WorldWideScience

Sample records for hypocapnic alkalosis slows

  1. The Effects of Bupivacaine and Ropivacaine on Baroreflex Sensitivity With or Without Respiratory Acidosis and Alkalosis in Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Watanabe, Yukinaga; Dohi, Shuji; Iida, Hiroki; Ishiyama, Tadahiko

    1997-01-01

    ...) depression that could be enhanced in the presence of respiratory acidosis.We examined a potential suppression of baroreflex function with bupivacaine and ropivacaine during hypercapnic acidosis or hypocapnic alkalosis...

  2. Respiratory alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, G T; Vaziri, N D; Sassoon, C S

    2001-04-01

    Respiratory alkalosis is an extremely common and complicated problem affecting virtually every organ system in the body. This article reviews the various facets of this interesting problem. Respiratory alkalosis produces multiple metabolic abnormalities, from changes in potassium, phosphate, and calcium, to the development of a mild lactic acidosis. Renal handling of the above ions is also affected. The etiologies may be related to pulmonary or extrapulmonary disorders. Hyperventilation syndrome is a common etiology of respiratory alkalosis in the emergency department setting and is a diagnosis by exclusion. There are many cardiac effects of respiratory alkalosis, such as tachycardia, ventricular and atrial arrhythmias, and ischemic and nonischemic chest pain. In the lungs, vasodilation occurs, and in the gastrointestinal system there are changes in perfusion, motility, and electrolyte handling. Therapeutically, respiratory alkalosis is used for treatment of elevated intracranial pressure. Correction of a respiratory alkalosis is best performed by correcting the underlying etiology.

  3. Human erythropoietin response to hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, and hypocapnic normoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Christensen, H; Hansen, J M

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the human erythropoietin (EPO) response to short-term hypocapnic hypoxia, its relationship to a normoxic or hypoxic increase of the haemoglobin oxygen affinity, and its suppression by the addition of CO2 to the hypoxic gas. On separate days, eight healthy male subjects were...... (10% Co2 with 10% O2) to the hypoxic gas mixture. This elicited an increased ventilation, unaltered arterial pH and haemoglobin oxygen affinity, a lower degree of hypoxia than during hypocapnic hypoxia, and no significant changes in serum-EPO (ANOVA P > 0.05). Hypocapnic normoxia, produced...... by hyperventilation of room air, elicited a normoxic increase in the haemoglobin oxygen affinity without changing serum-EPO. Among the measured blood gas and acid-base parameters, only the partial pressures of oxygen in arterial blood during hypocapnic hypoxia were related to the peak values of serum-EPO (r = -0...

  4. Human erythropoietin response to hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, and hypocapnic normoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Christensen, H; Hansen, J M;

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the human erythropoietin (EPO) response to short-term hypocapnic hypoxia, its relationship to a normoxic or hypoxic increase of the haemoglobin oxygen affinity, and its suppression by the addition of CO2 to the hypoxic gas. On separate days, eight healthy male subjects were...... experiments were corrected for these spontaneous variations in each individual. At 2 h after ending hypocapnic hypoxia (10% O2 in nitrogen), mean serum-EPO increased by 28% [baseline 8.00 (SEM 0.84) U.l-1, post-hypoxia 10.24 (SEM 0.95) U.l-1, P = 0.005]. Normocapnic hypoxia was produced by the addition of CO2...... (10% Co2 with 10% O2) to the hypoxic gas mixture. This elicited an increased ventilation, unaltered arterial pH and haemoglobin oxygen affinity, a lower degree of hypoxia than during hypocapnic hypoxia, and no significant changes in serum-EPO (ANOVA P > 0.05). Hypocapnic normoxia, produced...

  5. Human erythropoietin response to hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, and hypocapnic normoxia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, T; Christensen, H; Hansen, J M;

    1996-01-01

    This study investigated the human erythropoietin (EPO) response to short-term hypocapnic hypoxia, its relationship to a normoxic or hypoxic increase of the haemoglobin oxygen affinity, and its suppression by the addition of CO2 to the hypoxic gas. On separate days, eight healthy male subjects were...... exposed to 2 h each of hypocapnic hypoxia, normocapnic hypoxia, hypocapnic normoxia, and normal breathing of room air (control experiment). During the control experiment, serum-EPO showed significant variations (ANOVA P = 0.047) with a 15% increase in mean values. The serum-EPO measured in the other...... experiments were corrected for these spontaneous variations in each individual. At 2 h after ending hypocapnic hypoxia (10% O2 in nitrogen), mean serum-EPO increased by 28% [baseline 8.00 (SEM 0.84) U.l-1, post-hypoxia 10.24 (SEM 0.95) U.l-1, P = 0.005]. Normocapnic hypoxia was produced by the addition of CO2...

  6. The effects of bupivacaine and ropivacaine on baroreflex sensitivity with or without respiratory acidosis and alkalosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Y; Dohi, S; Iida, H; Ishiyama, T

    1997-02-01

    Systemic toxicity of local anesthetics causes cardiac and central nervous system (CNS) depression that could be enhanced in the presence of respiratory acidosis. We examined a potential suppression of baroreflex function with bupivacaine and ropivacaine during hypercapnic acidosis or hypocapnic alkalosis. Baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) was randomly tested in rats with one of 13 conditions during intravenous administration of saline (control), bupivacaine 1, 2, or 3 mg/kg, or ropivacaine 2, 4, or 6 mg/kg. The effects of bupivacaine (3 mg/kg) or ropivacaine (6 mg/kg) on BRS were also examined during hypercapnic acidosis or hypocapnic alkalosis. The BRS was assessed using a value of delta heart rate/ delta mean arterial pressure after infusion of phenylephrine (3 micrograms/kg). Both bupivacaine and ropivacaine (at the largest dose) significantly suppressed BRS. Acute respiratory acidosis (pHa 7.24 +/- 0.04, Paco2 63 +/- 4 mm Hg) enhanced BRS. The BRS enhanced during acidosis was also suppressed with bupivacaine and ropivacaine, but less so than in the absence of acidosis. The presence of hypocapnic alkalosis (pHa 7.55 +/- 0.03, Paco2 25 +/- 2 mm Hg) did not affect BRS and reversed BRS suppression caused by both drugs. Thus, bupivacaine and ropivacaine affect neuronal control mechanisms for maintaining cardiovascular stability, and acute changes of respiration could significantly modify such suppression.

  7. Influence on cerebral blood flow of infusion of sodium bicarbonate during respiratory acidosis and alkalosis in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvidsson, S; Häggendal, E; Winsö, I

    1981-04-01

    In anaesthetized dogs, a mixed acid-base disturbance was induced by adding a pronounced metabolic alkaline to an established respiratory acidosis or alkalosis. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by the radioisotope washout method. In the hypocapnic dogs, the addition of metabolic alkalosis did not significantly change cerebral blood flow. In the hypercapnic dogs, the intravenous infusion of alkali led to a substantial reduction of cerebral blood flow, parallelled by a reduction of cerebrovenous oxygen tension. Acid-base analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) indicated an increased bicarbonate concentration. Hypercapnia is suggested to facilitate the passage of bicarbonate over the blood-brain barrier, leading to cerebral vasoconstriction by means of increased extravascular pH.

  8. Effects of hyperventilation and hypocapnic/normocapnic hypoxemia on renal function and lithium clearance in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H; Klausen, T; Fogh-Andersen, N;

    1998-01-01

    Using the renal clearance of lithium as an index of proximal tubular outflow, this study tested the hypothesis that acute hypocapnic hypoxemia decreases proximal tubular reabsorption to the same extent as hypocapnic normoxemia (hyperventilation) and that this response is blunted during normocapni...

  9. Metabolic alkalosis: pathogenesis and physiopathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Tarantino

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic alkalosis is an acid-base disorder frequently encountered in hospitalised patients, particularly those in critical conditions and is not infrequently complicated by mixed acid-base disorders. This disorder can have serious clinical consequences, especially on the cardiovascular and central nervous systems. The disorder’s gravity is partly due to the precarious nature of the defence and compensation processes the body is able to provide to combat the alteration in the blood’s pH. Metabolic alkalosis is just one, secondary component of a complex water and electrolyte balance disorder, on which the maintenance of the acid-base disorder depends. Metabolic alkalosis can be a complication of various somewhat diverse conditions and is often common in hospital settings. A multitude of pathophysiological factors contribute to maintaining the acid-base disorder: these factors influence and feed one another. As the resolution of the acid-base disorder depends on the correction of these factors, it is essential to know their exact mechanisms in order to undertake the most appropriate therapeutic action.

  10. Metformin-associated respiratory alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Sean M; Cumpston, Kirk; Lipsky, Martin S; Patel, Nirali; Leikin, Jerrold B

    2004-01-01

    We present an 84-year-old man with a history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, glaucoma, and bladder cancer who presented to the emergency department after the police found him disoriented and confused. Metformin therapy began 3 days before, and he denied any overdose or suicidal ideation. Other daily medications included glipizide, fluticasone, prednisone, aspirin, furosemide, insulin, and potassium supplements. In the emergency department, his vital signs were significant for hypertension (168/90), tachycardia (120 bpm), and Kussmaul respirations at 24 breaths per minute. Oxygen saturation was 99% on room air, and a fingerstick glucose was 307 mg/dL. He was disoriented to time and answered questions slowly. Metformin was discontinued, and by day 3, the patient's vital signs and laboratory test results normalized. He has been asymptomatic at subsequent follow-up visits. Metformin-associated lactic acidosis is a well-known phenomenon. Respiratory alkalosis may be an early adverse event induced by metformin prior to the development of lactic acidosis.

  11. Magnesium Oxide Induced Metabolic Alkalosis in Cattle

    OpenAIRE

    Ogilvie, T H; Butler, D G; Gartley, C J; Dohoo, I. R.

    1983-01-01

    A study was designed to compare the metabolic alkalosis produced in cattle from the use of an antacid (magnesium oxide) and a saline cathartic (magnesium sulphate). Six, mature, normal cattle were treated orally with a magnesium oxide (MgO) product and one week later given a comparable cathartic dose of magnesium sulphate (MgSO4).

  12. Effect of airway acidosis and alkalosis on airway vascular smooth muscle responsiveness to albuterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancado, Jose E; Mendes, Eliana S; Arana, Johana; Horvath, Gabor; Monzon, Maria E; Salathe, Matthias; Wanner, Adam

    2015-04-02

    In vitro and animal experiments have shown that the transport and signaling of β2-adrenergic agonists are pH-sensitive. Inhaled albuterol, a hydrophilic β2-adrenergic agonist, is widely used for the treatment of obstructive airway diseases. Acute exacerbations of obstructive airway diseases can be associated with changes in ventilation leading to either respiratory acidosis or alkalosis thereby affecting albuterol responsiveness in the airway. The purpose of this study was to determine if airway pH has an effect on albuterol-induced vasodilation in the airway. Ten healthy volunteers performed the following respiratory maneuvers: quiet breathing, hypocapnic hyperventilation, hypercapnic hyperventilation, and eucapnic hyperventilation (to dissociate the effect of pH from the effect of ventilation). During these breathing maneuvers, exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH and airway blood flow response to inhaled albuterol (ΔQ̇aw) were assessed. Mean ± SE EBC pH (units) and ΔQ̇aw (μl.min(-1).mL(-1)) were 6.4 ± 0.1 and 16.8 ± 1.9 during quiet breathing, 6.3 ± 0.1 and 14.5 ± 2.4 during eucapnic hyperventilation, 6.6 ± 0.2 and -0.2 ± 1.8 during hypocapnic hyperventilation (p = 0.02 and <0.01 vs. quiet breathing), and 5.9 ± 0.1 and 2.0 ± 1.5 during hypercapnic hyperventilation (p = 0.02 and <0.02 vs quiet breathing). Albuterol responsiveness in the airway as assessed by ΔQ̇aw is pH sensitive. The breathing maneuver associated with decreased and increased EBC pH both resulted in a decreased responsiveness independent of the level of ventilation. These findings suggest an attenuated response to hydrophilic β2-adrenergic agonists during airway disease exacerbations associated with changes in pH. Registered at clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01216748 .

  13. Effect of gender on the development of hypocapnic apnea/hypopnea during NREM sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X S; Shahabuddin, S; Zahn, B R; Babcock, M A; Badr, M S

    2000-07-01

    We hypothesized that a decreased susceptibility to the development of hypocapnic central apnea during non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep in women compared with men could be an explanation for the gender difference in the sleep apnea/hypopnea syndrome. We studied eight men (age 25-35 yr) and eight women in the midluteal phase of the menstrual cycle (age 21-43 yr); we repeated studies in six women during the midfollicular phase. Hypocapnia was induced via nasal mechanical ventilation for 3 min, with respiratory frequency matched to eupneic frequency. Tidal volume (VT) was increased between 110 and 200% of eupneic control. Cessation of mechanical ventilation resulted in hypocapnic central apnea or hypopnea, depending on the magnitude of hypocapnia. Nadir minute ventilation in the recovery period was plotted against the change in end-tidal PCO(2) (PET(CO(2))) per trial; minute ventilation was given a value of 0 during central apnea. The apneic threshold was defined as the x-intercept of the linear regression line. In women, induction of a central apnea required an increase in VT to 155 +/- 29% (mean +/- SD) and a reduction of PET(CO(2)) by -4.72 +/- 0.57 Torr. In men, induction of a central apnea required an increase in VT to 142 +/- 13% and a reduction of PET(CO(2)) by -3.54 +/- 0.31 Torr (P = 0.002). There was no difference in the apneic threshold between the follicular and the luteal phase in women. Premenopausal women are less susceptible to hypocapnic disfacilitation during NREM sleep than men. This effect was not explained by progesterone. Preservation of ventilatory motor output during hypocapnia may explain the gender difference in sleep apnea.

  14. Effects of endurance training on the isocapnic buffering and hypocapnic hyperventilation phases in professional cyclists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicharro, J.; Hoyos, J.; Lucia, A.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives—To evaluate the changes produced in both the isocapnic buffering and hypocapnic hyperventilation (HHV) phases of professional cyclists (n = 11) in response to endurance training, and to compare the results with those of amateur cyclists (n = 11). Methods—Each professional cyclist performed three laboratory exercise tests to exhaustion during the active rest (autumn: November), precompetition (winter: January), and competition (spring: May) periods of the sports season. Amateur cyclists only performed one exercise test during the competition period. The isocapnic buffering and HHV ranges were calculated during each test and defined as VO2 and power output (W). Results—No significant differences were found in the isocapnic buffering range in each of the periods of the sports season in professional cyclists. In contrast, there was a significant reduction in the HHV range (expressed in W) during both the competition (p<0.01) and precompetition(p<0.05) periods compared with the rest period. On the other hand, a longer HHV range (p<0.01) was observed in amateur cyclists than in professional cyclists (whether this was expressed in terms of VO2 or W). Conclusions—No change is observed in the isocapnic buffering range of professional cyclists throughout a sports season despite a considerable increase in training loads and a significant reduction in HHV range expressed in terms of power output. Key Words: training; cycling; isocapnic buffering; hypocapnic hyperventilation PMID:11131234

  15. Respiratory alkalosis in children with febrile seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchmann, Sebastian; Hauck, Sarah; Henning, Stephan; Grüters-Kieslich, Annette; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Schmitz, Dietmar; Kaila, Kai

    2011-11-01

    Febrile seizures (FS) are the most common type of convulsive events in children. FS are suggested to result from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. However, the pathophysiologic mechanisms underlying FS remain unclear. Using an animal model of experimental FS, it was demonstrated that hyperthermia causes respiratory alkalosis with consequent brain alkalosis and seizures. Here we examine the acid-base status of children who were admitted to the hospital for FS. Children who were admitted because of gastroenteritis (GE), a condition known to promote acidosis, were examined to investigate a possible protective effect of acidosis against FS. We enrolled 433 age-matched children with similar levels of fever from two groups presented to the emergency department. One group was admitted for FS (n = 213) and the other for GE (n = 220). In the FS group, the etiology of fever was respiratory tract infection (74.2%), otitis media (7%), GE (7%), tonsillitis (4.2%), scarlet fever (2.3%) chickenpox (1.4%), urinary tract infection (1.4%), postvaccination reaction (0.9%), or unidentified (1.4%). In all patients, capillary pH and blood Pco(2) were measured immediately on admission to the hospital. Respiratory alkalosis was found in children with FS (pH 7.46 ± 0.04, [mean ± standard deviation] Pco(2) 29.5 ± 5.5 mmHg), whereas a metabolic acidosis was seen in all children admitted for GE (pH 7.31 ± 0.03, Pco(2) 37.7 ± 4.3 mmHg; p seizure triggering factors, each of these patients had an alkalotic blood pH when admitted because of FS, whereas they had an acidotic pH (and no FS) when admitted because of GE (pH 7.47 ± 0.05 vs. pH 7.33 ± 0.03, p seizures when they have GE-induced fever that is associated with acidosis. The present demonstration of a close link between FS and respiratory alkalosis may pave the way for further clinical studies and attempts to design novel therapies for the treatment of FS by controlling the systemic acid-base status. Wiley

  16. Hydrochloric acid for treating metabolic alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, A; Yildirim, E; Aras, N; Ercan, F

    1989-09-01

    Six patients with severe metabolic alkalosis were treated with intravenous hydrochloric acid (HCl) infusion. HCl was given through a central venous catheter, at a concentration of 0.1 mEq per ml. At least two of the following criteria were considered for initiation of the therapy: An arterial pH of greater than 7.45, a base excess (BE) of greater than +7 mmol/L, a PaCO2 of greater than 50 mmHg. The HCl amount was calculated using the BE formula, however, two thirds was infused for avoiding excessive acid loading. Patients were monitored by the blood gases, serum electrolytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, bilirubin determinations and blood smear findings. While a significant decrease was noticed in pH and BE values, moderate changes were detected in PaCO2 due to different ventilatory status of the cases. All laboratory test results remained within normal limits and no complication was encountered. The advantage of the therapy is that less volume is needed for the correction of alkalosis, particularly in the cases requiring fluid restriction. HCl therapy, moreover, is a safe and time-saving method because of having rapid response to the treatment in the critically ill surgical patients.

  17. Metabolic alkalosis in adults with stable cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghimlas, Fahad; Faughnan, Marie E; Tullis, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    The frequency of metabolic alkalosis among adults with stable severe CF-lung disease is unknown. Retrospective chart review. Fourteen CF and 6 COPD (controls) patients were included. FEV1 was similar between the two groups. PaO2 was significantly higher in the COPD (mean ± 2 SD is 72.0 ± 6.8 mmHg,) than in the CF group (56.1 ± 4.1 mmHg). The frequency of metabolic alkalosis in CF patients (12/14, 86%) was significantly greater (p=0.04) than in the COPD group (2/6, 33%). Mixed respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis was evident in 4 CF and 1 COPD patients. Primary metabolic alkalosis was observed in 8 CF and none of the COPD patients. One COPD patient had respiratory and metabolic alkalosis. Metabolic alkalosis is more frequent in stable patients with CF lung disease than in COPD patients. This might be due to defective CFTR function with abnormal electrolyte transport within the kidney and/ or gastrointestinal tract.

  18. Effect of metabolic alkalosis on respiratory function in patients with chronic obstructive lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bear, R.; Goldstein, M.; Phillipson, E.; Ho, M.; Hammeke, M.; Feldman, R.; Handelsman, S.; Halperin, M.

    1977-01-01

    Eleven instances of a mixed acid-base disorder consisting of chronic respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis were recognized in eight patients with chronic obstructive lung disease and carbon dioxide retention. Correction of the metabolic alkalosis led to substantial improvement in blood gas values and clinical symptoms. Patients with mixed chronic respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis constitute a common subgroup of patients with chronic obstructive lung disease and carbon dioxide retention; these patients benefit from correction of the metabolic alkalosis. PMID:21028

  19. Girl with hypokaliemia and metabolic alkalosis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenja Marguč Kirn

    2013-04-01

    Conclusions: In cases of unexplained hypokalemia and metabolic alkalosis associated with a normal or low blood pressure a tubulopathy, e.g., Gitelman syndrome, must be excluded. The identification and recognition of correct diagnosis is extremely important since a proper treatment can reduce the risk of life-threatening events, e.g. arrhythmias.

  20. Brain glutamate metabolism during metabolic alkalosis and acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, R C; Hoop, B; Kazemi, H

    1992-12-01

    Glutamate modifies ventilation by altering neural excitability centrally. Metabolic acid-base perturbations may also alter cerebral glutamate metabolism locally and thus affect ventilation. Therefore, the effect of metabolic acid-base perturbations on central nervous system glutamate metabolism was studied in pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs under normal acid-base conditions and during isocapnic metabolic alkalosis and acidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid transfer rates of radiotracer [13N]ammonia and of [13N]glutamine synthesized de novo via the reaction glutamate+NH3-->glutamine in brain glia were measured during normal acid-base conditions and after 90 min of acute isocapnic metabolic alkalosis and acidosis. Cerebrospinal fluid [13N]ammonia and [13N]glutamine transfer rates decreased in metabolic acidosis. Maximal glial glutamine efflux rate jm equals 85.6 +/- 9.5 (SE) mumol.l-1 x min-1 in all animals. No difference in jm was observed in metabolic alkalosis or acidosis. Mean cerebral cortical glutamate concentration was significantly lower in acidosis [7.01 +/- 0.45 (SE) mumol/g brain tissue] and tended to be larger in alkalosis, compared with 7.97 +/- 0.89 mumol/g in normal acid-base conditions. There was a similar change in cerebral cortical gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration. Within the limits of the present method and measurements, the results suggest that acute metabolic acidosis but not alkalosis reduces glial glutamine efflux, corresponding to changes in cerebral cortical glutamate metabolism. These results suggest that glutamatergic mechanisms may contribute to central respiratory control in metabolic acidosis.

  1. Direct suppressive effect of acute metabolic and respiratory alkalosis on parathyroid hormone secretion in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Ignacio; Rodriguez, Mariano; Felsenfeld, Arnold J; Estepa, Jose Carlos; Aguilera-Tejero, Escolastico

    2003-08-01

    Acute alkalosis may directly affect PTH secretion. The effect of acute metabolic and respiratory alkalosis was studied in 20 dogs. PTH values were lower in the metabolic (5.6 +/- 0.8 pg/ml) and respiratory (1.8 +/- 0.6 pg/ml) alkalosis groups than in the control group (27 +/- 5 pg/ml). Acute alkalosis is an independent factor that decreases PTH values during normocalcemia and delays the PTH response to hypocalcemia. We recently showed that acute metabolic and respiratory acidosis stimulated PTH secretion. This study was designed to evaluate whether acute metabolic and respiratory alkalosis suppressed parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion. Three groups of 10 dogs were studied: control, acute metabolic alkalosis, and acute respiratory alkalosis. Metabolic alkalosis was induced with an infusion of sodium bicarbonate and respiratory alkalosis by hyperventilation. Calcium chloride was infused to prevent alkalosis-induced hypocalcemia during the first 60 minutes. During the next 30 minutes, disodium EDTA was infused to induce hypocalcemia and to evaluate the PTH response to hypocalcemia. Because the infusion of sodium bicarbonate resulted in hypernatremia, the effect of hypernatremia was studied in an additional group that received hypertonic saline. After 60 minutes of a normocalcemic clamp, PTH values were less (p respiratory (1.8 +/- 0.6 pg/ml) alkalosis groups than in the control group (27 +/- 5 pg/ml); the respective blood pH values were 7.61 +/- 0.01, 7.59 +/- 0.02, and 7.39 +/- 0.02. The maximal PTH response to hypocalcemia was similar among the three groups. However, the maximal PTH response was observed after a decrease in ionized calcium of 0.20 mM in the control group but not until a decrease of 0.40 mM in the metabolic and respiratory alkalosis groups. In contrast to the metabolic alkalosis group, hypernatremia (157 +/- 2 mEq/liter) in the hypertonic saline group was associated with an increased PTH value (46 +/- 4 pg/ml). Finally, the half-life of intact PTH

  2. Alkalosis and renal excretion of ammonia by rat kidney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, S

    1988-05-15

    Upon sulfate administration, UpH falls more in alkalotic rats than in controls. Alkalosis can lead to a reduction in UNH3 V at highly acidic urine. The significance of this process is doubtful at UpH ranging from about 6 to 7. At lower UpH less NH3 would be excreted, thereby less H+ would be trapped in urine and some acid would be conserved.

  3. Effects of respiratory and metabolic alkalosis and acidosis on pipecuronium neuromuscular block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biró, K

    1988-09-23

    Acute respiratory and metabolic acidosis as well as metabolic alkalosis increased (by 11, 11, 21%) whereas respiratory alkalosis antagonized (by 10%) the partial steady state block produced by pipecuronium infusion on the anterior tibialis muscle of the cat. The duration of neuromuscular block following six successive doses of pipecuronium was prolonged 1.4-fold during long-lasting metabolic alkalosis while this parameter was shortened to half of that in control cats during acidosis. Pipecuronium block could be fully antagonized by neostigmine.

  4. Pulmonary vascular responses during acute and sustained respiratory alkalosis or acidosis in intact newborn piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J B; Rehorst-Paea, L A; Hoffman, G M; Nelin, L D

    1999-12-01

    Acute alkalosis-induced pulmonary vasodilation and acidosis-induced pulmonary vasoconstriction have been well described, but responses were generally measured within 5-30 min of changing pH. In contrast, several in vitro studies have found that relatively brief periods of sustained alkalosis can enhance, and sustained acidosis can decrease, vascular reactivity. In this study of intact newborn piglets, effects of acute (20 min) and sustained (60-80 min) alkalosis or acidosis on baseline (35% O2) and hypoxic (12% O2) pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) were compared with control piglets exposed only to eucapnia. Acute alkalosis decreased hypoxic PVR, but sustained alkalosis failed to attenuate either baseline PVR or the subsequent hypoxic response. Acute acidosis did not significantly increase hypoxic PVR, but sustained acidosis markedly increased both baseline PVR and the subsequent hypoxic response. Baseline PVR was similar in all piglets after resumption of eucapnic ventilation, but the final hypoxic response was greater in piglets previously exposed to alkalosis than in controls. Thus, hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction was not attenuated during sustained alkalosis, but was accentuated during sustained acidosis and after the resumption of eucapnia in alkalosis-treated piglets. Although extrapolation of data from normal piglets to infants and children with pulmonary hypertension must be done with caution, this study suggests that sustained alkalosis may be of limited efficacy in treating acute hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and the risks of pulmonary hypertension must be considered when using ventilator strategies resulting in permissive hypercapnic acidosis.

  5. Effect of voluntary hypocapnic hyperventilation or moderate hypoxia on metabolic and heart rate responses during high-intensity intermittent exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobashi, Kohei; Fujii, Naoto; Watanabe, Kazuhito; Tsuji, Bun; Sasaki, Yosuke; Fujimoto, Tomomi; Tanigawa, Satoru; Nishiyasu, Takeshi

    2017-08-01

    To investigate the effect of voluntary hypocapnic hyperventilation or moderate hypoxia on metabolic and heart rate responses during high-intensity intermittent exercise. Ten males performed three 30-s bouts of high-intensity cycling [Ex1 and Ex2: constant-workload at 80% of the power output in the Wingate anaerobic test (WAnT), Ex3: WAnT] interspaced with 4-min recovery periods under normoxic (Control), hypocapnic or hypoxic (2500 m) conditions. Hypocapnia was developed through voluntary hyperventilation for 20 min prior to Ex1 and during each recovery period. End-tidal CO2 pressure was lower before each exercise in the hypocapnia than control trials. Oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]) was lower in the hypocapnia than control trials (822 ± 235 vs. 1645 ± 245 mL min(-1); mean ± SD) during Ex1, but not Ex2 or Ex3, without a between-trial difference in the power output during the exercises. Heart rates (HRs) during Ex1 (127 ± 8 vs. 142 ± 10 beats min(-1)) and subsequent post-exercise recovery periods were lower in the hypocapnia than control trials, without differences during or after Ex2, except at 4 min into the second recovery period. [Formula: see text] did not differ between the control and hypoxia trials throughout. These results suggest that during three 30-s bouts of high-intensity intermittent cycling, (1) hypocapnia reduces the aerobic metabolic rate with a compensatory increase in the anaerobic metabolic rate during the first but not subsequent exercises; (2) HRs during the exercise and post-exercise recovery periods are lowered by hypocapnia, but this effect is diminished with repeated exercise bouts, and (3) moderate hypoxia (2500 m) does not affect the metabolic response during exercise.

  6. Incidence, nature, and etiology of metabolic alkalosis in dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Y-S; Hopper, K; Epstein, S E

    2013-01-01

    The incidence and causes of metabolic alkalosis in dogs and cats have not been fully investigated. To describe the incidence, nature, and etiology of metabolic alkalosis in dogs and cats undergoing blood gas analysis at a veterinary teaching hospital. Dogs and cats at a veterinary medical teaching hospital. Acid-base and electrolyte results for dogs and cats measured during a 13-month period were retrospectively collected from a computer database. Only the first measured (venous or arterial) blood gas analyzed in a single hospitalization period was included. Animals with a base excess above the reference range for the species were included. A total of 1,805 dogs and cats were included. Of these, 349 (19%) were identified as having an increased standardized base excess, 319 dogs and 30 cats. The mixed acid-base disorder of metabolic alkalosis with respiratory acidosis was the most common abnormality identified in both dogs and cats. Hypokalemia and hypochloremia were more common in animals with metabolic alkalosis compared to animals without metabolic alkalosis. The 4 most commonly identified underlying diseases were respiratory disease, gastrointestinal tract obstruction, furosemide administration, and renal disease. Metabolic alkalosis was less common than metabolic acidosis in the same population of animals. Evidence of contraction alkalosis was present in many patients in this study. Hypokalemia and hypochloremia were more frequent in patients with metabolic alkalosis and suggest the importance of evaluation of acid-base status in conjunction with serum electrolyte concentrations. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  7. Chronic metabolic alkalosis: not uncommon in young children with severe cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedroli, G; Liechti-Gallati, S; Mauri, S; Birrer, P; Kraemer, R; Foletti-Jäggi, C; Bianchetti, M G

    1995-01-01

    The acid-base balance of 199 patients with cystic fibrosis, seen from 1987 through 1992 at the Bern Outpatient Clinic, were evaluated. Simple metabolic alkalosis was demonstrated in 16 and mixed metabolic alkalosis and respiratory acidosis in 9 patients. When compared with 10 patients with simple respiratory acidosis and 16 with normal hydrogen ion balance, those with simple metabolic alkalosis were significantly younger. The need for pancreatic enzymes was significantly higher and the relative underweight significantly more severe in patients with either simple or mixed metabolic alkalosis and respiratory acidosis. The results indicate the rather common occurrence of chronic metabolic alkalosis in cystic fibrosis. It is observed in young patients, in patients who need high doses of pancreatic enzymes and in the those with poor nutritional status.

  8. Acute respiratory acidosis and alkalosis – A modern quantitative interpretation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andraž Stožer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Three different approaches for assessing the acid-base status of a patient exist, i.e. the Boston, Copenhagen, and Stewart´s approach, and they employ different parameters to assess a given acid-base disturbance. Students, researchers, and clinicians are getting confused by heated debates about which of these performs best and by the fact that during their curricula, they typically get acquainted with one of the approaches only, which prevents them to understand sources employing other approaches and to critically evaluate the advantages and drawbacks of each approach. In this paper, the authors introduce and define the basic parameters characterizing each of the approaches and point out differences and similarities between them. Special attention is devoted to how the different approaches assess the degree of change in the concentration of plasma bicarbonate that occurs during primary respiratory changes; proper understanding of these is necessary to correctly interpret chronic respiratory and metabolic acid-base changes.Conclusion: During acute respiratory acidosis the concentration of bicarbonate rises and during acute respiratory alkalosis it falls, depending on the buffering strength of non-bicarbonate buffers. During acute respiratory acid-base disturbances, buffer base (employed by the Copenhagen approach, apparent and effective strong ion difference, as well as strong ion gap (employed by the Stewart approach remain unchanged; the anion gap (employed by the Boston and Copenhagen approach falls during acute respiratory acidosis and rises during acute respiratory alkalosis.

  9. Cortical GABAergic neurons are more severely impaired by alkalosis than acidosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Acid–base imbalance in various metabolic disturbances leads to human brain dysfunction. Compared with acidosis, the patients suffered from alkalosis demonstrate more severe neurological signs that are difficultly corrected. We hypothesize a causative process that the nerve cells in the brain are more vulnerable to alkalosis than acidosis. Methods The vulnerability of GABAergic neurons to alkalosis versus acidosis was compared by analyzing their functional changes in response to the extracellular high pH and low pH. The neuronal and synaptic functions were recorded by whole-cell recordings in the cortical slices. Results The elevation or attenuation of extracellular pH impaired these GABAergic neurons in terms of their capability to produce spikes, their responsiveness to excitatory synaptic inputs and their outputs via inhibitory synapses. Importantly, the dysfunction of these active properties appeared severer in alkalosis than acidosis. Conclusions The severer impairment of cortical GABAergic neurons in alkalosis patients leads to more critical neural excitotoxicity, so that alkalosis-induced brain dysfunction is difficultly corrected, compared to acidosis. The vulnerability of cortical GABAergic neurons to high pH is likely a basis of severe clinical outcomes in alkalosis versus acidosis. PMID:24314112

  10. Effects of acidosis and alkalosis on hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimioulle, S; Lejeune, P; Vachiery, J L; Leeman, M; Melot, C; Naeije, R

    1990-02-01

    We studied the effects of metabolic and respiratory acidosis (pH 7.20) and alkalosis (pH 7.60) on pulmonary vascular tone in 32 pentobarbital-anesthetized dogs ventilated with hyperoxia (inspired oxygen fraction, FIO2 0.40) and with hypoxia (FIO2 0.10). Ventilation, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (Ppw), and cardiac output (3 l.min-1.m-2) were maintained constant to prevent passive changes in pulmonary arterial pressure (Ppa). Metabolic acidosis and alkalosis were induced with HCl (2 mmol.kg-1.h-1) and NaHCO3-Na2CO3 (5 mmol.kg-1.h-1) infusions, respectively, and respiratory acidosis and alkalosis by modifying the inspiratory CO2 fraction. The hypoxia-induced rise in Ppa-Ppw gradient increased from 5 to 9 mmHg in metabolic acidosis (P less than 0.001), decreased from 6 to 1 mmHg in metabolic alkalosis (P less than 0.001), remained unchanged in respiratory acidosis, and decreased from 5 to 2 mmHg in respiratory alkalosis (P less than 0.001). Linear relationships were found between pH and Ppa-Ppw gradients. These data indicate that in intact anesthetized dogs, metabolic acidosis and alkalosis, respectively, enhance and reverse hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV). Respiratory acidosis did not affect HPV and respiratory alkalosis blunted HPV, which suggests an pH-independent vasodilating effect of CO2.

  11. Metabolic alkalosis during immobilization in monkeys (M. nemestrina)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, D. R.; Yeh, I.; Swenson, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    The systemic and renal acid-base response of monkeys during ten weeks of immobilization was studied. By three weeks of immobilization, arterial pH and bicarbonate concentrations were elevated (chronic metabolic alkalosis). Net urinary acid excretion increased in immobilized animals. Urinary bicarbonate excretion decreased during the first three weeks of immobilization, and then returned to control levels. Sustained increases in urinary ammonium excretion were seen throughout the time duration of immobilization. Neither potassium depletion nor hypokalemia was observed. Most parameters returned promptly to the normal range during the first week of recovery. Factors tentatively associated with changes in acid-base status of monkeys include contraction of extracellular fluid volume, retention of bicarbonate, increased acid excretion, and possible participation of extrarenal buffers.

  12. Citrate metabolism in blood transfusions and its relationship due to metabolic alkalosis and respiratory acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Xu, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic alkalosis commonly results from excessive hydrochloric acid (HCl), potassium (K(+)) and water (H2O) loss from the stomach or through the urine. The plasma anion gap increases in non-hypoproteinemic metabolic alkalosis due to an increased negative charge equivalent on albumin and the free ionized calcium (Ca(++)) content of plasma decreases. The mean citrate load in all patients was 8740±7027 mg from 6937±6603 mL of transfused blood products. The citrate load was significantly higher in patients with alkalosis (9164±4870 vs. 7809±3967, P acidosis. As a result of intracellular acidosis compensation, decompensated metabolic alkalosis + respiratory acidosis and electrolyte imbalance may develop, blood transfusions may result in certain complications.

  13. Role of hormonal factors in plasma K alterations in acute respiratory and metabolic alkalosis in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H; Hishida, A; Ohishi, K; Kimura, M; Honda, N

    1990-02-01

    Studies were performed on previously nephrectomized dogs to examine roles of hormonal factors in plasma potassium alterations in acute alkalosis. Respiratory and metabolic alkalosis were induced by hyperventilation and intravenous NaHCO3 or tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris) infusion, respectively. Respiratory and NaHCO3-induced alkalosis provoked decreases in plasma potassium from the control value of 5.12 +/- 0.68 (SE) to 4.21 +/- 0.55 meq/l (P less than 0.01) and from 4.65 +/- 0.26 to 3.91 +/- 0.16 meq/l (P less than 0.01) within 180 min, respectively. In contrast, Tris-induced alkalosis elicited an increase in plasma potassium from the control value of 4.56 +/- 0.30 to 5.31 +/- 0.30 meq/l (P less than 0.01). Hypokalemia in respiratory alkalosis was associated with a decrease in the plasma norepinephrine concentration from the control level of 377 +/- 104 to 155 +/- 41 pg/ml (P less than 0.05) but not with changes in plasma levels of epinephrine, insulin, glucagon, cortisol, and aldosterone. However, this hypokalemia was not affected by phentolamine. Also, somatostatin did not modify the hypokalemic response. NaHCO3-induced hypokalemia was associated with a decline in the plasma aldosterone and norepinephrine concentrations. The decline in plasma norepinephrine in NaHCO3-induced alkalosis followed the decrease in plasma potassium. In Tris-induced alkalosis, plasma insulin increased but norepinephrine decreased. The findings do not suggest fundamental roles of the hormonal factors in the plasma potassium alterations in bilaterally nephrectomized dogs with acute alkalosis.

  14. Metabolic alkalosis in children: Study of patients admitted to pediatrics center1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic alkalosis is characterized by high HCO3- as it is seen in chronic respiratory acidosis, but PH differentiates the two disorders. There is no characteristic symptom or sign. Orthostatic hypotension may be encountered. Weakness and hyporeflexia occur if serum K+ is markerdly low. Tetany and neuromuscular irritability occur rarely. We report the results of retrospective data analysis of metabolic alkalosis in 15463 patients hospitalized Pediatric Medical Center in Tehran during years 1995-1997. We found 50 cases of metabolic alkalosis (rate of 0.32 percent. 64 precent male and 36 percent female. Most of them had growth failure (40% were bellow 3 percentile of height by age, 44% bellow 5 percentile of weight by height. More than 60 percent had hypokalemia, hypocloremia and hyponatremia. The most common cause of Metabolic alkalosis was cystic fibrosis and pyloric stenosis. Fifty percent of cystic fibrosis patients and Bartter cases had metabolic alkalosis. Metabolic alkalosis should be considered in every pediatric patient presented with projectile vomitting.

  15. Metabolic alkalosis in children: Study of patients admitted to pediatrics center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sobhani A

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic alkalosis is characterized by high HCO3- as it is seen in chronic respiratory acidosis, but PH differentiates the two disorders. There is no characteristic symptom or sign. Orthostatic hypotension may be encountered. Weakness and hyporeflexia occur if serum K+ is markerdly low. Tetany and neuromuscular irritability occur rarely. We report the results of retrospective data analysis of metabolic alkalosis in 15463 patients hospitalized Pediatric Medical Center in Tehran during years 1995-1997. We found 50 cases of metabolic alkalosis (rate of 0.32 percent. 64 precent male and 36 percent female. Most of them had growth failure (40% were bellow 3 percentile of height by age, 44% bellow 5 percentile of weight by height. More than 60 percent had hypokalemia, hypocloremia and hyponatremia. The most common cause of Metabolic alkalosis was cystic fibrosis and pyloric stenosis. Fifty percent of cystic fibrosis patients and Bartter cases had metabolic alkalosis. Metabolic alkalosis should be considered in every pediatric patient presented with projectile vomitting.

  16. Alcohol and alkalosis enhance excystation of Opisthorchis viverrini metacercariae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriraj, Pranee; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Boonmars, Thidarut; Wonkchalee, Nadchanan; Juasook, Amornrat; Sudsarn, Pakkayanee; Pairojkul, Chawalit; Waraasawapati, Sakda; Pinlaor, Somchai

    2013-06-01

    The northeastern region of Thailand has long been known as an endemic area of the human liver fluke infection which is caused by Opisthorchis viverrini. Humans are infected by ingestion of uncooked cyprinoid fish in traditional dishes such as "koi-pla," "pla-som," "pla-jom," and "pla-ra." To date, the prevalence of this parasite infection remains high because of cultural behavior and local beliefs. The popular misunderstanding among people in this area is that alcohol, lemon juice, and fish sauce can kill the parasites. Thus, they believe that they can eat raw fish without the risk of infection. This study attempts to clarify the effects of ethyl alcohol and acidosis-alkalosis on O. viverrini metacercariae excystation. Metacercariae of O. viverrini were obtained from infected cyprinoid fish in a natural reservoir. Most metacercariae were obtained from small cyprinoid fish. Metacercariae were divided into three experimental groups and were treated with solutions containing four different concentrations of ethyl alcohol, four different concentrations of salt, and a range of acidic/basic pH. Metacercariae excystation was observed at the assigned times, and the data were then analyzed. Salt had no effect on excystation. Interestingly, the optimal conditions for O. viverrini excystation were pH 9 and 25 % ethyl alcohol. The present study suggests that raw fish should not be eaten while drinking alcohol or when consuming other ingredients with pH 9, because both alcohol and pH 9 could induce O. viverrini metacercariae excystation, leading to the early development of parasites in the hepatobiliary system.

  17. Metabolic Acidosis or Respiratory Alkalosis? Evaluation of a Low Plasma Bicarbonate Using the Urine Anion Gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batlle, Daniel; Chin-Theodorou, Jamie; Tucker, Bryan M

    2017-09-01

    Hypobicarbonatemia, or a reduced bicarbonate concentration in plasma, is a finding seen in 3 acid-base disorders: metabolic acidosis, chronic respiratory alkalosis and mixed metabolic acidosis and chronic respiratory alkalosis. Hypobicarbonatemia due to chronic respiratory alkalosis is often misdiagnosed as a metabolic acidosis and mistreated with the administration of alkali therapy. Proper diagnosis of the cause of hypobicarbonatemia requires integration of the laboratory values, arterial blood gas, and clinical history. The information derived from the urinary response to the prevailing acid-base disorder is useful to arrive at the correct diagnosis. We discuss the use of urine anion gap, as a surrogate marker of urine ammonium excretion, in the evaluation of a patient with low plasma bicarbonate concentration to differentiate between metabolic acidosis and chronic respiratory alkalosis. The interpretation and limitations of urine acid-base indexes at bedside (urine pH, urine bicarbonate, and urine anion gap) to evaluate urine acidification are discussed. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Metabolic alkalosis contributes to acute hypercapnic respiratory failure in adult cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Anne E; Wilson, John W; Kotsimbos, Thomas C; Naughton, Matthew T

    2003-08-01

    and study objectives: Patients with end-stage cystic fibrosis (CF) develop respiratory failure and hypercapnia. In contrast to COPD patients, altered electrolyte transport and malnutrition in CF patients may predispose them to metabolic alkalosis and, therefore, may contribute to hypercapnia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of metabolic alkalosis in adults with hypercapnic respiratory failure in the setting of acute exacerbations of CF compared with COPD. Levels of arterial blood gases, plasma electrolytes, and serum albumin from 14 consecutive hypercapnic CF patients who had been admitted to the hospital with a respiratory exacerbation were compared with 49 consecutive hypercapnic patients with exacerbations of COPD. Hypercapnia was defined as a PaCO(2) of > or = 45 mm Hg. Despite similar PaCO(2) values, patients in the CF group were significantly more alkalotic than were those in the COPD group (mean [+/- SD] pH, 7.43 +/- 0.03 vs 7.37 +/- 0.05, respectively; p respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis was evident in 71% of CF patients and 22% of COPD patients (p alkalosis contributes to hypercapnic respiratory failure in adults with acute exacerbations of CF. This acid-base disturbance occurs in conjunction with reduced total body salt levels and hypoalbuminemia.

  19. Intestinal ion transport and intracellular pH during acute respiratory alkalosis and acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtin, P; Charney, A N

    1984-07-01

    Acute respiratory alkalosis and acidosis alter rat ileal and colonic but not jejunal electrolyte transport. To examine the role of altered intracellular pH, pHi, and HCO3 concentration, (HCO3)i, we measured pHi in mucosa scraped from the jejunum, ileum, and colon of anesthetized, mechanically ventilated Sprague-Dawley rats. During states of respiratory alkalosis (Pco2 24.9 +/- 0.8 mmHg, pH 7.586 +/- 0.014), respiratory acidosis (Pco2 67.8 +/- 1.2 mmHg, pH 7.228 +/- 0.007), and normocapnia (Pco2 41.1 +/- 0.7 mmHg, pH 7.401 +/- 0.006), pHi was measured by determining the distribution of 5,5-dimethyl[2-14C]oxazolidine-2,4-dione, using [3H]inulin as a marker of extracellular space. (HCO3)i was calculated using portal vein Pco2. In the ileum, the pHi of 6.901 +/- 0.029 was similar in alkalosis [(HCO3)i 5.4 +/- 0.3 mM], acidosis [(HCO3)i 12.4 +/- 0.6 mM], and normocapnia [(HCO3)i 8.6 +/- 0.8 mM). In both the jejunum and colon, pHi was increased in alkalosis [pHi 6.998 +/- 0.038, (HCO3)i 6.7 +/- 0.6 mM] and decreased in acidosis [pHi 6.789 +/- 0.024, (HCO3)i 10.4 +/- 0.6 mM] as compared with normocapnia [pHi 6.915 +/- 0.026, (HCO3)i 8.9 +/- 0.7 mM] (colon data given). Net electrolyte transport measured by in vivo perfusion revealed that ileal and colonic, but not jejunal, net Na and Cl absorption was decreased during alkalosis and increased during acidosis. These data suggest that, during respiratory acidosis and alkalosis, pHi is maintained in a qualitatively similar way in the jejunum, ileum, and colon with quantitatively greater or lesser changes in (HCO3)i.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Effect of respiratory acidosis and respiratory alkalosis on renal transport enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiam-ong, S; Laski, M E; Kurtzman, N A; Sabatini, S

    1994-09-01

    We studied the effect of respiratory acidosis and respiratory alkalosis on acid-base composition and on microdissected renal adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) enzymes. Rats were subjected to hypercapnia or hypocapnia of 6, 24, and 72 h duration. After 6 h of hypercapnia, collecting tubule (CT) ATPases were not changed. At 24 h, plasma bicarbonate was 35 +/- 1 meq/l (P respiratory acidosis stimulates activity of both renal proton ATPases. By contrast, both acute and chronic respiratory alkalosis decrease the two renal proton pumps. The stimulatory effect of hypercapnia and the inhibitory effect of hypocapnia on the renal ATPases appear to be potassium and aldosterone independent. Although the precise mechanisms for these results are not known, a direct effect of PCO2, pH, or changes in bicarbonate delivery may be involved.

  1. Acetazolamide for the management of chronic metabolic alkalosis in neonates and infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Bonnie; Chhay, Annie; Yen, Lilly; Tesoriero, Linda; Ramanathan, Rangasamy; Seri, Istvan; Friedlich, Philippe S

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of acetazolamide in the management of chronic metabolic alkalosis in neonates and infants with chronic respiratory insufficiency. A retrospective chart review of 90 patients treated with acetazolamide between 2006 and 2007 admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit was performed. Blood gases and electrolytes obtained at baseline and by 24 hours after acetazolamide administration were compared. Compared with baseline and after 24 hours of acetazolamide, mean measured serum bicarbonate (29.5±3.7 vs. 26.9±3.8 mEq/L, Prespiratory acidosis developed in 4 (3.1%) treatment courses. Acetazolamide may be effective in decreasing serum bicarbonate in carefully selected patients. Its use and safety as an adjunctive therapy for chronic metabolic alkalosis in neonates and infants with chronic respiratory insufficiency needs further study.

  2. Severe metabolic alkalosis and recurrent acute on chronic kidney injury in a patient with Crohn's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Schmid Axel; Küttner Axel; Amann Kerstin U; Opgenoorth Mirian; Schnellhardt Susanne; Jacobi Johannes; Eckardt Kai-Uwe; Hilgers Karl F

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Diarrhea is common in patients with Crohn's disease and may be accompanied by acid base disorders, most commonly metabolic acidosis due to intestinal loss of bicarbonate. Case Presentation Here, we present a case of severe metabolic alkalosis in a young patient suffering from M. Crohn. The patient had undergone multiple resections of the intestine and suffered from chronic kidney disease. He was now referred to our clinic for recurrent acute kidney injury, the nature of wh...

  3. Hydrochloric acid infusion for treatment of metabolic alkalosis associated with respiratory acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimioulle, S; Berre, J; Dufaye, P; Vincent, J L; Degaute, J P; Kahn, R J

    1989-03-01

    Hypercapnia due to respiratory failure can be more severe when accompanied by coexistent metabolic alkalosis. We therefore tested the hypothesis that hydrochloric acid (HCl) infusion could improve PaCO2 in 15 critically ill patients admitted with mixed respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis, and a pH of between 7.35 and 7.45. HCl was infused at a constant rate of 25 mmol/h until the bicarbonate concentration decreased less than 26 mmol/L, or until the pH decreased less than 7.35 (initial pH greater than 7.40) or 7.30 (initial pH less than 7.40). Administration of 170 +/- 53 mmol of HCl decreased the bicarbonate concentration from 34 +/- 3 to 25 +/- 2 mmol/L (p less than .001), the pH from 7.41 +/- 0.03 to 7.33 +/- 0.02 (p less than .001), and the PaCO2 from 54 +/- 8 to 48 +/- 8 torr (p less than .001). Postinfusion PaCO2 could be predicted accurately from the initial status of the patients (r = .95, p less than .001) except in one patient with fixed hypercapnia. PaCO2 increased from 77 +/- 19 to 94 +/- 24 torr (p less than .001) and PaO2/PAO2 increased from 59 +/- 17 to 66 +/- 17% (p less than .001). The effects of HCl were still present 12 h after the end of the infusion. No complications related to the acid infusion were noted. These results indicate that, even in the absence of alkalemia, active correction of metabolic alkalosis by HCl infusion can improve CO2 and oxygen exchange in critically ill patients with mixed respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis.

  4. Acidosis, but Not Alkalosis, Affects Anaerobic Metabolism and Performance in a 4-km Time Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia-Oliveira, Carlos Rafaell; Lopes-Silva, João Paulo; Bertuzzi, Romulo; McConell, Glenn K; Bishop, David John; Lima-Silva, Adriano Eduardo; Kiss, Maria Augusta Peduti Dal'molin

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to determine the effect of preexercise metabolic acidosis and alkalosis on power output (PO) and aerobic and anaerobic energy expenditure during a 4-km cycling time trial (TT). Eleven recreationally trained cyclists (V˙O2peak 54.1 ± 9.3 mL·kg·min) performed a 4-km TT 100 min after ingesting in a double-blind matter 0.15 g·kg of body mass of ammonium chloride (NH4Cl, acidosis), 0.3 g·kg of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3, alkalosis), or 0.15 g·kg of CaCO3 (placebo). A preliminary study (n = 7) was conducted to establish the optimal doses to promote the desirable preexercise blood pH alterations without gastrointestinal distress. Data for PO, aerobic and anaerobic energy expenditure, and blood and respiratory parameters were averaged for each 1 km and compared between conditions using two-way repeated-measures ANOVA (condition and distance factors). Gastrointestinal discomfort was analyzed qualitatively. Compared with placebo (pH 7.37 ± 0.02, [HCO3]: 27.5 ± 2.6 mmol·L), the NaHCO3 ingestion resulted in a preexercise blood alkalosis (pH +0.06 ± 0.04, [HCO3]: +4.4 ± 2.0 mmol·L, P acidosis (pH -0.05 ± 0.03, [HCO3]: -4.8 ± 2.1 mmol·L, P 0.05). Minimal gastrointestinal distress was noted in all conditions. Preexercise acidosis, but not alkalosis, affects anaerobic metabolism and PO during a 4-km cycling TT.

  5. Severe normotensive metabolic alkalosis in a 2-month-old boy with hyperekplexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlapbach, L J; Sozzo, A; Ramelli, G; Bianchetti, M G

    2006-02-01

    A 2-month-old infant with hereditary hyperekplexia, umbilical and bilateral inguinal hernias and history of poor feeding was noted to have severe normotensive metabolic alkalosis: sodium 132 mmol/L, potassium 3.4 mmol/L, chloride 77 mmol/L, pH 7.55, carbon dioxide tension 56.3 mmHg and bicarbonate 48.0 mmol/L. After parenteral rehydration and treatment with clonazepam, laboratory parameters normalized.

  6. [Efficacy of acetazolamide treatment of patients with hypercapnia and superimposed metabolic alkalosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto de Paula, J M; Villamandos Nicás, V; Cancelo Suárez, P; del Portillo Rubí, A; Guillem Ares, E; Prada Mínguez, A; Sanz de la Fuente, H

    1997-04-01

    Metabolic alkalosis usually complicates the evolution of patients with hypercapnia under diuretic or steroid therapy. The objective of this study was to analyze the efficiency of therapy with acetazolamide, a reversible carbonic anhydrase inhibitor, in this condition. Prospective study conducted at our hospital from June 1994 to March 1996, with 45 patients who had chronic respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis. After a previous stabilization of the patient and eventually the discontinuation of diuretic or corticosteroid drugs fro 24-48 hours, 500 or 750 mg of acetazolamide were administered daily for 48 hours. Later, variations both in arterial gasometry and venous electrolytes were analyzed by comparing two means of paired data. After therapy with acetazolamide a clinical improvement was observed in patients, a decrease in PaCO2, pH and CO3H (p acidosis appeared, which only in three cases was associated with acidemia. No secondary effects were observed. Acetazolamide is an efficient alternative for treatment of patients with respiratory acidosis and metabolic alkalosis, particularly when other more common measures in this condition (discontinuation of diuretics and/or volemic replacement) have failed or are contraindicated. On the other hand, the emergence of relevant secondary effects is unlikely.

  7. [An unexpected stage of alkalosis in the dynamics of the early posthemorrhagic period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beliaev, A V

    2000-01-01

    A study was made on acid-base metabolism in early posthemorrhagic period as exemplified by examination of patients presenting with gastrointestinal hemorrhage. It has been ascertained that hemorrhage is accompanied by a mixed variant of the acid-base state (ABS) deviation, namely metabolic lactate-acidosis and respiratory alkalosis. In the time-related course of posthemorrhagic period such deviations persist in patients with lethal outcome; with the disease running a favourable course the above deviations are found to return to normal quite soon. The development of complications leads to staging in ABC, its stages being as follows: stage I--the initial stage, stage II--persisting metabolic acidosis and respiratory alkalosis, stage III--alkalosis, stage IV--normalization, with stage III of ABS being encouraged by hypocapnia caused by function disorders of the lungs in early posthemorrhagic period, normalization of cell metabolism, increase in the rate of urination as a reflection of the third earlier identified stage of water metabolism, with the H+ excretion in the urine at the previous level. The identified ABS stage III threatens coming trouble, being accompanied by metabolic deviations together with a risk of function disorder of the myocardium.

  8. Regulation of AE1 anion exchanger and H(+)-ATPase in rat cortex by acute metabolic acidosis and alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabolić, I; Brown, D; Gluck, S L; Alper, S L

    1997-01-01

    The cortical collecting duct (CCD) mediates net secretion or reabsorption of protons according to systemic acid/base status. Using indirect immunofluorescence, we examined the localization and abundance of the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase and the AE1 anion exchanger in intercalated cells (IC) of rat kidney connecting segment (CNT) and CCD during acute (6 hr) metabolic (NH4Cl) acidosis and respiratory (NaHCO3) alkalosis. AE1 immunostaining intensity quantified by confocal microscopy was elevated in metabolic acidosis and substantially reduced in metabolic alkalosis. AE1 immunostaining was restricted to Type A IC in all conditions, and the fraction of AE1+IC was unchanged in CNT and CCd. Metabolic acidosis was accompanied by redistribution of H(+)-ATPase immunostaining towards the apical surface of IC, and metabolic alkalosis was accompanied by H(+)-ATPase redistribution towards the basal surface of IC. Therefore, acute metabolic acidosis produced changes consistent with increased activity of Type A IC and decreased activity of Type B IC, whereas acute metabolic alkalosis produced changes corresponding to increased activity of Type B IC and decreased activity of Type A IC. These data demonstrate that acute systemic acidosis and alkalosis modulate the cellular distribution of two key transporters involved in proton secretion in the distal nephron.

  9. Hypokalaemic paresis, hypertension, alkalosis and adrenal-dependent hyperadrenocorticism in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, D R; Foster, S F; Hopper, B J; Staudte, K L; O'Hara, A J; Irwin, P J

    2008-04-01

    Generalised paresis, severe hypokalaemia and kaliuresis, metabolic alkalosis and hypertension, characteristic of mineralocorticoid excess, were identified in a dog with hyperadrenocorticism due to a functional adrenocortical carcinoma. Aldosterone concentration was decreased and deoxycorticosterone concentration increased in the presence of hypokalaemia. These metabolic abnormalities resolved with resection of the carcinoma. Mineralocorticoid excess in dogs with hyperadrenocorticism is generally considered to be of little clinical significance but resulted in the acute presentation of this patient. The possible pathogenesis of mineralocorticoid excess in this case of canine hyperadrenocorticism is discussed.

  10. Mechanisms controlling the oxygen consumption in experimentally induced hypochloremic alkalosis in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambier, Carole; Clerbaux, Thierry; Amory, Hélène; Detry, Bruno; Florquin, Sandra; Marville, Vincent; Frans, Albert; Gustin, Pascal

    2002-01-01

    The study was carried out on healthy Friesian calves (n = 10) aged between 10 and 30 days. Hypochloremia and alkalosis were induced by intravenous administration of furosemide and isotonic sodium bicarbonate. The venous and arterial blood samples were collected repeatedly. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG), hemoglobin and plasmatic chloride concentrations were determined. The red blood cell chloride concentration was also calculated. pH, PCO2 and PO2 were measured in arterial and mixed venous blood. The oxygen equilibrium curve (OEC) was measured in standard conditions. The correspondence of the OEC to the arterial and mixed venous compartments was calculated, taking blood temperature, pH and PCO2 values into account. The oxygen exchange fraction (OEF%), corresponding to the degree of blood desaturation between the arterial and mixed venous compartments and the amount of oxygen released at the tissue level by 100 mL of blood (OEF Vol%) were calculated from the arterial and mixed venous OEC, combined with PO2 and hemoglobin concentration. Oxygen delivery (DO2) was calculated using the arterial oxygen content, the cardiac output measured by thermodilution, and the body weight of the animal. The oxygen consumption (VO2) was derived from the cardiac output, OEF Vol% and body weight values. Despite the plasma hypochloremia, the erythrocyte chloride concentration was not influenced by furosemide and sodium bicarbonate infusion. Due to the alkalosis-induced increase in the 2,3-DPG, the standard OEC was shifted to the right, allowing oxygen to dissociate from hemoglobin more rapidly. These changes opposed the increased affinity of hemoglobin for oxygen induced by alkalosis. Moreover, respiratory acidosis, hemoconcentration, and the slight decrease in the partial oxygen pressure in mixed venous blood (Pvo2) tended to improve the OEF Vol% and maintain the oxygen consumption in a physiological range while the cardiac output, and the oxygen delivery were significantly decreased

  11. Slow Heartbeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... per minute. The heartbeat is controlled by an electrical system that signals the heart muscle to contract, or “squeeze,” pumping blood to the rest of the body. Bradycardia happens when the system slows or blocks ...

  12. Intracellular pH and K+ of cardiac and skeletal muscle in acidosis and alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole-Wilson, P A; Cameron, I R

    1975-11-01

    The effects of a metabolic and respiratory acidosis and alkalosis on intracellular pH (pHi) and K+ have been compared in cardiac and skeletal muscle from the anesthetized rabbit. The extracellular space and pHi were calculated from the distribution volumes of [51Cr] EDTA and [14C]DMO, respectively. When pHe was varied by altering PCO2, the slope of the line relating pHi to the extracellular pH (pHe) was greater (P less than 0.05--0.001) than that obtained during metabolic changes of pHe in right and left ventricles, atria, diaphragm, and quadriceps. During metabolic acidosis and alkalosis, the slope of pHi/pHe line did not vary between tissues. During respiratory acidosis, there was no difference in slope between cardiac tissues, but it was less in left ventricle than quadriceps (P less than 0.001). In left ventricle intracellular K+ increased in a metabolic (P less than 0.05) or respiratory acidosis (P less than 0.02), whereas in diaphragm it decreased (P less than 0.02). Intracellular K+ correlated with pHe and pHE-PHi. Changes in pHi but not intracellular K+ could explain known differences in myocardial function in respiratory and metabolic acidosis.

  13. Respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis in a child treated with sulthiame.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissbach, Avichai; Tirosh, Irit; Scheuerman, Oded; Hoffer, Vered; Garty, Ben Zion

    2010-10-01

    To report on severe acid-base disturbance in a child with symptomatic epilepsy treated with sulthiame. A 9.5-year-old boy with chronic generalized tonic-clonic seizures was treated with carbamazepine and valproic acid. Because of poor seizure control, sulthiame was added to the treatment. Two months later, he presented at the emergency department with severe weakness, headache, dizziness, dyspnea, anorexia, and confusional state. Arterial blood gas analysis showed mixed respiratory alkalosis with high anion gap metabolic acidosis. Sulthiame-induced acid-base disturbance was suspected. The drug was withheld for the first 24 hours and then restarted at a reduced dosage. The arterial blood gases gradually normalized, the confusion disappeared, and the patient was discharged home.Three months later, 4 weeks after an increase in sulthiame dosage, the patient was once again admitted with the same clinical picture. Improvement was noted after the drug dosage was reduced. This is the first report of mixed respiratory alkalosis and metabolic acidosis in a child treated with sulthiame. Monitoring of the acid-base status should be considered in patients treated with sulthiame.

  14. Respiratory acidosis prolongs, while alkalosis shortens, the duration and recovery time of vecuronium in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Masanori; Takahashi, Hiromi; Iwasaki, Hiroshi; Namiki, Akiyoshi

    2002-03-01

    To determine the effects of respiratory acidosis and alkalosis by mechanical ventilation on the onset, duration, and recovery times of vecuronium. Randomized, prospective study. Operating rooms in the Sapporo Medical University Hospital and Kitami Red Cross Hospital. 90 ASA physical status I and II patients undergoing lower abdominal surgery. Patients were randomly allocated to one of three groups by arterial carbon dioxide tension level (PaCO2; mmHg) after induction: hyperventilation group (PaCO2 = 25-35), normoventilation group (PaCO2 = 35-45), and hypoventilation group (PaCO2 = 45-55). Anesthesia was maintained by spinal block with inhalation of 50% to 66% nitrous oxide in oxygen and intermittent intravenous administration of fentanyl and midazolam with tracheal intubation. After vecuronium 0.08 mg/kg was given, onset, duration, and recovery time were measured by mechanomyography (Biometer Myograph 2,000, Odense, Denmark). There were significant differences in the duration and recovery time of vecuronium among the normoventilation group (12.7 +/- 3.3 min and 11.8 +/- 2.8 min, respectively), the hyperventilation group (10.6 +/- 3.5 min and 9.2 +/- 2.7 min, respectively; p respiratory acidosis and shortened in respiratory alkalosis.

  15. Respiratory alkalosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the blood Basic metabolic panel Chest x-ray Pulmonary function tests to measure breathing and how well the lungs are functioning Treatment ... MD, MHS, Paul F. Harron, Jr. Associate Professor of Medicine, Pulmonary, Allergy, and Critical Care, Perelman School of Medicine, ...

  16. [Metabolic alkalosis despite hyperlactatemia and hypercapnia. Interpretation and therapy with help of the Stewart concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, D; Hofmann-Kiefer, K; Jacob, M; Conzen, P; Rehm, M

    2008-02-01

    Acid-base disturbances are commonly found in critically ill patients and are often associated with fatal complications. The basis of a successful treatment is a thorough understanding of the causes of these disorders. The "classical methods" to explain acid-base disorders--pH, base excess and bicarbonate concentration--mostly do not provide a causal correlation to the underlying pathology. An unusual case of a combined respiratory-metabolic disorder with hyperlactatemia and hypercapnia is presented. An acidosis masked by hypochloremic and hypoalbuminemic alkalosis was identified with the help of Stewart's concept and finally permitted a successful therapy. The modern Stewart concept provides enhanced information, enabling an exact diagnosis and causal therapy even in complex cases.

  17. Renal responses of trout to chronic respiratory and metabolic acidoses and metabolic alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C M; Milligan, C L; Walsh, P J

    1999-08-01

    Exposure to hyperoxia (500-600 torr) or low pH (4.5) for 72 h or NaHCO(3) infusion for 48 h were used to create chronic respiratory (RA) or metabolic acidosis (MA) or metabolic alkalosis in freshwater rainbow trout. During alkalosis, urine pH increased, and [titratable acidity (TA) - HCO(-)(3)] and net H(+) excretion became negative (net base excretion) with unchanged NH(+)(4) efflux. During RA, urine pH did not change, but net H(+) excretion increased as a result of a modest rise in NH(+)(4) and substantial elevation in [TA - HCO(-)(3)] efflux accompanied by a large increase in inorganic phosphate excretion. However, during MA, urine pH fell, and net H(+) excretion was 3.3-fold greater than during RA, reflecting a similar increase in [TA - HCO(-)(3)] and a smaller elevation in phosphate but a sevenfold greater increase in NH(+)(4) efflux. In urine samples of the same pH, [TA - HCO(-)(3)] was greater during RA (reflecting phosphate secretion), and [NH(+)(4)] was greater during MA (reflecting renal ammoniagenesis). Renal activities of potential ammoniagenic enzymes (phosphate-dependent glutaminase, glutamate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) and plasma levels of cortisol, phosphate, ammonia, and most amino acids (including glutamine and alanine) increased during MA but not during RA, when only alanine aminotransferase increased. The differential responses to RA vs. MA parallel those in mammals; in fish they may be keyed to activation of phosphate secretion by RA and cortisol mobilization by MA.

  18. Adaptation to alkalosis induces cell cycle delay and apoptosis in cortical collecting duct cells: role of Aquaporin-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivarola, Valeria; Flamenco, Pilar; Melamud, Luciana; Galizia, Luciano; Ford, Paula; Capurro, Claudia

    2010-08-01

    Collecting ducts (CD) not only constitute the final site for regulating urine concentration by increasing apical membrane Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) expression, but are also essential for the control of acid-base status. The aim of this work was to examine, in renal cells, the effects of chronic alkalosis on cell growth/death as well as to define whether AQP2 expression plays any role during this adaptation. Two CD cell lines were used: WT- (not expressing AQPs) and AQP2-RCCD(1) (expressing apical AQP2). Our results showed that AQP2 expression per se accelerates cell proliferation by an increase in cell cycle progression. Chronic alkalosis induced, in both cells lines, a time-dependent reduction in cell growth. Even more, cell cycle movement, assessed by 5-bromodeoxyuridine pulse-chase and propidium iodide analyses, revealed a G2/M phase cell accumulation associated with longer S- and G2/M-transit times. This G2/M arrest is paralleled with changes consistent with apoptosis. All these effects appeared 24 h before and were always more pronounced in cells expressing AQP2. Moreover, in AQP2-expressing cells, part of the observed alkalosis cell growth decrease is explained by AQP2 protein down-regulation. We conclude that in CD cells alkalosis causes a reduction in cell growth by cell cycle delay that triggers apoptosis as an adaptive reaction to this environment stress. Since cell volume changes are prerequisite for the initiation of cell proliferation or apoptosis, we propose that AQP2 expression facilitates cell swelling or shrinkage leading to the activation of channels necessary to the control of these processes.

  19. Rare mutation in the SLC26A3 transporter causes life-long diarrhoea with metabolic alkalosis

    OpenAIRE

    Abou Ziki, Maen D; Verjee, Mohamud A

    2015-01-01

    SLC26A3, a chloride/bicarbonate transporter mainly expressed in the intestines, plays a pivotal role in chloride absorption. We present a 23-year-old woman with a history of congenital chloride diarrhoea (CCD) and renal transplant who was admitted for rehydration and treatment of acute kidney injury after she presented with an acute diarrhoeal episode. Laboratory investigations confirmed metabolic alkalosis and severe hypochloraemia, consistent with her underlying CCD. This contrasts with mos...

  20. Severe hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis and hypertension in a 54 year old male with ectopic ACTH syndrome: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez-Valles, Miguel Angel; Palafox-Cazarez, Asael; Paredes-Avina, Jose Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Ectopic ACTH syndrome is a rare cause of Cushing’s syndrome accounting for about 15% of all cases. Small cell lung cancer and bronchial carcinoids account for about half of the cases. Malignant neoplasm has rapid and more aggressive metabolic effects. We report a 54-year-old male patient with phenotypic features of Cushing’s syndrome with severe hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypertension and altered mental status as manifestations of an ACTH-secreting small cell carcinoma from the lung. E...

  1. Ketoacid production in acute respiratory and metabolic acidosis and alkalosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaGrange, B M; Hood, V L

    1989-03-01

    Metabolic acidosis inhibits and alkalosis enhances ketoacid production in ketotic humans and animals. To compare these effects with those of superimposed respiratory acid-base disturbances, ketone output was evaluated in awake ketotic rats during metabolic (intravenous infusions of HCl or NaHCO3) or respiratory (hyper or hypocapnia) disorders. With decreases in blood pH of 0.1-0.2 units over 3 h, blood ketone concentrations significantly decreased an average of 1.9 mM (metabolic) and 1.1 mM (respiratory) and urinary ketone excretion rates significantly decreased by 1.3 mumol/min (metabolic). With increases in systemic pH, blood ketone concentrations and urinary ketone excretion rates were significantly increased. Changes in blood pH correlated with changes in urinary ketone excretion rates in both metabolic (r = 0.87) and respiratory (r = 0.67) acid-base disturbances. The alterations occurred promptly and were rapidly reversible. These findings indicate that modest changes in systemic pH from metabolic or respiratory acid-base disturbances modify net ketoacid production in ketotic rats, confirm pH control of endogenous acid output as an acid-base regulator, and show that systemic pH, not bicarbonate concentration, mediates the process.

  2. Severe Uncompensated Metabolic Alkalosis due to Plasma Exchange in a Patient with Pulmonary-Renal Syndrome: A Clinician’s Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsin Ijaz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic alkalosis secondary to citrate toxicity from plasma exchange is very uncommon in patients with normal renal function. In patients with advanced renal disease this can be a fatal event. We describe a case of middle-aged woman with Goodpasture’s syndrome treated with plasma exchange who developed severe metabolic alkalosis. High citrate load in plasma exchange fluid is the underlying etiology. Citrate metabolism generates bicarbonate and once its level exceeds the excretory capacity of kidneys, the severe metabolic alkalosis ensues. Our patient presented with generalized weakness, fever, and oliguria and developed rapidly progressive renal failure. Patient had positive serology for antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibodies myeloperoxidase (ANCA-MPO and anti-glomerular basement membrane antibodies (anti-GBM. Renal biopsy showed diffuse necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis with linear glomerular basement membrane staining. Patient did not respond to intravenous steroids. Plasma exchange was started with fresh frozen plasma but patient developed severe metabolic alkalosis. This metabolic alkalosis normalized with cessation of plasma exchange and initiation of low bicarbonate hemodialysis. ANCA-MPO and anti-GBM antibodies levels normalized within 2 weeks and remained undetectable at 3 months. Patient still required maintenance hemodialysis.

  3. Slow Pseudotachylites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pec, M.; Stunitz, H.; Heilbronner, R.

    2011-12-01

    Tectonic pseudotachylites as solidified, friction induced melts are believed to be the only unequivocal evidence for paleo-earthquakes. Earthquakes occur when fast slip (1 - 3 m/s) propagates on a localized failure plane and are always related with stress drops. The mechanical work expended, together with the rock composition and the efficiency of thermal dissipation, controls whether the temperature increase on a localized slip plane will be sufficient to induce fusion. We report the formation of pseudotachylites during steady-state plastic flow at slow bulk shear strain rates (~10^-3 to ~10^-5 /s corresponding to slip rates of ~10^-6 to ~10^-8 m/s) in experiments performed at high confining pressures (500 MPa) and temperatures (300°C) corresponding to a depth of ~15 km. Crushed granitioid rock (Verzasca gneiss), grain size ≤ 200 μm, with 0.2 wt% water added was placed between alumina forcing blocks pre-cut at 45°, weld-sealed in platinum jackets and deformed with a constant displacement rate in a solid medium deformation apparatus (modified Griggs rig). Microstructural observations show the development of a S-C-C' fabric with C' slip zones being the dominant feature. Strain hardening in the beginning of the experiment is accompanied with compaction which is achieved by closely spaced R1 shears pervasively cutting the whole gouge zone and containing fine-grained material (d 10) are localized in less densely spaced, ~10 μm thick C'-C slip zones which develop predominantly in feldspars and often contain micas. In TEM, they appear to have no porosity consisting of partly amorphous material and small crystalline fragments with the average grain size of 20 nm. After the peak strength, the samples weaken by ~20 MPa and continue deforming up to γ ~ 4 without any stress drops. Strain localization progresses in the C'-C slip zones and leads to the formation of pseudotachylites. Rough estimates of slip rates in the deforming slip zones are 2 to 4 orders of magnitude

  4. Effects of respiratory acidosis and alkalosis on the distribution of cyanide into the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djerad, A; Monier, C; Houzé, P; Borron, S W; Lefauconnier, J M; Baud, F J

    2001-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether respiratory acidosis favors the cerebral distribution of cyanide, and conversely, if respiratory alkalosis limits its distribution. The pharmacokinetics of a nontoxic dose of cyanide were first studied in a group of 7 rats in order to determine the distribution phase. The pharmacokinetics were found to best fit a 3-compartment model with very rapid distribution (whole blood T(1/2)alpha = 21.6 +/- 3.3 s). Then the effects of the modulation of arterial pH on the distribution of a nontoxic dose of intravenously administered cyanide into the brains of rats were studied by means of the determination of the permeability-area product (PA). The modulation of arterial blood pH was performed by variation of arterial carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2) in 3 groups of 8 anesthetized mechanically ventilated rats. The mean arterial pH measured 20 min after the start of mechanical ventilation in the acidotic, physiologic, and alkalotic groups were 7.07 +/- 0.03, 7.41 +/- 0.01, and 7.58 +/- 0.01, respectively. The mean PAs in the acidotic, physiologic, and alkalotic groups, determined 30 s after the intravenous administration of cyanide, were 0.015 +/- 0.002, 0.011 +/- 0.001, and 0.008 +/- 0.001 s(-1), respectively (one-way ANOVA; p < 0.0087). At alkalotic pH the mean permeability-area product was 43% of that measured at acidotic pH. This effect of pH on the rapidity of cyanide distribution does not appear to be limited to specific areas of the brain. We conclude that modulation of arterial pH by altering PaCO2 may induce significant effects on the brain uptake of cyanide.

  5. Delivery dependence of early proximal bicarbonate reabsorption in the rat in respiratory acidosis and alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santella, R N; Maddox, D A; Gennari, F J

    1991-01-01

    In the intact rat kidney, bicarbonate reabsorption in the early proximal tubule (EP) is strongly dependent on delivery. Independent of delivery, metabolic acidosis stimulates EP bicarbonate reabsorption. In this study, we investigated whether systemic pH changes induced by acute or chronic respiratory acid-base disorders also affect EP HCO3- reabsorption, independent of delivery (FLHCO3, filtered load of bicarbonate). Hypercapnia was induced in rats acutely (1-3 h) and chronically (4-5 d) by increasing inspired PCO2. Hypocapnia was induced acutely (1-3 h) by mechanical hyperventilation, and chronically (4-5 d) using hypoxemia to stimulate ventilation. When compared with normocapneic rats with similar FLHCO3, no stimulation of EP or overall proximal HCO3 reabsorption was found with either acute hypercapnia (PaCO2 = 74 mmHg, pH = 7.23) or chronic hypercapnia (PaCO2 = 84 mmHg, pH = 7.31). Acute hypocapnia (PaCO2 = 29 mmHg, pH = 7.56) did not suppress EP or overall HCO3 reabsorption. Chronic hypocapnia (PaCO2 = 26 mmHg, pH = 7.54) reduced proximal HCO3 reabsorption, but this effect was reversed when FLHCO3 was increased to levels comparable to euvolemic normocapneic rats. Thus, when delivery is accounted for, we could find no additional stimulation of proximal bicarbonate reabsorption in respiratory acidosis and, except at low delivery rates, no reduction in bicarbonate reabsorption in respiratory alkalosis. PMID:1991847

  6. Noninvasive measurement of tissue carbon dioxide tension using a fiberoptic conjunctival sensor: effects of respiratory and metabolic alkalosis and acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kram, H B; Fink, S; Tsang, M; Markle, D; Appel, P L; Shoemaker, W C

    1988-03-01

    To evaluate potential clinical applications of a newly developed, noninvasive fiberoptic conjunctival carbon dioxide (PcjCO2) sensor designed to measure continuously tissue PCO2 in a vascular bed supplied by the internal carotid artery, we studied the effects of graded respiratory and metabolic alkalosis and acidosis on PcjCO2 in a hemodynamically stable canine model. Respiratory changes were induced by varying the frequency of ventilation and metabolic changes were induced by incremental infusions of sodium bicarbonate and hydrochloric acid. Continuous measurement of end-tidal carbon dioxide tension (PETCO2) was also performed. During respiratory alkalosis and acidosis, PcjCO2 values correlated well with PaCO2 (r = 0.96, n = 106); linear regression analysis of PcjCO2 vs. PaCO2 produced a slope of 1.01 and a y-intercept of 3.94 over a PaCO2 range of 12 to 76 torr. The mean PcjCO2-PaCO2 gradient was 4 +/- 3 (SD) torr. PETCO2 values also correlated well with PaCO2 (r = 0.91), as well as with PcjCO2 values (r = 0.91). Both PcjCO2 and PETCO2 showed a much weaker correlation with PaCO2 during metabolic alkalosis and acidosis, partly because the variation in PaCO2 was less. Moreover, the PcjCO2-PaCO2 gradient increased during the metabolic portion of the study up to a mean of 10 +/- 8 (SD) torr during metabolic acidosis, implying a build-up and/or lack of washout of CO2 from the conjunctival tissues, despite the normal physiologic range of PaCO2 values. We conclude that in a hemodynamically stable canine model, PcjCO2 and PETCO2 values correlate well with PaCO2 during pure respiratory alkalosis and acidosis; the correlation weakens significantly, however, with metabolic alterations in tissue CO2 levels.

  7. FROM SLOW FOOD TO SLOW TOURISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bac Dorin Paul

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the effects of globalization is the faster pace of our lives. This rhythm can be noticed in all aspects of life: travel, work, shopping, etc. and it has serious negative effects. It has become common knowledge that stress and speed generate serious medical issues. Food and eating habits in the modern world have taken their toll on our health. However, some people took a stand and argued for a new kind of lifestyle. It all started in the field of gastronomy, where a new movement emerged – Slow Food, based on the ideas and philosophy of Carlo Petrini. Slow Food represents an important adversary to the concept of fast food, and is promoting local products, enjoyable meals and healthy food. The philosophy of the Slow Food movement developed in several directions: Cittaslow, slow travel and tourism, slow religion and slow money etc. The present paper will account the evolution of the concept and its development during the most recent years. We will present how the philosophy of slow food was applied in all the other fields it reached and some critical points of view. Also we will focus on the presence of the slow movement in Romania, although it is in a very early stage of development. The main objectives of the present paper are: to present the chronological and ideological evolution of the slow movement; to establish a clear separation of slow travel and slow tourism, as many mistake on for the other; to review the presence of the slow movement in Romania. Regarding the research methodology, information was gathered from relevant academic papers and books and also from interviews and discussions with local entrepreneurs. The research is mostly theoretical and empirical, as slow food and slow tourism are emerging research themes in academic circles.

  8. Effects of respiratory alkalosis and acidosis on myocardial blood flow and metabolism in patients with coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmaier, S; Weyland, A; Buhre, W; Stephan, H; Rieke, H; Filoda, K; Sonntag, H

    1998-10-01

    Variation of the arterial carbon dioxide partial pressure (PaCO2) is not uncommon in anesthetic practice. However, little is known about the myocardial consequences of respiratory alkalosis and acidosis, particularly in patients with coronary artery disease. The aim of the current study was to investigate the effects of variation in PaCO2 on myocardial blood flow (MBF), metabolism, and systemic hemodynamics in patients before elective coronary artery bypass graft surgery. In 10 male anesthetized patients, measurements of MBF, myocardial contractility, metabolism, and systemic hemodynamics were made in a randomized sequence at PaCO2 levels of 30, 40, and 50 mmHg, respectively. The MBF was measured using the Kety-Schmidt technique with argon as a tracer. End-diastolic left ventricular pressure and the maximal increase of left ventricular pressure were assessed using a manometer-tipped catheter. The cardiac index significantly changed with varying PaCO2 levels (hypocapnia, - 9%; hypercapnia, 13%). This reaction was associated with inverse changes in systemic vascular resistance index levels. The MBF significantly increased by 15% during hypercapnia, whereas no change was found during hypocapnia. Myocardial oxygen and glucose uptake and the maximal increase of left ventricular pressure were not affected by varying PaCO2 levels. In anesthetized patients with coronary artery disease, short-term variations in PaCO2 have significant effects on MBF but do not influence global myocardial oxygen and glucose uptake. Changes in systemic hemodynamics associated with respiratory alkalosis and acidosis are caused by changes in systemic vascular resistance rather than by alterations in myocardial contractility.

  9. A 3-year old girl with seizures, hypokalemia and metabolic alkalosis

    OpenAIRE

    Harnisch, E; Leertouwer, T; Cransberg, K.; Kist-van Holthe, J E

    2010-01-01

    A 3-year-old girl presented to the emergency department with seizures, low-grade fever and vomiting. She had tachycardia and a slow capillary refill. Blood pressure could not be measured. Because of suspected sepsis and/or meningo-encephalitis, broad spectrum antibiotics and antiviral medication were given together, along with volume expansion and anticonvulsive therapy. A few hours later, after a second seizure, the blood pressure was extremely high (156/116 mm Hg). The girl was treated with...

  10. Citrate metabolism and its complications in non-massive blood transfusions: association with decompensated metabolic alkalosis+respiratory acidosis and serum electrolyte levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bıçakçı, Zafer; Olcay, Lale

    2014-06-01

    Metabolic alkalosis, which is a non-massive blood transfusion complication, is not reported in the literature although metabolic alkalosis dependent on citrate metabolism is reported to be a massive blood transfusion complication. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of elevated carbon dioxide production due to citrate metabolism and serum electrolyte imbalance in patients who received frequent non-massive blood transfusions. Fifteen inpatients who were diagnosed with different conditions and who received frequent blood transfusions (10-30 ml/kg/day) were prospectively evaluated. Patients who had initial metabolic alkalosis (bicarbonate>26 mmol/l), who needed at least one intensive blood transfusion in one-to-three days for a period of at least 15 days, and whose total transfusion amount did not fit the massive blood transfusion definition (acidosis developed as a result of citrate metabolism. There was a positive correlation between cumulative amount of citrate and the use of fresh frozen plasma, venous blood pH, ionized calcium, serum-blood gas sodium and mortality, whereas there was a negative correlation between cumulative amount of citrate and serum calcium levels, serum phosphorus levels and amount of urine chloride. In non-massive, but frequent blood transfusions, elevated carbon dioxide production due to citrate metabolism causes intracellular acidosis. As a result of intracellular acidosis compensation, decompensated metabolic alkalosis+respiratory acidosis and electrolyte imbalance may develop. This situation may contribute to the increase in mortality. In conclusion, it should be noted that non-massive, but frequent blood transfusions may result in certain complications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Too slow, for Milton

    OpenAIRE

    Armstrong, N.

    2011-01-01

    Too slow, for Milton was written in 2011, as part of a memorial project for Milton Babbitt. The piece borrows harmonies from Babbitt's Composition for 12 Instruments (harmonies which Babbitt had in turn borrowed from Schoenberg's Ode to Napoleon), but unfolds them as part of a musical texture characterised by repetition, resonance, and a slow rate of change. As Babbitt once told me that my music was 'too slow', this seemed an appropriately obstinate form of homage.

  12. Effects of pre-exercise alkalosis on the decrease in VO2 at the end of all-out exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Claire; Delfour-Peyrethon, Rémi; Bishop, David J; Perrey, Stéphane; Leprêtre, Pierre-Marie; Dorel, Sylvain; Hanon, Christine

    2016-01-01

    This study determined the effects of pre-exercise sodium bicarbonate ingestion (ALK) on changes in oxygen uptake (VO2) at the end of a supramaximal exercise test (SXT). Eleven well-trained cyclists completed a 70-s all-out cycling effort, in double-blind trials, after oral ingestion of either 0.3 g kg(-1) of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) or 0.2 g kg(-1) body mass of calcium carbonate (PLA). Blood samples were taken to assess changes in acid-base balance before the start of the supramaximal exercise, and 0, 5 and 8 min after the exercise; ventilatory parameters were also measured at rest and during the SXT. At the end of the PLA trial, which induced mild acidosis (blood pH = 7.20), subjects presented a significant decrease in VO2 (P decrease in minute ventilation (VE) during the SXT (r = 0.70, P decrease in VO2 in eleven well-trained participants (PLA:12.5 ± 2.1 % and ALK: 4.9 ± 0.9 %, P decrease in mean power output was significantly less pronounced in ALK (P decrease between PLA and ALK trials were positively related to changes in the VE decrease (r = 0.74, P 0.05). Pre-exercise alkalosis counteracted the VO2 decrease related to mild acidosis, potentially as a result of changes in VE and in muscle acid-base status during the all-out supramaximal exercise.

  13. Rare mutation in the SLC26A3 transporter causes life-long diarrhoea with metabolic alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou Ziki, Maen D; Verjee, Mohamud A

    2015-01-07

    SLC26A3, a chloride/bicarbonate transporter mainly expressed in the intestines, plays a pivotal role in chloride absorption. We present a 23-year-old woman with a history of congenital chloride diarrhoea (CCD) and renal transplant who was admitted for rehydration and treatment of acute kidney injury after she presented with an acute diarrhoeal episode. Laboratory investigations confirmed metabolic alkalosis and severe hypochloraemia, consistent with her underlying CCD. This contrasts with most other forms of diarrhoea, which are normally associated with metabolic acidosis. Genetic testing was offered and revealed a homozygous non-sense mutation in SLC26A3 (Gly-187-Stop). This loss-of-function mutation results in bicarbonate retention in the blood and chloride loss into the intestinal lumen. Symptomatic management with daily NaCl and KCl oral syrups was supplemented with omeprazole therapy. The loss of her own kidneys is most likely due to crystal-induced nephropathy secondary to chronic volume contraction and chloride depletion. This case summarises the pathophysiology and management of CCD.

  14. Transformer Industry Productivity Slows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Phyllis Flohr

    1981-01-01

    Annual productivity increases averaged 2.4 percent during 1963-79, slowing since 1972 to 1.5 percent; computer-assisted design and product standardization aided growth in output per employee-hour. (Author)

  15. Slow light beam splitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yanhong; Klein, Mason; Hohensee, Michael; Jiang, Liang; Phillips, David F; Lukin, Mikhail D; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2008-07-25

    We demonstrate a slow light beam splitter using rapid coherence transport in a wall-coated atomic vapor cell. We show that particles undergoing random and undirected classical motion can mediate coherent interactions between two or more optical modes. Coherence, written into atoms via electromagnetically induced transparency using an input optical signal at one transverse position, spreads out via ballistic atomic motion, is preserved by an antirelaxation wall coating, and is then retrieved in outgoing slow light signals in both the input channel and a spatially-separated second channel. The splitting ratio between the two output channels can be tuned by adjusting the laser power. The slow light beam splitter may improve quantum repeater performance and be useful as an all-optical dynamically reconfigurable router.

  16. Central lactic acidosis, hyperventilation, and respiratory alkalosis: leading clinical features in a 3-year-old boy with malignant meningeal melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blüher, Susann; Schulz, Manuela; Bierbach, Uta; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Tröbs, Ralf-Bodo; Hirsch, Wolfgang; Schober, Ralf; Kiess, Wieland; Siekmeyer, Werner

    2008-04-01

    Meningeal tumors are extremely rare in children and are diagnostically as well as therapeutically challenging. Among the least common types of malignancies in childhood is malignant melanoma, counting for less than 1% of pediatric tumors. Due to the rarity and the wide spectrum of appearance, initial clinical features may be misleading. A 3-year-old boy was referred to our hospital with symptoms of hyperventilation, dyspnoea, tachycardia, respiratory alkalosis, inarticulate speech, and fatigue. Measurement of pH in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) yielded central lactic acidosis despite alkalosis in peripheral blood. Diagnostic imaging procedures as well as histology and immunohistochemistry revealed the diagnosis of a malignant meningeal melanoma. We hypothesize that central lactate production of the tumor nests might have induced central acidification, thus inducing hyperventilation by stimulation of central chemoreceptors. This case is a model example of the key role of central pH as an inducer/suppressor of ventilation in humans and illustrates the critical importance of central pH for regulating both ventilation and acid-base homeostasis. Thus, pH of CSF should be measured whenever a malignant brain tumor is suspected.

  17. Delay in onset of metabolic alkalosis during regional citrate anti-coagulation in continous renal replacement therapy with calcium-free replacement solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    See Kay

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Regional citrate anti-coagulation for continuous renal replacement therapy chelates calcium to produce the anti- coagulation effect. We hypothesise that a calcium-free replacement solution will require less citrate and produce fewer metabolic side effects. Fifty patients, in a Medical Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary teaching hospital (25 in each group, received continuous venovenous hemofiltration using either calcium-containing or calcium-free replacement solutions. Both groups had no significant differences in filter life, metabolic alkalosis, hypernatremia, hypocalcemia, and hypercalcemia. However, patients using calcium-containing solution developed metabolic alkalosis earlier, compared to patients using calcium-free solution (mean 24.6 hours,CI 0.8-48.4 vs. 37.2 hours, CI 9.4-65, P = 0.020. When calcium-containing replacement solution was used, more citrate was required (mean 280ml/h, CI 227.2-332.8 vs. 265ml/h, CI 203.4-326.6, P = 0.069, but less calcium was infused (mean 21.2 ml/h, CI 1.2-21.2 vs 51.6ml/h, CI 26.8-76.4, P ≤ 0.0001.

  18. The effects of respiratory alkalosis and acidosis on net bicarbonate flux along the rat loop of Henle in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, R; Stidwell, R; Taylor, S; Capasso, G

    1997-11-01

    We have studied the effects of acute respiratory alkalosis (ARALK, hyperventilation) and acidosis (ARA, 8% CO2), chronic respiratory acidosis (CRA; 10% CO2 for 7-10 days), and subsequent recovery from CRA breathing air on loop of Henle (LOH) net bicarbonate flux (JHCO3) by in vivo tubule microperfusion in anesthetized rats. In ARALK blood, pH increased to 7.6, and blood bicarbonate concentration ([HCO3-]) decreased from 29 to 22 mM. Fractional urinary bicarbonate excretion (FEHCO3) increased threefold, but LOH JHCO3 was unchanged. In ARA, blood pH fell to 7.2, and blood [HCO3-] rose from 28 to 34 mM; FEHCO3 was reduced to 50 mM, whereas FEHCO3 decreased to < 0.1%. JHCO3 was reduced by approximately 30%. Bicarbonaturia occurred when CRA rats breathed air, yet LOH JHCO3 increased (by 30%) to normal. These results suggest that LOH JHCO3 is affected by the blood-to-tubule lumen [HCO3-] gradient and HCO3- backflux. When the usual perfusing solution at 20 nl/min was made HCO3- free, mean JHCO3 was -34.5 +/- 4.4 pmol/min compared with 210 +/- 28.1 pmol/min plus HCO3-. When a low-NaCl perfusate (to minimize net fluid absorption) containing mannitol and acetazolamide (2 x 10(-4) M, to abolish H(+)-dependent JHCO3) was used, JHCO3 was -112.8 +/- 5.6 pmol/min. Comparable values for JHCO3 at 10 nl/min were -35.9 +/- 5.8 and -72.5 +/- 8.8 pmol/min, respectively. These data indicate significant backflux of HCO3-along the LOH, which depends on the blood-to-lumen [HCO3-] gradient; in addition to any underlying changes in active acid-base transport mechanisms, HCO3- permeability and backflux are important determinants of LOH JHCO3 in vivo.

  19. Slowing Kidney Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... takes years of daily use for NSAIDs to cause CKD. But, once CKD is present, NSAIDs can make ... in the wrong places can “oxidize” and cause damage, a lot like rust. Antioxidants ... Fish oil can help slow CKD that is caused by a disease called IgA ...

  20. Slowed Exports Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The first half of 2010 is showing that the impacts of the financial crisis are still lingering.Zhao Jinping,a researcher at the Development Research Center of the State Council,says that the possible implementation of exit strategies in developed countries may deal a heavy blow to a global rally,and it will certainly result in slowed exports growth for China.Zhao published his opinion in the China Economic Times.The first part was published in issue No.33.Edited excerpts of the second part follow:

  1. Severe metabolic alkalosis, hypokalemia, and respiratory acidosis induced by the Chinese herbal medicine yokukansan in an elderly patient with muscle weakness and drowsiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shunsuke; Tokumoto, Masanori; Kansui, Yasuo; Wakisaka, Yoshinobu; Uchizono, Yuji; Tsuruya, Kazuhiko; Ooboshi, Hiroaki

    2013-05-01

    Yokukansan is a Chinese herbal medicine containing licorice that has been shown to alleviate the behavioral and psychological symptoms of Alzheimer's disease, with few adverse effects. Increasing numbers of patients with Alzheimer's disease in Japan are now being treated with this drug. However, yokukansan should be used with caution because of its potential to induce pseudoaldosteronism through the inhibition of 11-beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2, which metabolizes cortisol into cortisone. We present the case of an 88-year-old woman with a history of Alzheimer's disease who was transferred to our emergency department because of drowsiness, anorexia, and muscle weakness. Her blood pressure was 168/90 mmHg. Laboratory data showed serum potassium of 1.9 mmol/l, metabolic alkalosis (pH 7.54; HCO 3(-) , 50.5 mmol/l; chloride, 81 mmol/l; sodium, 140 mmol/l), and respiratory disorders (pCO2, 60.5 mmHg; pO2, 63.8 mmHg). Plasma renin activity and aldosterone concentration were suppressed, and urinary potassium excretion was 22 mmol/l (calculated transtubular potassium gradient 12.9). An electrocardiogram showed flat T-waves and U-waves with ventricular premature contractions. Echocardiography denied volume depletion. Medical interview disclosed that she had been treated with a Chinese herbal medicine (yokukansan) containing licorice. The final diagnosis was pseudoaldosteronism and respiratory acidosis induced by licorice. Hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, and respiratory acidosis all subsided shortly after the discontinuation of yokukansan and initiation of intravenous potassium replacement. This case highlights the need for nephrologists to consider the possible involvement of Chinese herbal medicines, including yokukansan, when they encounter hypokalemia in elderly patients.

  2. V-H+ -ATPase translocation during blood alkalosis in dogfish gills: interaction with carbonic anhydrase and involvement in the postfeeding alkaline tide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Parks, Scott K; Wood, Chris M; Goss, Greg G

    2007-05-01

    We investigated the involvement of carbonic anhydrase (CA) in mediating V-H(+)-ATPase translocation into the basolateral membrane in gills of alkalotic Squalus acanthias. Immunolabeling revealed that CA is localized in the same cells as V-H(+)-ATPase. Blood plasma from dogfish injected with acetazolamide [30 mg/kg at time (t) = 0 and 6 h] and infused with NaHCO(3) for 12 h (1,000 microeq.kg(-1).h(-1)) had significantly higher plasma HCO(3)(-) concentration than fish that were infused with NaHCO(3) alone (28.72 +/- 0.41 vs. 6.57 +/- 2.47 mmol/l, n = 3), whereas blood pH was similar in both treatments (8.03 +/- 0.11 vs. 8.04 +/- 0.11 pH units at t = 12 h). CA inhibition impaired V-H(+)-ATPase translocation into the basolateral membrane, as estimated from immunolabeled gill sections and Western blotting on gill cell membranes (0.24 +/- 0.08 vs. 1.00 +/- 0.28 arbitrary units, n = 3; P < 0.05). We investigated V-H(+)-ATPase translocation during a postfeeding alkalosis ("alkaline tide"). Gill samples were taken 24-26 h after dogfish were fed to satiety in a natural-like feeding regime. Immunolabeled gill sections revealed that V-H(+)-ATPase translocated to the basolateral membrane in the postfed fish. Confirming this result, V-H(+)-ATPase abundance was twofold higher in gill cell membranes of the postfed fish than in fasted fish (n = 4-5; P < 0.05). These results indicate that 1) intracellular H(+) or HCO(3)(-) produced by CA (and not blood pH or HCO(3)(-)) is likely the stimulus that triggers the V-H(+)-ATPase translocation into the basolateral membrane in alkalotic fish and 2) V-H(+)-ATPase translocation is important for enhanced HCO(3)(-) secretion during a naturally occurring postfeeding alkalosis.

  3. Slow change deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhoff, John G; Wayand, Joseph; Ndiaye, Mamoudou C; Berkow, Ann B; Bertacchi, Breanna R; Benton, Catherine A

    2015-05-01

    In four experiments, we demonstrated a new phenomenon called "slow-change deafness." In Experiment 1 we presented listeners with continuous speech that changed three semitones in pitch over time, and we found that nearly 50 % failed to notice the change. Experiments 2 and 3 replicated the finding, demonstrated that the changes in the stimuli were well above threshold, and showed that when listeners were alerted to the possibility of a change, detection rates improved dramatically. Experiment 4 showed that increasing the magnitude of the change that occurred in the stimulus decreased the rate of change deafness. Our results are consistent with previous work that had shown that cueing listeners to potential auditory changes can significantly reduce change deafness. These findings support an account of change deafness that is dependent on both the magnitude of a stimulus change and listener expectations.

  4. Slowed Exports Growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Ⅲ. Slowed export recovery in the second half Since the beginning of this year, global trade has maintained a recovery growth thanks to the worldwide economic rally.From January to April, the imports of three major Economics--the United States, the euro zone and Japan--rose 17.5 percent on average from a year ago. Import growths for the United States, the euro zone and Japan were 20.9 percent, 4.8 percent and 29 percent, respectively, which spurred China's exports to those regions. From January to June this year, China's exports totaled $705.09 billion, up 35.2 percent from the same period in 2009 and were 5.8 percent higher than the first half of 2008 when the crisis had yet to begin. Those figures indicated China's exports had rebounded to precrisis levels.

  5. Slow Scan Telemedicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Originally developed under contract for NASA by Ball Bros. Research Corporation for acquiring visual information from lunar and planetary spacecraft, system uses standard closed circuit camera connected to a device called a scan converter, which slows the stream of images to match an audio circuit, such as a telephone line. Transmitted to its destination, the image is reconverted by another scan converter and displayed on a monitor. In addition to assist scans, technique allows transmission of x-rays, nuclear scans, ultrasonic imagery, thermograms, electrocardiograms or live views of patient. Also allows conferencing and consultation among medical centers, general practitioners, specialists and disease control centers. Commercialized by Colorado Video, Inc., major employment is in business and industry for teleconferencing, cable TV news, transmission of scientific/engineering data, security, information retrieval, insurance claim adjustment, instructional programs, and remote viewing of advertising layouts, real estate, construction sites or products.

  6. Slow frictional waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    Stick-slip, manifest as intermittent tangential motion between two dry solid surfaces, is a friction instability that governs diverse phenomena from automobile brake squeals to earthquakes. We show, using high-speed in situ imaging of an adhesive polymer interface, that low velocity stick-slip is fundamentally of three kinds, corresponding to passage of three different surface waves -- separation pulses, slip pulses and the well-known Schallamach waves. These waves, traveling much slower than elastic waves, have clear distinguishing properties. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves involve local interface separation, and propagate in opposite directions while slip pulses are characterized by a sharp stress front and do not display any interface detachment. A change in the stick-slip mode from separation to slip pulse is effected simply by increasing the normal force. Together, these three waves constitute all possible stick-slip modes in adhesive friction and are shown to have direct analogues in muscular locomotory waves in soft bodied invertebrates. A theory for slow wave propagation is also presented which is capable of explaining the attendant interface displacements, velocities and stresses.

  7. A Case for Slow Reading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Ostercamp

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This essay makes a case for the value of slow or deep reading.  Inspired by the Slow Food movement it seeks to apply their principles to reading.  It begins by exploring the meaning of information and how like food, information has come to be regarded as a commodity.  Drawing upon the philosophy of Albert Borgmann, it counters the prevalent commodity view of information by offering an alternative paradigm that connects careful reading to human flourishing.  It argues that by connecting information to pleasure and community, slow reading advocates can have comparable success to that enjoyed by the slow food movement.

  8. Slow light and slow acoustic phonons in optophononic resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villafañe, V.; Soubelet, P.; Bruchhausen, A. E.; Lanzillotti-Kimura, N. D.; Jusserand, B.; Lemaître, A.; Fainstein, A.

    2016-11-01

    Slow and confined light have been exploited in optoelectronics to enhance light-matter interactions. Here we describe the GaAs/AlAs semiconductor microcavity as a device that, depending on the excitation conditions, either confines or slows down both light and optically generated acoustic phonons. The localization of photons and phonons in the same place of space amplifies optomechanical processes. Picosecond laser pulses are used to study through time-resolved reflectivity experiments the coupling between photons and both confined and slow acoustic phonons when the laser is tuned either with the cavity (confined) optical mode or with the stop-band edge (slow) optical modes. A model that fully takes into account the modified propagation of the acoustic phonons and light in these resonant structures is used to describe the laser detuning dependence of the coherently generated phonon spectra and amplitude under these different modes of laser excitation. We observe that confined light couples only to confined mechanical vibrations, while slow light can generate both confined and slow coherent vibrations. A strong enhancement of the optomechanical coupling using confined photons and vibrations, and also with properly designed slow photon and phonon modes, is demonstrated. The prospects for the use of these optoelectronic devices in confined and slow optomechanics are addressed.

  9. Slow Tourism: Exploring the discourses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guiver

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ‘Slow travel’ and ‘slow tourism’ are relatively new, but contested, concepts. This paper examines the meanings ascribed to them in the academic literature and websites targeted at potential tourists. It finds concurrence on aspects of savouring time at the destination and investing time to appreciate the locality, its people, history, culture and products, but detects different emphases. The academic literature stresses the benefits to the destination and global sustainability, while the websites focus on the personal benefits and ways of becoming a ‘slow tourist’. Food and drink epitomise the immersion in and absorption of the destination and the multi-dimensional tourism experience, contrasted with the superficiality of mainstream tourism. The paper discusses whether tourists practising slow tourism without using the label are slow tourists or not.

  10. Birth control - slow release methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007555.htm Birth control - slow release methods To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Certain birth control methods contain man-made forms of hormones. These ...

  11. Slow light in flight imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, Kali; Gariepy, Genevieve; Henderson, Robert; Howell, John; Faccio, Daniele

    2016-01-01

    Slow-light media are of interest in the context of quantum computing and enhanced measurement of quantum effects, with particular emphasis on using slow-light with single photons. We use light-in-flight imaging with a single photon avalanche diode camera-array to image in situ pulse propagation through a slow light medium consisting of heated rubidium vapour. Light-in-flight imaging of slow light propagation enables direct visualisation of a series of physical effects including simultaneous observation of spatial pulse compression and temporal pulse dispersion. Additionally, the single-photon nature of the camera allows for observation of the group velocity of single photons with measured single-photon fractional delays greater than 1 over 1 cm of propagation.

  12. Perovskite photovoltaics: Slow recombination unveiled

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Jacques-E.

    2017-01-01

    One of the most salient features of hybrid lead halide perovskites is the extended lifetime of their photogenerated charge carriers. This property has now been shown experimentally to originate from a slow, thermally activated recombination process.

  13. The Potential of/for 'Slow': Slow Tourists and Slow Destinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guiver

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Slow tourism practices are nothing new; in fact, they were once the norm and still are for millions of people whose annual holiday is spent camping, staying in caravans, rented accommodation, with friends and relations or perhaps in a second home, who immerse themselves in their holiday environment, eat local food, drink local wine and walk or cycle around the area. So why a special edition about slow tourism? Like many aspects of life once considered normal (such as organic farming or free-range eggs, the emergence of new practices has highlighted differences and prompted a re-evaluation of once accepted practices and values. In this way, the concept of ‘slow tourism’ has recently appeared as a type of tourism that contrasts with many contemporary mainstream tourism practices. It has also been associated with similar trends already ‘branded’ slow: slow food and cittaslow (slow towns and concepts such as mindfulness, savouring and well-being.

  14. Recovery from blood alkalosis in the Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stoutii): involvement of gill V-H+-ATPase and Na+/K+-ATPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresguerres, Martin; Parks, Scott K; Goss, Greg G

    2007-09-01

    To investigate the base secretory mechanisms in the Pacific hagfish (Eptatretus stoutii), we injected animals with NaHCO3 into the subcutaneous sinus. In the first series of experiments, hagfish were injected with 6000 micromol kg(-1) NaHCO3 (base-infused hagfish, BIH) or NaCl (controls). Blood pH increased significantly 1 h after injection in BIH (8.05+/-0.05 vs. 7.82+/-0.03 pH units), but returned to control values by t=6 h. Plasma total CO2 (TCO2) followed the same pattern. Immunolabeled sections revealed that Na+/K+-ATPase and V-H+-ATPase were usually located in the same cells. Western blotting revealed that the abundance of both proteins remained unchanged in whole gill homogenates and in a fraction enriched in cell membranes 6 h after the injections. The second experimental series was to induce long-term alkalosis by serially injecting 6000 micromol kg(-1) NaHCO3 every 6 h for 24 h. Blood pH completely recovered from the base loads within 6 h after each injection. Moreover, plasma TCO2 was not elevated 3 h after the second infusion, suggesting that HCO3(-) secreting mechanisms had been upregulated by that time. Na+/K+-ATPase and V-H+-ATPase cellular localizations did not change in the 24 h base infusion protocol. Na+/K+-ATPase abundance was similar in gill homogenates from fish from both treatments. However, Na+/K+-ATPase abundance in the membrane fraction was significantly lower in BIH, while V-H+-ATPase was greater both in whole gill and membrane fractions. Our results suggest that differential insertion of V-H+-ATPase and Na+/K+-ATPase into the basolateral membrane is involved in recovering from alkalotic stress in hagfish.

  15. Dose from slow negative muons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siiskonen, T

    2008-01-01

    Conversion coefficients from fluence to ambient dose equivalent, from fluence to maximum dose equivalent and quality factors for slow negative muons are examined in detail. Negative muons, when stopped, produce energetic photons, electrons and a variety of high-LET particles. Contribution from each particle type to the dose equivalent is calculated. The results show that for the high-LET particles the details of energy spectra and decay yields are important for accurate dose estimates. For slow negative muons the ambient dose equivalent does not always yield a conservative estimate for the protection quantities. Especially, the skin equivalent dose is strongly underestimated if the radiation-weighting factor of unity for slow muons is used. Comparisons to earlier studies are presented.

  16. Diffusion theory of slow responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李景德; 陈敏; 郑凤; 周镇宏

    1997-01-01

    When an action is applied to a macroscopic substance, there is a particular sort of slow response he sides the well-known fast response. Using diffusion theory, the characteristics of slow response in dielectric, elastic, piezoelectric, and pyroelectric relaxation may he explained A time domain spectroscopy method suitable for slow and fast responses in linear and nonlinear effects is given. Every relaxation mechanism contributes a peak in differential spectroscopy, and its position, height, and line shape show the dynamical properties of the mechanism The method of frequency domain spectroscopy is suitable only for linear fast response. Time domain spectroscopy is another nonequiv-alent powerful method. The theory is confirmed by a lot of experimental data

  17. Obsessional slowness: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Wendy; Wong, Karen W; Fulks, Mary-Ann; Holsti, Liisa

    2008-10-01

    Obsessional slowness is a rare psychiatric disorder with few treatment options and limited research to date. Some suggest that targeted behavioural interventions may reduce the time taken for functional daily activities. To examine whether a behavioural intervention would reduce the amount of time taken for an adolescent with obsessional slowness to walk to class. A single-subject A-B-A withdrawal design was incorporated into this case study. The treatment involved one-to-one pacing and prompting during the subject's walk to gym class. Walking times to gym class were measured during a baseline phase, during a one-month treatment phase, and during a post-treatment follow-up phase. The subject's walking times decreased during the treatment phase. Post-treatment walking times suggested a carry-over effect. This study adds to the sparse evidence on treatments for obsessional slowness and suggests occupation-based treatment options.

  18. Periodic solutions and slow manifolds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhulst, F.

    2006-01-01

    After reviewing a number of results from geometric singular perturbation theory, we give an example of a theorem for periodic solutions in a slow manifold. This is illustrated by examples involving the van der Pol-equation and a modified logistic equation. Regarding nonhyperbolic transitions we disc

  19. Cold and Slow Molecular Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Hsin-I; Wright, Matthew J; Patterson, Dave; Doyle, John M

    2011-01-01

    Employing a two-stage cryogenic buffer gas cell, we produce a cold, hydrodynamically extracted beam of calcium monohydride molecules with a near effusive velocity distribution. Beam dynamics, thermalization and slowing are studied using laser spectroscopy. The key to this hybrid, effusive-like beam source is a "slowing cell" placed immediately after a hydrodynamic, cryogenic source [Patterson et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2007, 126, 154307]. The resulting CaH beams are created in two regimes. One modestly boosted beam has a forward velocity of vf = 65 m/s, a narrow velocity spread, and a flux of 10^9 molecules per pulse. The other has the slowest forward velocity of vf = 40 m/s, a longitudinal temperature of 3.6 K, and a flux of 5x10^8 molecules per pulse.

  20. Research Development and Perspective on Slow Slip, Tremors, and Slow Earthquakes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yanzhao; Shen Zhengkang

    2007-01-01

    Seismological and geodetic observations indicate that slow slip sometimes occurs in active fault zones beneath the seismogenic depth, and large slow slip can result in transient ground motion.Slow earthquakes, on the other hand, emit tremor-like signals within a narrow frequency band, and usually produce no catastrophic consequences. In general, slow slip and slow earthquakes probably correspond to deformation processes associated with releasing elastic energy in fault zones, and understanding their mechanisms may help improve our understanding of fault zone dynamic processes. This article reviews the research progress on slow slip and slow earthquakes over the last decade. Crustal motion and tremor activities associated with slow slip and slow earthquakes have been investigated extensively, mainly involving locating sources of slow slip and slow earthquakes and numerical modeling of their processes. In the meantime, debates have continued about slow slip and slow earthquakes,such as their origins, relationship, and mechanisms.

  1. Inherited ataxia with slow saccades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R T Chakor

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ataxia is a symptom of cerebellar dysfunction. Slowly progressive ataxia, dysarthria in an adult with a positive family history suggests an inherited cerebellar ataxia. We present an adult with gradually progressive ataxia and slow saccades. There was history of similar illness in his son. Genetic testing for spinocerebellar ataxia 2 was positive. We discuss the various inherited ataxias, causes of acute, progressive ataxia syndromes, episodic ataxias and ataxia associated with other neurological signs like peripheral neuropathy, pyramidal features, movement disorders and cognitive decline.

  2. Can Occupational Therapy Slow Alzheimer's Decline?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... news/fullstory_162135.html Can Occupational Therapy Slow Alzheimer's Decline? Patients, caregivers may reap some benefits, but ... slow down the physical decline that comes with Alzheimer's disease, a new clinical trial suggests. The study ...

  3. Integrated Photonics Enabled by Slow Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Chen, Yuntian; Ek, Sara;

    2012-01-01

    In this talk we will discuss the physics of slow light in semiconductor materials and in particular the possibilities offered for integrated photonics. This includes ultra-compact slow light enabled optical amplifiers, lasers and pulse sources.......In this talk we will discuss the physics of slow light in semiconductor materials and in particular the possibilities offered for integrated photonics. This includes ultra-compact slow light enabled optical amplifiers, lasers and pulse sources....

  4. Slowing Down in Chemical Tristability Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN,Ye-Hong(詹业宏); ZHANG,Chun-Hua(张春华); WU,Fu-Gen(吴福根); HU,Yi-Hua(胡义华)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper two kinds of slowing down in the chamical tristability systems are studied. One is the critical slowing down at the edges of tristable reion, and the other is the slowing down far from the critical point, which has much to do with the unstable steady-points. The results possess some universal propererties.

  5. Slow Monitoring Systems for CUORE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Suryabrata; Cuore Collaboration

    2016-09-01

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is a ton-scale neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment under construction at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS). The experiment is comprised of 988 TeO2 bolometric crystals arranged into 19 towers and operated at a temperature of 10 mK. We have developed slow monitoring systems to monitor the cryostat during detector installation, commissioning, data taking, and other crucial phases of the experiment. Our systems use responsive LabVIEW virtual instruments and video streams of the cryostat. We built a website using the Angular, Bootstrap, and MongoDB frameworks to display this data in real-time. The website can also display archival data and send alarms. I will present how we constructed these slow monitoring systems to be robust, accurate, and secure, while maintaining reliable access for the entire collaboration from any platform in order to ensure efficient communications and fast diagnoses of all CUORE systems.

  6. The TTI slowness surface approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Stovas, A.

    2011-01-01

    The relation between the vertical and horizontal slownesses, better known as the dispersion relation, for a transversely isotropic media with titled symmetry axis {left parenthesis, less than bracket}TTI{right parenthesis, greater than bracket} requires solving a quartic polynomial, which does not admit a practical explicit solution to be used, for example, in downward continuation. Using a combination of perturbation theory with respect to the anelliptic parameter and Shanks transform to improve the accuracy of the expansion, we develop an explicit formula for the dispersion relation that is highly accurate for all practical purposes. It also reveals some insights into the anisotropy parameter dependency of the dispersion relation including the low impact that the anelliptic parameter has on the vertical placement of reflectors for small tilt in the symmetry angle. © 2011 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  7. Plant domestication slows pest evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turcotte, Martin M; Lochab, Amaneet K; Turley, Nash E; Johnson, Marc T J

    2015-09-01

    Agricultural practices such as breeding resistant varieties and pesticide use can cause rapid evolution of pest species, but it remains unknown how plant domestication itself impacts pest contemporary evolution. Using experimental evolution on a comparative phylogenetic scale, we compared the evolutionary dynamics of a globally important economic pest - the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) - growing on 34 plant taxa, represented by 17 crop species and their wild relatives. Domestication slowed aphid evolution by 13.5%, maintained 10.4% greater aphid genotypic diversity and 5.6% higher genotypic richness. The direction of evolution (i.e. which genotypes increased in frequency) differed among independent domestication events but was correlated with specific plant traits. Individual-based simulation models suggested that domestication affects aphid evolution directly by reducing the strength of selection and indirectly by increasing aphid density and thus weakening genetic drift. Our results suggest that phenotypic changes during domestication can alter pest evolutionary dynamics.

  8. Highly Alfvenic Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D. Aaron

    2010-01-01

    It is commonly thought that fast solar wind tends to be highly Alfvenic, with strong correlations between velocity and magnetic fluctuations, but examples have been known for over 20 years in which slow wind is both Alfvenic and has many other properties more typically expected of fast solar wind. This paper will present a search for examples of such flows from more recent data, and will begin to characterize the general characteristics of them. A very preliminary search suggests that such intervals are more common in the rising phase of the solar cycle. These intervals are important for providing constraints on models of solar wind acceleration, and in particular the role waves might or might not play in that process.

  9. Traditional Procurement is too Slow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Kong

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on an exploratory interview survey of construction project participants aimed at identifying the reasons for the decrease in use of the traditional, lump-sum, procurement system in Malaysia. The results show that most people believe it is too slow. This appears to be in part due to the contiguous nature of the various phase and stages of the process and especially the separation of the design and construction phases. The delays caused by disputes between the various parties are also seen as a contributory factor - the most prominent cause being the frequency of variations, with design and scope changes being a particular source of discontent. It is concluded that an up scaling of the whole of the time related reward/penalty system may be the most appropriate measure for the practice in future.

  10. Slow dynamics in proteins and polymer chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2013-02-01

    How a biological system can maintain in a non-equilibrium state for a very long time and why proteins aggregate are still not well understood. In this paper, we first review critical slow down of the Ising model and slow relaxation of a spin-glass model at low temperatures. The data indicate that relaxation of the spin glass model at low temperatures can be slower than the critical slowing down of the Ising model. We then review recent molecular dynamics results for the slow relaxation of polymer chains and experimental data for the glassy behavior of collagen fibrils. The slow dynamics in polymer chains and collagen fibrils can provide clues for understanding why a biological system can maintain in a non-equilibrium state for a very long time, and how to slow down protein aggregation related to neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Slow Tourism Now and in the Future

    OpenAIRE

    Soininen, Tiia

    2011-01-01

    This thesis consists of a research to a new tourism trend; slow tourism. Tourism industry alters continuously and new forms of tourism are created all the time. The focus was given to slow tourism and travel because it has begun during the last decade in Italy from Slow Movement and it is an encounter to speed travelling and mass tourism. Slow tourism was identified with travelling slowly, living in the local culture and valuing sustainability. The main goal in the research was to find o...

  12. Hypercapnia slows down proliferation and apoptosis of human bone marrow promyeloblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamad, Mouna; Irhimeh, Mohammad R; Abbas, Ali

    2016-09-01

    Stem cells are being applied in increasingly diverse fields of research and therapy; as such, growing and culturing them in scalable quantities would be a huge advantage for all concerned. Gas mixtures containing 5 % CO2 are a typical concentration for the in vitro culturing of cells. The effect of varying the CO2 concentration on promyeloblast KG-1a cells was investigated in this paper. KG-1a cells are characterized by high expression of CD34 surface antigen, which is an important clinical surface marker for human hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) transplantation. KG-1a cells were cultured in three CO2 concentrations (1, 5 and 15 %). Cells were batch-cultured and analyzed daily for viability, size, morphology, proliferation, and apoptosis using flow cytometry. No considerable differences were noted in KG-1a cell morphological properties at all three CO2 levels as they retained their myeloblast appearance. Calculated population doubling time increased with an increase in CO2 concentration. Enhanced cell proliferation was seen in cells cultured in hypercapnic conditions, in contrast to significantly decreased proliferation in hypocapnic populations. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that apoptosis was significantly (p = 0.0032) delayed in hypercapnic cultures, in parallel to accelerated apoptosis in hypocapnic ones. These results, which to the best of our knowledge are novel, suggest that elevated levels of CO2 are favored for the enhanced proliferation of bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells such as HSCs.

  13. Contraception. Slow train gathers speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, N; Kubba, A

    The otherwise slow pace of contraceptive research developments has recently quickened, with new products developed, more on the way, and encouraging new data emerging about existing methods. While the 1995 UK pill scare called attention to a differential in the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) between pills containing levonorgestrel or norethisterone and those containing desogestrel or gestodene, there is only an extremely small level of excess mortality attributable to third-generation progestogens, less than 2 per million women per year. Tentative evidence suggests that pills with less anti-estrogenic progestogens are neutral with regard to coronary artery disease. The pill remains extremely safe for healthy young women, although additional research with larger numbers of participants is warranted. Salient research findings are that the combined oral contraceptive pill may protect against colon cancer, the pill appears to offer no protection against bone fractures, new products contain less estrogen and have a shortened pill-free interval, a WHO paper showed no significant association between cardiovascular disease and the use of oral or injectable progestogens, a UK study showed no correlation between bone density and plasma estrogen concentrations among long-term users of depot medroxyprogesterone acetate, and a WHO controlled trial found a progestogen-only method of emergency contraception to be considerably more effective in preventing expected pregnancies than the Yuzpe regimen. The T 380 copper IUD provides very high protection against intrauterine and extrauterine pregnancies for 10 years and is now available in an improved inserting mechanism, the Mirena levonorgestrel-releasing IUD system is now licensed for 5 years, and the GyneFIX IUD implant is a frameless device fixed during insertion to the fundal myometrium.

  14. Slow Movement/Slow University: Critical Engagements. Introduction to the Thematic Section

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie O'Neill

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This thematic section emerged from two seminars that took place at Durham University in England in November 2013 and March 2014 on the possibilities for thinking through what a change movement towards slow might mean for the University. Slow movements have emerged in relation to a number of topics: Slow food, Citta slow and more recently, slow science. What motivated us in the seminars was to explore how far these movements could help us address the acceleration and intensification of work within our own and other universities, and indeed, what new learning, research, philosophies, practices, structures and governance might emerge. This editorial introduction presents the concept of the "slow university" and introduces our critical engagements with slow. The articles presented here interrogate the potentialities, challenges, problems and pitfalls of the slow university in an era of corporate culture and management rationality. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1403166

  15. Can Fast and Slow Intelligence Be Differentiated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partchev, Ivailo; De Boeck, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Responses to items from an intelligence test may be fast or slow. The research issue dealt with in this paper is whether the intelligence involved in fast correct responses differs in nature from the intelligence involved in slow correct responses. There are two questions related to this issue: 1. Are the processes involved different? 2. Are the…

  16. 49 CFR 236.813 - Speed, slow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Speed, slow. 236.813 Section 236.813 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Speed, slow. A speed not exceeding 20 miles per hour....

  17. Tandem queue with server slow-down

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.I. Miretskiy; W.R.W. Scheinhardt; M.R.H. Mandjes

    2007-01-01

    We study how rare events happen in the standard two-node tandem Jackson queue and in a generalization, the socalled slow-down network, see [2]. In the latter model the service rate of the first server depends on the number of jobs in the second queue: the first server slows down if the amount of job

  18. Slow-light pulses in moving media

    OpenAIRE

    Fiurasek, J.; Leonhardt, U.; Parentani, R.

    2000-01-01

    Slow light in moving media reaches a paradoxical regime when the flow speed of the medium approaches the group velocity of light. Pulses can penetrate a region where a counter-propagating flow exceeds the group velocity. When the counter-flow slows down pulses are reflected.

  19. Can fast and slow intelligence be differentiated?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Partchev, I.; de Boeck, P.

    2012-01-01

    Responses to items from an intelligence test may be fast or slow. The research issue dealt with in this paper is whether the intelligence involved in fast correct responses differs in nature from the intelligence involved in slow correct responses. There are two questions related to this issue: 1.

  20. Slow Movements of Bio-Inspired Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babikian, Sarine; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.; Kanso, Eva

    2016-10-01

    Slow and accurate finger and limb movements are essential to daily activities, but the underlying mechanics is relatively unexplored. Here, we develop a mathematical framework to examine slow movements of tendon-driven limbs that are produced by modulating the tendons' stiffness parameters. Slow limb movements are driftless in the sense that movement stops when actuations stop. We demonstrate, in the context of a planar tendon-driven system representing a finger, that the control of stiffness suffices to produce stable and accurate limb postures and quasi-static (slow) transitions among them. We prove, however, that stable postures are achievable only when tendons are pretensioned, i.e., they cannot become slack. Our results further indicate that a non-smoothness in slow movements arises because the precision with which individual stiffnesses need to be altered changes substantially throughout the limb's motion.

  1. Connecting slow earthquakes to huge earthquakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Kazushige; Kato, Aitaro

    2016-07-15

    Slow earthquakes are characterized by a wide spectrum of fault slip behaviors and seismic radiation patterns that differ from those of traditional earthquakes. However, slow earthquakes and huge megathrust earthquakes can have common slip mechanisms and are located in neighboring regions of the seismogenic zone. The frequent occurrence of slow earthquakes may help to reveal the physics underlying megathrust events as useful analogs. Slow earthquakes may function as stress meters because of their high sensitivity to stress changes in the seismogenic zone. Episodic stress transfer to megathrust source faults leads to an increased probability of triggering huge earthquakes if the adjacent locked region is critically loaded. Careful and precise monitoring of slow earthquakes may provide new information on the likelihood of impending huge earthquakes.

  2. Connecting slow earthquakes to huge earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obara, Kazushige; Kato, Aitaro

    2016-07-01

    Slow earthquakes are characterized by a wide spectrum of fault slip behaviors and seismic radiation patterns that differ from those of traditional earthquakes. However, slow earthquakes and huge megathrust earthquakes can have common slip mechanisms and are located in neighboring regions of the seismogenic zone. The frequent occurrence of slow earthquakes may help to reveal the physics underlying megathrust events as useful analogs. Slow earthquakes may function as stress meters because of their high sensitivity to stress changes in the seismogenic zone. Episodic stress transfer to megathrust source faults leads to an increased probability of triggering huge earthquakes if the adjacent locked region is critically loaded. Careful and precise monitoring of slow earthquakes may provide new information on the likelihood of impending huge earthquakes.

  3. Slow light Mach-Zehnder fiber interferometer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yundong Zhang; Jinfang Wang; Xuenan Zhang; Hao Wu; Yuanxue Cai; Jing Zhang; Ping Yuan

    2012-01-01

    A slow light structure Mach-Zehnder fiber interferometer is theoretically demonstrated.The sensitivity of the interferometer is significantly enhanced by the dispersion of the slow light structure.The numerical results show that the sensitivity enhancement factor varies with the coupling coefficient and reaches its maximum under critical coupling conditions.Interferometers have been investigated in relation to their applications in fields such as metrology[1],optical sensing[2],optical communication[3,4],quantum information processing[5],and biomedical engineering[6].A number of schemes have been proposed to improve the performance of interferometers[7],such as using photonic crystal structures to minimize the size of on-chip devices[8],utilizing the dispersive property of semiconductor to enhance the spectral sensitivity of interferometers[9,10],utilizing slow light medium to enhance the resolution of Fourier transform interferometer[11],exploiting fast light medium or slow light structure to increase the rotation sensitivity of a Sagnac interferometer[12,13],enhancing the transmittance of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI) in the slow light region by gratings[14],and using liquid crystal light valve to derive high sensitivity interferometers[15].%A slow light structure Mach-Zehnder fiber interferometer is theoretically demonstrated. The sensitivity of the interferometer is significantly enhanced by the dispersion of the slow light structure. The numerical results show that the sensitivity enhancement factor varies with the coupling coefficient and reaches its maximum under critical coupling conditions.

  4. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyodo, T; Wada, K; Yagishita, A; Kosuge, T; Saito, Y; Kurihara, T; Kikuchi, T; Shirakawa, A; Sanami, T; Ikeda, M; Ohsawa, S; Kakihara, K; Shidara, T, E-mail: toshio.hyodo@kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan)

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps{sup -}). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a {sup 22}Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  5. KEK-IMSS Slow Positron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyodo, T.; Wada, K.; Yagishita, A.; Kosuge, T.; Saito, Y.; Kurihara, T.; Kikuchi, T.; Shirakawa, A.; Sanami, T.; Ikeda, M.; Ohsawa, S.; Kakihara, K.; Shidara, T.

    2011-12-01

    The Slow Positron Facility at the Institute of Material Structure Science (IMSS) of High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) is a user dedicated facility with an energy tunable (0.1 - 35 keV) slow positron beam produced by a dedicated 55MeV linac. The present beam line branches have been used for the positronium time-of-flight (Ps-TOF) measurements, the transmission positron microscope (TPM) and the photo-detachment of Ps negative ions (Ps-). During the year 2010, a reflection high-energy positron diffraction (RHEPD) measurement station is going to be installed. The slow positron generator (converter/ moderator) system will be modified to get a higher slow positron intensity, and a new user-friendly beam line power-supply control and vacuum monitoring system is being developed. Another plan for this year is the transfer of a 22Na-based slow positron beam from RIKEN. This machine will be used for the continuous slow positron beam applications and for the orientation training of those who are interested in beginning researches with a slow positron beam.

  6. Generation and evolution of interplanetary slow shocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-C. Wu

    Full Text Available It is well known that most MHD shocks observed within 1 AU are MHD fast shocks. Only a very limited number of MHD slow shocks are observed within 1 AU. In order to understand why there are only a few MHD slow shocks observed within 1 AU, we use a one-dimensional, time-dependent MHD code with an adaptive grid to study the generation and evolution of interplanetary slow shocks (ISS in the solar wind. Results show that a negative, nearly square-wave perturbation will generate a pair of slow shocks (a forward and a reverse slow shock. In addition, the forward and the reverse slow shocks can pass through each other without destroying their characteristics, but the propagating speeds for both shocks are decreased. A positive, square-wave perturbation will generate both slow and fast shocks. When a forward slow shock (FSS propagates behind a forward fast shock (FFS, the former experiences a decreasing Mach number. In addition, the FSS always disappears within a distance of 150R (where R is one solar radius from the Sun when there is a forward fast shock (with Mach number ≥1.7 propagating in front of the FSS. In all tests that we have performed, we have not discovered that the FSS (or reverse slow shock evolves into a FFS (or reverse fast shock. Thus, we do not confirm the FSS-FFS evolution as suggested by Whang (1987.

  7. Slow light vortices in periodic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Ha, Sangwoo; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2009-01-01

    We reveal that the reduction of the group velocity of light in periodic waveguides is generically associated with the presence of vortex energy flows. We show that the energy flows are gradually frozen for slow-light at the Brillouin zone edge, whereas vortices persist for slow-light states havin...... non-vanishing phase velocity inside the Brillouin zone. We also demonstrate that presence of vortices can be linked to the absence of slow-light at the zone edge, and present calculations illustrating these general results....

  8. Slow-light vortices in periodic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukhorukov, Andrey A.; Ha, Sangwoo; Desyatnikov, Anton S.

    2009-01-01

    We reveal that the reduction of the group velocity of light in periodic waveguides is generically associated with the presence of vortex energy flows. We show that the energy flows are gradually frozen for slow-light at the Brillouin zone edge, whereas vortices persist for slow-light states havin...... non-vanishing phase velocity inside the Brillouin zone. We also demonstrate that presence of vortices can be linked to the absence of slow-light at the zone edge, and present calculations illustrating these general results....

  9. [Do the variations in water carbon dioxide pressure and PH have an effect on the nature of end products of protein catabolism, ammonia and urea, in the clawed frog Xenopus laevis?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejours, P; Armand, J; Beekenkamp, H

    1991-01-01

    The effects of PCO2 and pH changes in the ambient water on the nitrogen catabolism and the proportions of the excreted nitrogenous end products, ammonia and urea, were studied in the clawed frog, Xenopus laevis, at 24 degrees C. In animals living in artificial fresh water, the exposure to a hypocapnic alkalosis (PCO2 = 0.7 Torr instead of 10 Torr) did not entail any change in the nitrogen catabolism. In animals who lived in a water loaded with NaCl and had therefore a higher oxygen consumption, an intense nitrogen catabolism and a marked ureotelism, the hypocapnic alkalosis seems to have increased the intensity of the nitrogen catabolism. In neither group were there signs of ammonia toxicity.

  10. Slow gamma rhythms in CA3 are entrained by slow gamma activity in the dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Tse; Zheng, Chenguang; Colgin, Laura Lee

    2016-12-01

    In hippocampal area CA1, slow (∼25-55 Hz) and fast (∼60-100 Hz) gamma rhythms are coupled with different CA1 afferents. CA1 slow gamma is coupled to inputs from CA3, and CA1 fast gamma is coupled to inputs from the medial entorhinal cortex (Colgin LL, Denninger T, Fyhn M, Hafting T, Bonnevie T, Jensen O, Moser MB, Moser EI. Nature 462: 353-357, 2009). CA3 gives rise to highly divergent associational projections, and it is possible that reverberating activity in these connections generates slow gamma rhythms in the hippocampus. However, hippocampal gamma is maximal upstream of CA3, in the dentate gyrus (DG) region (Bragin A, Jando G, Nadasdy Z, Hetke J, Wise K, Buzsaki G. J Neurosci 15: 47-60, 1995). Thus it is possible that slow gamma in CA3 is driven by inputs from DG, yet few studies have examined slow and fast gamma rhythms in DG recordings. Here we investigated slow and fast gamma rhythms in paired recordings from DG and CA3 in freely moving rats to determine whether slow and fast gamma rhythms in CA3 are entrained by DG. We found that slow gamma rhythms, as opposed to fast gamma rhythms, were particularly prominent in DG. We investigated directional causal influences between DG and CA3 by Granger causality analysis and found that DG slow gamma influences CA3 slow gamma. Moreover, DG place cell spikes were strongly phase-locked to CA3 slow gamma rhythms, suggesting that DG excitatory projections to CA3 may underlie this directional influence. These results indicate that slow gamma rhythms do not originate in CA3 but rather slow gamma activity upstream in DG entrains slow gamma rhythms in CA3. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Experimental demonstration of spinor slow light

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Meng-Jung; Lee, Chin-Yuan; Kudriasov, Viaceslav; Chang, Kao-Fang; Cho, Hung-Wen; Juzeliunas, Gediminas; Yu, Ite A

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade the developments of slow, stored and stationary light based on the electromagnetically induced transparency effect have attracted a great deal of attention, stimulated by potential applications such as low-light-level nonlinear optics and quantum information manipulation. The previous experiments all dealt with the single-component slow light. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of two-component or spinor slow light using a double tripod (DT) atom-light coupling scheme which involves two atomic ground state coherences. We observe the neutrino-type oscillations between the two slow light components controlled by the two-photon detuning. We show that the DT scheme for the light storage behaves like the two outcomes of a Mach-Zehnder interferometer enabling high precision measurements of the frequency detuning. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate a possible application of the DT scheme as quantum memory/rotator for the two-color qubits.

  12. Depression Can Slow Hospital Patients' Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166427.html Depression Can Slow Hospital Patients' Recovery: Study Screening for ... 9, 2017 FRIDAY, June 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression affects about one-third of hospital patients and ...

  13. Systematic Design of Slow Light Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fengwen

    Light can propagate much slower in photonic crystal waveguides and plasmonic waveguides than in vacuum. Slow light propagation in waveguides shows broad prospects in the terabit communication systems. However, it causes severe signal distortions and displays large propagation loss. Moreover...... two different parameterizations. Detailed comparisons show that the bandwidth of slow light propagation can be significantly enhanced by allowing irregular geometries in the waveguides. To mitigate the propagation loss due to scattering in the photonic crystal waveg- uides, an optimization problem...... is formulated to minimize the average propagation loss of the designed modes. The presented approach is employed to design a free-topology slow light waveguide. Numerical result illustrates that slow light propagation in the optimized waveguide displays significantly suppressed propagation loss while keeping...

  14. Slow living and the green economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana-Eugenia Ioncică

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The current paper explores the relationship between some relatively new concepts in the field of economics – slow living, slow food, slow writing and the green economy. The goal of the paper is twofold – discussing the possibilities opened by these exciting new concepts, in terms of an increase in the quality of life combined with an environmentally sustainable lifestyle, as well as ascertaining what the concepts may entail in the context in which the effects of the recent economic crisis may make green and slow living seem like a distant dream. It is this holistic view that we shall attempt to enlarge upon in the paper, with the avowed purpose of weighing out the possibilities presented in the complicated, crisis-fraught global context.

  15. Topological Origins of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S.

    2008-12-01

    Although the slow solar wind has been studied for decades with both in situ and remote sensing observations, its origin is still a matter of intense debate. In the standard quasi-steady model, the slow wind is postulated to originate near coronal hole boundaries that define topologically well-behaved separatrices between open and closed field regions. In the interchange model, on the other hand, the slow wind is postulated to originate on open flux that is dynamically diffusing throughout the seemingly closed-field corona. We argue in favor of the quasi-steady scenario and propose that the slow wind is due to two effects: First, the open-closed boundary is highly complex due to the complexity of the photospheric flux distribution. Second, this boundary is continuously driven by the transport of magnetic helicity from the closed field region into the open. The implications of this model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and slow wind are discussed, and observational tests of the model are presented. This work has been supported, in part, by the NASA LWS, HTP, and SR&T programs.

  16. Global Network of Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooker, N. U.; Antiochos, S. K.; Zhao, X.; Neugebauer, M.

    2012-01-01

    The streamer belt region surrounding the heliospheric current sheet (HCS) is generally treated as the primary or sole source of the slow solar wind. Synoptic maps of solar wind speed predicted by the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model during selected periods of solar cycle 23, however, show many areas of slow wind displaced from the streamer belt. These areas commonly have the form of an arc that is connected to the streamer belt at both ends. The arcs mark the boundaries between fields emanating from different coronal holes of the same polarity and thus trace the paths of belts of pseudostreamers, i.e., unipolar streamers that form over double arcades and lack current sheets. The arc pattern is consistent with the predicted topological mapping of the narrow open corridor or singular separator line that must connect the holes and, thus, consistent with the separatrix-web model of the slow solar wind. Near solar maximum, pseudostreamer belts stray far from the HCS-associated streamer belt and, together with it, form a global-wide web of slow wind. Recognition of pseudostreamer belts as prominent sources of slow wind provides a new template for understanding solar wind stream structure, especially near solar maximum.

  17. Human gamma oscillations during slow wave sleep.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Valderrama

    Full Text Available Neocortical local field potentials have shown that gamma oscillations occur spontaneously during slow-wave sleep (SWS. At the macroscopic EEG level in the human brain, no evidences were reported so far. In this study, by using simultaneous scalp and intracranial EEG recordings in 20 epileptic subjects, we examined gamma oscillations in cerebral cortex during SWS. We report that gamma oscillations in low (30-50 Hz and high (60-120 Hz frequency bands recurrently emerged in all investigated regions and their amplitudes coincided with specific phases of the cortical slow wave. In most of the cases, multiple oscillatory bursts in different frequency bands from 30 to 120 Hz were correlated with positive peaks of scalp slow waves ("IN-phase" pattern, confirming previous animal findings. In addition, we report another gamma pattern that appears preferentially during the negative phase of the slow wave ("ANTI-phase" pattern. This new pattern presented dominant peaks in the high gamma range and was preferentially expressed in the temporal cortex. Finally, we found that the spatial coherence between cortical sites exhibiting gamma activities was local and fell off quickly when computed between distant sites. Overall, these results provide the first human evidences that gamma oscillations can be observed in macroscopic EEG recordings during sleep. They support the concept that these high-frequency activities might be associated with phasic increases of neural activity during slow oscillations. Such patterned activity in the sleeping brain could play a role in off-line processing of cortical networks.

  18. Magnon Inflation: Slow Roll with Steep Potentials

    CERN Document Server

    Adshead, Peter; Burgess, C P; Hayman, Peter; Patil, Subodh P

    2016-01-01

    We find multi-scalar effective field theories (EFTs) that can achieve a slow inflationary roll despite having a scalar potential that does not satisfy the usual slow-roll condition (d V)^2 << V^2/Mp^2. They evade the usual slow-roll conditions on $V$ because their kinetic energies are dominated by single-derivative terms rather than the usual two-derivative terms. Single derivatives dominate during slow roll and so do not require a breakdown of the usual derivative expansion that underpins calculational control in much of cosmology. The presence of such terms requires some sort of UV Lorentz-symmetry breaking during inflation (besides the usual cosmological breaking). Chromo-natural inflation provides an example of a UV theory that can generate the multi-field single-derivative terms we consider, and we argue that the EFT we find indeed captures the slow-roll conditions for the background evolution for Chromo-natural inflation. We also show that our EFT can be understood as a multi-field generalization ...

  19. Slow wave propagation in soft adhesive interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Koushik; Sundaram, Narayan K; Chandrasekar, Srinivasan

    2016-11-16

    Stick-slip in sliding of soft adhesive surfaces has long been associated with the propagation of Schallamach waves, a type of slow surface wave. Recently it was demonstrated using in situ experiments that two other kinds of slow waves-separation pulses and slip pulses-also mediate stick-slip (Viswanathan et al., Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 5265-5275). While separation pulses, like Schallamach waves, involve local interface detachment, slip pulses are moving stress fronts with no detachment. Here, we present a theoretical analysis of the propagation of these three waves in a linear elastodynamics framework. Different boundary conditions apply depending on whether or not local interface detachment occurs. It is shown that the interface dynamics accompanying slow waves is governed by a system of integral equations. Closed-form analytical expressions are obtained for the interfacial pressure, shear stress, displacements and velocities. Separation pulses and Schallamach waves emerge naturally as wave solutions of the integral equations, with oppositely oriented directions of propagation. Wave propagation is found to be stable in the stress regime where linearized elasticity is a physically valid approximation. Interestingly, the analysis reveals that slow traveling wave solutions are not possible in a Coulomb friction framework for slip pulses. The theory provides a unified picture of stick-slip dynamics and slow wave propagation in adhesive contacts, consistent with experimental observations.

  20. Magnon inflation: slow roll with steep potentials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adshead, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign,Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Blas, Diego [Theoretical Physics Department, CERN,CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Burgess, C.P.; Hayman, Peter [Physics & Astronomy, McMaster University,Hamilton, ON, L8S 4M1 (Canada); Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, Ontario N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Patil, Subodh P. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Geneva,24 Quai Ansermet, Geneva, CH-1211 (Switzerland)

    2016-11-04

    We find multi-scalar effective field theories (EFTs) that can achieve a slow inflationary roll despite having a scalar potential that does not satisfy G{sup ab}∂{sub a}V∂{sub b}V≪V{sup 2}/M{sub p}{sup 2} (where G{sub ab} is the target-space metric). They evade the usual slow-roll conditions on V because their kinetic energies are dominated by single-derivative terms rather than the usual two-derivative terms. Single derivatives dominate during slow roll and so do not require a breakdown of the usual derivative expansion that underpins calculational control in much of cosmology. The presence of such terms requires some sort of UV Lorentz-symmetry breaking during inflation (besides the usual cosmological breaking). Chromo-natural inflation provides one particular example of a UV theory that can generate the multi-field single-derivative terms we consider, and we argue that the EFT we find indeed captures the slow-roll conditions for its background evolution. We also show that our EFT can be understood as a multi-field generalization of the single-field Cuscuton models. The multi-field case introduces a new feature, however: the scalar kinetic terms define a target-space 2-form, F{sub ab}, whose antisymmetry gives new ways for slow roll to be achieved.

  1. Universality of slow decorrelation in KPZ growth

    CERN Document Server

    Corwin, I; Peche, S

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that, under minimal hypothesis, a wide class of growth models diplays a phenomenon known as slow decorrelation, where along certain characteristic directions the range of correlation for fluctuations of the growth surface height is much longer than other directions. We apply this result to certain models known to be in the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) universality class in 1+1 dimension for which the necessary hypothesis holds. These models are the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), last passage percolation (LPP), and the polynuclear growth (PNG) model. Utilizing the slow decorrelation of fluctuations in these models we are able to extend known fluctuation limit process results away from the fixed curves on which they were proved, to general space-time curves. Using the monotonicity of the basic coupling we additionally prove that the partially asymmetric simple exclusion process (PASEP) displays slow decorrelation.

  2. Optical slowing of calcium monofluoride molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravi, Aakash; Chae, Eunmi; Hemmerling, Boerge; Anderegg, Loic; Augenbraun, Benjamin; Drayna, Garrett; Hutzler, Nicholas; Collopy, Alejandra; Wu, Yewei; Ding, Shiqian; Ye, Jun; Ketterle, Wolfgang; Doyle, John

    2016-05-01

    We report white-light slowing of calcium monofluoride molecules. A single main laser (606 nm) plus two additional vibrational repump lasers (628 nm) are employed. The slowing lasers are spectrally broadened to address the molecules' velocity spread and hyperfine splittings. We use a background-free two-photon fluorescence detection scheme to make high signal-to-noise measurements of our molecular beam's longitudinal velocity distribution. This method is applied to slow CaF produced by a two-stage cryogenic buffer gas beam source by > 30 m/s to near the capture velocity of a molecular magneto-optical trap (MOT). Due to the presence of magnetic dark states which inhibit optical cycling, we will use an AC-MOT. We characterize the performance of this AC-MOT used in the trapping of Li and Yb.

  3. Synchronized ion acceleration by ultraintense slow light

    CERN Document Server

    Brantov, A V; Kovalev, V F; Bychenkov, V Yu

    2015-01-01

    An effective scheme of synchronized laser-triggered ion acceleration and the corresponding theoretical model are proposed for a slow light pulse of relativistic intensity, which penetrates into a near-critical-density plasma, strongly slows, and then increases its group velocity during propagation within a target. The 3D PIC simulations confirm this concept for proton acceleration by a femtosecond petawatt-class laser pulse experiencing relativistic self-focusing, quantify the characteristics of the generated protons, and demonstrate a significant increase of their energy compared with the proton energy generated from optimized ultrathin solid dense foils.

  4. Ultrafast Faraday Rotation of Slow Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musorin, A. I.; Sharipova, M. I.; Dolgova, T. V.; Inoue, M.; Fedyanin, A. A.

    2016-08-01

    The active control of optical signals in the time domain is what science and technology demand in fast all-optical information processing. Nanostructured materials can modify the group velocity and slow the light down, as the artificial light dispersion emerges. We observe the ultrafast temporal behavior of the Faraday rotation within a single femtosecond laser pulse under conditions of slow light in a one-dimensional magnetophotonic crystal. The Faraday effect changes by 20% over the time of 150 fs. This might be applicable to the fast control of light in high-capacity photonic devices.

  5. Slow crack growth in spinel in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwantes, S.; Elber, W.

    1983-01-01

    Magnesium aluminate spinel was tested in a water environment at room temperature to establish its slow crack-growth behavior. Ring specimens with artificial flaws on the outside surface were loaded hydraulically on the inside surface. The time to failure was measured. Various precracking techniques were evaluated and multiple precracks were used to minimize the scatter in the static fatigue tests. Statistical analysis techniques were developed to determine the strength and crack velocities for a single flaw. Slow crack-growth rupture was observed at stress intensities as low as 70 percent of K sub c. A strengthening effect was observed in specimens that had survived long-time static fatigue tests.

  6. Geodynamic environments of ultra-slow spreading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokhan, Andrey; Dubinin, Evgeny

    2015-04-01

    Ultra-slow spreading is clearly distinguished as an outstanding type of crustal accretion by recent studies. Spreading ridges with ultra-slow velocities of extension are studied rather well. But ultra-slow spreading is characteristic feature of not only spreading ridges, it can be observed also on convergent and transform plate boundaries. Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on divergent plate boundaries: 1. On spreading ridges with ultra-slow spreading, both modern (f.e. Gakkel, South-West Indian, Aden spreading center) and ceased (Labrador spreading center, Aegir ridge); 2. During transition from continental rifting to early stages of oceanic spreading (all spreading ridges during incipient stages of their formation); 3. During incipient stages of formation of spreading ridges on oceanic crust as a result of ridge jumps and reorganization of plate boundaries (f.e. Mathematicians rise and East Pacific rise); 4. During propagation of spreading ridge into the continental crust under influence of hotspot (Aden spreading center and Afar triple junction), under presence of strike-slip faults preceding propagation (possibly, rift zone of California Bay). Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on transform plate boundaries: 1. In transit zones between two "typical" spreading ridges (f.e. Knipovich ridge); 2. In semi strike-slip/extension zones on the oceanic crust (f.e. American-Antarctic ridge); 3. In the zones of local extension in regional strike-slip areas in pull-apart basins along transform boundaries (Cayman trough, pull-apart basins of the southern border of Scotia plate). Ultra-slow spreading is observed now or could have been observed in the past in the following geodynamic environments on convergent plate boundaries: 1. During back-arc rifting on the stage of transition into back-arc spreading (central

  7. Where does slow axonal transport go?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terada, Sumio

    2003-12-01

    Axonal transport is the specialized and well-developed intracellular transport system for regulated and/or long-distance transport based on generalized cellular machineries. Among them, slow axonal transport conveys cytoplasmic proteins. The motor molecule, the nature of transporting complex and the transport regulation mechanism for slow transport are still unclarified. There has been a dispute regarding the nature of transporting complex of cytoskeletal proteins, polymer-sliding hypothesis versus subunit-transport theory. Recent data supporting the hypothesis of polymer sliding in cultured neurons only reconfirm the previously reported structure and this inference suffers from the lack of ultrastructural evidence and the direct relevance to the physiological slow transport phenomenon in vivo. Observation of the moving cytoskeletal proteins in vivo using transgenic mice or squid giant axons revealed that subunits do move in a microtubule-dependent manner, strongly indicating the involvement of microtubule-based motor kinesin. If the slow transport rate reflects the intermittent fast transport dependent on kinesin motor, we have to investigate the molecular constituents of the transporting complex in more detail and evaluate why the motor and cargo interaction is so unstable. This kind of weak and fluctuating interaction between various molecular pairs could not be detected by conventional techniques, thus necessitating the establishment of a new experimental system before approaching the molecular regulation problem.

  8. Proton energy dependence of slow neutron intensity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teshigawara, Makoto; Harada, Masahide; Watanabe, Noboru; Kai, Tetsuya; Sakata, Hideaki; Ikeda, Yujiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ooi, Motoki [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    The choice of the proton energy is an important issue for the design of an intense-pulsed-spallation source. The optimal proton beam energy is rather unique from a viewpoint of the leakage neutron intensity but no yet clear from the slow-neutron intensity view point. It also depends on an accelerator type. Since it is also important to know the proton energy dependence of slow-neutrons from the moderators in a realistic target-moderator-reflector assembly (TMRA). We studied on the TMRA proposed for Japan Spallation Neutron Source. The slow-neutron intensities from the moderators per unit proton beam power (MW) exhibit the maximum at about 1-2 GeV. At higher proton energies the intensity per MW goes down; at 3 and 50 GeV about 0.91 and 0.47 times as low as that at 1 GeV. The proton energy dependence of slow-neutron intensities was found to be almost the same as that of total neutron yield (leakage neutrons) from the same bare target. It was also found that proton energy dependence was almost the same for the coupled and decoupled moderators, regardless the different moderator type, geometry and coupling scheme. (author)

  9. Moving Crystal Slow-Neutron Wavelength Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buras, B.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1973-01-01

    Experimental proof that a moving single crystal can serve as a slow-neutron wavelength analyser of special features is presented. When the crystal moves with a velocity h/(2 md) (h-Planck constant, m-neutron mass, d-interplanar spacing) perpendicular to the diffracting plane and the analysed...

  10. Moving Crystal Slow-Neutron Wavelength Analyser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buras, B.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1973-01-01

    Experimental proof that a moving single crystal can serve as a slow-neutron wavelength analyser of special features is presented. When the crystal moves with a velocity h/(2 md) (h-Planck constant, m-neutron mass, d-interplanar spacing) perpendicular to the diffracting plane and the analysed...

  11. Slowed ageing, welfare, and population problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wareham, Christopher

    2015-10-01

    Biological studies have demonstrated that it is possible to slow the ageing process and extend lifespan in a wide variety of organisms, perhaps including humans. Making use of the findings of these studies, this article examines two problems concerning the effect of life extension on population size and welfare. The first--the problem of overpopulation--is that as a result of life extension too many people will co-exist at the same time, resulting in decreases in average welfare. The second--the problem of underpopulation--is that life extension will result in too few people existing across time, resulting in decreases in total welfare. I argue that overpopulation is highly unlikely to result from technologies that slow ageing. Moreover, I claim that the problem of underpopulation relies on claims about life extension that are false in the case of life extension by slowed ageing. The upshot of these arguments is that the population problems discussed provide scant reason to oppose life extension by slowed ageing.

  12. Exponential estimates of symplectic slow manifolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall; Wulff, C.

    2016-01-01

    is motivated by a paper of MacKay from 2004. The method does not notice resonances, and therefore we do not pose any restrictions on the motion normal to the slow manifold other than it being fast and analytic. We also present a stability result and obtain a generalization of a result of Gelfreich and Lerman...

  13. The slow death of most galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Cattaneo, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    For most galaxies, the shutdown of star formation was a slow process that took four billion years. An analysis of thousands of galaxies suggests that 'strangulation' by their environment was the most likely cause. See Letter on page 192 of Peng, Maiolino and Cochrane (2015), Nature, vol. 521.

  14. Slow light on a printed circuit board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanin, Aleksandr A; Voronin, Aleksandr A; Sokolov, Viktor I; Fedotov, Ilya V; Fedotov, Andrei B; Akhmanov, Aleksandr S; Panchenko, Vladislav Ya; Zheltikov, Aleksei M

    2011-05-15

    Slow-light effects induced by stimulated Raman scattering in polymer waveguides on a printed circuit board are shown to enable a widely tunable delay of broadband optical signals, suggesting an advantageous platform for optical information processing and ultrafast optical waveform transformation. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  15. Origin of pseudotachylites during slow creep experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peč, M.; Stünitz, H.; Heilbronner, R.; Drury, M.; De Capitani, C.

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a series of experiments on granitoid cataclasites under mid-crustal conditions (Pc∼500 MPa, T=300 °C) and slow displacement rates (10−8 ms−1

  16. Exploring the Hedonic Quality of Slow Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Orehovački, Tihomir; Al Sokkar, Abdullah A.M.; Derboven, Jan; Khan, Azam

    2013-01-01

    Pace is an inseparable part of all technologies and consequently represents an interaction design element. Various technology aspects can support hedonic qualities brought about from reflection transformed into unlimited unique experiences, mental rest, and inner peace. This paper argues different approaches to technology pace evaluation. Attributes that contribute to the hedonic quality of slow technology are presented and discussed.

  17. Fractal THz slow light metamaterial devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shoichi

    Scope and Method of Study: The goal of this study is to investigate the time delay of the fractal H metamaterials in the terahertz regime. This metamaterial contains resonators with two different sizes of H structures which mimic Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and create a transmission window and the corresponding phase dispersion, thus producing slow light. The Al structures were fabricated on silicon wafer and Mylar by using microelectronic lithography and thermal evaporation technique. By using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy, the phase change caused by the slow light system and the actual time delay were obtained. Numerical simulations were carried out to systematize the effect of permittivity and structure dimensions on the optical properties. Findings and Conclusions: We experimentally demonstrated the numerical time delay of the fractal H metamaterial as a slow light device. When permittivity of the substrates increases, the peak position of the transmission window shifts to lower frequency and the bandwidth becomes broader. As a result, silicon performed larger time delay than that of Mylar. By changing the length of the resonator, the bandwidth and the peak position of the transmission window is controllable. At the edges of the transmission window, the negative time delays (fast light) were also observed. Mylar acts as a quaci-free standing structure and allows higher spectral measurement. Moreover, metamaterials fabricated on multiple Mylar films can potentially act as a more effective slow light device. As applications, slow light metamaterials are expected to be used for high-capacity terahertz communication networks, all-optical information processing and sensing devices.

  18. Properties of slow oscillation during slow-wave sleep and anesthesia in cats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Crochet, Sylvain; Volgushev, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2011-01-01

    Deep anesthesia is commonly used as a model of slow-wave sleep (SWS). Ketamine-xylazine anesthesia reproduces the main features of sleep slow oscillation: slow, large amplitude waves in field potential, which are generated by the alternation of hyperpolarized and depolarized states of cortical neurons. However, direct quantitative comparison of field potential and membrane potential fluctuations during natural sleep and anesthesia is lacking, so it remains unclear how well the properties of sleep slow oscillation are reproduced by the ketamine-xylazine anesthesia model. Here, we used field potential and intracellular recordings in different cortical areas in the cat, to directly compare properties of slow oscillation during natural sleep and ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. During SWS cortical activity showed higher power in the slow/delta (0.1-4 Hz) and spindle (8-14 Hz) frequency range, while under anesthesia the power in the gamma band (30-100 Hz) was higher. During anesthesia, slow waves were more rhythmic and more synchronous across the cortex. Intracellular recordings revealed that silent states were longer and the amplitude of membrane potential around transition between active and silent states was bigger under anesthesia. Slow waves were largely uniform across cortical areas under anesthesia, but in SWS they were most pronounced in associative and visual areas, but smaller and less regular in somatosensory and motor cortices. We conclude that although the main features of the slow oscillation in sleep and anesthesia appear similar, multiple cellular and network features are differently expressed during natural SWS as compared to ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. PMID:22016533

  19. Properties of slow oscillation during slow-wave sleep and anesthesia in cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauvette, Sylvain; Crochet, Sylvain; Volgushev, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2011-10-19

    Deep anesthesia is commonly used as a model of slow-wave sleep (SWS). Ketamine-xylazine anesthesia reproduces the main features of sleep slow oscillation: slow, large-amplitude waves in field potential, which are generated by the alternation of hyperpolarized and depolarized states of cortical neurons. However, direct quantitative comparison of field potential and membrane potential fluctuations during natural sleep and anesthesia is lacking, so it remains unclear how well the properties of sleep slow oscillation are reproduced by the ketamine-xylazine anesthesia model. Here, we used field potential and intracellular recordings in different cortical areas in the cat to directly compare properties of slow oscillation during natural sleep and ketamine-xylazine anesthesia. During SWS cortical activity showed higher power in the slow/delta (0.1-4 Hz) and spindle (8-14 Hz) frequency range, whereas under anesthesia the power in the gamma band (30-100 Hz) was higher. During anesthesia, slow waves were more rhythmic and more synchronous across the cortex. Intracellular recordings revealed that silent states were longer and the amplitude of membrane potential around transition between active and silent states was bigger under anesthesia. Slow waves were mostly uniform across cortical areas under anesthesia, but in SWS, they were most pronounced in associative and visual areas but smaller and less regular in somatosensory and motor cortices. We conclude that, although the main features of the slow oscillation in sleep and anesthesia appear similar, multiple cellular and network features are differently expressed during natural SWS compared with ketamine-xylazine anesthesia.

  20. Escape for the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-05-01

    Plasma from the Sun known as the slow solar wind has been observed far away from where scientists thought it was produced. Now new simulations may have resolved the puzzle of where the slow solar wind comes from and how it escapes the Sun to travel through our solar system.An Origin PuzzleA full view of a coronal hole (dark portion) from SDO. The edges of the coronal hole mark the boundary between open and closed magnetic field lines. [SDO; adapted from Higginson et al. 2017]The Suns atmosphere, known as the corona, is divided into two types of regions based on the behavior of magnetic field lines. In closed-field regions, the magnetic field is firmly anchored in the photosphere at both ends of field lines, so traveling plasma is confined to coronal loops and must return to the Suns surface. In open-field regions, only one end of each magnetic field line is anchored in the photosphere, so plasma is able to stream from the Suns surface out into the solar system.This second type of region known as a coronal hole is thought to be the origin of fast-moving plasma measured in our solar system and known as the fast solar wind. But we also observe a slow solar wind: plasma that moves at speeds of less than 500 km/s.The slow solar wind presents a conundrum. Its observational properties strongly suggest it originates in the hot, closed corona rather than the cooler, open regions. But if the slow solar wind plasma originates in closed-field regions of the Suns atmosphere, then how does it escape from the Sun?Slow Wind from Closed FieldsA team of scientists led by Aleida Higginson (University of Michigan) has now used high-resolution, three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations to show how the slow solar wind can be generated from plasma that starts outin closed-field parts of the Sun.A simulated heliospheric arc, composed of open magnetic field lines. [Higginson et al. 2017]Motions on the Suns surface near the boundary between open and closed-field regions the boundary

  1. Slow and fast light in semiconductor waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Hansen, Per Lunnemann; Xue, Weiqi

    2010-01-01

    Investigations of slow and fast light effects in semiconductor waveguides entail interesting physics and point to a number of promising applications. In this review we give an overview of recent progress in the field, in particular focusing on the physical mechanisms of electromagnetically induced...... transparency and coherent population oscillations. While electromagnetically induced transparency has been the most important effect in realizing slowdown effects in atomic gasses, progress has been comparatively slow in semiconductors due to inherent problems of fast dephasing times and inhomogeneous...... broadening in quantum dots. The physics of electromagnetically induced transparency in semiconductors is discussed, emphasizing these limitations and recent suggestions for overcoming them. On the other hand, the mechanism of coherent population oscillations relies on wave mixing effects and is well suited...

  2. A tilted transversely isotropic slowness surface approximation

    KAUST Repository

    Stovas, A.

    2012-05-09

    The relation between vertical and horizontal slownesses, better known as the dispersion relation, for transversely isotropic media with a tilted symmetry axis (TTI) requires solving a quartic polynomial equation, which does not admit a practical explicit solution to be used, for example, in downward continuation. Using a combination of the perturbation theory with respect to the anelliptic parameter and Shanks transform to improve the accuracy of the expansion, we develop an explicit formula for the vertical slowness that is highly accurate for all practical purposes. It also reveals some insights into the anisotropy parameter dependency of the dispersion relation including the low impact that the anelliptic parameter has on the vertical placement of reflectors for a small tilt in the symmetry angle. © 2012 European Association of Geoscientists & Engineers.

  3. Slow scrambling in disordered quantum systems

    CERN Document Server

    Swingle, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has studied the growth of commutators as a probe of chaos and information scrambling in quantum many-body systems. In this work we study the effect of static disorder on the growth of commutators in a variety of contexts. We find generically that disorder slows the onset of scrambling, and, in the case of a many-body localized state, partially halts it. We access the many-body localized state using a standard fixed point Hamiltonian, and we show that operators exhibit slow logarithmic growth under time evolution. We compare the result with the expected growth of commutators in both localized and delocalized non-interacting disordered models. Finally, based on a scaling argument, we state a conjecture about the effect of weak interactions on the growth of commutators in an interacting diffusive metal.

  4. Polymeric membrane studied using slow positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hung, W.-S.; Lo, C.-H. [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Cheng, M.-L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan (China); Chen Hongmin; Liu Guang; Chakka, Lakshmi [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Nanda, D.; Tung, K.-L.; Huang, S.-H.; Lee, Kueir-Rarn; Lai, J.-Y. [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Sun Yiming [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Yuan Ze University, Chung-Li 32003, Taiwan (China); Yu Changcheng [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Zhang Renwu [Physical Science Department, Southern Utah University, Cedar City, UT 84720 (United States); Jean, Y.C. [R and D Center for Membrane Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung-Li 32023, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States)], E-mail: jeany@umkc.edu

    2008-10-31

    A radioisotope slow positron beam has been built at the Chung Yuan Christian University in Taiwan for the research and development in membrane science and technology. Doppler broadening energy spectra and positron annihilation lifetime have been measured as a function of positron energy up to 30 keV in a polyamide membrane prepared by the interfacial polymerization between triethylenetetraamine (TETA) and trimesoyl chloride (TMC) on modified porous polyacrylonitrile (PAN) asymmetric membrane. The multilayer structures and free-volume depth profile for this asymmetric membrane system are obtained. Positron annihilation spectroscopy coupled with a slow beam could provide new information about size selectivity of transporting molecules and guidance for molecular designs in polymeric membranes.

  5. Quake clamps down on slow slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Laura M.; Bartlow, Noel; Hamling, Ian; Fry, Bill

    2014-12-01

    Using continuous GPS (cGPS) data from the Hikurangi subduction zone in New Zealand, we show for the first time that stress changes induced by a local earthquake can arrest an ongoing slow slip event (SSE). The cGPS data show that the slip rate in the northern portion of the 2013/2014 Kapiti SSE decreased abruptly following a nearby intraslab earthquake. We suggest that deceleration of the Kapiti SSE in early 2014 occurred due to a tenfold increase in the normal stress relative to shear stress in the SSE source, induced by the nearby Mw 6.3 earthquake, consistent with expectations of rate and state friction. Our observation of an abrupt halting/slowing of the SSE in response to stress changes imposed by a local earthquake has implications for the strength of fault zones hosting SSEs and supports the premise that static stress changes are an important ingredient in triggering (or delaying) fault slip.

  6. Critical slowing down in a dynamic duopoly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobido, M. G. O.; Hatano, N.

    2015-01-01

    Anticipating critical transitions is very important in economic systems as it can mean survival or demise of firms under stressful competition. As such identifying indicators that can provide early warning to these transitions are very crucial. In other complex systems, critical slowing down has been shown to anticipate critical transitions. In this paper, we investigate the applicability of the concept in the heterogeneous quantity competition between two firms. We develop a dynamic model where the duopoly can adjust their production in a logistic process. We show that the resulting dynamics is formally equivalent to a competitive Lotka-Volterra system. We investigate the behavior of the dominant eigenvalues and identify conditions that critical slowing down can provide early warning to the critical transitions in the dynamic duopoly.

  7. MIND diet slows cognitive decline with aging

    OpenAIRE

    Morris, Martha Clare; Tangney, Christy C.; Wang, Yamin; Sacks, Frank Martin; Barnes, Lisa L.; Bennett, David William; Aggarwal, Neelum T

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Mediterranean and dash diets have been shown to slow cognitive decline; however, neither diet is specific to the nutrition literature on dementia prevention. METHODS: We devised the Mediterranean-Dietary Approach to Systolic Hypertension (DASH) diet intervention for neurodegenerative delay (MIND) diet score that specifically captures dietary components shown to be neuroprotective and related it to change in cognition over an average 4.7 years among 960 participants ...

  8. Eldor spin echoes and slow motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornak, Joseph P.; Freed, Jack H.

    1983-10-01

    It is shown how an ELDOR technique based upon spin echoes and rapid stepping of the magnetic field may be employed to measure rotational correlation times, τ R for very slow motions. Experiments on PD-Tempone in 85% glycerol/ D 2O at low temperatures led to τ R values of 10 -4 to 10 -5 s obtained with a simple analysis of the data.

  9. [Pathogenesis and treatment of slow transit constipation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongxu; Zhu, Anlong

    2016-12-25

    Slow transit constipation (STC) is generally considered as a complex idiopathic disease affected by multiple factors synergistically. Primarily caused by the condition of gut dysmotility, the transit of intestinal contents turned so slow that the moisture absorption increases, defecation frequency decreases, bowel movement is weakened or even disappeared with or without abdominal distension, dry and hard stool. Its etiology and pathogenesis remains unclear.Recently some researches reported the pathogenesis may be associated with the changes of the enteric nervous system (ENS), such as the change or degeneration of intestinal nerve cells, gut glial cell damage and neurotransmitter changes. Besides, intestinal myopathy, ICC reduction, immune factors, endocrine factors, laxative, mental psychological factors, diet and exercise habits may also be associated with the occurrence and aggravation of STC. The current understanding of STC mechanism can not meet the needs of clinical diagnosis and treatment. Conservative treatment is the main treatment of STC nowadays. For those receiving normative medical treatment but with little effect, surgery is necessary. "Jingling procedure" and "antiperistaltic anastomosis" can both get good efficacy. Treatment aiming at causes of disease will be uncovered as the development of the researches on the pathogenesis and treatment of slow transit constipation.

  10. Method for monitoring slow dynamics recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Kristian C. E.; Hedberg, Claes M.

    2012-11-01

    Slow Dynamics is a specific material property, which for example is connected to the degree of damage. It is therefore of importance to be able to attain proper measurements of it. Usually it has been monitored by acoustic resonance methods which have very high sensitivity as such. However, because the acoustic wave is acting both as conditioner and as probe, the measurement is affecting the result which leads to a mixing of the fast nonlinear response to the excitation and the slow dynamics material recovery. In this article a method is introduced which, for the first time, removes the fast dynamics from the process and allows the behavior of the slow dynamics to be monitored by itself. The new method has the ability to measure at the shortest possible recovery times, and at very small conditioning strains. For the lowest strains the sound speed increases with strain, while at higher strains a linear decreasing dependence is observed. This is the first method and test that has been able to monitor the true material state recovery process.

  11. Nonlinear dynamical triggering of slow slip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Knuth, Matthew W [WISCONSIN; Kaproth, Bryan M [PENN STATE; Carpenter, Brett [PENN STATE; Guyer, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Le Bas, Pierre - Yves [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daub, Eric G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marone, Chris [PENN STATE

    2010-12-10

    Among the most fascinating, recent discoveries in seismology have been the phenomena of triggered slip, including triggered earthquakes and triggered-tremor, as well as triggered slow, silent-slip during which no seismic energy is radiated. Because fault nucleation depths cannot be probed directly, the physical regimes in which these phenomena occur are poorly understood. Thus determining physical properties that control diverse types of triggered fault sliding and what frictional constitutive laws govern triggered faulting variability is challenging. We are characterizing the physical controls of triggered faulting with the goal of developing constitutive relations by conducting laboratory and numerical modeling experiments in sheared granular media at varying load conditions. In order to simulate granular fault zone gouge in the laboratory, glass beads are sheared in a double-direct configuration under constant normal stress, while subject to transient perturbation by acoustic waves. We find that triggered, slow, silent-slip occurs at very small confining loads ({approx}1-3 MPa) that are smaller than those where dynamic earthquake triggering takes place (4-7 MPa), and that triggered slow-slip is associated with bursts of LFE-like acoustic emission. Experimental evidence suggests that the nonlinear dynamical response of the gouge material induced by dynamic waves may be responsible for the triggered slip behavior: the slip-duration, stress-drop and along-strike slip displacement are proportional to the triggering wave amplitude. Further, we observe a shear-modulus decrease corresponding to dynamic-wave triggering relative to the shear modulus of stick-slips. Modulus decrease in response to dynamical wave amplitudes of roughly a microstrain and above is a hallmark of elastic nonlinear behavior. We believe that the dynamical waves increase the material non-affine elastic deformation during shearing, simultaneously leading to instability and slow-slip. The inferred

  12. Imaging slow slip events and their relationship to seismic slow earthquakes in southwest Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z.; Moore, A. W.; Owen, S. E.

    2016-12-01

    Past geodetic and seismic studies have revealed a diverse spectrum of fault slip behaviors including slow slip events (SSEs), tremor, low frequency earthquakes (LFEs) and very-low frequency earthquakes (VLFEs). Thanks to its dense GPS and seismic network, Japan has been one of the prime places to study slow slip transients and their relationship to seismic slow earthquakes such as tremor, LFEs and VLFEs. Recent studies show there are complex interactions between slow slip transients, large seismic event, downdip LFEs and up-dip VLFEs in southwest Japan [e.g., Liu et al., 2015]. In this study, we extend our Japan GEONET GPS position time series reanalysis from 1996 to 2016/07/02 using JPL GIPSY/OASIS-II based GPS Network Processor and raw data provided by Geospatial Information Authority of Japan and Caltech. Our analysis uses re-estimated JPL precise orbits, GMF troposphere model, and single receiver ambiguity resolution strategy. The resultant decades long position time series show good consistency and reduced scattering over the entire time period. We apply an in-house developed time series analysis framework to systemically identify and correct the offsets caused by earthquakes, instrument and other unknown sources, and estimate and correct common mode error. We employ a time dependent slip inversion approach to image the spatiotemporal variations of transient slip and investigate their relationship to seismic slow earthquakes. Our application to some recent events such as the one in Bungo Channel region in 2014-2015 shows different spatiotemporal slip pattern as compared to previous recurrent SSEs at the same region. The change in slip pattern, along with a shortened interval, indicates a possible change in recurrent behaviors. Within the same transient event, we find slow slip can occur with and without accompanying tremor/LFEs, suggesting different underlying mechanisms of the two. We are in the process of modeling other slip transients and investigating

  13. Slow Wave Sleep and Long Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmire, Alexandra; Orr, Martin; Arias, Diana; Rueger, Melanie; Johnston, Smith; Leveton, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    While ground research has clearly shown that preserving adequate quantities of sleep is essential for optimal health and performance, changes in the progression, order and /or duration of specific stages of sleep is also associated with deleterious outcomes. As seen in Figure 1, in healthy individuals, REM and Non-REM sleep alternate cyclically, with stages of Non-REM sleep structured chronologically. In the early parts of the night, for instance, Non-REM stages 3 and 4 (Slow Wave Sleep, or SWS) last longer while REM sleep spans shorter; as night progresses, the length of SWS is reduced as REM sleep lengthens. This process allows for SWS to establish precedence , with increases in SWS seen when recovering from sleep deprivation. SWS is indeed regarded as the most restorative portion of sleep. During SWS, physiological activities such as hormone secretion, muscle recovery, and immune responses are underway, while neurological processes required for long term learning and memory consolidation, also occur. The structure and duration of specific sleep stages may vary independent of total sleep duration, and changes in the structure and duration have been shown to be associated with deleterious outcomes. Individuals with narcolepsy enter sleep through REM as opposed to stage 1 of NREM. Disrupting slow wave sleep for several consecutive nights without reducing total sleep duration or sleep efficiency is associated with decreased pain threshold, increased discomfort, fatigue, and the inflammatory flare response in skin. Depression has been shown to be associated with a reduction of slow wave sleep and increased REM sleep. Given research that shows deleterious outcomes are associated with changes in sleep structure, it is essential to characterize and mitigate not only total sleep duration, but also changes in sleep stages.

  14. Fast-slow and slow-slow form of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia sustained by the same reentrant circuit: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantù, Francesco; De Filippo, Paolo; Rordorf, Roberto; De Ferrari, Gaetano M; Frattini, Folco; Petracci, Barbara; Russo, Giovanni; Cerrone, Marina; Landolina, Maurizio

    2005-01-01

    It has been suggested that a reentrant circuit confined to the posterior extensions of the atrioventricular node underlies both fast-slow and slow-slow types of atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT). According to this hypothesis the fast-slow reentrant circuit would be formed by two slow pathways, located in the rightward and leftward posterior extension of the atrioventricular node. Thus, the fast pathway would act as a bystander with respect to the reentrant circuit. We describe the case of a 40-year-old woman with several episodes of palpitations unresponsive to antiarrhythmic drugs. The ECG during symptoms showed a narrow QRS tachycardia with a long ventriculo-atrial interval and a negative P wave in the inferior leads. Electrophysiological study showed the inducibility of a slow-slow AVNRT which rapidly shifted to a fast-slow AVNRT without any change in the duration of the tachycardia cycle. Our observation is in agreement with the hypothesis that the fast-slow reentrant circuit consists of two slow pathways with the fast pathway acting as a bystander.

  15. Counting graphene layers with very slow electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Ludĕk; Mikmeková, Eliška; Müllerová, Ilona [Institute of Scientific Instruments AS CR, v.v.i., Královopolská 147, 61264 Brno (Czech Republic); Lejeune, Michaël [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matière Condensée, Faculté des Sciences d' Amiens, Universite de Picardie Jules Verne, 33 rue Saint Leu, 80039 Amiens Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-01-05

    The study aimed at collection of data regarding the transmissivity of freestanding graphene for electrons across their full energy scale down to the lowest energies. Here, we show that the electron transmissivity of graphene drops with the decreasing energy of the electrons and remains below 10% for energies below 30 eV, and that the slow electron transmissivity value is suitable for reliable determination of the number of graphene layers. Moreover, electrons incident below 50 eV release adsorbed hydrocarbon molecules and effectively clean graphene in contrast to faster electrons that decompose these molecules and create carbonaceous contamination.

  16. Improvement of pedestrian flow by slow rhythm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, Daichi; Tomoeda, Akiyasu; Nishinari, Katsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a simple model for pedestrians by dividing walking velocity into two parts, which are step size and pace of walking (number of steps per unit time). Theoretical analysis on pace indicates that rhythm that is slower than normal-walking pace in a low-density regime increases flow if the flow-density diagram is convex downward in a high-density regime. In order to verify this result, we have performed an experiment with real pedestrians and observed the improvement of flow in a congested situation using slow rhythm.

  17. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bonebrake, Eric; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, Victor A.; Haight, R. C.; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O' Donnell, J. M.; Weltz, Adam

    2012-06-07

    This report documents the progress that has been completed in the first half of FY2012 in the MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer project. Significant progress has been made on the algorithm development. We have an improve understanding of the experimental responses in LSDS for fuel-related material. The calibration of the ultra-depleted uranium foils was completed, but the results are inconsistent from measurement to measurement. Future work includes developing a conceptual model of an LSDS system to assay plutonium in used fuel, improving agreement between simulations and measurement, design of a thorium fission chamber, and evaluation of additional detector techniques.

  18. Slow slip event at Kilauea Volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Michael P.; Miklius, Asta; Wilson, J. David; Okubo, Paul G.; Montgomery-Brown, Emily; Segall, Paul; Brooks, Benjamin; Foster, James; Wolfe, Cecily; Syracuse, Ellen; Thurbe, Clifford

    2010-01-01

    Early in the morning of 1 February 2010 (UTC; early afternoon 31 January 2010 local time), continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) and tilt instruments detected a slow slip event (SSE) on the south flank of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. The SSE lasted at least 36 hours and resulted in a maximum of about 3 centimeters of seaward displacement. About 10 hours after the start of the slip, a flurry of small earthquakes began (Figure 1) in an area of the south flank recognized as having been seismically active during past SSEs [Wolfe et al., 2007], suggesting that the February earthquakes were triggered by stress associated with slip [Segall et al., 2006].

  19. Liquid crystal light valves for slow light and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Residori, S; Bortolozzo, U [INLN, CNRS, University de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, 1361 route des Lucioles, 06560 Valbonne (France); Huignard, J P, E-mail: jean-pierre.huignard@thalesgroup.co [Thales Research and Technology, RD 128 91767, Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2010-02-01

    The large dispersive properties of wave mixing in liquid crystal light-valves allow obtaining fast and slow light with tunable group velocities. A slow light interferometer is shown by using this interaction.

  20. Slow-plasmon resonant nano-strip antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Thomas; Beermann, Jonas; Boltasseva, Alexandra

    2008-01-01

    Resonant scattering by gold nanostrip antennas due to constructive interference of counterpropagating slow surface plasmon polaritons SPPs is analyzed, including the quasistatic limit of ultrasmall antennas, and experimentally demonstrated. The phase of slow SPP reflection by strip ends is found...

  1. Slow-plasmon resonant-nanostrip antennas: Analysis and demonstration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Thomas; Beermann, J.; Boltasseva, Alexandra;

    2008-01-01

    Resonant scattering by gold nanostrip antennas due to constructive interference of counterpropagating slow surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is analyzed, including the quasistatic limit of ultrasmall antennas, and experimentally demonstrated. The phase of slow SPP reflection by strip ends is found...

  2. Sustainable Development of Slow Fashion Businesses: Customer Value Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sojin Jung

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available As an alternative to the prevalent fast fashion model, slow fashion has emerged as a way of enhancing sustainability in the fashion industry, yet how slow fashion can enhance profitability is still largely unknown. Based on a customer value creation framework, this study empirically tested a structural model that specified the slow fashion attributes that contribute to creating perceived customer value, which subsequently increases a consumer’s intention to buy and pay a price premium for slow fashion products. An analysis of 221 U.S. consumer data revealed that delivering exclusive product value is significantly critical in creating customer value for slow fashion, and customer value, in turn, positively affects consumers’ purchase intentions. Further analysis also revealed that different slow fashion attributes distinctively affect customer value. This provides potential strategies on which slow fashion businesses can focus to secure an economically sustainable business model, thereby continuously improving environmental and social sustainability with the slow fashion ideal.

  3. Slow-light effects in photonic crystal membrane lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present a systematic investigation of photonic crystal cavity laser operating in the slow-light regime. The dependence of lasing threshold on the effect of slow-light will be particularly highlighted.......In this paper, we present a systematic investigation of photonic crystal cavity laser operating in the slow-light regime. The dependence of lasing threshold on the effect of slow-light will be particularly highlighted....

  4. Principles of Slow Fashion Application in Clothing Collection Creation

    OpenAIRE

    Agnė Antanavičiūtė; Vaida Dobilaitė

    2015-01-01

    Today we can clearly see the damage which is caused by fast fashion production and mass consumption. Therefore, a relevant issue is how to reduce consumption, waste, and threat to the environment and human health. Research into the slow fashion designers approach towards eco-friendly and slow fashion products shows that it is necessary to spread ideas of slow fashion widely and teach users about ecologically friendly clothing. Therefore, this paper analyses theoretical and practical slow fash...

  5. Nonlinear Gain Saturation in Active Slow Light Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Mørk, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    We present a quantitative three-dimensional analysis of slow-light enhanced traveling wave amplification in an active semiconductor photonic crystal waveguides. The impact of slow-light propagation on the nonlinear gain saturation of the device is investigated.......We present a quantitative three-dimensional analysis of slow-light enhanced traveling wave amplification in an active semiconductor photonic crystal waveguides. The impact of slow-light propagation on the nonlinear gain saturation of the device is investigated....

  6. Automated classification of spatiotemporal characteristics of gastric slow wave propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paskaranandavadivel, Niranchan; Gao, Jerry; Du, Peng; O'Grady, Gregory; Cheng, Leo K

    2013-01-01

    Gastric contractions are underpinned by an electrical event called slow wave activity. High-resolution electrical mapping has recently been adapted to study gastric slow waves at a high spatiotemporal detail. As more slow wave data becomes available, it is becoming evident that the spatial organization of slow wave plays a key role in the initiation and maintenance of gastric dsyrhythmias in major gastric motility disorders. All of the existing slow wave signal processing techniques deal with the identification and partitioning of recorded wave events, but not the analysis of the slow wave spatial organization, which is currently performed visually. This manual analysis is time consuming and is prone to observer bias and error. We present an automated approach to classify spatial slow wave propagation patterns via the use of Pearson cross correlations. Slow wave propagations were grouped into classes based on their similarity to each other. The method was applied to high-resolution gastric slow wave recordings from four pigs. There were significant changes in the velocity of the gastric slow wave wavefront and the amplitude of the slow wave event when there was a change in direction to the slow wave wavefront during dsyrhythmias, which could be detected with the automated approach.

  7. The Persistence of a Slow Manifold with Bifurcation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall; Palmer, P.; Robert, M.

    2012-01-01

    his paper considers the persistence of a slow manifold with bifurcation in a slow-fast two degree of freedom Hamiltonian system. In particular, we consider a system with a supercritical pitchfork bifurcation in the fast space which is unfolded by the slow coordinate. The model system is motivated...

  8. Slow features nonnegative matrix factorization for temporal data decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zafeiriou, Lazaros; Nikitidis, Symeon; Zafeiriou, Stefanos; Pantic, Maja

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we combine the principles of temporal slowness and nonnegative parts-based learning into a single framework that aims to learn slow varying parts-based representations of time varying sequences. We demonstrate that the proposed algorithm arises naturally by embedding the Slow Features

  9. Good, Clean, Fair: The Rhetoric of the Slow Food Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Stephen

    2008-01-01

    This article outlines the origins of the Slow Food movement before examining the ways in which Slow Food rhetoric seeks to redefine gastronomy and combat the more deleterious effects of globalization. In articulating a new gastronomy, Slow Food founder Carlo Petrini attempts to reconstruct the gastronomy of Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin, at once…

  10. Slow Photons for Photocatalysis and Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Zhao, Heng; Wu, Min; Van der Schueren, Benoit; Li, Yu; Deparis, Olivier; Ye, Jinhua; Ozin, Geoffrey A; Hasan, Tawfique; Su, Bao-Lian

    2017-02-06

    Solar light is widely recognized as one of the most valuable renewable energy sources for the future. However, the development of solar-energy technologies is severely hindered by poor energy-conversion efficiencies due to low optical-absorption coefficients and low quantum-conversion yield of current-generation materials. Huge efforts have been devoted to investigating new strategies to improve the utilization of solar energy. Different chemical and physical strategies have been used to extend the spectral range or increase the conversion efficiency of materials, leading to very promising results. However, these methods have now begun to reach their limits. What is therefore the next big concept that could efficiently be used to enhance light harvesting? Despite its discovery many years ago, with the potential for becoming a powerful tool for enhanced light harvesting, the slow-photon effect, a manifestation of light-propagation control due to photonic structures, has largely been overlooked. This review presents theoretical as well as experimental progress on this effect, revealing that the photoreactivity of materials can be dramatically enhanced by exploiting slow photons. It is predicted that successful implementation of this strategy may open a very promising avenue for a broad spectrum of light-energy-conversion technologies.

  11. Slow internal protein dynamics in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biehl, R.; Richter, D.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale domain dynamics in proteins are found when flexible linkers or hinges connect domains. The related conformational changes are often related to the function of the protein, for example by arranging the active center after substrate binding or allowing transport and release of products. The adaptation of a specific active structure is referred to as ‘induced fit’ and is challenged by models such as ‘conformational sampling’. Newer models about protein function include some flexibility within the protein structure or even internal dynamics of the protein. As larger domains contribute to the configurational changes, the timescale of the involved motions is slowed down. The role of slow domain dynamics is being increasingly recognized as essential to understanding the function of proteins. Neutron spin echo spectroscopy (NSE) is a technique that is able to access the related timescales from 0.1 up to several hundred nanoseconds and simultaneously covers the length scale relevant for protein domain movements of several nanometers distance between domains. Here we focus on these large-scale domain fluctuations and show how the structure and dynamics of proteins can be assessed by small-angle neutron scattering and NSE.

  12. Maxwell Equations for Slow-Moving Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozov, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    In the present work, the Minkowski equations obtained on the basis of theory of relativity are used to describe electromagnetic fields in moving media. But important electromagnetic processes run under non-relativistic conditions of slow-moving media. Therefore, one should carry out its description in terms of classical mechanics. Hertz derived electrodynamic equations for moving media within the frame of classical mechanics on the basis of the Maxwell theory. His equations disagree with the experimental data concerned with the moving dielectrics. In the paper, a way of description of electromagnetic fields in slow-moving media on the basis of the Maxwell theory within the frame of classical mechanics is offered by combining the Hertz approach and the experimental data concerned with the movement of dielectrics in electromagnetic fields. Received Maxwell equations lack asymmetry in the description of the reciprocal electrodynamic action of a magnet and a conductor and conform to known experimental data. Comparative analysis of the Minkowski and Maxwell models is carried out.

  13. Colectomy for idiopathic slow transit constipation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    童卫东; 刘宝华; 张胜本; 张连阳; 黄显凯

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the intervention of colectomy on a group of patients with idiopathic slow transit constipation (STC).Methods: Thirty-four patients with STC, underwent colectomy during recent 10 years in our department, were subjected and followed for a mean length of 34 months, and their colon transits, defecograms, colonoscopic examination, sex hormone detection, and immunohistochemical studies were retrospectively reviewed.Results: The colonic transit time ranged from 96 to 240 h, with a mean time of 136 h.Eighty-five percent of patients (29/34) accompanied with outlet obstructed constipation, and 50% (17/34) showed abnormal sex hormone levels.Colectomy obtained satisfactory results in most patients, except one case of recurrence.Moreover, more neurons positive to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and lesser to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) were seen in the colonic myenteric plexus.Conclusion: Colectomy produces a satisfactory functional outcome in the majority of patients undergoing surgery for slow transit constipation, but accompanied pelvic dysfunction must be corrected simultaneously.

  14. Computer analysis of slow vital capacity spirograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primiano, F P; Bacevice, A E; Lough, M D; Doershuk, C F

    1982-01-01

    We have developed a digital computer program which evaluates the vital capacity and its subdivisions, expiratory reserve volume and inspiratory capacity. The algorithm examines the multibreath spirogram, a continuous record of quiet breathing interspersed among repeated slow, large volume maneuvers. Quiet breaths are recognized by comparing features of each breath to the respective average and variation of these features for all breaths. A self-scaling, iterative procedure is used to identify those end-tidal points that most likely represent the subject's functional residual capacity. A least-squared error baseline is then fit through these points to partition the vital capacity. Twenty-three spirograms from patients with documented pulmonary disease were independently analyzed by the computer, a pulmonary function technician, and the laboratory supervisor. No practical differences were found among the results. However, the computer's values, in contrast to those of the technician, were reproducible on repeated trials and free of computational and transcriptional errors.

  15. Slow spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orendac, Martin; Sedlakova, Lucia; Orendacova, Alzbeta; Vrabel, Peter; Feher, Alexander; Pajerowski, Daniel M.; Cohen, Justin D.; Meisel, Mark W.; Shirai, Masae; Bramwell, Steven T.

    2009-03-01

    Spin relaxation in dipolar spin ice Dy2Ti2O7 and Ho2Ti2O7 was investigated using the magnetocaloric effect and susceptibility. The magnetocaloric behavior of Dy2Ti2O7 at temperatures where the orientation of spins is governed by ``ice rules`` (T Tice) revealed thermally activated relaxation; however, the resulting temperature dependence of the relaxation time is more complicated than anticipated by a mere extrapolation of the corresponding high temperature data [1]. A susceptibility study of Ho2Ti2O7 was performed at T > Tice and in high magnetic fields, and the results suggest a slow relaxation of spins analogous to the behavior reported in a highly polarized cooperative paramagnet [2]. [1] J. Snyder et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 107201. [2] B. G. Ueland et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 96 (2006) 027216.

  16. Slow light based optical frequency shifter

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Qian; Thuresson, Axel; Nilsson, Adam N; Rippe, Lars; Kröll, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically a controllable way of shifting the frequency of an optical pulse by using a combination of spectral hole burning, slow light effect, and linear Stark effect in a rare-earth-ion doped crystal. We claim that the solid angle of acceptance of a frequency shift structure can be close to $2\\pi$, which means that the frequency shifter could work not only for optical pulses propagating in a specific spatial mode but also for randomly scattered light. As the frequency shift is controlled solely by an external electric field, it works also for weak coherent light fields, and can e.g. be used as a frequency shifter for quantum memory devices in quantum communication.

  17. Environmentally friendly slow-release nitrogen fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Boli; Liu, Mingzhu; Lü, Shaoyu; Xie, Lihua; Wang, Yanfang

    2011-09-28

    To sustain the further world population, more fertilizers are required, which may become an environmental hazard, unless adequate technical and socioeconomic impacts are addressed. In the current study, slow-release formulations of nitrogen fertilizer were developed on the basis of natural attapulgite (APT) clay, ethylcellulose (EC) film, and sodium carboxymethylcellulose/hydroxyethylcellulose (CMC/HEC) hydrogel. The structural and chemical characteristics of the product were examined. The release profiles of urea, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium chloride as nitrogen fertilizer substrates were determined in soil. To further compare the release profiles of nitrogen from different fertilizer substrates, a mathematical model for nutrient release from the coated fertilizer was applied to calculate the diffusion coefficient D. The influence of the product on water-holding and water-retention capacities of soil was determined. The experimental data indicated that the product can effectively reduce nutrient loss, improve use efficiency of water, and prolong irrigation cycles in drought-prone environments.

  18. Thermal slow evolution of compact objects

    CERN Document Server

    Becerra, L; Nunez, L A

    2013-01-01

    We present a comparative study on the gravitational dissipative collapse for local and nonlocal anisotropic spherical matter configurations in the slow contraction approximation. The matter contents are radiant, anisotropic (unequal stresses) spherical local and nonlocal fluids, where the heat flux is described by causal thermodynamics, leading to a consistent determination of the temperature. It is found that both, local and nonlocal, matter configurations exhibit thermal peeling when most of the radiated energy comes from the outer layers of the distribution. This peeling occurs when different signs in the velocity of fluid elements appears, giving rise to the splitting of the matter configuration. This effect emerges as a combination of convection mass transfer and radiation flux, but is the intense radiation field at the outer layers of the object that causes of the peeling. This effect seems to be more violent for nonlocal configurations and it is very sensible to the initial mass of the energy flux prof...

  19. Limits of slow light in photonic crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Xiao, Sanshui; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2008-01-01

    in the group velocity acquiring a finite value above zero at the band-gap edges while attaining uperluminal values within the band gap. Simple scalings of the minimum and maximum group velocities with the imaginary part of the dielectric function or, equivalently, the linewidth of the broadened states......While ideal photonic crystals would support modes with a vanishing group velocity, state-of-the-art structures have still only provided a slow down by roughly two orders of magnitude. We find that the induced density of states caused by lifetime broadening of the electromagnetic modes results...... are presented. The results obtained are entirely general and may be applied to any effect which results in a broadening of the electromagnetic states, such as loss, disorder, and finite-size effects. This significantly limits the reduction in group velocity attainable via photonic crystals....

  20. Slow flow in channels with porous walls

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, Kaare H

    2012-01-01

    We consider the slow flow of a viscous incompressible liquid in a channel of constant but arbitrary cross section shape, driven by non-uniform suction or injection through the porous channel walls. A similarity transformation reduces the Navier-Stokes equations to a set of coupled equations for the velocity potential in two dimensions. When the channel aspect ratio and Reynolds number are both small, the problem reduces to solving the biharmonic equation with constant forcing in two dimensions. With the relevant boundary conditions, determining the velocity field in a porous channels is thus equivalent to solving for the vertical displacement of a simply suspended thin plate under uniform load. This allows us to provide analytic solutions for flow in porous channels whose cross-section is e.g. a rectangle or an equilateral triangle, and provides a general framework for the extension of Berman flow (Journal of Applied Physics 24(9), p. 1232, 1953) to three dimensions.

  1. Slow light pulse propagation in dispersive media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Roland; Mørk, Jesper; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2009-01-01

    -difference-time-domain Maxwell-Bloch simulations and compared to analytic results. For long pulses the group index (transmission) for the combined system is significantly enhanced (reduced) relative to slow light based on purely material or waveguide dispersion. Shorter pulses are strongly distorted and depending on parameters......We present a theoretical and numerical analysis of pulse propagation in a semiconductor photonic crystal waveguide with embedded quantum dots in a regime where the pulse is subjected to both waveguide and material dispersion. The group index and the transmission are investigated by finite...... broadening or break-up of the pulse may be observed. The transition from linear to nonlinear pulse propagation is quantified in terms of the spectral width of the pulse. To cite this article: T.R. Nielsen et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009). (C) 2009 Academie des sciences. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All...

  2. Slow photon delay and the neutrino velocity

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Martin, Gustavo R

    2011-01-01

    Starting from the coordinate system used by Einstein to find the bending of light rays by gravitational fields we calculate the effect of the Earth gravitational energy along a hypothetical photon null path on the geoid non inertial system. There is an energy term, relative to an inertial system, which may be interpreted as a small time-relative "dressed" physical rest mass correction to the photon null mass. This relative gravitational potential energy determines a proper time delay proportional to the laboratory non inertial flying time interval along the trajectory with a small factor 5.276x10-5. Applying this delay to a hypothetical photon trajectory from the CERN SPS/CNGS target to the LNGS OPERA detector we may interpret the reported neutrino time anomaly, which is of the same order of magnitude, by saying that the OPERA neutrino is faster than our slow photon but its speed is smaller than the fundamental constant c.

  3. Fast-slow analysis for parametrically and externally excited systems with two slow rationally related excitation frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiujing; Bi, Qinsheng; Ji, Peng; Kurths, Jürgen

    2015-07-01

    We present a general method for analyzing mixed-mode oscillations (MMOs) in parametrically and externally excited systems with two low excitation frequencies (PEESTLEFs) for the case of arbitrary m:n relation between the slow frequencies of excitations. The validity of the approach has been demonstrated using the equations of Duffing and van der Pol, separately. Our study shows that, by introducing a slow variable and finding the relation between the slow variable and the slow excitations, PEESTLEFs can be transformed into a fast-slow form with a single slow variable and therefore MMOs observed in PEESTLEFs can be understood by the classical machinery of fast subsystem analysis of the transformed fast-slow system.

  4. Slow-roll approximation in loop quantum cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Luc, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    The slow-roll approximation is an analytical approach to study dynamical properties of the inflationary universe. In this article, systematic construction of the slow-roll expansion for effective loop quantum cosmology is presented. The analysis is performed up to the fourth order in both slow-roll parameters and the parameter controlling the strength of deviation from the classical case. The expansion is performed for three types of the slow-roll parameters: Hubble slow-roll parameters, Hubble flow parameters and potential slow-roll parameters. An accuracy of the approximation is verified by comparison with the numerical phase space trajectories for the case with a massive potential term. The results obtained in this article may be helpful in the search for the subtle quantum gravitational effects with use of the cosmological data.

  5. Slow-roll approximation in loop quantum cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luc, Joanna; Mielczarek, Jakub

    2017-01-01

    The slow-roll approximation is an analytical approach to study dynamical properties of the inflationary universe. In this article, systematic construction of the slow-roll expansion for effective loop quantum cosmology is presented. The analysis is performed up to the fourth order in both slow-roll parameters and the parameter controlling the strength of deviation from the classical case. The expansion is performed for three types of the slow-roll parameters: Hubble slow-roll parameters, Hubble flow parameters and potential slow-roll parameters. An accuracy of the approximation is verified by comparison with the numerical phase space trajectories for the case with a massive potential term. The results obtained in this article may be helpful in the search for the subtle quantum gravitational effects with use of the cosmological data.

  6. Slow light in tapered slot photonic crystal waveguide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jun; LI YanPing; YANG ChuanChuan; PENG Chao; WANG ZiYu

    2009-01-01

    A slotted single-mode photonic crystal waveguide with a linear tapered slot is presented to realize slow light, whose dispersion curve is shifted by changing the slot width. When the slot width is reduced, the band curve shifts in the tapered structure, and the group velocity of light approach zero at the cut-off frequency. Therefore, different frequency components of the guided light are slowed down even loca-lized along the propagation direction inside a tapered slot photonic crystal waveguide. Furthermore, this structure can confine slow light-wave in a narrow slot waveguide, which may effectively enhance the interaction between slow light and the low-index wave-guiding materials filled in the slot. In addition, this tapered slot structure can be used to compensate group velocity dispersion of slow light by mod-ifying the structure, thus opening the opportunity for ultra-wide bandwidth slow light.

  7. A slow gravity compensated atom laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleine Büning, G.; Will, J.; Ertmer, W.

    2010-01-01

    We report on a slow guided atom laser beam outcoupled from a Bose–Einstein condensate of 87Rb atoms in a hybrid trap. The acceleration of the atom laser beam can be controlled by compensating the gravitational acceleration and we reach residual accelerations as low as 0.0027 g. The outcoupling...... mechanism allows for the production of a constant flux of 4.5×106 atoms per second and due to transverse guiding we obtain an upper limit for the mean beam width of 4.6 μm. The transverse velocity spread is only 0.2 mm/s and thus an upper limit for the beam quality parameter is M 2=2.5. We demonstrate...... the potential of the long interrogation times available with this atom laser beam by measuring the trap frequency in a single measurement. The small beam width together with the long evolution and interrogation time makes this atom laser beam a promising tool for continuous interferometric measurements....

  8. Slow positron beam at the JINR, Dubna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horodek Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Low Energy Positron Toroidal Accumulator (LEPTA at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR proposed for generation of positronium in flight has been adopted for positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS. The positron injector generates continuous slow positron beam with positron energy range between 50 eV and 35 keV. The radioactive 22Na isotope is used. In distinction to popular tungsten foil, here the solid neon is used as moderator. It allows to obtain the beam intensity of about 105 e+/s width energy spectrum characterized by full width at half maximum (FWHM of 3.4 eV and a tail to lower energies of about 30 eV. The paper covers the characteristic of variable energy positron beam at the LEPTA facility: parameters, the rule of moderation, scheme of injector, and transportation of positrons into the sample chamber. Recent status of the project and its development in the field of PAS is discussed. As an example, the measurement of the positron diffusion length in pure iron is demonstrated.

  9. Wall mode stabilization at slow plasma rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Bo; Betti, Riccardo; Reimerdes, Holger; Garofalo, Andrea; Manickam, Janardhan

    2007-11-01

    Unstable pressure-driven external kink modes, which become slowly growing resistive wall modes (RWMs) in the presence of a resistive wall, can lead to tokamak plasma disruptions at high beta. It has been shown that RWMs are stabilized by fast plasma rotation (about 1-2% of the Alfv'en frequency) in experiments. Conventional theories attribute the RWM suppression to the dissipation induced by the resonances between plasma rotation and ion bounce/transit or shear Alfv'en frequencies [1]. In those theories, the kinetic effects associated with the plasma diamagnetic frequencies and trapped-particle precession drift frequencies are neglected. It has been observed in recent experiments [2,3] that the RWM suppression also occurs at very slow plasma rotation (about 0.3% of the Alfv'en frequency), where the conventional dissipation is too small to fully suppress the RWMs. Here it is shown, that the trapped-particle kinetic contribution associated with the precession motion [4] is large enough to stabilize the RWM in DIII-D at low rotation. Work supported by the US-DoE OFES. [1] A. Bondeson and M. S. Chu, Physics of Plasmas, 3,3013 (1996). [2] H. Reimerdes et al., Physical Review Letters, 98,055001 (2007). [3] M. Takechi et al., Physical Review Letters, 98,055002 (2007). [4] B. Hu and R. Betti, Physical Review Letters, 93,105002 (2004).

  10. Mixing, ergodicity and slow relaxation phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, I. V. L.; Vainstein, M. H.; Lapas, L. C.; Batista, A. A.; Oliveira, F. A.

    2006-11-01

    Investigations on diffusion in systems with memory [I.V.L. Costa, R. Morgado, M.V.B.T. Lima, F.A. Oliveira, Europhys. Lett. 63 (2003) 173] have established a hierarchical connection between mixing, ergodicity, and the fluctuation-dissipation theorem (FDT). This hierarchy means that ergodicity is a necessary condition for the validity of the FDT, and mixing is a necessary condition for ergodicity. In this work, we compare those results with recent investigations using the Lee recurrence relations method [M.H. Lee, Phys. Rev. B 26 (1982) 2547; M.H. Lee, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 250601; M.H. Lee, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 (2006) 4651]. Lee shows that ergodicity is violated in the dynamics of the electron gas [M.H. Lee, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39 (2006) 4651]. This reinforces both works and implies that the results of [I.V.L. Costa, R. Morgado, M.V.B.T. Lima, F.A. Oliveira, Europhys. Lett. 63 (2003) 173] are more general than the framework in which they were obtained. Some applications to slow relaxation phenomena are discussed.

  11. Impregnated netting slows infestation by Triatoma infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Michael Z; Quíspe-Machaca, Victor R; Ylla-Velasquez, Jose L; Waller, Lance A; Richards, Jean M; Rath, Bruno; Borrini-Mayori, Katty; del Carpio, Juan G Cornejo; Cordova-Benzaquen, Eleazar; McKenzie, F Ellis; Wirtz, Robert A; Maguire, James H; Gilman, Robert H; Bern, Caryn

    2008-10-01

    We used sentinel animal enclosures to measure the rate of infestation by the Chagas disease vector, Triatoma infestans, in an urban community of Arequipa, Peru, and to evaluate the effect of deltamethrin-impregnated netting on that rate. Impregnated netting decreased the rate of infestation of sentinel enclosures (rate ratio, 0.23; 95% confidence interval, 0.13-0.38; P < 0.001), controlling for the density of surrounding vector populations and the distance of these to the sentinel enclosures. Most migrant insects were early-stage nymphs, which are less likely to carry the parasitic agent of Chagas disease, Trypanosoma cruzi. Spread of the vector in the city therefore likely precedes spread of the parasite. Netting was particularly effective against adult insects and late-stage nymphs; taking into account population structure, netting decreased the reproductive value of migrant populations from 443.6 to 40.5. Impregnated netting can slow the spread of T. infestans and is a potentially valuable tool in the control of Chagas disease.

  12. Slow Diffusive Gravitational Instability Before Decoupling

    CERN Document Server

    Thompson, Todd A

    2009-01-01

    Radiative diffusion damps acoustic modes at large comoving wavenumber (k) before decoupling (``Silk damping''). In a simple WKB analysis, neglecting moments of the temperature distribution beyond the quadrupole, damping appears in the acoustic mode as a term of order ik^2/(taudot) where taudot is the scattering rate per unit conformal time. Although the Jeans instability is stabilized on scales smaller than the adiabatic Jeans length, I show that the medium is linearly unstable to first order in (1/taudot) to a slow diffusive mode. At large comoving wavenumber, the characteristic growth rate becomes independent of spatial scale and constant: (t_{KH}a)^-1 ~ (128 pi G/9 kappa_T c)(rho_m/rho_b), where "a" is the scale factor, rho_m and rho_b are the matter and baryon energy density, respectively, and kappa_T is the Thomson opacity. This is the characteristic timescale for a fluid parcel to radiate away its thermal energy content at the Eddington limit, analogous to the Kelvin-Helmholz (KH) time for a massive sta...

  13. Deciding about fast and slow decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croskerry, Pat; Petrie, David A; Reilly, James B; Tait, Gordon

    2014-02-01

    Two reports in this issue address the important topic of clinical decision making. Dual process theory has emerged as the dominant model for understanding the complex processes that underlie human decision making. This theory distinguishes between the reflexive, autonomous processes that characterize intuitive decision making and the deliberate reasoning of an analytical approach. In this commentary, the authors address the polarization of viewpoints that has developed around the relative merits of the two systems. Although intuitive processes are typically fast and analytical processes slow, speed alone does not distinguish them. In any event, the majority of decisions in clinical medicine are not dependent on very short response times. What does appear relevant to diagnostic ease and accuracy is the degree to which the symptoms of the disease being diagnosed are characteristic ones. There are also concerns around some methodological issues related to research design in this area of enquiry. Reductionist approaches that attempt to isolate dependent variables may create such artificial experimental conditions that both external and ecological validity are sacrificed. Clinical decision making is a complex process with many independent (and interdependent) variables that need to be separated out in a discrete fashion and then reflected on in real time to preserve the fidelity of clinical practice. With these caveats in mind, the authors believe that research in this area should promote a better understanding of clinical practice and teaching by focusing less on the deficiencies of intuitive and analytical systems and more on their adaptive strengths.

  14. Towards Modelling slow Earthquakes with Geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Yuen, D. A.

    2006-12-01

    We explore a new, properly scaled, thermal-mechanical geodynamic model{^1} that can generate timescales now very close to those of earthquakes and of the same order as slow earthquakes. In our simulations we encounter two basically different bifurcation phenomena. One in which the shear zone nucleates in the ductile field, and the second which is fully associated with elasto-plastic (brittle, pressure- dependent) displacements. A quartz/feldspar composite slab has all two modes operating simultaneously in three different depth levels. The bottom of the crust is predominantly controlled by the elasto-visco-plastic mode while the top is controlled by the elasto-plastic mode. The exchange of the two modes appears to communicate on a sub-horizontal layer in a flip-flop fashion, which may yield a fractal-like signature in time and collapses into a critical temperature which for crustal rocks is around 500-580 K; in the middle of the brittle-ductile transition-zone. Near the critical temperature, stresses close to the ideal strength can be reached at local, meter-scale. Investigations of the thermal-mechanical properties under such extreme conditions are pivotal for understanding the physics of earthquakes. 1. Regenauer-Lieb, K., Weinberg, R. & Rosenbaum, G. The effect of energy feedbacks on continental strength. Nature 442, 67-70 (2006).

  15. Enhancement of sleep slow waves: underlying mechanisms and practical consequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Michele eBellesi; Brady A Riedner; Garcia-Molina, Gary N.; Chiara eCirelli; Giulio eTononi

    2014-01-01

    Even modest sleep restriction, especially the loss of sleep slow wave activity, is invariably associated with slower EEG activity during wake, the occurrence of local sleep in an otherwise awake brain, and impaired performance due to cognitive and memory deficits. Recent studies not only confirm the beneficial role of sleep in memory consolidation, but also point to a specific role for sleep slow waves. Thus, the implementation of methods to enhance sleep slow waves without unwanted arousals ...

  16. Slow mode shocks propagating in open and closed magnetic fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吕建永; 魏奉思

    1999-01-01

    A 2-D MHD model is used to investigate the propagation of slow mode shocks in the open and closed magnetic fields of the meridional plane near the sun. The solutions demonstrate that a forward slow shock could retain its slow shock characteristics into interplanetary space in the magnetically open region; however, it can evolve into an intermediate shock through the helmet-type current sheet to the open magnetic field.

  17. Elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kepko, L.; Viall, N. M.; Lepri, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    While the source of the fast solar wind is well understood to be linked to coronal holes, the source of the slow solar wind has remained elusive. A distinguishing characteristic of the slow solar wind is the high variability of the plasma parameters, such as magnetic field, velocity, density, composition, and charge state. Many previous studies of the slow solar wind have examined trends in the composition and charge states over long time scales and using data with comparatively low temporal resolution. In this study, we take advantage of high time resolution (12 min) measurements of the charge-state abundances recently reprocessed by the ACE SWICS science team to probe the timescales of solar wind variability of coherent structures at relatively small scales (<2000 Mm, or ~ 90 minutes at slow wind speeds). We use an interval of slow solar wind containing quasi pressure-balanced, periodic number density structures previously studied by Kepko et al and shown to be important in solar wind-magnetospheric coupling. The combination of high temporal resolution composition measurements and the clearly identified boundaries of the periodic structures allows us to probe the elemental slow solar wind flux tubes/structures. We use this train of 2000Mm periodic density structures as tracers of solar wind origin and/or acceleration. We find that each 2000 Mm parcel of slow solar wind, though its speed is steady, exhibits the complete range of charge state and composition variations expected for the entire range of slow solar wind, in a repeated sequence. Each parcel cycles through three states: 1) 'normal' slow wind, 2) compositionally slow wind with very high density, and 3) compositionally fast but typical slow solar wind density. We conclude by suggesting these structures form elemental building blocks of the slow solar wind, and discuss whether it is necessary to decouple separately the process(es) responsible for the release and acceleration.

  18. Sustainable Development of Slow Fashion Businesses: Customer Value Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Sojin Jung; Byoungho Jin

    2016-01-01

    As an alternative to the prevalent fast fashion model, slow fashion has emerged as a way of enhancing sustainability in the fashion industry, yet how slow fashion can enhance profitability is still largely unknown. Based on a customer value creation framework, this study empirically tested a structural model that specified the slow fashion attributes that contribute to creating perceived customer value, which subsequently increases a consumer’s intention to buy and pay a price premium for slo...

  19. Threshold Characteristics of Slow-Light Photonic Crystal Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xue, Weiqi; Yu, Yi; Ottaviano, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    The threshold properties of photonic crystal quantum dot lasers operating in the slow-light regime are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Measurements show that, in contrast to conventional lasers, the threshold gain attains a minimum value for a specific cavity length. The experimental...... results are explained by an analytical theory for the laser threshold that takes into account the effects of slow light and random disorder due to unavoidable fabrication imperfections. Longer lasers are found to operate deeper into the slow-light region, leading to a trade-off between slow-light induced...

  20. Regional Slow Waves and Spindles in Human Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Yuval; Staba, Richard J.; Andrillon, Thomas; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.; Cirelli, Chiara; Fried, Itzhak; Tononi, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The most prominent EEG events in sleep are slow waves, reflecting a slow (waves and the underlying active and inactive neuronal states occur locally. Thus, especially in late sleep, some regions can be active while others are silent. We also find that slow waves can propagate, usually from medial prefrontal cortex to the medial temporal lobe and hippocampus. Sleep spindles, the other hallmark of NREM sleep EEG, are likewise predominantly local. Thus, intracerebral communication during sleep is constrained because slow and spindle oscillations often occur out-of-phase in different brain regions. PMID:21482364

  1. On Promoting the Slow Learners' Learning in English Class

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庞雅

    2011-01-01

    Nowadays,the actualities of slow learners in English class are not satisfying in China.Confronted with such kind of situation,as language teachers,how to promote the slow students' learning,is one of the biggest problems in our teaching.The paper focuses on the features of slow learners,e.g.,lit'de or improper motivation,debilitative anxiety,introversion,inhibition,etc.and the roles the slow learners play in English class,and some of the writer's personal suggestions for promoting their learning in English class as well.

  2. Sustainable Development of Slow Fashion Businesses: Customer Value Approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jung, Sojin; Jin, Byoungho

    2016-01-01

    ... fashion can enhance protability is still largely unknown. Based on a customer value creation framework, this study empirically tested a structural model that specied the slow fashion attributes ...

  3. New data on programmed aging - slow phenoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skulachev, M V; Skulachev, V P

    2014-10-01

    indicating that aging can be regulated by an organism provide another argument in favor of optionality of aging. Cases have been described when aging as a program useful for the evolution of offspring but counterproductive for the parental individual slows under conditions that threaten the very existence of the individual. These conditions include food restriction (the threat of death from starvation), heavy muscular work, decrease or increase in the environmental temperature, small amounts of poisons (including ROS; here we speak about the paradoxical geroprotective effect of the low doses of prooxidants that inhibit apoptosis). On the other hand, aging can be inhibited (and maybe even cancelled) artificially. This can be done by turning off the genes encoding the proteins participating in the aging program, such as FAT10, p66shc, and some others. In addition, the gene of the antioxidant enzyme catalase can be addressed into mitochondria, where it will split mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide, the level of which increases with age. However, today the simplest way to slow down the aging program is the use of mitochondria-targeted low molecular weight antioxidant compounds of plastoquinonyl decyltriphenylphosphonium-type (SkQ1), which prolong the life of animals, plants, and fungi and inhibit the development of many age-related diseases and symptoms.

  4. Mutual recombination in slow Si+ + H- collisions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Jian-Guo; Liu Chun-Lei; Janev R. K.; Yan Jun; Shi Jian-Rong

    2006-01-01

    This paper studies the process of mutual neutralization of Si+ and H- ions in slow collisions within the multichannel Landau-Zener model. All important ionic-covalent couplings in this collision system are included in the collision dynamics. The cross sections for population of specific final states of product Si atom are calculated in the CM energy range 0.05 eV/u-5 keV/u. Both singlet and triplet states are considered. At collision energies below ~10 eV/u, the most populated singlet state is Si(3p4p, 1S0), while for energies above ~150eV/u it is the Si(3p, 4p, 1P1) state. In the case of triplet states, the mixed 3p4p(3 S1 +3P0) states are the most populated in the entire collision energy range investigated. The total cross section exhibits a broad maximum around 200-300 eV/u and for ECM ≤ 10eV/u it monotonically increases with decreasing the collision energy, reaching a value of 8 × 10-13 cm2 at ECM = 0.05 eV/u. The ion-pair formation process in Si(3p2 3PJ)+H(1s) collisions has also been considered and its cross section in the considered energy range is very small (smaller than 10-20 cm2 in the energy region below 1 keV/u).

  5. Rapid identification of slow healing wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kenneth; Covington, Scott; Sen, Chandan K; Januszyk, Michael; Kirsner, Robert S; Gurtner, Geoffrey C; Shah, Nigam H

    2016-01-01

    Chronic nonhealing wounds have a prevalence of 2% in the United States, and cost an estimated $50 billion annually. Accurate stratification of wounds for risk of slow healing may help guide treatment and referral decisions. We have applied modern machine learning methods and feature engineering to develop a predictive model for delayed wound healing that uses information collected during routine care in outpatient wound care centers. Patient and wound data was collected at 68 outpatient wound care centers operated by Healogics Inc. in 26 states between 2009 and 2013. The dataset included basic demographic information on 59,953 patients, as well as both quantitative and categorical information on 180,696 wounds. Wounds were split into training and test sets by randomly assigning patients to training and test sets. Wounds were considered delayed with respect to healing time if they took more than 15 weeks to heal after presentation at a wound care center. Eleven percent of wounds in this dataset met this criterion. Prognostic models were developed on training data available in the first week of care to predict delayed healing wounds. A held out subset of the training set was used for model selection, and the final model was evaluated on the test set to evaluate discriminative power and calibration. The model achieved an area under the curve of 0.842 (95% confidence interval 0.834-0.847) for the delayed healing outcome and a Brier reliability score of 0.00018. Early, accurate prediction of delayed healing wounds can improve patient care by allowing clinicians to increase the aggressiveness of intervention in patients most at risk. © 2015 by the Wound Healing Society.

  6. Experimental determination of the slow-neutron wavelength distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lebech, Bente; Mikke, K.; Sledziewska-Blocka, D.

    1970-01-01

    Different experiments for determining the slow-neutron wavelength distribution in the region 227-3 meV have been carried out, and the results compared. It is concluded that the slow-neutron wave-length distribution can be determined accurately by elastic scattering on a pure incoherent or a pure...

  7. Slow Light at High Frequencies in an Amplifying Semiconductor Waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Öhman, Filip; Yvind, Kresten; Mørk, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate slow-down of a modulated light signal in a semiconductor waveguide. Concatenated amplifying and absorbing sections simultaneously achieve both amplification and a controllable time delay at 15 GHz.......We demonstrate slow-down of a modulated light signal in a semiconductor waveguide. Concatenated amplifying and absorbing sections simultaneously achieve both amplification and a controllable time delay at 15 GHz....

  8. Helping the Slow-Reader in the Primary School Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Edmund V.

    1988-01-01

    A strategy is proposed for primary teachers to use with children who have reading difficulties. It includes developing a profile of each slow reader, testing each slow reader to determine reading level and specific weaknesses, and using certain practical methods to help solve the problem. (two references) (LB)

  9. The impact of cortical deafferentation on the neocortical slow oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemieux, Maxime; Chen, Jen-Yung; Lonjers, Peter; Bazhenov, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2014-04-16

    Slow oscillation is the main brain rhythm observed during deep sleep in mammals. Although several studies have demonstrated its neocortical origin, the extent of the thalamic contribution is still a matter of discussion. Using electrophysiological recordings in vivo on cats and computational modeling, we found that the local thalamic inactivation or the complete isolation of the neocortical slabs maintained within the brain dramatically reduced the expression of slow and fast oscillations in affected cortical areas. The slow oscillation began to recover 12 h after thalamic inactivation. The slow oscillation, but not faster activities, nearly recovered after 30 h and persisted for weeks in the isolated slabs. We also observed an increase of the membrane potential fluctuations recorded in vivo several hours after thalamic inactivation. Mimicking this enhancement in a network computational model with an increased postsynaptic activity of long-range intracortical afferents or scaling K(+) leak current, but not several other Na(+) and K(+) intrinsic currents was sufficient for recovering the slow oscillation. We conclude that, in the intact brain, the thalamus contributes to the generation of cortical active states of the slow oscillation and mediates its large-scale synchronization. Our study also suggests that the deafferentation-induced alterations of the sleep slow oscillation can be counteracted by compensatory intracortical mechanisms and that the sleep slow oscillation is a fundamental and intrinsic state of the neocortex.

  10. Kinetic investigation for slow combustion of biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haykiri-Acma, H.; Yaman, S. [Istanbul Technical Univ., Istanbul (Turkey). Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Metallurgical Engineering

    2006-07-01

    The renewed interest in biomass as a renewable, clean, and inexpensive fuel was discussed. Many different mechanisms take place simultaneously during biomass combustion and also during other thermal processes such as gasification, pyrolysis or carbonization. These mechanisms have a pronounced influence on the design and operation of thermal conversion processes. In addition, product yields and product distributions from the thermal processes are sensitive to the kinetic properties of biomass. In order to evaluate the combustion mechanisms and the combustion kinetics of biomass, the behavior of these constituents under combustion conditions were properly evaluated. In this study, combustion of biomass samples was carried out in a thermogravimetric analyzer by heating them from ambient to 1173 K with heating rates of 5 K/min and 10 K/min under dynamic dry air atmosphere of 40 mL/min. The biomass samples included olive refuse, sunflower seed shell, rapeseed, grape seed, and hybrid poplar. The purpose of the study was to examine the kinetic properties of biomass during slow combustion for the overall combustion process as well as for some definite temperature intervals at which different combustion mechanisms are present according to the type and complexity of biomass used. Derivative thermogravimetric analysis (DTG) curves were derived, and data obtained from these curves were used to compute the kinetic parameters such as activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and governing mechanisms for the combustion processes. The governing mechanisms for individual temperature intervals were examined along with the overall combustion process. The study showed that at lower temperature intervals, the combustion process was controlled primarily by the chemical reaction. At least 3 sequential mechanisms may occur at different temperature intervals during combustion of biomass. Activation energy and pre-exponential factors were determined for each temperature interval

  11. Ultra Slow Muon Project at J-PARC MUSE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Yasuhiro; Ikedo, Yutaka; Shimomura, Koichiro; Strasser, Patrick; Takashi, Nagatomo; Nakamura, Jumpei; Makimura, Shunsuke; Kawamura, Naritoshi; Fujimori, Hiroshi; Koda, Akihiro; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Nishiyama, Kusuo; Kadono, Ryosuke; Higemoto, Wataru; Ito, Takashi; Ogitsu, Toru; Makida, Yasuhiro; Sasaki, Kenichi; Adachi, Taihei; Torikai, Eiko

    We have been proceeding the Ultra Slow Muon project at J-PARC MUSE(MUon Science Establishment). As a first mission, we constructed the U-Line and succeeded in extracting the world highest intensity pulsed surface muons, 2,500,000 muons per pulse (6.4 × 107/s at 212 kW proton beam intensity, corresponding to 3 × 108/s at 1 MW) to the U1 experimental area. As the second mission, we have installed a Mu chamber to stop such intense pulsed surface muons towards a hot tungsten target for generating an intense ultra slow muon beam, as well as a slow ion optics to accelerate and transport ultra slow muons to the U1A and U1B areas where μ+ SR spectrometers are located. We are standing on the stage we are ready to generate ultra slow muons, if J-PARC operation is approved.

  12. Identification of slow molecular order parameters for Markov model construction

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Hernandez, Guillermo; Giorgino, Toni; de Fabritiis, Gianni; Noé, Frank

    2013-01-01

    A goal in the kinetic characterization of a macromolecular system is the description of its slow relaxation processes, involving (i) identification of the structural changes involved in these processes, and (ii) estimation of the rates or timescales at which these slow processes occur. Most of the approaches to this task, including Markov models, Master-equation models, and kinetic network models, start by discretizing the high-dimensional state space and then characterize relaxation processes in terms of the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of a discrete transition matrix. The practical success of such an approach depends very much on the ability to finely discretize the slow order parameters. How can this task be achieved in a high-dimensional configuration space without relying on subjective guesses of the slow order parameters? In this paper, we use the variational principle of conformation dynamics to derive an optimal way of identifying the "slow subspace" of a large set of prior order parameters - either g...

  13. Damping of Slow Magnetoacoustic Waves in an Inhomogeneous Coronal Plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nagendra Kumar; Pradeep Kumar; Shiv Singh; Anil Kumar

    2008-03-01

    We study the propagation and dissipation of slow magnetoacoustic waves in an inhomogeneous viscous coronal loop plasma permeated by uniform magnetic field. Only viscosity and thermal conductivity are taken into account as dissipative processes in the coronal loop. The damping length of slow-mode waves exhibit varying behaviour depending upon the physical parameters of the loop in an active region AR8270 observed by TRACE. The wave energy flux associated with slow magnetoacoustic waves turns out to be of the order of 106 erg cm-2 s-1 which is high enough to replace the energy lost through optically thin coronal emission and the thermal conduction belowto the transition region. It is also found that only those slow-mode waves which have periods more than 240 s provide the required heating rate to balance the energy losses in the solar corona. Our calculated wave periods for slow-mode waves nearly match with the oscillation periods of loop observed by TRACE.

  14. Slow-light enhanced gain in active photonic crystal waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Ek, Sara; Chen, Yaohui; Semenova, Elizaveta; Yvind, Kresten; Mørk, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    Slow light is a fascinating physical effect, raising fundamental questions related to our understanding of light-matter interactions as well as offering new possibilities for photonic devices. From the first demonstrations of slow light propagation in ultra-cold atomic gasses, solid-state Ruby and photonic crystal structures, focus has shifted to applications, with slow light offering the ability to enhance and control light-matter interactions. The demonstration of tuneable delay lines, enhanced nonlinearities and spontaneous emission, enlarged spectral sensitivity and increased phase shifts illustrate the possibilities enabled by slow light propagation, with microwave photonics emerging as one of the promising applications. Here, we demonstrate that slow light can be used to control and increase the gain coefficient of an active semiconductor waveguide. The effect was theoretically predicted but not yet experimentally demonstrated. These results show a route towards realizing ultra-compact optical amplifier...

  15. Enhancement of sleep slow waves: underlying mechanisms and practical consequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele eBellesi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Even modest sleep restriction, especially the loss of sleep slow wave activity, is invariably associated with slower EEG activity during wake, the occurrence of local sleep in an otherwise awake brain, and impaired performance due to cognitive and memory deficits. Recent studies not only confirm the beneficial role of sleep in memory consolidation, but also point to a specific role for sleep slow waves. Thus, the implementation of methods to enhance sleep slow waves without unwanted arousals or lightening of sleep could have significant practical implications. Here we first review the evidence that it is possible to enhance sleep slow waves in humans using transcranial direct-current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Since these methods are currently impractical and their safety is questionable, especially for chronic long-term exposure, we then discuss novel data suggesting that it is possible to enhance slow waves using sensory stimuli. We consider the physiology of the K-complex, a peripheral evoked slow wave, and show that, among different sensory modalities, acoustic stimulation is the most effective in increasing the magnitude of slow waves, likely through the activation of non-lemniscal ascending pathways to the thalamo-cortical system. In addition, we discuss how intensity and frequency of the acoustic stimuli, as well as exact timing and pattern of stimulation, affect sleep enhancement. Finally, we discuss automated algorithms that read the EEG and, in real-time, adjust the stimulation parameters in a closed-loop manner to obtain an increase in sleep slow waves and avoid undesirable arousals. In conclusion, while discussing the mechanisms that underlie the generation of sleep slow waves, we review the converging evidence showing that acoustic stimulation is safe and represents an ideal tool for slow wave sleep enhancement.

  16. Enhancement of sleep slow waves: underlying mechanisms and practical consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellesi, Michele; Riedner, Brady A; Garcia-Molina, Gary N; Cirelli, Chiara; Tononi, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Even modest sleep restriction, especially the loss of sleep slow wave activity (SWA), is invariably associated with slower electroencephalogram (EEG) activity during wake, the occurrence of local sleep in an otherwise awake brain, and impaired performance due to cognitive and memory deficits. Recent studies not only confirm the beneficial role of sleep in memory consolidation, but also point to a specific role for sleep slow waves. Thus, the implementation of methods to enhance sleep slow waves without unwanted arousals or lightening of sleep could have significant practical implications. Here we first review the evidence that it is possible to enhance sleep slow waves in humans using transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) and transcranial magnetic stimulation. Since these methods are currently impractical and their safety is questionable, especially for chronic long-term exposure, we then discuss novel data suggesting that it is possible to enhance slow waves using sensory stimuli. We consider the physiology of the K-complex (KC), a peripheral evoked slow wave, and show that, among different sensory modalities, acoustic stimulation is the most effective in increasing the magnitude of slow waves, likely through the activation of non-lemniscal ascending pathways to the thalamo-cortical system. In addition, we discuss how intensity and frequency of the acoustic stimuli, as well as exact timing and pattern of stimulation, affect sleep enhancement. Finally, we discuss automated algorithms that read the EEG and, in real-time, adjust the stimulation parameters in a closed-loop manner to obtain an increase in sleep slow waves and avoid undesirable arousals. In conclusion, while discussing the mechanisms that underlie the generation of sleep slow waves, we review the converging evidence showing that acoustic stimulation is safe and represents an ideal tool for slow wave sleep (SWS) enhancement.

  17. Slow Money for Soft Energy: Lessons for Energy Finance from the Slow Money Movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kock, Beaudry E. [Environmental Change Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)], e-mail: beaudry.kock@ouce.ox.ac.uk

    2012-12-15

    Energy infrastructure is decarbonizing, shifting from dirty coal to cleaner gas- and emissions-free renewables. This is an important and necessary change that unfortunately risks preserving many problematic technical and institutional properties of the old energy system: in particular, the large scales, high aggregation, and excessive centralization of renewable energy infrastructure and, importantly, its financing. Large-scale renewables carry environmental, social and political risks that cannot be ignored, and more importantly they may not alone accomplish the necessary decarbonization of the power sector. We need to revive a different approach to clean energy infrastructure: a 'softer' (Lovins 1978), more distributed, decentralized, local-scale strategy. To achieve this, we need a fundamentally different approach to the financing of clean energy infrastructure. I propose we learn from the 'Slow Money' approach being pioneered in sustainable agriculture (Tasch 2010), emphasizing a better connection to place, smaller scales, and a focus on quality over quantity. This 'slow money, soft energy' vision is not a repudiation of big-scale renewables, since there are some societal needs, which can only be met by big, centralized power. But we do not need the level of concentration in control and finance epitomized by the current trends in the global renewables sector: this can and must change.

  18. Origin of Pseudotachylites during slow creep experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peč, M.; Stünitz, H.; Heilbronner, R.; Drury, M.; De Capitani, C.

    2012-04-01

    structures, bubbles, and bubble trains following the local flow pattern, corroded clasts and amorphous glass identified by TEM. The chemical composition of the pseudotachylites varies depending on the precursor material and is in general more ferromagnesian and basic compared to the bulk rock indicating preferred melting of biotite. The calculated temperature increase due to shear heating is at the most 5°C. High stresses cause pervasive comminution: the smallest crystalline fragments within the bubbly melt have a grain diameter of 10 nm. Nanomaterials exhibit a 'melting point depression' (dependence of melting point on grain size) which allows melting well below bulk melting temperatures. Thus, it seems that melting is a continuation of the comminution once the rock has reached small enough grain size. We therefore suggest that pseudotachylites may also form as 'mechanical melts' at slow displacement rates without the necessity of reaching high temperatures.

  19. Regeneration of frog twitch and slow muscle fibers after mincing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, H; Emser, W

    1985-10-01

    Iliofibularis muscles of Rana temporaria were minced and allowed to regenerate in the iliofibularis or the sartorius bed of the same frog. Regenerated muscles were examined for the presence of slow muscle fibers using electrophysiologic, histochemical, and contractile parameters. Muscle regeneration from sartorius mince was also studied. Regeneration was more successful from iliofibularis than from sartorius mince, and the iliofibularis bed was more favorable for regeneration than the sartorius bed for both types of muscle. Twitch fibers regenerated within a few months, but slow fibers could not be identified earlier than 14 months after muscle destruction. Slow muscle fibers regenerated only from iliofibularis mince, both orthotopically and heterotopically. All regenerates capable of maintaining a K-contracture contained histochemically identified slow fibers; the membrane properties of electrophysiologically identified slow fibers were normal. It is concluded that slow muscle fibers regenerate only from the remnants of a muscle that contains slow fibers. The results are discussed with respect to the role of innervating nerve fibers.

  20. Hedgehog can drive terminal differentiation of amniote slow skeletal muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bildsoe Heidi

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Secreted Hedgehog (Hh signalling molecules have profound influences on many developing and regenerating tissues. Yet in most vertebrate tissues it is unclear which Hh-responses are the direct result of Hh action on a particular cell type because Hhs frequently elicit secondary signals. In developing skeletal muscle, Hhs promote slow myogenesis in zebrafish and are involved in specification of medial muscle cells in amniote somites. However, the extent to which non-myogenic cells, myoblasts or differentiating myocytes are direct or indirect targets of Hh signalling is not known. Results We show that Sonic hedgehog (Shh can act directly on cultured C2 myoblasts, driving Gli1 expression, myogenin up-regulation and terminal differentiation, even in the presence of growth factors that normally prevent differentiation. Distinct myoblasts respond differently to Shh: in some slow myosin expression is increased, whereas in others Shh simply enhances terminal differentiation. Exposure of chick wing bud cells to Shh in culture increases numbers of both muscle and non-muscle cells, yet simultaneously enhances differentiation of myoblasts. The small proportion of differentiated muscle cells expressing definitive slow myosin can be doubled by Shh. Shh over-expression in chick limb bud reduces muscle mass at early developmental stages while inducing ectopic slow muscle fibre formation. Abundant later-differentiating fibres, however, do not express extra slow myosin. Conversely, Hh loss of function in the limb bud, caused by implanting hybridoma cells expressing a functionally blocking anti-Hh antibody, reduces early slow muscle formation and differentiation, but does not prevent later slow myogenesis. Analysis of Hh knockout mice indicates that Shh promotes early somitic slow myogenesis. Conclusions Taken together, the data show that Hh can have direct pro-differentiative effects on myoblasts and that early-developing muscle requires Hh for

  1. On Slow Light as a Black Hole Analogue

    CERN Document Server

    Unruh, W G

    2003-01-01

    Although slow light (electromagnetically induced transparency) would seem an ideal medium in which to institute a ``dumb hole'' (black hole analog), it suffers from a number of problems. We show that the high phase velocity in the slow light regime ensures that the system cannot be used as an analog displaying Hawking radiation. Even though an appropriately designed slow-light set-up may simulate classical features of black holes -- such as horizon, mode mixing, Bogoliubov coefficients, etc. -- it does not reproduce the related quantum effects. PACS: 04.70.Dy, 04.80.-y, 42.50.Gy, 04.60.-m.

  2. Theory of neutron slowing down in nuclear reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Ferziger, Joel H; Dunworth, J V

    2013-01-01

    The Theory of Neutron Slowing Down in Nuclear Reactors focuses on one facet of nuclear reactor design: the slowing down (or moderation) of neutrons from the high energies with which they are born in fission to the energies at which they are ultimately absorbed. In conjunction with the study of neutron moderation, calculations of reactor criticality are presented. A mathematical description of the slowing-down process is given, with particular emphasis on the problems encountered in the design of thermal reactors. This volume is comprised of four chapters and begins by considering the problems

  3. Enhanced parametric amplification in slow-light photonic crystal waveguides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yang; JIANG Chun

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate both theoretically and numerically that slow light can enhance the parametric process of silicon in photonic crystal line-defect waveguides.Specifically,to get the desired gain,the pump power for a given gain medium length or the gain medium length for given pump power can be reduced by (c/vgn)2 when slow light waveguides are used,where n is the material index of conventional waveguide,vg is the group velocity of the slow light waveguide and c is the light velocity in vacuum.

  4. Magnetic Trapping of Molecules via Optical Loading and Magnetic Slowing

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Hsin-I; Hemmerling, Boerge; Piskorski, Julia; Doyle, John M

    2013-01-01

    Calcium monofluoride (CaF) is magnetically slowed and trapped using optical pumping. Starting from a collisionally cooled slow beam, CaF with an initial velocity of ~ 30 m/s is slowed via magnetic forces as it enters a 800 mK deep magnetic trap. Employing two-stage optical pumping, CaF is irreversibly loaded into the trap via two scattered photons. We observe a trap lifetime exceeding 500 ms, limited by background collisions. This method paves the way for cooling and magnetic trapping of chemically diverse molecules without closed cycling transitions.

  5. Slow light invisibility, teleportation, and other mysteries of light

    CERN Document Server

    Perkowitz, Sidney

    2011-01-01

    Slow Light is a popular treatment of today's astonishing breakthroughs in the science of light. Even though we don't understand light's quantum mysteries, we can slow it to a stop and speed it up beyond its Einsteinian speed limit, 186,000 miles/sec; use it for quantum telecommunications; teleport it; manipulate it to create invisibility; and perhaps generate hydrogen fusion power with it. All this is lucidly presented for non-scientists who wonder about teleportation, Harry Potter invisibility cloaks, and other fantastic outcomes. Slow Light shows how the real science and the fantasy inspire

  6. Slow Food: por um alimento bom, limpo e justo

    OpenAIRE

    Fabiele Porazzi

    2012-01-01

    REVIEW:PETRINI, Carlo. Slow Food: princípios da nova gastronomia. Trad. de Renata Lúcia Botina. São Paulo: Editora Senac, 2009. 245 p. RESEÑA:PETRINI, Carlo. Slow Food: princípios da nova gastronomia. Trad. de Renata Lúcia Botina. São Paulo: Editora Senac, 2009. 245 p. http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1807-1384.2012v9n1p384 RESENHA:PETRINI, Carlo. Slow Food: princípios da nova gastronomia. Trad. de Renata Lúcia Botina. São Paulo: Editora Senac, 2009. 245 p.

  7. Origin of the slow afterhyperpolarization and slow rhythmic bursting in striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Charles J; Goldberg, Joshua A

    2006-01-01

    Striatal cholinergic interneurons recorded in slices exhibit three different firing patterns: rhythmic single spiking, irregular bursting, and rhythmic bursting. The rhythmic single-spiking pattern is governed mainly by a prominent brief afterhyperpolarization (mAHP) that follows single spikes. The mAHP arises from an apamin-sensitive calcium-dependent potassium current. A slower AHP (sAHP), also present in these neurons, becomes prominent during rhythmic bursting or driven firing. Although not apamin sensitive, the sAHP is caused by a calcium-dependent potassium conductance. It is not present after blockade of calcium current with cadmium or after calcium is removed from the media or when intracellular calcium is buffered with bis-(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid. It reverses at the potassium equilibrium potential. It can be generated by subthreshold depolarizations and persists after blockade of sodium currents by tetrodotoxin. It is slow, being maximal approximately 1 s after depolarization onset, and takes several seconds to decay. It requires >300-ms depolarizations to become maximally activated. Its voltage sensitivity is sigmoidal, with a half activation voltage of -40 mV. We conclude the sAHP is a high-affinity apamin-insensitive calcium-dependent potassium conductance, triggered by calcium currents partly activated at subthreshold levels. In combination with those calcium currents, it accounts for the slow oscillations seen in a subset of cholinergic interneurons exhibiting rhythmic bursting. In all cholinergic interneurons, it contributes to the slowdown or pause in firing that follows driven activity or prolonged subthreshold depolarizations and is therefore a candidate mechanism for the pause response observed in cholinergic neurons in vivo.

  8. Optimum Multiuser Detector for Multipath Slow Fading Asynchronous CDMA Channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WangZhaocheng; YangZhixing; 等

    1995-01-01

    A structure of optimum multiuser detector for asynchronous CDMA in multipath slow fading channels is derived and the significant performance gain over the conventional RAKE receiv-er is shown by simulation.

  9. Compounding of slow-release niacinamide capsules: feasibility and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radojkovic, Branko; Milić, Jela; Calija, Bojan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of extemporaneous compounding of slow-release oral dosage form of niacinamide and to evaluate its release kinetics. The model formulation (preparation) was developed in the form of powder-filled hard gelatin capsules. Two slow-release preparations with different ratios of hypromellose have been prepared and evaluated in comparison with an immediate-release preparation. The dissolution tests were performed as per United States Pharmacopoeia requirements: Type I Apparatus, over 7 hours. Both slow-release preparations, containing 40% and 60% v/v hypromellose, respectively, have showed slow release kinetics. The dissolution profiles were significantly different, with similarity factor f2niacinamide capsules can be successfully compounded using hypromellose as a sole release rate modifier, and that the release mechanism is comparable to hydrophilic polymer matrix-based systems.

  10. Effects of cervical self-stretching on slow vital capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dongwook; Yoon, Nayoon; Jeong, Yeongran; Ha, Misook; Nam, Kunwoo

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of self-stretching of cervical muscles, because the accessory inspiratory muscle is considered to improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy university students 19-21 years old who did not have any lung disease, respiratory dysfunction, cervical injury, or any problems upon cervical stretching. [Methods] Spirometry was used as a pulmonary function test to measure the slow vital capacity before and after stretching. The slow vital capacity of the experimental group was measured before and after cervical self-stretching. Meanwhile, the slow vital capacity of the control group, which did not perform stretching, was also measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The expiratory vital capacity, inspiratory reserve volume, and expiratory reserve volume of the experimental group increased significantly after the cervical self-stretching. [Conclusion] Self-stretching of the cervical muscle (i.e., the inspiratory accessory muscle) improves slow vital capacity.

  11. Obesity Slows Recovery for Heart Surgery Patients: Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167721.html Obesity Slows Recovery for Heart Surgery Patients: Study They' ... Aug. 10 in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery . "Obesity is a growing problem for society that has ...

  12. Preparation and characterization of slow release formulations of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    *

    characterize the resulting slow release formulations (SRFs) using scanning electron microscopy. (SEM), and Fourier ... used for controlled release of N-P-K compound fertilizer9 and of ..... fertilizer with controlled release and water retention,.

  13. Slow light enhancement and limitations in periodic media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grgic, Jure

    to longer interaction time in the periodic media. Due to this reason, weak light-matter interaction is enhanced. The enhancement due to slow light has been studied for loss and gain. By introducing gain/loss, dispersive properties, in the slow light region, are severely influenced. The minimum attainable......Properties of periodic dielectric media have attracted a big interest in the last two decades due to numerous exciting physical phenomena that cannot occur in homogeneous media. Due to their strong dispersive properties, the speed of light can be significantly slowed down in periodic structures...... and significant structures with numerical and analytical methods. By analyzing different structures, we show very general properties for limitation and enhancement in the slow light regime. Inherent imperfections of fabricated structures such as a material loss and structural disorder have a strong influence...

  14. Exploring carrier dynamics in semiconductors for slow light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Xue, Weiqi; Chen, Yaohui

    2009-01-01

    We give an overview of recent results on slow and fast light in active semiconductor waveguides. The cases of coherent population oscillations as well as electromagnetically induced transparency are covered, emphasizing the physics and fundamental limitations.......We give an overview of recent results on slow and fast light in active semiconductor waveguides. The cases of coherent population oscillations as well as electromagnetically induced transparency are covered, emphasizing the physics and fundamental limitations....

  15. Slow Fashion : Tailoring a Strategic Approach towards Sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Cataldi, Carlotta; Dickson, Maureen; Grover, Crystal

    2010-01-01

    This research explores one avenue for achieving sustainability within the fashion industry; which as it exists today is unsustainable. The Slow Fashion movement has an existing foundation in the larger fashion industry and is already making strides towards sustainability. The authors used this opportunity to examine a strategic approach, as its current approach is ad hoc. First, the authors assessed the Slow Fashion movement using the 5 level Framework for Strategic Sustainable Development. T...

  16. Slow and fast light in semiconductor structures: physics and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Nielsen, Torben Roland; Xue, Weiqi;

    We discuss the physics and applications of slow light in semiconductor waveguides. In particular we introduce methods for enhancing the degree of light speed control considering both electromagnetically induced transparency as well as coherent population oscillations.......We discuss the physics and applications of slow light in semiconductor waveguides. In particular we introduce methods for enhancing the degree of light speed control considering both electromagnetically induced transparency as well as coherent population oscillations....

  17. Essential Thalamic Contribution to Slow Waves of Natural Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, François; Schmiedt, Joscha T.; Taylor, Hannah L.; Orban, Gergely; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Uebele, Victor N.; Renger, John J.; Lambert, Régis C.; Leresche, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    Slow waves represent one of the prominent EEG signatures of non-rapid eye movement (non-REM) sleep and are thought to play an important role in the cellular and network plasticity that occurs during this behavioral state. These slow waves of natural sleep are currently considered to be exclusively generated by intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms within neocortical territories, although a role for the thalamus in this key physiological rhythm has been suggested but never demonstrated. Combining neuronal ensemble recordings, microdialysis, and optogenetics, here we show that the block of the thalamic output to the neocortex markedly (up to 50%) decreases the frequency of slow waves recorded during non-REM sleep in freely moving, naturally sleeping-waking rats. A smaller volume of thalamic inactivation than during sleep is required for observing similar effects on EEG slow waves recorded during anesthesia, a condition in which both bursts and single action potentials of thalamocortical neurons are almost exclusively dependent on T-type calcium channels. Thalamic inactivation more strongly reduces spindles than slow waves during both anesthesia and natural sleep. Moreover, selective excitation of thalamocortical neurons strongly entrains EEG slow waves in a narrow frequency band (0.75–1.5 Hz) only when thalamic T-type calcium channels are functionally active. These results demonstrate that the thalamus finely tunes the frequency of slow waves during non-REM sleep and anesthesia, and thus provide the first conclusive evidence that a dynamic interplay of the neocortical and thalamic oscillators of slow waves is required for the full expression of this key physiological EEG rhythm. PMID:24336724

  18. Slow light in semiconductor waveguides: Theory and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Öhman, Filip; Poel, Mike van der;

    2007-01-01

    Slow light in multi-section quantum well waveguide structure is realized using either coherent population oscillations (CPO) and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is studied. The properties of the two schemes are compared and discussed.......Slow light in multi-section quantum well waveguide structure is realized using either coherent population oscillations (CPO) and electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) is studied. The properties of the two schemes are compared and discussed....

  19. Slow-light enhancement of Beer-Lambert-Bouguer absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Asger; Xiao, Sanshui

    2007-01-01

    We theoretically show how slow light in an optofluidic environment facilitates enhanced light-matter interactions, by orders of magnitude. The proposed concept provides strong opportunities for improving existing miniaturized chemical absorbance cells for Beer-Lambert-Bouguer absorption measureme......We theoretically show how slow light in an optofluidic environment facilitates enhanced light-matter interactions, by orders of magnitude. The proposed concept provides strong opportunities for improving existing miniaturized chemical absorbance cells for Beer-Lambert-Bouguer absorption...

  20. Slow Tech: The Bridge between Computer Ethics and Business Ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Patrignani, Norberto; Whitehouse, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Part 1: Society, Social Responsibility, Ethics and ICT; International audience; This paper addresses the difficult task of implementing the concept of Slow Tech, that is, information and communication technology (ICT) that is good, clean and fair, in a business environment. It investigates the democratic, environmental, and social challenges currently facing ICT vendors. More specifically, it examines the opportunities available for these companies to use Slow Tech as a bridging mechanism bet...

  1. On the use of slow light for enhancing waveguide properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Nielsen, Torben Roland

    2010-01-01

    On the basis of a general analysis of waveguides containing a dispersive material, we identify conditions under which slow-light propagation may enhance the gain, absorption, or phase change. The enhancement is shown to depend on the slow-light mechanism and the translational symmetry...... of the waveguide. A combination of material and waveguide dispersion may strongly enhance the control of light speed, e.g., using electromagnetically induced transparency in quantum dots embedded in a photonic crystal waveguide....

  2. On the stability of slow neutron combustion in astrophysical objects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horvath, J.E.; Benvenuto, O.G.

    1988-11-03

    The problem of slow neutron combustion in astrophysical objects is studied from the hydrodynamical point of view, showing that unless the existence of unknown stabilizing effects, the process seems to be absolutely unstable. It is shown that the slow combustion is likely to become a fast combustion mode called detonation. Some possible consequences of this instability for neutron stars and type II supernovae are presented and discussed.

  3. Perceptions of the Slow Food Cultural Trend among the Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Lelia Voinea; Anca Atanase; Ion Schileru

    2016-01-01

    As they become increasingly aware of the importance of healthy eating and of the serious food imbalance caused by the overconsumption of industrial, ultra-processed and superorganoleptic food, consumers are now beginning to turn their attention to food choices guaranteeing both individual health and also of the environment . Thus, in recent years we are witnessing the rise of a cultural trend ‒ Slow Food. Slow Food has become an international movement that advocates for satisfying culinary pl...

  4. Apparatus for laser slowing and cooling of molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-09

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: This is the final report for our DURIP grant entitled "Apparatus for Laser Slowing and cooling of Molecules". We have... cooling of a new molecular species, TlF. We have also successfully acquired and assembled the parts for a custom laser system, which produces long...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 09-10-2016 1-Sep-2012 31-Aug-2014 Final Report: Apparatus for laser slowing and cooling of molecules The views

  5. Implications of the Deep Minimum for Slow Solar Wind Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.; Titov, V. S.; Linker, J. A.

    2009-12-01

    The origin of the slow solar wind has long been one of the most important problems in solar/heliospheric physics. Two observational constraints make this problem especially challenging. First, the slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, unlike the fast wind that originates on open field lines. Second, the slow wind has substantial angular extent, of order 30 degrees, which is much larger than the widths observed for streamer stalks or the widths expected theoretically for a dynamic heliospheric current sheet. We propose that the slow wind originates from an intricate network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that emanate from the polar coronal hole regions. Using topological arguments, we show that these corridors must be ubiquitous in the solar corona. The total solar eclipse in August 2008, near the lowest point of the Deep Minimum, affords an ideal opportunity to test this theory by using the ultra-high resolution Predictive Science's (PSI) eclipse model for the corona and wind. Analysis of the PSI eclipse model demonstrates that the extent and scales of the open-field corridors can account for both the angular width of the slow wind and its closed-field composition. We discuss the implications of our slow wind theory for the structure of the corona and heliosphere at the Deep Minimum and describe further observational and theoretical tests. This work has been supported by the NASA HTP, SR&T, and LWS programs.

  6. Slow Solar Wind from S-Web Arcs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, Aleida K.; Antiochos, Spiro K.; DeVore, C. Richard; Wyper, Peter; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.

    2017-08-01

    A long-standing mystery posed by in-situ heliospheric observations is the large angular extent of slow solar wind about the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). Measurements of plasma composition strongly imply that much of the slow wind consists of plasma from the closed corona that escapes onto open field lines, presumably by field-line opening or by interchange reconnection. Both of these processes are expected to release closed-field plasma into the solar wind within and immediately adjacent to the HCS. The recently proposed Separatrix-Web (S-Web) Theory postulates that the observations of slow wind far from the HCS can be explained by the dynamical interaction of open and closed flux in regions of complex coronal-hole topology. We present the first high-resolution, three-dimensional numerical simulations of the dynamic S-Web. These simulations suggest that photospheric motions at coronal-hole boundaries are responsible for the release of slow solar wind plasma from the magnetically closed solar corona, specifically through prolific interchange magnetic reconnection. The location of this plasma once it is released into the solar wind depends strongly on the geometry of the coronal-hole flux. We demonstrate how the dynamics at the boundaries of narrow corridors of open flux (coronal hole corridors) can create giant S-Web arcs of slow solar wind at high latitudes in the heliosphere, far from the HCS, accounting for the long-puzzling slow-wind observations.

  7. Global intracellular slow-wave dynamics of the thalamocortical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheroziya, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2014-06-25

    It is widely accepted that corticothalamic neurons recruit the thalamus in slow oscillation, but global slow-wave thalamocortical dynamics have never been experimentally shown. We analyzed intracellular activities of neurons either from different cortical areas or from a variety of specific and nonspecific thalamic nuclei in relation to the phase of global EEG signal in ketamine-xylazine anesthetized mice. We found that, on average, slow-wave active states started off within frontal cortical areas as well as higher-order and intralaminar thalamus (posterior and parafascicular nuclei) simultaneously. Then, the leading edge of active states propagated in the anteroposterior/lateral direction over the cortex at ∼40 mm/s. The latest structure we recorded within the slow-wave cycle was the anterior thalamus, which followed active states of the retrosplenial cortex. Active states from different cortical areas tended to terminate simultaneously. Sensory thalamic ventral posterior medial and lateral geniculate nuclei followed cortical active states with major inhibitory and weak tonic-like "modulator" EPSPs. In these nuclei, sharp-rising, large-amplitude EPSPs ("drivers") were not modulated by cortical slow waves, suggesting their origin in ascending pathways. The thalamic active states in other investigated nuclei were composed of depolarization: some revealing "driver"- and "modulator"-like EPSPs, others showing "modulator"-like EPSPs only. We conclude that sensory thalamic nuclei follow the propagating cortical waves, whereas neurons from higher-order thalamic nuclei display "hub dynamics" and thus may contribute to the generation of cortical slow waves.

  8. Acid-base disturbance in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H; Bendtsen, Flemming; Møller, Søren

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: Acid-base disturbances were investigated in patients with cirrhosis in relation to hemodynamic derangement to analyze the hyperventilatory effects and the metabolic compensation. METHODS: A total of 66 patients with cirrhosis and 44 controls were investigated during a hemodynamic study......, and effects of unidentified ions (all Pacid-base disturbances could not be identified. CONCLUSION: Hypocapnic alkalosis is related to disease severity and hyperdynamic systemic circulation in patients with cirrhosis. The metabolic compensation includes...... alterations in serum albumin and water retention that may result in a delicate acid-base balance in these patients....

  9. Plasma depletion layer: the role of the slow mode waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Wang

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The plasma depletion layer (PDL is a layer on the sunward side of the magnetopause with lower plasma density and higher magnetic field compared to their corresponding values in the upstream magnetosheath. The depletion layer usually occurs during northward (IMF conditions with low magnetic shear across the magnetopause. We have previously validated the Raeder global model by comparing the computed formation of a magnetosheath density depletion with in-situ observations. We also have performed a detailed force analysis and found the varying roles that different MHD forces play along the path of a plasma parcel flowing around the magnetopause. That study resulted in a new description of the behavior of magnetosheath magnetic flux tubes which better explains the plasma depletion along a flux tube. The slow mode waves have been observed in the magnetosheath and have been used to explain the formation of the PDL in some of the important PDL models. In this study, we extend our former work by investigating the possible role of the slow mode waves for the formation of the PDL, using global MHD model simulations. We propose a new technique to test where a possible slow mode front may occur in the magnetosheath by comparing the slow mode group velocity with the local flow velocity. We find that the slow mode fronts can exist in certain regions in the magnetosheath under certain solar wind conditions. The existence and location of such fronts clearly depend on the IMF. We do not see from our global simulation results either the sharpening of the slow mode front into a slow mode shock or noticeable changes of the flow and field in the magnetosheath across the slow mode front, which implies that the slow mode front is not likely responsible for the formation of the PDL, at least for the stable solar wind conditions used in these simulations. Also, we do not see the two-layered slow mode structures shown in some observations and proposed in certain PDL

  10. Principles of Slow Fashion Application in Clothing Collection Creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnė Antanavičiūtė

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Today we can clearly see the damage which is caused by fast fashion production and mass consumption. Therefore, a relevant issue is how to reduce consumption, waste, and threat to the environment and human health. Research into the slow fashion designers approach towards eco-friendly and slow fashion products shows that it is necessary to spread ideas of slow fashion widely and teach users about ecologically friendly clothing. Therefore, this paper analyses theoretical and practical slow fashion principles applied by slow fashion designers; according to this, the collection ‘Just Share’ was created. The aim of the collection is to spread ideas of slow fashion and adapt them in specific technical projects dealing with the problems of use and production waste minimisation and creating sustainable, easily recyclable, environmentally friendly garments. Products for reducing consumption are developed based on the idea of sharing clothing. Therefore, garments are one size and suitable for different types of figures of men and women.  Clothing design is inspired by folding, so models have various pleats, unfolds allowing minimal transformation of the garment, which gives the product its individuality and extends time of wearing. Models are designed with a minimal amount of accessories and minimum division lines, maintaining the uniformity of materials and uncomplicated sewing technology. In this way, out of wear garments can be easily remade. Original constructions of models are based on the ‘zero waste’ principle. This method reduces waste generation. So this research was prepared using the principles of slow fashion, which has a potential to reduce excessive consumption and stop growth of textile waste.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.erem.71.2.12392

  11. Mechanical and Acoustic Signature of Slow Earthquakes on Laboratory Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuderi, Marco Maria; Marone, Chris; Tinti, Elisa; Scognamiglio, Laura; Di Stefano, Giuseppe; Collettini, Cristiano

    2015-04-01

    Recent seismic and geodetic observations show that fault slip occurs via a spectrum of behaviors that range from seismic (fast dynamic) to aseismic (creep). Indeed faults can slip via a variety of quasi-dynamic processes such as Slow-Slip, Low Frequency Earthquakes (LFE), and Tremor. These transient modes of slip represent slow, but self-propagating acceleration of slip along fault zones. These phenomena have been observed worldwide in a variety of active tectonic environments, however the physics of quasi-dynamic rupture and the underlying fault zone processes are still poorly understood. Rate- and State- frictional constitutive equations predict that fast dynamic slip will occur when the stiffness of the loading system (k) is less than a critical stiffness (kc) characterizing the fault gouge. In order to investigate quasi-dynamic transients, we performed laboratory experiments on simulated fault gouge (silica powders) in the double direct shear configuration with a compliant central block allowing boundary conditions where k≈kc. In addition, PZTs were used to measure acoustical properties of the gouge layers during shear. We document an evolution of the fault mechanical properties as the σn is increased. For σn state frictional type of shear. When σn ≥ 15 MPa we observe emergent slow-slip events from steady state shear with accumulated shear displacement of about 10 mm. The typical values of stress drop (Δτ) vary between 0.2 and 0.8 MPa, and have typical duration from 0.5 up to 3 seconds giving the characteristics of slow stick-slip. As σn is varied we observe different characteristics of slow slip. For σn = 15MPa a repetitive double period oscillation is observed with slow slip growing until a maximum stress drop and then self attenuating. When σn is increased to 20 and 25 MPa slow slip are characterized by larger Δτ with constant τmax and τmin, however still showing a co-seismic duration of ~2 seconds. Our results suggest that strain

  12. Perceptions of the Slow Food Cultural Trend among the Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lelia Voinea

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As they become increasingly aware of the importance of healthy eating and of the serious food imbalance caused by the overconsumption of industrial, ultra-processed and superorganoleptic food, consumers are now beginning to turn their attention to food choices guaranteeing both individual health and also of the environment . Thus, in recent years we are witnessing the rise of a cultural trend ‒ Slow Food. Slow Food has become an international movement that advocates for satisfying culinary pleasure, protects biological and cultural diversity, spread taste education, links "green" producers to consumers and believes that gastronomy intersects with politics, agriculture and ecology. Slow Food proposes a holistic approach to food problem, where the economic, sociocultural and environmental aspects are interlinked, being pursued as part of an overall strategy. In order to highlight the manner in which the principles of this cultural trend are perceived by the representatives of the new generation of consumers in Romania, exploratory research marketing was conducted among the students in the second year of the master’s program Quality Management, Expertise and Consumer Protection, from the Faculty of Business and Tourism from the Buchares t University of Economic Studies . The results of this research have shown an insufficient knowledge of Slow Food phenomenon and, especially, the Slow Food network activity in Romania. To show that the Slow Food type of food is a healthier option towards which the future consumer demand should be guided, especially those belonging to the younger generation, an antithetical comparative analysis of the nutritional value of two menus was performed: a suggestive one for the Slow Food feeding style and other one, specific to the fast food style. Slow Food style was considered antithetical to the fast food because many previous studies have shown a preference of the young for the fast-food type products, despite the

  13. A taste of ethical consumption at a slow food festival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Lauren T; Germov, John; Fuller, Sascha; Freij, Maria

    2015-08-01

    This paper examines the motives and experiences of attendees at a Slow Food festival to gain an understanding of how people engage with ethical consumer projects. Slow Food is a global social movement aimed at promoting food that is regionally, ethically, and sustainably produced, and convivially consumed. The movement uses culinary tourist events, such as food festivals and farmers' markets, to promote its philosophy and attract new members. There have been no empirical studies of ethical consumption using a Slow Food event as a case study. This study uses an ethnographic approach and a framework of virtue ethics to explore the views of people attending a major Slow Food festival in the city of Melbourne, Australia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in situ with 33 participants (19 consumers and 14 stallholders) to discover their rationales for attending the festival, and their perspectives on ethical consumption. Transcripts were coded and thematically analysed, resulting in three themes reflecting varying degrees of public virtues (altruistic motivations) and private virtues (personal wellbeing): the quest for virtuous lifestyles through ethical consumption, the importance of co-production, and the challenges of putting ethical consumer projects like Slow Food into daily practice. The findings reveal the manner in which virtue ethics affects foodways and highlights the contingent and challenging nature of practising ethical eating. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Optimizing detection and analysis of slow waves in sleep EEG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensen, Armand; Riedner, Brady; Tononi, Giulio

    2016-12-01

    Analysis of individual slow waves in EEG recording during sleep provides both greater sensitivity and specificity compared to spectral power measures. However, parameters for detection and analysis have not been widely explored and validated. We present a new, open-source, Matlab based, toolbox for the automatic detection and analysis of slow waves; with adjustable parameter settings, as well as manual correction and exploration of the results using a multi-faceted visualization tool. We explore a large search space of parameter settings for slow wave detection and measure their effects on a selection of outcome parameters. Every choice of parameter setting had some effect on at least one outcome parameter. In general, the largest effect sizes were found when choosing the EEG reference, type of canonical waveform, and amplitude thresholding. Previously published methods accurately detect large, global waves but are conservative and miss the detection of smaller amplitude, local slow waves. The toolbox has additional benefits in terms of speed, user-interface, and visualization options to compare and contrast slow waves. The exploration of parameter settings in the toolbox highlights the importance of careful selection of detection METHODS: The sensitivity and specificity of the automated detection can be improved by manually adding or deleting entire waves and or specific channels using the toolbox visualization functions. The toolbox standardizes the detection procedure, sets the stage for reliable results and comparisons and is easy to use without previous programming experience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Slow and fast development in ladybirds: occurrence, effects and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Mishra

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Developmental and growth rates are known to vary in response to genetic, developmental, physiological and environmental factors. However, developmental variations that exist within a cohort under any constant rearing condition are not so well investigated. A few such prominent polymorphisms have been studied, but not the subtle ones. The current study investigates the presence of such varying rates of development, slow and fast, in a cohort reared under constant conditions in two ladybirds, Cheilomenes sexmaculata and Propylea dissecta. Our results reveal slow and fast developers in the cohorts of each species and the ratio of slow and fast developers was similar. Slow developers showed a female biased sex ratio. The two developmental variants differed significantly in juvenile duration only in the first instar and the pupal stage, though variations in developmental time were observed in all stages. Fecundity was higher in slow developers, but developmental rates did not affect egg viability. The similar ratio in both ladybirds indicates it to be a result of either presence of a constant ratio across species or an effect of the similar rearing environment.

  16. Optimal Curiosity-Driven Modular Incremental Slow Feature Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompella, Varun Raj; Luciw, Matthew; Stollenga, Marijn Frederik; Schmidhuber, Juergen

    2016-08-01

    Consider a self-motivated artificial agent who is exploring a complex environment. Part of the complexity is due to the raw high-dimensional sensory input streams, which the agent needs to make sense of. Such inputs can be compactly encoded through a variety of means; one of these is slow feature analysis (SFA). Slow features encode spatiotemporal regularities, which are information-rich explanatory factors (latent variables) underlying the high-dimensional input streams. In our previous work, we have shown how slow features can be learned incrementally, while the agent explores its world, and modularly, such that different sets of features are learned for different parts of the environment (since a single set of regularities does not explain everything). In what order should the agent explore the different parts of the environment? Following Schmidhuber's theory of artificial curiosity, the agent should always concentrate on the area where it can learn the easiest-to-learn set of features that it has not already learned. We formalize this learning problem and theoretically show that, using our model, called curiosity-driven modular incremental slow feature analysis, the agent on average will learn slow feature representations in order of increasing learning difficulty, under certain mild conditions. We provide experimental results to support the theoretical analysis.

  17. Interneuron-mediated inhibition synchronizes neuronal activity during slow oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jen-Yung; Chauvette, Sylvain; Skorheim, Steven; Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    The signature of slow-wave sleep in the electroencephalogram (EEG) is large-amplitude fluctuation of the field potential, which reflects synchronous alternation of activity and silence across cortical neurons. While initiation of the active cortical states during sleep slow oscillation has been intensively studied, the biological mechanisms which drive the network transition from an active state to silence remain poorly understood. In the current study, using a combination of in vivo electrophysiology and thalamocortical network simulation, we explored the impact of intrinsic and synaptic inhibition on state transition during sleep slow oscillation. We found that in normal physiological conditions, synaptic inhibition controls the duration and the synchrony of active state termination. The decline of interneuron-mediated inhibition led to asynchronous downward transition across the cortical network and broke the regular slow oscillation pattern. Furthermore, in both in vivo experiment and computational modelling, we revealed that when the level of synaptic inhibition was reduced significantly, it led to a recovery of synchronized oscillations in the form of seizure-like bursting activity. In this condition, the fast active state termination was mediated by intrinsic hyperpolarizing conductances. Our study highlights the significance of both intrinsic and synaptic inhibition in manipulating sleep slow rhythms. PMID:22641778

  18. Advances in Bichromatic Force Slowing of Atoms and Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chieda, M. A.; Eyler, E. E.

    2012-06-01

    The optical bichromatic force (BCF) holds promise as an efficient, simple, and compact means to slow atoms and molecules to MOT capture velocities.ootnotetextM. Cashen and H. Metcalf, JOSA B 20, 915 (2003).^,ootnotetextM. A. Chieda and E. E. Eyler, PRA 84, 063401 (2011). Metastable helium beams, with v˜1000 m/s, are especially worthwhile atomic candidates since they presently require Zeeman slowers with lengths of 2--3 m. We present a novel BCF decelerator in which the Doppler shifts are chirped to keep the force centered on the atoms as they slow. This is made possible by recent advances in high-power diode lasers and electronics, and avoids many of the problems of alternative designs using large detunings. Initial tests on He* atoms show encouraging results. Unlike atoms, direct laser slowing of molecules remains exceedingly difficult, although success with SrF has very recently been reported.ootnotetextJ. F. Barry, E. S. Shuman, E. B. Norrgard, and D. DeMille, to be published. We calculate that for molecules with near-cycling transitions, rapid laser BCF slowing should be possible.ootnotetextChieda, op. sit. For the CaF molecule, we predict slowing by δv = 150 m/s, enough to bring a buffer-gas cooled beam to rest. An experimental demonstration is in progress.

  19. Rotigaptide (ZP123) reverts established atrial conduction velocity slowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugan, Ketil; Kjølbye, Anne Louise; Hennan, James K; Petersen, Jørgen Søberg

    2005-01-01

    Rotigaptide (ZP123) increases gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) and prevents stress-induced cardiac conduction velocity (CV) slowing. However, the effect of rotigaptide on established cardiac conduction slowing and the duration of effect on rotigaptide during washout is unknown. Metabolic stress (induced by superfusion with nonoxygenated glucose-free Tyrodes buffer) was associated with a 30% decrease in atrial CV in vehicle-treated rat atria. Rotigaptide treatment initiated after a period of 30 minutes of metabolic stress produced a rapid and significant increase in CV compared to vehicle-treated time controls. During washout of rotigaptide for 30 min (while subjected to metabolic stress), there was a minor decrease in atrial CV; however, this was not significantly different from atrial CV in a rotigaptide-treated time control group. Rotigaptide treatment rapidly normalizes established conduction slowing in atria subjected to metabolic stress. However, the cessation of effect was considerably slower than the onset of action.

  20. Modeling fast and slow earthquakes at various scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Earthquake sources represent dynamic rupture within rocky materials at depth and often can be modeled as propagating shear slip controlled by friction laws. These laws provide boundary conditions on fault planes embedded in elastic media. Recent developments in observation networks, laboratory experiments, and methods of data analysis have expanded our knowledge of the physics of earthquakes. Newly discovered slow earthquakes are qualitatively different phenomena from ordinary fast earthquakes and provide independent information on slow deformation at depth. Many numerical simulations have been carried out to model both fast and slow earthquakes, but problems remain, especially with scaling laws. Some mechanisms are required to explain the power-law nature of earthquake rupture and the lack of characteristic length. Conceptual models that include a hierarchical structure over a wide range of scales would be helpful for characterizing diverse behavior in different seismic regions and for improving probabilistic forecasts of earthquakes.

  1. A comprehensive investigation on the slowing down of cosmic acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Yazhou; Li, Nan; Wang, Shuang

    2015-01-01

    In~\\citep{Shafieloo2009}, Shafieloo, Sanhi and Starobinsky firstly proposed the possibility that the current cosmic acceleration (CA) is slowing down. This is rather counterintuitive, because a slowing down CA cannot be accommodated in almost all the mainstream cosmological models. In this work, by exploring the evolutionary trajectories of dark energy equation of state $w(z)$ and deceleration parameter $q(z)$, we present a comprehensive investigation on the slowing down of CA from both the theoretical and the observational sides. For the theoretical side, we study the impacts of different $w(z)$ by using six parametrization models, and then discuss the effects of spatial curvature. For the observational side, we investigate the effects of different type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia), different baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO), and different cosmic microwave background (CMB) data, respectively. We find that the evolution of CA are insensitive to the specific form of $w(z)$; in contrast, a non-flat Universe more fav...

  2. Transmural myocardial ischemia due to slow coronary flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Slow coronary flow phenomenon(SCFP) is an angiographic observation characterized by delayed distal vessel opacification in the absence of significant epicardial coronary disease. Only limited studies have been focused on the etiologies, clinical manifestations and treatment of this unique angiographic phenomenon. In our case report, we described an 85-year-old man who came with significant ST segment elevation in leads V1-V4 and V3R-V5R without increase in myocardial enzyme. The patient also developed respiratory failure requiring intubation and mechanical ventilation. Coronary angiography revealed only mild atherosclerosis without spasm or thromboembolic occlusion. Slow flow was seen in all coronary arteries, especially in the left anterior descending and right coronary arteries. This case speculated that transmural myocardial ischemia with ST segment elevation might be resulted from slow coronary flow. Transmural myocardial ischemia can occur owing to abnormalities of the coronary microcirculation.

  3. Slow-roll corrections to inflaton fluctuations on a brane

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, K; Wands, D; Koyama, Kazuya; Mizuno, Shuntaro; Wands, David

    2005-01-01

    Quantum fluctuations of an inflaton field, slow-rolling during inflation are coupled to metric fluctuations. In conventional four dimensional cosmology one can calculate the effect of scalar metric perturbations as slow-roll corrections to the evolution of a massless free field in de Sitter spacetime. This gives the well-known first-order corrections to the field perturbations after horizon-exit. If inflaton fluctuations on a four dimensional brane embedded in a five dimensional bulk spacetime are studied to first-order in slow-roll then we recover the usual conserved curvature perturbation on super-horizon scales. But on small scales, at high energies, we find that the coupling to the bulk metric perturbations cannot be neglected, leading to a modified amplitude of vacuum oscillations on small scales. This is a large effect which casts doubt on the reliability of the usual calculation of inflaton fluctuations on the brane neglecting their gravitational coupling.

  4. Slow light with electromagnetically induced transparency in cylindrical waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Hatta, Agus Muhamad; Al-Hagan, Ola A; Moiseev, Sergey A

    2014-01-01

    Slow light with electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in the core of cylindrical waveguide (CW) for an optical fiber system containing three-level atoms is investigated. The CW modes are treated in the weakly guiding approximation which renders the analysis into manageable form. The transparency window and permittivity profile of the waveguide due to the strong pump field in the EIT scheme is calculated. For a specific permittivity profile of the waveguide due to EIT, the propagation constant of the weak signal field and spatial shape of fundamental guided mode are calculated by solving the vector wave equation using the finite difference method. It is found that the transparency window and slow light field can be controlled via the CW parameters. The reduced group velocity of slow light in this configuration is useful for many technological applications such as optical memories, effective control of single photon fields, optical buffer and delay line.

  5. A REVIEW OF SLOW SPEED BEARING DIAGNOSTICS AND PROGNOSTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SYLVESTER A. AYE

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the literature in diagnostics and prognostics of slow rotating bearings. Diagnostics and prognostics involve data acquisition and processing. The diagnostics and prognostics of rotating machinery is a subject of much on-going research. There are three approaches to diagnostics and prognostics which include data driven techniques, model based techniques and experience based approach. The review looks at current diagnostics and prognostics approaches to bearings in general and slow rotating bearings in particular and future trends. Bayesian techniques are currently gaining widespread application in diagnostics and prognostics of slow rotating bearings and mechanical systems as a result of their ability to handle the stochastic nature of the data well at varying operating conditions.

  6. Study of Dynamic Characteristics of Slow-Changing Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinong Li

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available A vibration system with slow-changing parameters is a typical nonlinear system. Such systems often occur in the working and controlled process of some intelligent structures when vibration and deformation exist synchronously. In this paper, a system with slow-changing stiffness, damping and mass is analyzed in an intelligent structure. The relationship between the amplitude and the frequency of the system is studied, and its dynamic characteristic is also discussed. Finally, a piecewise linear method is developed on the basis of the asymptotic method. The simulation and the experiment show that a suitable slow-changing stiffness can restrain the amplitude of the system when the system passes through the resonant region.

  7. Slow fragmentation of hydrocarbons after ultrafast laser interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Larimian, Seyedreza; Lötstedt, Erik; Szidarovszky, Tamás; Maurer, Raffael; Roither, Stefan; Schöffler, Markus; Kartashov, Daniil; Baltuška, Andrius; Yamanouchi, Kaoru; Kitzler, Markus; Xie, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigated the deprotonation process on nanosecond to microsecond timescale in ethylene and acetylene molecules, following their double ionization by a strong femtosecond laser field. In our experiments we utilized coincidence detection with the reaction microscope technique, and found that both the mean lifetime of the ethylene dication leading to the "slow" deprotonation and the relative channel strength of the slow deprotonation compared to the fast one have no evident dependence on the laser pulse duration and the laser peak intensity. Furthermore, quantum chemical simulations suggest that such slow fragmentation originates from the tunneling of near-dissociation-threshold vibrational states through a dissociation barrier on an electronic dication state. Such vibrational states can be populated through strong field double ionization induced vibrational excitation on an electronically excited state in the case of ethylene, and through intersystem processes from electro...

  8. Semiclassical approximations for adiabatic slow-fast systems

    CERN Document Server

    Teufel, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    In this letter we give a systematic derivation and justification of the semiclassical model for the slow degrees of freedom in adiabatic slow-fast systems first found by Littlejohn and Flynn [5]. The classical Hamiltonian obtains a correction due to the variation of the adiabatic subspaces and the symplectic form is modified by the curvature of the Berry connection. We show that this classical system can be used to approximate quantum mechanical expectations and the time-evolution of operators also in sub-leading order in the combined adiabatic and semiclassical limit. In solid state physics the corresponding semiclassical description of Bloch electrons has led to substantial progress during the recent years, see [1]. Here, as an illustration, we show how to compute the Piezo-current arising from a slow deformation of a crystal in the presence of a constant magnetic field.

  9. Moderate Cortical Cooling Eliminates Thalamocortical Silent States during Slow Oscillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheroziya, Maxim; Timofeev, Igor

    2015-09-23

    Reduction in temperature depolarizes neurons by a partial closure of potassium channels but decreases the vesicle release probability within synapses. Compared with cooling, neuromodulators produce qualitatively similar effects on intrinsic neuronal properties and synapses in the cortex. We used this similarity of neuronal action in ketamine-xylazine-anesthetized mice and non-anesthetized mice to manipulate the thalamocortical activity. We recorded cortical electroencephalogram/local field potential (LFP) activity and intracellular activities from the somatosensory thalamus in control conditions, during cortical cooling and on rewarming. In the deeply anesthetized mice, moderate cortical cooling was characterized by reversible disruption of the thalamocortical slow-wave pattern rhythmicity and the appearance of fast LFP spikes, with frequencies ranging from 6 to 9 Hz. These LFP spikes were correlated with the rhythmic IPSP activities recorded within the thalamic ventral posterior medial neurons and with depolarizing events in the posterior nucleus neurons. Similar cooling of the cortex during light anesthesia rapidly and reversibly eliminated thalamocortical silent states and evoked thalamocortical persistent activity; conversely, mild heating increased thalamocortical slow-wave rhythmicity. In the non-anesthetized head-restrained mice, cooling also prevented the generation of thalamocortical silent states. We conclude that moderate cortical cooling might be used to manipulate slow-wave network activity and induce neuromodulator-independent transition to activated states. Significance statement: In this study, we demonstrate that moderate local cortical cooling of lightly anesthetized or naturally sleeping mice disrupts thalamocortical slow oscillation and induces the activated local field potential pattern. Mild heating has the opposite effect; it increases the rhythmicity of thalamocortical slow oscillation. Our results demonstrate that slow oscillation can be

  10. On Slow-roll Glueball Inflation from Holography

    CERN Document Server

    Anguelova, Lilia

    2016-01-01

    We investigate glueball inflation model-building via the methods of the gauge/gravity duality. For that purpose, we consider a certain 5d consistent truncation of type IIB supergravity. This theory admits a solution, whose metric is of the form of a $dS_4$ fibration over a fifth dimension. We find a new time-dependent deformation around this solution, which allows for a small $\\eta$ parameter of the corresponding inflationary model. This resolves a problem with a previous solution that allowed only $\\eta$ of order one and thus gave only an ultra-slow roll regime, but not regular slow roll.

  11. Past, Present and Future of Ultra-Slow Muons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Kanetada

    Experimental works towards a realization of the ultra-slow positive muon by laser resonant ionization of thermal muonium (USM) in 1995 are reviewed with reference to the other methods. Then a short description is given for the present USM project at J-PARC MUSE. Finally, possible future projects at J-PARC MUSE are presented, with a particular emphasis on the fundamental atomic physics of extreme muonic atomic states, µ+µ- atoms which would only be produced, along with the UCM, by a possible development of a slow and narrow µ- beam for which some ideas are given.

  12. Possible detection of super massive very slow GUTS monopole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, A. E.

    A conceptual design idea for a detector of super massive very slow grand unified theories (GUTS) monopoles is discussed. The idea is based on the total stopping power due to the field energy generated by the supercurrents when a slowly moving monopole β ≍ 10-4 passes through a superconductor. The detector incorporates a superconducting Al disc with dimensions chosen for maximum phonon thermalization energy, surrounded by an array of plastic scintillators to provide a monopole trigger and cosmic ray veto. The integrated system acts as a velocity filter for very slow Dirac galactic monopoles.

  13. Optical signal processing using slow and fast light technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Capmany, J.; Sales, Salvador; Xue, Weiqi;

    2009-01-01

    microwave or millimeter-wave frequency bands, we present one scheme to increase the achievable RF phase shift by enhancing light slow-down or speed-up. As a real application in microwave photonics, a widely tunable microwave photonic notch filter with 100% fractional tuning range is also proposed......We review the theory of slow and fat light effects due to coherent population oscillations in semiconductor waveguides, which can be potentially applied in microwave photonic systems as a RF phase shifters. In order to satisfy the application requirement of 360 degrees RF phase shift at different...

  14. Computation of saddle-type slow manifolds using iterative methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an alternative approach for the computation of trajectory segments on slow manifolds of saddle type. This approach is based on iterative methods rather than collocation-type methods. Compared to collocation methods, which require mesh refinements to ensure uniform convergence...... with respect to , appropriate estimates are directly attainable using the method of this paper. The method is applied to several examples, including a model for a pair of neurons coupled by reciprocal inhibition with two slow and two fast variables, and the computation of homoclinic connections in the Fitz...

  15. Entangled photons from on-chip slow light

    CERN Document Server

    Takesue, Hiroki; Kuramochi, Eiichi; Notomi, Masaya

    2014-01-01

    We report the first entanglement generation experiment using an on-chip slow light device. With highly efficient spontaneous four-wave mixing enhanced by the slow light effect in a coupled resonator optical waveguide based on a silicon photonic crystal, we generated 1.5-$\\mu$m-band high-dimensional time-bin entangled photon pairs. We undertook two-photon interference experiments and observed the coincidence fringes with visibilities $>74\\%$. The present result enables us to realize an on-chip entanglement source with a very small footprint, which is an essential function for quantum information processing based on integrated quantum photonics.

  16. Ultrasonic slow dynamics to probe concrete aging and damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larose, E.; Tremblay, N.; Payan, C.; Garnier, V.; Rossetto, V.

    2013-01-01

    The stiffness of concrete experiences a drop immediately after a moderate mechanical solicitation. Then the stiffness rises back logarithmically toward its initial value. This Slow Dynamics behavior has been probed by macroscopic quantities averaged over the sample volume, including resonant frequency. This article presents a different approach based on diffuse acoustic wave spectroscopy, a technique that is directly sensitive to the details of the sample structure. The parameters of the dynamics are found to depend on mechanical and thermal damage of the medium. Results confirm that slow dynamics can be used onsite to assess the level of damage of a given structure.

  17. Slow effects of fast harmonic excitation for elastic structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tcherniak, Dmitri; Thomsen, Jon Juel

    1998-01-01

    High-frequency excitation may affect the 'slow' behavior of a dynamical system. For example, equilibria may move, disappear, or gain or loose stability. We consider such slow effects of fast excitation for a simple mechanical system that incorporates features of many engineering structures. The s....... The study is intended to contribute to the general understanding of periodically excited linear and nonlinear systems, as well as to the current attempts to utilize high-frequency excitation for altering the low-frequency properties of structures....

  18. Closed-loop transcranial alternating current stimulation of slow oscillations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilde Christian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS is an emerging non-invasive tool for modulating brain oscillations. There is evidence that weak oscillatory electrical stimulation during sleep can entrain cortical slow oscillations to improve the memory consolidation in rodents and humans. Using a novel method and a custom built stimulation device, automatic stimulation of slow oscillations in-phase with the endogenous activity in a real-time closed-loop setup is possible. Preliminary data from neuroplasticity experiments show a high detection performance of the proposed method, electrical measurements demonstrate the outstanding quality of the presented stimulation device.

  19. Wide-band slow-wave systems simulation and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Staras, Stanislovas

    2012-01-01

    The field of electromagnetics has seen considerable advances in recent years, based on the wide applications of numerical methods for investigating electromagnetic fields, microwaves, and other devices. Wide-Band Slow-Wave Systems: Simulation and Applications presents new technical solutions and research results for the analysis, synthesis, and design of slow-wave structures for modern electronic devices with super-wide pass-bands. It makes available, for the first time in English, significant research from the past 20 years that was previously published only in Russian and Lithuanian. The aut

  20. Slow Unfolding of Monomeric Proteins from Hyperthermophiles with Reversible Unfolding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Mukaiyama

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the differences in their optimal growth temperatures microorganisms can be classified into psychrophiles, mesophiles, thermophiles, and hyperthermophiles. Proteins from hyperthermophiles generally exhibit greater stability than those from other organisms. In this review, we collect data about the stability and folding of monomeric proteins from hyperthermophilies with reversible unfolding, from the equilibrium and kinetic aspects. The results indicate that slow unfolding is a general strategy by which proteins from hyperthermophiles adapt to higher temperatures. Hydrophobic interaction is one of the factors in the molecular mechanism of the slow unfolding of proteins from hyperthermophiles.

  1. Characterization of RyR1-slow, a ryanodine receptor specific to slow-twitch skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissette, J; Xu, L; Nelson, A; Meissner, G; Block, B A

    2000-11-01

    Two distinct skeletal muscle ryanodine receptors (RyR1s) are expressed in a fiber type-specific manner in fish skeletal muscle (11). In this study, we compare [(3)H]ryanodine binding and single channel activity of RyR1-slow from fish slow-twitch skeletal muscle with RyR1-fast and RyR3 isolated from fast-twitch skeletal muscle. Scatchard plots indicate that RyR1-slow has a lower affinity for [(3)H]ryanodine when compared with RyR1-fast. In single channel recordings, RyR1-slow and RyR1-fast had similar slope conductances. However, the maximum open probability (P(o)) of RyR1-slow was threefold less than the maximum P(o) of RyR1-fast. Single channel studies also revealed the presence of two populations of RyRs in tuna fast-twitch muscle (RyR1-fast and RyR3). RyR3 had the highest P(o) of all the RyR channels and displayed less inhibition at millimolar Ca(2+). The addition of 5 mM Mg-ATP or 2.5 mM beta, gamma-methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate (AMP-PCP) to the channels increased the P(o) and [(3)H]ryanodine binding of both RyR1s but also caused a shift in the Ca(2+) dependency curve of RyR1-slow such that Ca(2+)-dependent inactivation was attenuated. [(3)H]ryanodine binding data also showed that Mg(2+)-dependent inhibition of RyR1-slow was reduced in the presence of AMP-PCP. These results indicate differences in the physiological properties of RyRs in fish slow- and fast-twitch skeletal muscle, which may contribute to differences in the way intracellular Ca(2+) is regulated in these muscle types.

  2. Laser cooling and slowing of CaF molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truppe, Stefan; Williams, Hannah; Hambach, Moritz; Sauer, Ben; Hinds, Ed; Tarbutt, Mike

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a cold and bright source for CaF molecules and use laser radiation pressure to slow the molecules to within the capture velocity of a magneto-optical trap (MOT). Using laser ablation of Ca into a continuous flow of cryogenic Helium buffer gas mixed with SF6 we produce up to 1011 molecules per steradian per pulse in a single rotational state. The molecules move with a mean forward velocity of 160m/s and have a velocity spread of 80m/s. We then apply laser radiation pressure to the molecular beam to slow and cool the molecules. We form a quasi-closed laser-cooling cycle by using a main cooling laser to drive the B2Σ+ (v' = 0) - X2Σ+ (v'' = 0) transition and a single repump laser to address the A2Π1 / 2 (v' = 0) -X2Σ+ (v'' = 1) transition. Radio-frequency sidebands applied to both lasers address the hyperfine structure. By chirping the frequencies of both lasers to keep the decelerating molecules resonant with the light, we scatter more than 10000 photons and reduce the speed to below 50 m/s. We achieve a similar effect by broadening the linewidth of the laser to several hundred MHz. This ``white-light'' slowing is compared to the chirped slowing technique. We also present progress towards a MOT of CaF molecules.

  3. Structural looseness investigation in slow rotating permanent magnet generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrimpas, Georgios Alexandros; Mijatovic, Nenad; Sweeney, Christian Walsted;

    2016-01-01

    Structural looseness in electric machines is a condition influencing the alignment of the machine and thus the overall bearing health. In this work, assessment of the above mentioned failure mode is tested on a slow rotating (running speed equal to 0.7Hz) permanent magnet generator (PMG), while...

  4. One Size Fits All? Slow Cortical Potentials Neurofeedback: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Kerstin; Wyckoff, Sarah N.; Strehl, Ute

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The intent of this manuscript was to review all published studies on slow cortical potentials (SCP) neurofeedback for the treatment of ADHD, with emphasis on neurophysiological rationale, study design, protocol, outcomes, and limitations. Method: For review, PubMed, MEDLINE, ERIC, and Google Scholar searches identified six studies and…

  5. The multilayer Fe/Hf studied with slow positron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashige, Y.; Tashiro, M.; Nakajyo, T.; Koizumi, T.; Kanazawa, I.; Komori, F.; Ito, Y.

    1997-04-01

    The positron annihilation parameter versus the incident positron energy is measured in the thin Fe films and the Fe/Hf bilayer on silica substrate, by means of the variable energetic slow-positron beam technique. We have analyzed the change in open-volume spaces and vacancy-type defects among the Fe microcrystals in these thin films with the deposition temperature.

  6. Formation of Heliospheric Arcs of Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higginson, A. K.; Antiochos, S. K.; Devore, C. R.; Wyper, P. F.; Zurbuchen, T. H.

    2017-01-01

    A major challenge in solar and heliospheric physics is understanding the origin and nature of the so-called slow solar wind. The Sun's atmosphere is divided into magnetically open regions, known as coronal holes, where the plasma streams out freely and fills the solar system, and closed regions, where the plasma is confined to coronal loops. The boundary between these regions extends outward as the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). Measurements of plasma composition strongly imply that much of the slow wind consists of plasma from the closed corona that escapes onto open field lines, presumably by field-line opening or by interchange reconnection. Both of these processes are expected to release closed-field plasma into the solar wind within and immediately adjacent to the HCS. Mysteriously, however, slow wind with closed-field plasma composition is often observed in situ far from the HCS. We use high-resolution, three-dimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations to calculate the dynamics of a coronal hole with a geometry that includes a narrow corridor flanked by closed field and is driven by supergranule-like flows at the coronal-hole boundary. These dynamics produce giant arcs of closed-field plasma that originate at the open-closed boundary in the corona, but extend far from the HCS and span tens of degrees in latitude and longitude at Earth. We conclude that such structures can account for the long-puzzling slow-wind observations.

  7. Reduction in slow intercompartmental clearance of urea during dialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowsher, D.J.; Krejcie, T.C.; Avram, M.J.; Chow, M.J.; Del Greco, F.; Atkinson, A.J. Jr.

    1985-04-01

    The kinetics of urea and inulin were analyzed in five anesthetized dogs during sequential 2-hour periods before, during, and after hemodialysis. The distribution of both compounds after simultaneous intravenous injection was characterized by three-compartment models, and the total volumes of urea (0.66 +/- 0.05 L/kg) and inulin (0.19 +/- 0.01 L/kg) distribution were similar to expected values for total body water and extravascular space, respectively. Intercompartmental clearances calculated before dialysis were used to estimate blood flows to the fast and slow equilibrating compartments. In agreement with previous results, the sum of these flows was similar to cardiac output, averaging 101% of cardiac output measured before dialysis (range 72% to 135%). Dialysis was accompanied by reductions in the slow intercompartmental clearances of urea (81%) and inulin (47%), which reflected a 90% attenuation in blood flow supplying the slow equilibrating compartments. This was estimated to result in a 10% average reduction in the efficiency with which urea was removed by dialysis (range 2.0% to 16.4%). Mean arterial pressure fell by less than 5% during dialysis, but total peripheral resistance increased by 47% and cardiac output fell by 35%. In the postdialysis period, total peripheral resistance and cardiac output returned toward predialysis values, but blood flow to the slow equilibrating peripheral compartment was still reduced by 80%. These changes parallel activation of the renin-angiotensin system, but further studies are required to establish causality.

  8. A Model for the Sources of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.; Titov, V.; Linker, J.

    2010-05-01

    Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: The slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, implying that it originates at the open-closed field boundary layer, but it also has large angular width, up to 40 degrees. We propose a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We calculate with high numerical resolution, the quasi-steady solar wind and magnetic field for a Carrington rotation centered about the August 1, 2008 total solar eclipse. Our numerical results demonstrate that, at least for this time period, a web of separatrices (S-web) forms with sufficient density and extent in the heliosphere to account for the observed properties of the slow wind. We discuss the implications of our S-web model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and heliosphere, and propose further tests of the model. This work was supported, in part, by the NASA HTP, TR&T and SR&T programs.

  9. Standing Shocks in the Inner Slow Solar Wind

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bo; CHEN Yan-Jun; LI Xing

    2011-01-01

    @@ We examine whether the flow tube along the edge of a coronal streamer supports standing shocks in the inner slow wind by solving an isothermal wind model in terms of the Lambert W function.It is shown that solutions with standing shocks do exist and they exist in a broad area in the parameter space characterizing the wind temperature and flow tube.In particular,streamers with cusps located at a heliocentric distance(>~)3.2R⊙ can readily support discontinuous slow winds with temperatures barely higher than 1 MK.%We examine whether the flow tube along the edge of a coronal streamer supports standing shocks in the inner slow wind by solving an isothermal wind model in terms of the Lambert W function. It is shown that solutions with standing shocks do exist and they exist in a broad area in the parameter space characterizing the wind temperature and flow tube. In particular, streamers with cusps located at a heliocentric distance (>) 3.2P⊙ can readily support discontinuous slow winds with temperatures barely higher than 1 MK.

  10. Slow motions in systems with fast modulated excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, E.

    2016-11-01

    It is well known that high-frequency excitation can modify the behavior of systems with respect to slow motions. The goal of this study is consideration of these effects in a rather general case of analytical systems with modulated sinusoidal excitation. The method of direct separation of motions proposed by I.I. Blekhman was applied in a modified form with the explicit introduction of a small parameter. Equations for the slow motions are obtained and an analysis of how they depend on the structure of the original equations is performed. Five basic effects corresponding to different possible dependencies of the modulation amplitude on position, velocity, and slow time are selected (some of them for the first time). These effects offer a possibility for designing a high-frequency control of the slow motions with specified properties. For example, high-frequency excitation in a system with a nonlinear friction can essentially increase the effective damping. The results are also of significance for system identification and diagnostics. Analysis of a hydraulic valve is given as an example of application.

  11. Temporal Heterogeneity and the Value of Slowness in Robotic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    persistent monitoring is precision farming , where robots are deployed on farms for long periods of time. In this case, we consider these SlowBots as...33]. The mating system is also unknown at this time. Specific nocturnal social interactions include allogroom (repeated licking), alternate click

  12. A Model for the Sources of the Slow Solar Wind

    CERN Document Server

    Antiochos, S K; Titov, V S; Lionello, R; Linker, J A

    2011-01-01

    Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: The slow wind has the composition of the closed field corona, implying that it originates from the continuous opening and closing of flux at the boundary between open and closed field. On the other hand, the slow wind also has large angular width, up to ~ 60{\\circ}, suggesting that its source extends far from the open-closed boundary. We propose a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We compute analytically the topology of an open-field corridor and show that it produces a quasi-separatrix layer in the heliosphere that extends to angles far from the heliospheric current sheet. We then use an MHD code and MDI/SOHO observations of the photospheric magnetic field to calculate numerically, with high spat...

  13. Efficient coupling to slow light photonic crystal waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Md Shofiqul Islam; Devarapu, Ganga Chinna Rao; O'Faolain, Liam

    2016-04-01

    Slow light photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) have been the subject of intensive study due to their potential for on-chip applications such as optical buffers and the enhancement of nonlinear phenomenon. However, due to high group velocity mismatch between the strip waveguide and the slow light waveguide efficient coupling of light is challenging. The coupling efficiency is also very sensitive to the truncation at the interface between the two waveguides. This sensitivity can be removed and light can efficiently be coupled from the strip waveguide to the slow light waveguide by adding an intermediate photonic crystal waveguide (or coupler) that operates at a group index of ˜ 5. Several designs have been proposed for couplers to obtain higher coupling efficiency within the desired group index range. We have studied uniaxial stretched couplers in which the lattice constant is stretched in the direction of propagation by 10-50 nm in the coupler region. Using a Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) Simulation Method that allows the extraction of the group index, we have observed 8.5 dB improvement in the coupling efficiency at the group index of 30. Efficient coupling is dominantly determined by the band edge position of the coupler region and maximum transmission efficiency is limited by the maximum transmission of the coupler PCW. If the band edge of coupler PCW is sufficiently red shifted relative to the band edge of the slow light PCW then higher coupling efficiency can be achieved.

  14. Slow Manifold and Hannay Angle in the Spinning Top

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M. V.; Shukla, P.

    2011-01-01

    The spin of a top can be regarded as a fast variable, coupled to the motion of the axis which is slow. In pure precession, the rotation of the axis round a cone (without nutation), can be considered as the result of a reaction from the fast spin. The resulting restriction of the total state space of the top is an illustrative example, at…

  15. Delineating psychomotor slowing from reduced processing speed in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrens, M.; Hulstijn, W.; Matton, C.; Madani, Y.; Bouwel, L. van; Peuskens, J.; Sabbe, B.G.C.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Psychomotor slowing is an intrinsic feature of schizophrenia that is poorly delineated from generally reduced processing speed. Although the Symbol Digit Substitution Test (SDST) is widely used to assess psychomotor speed, the task also taps several higher-order cognitive processes. Re

  16. Good cash flow = come in fast, go out slow!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Sherill

    2002-07-01

    The formula for successful cash management in home care is a simple one: The agency must bring cash in as quickly as possible, while keeping expenditures at as low and slow a pace as possible. However, while the formula may be simple, success may be elusive unless agency administrators have a well-thought-out plan to handle cash management.

  17. Understanding bifurcation of slow versus fast cyber-attackers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieren, van Maarten; Doerr, Christian; Jacobs, Vivian; Pieters, Wolter; Livraga, Giovanni; Torra, Vicenç; Aldini, Alessandro; Martinelli, Fabio; Suri, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotally, the distinction between fast “Smash-and-Grab” cyber-attacks on the one hand and slow attacks or “Advanced Persistent Threats” on the other hand is well known. In this article, we provide an explanation for this phenomenon as the outcome of an optimization from the perspective of the att

  18. Nonhuman Primates Prefer Slow Tempos but Dislike Music Overall

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Josh; Hauser, Marc D.

    2007-01-01

    Human adults generally find fast tempos more arousing than slow tempos, with tempo frequently manipulated in music to alter tension and emotion. We used a previously published method [McDermott, J., & Hauser, M. (2004). Are consonant intervals music to their ears? Spontaneous acoustic preferences in a nonhuman primate. Cognition, 94(2), B11-B21]…

  19. Film thickness in grease lubricated slow rotating rolling bearings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morales-Espejel, G.E.; Lugt, Pieter Martin; Pasaribu, H.R.; Cen, H.

    2014-01-01

    Film thickness measurements in grease lubricated contacts are presented for different greases. The conditions used in the experiments are similar to the ones expected in fully-flooded slow rotating bearings. The results show that at very low speeds grease produces film thicknesses substantially thic

  20. Slow light in quantum dot photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Roland; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    A theoretical analysis of pulse propagation in a semiconductor quantum dot photonic crystal waveguide in the regime of electromagnetically induced transparency is presented. The slow light mechanism considered here is based on both material and waveguide dispersion. The group index n...

  1. A New Approach to Charged Particle Slowing Down and Dispersion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, David E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-24

    The process by which super-thermal ions slow down against background Coulomb potentials arises in many fields of study. In particular, this is one of the main mechanisms by which the mass and energy from the reaction products of fusion reactions is deposited back into the background. Many of these fields are characterized by length and time scales that are the same magnitude as the range and duration of the trajectory of these particles, before they thermalize into the background. This requires numerical simulation of this slowing down process through numerically integrating the velocities and energies of these particles. This paper first presents a simple introduction to the required plasma physics, followed by the description of the numerical integration used to integrate a beam of particles. This algorithm is unique in that it combines in an integrated manner both a second-order integration of the slowing down with the particle beam dispersion. These two processes are typically computed in isolation from each other. A simple test problem of a beam of alpha particles slowing down against an inert background of deuterium and tritium with varying properties of both the beam and the background illustrate the utility of the algorithm. This is followed by conclusions and appendices. The appendices define the notation, units, and several useful identities.

  2. Babbling and First Words in Children with Slow Expressive Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasolo, Mirco; Majorano, Marinella; D'Odorico, Laura

    2008-01-01

    This study examined early vocal production to assess whether it is possible to identify predictors of vocabulary development prior to the age point at which lexical delay is usually identified. Characteristics of babbling and first words in 12 Italian children with slow expressive development (late talkers; LT) were compared with those of 12…

  3. ASACUSA atomic spectroscopy and collisions using slow antiprotons

    CERN Document Server

    Horváth, D

    1999-01-01

    The ASACUSA experiment was approved last year for the antiproton decelerator at CERN. Its aim is to study basic atomic processes of slow antiprotons: stopping power and ionization in low-pressure gases, Coulomb capture of $9 antiprotons and to make laser spectroscopy of antiprotonic transitions. (30 refs).

  4. Cellulose-Lignin interactions during slow and fast pyrolysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilbers, T.J.; Wang, Z.; Pecha, B.; Westerhof, R.J.M.; Kersten, S.R.A.; Pelaez-Samaniego, M.R.; Garcia-Perez, M.

    2015-01-01

    The interactions between lignin and cellulose during the slow pyrolysis of their blends were studied by means of Thermogravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Fast pyrolysis was studied using Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy (Py–GC/MS). Crystalline cellulose

  5. Slow Manifold and Hannay Angle in the Spinning Top

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, M. V.; Shukla, P.

    2011-01-01

    The spin of a top can be regarded as a fast variable, coupled to the motion of the axis which is slow. In pure precession, the rotation of the axis round a cone (without nutation), can be considered as the result of a reaction from the fast spin. The resulting restriction of the total state space of the top is an illustrative example, at…

  6. Slow ions in plasma wind tunnels. [satellite-ionosphere interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oran, W. A.; Stone, N. H.; Samir, U.

    1976-01-01

    One of the limitations of simulation experiments for the study of interaction between a satellite and its space environment is the background of slow ions in the plasma chamber. These ions appear to be created by charge exchange between the beam ions and residual neutral gas and may affect measurements of the current and potential in the wake. Results are presented for a plasma wind tunnel experiment to study the effect of slow ions on both the ion and electron current distribution and the electron temperature in the wake of a body in a streaming plasma. It is shown that the effect of slow ions for beam ion density not exceeding 3 is not significant for measurements of ion current variations in the wake zone. This is not the case when studies are aimed at the quantitative examination of electron current and temperature variations in the near wake zone. In these instances, the measurements of electron properties in the wake should be done at very low system pressures or over a range of system pressures in order to ascertain the influence of slow ions.

  7. The fundamental Diagram of Pedestrian Model with Slow Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Fang, Jun; Hu, Hao; Xu, Zhaohui; Li, Huan

    2015-01-01

    The slow-to-start models are a classical cellular automata model in simulating vehicle traffic. However, to our knowledge, the slow-to-start effect has not considered in modeling pedestrian dynamic. We verify the similar behavior between pedestrian and vehicle, and propose an new lattice gas (LG) model called the slow reaction (SR) model to describe the pedestrian's delayed reaction in single-file movement. We simulate and reproduce the Seyfried's field experiments at the research centre Julich, and use its empirical data to validate our SR model. We compare the SR model with the standard LG model. We test different probability of slow reaction ps in SR model and found the simulation data of ps=0.3 fit the empirical data best. The RMS error of mean velocity of SR model is smaller than that of standard LG model. In the range of ps=0.1~0.3, our fundamental diagram between velocity and density by simulation coincides with field experiments. The distribution of individual velocity in fundamental diagram in SR mod...

  8. Tropical birds have a slow pace of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Popko; Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Walker, Amy; Williams, Joseph B

    2007-05-29

    Tropical birds are relatively long-lived and produce few offspring, which develop slowly and mature relatively late in life, the slow end of the life-history axis, whereas temperate birds lie at the opposite end of this continuum. We tested the hypothesis that tropical birds have evolved a reduced basal metabolic rate (BMR). We measured BMR of 69 species of tropical birds, the largest data set amassed on metabolic rates of tropical birds, and compared these measurements with 59 estimates of BMR for temperate birds. Our analyses included conventional least squares regression, regressions based on phylogenetic independent contrasts, and a comparison of BMR of 13 phylogenetically matched pairs, one species from the tropics and one from northerly temperate areas. Our triptych showed that tropical birds had a reduced BMR, compelling evidence for a connection between the life history of tropical birds and a slow pace of life. Further, tropical migrants breeding in temperate habitats had a lower BMR than did temperate residents, suggesting that these migrants have physiological traits consistent with a slow pace of life. In addition, we determined that tropical birds had a lower cold-induced peak metabolic rate and thermogenic metabolic scope than temperate species, a finding that is consistent with the hypothesis that their environment has not selected for high levels of thermogenesis, or alternatively, that a slow pace of life may be incompatible with high thermogenic capacity. We conclude that physiological function correlates with the suite of life-history traits.

  9. Slow light based on material and waveguide dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben Roland; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We study slow light pulse propagation in a photonic crystal structure consisting of a dispersive and absorptive dielectric material and compare it with the constant wave case. The group index and the trasmission are investigated for the example of an ensemble of semiconductor quantum dots embedded...

  10. Post-error slowing in sequential action: An aging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit eRuitenberg

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies demonstrated significant differences in the learning and performance of discrete movement sequences across the lifespan: Young adults (18-28 years showed more indications for the development of (implicit motor chunks and explicit sequence knowledge than middle-aged (55-62 years; Verwey et al., 2011 and elderly participants (75-88 years; Verwey, 2010. Still, even in the absence of indications for motor chunks, the middle-aged and elderly participants showed some performance improvement too. This was attributed to a sequence learning mechanism in which individual reactions are primed by implicit sequential knowledge. The present work further examined sequential movement skill across these age groups. We explored the consequences of making an error on the execution of a subsequent sequence, and investigated whether this is modulated by aging. To that end, we re-analyzed the data from our previous studies. Results demonstrate that sequencing performance is slowed after an error has been made in the previous sequence. Importantly, for young adults and middle-aged participants the observed slowing was also accompanied by increased accuracy after an error. We suggest that slowing in these age groups involves both functional and non-functional components, while slowing in elderly participants is non-functional. Moreover, using action sequences (instead of single key-presses may allow to better track the effects on performance of making an error.

  11. Enhanced circular dichroism via slow light in dispersive structured media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Goor; Mortensen, Asger

    2007-01-01

    Circular dichroism (CD) is in widespread use as a means of determining enantiomeric excess. We show how slow-light phenomena in dispersive structured media allow for a reduction in the required optical path length of an order of magnitude. The same ideas may be used to enhance the sensitivity of CD...

  12. Human Growth Hormone (HGH): Does It Slow Aging?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Healthy aging Human growth hormone is described by some as the key to slowing the aging process. Before you sign up, get the facts. ... stave off some of the changes linked to aging, such as decreased muscle and bone mass. If ...

  13. TANGO standard software to control the Nuclotron beam slow extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, V. A.; Volkov, V. I.; Gorbachev, E. V.; Isadov, V. A.; Kirichenko, A. E.; Romanov, S. V.; Sedykh, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    TANGO Controls is a basis of the NICA control system. The report describes the software which integrates the Nuclotron beam slow extraction subsystem into the TANGO system of NICA. Objects of control are power supplies for resonance lenses. The software consists of the subsystem device server, remote client and web-module for viewing the subsystem data.

  14. Understanding Bifurcation of Slow Versus Fast Cyber-Attackers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wieren, Maarten; Doerr, Christian; Jacobs, Vivian; Pieters, Wolter; Livraga, Giovanni; Torra, Vicenç; Aldini, Alessandro; Martinelli, Fabio; Suri, Neeraj

    2016-01-01

    Anecdotally, the distinction between fast “Smash-and-Grab‿ cyber-attacks on the one hand and slow attacks or “Advanced Persistent Threats‿ on the other hand is well known. In this article, we provide an explanation for this phenomenon as the outcome of an optimization from the perspective of the

  15. Malnutrition and Mother-Infant Asynchrony: Slow Mental Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Maria Clotilde Rossetti

    1978-01-01

    Suggests an explanation for the link between environment, malnutrition, and rate of mental development in children. It is argued that biological factors and difficult socioeconomic conditions interact to slow mental development by undermining the establishment and maintenance of a "syntonic,""synchronic," and "reciprocal" relationship between the…

  16. An Inventory Model for Slow Moving Items Subject to Obsolescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Pinçe (Çerağ); R. Dekker (Rommert)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper, we consider a continuous review inventory system of a slow moving item for which the demand rate drops to a lower level at a pre-determined time. Inventory system is controlled according to one-for-one replenishment policy with fixed lead time. Adaptation to the lower

  17. Slow Light by Two-Dimensional Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chao; HUANG Yan; MAO Xiao-Yu; CUI Kai-Yu; HUANG Yi-Dong; ZHANG Wei; PENG Jiang-De

    2009-01-01

    A simple and effective way to measure the group velocity of photonic crystal waveguides (PCWGs) is developed by using a fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A PCWG with perfect air-bridge structure is fabricated and slow light with group velocity slower than c/80 is demonstrated.

  18. Muscle slowness in a family with nemaline myopathy.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gommans, I.M.P.; Gerrits, K.H.; Haan, A. de; Engelen, B.G.M. van

    2006-01-01

    All patients of a large family with nemaline myopathy complained of slowness in movement. We confirmed this clinical complaint physiologically by showing lower contractile speed in quadriceps muscle. Electrically evoked contractions of the quadriceps muscle elicited a lower rate of relaxation and a

  19. Grating-assisted superresolution of slow waves in Fourier space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomas, N. Le; Houdré, R.; Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn

    2007-01-01

    with a high numerical aperture Fourier space imaging set-up. A high-resolution spectroscopy of the far-field emission diagram allows us to accurately and efficiently determine the dispersion curve and the group-index dispersion of planar photonic waveguides operating in the slow light regime....

  20. Delineating psychomotor slowing from reduced processing speed in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrens, M.; Hulstijn, W.; Matton, C.; Madani, Y.; Bouwel, L. van; Peuskens, J.; Sabbe, B.G.C.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Psychomotor slowing is an intrinsic feature of schizophrenia that is poorly delineated from generally reduced processing speed. Although the Symbol Digit Substitution Test (SDST) is widely used to assess psychomotor speed, the task also taps several higher-order cognitive processes.

  1. Systematic design of slow-light photonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matzen, René; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Sigmund, Ole

    2011-01-01

    A pulse-delaying optimization scheme based on topology optimization for transient response of photonic crystal structures (PhCs) is formulated to obtain slow-light devices. The optimization process is started from a qualified W1 PhC waveguide design with group index ng≈40 obtained from a simple E...

  2. A Model fot the Sources of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, S. K.; Mikic, Z.; Titov, V. S.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: the slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, implying that it originates from the continuous opening and closing of flux at the boundary between open and closed field. On the other hand, the slow wind also has large angular width, up to approx.60deg, suggesting that its source extends far from the open-closed boundary. We propose a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We compute analytically the topology of an open-field corridor and show that it produces a quasi-separatrix layer in the heliosphere that extends to angles far from the heliospheric current sheet. We then use an MHD code and MDI/SOHO observations of the photospheric magnetic field to calculate numerically, with high spatial resolution, the quasi-steady solar wind, and magnetic field for a time period preceding the 2008 August 1 total solar eclipse. Our numerical results imply that, at least for this time period, a web of separatrices (which we term an S-web) forms with sufficient density and extent in the heliosphere to account for the observed properties of the slow wind. We discuss the implications of our S-web model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and heliosphere and propose further tests of the model. Key words: solar wind - Sun: corona - Sun: magnetic topology

  3. A Model for the Sources of the Slow Solar Wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antiochos, Spiro K.; Mikic, Z.; Titov, V. S.; Lionello, R.; Linker, J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Models for the origin of the slow solar wind must account for two seemingly contradictory observations: The slow wind has the composition of the closed-field corona, implying that it originates from the continuous opening and closing of flux at the boundary between open and closed field. On the other hand, the slow wind has large angular width, up to approximately 60 degrees, suggesting that its source extends far from the open-closed boundary. We propose a model that can explain both observations. The key idea is that the source of the slow wind at the Sun is a network of narrow (possibly singular) open-field corridors that map to a web of separatrices and quasi-separatrix layers in the heliosphere. We compute analytically the topology of an open-field corridor and show that it produces a quasi-separatrix layer in the heliosphere that extends to angles far front the heliospheric current sheet. We then use an MHD code and MIDI/SOHO observations of the photospheric magnetic field to calculate numerically, with high spatial resolution, the quasi-steady solar wind and magnetic field for a time period preceding the August 1, 2008 total solar eclipse. Our numerical results imply that, at least for this time period, a web of separatrices (which we term an S-web) forms with sufficient density and extent in the heliosphere to account for the observed properties of the slow wind. We discuss the implications of our S-web model for the structure and dynamics of the corona and heliosphere, and propose further tests of the model.

  4. A Simple Slow-Sand Filter for Drinking Water Purification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O. Yusuf

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Water-borne diseases are commonly encountered when pathogen-contaminated water is consumed. In rural areas, water is usually obtained from ponds, open shallow wells, streams and rain water during rainy season. Rain water is often contaminated by pathogens due to unhygienic of physical and chemical conditions of the roofs thereby making it unsafe for consumption. A simple slow sand filter mechanism was designed and fabricated for purification of water in rural areas where electricity is not available to power water purification devices. Rain water samples were collected from aluminum roof, galvanized roof and thatched roof. The waters samples were allowed to flow through the slow sand filter. The values of turbidity, total dissolved solids, calcium, nitrite, faecal coliform and total coliform from unfiltered water through thatched roof were 0.92 NTU, 27.23 mg/l, 6 mg/l, 0.16 mg/l, 5cfu/100ml and 6.0 cfu/100ml, respectively while the corresponding values for slow sand filter from thatched roof were 0.01 NTU, 0.23 mg/l, 2.5 mg/l, 0.1 mg/l, 0 cfu/100ml and 0 cfu/100ml, respectively. The values of turbidity, total dissolved solid, nitrite, calcium, faecal coliform and total coliform from unfiltered water for aluminum roof were 0.82 NTU, 23.68 mg/l, 2.70 mg/l, 1.0 mg/l, 4 cfu/100ml and 4cfu/100ml, respectively while the corresponding values for slow sand filter were 0.01 NTU, 0.16 mg/l, 0.57 mg/l, 0.2 mg/l, 0 cfu/100ml and 0 cfu/100ml, respectively. The values obtained for galvanized roof were also satisfactory. The slow sand filter is recommended for used in rural areas for water purification to prevent risk of water-borne diseases.

  5. Children with Dyslexia Are Slow Writers Because They Pause More Often and Not Because They Are Slow at Handwriting Execution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Emma; Connelly, Vincent; Barnett, Anna L.

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that children with dyslexia are slower at handwriting than other children. However, evidence of slow handwriting in children with dyslexia is very mixed. Thirty-one children with dyslexia, aged 9 years, were compared to both age-matched children and younger spelling-ability matched children. Participants completed an…

  6. Slow inactivation of Na+ current and slow cumulative spike adaptation in mouse and guinea-pig neocortical neurones in slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleidervish, I A; Friedman, A; Gutnick, M J

    1996-05-15

    1. Spike adaptation of neocortical pyramidal neurones was studied with sharp electrode recordings in slices of guinea-pig parietal cortex and whole-cell patch recordings of mouse somatosensory cortex. Repetitive intracellular stimulation with 1 s depolarizing pulses delivered at intervals of pS and an extrapolated reversal potential of 127 +/- 6 mV above resting potential (Vr) (mean +/- S.E.M.; n = 5). Vr was estimated at -72 +/- 3 mV (n = 8), based on the voltage dependence of the steady-state inactivation (h infinity) curve. 5. Slow inactivation (SI) of Na+ channels had a mono-exponential onset with tau on between 0.86 and 2.33 s (n = 3). Steady-state SI was half-maximal at -43.8 mV and had a slope of 14.4 mV (e-fold)-1. Recovery from a 2 s conditioning pulse was bi-exponential and voltage dependent; the slow time constant ranged between 0.45 and 2.5 s at voltages between-128 and -68 mV. 6. The experimentally determined parameters of SI were adequate to simulate slow cumulative adaptation of spike firing in a single-compartment computer model. 7. Persistent Na+ current, which was recorded in whole-cell configuration during slow voltage ramps (35 mV s-1), also underwent pronounced SI, which was apparent when the ramp was preceded by a prolonged depolarizing pulse.

  7. Children with Dyslexia Are Slow Writers Because They Pause More Often and Not Because They Are Slow at Handwriting Execution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, Emma; Connelly, Vincent; Barnett, Anna L.

    2013-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that children with dyslexia are slower at handwriting than other children. However, evidence of slow handwriting in children with dyslexia is very mixed. Thirty-one children with dyslexia, aged 9 years, were compared to both age-matched children and younger spelling-ability matched children. Participants completed an…

  8. Slow wave activity and slow oscillations in sleepwalkers and controls: effects of 38 h of sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, Rosemarie; Carrier, Julie; Desautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Zadra, Antonio

    2013-08-01

    Sleepwalkers have been shown to have an unusually high number of arousals from slow wave sleep and lower slow wave activity (SWA) power during the night than controls. Because sleep deprivation increases the frequency of slow wave sleep (SWS) arousals in sleepwalkers, it may also affect the expression of the homeostatic process to a greater extent than shown previously. We thus investigated SWA power as well as slow wave oscillation (SWO) density in 10 sleepwalkers and nine controls at baseline and following 38 h of sleep deprivation. There was a significant increase in SWA during participants' recovery sleep, especially during their second non-rapid eye movement (NREM) period. SWO density was similarly increased during recovery sleep's first two NREM periods. A fronto-central gradient in SWA and SWO was also present on both nights. However, no group differences were noted on any of the 2 nights on SWA or SWO. This unexpected result may be related to the heterogeneity of sleepwalkers as a population, as well as our small sample size. SWA pressure after extended sleep deprivation may also result in a ceiling effect in both sleepwalkers and controls.

  9. Slow tourism jako nová forma cestovního ruchu

    OpenAIRE

    Pajmová, Klára

    2012-01-01

    The thesis is focused on slow tourism. The first chapter is dedicated to national and international documents governing sustainable development of tourism, impacts of tourism and approaches to sustainable tourism. It also defines slow tourism, presents the history of its origin, present and future position in the world tourism and the typical participant of slow tourism. Destination of slow tourism and requirements of slow tourists are characterized in this thesis. The next chapter deals with...

  10. Towards An Ideal Slow Cookoff Model For PBXN-109

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wardell, J F; Maienschein, J L; Yoh, J J; Nichols, A L; McClelland, M A

    2003-11-21

    We present an overview of computational techniques for simulating the thermal cookoff of high explosives using a multi-physics hydrodynamics code, ALE3D. Recent improvements to the code have aided our computational capability in modeling the response of energetic materials systems exposed to extreme thermal environments, such as fires. We consider an idealized model process for a confined explosive involving the transition from slow heating to rapid deflagration in which the time scale changes from days to hundreds of microseconds. The heating stage involves thermal expansion and decomposition according to an Arrhenius kinetics model while a pressure-dependent burn model is employed during the explosive phase. We describe and demonstrate the numerical strategies employed to make the transition from slow to fast dynamics. In addition, we investigate the sensitivity of wall expansion rates to numerical strategies and parameters. Results from a one-dimensional model show increased violence when the gap between the explosive and steel vessel is removed.

  11. Standing Slow MHD Waves in Radiatively Cooling Coronal Loops

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Ghafri, Khalil Salim

    2015-01-01

    The standing slow magneto-acoustic oscillations in cooling coronal loops are investigated. There are two damping mechanisms which are considered to generate the standing acoustic modes in coronal magnetic loops namely thermal conduction and radiation. The background temperature is assumed to change temporally due to optically thin radiation. In particular, the background plasma is assumed to be radiatively cooling. The effects of cooling on longitudinal slow MHD modes is analytically evaluated by choosing a simple form of radiative function that ensures the temperature evolution of the background plasma due to radiation coincides with the observed cooling profile of coronal loops. The assumption of low-beta plasma leads to neglect the magnetic field perturbation and eventually reduces the MHD equations to a 1D system modelling longitudinal MHD oscillations in a cooling coronal loop. The cooling is assumed to occur on a characteristic time scale much larger than the oscillation period that subsequently enables...

  12. Slow digestion properties of rice different in resistant starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiaoli; Jia, Limeng; Ye, Hongxia; Li, Chengdao; Wu, Dianxing

    2009-08-26

    The hydrolysis of starch is a key factor for controlling the glycemic index (GI). Slow digestion properties of starch lead to slower glucose release and lower glycemic response. Food with high resistant starch (RS) possesses great value for controlling the GI. To elucidate the factors that play a role in slow digestibility, seven rice mutants different in RS contents were selected for comparative studies. The degree of hydrolysis showed highly significant correlation with RS, apparent amylose content (AAC), lipid content (LC), and other starch physiochemical properties in all these materials with different RS contents. The rate of in vitro digestible starch correlated positively with RS, whereas digestibility was affected mostly by lipid content for those mutants with similar RS. Starch-lipid complexes and short chains with degrees of polymerization (DP) of 8-12 strongly influenced starch digestion. The integrity of aggregated starch and the number of round starch granules might influence the digestibility of starch directly.

  13. The Asteroid Catalog Using AKARI IRC Slow-Scan Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, Sunao; Kuroda, Daisuke; Takita, Satoshi; Usui, Fumihiko

    2012-01-01

    We present an asteroidal catalog from the mid-infrared wavelength region using the slow-scan observation mode obtained by the Infrared Camera (IRC) on-board the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI. An archive of IRC slow-scan observations comprising about 1000 images was used to search for serendipitous encounters of known asteroids. We have determined the geometric albedos and diameters for 88 main-belt asteroids, including two asteroids in the Hilda region, and compared these, where possible, with previously published values. Approximately one-third of the acquired data reflects new asteroidal information. Some bodies classified as C or D-type with high albedo were also identified in the catalog.

  14. An exact solution of the slow-light problem

    CERN Document Server

    Rybin, A V; Bishop, A R

    2004-01-01

    We investigate propagation of a slow-light soliton in atomic vapors and Bose-Einstein condensates described by the nonlinear Lambda-model. We show that the group velocity of the soliton monotonically decreases with the intensity of the controlling laser field, which decays exponentially after the laser is switched off. The shock wave of the vanishing controlling field overtakes the slow soliton and stops it, while the optical information is recorded in the medium in the form of spatially localized polarization. We find an explicit exact solution describing the whole process within the slowly varying amplitude and phase approximation. Our results point to the possibility of addressing spatially localized memory formations and moving these memory bits along the medium in a controllable fashion.

  15. Ionization of Atoms by Slow Heavy Particles, Including Dark Matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, B M; Flambaum, V V; Gribakin, G F

    2016-01-15

    Atoms and molecules can become ionized during the scattering of a slow, heavy particle off a bound electron. Such an interaction involving leptophilic weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) is a promising possible explanation for the anomalous 9σ annual modulation in the DAMA dark matter direct detection experiment [R. Bernabei et al., Eur. Phys. J. C 73, 2648 (2013)]. We demonstrate the applicability of the Born approximation for such an interaction by showing its equivalence to the semiclassical adiabatic treatment of atomic ionization by slow-moving WIMPs. Conventional wisdom has it that the ionization probability for such a process should be exponentially small. We show, however, that due to nonanalytic, cusplike behavior of Coulomb functions close to the nucleus this suppression is removed, leading to an effective atomic structure enhancement. We also show that electron relativistic effects actually give the dominant contribution to such a process, enhancing the differential cross section by up to 1000 times.

  16. Elements of slow-neutron scattering basics, techniques, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Carpenter, J M

    2015-01-01

    Providing a comprehensive and up-to-date introduction to the theory and applications of slow-neutron scattering, this detailed book equips readers with the fundamental principles of neutron studies, including the background and evolving development of neutron sources, facility design, neutron scattering instrumentation and techniques, and applications in materials phenomena. Drawing on the authors' extensive experience in this field, this text explores the implications of slow-neutron research in greater depth and breadth than ever before in an accessible yet rigorous manner suitable for both students and researchers in the fields of physics, biology, and materials engineering. Through pedagogical examples and in-depth discussion, readers will be able to grasp the full scope of the field of neutron scattering, from theoretical background through to practical, scientific applications.

  17. Cascaded passive silicon microrings for large bandwidth slow light device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Yuntao; Hu Yingtao; Xiao Xi; Li Zhiyong; Yu Yude; Yu Jinzhong, E-mail: ytli@semi.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of integrated Optoelectronics, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P. O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Slow light devices have important applications in the areas of data buffering, signal processing, and phased array antenna. Cascaded microring resonators structure can obtain large delay and also enhance the bandwidth, which was considered as a potential approach for future on-chip optical buffer. In this paper, we demonstrated a large bandwidth slow light device using cascaded Silicon-on-insulator (SOI) based microring resonators. With carefully designed the gap between the bus and the ring waveguides and the distances between the adjacent rings, a 57 ps group delay was observed and 83 Gbps maximum allowable bit rate is suggested according the measured 3 dB spectral bandwidth in the 8-stage cascaded microrings.

  18. Characterizing micro-macro transitions with slow light

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Zhifan; Glasser, Ryan T; Qin, Zhongzhong; Fang, Yami; Jing, Jietai; Zhang, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    The transition between the microscopic to the macroscopic world is of broad fundamental and technological significance. Optical parametric amplifiers allow for amplifying single photons to the macroscopic level, but the underlying temporal dynamics are still not well understood. Slow light, in which the group velocity is delayed via quantum interference, is an effective tool to interrogate the temporal dynamics of light-matter interactions. Here, we demonstrate a scheme to characterize micro-macro transitions with slow light based on a four-wave mixing linear amplification process in a hot rubidium vapour. The scheme exhibits strong dispersion which is sensitive to the input's change at the single-photon level, resulting in a nonlinear decay of the micro-macro transition time with the increased microscopic input. The present system is suitable for the study of the relevant time scale of quantum-to-classical transitions and the potential impact from fundamental effects such as gravity, as indicated by recent p...

  19. Nonlinear light propagation in chalcogenide photonic crystal slow light waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keijiro; Baba, Toshihiko

    2010-12-06

    Optical nonlinearity can be enhanced by the combination of highly nonlinear chalcogenide glass and photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) providing strong optical confinement and slow-light effects. In a Ag-As(2)Se(3) chalcogenide PCW, the effective nonlinear parameter γeff reaches 6.3 × 10(4) W(-1)m(-1), which is 200 times larger than that in Si photonic wire waveguides. In this paper, we report the detailed design, fabrication process, and the linear and nonlinear characteristics of this waveguide at silica fiber communication wavelengths. We show that the waveguide exhibits negligible two-photon absorption, and also high-efficiency self-phase modulation and four-wave mixing, which are assisted by low-dispersion slow light.

  20. Slow waves in locally resonant metamaterials line defect waveguides

    CERN Document Server

    Kaina, Nadège; Bourlier, Yoan; Fink, Mathias; Berthelot, Thomas; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2016-01-01

    The ability of electromagnetic waves to interact with matter governs many fascinating effects involved in fundamental and applied, quantum and classical physics. It is necessary to enhance these otherwise naturally weak effects by increasing the probability of wave/matter interactions, either through field confinement or slowing down of waves. This is commonly achieved with structured materials such as photonic crystal waveguides or coupled resonator optical waveguides. Yet their minimum structural scale is limited to the order of the wavelength which not only forbids ultra-small confinement but also severely limits their performance for slowing down waves. Here we show that line defect waveguides in locally resonant metamaterials can outperform these proposals due to their deep subwavelength scale. We experimentally demonstrate our approach in the microwave domain using 3D printed resonant wire metamaterials, achieving group indices ng as high as 227 over relatively wide frequency bands. Those results corres...

  1. Coupled-cavity-based slow light metamaterials with antireflection structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Goo; Kim, Seong-Han; Jung, Soo-Yong; Lee, Jongjin; Park, Jong-Moon; Kee, Chul-Sik

    2016-11-01

    A slow light metamaterial based on a coupled Fabry-Pérot cavity is proposed and numerically studied using finite-difference time-domain simulations. The coupled cavity-based slow light metamaterial is composed of a periodic array of partial mirrors with low transmittance, i.e., thin metal films perforated with a subwavelength hole array. The tight-binding model is employed to investigate the transmission properties of the coupled-cavity-based metamaterial. It is shown that the group velocities of the slowly propagating modes can be controlled by adjusting the radius of holes in the mirrors. We also show that undesirable reflections at the boundaries of the finite-size metamaterial can be minimized by introducing optimized antireflection structures.

  2. Global spill control in RF-knockout slow-extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, T.; Noda, K.; Muramatsu, M.; Uesugi, T.; Shibuya, S.; Kawai, H.; Takada, E.; Yamada, S.

    2004-04-01

    The time structure of extracted beams has been improved in synchrotron rings with resonant slow-extraction including RF-knockout extraction. In order to control the global spill structure in the RF-knockout slow-extraction method, it is necessary to improve the amplitude modulation (AM) function of the transverse RF-field. For this purpose, a scheme with a simple model of the extraction process has been proposed. Using this simple model, an analysis was carried out for determining the parameter relevant to the diffusion process in the separatrix. With this parameter, the new AM function obtained by the analytical approach could provide a flat spill within ±23% in both a simulation and an experiment at the HIMAC synchrotron. Cooperating with the feedback system, the global spill structure was significantly suppressed to be less than ±5%.

  3. Systematic design of loss-engineered slow-light waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fengwen; Jensen, Jakob Søndergaard; Mørk, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    , where the scattering losses due to manufacturing imperfections are represented by an edge-related effective dissipation. The loss engineering of slow-light waveguides is realized by minimizing the propagation losses of design modes. Numerical examples illustrate that the propagation losses of free......This paper employs topology optimization to systematically design free-topology loss-engineered slow-light waveguides with enlarged group index bandwidth product (GBP). The propagation losses of guided modes are evaluated by the imaginary part of eigenvalues in complex band structure calculations......-topology dispersion-engineered waveguides can be significantly suppressed by loss engineering. Comparisons between fixed- and free-topology loss-engineered waveguides demonstrate that the GBP can be enhanced significantly by the free-topology loss-engineered waveguides with a small increase of the propagation losses....

  4. Slow collisions in the ballistic pendulum: A computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Denis; Diamond, Joshua B.

    2003-06-01

    We study the ballistic pendulum in a situation that is not usually considered where the bullet shot into a hanging block requires a finite time (the collision time) to come to rest relative to the block. During this time the block undergoes a non-negligible displacement. A slow collision is one for which the block's displacement during the collision time is an appreciable fraction of its maximum displacement. For slow collisions, the quantitative results of our model differ significantly from the standard ballistic pendulum treatment. Suitably generalized momentum and energy relations are evaluated and provide a check on the numerical solutions. This work extends the treatment of a familiar problem and demonstrates the utility of computational tools accessible to undergraduates.

  5. Slow dynamics of the contact process on complex networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ódor Géza

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Contact Process has been studied on complex networks exhibiting different kinds of quenched disorder. Numerical evidence is found for Griffiths phases and other rare region effects, in Erdős Rényi networks, leading rather generically to anomalously slow (algebraic, logarithmic,… relaxation. More surprisingly, it turns out that Griffiths phases can also emerge in the absence of quenched disorder, as a consequence of sole topological heterogeneity in networks with finite topological dimension. In case of scalefree networks, exhibiting infinite topological dimension, slow dynamics can be observed on tree-like structures and a superimposed weight pattern. In the infinite size limit the correlated subspaces of vertices seem to cause a smeared phase transition. These results have a broad spectrum of implications for propagation phenomena and other dynamical process on networks and are relevant for the analysis of both models and empirical data.

  6. ON THE SOURCE OF PROPAGATING SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVES IN SUNSPOTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, S. Krishna; Jess, D. B. [Astrophysics Research Centre, School of Mathematics and Physics, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Khomenko, Elena, E-mail: krishna.prasad@qub.ac.uk [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2015-10-10

    Recent high-resolution observations of sunspot oscillations using simultaneously operated ground- and space-based telescopes reveal the intrinsic connection between different layers of the solar atmosphere. However, it is not clear whether these oscillations are externally driven or generated in situ. We address this question by using observations of propagating slow magnetoacoustic waves along a coronal fan loop system. In addition to the generally observed decreases in oscillation amplitudes with distance, the observed wave amplitudes are also found to be modulated with time, with similar variations observed throughout the propagation path of the wave train. Employing multi-wavelength and multi-instrument data, we study the amplitude variations with time as the waves propagate through different layers of the solar atmosphere. By comparing the amplitude modulation period in different layers, we find that slow magnetoacoustic waves observed in sunspots are externally driven by photospheric p-modes, which propagate upward into the corona before becoming dissipated.

  7. Primordial perturbations from slow-roll inflation on a brane

    CERN Document Server

    Koyama, K; Mennim, A; Rubakov, V A; Wands, D; Hiramatsu, Takashi; Koyama, Kazuya; Mennim, Andrew; Wands, David

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we quantise scalar perturbations in a Randall-Sundrum-type model of inflation where the inflaton field is confined to a single brane embedded in five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space-time. In the high energy regime, small-scale inflaton fluctuations are strongly coupled to metric perturbations in the bulk and gravitational back-reaction has a dramatic effect on the behaviour of inflaton perturbations on sub-horizon scales. This is in contrast to the standard four-dimensional result where gravitational back-reaction can be neglected on small scales. Nevertheless, this does not give rise to significant particle production, and the correction to the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations on super-horizon scales is shown to be suppressed by a slow-roll parameter. We calculate the complete first order slow-roll corrections to the spectrum of primordial curvature perturbations.

  8. Slow light and pulse propagation in semiconductor waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Lunnemann

    This thesis concerns the propagation of optical pulses in semiconductor waveguide structures with particular focus on methods for achieving slow light or signal delays. Experimental pulse propagation measurements of pulses with a duration of 180 fs, transmitted through quantum well based waveguide...... structures, are presented. Simultaneous measurements of the pulse transmission and delay are measured as a function of input pulse energy for various applied electrical potentials. Electrically controlled pulse delay and advancement are demonstrated and compared with a theoretical model. The limits...... of the model as well as the underlying physical mechanisms are analysed and discussed. A method to achieve slow light by electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in an inhomogeneously broadened quantum dot medium is proposed. The basic principles of EIT are assessed and the main dissimilarities between...

  9. Dynamic wavelength conversion in copropagating slow-light pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Baba, T

    2014-06-06

    Dynamic wavelength conversion (DWC) is obtained by controlling copropagating slow-light signal and control pulse trajectories. Our method is based on the understanding that conventional resonator-based DWC can be generalized, and is linked to cross-phase modulation. Dispersion-engineered Si photonic crystal waveguides produce such slow-light pulses. Free carriers generated by two-photon absorption of the control pulse dynamically shift the signal wavelength. Matching the group velocities of the two pulses enhances the shift, elongating the interaction length. We demonstrate an extremely large wavelength shift in DWC (4.9 nm blueshift) for the signal wavelength. Although DWC is similar to the Doppler effect, we highlight their essential differences.

  10. Laser radiation pressure slowing of a molecular beam

    CERN Document Server

    Barry, J F; Norrgard, E B; DeMille, D

    2011-01-01

    There is substantial interest in producing samples of ultracold molecules for possible applications in quantum computation, quantum simulation of condensed matter systems, precision measurements, controlled chemistry, and high precision spectroscopy. A crucial step to obtaining large samples of ultracold, trapped molecules is developing a means to bridge the gap between typical molecular source velocities (~150-600 m/s) and velocities for which trap loading or confinement is possible (~5-20 m/s). Here we show deceleration of a beam of neutral strontium monofluoride (SrF) molecules using radiative force. Under certain conditions, the deceleration results in a substantial flux of molecules with velocities <50 m/s. The observed slowing, from ~140 m/s, corresponds to scattering ~10000 photons. We also observe longitudinal velocity compression under different conditions. Combined with molecular laser cooling techniques, this lays the groundwork to create slow and cold molecular beams suitable for trap loading.

  11. Model independent analysis on the slowing down of cosmic acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Ming-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Possible slowing down of cosmic acceleration has attracted more and more attention. However, most analysis in previous work were commonly imposed in some parametrization models. In the present paper, we investigate this subject using the the Gaussian processes (GP), providing a model-independent analysis. We carry out the reconstruction by abundant data including luminosity distance from Union2, Union2.1 compilation and gamma-ray burst, and Hubble parameter from cosmic chronometer and baryon acoustic oscillation peaks. The GP reconstructions suggest that no slowing down of cosmic acceleration is approved within 95\\% C.L. from current observational data. We also test the influence of spatial curvature and Hubble constant, finding that spatial curvature does not present significant impact on the reconstructions. However, Hubble constant strongly influence the reconstructions especially at low redshift. In order to reveal the reason of inconsistence between our reconstruction and previous parametrization constra...

  12. Passive integrated circuits utilizing slow light in photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavrinenko, Andrei; Têtu, Amélie; Yang, Lirong;

    2006-01-01

    We report thorough investigations of photonic crystal waveguide properties in the slow light regime. The transmission and the group index near the cutoff wavelengths oscillate in phase in close analogy with the ID photonic crystal behavior. The influence of having a finite number of periods...... in the photonic crystal waveguide is addressed to explain the spiky character of both the transmission and group index spectra. The profile of the slow-light modes is stretched out into the first and second rows of the holes closest to the waveguide channel. One of our strategies to ameliorate the design...... of photonic crystal devices is to engineer the radii of holes in these rows. A topology optimization approach is also utilized to make further improvements. The results of the numerical simulations and the optical characterization of fabricated devices such as straight waveguides with bends and couplers...

  13. Centriolar CPAP/SAS-4 Imparts Slow Processive Microtubule Growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ashwani; Aher, Amol; Dynes, Nicola J; Frey, Daniel; Katrukha, Eugene A; Jaussi, Rolf; Grigoriev, Ilya; Croisier, Marie; Kammerer, Richard A; Akhmanova, Anna; Gönczy, Pierre; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-05-23

    Centrioles are fundamental and evolutionarily conserved microtubule-based organelles whose assembly is characterized by microtubule growth rates that are orders of magnitude slower than those of cytoplasmic microtubules. Several centriolar proteins can interact with tubulin or microtubules, but how they ensure the exceptionally slow growth of centriolar microtubules has remained mysterious. Here, we bring together crystallographic, biophysical, and reconstitution assays to demonstrate that the human centriolar protein CPAP (SAS-4 in worms and flies) binds and "caps" microtubule plus ends by associating with a site of β-tubulin engaged in longitudinal tubulin-tubulin interactions. Strikingly, we uncover that CPAP activity dampens microtubule growth and stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting catastrophes and promoting rescues. We further establish that the capping function of CPAP is important to limit growth of centriolar microtubules in cells. Our results suggest that CPAP acts as a molecular lid that ensures slow assembly of centriolar microtubules and, thereby, contributes to organelle length control.

  14. Simultaneous slow and fast light involving Faraday effect

    CERN Document Server

    Macke, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically study the linear transmission of linearly polarized light pulses in an ensemble of cold atoms submitted to a static magnetic field parallel to the direction of propagation. The carrier frequency of the incident pulses coincides with a resonance frequency of the atoms in absence of magnetic field and the light transmitted in presence of magnetic field is examined in the polarizations parallel and perpendicular to that of the incident pulses. We give explicit analytic expressions of the transfer functions of the system for both polarizations. We demonstrate that slow light can be observed in a polarization whereas fast light is simultaneously observed in the perpendicular polarization. Moreover we point out that, due to the polarization post-selection, the system is not necessarily minimum-phase-shift. Slow light can then be obtained in situations where an irrelevant application of the Kramers-Kronig relations leads to expect fast light. When the incident light is step-modulated, we finally sho...

  15. 奥美拉唑快速纠正先天性肥厚性幽门狭窄代谢性碱中毒的临床研究%The clinical study of omeprazole in rapid correction of metabolic alkalosis in congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙邡; 刘斌; 张宏伟; 禚保彪; 刘丰丽; 方允

    2014-01-01

    Objetive To explore the function of omeprazole in rapid correction of metabolic alkalosis in congenital hypertrophic pyloric stenosis(CHPS). Methods 80 infants with CHPS were randomly divided into two groups,treatment group 40 cases,control group 40 cases.According to the pH on admission ,those patients were divided into pH>7.5 group (treatment group 21 cases,control group 22 cases),pH≤7.5 group (treat-ment group19 cases,control group18 cases ).The control group was given conventional normal saline,equilibri-um liquid to correct electrolyte and acid-base balance disorders,the treatment group in addition to routine thera-py was given omeprazole 0.7 mg/(kg.d)qd intravenous injection.The arterial blood gas analysis were detec-ted in every 12 h after admission,The SPSS13.0 software of statistics analyzed the primary data. Results pH>7.5 group:12 h after admission treatment group with 8 cases (8/21,38.1%)pH returned to normal,while control group only with 2 cases (2/22,9.1%),(P0.05).Conclusion Intravenous omeprazole administration can rapidly normalize severe meta-bolic alkalosis in CHPS patients,particularly for moderately severe metabolic alkalosis.As a result,pyloromyoto-my can be performed sooner reducing both hospital stay and costs.%目的:探讨奥美拉唑在快速纠正先天性肥厚性幽门狭窄代谢性碱中毒中的作用。方法将本院80例诊断为先天性肥厚性幽门狭窄的患儿随机分成两组,治疗组40例,对照组40例。根据入院时pH值又分为pH>7.5组(治疗组21例,对照组22),pH≤7.5组(治疗组19例,对照组18例)。对照组采用补充生理盐水、平衡液等纠正电解质紊乱及酸碱失衡,治疗组除采用上述治疗外加用奥美拉唑0.7 mg·kg-1·d-1静脉滴注,每日1次。入院后每12 h行动脉血气分析,数据通过SPSS13.0软件包进行统计学处理。结果 pH>7.5组:入院后12h治疗组有8例(8/21,38.1%)pH

  16. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study’s methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 ti...

  17. Effects of cervical self-stretching on slow vital capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Dongwook; Yoon, Nayoon; Jeong, Yeongran; Ha, Misook; Nam, Kunwoo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of self-stretching of cervical muscles, because the accessory inspiratory muscle is considered to improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy university students 19–21 years old who did not have any lung disease, respiratory dysfunction, cervical injury, or any problems upon cervical stretching. [Methods] Spirometry was used as a pulmonary function test to measure the slow vital capacity before and after stretching. The slo...

  18. Sagnac Interferometry in a Slow-Light Medium

    CERN Document Server

    Purves, G T; Hughes, I G; Adams, Charles S.; Hughes, Ifan G.; Purves, Graham T.

    2005-01-01

    We use a Sagnac interferometer to measure the dispersive and absorptive properties of room temperature Rubidium vapor on the D_2 line at 780.2 nm. We apply a pump beam such that the resulting Lambda system exhibits Electromagnetically Induced Transparency. Using a "biased alignment" technique we demonstrate a direct and robust method of measuring the rapid variation in the refractive index. Such a "slow-light" Sagnac interferometer is ideally suited to precision measurement applications such as magnetometry and inertial sensing.

  19. Operational method for the space-energy slowing down problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Wakil, S.A.; Machali, H.M.; Madkour, M.A.; Saied, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    The direct operational method and Pade's approximation is used to transform the integro-differential form of the transport equation to differential form. The moment method and the similarity method are used to solve the space-energy problem in the slowing down region with energy-dependent cross section. The energy deposition factor is calculated in terms of the spatial-angular moments, without using the integral transform.

  20. Slow saccades in bulbar-onset motor neurone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaghy, Colette; Pinnock, Ralph; Abrahams, Sharon; Cardwell, Chris; Hardiman, Orla; Patterson, Victor; McGivern, R Canice; Gibson, J Mark

    2010-07-01

    Historical studies of eye movements in motor neurone disease (MND) have been conflicting although current findings suggest that eye movement abnormalities relate to frontal lobe impairment. Numerous case reports, however, describe slow saccades and supranuclear gaze palsies in patients with MND often associated with bulbar-onset disease. We performed a study of saccades and smooth pursuit in a large group of patients with MND to examine for any differences between bulbar-onset and spinal-onset patients. Forty-four patients (14 bulbar-onset and 30 spinal-onset patients) and 45 controls were recruited. Reflexive saccades, antisaccades and smooth pursuit were examined using infra-red oculography and all subjects then underwent neuropsychological evaluation. Reflexive saccades were found to be slower in bulbar-onset compared to spinal-onset patients and controls (p = 0.03, p = 0.05). Antisaccade latency (p = 0.01) and antisaccade type 1 errors (p = 0.03, p = 0.04) were increased in patients compared to controls. 'Proportion of time spent in smooth pursuit' and smooth pursuit 'velocity gain' were reduced in patients compared to controls (p = 0.000, p = 0.001). Antisaccade errors and velocity gain correlated with neuropsychological measures sensitive to lesions of the frontal lobes. This is the first study to highlight the presence of slow saccades in bulbar-onset MND. These findings suggest that slow saccades may be due to increased brainstem pathology in bulbar-onset disease that involves burst cell neurons. Furthermore these observations highlight the potential for overlap between bulbar-onset MND and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) as both can have a bulbar palsy and slowed saccades.

  1. Slow control systems of the Reactor Experiment for Neutrino Oscillation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, J.H. [Basic Science Research Institute, Dongshin University, Naju 58245 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, H.I. [Department of Fire Safety, Seoyeong University, Gwangju 61268 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, W.Q. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Y. [Department of Physics, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 16419 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, J.S. [GIST College, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju 61005 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, E.J. [Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon 34047 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sejong University, Seoul 05006 (Korea, Republic of); Joo, K.K.; Kim, B.R. [Institute for Universe & Elementary Particles, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H.S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Sejong University, Seoul 05006 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J.Y. [Institute for Universe & Elementary Particles, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.B.; Kim, S.Y. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, W. [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 41566 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y.D. [Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon 34047 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Y.J. [Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 06974 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J.K. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, I.T. [Institute for Universe & Elementary Particles, Chonnam National University, Gwangju 61186 (Korea, Republic of); Pac, M.Y., E-mail: pac@dsu.kr [Basic Science Research Institute, Dongshin University, Naju 58245 (Korea, Republic of); Park, I.G. [Department of Physics, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju 52828 (Korea, Republic of); Park, J.S. [Department of Physics & Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-02-21

    The RENO experiment has been in operation since August 2011 to measure reactor antineutrino disappearance using identical near and far detectors. For accurate measurements of neutrino mixing parameters and efficient data taking, it is crucial to monitor and control the detector in real time. Environmental conditions also need to be monitored for stable operation of detectors as well as for safety reasons. In this paper, we report the design, hardware, operation, and performance of the slow control system.

  2. [Chronic and slow neuroinfections. Current status of problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, P V; Tsinzerling, V A

    2001-01-01

    Some causes and conditions of chronic and slow neuroinfections were reviewed: brain immunological "priveledge"; congenital immunodeficiencies including clinically latent; immunomodulation induced by microorganisms due to infection of immune cells, inactivation of cytokines making difficulties to antibodies; disorders of genetic control of immune reaction; immunopathologic processes are of great importance for the agents persistence including autoimmunity. Microorganisms can locate in the neurons, glyocytes, endothelium. Neuroinfections chronic course depends on the agents properties and peculiarities of nervous system reactivity.

  3. Effect of Strontium Nitrate on Extremely Slow Strobe Compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    describes the evaluation of the slow strobe’s pulse rate , based on the mesh size of the metal powder and the effect of the variation of strontium...Increasing potassium vs pulse rate ...........................................................................8 TABLES 1. Orion’s Flashing...solution of nitrocellulose in acetone was used as a binder for all mixes. Batches were dried overnight in an oven at 150 °F. After drying, the mixes were

  4. Using Nonuniform Fiber to Generate Slow Light via SBS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenhai Li

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The data pulse delay based on slow light induced by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS in a nonuniform dispersion decreasing fiber (DDF is demonstrated experimentally, and the distortions of data pulses at different beat frequencies are studied. We found that a delay exceeding a pulse width can be achieved at particular beat frequency, and the DDF has larger delay versus gain slope coefficient with much better output pulse quality than single-mode fiber.

  5. The puzzle of decreased homeostatic slow wave sleep in aging

    OpenAIRE

    Rytkönen, Kirsi-Marja

    2012-01-01

    Slow wave sleep is the most important part of sleep, yet it decreases with aging. Staying awake puts pressure on the neurons of the brain s arousal systems, e.g. on the cortically projecting neurons of the basal forebrain. During wakefulness, these neurons are active and excite the cortex, thereby enhancing behavioral arousal. Sleep quality and duration are compromised with increasing age. Elderly people often experience these symptoms as sleep problems and contact medical professionals. Trea...

  6. Slow Wave Characteristics of Helix Structure with Elliptical Cross Section

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Jian-Xiang; WEI Yan-Yu; GONG Yu-Bin; Fu Cheng-Fang; YUE Ling-Na; WANG Wen-Xiang

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel helix slow wave structure with an elliptical cross section shielded by an elliptical waveguide.The rf characteristics including dispersion properties,interaction impedance of zero mode in this structure have been studied in detail.The theoretical results reveal that weaker dispersion even abnormal dispersion characteristics is obtained with the increasing eccentricity of the elliptical waveguide,while the interaction impedance is enhanced by enlarging the eccentricity of elliptical helix.

  7. Dirac-graphene quasiparticles in strong slow-light pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovinski, P. A.; Astapenko, V. A.; Yakovets, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    An analytical Volkov's solution of the massless Dirac equation for graphene in the field of slow-light pulse with arbitrary time dependence is obtained. Exact solutions are presented for special cases of monochromatic field and a single-cycle pulse. Following the Fock-Schwinger proper time method, the Green's function for quasiparticles is derived with the account of the influence an external classical electromagnetic wave field.

  8. Slow Neutron Velocity Spectrometer Transmission Studies Of Pu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, W. W. Jr.; Melkonian, E.; Rainwater, L. J.; Levin, M.

    1951-05-28

    The slow neutron transmission of several samples of Pu has been investigated with the Columbia Neutron Velocity Spectrometer. Data are presented in two groups, those covering the energy region from 0 to 6 ev, and those covering the region above 6 ev. Below 6 ev the resolution was relatively good, and a detailed study of the cross section variation was made. Work above 6 ev consisted of merely locating levels and obtaining a rough idea of their strengths.

  9. Polarized 3 He Spin Filters for Slow Neutron Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Gentile, T. R.; W.C. Chen; Jones, G. L.; Babcock, E.; Walker, T. G.

    2005-01-01

    Polarized 3He spin filters are needed for a variety of experiments with slow neutrons. Their demonstrated utility for highly accurate determination of neutron polarization are critical to the next generation of betadecay correlation coefficient measurements. In addition, they are broadband devices that can polarize large area and high divergence neutron beams with little gamma-ray background, and allow for an additional spin-flip for systematic tests. These attributes are relevant to all neut...

  10. Traction Forces of Endothelial Cells under Slow Shear Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrault, Cecile M.; Brugues, Agusti; Bazellieres, Elsa; Ricco, Pierre; Lacroix, Damien; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cells are constantly exposed to fluid shear stresses that regulate vascular morphogenesis, homeostasis, and disease. The mechanical responses of endothelial cells to relatively high shear flow such as that characteristic of arterial circulation has been extensively studied. Much less is known about the responses of endothelial cells to slow shear flow such as that characteristic of venous circulation, early angiogenesis, atherosclerosis, intracranial aneurysm, or interstitial flow. Here we used a novel, to our knowledge, microfluidic technique to measure traction forces exerted by confluent vascular endothelial cell monolayers under slow shear flow. We found that cells respond to flow with rapid and pronounced increases in traction forces and cell-cell stresses. These responses are reversible in time and do not involve reorientation of the cell body. Traction maps reveal that local cell responses to slow shear flow are highly heterogeneous in magnitude and sign. Our findings unveil a low-flow regime in which endothelial cell mechanics is acutely responsive to shear stress. PMID:26488643

  11. Slow magnetosonic waves and fast flows in active region loops

    CERN Document Server

    Ofman, Leon; Davila, Joseph M

    2012-01-01

    Recent EUV spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast (~100-300 km/s) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux-tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magn...

  12. On novel mechanisms of slow ion induced electron emission

    CERN Document Server

    Eder, H

    2000-01-01

    impact of singly and doubly charged ions on poly- and monocrystalline aluminum surfaces were performed. From the results we conclude that direct plasmon excitation by slow ions occurs due to the potential energy of the projectile in a quasi-resonant fashion. The highest relative plasmon intensities were found for impact of 5 keV Ne+ on Al(111) with 5 % of the total yield. For impact of H + and H sub 2 + characteristical differences were observed for Al(111) and polycrystalline aluminum. We show that structures in the spectrum for monocrystalline aluminum arise from diffraction of ejected electrons instead of plasmon excitation as previously assumed. The present work has contributed in new ways to the field of slow ion induced electron emission. First, measurements of the total electron yield gamma for impact of slow singly and multiply charged ions on atomically clean polycrystalline gold and graphite have been made. The respective yields were determined by current measurements and measurements of the electro...

  13. Multifunctional slow-release organic-inorganic compound fertilizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Boli; Liu, Mingzhu; Lü, Shaoyu; Xie, Lihua; Wang, Yanfang

    2010-12-08

    Multifunctional slow-release organic-inorganic compound fertilizer (MSOF) has been investigated to improve fertilizer use efficiency and reduce environmental pollution derived from fertilizer overdosage. The special fertilizer is based on natural attapulgite (APT) clay used as a matrix, sodium alginate used as an inner coating and sodium alginate-g-poly(acrylic acid-co-acrylamide)/humic acid (SA-g-P(AA-co-AM)/HA) superabsorbent polymer used as an outer coating. The coated multielement compound fertilizer granules were produced in a pan granulator, and the diameter of the prills was in the range of 2.5-3.5 mm. The structural and chemical characteristics of the product, as well as its efficiency in slowing the nutrients release, were examined. In addition, a mathematical model for nutrient release from the fertilizer was applied to calculate the diffusion coefficient D of nutrients in MSOF. The degradation of the SA-g-P(AA-co-AM)/HA coating was assessed by examining the weight loss with incubation time in soil. It is demonstrated that the product prepared by a simple route with good slow-release property may be expected to have wide potential applications in modern agriculture and horticulture.

  14. Slow Motion and Zoom in HD Digital Videos Using Fractals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Murroni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Slow motion replay and spatial zooming are special effects used in digital video rendering. At present, most techniques to perform digital spatial zoom and slow motion are based on interpolation for both enlarging the size of the original pictures and generating additional intermediate frames. Mainly, interpolation is done either by linear or cubic spline functions or by motion estimation/compensation which both can be applied pixel by pixel, or by partitioning frames into blocks. Purpose of this paper is to present an alternative technique combining fractals theory and wavelet decomposition to achieve spatial zoom and slow motion replay of HD digital color video sequences. Fast scene change detection, active scene detection, wavelet subband analysis, and color fractal coding based on Earth Mover's Distance (EMD measure are used to reduce computational load and to improve visual quality. Experiments show that the proposed scheme achieves better results in terms of overall visual quality compared to the state-of-the-art techniques.

  15. Contracture of Slow Striated Muscle during Calcium Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Richard L.; Hein, Manfred M.

    1963-01-01

    When deprived of calcium the slow striated muscle fibers of the frog develop reversible contractures in either hypertonic or isotonic solutions. While calcium deprivation continues because of a flowing calcium-free solution the muscles relax slowly and completely. Restoration of calcium during contracture relaxes the muscle promptly to initial tension. When relaxed during calcium lack the return of calcium does not change tension and the muscle stays relaxed. When contractures are induced by solutions containing small amounts of calcium relaxation does not occur or requires several hours. The rate of tension development depends upon the rate at which calcium moves outward since the contractures develop slower in low concentrations of calcium and are absent or greatly slowed in a stagnant calcium-free solution. Withdrawal of calcium prevents the contractile responses to ACh, KCl, or electrical stimulation through the nerve. Muscles return to their original excitability after calcium is restored. Origin of the contractures is unrelated to nerve activity since they are maximal during transmission failure from calcium lack, occur in denervated muscles, and are not blocked by high concentrations of d-tubocurarine, procaine, or atropine. The experiments also indicate that the contractures do not originate from repetitive activity of muscle membranes. The findings are most simply explained by relating the outward movement of calcium as a link for initiating contraction in slow type striated muscle. PMID:14065284

  16. Standing Slow MHD Waves in Radiatively Cooling Coronal Loops

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K. S. Al-Ghafri

    2015-06-01

    The standing slow magneto-acoustic oscillations in cooling coronal loops are investigated. There are two damping mechanisms which are considered to generate the standing acoustic modes in coronal magnetic loops, namely, thermal conduction and radiation. The background temperature is assumed to change temporally due to optically thin radiation. In particular, the background plasma is assumed to be radiatively cooling. The effects of cooling on longitudinal slow MHD modes is analytically evaluated by choosing a simple form of radiative function, that ensures the temperature evolution of the background plasma due to radiation, coincides with the observed cooling profile of coronal loops. The assumption of low-beta plasma leads to neglecting the magnetic field perturbation and, eventually, reduces the MHD equations to a 1D system modelling longitudinal MHD oscillations in a cooling coronal loop. The cooling is assumed to occur on a characteristic time scale, much larger than the oscillation period that subsequently enables using the WKB theory to study the properties of standing wave. The governing equation describing the time-dependent amplitude of waves is obtained and solved analytically. The analytically derived solutions are numerically evaluated to give further insight into the evolution of the standing acoustic waves. We find that the plasma cooling gives rise to a decrease in the amplitude of oscillations. In spite of the reduction in damping rate caused by rising the cooling, the damping scenario of slow standing MHD waves strongly increases in hot coronal loops.

  17. Virus removal vs. subsurface water velocity during slow sand filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizer, Halim; Brackmann, Bernhard; Rahman, M Azizur; Szewzyk, Regine; Sprenger, Christoph; Holzbecher, Ekkehard; López-Pila, Juan M

    2015-06-01

    In an attempt to obtain a conservative estimate of virus removal during slow sand and river bank filtration, a somatic phage was isolated with slow decay and poor adsorption to coarse sand. We continuously fed a phage suspension to a 7-m infiltration path and measured the phage removal. In a second set of experiments, we fed the phage suspension to 1-m long columns run at different pore water velocities. Using the data obtained, a mathematical model was constructed describing removal vs. pore water velocity (PWV), assuming different statistical distributions of the adsorption coefficient λ. The bimodal distribution best fit the results for PWVs higher than 1 m/d. It predicted a removal of approximately 4 log10 after 50 days infiltration at 1 m/d. At PWVs below 1 m/d the model underestimated removal. Sand-bound phages dissociated slowly into the liquid phase, with a detachment constant kdet of 2.6 × 10⁻⁵. This low kdet suggests that river bank filtration plants should be intermittently operated when viral overload is suspected, e.g. during flooding events or at high water-marks in rivers, in order for viruses to become soil-associated during the periods of standstill. Resuming filtration will allow only a very slow virus release from the soil.

  18. Rotational evolution of slow-rotators sequence stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzafame, Alessandro C

    2015-01-01

    The observed mass-age-rotation relationship in open clusters shows the progressive development of a slow-rotators sequence at masses lower than 1.2 $M_{\\odot}$. After 0.6 Gyr, almost all stars have settled on this sequence. The observed clustering on this sequence suggests that it corresponds to some equilibrium or asymptotic condition that still lacks a complete theoretical interpretation, crucial to our understanding of the stellar angular momentum evolution. We couple a rotational evolution model that takes into account internal differential rotation with classical and new proposals for the wind braking law, and fit models to the data using a Monte Carlo Markov Chain method tailored to the case at hand. We explore the extent to which these models are able to reproduce the mass and time dependence of the stellar rotational evolution on the slow-rotators sequence. The description of the early evolution (0.1-0.6 Gyr) of the slow-rotators sequence requires taking into account the transfer of angular momentum f...

  19. Energy compensation of slow extracted beams with RF acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Tetsuya; Souda, Hikaru; Torikoshi, Masami; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Yamada, Satoru; Noda, Koji

    2016-03-01

    In a conventional carbon-ion radiotherapy facility, a carbon-ion beam is typically accelerated up to an optimum energy, slowly extracted from a synchrotron ring by a resonant slow extraction method, and ultimately delivered to a patient through a beam-delivery system. At Japan's Gunma University, a method employing slow-beam extraction along with beam-acceleration has been adopted. This method slightly alters the extracted-beam's energy owing to the acceleration component of the process, which subsequently results in a residual-range variation of approximately 2 mm in water-equivalent length. However, this range variation does not disturb a distal dose distribution with broad-beam methods such as the single beam-wobbling method. With the pencil-beam 3D scanning method, however, such a range variation disturbs a distal dose distribution because the variation is comparable to slice thickness. Therefore, for pencil-beam 3D scanning, an energy compensation method for a slow extracted beam is proposed in this paper. This method can compensate for the aforementioned energy variances by controlling net energy losses through a rotatable energy absorber set fixed between the synchrotron exit channel and the isocenter. Experimental results demonstrate that beam energies can be maintained constant, as originally hypothesized. Moreover, energy-absorber positions were found to be significantly enhanced by optimizing beam optics for reducing beam-size growth by implementation of the multiple-scattering effect option.

  20. Fast-slow climate dynamics and peak global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Ashwin K.

    2016-06-01

    The dynamics of a linear two-box energy balance climate model is analyzed as a fast-slow system, where the atmosphere, land, and near-surface ocean taken together respond within few years to external forcing whereas the deep-ocean responds much more slowly. Solutions to this system are approximated by estimating the system's time-constants using a first-order expansion of the system's eigenvalue problem in a perturbation parameter, which is the ratio of heat capacities of upper and lower boxes. The solution naturally admits an interpretation in terms of a fast response that depends approximately on radiative forcing and a slow response depending on integrals of radiative forcing with respect to time. The slow response is inversely proportional to the "damping-timescale", the timescale with which deep-ocean warming influences global warming. Applications of approximate solutions are discussed: conditions for a warming peak, effects of an individual pulse emission of carbon dioxide (CO2 ), and metrics for estimating and comparing contributions of different climate forcers to maximum global warming.

  1. Biodegradation of MIB and geosmin with slow sand filters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shu-Ting; Lin, Tsair-Fuh; Wang, Gen-Shuh

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the biodegradation of MIB (2-methylisoborneol) and geosmin (trans-1,10-dimethyl-trans- 9-decalol) in simulated slow sand filtration (SSF) columns and in batch reactors. The results showed that both MIB and geosmin were biodegradable in the two systems. In batch experiments, the overall removals for MIB and geosmin were 50% and 78%, respectively, after 7 days of contact time. Volatilization loss plays an important role for geosmin in batch systems. Simulated SSF column studies also showed that more than 50% of geosmin and MIB were degraded by the microbial on the sand surface of a slow sand filter. With a filtration rate of 5 m/day, the simulated SSF degraded MIB from 48% to 69% and geosmin from 87% to 96%. The rapid biodegradation of MIB and geosmin in SSF column tests was attributed to the use of filter sands from the SSF unit in the Kinmen water treatment plant, where the microbial had been acclimated to both MIB and geosmin. The results also showed that more than 70% of the geosmin was removed in the top portion of the filter ( approximately 10 cm); while the removal of MIB occurred throughout the entire column depth. The results of this study demonstrated that slow flow through preacclimated sand was effective for control of MIB and geosmin in drinking water.

  2. Photorespiration in C4 grasses remains slow under drought conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo-Silva, Ana E; Powers, Stephen J; Keys, Alfred J; Arrabaça, Maria Celeste; Parry, Martin A J

    2008-07-01

    The CO(2)-concentrating mechanism present in C(4) plants decreases the oxygenase activity of ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) and, consequently, photorespiratory rates in air. Under drought conditions, the intercellular CO(2) concentration may decrease and cause photorespiration to increase. The C(4) grasses Paspalum dilatatum Poiret, Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. and Zoysia japonica Steudel were grown in soil and drought was imposed by ceasing to provide water. Net CO(2) assimilation (A) and stomatal conductance to water vapour decreased with leaf dehydration. Decreased carbon and increased oxygen isotope composition were also observed under drought. The response of A to CO(2) suggested that the compensation point was zero in all species irrespective of the extent of drought stress. A slight decrease of A as O(2) concentration increased above 10% provided evidence for slow photorespiratory gas exchanges. Analysis of amino acids contained in the leaves, particularly the decrease of glycine after 30 s in darkness, supported the presence of slow photorespiration rates, but these were slightly faster in Cynodon dactylon than in Paspalum dilatatum and Zoysia japonica. Although the contents of glycine and serine increased with dehydration and mechanistic modelling of C(4) photosynthesis suggested slightly increased photorespiration rates in proportion to photosynthesis, the results provide evidence that photorespiration remained slow under drought conditions.

  3. Multisteps Global Kinetic Analysis of MSW Slow Pyrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Aries Himawanto

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to find relationships between single components slow pyrolysis characteristics and mixed component slow pyrolysis characteristics of segregated municipal solid wastes (MSW. The material of this research consists of organic wastes (bamboo wastes and banana leaves wastes and inorganic wastes (styrofoam wastes and snack wrapping wastes. The materials which used to study were the unprosessing waste. The samples were collected, dried and crushed until passing 20 mesh shieves then characterized in self manufactured macro balance. The thermogravimetry analyses were done to find the MSW slow pyrolysis characteristics. The 20 gram sample was placed in the furnace whose temperature is increased with 10 0C/min heating rate until reached 400 0 final temperature and held for 30 minutes before the sample is cooled into room temperature. One hundred ml/min nitrogen introduced from the bottom of furnace as a swept gas. The results of the research show that the global kinetic method could be used to predict the MSW single component activation energy but it should be modified to calculate the mixed sample activation energy . The predictive activation energy values which calculated based on weighed sum of single component have 18.5 % deviations if compared with experimental result.

  4. Slowing down light using a dendritic cell cluster metasurface waveguide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Z. H.; Chen, H.; Yang, F. S.; Luo, C. R.; Zhao, X. P.

    2016-11-01

    Slowing down or even stopping light is the first task to realising optical information transmission and storage. Theoretical studies have revealed that metamaterials can slow down or even stop light; however, the difficulty of preparing metamaterials that operate in visible light hinders progress in the research of slowing or stopping light. Metasurfaces provide a new opportunity to make progress in such research. In this paper, we propose a dendritic cell cluster metasurface consisting of dendritic structures. The simulation results show that dendritic structure can realise abnormal reflection and refraction effects. Single- and double-layer dendritic metasurfaces that respond in visible light were prepared by electrochemical deposition. Abnormal Goos-Hänchen (GH) shifts were experimentally obtained. The rainbow trapping effect was observed in a waveguide constructed using the dendritic metasurface sample. The incident white light was separated into seven colours ranging from blue to red light. The measured transmission energy in the waveguide showed that the energy escaping from the waveguide was zero at the resonant frequency of the sample under a certain amount of incident light. The proposed metasurface has a simple preparation process, functions in visible light, and can be readily extended to the infrared band and communication wavelengths.

  5. Fast-slow climate dynamics and peak global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Ashwin K.

    2017-04-01

    The dynamics of a linear two-box energy balance climate model is analyzed as a fast-slow system, where the atmosphere, land, and near-surface ocean taken together respond within few years to external forcing whereas the deep-ocean responds much more slowly. Solutions to this system are approximated by estimating the system's time-constants using a first-order expansion of the system's eigenvalue problem in a perturbation parameter, which is the ratio of heat capacities of upper and lower boxes. The solution naturally admits an interpretation in terms of a fast response that depends approximately on radiative forcing and a slow response depending on integrals of radiative forcing with respect to time. The slow response is inversely proportional to the "damping-timescale", the timescale with which deep-ocean warming influences global warming. Applications of approximate solutions are discussed: conditions for a warming peak, effects of an individual pulse emission of carbon dioxide (CO2), and metrics for estimating and comparing contributions of different climate forcers to maximum global warming.

  6. The kinetics of slow-binding and slow, tight-binding inhibition: the effects of substrate depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waley, S G

    1993-08-15

    Inhibitors with dissociation constants in the micromolar to nanomolar range are important, but hard to characterize kinetically, especially when the substrate concentration in the assay is less than Km. When inhibition increases during the course of the assay (slow-binding inhibition) the concentration of substrate may decrease appreciably. Methods that take substrate depletion into account are described for analysing experiments in which the initial substrate concentration is below Km. Fitting progress curves gives the rate constants for the second (slow) step in a two-step mechanism. An approximate value for the overall dissociation constant may be determined from measurements of rates when the reaction is treated as a first-order process. When the concentrations of inhibitor and enzyme are comparable numerical methods are required. Procedures, suitable for implementation on a microcomputer, for the solution of the differential equations and the fitting of progress curves are described.

  7. Excitation of surface plasma waves over corrugated slow-wave structure

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ashim P Jain; Jetendra Parashar

    2005-08-01

    A microwave propagating along vacuum–dielectric–plasma interface excites surface plasma wave (SPW). A periodic slow-wave structure placed over dielectric slows down the SPW. The phase velocity of slow SPW is sensitive to height, periodicity, number of periods, thickness and the separation between dielectric and slow-wave structure. These slow SPW can couple the microwave energy to the plasma and can sustain the discharge. The efficiency of the power coupling is few per cent and is sensitive to separation between dielectric and slow-wave structure.

  8. Slow speech rate effects on stuttering preschoolers with disordered phonology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaSalle, Lisa R

    2015-05-01

    To study the effects of clinicians' slow rate on the speech of children who stutter with and without a concomitant phonological disorder, an A-B-A-B single case design was used with six clinician-child dyads, where B = Clinician's slow speech rate model. Two boys and one girl, aged 49-54 months, stuttering with disordered phonology (S + DP), were compared to three boys aged 42-50 months, stuttering with normal phonology (S + NP). Articulation rates were measured in phones per second (pps) in clinician-child adjacent utterance pairs. The S + NP dyads showed improved fluency in the B condition through a larger effect size, higher mean baseline stutter reductions and lower percentages of non-overlapping data than did the S + DP dyads. The S + DP girl showed relatively improved fluency in the B condition. S + DP children showed no articulation rate alignment (Range: 16% decrease to a 1.2% increase), whereas S + NP children averaged a 20% pps rate reduction (Range: 19.6-25.4% decrease), aligning with their clinicians who averaged a 38% pps rate reduction from baseline. The S + DP group spoke significantly (z = -4.63; p < 0.00) slower at baseline (Mdn = 6.9 pps; SE = 0.07 pps) than S + NP children in previously published samples (Mdn = 9.8 pps; SE = 0.22 pps). Results suggest that a slow rate model alone is not effective for facilitating fluency in S + DP boys with time since onset of about 2 years.

  9. The slowed brain: cortical oscillatory activity in hepatic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Markus; May, Elisabeth S; Häussinger, Dieter; Schnitzler, Alfons

    2013-08-15

    Oscillatory activity of the human brain has received growing interest as a key mechanism of large-scale integration across different brain regions. Besides a crucial role of oscillatory activity in the emergence of other neurological and psychiatric diseases, recent evidence indicates a key role in the pathophysiology of hepatic encephalopathy (HE). This review summarizes the current knowledge on pathological alterations of oscillatory brain activity in association with liver dysfunction and HE in the context of spontaneous brain activity, motor symptoms, sensory processing, and attention. The existing literature demonstrates a prominent slowing of the frequency of oscillatory activity as shown for spontaneous brain activity at rest, with respect to deficits of motor behavior and motor symptoms, and in the context of visual attention processes. The observed slowing extends across different subsystems of the brain and has been confirmed across different frequency bands, providing evidence for ubiquitous changes of oscillatory activity in HE. For example, the frequency of cortico-muscular coherence in HE patients appears at the frequency of the mini-asterixis (⩽12Hz), while cirrhotics without overt signs of HE show coherence similar to healthy subjects, i.e. at 13-30Hz. Interestingly, the so-called critical flicker frequency (CFF) as a measure of the processing of an oscillating visual stimulus has emerged as a useful tool to quantify HE disease severity, correlating with behavioral and neurophysiological alterations. Moreover, the CFF reliably distinguishes patients with manifest HE from cirrhotics without any signs of HE and healthy controls using a cut-off frequency of 39Hz. In conclusion, oscillatory activity is globally slowed in HE in close association with HE symptoms and disease severity. Although the underlying causal mechanisms are not yet understood, these results indicate that pathological changes of oscillatory activity play an important role in the

  10. Critical slowing down and error analysis in lattice QCD simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virotta, Francesco

    2012-02-21

    In this work we investigate the critical slowing down of lattice QCD simulations. We perform a preliminary study in the quenched approximation where we find that our estimate of the exponential auto-correlation time scales as {tau}{sub exp}(a){proportional_to}a{sup -5}, where a is the lattice spacing. In unquenched simulations with O(a) improved Wilson fermions we do not obtain a scaling law but find results compatible with the behavior that we find in the pure gauge theory. The discussion is supported by a large set of ensembles both in pure gauge and in the theory with two degenerate sea quarks. We have moreover investigated the effect of slow algorithmic modes in the error analysis of the expectation value of typical lattice QCD observables (hadronic matrix elements and masses). In the context of simulations affected by slow modes we propose and test a method to obtain reliable estimates of statistical errors. The method is supposed to help in the typical algorithmic setup of lattice QCD, namely when the total statistics collected is of O(10){tau}{sub exp}. This is the typical case when simulating close to the continuum limit where the computational costs for producing two independent data points can be extremely large. We finally discuss the scale setting in N{sub f}=2 simulations using the Kaon decay constant f{sub K} as physical input. The method is explained together with a thorough discussion of the error analysis employed. A description of the publicly available code used for the error analysis is included.

  11. DEVELOPMENT OF LEAD SLOWING DOWN SPECTROMETER FOR ISOTOPIC FISSILE ASSAY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANG JOON AHN

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS is under development for analysis of isotopic fissile material contents in pyro-processed material, or spent fuel. Many current commercial fissile assay technologies have a limitation in accurate and direct assay of fissile content. However, LSDS is very sensitive in distinguishing fissile fission signals from each isotope. A neutron spectrum analysis was conducted in the spectrometer and the energy resolution was investigated from 0.1eV to 100keV. The spectrum was well shaped in the slowing down energy. The resolution was enough to obtain each fissile from 0.2eV to 1keV. The detector existence in the lead will disturb the source neutron spectrum. It causes a change in resolution and peak amplitude. The intense source neutron production was designed for ∼E12 n's/sec to overcome spent fuel background. The detection sensitivity of U238 and Th232 fission chamber was investigated. The first and second layer detectors increase detection efficiency. Thorium also has a threshold property to detect the fast fission neutrons from fissile fission. However, the detection of Th232 is about 76% of that of U238. A linear detection model was set up over the slowing down neutron energy to obtain each fissile material content. The isotopic fissile assay using LSDS is applicable for the optimum design of spent fuel storage to maximize burnup credit and quality assurance of the recycled nuclear material for safety and economics. LSDS technology will contribute to the transparency and credibility of pyro-process using spent fuel, as internationally demanded.

  12. KINEMATIC CHANGES DURING A MARATHON FOR FAST AND SLOW RUNNERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maggie Chan-Roper

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to describe kinematic changes that occur during an actual marathon. We hypothesized that (1 certain running kinematic measures would change between kilometres 8 and 40 (miles 5 and 25 of a marathon and (2 fast runners would demonstrate smaller changes than slow runners. Subjects (n = 179 were selected according to finish time (Range = 2:20:47 to 5:30:10. Two high-speed cameras were used to measure sagittal-plane kinematics at kilometres 8 and 40 of the marathon. The dependent variables were stride length, contact time, peak knee flexion during support and swing, and peak hip flexion and extension during swing. Two-tailed paired t-tests were used to compare dependent variables between kilometres 8 and 40 for all subjects, and regression analyses were used to determine whether faster runners exhibited smaller changes (between miles 5 and 25 than slower runners. For all runners, every dependent variable changed significantly between kilometres 8 and 40 (p < 0.001. Stride length increased 1.3%, contact time increased 13.1%, peak knee flexion during support decreased 3.2%, and peak hip extension, knee flexion, and hip flexion during swing decreased 27.9%, increased 4.3%, and increased 7.4%, respectively (p < 0.001. Among these significant changes, all runners generally changed the same from kilometres 8 and 40 except that fast runners decreased peak knee flexion during support less than the slow runners (p < 0.002. We believe that these changes, for all runners (fast and slow, were due to fatigue. The fact that fast runners maintained knee flexion during support more consistently might be due to their condition on the race day. Strengthening of knee extensor muscles may facilitate increased knee flexion during support throughout a marathon

  13. Cyclosporin A preferentially attenuates skeletal slow-twitch muscle regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyabara E.H.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase, is associated with muscle regeneration via NFATc1/GATA2-dependent pathways. However, it is not clear whether calcineurin preferentially affects the regeneration of slow- or fast-twitch muscles. We investigated the effect of a calcineurin inhibitor, cyclosporin A (CsA, on the morphology and fiber diameter of regenerating slow- and fast-twitch muscles. Adult Wistar rats (259.5 ± 9 g maintained under standard conditions were treated with CsA (20 mg/kg body weight, ip for 5 days, submitted to cryolesion of soleus and tibialis anterior (TA muscles on the 6th day, and then treated with CsA for an additional 21 days. The muscles were removed, weighed, frozen, and stored in liquid nitrogen. Cryolesion did not alter the body weight gain of the animals after 21 days of regeneration (P = 0.001 and CsA significantly reduced the body weight gain (15.5%; P = 0.01 during the same period. All treated TA and soleus muscles showed decreased weights (17 and 29%, respectively, P < 0.05. CsA treatment decreased the cross-sectional area of both soleus and TA muscles of cryoinjured animals (TA: 2108 ± 930 vs 792 ± 640 µm²; soleus: 2209 ± 322 vs 764 ± 439 m²; P < 0.001. Histological sections of both muscles stained with Toluidine blue revealed similar regenerative responses after cryolesion. In addition, CsA was able to minimize these responses, i.e., centralized nuclei and split fibers, more efficiently so in TA muscle. These results indicate that calcineurin preferentially plays a role in regeneration of slow-twitch muscle.

  14. Serum visfatin and omentin levels in slow coronary flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucgun, Taner; Başar, Cengiz; Memişoğulları, Ramazan; Demirin, Hilmi; Türker, Yasin; Aslantaş, Yusuf

    2014-12-01

    The adipocytokines visfatin and omentin have a direct effect on inflammation and endothelial injury. The expression of visfatin is closely associated with the expression of proinflammatory cytokines. Omentin has an anti-inflammatory effect and is inversely associated with coronary artery disease (CAD). The slow coronary flow phenomenon is an angiographic finding characterized by delayed distal vessel opacification in the absence of significant epicardial coronary disease. The pathophysiology of SCF has not been clearly identified, although multiple abnormalities including endothelial dysfunction, atherothrombosis and inflammation have been reported. However, the relationship between visfatin, omentin and SCF is still unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship of these adipocytokines with SCF. The study included slow coronary flow (n=45) and normal coronary flow (n=55) subjects, according to the corrected TIMI frame count, who underwent angiography in the catheterization laboratory of Duzce University. Statistical analyses were performed with SPSS version 12. Visfatin levels were significantly higher in patients with SCF than in controls (p<0.001). Plasma omentin levels were lower in the SCF group than in controls, although without statistical significance. Visfatin, gender and platelet count were significant predictors of SCF in multivariate logistic regression analysis (OR 0.748, 95% CI 0.632-0.886, p=0.01; OR 30.016, 95% CI 4.355-206.8, p=0.01; OR1.028, 95% CI 1.006-1.050, p=0.011, respectively). Adipocytokines such as visfatin and omentin may play a role in the pathogenesis of coronary slow flow. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. GLUT4 is reduced in slow muscle fibers of type 2 diabetic patients: is insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes a slow, type 1 fiber disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, M; Staehr, P; Beck-Nielsen, H

    2001-01-01

    To gain further insight into the mechanisms underlying muscle insulin resistance, the influence of obesity and type 2 diabetes on GLUT4 immunoreactivity in slow and fast skeletal muscle fibers was studied. Through a newly developed, very sensitive method using immunohistochemistry combined...... with morphometry, GLUT4 density was found to be significantly higher in slow compared with fast fibers in biopsy specimens from lean and obese subjects. In contrast, in type 2 diabetic subjects, GLUT4 density was significantly lower in slow compared with fast fibers. GLUT4 density in slow fibers from diabetic...... patients was reduced by 9% compared with the weight-matched obese subjects and by 18% compared with the lean control group. The slow-fiber fraction was reduced to 86% in the obese subjects and to 75% in the diabetic subjects compared with the control group. Estimated GLUT4 contribution from slow fibers...

  16. [A very slow growing ankle swelling in a healthy male].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Christoph; Merlo, Pierina; Holzinger, Fernando; Pranghofer, Sigrid; Pfeiffer, David; Nüesch, Reto

    2014-08-20

    We describe the case report of a 66-year-old man with a very slow growing ankle tumour caused by a subcutaneous fungal abscess. Phaeoacremonium inflatipes, a member of the Dematiaceae family, was identified by needle puncture and culture of the non-odorous creamy yellow brown fluid. The fungal pseudocyst was surgically removed in toto and no further fungicidal drug therapy was required. Human infections by dematiaceous fungi causes subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis, a rare, deep fungal infection of the skin and subcutaneous tissues usually acquired through traumatic skin lesions. In addition, systemic infections are reported, predominantly in immunosuppressed individuals.

  17. All-optical slow-light on a photonic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawachi, Yoshitomo; Foster, Mark; Sharping, Jay; Gaeta, Alexander; Xu, Qianfan; Lipson, Michal

    2006-03-20

    We demonstrate optically tunable delays in a silicon-on-insulator planar waveguide based on slow light induced by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). Inside an 8-mm-long nanoscale waveguide, we produce a group-index change of 0.15 and generate controllable delays as large as 4 ps for signal pulses as short as 3 ps. The scheme can be implemented at bandwidths exceeding 100 GHz for wavelengths spanning the entire low-loss fiber-optics communications window and thus represents an important step in the development of chip-scale photonics devices that process light with light.

  18. Rapamycin extends life- and health span because it slows aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagosklonny, Mikhail V

    2013-08-01

    Making headlines, a thought-provocative paper by Neff, Ehninger and coworkers claims that rapamycin extends life span but has limited effects on aging. How is that possibly possible? And what is aging if not an increase of the probability of death with age. I discuss that the JCI paper actually shows that rapamycin slows aging and also extends lifespan regardless of its direct anti-cancer activities. Aging is, in part, MTOR-driven: a purposeless continuation of developmental growth. Rapamycin affects the same processes in young and old animals: young animals' traits and phenotypes, which continuations become hyperfunctional, harmful and lethal later in life.

  19. Slowing Down Surface Plasmons on a Moiré Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Askin; Senlik, S. Seckin; Aydinli, Atilla

    2009-02-01

    We have demonstrated slow propagation of surface plasmons on metallic Moiré surfaces. The phase shift at the node of the Moiré surface localizes the propagating surface plasmons and adjacent nodes form weakly coupled plasmonic cavities. Group velocities around vg=0.44c at the center of the coupled cavity band and almost a zero group velocity at the band edges are observed. A tight binding model is used to understand the coupling behavior. Furthermore, the sinusoidally modified amplitude about the node suppresses the radiation losses and reveals a relatively high quality factor (Q=103).

  20. Topology and slowing down of high energy ion orbits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, L.G. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Porcelli, F. [Politecnico di Torino, Turin (Italy); Berk, H.L. [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1994-07-01

    An analysis of nonstandard guiding centre orbits is presented, which is relevant to MeV ions in a Tokamak. The orbit equation has been simplified from the start, allowing to present an analytic classification of the possible orbits. The topological transitions of the orbits during collisional slowing down are described. In particular, the characteristic equations reveal the existence of a single fixed point in the relevant phase plane, and the presence of a bifurcation curve corresponding to the locus of the pinch orbits. A significant particle inward pinch has been discovered. (authors). 7 figs.

  1. Control of on-off intermittency by slow parametric modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reategui, Rider Jaimes; Pisarchik, Alexander N

    2004-06-01

    We study on-off intermittent behavior in two coupled double-well Duffing oscillators with stochastic driving and demonstrate that, by using slow harmonic modulation applied to an accessible system parameter, the intermittent attractors can be completely eliminated. The influence of noise is also investigated. Power-law scaling of the average laminar time with a critical exponent of -1 as a function of both the amplitude and frequency of the control modulation is found near the onset of intermittency, which is a signature of on-off intermittency.

  2. Using Updated Climate Accounting to Slow Global Warming Before 2035

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, T.

    2015-12-01

    The current and projected worsening of climate impacts make clear the urgency of limiting the global mean temperature to 2°C over preindustrial levels. But while mitigation policy today may slow global warming at the end of the century, it will not keep global warming within these limits. This failure arises in large part from the climate accounting system used to inform this policy, which does not factor in several scientific findings from the last two decades, including: The urgent need to slow global warming before 2035. This can postpone the time the +1.5°C limit is passed, and is the only way to avoid the most serious long-term climate disruptions. That while it may mitigate warming by the end of the century, reducing emissions of CO2 alone, according to UNEP/WMO[1], will do "little to mitigate warming over the next 20-30 years," and "may temporarily enhance near-term warming as sulfate [cooling] is reduced." That the only emissions reductions that can slow warming before 2035 are focused on short-lived climate pollutants. A small increase in current mitigation funding could fund these projects, the most promising of which target emissions in regional climate "hot spots" like the Arctic and India.[2] To ensure policies can effectively slow global warming before 2035, a new climate accounting system is needed. Such an updated system is being standardized in the USA,[3] and has been proposed for use in ISO standards. The key features of this updated system are: consideration of all climate pollutants and their multi-faceted climate effects; use of time horizons which prioritize mitigation of near-term warming; a consistent and accurate accounting for "biogenic" CO2; protocols ensuring that new scientific findings are incorporated; and a distinct accounting for emissions affecting regional "hot spots". This accounting system also considers environmental impacts outside of climate change, a feature necessary to identify "win-win" projects with climate benefits

  3. Decoherence in Field Theory General Couplings and Slow Quenches

    CERN Document Server

    Lombardo, F C; Rivers, R J

    2003-01-01

    We study the onset of a classical order parameter after a second-order phase transition in quantum field theory. We consider a quantum scalar field theory in which the system-field (long-wavelength modes), interacts with its environment, represented both by a set of scalar fields and by its own short-wavelength modes. We compute the decoherence times for the system-field modes and compare them with the other time scales of the model. We analyze different couplings between the system and the environment for both instantaneous and slow quenches. Within our approximations decoherence is in general a short time event.

  4. Slow DNA transport through nanopores in hafnium oxide membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkin, Joseph; Henley, Robert; Bell, David C; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Wanunu, Meni

    2013-11-26

    We present a study of double- and single-stranded DNA transport through nanopores fabricated in ultrathin (2-7 nm thick) freestanding hafnium oxide (HfO2) membranes. The high chemical stability of ultrathin HfO2 enables long-lived experiments with 50 000 DNA translocations with no detectable pore expansion. Mean DNA velocities are slower than velocities through comparable silicon nitride pores, providing evidence that HfO2 nanopores have favorable physicochemical interactions with nucleic acids that can be leveraged to slow down DNA in a nanopore.

  5. Low oxygen levels slow embryonic development of Limulus polyphemus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Funch, Peter; Wang, Tobias; Pertoldi, Cino

    2016-01-01

    The American horseshoe crab Limulus polyphemus typically spawns in the upper intertidal zone, where the developing embryos are exposed to large variations in abiotic factors such as temperature, humidity, salinity, and oxygen, which affect the rate of development. It has been shown that embryonic...... development is slowed at both high and low salinities and temperatures, and that late embryos close to hatching tolerate periodic hypoxia. In this study we investigated the influence of hypoxia on both early and late embryonic development in L. polyphemus under controlled laboratory conditions. Embryos were...... pronounced hypoxia in later embryonic developmental stages, but also in earlier, previously unexplored, developmental stages....

  6. Proactive restoration of slow-failures in optical networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siracusa, Domenico; Pederzolli, Federico; Salvadori, Elio;

    2014-01-01

    , which leads to traffic losses while such operation completes. In this paper we propose a technique, applicable to optical networks with centralized control, to better handle failures with slow transients. The idea is to proactively perform the backup lightpath's setup, triggered by either a fixed......Current optical networks, while offering outstanding reliability, still suffer from occasional failures. A resource-efficient procedure to handle these failures in un-protected scenarios is to perform restoration, i.e., to dynamically setup a backup lightpath after the primary one stops working...

  7. Improving the Material Response for Slow Heat of Energetic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, A L

    2010-03-08

    The goal of modern high explosive slow heat cookoff modeling is to understand the level of mechanical violence. This requires understanding the coupled thermal-mechanical-chemical system that such an environment creates. Recent advances have improved our ability to predict the time to event, and we have been making progress on predicting the mechanical response. By adding surface tension to the product gas pores in the high explosive, we have been able to reduce the current model's tendency to overpressurize confinement vessels. We describe the model and demonstrate how it affects a LX-10 STEX experiment. Issues associated with current product gas equations of state are described and examined.

  8. Slowing the Next Pandemic: Survey of Community Mitigation Strategies

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-04-15

    During the next influenza pandemic, it will take time to develop a vaccine and there may be limited medication to treat or prevent illness. To slow the spread of disease, CDC and other public health officials will likely ask Americans to decrease contact with others through altering work schedules, school dismissals and other measures. Researchers recently surveyed the public to see whether people could follow those recommendations and what kind of impact they might have.  Created: 4/15/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 4/29/2008.

  9. Barnidipine, a long-acting slow onset calcium antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korstanje, C

    2000-11-01

    Barnidipine is a stereochemically pure dihydropyridine calcium antagonist with a high potency. The drug showed a slow onset and long-lasting vasorelaxating effect in vitro, and strong antihypertensive activity in hypertension models. Barnidipine was shown to have a high vasoselectivity and offered protection in cardiac and renal ischaemia models. The in vitro drug:drug interaction profile suggests a low potential for clinically relevant interactions with concomitant medication. It can be anticipated that barnidipine is an attractive calcium antagonist, offering good blood pressure control without compensatory baroreflex activity.

  10. MODELLING SLOW EXTRACTION INDUCED RADIOACTIVITY IN SPS LSS2

    CERN Document Server

    Araujo Martinez, Aurora Cecilia; CERN. Geneva. TE Department

    2017-01-01

    The Accelerator and Beam Transfer (ABT) group is investigating the impact of recent proposals to extract higher proton intensities to Fixed Target experiments at the SPS. The 400 GeV high-energy proton beam is typically extracted over a few seconds using a resonant slow-extraction technique that induces small but unavoidable beam losses on the extraction equipment in SPS LSS2. In this report, the induced radioactivity for 2016-2017 is used to predict future activation levels and cool-down times, using a past intervention as a reference to predict dose to the personnel carrying-out maintenance of the accelerator.

  11. A gravity dual of ultra-slow roll inflation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Anguelova

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We study time-dependent deformations of a certain class of backgrounds in type IIB supergravity. These backgrounds are solutions of a five-dimensional consistent truncation, relevant for gauge/gravity duality, which have the form of dS4 foliations over a fifth (radial direction. We investigate time-dependent deformations of those solutions in the search for gravitational duals of models of glueball inflation. A particular starting ansatz enables us to find a class of analytical solutions, corresponding to an ultra-slow roll inflationary regime. This regime may play a role in understanding the low l anomaly in the power spectrum of the CMB.

  12. A gravity dual of ultra-slow roll inflation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguelova, Lilia

    2016-10-01

    We study time-dependent deformations of a certain class of backgrounds in type IIB supergravity. These backgrounds are solutions of a five-dimensional consistent truncation, relevant for gauge/gravity duality, which have the form of dS4 foliations over a fifth (radial) direction. We investigate time-dependent deformations of those solutions in the search for gravitational duals of models of glueball inflation. A particular starting ansatz enables us to find a class of analytical solutions, corresponding to an ultra-slow roll inflationary regime. This regime may play a role in understanding the low l anomaly in the power spectrum of the CMB.

  13. Acoustic transparency and slow sound using detuned acoustic resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santillan, Arturo Orozco; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that the phenomenon of acoustic transparency and slowsound propagation can be realized with detuned acoustic resonators (DAR), mimicking thereby the effect of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in atomic physics. Sound propagation in a pipe with a series of side......-attached DAR, with adjacent DAR units spaced by a distance much smaller than the wavelength, is analyzed. We show that such a chain of DAR units forms an analog of one-dimensional (1D) metamaterial with unique properties of dispersion and transmission, revealing the possibility of slowing sound (at 2 kHz) down...

  14. Loan Growth Slowing down in 1st 7 Months

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ The growth of loans significantly slowed during the first seven months of this year, which indicates the government's economic macro control measures are taking effect, the People's Bank of China (PBOC) said. By the end of July, outstanding loans of all financial institutions stood at RMB18.1 trillion (US$2.18 trillion),up 15.9% on a year-on-year basis. The growth rate compared to 23.2% registered during the same period in 2003,the central bank said.

  15. Dispersion Characteristics of a New Slow-Wave Structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Jian-Qiang

    2004-01-01

    @@ The microwave excitation in a new slow-wave structure, i.e. the plasma-filled coaxial cylindrical dielectric-loaded cylindrical waveguide, is investigated by using the self-consistent linear field theory in considering the collision effect between electrons and ions in the plasma via the collision frequency term. The determinant dispersion equation of the beam-wave interaction with a complex value of angular frequency is derived. The effects of plasma collision frequency on the output frequency and the wave growth rate of the beam-wave interaction are calculated and discussed.

  16. Tropical birds have a slow pace of life

    OpenAIRE

    Wiersma, Popko; Muñoz-Garcia, Agustí; Walker, Amy; Williams, Joseph B.

    2007-01-01

    Tropical birds are relatively long-lived and produce few offspring, which develop slowly and mature relatively late in life, the slow end of the life-history axis, whereas temperate birds lie at the opposite end of this continuum. We tested the hypothesis that tropical birds have evolved a reduced basal metabolic rate (BMR). We measured BMR of 69 species of tropical birds, the largest data set amassed on metabolic rates of tropical birds, and compared these measurements with 59 estimates of B...

  17. Invariant slow-roll parameters in scalar-tensor theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuusk, Piret; Rünkla, Mihkel; Saal, Margus; Vilson, Ott

    2016-10-01

    A general scalar-tensor theory can be formulated in different parametrizations that are related by a conformal rescaling of the metric and a scalar field redefinition. We compare formulations of slow-roll regimes in the Einstein and Jordan frames using quantities that are invariant under the conformal rescaling of the metric and transform as scalar functions under the reparametrization of the scalar field. By comparing spectral indices, calculated up to second order, we find that the frames are equivalent up to this order, due to the underlying assumptions.

  18. Spatial Switching of Slow Light in Periodic Photonic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhorukov, Andrey A.

    The speed of light sets the maximum possible rate for transmission of information, in excess of 108 meters per second. Light pulses in optical fibers carry bits of data around the world in sub-second time frame, enabling interactive global communications. There is a constant demand for increasing the network performance in view of steadily growing information flows. It is envisioned that the presently required multiple conversions between optical pulses and electronic signals at network hubs may be eliminated in future when routing and switching of data flows is performed all-optically. This vision can be realized if the speed of light is dynamically controlled, allowing for synchronization and multiplexing of signals. Furthermore, by temporarily making the light slower it becomes possible to compress optical signals and perform their manipulation in compact photonic chips. Additionally, in the regime of slow light the photon-matter interactions are dramatically enhanced, enabling the active control of light and nonlinear transformations of signals. Slowing down the light is a challenging physical problem. In conventional dielectrics, the speed of light can only be reduced by a factor less than four which is limited by the optical refractive index of available materials. The most dramatic slowing down of light to a complete stop was reported in the regime of electromagnetically induced transparency [1]. This phenomenon is based on a resonant interaction of light with an atomic system and accordingly the speed of light is very sensitive to the frequency detuning. This restricts the effect to narrow frequency ranges limiting its applicability to communication networks with demands for data rates in excess of 100Gb per second. In contrast, dielectric photonic structures with a periodic modulation of the optical refractive index at a sub-micrometer scale can be engineered to operate at any frequency range. Periodic modulation results in resonant light scattering, and

  19. Slow fluctuations in recurrent networks of spiking neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Stefan; Bernardi, Davide; Schwalger, Tilo; Lindner, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    Networks of fast nonlinear elements may display slow fluctuations if interactions are strong. We find a transition in the long-term variability of a sparse recurrent network of perfect integrate-and-fire neurons at which the Fano factor switches from zero to infinity and the correlation time is minimized. This corresponds to a bifurcation in a linear map arising from the self-consistency of temporal input and output statistics. More realistic neural dynamics with a leak current and refractory period lead to smoothed transitions and modified critical couplings that can be theoretically predicted.

  20. [Italy's Slow Medicine: a new paradigm in medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldi, Antonio; Vernero, Sandra

    2015-02-01

    Italy's Slow Medicine was founded in 2011 as a movement aimed to promote processes of care based on appropriateness, but within a relation of listening, dialogue and decision sharing with the patient. The mission of Slow Medicine is synthetized by three key words: measured, because it acts with moderation, gradually and without waste; respectful, because it is careful in preserving the dignity and values of each person; and equitable, because it is committed to ensuring access to appropriate care for all. In a short time, the association spreads at national and international level, gathering the needs of change of a growing number of health professionals, patients and citizens, committed to manage health problems with a new cultural and methodological paradigm. Medicine is soaked with inappropriateness, wastes, conflicts of interest, and many clichés induce professionals and patients to consume more and more healthcare services in the illusion that it is always better doing more for improving health. Moreover, the dominant reductionist cultural model, on which the concept of health and disease is based today, considers man as a machine, investigated by a growing number of specialists, particularly interested in the pathophysiological mechanisms of diseases. The interest is mainly focused on technologies, while the person along with the relations with his/her family and the social environment are completely neglected. The systemic approach adopted by Slow Medicine, on the contrary, teaches us that health and disease are complex phenomena and the life of a person is more than the sum of the chemical reactions that occur in its cells. At different levels of complexity, in fact, new and unexpected properties appear, such as thinking, emotions, pleasure, health. These properties are not detectable in the individual elements and can only be studied using methods of analysis and knowledge belonging to other domains of knowledge, such as humanity sciences: philosophy

  1. Extending Magnetohydrodynamics to the Slow Dynamics of Collisionless Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L.; Hunana, P.

    2012-01-01

    A fluid approach aimed to provide a consistent description of the slow dynamics of a collisionless plasma, is presented. In this regime, both Landau damping and finite Larmor radius effects cannot be ignored. Two models are discussed; one retains the dynamics at sub-ionic scales, while the other is restricted to scales larger than the ion gyroscale. Special attention is paid to the capability of these approaches to accurately reproduce the properties of linear waves that are known to play an important role, for example, in the small-scale dynamics of solar wind turbulence.

  2. Invariant slow-roll parameters in scalar-tensor theories

    CERN Document Server

    Kuusk, Piret; Saal, Margus; Vilson, Ott

    2016-01-01

    A general scalar-tensor theory can be formulated in different parametrizations that are related by a conformal rescaling of the metric and a scalar field redefinition. We compare formulations of slow-roll regimes in the Einstein and Jordan frames using quantities that are invariant under the conformal rescaling of the metric and transform as scalar functions under the reparametrization of the scalar field. By comparing spectral indices, calculated up to second order, we find that the frames are equivalent up to this order, due to the underlying assumptions.

  3. Slow transit constipation: A functional disorder becomes an enteric neuropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gabrio Bassotti; Vincenzo Villanacci

    2006-01-01

    Slow transit constipation has been traditionally considered and classified as a functional disorder.However, clinical and manometric evidence has been accumulating that suggests how most of the motility alterations in STC might be considered of neuropathic type. In addition, further investigations showed that subtle alterations of the enteric nervous system, not evident to conventional histological examination, may be present in these patients. In the present article we will discuss these evidences, and will try to put them in relation with the abnormal motor function of the large bowel documented in this pathological condition.

  4. Therapeutic effect of nicorandil on coronary slow flow intervention and endothelial function in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王涛

    2013-01-01

    Objective To observe the effects of nicorandil on coronary slow flow phenomenon (CSFP) and endothelial function in elderly patients.Methods Totally 76 elderly patients diagnosed angiographically as coronary slow flow phenomenon were enrolled.All patients were randomly

  5. Enhancing the light-matter interaction using slow light: towards the concept of dense light

    OpenAIRE

    Thévenaz, Luc; Dicaire, Isabelle; Chin, Sang Hoon

    2012-01-01

    A couple of experiments are here presented to clarify the impact of slow light on light-matter interaction. The experiments are designed, so that the process generating slow light and the probed light-matter interaction only present a marginal cross-effect. The impact of slow light on simple molecular absorption could be separately evaluated under either material or structural slow light propagation in the same medium and led to an entirely different response.

  6. Slow component of VO2 kinetics: Mechanistic bases and practical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Andrew M; Grassi, Bruno; Christensen, Peter Møller

    2011-01-01

    state of knowledge concerning the mechanistic bases of the V¿O2 slow component and describes practical interventions which can attenuate the slow componentand thus enhance exercise tolerance. There is strong evidence that, during CWR exercise, the development of the V¿O2 slow component is associated...

  7. On the scalar consistency relation away from slow roll

    CERN Document Server

    Sreenath, V; Sriramkumar, L

    2014-01-01

    As is well known, the non-Gaussianity parameter $f_{_{\\rm NL}}$, which is often used to characterize the amplitude of the scalar bi-spectrum, can be expressed completely in terms of the scalar spectral index $n_{\\rm s}$ in the squeezed limit, a relation that is referred to as the consistency condition. This relation, while it is largely discussed in the context of slow roll inflation, is actually expected to hold in any single field model of inflation, irrespective of the dynamics of the underlying model. In this work, we explicitly examine the validity of the consistency relation, analytically as well as numerically, away from slow roll. Analytically, we first arrive at the relation in the simple case of power law inflation. We also consider the non-trivial example of the Starobinsky model involving a linear potential with a sudden change in its slope (which leads to a brief period of fast roll), and establish the condition completely analytically. We then numerically examine the validity of the consistency ...

  8. Slow epidemic extinction in populations with heterogeneous infection rates

    CERN Document Server

    Buono, C; Macri, P A; Braunstein, L A

    2013-01-01

    We explore how heterogeneity in the intensity of interactions between people affects epidemic spreading. For that, we study the susceptible-infected-susceptible model on a complex network, where a link connecting individuals $i$ and $j$ is endowed with an infection rate $\\beta_{ij} = \\lambda w_{ij}$ proportional to the intensity of their contact $w_{ij}$, with a distribution $P(w_{ij})$ taken from face-to-face experiments analyzed in Cattuto $et\\;al.$ (PLoS ONE 5, e11596, 2010). We find an extremely slow decay of the fraction of infected individuals, for a wide range of the control parameter $\\lambda$. Using a distribution of width $a$ we identify two large regions in the $a-\\lambda$ space with anomalous behaviors, which are reminiscent of rare region effects (Griffiths phases) found in models with quenched disorder. We show that the slow approach to extinction is caused by isolated small groups of highly interacting individuals, which keep epidemic alive for very long times. A mean-field approximation and a ...

  9. Coupling between whistler waves and slow-mode solitary waves

    CERN Document Server

    Tenerani, Anna; Pegoraro, Francesco; Contel, Olivier Le

    2012-01-01

    The interplay between electron-scale and ion-scale phenomena is of general interest for both laboratory and space plasma physics. In this paper we investigate the linear coupling between whistler waves and slow magnetosonic solitons through two-fluid numerical simulations. Whistler waves can be trapped in the presence of inhomogeneous external fields such as a density hump or hole where they can propagate for times much longer than their characteristic time scale, as shown by laboratory experiments and space measurements. Space measurements have detected whistler waves also in correspondence to magnetic holes, i.e., to density humps with magnetic field minima extending on ion-scales. This raises the interesting question of how ion-scale structures can couple to whistler waves. Slow magnetosonic solitons share some of the main features of a magnetic hole. Using the ducting properties of an inhomogeneous plasma as a guide, we present a numerical study of whistler waves that are trapped and transported inside pr...

  10. Landau-Zener transition driven by slow noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhu-Xi; Raikh, M. E.

    2017-02-01

    The effect of a slow noise in nondiagonal matrix element J (t ) that describes the diabatic level coupling on the probability of the Landau-Zener transition is studied. For slow noise, the correlation time τc of J (t ) is much longer than the characteristic time of the transition. Existing theory for this case suggests that the average transition probability is the result of averaging of the conventional Landau-Zener probability, calculated for a given constant J , over the distribution of J . We calculate a finite-τc correction for this classical result. Our main finding is that this correction is dominated by sparse realizations of noise for which J (t ) passes through zero within a narrow time interval near the level crossing. Two models of noise, random telegraph noise and Gaussian noise, are considered. Naturally, in both models the average probability of transition decreases upon decreasing τc. For Gaussian noise we identify two domains of this falloff with specific dependencies of average transition probability on τc.

  11. Modeling place field activity with hierarchical slow feature analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian eSchoenfeld

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present six experimental studies from the literature on hippocampal place cells and replicate their main results in a computational framework based on the principle of slowness. Each of the chosen studies first allows rodents to develop stable place field activity and then examines a distinct property of the established spatial encoding, namely adaptation to cue relocation and removal; directional firing activity in the linear track and open field; and results of morphing and stretching the overall environment. To replicate these studies we employ a hierarchical Slow Feature Analysis (SFA network. SFA is an unsupervised learning algorithm extracting slowly varying information from a given stream of data, and hierarchical application of SFA allows for high dimensional input such as visual images to be processed efficiently and in a biologically plausible fashion. Training data for the network is produced in ratlab, a free basic graphics engine designed to quickly set up a wide range of 3D environments mimicking real life experimental studies, simulate a foraging rodent while recording its visual input, and training & sampling a hierarchical SFA network.

  12. Slow-Equilibration Approximation in Kinetic Size Exclusion Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherney, Leonid T; Krylov, Sergey N

    2016-04-05

    Kinetic size exclusion chromatography with mass spectrometry detection (KSEC-MS) is a solution-based label-free approach for studying kinetics of reversible binding of a small molecule to a protein. Extraction of kinetic data from KSEC-MS chromatograms is greatly complicated by the lack of separation between the protein and protein-small molecule complex. As a result, a sophisticated time-consuming numerical approach was used for the determination of rate constants in the proof-of-principle works on KSEC-MS. Here, we suggest the first non-numerical (analytical) approach for finding rate constants of protein-small molecule interaction from KSEC-MS data. The approach is based on the slow-equilibration approximation, which is applicable to KSEC-MS chromatograms that reveal two peaks. The analysis of errors shows that the slow-equilibration approximation guarantees that the errors in the rate constants are below 20% if the ratio between the characteristic separation and equilibration times does not exceed 0.1. The latter condition can typically be satisfied for specific interactions such as receptor-ligand or protein-drug. The suggested analytical solution equips analytical scientists with a simple and fast tool for processing KSEC-MS data. Moreover, a similar approach can be potentially developed for kinetic analysis of protein-small molecule binding by other kinetic-separation methods such as nonequilibrium capillary electrophoresis of equilibrium mixtures (NECEEM).

  13. Slow Control System for the NIFFTE Collaboration TPC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringle, Erik; Niffte Collaboration Collaboration

    2011-10-01

    As world energy concerns continue to dominate public policy in the 21st century, the need for cleaner and more efficient nuclear power is necessary. In order to effectively design and implement plans for generation IV nuclear reactors, more accurate fission cross-section measurements are necessary. The Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) collaboration, in an effort to meet this need, has constructed a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) which aims to reduce the uncertainty of the fission cross-section to less than 1%. Using the Maximum Integration Data Acquisition System (MIDAS) framework, slow control measurements are integrated into a single interface to facilitate off-site monitoring. The Hart Scientific 1560 Black Stack will be used with two 2564 Thermistor Scanner Modules to monitor internal temperature of the TPC. A Prologix GPIB to Ethernet controller will be used to interface the hardware with MIDAS. This presentation will detail the design and implementation of the slow control system for the TPC. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Division of Energy Research.

  14. On the geometry of an atmospheric slow manifold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camassa, Roberto

    We examine the hyperbolic structure and the invariant manifolds of a model proposed by Lorenz to introduce the concept of an atmospheric slow manifold within the framework of dynamical system theory. We address the question of the long time asymptotic behaviour of the system using the (global) geometric point of view. It is shown that the model can be reduced to the classical example of a pendulum coupled to a harmonic oscillator. The dynamical regimes of interest for the slow manifold hypothesis correspond to regions of phase space near the saddle-center fixed point of this model which were not previously explored. These phase space regions are analysed using a combination of Melnikov-type methods and ideas from singular perturbation theory. By using the reversible symmetries of the model, an extension of the Melnikov theory is derived. This extension allows us to find homoclinic orbits and determine their approximation by simply computing the zeros of a certain function, which is constructed in terms of the usual Melnikov function. Countable infinities of global homoclinic bifurcations and existence of chaotic dynamics can be shown to exist by using the new tool.

  15. GEANT4 simulation of slow positron beam implantation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dryzek, Jerzy; Horodek, Paweł

    2008-09-01

    The paper presents the positron implantation profiles, which are important for proper interpretation of data produced in slow-positron depth defect spectroscopy (VEPAS). In the paper, we compared the profiles reported in other publications and those obtained using the GEANT4 codes, which are used for the simulation of interaction of energetic particles with matter. The comparison shows that the GEANT4 codes produce profiles which match fairly well with those generated by other codes, which take into account more accurately processes at low energies when positrons interact with core electrons, valence electrons, plasmons etc. The profiles in different materials simulated for different implant energies were parameterized using two analytical formulas: the Makhovian profile and the profile proposed by Ghosh et al. [V.J. Ghosh, D.O. Welch, K.G. Lynn, in: E. Ottewite, A.H. WeissSlow (Eds.), Positron Beam Techniques for Solids and Surfaces, Jackson Hole, Wyoming, AIP Conference Proceedings, Vol. 303, New York, 1994, p. 37]. The adjustable parameters obtained are presented in Tables 1 and 2. The total backscattering probability obtained from the GEANT4 simulations is in agreement with experimental data reported.

  16. Multifork chromosome replication in slow-growing bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojanowski, Damian; Hołówka, Joanna; Ginda, Katarzyna; Jakimowicz, Dagmara; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2017-01-01

    The growth rates of bacteria must be coordinated with major cell cycle events, including chromosome replication. When the doubling time (Td) is shorter than the duration of chromosome replication (C period), a new round of replication begins before the previous round terminates. Thus, newborn cells inherit partially duplicated chromosomes. This phenomenon, which is termed multifork replication, occurs among fast-growing bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. In contrast, it was historically believed that slow-growing bacteria (including mycobacteria) do not reinitiate chromosome replication until the previous round has been completed. Here, we use single-cell time-lapse analyses to reveal that mycobacterial cell populations exhibit heterogeneity in their DNA replication dynamics. In addition to cells with non-overlapping replication rounds, we observed cells in which the next replication round was initiated before completion of the previous replication round. We speculate that this heterogeneity may reflect a relaxation of cell cycle checkpoints, possibly increasing the ability of slow-growing mycobacteria to adapt to environmental conditions. PMID:28262767

  17. Slow light in fiber Bragg gratings and its applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skolianos, George; Arora, Arushi; Bernier, Martin; Digonnet, Michel

    2016-11-01

    Slow-light fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) belong to a class of gratings designed to exhibit one or more narrow resonances in their reflection and transmission spectra, produced either by introducing a π phase shift near the middle of the grating, or by increasing the index modulation so that the grating behaves like a Fabry-Perot interferometer. These resonances can have very narrow linewidths (optics, optical switching, optical delay lines, and sensing. This paper reviews the principle of these gratings, in particular the more recent slow-light gratings relying on a strong index modulation. It discusses in particular the requirements for achieving large group delays and high sensitivities in sensors, and the fabrication and annealing techniques used to meet these requirements (high index modulation, low loss, index-profile apodization, and optimized length). Several applications are presented, including record-breaking FBGs that exhibit a group delay of 42 ns and Q-factor of ~30 million over a 12.5 mm length, robust acoustic sensors with pressure resolution of ~50 µPa (√Hz)-1 in the few-kHz, and a strain sensor capable of resolving as little as 30 femtostrain (√Hz)-1.

  18. Hazardous animal waste carcasses transformation into slow release fertilizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharrock, Patrick; Fiallo, Marina; Nzihou, Ange; Chkir, Mouna

    2009-08-15

    Because of the need to address disposal of materials infected with pathogens new regulations have come into effect for the transport and disposal of dead farm animals or carcasses. For precautionary reasons, disposal to landfill, composting, biogas generation or fertilizer use are banned recycling paths because of incomplete knowledge about contamination transmission paths. Thermal treatment is recognized as a safe elimination process. Animal wastes have a high calorific value (above 16 MJ/kg). However, combustion of the organics leaves mineral residues (near 30%). The ashes contain mostly calcium and phosphate with some sodium, potassium and magnesium. We have examined the transformation of the ashes into a slow release fertilizer. We used a mixture of acids to partly dissolve the combustion residues and form slurry. In a second step, base was added to neutralize and solidify the reaction mixture. The final product was a whitish polycrystalline solid. Leaching tests were made to evaluate the nutrient release rate in laboratory columns. Water leachates were analyzed for up to ten pore-bed volumes and showed, as expected, large differences in release rates. Nitrate release was slowed and phosphate did not level even after ten pore-bed volumes. This demonstrates that insoluble precipitates (gypsum) contribute to control soluble ion release.

  19. Overcoming Critical Slowing Down in Quantum Monte Carlo Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evertz, Hans Gerd; Marcu, Mihai

    The classical d+1-dimensional spin systems used for the simulation of quantum spin systems in d dimensions are, quite generally, vertex models. Standard simulation methods for such models strongly suffer from critical slowing down. Recently, we developed the loop algorithm, a new type of cluster algorithm that to a large extent overcomes critical slowing down for vertex models. We present the basic ideas on the example of the F model, a special case of the 6-vertex model. Numerical results clearly demonstrate the effectiveness of the loop algorithm. Then, using the framework for cluster algorithms developed by Kandel and Domany, we explain how to adapt our algorithm to the cases of the 6-vertex model and the 8-vertex model, which are relevant for spin 1/2 systems. The techniqes presented here can be applied without modification to 2-dimensional spin 1/2 systems, provided that in the Suzuki-Trotter formula the Hamiltonian is broken up into 4 sums of link terms. Generalizations to more complicated situations (higher spins, different uses of the Suzuki-Trotter formula) are, at least in principle, straightforward.

  20. Multiple slow waves in metaporous layers for broadband sound absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jieun; Lee, Joong Seok; Kim, Yoon Young

    2017-01-01

    Sound absorption for a broad frequency range requires sound dissipation. The mechanics of acoustic metamaterials for non-dissipative applications has been extensively studied, but sound absorption using dissipative porous metamaterials has been less explored because of the complexity resulting from the coupling of its dissipative mechanism and metamaterial behavior. We investigated broadband sound absorption by engineering dissipative metaporous layers, which absorb sound by the mechanism of multiple slow waves, and combined local and global resonance phenomena. A set of rigid partitions of varying lengths was elaborately inserted in a hard-backed porous layer of a finite thickness. An effective medium theory was used to explain the physics involved; high performance at a low-frequency range was found to be mainly due to the formation of global resonances caused by multiple slow waves over the thickness of the metaporous layer, while enhancement at a high-frequency range was attributed to the combined effects of the global resonances and the local resonances directly related to the sizes of the inserted partitions.

  1. Spectral Evolution of the Unusual Slow Nova V5558 Sgr

    CERN Document Server

    Tanaka, Jumpei; Fujii, Mitsugu; Ayani, Kazuya; Kato, Taichi; Maehara, Hiroyuki; Kiyota, Seiichiro; Nakajima, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    We report on the spectral evolution of the enigmatic, very slow nova V5558 Sgr, based on the low-resolution spectra obtained at the Fujii-Bisei Observatory and the Bisei Astronomical Observatory, Japan during a period of 2007 April 6 to 2008 May 3. V5558 Sgr shows a pre-maximum halt and then several flare-like rebrightenings, which is similar to another very slow nova V723 Cas. In our observations, the spectral type of V5558 Sgr evolved from the He/N type toward the Fe II type during the pre-maximum halt, and then toward the He/N type again. This course of spectral transition was observed for the first time in the long history of the nova research. In the rebrightening stage after the initial brightness maximum, we could identify many emission lines accompanied by a stronger absorption component of the P-Cygni profile at the brightness maxima. We found that the velocity of the P-Cygni absorption component measured from the emission peak decreased at the brightness maxima. Furthermore, we compared the spectra ...

  2. Standing shocks in the inner slow solar wind

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Bo; Li, Xing

    2011-01-01

    The slow solar wind, or at least a significant part of it, originates from the region bordering streamer helmets, where the flow tube geometry is distinct from flow tubes rooted in the center of coronal holes. We examine whether this particular tube geometry leads to standing shocks in the inner slow wind in this region. To isolate the influence of tube geometry, a simple isothermal wind model is employed and is solved in terms of the Lambert W function. In addition to a continuous solution, the model may also admit solutions with shocks, readily constructed with a graphical approach. When allowed, the shock solutions appear in pairs, one with a shock located in the streamer stalk, the other with a shock below the cusp along the streamer border. We show that solutions with standing shocks exist in a broad area in the parameter space characterizing the wind temperature and flow tube. In particular, streamers with cusps located at a heliocentric distance $\\gtrsim 3.2 R_\\odot$ can readily support discontinuous s...

  3. Emergence of Slow-Switching Assemblies in Structured Neuronal Networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael T Schaub

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Unraveling the interplay between connectivity and spatio-temporal dynamics in neuronal networks is a key step to advance our understanding of neuronal information processing. Here we investigate how particular features of network connectivity underpin the propensity of neural networks to generate slow-switching assembly (SSA dynamics, i.e., sustained epochs of increased firing within assemblies of neurons which transition slowly between different assemblies throughout the network. We show that the emergence of SSA activity is linked to spectral properties of the asymmetric synaptic weight matrix. In particular, the leading eigenvalues that dictate the slow dynamics exhibit a gap with respect to the bulk of the spectrum, and the associated Schur vectors exhibit a measure of block-localization on groups of neurons, thus resulting in coherent dynamical activity on those groups. Through simple rate models, we gain analytical understanding of the origin and importance of the spectral gap, and use these insights to develop new network topologies with alternative connectivity paradigms which also display SSA activity. Specifically, SSA dynamics involving excitatory and inhibitory neurons can be achieved by modifying the connectivity patterns between both types of neurons. We also show that SSA activity can occur at multiple timescales reflecting a hierarchy in the connectivity, and demonstrate the emergence of SSA in small-world like networks. Our work provides a step towards understanding how network structure (uncovered through advancements in neuroanatomy and connectomics can impact on spatio-temporal neural activity and constrain the resulting dynamics.

  4. Global slowing of network oscillations in mouse neocortex by diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffzük, Claudia; Kukushka, Valeriy I; Vyssotski, Alexei L; Draguhn, Andreas; Tort, Adriano B L; Brankačk, Jurij

    2013-02-01

    Benzodiazepines have a broad spectrum of clinical applications including sedation, anti-anxiety, and anticonvulsive therapy. At the cellular level, benzodiazepines are allosteric modulators of GABA(A) receptors; they increase the efficacy of inhibition in neuronal networks by prolonging the duration of inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. This mechanism of action predicts that benzodiazepines reduce the frequency of inhibition-driven network oscillations, consistent with observations from human and animal EEG. However, most of existing data are restricted to frequency bands below ∼30 Hz. Recent data suggest that faster cortical network rhythms are critically involved in several behavioral and cognitive tasks. We therefore analyzed diazepam effects on a large range of cortical network oscillations in freely moving mice, including theta (4-12 Hz), gamma (40-100 Hz) and fast gamma (120-160 Hz) oscillations. We also investigated diazepam effects over the coupling between theta phase and the amplitude fast oscillations. We report that diazepam causes a global slowing of oscillatory activity in all frequency domains. Oscillation power was changed differently for each frequency domain, with characteristic differences between active wakefulness, slow-wave sleep and REM sleep. Cross-frequency coupling strength, in contrast, was mostly unaffected by diazepam. Such state- and frequency-dependent actions of benzodiazepines on cortical network oscillations may be relevant for their specific cognitive effects. They also underline the strong interaction between local network oscillations and global brain states.

  5. Non-slow-roll dynamics in $\\alpha-$attractors

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, K Sravan; Moniz, Paulo Vargas; Das, Suratna

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we consider the $\\alpha-$attractor model and study inflation under a generalization of slow-roll dynamics. We follow the recently proposed Gong \\& Sasaki approach \\cite{Gong:2015ypa} of assuming $N=N\\left(\\phi\\right)$. We relax the requirement of inflaton potential flatness and consider a sufficiently steep one to support 60-efoldings. We find that this type of inflationary scenario predicts an attractor at $n_{s}\\approx0.967$ and $r\\approx5.5\\times10^{-4}$ which are very close to the predictions of the first chaotic inflationary model in supergravity (Goncharov-Linde model) \\cite{Goncharov:1983mw}. We show that even with non-slow-roll dynamics, the $\\alpha-$attractor model is compatible with any value of $r<0.1$. In addition, we emphasize that in this particular inflationary scenario, the standard consistency relation $\\left(r\\simeq-8n_{t}\\right)$ is significantly violated and we find an attractor for tensor tilt at $n_{t}\\approx-0.034$ as $r\\rightarrow0$. Any prominent detection of the ...

  6. Fast and Slow Wetting Dynamics on nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandyala, Dhiraj; Rahmani, Amir; Cubaud, Thomas; Colosqui, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This talk will present force-displacement and spontaneous drop spreading measurements on diverse nanostructured surfaces (e.g., mesoporous titania thin films, nanoscale pillared structures, on silica or glass substrates). Experimental measurements are performed for water-air and water-oil systems. The dynamics of wetting observed in these experiments can present remarkable crossovers from fast to slow or arrested dynamics. The emergence of a slow wetting regime is attributed to a multiplicity of metastable equilibrium states induced by nanoscale surface features. The crossover point can be dramatically advanced or delayed by adjusting specific physical parameters (e.g., viscosity of the wetting phases) and geometric properties of the surface nanostructure (e.g., nanopore/pillar radius and separation). Controlling the crossover point to arrested dynamics can effectively modify the degree of contact angle hysteresis and magnitude of liquid adhesion forces observed on surfaces of different materials. This work is supported by a SEED Award from The Office of Brookhaven National Laboratory Affairs at Stony Brook University.

  7. Data assimilation on the exponentially accurate slow manifold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, Colin

    2013-05-28

    I describe an approach to data assimilation making use of an explicit map that defines a coordinate system on the slow manifold in the semi-geostrophic scaling in Lagrangian coordinates, and apply the approach to a simple toy system that has previously been proposed as a low-dimensional model for the semi-geostrophic scaling. The method can be extended to Lagrangian particle methods such as Hamiltonian particle-mesh and smooth-particle hydrodynamics applied to the rotating shallow-water equations, and many of the properties will remain for more general Eulerian methods. Making use of Hamiltonian normal-form theory, it has previously been shown that, if initial conditions for the system are chosen as image points of the map, then the fast components of the system have exponentially small magnitude for exponentially long times as ε→0, and this property is preserved if one uses a symplectic integrator for the numerical time stepping. The map may then be used to parametrize initial conditions near the slow manifold, allowing data assimilation to be performed without introducing any fast degrees of motion (more generally, the precise amount of fast motion can be selected).

  8. Slow-release fluoride devices: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Pelim Pessan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Although the prevalence of caries has decreased dramatically over the past decades, it has become a polarised disease, with most of subjects presenting low caries levels and few individuals accounting for most of the caries affected surfaces. Thus it become evident for the need of clinical approaches directed at these high-risk patients, in order to overcome problems related to compliance and low attendance at dental care centres. Slow-release fluoride devices were developed based on the inverse relationship existing between intra-oral fluoride levels and dental caries experience. The two main types of slow-release devices - copolymer membrane type and glass bead - are addressed in the present review. A substantial number of studies have demonstrated that these devices are effective in raising intra-oral F concentrations at levels able to reduce enamel solubility, resulting in a caries-protective effect. Studies in animals and humans demonstrated that the use of these devices was able to also protect the occlusal surfaces, not normally protected by conventional fluoride regimens. However, retention rates have been shown to be the main problem related to these devices and still requires further improvements. Although the results of these studies are very promising, further randomised clinical trials are needed in order to validate the use of these devices in clinical practice. The concept of continuously providing low levels of intra-oral fluoride has great potential for caries prevention in high caries-risk groups.

  9. High-resolution noise radar using slow ADC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukin, Konstantin; Vyplavin, Pavlo; Zemlyanyi, Oleg; Lukin, Sergiy; Palamarchuk, Volodymyr

    2011-06-01

    Conventional digital signal processing scheme in noise radars has some limitations related to combination of high resolution and high dynamic range. Those limitations are caused by a tradeoff in performance of currently available ADCs: the faster is ADC the smaller is its depth (number of bits) available. Depth of the ADC determines relation between the smallest and highest observable signals and thus limits its dynamic range. In noise radar with conventional processing the sounding and reference signals are to be digitized at intermediate frequency band and to be processed digitally. The power spectrum bandwidth of noise signal which can be digitized with ADC depends on its sampling rate. The bandwidth of radar signal defines range resolution of any radar: the wider the spectrum the better the resolution. Actually this is the main bottleneck of high resolution Noise Radars: conventional processing doesn't enable to get both high range resolution and high dynamic range. In the paper we present a way to go around this drawback by changing signal processing ideology in noise radar. We present results of our consideration and design of high resolution Noise Radar which uses slow ADCs. The design is based upon generation of both probing and reference signals digitally and realization of their cross-correlation in an analog correlator. The output of the correlator is a narrowband signal that requires rather slow ADC to be sampled which nowadays may give up to 130 dB dynamic range.

  10. Emergence of Slow-Switching Assemblies in Structured Neuronal Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Michael T; Billeh, Yazan N; Anastassiou, Costas A; Koch, Christof; Barahona, Mauricio

    2015-07-01

    Unraveling the interplay between connectivity and spatio-temporal dynamics in neuronal networks is a key step to advance our understanding of neuronal information processing. Here we investigate how particular features of network connectivity underpin the propensity of neural networks to generate slow-switching assembly (SSA) dynamics, i.e., sustained epochs of increased firing within assemblies of neurons which transition slowly between different assemblies throughout the network. We show that the emergence of SSA activity is linked to spectral properties of the asymmetric synaptic weight matrix. In particular, the leading eigenvalues that dictate the slow dynamics exhibit a gap with respect to the bulk of the spectrum, and the associated Schur vectors exhibit a measure of block-localization on groups of neurons, thus resulting in coherent dynamical activity on those groups. Through simple rate models, we gain analytical understanding of the origin and importance of the spectral gap, and use these insights to develop new network topologies with alternative connectivity paradigms which also display SSA activity. Specifically, SSA dynamics involving excitatory and inhibitory neurons can be achieved by modifying the connectivity patterns between both types of neurons. We also show that SSA activity can occur at multiple timescales reflecting a hierarchy in the connectivity, and demonstrate the emergence of SSA in small-world like networks. Our work provides a step towards understanding how network structure (uncovered through advancements in neuroanatomy and connectomics) can impact on spatio-temporal neural activity and constrain the resulting dynamics.

  11. Polarized (3) He Spin Filters for Slow Neutron Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, T R; Chen, W C; Jones, G L; Babcock, E; Walker, T G

    2005-01-01

    Polarized (3)He spin filters are needed for a variety of experiments with slow neutrons. Their demonstrated utility for highly accurate determination of neutron polarization are critical to the next generation of betadecay correlation coefficient measurements. In addition, they are broadband devices that can polarize large area and high divergence neutron beams with little gamma-ray background, and allow for an additional spin-flip for systematic tests. These attributes are relevant to all neutron sources, but are particularly well-matched to time of flight analysis at spallation sources. There are several issues in the practical use of (3)He spin filters for slow neutron physics. Besides the essential goal of maximizing the (3)He polarization, we also seek to decrease the constraints on cell lifetimes and magnetic field homogeneity. In addition, cells with highly uniform gas thickness are required to produce the spatially uniform neutron polarization needed for beta-decay correlation coefficient experiments. We are currently employing spin-exchange (SE) and metastability-exchange (ME) optical pumping to polarize (3)He, but will focus on SE. We will discuss the recent demonstration of 75 % (3)He polarization, temperature-dependent relaxation mechanism of unknown origin, cell development, spectrally narrowed lasers, and hybrid spin-exchange optical pumping.

  12. Preseismic, Postseismic and Slow Faulting in Subduction Zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melbourne, T. I.; Webb, F. H.; Miller, M. M.

    2002-12-01

    The last several years have witnessed a broad reappraisal of our understanding of the energy budgets of subduction zones. Due primarily to the deployment of continuous geodetic instrumentation along convergent margins worldwide, we now recognize that fault rupture commonly occurs over rates ranging from kilometers per second to millimeters per day. Along with transient postseismic slip, both isolated and episodic slow slip events have now been recorded along convergent margins offshore Japan, Alaska, Mexico, Cascadia and Peru, and thus would appear to constitute a fundamental mode of strain release only observable through geodetic methods. In many instances, postseismic creep along the deeper plate interface is triggered by seismogenic rupture up-dip. Continuous GPS measurements from three earthquakes in México (Mw=8.0,1995), Peru (Mw=8.4,2001) and Japan (Mw=7.7, 1994) show that deep postseismic creep was triggered by local Coulomb stress increases of the order of one half bar produced by their mainshock ruptures. For these three events, afterslip along their primary coseismic asperities is significantly less important than triggered deep creep. Deeper slow faulting does not have to be triggered by adjacent seismogenic rupture. In Cascadia, eight episodic slow slip events since 1991 have been recognized to have an astonishingly regular 14.5-month onset period, the most recent of which began in February of 2002. For these events, time dependent inversion of GPS data map the propagation of creep fronts and show they released moment with magnitudes in excess of Mw=6.5. If they occur throughout the Cascadia interseismic period, then cumulatively they rival the moment release of the infrequent Mw=9.0 megathrust events. Most recently, an 18-hour precursor to an Mw=7.6 aftershock of the 2001 Mw=8.4 Peru earthquake was detected at Arequipa, Peru. This precursor appears as a ~3 cm departure from a continuous time series broken only by the coseismic displacements of the

  13. Characteristics and habitat of deep vs. shallow slow slip events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, L. M.; Saffer, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    It is well-known that slow slip events (SSEs) occur over a large depths range at subduction zones, from near the trench to 40-50 km depth. We review the characteristics and in situ conditions of shallow vs. deep SSEs, including duration, magnitude, seismic signatures, and inferences about the rock properties and stress state in their source regions. Deep SSEs (>15 km depth) exhibit a range of durations (days to years), while shallow SSEs (Mexico, Cascadia), although shallow SSEs offshore Costa Rica and Nankai have also been linked to tremor and/or very low frequency earthquakes. Shallow SSEs in central Japan (Boso), Hikurangi, and Ecuador are associated with bursts of microseismicity. Deep SSEs occur at the inferred down-dip limit of the locked seismogenic zone, whereas many shallow SSEs occur at mostly creeping plate boundaries (Hikurangi, Ecuador), or updip of the seismogenic zone (Nankai, Costa Rica). Despite the differences, there are many similarities between deep and shallow SSEs, suggesting that common physical mechanisms may be responsible for slow slip in these vastly different environments. Deep and shallow SSEs span a range of temperature and pressure conditions, implying that the physical conditions hosting SSEs are broad. Seismic imaging of shallow and deep SSE regions indicate likely fluid overpressure, supporting the idea that low effective normal stress may be a common factor promoting SSE behavior. High fluid pressure in shallow SSE zones is largely from disequilibrium compaction of low permeability marine sediments, while fluids in deep SSE regions are likely sourced from metamorphic dehydration reactions. That all shallow SSEs observed thus far are shorter in duration than many deep SSEs may be due to a number of factors, including higher effective stress on the plate boundary in deep vs. shallow regions, and differing degrees of subduction interface heterogeneity. Tremor vs. microseismicity may be related to the scale and distribution of

  14. Did growth of high Andes slow down Nazca plate subduction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinteros, J.; Sobolev, S. V.

    2010-12-01

    The convergence velocity rate of the Nazca and South-American plate and its variations during the last 100 My are quite well-known from the global plate reconstructions. The key observation is that the rate of Nazca plate subduction has decreased by about 2 times during last 20 Myr and particularly since 10 Ma. During the same time the Central Andes have grown to its present 3-4 km height. Based on the thin-shell model, coupled with mantle convection, it was suggested that slowing down of Nazca plate resulted from the additional load exerted by the Andes. However, the thin-shell model, that integrates stresses and velocities vertically and therefore has no vertical resolution, is not an optimal tool to model a subduction zone. More appropriate would be modeling it with full thermomechanical formulation and self-consistent subduction. We performed a set of experiments to estimate the influence that an orogen like the Andes could have on an ongoing subduction. We used an enhanced 2D version of the SLIM-3D code suitable to simulate the evolution of a subducting slab in a self-consistent manner (gravity driven) at vertical crossections through upper mantle, transition zone and shallower lower mantle. The model utilizes non-linear temperature- and stress-dependant visco-elasto-plastic rheology and phase transitions at 410 and 660 km depth. We started from a reference case with a similar configuration as both Nazca and South-America plates. After some Mys of slow kinematicaly imposed subduction, to develop a coherent thermo-mechanical state, subduction was totally dynamic. On the other cases, the crust was slowly thickened artificially during 10 My to generate the Andean topography. Although our first results show no substantial changes on the velocity pattern of the subduction, we, however, consider this result as preliminary. At the meeting we plan to report completed and verified modeling results and discuss other possible cases of the late Cenozoic slowing down of

  15. Fast and slow effects of medial olivocochlear efferent activity in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The medial olivocochlear (MOC pathway modulates basilar membrane motion and auditory nerve activity on both a fast (10-100 ms and a slow (10-100 s time scale in guinea pigs. The slow MOC modulation of cochlear activity is postulated to aide in protection against acoustic trauma. However in humans, the existence and functional roles of slow MOC effects remain unexplored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By employing contralateral noise at moderate to high levels (68 and 83 dB SPL as an MOC reflex elicitor, and spontaneous otoacoustic emissions (SOAEs as a non-invasive probe of the cochlea, we demonstrated MOC modulation of human cochlear output both on a fast and a slow time scale, analogous to the fast and slow MOC efferent effects observed on basilar membrane vibration and auditory nerve activity in guinea pigs. The magnitude of slow effects was minimal compared with that of fast effects. Consistent with basilar membrane and auditory nerve activity data, SOAE level was reduced by both fast and slow MOC effects, whereas SOAE frequency was elevated by fast and reduced by slow MOC effects. The magnitudes of fast and slow effects on SOAE level were positively correlated. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Contralateral noise up to 83 dB SPL elicited minimal yet significant changes in both SOAE level and frequency on a slow time scale, consistent with a high threshold or small magnitude of slow MOC effects in humans.

  16. Merged-Beams for Slow Molecular Collision Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Wei, Qi; Herschbach, Dudley

    2012-01-01

    Molecular collisions can be studied at very low relative kinetic energies, in the milliKelvin range, by merging codirectional beams with much higher translational energies, extending even to the kiloKelvin range, provided that the beam speeds can be closely matched. This technique provides far more intensity and wider chemical scope than methods that require slowing both collision partners. Previously, at far higher energies, merged beams have been widely used with ions and/or neutrals formed by charge transfer. Here we assess for neutral, thermal molecular beams the range and resolution of collision energy that now appears attainable, determined chiefly by velocity spreads within the merged beams. Our treatment deals both with velocity distributions familiar for molecular beams formed by effusion or supersonic expansion, and an unorthodox variant produced by a rotating supersonic source capable of scanning the lab beam velocity over a wide range.

  17. Analysis of slow transitions between nonequilibrium steady states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Dibyendu; Jarzynski, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Transitions between nonequilibrium steady states obey a generalized Clausius inequality, which becomes an equality in the quasistatic limit. For slow but finite transitions, we show that the behavior of the system is described by a response matrix whose elements are given by a far-from-equilibrium Green-Kubo formula, involving the decay of correlations evaluated in the nonequilibrium steady state. This result leads to a fluctuation-dissipation relation between the mean and variance of the nonadiabatic entropy production, Δ {{s}\\text{na}} . Furthermore, our results extend—to nonequilibrium steady states—the thermodynamic metric structure introduced by Sivak and Crooks for analyzing minimal-dissipation protocols for transitions between equilibrium states.

  18. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study’s methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 times at per each portion of scalene muscles: the anterior, middle, and posterior parts. [Results] Expiratory vital capacity (EVC) and tidal volume (Vt) noticeably increased after stretching. However, there were no changes in any of the SVC items in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that stretching of the scalene muscles can effectively improve SVC. In particular, we confirmed that stretching of the scalene muscles was effective in increasing EVC and Vt, which are items of SVC. PMID:27390425

  19. Slowing down: age-related neurobiological predictors of processing speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Eckert

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Processing speed, or the rate at which tasks can be performed, is a robust predictor of age-relatedcognitive decline and an indicator of independence among older adults. This review examines evidence for neurobiological predictors of age-related changes in processing speed, which is guided in part by our source based morphometry findings that unique patterns of frontal and cerebellar gray matter predict age-related variation in processing speed. These results, together with the extant literature on morphological predictors of age-related changes in processing speed, suggest that specific neural systems undergo declines and as a result slow processing speed. Future studies of processing speed - dependent neural systems will be important for identifying the etiologies for processing speed change and the development of interventions that mitigate gradual age-related declines in cognitive functioning and enhance healthy cognitive aging.

  20. Possible Reasons for the Slow Rotation of BF Ori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shulman, S. G.

    2016-03-01

    Possible reasons for the very low projected rotation velocity of BF Ori compared to other UX Ori stars are discussed. The hypothesis of a close companion that slows down the star's rotation by a tidal interaction is examined. Based on a theory of synchronization and modern models of evolution, the interaction is calculated numerically for different masses of the companion and values of the semi-major axis. It is shown that in order to obtain the projected velocity observed for BF Ori, the companion must have a mass greater than 0.5M⊙ . Such a large companion should have been discovered observationally. It is suggested that the low rotation velocity of BF Ori is more likely to be related to the distribution of the angular momentum of a protostellar cloud between the angular momentum of the star and the orbital angular momentum of a low-mass companion.

  1. Proprioceptive deafferentation slows down the processing of visual hand feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Miall, R Chris; Cole, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    During visually guided movements both vision and proprioception inform the brain about the position of the hand, so interaction between these two modalities is presumed. Current theories suggest that this interaction occurs by sensory information from both sources being fused into a more reliable...... proprioception facilitates the processing of visual information during motor control. Subjects used a computer mouse to move a cursor to a screen target. In 28% of the trials, pseudorandomly, the cursor was rotated or the target jumped. Reaction time for the trajectory correction in response to this perturbation...... was compared under conditions with normal and reduced proprioception after 1-Hz rTMS over the hand-contralateral somatosensory cortex. Proprioceptive deafferentation slowed down the reaction time for initiating a motor correction in response to a visual perturbation in hand position, but not to a target jump...

  2. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Slow Light with Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H; Chan, Jasper; Eichenfield, Matt; Winger, Martin; Lin, Qiang; Hill, Jeffrey T; Chang, Darrick; Painter, Oskar

    2010-01-01

    Controlling the interaction between localized optical and mechanical excitations has recently become possible following advances in micro- and nano-fabrication techniques. To date, most experimental studies of optomechanics have focused on measurement and control of the mechanical subsystem through its interaction with optics, and have led to the experimental demonstration of dynamical back-action cooling and optical rigidity of the mechanical system. Converseley, the optical response of these systems is also modified in the presence of mechanical interactions, leading to strong nonlinear optical effects such as Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) and parametric normal-mode splitting. In atomic systems, seminal experiments and proposals to slow and stop the propagation of light, and their applicability to modern optical networks, and future quantum networks, have thrust EIT to the forefront of experimental study during the last two decades. In a similar fashion, here we use the optomechanical nonli...

  3. Responsive demand to mitigate slow recovery voltage sags

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia-Valle, Rodrigo; da Silva, Luiz Carlos Pereira; Xu, Zhao

    2012-01-01

    It is expected that in the future, customers will play a much more active role in modern power distribution systems. Instead of being passive agents, customers will be encouraged to participate in many other functions, such as frequency and voltage control, by providing a rapid, active......, and reactive power reserve for peak load management through price responsive methods and also as energy providers through embedded generation technologies. This article introduces a new technology, called demand as voltagecontrolled reserve, which can help mitigation of momentary voltage sags. The technology...... can be provided by thermostatically controlled loads as well as other types of load. This technology has proven to be effective in distribution systems with a large composition of induction motors, when voltage sags present slow recovery characteristics because of the deceleration of the motors during...

  4. Fluoxetine is neuroprotective in slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Haipeng; Grajales-Reyes, Gary E; Alicea-Vázquez, Vivianette; Grajales-Reyes, Jose G; Robinson, KaReisha; Pytel, Peter; Báez-Pagán, Carlos A; Lasalde-Dominicci, Jose A; Gomez, Christopher M

    2015-08-01

    The slow-channel congenital myasthenic syndrome (SCS) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease that caused mutations in the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) affecting neuromuscular transmission. Leaky AChRs lead to Ca(2+) overload and degeneration of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ) attributed to activation of cysteine proteases and apoptotic changes of synaptic nuclei. Here we use transgenic mouse models expressing two different mutations found in SCS to demonstrate that inhibition of prolonged opening of mutant AChRs using fluoxetine not only improves motor performance and neuromuscular transmission but also prevents Ca(2+) overload, the activation of cysteine proteases, calpain, caspase-3 and 9 at endplates, and as a consequence, reduces subsynaptic DNA damage at endplates, suggesting a long term benefit to therapy. These studies suggest that prolonged treatment of SCS patients with open ion channel blockers that preferentially block mutant AChRs is neuroprotective.

  5. The coronary slow flow phenomenon: a new cardiac "Y" syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Maria Cristina; Gori, Tommaso; Fineschi, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    The coronary slow flow phenomenon (CSFP) is an angiographic finding that is characterised by delayed progression of the contrast medium during coronary angiography. The mechanism of this phenomenon remains unknown. In the present paper, we revise the current evidence regarding this phenomenon and discuss recent findings from our group reporting increased resting resistances in patients with the CSFP. We report that these patients had preserved blood flow responses to the intracoronary infusion of the vasodilator papaverine, demonstrating that the CSFP is not necessarily associated with an abnormal coronary flow reserve. Based on these findings and on the review of the current literature, we concur with the concept proposed by Beltrame et al. that the CSFP should be considered a separate clinical entity. Further studies are necessary to describe the clinical characteristics, including the prognosis, of these patients and to identify potential treatments.

  6. Characterization of the slow wind in the outer corona

    CERN Document Server

    Abbo, Lucia; Mikić, Zoran; Linker, Jon A; Riley, Pete; Lionello, Roberto; 10.1016/j.asr.2010.08.008

    2010-01-01

    The study concerns the streamer belt observed at high spectral resolution during the minimum of solar cycle 22 with the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) onboard SOHO. On the basis of a spectroscopic analysis of the O VI doublet, the solar wind plasma parameters are inferred in the extended corona. The analysis accounts for the coronal magnetic topology, extrapolated through a 3D magneto-hydrodynamic model, in order to define the streamer boundary and to analyse the edges of coronal holes. The results of the analysis allow an accurate identification of the source regions of the slow coronal wind that are confirmed to be along the streamer boundary in the open magnetic field region.

  7. Characterization of slow conformational dynamics in solids: dipolar CODEX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Wenbo; McDermott, Ann E. [Columbia University, Department of Chemistry (United States)], E-mail: aem5@columbia.edu

    2009-09-15

    A solid state NMR experiment is introduced for probing relatively slow conformational exchange, based on dephasing and refocusing dipolar couplings. The method is closely related to the previously described Centerband-Only Detection of Exchange or CODEX experiment. The use of dipolar couplings for this application is advantageous because their values are known a priori from molecular structures, and their orientations and reorientations relate in a simple way to molecular geometry and motion. Furthermore the use of dipolar couplings in conjunction with selective isotopic enrichment schemes is consistent with selection for unique sites in complex biopolymers. We used this experiment to probe the correlation time for the motion of {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N enriched urea molecules within their crystalline lattice.

  8. Characterization of slow conformational dynamics in solids: dipolar CODEX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenbo; McDermott, Ann E

    2009-09-01

    A solid state NMR experiment is introduced for probing relatively slow conformational exchange, based on dephasing and refocusing dipolar couplings. The method is closely related to the previously described Centerband-Only Detection of Exchange or CODEX experiment. The use of dipolar couplings for this application is advantageous because their values are known a priori from molecular structures, and their orientations and reorientations relate in a simple way to molecular geometry and motion. Furthermore the use of dipolar couplings in conjunction with selective isotopic enrichment schemes is consistent with selection for unique sites in complex biopolymers. We used this experiment to probe the correlation time for the motion of (13)C, (15)N enriched urea molecules within their crystalline lattice.

  9. Tailoring the slow light behavior in terahertz metasurfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Manjappa, Manukumara; Cong, Longqing; Bettiol, Andrew A; Zhang, Weili; Singh, Ranjan

    2015-01-01

    We experimentally study the effect of near field coupling on the transmission of light in terahertz metasurfaces, possessing slightly distinctive SRR resonances. Our results show that the interplay between the strengths of electric and magnetic dipoles, modulates the amplitude of resulting electromagnetically induced transmission, probed under different types of asymmetries in the coupled system. We employ a two-particle model to theoretically study the influence of the near field coupling between bright and quasi-dark modes on the transmission properties of the coupled system and we find an excellent agreement with our observed results. Adding to the enhanced transmission characteristics, our results provide a deeper insight into the metamaterial analogues of atomic electromagnetically induced transparency and offer an approach to engineer slow light devices, broadband filters and attenuators at terahertz frequencies.

  10. Stability of Brillouin Flow in Slow-Wave Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, David; Lau, Y. Y.; Greening, Geoffrey; Wong, Patrick; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Hoff, Brad

    2016-10-01

    For the first time, we include a slow-wave structure (SWS) to study the stability of Brillouin flow in the conventional, planar, and inverted magnetron geometry. The resonant interaction of the SWS circuit mode and the corresponding smooth-bore diocotron-like mode is found to be the dominant cause for instability, overwhelming the intrinsic negative (positive) mass property of electrons in the inverted (conventional) magnetron geometry. It severely restricts the wavenumber for instability to the narrow range in which the cold tube frequency of the SWS is within a few percent of the corresponding smooth bore diocotron-like mode in the Brillouin flow. This resonant interaction is absent in a smooth bore magnetron. Work supported by ONR N00014-13-1-0566 and N00014-16-1-2353, AFOSR FA9550-15-1-0097, and L-3 Communications Electron Device Division.

  11. Tetranectin in slow intra- and extrafusal chicken muscle fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, X; Gilpin, B; Iba, K

    2001-01-01

    Tetranectin is a C-type lectin that occurs in the mammalian musculoskeletal system. In the present report we describe the first studies on an avian tetranectin. A full-length chicken tetranectin cDNA was isolated. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of chicken tetranectin with mouse...... and human tetranectin showed an identity of 67 and 68%, respectively. Northern blot analysis demonstrated broad expression of chicken tetranectin mRNA, which was first detected on embryonic day 4. Tetranectin protein was detected in chicken serum and egg yolk. Since muscle is one of few tissues in which...... tetranectin protein is retained, we examined the distribution of tetranectin in various muscle types in chicken. Myofibers strongly positive for tetranectin were observed in several muscles including m. tibialis ant. and m. sartorius (from embryonic day 10 to adult). Using antibodies to fast and slow myosin...

  12. VAST: An ASKAP Survey for Variables and Slow Transients

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Tara; Kaplan, David L; Banyer, Jay; Bell, Martin E; Bignall, Hayley E; Bower, Geoffrey C; Cameron, Robert; Coward, David M; Cordes, James M; Croft, Steve; Curran, James R; Djorgovski, S G; Farrell, Sean A; Frail, Dale A; Gaensler, B M; Galloway, Duncan K; Gendre, Bruce; Green, Anne J; Hancock, Paul J; Johnston, Simon; Kamble, Atish; Law, Casey J; Lazio, T Joseph W; Lo, Kitty K; Macquart, Jean-Pierre; Rea, Nanda; Rebbapragada, Umaa; Reynolds, Cormac; Ryder, Stuart D; Schmidt, Brian; Soria, Roberto; Stairs, Ingrid H; Tingay, Steven J; Torkelsson, Ulf; Wagstaff, Kiri; Walker, Mark; Wayth, Randall B; Williams, Peter K G

    2012-01-01

    The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) will give us an unprecedented opportunity to investigate the transient sky at radio wavelengths. In this paper we present VAST, an ASKAP survey for Variables and Slow Transients. VAST will exploit the wide-field survey capabilities of ASKAP to enable the discovery and investigation of variable and transient phenomena from the local to the cosmological, including flare stars, intermittent pulsars, X-ray binaries, magnetars, extreme scattering events, interstellar scintillation, radio supernovae and orphan afterglows of gamma ray bursts. In addition, it will allow us to probe unexplored regions of parameter space where new classes of transient sources may be detected. In this paper we review the known radio transient and variable populations and the current results from blind radio surveys. We outline a comprehensive program based on a multi-tiered survey strategy to characterise the radio transient sky through detection and monitoring of transient and va...

  13. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study's methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 times at per each portion of scalene muscles: the anterior, middle, and posterior parts. [Results] Expiratory vital capacity (EVC) and tidal volume (Vt) noticeably increased after stretching. However, there were no changes in any of the SVC items in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that stretching of the scalene muscles can effectively improve SVC. In particular, we confirmed that stretching of the scalene muscles was effective in increasing EVC and Vt, which are items of SVC.

  14. Slow waves, sharp waves, ripples, and REM in sleeping dragons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shein-Idelson, Mark; Ondracek, Janie M; Liaw, Hua-Peng; Reiter, Sam; Laurent, Gilles

    2016-04-29

    Sleep has been described in animals ranging from worms to humans. Yet the electrophysiological characteristics of brain sleep, such as slow-wave (SW) and rapid eye movement (REM) activities, are thought to be restricted to mammals and birds. Recording from the brain of a lizard, the Australian dragon Pogona vitticeps, we identified SW and REM sleep patterns, thus pushing back the probable evolution of these dynamics at least to the emergence of amniotes. The SW and REM sleep patterns that we observed in lizards oscillated continuously for 6 to 10 hours with a period of ~80 seconds. The networks controlling SW-REM antagonism in amniotes may thus originate from a common, ancient oscillator circuit. Lizard SW dynamics closely resemble those observed in rodent hippocampal CA1, yet they originate from a brain area, the dorsal ventricular ridge, that has no obvious hodological similarity with the mammalian hippocampus.

  15. Slow Activity in Focal Epilepsy During Sleep and Wakefulness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellegrino, Giovanni; Tombini, Mario; Curcio, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Introduction We aimed to test differences between healthy subjects and patients with respect to slow wave activity during wakefulness and sleep. Methods Fifteen patients affected by nonlesional focal epilepsy originating within temporal areas and fourteen matched controls underwent a 24-hour EEG...... recording. We studied the EEG power spectral density during wakefulness and sleep in delta (1-4 Hz), theta (5-7 Hz), alpha (8-11 Hz), sigma (12-15 Hz), and beta (16-20 Hz) bands. Results During sleep, patients with focal epilepsy showed higher power from delta to beta frequency bands compared with controls...... was the delta band during the first 2 sleep cycles (sleep cycle 1, P = .014; sleep cycle 2, P = .002). During wakefulness, patients showed higher delta/theta activity over the affected regions compared with controls. Conclusions Patients with focal epilepsy showed a pattern of power increases characterized...

  16. Radial velocities of "slow movers" - call for observations

    CERN Document Server

    Dybczynski, P A; Dybczynski, Piotr A.; Kwiatkowski, Tomasz

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a list of suggested stars for radial velocity measurements. We explain here in brief the research project for which the radial velocity of the "slow movers" i.e. small proper motion stars are necessary. Basing on this study we prepared a list of 1100 stellar targets with very accurate positions, proper motions and trigonometric parallaxes but without radial velocity measurements. Distributions of stellar brightnesses and spectral types among these stars are presented as well as its "most wanted" subset. We announce the begin of the radial velocity measurements to be conducted with our new echelle spectrograph just put into operation and offer some coordination for observations of targets that cannot be reached from our location.

  17. Modeling slow deformation of polygonal particles using DEM

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    We introduce two improvements in the numerical scheme to simulate collision and slow shearing of irregular particles. First, we propose an alternative approach based on simple relations to compute the frictional contact forces. The approach improves efficiency and accuracy of the Discrete Element Method (DEM) when modeling the dynamics of the granular packing. We determine the proper upper limit for the integration step in the standard numerical scheme using a wide range of material parameters. To this end, we study the kinetic energy decay in a stress controlled test between two particles. Second, we show that the usual way of defining the contact plane between two polygonal particles is, in general, not unique which leads to discontinuities in the direction of the contact plane while particles move. To solve this drawback, we introduce an accurate definition for the contact plane based on the shape of the overlap area between touching particles, which evolves continuously in time.

  18. Robot Navigation using Reinforcement Learning and Slow Feature Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Böhmer, Wendelin

    2012-01-01

    The application of reinforcement learning algorithms onto real life problems always bears the challenge of filtering the environmental state out of raw sensor readings. While most approaches use heuristics, biology suggests that there must exist an unsupervised method to construct such filters automatically. Besides the extraction of environmental states, the filters have to represent them in a fashion that support modern reinforcement algorithms. Many popular algorithms use a linear architecture, so one should aim at filters that have good approximation properties in combination with linear functions. This thesis wants to propose the unsupervised method slow feature analysis (SFA) for this task. Presented with a random sequence of sensor readings, SFA learns a set of filters. With growing model complexity and training examples, the filters converge against trigonometric polynomial functions. These are known to possess excellent approximation capabilities and should therfore support the reinforcement algorith...

  19. Slow light in a semiconductor waveguide at gigahertz frequencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper; Kjær, Rasmus; Poel, Mike van der;

    2005-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate slow-down of light by a factor of three in a 100 µm long semiconductor waveguide at room temperature and at a record-high frequency of 16.7 GHz. It is shown that the group velocity can be controlled all-optically as well as through an applied bias voltage. A semi......-analytical model based on the effect of coherent population oscillations and taking into account propagation effects is derived and is shown to well account for the experimental results. It is shown that the carrier lifetime limits the maximum achievable delay. Based on the general model we analyze fundamental...... limitations in the application of light slowdown due to coherent population oscillations....

  20. A Stochastic Slow Extraction Scheme For U70 Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, S

    2004-01-01

    Outcomes of a feasibility study for a low-budget sto-chastic slow extraction system in the U70 proton synchro-tron of IHEP are reported. The existing 200 MHz (spill) RF system is to be employed as a longitudinal kicker. It will be driven by a sum of a non-random RF carrier plus an additive random amplitude-modulated signal - either quadrature or in-phase, or both. A few novel solutions to be implemented in the longitudinal diffusion technique that would force protons into the conventional 3-rd order transverse extraction resonance are foreseen so as to com-ply with the technical constraints inherent in U70. Getting a-few-seconds-long and high-quality spills is assessed as being viable with the system in question.