may help in patient management. At present, there are different methods for the assessment of salivary gland hypofunction; however, none of them are considered to be standard procedure. This article reviews the value of common methods in the assessment of post-radiotherapy salivary glands. PMID:21511748

  16. Track structure modelling for ion radiotherapy

    CERN Document Server

    Korcyl, Marta

    2014-01-01

    In its broadest terms, doctoral dissertation entitled "Track structure modelling for ion radiotherapy" is part of the supporting research background in the development of the ambitious proton radiotherapy project currently under way at the Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN in Krak\\'ow. Another broad motivation was the desire to become directly involved in research on a topical and challenging subject of possibly developing a therapy planning system for carbon beam radiotherapy, based in its radiobiological part on the Track Structure model developed by prof. Robert Katz over 50 years ago. Thus, the general aim of this work was, firstly, to recapitulate the Track Structure model and to propose an updated and complete formulation of this model by incorporating advances made by several authors who had contributed to its development in the past. Secondly, the updated and amended (if necessary) formulation of the model was presented in a form applicable for use in computer codes which would constitute the "radiobio...

  17. Pelvic radiotherapy and sexual dysfunction in women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Tine; Froeding, Ligita Paskeviciute

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: During the past decade there has been considerable progress in developing new radiation methods for cancer treatment. Pelvic radiotherapy constitutes the primary or (neo) adjuvant treatment of many pelvic cancers e.g., locally advanced cervical and rectal cancer. There is an increasing...... of life (QOL) issues; sexual functioning has proved to be one of the most important aspects of concern in long-term survivors. METHODS: An updated literature search in PubMed was performed on pelvic radiotherapy and female sexual functioning/dysfunction. Studies on gynaecological, urological...... and gastrointestinal cancers were included. The focus was on the period from 2010 to 2014, on studies using PROs, on potential randomized controlled trials (RCTs) where female sexual dysfunction (FSD) at least constituted a secondary outcome, and on studies reporting from modern radiotherapy modalities. RESULTS...

  18. Experience with carbon ion radiotherapy at GSI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaekel, O. [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy (E040), German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: o.jaekel@dkfz.de; Schulz-Ertner, D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Karger, C.P. [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy (E040), German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Heeg, P. [Division of Medical Physics in Radiation Therapy (E040), German Cancer Research Center, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    At GSI, a radiotherapy facility was established using beam scanning and active energy variation. Between December 1997 and April 2004, 220 patients have been treated at this facility with carbon ions. Most patients are treated for chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the base of skull, using a dose of 60 Gye (Gray equivalent) in 20 fractions. Carbon ion therapy is also offered in a combination with conventional radiotherapy for a number of other tumors (adenoidcystic carcinoma, chordoma of the cervical spine and sacrum, atypical menningeoma). The patients treated for skull base tumors showed an overall local control rate after two years of 90%. The overall treatment toxicity was mild. This shows that carbon ion radiotherapy can safely be applied using a scanned beam and encouraged the Heidelberg university hospital to build a hospital based facility for ion therapy.

  19. Experience with carbon ion radiotherapy at GSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäkel, O.; Schulz-Ertner, D.; Karger, C. P.; Heeg, P.; Debus, J.

    2005-12-01

    At GSI, a radiotherapy facility was established using beam scanning and active energy variation. Between December 1997 and April 2004, 220 patients have been treated at this facility with carbon ions. Most patients are treated for chordoma and chondrosarcoma of the base of skull, using a dose of 60 Gye (Gray equivalent) in 20 fractions. Carbon ion therapy is also offered in a combination with conventional radiotherapy for a number of other tumors (adenoidcystic carcinoma, chordoma of the cervical spine and sacrum, atypical menningeoma). The patients treated for skull base tumors showed an overall local control rate after two years of 90%. The overall treatment toxicity was mild. This shows that carbon ion radiotherapy can safely be applied using a scanned beam and encouraged the Heidelberg university hospital to build a hospital based facility for ion therapy.

  20. Growth laws in cancer: implications for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castorina, P; Deisboeck, T S; Gabriele, P; Guiot, C

    2007-09-01

    Comparing the conventional Gompertz tumor growth law (GL) with the "Universal" law (UL), which has recently been proposed and applied to cancer, we have investigated the implications of the growth laws for various radiotherapy regimens. According to the GL, the surviving tumor cell fraction could be reduced ad libitum, independent of the initial tumor mass, simply by increasing the number of treatments. In contrast, if tumor growth dynamics follows the Universal scaling law, there is a lower limit of the surviving fraction that cannot be reduced further regardless of the total number of treatments. This finding can explain the so-called tumor size effect and re-emphasizes the importance of early diagnosis because it implies that radiotherapy may be successful provided that the tumor mass at treatment onset is rather small. Taken together with our previous work, the implications of these findings include revisiting standard radiotherapy regimens and treatment protocols overall.

  1. Radiotherapy versus combined modality in early stages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Specht, L.; Carde, P.; Mauch, P.

    1992-01-01

    metaanalysis of these trials indicate that we still do not definitively know whether or not the addition of prophylactic chemotherapy up front improves survival. Arguments in favour of the addition of chemotherapy up front are: that laparotomy may be avoided, that radiation fields and doses may perhaps......In early stage Hodgkin's disease the optimal choice of treatment for the individual patient is still an unresolved issue. So far, twenty-two randomized trials of radiotherapy alone versus radiotherapy plus combination chemotherapy have been carried out worldwide. The preliminary results of a global...... be reduced, and that the stress of experiencing a relapse is avoided in many patients. The major argument against the use of chemotherapy up front is: that by careful staging and selection of patients and by careful radiotherapy techniques the number of patients exposed to potentially toxic chemotherapy may...

  2. Randomised phase I/II study to evaluate carbon ion radiotherapy versus fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with recurrent or progressive gliomas: the CINDERELLA trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Stephanie E; Burkholder, Iris; Edler, Lutz; Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Jäkel, Oliver; Haberer, Thomas; Haselmann, Renate; Unterberg, Andreas; Wick, Wolfgang; Debus, Jürgen

    2010-10-06

    Treatment of patients with recurrent glioma includes neurosurgical resection, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. In most cases, a full course of radiotherapy has been applied after primary diagnosis, therefore application of re-irradiation has to be applied cauteously. With modern precision photon techniques such as fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), a second course of radiotherapy is safe and effective and leads to survival times of 22, 16 and 8 months for recurrent WHO grade II, III and IV gliomas.Carbon ions offer physical and biological characteristics. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE), which can be calculated between 2 and 5 depending on the GBM cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Protons, however, offer an RBE which is comparable to photons.First Japanese Data on the evaluation of carbon ion radiation therapy for the treatment of primary high-grade gliomas showed promising results in a small and heterogeneous patient collective. In the current Phase I/II-CINDERELLA-trial re-irradiation using carbon ions will be compared to FSRT applied to the area of contrast enhancement representing high-grade tumor areas in patients with recurrent gliomas. Within the Phase I Part of the trial, the Recommended Dose (RD) of carbon ion radiotherapy will be determined in a dose escalation scheme. In the subsequent randomized Phase II part, the RD will be evaluated in the experimental arm, compared to the standard arm, FSRT with a total dose of 36 Gy in single doses of 2 Gy.Primary endpoint of the Phase I part is toxicity. Primary endpoint of the randomized part II is survival after re-irradiation at 12 months, secondary endpoint is progression-free survival. The Cinderella trial is the first study to evaluate carbon ion

  3. Randomised phase I/II study to evaluate carbon ion radiotherapy versus fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy in patients with recurrent or progressive gliomas: The CINDERELLA trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haselmann Renate

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment of patients with recurrent glioma includes neurosurgical resection, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy. In most cases, a full course of radiotherapy has been applied after primary diagnosis, therefore application of re-irradiation has to be applied cauteously. With modern precision photon techniques such as fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT, a second course of radiotherapy is safe and effective and leads to survival times of 22, 16 and 8 months for recurrent WHO grade II, III and IV gliomas. Carbon ions offer physical and biological characteristics. Due to their inverted dose profile and the high local dose deposition within the Bragg peak precise dose application and sparing of normal tissue is possible. Moreover, in comparison to photons, carbon ions offer an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE, which can be calculated between 2 and 5 depending on the GBM cell line as well as the endpoint analyzed. Protons, however, offer an RBE which is comparable to photons. First Japanese Data on the evaluation of carbon ion radiation therapy for the treatment of primary high-grade gliomas showed promising results in a small and heterogeneous patient collective. Methods Design In the current Phase I/II-CINDERELLA-trial re-irradiation using carbon ions will be compared to FSRT applied to the area of contrast enhancement representing high-grade tumor areas in patients with recurrent gliomas. Within the Phase I Part of the trial, the Recommended Dose (RD of carbon ion radiotherapy will be determined in a dose escalation scheme. In the subsequent randomized Phase II part, the RD will be evaluated in the experimental arm, compared to the standard arm, FSRT with a total dose of 36 Gy in single doses of 2 Gy. Primary endpoint of the Phase I part is toxicity. Primary endpoint of the randomized part II is survival after re-irradiation at 12 months, secondary endpoint is progression-free survival. Discussion The

  4. Prolonged impact of chemotherapy on fatigue in breast cancer survivors: a longitudinal comparison with radiotherapy-treated breast cancer survivors and noncancer controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedendorp, M.M.; Andrykowski, M.A.; Donovan, K.A.; Jim, H.S.; Phillips, K.M.; Small, B.J.; Laronga, C.; Jacobsen, P.B.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study, the authors examined the influence of prior treatment on the course of fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Patients who received chemotherapy were expected to have greater fatigue than patients who received radiotherapy and noncancer controls 6 months after the completion

  5. Prolonged impact of chemotherapy on fatigue in breast cancer survivors : a longitudinal comparison with radiotherapy-treated breast cancer survivors and noncancer controls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedendorp, Martine M; Andrykowski, Michael A; Donovan, Kristine A; Jim, Heather S; Phillips, Kristin M; Small, Brent J; Laronga, Christine; Jacobsen, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this study, the authors examined the influence of prior treatment on the course of fatigue in breast cancer survivors. Patients who received chemotherapy were expected to have greater fatigue than patients who received radiotherapy and noncancer controls 6 months after the completion

  6. Pinnacle Scripts: Clearing automated treatment in external radiotherapy after unscheduled interruptions; Scripts en Pinnacle3: Compensacion automatizada ena tratamientos en radioterapia externa tras interrupciones no programadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jover Perez, C. I.; Alaman Sanchez, C.; Osorio Ceballos, J. L.; Real Nunez, R. del; Almansa Lopez, J.

    2013-07-01

    The stops not foreseen during the usual course of radiotherapy treatment affect the quality of the same. The calculation of dosage compensation is the tool that have physicists and radiation therapists in order to mitigate the effect of these disruptions and achieve an effective treatment. (Author)

  7. [Radiotherapy in node-positive prostate cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottke, D; Bartkowiak, D; Bolenz, C; Wiegel, T

    2016-03-01

    There are numerous randomized trials to guide the management of patients with localized (and metastatic) prostate cancer, but only a few (mostly retrospective) studies have specifically addressed node-positive patients. Therefore, there is uncertainty regarding optimal treatment in this situation. Current guidelines recommend long-term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) alone or radiotherapy plus long-term ADT as treatment options. This overview summarizes the existing literature on the use of radiotherapy for node-positive prostate cancer as definitive treatment and as adjuvant or salvage therapy after radical prostatectomy. In this context, we also discuss several PET tracers in the imaging evaluation of patients with biochemical recurrence of prostate cancer after radical prostatectomy. As for definitive treatment, retrospective studies suggest that ADT plus radiotherapy improves overall survival compared with ADT alone. These studies also consistently demonstrated that many patients with node-positive prostate cancer can achieve long-term survival - and are likely curable - with aggressive therapy. The beneficial impact of adjuvant radiotherapy on survival in patients with pN1 prostate cancer seems to be highly influenced by tumor characteristics. Men with ≤ 2 positive lymph nodes in the presence of intermediate- to high-grade disease, or positive margins, and those with 3 or 4 positive lymph nodes are the ideal candidates for adjuvant radiotherapy (plus long-term ADT) after surgery. There is a need for randomized trials to further examine the potential role of radiotherapy as either definitive or adjuvant treatment, for patients with node-positive prostate cancer.

  8. Radiotherapy in the treatment of solitary plasmacytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyothirmayi, R; Gangadharan, V P; Nair, M K; Rajan, B

    1997-05-01

    Solitary plasmacytoma of bone (SPB) and extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) are rare. High local control rates are reported with radiotherapy, although the optimal dose and extent of radiotherapy portals remains controversial