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Sample records for hyperthermia late effects

  1. Biological effects of hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Hiroshi

    1980-01-01

    Biological effects of hyperthermia and application of hyperthermia to cancer therapy were outlined. As to independent effects of hyperthermia, heat sensitivity of cancer cells, targets of hyperthermia, thermal tolerance of cancer cells, effects of pH on hyperthermic cell survival, effects of hyperthermia on normal tissues, and possibility of clinical application of hyperthermia were described. Combined effect of hyperthermia and x-irradiation to enhance radiosensitivity of cancer cells, its mechanism, effects of oxygen on cancer cells treated with hyperthermia and irradiation, and therapeutic ratio of combined hyperthermia and irradiation were also described. Finally, sensitizers were mentioned. (Tsunoda, M.)

  2. Late response to whole-lung irradiation alone and with whole-body hyperthermia in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillette, S.M.; Gillette, E.L.; Dawson, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    The late effects of whole-lung irradiation with and without whole-body hyperthermia were studied in beagle dogs. The reference doses ranged from 18 to 49.5 Gy given in 1.5-Gy fractions over 6 weeks. Whole-body hyperthermia was given in three 2-h treatments to a deep rectal temperature of 42.0 degrees C. Radiation was given simultaneously with hyperthermia on those days. Physiological and histopathological responses were evaluated. Physiological changes included decreases in cardiac output, systemic blood pressure, dynamic compliance and serotonin uptake. Early changes included an increase in extravascular water and total protein in the lavage. These changes were considered mild, were compensated for and occurred only in dogs receiving doses of 40.5 Gy or greater given in 1.5-Gy fractions over 6 weeks. Histopathological change were typical of irradiated lung and included pleural fibrosis, interstitial fibrosis, fibrotic foci, and peribronchial and perivascular fibrosis. There was no enhancement of late injury to lung by hyperthermia seen in this study. 17 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, C.A.; Emami, B.; Nussbaum, G.; Sapareto, S.

    1987-01-01

    The effect on heat on malignant tumors was first reported by Hippocrates. In 1856 another described the disappearance of a soft tissue sarcoma following high fever in a patient with erysipelas. Later, another induced fever by injecting bacterial toxins, and others used localized hyperthermia to produce tumor regression in patients. There were 32 patients with advanced cancer of various types treated with a combination of heat, induced with pyrogenic substances, and x-ray therapy. Twenty-nine of these patients improved for 1 to 6 months. In the past 10 years interest has been rekindled to the clinical application of this modality because numerous papers have indicated that there may be a significant advantage to the use of heat alone or combined with irradiation and cytotoxic drugs to enhance the killing of tumor cells. The clinical use of heat has been hampered by a lack of adequate equipment to deliver effective heat in deep-seated lesions and of thermometry techniques that provide reliable information on heat distribution in target tissues. However, significant progress has been made. About 30% to 50% of patients with solid tumors have recurrences at the primary site. Many of these patients have regional lymph node recurrences. Both failure patterns could be improved if effective radiation sensitizers are developed

  4. Cellular and tissue effects of hyperthermia and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, S.B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents the idea that hyperthermia is likely to be most effective in poorly perfused regions, which is where radiotherapy and chemotherapy are least effective. The author suggests that a therapeutic gain might, therefore, be obtained by combined treatments

  5. The effect of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, hyperthermia and chemotherapy for rectal carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, Fumio; Furuta, Kazuhiro; Saito, Yukio; Kataoka, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Hiroshi; Okada, Masaki; Kanazawa, Kyotaro; Sugahara, Tadashi; Shinohara, Naohiro (Jichi Medical School, Minamikawachi, Tochigi (Japan))

    1994-03-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, chemotherapy and hyperthermia for rectal carcinoma, two groups were compared. Group A consisted of 18 patients in whom hyperthermia, radiation and chemotherapy were performed. Group B consisted of 18 patients in whom only chemotherapy and radiation were performed. The total dose of radiation in both of the two groups was 40.5 Gy, and a radiation field covering the whole pelvis was used. Hyperthermia was performed using 8 MHz radiofrequency waves (Thermotron RF8, Yamamoto Vinyter, Japan), and tumors were heated at about 42 degrees C for 50 minutes. Hyperthermia was repeated five times during the preoperative treatment. Chemotherapy was performed by giving 5-fluorouracil suppositories to a total dose of 3400 mg. Mean tumor reduction rates on barium enema were 31.8% in group A and 18.2% in group B. The difference was statistically significant. The result of the histological assessment of tumor necrosis showed that there was a significantly higher degree of necrosis in group A than in group B. These results showed that the addition of hyperthermia enhanced tumor necrosis. It was concluded that the addition of hyperthermia would be an effective preoperative treatment of rectal carcinoma. (author).

  6. The effect of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, hyperthermia and chemotherapy for rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Fumio; Furuta, Kazuhiro; Saito, Yukio; Kataoka, Takashi; Kashiwagi, Hiroshi; Okada, Masaki; Kanazawa, Kyotaro; Sugahara, Tadashi; Shinohara, Naohiro

    1994-01-01

    To investigate the effectiveness of hyperthermia in the preoperative combined treatment of radiation, chemotherapy and hyperthermia for rectal carcinoma, two groups were compared. Group A consisted of 18 patients in whom hyperthermia, radiation and chemotherapy were performed. Group B consisted of 18 patients in whom only chemotherapy and radiation were performed. The total dose of radiation in both of the two groups was 40.5 Gy, and a radiation field covering the whole pelvis was used. Hyperthermia was performed using 8 MHz radiofrequency waves (Thermotron RF8, Yamamoto Vinyter, Japan), and tumors were heated at about 42 degrees C for 50 minutes. Hyperthermia was repeated five times during the preoperative treatment. Chemotherapy was performed by giving 5-fluorouracil suppositories to a total dose of 3400 mg. Mean tumor reduction rates on barium enema were 31.8% in group A and 18.2% in group B. The difference was statistically significant. The result of the histological assessment of tumor necrosis showed that there was a significantly higher degree of necrosis in group A than in group B. These results showed that the addition of hyperthermia enhanced tumor necrosis. It was concluded that the addition of hyperthermia would be an effective preoperative treatment of rectal carcinoma. (author)

  7. Effects of Radiofrequency Induced local Hyperthermia on Normal Canine Liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Chang Ok; Loh, John J. K.; Seong, Jin Sil

    1991-01-01

    In order to assess the effects of radiofrequency-induced local hyperthermia on the normal liver, histopathologic findings and biochemical changes after localized hyperthermia in canine liver were studied. Hyperthermia was externally administered using the Thermotron RF-8 (Yamamoto Vinyter Co., Japan; Capacitive type heating machine) with parallel opposed electrodes. Thirteen dogs were used and allocated into one control group (N=3) and two treatment groups according to the treatment temperature. Group I (N=5) was heated with 42.5±0.5.deg.C for 30 minutes, and Group(N=5) was heated with 45±0.5.deg.C for 15-30 minutes. Samples of liver tissue were obtained through a needle biopsy immediately after hyperthermia and 7, 14 and 28 days after treatment and examined for SGOT, SGPT and alkaline phosphatase. Although SGOT and SGPT were elevated after hyperthermia in both groups (three of five in each group), there was no liver cell necrosis or hyperthermia related mortality in Group I. A hydropic swelling of hepatocytes was prominent histologic finding. Hyperthermia with 45.deg.C for 30 minutes was fatal and showed extensive liver cell necrosis. In conclusion, liver damage day heat of 42.5±0.5.deg.C for 30 minutes is reversible, and liver damage by heat of 45±0.5.deg.C for 30 minutes can be fatal or irreversible. However, these results cannot be applied directly to human trial. Therefore, in order to apply hyperthermic treatment on human liver tumor safely, close observation of temperature with proper thermometry is mandatory. Hyperthermic treatment should be confined to the tumor area while sparing a normal liver as much as possible

  8. Combined effects of hyperthermia and radiation in cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hur, E.; Elkind, M.M.; Riklis, E.

    1977-01-01

    Hyperthermia (temperatures of 39 0 C or higher) enhances the killing of mammalian cells by ionizing radiation (fission-spectrum neutrons and x-rays). The nature and the magnitude of the enhanced radiation killing varies with temperature and for a fixed temperature during irradiation, the enhanced lethality varies inversely with dose rate. For temperatures up to 41 0 C, dose fractionation measurements indicate that hyperthermia inhibits the repair of sublethal damage. At higher temperatures, the expression of potentially lethal damage is enhanced. Since the effect of heat is greatest in cells irradiated during DNA synthesis, the radiation age-response pattern is flattened by hyperthermia. In addition to the enhanced cell killing described above, three other features of the effect of hyperthermia are important in connection with the radiation treatment of cancer. The first is that heat selectively sensitizes S-phase cells to radiation. The second is that it takes radiation survivors 10 to 20 hrs after a modest heat treatment to recover their ability to repair sublethal damage. And the third is that hyperthermia reduces the magnitude of the oxygen enhancement ratio. Thus, heat if applied selectively, could significantly increase the margin of damage between tumors and normal tissues

  9. The effect of the malignant hyperthermia gene on carcass ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) genotype, as expressed by the halo- thane genotype, was determined on a random sample of 100 pigs originating fiom the Western Cape. The pigs were slaughtered to investigate the effect of MH genotype on certain carcass character- istics and meat quality traits. Genotypes were determined ...

  10. Effects of hyperthermia, radiotherapy and thermoradiotherapy on tumor microvasculature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Kouji

    1987-01-01

    The therapeutic effects of hyperthermia (immersion of tumor-bearing leg in a water bath at 46 deg C for 60 min), radiotherapy (500 rad or 1000 rad) and thermoradiotherapy on VX-2 tumors of the rabbits were studied morphologically. Especially, vascular morphological changes and vascular permeability to ferritin after treatment were investigated by electron microscopy. As assessed by decrease in tumor volume, local hyperthermia potentiated the destructive effect of radiotherapy. The light microscopic pictures invariably suggested prolonged necrotic tendency of tumor cells following thermoradiotherapy. Electron microscopically, 1 day and 3 days after thermoradiotherapy, small blood vessels in the tumors showed swelling and protrusion of endothelial cells in the lumen. Similar morphological changes were obtained only at 3 days after radiotherapy. When vascular permeability to ferritin was examined by electron microscopy, an increase in tumor vascular permeability was occured at 1 day after hyperthermia or thermoradiotherapy, while at 3 days after radiotherapy. These results suggest that the early reaction of tumor microvasculature may be a contributing factor to delayed cell death in tumors after hyperthermia or thermoradiotherapy. (author)

  11. Effects of hyperthermia on the hamster immune system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gangavalli, R.; Cain, C.A.; Tompkins, W.A.F.

    1984-01-01

    In previous studies, the authors have shown that hyperthermia can enhance antibody-complement chytotoxicity of hamster and human tumor cells. Moreover, whole body microwave exposure of hamsters resulted in activation of peritoneal macrophages to a viricidal state and transient suppression of natural killer (NK) cell activity. In this study, the authors compare the effects of whole body heating by microwaves or by an environmental chamber (hot air) on the hamster immune system. Microwave exposure (25mW/cm/sup 2/; 1 hr) caused viricidal activation of peritoneal macrophages which resulted in restriction of vaccinia and vesicular stomatitis virs (VSV) growth. However, heating in an environmental chamber (41 0 C; 1 hr) did not activate macrophages to a viricidal state. Both microwave and hot air hyperthermia caused significant augmentation of antibody producing spleen cell response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC), using the Jerne hymolytic plaque assay, four days post exposure and immunization with SRBC. Natural killer spleen cell cytotoxicity was suppressed by microwave and hot air hyperthermia showing that NK lymphocytes are extremely sensitive to changes in temperature. These alterations in cellular immune response due to hyperthermia could be of significance in treatment of tumors and viral infections

  12. Effect of hyperthermia on replicating chromatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warters, R.L.; Roti Roti, J.L.

    1981-01-01

    The extent of heat-induced structural alterations in chromatin containing nascent (pulse-labeled) DNA was assayed using the enzyme micrococcal nuclease. The basic nucleosome structure in nascent and mature chromatin of S-phase cells appeared unaltered for up to 16 hr after exposure to hyperthermic temperatures as high as 48 0 C for 15 min. However, the rate of nuclease digestion of DNA in both nascent and mature chromatin is inhibited following exposure to hyperthermic temperatures. In unheated cells, pulse-labeled nascent DNA matured into mature chromatin structure with a half-time of 2.5 min. The half-time for the maturation of pulse-labeled DNA from nascent into mature chromatin increased in a linear manner as a function of increasing temperature of exposure with constant heating time at temperatures above 43 0 C. Both the reduced nuclease digestibility of nascent DNA and the increased time for chromatin structural changes could be due to the increased protein mass of chromatin following hyperthermia

  13. Experimental animal studies on effects of hyperthermia on the central nervous system: an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haveman, J; Hulshof, M C.C.M. [Department of Radiotherapy, Academisch Medisch Centrum, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sminia, P [Department of Radiation Oncology, Section Radiobiology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wondergem, J [Department of Occupational Health and Risk Assessment, Leids Universitair Medisch Centrum, Leiden (Netherlands); Zee van der, J [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hyperthermia Unit, Erasmus MC - Daniel den Hoed Cancer Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2005-07-01

    Full text: From the experimental studies reported in the literature it may be concluded that the maximum tolerable heat dose in CNS is 42{sup o}C to 42.5{sup o}C for 40 to 60 min or 43{sup o}C for 10 to 30 min. This in spite of diversity in animal species studied, as well as the different endpoints for assessment of effects, the different parts of CNS treated, differences in procedures used for anesthesia, thermometry and heating techniques applied. The effects of hyperthermia are expressed immediately or within a few days after treatment and heat injury to neural tissue apparently results in neurological abnormalities which, unless lethal, are transient in most cases. Histological studies show irreversible lesions after high heat dose, characterized by coagulation necrosis. Thermal injury to normal neural tissue is repaired by fibrotic or gliotic scarring. Surviving neuronal elements my be responsible for functional recovery from heat injury, which is, however, dependent on the injured volume and anatomical site of the lesion. Hence, the data indicate a correlation between the exposed volume and toxicity of the heat treatment. The relatively high heat dose tolerated in interstitial heating can be ascribed to this volume effect, since the heated volume of normal neural tissue generally was small and not responsible for vital functions. Late effects, many months after treatment have not been reported. The spinal cord data on maximum tolerable heat dose, point in the same direction as the data on the brain. All studies show that, as with brain, the spinal cord is sensitive to heat. The maximum tolerated heat dose of the cervical part after local hyperthermia lies in the range of 40-60 min at 42-42.5{sup o}C, or less than 30 min at 43{sup o}C. No late effects were reported. The observations on neurology and heat sensitivity of the spinal cord in mice are very similar to those of the rat. There is good evidence indicating that white matter is more heat resistant than

  14. Experimental animal studies on effects of hyperthermia on the central nervous system: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haveman, J.; Hulshof, M.C.C.M.; Sminia, P.; Wondergem, J.; Zee van der, J.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: From the experimental studies reported in the literature it may be concluded that the maximum tolerable heat dose in CNS is 42 o C to 42.5 o C for 40 to 60 min or 43 o C for 10 to 30 min. This in spite of diversity in animal species studied, as well as the different endpoints for assessment of effects, the different parts of CNS treated, differences in procedures used for anesthesia, thermometry and heating techniques applied. The effects of hyperthermia are expressed immediately or within a few days after treatment and heat injury to neural tissue apparently results in neurological abnormalities which, unless lethal, are transient in most cases. Histological studies show irreversible lesions after high heat dose, characterized by coagulation necrosis. Thermal injury to normal neural tissue is repaired by fibrotic or gliotic scarring. Surviving neuronal elements my be responsible for functional recovery from heat injury, which is, however, dependent on the injured volume and anatomical site of the lesion. Hence, the data indicate a correlation between the exposed volume and toxicity of the heat treatment. The relatively high heat dose tolerated in interstitial heating can be ascribed to this volume effect, since the heated volume of normal neural tissue generally was small and not responsible for vital functions. Late effects, many months after treatment have not been reported. The spinal cord data on maximum tolerable heat dose, point in the same direction as the data on the brain. All studies show that, as with brain, the spinal cord is sensitive to heat. The maximum tolerated heat dose of the cervical part after local hyperthermia lies in the range of 40-60 min at 42-42.5 o C, or less than 30 min at 43 o C. No late effects were reported. The observations on neurology and heat sensitivity of the spinal cord in mice are very similar to those of the rat. There is good evidence indicating that white matter is more heat resistant than grey matter as data

  15. Deep RF-hyperthermia: an effective treatment of advanced gliomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahinbas, H.; Groenemeyer, D.H.W.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Contrary to the enormous efforts, results of conventional treatments of high-grade malignant gliomas are unsatisfactory. The prognosis of that tumor type is poor, its overall median survival time (MST) less than a year. Most of the cases are inoperable or only partially resectable, and their response to the various chemotherapies and/or radiotherapy is poor. The chemo-therapies which are successful for other locations often fail due to the effective brain-blood barrier (BBB). Probably the modification of the BBB by electromagnetic fields together with the direct electromagnetic-field heating are the main factors for the success of electro-hyperthermia. Primary aim of this study was to present the therapy tolerance for patients of electro-hyperthermia (EHY) for advanced malignant gliomas and as main intention to show the increase of the median survival time (MST). Our study was performed between 2000 - 2004; for patients with inoperable, partially resected or recurrent gliomas (WHO grade III and IV) with progression after radio- and/or chemotherapy and a Karnofsky Performance Score ≤30-40 %. 105 pts were involved in this study: 38 astrocytoma pts, 56 glioblastoma pts and 12 pts with other brain malignancies. All patients were heavily and unsatisfactory pretreated. EHY was applied over 4 weeks, 3 times a week over 1 hour in average by 100 Watt, as mono- or combined therapy (chemotherapy, irradiation therapy). The set of patients as well as the frequency of EHY was well documented for future evaluations. The historic reference of the MST from the first diagnosis for gliomas grade III and IV in our institute is 11.42 months (range 1-62), which is in good agreement with the relevant literature. The median survival time (MST) in our institute with EHY increases to 44.2 m, 23.2 m and 61.0 m for astrocytoma, glioblastoma and other brain malignancies, respectively. The therapy results were controlled by MRI images. EHY is a feasible treatment for advanced

  16. Interaction of the effects of hyperthermia and ionizing radiation on cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loshek, D.D.

    1976-09-01

    The literature concerning the effects of hyperthermia and radiation on cellular reproductive integrity is reviewed. The cell line and the physical and biological aspects of the experiments are described. Preliminary experiments revealed that the experimental stability was adequate for inter-experiment comparisons, provided that sufficient control data were obtained. Further experiments provided a cursory examination of several aspects of the interaction between radiation and hyperthermia. A simple sensitization model that would account for the observed results for any single value of the perturbing radiation or hyperthermia dose was developed. Using the concept of the survival surface, this simple model was expanded to describe simultaneously survivals for any combination of the radiation and hyperthermia dose. The interaction component of this model is first order in both hyperthermia exposure and radiation dose. The mechanism by which radiation contributes to the interaction was investigated by altering the radiation quality. The results suggest that high LET events contribute to the interaction. The mechanism by which hyperthermia contributes to the interaction was investigated by altering the hyperthermia temperature. A thermodynamic analysis of the data reveals parallels with the effects of hyperthermia and radiation on protein, suggesting a possible involvement of protein denaturation in cell inactivation. (author)

  17. Pharmacokinetics, Tissue Distribution and Therapeutic Effect of Cationic Thermosensitive Liposomal Doxorubicin Upon Mild Hyperthermia

    OpenAIRE

    Dicheva, Bilyana M.; Seynhaeve, Ann L. B.; Soulie, Thomas; Eggermont, Alexander M. M.; ten Hagen, Timo L. M.; Koning, Gerben A.

    2015-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To evaluate pharmacokinetic profile, biodistribution and therapeutic effect of cationic thermosensitive liposomes (CTSL) encapsulating doxorubicin (Dox) upon mild hyperthermia (HT). Methods: Non-targeted thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) and CTSL were developed, loaded with Dox and characterized. Blood kinetics and biodistribution of Dox-TSL and Dox-CTSL were followed in B16BL6 tumor bearing mice upon normothermia (NT) or initial hyperthermia conditions. Efficacy study in B...

  18. Quantifying the Combined Effect of Radiation Therapy and Hyperthermia in Terms of Equivalent Dose Distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kok, H. Petra; Crezee, Johannes; Franken, Nicolaas A.P.; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Barendsen, Gerrit W.; Bel, Arjan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a method to quantify the therapeutic effect of radiosensitization by hyperthermia; to this end, a numerical method was proposed to convert radiation therapy dose distributions with hyperthermia to equivalent dose distributions without hyperthermia. Methods and Materials: Clinical intensity modulated radiation therapy plans were created for 15 prostate cancer cases. To simulate a clinically relevant heterogeneous temperature distribution, hyperthermia treatment planning was performed for heating with the AMC-8 system. The temperature-dependent parameters α (Gy −1 ) and β (Gy −2 ) of the linear–quadratic model for prostate cancer were estimated from the literature. No thermal enhancement was assumed for normal tissue. The intensity modulated radiation therapy plans and temperature distributions were exported to our in-house-developed radiation therapy treatment planning system, APlan, and equivalent dose distributions without hyperthermia were calculated voxel by voxel using the linear–quadratic model. Results: The planned average tumor temperatures T90, T50, and T10 in the planning target volume were 40.5°C, 41.6°C, and 42.4°C, respectively. The planned minimum, mean, and maximum radiation therapy doses were 62.9 Gy, 76.0 Gy, and 81.0 Gy, respectively. Adding hyperthermia yielded an equivalent dose distribution with an extended 95% isodose level. The equivalent minimum, mean, and maximum doses reflecting the radiosensitization by hyperthermia were 70.3 Gy, 86.3 Gy, and 93.6 Gy, respectively, for a linear increase of α with temperature. This can be considered similar to a dose escalation with a substantial increase in tumor control probability for high-risk prostate carcinoma. Conclusion: A model to quantify the effect of combined radiation therapy and hyperthermia in terms of equivalent dose distributions was presented. This model is particularly instructive to estimate the potential effects of interaction from different treatment

  19. The individual and combined effects of γ rays and hyperthermia on the development of embryonic brains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yepeng; Ruan Ming; Liu Jingyuan; Hong Min; Lu Chunlin

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To observe the individual and combined effects of exposure to γ rays and hyperthermia on the development of embryonic brains. Methods: the pregnant LACA mice were exposed to 1.0 Gy 60 Co-γ rays, 42 degree C hyperthermia for 10 minutes or the two treatments combined together on day 9 of pregnancy. The females were sacrificed on day 18 of pregnancy and the fetuses were gained by cesarean section. The appearance of fetuses was observed and, then, the weight of fetal brains, the cell number of whole brains, the contents of nucleic acid and protein in brain tissue and the activity of acetylcholine esterase (AChE) in brain tissue as a marker for cholinergic neurons were determined. Results: Nervous tube defects did not occur in all groups. Compared with the control group, all the indices determined significantly declined in the radiation group while the cell number of whole brains and the AChE activity in brain tissue significantly decreased in the hyperthermia group. In the group of hyperthermia in advance, 4 hours later, followed by exposure to radiation, the AChE activity in brain tissue was significantly higher than the single radiation group. In the group of prior radiation exposure, 4 hours later, followed by hyperthermia, all the indices did not present significant difference from the single radiation group. Conclusion: The effects of 42 degree C hyperthermia for 10 minutes on the development of mouse embryo's brains are much weaker than 1.0 Gy γ radiation. It seems that the hyperthermia in advance can induce mouse fetuses to produce the cross adaptability to the following exposure to radiation. Exposure to γ radiation followed by hyperthermia does not present and additive action or a synergistic action

  20. Effect of hyperthermia in combination with radiation therapy in a rat glioma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Masaru; Zama, Akira; Kunimine, Hideo; Tamaki, Yoshio; Niibe, Hideo

    1988-01-01

    Rat glioma model was used to evaluate the effect of hyperthermia with and without radiation therapy. The animal model was induced by left frontal burr hole opening and inoculation of a small piece of G-XII glioma tissue to 6- to 8-week-old rats. The therapeutical experiments were given 10 - 14 days after inoculation of the tumor. Interstitial heating at 44 and 45 deg C at the surface of the inserting probe using 2450 MHz microwave was delivered for 30 minutes. Deep X-ray whole head irradiation of 800 R using Stabilipan 2 (Siemens) was given just after the hyperthermia therapy. The survival of treated animals of hyperthermia, radiation, and combination of hyperthermia and radiation was significantly superior to that of non-treated control group. There was no significant difference of survival among the treated groups, though median survival was longest in the group of combination therapy of hyperthermia and radiation. Large tumors developed at the time of death in all the control and the treated animals. Histological examination showed some tendencies of macrophage infiltration in tumor tissue of hyperthermia therapy. (author)

  1. Effect of hyperthermia on radiation damage and its repair in Tribolium confusum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, P.K.

    1977-01-01

    A series of temperature tolerance curves from 43.5 0 C to 46.0 0 C in 0.5 0 C increment were determined. Two non-lethal hyperthermia schemes, i.e., 45.0 0 C for 2 hr and 43.0 0 C for 2 hr were chosen to examine the sensitizing effect of heat on lethality produced by radiation in flour beetles. When hyperthermia was applied either immediately before or after irradiation, the sensitizing effect of hyperthermia was indicated by the shifting of the regression line of survival in probits on dose to the left of that of the control. The sensitizing effect as measured by decreased LD 50 did not reveal any definite trend related to the order of application of the two modalities in immediate sequence. The effect of hyperthermia was more dramatic in dose-fractionation experiments. Flour beetles exhibited typical Elkind kinetics of split-dose repair and recovery, and the amount of the sparing effect of dose-fractionation (sdf) was influenced by interfraction temperature. Both interfraction hypothermia (i.e., less than or equal to 10 0 C) and interfraction hyperthermia (i.e., > 42.0 0 C) completely suppress sdf. However, the mechanism involved in the suppression of sdf by hypothermia was different than that by hyperthermia. In the former, the suppression of sdf was reversible immediately upon return to the normal incubation temperature of 30 0 C; in the latter, the suppression of sdf was protracted and the reversibility of sdf depended on the severity of the hyperthermia treatment. Hyperthermia of 43.0 0 C for 2 hr, applied either immediately before or after the first radiation dose, suppressed sdf for 6-10 hr, and then sdf reappeared slowly, so that the final level of survival was slightly less than that of the comparable groups maintained at 30 0 C. With the more severe hyperthermia treatment of 45.0 0 C for 2 hr, sdf was suppressed for almost 36 hr after return to 30 0 C although there were some slight surges in survival

  2. Effects of intraoperative irradiation and intraoperative hyperthermia on canine sciatic nerve: neurologic and electrophysiologic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Gillette, Sharon M.; Powers, Barbara E.; Stukel, Therese A.; LaRue, Susan M.; Gillette, Edward L.; Borak, Thomas B.; Scott, Robert J.; Weiss, Julia; Colacchio, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Late radiation injury to peripheral nerve may be the limiting factor in the clinical application of intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). The combination of IORT with intraoperative hyperthermia (IOHT) raises specific concerns regarding the effects on certain normal tissues such as peripheral nerve, which might be included in the treatment field. The objective of this study was to compare the effect of IORT alone to the effect of IORT combined with IOHT on peripheral nerve in normal beagle dogs. Methods and Materials: Young adult beagle dogs were randomized into five groups of three to five dogs each to receive IORT doses of 16, 20, 24, 28, or 32 Gy to 5 cm of surgically exposed right sciatic nerve using 6 MeV electrons and six groups of four to five dogs each received IORT doses of 0, 12, 16, 20, 24, or 28 Gy simultaneously with 44 deg. C of IOHT for 60 min. IOHT was performed using a water circulating hyperthermia device with a multichannel thermometry system on the surgically exposed sciatic nerve. Neurologic and electrophysiologic examinations were done before and monthly after treatment for 24 months. Electrophysiologic studies included electromyographic (EMG) examinations of motor function, as well as motor nerve conduction velocities studies. Results: Two years after treatment, the effective dose for 50% complication (ED 50 ) for limb paresis in dogs exposed to IORT only was 22 Gy. The ED 50 for paresis in dogs exposed to IORT combined with IOHT was 15 Gy. The thermal enhancement ratio (TER) was 1.5. Electrophysiologic studies showed more prominent changes such as EMG abnormalities, decrease in conduction velocity and amplitude of the action potential, and complete conduction block in dogs that received the combination of IORT and IOHT. The latency to development of peripheral neuropathies was shorter for dogs exposed to the combined treatment. Conclusion: The probability of developing peripheral neuropathies in a large animal model was higher

  3. The effect of hypofractionated radiation and magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia on tumor immunogenicity and overall treatment response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoopes, P. Jack; Wagner, Robert J.; Song, Ailin; Osterberg, Bjorn; Gladstone, David J.; Bursey, Alicea A.; Fiering, Steven N.; Giustini, Andrew J.

    2017-02-01

    It is now known that many tumors develop molecular signals (immune checkpoint modulators) that inhibit an effective tumor immune response. New information also suggest that even well-known cancer treatment modalities such as radiation and hyperthermia generate potentially beneficial immune responses that have been blocked or mitigated by such immune checkpoints, or similar molecules. The cancer therapy challenge is to; a) identify these treatment-based immune signals (proteins, antigens, etc.); b) the treatment doses or regimens that produce them; and c) the mechanisms that block or have the potential to promote them. The goal of this preliminary study, using the B6 mouse - B16 tumor model, clinically relevant radiation doses and fractionation schemes (including those used clinically in hypofractionated radiation therapy), magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPH) and sophisticated protein, immune and tumor growth analysis techniques and modulators, is to determine the effect of specific radiation or hyperthermia alone and combined on overall treatment efficacy and immunologic response mechanisms. Preliminary analysis suggests that radiation dose (10 Gy vs. 2 Gy) significantly alters the mechanism of cell death (apoptosis vs. mitosis vs. necrosis) and the resulting immunogenicity. Our hypothesis and data suggest this difference is protein/antigen and immune recognition-based. Similarly, our evidence suggest that radiation doses larger than the conventional 2 Gy dose and specific hyperthermia doses and techniques (including mNP hyperthermia treatment) can be immunologically different, and potentially superior to, the radiation and heat therapy regimens that are typically used in research and clinical practice.

  4. Effect of hypothermia on cell kinetics and response to hyperthermia and x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Rijn, J.; van den Berg, J.; Kipp, J.B.A.; Schamhart, D.H.J.; van Wijk, R.

    1985-01-01

    Hyperthermia is a potent radio enhancer. Studies using hypothermia in combination with irradiation have given confusing results due to lack of uniformity in experimental design. This report shows that hypothermia might have potential significance in the treatment of malignant cells with both thermo- and radiotherapy. Reuber H35 hepatoma cells, clone KRC-7 were used to study the effect of hypothermia on cell kinetics and subsequent response to hyperthermia and/or X rays. Cells were incubated at 8.5 0 C or between 25 and 37 0 C for 24 hr prior to hyperthermia or irradiation. Hypothermia caused sensitization to both hyperthermia and X rays. In contrast to the effect of hypothermia on either hyperthermia or X rays alone, thermal radiosensitization was decreased in hypothermically pretreated cells (24 hr at 25 0 C) compared to control cells (37 0 C). The expression of thermotolerance and the rate of development at 37 0 C after an initial heating at 42.5 0 C were not influenced after preincubation at 25 0 C for 24 hr. The expression of thermotolerance for heat or heat plus X rays during incubation at 41 0 C occurred in a significantly smaller number of cells after 24 hr preincubation at 25 0 C. The enhanced thermo- and radiosensitivity in hypothermically treated cells disappeared in approximately 6 hr after return to 37 0 C

  5. Late somatic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.

    1989-01-01

    Late effects are by definition effects that occur at least one year, and in most cases decades, after the time of exposure. The late effects considered in this chapter are limited to latent cancer incidence and mortality, and benign thyroid disease. A model is provided for estimating risks of late effects resulting from the radiation exposure likely to be received in the event of a nuclear power plant accident. It is assumed that exposure to high-LET radiation would be negligible in such an accident, and thus only risks from low-LET exposure are evaluated. Separate estimates are provided for risks of leukemia, bone cancer, lung cancer, gastrointestinal cancers, thyroid cancer, skin cancer, and the residual group of all other cancers; estimates of leukemia and other cancers due to in utero exposure are also provided. Risks are expressed in absolute terms as the number of cancer deaths (or cases) per million persons exposed to a particular dose. Because the time of death is also important in assessing the impact of an accident, and because the quality of life after the occurrence of cancer will often be reduced, the number of years of life lost and the number of years of life lived after the occurrence of cancer are also estimated

  6. Coping – Late Side Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer treatment can cause late side effects that may not show up for months or years after treatment. These late effects may include heart and lung problems, bone loss, eye and hearing changes, lymphedema, and other problems

  7. Effects of hyperthermia on radiation-induced chromosome breakage and loss in excision repair deficient Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittler, S.

    1986-01-01

    Hyperthermia increased radiosensitivity with respect to γ-ray induced chromosome loss and breakage in all stages of spermatogenesis in the wild type Oregon R strain of Drosophila melanogaster, whereas hyperthermia increased radiosensitivity to a lesser extent in cn mus(2) 201sup(D1), an excision repair mutant with 0 per cent excision capacity and in mus(3) 308sup(D1), a strain with 24 per cent excision capacity. The differences in hyperthermia-induced radiation sensitivity between the excision repair mutants and the wild strain may be due to the hyperthermia affecting the excision repair mechanism, suggesting that one of the possible mechanisms involved in hyperthermia-increased radiosensitivity is an effect on excision repair. (author)

  8. Effects of hyperthermia on the normal liver using scintigraphic methods. Functional changes of the rabbit whole-liver by local hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Kiyotaka; Shinotsuka, Akira; Takenaka, Hiroki; Hirono, Yoshisada

    1995-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate effect of hyperthermia to the liver in rabbits. The whole liver was heated at 43degC for 30 min by a RF capacitive heating device, and subsequent changes were observed by scintigraphy using 99m Tc-EHIDA and 99m Tc-Sn-colloid. The excretory ratio (Ke value) of 99m Tc-EHIDA and the uptake ratio (K value) of 99m Tc-Sn-colloid were measured to estimate hyperthermia induced hepatic injury for a month. Blood chemistry analysis was also conducted during this period. Also, the uptake of 3 H-methyl-thymidine into the DNA of hepatocyted was assayed 2 and 5 days after heating. Concurrently, histopathological changes were observed. The Ke value showed a transient increase and returned to the level prior to heating after approximately one week. A distinct increase in GPT was observed. The uptake of 3 H-methyl-thymidine showed a marked rise 2 days after hyperthermia, which demonstrated regeneration of the previously damaged hepatocytes. Pathologically, overall liver congestion and hepatocytes necrosis were noted. Also, both enlargement of the nuclei and binuclear hepatocytes were present, pathologically proving hepatocytes regeneration. The K value showed a transient decrease, showing that the reticuloendothelial function and blood flow of the liver were temporarily reduced. These results indicate the whole liver function damaged by hyperthermia is reversible. (author)

  9. Effects of hyperthermia and radiation on mouse testis stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, B.O.; Mason, K.A.; Withers, H.R.; West, J.

    1981-01-01

    The response of mouse testis stem cells to hyperthermia and combined hyperthermia-radiation treatments was assayed by spermatogenic colony regrowth, sperm head counts, testis weight loss, and fertility. With the use of spermatogenic colony assay, thermal enhancement ratios at an isosurvival level of 0.1 were 1.27 at 41 degrees, 1.80 at 42 degrees, and 3.97 at 43 degrees for testes exposed to heat for 30 min prior to irradiation. Sperm head counts were reduced by heat alone from a surviving fraction of 0.58 at 41 degrees to 0.003 at 42.5-43.5 degrees. Curves for sperm head survival measured 56 days after the testes had been heated for 30 min prior to irradiation were biphasic and showed a progressive downward displacement to lower survival with increasing temperature. The 41, 42, and 43 degrees curves were displaced downward by factors of 2, 58, and 175, respectively. The proportion of animals remaining sterile after 30 min of heat (41-43 degrees) and the median sterility period in days increased with increasing temperature. The minimum sperm count necessary to regain fertility was 13% of the normal mouse level

  10. Late somatic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.

    1985-01-01

    A model is provided for estimating risks of late effects resulting from low-LET radiation exposure likely to be received in the event of a nuclear power plant accident. Separate estimates are provided for risks of leukemia, cancers of the bones, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, thyroid, skin, and the residual group of all other cancers; estimates of leukemia and other cancers due to in utero exposure are also provided. Risks are expressed in absolute terms as the number of cancer deaths (or cases) per million persons exposed to a particular dose. In addition, the number of years of life lost and the number of years of life lived after the occurrence of cancer are also estimated. The model used in the earlier Reactor Safety Study has been modified to reflect additional epidemiological data and these changes are described in detail. 37 references, 1 figure, 13 tables

  11. Effects of hyperthermia on repair of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, M.D.; Meyn, R.E.

    1981-01-01

    Previous reports have suggested a relationship between the heat-induced changes in nucleoprotein and the hyperthermic enhancement of radiation sensitivity. In an effort to further understand these relationships, we measured the level of initial DNA strand break damage and the DNA strand break rejoining kinetics in Chinese hamster ovary cells following combined hyperthermia and ionizing radiation treatments. The amount of protein associated with DNA measured as the ratio of [ 3 H)leucine to [ 14 C]thymidine was also compared in chromatin isolated from both heated and unheated cells. The results of these experiments show that the initial level of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks is significantly enhanced by a prior hyperthermia treatment of 43 0 C for 30 min. Treatments at higher temperatures and longer treatments at the same temperature magnified this effect. Hyperthermia was also shown to cause a substantial inhibition of the DNA strand break rejoining after irradiation. Both the initial level of DNA damage and the rejoining kinetics recovered to normal levels with incubation at 37 0 C between the hyperthermia and radiation treatments. Recovery of these parameters coincided with the return of the amount of protein associated with DNA to normal values, further suggesting a relationship between the changes in nucleoprotein and the hyperthermic enhancement of radiation sensivivity

  12. Effects of hyperthermia and X-irradiation on mouse stromal tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.

    1986-01-01

    The sensitivity of normal stroma to heat, irradiation and heat combined with irradiation, was studied using the tumour bed effect (TBE) assay. Irradiation before implantation led to a TBE, dose dependent below 15 Gy, but remaining relatively constant above. The interval (0-90 days) between irradiation and tumour implantation did not influence the magnitude of the TBE. Hyperthermia with large heat doses (45-60 min at 44 0 C) before implantation may lead to a TBE. The interval between hyperthermia and tumour implantation was very important. Results showed that the recovery from heat-induced stromal damage is very rapid. When the interval between hyperthermia and tumour implantation was 10 days or longer, no TBE could be observed. Irradiation combined with large heat doses (30-60 min at 44 0 C) decreased the radiation-induced TBE. The combination of irradiation with mild heat treatments (15 min at 44 0 C) could lead to a larger TBE then after irradiation alone. When hyperthermia was given prior to irradiation, the interval between heat and irradiation proved to be very important. With large intervals (21 days or longer), TBE values were about the same as with irradiation alone. When heat was given after irradiation, irradiation-induced TBE was always reduced. (UK)

  13. Hyperthermia: an effective strategy to induce apoptosis in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Kanwal; Tabuchi, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Takashi

    2015-11-01

    Heat has been used as a medicinal and healing modality throughout human history. The combination of hyperthermia (HT) with radiation and anticancer agents has been used clinically and has shown positive results to a certain extent. However, the clinical results of HT treatment alone have been only partially satisfactory. Cell death following HT treatment is a function of both temperature and treatment duration. HT induces cancer cell death through apoptosis; the degree of apoptosis and the apoptotic pathway vary in different cancer cell types. HT-induced reactive oxygen species production are responsible for apoptosis in various cell types. However, the underlying mechanism of signal transduction and the genes related to this process still need to be elucidated. In this review, we summarize the molecular mechanism of apoptosis induced by HT, enhancement of heat-induced apoptosis, and the genetic network involved in HT-induced apoptosis.

  14. The effects of hyperthermia on the immunomodulatory properties of human umbilical cord vein mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesami, Shilan; Mohammadi, Mehdi; Rezaee, Mohamad Ali; Jalili, Ali; Rahmani, Mohammad Reza

    2017-11-01

    Hyperthermia can modulate inflammation and the immune response. Based on the recruitment of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to inflamed tissues and the immunomodulatory properties of these cells, the aim of this study was to examine the effects of hyperthermia on the immunomodulatory properties of MSCs in a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Passages 4-6 of human umbilical cord vein mesenchymal stem cells were co-cultured in a two-way MLR. Cells in the hyperthermia groups were incubated at 41 °C for 45 min. A colorimetric assay was employed to examine the effects of MSCs on cell proliferation. The levels of IL-4 and TNF-α proteins in the cell culture supernatant were measured, and non-adherent cells were used for RNA extraction, which was then used for cDNA synthesis. RT-PCR was utilised to assess levels of IL-10, IL-17A, IL-4, TNF-α, TGF-β1, FOX P 3 , IFN-γ, CXCL12 and β-actin mRNA expression. UCV-MSCs co-cultured in an MLR reduced lymphocyte proliferation at 37 °C, whereas hyperthermia attenuated this effect. Hyperthermia increased expression of IL-10, TGF-β1 and FOXP3 mRNAs in co-culture; however, no effects on IL-17A and IFN-γ were observed, and it reduced CXCL12 expression. In co-culture, IL-4 mRNA and protein increased at 37 °C, an effect that was reduced by hyperthermia. No considerable change in TNF-α mRNA expression was found in hyperthermia-treated cells. Hyperthermia increases cell proliferation of the peripheral blood mononuclear cells and modifies the cytokine profile in the presence of UCV-MSCs.

  15. Hyperthermia and chemotherapy agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roizin-Towle, L.; Hall, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The use of chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of cancer dates back to the late 19th century, but the modern era of chemotherapy drugs was ushered in during the 1940's with the development of the polyfunctional alkylating agent. Since then, numerous classes of drugs have evolved and the combined use of antineoplastic agents with other treatment modalities such as radiation or heat, remains a large relatively unexplored area. This approach, combining local hyperthermia with chemotherapy agents affords a measure of targeting and selective toxicity not previously available for drugs. In this paper, the effects of adriamycin, bleomycin and cis-platinum are examined. The adjuvant use of heat may also reverse the resistance of hypoxic cells noted for some chemotherapy agents

  16. Cellular radiation effects and hyperthermia cell cycle kinetics of radiation sensitive mutants of saccharomyces cerevisiae after x-irradiation and hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingerhut, R.; Kiefer, J.; Otto, F.

    1983-01-01

    Radiosensitive mutants rad2, rad9, and rad51 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were X-irradiated with 120 Gy or 60 Gy, heated at 50 0 C for 30 min or treated with a combination of both and incubated in nutrient medium at 30 0 C. Cell number, percentage of budding cells, and cell cycle progression were determined in 45-min intervals. Cell cycle kinetics were investigated by flow cytofluorometry. Hyperthermia leads mainly to a lengthening of G1, whereas X-rays arrest cells of the rad2 and rad9 mutant in G2 and the rad51 - mutant additionaly in a state with DNA contents above G2. Cell division dealy is influenced by oxygen in all strains but to a lesser extent in the rad2 mutant. The effect of the combined treatment appears to be merely additive in the rad2 and rad9 mutant while the rad51 mutant is sensitized to X-irradiation by hyperthermia. No selective action of hyperthermia on hypoxic cells was found. (orig.)

  17. Hyperthermia effects in the presence of gold nanoparticles together with chemotherapy on Saos-2 cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazgarnia, A.; Bahreyni Toosi, M. H.; Haji Ghahremani, F.; Rajabi, O.; Aledavood, A.; Esmaily, H.

    2011-01-01

    Hyperthermia created by microwave, infrared, ultrasound and other methods, is often utilized as an adjuvant to sensitize cancer cells to the effects of chemotherapy and radiation therapy. We investigated the efficacy of hyperthermia using microwave in synergy with chemotherapy in the presence and absence and gold nanoparticles. Material and Methods: After culturing and proliferation of the Saos-2 cell line derived from human osteogenic sarcoma, the cells were incubated at two concentrations of gold nanoparticles in two diameters of 20 and 40 nm and in the absence and presence of doxorubicin in different groups. Forty eight hours after irradiating the cells with microwave up to a temperature of 42 d egree C , cell survival rate was determined using the MTT method, in order to study the effectiveness of the therapeutic parameters. Results: Cell survival in the presence of gold nanoparticles was greater than 95%. After chemotherapy by doxorubicin with and without 40 nm gold nanoparticles, cell survival rates were determined as 62.8% and 37.1 %, declining down to 17% and 4.1% respectively following the combined treatment with microwave and chemotherapy in the presence of 20 and 40 nm gold nanoparticles. Discussion and Conclusions: Gold nanoparticles did not induce any cytotoxicity by themselves; their presence along with microwave provided a reduction in survival rate that was comparable in severity with the lethal effects of doxorubicin. microwave hyperthermia with gold nanoparticles produced a higher treatment efficiency in comparison to similar groups in which gold nanoparticles were absent. The synergism observed between hyperthermia and chemotherapy was dependent in gold nanoparticles' size and concentration. This finding could be caused by increased uptake of doxorubicin by the cells in the presence of gold nanoparticles.

  18. Cellular radiation effects and hyperthermia: Cytokinetic investigations with stationary phase yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingerhut, R.; Otto, F.; Oldiges, H.; Kiefer, J.

    1980-01-01

    Wild type diploid yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 211, was subjected to 250 kV X-rays or 50 0 C heat treatment for 30 min or to a combination of both. X-ray exposure took place either in air or in nitrogen. Cell number, percentage of budding cells and cell cycle progression was followed for up to 12 h post irradiation. The distribution of cell cycle stages was determined by flow cytofluorometry. All treatments cause a retardation of cell division rate. Hyperthermia leads mainly to a lengthening of G 1 , whereas X-rays arrest the cells reversibly in G 2 . The effect of the combined treatment appears to be merely additive. No selective action of hyperthermia on hypoxic cells was found. (orig.) [de

  19. Effects of methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) on tumour and skin responses to hyperthermia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyakoshi, J.; Oda, W.; Inagaki, C.; Hiraoka, M.; Takahashi, M.; Abe, M.

    1984-01-01

    Effects of methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) on tumour and skin responses to hyperthermia (42degC) were examined in C3H mice. MGBG (50 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to mice 4 hours before hyperthermic treatment. The tumour (FM3A) growth time was elongated by an amount dependent on the exposure time of treatment at 42degC (60, 90 and 120 min). Pre-treatment of mice with MGBG (50 mg/kg, i.p.) apparently further lengthened the tumour growth time after treatment at 42degC. No significant damage of foot skin was caused by 42degC hyperthermia. Pre-treatment with MGBG did not make the foot skin susceptible to the heating. From these findings, it can be considered that MGBG or related less-toxic compounds may have a clinical advantage for the mild (42degC) hyperthermic treatment in cancer therapy. (author)

  20. Effects of methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) on tumour and skin responses to hyperthermia in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyakoshi, J.; Oda, W.; Inagaki, C. (Kyoto Coll. of Pharmacy (Japan)); Hiraoka, M.; Takahashi, M.; Abe, M. (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1984-09-01

    Effects of methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) on tumour and skin responses to hyperthermia (42degC) were examined in C3H mice. MGBG (50 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to mice 4 hours before hyperthermic treatment. The tumour (FM3A) growth time was elongated by an amount dependent on the exposure time of treatment at 42degC (60, 90 and 120 min). Pre-treatment of mice with MGBG (50 mg/kg, i.p.) apparently further lengthened the tumour growth time after treatment at 42degC. No significant damage of foot skin was caused by 42degC hyperthermia. Pre-treatment with MGBG did not make the foot skin susceptible to the heating. From these findings, it can be considered that MGBG or related less-toxic compounds may have a clinical advantage for the mild (42degC) hyperthermic treatment in cancer therapy.

  1. Effects of X-ray irradiation combined with hyperthermia on human bone marrow cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Huaijiang; Niu Rongjiu; Liu Xiaodong; Liu Huanqin

    1996-01-01

    The authors report on the effects of X-ray irradiation combined with hyperthermia on human bone marrow cells (BMC) in vitro. Observation was made on the morphology of treated cells under optic microscope and ultrastructural changes under electron microscope. The change was not obvious at first after treatment i,e, only the vacuolar degeneration was observed in a few cells under the EM. The survival of BMC alone after irradiation decreased with increase of the irradiation dose. The morphological changes included vacuolar degeneration of cells, swelling of mitochondria, and disintegration of nuclear membranes. The survival rate of BMC after irradiation combined with hyperthermia was significantly lower than that after treatment by either of them alone (P<0.01). The morphological changes were as follows: the cell structure was destroyed, the cell support system and cell organelles were destroyed, the cell membrane and nuclear membranes were destroyed, and the cell plasma and nuclear sap overflowed

  2. Effect of prior hyperthermia on subsequent thermal enhancement of radiation damage in mouse intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marigold, J.C.L.; Hume, S.P.

    1982-01-01

    Hyperthermia given in conjunction with X-rays results in a greater level of radiation injury than following X-rays alone, giving a thermal enhancement ratio (TER). The effect of prior hyperthermia ('priming') on TER was studied in the small intestine of mouse by giving 42.0 deg C for 1 hour at various times before the combined heat and X-ray treatments. Radiation damage was assessed by measuring crypt survival 4 days after radiation. TER was reduced when 'priming' hyperthermia was given 24-48 hours before the combined treatments. The reduction in effectiveness of the second heat treatment corresponded to a reduction in hyperthermal temperature of approximately 0.5 deg C, a value similar to that previously reported for induced resistance to heat given alone ('thermotolerance') (Hume and Marigold 1980). However, the time courses for development and decay of the TER response were much longer than those for 'thermotolerance', suggesting that different mechanisms are involved in thermal damage following heat alone and thermal enhancement of radiation damage

  3. Effect of hyperthermia on blood flow in VX2 tumor transplanted in rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arita, Takeshi

    1994-01-01

    Effect of hyperthermia on blood flow was evaluated using VX 2 rabbit carcinoma in both legs. Microwave energy at 2450 MHz was used to heat tumors for 40 minutes. An outer canula of 18 G Erasta was implanted in the depth of 2 cm in tumor to measure the temperature and to maintain at 43.0degC-44.0degC. The blood flow in tumors was evaluated by color doppler flow imaging and dynamic MRI. Disturbance of blood flow in the depth of surface 0 cm to 2 cm in tumors was showed at 10 minutes starting 43.0degC heating and at almost all sites disappearance of blood flow was showed at 40 minutes using color doppler flow imaging. But the blood flow beyond the depth of 2 cm was not so disturbed at 40 minutes, relatively. After hyperthermia T1WI and T2WI in heated tumor were no difference comparing with those in control tumor, but heated tumor showed no enhancement using dynamic MRI with TURBO-FLASH technique and post-enhanced T1WI. Histologically, there was extensive tumor necrosis and thrombus formation in heated tumor after 3 days and 1 week. Therefore color doppler flow imaging and dynamic MRI were considered to be useful for evaluation of blood flow in tumor after and during hyperthermia. (author)

  4. The effect of hyperthermia and radiation on lysosomal enzyme activity of mouse mammary tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barratt, G.M.; Wills, E.D.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of hyperthermia and radiation have been studied on the acid phosphatase and β-glucuronidase activities in lysosomes of C3H mice mammary tumours and of the spleen. Quantitative histochemical methods have been used. Hyperthermic treatment of both spontaneous and transplanted tumours caused an increase in the activity of both acid phosphatase and β-glucuronase when measured immediately after treatment, but the activities returned to normal after 24 hours. In contrast a radiation dose of 3500 rad did not cause an increase in activity of either enzyme immediately, but a large activation was observed after 24 hr. Combination of hyperthermic and radiation treatment caused increases in enzyme activities which were dependent on the time after treatment. Hyperthermic treatment of the lower body of mice bearing tumours also caused activation of lysosomal enzymes in the spleen. This may be hormone mediated. It is considered that the increased lysosomal enzyme activity observed after hyperthermia may be a consequence of increased permeability of the lysosomal membrane caused by hyperthermia. (author)

  5. Late effects from hadron therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, Eleanor A.; Chang, Polly Y.

    2004-06-01

    Successful cancer patient survival and local tumor control from hadron radiotherapy warrant a discussion of potential secondary late effects from the radiation. The study of late-appearing clinical effects from particle beams of protons, carbon, or heavier ions is a relatively new field with few data. However, new clinical information is available from pioneer hadron radiotherapy programs in the USA, Japan, Germany and Switzerland. This paper will review available data on late tissue effects from particle radiation exposures, and discuss its importance to the future of hadron therapy. Potential late radiation effects are associated with irradiated normal tissue volumes at risk that in many cases can be reduced with hadron therapy. However, normal tissues present within hadron treatment volumes can demonstrate enhanced responses compared to conventional modes of therapy. Late endpoints of concern include induction of secondary cancers, cataract, fibrosis, neurodegeneration, vascular damage, and immunological, endocrine and hereditary effects. Low-dose tissue effects at tumor margins need further study, and there is need for more acute molecular studies underlying late effects of hadron therapy.

  6. Effect of radiation combined with hyperthermia on human prostatic carcinoma cell lines in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaver, I.; Ware, J.L.; Wilson, J.D.; Koontz, W.W. Jr.

    1991-01-01

    The effect of radiation combined with heat on three human prostatic carcinoma cell lines growing in vitro was investigated. Cells were exposed to different radiation doses followed by heat treatment at 43 degrees C for one hour. Heat treatment, given ten minutes after radiation, significantly enhanced the radiation response of all the cell lines studied. The combined effect of radiation and heat produced greater cytotoxicity than predicted from the additive effects of the two individual treatment modalities alone. These results indicate that a combined treatment regimen of radiation plus hyperthermia (43 degrees, 1 hr) might be an important tool in maintaining a better local control of prostatic cancer

  7. Effects of hyperthermia applied to previously irradiated cervical spinal cord in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sminia, P.; Haveman, J.; Koedoder, C.

    1991-01-01

    Rat cervical spinal cord was X-ray irradiated at doses of 15, 18, 20 and 26 Gy. Approximately the same part of the spinal cord was heated by means of a 434 MHz microwave applicator 90 days later. After treatment, animals were observed for 18 months, for expression of neurological complications. These could either be result of the heat or of the radiation treatment. The time course showed 3 distinct peaks in the incidence of neurological symptoms. The 1st peak was due to the acute response to hyperthermia. The ED 50 value for neurological complications one day after treatment at 42.3±0.4 o C was 74 ±2 min. Previous X-ray irradiation of spinal cord with 18, 20 and 26 Gy reduced ED 50 to 57±7,65±4 and 55±5 min (12-26% of control), resp. Recovery from heat-induced neurological complications was diminished in previously irradiated animals. The 2nd peak (150-300 days after X-rays) concerned expression of 'early-delayed' radiation damage. Hyperthermia given in 90 days after irradiation did not influence either the percentage of animals with paralysis or the latent period. Neurological symptoms developing after day 300 were due to the late delayed radiation response. Significant difference was not observed in data on paralysis induced by radiation alone or radiation followed by heat. The late radiation-induced minor neurological symptoms, were however, influenced by retreatment with heat. (author). 30 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  8. Effect of combined radiotherapy, hyperthermia, radioprotective agent and hypoxic cell sensitizer on mice testes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Yasuhiko

    1985-08-01

    Application of hyperthermia was executed by immersing pelvis, testes and legs of mice in a thermostatically controlled water bath. Irradiation was carried out using Toshiba KXC-18 type X-ray therapy machine. Mice were killed 30 days after treatment. The testis weights obtained after hypertheramia alone were compared with that of the control and the relative testis weight ratios were calculated. The testis weights of mice treated for 5, 10, 20 and 40 min. in 40 deg C water and for 5 and 10 min. in 43 deg C water were not significantly different from the control. Their weights were reduced when treated for 20 min. in 43 deg C water and for 5 min. in 46 deg C water and their testis weight ratios were 0.81 and 0.46, respectively. The testis weights of irradiated mice decreased to about 45 % of the control at 250 rad. Beyond this dose, reduction of their weights was slowed down and testis weight at 1,000 rad was 28 %. There was not significantly difference between the relative testis weight ratios of the irradiation alone and that of the radiotherapy combined with YM-08310 (S-2-)3-aminopropylamino) ethyl phosphorothioic acid monohydrate). But when hyperthermia was added to their treatment, the effectiveness of the YM-08310 was slightly increased. The relative testis weight ratio on 400 rad X-ray combined with YM-08310 was 0.32 of the control, while its ratio on the radiotherapy and YM-08310 combined with the hyperthermia (43 deg C, 10 min.) was 0.43. (p < 0.01). The misonidazole treatments at 50, 100 and 200 rads were found to be effectuve. Radiation alone gave the relative testis weight ratios of 0.78, 0.71 and 0.49, respectively. In contrast, its ratios on the irradiation combined with the misonidazole were 0.57 (p < 0.01), 0.46 (p < 0.01) and 0.41 (p < 0.001). But, the additional hyperthermia combined with their treatment was found to be ineffective. (J.P.N.).

  9. Effects of misonidazole, irradiation and hyperthermia on lysosomal enzyme activity in mouse tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barratt, G.M.; Wills, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    Male C3H mice bearing transplanted tumours were treated with hyperthermia, gamma radiation and the radiosensitising drug misonidazole. The activity of tumour lysosomal acid phosphatase and β-glucuronidase was determined using quantitative cytochemical techniques which measure both lysosomal membrane permeability and enzyme activity. Misonidazole had no effect on the membrane permeability or enzyme activity of tumour lysosomes 1 hr after injection; but 25 hr after the drug treatment the permeability of the lysosomal membrane to the substrate was increased to 1.7 times control. Increases in the lysosomal enzyme activity and membrane permeability were observed 1 hr after combined treatment with misonidazole and irradiation, although neither the drug nor irradiation given alone affected the lysosomes 1 hr after treatment. Twenty-five hours after treatment of tumours with misonidazole given 25 minutes before irradiation of tumours, permeability of the lysosomal membrane had increased to 2.3 times the control. The effects of the irradiation and the radio-sensitisers were thus synergistic. Hyperthermic treatment of tumours increased and misonidazole decreased the lysosomal membrane permeability and enzyme activity measured immediately after exposure. Thus misonidazole and irradiation act synergistically to cause increased lysosomal activity but misonidazole depresses the effect of hyperthermia on lysosomes. (author)

  10. Effect of hyperthermia and radiation on the cell cycle progression of HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Nobuo

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hyperthermia and irradiation on cytokinetics was studied using exponentially growing HeLa cells. To determine the effect of heat and/or radiation on the cell cycle progression, the changes in the DNA distribution of the cell population after time intervals after treatment were studied. The cellular DNA content of the cell population was measured by flow cytometry. The results obtained were as follows: 1. Compared with the control, the cellular DNA content distribution of HeLa cells treated with 43 0 C for 20 min and 60 min showed cell accumulation in S and G 2 M phases 8 hours after treatment. 2. Hyperthermic treatment at 45 0 C for 20 min caused cells to accumulate in S phase in the first 4 hours and G 2 M phase after 8 to 14.5 hours, whereas heat treatment at 45 0 C for 60 min caused cells to accumulate in G 2 M phase after 24 hours. 3. Irradiation of exponentially growing cells induced a block in the progress from G 2 M to G 1 phase. 4. Dose survival curves of HeLa cells with and without postirradiation thermal treatment (43 0 C, 60 min) showed significant enhancement of radiosensitivity by hyperthermia. 5. The sequential treatment, i.e. 5 Gy irradiation followed immediately by heat treatment at 43 0 C for 60 min, caused more cells to accumulate in G 2 M phase after 24 and 48 hours, as compared with 5 Gy irradiation alone. (author)

  11. Magnetic hyperthermia properties of iron oxide nanoparticles: The effect of concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimisadr, Saeid; Aslibeiki, Bagher; Asadi, Reza

    2018-06-01

    We investigated the effect of concentration on magnetic hyperthermia properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles (NPs). The NPs were synthesized by co-precipitation method at 80 °C. Scanning electron microscope image showed that the mean diameter of NPs is about 18 nm. The XRD pattern indicated that the sample is pure Fe3O4 with spinel structure and the FT-IR spectroscopy confirmed formation of metal-oxygen bonds in the octahedral and tetrahedral spinel sub-lattice which further confirmed crystalline structure of the sample. The hyperthermia property of Fe3O4 NPs was investigated via an induction heater generating alternating magnetic field with frequency of 92 kHz. The temperature rise (ΔT) of suspension in the AC magnetic field was studied on different concentrations of NPs and the specific absorption rate (SAR) was obtained from Box-Lucas equation and linear fitting of ΔT-time curve. The results showed that the ΔT sharply increases with increasing the NPs concentration while the SAR remains almost constant.

  12. Effects of intraoperative irradiation (IORT) and intraoperative hyperthermia (IOHT) on canine sciatic nerve: histopathological and morphometric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vujaskovic, Zeljko; Powers, Barbara E.; Paardekoper, Gabriel; Gillette, Sharon M.; Gillette, Edward L.; Colacchio, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Peripheral neuropathies have emerged as the major dose-limiting complication reported after intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). The combination of IORT with hyperthermia may further increase the risk of peripheral nerve injury. The objective of this study was to evaluate histopathological and histomorphometric changes in the sciatic nerve of dogs, after IORT with or without hyperthermia treatment. Methods and Materials: Young adult beagle dogs were randomized into five groups of 3-5 dogs each to receive IORT doses of 16, 20, 24, 28, or 32 Gy. Six groups of 4-5 dogs each received IORT doses of 12, 16, 20, 24, or 28 Gy simultaneously with 44 deg. C of intraoperative hyperthermia (IOHT) for 60 min. One group of dogs acted as hyperthermia-alone controls. Two years after the treatment, dogs were euthanized, and histopathological and morphometric analyses were performed. Results: Qualitative histological analysis showed prominant changes such as focal necrosis, mineralization, fibrosis, and severe fiber loss in dogs which received combined treatment. Histomorphometric results showed a significantly higher decrease in axon and myelin and small blood vessels, with a corresponding increase in connective tissue in dogs receiving IORT plus hyperthermia treatment. The effective dose for 50% of nerve fiber loss (ED 50 ) in dogs exposed to IORT only was 25.3 Gy. The ED 50 for nerve fiber loss in dogs exposed to IORT combined with IOHT was 14.8 Gy. The thermal enhancement ratio (TER) was 1.7. Conclusion: The probability of developing peripheral neuropathies in a large animal model is higher when IORT is combined with IOHT, when compared to IORT application alone. To minimize the risk of peripheral neuropathy, clinical treatment protocols for the combination of IORT and hyperthermia should not assume a thermal enhancement ratio (TER) to be lower than 1.5

  13. Effect of hyperthermia on experimental acute pancreatitis Efeito da hipertermia na pancreatite aguda experimental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz Jesus de Almeida

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUD: Recent studies indicate that hyperthermia can change inflammatory mechanisms and protect experimental animals from deleterious effects of secretagogue-induced acute pancreatitis AIM: To evaluate the effects of hyperthermia post-treatment on cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis in rats METHODS: Twenty animals were divided in two groups: group I (n = 10, rats with cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis undergone hyperthermia, and group II (n = 10, animals with cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis that were kept normothermic. In all groups, amylase serum levels, histologic damage, vascular permeability and pancreatic water content were assessed. Acute pancreatitis was induced by administration of two cerulein injections (20 mcg/kg. A single dose of Evans' blue dye was administered along with the second dose of cerulein. All animals also received a subcutaneous injection of saline solution. After this process, animals undergone hyperthermia were heated in a cage with two 100 W lamps. Body temperature was increased to 39.5ºC and maintained at that level for 45 minutes. Normothermia rats were kept at room temperature in a second cage RESULTS: Control animals had typical edema, serum amylase activity and morphologic changes of this acute pancreatitis model. Hyperthermia post-treatment ameliorated the pancreatic edema, whereas the histologic damage and the serum amylase level remained unchanged CONCLUSIONS: The findings suggest a beneficial effect of the thermal stress on inflammatory edema in experimental acute pancreatitis.RACIONAL: Estudos recentes indicam que a hipertermia pode modificar mecanismos inflamatórios e proteger animais experimentais dos efeitos deletérios da pancreatite aguda induzida por secretagogos OBJETIVO: Avaliar a eficácia da hipertermia como tratamento da pancreatite aguda induzida por ceruleína em ratos MÉTODOS: Vinte animais foram divididos em dois grupos: grupo I (n = 10, ratos com pancreatite aguda induzida por

  14. Effect of short-term scrotal hyperthermia on spermatological parameters, testicular blood flow and gonadal tissue in dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henning, H; Masal, C; Herr, A; Wolf, K; Urhausen, C; Beineke, A; Beyerbach, M; Kramer, S; Günzel-Apel, A-R

    The objective was to assess the effect of a short-term scrotal hyperthermia in dogs on quantitative and qualitative ejaculate parameters, testicular blood flow and testicular and epididymal histology. After a control period, the scrotum of seven normospermic adult beagle dogs was insulated with a

  15. The combination of hyperthermia or chemotherapy with gimeracil for effective radiosensitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takagi, M.; Sakata, K.; Someya, M.; Hareyama, M. [Sapporo Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Radiology; Matsumoto, Y. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan). Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors; Tauchi, H. [Ibaraki Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Fukushima, M. [Taiho Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd., Tokushima (Japan). Pharmacokinetics Research Lab.

    2012-03-15

    5-chloro-2,4-dihydroxypyridine (gimeracil) is a component of the oral fluoropyrimidine derivative S-1. Gimeracil was originally added to S-1 to yield prolonged 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) concentrations in serum and tumor tissues by inhibiting dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, which degrades 5-FU. We previously demonstrated that gimeracil enhances the efficacy of radiotherapy through the suppression of homologous recombination (HR) in DNA double strand repair. The goal of this paper was to examine the effects of gimeracil on the sensitivity of anticancer drugs and hyperthermia in order to obtain effective radiosensitization. Various cell lines, including DLD 1 (human colon carcinoma cells) and cells deficient in HR or nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), were used in clonogenic assays. The survival of these cells after various treatments (e.g., drug treatment, heat treatment, and radiation) was determined based on their colony-forming ability. Gimeracil enhanced cell-killing effects of camptothecin (CPT), 5-FU, and hydroxyurea. Gimeracil sensitized effects of CPT or 5-FU to cells deficient in HR or NHEJ to a similar extent as in other cells (DLD1 and a parent cell), indicating that its sensitizing mechanisms may be different from inhibition of HR or NHEJ. Combination of gimeracil and CPT or 5-FU sensitized radiation more effectively than each modality alone. Gimeracil also enhanced heat sensitivity at 42 C or more. The degree of heat sensitization with gimeracil increased as the temperature increased, and the combination of gimeracil and heat-sensitized radiation was more effective than each modality alone. Gimeracil enhanced sensitivity of CPT, 5-FU, and hyperthermia. Combination of these modalities sensitized radiation more efficiently than each modality alone.

  16. The effect of hyperglycemia with or without hyperthermia on the radiation response of a spontaneous mouse fibrosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urano, M.; Todoroki, T.; Kahn, J.

    1985-01-01

    Hyperglycemia facilitates glycolysis with a resultant decrease in the tissue, particularly tumor pH. Another effect of hyperglycemia is to increase osmotic pressure in the extracellular fluid. The affect of hyperglycemia on the radiation response of our spontaneous tumor, FSa-II was examined. Further experiment includes the effect of hyperglycemia given 1 hour before local hyperthermia which was given in a 43.5 0 C water bath. Animals were C/sub 3/Hf/Sed mice from our defined flora colony. Tumor cell suspension was transplanted into the animal foot and the treatment was given when tumors reached an average diameter of 7 mm. Tumors were irradiated under clamped hypoxia, in air or under HPO (30 psi). Hyperglycemia, 5 mg/g given 1 hour before radiation, increased hypoxic cell fraction of the tumor without altering the slope fo the dose response curve. Hyperthermia enhanced the tumor response and increased hypoxic cell fraction. Further increase in the hypoxic cell fraction was noted following combined hyperglycemia and hyperthermia. Hyperthermia given 24 hours before radiation with or without glucose also increased hypoxic cell fraction, but decrease chronically hypoxic cell fraction (fraction not oxygenated under HPO)

  17. Hyperthermia and hyperglycemia in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhavrid, Eh.A.; Osinskij, S.P.; Fradkin, S.Z.

    1987-01-01

    Consideration is being given to publication data and results of author's investigations into the effect of hyperthermia and hyperglycemia on physico-chemical characteristics and growth of various experimental tumors. Factors, modifying thermosensitivity, mechanisms of hyperthermia effect, various aspects of thermochimio- and thermoradiotherapy have been analyzed. Effect of artificial hyperglycemia on metabolism and kinetics of tumor and some normal cells is considered in detail. Many data, testifying to sufficient growth of efficiency of oncologic patient treatment under conditions of multimodality therapy including hyperthermia and hyperglycemia are presented

  18. Effect of short-term scrotal hyperthermia on spermatological parameters, testicular blood flow and gonadal tissue in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, H; Masal, C; Herr, A; Wolf, K; Urhausen, C; Beineke, A; Beyerbach, M; Kramer, S; Günzel-Apel, A-R

    2014-02-01

    The objective was to assess the effect of a short-term scrotal hyperthermia in dogs on quantitative and qualitative ejaculate parameters, testicular blood flow and testicular and epididymal histology. After a control period, the scrotum of seven normospermic adult beagle dogs was insulated with a self-made suspensory for 48 h. Nine weeks later, two animals were castrated, while in five animals, scrotal hyperthermia was repeated. Dogs were castrated either 10 or 40 days thereafter. In each phase of scrotal insulation, average scrotal surface temperature increased by 3.0°C. Semen was collected twice weekly throughout the experiment. Total sperm count did not change after the first hyperthermia, but it slightly decreased after the second (p sperm morphology and velocity parameters (CASA) rather indicated subtle physiological variations in sperm quality than effects of a local heat stress. Chromatin stability of ejaculated spermatozoa as indicated by SCSA remained constant throughout the experiment. Perfusion characteristics of the gonads, that is, systolic peak velocity, pulsatility and resistance index at the marginal location of the testicular artery, did not change due to hyperthermia (p > 0.05). Histological examination of excised testes and epididymides for apoptotic (TUNEL and activated caspase-3) and proliferating cells (Ki-67 antigen) indicated only marginal effects of scrotal insulation on tissue morphology. In conclusion, a mild short-term scrotal hyperthermia in dogs does not cause substantial changes in sperm quantity and quality. In contrast to other species, canine testes and epididymides may have a higher competence to compensate such thermal stress. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. Effects of combined irradiation and hyperthermia on creatine kinase activity in rat tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyushichev, V B; Taratukhin, V P; Shamratova, V G; Yuzhakova, G A [Leningradskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR)

    1977-09-01

    The effects of different doses of beta- and X-irradiations on creatine kinase activity (CKA) in cerebrum and liver of rats were investigated under hyperthermia conditions. Beta irradiation was carried out at 2.50, 3.05, 4.45 or 7.40 Krad doses under heat load. After withdrawal of the animals from the chamber they were exposed to 25,50,100,250 or 400 R X-ray doses (for beta irradiation 2.50,2.50,3.05,4.45 or 7.40 Krad, respectively). In 5,12,19 and 26 days after exposure the animals were decapitated and CKA of aqueous extracts of cerebral hemispheres and livers were determined. It has been established, that the thermal stress decreases the radiosensitivity of cerebral CKA, but intensifies the irradiation consequences in respect to liver activity.

  20. Effect of hyperthermia, radiation and adriamycin combinations on tumor vascular function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, H.A.; Chmielewski, G.

    1982-01-01

    Pathophysiologic studies of tumor vascular responses to hyperthermia, radiation or adriamycin given alone or in specific combinations have been made in the cervical carcinoma grown in the transparent cheek pouch chamber of the Syrian hamster. A specially designed chamber containing a compartment for flowing water enabled controlled heating of the tumor and pouch to within 0.2 0 C; the desired temperatures were achieved within one minute. Heating at 42 0 C for 30 minutes was followed, at 1, 5 or 24 hours, by a second heating for 30 minutes at 42 0 C. In addition, the same period of heating was preceded or followed, at 1, 5 or 24 hour intervals, by a single exposure to 2000R or a single intravenous injectionof adriamycin given at a rate of 0.45 mg/100 gm body weight. Of the three modalities, heat appeared to have the greatest acute effect on the tumor vascular system. A single dose of heat produced a rapid but transient constriction followed by a prominent dilation of vessels. Two heating periods given at a 1 hour interval caused persistent stasis in the tumor which progressed to coagulation necrosis. Although heating prior to irradiation or adriamycin, in general, increased the vascular responses to these agents, this sequence gave no tumor control. Radiation or adriamycin given prior to heating had relatively little effect on the vascular response to heating and produced no tumor control except when heat was applied shortly after irradiation. These studies indicate that changes in the microvasculature and perfusion in tumors, in response to hyperthermia alone or combined in specific sequences with radiation, can alter the internal environment of the tumor to produce a greater degree of tumor control than can be attributed to direct cell killing by these agents

  1. Combined anti-tumor therapeutic effect of targeted gene, hyperthermia, radionuclide brachytherapy in breast carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Daozhen; Tang Qiusha; Xiang Jingying; Xu Fei; Zhang Li; Wang Junfeng

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the antitumor therapeutic effect of combined therapy of magnetic induction heating by nano-magnetic particles, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene (HSV-tk suicide gene) and internal radiation in mice bearing MCF-7 breast carcinoma. Methods: The transfection reagents, plasmids heat shock protein-HSV-tk (pHSP-HSV-tk), ferroso-ferric oxide nano-magnetic fluid flow and 188 Re-ganciclovir-bovine serum albumin-nanopaticles (GCV-BSA-NP) were prepared. The heating experiments in vivo were carried out using ferroso-ferric oxide nano-magnetic fluid flow. Sixty mice tumor models bearing MCF-7 breast carcinoma were established and randomly divided into six groups. Group A was the control group, B was gene transfection therapy group, C was hyperthermia group, D was gene transfection therapy combined with radionuclide brachytherapy group, E was gene therapy combined with hyperthermia group, and F was gene therapy, hyperthermia combined with radionuclide brachytherapy group. The tumor growth, tumor mass and histopathological changes were evaluated. The expression of HSV-tk in the groups of B, D, E and F was detected by RT-PCR. Poisson distribution and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used for statistical analysis by SPSS 10.0 software. Results: In the animal heating experiments, the temperature of tumor increased up to 39.6 degree C, 43.2 degree C, and 48.1 degree C quickly with different injected doses (2, 4 and 6 mg respectively) of nano-magnetic particles and maintained for 40 min. The temperature of tumor tissue reduced to 36.8 degree C, 37.5 degree C and 37.8 degree C in 10 min when alternating magnetic field (AMF) stopped. The tumor mass in Groups C ((452.50±30.29) mg), D ((240.98±35.32)mg), E((231.87±27.41) mg) and F ((141.55±23.78) mg) were much lower than that in Group A ((719.12±22.65) mg) (F=800.07, P<0.01), with the most significant treatment effect in Group F.The tumor mass in Group B((684.05±24.02) mg) was higher than

  2. Late Effects of Polio: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Polio Wellness Retreats For Health Professionals The Late Effects of Polio: An Overview FRENCH | GERMAN | PORTUGUESE POLIOMYELITIS ( ... largest and most inclusive category is called Late Effects of Polio or Polio Sequelae and is defined ...

  3. Hyperthermia of locally advanced or recurrent gynecological cancer. The effect of combination with irradiation or chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terashima, Hiromi; Imada, Hajime; Egashira, Kanji; Nakata, Hajime; Kunugita, Naoki; Matsuura, Yuusuke; Kashimura, Masamichi

    1995-01-01

    Between May 1986 and April 1994, 15 patients with advanced or recurrent gynecological cancer were treated with combined therapy of hyperthermia and irradiation or chemotherapy at UOEH Hospital. Initial cases were treated by hyperthermia combined with irradiation in 4 and with chemotherapy in 2. Recurrent 9 cases were treated by hyperthermia combined with chemotherapy or by hyperthermia alone. Radiotherapy was given in a conventional way 5 fractions per week and hyperthermia was performed using RF capacitive heating equipment, Thermotron RF-8, once or twice a week. Intratumoral temperature was measured by thermocouple inserted into the tumor and kept at 42-44degC for 30-40 minutes. Complete response (CR) and partial response (PR), defined as 50% or more regression, was obtained in 8/15 (53%). Response rates (CR+PR/all cases) were good in initially treated cases (5/6, 83%), irradiated cases (7/8, 88%) and cases hearted over 42degC (7/9, 78%). Combined therapy of hyperthermia and radiotherapy seemed to be useful for controlling advanced gynecological cancers. (author)

  4. Comparison of the effects of radiation and hyperthermia on prenatal retardation of brain growth of guinea-pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanner, R.A.; Edwards, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    On day 21 of pregnancy guinea-pigs were exposed to hyperthermia or #betta# radiation. The effects on prenatal growth and especially brain growth of offspring were compared. Doses of 0.04-0.99 Gy of radiation produced a dose-dependent and irreversible reduction of brainweight in the offspring, but had little effect on body weight. Treatment with hyperthermia resulting in maternal temperatures of 41.8-43.9 0 C after exposure in a heated incubator for an hour also produced a dose-related micrencephaly in the offspring. Comparison of the two agents showed that a dose increment of 0.525 Gy of radiation produced a deficit in brain weight equivalent to an elevation of 1 0 C in maternal temperature. Using this guinea-pig brain weight assay system a threshold was detected of between 0.05 and 0.10 Gy for retardation of brain growth. (author)

  5. Hyperthermia and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitspatrick, C.

    1990-01-01

    Hyperthermia and radiotherapy have for long been used to assist in the control of tumours, either as separate entities, or, in a combined treatment scheme. This paper outlines why hyperthermia works, thermal dose and the considerations required in the timing when hyperthermia is combined with radiotherapy. Previously reported results for hyperthermia and radiotherapy used together are also presented. 8 refs., 8 tabs

  6. A support system in virtual reality for effective hyperthermia treatments. Heating properties of needle applicator for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, Yasuhiro; Iseki, Yuya; Nakane, Kazuya; Mimoto, Naoki; Kubo, Mitsunori; Kato, Kazuo; Takahashi, Hideaki; Uzuka, Takeo; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the effectiveness of the developed simulator system for performing an effective hyperthermia treatment with a needle applicator in virtual reality (VR). The human brain is protected by the skull, which makes it difficult to non-invasively heat deep brain tumors with electromagnetic energy. Generally, needle applicators were used in clinical practice to heat brain tumors. However, some problems exist. One is that this heating method has a small heating area around the needle. In order to expand the heating area of a needle applicator, we developed a new type of needle applicator made from a shape memory alloy (SMA). The thermal properties of the SMA were checked experimentally using the developed heating system. As a result, the proposed needle applicator made of SMA is useful to create a wider heating area inside a tumor. Another problem is that medical doctors find it difficult to put a needle applicator into a target point inside of tumors. Therefore, a support system for performing an effective hyperthermia treatment is required in the clinic. In this paper, first, we constructed an anatomical 3-D model from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and X-ray computed tomography (CT) images by using 3-D computer aided design (CAD) software. Second, we presented the finite element method (FEM) model which is divided into non-linear elements on 3-D computer graphics (CG). Finally, we calculated temperature distributions using the 3-D FEM model with blood perfusion during hyperthermia treatments. From these results, it was found that the proposed VR system is effective for performing hyperthermia treatments. (author)

  7. Hyperthermia improves the antitumour effect of metronomic cyclophosphamide in a rat transplantable brain tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl Borkamo, Erling; Fluge, Oystein; Mella, Olav; Akslen, Lars A.; Bruland, Ove; Dahl, Olav

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: As low-dose metronomic cyclophosphamide (CTX) and hyperthermia (HT) both exert antitumour effects in part through antiangiogenic mechanisms, interactive effects of the two modalities were explored. Materials and methods: Subcutaneously implanted rat tumours (BT4An) were treated with CTX 35 mg/kg i.p. three doses a week for two weeks, local water-bath HT yielding mean tumour temperature of 43 o C for one hour at day 0, both modalities combined (CTX-HT 0 ), or saline. TUNEL assays, immunohistochemical staining of thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1) and real time RT-PCR of TSP-1 mRNA were analysed the first three hours after completed treatment day 0. Results: Metronomic dosed CTX (p = 0.006) and HT (p 0 (41%) treated rats. TSP-1 protein was specifically upregulated in the vascular matrix of tumours receiving CTX (weak), HT (moderate) and CTX-HT 0 (strong). In contrast, reduced expression of TSP-1 protein was observed in tumour cells after HT alone and CTX-HT 0 . TUNEL assays indicated induction of apoptosis by HT and CTX-HT 0 90 minutes after end of the first treatment. Conclusion: A single session of local HT enhances the effects of low-dose metronomic CTX, possibly in part mediated through a differential effect on TSP-1 protein levels in tumour cells and tumour vasculature

  8. Hormonal, Biochemical and Haematological Changes in Response to Acute Hyperthermia in Rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahran, N.A.R.M.

    2004-01-01

    Today, hyperthermia plays a significant role in the evidence-based on treatment of cancer patients. Such promising endeavor is due to the fact that neoplastic cells are more heat sensitive than normal cells. the prospect of using hyperthermia alone to treat cancer tumours is appealing because hyperthermia is a physical treatment and so would have fewer side effects than chemotherapy or radiotherapy and, it could be used in combination with these therapeutic approaches. much more consistent evidence has been obtained experimentally, and continuing clinical interest has been encouraged by confirmation that, at relatively low temperature (37-41.5 C), heat enhances cell growth and may well enhance also the growth and proliferation of tumours, while above 45 C heat begins to damage both normal and malignant cells in both animal and human. So, the goal is to achieve a selective temperature elevation between 42-45 C at the tumour site while maintaining healthy tissue temperatures in a physiological save range.This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of acute whole body hyperthermia , (WBH) (rectal temperature 43 c) on biochemical , hormonal and haematological changes in normal healthy local strain (baladi) rabbits.The thermal late effects (recovery) at 24 hr-post whole body hyperthermia was also undertaken , in the attempt to evaluate the degree of safety , when hyperthermia is applied in the clinic for treating cancer and other diseases

  9. Effects of hyperthermia and ionizing radiation in normal and ataxia telangiectasia human fibroblast lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Chan, A.; Smith, B.P.; Child, S.D.; Paterson, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of 45 0 C hyperthermia and γ radiation have been studied in three normal human fibroblast lines (GM38, GM730, WI38) and compared to the effects in two lines derived from patients with the hereditary disease ataxia telangiectasia (AR3BI, AT5BI). All lines, both normal and γ-sensitive AT, showed a similar resistance to killing by heat alone, suggesting that the defect responsible for the increased radiation sensitivity in AT lines does not confer increased heat sensitivity. Shouldered survival curves were obtained in each case indicating the ability to accumulate sublethal heat damage. All normal and AT cell lines exhibited increased resistance to the lethal effects of heat in response to a thermal stress, indicating that the defect that causes radiosensitivity in AT cell lines does not prevent the induction of thermotolerance. It was hypothesized that in normal cells, this heat treatment inactivates the process which is already defective in AT lines, and that this process may be required for the proper rejoining of double-strand breaks produced during the repair of other radiation-induced lesions

  10. EFFECT OF HEAT PRECONDITIONING BY MICROWAVE HYPERTHERMIA ON HUMAN SKELETAL MUSCLE AFTER ECCENTRIC EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norio Saga

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to clarify whether heat preconditioning results in less eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage and muscle soreness, and whether the repeated bout effect is enhanced by heat preconditioning prior to eccentric exercise. Nine untrained male volunteers aged 23 ± 3 years participated in this study. Heat preconditioning included treatment with a microwave hyperthermia unit (150 W, 20 min that was randomly applied to one of the subject's arms (MW; the other arm was used as a control (CON. One day after heat preconditioning, the subjects performed 24 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the elbow flexors at 30°·s-1 (ECC1. One week after ECC1, the subjects repeated the procedure (ECC2. After each bout of exercise, maximal voluntary contraction (MVC, range of motion (ROM of the elbow joint, upper arm circumference, blood creatine kinase (CK activity and muscle soreness were measured. The subjects experienced both conditions at an interval of 3 weeks. MVC and ROM in the MW were significantly higher than those in the CON (p < 0.05 for ECC1; however, the heat preconditioning had no significant effect on upper arm circumference, blood CK activity, or muscle soreness following ECC1 and ECC2. Heat preconditioning may protect human skeletal muscle from eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage after a single bout of eccentric exercise but does not appear to promote the repeated bout effect after a second bout of eccentric exercise

  11. Effects of hyperthermia, x-ray irradiation and their combination on ascites tumor cells of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Itsuo

    1982-01-01

    Fibrosarcoma ascites tumor cells (PB8) from NMRI mice were used to investigate cell loss by hyperthermia and/or x-ray irradiation. The tumor cells were labelled by an injection of 125 I-deoxyuridine to the abdominal cavity of the donors 2 days before the physical treatments. The labelled cells, transfered in test tubes, were heated at 44 0 C for 10-20 min and/or irradiated by x-ray at 250-1612 rad, and were transplanted in the recipient abdominal cavity as soon as possible after the treatments. The radioactivity of the tumor cells, as an indicator of cell loss, was measured with a gamma spectrometer. In the irradiated group, the ratio of cell loss increased in a dose-dependent manner, starting from the 4th day after the transplantation to the 9th day. In the heated group, the ratio of cell loss increased in proportion to the heating time, starting without delay after transplantation. In the combination group, the effect of the treatments was more marked than that by each single treatment. In the early stage of this group, cell loss was by heating and then, from the 4th day, the irradiation effect mostly dominated. It is concluded from the above results that cell loss by heating or irradiation is independent and that the effect of the combination is additive. (author)

  12. Effects of hyperthermia and x irradiation on sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequency in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livingston, G.K.; Dethlefsen, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The BrdUrd labeling method was used to evaluate the effects of hyperthermia, x irradiation, and the combined treatment on the incidence of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Cells cultured in McCoy's 5A media containing 10 μM 5-bromodeoxyuridine were synchronized after one cell cycle by mitotic shake-off. Early-G 1 cells were heated by submerging culture flasks in a 44 +- 0.05 0 C water bath for periods of 20, 40, and 60 min. By the same method, other cultures were x irradiated at doses of 100, 200, 400, and 600 rad. A third protocol involved combined treatment of 20 min at 44 0 C followed immediately by one of the above radiation doses. A fourth protocol reversed the sequence of the combined treatment applying x irradiation (200 or 400 rad) followed immediately by hyperthermia. The data showed that hyperthermia and x irradiation both elevated the frequency of SCEs significantly whether applied separately or together. The combined treatment (heat: 20 min at 44 0 C plus varying x-radiation doses) produced results suggestive of a synergistic interaction. The sequence of the heat and x irradiation did not appear to have a significant effect on the production of SCE

  13. Effect of hyperthermia on the radiation response of the mouse jejunum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merino, O.R.; Peters, L.J.; Mason, K.A.; Withers, H.R.

    1978-01-01

    The experiments reported show that the effect of radiation on the gut mucosa may be significantly enhanced by moderate hyperthermia (41 to 44 0 C) that is applied for 30 min before or after irradiation. The predominant effect of combined heat and radiation was to displace the radiation survival curves of jejunal crypt stem cells to the left without a significant change in slope. The degree of displacement was temperature-dependent from 41 to 44 0 C, and was greater when heating preceded irradiation. The thermal enhancement ratio (TER) for crypt stem cell survival is not constant but increases with higher surviving fractions. At the isoeffect level of 20 surviving stem cells per jejunal circumference, the TER reached a maximum of 4.7 when heating for 30 min at 44 0 C preceded irradiation. Although direct comparisons of published TER's for different tissues cannot be made because the levels of cellular survival to produce given endpoints differ, it appears that the gut may be particularly vulnerable to radiation damage when preheated to temperatures over 42 0 C. It is important for the safety of human combined modality studies first that specific information concerning the tolerance of all critical normal tissues to heat and irradiation be obtained, and second that the likelihood of an increase in TER with fractionated exposures to heat and irradiation be appreciated

  14. PET measurements of hyperthermia-induced suppression of protein synthesis in tumors in relation to effects on tumor growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daemen, B.J.; Elsinga, P.H.; Mooibroek, J.; Paans, A.M.; Wieringa, A.R.; Konings, A.W.; Vaalburg, W.

    1991-01-01

    Hyperthermia-induced metabolic changes in tumor tissue have been monitored by PET. Uptake of L-[1-11C]tyrosine in rhabdomyosarcoma tissue of Wag/Rij rats was dose-dependently reduced after local hyperthermia treatment at 42, 45, or 47 degrees C. Tumor blood flow, as measured by PET with 13NH3, appeared to be unchanged. The L-[1-11C]tyrosine uptake data were compared to uptake data of L-[1-14C]tyrosine and with data on the incorporation of L-[1-14C]tyrosine into tumor proteins. After intravenous injection, the 14C data were obtained from dissected tumor tissue. Heat-induced inhibition of the incorporation of L-[1-14C]tyrosine into tumor proteins tallied with the L-[1-11C]tyrosine uptake data. Heat-induced inhibition of amino acid uptake in the tumor correlated well with regression of tumor growth. It is concluded that PET using L-[1-11C]tyrosine is eligible for monitoring the effect of hyperthermia on tumor growth

  15. In vivo hyperthermia effect induced by high-intensity pulsed ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Wei-Cheng; Tu Juan; Li Qian; Fan Ting-Bo; Zhang Dong; Chen Wei-Zhong; Joo-Ha Hwang; Chen Jing-Hai

    2012-01-01

    Hyperthermia effects (39–44 °C) induced by pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) have been regarded as a promising therapeutic tool for boosting immune responses or enhancing drug delivery into a solid tumor. However, previous studies also reported that the cell death occurs when cells are maintained at 43 °C for more than 20 minutes. The aim of this study is to investigate thermal responses inside in vivo rabbit auricular veins exposed to pulsed HIFU (1.17 MHz, 5300 W/cm 2 , with relatively low-duty ratios (0.2%–4.3%). The results show that: (1) with constant pulse repetition frequency (PRF) (e.g., 1 Hz), the thermal responses inside the vessel will increase with the increasing duty ratio; (2) a temperature elevation to 43 °C can be identified at the duty ratio of 4.3%; (3) with constant duty ratios, the change of PRF will not significantly affect the temperature measurement in the vessel; (4) as the duty ratios lower than 4.3%, the presence of microbubbles will not significantly enhance the thermal responses in the vessel, but will facilitate HIFU-induced inertial cavitation events. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  16. Hyperthermia and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietzel, F.

    1979-01-01

    Of decisive importance for superadditive enhancement is the close temporal correlation of hyperthermia and radiotherapy. It is recommended to first irradiate and then use heat treatment in order to ensure that dividable tumour cells are irradiated before hyperthermia. To achieve an optimal enhancing effect, temperatures of appr. 42 0 are sufficient. In order to be able to neglect temperature regulation and convection effects, hyperthermia for clinical use must be carried out in doses high enough to ensure that it can be finished within 3-4 minutes. It is necessary to make efforts to find out which forms of application can be realised in order to reach deeper tissue regions, thus making possible at least a half-depth-therapy. Up to day, only the 2 cm near to the surface can be heated in a sufficiently homogeneous way. In the FRG, there are more than 200 high-volt-therapy systems, including electron accelerators and telegamma systems. This is a dense network of radiation-therapeutical supply. An improved therapy effect of loose ionising rays which, with the help of the hypertherming, would almost be equal to irradiation with high ionisation density, is not only of scientific interest, but also of high interest for public health. (orig./MG) 891 MG/orig.- 892 RDG [de

  17. SU-F-J-05: The Effect of Air Pockets in the Urinary Bladder During Bladder Hyperthermia Treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schooneveldt, G.; Kok, H.P.; Bakker, A.; Geijsen, E.D.; Reijke, T.M. de; Crezee, J. [Academisch Medisch Centrum / Universiteit van Amsterdam, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Hyperthermia combined with Mitomycin C is used for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC), using a phased array system of microwave antennas for bladder heating. Often some air is present in the bladder, which effectively blocks the microwave radiation, potentially preventing proper treatment of that part of the bladder. Air can be a relevant fraction of the bladder content and large air pockets are expected to have a noticeable influence on achieved temperatures. Methods: We analysed 14 NMIBC patients treated at our institute with our AMC-4 hyperthermia device with four 70MHz antennas around the pelvis. A CT scan was made after treatment and a physician delineated the bladder on the CT scan. On the same scan, the amount of air present in the bladder was delineated. Using our in-house developed hyperthermia treatment planning system, we simulated the treatment using the clinically applied device settings. We did this once with the air pocket delineated on the CT scan, and once with the same volume filled with bladder tissue. Results: The patients had on average 4.2ml (range 0.8–10.1ml) air in the bladder. The bladder volume was delineated by the physician, that is including air pocket and bladder wall, was on average 253ml (range 93–452ml). The average volume in which changes exceeded 0.25°C was 22ml (range 0–108 ml), with the bladder being up to 2°C cooler when an air pocket was present. Except for extreme cases, there was no evident relation between the quantity of air and the difference in temperature. Conclusion: The effect of an air pocket in the bladder during bladder hyperthermia treatment varies strongly between patients. Generally, this leads to lower temperatures in the bladder, potentially affecting treatment quality, and suggesting that care need be taken to minimise the size of air pockets during hyperthermia treatments. The KWF Dutch Cancer Society financially supported this work, grant UVA 2012-5539.

  18. Hyperthermia: clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicher, H.I.

    1982-01-01

    A large number of patients have now been entered into a phase I/II protocol to examine the effects of fractionated hyperthermia and radiation on tumor response. Included in the study were 11 different histologies with anatomical locations varying between peripheral and superficial metastases to deep-seated, solid tumors. Patients were treated with four fractions of microwave-induced hyperthermia (45.0 +- 0.5 0 C), each separated by intervals of 72 hours. Microwaves at frequencies of 915 MHz or 300 MHz were employed, Patients were given a one week rest following the first four treatments, following which a second series of four fractions were administered, again at 72 hour intervals. Each of these fractions consisted of a 400 rad dose of radiation followed within 20 min by hyperthermia (42.5 +- 5 0 C) for 1.5 hours. To date 121 fields have been treated by 82 patients. Total regression is seen in 65% of all cases, partial regression in 35% and no response is seen in only 5% of treatments. Adverse effects were rare. Site specific trials are currently in progress to study the feasibility of deep-seated heating with intracavitary antennae as well as to assess tumor response. In addition, a randomized trial to examine the clinical relevance of thermotolerance has been started

  19. Cooling Effectiveness of a Modified Cold-Water Immersion Method After Exercise-Induced Hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luhring, Katherine E; Butts, Cory L; Smith, Cody R; Bonacci, Jeffrey A; Ylanan, Ramon C; Ganio, Matthew S; McDermott, Brendon P

    2016-11-01

     Recommended treatment for exertional heat stroke includes whole-body cold-water immersion (CWI). However, remote locations or monetary or spatial restrictions can challenge the feasibility of CWI. Thus, the development of a modified, portable CWI method would allow for optimal treatment of exertional heat stroke in the presence of these challenges.  To determine the cooling rate of modified CWI (tarp-assisted cooling with oscillation [TACO]) after exertional hyperthermia.  Randomized, crossover controlled trial.  Environmental chamber (temperature = 33.4°C ± 0.8°C, relative humidity = 55.7% ± 1.9%).  Sixteen volunteers (9 men, 7 women; age = 26 ± 4.7 years, height = 1.76 ± 0.09 m, mass = 72.5 ± 9.0 kg, body fat = 20.7% ± 7.1%) with no history of compromised thermoregulation.  Participants completed volitional exercise (cycling or treadmill) until they demonstrated a rectal temperature (T re ) ≥39.0°C. After exercise, participants transitioned to a semirecumbent position on a tarp until either T re reached 38.1°C or 15 minutes had elapsed during the control (no immersion [CON]) or TACO (immersion in 151 L of 2.1°C ± 0.8°C water) treatment.  The T re , heart rate, and blood pressure (reported as mean arterial pressure) were assessed precooling and postcooling. Statistical analyses included repeated-measures analysis of variance with appropriate post hoc t tests and Bonferroni correction.  Before cooling, the T re was not different between conditions (CON: 39.27°C ± 0.26°C, TACO: 39.30°C ± 0.39°C; P = .62; effect size = -0.09; 95% confidence interval [CI] = -0.2, 0.1). At postcooling, the T re was decreased in the TACO (38.10°C ± 0.16°C) compared with the CON condition (38.74°C ± 0.38°C; P < .001; effect size = 2.27; 95% CI = 0.4, 0.9). The rate of cooling was greater during the TACO (0.14 ± 0.06°C/min) than the CON treatment (0.04°C/min ± 0.02°C/min; t 15 = -8.84; P < .001; effect size = 2.21; 95% CI = -0.13, -0

  20. Late effects of childhood leukemia therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulbright, Joy M; Raman, Sripriya; McClellan, Wendy S; August, Keith J

    2011-09-01

    As survival rates for children treated for childhood cancers become significantly better, the focus is increasingly on determining the late effects of treatments and the best ways to monitor for them and prevent their occurrence. This review focuses on recent literature discussing the late effects of treatment in patients treated for acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia during childhood. The late effects of therapy for childhood leukemia include secondary malignancy, cardiotoxicity, obesity, endocrine abnormalities, reproductive changes, neurocognitive deficits, and psychosocial effects. As clinicians have become more aware of the late effects of therapy, treatment regimens have been changed to decrease late effects, but patients still require long-term follow-up for their prevention and treatment.

  1. Late effects on normal tissues: oesophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavy, J.J.; Bosset, J.F.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation-induced late effects of oesophagus are observed after treatment of various cancers. Acute reactions, mainly oesophagitis, are well known and accurately described; late effects share, for most of these, a common consequence: alteration of the main oesophageal function, namely to conduct the food bolus; clinically they are impaired in terms of mobility and stenosis. More rarely, ulcerations and pseudodiverticulae can be observed. Chemotherapy further increases the risk of late effects, especially in case of concomitant chemo-radiotherapy. All numbers and statistical data on oesophagus late effects should be regarded with caution due to recent changes in the therapeutic attitudes (more and more combined chemotherapy-radiotherapy) and some progress in given cancer locations. A common scale like the LENT-SOMA should enable the clinician to better know these late effects on oesophagus which is required to initiate effective prevention measures and adapted treatments. (authors)

  2. Are we ready to predict late effects?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salz, Talya; Baxi, Shrujal S; Raghunathan, Nirupa

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: After completing treatment for cancer, survivors may experience late effects: consequences of treatment that persist or arise after a latent period. PURPOSE: To identify and describe all models that predict the risk of late effects and could be used in clinical practice. DATA SOURCES:...

  3. Effect of hyperthermia and misonidazole on the radiosensitivity of a transplant murine tumor: influence of factors modifying the fraction of hypoxic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, J.; Haveman, J.; van der Schueren, E.; van den Hoeven, H.; Breur, K.

    1982-01-01

    Hypoxia has been demonstrated to play an important role in the effect of hyperthermia on tumors. The influence of different factors modifying the oxygenation status of a transplantable murine mammary adenocarcinoma has been studied. The effect of hyperthermia alone on the tumor is not significantly influenced by the change in oxygenation status during the growth of the tumor. Also, the large increase of the acutely hypoxic cell fraction, as a result of anesthesia, does not change the effect of hyperthermia alone. In the combined irradiation-heat treatment there is a clear influence of the chronically hypoxic cell fraction on the response to hyperthermia: an increase in tumor size, resulting in a larger hypoxic cell fraction, leads to an increase in thermal enhancement ratio. However, the increased acutely hypoxic cell fraction, resulting from anesthesia, did not lead to an increase in thermal enhancement ratio; in fact the enhancement ratio apparently decreased. In spite of the fact that hyperthermia was applied immediately after irradiation no potentiation of radiation effects was found. The thermal enhancement of the radiation response was never larger than the enhancement as a result of misonidazole

  4. Hyperthermia and massage are effect for the gingivitis improvement; Onnetsu to massaji ga shinikuen kaizen ni koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-10-01

    It was confirmed that Kao and research group of Nosaka professor of Iwate Medical Univ. faculty of dentistry that hyperthermia and massage at the 40 degrees C for the gingival activate the gingival lymph duct function and that it improves the gingivitis was effective. By causing the microcirculation disorder of the gingival, the research of the vascularisation is main until now for the gingivitis. Present research demonstrated that the recovery of the lymph duct function was effective for the gingivitis improvement for the first time in the world. (translated by NEDO)

  5. Malignant hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pollock Neil

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malignant hyperthermia (MH is a pharmacogenetic disorder of skeletal muscle that presents as a hypermetabolic response to potent volatile anesthetic gases such as halothane, sevoflurane, desflurane and the depolarizing muscle relaxant succinylcholine, and rarely, in humans, to stresses such as vigorous exercise and heat. The incidence of MH reactions ranges from 1:5,000 to 1:50,000–100,000 anesthesias. However, the prevalence of the genetic abnormalities may be as great as one in 3,000 individuals. MH affects humans, certain pig breeds, dogs, horses, and probably other animals. The classic signs of MH include hyperthermia to marked degree, tachycardia, tachypnea, increased carbon dioxide production, increased oxygen consumption, acidosis, muscle rigidity, and rhabdomyolysis, all related to a hypermetabolic response. The syndrome is likely to be fatal if untreated. Early recognition of the signs of MH, specifically elevation of end-expired carbon dioxide, provides the clinical diagnostic clues. In humans the syndrome is inherited in autosomal dominant pattern, while in pigs in autosomal recessive. The pathophysiologic changes of MH are due to uncontrolled rise of myoplasmic calcium, which activates biochemical processes related to muscle activation. Due to ATP depletion, the muscle membrane integrity is compromised leading to hyperkalemia and rhabdomyolysis. In most cases, the syndrome is caused by a defect in the ryanodine receptor. Over 90 mutations have been identified in the RYR-1 gene located on chromosome 19q13.1, and at least 25 are causal for MH. Diagnostic testing relies on assessing the in vitro contracture response of biopsied muscle to halothane, caffeine, and other drugs. Elucidation of the genetic changes has led to the introduction, on a limited basis so far, of genetic testing for susceptibility to MH. As the sensitivity of genetic testing increases, molecular genetics will be used for identifying those at risk with

  6. On the improvement of regional hyperthermia treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroeze, Hugo

    2002-01-01

    Hyperthermia is an adjuvant treatment modality to radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy, with the aim of increasing the tumour killing effect of the treatment. It involves the elevation of the tumour temperature to ~ 42oC. Radiofrequent heating is a practical method for hyperthermia: a number of

  7. Regional hyperthermia of the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovich, Z.; Langholz, B.; Astrahan, M.; Emami, B.; Oleson, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    From 1981 through 1986, 49 patients with metastatic liver tumors received deep regional hyperthermia in phase I protocols in six major medical centers in the United States. Adenocarcinoma was seen in 80% of patients with colon as the primary site in 26%. The remaining patients had the following histological diagnoses: Soft tissue sarcoma in seven, malignant melanoma in two and transitional cell carcinoma in one. Deep regional hyperthermia treatments with a BSD-1000 annular phased array were given once or twice a week with a total of 167 treatment sessions, mean 3.4 (range 1 to 8). In addition to deep regional hyperthermia, 17 patients received radiotherapy, and 14 received chemotherapy. The median survival for all patients was 25 weeks. Complete response was obtained in two patients and partial response in four patients. An additional ten patients had nominal response. There was no complete or partial response among the 14 hyperthermia alone treated patients. Of the 26 patients who presented with severe pain, five had complete pain relief, five had partial relief and the majority had a lesser degree of pain relief or no pain relief. Acute treatment toxicity consisted of pain in ten, systemic temperature increase to 39 0 C in four tachycardia in two, claustrophobia in one. The majority of patients did not experience acute toxicity. No late toxicity was recorded in this group of 49 patients. (orig./MG)

  8. Effects of Social Interaction and Warm Ambient Temperature on Brain Hyperthermia Induced by the Designer Drugs Methylone and MDPV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Kim, Albert H; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2015-01-01

    3,4-Methylenedioxymethcathinone (methylone) and 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV) are new drugs of abuse that have gained worldwide popularity. These drugs are structurally similar to 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and share many of its physiological and behavioral effects in humans, including the development of hyperthermia during acute intoxication. Here, we examined the effects of methylone (1–9 mg/kg, s.c.) or MDPV (0.1–1.0 mg/kg, s.c.) on brain temperature homeostasis in rats maintained in a standard laboratory environment (single-housed in a quiet rest at 22 °C) and under conditions that model human drug use (social interaction and 29 °C ambient temperature). By simultaneously monitoring temperatures in the nucleus accumbens, temporal muscle, and facial skin, we assessed the effects of methylone and MDPV on intra-brain heat production and cutaneous vascular tone, two critical factors that control brain temperature responses. Both methylone and MDPV dose-dependently increased brain temperature, but even at high doses that induced robust locomotor activation, hyperthermia was modest in magnitude (up to ∼2 °C). Both drugs also induced dose-dependent peripheral vasoconstriction, which appears to be a primary mechanism determining the brain hyperthermic responses. In contrast to the powerful potentiation of MDMA-induced hyperthermia by social interaction and warm ambient temperature, such potentiation was absent for methylone and minimal for MDPV. Taken together, despite structural similarities to MDMA, exposure to methylone or MDPV under conditions commonly associated with human drug use does not lead to profound elevations in brain temperature and sustained vasoconstriction, two critical factors associated with MDMA toxicity. PMID:25074640

  9. Clinical use of the hyperthermia treatment planning system HyperPlan to predict effectiveness and toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sreenivasa, Geetha; Gellermann, Johanna; Rau, Beate; Nadobny, Jacek; Schlag, Peter; Deuflhard, Peter; Felix, Roland; Wust, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: The main aim is to prove the clinical practicability of the hyperthermia treatment planning system HyperPlan on a β-test level. Data and observations obtained from clinical hyperthermia are compared with the numeric methods FE (finite element) and FDTD (finite difference time domain), respectively. Methods and Materials: The planning system HyperPlan is built on top of the modular, object-oriented platform for visualization and model generation AMIRA. This system already contains powerful algorithms for image processing, geometric modeling, and three-dimensional graphics display. A number of hyperthermia-specific modules are provided, enabling the creation of three-dimensional tetrahedral patient models suitable for treatment planning. Two numeric methods, FE and FDTD, are implemented in HyperPlan for solving Maxwell's equations. Both methods base their calculations on segmented (contour based) CT or MR image data. A tetrahedral grid is generated from the segmented tissue boundaries, consisting of approximately 80,000 tetrahedrons per patient. The FE method necessitates, primarily, this tetrahedral grid for the calculation of the E-field. The FDTD method, on the other hand, calculates the E-field on a cubical grid, but also requires a tetrahedral grid for correction at electrical interfaces. In both methods, temperature distributions are calculated on the tetrahedral grid by solving the bioheat transfer equation with the FE method. Segmentation, grid generation, E-field, and temperature calculation can be carried out in clinical practice at an acceptable time expenditure of about 1-2 days. Results: All 30 patients we analyzed with cervical, rectal, and prostate carcinoma exhibit a good correlation between the model calculations and the attained clinical data regarding acute toxicity (hot spots), prediction of easy-to-heat or difficult-to-heat patients, and the dependency on various other individual parameters. We could show sufficient agreement between

  10. Effects of 42 deg. C hyperthermia on intracellular pH in ovarian carcinoma cells during acute or chronic exposure to low extracellular pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wahl, Miriam L.; Bobyock, Suzanne B.; Leeper, Dennis B.; Owen, Charles S.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether intracellular pH (pH i ) is affected during hyperthermia in substrate-attached cells and whether acute extracellular acidification potentiates the cytotoxicity of hyperthermia via an effect on pH i . Methods and Materials: The pH i was determined in cells attached to extracellular matrix proteins loaded with the fluorescent indicator dye BCECF at 37 deg. C and during 42 deg. C hyperthermia at an extracellular pH (pH e ) of 6.7 or 7.3 in cells. Effects on pH i during hyperthermia are compared to effects on clonogenic survival after hyperthermia at pH e 7.3 and 6.7 of cells grown at pH e 7.3, or of cells grown and monitored at pH e 6.7. Results: The results show that pH i values are affected by substrate attachments. Cells attached to extracellular matrix proteins had better signal stability, low dye leakage and evidence of homeostatic regulation of pH i during heating. The net decrease in pH i in cells grown and assayed at pH e = 7.3 during 42 deg. C hyperthermia was 0.28 units and the decrease in low pH adapted cells heated at pH e = 6.7 was 0.14 units. Acute acidification from pH e = 7.3 to pH e = 6.7 at 37 deg. C caused an initial reduction of 0.5-0.8 unit in pH i , but a partial recovery followed during the next 60-90 min. Concurrent 42 deg. C hyperthermia caused the same initial reduction in pH i in acutely acidified cells, but inhibited the partial recovery that occurred during the next 60-90 min at 37 deg. C. After 4 h at 37 deg. C, the net change in pH i in acutely acidified cells was 0.30 pH unit, but at 42 deg. C is 0.63 pH units. The net change in pH i correlated inversely with clonogenic survival. Conclusions: Hyperthermia causes a pH i reduction in cells which was smaller in magnitude by 50% in low pH adapted cells. Hyperthermia inhibited the partial recovery from acute acidification that was observed at 37 deg. C in substrate attached cells, in parallel with a lower subsequent clonogenic survival

  11. Postradiation DNA repair in mammalian cells under the combined effect of hyperthermia and 8-bromocaffeine and actinomycin D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezvaya, S.P.; Khanson, K.P.

    1981-01-01

    A study was made of the influence of postirradiation hyperthermia combined with chemical inhibitirors of DNA repa on rejoining the singlestranded DNA breaks induced by X-irradiation (50 Gy) of LL, cells. Separation of single- and double-stranded DNA fragments on a column with hydroxyapatite has revealed that elevation of the postradiation incubation temperature up to 41 deg C does not influence the degree of repair of single-stranded breaks. No repair is detected at 43 deg C. 8-Bromocaffeine and actinomycin combined with the elevated temperature (41 deg C) remove the inhibitory effect of the preparations on the postradiation repair of DNA [ru

  12. The effects of isatin (indole-2, 3-dione on pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-induced hyperthermia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tóth Gábor

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies have demonstrated that centrally administered natriuretic peptides and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide-38 (PACAP-38 have hyperthermic properties. Isatin (indole-2, 3-dione is an endogenous indole that has previously been found to inhibit hyperthermic effects of natriuretic peptides. In this study the aim was to investigate the effects of isatin on thermoregulatory actions of PACAP-38, in rats. Results One μg intracerebroventricular (icv. injection of PACAP-38 had hyperthermic effect in male, Wistar rats, with an onset of the effect at 2 h and a decline by the 6th h after administration. Intraperitoneal (ip. injection of different doses of isatin (25-50 mg/kg significantly decreased the hyperthermic effect of 1 μg PACAP-38 (icv., whereas 12.5 mg/kg isatin (ip. had no inhibiting effect. Isatin alone did not modify the body temperature of the animals. Conclusion The mechanisms that participate in the mediation of the PACAP-38-induced hyperthermia may be modified by isatin. The capability of isatin to antagonize the hyperthermia induced by all members of the natriuretic peptide family and by PACAP-38 makes it unlikely to be acting directly on receptors for natriuretic peptides or on those for PACAP in these hyperthermic processes.

  13. Effect of SPIO Nanoparticle Concentrations on Temperature Changes for Hyperthermia via MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alsayed A. M. Elsherbini

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs are being developed for a wide range of biomedical applications. In particular, hyperthermia involves heating the MNPs through exposure to an alternating magnetic field (AMF. These materials offer the potential for selectively by heating cancer tissue locally and at the cellular level. This may be a successful method if there are enough particles in a tumor possessing sufficiently high specific absorption rate (SAR to deposit heat quickly while minimizing thermal damage to surrounding tissue. The current research aim is to study the influence of super paramagnetic iron oxides Fe3O4 (SPIO NPs concentration on the total heat energy dose and the rate of temperature change in AMF to induce hyperthermia in Ehrlich carcinoma cells implanted in female mice. The results demonstrated a linearly increasing trend between these two factors.

  14. Using eye tracking technology to compare the effectiveness of malignant hyperthermia cognitive aid design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Roderick; Hanhan, Jaber; Harrison, T Kyle; Kou, Alex; Howard, Steven K; Borg, Lindsay K; Shum, Cynthia; Udani, Ankeet D; Mariano, Edward R

    2018-05-15

    Malignant hyperthermia is a rare but potentially fatal complication of anesthesia, and several different cognitive aids designed to facilitate a timely and accurate response to this crisis currently exist. Eye tracking technology can measure voluntary and involuntary eye movements, gaze fixation within an area of interest, and speed of visual response and has been used to a limited extent in anesthesiology. With eye tracking technology, we compared the accessibility of five malignant hyperthermia cognitive aids by collecting gaze data from twelve volunteer participants. Recordings were reviewed and annotated to measure the time required for participants to locate objects on the cognitive aid to provide an answer; cumulative time to answer was the primary outcome. For the primary outcome, there were differences detected between cumulative time to answer survival curves (P typescript with minimal use of single color blocking.

  15. Effect of size and geometry of gold nanostructures in performance of laser-based hyperthermia: a multiscale- multiphysics modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samadinia, Hossein; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem; Sasanpour, Pezhman; Razaghi, Mohammad Reza; Nezhad, Mohammadreza Hormozi

    2016-01-01

    The importance of hyperthermia as a promising method in disruption and removal of cancerous cells is well understood. One of the effective options of concentration of heat within a specific tissue is using laser and exploiting absorption properties of metallic nanostructures. In this report, the geometrical effect of gold nanostructures in the performance of laser based hyperthermia has been analyzed. The analysis is based on the consideration of absorption properties of gold nanostructures, interaction of laser light with a specific tissue containing nanostructures and the effect of generated heat on elevation of temperature inside the tissue. The analysis is performed using Mie theory (for extraction of absorption/scattering properties of nanostructures), Monte Carlo (MC) (interaction of light inside the tissue) and solving the heat equation (considering the elevation of temperature inside the tissue). We have compared the effect of a laser beam on the maximum temperature inside the tissue and the results indicate that focusing the beam size of the laser to half width will culminate in a 50% elevation of maximum temperature in the tissue, while the average temperature raise inside the tissue will not be altered. (paper)

  16. Effects of hyperthermia on growth kinetics of Chinese hamster ovarian carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeper, D.B.; Bobyock, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of hyperthermia on growth rate, cell volume, and density at plateau phase were studied in OvCa cells in monolayer culture in McCoy's 5a + 10% FCS. At 37 0 C, T/sub G/=9.3 hr, cell density at plateau was 32 x 10/sup 4//cm/sup 2/, and mean cell volume decreased from 1200 μ/sup 3/ at the onset of exponential growth to 850 μ/sup 3/ in plateau phase. Cells were acutely heated for 60' at 43 0 ,30' at 44 0 , or 15' at 45 0 (S.F.=20%) and incubated at 37 0 ; or were chronically heated for up to 80 hr at 39-42 0 . Acute heating at 43-45 0 delayed cell division for appx 13 hr after which growth resumed with a T/sub G/=18 hr. Incubation at 39-40 0 had no effect on T/sub G/, but temperatures of 40.5-42 0 increased T/sub G/ at ΔH=176 kcal/mole. Increasing incubation temperature decreased cell density at plateau phase and altered cell volume kinetics. Cell density in plateau phase was 20 x 10/sup 4//cm/sup 2/ at 39 0 , 13 x 10/sup 4//cm/sup 2/ at 40 0 , 5x10/sup 4//cm/sup 2/ at 41 0 . Growth was greatly reduced at 42 0 (T/sub G/=55 hr) and doubling did not occur before onset of cell lysis. The decrease in cell volume with growth of the culture was unaffected at 39 0 . However, at temperatures ≥40 0 cell volume transiently increase, and the rate of decrease in volume that normally occurred with growth at 37-39 0 was less such that at 41 0 there was no decrease in volume at all before cells entered plateau phase. The authors' hypothesis is that the effects of heat on growth kinetics are related to alterations in rates of protein synthesis. This is currently being tested

  17. Different effectiveness of hyperthermia with regard to fast electrons and X-rays with different energy spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrader-Reichhardt, U.; Markus, B.

    1981-01-01

    The synergistic enhancement of the irradiation effect by mild (40.5 0 C) and strong (43 0 C) hyperthermia (TER = temperature enhancement ratio) was examined for different sparsely ionizing radiation qualities (15 MeV electrons in two irradiation depths corresponding to a relative depth dose of 100% and 30%, 200-kV and 29-kV-X-rays). Hypotetraploid ( 4n ) and diploid (2n), asynchronous, exponentially growing CHO fibroblasts were used as experimental subjects. The survival in the colony test was used as criterion to assess the effect. The experiments carried out with 4n cells showed that, for the two temperatures, the TER decreases with increasing ionization density and, when applying fast electrons producing an extremely sparse ionization in an irradiation depth of 100%, the TER shows a maximum increase as compared to the more densely ionizing radiation qualities. Already when mild hyperthermia is employed, fast electrons show a TER of 1.25 which rises to about 2.25 at 43 0 C. In case of 29-kV-X-rays, these values amount to 1 and 1.66 respectively. As to the 2n cells, the TER reaches here the double value and seems to be similarly dependent on the ionization density. (orig.) [de

  18. Effects of γ radiation and hyperthermia on DNA repair synthesis and the level of NAD+ in cultured human mononuclear leukocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, G.G.; Eriksson, G.; Pero, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    DNA repair has been investigated, estimated by unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) and the cellular NAD + pool, after exposing human mononuclear leukocytes to hyperthermia and γ radiation separately and in combination. It was found that γ radiation induced a decline in UDS with increasing temperature through the temperature region studied (37-45 0 C). At 42.5 0 C the γ-ray-induced UDS was reduced to about 70% of that at 37 0 C. Following γ-ray damage the NAD + pool dropped to about 20% of control values. Without hyperthermic treatment the cells completely recovered to the original level within 5 hr. Moderate hyperthermia (42.5 0 C for 45 min) followed by γ-ray damage altered the kinetics so that even after 8 hr the NAD + pool had recovered to only 70% of the original level. After heat treatment at 44 0 C for 45 min prior to γ radiation the cells did not recover at all, presumably because of the cytotoxic effects from the combined treatment

  19. The effect of leg hyperthermia using far infrared rays in bedridden subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaura, Akihiko; Tanida, Noritoshi; Kamitani, Masato; Akiyama, Junichi; Mizutani, Masatoshi; Tsugawa, Naoko; Okano, Toshio; Takeda, Eiji

    2010-04-01

    We examined the effect of leg hyperthermia on oxidative stress in bedridden subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus using 15-min sessions of far infrared rays over a two-week period. Four subjects (male 1, female 3) incapacitated by a stroke were recruited for this study. All patients were admitted to Takahashi Central Hospital and ate the same hospital meals. Fasting plasma glucose, HbA1c, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)alpha, free fatty acid, leptin, adiponectin and plasma 8-epi-prostaglandin F2alpha (8-epi-PGF2alpha) levels as a marker of oxidative stress were measured on admission, just before and 2 weeks after local heating of the leg. Results showed that plasma total 8-epi-PGF2alpha levels were decreased significantly while TNFalpha levels were increased significantly. On the other hand, glucose, HbA1c, free fatty acid, leptin and adiponectin levels were not changed during the study period. These results suggest that repeated leg hyperthermia may protect against oxidative stress.

  20. Cell biological effects of hyperthermia alone or combined with radiation or drugs : A short introduction to newcomers in the field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kampinga, HH

    Hyperthermia results in protein unfolding that, if not properly chaperoned by Heat Shock Proteins (HSP), can lead to irreversible and toxic protein aggregates. Elevating HSP prior to heating makes cells thermotolerant. Hyperthermia also can enhance the sensitivity of cells to radiation and drugs.

  1. Late effects of thoracic irradiation in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boelling, T.; Koenemann, S.; Ernst, I.; Willich, N. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital of Muenster (Germany)

    2008-06-15

    Purpose: to summarize the literature regarding the late effects of radiotherapy to the thorax in childhood and adolescence with special emphasis on cardiac and pulmonary impairment. Material und methods: the literature was critically reviewed using the PubMed {sup registered} database with the key words 'late effects', 'late sequelae', 'child', 'childhood', 'adolescence', 'radiation', 'radiotherapy', 'thorax', 'lung', 'heart', and 'pulmonary'. Results: 17 publications dealing with radiation-induced pulmonary and cardiac late sequelae in children could be identified and were analyzed in detail. 29 further publications with additional information were also included in the analysis. Pulmonary function impairment after mediastinal irradiation arose in one third of all pediatric patients, even when treatment was performed with normofractionated lower doses (15-25 Gy). Whole lung irradiation was regularly followed by pulmonary function impairment with differing rates in several reports. However, clinically symptomatic function impairment like dyspnea was less frequent. Irradiation of up to 25 Gy (single doses {<=} 2 Gy) to the heart showed little or no cardiac toxicity in analyses of irradiated children (median follow-up 1.3-14.3 years). Doses of > 25 Gy (single doses {<=} 2-3.3 Gy) led to several cardiac dysfunctions. However, new data from adults with longer follow-up may indicate threshold doses as low as 1 Gy. Impairment of skeletal growth, breast hypoplasia, and secondary malignancy were further potential late sequelae. Conclusion: several retrospective reports described radiation-associated late sequelae in children. However, there is still a lack of sufficient data regarding the characterization of dose-volume effects. (orig.)

  2. Late effects of radiation: host factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.; Storer, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    The paper discusses the influence of host factors on radiation late effects and in particular cancer. Radiation induces cellular changes that result in initiated cells with a potential to become cancers. The expression of the initiated cells as tumors is influenced, if not determined, by both tissue and systemic factors that are sex-, age-, and species-dependent

  3. Effects of hyperthermia on cerebral blood flow and metabolism during prolonged exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Møller, Kirsten; Volianitis, Stefanos

    2002-01-01

    The development of hyperthermia during prolonged exercise in humans is associated with various changes in the brain, but it is not known whether the cerebral metabolism or the global cerebral blood flow (gCBF) is affected. Eight endurance-trained subjects completed two exercise bouts on a cycle...... ergometer. The gCBF and cerebral metabolic rates of oxygen, glucose, and lactate were determined with the Kety-Schmidt technique after 15 min of exercise when core temperature was similar across trials, and at the end of exercise, either when subjects remained normothermic (core temperature = 37.9 degrees C...... with control at the end of exercise (43 +/- 4 vs. 51 +/- 4 ml. 100 g(-1). min(-1); P glucose, and the cerebral metabolic rate was therefore higher at the end...

  4. Effect of hyperthermia on epithelial microneoplastic cell populations induced by irradiation of rat skin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gragtmans, N.J.; McGregor, J.F.

    1983-01-01

    Two groups of male rats of the Charles River CD stock received a dose of 1,600 rad beta-radiation (700 rad/min) on the skin of the dorsum. Two months later, the site of irradiation of one of the groups was treated with hyperthermia at 44 degrees C for 2.5 minutes. A third control group received only the hyperthermic treatment. Over 90% of the animals in the 2 irradiated groups developed skin tumors (benign and malignant epithelial) at the irradiated site. There was no significant difference between these 2 groups in incidence of animals with tumors, incidence of tumors, distribution of tumor types, or rate of tumor appearance. The incidence of animals with tumors in the control group was less than 4% at any time

  5. Effects of experimental radiotherapy and hyperthermia on tumors and normal tissues in small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wondergem, J.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments on responses of tumors, implanted subcutaneously in the leg, to irradiation alone or combined with heat are reported. The influence of factors modifying the fraction of hypoxic cells (e.g. anesthesia of the animal and tumor volume) is also discussed. The radiosensitivity of developing lung tumors was examined for spontaneous as well as for artificial lung metastases. Both experimental tumor models were compared with regard to their value in experimental radiotherapy. Data obtained on the response of artificial metastases and lung tissue to combined treatment with irradiation and several drugs are presented. Data on damage of the mouse foot, as a result of heat and/or irradiation treatments are presented. In particular the influence of thermotolerance on thermal enhancement of the radiation induced skin reaction was studied. Tolerance of the skin of previously irradiated mice to retreatment with irradiation, to hyperthermia alone and combined with X-rays was assessed. (Auth.)

  6. Effect of Passive Hyperthermia on Working Memory Resources during Simple and Complex Cognitive Tasks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Gaoua

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the hypothesis that hyperthermia represents a cognitive load limiting available resources for executing concurrent cognitive tasks. Electroencephalographic activity (EEG: alpha and theta power was obtained in 10 hyperthermic participants in HOT (50°C, 50% RH conditions and in a normothermic state in CON (25°C, 50% RH conditions in counterbalanced order. In each trial, EEG was measured over the frontal lobe prior to task engagement (PRE in each condition and during simple (One Touch Stockings of Cambridge, OTS-4 and complex (OTS-6 cognitive tasks. Core (39.5 ± 0.5 vs. 36.9 ± 0.2°C and mean skin (39.06 ± 0.3 vs. 31.6 ± 0.6°C temperatures were significantly higher in HOT than CON (p < 0.005. Theta power significantly increased with task demand (p = 0.017, η2 = 0.36 and was significantly higher in HOT than CON (p = 0.041, η2 = 0.39. The difference between HOT and CON was large (η2 = 0.40 and significant (p = 0.036 PRE, large (η2 = 0.20 but not significant (p = 0.17 during OTS-4, and disappeared during OTS-6 (p = 0.87, η2 = 0.00. Those changes in theta power suggest that hyperthermia may act as an additional cognitive load. However, this load disappeared during OTS-6 together with an impaired performance, suggesting a potential saturation of the available resources.

  7. Effect of transient scrotal hyperthermia on sperm parameters, seminal plasma biochemical markers, and oxidative stress in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this experimental prospective study, we aimed to analyze the effect of transient scrotal hyperthermia on the male reproductive organs, from the perspective of sperm parameters, semen plasma biochemical markers, and oxidative stress, to evaluate whether different frequencies of heat exposure cause different degrees of damage to spermatogenesis. Two groups of volunteers (10 per group received testicular warming in a 43°C water bath 10 times, for 30 min each time: group 1: 10 consecutive days; group 2: once every 3 days. Sperm parameters, epididymis and accessory sex gland function, semen plasma oxidative stress and serum sex hormones were tested before treatment and in the 16-week recovery period after treatment. At last, we found an obvious reversible decrease in sperm concentration (P = 0.005 for Group 1 and P= 0.008 for Group 2 when the minimums were compared with baseline levels, the same below, motility (P = 0.009 and 0.021, respectively, the hypoosmotic swelling test score (P = 0.007 and 0.008, respectively, total acrosin activity (P = 0.018 and 0.009, respectively, and an increase in the seminal plasma malondialdehyde concentration (P = 0.005 and 0.017, respectively. The decrease of sperm concentration was greater for Group 2 than for Group 1 (P = 0.031. We concluded that transient scrotal hyperthermia seriously, but reversibly, negatively affected the spermatogenesis, oxidative stress may be involved in this process. In addition, intermittent heat exposure more seriously suppresses the spermatogenesis compared to consecutive heat exposure. This may be indicative for clinical infertility etiology analysis and the design of contraceptive methods based on heat stress.

  8. Hyperthermia treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lagendijk, J.J.W.

    2000-01-01

    The development of hyperthermia, the treatment of tumours with elevated temperatures in the range of 40-44 deg. C with treatment times over 30 min, greatly benefits from the development of hyperthermia treatment planning. This review briefly describes the state of the art in hyperthermia technology, followed by an overview of the developments in hyperthermia treatment planning. It particularly highlights the significant problems encountered with heating realistic tissue volumes and shows how treatment planning can help in designing better heating technology. Hyperthermia treatment planning will ultimately provide information about the actual temperature distributions obtained and thus the tumour control probabilities to be expected. This will improve our understanding of the present clinical results of thermoradiotherapy and thermochemotherapy, and will greatly help both in optimizing clinical heating technology and in designing optimal clinical trials. (author)

  9. Multimodal treatment combining chemotherapy, hyperthermia and radiotherapy for ovarian cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Kei

    1992-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in the use of heat in the treatment of cancer. Theoretically cells are the most sensitive to ionizing radiation at mitosis, whereas the cycle phase that is the most resistant to ionizing radiation namely late in the DNA. Synthetic phase (late S) is the most sensitive to hyperthermia. Hyperthermia has been reported to enhance the cytocidal effects of several active chemotherapeutic agents. When thermal potentiation of chemotherapeutic agents against malignant cells is contemplated, normal tissues have a relatively high ambient blood flow which increases in response to thermal stress, thereby dissipating heat, compared to tumors. Tumors, with relatively poor blood flow and a responsive neovasculature, are in capable of augmenting flow and acting as a heat reservoir. This is the phenomenon of a heat reservoir which is one factor to enhance the cytocidal effects of several active anticancer agents for enhancing the uptake in tumor. The importance is in the adjuvant chemotherapy treated for post operative, advanced and recurrent ovarian cancer. Heating enhances the effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Thirty patients with ovarian cancer were subjected to the multidisciplinary treatment with combination of hyperthermochemotherapy and radiation. The 30 patients consisted of 18 with endometrioid adenocarcinoma and 7 with serious post operative or recurrent status. Two types of equipments with rediofrequencies of 70 MHz (BSD-1000) or 434 MHZ (TAG MED·HS 434) were used for hyperthermia. Chemotherapeutic agents such as adriamycin, cis DDP, cyclophosphamide and etoposide were injected intravenously. Arterial infusion with reservoir was very effective in advanced stage of ovarian cancer. No severe or fatal side effects were observed. Hyperthermochemotherapy is useful and effective for the postoperative management or the treatment of recurrent cancer of the ovary. (J.P.N.)

  10. Effect of Passive Hyperthermia on Working Memory Resources during Simple and Complex Cognitive Tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaoua, Nadia; Herrera, Christopher P; Périard, Julien D; El Massioui, Farid; Racinais, Sebastien

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the hypothesis that hyperthermia represents a cognitive load limiting available resources for executing concurrent cognitive tasks. Electroencephalographic activity (EEG: alpha and theta power) was obtained in 10 hyperthermic participants in HOT (50°C, 50% RH) conditions and in a normothermic state in CON (25°C, 50% RH) conditions in counterbalanced order. In each trial, EEG was measured over the frontal lobe prior to task engagement (PRE) in each condition and during simple (One Touch Stockings of Cambridge, OTS-4) and complex (OTS-6) cognitive tasks. Core (39.5 ± 0.5 vs. 36.9 ± 0.2°C) and mean skin (39.06 ± 0.3 vs. 31.6 ± 0.6°C) temperatures were significantly higher in HOT than CON ( p cognitive load. However, this load disappeared during OTS-6 together with an impaired performance, suggesting a potential saturation of the available resources.

  11. Neuronal Rat Brain Damage Caused by Endogenous and Exogenous Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Aydın

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Hyperthermia may induce pathologic alterations within body systems and organs including brain. In this study, neuronal effects of endogenous and exogenous hyperthermia (41°C were studied in rats. METHODS: The endogenous hyperthermia (41°C was induced by lipopolysaccharide and the exogenous by an (electric heater. Possible neuronal damage was evaluated by examining healthy, apoptotic and necrotic cells, and heat shock proteins (HSP 27, HSP 70 in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and hypothalamus RESULTS: At cellular level, when all neuronal tissues are taken into account; (i a significant increase in the necrotic cells was observed in the both groups (p0.05. CONCLUSION: The neural tissue of brain can show different degree of response to hyperthermia. But we can conclude that endogenous hyperthermia is more harmful to central nervous system than exogenous hyperthermia

  12. Hyperthermia quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrivastava, P.N.; Paliwal, B.R.

    1984-01-01

    Hyperthermia Physics Center (HPC) operating under contract with the National Cancer Institute is developing a Quality Assurance program for local and regional hyperthermia. The major clinical problem in hyperthermia treatments is that they are extremely difficult to plan, execute, monitor and reproduce. A scientific basis for treatment planning can be established only after ensuring that the performance of heat generating and temperature monitoring systems are reliable. The HPC is presently concentrating on providing uniform NBS traceable calibration of thermometers and evaluation of reproducibility for power generator operation, applicator performance, phanta compositions, system calibrations and personnel shielding. The organizational plan together with recommended evaluation measurements, procedures and criteria are presented

  13. Early and late arrhythmogenic effects of doxorubicin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilickap, Saadettin; Barista, Ibrahim; Akgul, Ebru; Aytemir, Kudret; Aksoy, Sercan; Tekuzman, Gulten

    2007-03-01

    To determine the incidence of early and late arrhythmogenic effects of doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy regimens. A prospective study including 29 patients who were treated with doxorubicin-containing regimens. Cardiac evaluation was based on 24-hour electrocardiographic monitorization (Holter), which was performed during the first cycle of doxorubicin-containing regimens, as well as after the last cycle of chemotherapy. The mean age of the patients was 45.8 +/- 15.1 (range 18-69). Holter records obtained during the first cycle of treatment revealed varying arrhythmias in 19 patients (65.5%) and in 18 (62.1%) patients after completion of therapy. One patient presented with syncope and both Mobitz Type 2 atrioventricular block and complete atrioventricular block were demonstrated. The patient subsequently underwent permanent pacemaker implantation. Doxorubicin may result in arrhythmias both in early and late periods of treatment. These arrhythmias are rarely life threatening.

  14. Microwave radiation, in the absence of hyperthermia, has no detectable effect on synapsin I levels or phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Browning, M.D.; Haycock, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Recent reports have indicated that microwave radiation can produce effects on a variety of cell types in vitro. To determine whether microwave radiation might be neurotoxic, the effects of microwave radiation on synapsin I have been examined. Synapsin I is a neuron-specific phosphoprotein that is present in all neurons, where it is localized to the presynaptic terminal and is associated with synaptic vesicles. O'Callaghan and Miller have demonstrated that studies of such neuron-specific proteins can provide reliable indices of neurotoxicity. We have used a radioimmunoassay for synapsin I to determine whether microwave irradiation has any effect on the levels of synapsin I. Neither acute nor chronic exposure to microwave irradiation had any detectable effect on synapsin I levels. We have also examined the calcium-dependent phosphorylation of synapsin I in synaptosomes isolated from rats that had been subjected to microwave radiation. The phosphorylation of synapsin I in synaptosomes reflects numerous components of the presynaptic aspect of neuronal transmission. At intensities below that required to produce mild hyperthermia, no effects of microwave irradiation were seen on synapsin I phosphorylation

  15. The late biological effects of ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-06-15

    Full text: The principal objective of the symposium was to review the current status of understanding of the late biological effects of ionizing radiation from external and internal sources. A second objective was to critically evaluate information obtained from epidemiological studies of human population groups as well as from animal experimentation in order to provide a solid scientific basis upon which problems of current concern, such as radiation protection standards and risk-benefit analysis, could be deliberated. Eighty-one papers were presented in 10 sessions which covered epidemiological studies of late effects in human populations exposed to internal and/or external ionizing radiation; quantitative and qualitative data from animal experimentation of late effects; methodological problems and modern approaches; factors influencing susceptibility or expression of late radiation injury; comparative evaluation of late effects induced by radiation and other environmental pollutants, and problems of risk assessment. In addition, there were two evening sessions for free discussion of problems of interpreting animal data, and of the epidemiological studies of occupationally exposed populations. Reports on atomic bomb survivors showed that these epidemiological studies are providing dependable data, such as dose-related excess infant mortality. The reports also revealed the need for consensus in the method employed in the interpretation of data. That was also the case with studies on occupationally exposed populations at Hanford plant, where disparate results were presented on radiation-induced neoplasia among radiation workers. These data are, however, considered not so significant in relative terms when compared to risks involved in other industries. It was recommended that national registry systems for the dosimetry and medical records of radiation workers be established and co-ordinated internationally in order to facilitate reliable epidemiological

  16. Thermo-radiosensitivity of the granulocyte and macrophage precursor cells of mice. I.-Development of the in vivo culture and effects induced by the hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueren, J. A.; Nieto, M.

    1983-01-01

    The present report shows the agar diffusion chamber technique for culturing granulocyte- macrophage precursor cells, obtained from mice bone marrow. Diffusion chambers containing the bone marrow suspension are implanted intraperitoneally Into mice and constitute a compartment which avoids the migration of cells, but allows the transit of the mouse biological fluxes, necessary for the cellular proliferation. By means of this technique, we studied the lethal effects of the hyperthermia on the precursors and their capacity to repair sublethal damage. (Author) 129 refs

  17. Hyperthermia, immunity and metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopatin, V.F.

    1983-01-01

    The analysis of literature data concerning local hyperthermia effects shows that temperatures over 41-42 deg C (in the whole tumor volume), causing tumor growth inhibition and cell injury, can change antigenic nature of a malignant tissue. The tumor injured by thermal effect is able probably the full length of time of injured tissue resorption to maintain at a sufficiently high level antitumoral immunity and lay obstacles to emergence of metastases or even cause regression of those tumoral foci which have not been exposed to direct effect of the injuring agent. The facts of tumoral foci regression take place also upon radiation effect which is associated as well with participation of immune mechanisms. In.experiments with animals an essential increase of immunogenic character of malignant cells exposed to ionizing radiation effect has been observed. It follows that radiation injury of tumoral tissue as well as thermal one is able to stimulate antitumoral immunity and reduce the probability of emergence of metastases. But in case of radiotherapy immunosuppression effect of ionizing radiation (at the expense of inhibition of proliferation and death of immunocompetent cells) can essentially overlap immunostimulating effect related to the changes in antigenic character of tumoral cells

  18. Hyperthermia stimulates HIV-1 replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferdinand Roesch

    Full Text Available HIV-infected individuals may experience fever episodes. Fever is an elevation of the body temperature accompanied by inflammation. It is usually beneficial for the host through enhancement of immunological defenses. In cultures, transient non-physiological heat shock (42-45°C and Heat Shock Proteins (HSPs modulate HIV-1 replication, through poorly defined mechanisms. The effect of physiological hyperthermia (38-40°C on HIV-1 infection has not been extensively investigated. Here, we show that culturing primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and cell lines at a fever-like temperature (39.5°C increased the efficiency of HIV-1 replication by 2 to 7 fold. Hyperthermia did not facilitate viral entry nor reverse transcription, but increased Tat transactivation of the LTR viral promoter. Hyperthermia also boosted HIV-1 reactivation in a model of latently-infected cells. By imaging HIV-1 transcription, we further show that Hsp90 co-localized with actively transcribing provirus, and this phenomenon was enhanced at 39.5°C. The Hsp90 inhibitor 17-AAG abrogated the increase of HIV-1 replication in hyperthermic cells. Altogether, our results indicate that fever may directly stimulate HIV-1 replication, in a process involving Hsp90 and facilitation of Tat-mediated LTR activity.

  19. Local hyperthermia, radiation, and chemotherapy in recurrent breast cancer is feasible and effective except for inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feyerabend, Thomas; Wiedemann, Guenter Joseph; Jaeger, Birgit; Vesely, Hugo; Mahlmann, Birgit; Richter, Eckart

    2001-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of radiochemothermotherapy (triple-modality therapy) in patients with inoperable recurrent breast cancer. Patients and Methods: Patients with inoperable recurrent lesions, World Health Organization (WHO) performance status of 2 or greater, life expectancy of more than 3 months, adequate bone marrow, hepatic and renal function were eligible for this Phase I/II study. Conventionally fractionated or hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) was performed. Once-weekly local hyperthermia (HT) combined with chemotherapy (CT; epirubicin 20 mg/m{sup 2}, ifosfamide 1.5 g/m{sup 2}) was applied within 30 min after RT. Results: Twenty-five patients, all heavily pretreated (18/25 preirradiated), received a mean total dose of 49 Gy. The median number of HT/CT sessions was 4. Skin toxicity was low, whereas bone marrow toxicity was significant (leucopenia Grade 3/4 in 14/1 patients). The overall response rate was 80% with a complete response (CR) rate of 44%. Response rates in patients with noninflammatory disease (n=14; CR 10 patients, partial response [PR] 3 patients) were far better than in patients with inflammatory disease (n=11; CR 1 patient, PR 6 patients). Conclusions: In patients with recurrent breast cancer, triple-modality therapy is feasible with acceptable toxicity. High remission rates can be achieved in noninflammatory disease, however, local control is limited to a few months. Whether the addition of chemotherapy has a clear-cut advantage to radiothermotherapy alone remains an open question.

  20. Local hyperthermia, radiation, and chemotherapy in recurrent breast cancer is feasible and effective except for inflammatory disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feyerabend, Thomas; Wiedemann, Guenter Joseph; Jaeger, Birgit; Vesely, Hugo; Mahlmann, Birgit; Richter, Eckart

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of radiochemothermotherapy (triple-modality therapy) in patients with inoperable recurrent breast cancer. Patients and Methods: Patients with inoperable recurrent lesions, World Health Organization (WHO) performance status of 2 or greater, life expectancy of more than 3 months, adequate bone marrow, hepatic and renal function were eligible for this Phase I/II study. Conventionally fractionated or hyperfractionated radiotherapy (RT) was performed. Once-weekly local hyperthermia (HT) combined with chemotherapy (CT; epirubicin 20 mg/m 2 , ifosfamide 1.5 g/m 2 ) was applied within 30 min after RT. Results: Twenty-five patients, all heavily pretreated (18/25 preirradiated), received a mean total dose of 49 Gy. The median number of HT/CT sessions was 4. Skin toxicity was low, whereas bone marrow toxicity was significant (leucopenia Grade 3/4 in 14/1 patients). The overall response rate was 80% with a complete response (CR) rate of 44%. Response rates in patients with noninflammatory disease (n=14; CR 10 patients, partial response [PR] 3 patients) were far better than in patients with inflammatory disease (n=11; CR 1 patient, PR 6 patients). Conclusions: In patients with recurrent breast cancer, triple-modality therapy is feasible with acceptable toxicity. High remission rates can be achieved in noninflammatory disease, however, local control is limited to a few months. Whether the addition of chemotherapy has a clear-cut advantage to radiothermotherapy alone remains an open question

  1. The influence of hyperthermia and irradiation on some bioelectric parameters of the cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solic, F.; Milotic, B.; Stipcic-Solic, N.

    1986-01-01

    The simultaneously influence of hyperthermia and low intensity gamma irradiation on the biopotential and the resistance of Nitella cells were investigated. The effect induced by irradiation and hyperthermia is manifested as membrane repolarization while hyperthermia alone induced depolarization. The resistance of cells is in positive correlation with membrane potential. (author)

  2. Association of acute adverse effects with high local SAR induced in the brain from prolonged RF head and neck hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adibzadeh, F; Verhaart, R F; Rijnen, Z; Franckena, M; Van Rhoon, G C; Paulides, M M; Verduijn, G M; Fortunati, V

    2015-01-01

    To provide an adequate level of protection for humans from exposure to radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) and to assure that any adverse health effects are avoided. The basic restrictions in terms of the specific energy absorption rate (SAR) were prescribed by IEEE and ICNIRP. An example of a therapeutic application of non-ionizing EMF is hyperthermia (HT), in which intense RF energy is focused at a target region. Deep HT in the head and neck (H and N) region involves inducing energy at 434 MHz for 60 min on target. Still, stray exposure of the brain is considerable, but to date only very limited side-effects were observed. The objective of this study is to investigate the stringency of the current basic restrictions by relating the induced EM dose in the brain of patients treated with deep head and neck (H and N) HT to the scored acute health effects. We performed a simulation study to calculate the induced peak 10 g spatial-averaged SAR (psSAR 10g ) in the brains of 16 selected H and N patients who received the highest SAR exposure in the brain, i.e. who had the minimum brain-target distance and received high forwarded power during treatment. The results show that the maximum induced SAR in the brain of the patients can exceed the current basic restrictions (IEEE and ICNIRP) on psSAR 10g for occupational environments by 14 times. Even considering the high local SAR in the brain, evaluation of acute effects by the common toxicity criteria (CTC) scores revealed no indication of a serious acute neurological effect. In addition, this study provides pioneering quantitative human data on the association between maximum brain SAR level and acute adverse effects when brains are exposed to prolonged RF EMF. (paper)

  3. Quantified Effects of Late Pregnancy and Lactation on the Osmotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quantified Effects of Late Pregnancy and Lactation on the Osmotic Stability of ... in the composition of erythrocyte membranes associated with the physiologic states. Keywords: Erythrocyteosmotic stability, osmotic fragility, late pregnancy, ...

  4. Targeting DNA double strand break repair with hyperthermia and DNA-PKcs inhibition to enhance the effect of radiation treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorschot, Bregje; Granata, Giovanna; Di Franco, Simone; Ten Cate, Rosemarie; Rodermond, Hans M; Todaro, Matilde; Medema, Jan Paul; Franken, Nicolaas A P

    2016-10-04

    Radiotherapy is based on the induction of lethal DNA damage, primarily DNA double-strand breaks (DSB). Efficient DSB repair via Non-Homologous End Joining or Homologous Recombination can therefore undermine the efficacy of radiotherapy. By suppressing DNA-DSB repair with hyperthermia (HT) and DNA-PKcs inhibitor NU7441 (DNA-PKcsi), we aim to enhance the effect of radiation.The sensitizing effect of HT for 1 hour at 42°C and DNA-PKcsi [1 μM] to radiation treatment was investigated in cervical and breast cancer cells, primary breast cancer sphere cells (BCSCs) enriched for cancer stem cells, and in an in vivo human tumor model. A significant radio-enhancement effect was observed for all cell types when DNA-PKcsi and HT were applied separately, and when both were combined, HT and DNA-PKcsi enhanced radio-sensitivity to an even greater extent. Strikingly, combined treatment resulted in significantly lower survival rates, 2 to 2.5 fold increase in apoptosis, more residual DNA-DSB 6 h post treatment and a G2-phase arrest. In addition, tumor growth analysis in vivo showed significant reduction in tumor growth and elevated caspase-3 activity when radiation was combined with HT and DNA-PKcsi compared to radiation alone. Importantly, no toxic side effects of HT or DNA-PKcsi were found.In conclusion, inhibiting DNA-DSB repair using HT and DNA-PKcsi before radiotherapy leads to enhanced cytotoxicity in cancer cells. This effect was even noticed in the more radio-resistant BCSCs, which are clearly sensitized by combined treatment. Therefore, the addition of HT and DNA-PKcsi to conventional radiotherapy is promising and might contribute to more efficient tumor control and patient outcome.

  5. Investigation of particle accumulation, chemosensitivity and thermosensitivity for effective solid tumor therapy using thermosensitive liposomes and hyperthermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.J.M. Lokerse (Wouter); M. Bolkestein (Michiel); T.L.M. ten Hagen (Timo); M. de Jong (Marcel); A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander); Grüll, H. (Holger); G.A. Koning (Gerben)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractDoxorubicin (Dox) loaded thermosensitive liposomes (TSLs) have shown promising results for hyperthermia-induced local drug delivery to solid tumors. Typically, the tumor is heated to hyperthermic temperatures (41-42 °C), which induced intravascular drug release from TSLs within the tumor

  6. Effects of intraoperative irradiation (IORT) and intraoperative hyperthermia (IOHT) on canine sciatic nerve : Histopathological and morphometric studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vujaskovic, Z; Powers, BE; Paardekoper, G; Gillette, SM; Gillette, EL; Colacchio, TA

    1999-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Peripheral neuropathies have emerged as the major dose-limiting complication reported after intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT). The combination of IORT with hyperthermia may further increase the risk of peripheral nerve injury. The objective of this study was to evaluate

  7. A study of effects of hyperthermia on large, short-haired male dogs : a simulated air transport environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-03-01

    When dogs are shipped by air transport, they can encounter environmental temperatures as high as 130.0 F during the summer months. Heat- induced hyperthermia can be a major problem in dogs. : To assess some aspects of the heat stress problem, 20 dogs...

  8. Ultrasonic system for hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppi, E.J.; Shapiro, E.G.; Zitelli, L.T.

    1985-01-01

    A system using ultrasound has been developed for hyperthermia application. It consists of a water bed containing a large ultrasound transducer array for heat application, an annular imaging transducer for alignment and treatment monitoring, and a 30-channel monitoring system for invasive temperature measurements. The heat applicator array contains 30 transducers mounted in a hexagonal configuration. Four subsets of transducers in the array can be remotely mechanically driven in such a way as to allow control of the distribution and diameter of ultrasound power at the effective focus of the array. The array can be remotely translated in three dimensions and can be rotated about its axis of symmetry. These motions allow positioning of the focal area of the array at the desired location. Each transducer of the array is powered by an individual amplifier and can be controlled in intensity and phase. The system can operate at variable ultrasound frequencies. An imaging transducer located at the center of the heat applicator array is used to collect data for ultrasound imaging and other purposes. Ultrasound images are displayed along with marks indicating the location of the heat applicator focal region for setup and for monitoring during treatment. The entire system is under computer control. This allows for operator ease in the control of the numerous parameters involved in the operation of the system

  9. Re-irradiation and hyperthermia after surgery for recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linthorst, Marianne; Geel, Albert N. van; Baaijens, Margreet; Ameziane, Ali; Ghidey, Wendim; Rhoon, Gerard C. van; Zee, Jacoba van der

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluation of efficacy and side effects of combined re-irradiation and hyperthermia electively or for subclinical disease in the management of locoregional recurrent breast cancer. Methods and materials: Records of 198 patients with recurrent breast cancer treated with re-irradiation and hyperthermia from 1993 to 2010 were reviewed. Prior treatments included surgery (100%), radiotherapy (100%), chemotherapy (42%), and hormonal therapy (57%). Ninety-one patients were treated for microscopic residual disease following resection or systemic therapy and 107 patients were treated electively for areas at high risk for local recurrences. All patients were re-irradiated to 28–36 Gy (median 32) and treated with 3–8 hyperthermia treatments (mean 4.36). Forty percent of the patients received concurrent hormonal therapy. Patient and tumor characteristics predictive for actuarial local control (LC) and toxicity were studied in univariate and multivariate analysis. Results: The median follow-up was 42 months. Three and 5 year LC-rates were 83% and 78%. Mean of T90 (tenth percentile of temperature distribution), maximum and average temperatures were 39.8 °C, 43.6 °C, and 41.2 °C, respectively. Mean of the cumulative equivalent minutes (CEM43) at T90 was 4.58 min. Number of previous chemotherapy and surgical procedures were most predictive for LC. Cumulative incidence of grade 3 and 4 late toxicity at 5 years was 11.9%. The number of thermometry sensors and depth of treatment volume were associated with acute hyperthermia toxicity. Conclusions: The combination of re-irradiation and hyperthermia results in a high LC-rate with acceptable toxicity

  10. Combined effects of x irradiation and hyperthermia on CHO cells for various temperatures and orders of application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapareto, S.A.; Hopwood, L.E.; Dewey, W.C.

    1978-01-01

    The survival of CHO cells to hyperthermic treatment combined with radiation indicates that heat given either immediately before or immediately after irradiation radiosensitizers S-phase cells more than G1 cells, thus resulting in similar absolute levels of survival for each phase. No difference in effect was observed for different temperatures (42.0 to 45.5 0 C) applied before irradiation in either G1 or S when times of heating were adjusted to obtain the same survival (0.5 to 0.6) from heat alone. When heat was administered after irradiation and the time between treatments was increased, repair during G1 of radiation damage which interacted with subsequent heat damage occurred over a 2-hr period. Survival increased from a synergistic level to an independent level with kinetics similar to those seen for repair between split x-ray doses. For this experiment, the heat treatments were administered at either 42.5 or 45.5 0 C with times of heating adjusted to obtain the same survival (0.15) from heat alone. When cells were treated similarly in S phase using either 42.5 or 45.5 0 C (survival from heat alone was 0.2), recovery from a synergistic level of survival was similar to that observed in G1; however, survival did not reach an independent level by 120 min between treatments. When relatively sublethal heat doses at either 42.5 or 45.5 0 C were applied either before, during, or after irradiation, the maximum reduction in survival of asynchronous cells occurred when heat was present during and immediately following irradation, presumably due to heat increasing the fixation of radiation damage. A sixfold difference in survival was observed with about a 5-min change in the timing of radiation with respect to heating. This sensitivity of survival to changes in protocol may have considerable implications in the combined use of hyperthermia and radiation for cancer therapy

  11. Thermo-radiosensitivity of the granulocyte and macrophage precursor cells of mice. II. - X irradiation effects and influence of hyperthermia on the radiosensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bueren, J.A.; Nieto, M.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of the X-irradiation on the viability of the granulocyte-macrophage precursors, has been determined by means of the agar diffusion chamber culture technique. The results show the high radiosensitivity of these cells, with survival parameter similar to those previously reported in the literature about different granulocyte-macrophage precursors. When a hyperthermic treatment is performed prior to the X-irradiation, a radiosensitization phenomenon is observed due to the synergism existent between hyperthermia and X rays on the lethality of the precursors. (Authors) 37 refs

  12. Late effects of total body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, A.; Gibson, B.

    1987-01-01

    Late effects of chemo-radiotherapy conditioning before bone marrow transplantation (BMT) are being increasingly recognised in long-term survivors, particularly children. They can be divided into two categories: those affecting hormonal status and those affecting specific organ function. All women treated develop ovarian failure with low levels of β-oestradiol and raised values of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and leutinizing hormone (LH). In males, raised FSH and LH values are found with normal testosterone levels but most patients have azoospermia. In children, puberty is usually but not invariably delayed by treatment but can be induced by appropriate hormone replacement. Compensated hypothyroidism was found in 6/30 children. Growth hormone secretion may be impaired especially if previous cranial irradiation has been given. In children, a reduction in sitting height has been observed. Cataract has occurred in 20% of children between 3 and 6 years after treatment. Two second tumours have been observed. No other major organ toxicities have been encountered. (Auth.)

  13. Thermometry of hot spot using NMR for hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amemiya, Yoshifumi; Kamimura, Yoshitsugu

    1983-01-01

    Lately noticed hyperthermia in cancer therapy requires non-invasive measurement of the temperature at the warmed site in the deep portion of human body. Nuclear magnetic relaxation time of NMR is also usable for cancer diagnosis. For coordination of these two techniques, it was judged suitable to measure temperature by NMR so that cancer diagnosis and treatment and evaluation of therapeutic effect might be incorporated into one system. This report dealt with concrete procedures of measuring the temperature of deep portions by NMR. Computations revealed that the coefficient of temperature of the thermal equilibrium magnetization was useful, that magnetic field focusing was the most effective imaging technique and that temperature rise in areas about 2 cm in radius could be measured without large errors. (Chiba, N.)

  14. Research and clinical aspects of the late effects of poliomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halstead, L.S.; Wiechers, D.O.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 32 selections. Some of the titles are: Late effects of Polio: Historical Perspectives; Sleep-Disordered Breathing as a Late Effect of Poliomyelitis; Clinical Subtypes, DNA Repair Efficiency, and Therapeutic Trials in the Post-Polio Syndromes; and Post-Polio Muscle Function.

  15. ADPRT inhibitors and hyperthermia as radiosensitizers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonsson, G.G.

    1985-01-01

    Hyperthermia given in combination with gamma radiation has given considerable improvement in the therapeutic results for treatment of malignant tumors. The mechanism behind the hyperthermia effect is probably operative at the tissue level as well as at the molecular level. The metabolism of NAD + in relation to the activity of the chromosomal enzyme ADP-ribosyl transferase (ADPRT) has been studied as a possible molecular mechanism for this effect. The ADPRT activity was measured after radiosensitization with both hyperthermia and nicotinamide, which is a potent inhibitor of ADPRT. The results indicate that hyperthermia can improve the effect of radiotherapy by reducing the supply of NAD + , which is a co-substrate for ADPRT, while nicotinamide functions as a radiosensitizing agent by direct inhibition of the enzyme. The hypothesis is discussed in the thesis where inhibition of ADPRT might increase the radiosensitivity because the radiation-induced DNA damage can not be repaired with normal efficiency. The function of nicotinamide as a radiosensitizer was verified by studies on C3H mice with transplanted spontaneous mammary tumors. Because nicotinamide is not toxic, it seems quite attractive to test this vitamin as a radiosensitizing agent against human tumors. (251 refs.) (author)

  16. Effects of hyperthermia and X-irradiation on mouse stromal tissue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wondergem, J.; Begg, A. C.; Haveman, J.

    1986-01-01

    The sensitivity of normal stroma to heat, irradiation and heat combined with irradiation has been studied using the tumour bed effect (TBE) assay. Irradiation before implantation led to a TBE. This TBE was dose dependent below 15 Gy, the TBE remaining relatively constant above 15 Gy. The interval

  17. Magnetocaloric effect in magnetothermally-responsive nanocarriers for hyperthermia-triggered drug release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianbo; Qu Yang; Ren Jie; Yuan Weizhong; Shi Donglu

    2012-01-01

    The magnetocaloric effects and lower critical solution temperature (LCST) were investigated in a magnetothermally-responsive nanocarrier for magnetothermal drug release under alternating magnetic field (AMF). The Mn 0.2 Zn 0.8 Fe 2 O 4 nanoparticles with low T c were dispersed in a polymeric matrix consisting of N-Isopropyl acrylamide (NIPAAm) and N-hydroxymethyl acrylamide (HMAAm). The magnetocaloric effects and LCST of the nanocarriers were characterized by using high-resolution electron transmission microscopy, thermogravimetric analyses, and vibrating sample magnetometer. The maximum self-heating temperature of 42.9 °C was achieved by optimizing the Mn 0.2 Zn 0.8 Fe 2 O 4 concentration in the polymer matrix. By adjusting the NIPAAm to HMAAm ratio, the LCST was controlled at an ideal level of 40.1 °C for efficient thermosensitive drug delivery. Magnetothermally responsive drug release of Doxorubicin, an anticancer drug, was significantly enhanced by application of an external AMF on the nanocarriers. The cytotoxicity experimental results in vitro show good biocompatibility and efficient therapeutic effects in cancer treatment. (paper)

  18. Effects of extracellular calcium on calcium transport during hyperthermia of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghileri, L J; Marcha, C; Crone-Escanyé, M C; Robert, J

    1985-08-01

    The effects of different concentrations of extracellular ion calcium on the transport of calcium by tumor cells have been studied by means of the uptake of radiocalcium. Tumor cells incubated at 45 degrees C take up 4-10 times the amount of radioactivity incorporated by cells incubated at 37 degrees C. The difference is still greater (up to 100 times) for the intracellular incorporation as assessed by elimination of the membrane-bound calcium by EGTA treatment. The possible mechanisms involved in this differential behavior are discussed.

  19. Biological Effects of Potato Plants Transformation with Glucose Oxidase Gene and their Resistance to Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Grabelnych

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available It is known that regulation of plant tolerance to adverse environmental factors is connected with short term increase of the concentration of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS, which are signalling molecules for the induction of protective mechanisms. Introduction and expression of heterologous gox gene, which encodes glucose oxidase enzyme in plant genome, induce constantly higher content of hydrogen peroxide in plant tissues. It is not known how the introduction of native or modified gox gene affects the plant resistance to high-temperature stress, one of the most commonly used model for the study of stress response and thermal tolerance. In this study, we investigated biological effects of transformation and evaluated the resistance to temperature stress of potato plants with altered levels of glucose oxidase expression. Transformation of potato plants by gox gene led to the more early coming out from tuber dormancy of transformed plants and slower growth rate. Transformants containing the glucose oxidase gene were more sensitive to lethal thermal shock (50 °C, 90 min than the transformant with the empty vector (pBI or untransformed plants (CK. Pre-heating of plants at 37 °C significantly weakened the damaging effect of lethal thermal shock. This attenuation was more significant in the non-transformed plants.

  20. Exercise hyperthermia as a factor limiting physical performance - Temperature effect on muscle metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, S.; Brzezinska, Z.; Kruk, B.; Kaciuba-Uscilko, H.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of trunk cooling on the muscle contents of ATP, ADP, AMP, creatine phosphate (CrP), and creatine, as well as of glycogen, some glycolytic intermediates, pyruvate, and lactate were assessed in 11 fasted dogs exercised at 20 C on treadmill to exhaustion. Without cooling, dogs were able to run 57 min, and their rectal (Tre) and muscle (Tm) temperatures increased to 41.8 and 43.0 C, respectively. Cooling with ice packs prolonged the ability to run by 45 percent, and resulted in lower Tre (by 1.1 C) and Tm (by 1.2 C). Depletion of muscle content of total high-energy phosphates (ATP + CrP) and glycogen, and increases in contents of AMP, pyruvate, and lactate were lower in cooled dogs than in non-cooled dogs. The muscle content of lactiate correlated positively with TM. These results indicate that hypothermia accelerates glycolysis, and shifts the equilibrium between high- and low-energy phosphates in favor of the latter. The adverse effect of hypothermia on muscle metabolism may be relevant to the limitation of endurance.

  1. Heat- and exercise-induced hyperthermia: effects on high-energy phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesconi, R; Mager, M

    1979-08-01

    To assess the role of high-energy phosphate compounds in the etiology of heat injury with respect to the release of intracellular constituents, the susceptibility of selected tissues to heat injury, and the shock-like demise of the animals, rats were exercised on a treadmill (9.14 m/min) in a hot environment (34.5-35 degrees C) to a rectal temperature (Tre) of 42.5-43 degrees C. In the heart, kidney, left lateral lobe of the liver, and gastrocnemius muscle extricated from animals immediately upon termination of the treadmill run, levels of glucose-6-phosphate (G-6-P), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), and creatine phosphate (CP) were unchanged when compared with sedentary controls. In animals which had been resuscitated by infusion of isotonic saline into a jugular catheter, levels of CP were significantly (p less than 0.025) elevated in gastrocnemius muscle. In rats which were unconscious and succumbing to the effects of hyperthermic injury, levels of hepatic G-6-P and ATP were significantly reduced (p less than 0.05, p less than 0.02, respectively). These results indicate that the combination of exhaustive excercise/heat injury had the most deleterious effects upon hepatic metabolism. However, while resuscitation with physiological saline may be accompanied by an increased synthesis of CP, hyperthermic exhaustion and the concomitant efflux of cellular constituents cannot be attributed to a depletion or even a decrement of high-energy phosphates in vital tissues.

  2. Morphologic alterations in normal and neoplastic tissues following hyperthermia treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badylak, S.F.; Babbs, C.F.

    1984-01-01

    The sequential morphologic alterations in normal skeletal muscle in rats, Walker 256 tumors in rats, and transmissible venereal tumors (TVT) in dogs following microwave-induced hyperthermia (43 0 C and 45 0 for 20 minutes) were studied by light and electron microscopy. Normal muscle and Walker 256 tumors showed vascular damage at 5 minutes post-heating (PH), followed by suppuration and thrombosis at 6 and 48 hours PH, and by regeneration and repair at 7 days PH. Endothelial damage and parenchymal degeneration were present 5 minutes PH. Progressive ischemic injury occurred for at least 48 hours PH. Two hyperthermia treatments, separated by a 30 or 60 minute cooling interval, were applied to rats implanted with Walker 256 tumors. Increased selective heating of tumor tissue versus surrounding normal tissue, and increased intratumoral temperatures were found during the second hyperthermia treatment. Canine TVTs were resistant to hyperthermia damage. These results characterized the sequential morphologic alterations following hyperthermia treatment and showed that: 1) vascular damage contributed to the immediate and latent cytotoxic effects of hyperthermia, 2) selective heating occurred in the neoplastic tissue disrupted by prior heat treatment, and 3) not all neoplasms are responsive to hyperthermia treatment

  3. Effects of hyperthermia on intracellular CA/sup 2+/ monitored by digitized video image fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asher, C.R.; Mikkelsen, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    With digitized video image fluorescence microscopy and the fluorescent Ca/sup 2+/ dye, fuca-2, the authors examined heat effects on intracellular free Ca/sup 2+/, [Ca/sup 2/]/sub f/. HT-29 human colon cancer cells grown on coverslip were equilibrated with 2.0 μM fura-2 in RPMI 1540 (20 0 , 15 min), washed three times and incubated at 20 0 for 1 h. Coverslips were mounted in a Dvorok perfusion chamber sitting within a temperature controlled microscope stage. Fluorescence was monitored at 500 nm by epi-illumination at 385 nm, excitation maximum for free dye, and 340 nm, maximum for Ca/sup 2+/ complexed dye, with a computer controlled filter wheel. The emission intensity ratio, I/sub 340//I/sub 385/, which corrects for dye leakage, photo-bleaching and cell thickness was used to calculate [Ca/sup 2+/]/sub f/. Measurements of 200 cells at 37 0 using a bit pad and mouse to select 0.6 x 0.6 μ cytoplasmi areas indicated 3 populations of cells in terms of [Ca/sup 2+/]/sub f/ (70%, 40-60nM; 15% 70-110nM; 15%, 120-200 nM). Heating to 43 0 for 1 h resulted in an overall decrease in [Ca/sup 2+/]/sub f/ with greater than 90% cells within 30-50 nM. Not all cells responded to heat. Post-incubation for 3 h at 37 0 showed the identical cell distribution; at 24 h, cell distribution was that of non-heated cells. The relationship of these results to cell killing and thermotolerance are not understood, but these results indicated the importance of cell heterogeneity in response to heat

  4. Method of hyperthermia and tumor size influence effectiveness of doxorubicin release from thermosensitive liposomes in experimental tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willerding, Linus; Limmer, Simone; Hossann, Martin; Zengerle, Anja; Wachholz, Kirsten; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Koning, Gerben A; Sroka, Ronald; Lindner, Lars H; Peller, Michael

    2016-01-28

    Systemic chemotherapy of solid tumors could be enhanced by local hyperthermia (HT) in combination with thermosensitive liposomes (TSL) as drug carriers. In such an approach, effective HT of the tumor is considered essential for successful triggering local drug release and targeting of the drug to the tumor. To investigate the effect of HT method on the effectiveness of drug delivery, a novel laser-based HT device designed for the use in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was compared systematically with the frequently used cold light lamp and water bath HT. Long circulating phosphatidyldiglycerol-based TSL (DPPG2-TSL) with encapsulated doxorubicin (DOX) were used as drug carrier enabling intravascular drug release. Experiments were performed in male Brown Norway rats with a syngeneic soft tissue sarcoma (BN 175) located on both hind legs. One tumor was heated while the second tumor remained unheated as a reference. Six animals were investigated per HT method. DPPG2-TSL were injected i.v. at a stable tumor temperature above 40°C. Thereafter, temperature was maintained for 60min. Total DOX concentration in plasma, tumor tissue and muscle was determined post therapy by HPLC. Finally, the new laser-based device was tested in a MRI environment at 3T using DPPG2-TSL with encapsulated Gd-based contrast agent. All methods showed effective DOX delivery by TSL with 4.5-23.1ng/mg found in the heated tumors. In contrast, DOX concentration in the non-heated tumors was 0.5±0.1ng/mg. Independent of used HT methods, higher DOX levels were found in the smaller tumors. In comparison water bath induced lowest DOX delivery but still showing fourfold higher DOX concentrations compared to the non-heated tumors. With the laser-based applicator, a 13 fold higher DOX deposition was possible for large tumors and a 15 fold higher for the small tumors, respectively. Temperature gradients in the tumor tissue were higher with the laser and cold light lamp (-0.3°C/mm to -0.5°C/mm) compared to

  5. Radiobiological considerations of late effects arising from radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogelnik, H.D.; Kaercher, K.H.

    1977-01-01

    A variety of clinical and experimental data are reviewed to investigate the different factors leading to appearance of late complications. Higher individual doses per fraction are related to an increase in the incidence and severity of late effects and massive dose techniques result in catastrophic late complications. There is no apparent relation between the severity of initial skin reactions and late effects, indicating that matching of acute radiation reactions on skin or mucous membranes cannot be extrapolated to late damage in connective tissues and organs. The probability of late tissue injury increases with the volume of tissue irradiated. Several phenomena, e.g. parenchymal cell depletion, vascular injury and fibrocyte dysfunction, are likely to operate together as well as separately in the pathogenesis of late effects. The late complications of radiotherapy develop in cells with a slow proliferation, and this is consistent with the hypothesis that parenchymal cell killing may be the basis for the injury. The response of cells with a slow proliferation to a course of fractionated irradiation differs from that of rapidly proliferative cells in three biological processes: repair of potentially lethal damage, redistribution and regeneration. (author)

  6. Nanotechnology in hyperthermia cancer therapy: From fundamental principles to advanced applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beik, Jaber; Abed, Ziaeddin; Ghoreishi, Fatemeh S; Hosseini-Nami, Samira; Mehrzadi, Saeed; Shakeri-Zadeh, Ali; Kamrava, S Kamran

    2016-08-10

    In this work, we present an in-depth review of recent breakthroughs in nanotechnology for hyperthermia cancer therapy. Conventional hyperthermia methods do not thermally discriminate between the target and the surrounding normal tissues, and this non-selective tissue heating can lead to serious side effects. Nanotechnology is expected to have great potential to revolutionize current hyperthermia methods. To find an appropriate place in cancer treatment, all nanotechnology-based hyperthermia methods and their risks/benefits must be thoroughly understood. In this review paper, we extensively examine and compare four modern nanotechnology-based hyperthermia methods. For each method, the possible physical mechanisms of heat generation and enhancement due to the presence of nanoparticles are explained, and recent in vitro and in vivo studies are reviewed and discussed. Nano-Photo-Thermal Therapy (NPTT) and Nano-Magnetic Hyperthermia (NMH) are reviewed as the two first exciting approaches for targeted hyperthermia. The third novel hyperthermia method, Nano-Radio-Frequency Ablation (NaRFA) is discussed together with the thermal effects of novel nanoparticles in the presence of radiofrequency waves. Finally, Nano-Ultrasound Hyperthermia (NUH) is described as the fourth modern method for cancer hyperthermia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of heat-shock protein 90 sensitizes liver cancer stem-like cells to magnetic hyperthermia and enhances anti-tumor effect on hepatocellular carcinoma-burdened nude mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rui; Tang, Qiusha; Miao, Fengqin; An, Yanli; Li, Mengfei; Han, Yong; Wang, Xihui; Wang, Juan; Liu, Peidang; Chen, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To explore the thermoresistance and expression of heat-shock protein 90 (HSP90) in magnetic hyperthermia-treated human liver cancer stem-like cells (LCSCs) and the effects of a heat-shock protein HSP90 inhibitor 17-allylamino-17-demethoxgeldanamycin (17-AAG) on hepatocellular carcinoma-burdened nude mice. Methods CD90+ LCSCs were isolated by magnetic-activated cell sorting from BEL-7404. Spheroid formation, proliferation, differentiation, drug resistance, and tumor formation assays were performed to identify stem cell characteristics. CD90-targeted thermosensitive magnetoliposomes (TMs)-encapsulated 17-AAG (CD90@17-AAG/TMs) was prepared by reverse-phase evaporation and its characteristics were studied. Heat tolerance in CD90+ LCSCs and the effect of CD90@17-AAG/TMs-mediated heat sensitivity were examined in vitro and in vivo. Results CD90+ LCSCs showed significant stem cell-like properties. The 17-AAG/TMs were successfully prepared and were spherical in shape with an average size of 128.9±7.7 nm. When exposed to magnetic hyperthermia, HSP90 was up-regulated in CD90+ LCSCs. CD90@17-AAG/TMs inhibited the activity of HSP90 and increased the sensitivity of CD90+ LCSCs to magnetic hyperthermia. Conclusion The inhibition of HSP90 could sensitize CD90+ LCSCs to magnetic hyperthermia and enhance its anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26677324

  8. Radiotherapy and local hyperthermia plus androgen suppression in locally advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maluta, S.; Marciai, N.; Gabbani, M.; Palazzi, M.; Dall'Oglio, S.; Grandinetti, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In advanced prostatic cancer, hyperthermia may be useful in order to enhance irradiation efficacy so to avoid delivering of too high dose of radiotherapy which increases acute and late sequelae. A multi-centric phase II study is warranted to give hyperthermia a level 3 evidence in prostate cancer treatment. A randomized phase III study to demonstrate efficacy of hyperthermia is not available because of the optimal results obtained by using radiotherapy combined with androgen suppression. To evaluate hyperthermia gain, LHT should be combined with radiotherapy alone in patients refusing androgen suppression or affected by hormone refractory prostate carcinoma (HRPC). Patients with HRPC have multiple possibilities of treatment improving performance status and median survival, as chemotherapy regimens, and new agents. All these treatments modalities need to be confirmed by phase III trials. Also hyperthermia may be considered among these promising approaches. (author)

  9. Cohort Profile: The Danish Testicular Cancer Late Treatment Effects Cohort (DaTeCa-LATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Kreiberg

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The cohort was set up in order to analyze late effects in long-term testicular cancer survivors (TCS and to contribute to the design of future follow-up programs addressing and potentially preventing late effects. Data for this cross-sectional study were collected between January 1, 2014, and December 31, 2016, among living Danish TCS and 60% agreed to participate in the cohort (N = 2,572. Mean time since testicular cancer (TC diagnosis was 18 years (range 7–33 and mean age of participants was 53 years (range 25–95. Data consist of results of a questionnaire with patient reported outcomes which covers a broad range of items on late-effects. The study also included data obtained through linkages to Danish registries, a biobank, and clinical data from hospital files and pathology reports originating from the Danish Testicular Cancer Database (DaTeCa. The treatment during the observation period has been nearly the same for all stages of TC and is in agreement with today’s standard treatment, this allows for interesting analysis with a wide timespan. We have extensive data on non-responders and are able to validate our study findings. Data from a Danish reference population (N = 162,283 allow us to compare our findings with a Danish background population. The cohort can easily be extended to access more outcomes, or include new TCS. A limitation of the present study is the cross-sectional design and despite the large sample size, The Danish Testicular Cancer Late Treatment Effects Cohort (DaTeCa-LATE lacks statistical power to study very rare late effects. Since it was voluntary to participate in the study we have some selection bias, for instance, we lack responders who were not in a paired relationship, but we would still argue that this cohort of TCSs is representative for TCSs in Denmark.Collaboration and data accessResearches interested in collaboration with the DaTeCa-LATE study group please contact Professor Gedske Daugaard

  10. Hyperthermia on skin immune system and its application in the treatment of HPV-infected skin diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Xinghua; Chen Hongduo

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of hyperthermia on cells and immune system are introduced briefly. The mechanism of action of hyperthermia on human papilloma virus (HPV)-infected skin diseases was elaborated as an example in this paper. Many studies have proved that hyperthermia affects a number of cellular and molecu- lar constitutes in the skin immune system, involving both innate and adaptive immune responses; the efficacy of hyperthermia in treating some infectious and cancerous conditions has been validated and applied in clinics, while molecular mechanisms of hyperthermia affecting the immunereaction is still unclear.

  11. Investigation properties of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and magnetic field-dependent hyperthermia therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayatnasab, Z.; Abnisa, F.; Daud, W. M. A. Wan

    2018-03-01

    The application of superparamagnetic nanoparticles as heating agents in hyperthermia therapy has made a therapeutic breakthrough in cancer treatment. The high efficiency of this magnetic hyperthermia therapy has derived from a great capability of superparamagnetic nanoparticles to generate focused heat in inaccessible tumors being effectively inactivated. The main challenges of this therapy are the improvement of the induction heating power of superparamagnetic nanoparticles and the control of the hyperthermia temperature in a secure range of 42 °C to 47 °C, at targeted area. The variation of these hyperthermia properties is principally dependent on the magnetic nanoparticles as well as the magnetic field leading to enhance the efficiency of magnetic hyperthermia therapy at targeted area and also avoid undue heating to healthy cells. The present study evaluates the magnetic hyperthermia therapy through the determination of superparamagnetic nanoparticles properties and magnetic field’ parameters.

  12. Hyperthermia, a modality in the wings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szasz A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia is a heat-treatment. It is widely used in various medical fields and has a well-recognized effect in oncology. Its effect is achieved by overheating of the targeted tissues. It is an ancient treatment and a promising physical approach with lack of acceptance by the serious medical use. To accept the method we need strong proofs and stable, reproducible treatment quality, but we are limited by biological, physical/technical and physiological problems. However, the main point - I believe - is the incorrect characterization and unrealistic expectations from this capable method. The temperature concept of the quality assurance guidelines has to be replaced by the heat-dose sensitive characterization, pointing the essence of the hyperthermia method.

  13. Late radiation effects in animals surviving lethal irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrov, L.A.

    1974-01-01

    Animals (rats, mice, dogs) survived lethal irradiation by means of prophylactic-therapeutic treatments or previously irradiated, were studied for late radiation effects: life span, cachexia and fat growing of hypophysical type, tissue or organ hypoplasia manifested by disturbed hemopoiesis, suppressed function of adrenal gland, etc., suppressed immune reactivity of the irradiated organism, atypical biochemical changes in DNA and protein metabolism, epilation, chronic dermatitis, ulcerations, reduced reproductivity or full sterility, damage of kidneys leading to nephrosclerosis, dishormonal states, cataracts, diffuse sclerotic processes, various kinds of malignant and non-malignant tumors. In these cases hemopoiesis compensated for a definite time peripheral blood composition, but during the late period it showed features of incompleteness: shorter life survival of erythrocytes and thrombocytes manifested by a decreased binding of labelled methionine in these blood elements, anemia and relative thrombocytopenia sometimes with an increased number of polychromatic erythrocytes in peripheral blood and a decreased number of reticulocytes at the same time; lymphopenia and relative leucopenia with an increased number of hypersegmented neutrophils. Decreased reproductivity and atypical biochemical changes available in the first generation of the irradiated animals showed the probable role of mutagenic factors in the emergence of some late radiation effects. A significant part of late radiation sequences were due to neuro-endocrine desintegrations which lead to a disturbed supply of the vessels and afterwards to their sclerosis. Some of the described late radiation effects were also observed in biological controls as festures of ageing while in irradiated animals they were manifested in an earlier period. After application of optimal amounts radioprotectors (AET, cysteamine, serotonin) a more marked protective effect is demonstrated in the early reactions (time survival

  14. Outcomes after environmental hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoVecchio, Frank; Pizon, Anthony F; Berrett, Christopher; Balls, Adam

    2007-05-01

    This study was conducted to describe the characteristics and outcomes of patients who presented to the emergency department (ED) with presumed environmental hyperthermia. A retrospective chart review was performed in 2 institutions with patients who were seen in the ED and had a discharge diagnosis of hyperthermia, heat stroke, heat exhaustion, or heat cramps. Exclusion criteria were an alternative diagnosis potentially explaining the hyperthermia (pneumonia, etc). Research assistants, who were blinded to the purpose of the study, performed a systematic chart review after a structured training session. If necessary, a third reviewer acted as a tiebreaker. Data regarding patient demographics, comorbidities, vital signs, laboratory results, and short-term outcome were collected. Data were analyzed with Excel and STATA software. We enrolled 52 patients with a mean age of 42.6 years (range, 0.4-81 years) from August 1, 2003 to August 31, 2005. The mean high daily temperature was 103.6 degrees F (range, 88-118 degrees F). At presentation, the mean body temperature was 105.1 degrees F (range, 100.2-111.2 degrees F) and the Glasgow Coma Scale score was less than 14 in 36 (69.2%) patients. Laboratory results demonstrated that 21 (40.4%) patients had a creatinine level of more than 1.5 mg/dL, 35 (67.3%) patients had a creatine kinase (CK) of more than 200 U/L, 30 patients (57.7%) had a prothrombin time of more than 13 seconds, 29 (55.8%) patients had an aspartate aminotransferase (AST) of more than 45 U/L, and only 3 patients (5.7%) had a glucose of less than 60 mg/dL. Ethanol or illicit drugs were involved in 18 (34.6%) cases. The mean hospital stay was 4.7 days (range, 1-30 days), and there were 15 deaths (28.8%). A kappa score for interreviewer reliability was 0.69. Major limitations were the retrospective nature and lack of homogeneity in patient evaluation and test ordering. Hyperthermic patients with higher initial temperatures, hypotension, or low Glasgow Coma Scale

  15. Genetics Home Reference: malignant hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 1722-30. Review. Citation on PubMed Litman RS, Rosenberg H. Malignant hyperthermia: update on susceptibility testing. JAMA. ... 27(10):977-89. Review. Citation on PubMed Rosenberg H, Davis M, James D, Pollock N, Stowell ...

  16. Hyperthermia and fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The present review addresses mechanisms of importance for hyperthermia-induced fatigue during short intense activities and prolonged exercise in the heat. Inferior performance during physical activities with intensities that elicit maximal oxygen uptake is to a large extent related to perturbation...... of the cardiovascular function, which eventually reduces arterial oxygen delivery to the exercising muscles. Accordingly, aerobic energy turnover is impaired and anaerobic metabolism provokes peripheral fatigue. In contrast, metabolic disturbances of muscle homeostasis are less important during prolonged exercise...... in the heat, because increased oxygen extraction compensates for the reduction in systemic blood flow. The decrease in endurance seems to involve changes in the function of the central nervous system (CNS) that lead to fatigue. The CNS fatigue appears to be influenced by neurotransmitter activity...

  17. Late effects of radiation therapy on the gastrointestinal tract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coia, Lawrence R.; Myerson, Robert J.; Tepper, Joel E.

    1995-01-01

    Late gastrointestinal complications of radiation therapy have been recognized but not extensively studied. In this paper, the late effects of radiation on three gastrointestinal sites, the esophagus, the stomach, and the bowel, are described. Esophageal dysmotility and benign stricture following esophageal irradiation are predominantly a result of damage to the esophageal wall, although mucosal ulcerations also may persist following high-dose radiation. The major late morbidity following gastric irradiation is gastric ulceration caused by mucosal destruction. Late radiation injury to the bowel, which may result in bleeding, frequency, fistula formation, and, particularly in small bowel, obstruction, is caused by damage to the entire thickness of the bowel wall, and predisposing factors have been identified. For each site a description of the pathogenesis, clinical findings, and present management is offered. Simple and reproducible endpoint scales for late toxicity measurement were developed and are presented for each of the three gastrointestinal organs. Factors important in analyzing late complications and future considerations in evaluation and management of radiation-related gastrointestinal injury are discussed

  18. Comparative studies on the effect of negative pions, 60Co gamma irradiation and hyperthermia on an in vitro 'tumour model'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luecke-Huhle, C.; Dertinger, H.; Schlag, H.; Weibezahn, K.F.

    1977-01-01

    Multicellular spheriods of Chinese hamster cells (V79) are much more resistant than monolayer cultures of the same cell line; this is observed after 60 Co γ-irradiation, after hyperthermic treatment, after combined treatment of heat with 60 Co γ-radiation and after exposure to negative pi-mesons. Intercellular communication within the three-dimensional cell clones seems to be responsible for an enhanced repair capacity for sub-lethal as well as for potentially lethal damage. While the response of spheroid cells to 60 Co γ-irradiation is almost independent of the state of growth, there is a clear difference in survival whether exponentially growing outer cells or inner plateau phase cells are exposed to heat: moderate heat treatment (4h at 42 0 C) leads to a greater killing efficiency of exponentially growing cells while the inner non-cycling cells exhibit a recruitment of resting cells into the proliferative compartment as demonstrated by means of flow-microfluorometry. Hyperthermia in combination with 60 Co γ-irradiation was shown to eliminate hypoxic cells and to yield a thermal enhancement ratio comparable to the RBE value obtained after pion irradiation at maximum LET. (author)

  19. Effect of perphenazine enanthate on open-field test behaviour and stress-induced hyperthermia in domestic sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedernera-Romano, Cecilia; Ruiz de la Torre, José L; Badiella, Llorenç; Manteca, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    The open-field test (OFT) and stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) have been used to measure individual differences in fear. The present study has been designed as a pharmacological validation of OFT and SIH as indicators of fear in sheep using perphenazine enanthate (PPZ), a long-acting neuroleptic. Twenty four ewes of two breeds, Lacaune and Ripollesa, were tested in an arena measuring 5mx2.5m. Treatment group received one dose of 1.5mg/kg of PPZ and control group received sterile sesame oil. All animals were tested for 10min and behaviours were recorded. Rectal temperature was measured at the beginning (T1) and at the end (T2) of the test. SIH was defined as the difference between T2 and T1. Sheep were tested on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 7 and 9 after PPZ injection. Variables were analysed using a mixed model. PPZ decreased bleats on days 2, 3, 4 and the SIH response on days 2 and 3. Breed differences were observed. Treated animals showed positive correlations between SIH and bleats; squares entered; attempts to escape and negative correlation between SIH and visits to the food bucket. Our results suggest that behaviour and SIH on the OFT are useful measures of fear in sheep.

  20. Study on intraoperative radiotherapy applying hyperthermia together with radiation sensitizers for progressive local carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abe, M; Takahashi, M; Ono, K; Hiraoka, M [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1980-08-01

    Intraoperative radiotherapy for gastric cancer, colonic cancer, pancreatic cancer, cancer of the biliary tract, prostatic carcinoma, cerebral tumor, tumor of soft tissues, and osteosarcoma and its clinical results were described. Basic and clinical studies on effects of both hyperthermia and radiation sensitizers to elevate radiation sensitivity were also described, because effects of intraoperative radiotherapy were raised by applying hyperthermia and hypoxic cell sensitizers.

  1. Hyperthermia-induced degradation of BRCA2 : from bedside to bench and back again

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van den Tempel (Nathalie)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractLocal hyperthermia, a method during which the temperature of a tumor is elevated, clinically increases the efficacy of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, without increasing side-effects. One of the reasons that explains why hyperthermia increases effectivity of these therapies is that it

  2. Magnetic hyperthermia with hard-magnetic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashevsky, Bronislav E., E-mail: bekas@itmo.by [A.V Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Institute, Belarus Academy of Sciences, P. Brovka str. 15, Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Kashevsky, Sergey B.; Korenkov, Victor S. [A.V Luikov Heat and Mass Transfer Institute, Belarus Academy of Sciences, P. Brovka str. 15, Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Istomin, Yuri P. [N. N. Alexandrov National Cancer Center of Belarus, Lesnoy-2, Minsk 223040 (Belarus); Terpinskaya, Tatyana I.; Ulashchik, Vladimir S. [Institute of Physiology, Belarus Academy of Sciences, Akademicheskaya str. 28, Minsk 220072 (Belarus)

    2015-04-15

    Recent clinical trials of magnetic hyperthermia have proved, and even hardened, the Ankinson-Brezovich restriction as upon magnetic field conditions applicable to any site of human body. Subject to this restriction, which is harshly violated in numerous laboratory and small animal studies, magnetic hyperthermia can relay on rather moderate heat source, so that optimization of the whole hyperthermia system remains, after all, the basic problem predetermining its clinical perspectives. We present short account of our complex (theoretical, laboratory and small animal) studies to demonstrate that such perspectives should be related with the hyperthermia system based on hard-magnetic (Stoner–Wohlfarth type) nanoparticles and strong low-frequency fields rather than with superparamagnetic (Brownian or Neél) nanoparticles and weak high-frequency fields. This conclusion is backed by an analytical evaluation of the maximum absorption rates possible under the field restriction in the ideal hard-magnetic (Stoner–Wohlarth) and the ideal superparamagnetic (single relaxation time) systems, by theoretical and experimental studies of the dynamic magnetic hysteresis in suspensions of movable hard-magnetic particles, by producing nanoparticles with adjusted coercivity and suspensions of such particles capable of effective energy absorption and intratumoral penetration, and finally, by successful treatment of a mice model tumor under field conditions acceptable for whole human body. - Highlights: • Hard-magnetic nanoparticles are shown superior for hyperthetmia to superparamagnetic. • Optimal system parameters are found from magnetic reversal model in movable particle. • Penetrating suspension of HM particles with aggregation-independent SAR is developed. • For the first time, mice with tumors are healed in AC field acceptable for human body.

  3. Late effects of stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiko, Yuka; Ishida, Yuji; Kou, Katsuyoshi; Honda, Koujirou; Kigasawa, Hisato; Ishikawa, Kumiko; Ohnuma, Kei; Toyoda, Yasunori; Nishihira, Hirokazu

    1999-01-01

    We reviewed growth and endocrine functions in 29 patients who underwent stem cell transplantation (SCT) at the Kanagawa Children's Medical Center and survived without disease for more than 1 year after their SCT. In our study, the more severe decrease of height standard deviation score (SDS) was observed in children who had undergone SCT at an earlier age, using total body irradiation (TBI). The risk factor of hypothyroidism after SCT was the cranial irradiation before SCT. Gonadal dysfunction occurred frequently in both boys and girls regardless of preparative regimen before SCT. It is important to observe carefully the effect of SCT on growth and endocrine function, and to consider whether the hormonal therapy is indicated. (author)

  4. Use of the vasodilator sodium nitroprusside during local hyperthermia: effects on tumor temperature and tumor response in a rat tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krossnes, Baard Kronen; Mella, Olav; Dahl, Olav

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of a decrease in the mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) induced by sodium nitroprusside (SNP) on the tumor temperature during hyperthermia (HT), and on the cytotoxic effect of HT, was studied in the BT 4 An tumor transplanted to the hind limb of BD IX rats. Experiments with two different anesthetics, pentobarbital and the midazolam/fentanyl/fluanisone combination (MFF), were performed to secure reliable conclusions. Methods and Materials: In the tumor response experiments local waterbath HT at 44.0 deg. C was given for 60 min. Sodium nitroprusside was administered as a continuous intravenous infusion to lower the MAP to 60 or 80 mmHg during HT. In two other experiments the temperature at the base of the tumor during HT was measured before and during SNP infusion. In animals without tumor the temperature was measured subcutaneously on the foot during HT with or without SNP-induced hypotension. Results: When SNP was given to lower the MAP to 60 mmHg during HT in MFF anesthetized animals, the median tumor growth time (TGT) was 70 days, compared to 14.5 days in the HT alone group. The corresponding figures were 127 and 12.1 days with pentobarbital anesthesia. In the HT + SNP group, more than 40% cure was observed in both experiments. No cures were seen in any of the other groups. Hyperthermia alone prolonged the TGT slightly, whereas SNP given alone had no effect, compared to controls. When the MAP was lowered to 80 mmHg by SNP infusion during HT (MFF anesthesia), the median TGT was 19.9 days, which was significantly longer than that in the HT alone group (10.9 days). In the MAP range from 60 to 120 mmHg, a nearly linear relationship between the MAP and the tumor temperature was found during HT in MFF anesthetized animals. With both anesthetics, the median temperature at the base of the tumor was about 0.8 deg. C higher during HT when the MAP was lowered to 60 mmHg by SNP. In animals without tumors, the temperature subcutaneously on the foot was 0

  5. Late effects of irradiation in mouse jejunum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynaud, A.; Travis, E.L.

    1984-01-01

    The response of mouse jejunum at intervals up to 1 year after single 'priming' doses of X-rays has been assessed by crypt survival after retreatment with single doses of X-rays and morphometric analysis of changes in the intestinal submucosa. The crypt dose-survival curves in mice re-irradiated at 2, 6, or 12 months after priming irradiation were displaced to higher doses in pre-treated than in non-pre-treated mice and were characterized by higher D 0 values. Misonidazole given before the test exposure reversed this effect so that the dose survival curve for crypts in pre-treated mice were superimposed on that for mice not previously irradiated, suggesting that the increase in isoeffect dose and the change in the D 0 in previously exposed mice was due to crypt hypoxia. Quantifications of the area of the submucosa showed that its area was increased at all three times after the priming doses and was a result of collagen deposition and oedema. Thus, the hypoxia in the crypts was probably secondary to these changes. Deaths began at 6-7 months after priming irradiation and were due to intestinal obstruction and stenosis. Thus, as in other tissues, two phases of injury can be assayed in the intestine of experimental animals. (author)

  6. Late effects of radiation on the spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kogel, A.J. van der.

    1979-01-01

    The author describes experiments concerned with the mechanisms of the development of late radiation damage in the spinal cord. Male rats were used in most of the experiments. The effects of 300 kV X-rays or 15 MeV neutrons were evaluated for different regions of the spinal cord. (Auth.)

  7. FDTD analysis of a noninvasive hyperthermia system for brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yacoob, Sulafa M; Hassan, Noha S

    2012-08-14

    Hyperthermia is considered one of the new therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment and is based on the difference in thermal sensitivity between healthy tissues and tumors. During hyperthermia treatment, the temperature of the tumor is raised to 40-45°C for a definite period resulting in the destruction of cancer cells. This paper investigates design, modeling and simulation of a new non-invasive hyperthermia applicator system capable of effectively heating deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors using inexpensive, simple, and easy to fabricate components without harming surrounding healthy brain tissues. The proposed hyperthermia applicator system is composed of an air filled partial half ellipsoidal chamber, a patch antenna, and a head model with an embedded tumor at an arbitrary location. The irradiating antenna is placed at one of the foci of the hyperthermia chamber while the center of the brain tumor is placed at the other focus. The finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used to compute both the SAR patterns and the temperature distribution in three different head models due to two different patch antennas at a frequency of 915 MHz. The obtained results suggest that by using the proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system it is feasible to achieve sufficient and focused energy deposition and temperature rise to therapeutic values in deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors without harming surrounding healthy tissue. The proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system proved suitable for raising the temperature in tumors embedded in the brain to therapeutic values by carefully selecting the systems components. The operator of the system only needs to place the center of the brain tumor at a pre-specified location and excite the antenna at a single frequency of 915 MHz. Our study may provide a basis for a clinical applicator prototype capable of heating brain tumors.

  8. FDTD analysis of a noninvasive hyperthermia system for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacoob Sulafa M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperthermia is considered one of the new therapeutic modalities for cancer treatment and is based on the difference in thermal sensitivity between healthy tissues and tumors. During hyperthermia treatment, the temperature of the tumor is raised to 40–45°C for a definite period resulting in the destruction of cancer cells. This paper investigates design, modeling and simulation of a new non-invasive hyperthermia applicator system capable of effectively heating deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors using inexpensive, simple, and easy to fabricate components without harming surrounding healthy brain tissues. Methods The proposed hyperthermia applicator system is composed of an air filled partial half ellipsoidal chamber, a patch antenna, and a head model with an embedded tumor at an arbitrary location. The irradiating antenna is placed at one of the foci of the hyperthermia chamber while the center of the brain tumor is placed at the other focus. The finite difference time domain (FDTD method is used to compute both the SAR patterns and the temperature distribution in three different head models due to two different patch antennas at a frequency of 915 MHz. Results The obtained results suggest that by using the proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system it is feasible to achieve sufficient and focused energy deposition and temperature rise to therapeutic values in deep seated as well as superficial brain tumors without harming surrounding healthy tissue. Conclusions The proposed noninvasive hyperthermia system proved suitable for raising the temperature in tumors embedded in the brain to therapeutic values by carefully selecting the systems components. The operator of the system only needs to place the center of the brain tumor at a pre-specified location and excite the antenna at a single frequency of 915 MHz. Our study may provide a basis for a clinical applicator prototype capable of heating brain tumors.

  9. Chemical and radiation induced late dominant lethal effects in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favor, J.; Crenshaw, J.W. Jr.; Soares, E.R.

    1978-01-01

    Although theoretically expected, experimental data to date have not shown dominant lethal expression to occur throughout the developmental period. Specifically, late post-implantation effects have not been demonstrated. The authors routinely use an experimental technique in which parental females mated to mutagenically treated males are allowed to give birth and wean their litter, and their uterine horns are then inspected for uterine scars indicative of live and dead embryos. In a number of experiments in which males were mutagenically treated with either chemicals or X-irradiation, a discrepancy was observed between the number of live embryos as determined by the scar technique and the number of live observed at birth, suggesting the possibility of embryonic losses at a late stage in development. Initial analyses showed that mutagenic treatment increased the percentage of these late losses. These differences were statistically significant in 2 of 3 analyses. Factors affecting statistical significance and an understanding of dominant lethal mutations are discussed. (Auth.)

  10. Late side effects of Ruthenium 106 therapy for uveal melanomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langmann, G.; Faulborn, J.; Poier, E.

    1994-01-01

    When effectiveness is evaluated in brachytherapy with Ruthenium 106 special emphasis has to be put on tumor destruction and late side effects responsible for the definite functional results. We evaluated the late side effects of 22 uveal melanomas, which had been treated with 106 Ruthenium plaques. The tumor prominences ranged from 3 to 10 mm, the diameter from 4 to 9 disc diameters. In 4 patients the tumor involved the posterior pole, 14 melanomas were located in the midperiphery of the fundus, 4 tumors were ciliary body melanomas. The total radiation dose of the apex ranged from 100 to 240 Gy with a corresponding dose to the sclera between 540 to 1000 Gy. Because of the short half life of the plaque we have been using different dose rates (1.6-11 Gy/h). In 17/22 eyes adequate regression could be achieved by Ruthenium therapy alone. In one case additional laser treatment of the macular part of the melanoma had to be performed, Gamma Knife therapy was necessary in another melanoma with 10 mm tumor prominence. 3 recurrences led to enucleation. The mean follow up was 4.8 years ranging from 1 to 7 years. In 2/22 patients opticopathy caused severe visual impairment, in another 2 patients radiation maculopathy and opticopathy was observed. 7/22 developed vasculopathy with neovascularization treated by photocoagulation. In one case of focal radiation maculopathy laser treatment could prevent further visual impairment. The following factors are responsible for a higher incidence of late side effects: 1. High dose rate of the plaques in combination with a high radiation dose to the sclera 2. Location of the tumor within a minimum distance of 2 disc diameters to the optic nerve or macula 3. Tumor location at the ciliary body Laser treatment in case of neovascularization and focal radiation maculopathy is the only effective treatment with regard to late side effects. Ischemic maculopathy and radiation opticopathy are responsible for late visual impairment. (authors)

  11. A Cost-effectiveness Analysis of Early vs Late Tracheostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C Carrie; Rudmik, Luke

    2016-10-01

    The timing of tracheostomy in critically ill patients requiring mechanical ventilation is controversial. An important consideration that is currently missing in the literature is an evaluation of the economic impact of an early tracheostomy strategy vs a late tracheostomy strategy. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the early tracheostomy strategy vs the late tracheostomy strategy. This economic analysis was performed using a decision tree model with a 90-day time horizon. The economic perspective was that of the US health care third-party payer. The primary outcome was the incremental cost per tracheostomy avoided. Probabilities were obtained from meta-analyses of randomized clinical trials. Costs were obtained from the published literature and the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project database. A multivariate probabilistic sensitivity analysis was performed to account for uncertainty surrounding mean values used in the reference case. The reference case demonstrated that the cost of the late tracheostomy strategy was $45 943.81 for 0.36 of effectiveness. The cost of the early tracheostomy strategy was $31 979.12 for 0.19 of effectiveness. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio for the late tracheostomy strategy compared with the early tracheostomy strategy was $82 145.24 per tracheostomy avoided. With a willingness-to-pay threshold of $50 000, the early tracheostomy strategy is cost-effective with 56% certainty. The adaptation of an early vs a late tracheostomy strategy depends on the priorities of the decision-maker. Up to a willingness-to-pay threshold of $80 000 per tracheostomy avoided, the early tracheostomy strategy has a higher probability of being the more cost-effective intervention.

  12. Late radiation effects: status and needs of epidemiologic research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.W.

    1974-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies of late radiation effects in man are reviewed, based on exposure to the atomic bomb, radiotherapy, diagnostic radiations, and occupational or accidental exposures. Areas studied include: genetic effects, fertility, immunology, cancer, congenital malformations, growth and development, aging, cataracts, psychiatric effects, interactions with drugs or viruses, host susceptibility, and radiation factors. Cancer areas discussed include leukemia; thyroid, lung, breast, bone, and liver cancers; lymphoma; salivary gland tumors; brain tumors; nonleukemia cancers; intrauterine exposures; and preconception irradiation and childhood cancers. (U.S.)

  13. Anisotropy effects in magnetic hyperthermia: A comparison between spherical and cubic exchange-coupled FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khurshid, H., E-mail: khurshid@usf.edu, E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu; Nemati, Z.; Phan, M. H.; Mukherjee, P.; Srikanth, H., E-mail: khurshid@usf.edu, E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Alonso, J. [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); BCMaterials Edificio No. 500, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Derio 48160 (Spain); Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.; Barandiarán, J. M. [BCMaterials Edificio No. 500, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Derio 48160 (Spain); Depto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Universidad del País Vasco, Leioa 48940 (Spain)

    2015-05-07

    Spherical and cubic exchange-coupled FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, with different FeO:Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} ratios, have been prepared by a thermal decomposition method to probe anisotropy effects on their heating efficiency. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reveal that the nanoparticles are composed of FeO and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phases, with an average size of ∼20 nm. Magnetometry and transverse susceptibility measurements show that the effective anisotropy field is 1.5 times larger for the cubes than for the spheres, while the saturation magnetization is 1.5 times larger for the spheres than for the cubes. Hyperthermia experiments evidence higher values of the specific absorption rate (SAR) for the cubes as compared to the spheres (200 vs. 135 W/g at 600 Oe and 310 kHz). These observations point to an important fact that the saturation magnetization is not a sole factor in determining the SAR and the heating efficiency of the magnetic nanoparticles can be improved by tuning their effective anisotropy.

  14. Mg shallow doping effects on the ac magnetic self-heating characteristics of γ-Fe2O3 superparamagnetic nanoparticles for highly efficient hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jung-tak; Bae, Seongtae

    2017-10-01

    The effects of Mg doping on the magnetic and AC self-heating temperature rising characteristics of γ-Fe2O3 superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPNPs) were investigated for hyperthermia applications in biomedicine. The doping concentration of nonmagnetic Mg2+ cation was systematically controlled from 0 to 0.15 at. % in Mgx-γFe2O3 SPNPs during chemically and thermally modified one-pot thermal decomposition synthesis under bubbling O2/Ar gas mixture. It was empirically observed that the saturation magnetization (Ms) and the out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility ( χm″)of Mgx-γFe2O3 SPNPs were increased by increasing the Mg2+ cation doping concentration from 0.05 to 0.13 at. %. Correspondingly, the AC magnetically induced self-heating temperature (Tac,max) in solid state and the intrinsic loss power in water were increased up to 184 °C and 14.2 nH m2 kg-1 (Mgx-γFe2O3, x = 0.13), respectively, at the biologically and physiologically safe range of AC magnetic field (Happl × fappl = 1.2 × 109 A m-1 s-1). All the chemically and physically analyzed results confirmed that the dramatically improved AC magnetic induction heating characteristics and the magnetic properties of Mgx-γFe2O3 SPNPs (x = 0.13) are primarily due to the significantly enhanced magnetic susceptibility (particularly, χm″) and the improved AC/DC magnetic softness (lower AC/DC magnetic anisotropy) resulting from the systematically controlled nonmagnetic Mg2+ cation concentrations and distributions (occupation ratio) in the Fe vacancy sites of γ-Fe2O3 (approximately 12% vacancy), instead of typically well-known Fe3O4 (no vacancy) SPNPs. The cell viability and biocompatibility with U87 MG cell lines demonstrated that Mgx-γFe2O3 SPNPs (x = 0.13) has promising bio-feasibility for hyperthermia agent applications.

  15. Late radiation effects in animals surviving lethal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimitrov, L A

    1974-01-01

    Animals (rats, mice, dogs) survived lethal irradiation by means of prophylactic-therapeutic treatments or previously irradiated, were studied for late radiation effects: life span, cachexia and fat growing of hypophysical type, tissue or organ hypoplasia manifested by disturbed hemopoiesis, suppressed function of adrenal gland, etc., suppressed immune reactivity of the irradiated organism, atypical biochemical changes in DNA and protein metabolism, epilation, chronic dermatitis, ulcerations, reduced reproductivity or full sterility, damage of kidneys leading to nephrosclerosis, dishormonal states, cataracts, diffuse sclerotic processes, various kinds of malignant and non-malignant tumors. In these cases hemopoiesis compensated for a definite time peripheral blood composition, but during the late period it showed features of incompleteness: shorter life survival of erythrocytes and thrombocytes manifested by a decreased binding of labelled methionine in these blood elements, anemia and relative thrombocytopenia sometimes with an increased number of polychromatic erythrocytes in peripheral blood and a decreased number of reticulocytes at the same time; lymphopenia and relative leucopenia with an increased number of hypersegmented neutrophils. Decreased reproductivity and atypical biochemical changes available in the first generation of the irradiated animals showed the probable role of mutagenic factors in the emergency of some late radiation effects. A significant part of late radiation sequences were due to neuro-endocrine disintegrations. Some of the described late radiation effects were also observed in biological controls as features of ageing. After application of radioprotectors (AET, cysteamine, serotonin) a more marked protective effect is demonstrated in the early reactions (time survival till 30th day, DNA and protein metabolism, immune reactions) of the lethally irradiated animals.

  16. Acute and late effects of multimodal therapy on normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, T.L.; Fu, K.K.

    1977-01-01

    The increasing use of combined radiation, chemotherapy, and surgery has led to an increased incidence of acute and late complications. The complications are, in general, similar to those seen with each modality alone, but occur with increased incidence. Enhanced effects of combined radiation and surgery are modest in number and consist primarily of problems with wound healing and fibrosis, as well as late gastrointestinal damage. Combinations of radiotherapy and chemotherapy have shown a greater degree of enhanced acute and late reactions. Drugs, such as actinomycin-D and Adriamycin, are particularly dangerous if the marked enhancement of radiation effects caused by the drugs in almost all organs is not appreciated and the radiation dose not adjusted accordingly. Proper selection of drugs can lead to enhanced local control by radiotherapy and/or surgery, as well as eradication of microscopic distant metastases, without increased normal tissue injury. Late induction of malignancy can occur with either radiation or chemotherapy alone and, in some cases, this appears to be enhanced when they are combined

  17. Neurogenesis, Exercise, and Cognitive Late Effects of Pediatric Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaefali P. Rodgers

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain cancer is a common type of childhood malignancy, and radiotherapy (RT is a mainstay of treatment. RT is effective for tumor eradication, and survival rates are high. However, RT damages the brain and disrupts ongoing developmental processes, resulting in debilitating cognitive “late” effects that may take years to fully manifest. These late effects likely derive from a long-term decrement in cell proliferation, combined with a neural environment that is hostile to plasticity, both of which are induced by RT. Long-term suppression of cell proliferation deprives the brain of the raw materials needed for optimum cognitive performance (such as new neurons in the hippocampus and new glia in frontal cortex, while chronic inflammation and dearth of trophic substances (such as growth hormone limit neuroplastic potential in existing circuitry. Potential treatments for cognitive late effects should address both of these conditions. Exercise represents one such potential treatment, since it has the capacity to enhance cell proliferation, as well as to promote a neural milieu permissive for plasticity. Here, we review the evidence that cognitive late effects can be traced to RT-induced suppression of cell proliferation and hostile environmental conditions, as well as emerging evidence that exercise may be effective as an independent or adjuvant therapy.

  18. Social factors modulate restraint stress induced hyperthermia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Shigeru

    2015-10-22

    Stress-induced hyperthermia (SIH) was examined in three different social conditions in mice by thermographic measurement of the body surface temperature. Placing animals in cylindrical holders induced restraint stress. I examined the effect of the social factors in SIH using the thermograph (body surface temperature). Mice restrained in the holders alone showed SIH. Mice restrained in the holders at the same time as other similarly restrained cage mates (social equality condition) showed less hyperthermia. Interestingly, restrained mice with free moving cage mates (social inequality condition) showed the highest hyperthermia. These results are consistent with a previous experiment measuring the memory-enhancing effects of stress and the stress-induced elevation of corticosterone, and suggest that social inequality enhances stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Inflammatory markers of radiation-induced late effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubner, D.; Gallegos, C.; Michelin, S.; Portas, M.

    2011-01-01

    Up to now there is no established parameters for the follow-up of delayed radiation injuries. Late toxicity is generally irreversible and can have devastating effects on quality of life of people exposed either accidentally or during therapeutic radiation treatments. Histologically, late manifestations of radiation damage include fibrosis, necrosis, atrophy and vascular lesions. Although many etiologies have been suggested regarding these late toxicities, persistent inflammation has been described as playing a key role. The recruitment of leukocytes from circulating blood is decisive in the inflammatory reaction. All the steps in the recruitment cascade are orchestrated by cell-adhesion molecules (CAMs) on both leukocytes and endothelial cells, and different subsets of CAMs are responsible for different steps in extravasation. A link between radiation –induced inflammatory processes and alterations in T-cell immunity are still demonstrable in the blood of A-bomb survivors. The following study was conducted to examine the response of the immune system in the inflammatory reactions in patients with late skin injuries after radiotherapy or interventional fluoroscopy procedures. The expression of adhesion molecules ICAM1 and β1-integrin on granulocytes and lymphocytes, as well as changes in subpopulations of T lymphocytes and the level of C-reactive protein, a well- studied inflammatory marker were evaluated. (authors)

  20. Hyperthermia and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    Combined hyperthermia (HT 45 min once or twice per week) and low dose radiotherapy (LDRT 30-34.5 Gy in 2-3 weeks) have been given to 182 locally recurrent or metastatic superficial tumours in 133 patients. Tumour response was analysed in 137 tumours in 100 patients. The overall complete response (CR) was 50% with a median duration (DCR) of 13±3 months. When mammary carcinoma, representing 62% of the treated tumours, were analysed, CR was 62% with a DCR of 14±4 months. In a comparative, non-randomized study, on 34 matched tumour pairs in 24 patients, treatment was given with LDRT+HT to the larger and the same LDRT to the smaller tumour, the patients acting as their own control. A significant difference in CR was obtained in favour of the combined treatment (p=0.0013 all diagnosis and p=0.0027 mammary carcinoma). There was no significant difference in DCR between the two modalities. No significant difference in CR was seen when tumours were randomely treated with HT once (CR 56%) or twice (CR 69%) per week combined with the same LDRT. Predictive factors for CR, multivariately analysed (15 parameters), in mammary carcinoma recurring in earlier irradiated regions, were; the present LDRT absorbed dose (p=0.02) and the average minimum temperature in the best HT session (p=0.03). Significant skin toxicity was seen in 28% of all the 182 heated regions. Prognostic factors for skin damage, multivariately analysed, were; the extension of the heated region (p=0.007) and the highest average maximum temperature in any of the HT sessions (p=0.04). Pain was in some way correlated to severe toxicity but was not considered to be an optimal monitor for HT as many patients with severe and moderate pain were without any serious skin reactions, while slight or no pain sometimes were associated with severe reactions. 401 refs

  1. Pifithrin-μ, an inhibitor of heat-shock protein 70, can increase the antitumor effects of hyperthermia against human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazumasa Sekihara

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia (HT improves the efficacy of anti-cancer radiotherapy and chemotherapy. However, HT also inevitably evokes stress responses and increases the expression of heat-shock proteins (HSPs in cancer cells. Among the HSPs, HSP70 is known as a pro-survival protein. In this study, we investigated the sensitizing effect of pifithrin (PFT-μ, a small molecule inhibitor of HSP70, when three human prostate cancer cell lines (LNCaP, PC-3, and DU-145 were treated with HT (43°C for 2 h. All cell lines constitutively expressed HSP70, and HT further increased its expression in LNCaP and DU-145. Knockdown of HSP70 with RNA interference decreased the viability and colony-forming ability of cancer cells. PFT-μ decreased the viabilities of all cell lines at one-tenth the dose of Quercetin, a well-known HSP inhibitor. The combination therapy with suboptimal doses of PFT-μ and HT decreased the viability of cancer cells most effectively when PFT-μ was added immediately before HT, and this combination effect was abolished by pre-knockdown of HSP70, suggesting that the effect was mediated via HSP70 inhibition. The combination therapy induced cell death, partially caspase-dependent, and decreased proliferating cancer cells, with decreased expression of c-Myc and cyclin D1 and increased expression of p21(WAF1/Cip, indicating arrest of cell growth. Additionally, the combination therapy significantly decreased the colony-forming ability of cancer cells compared to therapy with either alone. Furthermore, in a xenograft mouse model, the combination therapy significantly inhibited PC-3 tumor growth. These findings suggest that PFT-μ can effectively enhance HT-induced antitumor effects via HSP70 inhibition by inducing cell death and arrest of cell growth, and that PFT-μ is a promising agent for use in combination with HT to treat prostate cancer.

  2. The treatment of late radiation effects with hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plafki, C.; Carl, U.M.; Glag, M.; Hartmann, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    Background: Late radiation injuries may impose a negative influence on the quality of life in the affected patients. In several entities, standardized treatment protocols are lacking. Hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) has been shown to have beneficial effects in the treatment of late radiation sequelae. Material and methods: The basic principles of HBO are reviewed as well as clinical issues. Current study protocols are presented. Results: During HBO-therapy the patient breathes pure oxygen at pressures above 100 kPa. The oxygen solubility within the fluid phase of the blood is largely increased. Biological effects include an increased oxygen diffusibility, improved collagen synthesis and neoangiogenesis as well as an enhancement of antimicrobial defenses. By decreasing the capillary filtration pressure a reduction of edema becomes possible. HBO has been shown to prevent complications following surgery in irradiated tissues. Its efficacy as an adjunct in the treatment of osteonecroses in radiation patients could be demonstrated. In addition, the loss of osseointegrated implants in the maxillofacial bones of these patients could be significantly reduced. Further indications include soft tissue necroses, hemorrhagic cystitis and proctitis in tumor patients that have been treated by radiotherapy as part of a multimodality approach. Conclusions: HBO in the treatment of late radiation effects is still subject of investigation, but remarkable results have been reported. Optimized treatment protocols need to be determined in various entities. The rate of side effects is acceptable low. (orig.) [de

  3. Magnetic Hyperthermia and Radiation Therapy: Radiobiological Principles and Current Practice †

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiridon V. Spirou

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Hyperthermia, though by itself generally non-curative for cancer, can significantly increase the efficacy of radiation therapy, as demonstrated by in vitro, in vivo, and clinical results. Its limited use in the clinic is mainly due to various practical implementation difficulties, the most important being how to adequately heat the tumor, especially deep-seated ones. In this work, we first review the effects of hyperthermia on tissue, the limitations of radiation therapy and the radiobiological rationale for combining the two treatment modalities. Subsequently, we review the theory and evidence for magnetic hyperthermia that is based on magnetic nanoparticles, its advantages compared with other methods of hyperthermia, and how it can be used to overcome the problems associated with traditional techniques of hyperthermia.

  4. Late effects of low doses and dose rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paretzke, H.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper outlines the spectrum of problems and approaches used in work on the derivation of quantitative prognoses of late effects in man of low doses and dose rates. The origins of principal problems encountered in radiation risks assessments, definitions and explanations of useful quantities, methods of deriving risk factors from biological and epidemiological data, and concepts of risk evaluation and problems of acceptance are individually discussed

  5. Reproductive Late Effects in Female Survivors of Childhood Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Gnaneswaran, Shivany; Deans, Rebecca; Cohn, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Childhood cancer treatments can cause female reproductive late effects. Radiation to the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis is associated with altered menarche, miscarriage, and implantation failure. Patients who receive chemotherapy and/or ovarian radiation are at risk of premature ovarian failure; the risk increases with increasing radiation dose, alkylating agent score, combination therapy, and older age at treatment. Ovarian reserve may be assessed using antimullerian hormone assay and u...

  6. Magnetic Properties of Magnetic Nanoparticles for Efficient Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihab M. Obaidat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Localized magnetic hyperthermia using magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs under the application of small magnetic fields is a promising tool for treating small or deep-seated tumors. For this method to be applicable, the amount of MNPs used should be minimized. Hence, it is essential to enhance the power dissipation or heating efficiency of MNPs. Several factors influence the heating efficiency of MNPs, such as the amplitude and frequency of the applied magnetic field and the structural and magnetic properties of MNPs. We discuss some of the physics principles for effective heating of MNPs focusing on the role of surface anisotropy, interface exchange anisotropy and dipolar interactions. Basic magnetic properties of MNPs such as their superparamagnetic behavior, are briefly reviewed. The influence of temperature on anisotropy and magnetization of MNPs is discussed. Recent development in self-regulated hyperthermia is briefly discussed. Some physical and practical limitations of using MNPs in magnetic hyperthermia are also briefly discussed.

  7. Present clinical status of hyperthermia associated with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaulerry, C.; Bataini, J.P.; Brunin, F.; Gaboriaud, G.

    1981-01-01

    Improved techniques for inducing heat: ultrasound, microwaves, diathermy with different application modalities, capable of producing localized superficial or deep, regional or total body hyperthermia have been responsible for the multiplication of clinical trials. These studies have confirmed the tumoricidal effect of hyperthermia alone, or more especially when combined with radiotherapy, and the good tolerance of normal tissues to localized temperatures of 42 to 43.5 0 C even in previously irradiated cases. Localized heating does not seem to increase the incidence of metastasis. Enhancement ratios and therapeutic gain with respect to normal tissues are not yet well documented. Many problems, including the heterogenicity of tissues to be heated, difficulties with temperature monitoring, and selection of appropriate sequential scheduling of radiation and hyperthermia remain unsolved and further investigationss are required [fr

  8. An FDTD code for hyperthermia treatment planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marrocco, G.; Bardati, F. [Rome Univ. Tor Vergata (Italy). Dipt. di Informatica, sistemi e produzione; Tognolatti, P. [L' Aquila Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Ingegneria Elettrica

    1999-08-01

    Radio-frequency hyperthermia is an anticancer modality based on the heating of tumours by radiating sources. A set of antennas is frequently used to enhance power depositions in tissues. Treatments planning needs electromagnetic field computation within realistic body models. Since several simulation may be required the optimize the antenna-body configuration, the electromagnetic solver should be designed in such a way that new configuration of the antenna set-up can be solved without heavy changes of the basic numerical code. In this paper a numerical investigation on the effects of a segmentation technique will be presented, with reference to an FDTD computation and the heating of a paediatric tumour.

  9. Late effects of various dose-fractionation regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turesson, I.; Notter, G.

    1983-01-01

    These clinical investigations of various dose-fractionation regimens on human skin show that: The late reactions cannot be predicted from the early reactions; The dose-response curves for late reactions are much steeper than for early reactions; Equivalent doses for various fractionation schedules concerning late effects can be calculated by means of a corrected CRE (NSD) formula; the correction must be considered preliminary because further follow-up is needed. A clinical fractionation study of this type requires: Extremely careful dosimetry; Study of the same anatomical region; Very long follow-up; Studies at different effect levels; Skin reaction is the only end point we have studied systematically for different fractionation regimens. Experience with the CRE formula as a model for calculating isoeffect doses for different fractionation schedules in routine clinical use can be summarized as follows: The CRE formula has been used prospectively since 1972 in all patients; CRE-equivalent weekly doses to 5 x 2.0 Gy per week has been used. (Although the fractionation schedule is changed, the overall treatment time is still the same); The CRE range was 18 to 21 for curative radiotherapy on carcinomas; No irradiation was applied during pronounced acute reactions. No unexpected complications have been observed under these conditions

  10. Modification of radiation damage in CHO cells by hyperthermia at 40 and 450C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henle, K.J.; Leeper, D.B.

    1977-01-01

    Low hyperthermia at 40 0 C either before or after X irradiation did not alter the slope of the radiation dose-cell survival curve but reduced the D/sub q/ from 145 to 41 or to 0 rad for a pre- or postirradiation incubation period of 2 hr at 40 0 C, respectively. In contrast, hyperthermia at 45 0 C increased the slope of the radiation survival curve by a factor of 1.7 for a radiation pretreatment of 10 min at 45 0 C, but only by 1.3 for the same treatment immediately after irradiation. The corresponding D/sub q/'s were 262 and 138 rad, respectively. A combination of 45 and 40 0 C hyperthermia (10 min at 45 0 C + 2 hr at 40 0 C + X) resulted in a superposition of the individual effects of 45 or 40 0 C hyperthermia on the radiation survival curve. In addition, the radiation survival curve was shifted downward by a factor of three due to the potentiation of 45 0 C hyperthermia damage by postincubation at 40 0 C. Repair of sublethal radiation damage was completely suppressed during incubation at 40 following hyperthermia at 45 0 C. However, when cells were returned to 37 0 C, even after 6 hr at 40 following 45 0 C hyperthermia, the capacity to accumulate and repair sublethal radiation damage was immediately restored. These findings imply that the hyperthermia damage from low or high temperatures interacts differentially with radiation damage. Low hyperthermia at 40 0 C may affect principally the radiation repair system, whereas 45 0 C hyperthermia probably alters the radiation target more severely than the repair system

  11. Strategies to reduce hyperthermia in ambulatory multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlich, Richard F; Buschbacher, Ralph M; Cox, Mary Jude; Long, William B; Winters, Kathryne L; Becker, Daniel G

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 400,000 Americans have multiple sclerosis. Worldwide, multiple sclerosis affects 2.5 million individuals. Multiple sclerosis affects two to three times as many women as men. The adverse effects of hyperthermia in patients with multiple sclerosis have been known since 1890. While most patients with multiple sclerosis experience reversible worsening of their neurologic deficits, some patients experience irreversible neurologic deficits. In fact, heat-induced fatalities have been encountered in multiple sclerosis patients subjected to hyperthermia. Hyperthermia can be caused through sun exposure, exercise, and infection. During the last 50 years, numerous strategies have evolved to reduce hyperthermia in individuals with multiple sclerosis, such as photoprotective clothing, sunglasses, sunscreens, hydrotherapy, and prevention of urinary tract infections. Hydrotherapy has become an essential component of rehabilitation for multiple sclerosis patients in hospitals throughout the world. On the basis of this positive hospital experience, hydrotherapy has been expanded through the use of compact aquatic exercise pools at home along with personal cooling devices that promote local and systemic hypothermia in multiple sclerosis patients. The Multiple Sclerosis Association of America and NASA have played leadership roles in developing and recommending technology that will prevent hyperthermia in multiple sclerosis patients and should be consulted for new technological advances that will benefit the multiple sclerosis patient. In addition, products recommended for photoprotection by The Skin Cancer Foundation may also be helpful to the multiple sclerosis patient's defense against hyperthermia. Infections in the urinary tract, especially detrusor-external sphincter dyssynergia, are initially managed conservatively with intermittent self-catheterization and pharmacologic therapy. In those cases, refractory to conservative therapy, transurethral external

  12. Numerical modeling for an electric-field hyperthermia applicator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Te-Kao; Chou, C. K.; Chan, K. W.; Mcdougall, J.

    1993-01-01

    Hyperthermia, in conjunction with radiation and chemotherapy for treatment of cancers, is an area of current concern. Experiments have shown that hyperthermia can increase the potency of many chemotherapy drugs and the effectiveness of radiation for treating cancer. A combination of whole body or regional hyperthermia with chemotherapy or radiation should improve treatment results. Conventional methods for inducing whole body hyperthermia, such as exposing a patient in a radiant cabinet or under a hot water blanket, conduct heat very slowly from the skin to the body core. Thus a more efficient system, such as the three-plate electric-field hyperthermia applicator (EHA), is developed. This three-plate EHA has one top plate over and two lower plates beneath the patient. It is driven at 27.12 MHz with 500 Watts through a matching circuit. Using this applicator, a 50 kg pig was successfully heated to 42 C within 45 minutes. However, phantom and animal studies have indicated non-uniform heating near the side of the body. In addition, changes in the size and distance between the electrode plates can affect the heating (or electromagnetic field) pattern. Therefore, numerical models using the method of moments (MOM) or the finite difference time domain (FDTD) technique are developed to optimize the heating pattern of this EHA before it is used for human trials. The accuracy of the numerical modeling has been achieved by the good agreement between the MOM and FDTD results for the three-plate EHA without a biological body. The versatile FDTD technique is then applied to optimize the EHA design with a human body. Both the numerical and measured data in phantom blocks will be presented. The results of this study will be used to design an optimized system for whole body or regional hyperthermia.

  13. Late effects of treatment of cancer in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Advances in surgical techniques, in chemotherapy, and in radiation therapy have led to improved survival in children treated for cancer. Children cured of cancer will soon form a significant fraction of our adult population. As we follow such survivors, we have become more aware of long-term side effects of treatment. This is not a reason to withhold therapy. Instead, careful followup of oncology patients is needed to document the late effects, to identify the etiologic agents, and to alter treatment to give the least toxic therapy without sacrificing quality or duration of survival

  14. Late intestinal adverse effects of radiotherapy for uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsukada, Seiji; Yamamoto, Yasuaki; Kaneko, Toru; Maruhashi, Toshihiro; Takahashi, Takeshi

    1993-01-01

    We investigated the incidence and clinical appearance of late adverse intestinal effects in 88 patients treated with postoperative radiotherapy and 46 patients treated with radiotherapy alone for uterine cervical cancer. In the postoperative radiotherapy group, colitis, ileus and bowel fistules were seen in 13 patients (14.8%), 8 (9.1%), and 3 (3.4%) of the patients, respectively. Of these patients, 11 (12.5%) needed to have surgical therapy for these adverse effects. In the radiation alone group, 18 patients (39.1%) had colitis and 2 (4.3%) had ileus; of them, 2 patients (4.3%) needed to have surgical therapy. The higher incidence of so severe adverse effects as to require surgical therapy in the postoperative radiotherapy group indicates that adhesion caused by operation might have caused the occurrence of these adverse effects. Four of a total of 134 patients died of causes which might be attributable to irradiation. In 61 patients treated by radical hysterectomy without postoperative radiotherapy, intestinal adverse effects were not found. These results indicate that late intestinal adverse effects after radiotherapy are likely to occur in some cases very severely; therefore, careful consideration is necessary in the decision to use radiotherpay for uterine cervical cancer. (J.P.N.)

  15. The role of connective tissue in late effects of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerber, G.B.

    1979-01-01

    Connective tissues not only serve as support, but also filter and censor the physical and molecular information reaching cells. The late change in connective tissues, i.e. fibrosis several months or years after the irradiation with 1000 rad or more, has been well known, and the dreaded sequel of radiation therapy, but connective tissues are affected already at much earlier time. The change in irradiated connective tissues may be distinguished in 3 phases after irradiation, the change in permeability within hours, damage to cell replacement systems within days and months and the late change of fibrosis, vascular damage and parenchymal atrophy after months and years. Glomerular sclerosis, tubular atrophy and interstitial fibrosis after the excessive irradiation of kidneys, accompanied by renal failure and hypertension, are usually considered as the consequence of vascular or tubular damage, but recent investigation suggested that the change in blood flow is correlated also with the increase in collagen, so that fibrosis may represent an important factor in the pathogenesis of renal damage. Radiofibrosis is considered simply as a result of the vascular damage due to the deficient or abnormal replacement of endothelial cells and/or due to arteriolo-capillary fibrosis. The late effects depend on early ones, and the endothelial cells would be only one. Other possible paths could depend on low fibrinolytic activity and immunological reactions. (Yamashita, S.)

  16. Analysis of effect of late water injection on RCS repressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Jun; Cao Xuewu

    2011-01-01

    Effect of late water injection on RCS repressurization during high pressure severe accident sequence in a typical PWR was analyzed. As the results shown, late water injection could increase RCS pressure when RPV failed without RCS passive depressurization. Especially in the condition of opening one PORV, RCS pressure could reach high pressure limit when RPV failed and the risk of HPME and DCH was dramatically increased. Integrity of containment could be threatened. However, in the condition of RCS passive depressurization induced by pressurizer surge line creep failure, RCS pressure could be decreased to very low level even only one PORV was opened and two trains of emergency core cooling were implemented. The risk of HPME and DCH was eliminated. The more PORVs were opened, the faster accident progression was and the earlier RPV failed. RCS pressure was a little higher when PRV failed if two trains of emergency core cooling was implemented comparing with the condition with only one train of emergency core cooling. However the time of RPV failure was obviously delayed. From the point of delaying RPV failure and preventing containment early failure of view, the optimized late water injection was opening three PORVs and implementing two trains of emergency core cooling. (authors)

  17. Salivary buffer effect in relation to late pregnancy and postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, M; Pienihäkkinen, K

    2000-02-01

    We studied the salivary pH, buffer effect (BE), and flow rates of unstimulated and paraffin-stimulated saliva of 8 women in their late pregnancy and postpartum. Salivary samples were collected about 1 month prior to and about 2 months after delivery. In non-pregnant control women, two paraffin-stimulated salivary samples were collected 1 month apart. The salivary BE increased significantly from late pregnancy to postpartum without exception. The increase was 2.04 +/- 1.17 pH units (P pH) to 6.82 +/- 1.01 (final pH). This change was not due to variation in salivary flow rates, since both unstimulated and paraffin-stimulated flow rates remained unchanged. In control women the difference between the 2 BE measurements was only 0.13 +/- 0.47 pH units on average. We concluded that women with high postpartum BE values may have moderate or even low BE values in late pregnancy. In control women, individual variation was found to be low in all variables studied.

  18. Enhancement of immunological activity after mild hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noguchi, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Takeo; Takahashi, Tohru

    2002-01-01

    At present, hyperthermia is clinically very important as interdisciplinary therapeutic method, and studies are being performed on combined effects with surgical treatment, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and gene therapy for the treatment of malignant tumors. We evaluated the effects of hyperthermia under temperature of 42.5C and demonstrated that the activation of immunological response is increased and anti-tumor effect cabn be obtained in this studies. We used animals were C3H mice (male,7W) bearing SCC-VII tumor on femur skin. Then, the mice were divided to 10 mice in each group, and only femur region was immersed in warm water for thermal treatment. Also we measured the tumor growth, changes of blood cell fraction and NK cell activity. The results of the present study confirmed: (1) Anti-tumor effect can be given by thermal treatment at relatively mild temperature (mild temperature at 39C-42C); (2) The increase of neutrophils is dependent on the quantity of heat added; (3) Immunological response of monocytes and lymphocytes is associated with it; (4) Activity of the immunological potency as a whole such as activation of NK cells was also confirmed

  19. Proton Radiotherapy for Parameningeal Rhabdomyosarcoma: Clinical Outcomes and Late Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Childs, Stephanie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Kozak, Kevin R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wisconsin Cancer Center Johnson Creek, Madison, WI (United States); Friedmann, Alison M. [Department of Pediatric Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adams, Judith; MacDonald, Shannon M.; Liebsch, Norbert J.; Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yock, Torunn I., E-mail: tyock@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical outcome and late side effect profile of proton radiotherapy in the treatment of children with parameningeal rhabdomyosarcoma (PM-RMS). Methods and Materials: Seventeen consecutive children with PM-RMS were treated with proton radiotherapy at Massachusetts General Hospital between 1996 and 2005. We reviewed the medical records of all patients and asked referring physicians to report specific side effects of interest. Results: Median patient age at diagnosis was 3.4 years (range, 0.4-17.6). Embryonal (n = 11), alveolar (n = 4), and undifferentiated (n = 2) histologies were represented. Ten patients (59%) had intracranial extension. Median prescribed dose was 50.4 cobalt gray equivalents (GyRBE) (range, 50.4-56.0 GyRBE) delivered in 1.8-2.0-GyRBE daily fractions. Median follow-up was 5.0 years for survivors. The 5-year failure-free survival estimate was 59% (95% confidence interval, 33-79%), and overall survival estimate was 64% (95% confidence interval, 37-82%). Among the 7 patients who failed, sites of first recurrence were local only (n = 2), regional only (n = 2), distant only (n = 2), and local and distant (n = 1). Late effects related to proton radiotherapy in the 10 recurrence-free patients (median follow-up, 5 years) include failure to maintain height velocity (n = 3), endocrinopathies (n = 2), mild facial hypoplasia (n = 7), failure of permanent tooth eruption (n = 3), dental caries (n = 5), and chronic nasal/sinus congestion (n = 2). Conclusions: Proton radiotherapy for patients with PM-RMS yields tumor control and survival comparable to that in historical controls with similar poor prognostic factors. Furthermore, rates of late effects from proton radiotherapy compare favorably to published reports of photon-treated cohorts.

  20. Heating efficiency in magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deatsch, Alison E.; Evans, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermic treatment of cancers have gained significant attention in recent years. In magnetic hyperthermia, three independent mechanisms result in thermal energy upon stimulation: Néel relaxation, Brownian relaxation, and hysteresis loss. The relative contribution of each is strongly dependent on size, shape, crystalline anisotropy, and degree of aggregation or agglomeration of the nanoparticles. We review the effects of each of these physical mechanisms in light of recent experimental studies and suggest routes for progress in the field. Particular attention is given to the influence of the collective behaviors of nanoparticles in suspension. A number of recent studies have probed the effect of nanoparticle concentration on heating efficiency and have reported superficially contradictory results. We contextualize these studies and show that they consistently indicate a decrease in magnetic relaxation time with increasing nanoparticle concentration, in both Brownian- and Néel-dominated regimes. This leads to a predictable effect on heating efficiency and alleviates a significant source of confusion within the field. - Highlights: • Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia. • Heating depends on individual properties and collective properties. • We review recent studies with respect to loss mechanisms. • Collective behavior is a key source of confusion in the field. • We contextualize recent studies to elucidate consistencies and alleviate confusion

  1. Clinically Relevant Pharmacological Strategies That Reverse MDMA-Induced Brain Hyperthermia Potentiated by Social Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Ren, Suelynn; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2016-01-01

    MDMA-induced hyperthermia is highly variable, unpredictable, and greatly potentiated by the social and environmental conditions of recreational drug use. Current strategies to treat pathological MDMA-induced hyperthermia in humans are palliative and marginally effective, and there are no specific pharmacological treatments to counteract this potentially life-threatening condition. Here, we tested the efficacy of mixed adrenoceptor blockers carvedilol and labetalol, and the atypical antipsychotic clozapine, in reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia. We injected rats with a moderate non-toxic dose of MDMA (9 mg/kg) during social interaction, and we administered potential treatment drugs after the development of robust hyperthermia (>2.5 °C), thus mimicking the clinical situation of acute MDMA intoxication. Brain temperature was our primary focus, but we also simultaneously recorded temperatures from the deep temporal muscle and skin, allowing us to determine the basic physiological mechanisms of the treatment drug action. Carvedilol was modestly effective in attenuating MDMA-induced hyperthermia by moderately inhibiting skin vasoconstriction, and labetalol was ineffective. In contrast, clozapine induced a marked and immediate reversal of MDMA-induced hyperthermia via inhibition of brain metabolic activation and blockade of skin vasoconstriction. Our findings suggest that clozapine, and related centrally acting drugs, might be highly effective for reversing MDMA-induced brain and body hyperthermia in emergency clinical situations, with possible life-saving results.

  2. Late effects of radiation on mature and growing bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramuz, O.; Mornex, F.; Bourhis, J.

    1997-01-01

    The physiopathology of radiation-induced bone damage is no completely elucidated. Ionizing radiation may induce an inhibition or an impairment of growing bone. This fact is of particular importance in children, and represents one of the most important dose-limiting factors in the radiotherapeutic management of children with malignant diseases. Scoliosis, epiphyseal slippage, avascular necrosis, abnormalities of craniofacial growth may be observed after radiation. Child's age at the time of treatment, location of irradiated bone and irradiation characteristics may influence the radiation related observed effects. In adults, pathological analysis of mature bone after ionizing radiation exposure are rare, suggesting that it is difficult to draw a clear feature of the action of radiation on the bone. Osteoporosis, medullary fibrosis and cytotoxicity on bone cells lead to fracture or necrosis. Various factors can influence bone tolerance to radiation such as bone involvement by tumor cells or infection, which is frequent is mandibulary osteoradionecrosis. Technical improvements in radiation techniques have also decreased radio-induced bone complications : the volume, fractionation and total dose are essential to consider. The absence of a consistent radiation-induced late effects evaluation scale has hampered efforts to analyze the influence of various therapeutic maneuvers and the comparison of results from different reported series. The currently proposed evaluation scale may help harmonizing the classification of radiation-induced bone late effects. (author)

  3. Late effects of treatment of cancer in infancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pastore, G.; Antonelli, R.; Fine, W.; Li, F.P.; Sallan, S.E.

    1982-01-01

    Eighty-six children were diagnosed with cancer in infancy, followed for at lest 5 years, and assessed for late effects of disease and therapy. One child subsequently died from respiratory failure and 3 died from second primary cancers. Another patient survived second primary cancers of the skin. The high frequency of new cancers (4 observed, 0.09 expected) was attributable to host susceptibility factors and treatment effects. Kyphoscoliosis was diagnosed in 44 patients, 40 of whom had received radiotherapy to the spine. Other patients had neurologic deficits, pulmonary fibrosis, hypoplastic breasts, bowel adhesions, thyroid nodules, musculoskeletal defects, and liver fibrosis associated with tumor therapy. Sequelae of cancer were more common after treatment in infancy than in later childhood. Improved treatments and knowledge of natural history can reduce adverse effects of therapy

  4. Effect of Ahmed valve implantation on late neovascular glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-An Mao

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To discuss the effect and safety of Ahmed valve implantation in late neovascular glaucoma. METHODS: The Ahmed glaucoma valve were implanted in 41 eyes(41 caseswith late neovascular glaucoma, the follow-up was 12 months on average, intraocular pressure was recorded at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3, 6, 12 months respectively after operation and compared with that before operation, at the same time, the complications and treatment were analyzed.RESULTS: The mean intraocular pressure before operation, 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, 3, 6, 12 months after operation was 59.83±5.53, 19.27±8.19, 19.69±6.86, 20.67±6.73, 21.05±6.93, 21.49±7.42, 22.14±8.08mmHg, the mean intraocular pressure before operation was higher than that after operation and the difference was obvious in statistics. Major complications included hyphema, low intraocular pressure early postoperation, shallow anterior chamber, obstruction of the tube, the plate wrapped or exposed.CONCLUSION: Ahmed valve implantation is an effective method to treatlate neovascular glaucoma.

  5. Radiation doses and correlated late effects in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gustafsson, M.

    1980-04-01

    Patient irradiation in diagnostic radiology was estimated from measurements of absorbed doses in different organs, assessment of the energy imparted and retrospective calculations based on literature data. Possible late biological effects, with special aspects on children, were surveyed. The dose to the lens of the eye and the possibility of shielding in carotid angiography was studied as was the absorbed dose to the thyroid gland at cardiac catheterization and angiocardiography in children. Calculations of the mean bone marrow dose and gonad doses were performed in children with chronic skeletal disease revealing large contributions from examinations of organs other than the skeleton. The dose distribution in the breast in mammography was investigated. Comparison of the energy imparted in common roentgen examinations in 1960 and 1975 showed an unexpected low decrease in spite of technical improvements. Reasons for the failing decrease are discussed. The energy imparted to children in urological examinations was reduced significantly due to introduction of high sensitivity screens and omission of dose demanding projections. Contributions to the possible late effects were estimated on the basis of the organ doses assessed. (author)

  6. Long duration mild temperature hyperthermia and brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, E P; Raaphorst, G P

    2004-03-01

    Combining long duration mild temperature hyperthermia (LDMH) and low dose-rate (LDR) brachytherapy to enhance therapeutic killing of cancer cells was proposed many years ago. The cellular and tumour research that supports this hypothesis is presented in this review. Research describing LDMH interaction with pulsed brachytherapy and high dose-rate brachytherapy using clinically relevant parameters are compared with LDMH/LDR brachytherapy. The mechanism by which LDMH sensitizes LDR has been established as the inhibition of sublethal damage repair. The molecular mechanisms have been shown to involve DNA repair enzymes, but the exact nature of these processes is still under investigation. The relative differences between LDMH interactions with human and rodent cells are presented to help in the understanding of possible roles of LDMH in clinical application. The role of LDMH in modifying tumour blood flow and its possible role in LDR sensitization of tumours is also presented. The positive aspects of LDMH-brachytherapy for clinical application are sixfold; (1) the thermal goals (temperature, time and volume) are achievable with currently available technology, (2) the hyperthermia by itself has no detectable toxic effects, (3) thermotolerance appears to play a minor if any role in radiation sensitization, (4) TER of around 2 can be expected, (5) hypoxic fraction may be decreased due to blood flow modification and (6) simultaneous chemotherapy may also be sensitized. Combined LDMH and brachytherapy is a cancer therapy that has established biological rationale and sufficient technical and clinical advancements to be appropriately applied. This modality is ripe for clinical testing.

  7. Reirradiation + hyperthermia for recurrent breast cancer en cuirasse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oldenborg, Sabine; Rasch, Coen R.N.; Os, Rob van; Kusumanto, Yoka H.; Voerde Sive Voerding, Paul J. zum; Crezee, Hans; Tienhoven, Geertjan van [University of Amsterdam (AMC), Department of Radiation Oncology, Z1-215, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Oei, Bing S.; Venselaar, Jack L. [Institute Verbeeten (BVI), Department of Radiation Oncology, Tilburg (Netherlands); Heymans, Martijn W. [VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2018-03-15

    Patients with irresectable locoregional recurrent breast cancer en cuirasse (BCEC) do not have effective curative treatment options. Hyperthermia, the elevation of tumor temperature to 40-45 C, is a well-established radio- and chemotherapy sensitizer. A total of 196 patients were treated with reirradiation and hyperthermia (reRT+HT) at two Dutch institutes from 1982-2005. The palliative effect was evaluated in terms of clinical outcome and toxicity. All patients received previous irradiation to a median dose of 50 Gy. In all, 75% of patients received 1-6 treatment modalities for previous tumor recurrences. ReRT consisted of 8 x 4 Gy given twice a week or 12 x 3 Gy given four times a week. Superficial hyperthermia was added once or twice a week. Tumor area comprised ≥1/2 of the ipsilateral chest wall. Overall clinical response rate was 72% (complete response [CR] 30%, partial response [PR] 42%, stable disease [SD] 22%, progressive disease [PD] 6%). The local progression-free rate at 1 year was 24%. Median survival was 6.9 months. Forty-three percent of our patients with CR, PR, SD after treatment remained infield progression-free until death or last follow-up. Acute ≥grade 3 toxicity occurred in 33% of patients, while late ≥grade 3 toxicity was recorded in 14% of patients. Tumor ulceration prior to treatment had a negative impact on both clinical outcome and toxicity. ReRT+HT provides sustainable palliative tumor control, despite refractory, extensive tumor growth. Compared to currently available systemic treatment options, reRT+HT is more effective with less toxicity. (orig.) [German] Fuer Patienten mit inoperablen lokoregionalen Rueckfaellen von Brustkrebs in Form eines Cancer en cuirasse (BCEC) gibt es keine effektiven kurativen Behandlungsoptionen. Die Hyperthermie, bei der die Tumortemperatur auf 40-45 C erhoeht wird, ist eine etablierte Methode zur Radio- und Chemotherapiesensibilisierung. Insgesamt 161 Patientinnen wurden in zwei niederlaendischen

  8. Carcinostatic effects of diverse ascorbate derivatives in comparison with aliphatic chain moiety structures: Promotion by combined hyperthermia and reduced cytotoxicity to normal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Ryoko; Kageyama, Katsuhiro; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Kimura, Masatugu; Saitoh, Yasukazu; Miwa, Nobuhiko

    2012-05-01

    In this study, using human tongue squamous carcinoma cells (HSC-4) carcinostatic activity was compared for diverse L-ascorbic acid (Asc) derivatives, including the 'straight-C(16)-chain types', 6-O-palmitoyl-Asc (A6-P) and Asc-2-phosphate-6-O-palmitate sodium salt (APPS), as well as the 'branched-C(16)-chain types', Asc-2-phosphate-6-O-(2'-hexyl)decanoate (APHD), an isomer of APPS, and Asc-2,3,5,6-O-tetra-(2'-hexyl)decanoate (VCIP). The order of magnitude of the carcinostatic effects at 37°C was: APPS>A6-P = APHD>VCIP and at 42°C was APPS = A6-P>APHD>VCIP. Therefore, the two straight-C(16)-chain derivatives, APPS and A6-P, had a greater effect compared to the two branched-C(16)-chain Asc derivatives, which are considered to have more difficulty with 'orientation along cell-membrane-glycerolipid direction'. APPS-treated HCS-4 cells were observed for a decrease in cell number, cell shrinkage, pycnosis indicative of apoptosis and cell deformation. The order of cytotoxicity for the normal human dermal fibroblasts (OUMS-36) at 37°C was: A6-P (50% inhibitory concentration: 150-300 μM)>APHD (450-600 μM)>Asc = APPS (800-1000 μM). Accordingly, APHD was more cytotoxic than APPS, since the straight-C(16)-chain type, which was eliminated after the enzymatic esterolysis of APPS, is metabolized via the 'fatty acid β-oxidation cycle' more efficiently in normal cells. Thus, APPS had a greater advantage over APHD, A6-P and VCIP in terms of carcinostatic effects at 37°C, carcinostasis promotion at 42°C and a decrease of cytotoxicity to normal cells. This observation suggests a marked potential for aliphatic chain-moiety structures as anticancer agents, due to their cancer-selective carcinostasis and combined efficacy with hyperthermia, without causing side effects.

  9. Comparative evaluation of combined irradiation and hyperthermia versus irradiation alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawas-Dimopoulou, C.; Iordanou, I.; Uzunoglu, N.; Dardoufas, K.; Kouloulias, V.; Maris, T.; Kotaridis, S.

    1994-01-01

    Controvesy remains as to the treatment schedule producing better results in combined hyperthermia and X-ray therapy. Our experience concerning combined therapy of the solid tumour Walker carcinoma is reported. Male Wistar rats were submitted to treatment on the ninth day after transplantation of the tumour. Two groups of rats received either a therapeutic X-ray dose of 800 cGy by a 6-MeV linear accelerator (Mevatron, Siemens) or treatment by 432 MHz of microwaves with continuous control of tumour tissue temperature to 44±1 C for 45 min. Another group of rats was submitted to a combined treatment, with X-ray therapy preceding hyperthermia by 24 h. The last group of animals constituted the control rats. Greater tumour regression and longer survival times were obtained with the combined treatment. The gain factor for survival time was equal to 1.85 after combined treatment compared with 1.30 after X-ray therapy and 1.05 after hyperthermia. In conclusion, the results suggest that in the above schedule of combined treatment, hyperthermia applied to a solid tumour 24 h after a single dose of X-rays enhances the beneficial effect of therapy. (orig.)

  10. On the temperature control in self-controlling hyperthermia therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebrahimi, Mahyar, E-mail: ebrahimi_m@mehr.sharif.ir

    2016-10-15

    In self-controlling hyperthermia therapy, once the desired temperature is reached, the heat generation ceases and overheating is prevented. In order to design a system that generates sufficient heat without thermal ablation of surrounding healthy tissue, a good understanding of temperature distribution and its change with time is imperative. This study is conducted to extend our understanding about the heat generation and transfer, temperature distribution and temperature rise pattern in the tumor and surrounding tissue during self-controlling magnetic hyperthermia. A model consisting of two concentric spheres that represents the tumor and its surrounding tissue is considered and temperature change pattern and temperature distribution in tumor and surrounding tissue are studied. After describing the model and its governing equations and constants precisely, a typical numerical solution of the model is presented. Then it is showed that how different parameters like Curie temperature of nanoparticles, magnetic field amplitude and nanoparticles concentration can affect the temperature change pattern during self-controlling magnetic hyperthermia. The model system herein discussed can be useful to gain insight on the self-controlling magnetic hyperthermia while applied to cancer treatment in real scenario and can be useful for treatment strategy determination. - Highlights: • Temperature change pattern in tumor and surrounding tissue are studied. • The model system herein can be useful for treatment strategy determination. • In the work described herein, emphasis is on the effect of low Curie temperature. • If the equilibrium temperature can be tuned appropriately, the stay time will be infinite.

  11. On the temperature control in self-controlling hyperthermia therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebrahimi, Mahyar

    2016-01-01

    In self-controlling hyperthermia therapy, once the desired temperature is reached, the heat generation ceases and overheating is prevented. In order to design a system that generates sufficient heat without thermal ablation of surrounding healthy tissue, a good understanding of temperature distribution and its change with time is imperative. This study is conducted to extend our understanding about the heat generation and transfer, temperature distribution and temperature rise pattern in the tumor and surrounding tissue during self-controlling magnetic hyperthermia. A model consisting of two concentric spheres that represents the tumor and its surrounding tissue is considered and temperature change pattern and temperature distribution in tumor and surrounding tissue are studied. After describing the model and its governing equations and constants precisely, a typical numerical solution of the model is presented. Then it is showed that how different parameters like Curie temperature of nanoparticles, magnetic field amplitude and nanoparticles concentration can affect the temperature change pattern during self-controlling magnetic hyperthermia. The model system herein discussed can be useful to gain insight on the self-controlling magnetic hyperthermia while applied to cancer treatment in real scenario and can be useful for treatment strategy determination. - Highlights: • Temperature change pattern in tumor and surrounding tissue are studied. • The model system herein can be useful for treatment strategy determination. • In the work described herein, emphasis is on the effect of low Curie temperature. • If the equilibrium temperature can be tuned appropriately, the stay time will be infinite.

  12. Late biological effects from internal and external exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    Information on late biological effects of radiation was obtained from the long-term medical followup of a small population of Marshallese accidentally exposed to radioactive fallout from a thermonuclear test in 1954. Endocrine data are compatible with a sequence of nonstochastic radiation effects. The ingestion of radioisotopes of iodine produced clinical thyroid hypofunction in children, biochemical evidence of thyroid dysfunction in some adults, thyroid adenomatous module formation, and, as a possible indirect effect of thyroid damage, at least two cases of pituitary adenoma. In contrast, the only evidence of a stochastic effect has been a real increase in thyroid cancers among the more highly exposed people of Rongelap, none of whom have evidence of residual disease. While three nonthyroidal cancers which are known to be inducible in humans by external irradiation have been documented in the exposed population, three similar cancers have occurred in an unexposed comparison population of Marshallese. Nonstochastic effects of radiation exposure may be common but subtle. In the Marshallese experience the morbidity of delayed nonstochastic effects far exceeds that of the stochastic. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  13. Efficiency of lipofection combined with hyperthermia in Lewis lung carcinoma cells and a rodent pleural dissemination model of lung carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okita, Atsushi; Mushiake, Hiroyuki; Tsukuda, Kazunori; Aoe, Motoi; Murakami, Masakazu; Andou, Akio; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi

    2004-06-01

    We have previously reported that hyperthermia at 41 degrees C enhanced lipofection-mediated gene transduction into cultured cells. In this study, we adapted hyperthermia technique to novel cationic liposome (Lipofectamine 2000) mediated gene transfection into Lewis lung carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, transfection efficiencies were 38.9+/-3.3% by lipofection alone and 52.1+/-2.6% by lipofection with hyperthermia for 30 min, and 62.5+/-5.5% and 81.4+/-3.2% for 1 h, respectively. Hyperthermia significantly enhanced gene transfection efficiency 1.2-1.4 times more than that with lipofection only. We also evaluated the effect of hyperthermia with a pleural dissemination model of lung carcinoma of mice. We developed a model which was well-tolerated with hyperthermia with lipofection by the mice. In spite of repeated treatments, transfection efficiencies were very low and we could not show the augmentation of gene transfection by hyperthermia. Though Lipofectamine 2000 showed strong gene transduction effect and hyperthermia augmented its effect in vitro, further evaluation is needed to adapt both techniques in vivo.

  14. Assessment of immunomodulating action of combined therapy with UHF-hyperthermia in children with osteogenic sarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neprina, G.S.; Panteleeva, E.S.; Vatin, O.E.; Bizer, V.A.; Bojko, I.N.

    1989-01-01

    The paper is concerned with immunological evaluation of different stages of combined therapy with local UHF-hyperthermia in children with osteogenic sarcoma. Combined therapy (polychemo- and raditherapy) was shown to cause a decrease in the number of immunocompetent cells, to enhance dysbalance of immunoregulatory T-lymphocytes, to weaken T-lymphocyte function on PHA; immunosuppressive action of combined therapy did not depend on a tumor site. The incorporation of UHF-hyperthermia in the therapeutic scheme weakened the manifestations of secondary immunodeficiency, got back to normal structure of T-lymphocyte population. A favorable immunomodulating effect of hyperthermia was more frequently observed in patients with crural bone tumors. The effect of hyperthermia was revealed after direct influence of thermotherapy but it was absent in continuation of combined treatment

  15. Wilms tumour: prognostic factors, staging, therapy and late effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaste, Sue C.; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Babyn, Paul S.; Graf, Norbert M.; Grundy, Paul; Godzinski, Jan; Levitt, Gill A.; Jenkinson, Helen

    2008-01-01

    Wilms tumour is the most common malignant renal tumour in children. Dramatic improvements in survival have occurred as the result of advances in anaesthetic and surgical management, irradiation and chemotherapy. Current therapies are based on trials and studies primarily conducted by large multi-institutional cooperatives including the Societe Internationale d'Oncologie Pediatrique (SIOP) and the Children's Oncology Group (COG). The primary goals are to treat patients according to well-defined risk groups in order to achieve the highest cure rates, to decrease the frequency and intensity of acute and late toxicity and to minimize the cost of therapy. The SIOP trials and studies largely focus on the issue of preoperative therapy, whereas the COG trials and studies start with primary surgery. This paper reviews prognostic factors and staging systems for Wilms tumour and its current treatment with surgery and chemotherapy. Surgery remains a crucial part of treatment for nephroblastoma, providing local primary tumour control and adequate staging and possibly controlling the metastatic spread and central vascular extension of the disease. Partial nephrectomy, when technically feasible, seems reasonable not only in those with bilateral disease but also in those with unilateral disease where the patient has urological disorders or syndromes predisposing to malignancy. Partial nephrectomy, however, is frequently not sufficient for an anaplastic variant of tumour. The late effects for Wilms tumour and its treatment are also reviewed. The treatment of Wilms tumour has been a success story, and currently in excess of 80% of children diagnosed with Wilms tumour can look forward to long-term survival, with less than 20% experiencing serious morbidity at 20 years from diagnosis. The late complications are a consequence of the type and intensity of treatment required, which in turn reflects the nature and extent of the original tumour. Continual international trial development

  16. Wilms tumour: prognostic factors, staging, therapy and late effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaste, Sue C. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Radiological Sciences, Memphis, TN (United States); Dome, Jeffrey S. [St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Department of Oncology, Memphis, TN (United States); Babyn, Paul S. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Radiology, Toronto (Canada); Graf, Norbert M. [University Hospital of the Saarland, Clinic for Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Homburg (Germany); Grundy, Paul [University of Alberta, Division of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Palliative Care, and Northern Alberta Children' s Cancer Program, Edmonton (Canada); Godzinski, Jan [Mother and Child Institute, Department of Oncological Surgery for Children and Adolescents, Warsaw (Poland); Levitt, Gill A. [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Sick Children NHS Trust, Paediatric Oncology, London (United Kingdom); Jenkinson, Helen [Birmingham Children' s Hospital NHS Trust, Oncology Department, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-15

    Wilms tumour is the most common malignant renal tumour in children. Dramatic improvements in survival have occurred as the result of advances in anaesthetic and surgical management, irradiation and chemotherapy. Current therapies are based on trials and studies primarily conducted by large multi-institutional cooperatives including the Societe Internationale d'Oncologie Pediatrique (SIOP) and the Children's Oncology Group (COG). The primary goals are to treat patients according to well-defined risk groups in order to achieve the highest cure rates, to decrease the frequency and intensity of acute and late toxicity and to minimize the cost of therapy. The SIOP trials and studies largely focus on the issue of preoperative therapy, whereas the COG trials and studies start with primary surgery. This paper reviews prognostic factors and staging systems for Wilms tumour and its current treatment with surgery and chemotherapy. Surgery remains a crucial part of treatment for nephroblastoma, providing local primary tumour control and adequate staging and possibly controlling the metastatic spread and central vascular extension of the disease. Partial nephrectomy, when technically feasible, seems reasonable not only in those with bilateral disease but also in those with unilateral disease where the patient has urological disorders or syndromes predisposing to malignancy. Partial nephrectomy, however, is frequently not sufficient for an anaplastic variant of tumour. The late effects for Wilms tumour and its treatment are also reviewed. The treatment of Wilms tumour has been a success story, and currently in excess of 80% of children diagnosed with Wilms tumour can look forward to long-term survival, with less than 20% experiencing serious morbidity at 20 years from diagnosis. The late complications are a consequence of the type and intensity of treatment required, which in turn reflects the nature and extent of the original tumour. Continual international trial

  17. Metastatic spreading and growth of rhabdomyosarcoma in exposure to hyperglycemia, hyperthermia and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanenko, S.E.; Salamatina, N.A.; Dedenkov, A.N.

    1985-01-01

    Under the effect of local UHF-hyperthermia, short-term hyperglycemia and ionizing radiation on metastasing strain of rhabdomysarcoma an increase in metastatic spreading or stimulated growth of primary tumor are not noticed. Otherwise, it is stated that hyperglycemia and hyperthermia thrice-used prevent from metastatic spreading of the tumor. Ionizing radiation decelerates both tumor growth and to a least extent its metastatic spreading

  18. Immunohistochemical study on the fetal rat pituitary in hyperthermia-induced exencephaly

    OpenAIRE

    Watanabe, Yuichi G.; 渡辺, 勇一

    2002-01-01

    Hyperthermia of fetal rats is known to cause malformations of various organs including brain. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of the hyperthermia-induced brain damages on the development of the adenohypophysis. Mother rats of Day 9.5 of pregnancy were anesthetized and immersed in hot water (43℃) for 15 min. At Day 21.5 of gestation, fetuses were removed by caesarian section and examined for exencephaly. Hyperthermal stress induced varying degrees of exencephaly in ...

  19. Immunohistochemical Study on the Fetal Rat Pituitary in Hyperthermia-lnduced Exencephaly(Endocrinology)

    OpenAIRE

    Yuichi G., Watanabe; Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Niigata University

    2002-01-01

    Hyperthermia of fetal rats is known to cause malformations of various organs including brain. The present study was carried out to investigate the effect of the hyperthermia-induced brain damages on the development of the adenohypophysis. Mother rats of Day 9.5 of pregnancy were anesthetized and immersed in hot water (43℃) for 15 min. At Day 21.5 of gestation, fetuses were removed by caesarian section and examined for exencephaly. Hyperthermal stress induced varying degrees of exencephaly in ...

  20. Mechanisms of hyperthermia induced radiatiosensitization for treatment of human papillomavirus positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oei, Arlene; Leeuwen, Caspar van; Stalpers, Lukas; Rodermond, Hans; Kok, Petra; Crezee, Hans; Franken, Nicolaas

    2016-01-01

    HPV is associated with cervical cancer, the third most common cancer in women. In over 70% of cervical cancers, the high-risk HPV-types 16 and 18 are found. In these tumors, functionality of p53 is suppressed by the presence of protein E6. Hyperthermia is a clinical application of heat in which tumour temperatures are raised to 40-43°C and combined hyperthermia with radiation is very effective in the treatment of cervical cancer

  1. Late effects of whole brain irradiation within the therapeutic range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caveness, W.F.; Carsten, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    Whole brain exposure with supervoltage x irradiation was carried out in three sets of Macaca mulatta. Two sets of 12 monkeys each, at puberty, received single and fractionated exposures, respectively. One set of 21 monkeys in adulthood received a fractionated exposure. Exposure to 1000 rads in a single dose, at puberty, caused no late effects. Exposure to 1500 rads caused small areas of necrosis in the forebrain white matter at 26 weeks, but a much more extensive involvement at and beyond 52 weeks that included confluent areas of necrosis in gray and white matter. Brain loss resulted in ventricular dilatation. Gliomas appeared in two out of three monkeys at or beyond 52 weeks. Exposure to 2000 rads caused such a wide scatter of focal areas of necrosis, including those in the brain stem, that survival beyond 20 to 26 weeks was not possible. All showed enlarged ventricular systems. Whole brain exposure, 200 rads a day, five days a week, for a course of 4000 rads, at puberty, resulted in no delayed effects. Whole brain exposure to 6000 rads in a six weeks course, in the adult, produced less effects than the same dose at puberty. The onset of the scattered necrotic lesions was later than expected, appearing in one out of three animals at 33 weeks, two out of three animals at 52 weeks, and two out of three at 104 weeks. The lesions at 104 weeks were predominantly mineralized, but were accompanied by a greater extent of telangiectasia than seen in the pubescent monkeys

  2. Findings in young pigs following combined treatment by hyperthermia and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schorcht, J.; Herrmann, T.; Barke, R.; Johannsen, U.

    1985-01-01

    In a pilot study, 8 store pigs were submitted to a combined treatment with hyperthermia (5 x 60 min; 42 0 C in the thoracic region) followed by telecobalt irradiation of the right lung (5 x 4 Gy). Radiologic checks of the thoracic organs and laboratory diagnostics provided useful data as to the temporal course of the radiogenic pulmonary affections and the tolerability of fractionated whole-body hyperthermia including superimposed local heating on store pigs. Histologic examinations of sections of heated and irradiated (right) as compared to exclusively heated (left) lung lobes of 4 animals suggested that hyperthermia exerted a radiosensitizing effect on the right lungs. Histologically confirmed irreversible lung fibrosis occurred there after exposure to even lower total doses following hyperthermia as compared to sole irradiation. (author)

  3. Non-carcinogenic late effects of ionizing radiation; human data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beebe, G.W.

    1979-01-01

    The late effects of ionizing radiation may be somatic effect or potential effect, about which such informations as follows are required: teratogenesis the disturbances in growth and development, cataracts, infertility, cytogenetic aberration, and accelerated aging. Although much is known about the nature of the malformations produced by ionizing radiation, and about the vulnerability of human embryonal and fetal tissues during various stages of organogenesis, the quantitative information is uncertain and incomplete. The data on A-bomb survivors were flawed by confounding radiation dose with nutritional and other influences caused by the disasters created by war-time bombings. If the effects of radiation are real, they are quite small for the dose below 100 rad (kerma), are confined to the children of pre-pubertal age at the time of exposure, and are of much less consequence for low-LET radiation than for high. Radiation-induced lenticular changes are of graded severity, and as for cataracts, the threshold is in the range from 600 to 1,000 rad of low-LET radiation, and perhaps 75 to 100 rad for fast neutrons; the average latent period is 2 to 7 years. The estimate of the RBE for neutrons is in the range from 2 to 10, and dose-dependent. Ionizing radiation has important effects on fertility only at very high dose. The relationship of the quantitative aspects of the biologic significance of chromosomal aberration in somatic cells to dose may provide an interesting parallel to the carcinogenic effect. For neutrons, the dose-response curve appears to be linear, at least for stable aberration. (Yamashita, S.)

  4. Hyperthermia and PARP1-inhibition for sensitization of radiation and cisplatin treatment of cervical carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franken, Nicolaas; Oei, Arlene; Leeuwen, Caspar van; Stalpers, Lukas; Rodermond, Hans; Bel, Arjan; Kok, Petra; Crezee, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation causes single and double strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs). DSBs are among the most critical DNA lesions and can be repaired via either non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) in which PARP1, Ku70 and DNA-PKcs are important, or homologous recombination (HR), where BRCA2 and Rad51 are essential. Hyperthermia disturbs HR by temporary inactivation of BRCA2. Cisplatin disrupts NHEJ and PARP1-inhibitor blocks Poly-(ADP-ribose)polymerase- 1, which is important in SSB repair, NHEJ and backup-NHEJ. Our goal was to investigate the additional effectiveness of hyperthermia and PARP1-inhibition on radiation and/or cisplatin treatment. Cervical carcinoma cells (SiHa) were treated at different temperature levels levels (41.0-43.0℃, PARP1-inhibitor (100 μM; NU1025), gamma-irradiation doses (0-8 Gy) or cisplatin (1'R for 1 h). Clonogenic assays were carried out to measure survival and γH2AX staining was used to visualize DSBs. To elucidate mechanisms of action expression levels of DNA repair proteins BRCA2 and DNA-PKcs were investigated after 42.0℃ (1 h) using western blot. Combined hyperthermia and radiation resulted in an increased number of γH2AX foci as compared to radiation alone. Hyperthermia treatment in combination with cisplatin and PARP1 inhibitor and with radiation and PARP1 inhibitor significantly decreased cell survival. Western blot demonstrated a decreased expression of BRCA2 protein at 30 min after hyperthermia treatment. Adding PARP1-inhibitor significantly improves the effectiveness of combined hyperthermia radiotherapy and combined hyperthermia-cisplatin treatment on cervical carcinoma cells. Hyperthermia affects DNA-DSB repair as is indicated by increased γH2AX foci numbers and decreased BRCA2 expression. (author)

  5. Desoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis in vitro by thymus and spleen cells of the rat after hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tempel, K.; Spath, A.

    1988-03-01

    The inhibition of the semiconservative and restorative DNA synthesis caused by hyperthermia (30 to 60 min, 43/sup 0/C) was significantly higher in spleen cells than in thymus cells. The DNA repair synthesis of thymus cells measured at 37/sup 0/C was increased by about two times the initial value after a pre-incubation of 30 to 90 min and 30 to 60 min, respectively, with 37 and 43/sup 0/C, respectively. Under the same conditions, the /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation into the DNA of spleen cells diminished proportionally to the pre-incubation time after a pre-incubation of 30 and 45 min, respectively, with 43 and 37/sup 0/C, respectively. When hyperthermia and inhibitors of DNA synthesis or DNA repair (hydroxyurea, 1-..beta..-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine, 3', 5'-didesoxythymidine, and 3-aminobenzamide) were combined, overadditive effects - without cellspecific particularities - were seen only in the case of 3-aminobenzamide. Only in thymus cells, the inhibitor of DNA topoisomerase II novobiocin caused an overadditive reinforcement of the inhibition induced by hyperthermia of the semiconservative DNA synthesis. The stimulation of DNA repair synthesis in thymus cells caused by novobiocin with the aid of DNA polymerase ..beta.. could be compensated by hyperthermia. The sedimentation of thymus and spleen cell nucleoids was increased after hyperthermia. The results suggest a special importance of DNA topology and of the DNA polymerase ..beta.. activity for the cellular effect of hyperthermia.

  6. Late effects of radiation on immune system; a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sado, T.

    1979-01-01

    Lymphocytes are divided into 2 major classes: T and B lymphocytes (or cells). T cells are responsible for cell-mediated immune response, and B cells for humoral immune response or antibody formation. The possible immunological complications that might develop as the late manifestation of radiation effects include: lymphoid neoplasms, immune complex diseases, auto-aggressive immune reactions, and other degenerative diseases of immunological nature. The development of lymphoid neoplasma following the exposure to radiation was extensively studied with mice. Radiation-induced immunological compications would not contribute significantly to the life-shortening of exposed individuals. The extensive health survey of adult A-bomb survivors revealed little evidence of immunological complications such as rheumatoid arthritis, kidney diseases, paraproteinemia, etc. The young healthy adults who had received thymic irradiation during infancy for the treatment of enlarged thymus manifested higher incidence of illness with abnormal immunological features. Immune complex diseases, particularly the inter-capillary glomerulosclerosis of kidneys, develop as a result of earlier exposure to high dose of radiation. (Yamashita, S.)

  7. Early and Late Onset Side Effects of Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Borgia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic Therapy (PDT is a non-invasive treatment successfully used for neoplastic, inflammatory and infectious skin diseases. One of its strengths is represented by the high safety profile, even in elderly and/or immuno-depressed subjects. PDT, however, may induce early and late onset side effects. Erythema, pain, burns, edema, itching, desquamation, and pustular formation, often in association with each other, are frequently observed in course of exposure to the light source and in the hours/days immediately after the therapy. In particular, pain is a clinically relevant short-term complication that also reduces long-term patient satisfaction. Rare complications are urticaria, contact dermatitis at the site of application of the photosensitizer, and erosive pustular dermatosis. Debated is the relationship between PDT and carcinogenesis: the eruptive appearance of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC in previously treated areas has been correlated to a condition of local and/or systemic immunosuppression or to the selection of PDT-resistant SCC. Here we review the literature, with particular emphasis to the pathogenic hypotheses underlying these observations.

  8. Late effects of whole brain irradiation within the therapeutic range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caveness, W.F.; Carsten, A.L.

    1978-01-01

    Whole brain exposure with supervoltage irradiation was carried out on three sets of Macaca mulatta. Two sets of 12 monkeys each, at puberty, received single and fractionated exposures respectively. One set of 21 monkeys in adulthood received a fractionated exposure. Exposure to 1000 rads in a single dose, at puberty, caused no late effects. Exposure to 1500 rads caused small areas of necrosis in the forebrain white matter at 26 weeks, but a much more extensive involvementat and beyond 52 weeks that included confluent areas of necrosis in gray and white matter. Brain loss resulted in ventricular dilatation. Gliomas appeared in two out of three monkeys at or beyond 52 weeks. Exposure to 2000 rads caused such a wide scatter of focal areas of necrosis, including those in the brain stem, that survival beyond 20-26 weeks was not possible. All showed enlarged ventricular systems. Whole brain exposure, 200 rads a day, five days a week, for a course of 4000 rads, at puberty, resulted in no delayed effects. An exposure to 6000 rads, in a six weeks course, caused small, less than 1 mm, widely scattered necrotic lesions with a predilection for the forebrain white matter but not excluding the central gray matter and brain stem, at 26 weeks. At 52 weeks, there was considerable mineralization of the lesions and widespread telangiectasia. In the developing lesions, multiple minute breaks in the blood brain barrier caused diffuse brain swelling, reflected by papilloedema. Whole brain exposure to 6000 rads in a six weeks course, in the adult, produced less effects than the same dose at puberty. The onset of the scattered necrotic lesions was later than expected, appearing in one out of three animals at 33 weeks, two out of three animals at 52 weeks, and two out of three at 104 weeks. The lesions at 104 weeks were predominantly mineralized, but were accompanied by a greater extent of telangiectasia than seen in the pubescent monkeys

  9. Epidemiology of Late Health Effects in Ukrainian Chornobyl Cleanup Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyka, Dimitry; Prysyazhnyuk, Anatoly; Gudzenko, Natalya; Dyagil, Iryna; Belyi, David; Chumak, Vadim; Buzunov, Volodymyr

    2018-07-01

    This article summarizes the results of 30 y of follow-up of cancer and noncancer effects in Ukrainian cleanup workers after the Chornobyl accident. The number of power plant employees and first responders with acute radiation syndrome under follow-up by the National Research Center for Radiation Medicine decreased from 179 in 1986-1991 to 105 in 2011-2015. Cancers and leukemia (19) and cardiovascular diseases (21) were the main causes of deaths among acute radiation syndrome survivors (54) during the postaccident period. Increased radiation risks of leukemia in the Ukrainian cohort of 110,645 cleanup workers exposed to low doses are comparable to those among survivors of the atomic bomb explosions in Japan in 1945. Additionally, an excess of chronic lymphocytic leukemia was demonstrated in the cleanup workers cohort for 26 y after the exposure. A significant excess of multiple myeloma incidence [standardized incidence rate (SIR) 1.61 %, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-2.21], thyroid cancer (SIR 4.18, 95% CI 3.76-4.59), female breast cancer (SIR 1.57 CI 1.40-1.73), and all cancers combined (SIR 1.07; 95% CI 1.05-1.09) was registered. High prevalence was demonstrated for cardio- and cerebrovascular diseases and mental health changes. However, the reasons for the increases require further investigation. To monitor other possible late effects of radiation exposure in Chornobyl cleanup workers, analytical cohort and case-control studies need to include cardiovascular pathology, specifically types of potentially radiogenic cancers using a molecular epidemiology approach. Possible effects for further study include increased rates of thyroid, breast, and lung cancers and multiple myeloma; reduction of radiation risks of leukemia to population levels; and increased morbidity and mortality of cleanup workers from cardio- and cerebrovascular pathology.

  10. Hyperthermia generated by Foucault currents for oncological treatments with COMSOL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero C, R. L.; Cordova F, T.; Basurto I, G.; Guzman C, R.; Castro L, J.

    2017-10-01

    The hyperthermia generated by variable magnetic fields is a promising power method for oncological therapy, because apoptosis is induced in tumor cells at temperatures between 42 and 45 degrees Celsius. It is known that an alternating magnetic field on the FeO 4 magnetite particles produces heat through three paths: is generated by parasitic currents, lost in hysteresis cycles and losses by magnetization relaxation; taking advantage of the energy losses through the joule effect and the transformation into heat, a simulation is shown in COMSOL about the temporal distribution of temperature in transformed biological systems, to have an estimate of the properties and behavior of the temperature gradient when magnetic hyperthermia is generated in human transformed tissue. (Author)

  11. Thermoseeds for interstitial magnetic hyperthermia: from bioceramics to nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeza, A; Arcos, D; Vallet-Regí, M

    2013-01-01

    The development of magnetic materials for interstitial hyperthermia treatment of cancer is an ever evolving research field which provides new alternatives to antitumoral therapies. The development of biocompatible magnetic materials has resulted in new biomaterials with multifunctional properties, which are able to adapt to the complex scenario of tumoral processes. Once implanted or injected in the body, magnetic materials can behave as thermoseeds under the effect of AC magnetic fields. Magnetic bioceramics aimed to treat bone tumors and magnetic nanoparticles are among the most studied thermoseeds, and supply different solutions for the different scenarios in cancerous processes. This paper reviews some of the biomaterials used for bone cancer treatment and skeletal reinforcing, as well as the more complex topic of magnetic nanoparticles for intracellular targeting and hyperthermia. (topical review)

  12. An overview of interstitial brachytherapy and hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, B.B.; Harney, J.

    1989-01-01

    Interstitial thermoradiotherapy, an experimental cancer treatment that combines interstitial radiation implants (brachytherapy) and interstitial hyperthermia, is in the early stages of investigation. In accordance with the procedure used in a current national trial protocol, a 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered after catheters are placed into the tumor area while the patient is under general anesthesia. This is immediately followed by loading of radioactive Iridium-192 seeds into the catheters for a defined period of time. Once the prescribed radiation dose is delivered, the radioactive sources are removed and a second, 60-minute hyperthermia treatment is administered. Clinical trials with hyperthermia in combination with radiation have increased in recent years. Nurses caring for these patients need to become more knowledgeable about this investigational therapy. This paper provides an overview of the biologic rationale for this therapy, as well as a description of the delivery method and clinical application. Specific related nursing interventions are defined in a nursing protocol.23 references

  13. Interstitial microwave hyperthermia treatment investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siauve, N; Lormel, C

    2012-01-01

    Microwave ablation also called interstitial hyperthermia is a medical procedure used in the treatment of many cancers, cardiac arrhythmias and other medical conditions. With this medical therapy, an electromagnetic source (antenna) is directly positioned in the target tissue and a sufficient power is injected to necrosis the tissue. The aim of this study is to propose a design procedure and develop the associated tools, for determining the optimal shape, dimensions, type and operating frequency of antenna according to the target volume. In this context, a 3D numerical predictive model of temperature elevation induced by the electric fields and two benches for thermal and electrical tissues properties characterization have been developed. To validate the procedure and the different tools, an experimental bench test which includes interstitial antenna, external microwave generator, phantom that represents the target tissue and measurement system of temperature and electric field has been elaborated.

  14. Effect of Tetracycline on Late-stage African trypanosomiasis in Rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of Tetracycline on Late-stage African trypanosomiasis in Rats. T.O. Johnson, J.T. Ekanem. Abstract. The effect of tetracycline on late stage African trypanosomiasis was examined in an in vivo experiment using rats infected with Trypanosoma brucei brucei. Infected rats were treated on the 5th day of infection with ...

  15. Late-successional forests and northern spotted owls: how effective is the Northwest Forest Plan?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles Hemstrom; Martin G. Raphael

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the late-successional and old-growth forest and the northern spotted owl effectiveness monitoring plans for the Northwest Forest Plan. The effectiveness monitoring plan for late-successional and old-growth forests will track changes in forest spatial distribution, and within-stand structure and composition, and it will predict future trends.

  16. Late-Onset Hearing Loss: Strategies for Effective Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. Mae; Kampfe, Charlene M.

    1999-01-01

    Late-onset hearing loss is one of the major chronic conditions experienced by older individuals. The term "presbycusis" is typically used when describing this condition. Presbycusis refers to many degenerative changes that affect older people's hearing. This article provides practical suggestions for working with persons with this…

  17. Comparison of microwave and magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia radiosensitization in murine breast tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giustini, Andrew J.; Petryk, Alicia A.; Hoopes, Paul J.

    2011-03-01

    Hyperthermia has been shown to be an effective radiosensitizer. Its utility as a clinical modality has been limited by a minimally selective tumor sensitivity and the inability to be delivered in a tumor-specific manner. Recent in vivo studies (rodent and human) have shown that cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity can be effectively and safely delivered via iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (mNP) and an appropriately matched noninvasive alternating magnetic field (AMF). To explore the tumor radiosensitization potential of mNP hyperthermia we used a syngeneic mouse breast cancer model, dextran-coated 110 nm hydrodynamic diameter mNP and a 169 kHz / 450 Oe (35.8 kA/m) AMF. Intradermally implanted (flank) tumors (150 +/- 40 mm3) were treated by injection of 0.04 ml mNP (7.5 mg Fe) / cm3 into the tumor and an AMF (35.8 kA/m and 169 kHz) exposure necessary to achieve a CEM (cumulative equivalent minute) thermal dose of 60 (CEM 60). Tumors were treated with mNP hyperthermia (CEM 60), radiation alone (15 Gy, single dose) and in combination. Compared to the radiation and heat alone treatments, the combined treatment resulted in a greater than two-fold increase in tumor regrowth tripling time (tumor treatment efficacy). None of the treatments resulted in significant normal tissue toxicity or morbidity. Studies were also conducted to compare the radiosensitization effect of mNP hyperthermia with that of microwave-induced hyperthermia. The effects of incubation of nanoparticles within tumors (to allow nanoparticles to be endocytosed) before application of AMF and radiation were determined. This preliminary information suggests cancer cell specific hyperthermia (i.e. antibody-directed or anatomically-directed mNP) is capable of providing significantly greater radiosensitization / therapeutic ratio enhancement than other forms of hyperthermia delivery.

  18. Thyroid Nodules as a Late Effect of Exposure to Fallout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conard, R. A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Sutow, W. W. [M.D. Anderson Hospital and Tumor Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Colcock, B. P. [Lahey Clinic, Boston, MA (United States); Dobyns, B. M. [Cleveland Metropolitan General Hospital, Cleveland, OH (United States); Paglia, D. E. [Center for the Health Sciences, University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1969-11-15

    Multiple nodules of the thyroid gland have developed in a Marshallese population 10 to 14 years after accidental exposure to radioactive fallout The exposure occurred in 1954 when an unpredicted shift in winds caused deposition of fallout on several Marshall Islands east of Bikini Sixty four people received 175 rads of gamma radiation which proved to be sub lethal but resulted in early nausea and vomiting and significant depression of blood elements Exposure of the skin resulted m beta bums and epilation and there was significant internal absorption of fission isotopes from contaminated food and water The most serious internal exposure was from radioiodines ({sup 131}I {sup 132}I {sup 133}I {sup 135}I) It was estimated that in addition to the gamma radiation the adult thyroid gland received 160 rads from radioiodines and the young children because of their considerably smaller glands an estimated 700 1400 rads Recovery of blood elements to nearly normal and healing of skin lesions with regrowth of hair was complete by one year These findings have been fully documented The most important late radiation effect has been the development of thyroid abnormalities Since 1963 a total of 20 cases have thus far been detected 17 in children exposed at less than 10 years of age (90% of that group) and 3 in adults Thyroid surgery on 11 children and 3 adults revealed that all had benign adenomatous nodules except for a mixed papillary and follicular carcinoma in a 40 year-old woman The benign nodules were similar to those associated with iodine deficiency but such deficiency was not apparent m the Marshallese who live largely on seafood However most pathologists could not distinguish definite radiation effects in the nodules Growth and development retardation in some of the exposed children is now clearly related to thyroid deficiency Two boys with the greatest growth retardation developed pronounced hypothyroidism with atrophy of their thyroid glands Treatment of the exposed

  19. Effects of late defoliations on chemical and sensory characteristics of cv. uva longanesi wines

    OpenAIRE

    Tessarin, P; Boliani, A. C; Botelho, R. V; Rusin, C; Versari, A; Parpinello, G. P; Rombolà, A. D

    2014-01-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of late leaf removal on the berry and wine composition and on wine sensory characteristics of Uva Longanesi, a late maturing red Italian grape variety, which wines are characterized by high levels of alcohol and excessive astringency, the latter apparently intensified by late defoliation practices. During 2008 season, spur-pruned trained vines were submitted to manual defoliation (4 basal leaves) at the onset (DEF I, 210 DOY) or at the end (DEF II, 23...

  20. Late health effects of chronic radiation exposure of bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarmoshenko, Ilia V.; Malinovsky, Georgy P.; Konshina, Lidia G.; Zhukovsky, Michael V. [Institute of Industrial Ecology UB RAS, 620219, 20, Sophy Kovalevskoy St., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Tuzankina, Irina A. [Institute of Immunology and Physiology UB RAS, 620049, 106, Pervomayskaya St., Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    infectious etiology, which are unexpected due to low doses absorbed in those organs and tissues. To analyze the unexpected results recent findings on strong attributability of stomach, liver and cervix cancers to bacterial and viral infections was taken into account. According to IARC, stomach cancer relative risk associated with helicobacter pillory is 5.6, liver cancer relative risks associated with HBV and HCV are 23 and 17 respectively, cervix cancer relative risk associated with HPV is >100. At the same time association of lung cancer, colon cancer and some other common malignancies with infections is either not established or of low significance. To explain observed effects we suggested that excess mortality due to cancer and non-cancer diseases of infectious etiology is associated with radiation exposure of bone marrow due to Sr-90. Irradiation of hematopoietic stem cells and progenitor cells damages hematopoiesis and suppresses the immune response. Secondary immune deficiency induced by chronic radiation increases susceptibility to the bacterial and viral infections. Such late effect of radiation exposure can be considered within the concept of deterministic tissue reactions. (Under support of UB RAS project 12-P-2-1033). (authors)

  1. Radiation plus local hyperthermia versus radiation plus the combination of local and whole-body hyperthermia in canine sarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrall, Donald E.; Prescott, Deborah M.; Samulski, Thaddeus V.; Rosner, Gary L.; Denman, David L.; Legorreta, Roberto L.; Dodge, Richard K.; Page, Rodney L.; Cline, J. Mark; Lee Jihjong; Case, Beth C.; Evans, Sydney M.; Oleson, James R.; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of increasing intratumoral temperatures by the combination of local hyperthermia (LH) and whole body hyperthermia (WBH) on the radiation response of canine sarcomas. Methods and Materials: Dogs with spontaneous soft tissue sarcomas and no evidence of metastasis were randomized to be treated with radiation combined with either LH alone or LH + WBH. Dogs were accessioned for treatment at two institutions. The radiation dose was 56.25 Gy, given in 25 2.25 Gy daily fractions. Two hyperthermia treatments were given; one during the first and one during the last week of treatment. Dogs were evaluated after treatment for local recurrence, metastasis, and complications. Results: Sixty-four dogs were treated between 1989 and 1993. The use of LH+WBH resulted in statistically significant increases in the low and middle regions of the temperature distributions. The largest increase was in the low temperatures with median CEM 43 T90 values of 4 vs. 49 min for LH vs. LH + WBH, respectively (p < 0.001). There was no difference in duration of local tumor control between hyperthermia groups (p = 0.59). The time to metastasis was shorter for dogs receiving LH + WBH (p = 0.02); the hazard ratio for metastatic disease for dogs in the LH + WBH group was 2.5 (95% confidence interval, 1.2-5.4) with respect to dogs in the LH group. Complications were greater in larger tumors and in tumors treated with LH + WBH. Conclusion: The combination of LH + WBH with radiation therapy, as described herein, was not associated with an increase in local tumor control in comparison to use of LH with radiation therapy. The combination of LH + WBH also appeared to alter the biology of the metastatic process and was associated with more complications than LH. We identified no rationale for further study of LH + WBH in combination with radiation for treatment of solid tumors

  2. Impact of late radiation effects on cancer survivor children: an integrative review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coura, Cibeli Fernandes; Modesto, Patrícia Cláudia; Coura, Cibeli Fernandes; Modesto, Patrícia Cláudia

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to identify the late effects of radiation exposure in pediatric cancer survivors. An integrated literature review was performed in the databases MEDLINE and LILACS and SciELO. Included were articles in Portuguese and English, published over the past 10 years, using the following keywords: “neoplasias/neoplasms” AND “radioterapia/radiotherapy” AND “radiação/radiation”. After analysis, 14 articles - published in nine well-known journals - met the inclusion criteria. The publications were divided into two categories: “Late endocrine effects” and “Late non-endocrine effects”. Considering the increased survival rates in children who had cancer, the impact of late effects of exposure to radiation during radiological examinations for diagnosis and treatment was analyzed. Childhood cancer survivors were exposed to several late effects and should be early and regularly followed up, even when exposed to low radiation doses

  3. Impact of late radiation effects on cancer survivor children: an integrative review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coura, Cibeli Fernandes; Modesto, Patrícia Cláudia [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Coura, Cibeli Fernandes; Modesto, Patrícia Cláudia [Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    We aimed to identify the late effects of radiation exposure in pediatric cancer survivors. An integrated literature review was performed in the databases MEDLINE and LILACS and SciELO. Included were articles in Portuguese and English, published over the past 10 years, using the following keywords: “neoplasias/neoplasms” AND “radioterapia/radiotherapy” AND “radiação/radiation”. After analysis, 14 articles - published in nine well-known journals - met the inclusion criteria. The publications were divided into two categories: “Late endocrine effects” and “Late non-endocrine effects”. Considering the increased survival rates in children who had cancer, the impact of late effects of exposure to radiation during radiological examinations for diagnosis and treatment was analyzed. Childhood cancer survivors were exposed to several late effects and should be early and regularly followed up, even when exposed to low radiation doses.

  4. nNOS inhibitors attenuate methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity but not hyperthermia in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzhak, Y; Martin, J L; Ail, S F

    2000-09-11

    Methamphetamine (METH)-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity is associated with hyperthermia. We investigated the effect of several neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) inhibitors on METH-induced hyperthermia and striatal dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Administration of METH (5 mg/kg; q. 3 h x 3) to Swiss Webster mice produced marked hyperthermia and 50-60% depletion of striatal dopaminergic markers 72 h after METH administration. Pretreatment with the nNOS inhibitors S-methylthiocitrulline (SMTC; 10 mg/kg) or 3-bromo-7-nitroindazole (3-Br-7-NI; 20 mg/kg) before each METH injection did not affect the persistent hyperthermia produced by METH, but afforded protection against the depletion of dopaminergic markers. A low dose (25 mg/kg) of the nNOS inhibitor 7-nitroindazole (7-NI) did not affect METH-induced hyperthermia, but a high dose (50 mg/kg) produced significant hypothermia. These findings indicate that low dose of selective nNOS inhibitors protect against METH-induced neurotoxicity with no effect on body temperature and support the hypothesis that nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrite have a major role in METH-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

  5. Contributions of different modes of TRPV1 activation to TRPV1 antagonist-induced hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garami, Andras; Shimansky, Yury P; Pakai, Eszter; Oliveira, Daniela L; Gavva, Narender R; Romanovsky, Andrej A

    2010-01-27

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) antagonists are widely viewed as next-generation pain therapeutics. However, these compounds cause hyperthermia, a serious side effect. TRPV1 antagonists differentially block three modes of TRPV1 activation: by heat, protons, and chemical ligands (e.g., capsaicin). We asked what combination of potencies in these three modes of TRPV1 activation corresponds to the lowest potency of a TRPV1 antagonist to cause hyperthermia. We studied hyperthermic responses of rats, mice, and guinea pigs to eight TRPV1 antagonists with different pharmacological profiles and used mathematical modeling to find a relative contribution of the blockade of each activation mode to the development of hyperthermia. We found that the hyperthermic effect has the highest sensitivity to the extent of TRPV1 blockade in the proton mode (0.43 to 0.65) with no to moderate sensitivity in the capsaicin mode (-0.01 to 0.34) and no sensitivity in the heat mode (0.00 to 0.01). We conclude that hyperthermia-free TRPV1 antagonists do not block TRPV1 activation by protons, even if they are potent blockers of the heat mode, and that decreasing the potency to block the capsaicin mode may further decrease the potency to cause hyperthermia.

  6. Late effects from particulate radiations in primate and rabbit tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lett, J. T.; Cox, A. B.; Bergtold, D. S.; Lee, A. C.; Pickering, J. E.

    Optic tissues in groups of New Zealand white rabbits were irradiated locally at different stages throughout the median life span of the species with a single dose (9 Gy) of 425 MeV/amu Ne ions (LET∞~30 keV/μm) and then inspected routinely for the progression of radiation cataracts. The level of early cataracts was found to be highest in the youngest group of animals irradiated (8 weeks old) but both the onset of late cataracts and loss of vision occurred earlier when animals were irradiated during the second half of the median life span. This age response can have serious implications in terms of space radiation hazards to man. Rhesus monkeys that had been subjected to whole-body skin irradiation (2.8 and 5.6 Gy) by 32 MeV protons (range in tissue ~ 1 cm) some twenty years previously were analysed for radiation damage by the propagation of skin fibroblasts in primary cultures. Such propagation from skin biopsies in MEM-α medium (serial cultivation) or in supplemented Ham's F-10 medium (cultivation without dilution) revealed late damage in the stem (precursor) cells of the skins of the animals. The proton fluxes employed in this experiment are representative of those occurring in major solar flares.

  7. Early and late endocrine effects in pediatric central nervous system diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Ivy R; Cheung, Clement C

    2014-01-01

    Endocrinopathies are frequently linked to central nervous system disease, both as early effects prior to the disease diagnosis and/or late effects after the disease has been treated. In particular, tumors and infiltrative diseases of the brain and pituitary, such as craniopharyngioma, optic pathway and hypothalamic gliomas, intracranial germ cell tumor, and Langerhans cell histiocytosis, can present with abnormal endocrine manifestations that precede the development of neurological symptoms. Early endocrine effects include diabetes insipidus, growth failure, obesity, and precocious or delayed puberty. With improving prognosis and treatment of childhood brain tumors, many survivors experience late endocrine effects related to medical and surgical interventions. Chemotherapeutic agents and radiation therapy can affect the hypothalamic-pituitary axes governing growth, thyroid, gonadal, and adrenal function. In addition, obesity and metabolic alterations are frequent late manifestations. Diagnosing and treating both early and late endocrine manifestations can dramatically improve the growth, well-being, and quality of life of patients with childhood central nervous system diseases.

  8. The late negative episodic memory effect: the effect of recapitulating study details at test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, David; Cycowicz, Yael M; Bersick, Michael

    2005-05-01

    An hypothesis concerning mnemonic function suggests that perceptual details of previously experienced episodes are retrieved from the cortices that initially processed that information during the encoding phase. Cycowicz et al. [Cycowicz, Y.M., Friedman, D. and Snodgrass, J.G., Remembering the color of objects: an ERP investigation of source memory, Cereb Cortex, 11 (2001) 322-334.] have interpreted the presence of a late negative episodic memory (EM) effect, maximal over parieto-occipital scalp, as a brain signature of the search for and/or retrieval/evaluation of the specific perceptual source-specifying attributes (i.e., color) of pictures in the visual cortical regions that were recruited during the encoding of that information. The present study assessed the validity of this hypothesis. Twelve participants studied pictures outlined in red or green and were subsequently tested with inclusion (i.e., item; old or new regardless of color) and exclusion (i.e., source; same color, different color/new judgments) tasks. In both, old pictures were presented either in the same color as at study or in the alternate color. A late negative, parieto-occipital EM effect was of much larger amplitude in the source compared to the item task. It was of similar magnitude to correctly recognized pictures whose colors were identical at study and test relative to those whose colors changed, and was not modulated by the success or failure of the source retrieval. These data run counter to the initial hypothesis that the late negative EM effect reflects the search for and/or retrieval of specific perceptual attributes such as color. Rather, the late negative EM effect may reflect the search for and/or retrieval/evaluation of more general source-specifying information in the cortical regions that initially processed the stimuli.

  9. Simultaneous hyperthermia and doxorubicin delivery from polymer-coated magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iglesias, G.R., E-mail: iglesias@ugr.es [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain); Delgado, A.V.; González-Caballero, F. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain); Ramos-Tejada, M.M. [Department of Physics, University of Jaén, Linares 23700 (Spain)

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the hyperthermia response, (i.e., heating induced by an externally applied alternating magnetic field) and the simultaneous release of an anti-cancer drug (doxorubicin) by polymer-coated magnetite nanoparticles have been investigated. After describing the setup for hyperthermia measurements in suspensions of magnetic nanoparticles, the hyperthermia (represented by the rate of suspension heating and, ultimately, by the specific absorption rate or SAR) of magnetite nanoparticles (both bare and polymer-coated as drug nanocarriers) is discussed. The effect of the applied ac magnetic field on doxorubicin release is also studied, and it is concluded that the field does not interfere with the release process, demonstrating the double functionality of the investigated particles. - Highlights: • Magnetite NPs coated with polymers are used for drug delivery and hyperthermia. • The SAR of polyelectrolyte-coated NPs is larger because of their improved stability. • The antitumor drug doxorubicin is adsorbed on the coated particles. • The release rate of the drug is not affected by the ac magnetic field used in hyperthermia.

  10. Magnetic hyperthermia of laponite based ferrofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamantopoulos, G., E-mail: gior15@ims.demokritos.gr [Institute of Materials Science, National Centre for Scientific Research ‘Demokritos’, 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Basina, G.; Tzitzios, V.; Karakosta, E.; Fardis, M. [Institute of Materials Science, National Centre for Scientific Research ‘Demokritos’, 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece); Jaglicic, Z. [University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Civil Engineering and Geodesy and Institute of Mathematics, Physics and Mechanics, Jadranska 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lazaridis, N. [Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Chemistry Department, 54124 Thessaloniki (Greece); Papavassiliou, G. [Institute of Materials Science, National Centre for Scientific Research ‘Demokritos’, 153 10 Aghia Paraskevi, Athens (Greece)

    2013-06-15

    Magnetic Hyperthermia experiments have been performed on different concentrations of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles immobilized on nano-clay disks. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was measured in AC field amplitudes H{sub 0} from 7 to 30 kA/m. At low field amplitudes, SAR followed the usual H{sub 0}{sup 2} law whereas for higher field amplitudes a linear dependence was found for the higher concentrations. Measurements at three different field amplitudes were also performed for a wide range of iron oxide concentrations in order to determine the effect of the Brownian relaxation time to SAR. A field dependent maximum was observed and for fields up to 20 kA/m the power dissipation losses were well explained according to theoretical predictions. - Highlights: ► Influence of the AC field to the specific absorption rates (SAR). ► Transition point from the expected square dependence to a linear law between SAR and AC field amplitude. ► A field dependent maximum of the SAR values versus iron oxide concentration is observed. ► Experimental validation of the existing theoretical work.

  11. Decreasing Irradiated Rat Lung Volume Changes Dose-Limiting Toxicity From Early to Late Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veen, Sonja J. van der; Faber, Hette; Ghobadi, Ghazaleh [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Brandenburg, Sytze [KVI Center for Advanced Radiation Research, University of Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Coppes, Robert P. [Department of Cell Biology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Luijk, Peter van, E-mail: p.van.luijk@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Technological developments in radiation therapy result in smaller irradiated volumes of normal tissue. Because the risk of radiation therapy-induced toxicity generally depends on irradiated volume, changing volume could change the dose-limiting toxicity of a treatment. Recently, in our rat model, we found that early radiation-induced lung dysfunction (RILD) was closely related to irradiated volume dependent vascular remodeling besides inflammation. The exact relationship between early and late RILD is still unknown. Therefore, in this preclinical study we investigated the dose-volume relationship of late RILD, assessed its dependence on early and late pathologies and studied if decreasing irradiated volume changed the dose-limiting toxicity. Methods and Materials: A volume of 25%, 32%, 50%, 63%, 88%, or 100% of the rat lung was irradiated using protons. Until 26 weeks after irradiation, respiratory rates were measured. Macrovascular remodeling, pulmonary inflammation, and fibrosis were assessed at 26 weeks after irradiation. For all endpoints dose-volume response curves were made. These results were compared to our previously published early lung effects. Results: Early vascular remodeling and inflammation correlated significantly with early RILD. Late RILD correlated with inflammation and fibrosis, but not with vascular remodeling. In contrast to the early effects, late vascular remodeling, inflammation and fibrosis showed a primarily dose but not volume dependence. Comparison of respiratory rate increases early and late after irradiation for the different dose-distributions indicated that with decreasing irradiated volumes, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late RILD. Conclusions: In our rat model, different pathologies underlie early and late RILD with different dose-volume dependencies. Consequently, the dose-limiting toxicity changed from early to late dysfunction when the irradiated volume was reduced. In patients, early and late

  12. Thermo-radiosensitivity of the granulocyte and macrophage precursor cells of mice. I.-Development of the in vivo culture and effects induced by the hyperthermia; Termo-radiosensibilidad del precursor hematopoyetico que origina las series granulocitica y macrofaga de raton. I.- Desarrollo del cultivo in vivo y efectos producidos por la hipertermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueren, J A; Nieto, M

    1983-07-01

    The present report shows the agar diffusion chamber technique for culturing granulocyte- macrophage precursor cells, obtained from mice bone marrow. Diffusion chambers containing the bone marrow suspension are implanted intraperitoneally Into mice and constitute a compartment which avoids the migration of cells, but allows the transit of the mouse biological fluxes, necessary for the cellular proliferation. By means of this technique, we studied the lethal effects of the hyperthermia on the precursors and their capacity to repair sublethal damage. (Author) 129 refs.

  13. Functional challenges among late effects cancer survivors: a preliminary report on work engagement issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crist, Patricia

    2013-01-01

    While the cancer survivor rate is nearly 68% now, intervention regimens may leave residual conditions that impact engagement in work and various life tasks. Survivors are underemployed and report stigmatizing attitudes among co-workers. When late effects from cancer arise over 10 years later, the impact on individuals in the prime of their productive employment life is evident. Assisting these individuals begins with awareness of late effects in order to create work-related, adaptive strategies. Sixteen adult cancer survivors experiencing late effects completed the Occupational Self Assessment (Version 2.2) and the Quality of Life-Cancer Survivors (QOL-CS). Knowledge of functional problems secondary to recognized late effects medical conditions reported in the literature was utilized to sort items according to professional definitions of work, performance skills and performance patterns. Late effects survivors reported that cancer illness and treatment has negatively impacted their employment. Individual response to the impact of late effects is highly variant. "Getting things done" and physical energy limitations are most pronounced. Cancer survivors report lower competence in significant work-related skills and patterns. Quality of life associated with the aftereffects of fatigue, aches and pain, and sleep changes are the lowest. Responses range across the 16 survivors to both performance skills and performance patterns. Cancer survivorship has clearly interfered with employment. An interdisciplinary focus on meaningful engagement in life activities, particularly work is crucial to support survivors through advocacy, adaptation and positive change to focus on engaging the work talents and gifts for all cancer survivors.

  14. Local hyperthermia and artificial hyperglycemia in combined treatment of patients with rectum cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezmen, V.A.; Illarionov, A.A.; Novokhrost, V.I.; Shilov, N.I.; Ospishchev, A.A.; Kejs, G.D.

    1990-01-01

    To study prospects of application of local hyperthermia, artificial hyperglycemia and radiotherapy in a preoperative period, 31 patients with rectum cancer were studied. The treatment included 3-hour artificial hyperglycemia first, then local SHF hyperthermia and telegamma irradiation using large-fractioned doses (ROD is 5 Gy, COD is 20 Gy). No serious side-effects were observed during the preoperative treatment period. The immediate and early results of combined treatment promise to improve the effectiveness of treatment of patients with rectum cancer. 3 refs

  15. Luminescence properties of Sm"3"+ doped YPO_4: Effect of solvent, heat-treatment, Ca"2"+/W"6"+-co-doping and its hyperthermia application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, Dimple P.; Ningthoujam, R. S.; Tyagi, A. K.

    2012-01-01

    Sm"3"+ doped YPO_4 spherical nanoparticles are prepared by wet chemical route. Pure YPO_4 shows the tetragonal phase, which is stable up to 900 °C, whereas pure SmPO_4 shows the phase transition from hexagonal to monoclinic when heated above 800 °C. The (2-10 at.%) Sm"3"+ doped YPO_4 shows the mixture of phases of tetragonal and hexagonal, which transform to the tetragonal phase above 800 °C. Infra-red study could distinguish confined water in the pore of hexagonal phase from water present on the surface of particles. Luminescence intensities of Sm"3"+ at 564, 601 and 645 nm are weak in case of as-prepared samples because of high non-radiative rate arising from the H_2O molecules present in pores of hexagonal lattice. The intensities increase for samples heated up to 900 °C because of increase of extent of radiative rate. Luminescence lifetime increases with increase of heat-treatment up to 900 °C. When solvent of as-prepared sample was changed from the H_2O to D_2O, 5 times enhancement in luminescence intensity is observed, which can be ascribed to the lower vibration energy of D-O over H-O, which is near to Sm"3"+. When Y"3"+ and P"5"+ ions are substituted by Ca"3"+ and W"3"+ up to 3 at.%, there is an enhancement of luminescence. In order to use them as bio-labeling in drug delivery for hyperthermia applications, hybrid of Fe_3O_4@YPO_4:7Sm is prepared and heating up to 45 °C is observed under AC magnetic field.

  16. Late effects of x-irradiation in rats, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankovic-Stejin, V.D.; Kanazir, D.T.

    1978-01-01

    The present cytogenetic study was made on the bone marrow cells of 48 male rats killed after 9 to 17 months following acute whole-body x-irradiation. We found that exposure to a dose of 700 rads of x-rays, delivered to animals at a high dose-rate (100 rads/min) resulted in a widespread karyotype variability. The number of cell types were existing independently in the haemopoietic tissue within the first week after irradiation, decreased with time. The selection process of persisting abnormalities as well a further evolution of the cells with new karyotypes to clones, were evident after a month following irradiation. Consequently, the analysis of haemopoietic tissue revealed, in 92% of the late survivors, a genetically heterogeneous cell population in which the number of normal diploid cells decreased to a considerable extent. Clones increased in size with elapsing time from exposure to radiation. Thus, the mean clone cell frequency for animals killed after 9 to 17 months following irradiation ranged from 20.6 +- 3.42% to 61.6 +- 4.26%. Analysis of the data showed a significant positive correlation between development of clones in vivo and the survival time after irradiation (r = 0.820; P<0.01). For such a finding, the occurrence of large clones especially in the bone marrow of rats with growing tumors was of the great influence. Relationship between the degree of mutagenesis on the chromosome level and the process of tumor advancement is discussed. (auth.)

  17. Hyperthermia enhances mapatumumab-induced apoptotic death through ubiquitin-mediated degradation of cellular FLIP(long) in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, X; Kim, S-Y; Zhou, Z; Lagasse, E; Kwon, Y T; Lee, Y J

    2013-04-04

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world; the main cause of death of colorectal cancer is hepatic metastases, which can be treated with hyperthermia using isolated hepatic perfusion (IHP). In this study, we report that mild hyperthermia potently reduced cellular FLIP(long), (c-FLIP(L)), a major regulator of the death receptor (DR) pathway of apoptosis, thereby enhancing humanized anti-DR4 antibody mapatumumab (Mapa)-mediated mitochondria-independent apoptosis. We observed that overexpression of c-FLIP(L) in CX-1 cells abrogated the synergistic effect of Mapa and hyperthermia, whereas silencing of c-FLIP in CX-1 cells enhanced Mapa-induced apoptosis. Hyperthermia altered c-FLIP(L) protein stability without concomitant reductions in FLIP mRNA. Ubiquitination of c-FLIP(L) was increased by hyperthermia, and proteasome inhibitor MG132 prevented heat-induced downregulation of c-FLIP(L). These results suggest the involvement of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in this process. We also found lysine residue 195 (K195) to be essential for c-FLIP(L) ubiquitination and proteolysis, as mutant c-FLIP(L) lysine 195 arginine (arginine replacing lysine) was left virtually un-ubiquitinated and was refractory to hyperthermia-triggered degradation, and thus partially blocked the synergistic effect of Mapa and hyperthermia. Our observations reveal that hyperthermia transiently reduced c-FLIP(L) by proteolysis linked to K195 ubiquitination, which contributed to the synergistic effect between Mapa and hyperthermia. This study supports the application of hyperthermia combined with other regimens to treat colorectal hepatic metastases.

  18. Clinical study of suppository delivery of 5-fluorouracil and pathological effects on metastatic lymph nodes caused by preoperative combined treatment with radiation, intraluminal hyperthermia and 5-fluorouracil suppository in rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Takaaki [Kyoto Prefectural Univ. of Medicine (Japan)

    1997-11-01

    Preoperative combined treatment with radiation, intraluminal hyperthermia, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) suppository has been reported effective in shrinking locally advanced rectal cancers and facilitating subsequent surgery. Suppository and intravenous 5-FU administration were compared with respect to tissue concentrations in rectal cancer cases. Just before the operation patients received 100 mg of 5-FU via suppository or intravenously. Portal and systemic blood, tumor tissue, normal mucosa and muscle layer separately at 5, 10, 15 cm in the oral direction from the tumor and the pararectal lymph node were harvested for high-performance liquid chromatography determination of 5-FU concentrations. Rectal 5-FU concentrations were significantly higher in the suppository cases compared with the intravenously administrated ones. Suppository distributed more 5-FU at pararectal lymph nodes than intravenous injection. This fact revealed 5-FU suppositories to be a useful drug delivery system for rectal cancer. The pathological effects on metastatic lymph nodes caused by combined treatment were evaluated in 22 cases. Normal lymph nodes showed congestion only. Fibrotic and necrotic changes were characteristic of damaged metastatic areas. In 6 cases (27.3%), no metastatic cells were detected on fibrotically changed areas. The down staging of the lymph node metastatic factor was carried out by preoperative combined treatment. High concentrations of 5-FU at mucosa could suggest the usefulness of 5-FU suppository administration just before operation for prevention of suture-line implantation. (author)

  19. Clinical study of suppository delivery of 5-fluorouracil and pathological effects on metastatic lymph nodes caused by preoperative combined treatment with radiation, intraluminal hyperthermia and 5-fluorouracil suppository in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Takaaki

    1997-01-01

    Preoperative combined treatment with radiation, intraluminal hyperthermia, and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) suppository has been reported effective in shrinking locally advanced rectal cancers and facilitating subsequent surgery. Suppository and intravenous 5-FU administration were compared with respect to tissue concentrations in rectal cancer cases. Just before the operation patients received 100 mg of 5-FU via suppository or intravenously. Portal and systemic blood, tumor tissue, normal mucosa and muscle layer separately at 5, 10, 15 cm in the oral direction from the tumor and the pararectal lymph node were harvested for high-performance liquid chromatography determination of 5-FU concentrations. Rectal 5-FU concentrations were significantly higher in the suppository cases compared with the intravenously administrated ones. Suppository distributed more 5-FU at pararectal lymph nodes than intravenous injection. This fact revealed 5-FU suppositories to be a useful drug delivery system for rectal cancer. The pathological effects on metastatic lymph nodes caused by combined treatment were evaluated in 22 cases. Normal lymph nodes showed congestion only. Fibrotic and necrotic changes were characteristic of damaged metastatic areas. In 6 cases (27.3%), no metastatic cells were detected on fibrotically changed areas. The down staging of the lymph node metastatic factor was carried out by preoperative combined treatment. High concentrations of 5-FU at mucosa could suggest the usefulness of 5-FU suppository administration just before operation for prevention of suture-line implantation. (author)

  20. An ultrasonic phased array applicator for deep localized hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocheltree, K.B.; Benkeser, P.J.; Foster, S.G.; Frizzell, L.A.; Cain, C.A.

    1984-01-01

    The use of an ultrasonic phased array applicator presents a major advantage over the fixed beam ultrasonic applicators which are typically used for clinical hyperthermia. Such an applicator allows focal region placement in the three dimensional treatment field by electronic steering instead of mechanical movement of the transducer assembly. The design of an array is discussed theoretically, considering that the constraints on grating lobes and power output for hyperthermic applications are quite different from those for imaging. The effects of various design parameters are discussed. Experimental results are presented for several arrays for frequencies under 1 Mhz

  1. Boron-doped nanodiamonds as possible agents for local hyperthermia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vervald, A. M.; Burikov, S. A.; Vlasov, I. I.; Ekimov, E. A.; Shenderova, O. A.; Dolenko, T. A.

    2017-04-01

    In this work, the effective heating of surrounding water by heavily-boron-doped nanodiamonds (NDs) under laser irradiation of visible wavelength was found. Using Raman scattering spectroscopy of aqueous suspensions of boron-doped NDs, it was found that this abnormally high heating results in the weakening of hydrogen bonds much more so (2-5 times stronger) than for undoped NDs. The property of boron-doped NDs to heat a solvent under the influence of laser radiation (1-5 W cm-2) opens broad prospects for their use to create nanoagents for medical oncology and local hyperthermia.

  2. Hyperthermia: Clinical promise and current challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapp, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Local-regional hyperthermia (HT) when used in conjunction with radiation therapy (XRT), has been shown in numerous clinical trials to result in considerable improvement in response rates and local tumor control rates when compared with treatment by XRT alone. Although considerable progress has been made in understanding the biological basis for hyperthermia induced cytotoxicity and radiosensitization, additional research remains in establishing the optimal treatment schedules for the clinical utilization of HT-XRT. The number of HT treatments; the sequencing of HT and XRT; the frequency of administration of HT; and the ideal temperature-time parameters all remain to be better defined for the clinical setting. The role of tumor blood flow on the thermal distributions also warrants further investigation. In addition, considerable effort is needed to improve hyperthermia equipment in order to provide more uniform therapeutic temperature distributions (temperatures ≥42.5%C). Better heating equipment is particularly needed for the treatment of deep seeted tumors. Pertinent clinical literature will be presented summarizing the clinical promise of hyperthermia and the above mentioned clinical challenges

  3. Long-Term Improvement in Treatment Outcome After Radiotherapy and Hyperthermia in Locoregionally Advanced Cervix Cancer: An Update of the Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franckena, Martine; Stalpers, Lukas J.A.; Koper, Peter C.M.; Wiggenraad, Ruud G.J.; Hoogenraad, Wim J.; Dijk, Jan D.P. van; Warlam-Rodenhuis, Carla C.; Jobsen, Jan J.; Rhoon, Gerard C. van; Zee, Jacoba van der

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The local failure rate in patients with locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is 41-72% after radiotherapy (RT) alone, whereas local control is a prerequisite for cure. The Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial showed that combining RT with hyperthermia (HT) improved 3-year local control rates of 41-61%, as we reported earlier. In this study, we evaluate long-term results of the Dutch Deep Hyperthermia Trial after 12 years of follow-up. Methods and Materials: From 1990 to 1996, a total of 114 women with locoregionally advanced cervical carcinoma were randomly assigned to RT or RT + HT. The RT was applied to a median total dose of 68 Gy. The HT was given once weekly. The primary end point was local control. Secondary end points were overall survival and late toxicity. Results: At the 12-year follow-up, local control remained better in the RT + HT group (37% vs. 56%; p = 0.01). Survival was persistently better after 12 years: 20% (RT) and 37% (RT + HT; p = 0.03). World Health Organization (WHO) performance status was a significant prognostic factor for local control. The WHO performance status, International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage, and tumor diameter were significant for survival. The benefit of HT remained significant after correction for these factors. European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Grade 3 or higher radiation-induced late toxicities were similar in both groups. Conclusions: For locoregionally advanced cervical cancer, the addition of HT to RT resulted in long-term major improvement in local control and survival without increasing late toxicity. This combined treatment should be considered for patients who are unfit to receive chemotherapy. For other patients, the optimal treatment strategy is the subject of ongoing research

  4. Radiofrequency hyperthermia for advanced malignant liver tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Y.; Okuno, Y.; Mitsumori, M.; Akuta, K.; Nishimura, Y.; Masunaga, S.; Kanamori, S.; Fujishiro, M.; Hiraoka, M.; Takahashi, M.; Abe, M.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate thermometry and the clinical results of radiofrequency (RF) thermotherapy for advanced malignant liver tumors. Materials and Methods One-hundred and seventy-three patients with malignant liver tumors treated between 1983 and 1995 underwent hyperthermia. Surgery were contraindicated in all patients. The 173 tumors consisted of 114 hepatocellular carcinomas(HCCs), and 59 non-HCCs(45 metastatic liver tumors and 12 cholangiocarcinomas). Eight MHz RF capacitive heating equipment was used for hyperthermia. Two opposing 25-cm or 30-cm electrodes were generally used for heating liver tumors. Our standard protocol was to administer hyperthermia 40-50 minutes twice a week to a total of 8 sessions. Temperature of the liver tumor was measured by microthermocouples. In each patient, a single catheter was inserted into the liver tumor through the normal liver. Transcatheter arterial embolization, radiotherapy, immunotherapy, and chemotherapy were combined with hyperthermia depending on the patient's liver function and tumor location. The therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by the change in tumor size assessed by computed tomography (CT) three or four months after the completion of treatment. Results One-hundred and forty (81%) of 173 patients underwent hyperthermia more than 4 times. Thermometry could be performed in 77(55%) of these 140 patients. Neither systolic nor diastolic blood pressure changed significantly after hyperthermia. However, pulse rate significantly increased from 82.8 ± 1.1 to 96.5 ± 1.3 beats/min. Only 21 patients (11%) showed a decrease in pulse rate after hyperthermia. Body temperature increased from 36.3 ±0.1 to 37.4±0.2 after hyperthermia. Sequelae of hyperthermia included focal fat burning in 20 (12%), gastric ulceration in 4 (2%), and liver necrosis in 1(1%). Sequelae of thermometry were severe peritoneal pain in 7 (11%), intraperitoneal hematoma in 1(1%), and pneumothorax in one (1%) patient. The maximal tumor temperature

  5. Late adverse effects of radiation therapy for rectal cancer - a systematic overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birgisson, Helgi; Paahlman, Lars; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Glimelius, Bengt

    2007-01-01

    Purpose. The use of radiation therapy (RT) together with improvement in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer improves survival and reduces the risk for local recurrences. Despite these benefits, the adverse effects of radiation therapy limit its use. The aim of this review was to present a comprehensive overview of published studies on late adverse effects related to the RT for rectal cancer. Methods. Meta-analyses, reviews, randomised clinical trials, cohort studies and case-control studies on late adverse effects, due to pre- or postoperative radiation therapy and chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer, were systematically searched. Most information was obtained from the randomised trials, especially those comparing preoperative short-course 5x5 Gy radiation therapy with surgery alone. Results. The late adverse effects due to RT were bowel obstructions; bowel dysfunction presented as faecal incontinence to gas, loose or solid stools, evacuation problems or urgency; and sexual dysfunction. However, fewer late adverse effects were reported in recent studies, which generally used smaller irradiated volumes and better irradiation techniques; although, one study revealed an increased risk for secondary cancers in irradiated patients. Conclusions. These results stress the importance of careful patient selection for RT for rectal cancer. Improvements in the radiation technique should further be developed and the long-term follow-up of the randomised trials is the most important source of information on late adverse effects and should therefore be continued

  6. Late adverse effects of radiation therapy for rectal cancer - a systematic overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birgisson, Helgi; Paahlman, Lars; Gunnarsson, Ulf [Dept. of Surgery, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Glimelius, Bengt [Dept. of Oncology, Radiology and Clinical Immunology, Univ. Hospital, Univ. of Uppsala, Uppsala (Sweden); Dept. of Oncology and Pathology, Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-05-15

    Purpose. The use of radiation therapy (RT) together with improvement in the surgical treatment of rectal cancer improves survival and reduces the risk for local recurrences. Despite these benefits, the adverse effects of radiation therapy limit its use. The aim of this review was to present a comprehensive overview of published studies on late adverse effects related to the RT for rectal cancer. Methods. Meta-analyses, reviews, randomised clinical trials, cohort studies and case-control studies on late adverse effects, due to pre- or postoperative radiation therapy and chemo-radiotherapy for rectal cancer, were systematically searched. Most information was obtained from the randomised trials, especially those comparing preoperative short-course 5x5 Gy radiation therapy with surgery alone. Results. The late adverse effects due to RT were bowel obstructions; bowel dysfunction presented as faecal incontinence to gas, loose or solid stools, evacuation problems or urgency; and sexual dysfunction. However, fewer late adverse effects were reported in recent studies, which generally used smaller irradiated volumes and better irradiation techniques; although, one study revealed an increased risk for secondary cancers in irradiated patients. Conclusions. These results stress the importance of careful patient selection for RT for rectal cancer. Improvements in the radiation technique should further be developed and the long-term follow-up of the randomised trials is the most important source of information on late adverse effects and should therefore be continued.

  7. Late effects of normal tissues (lent) scoring system: the soma scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mornex, F.; Pavy, J.J.; Denekamp, J.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation tolerance of normal tissues remains the limiting factor for delivering tumoricidal dose. The late toxicity of normal tissues is the most critical element of an irradiation: somatic, functional and structural alterations occur during the actual treatment itself, but late effects manifest months to years after acute effects heal, and may progress with time. The optimal therapeutic ratio ultimately requires not only complete tumor clearance, but also minimal residual injury to surrounding vital normal tissues. The disparity between the intensity of acute and late effects and the inability to predict the eventual manifestation of late normal tissue injury has made radiation oncologists recognize the importance of careful patient follow-up. There is so far no uniform toxicity scoring system to compare several clinical studies in the absence of a 'common toxicity language'. This justifies the need to establish a precise evaluation system for the analysis of late effects of radiation on normal tissues. The SOMA/LENT scoring system results from an international collaboration. European Organization Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) have created subcommittees with the aim of addressing the question of standardized toxic effects criteria. This effort appeared as a necessity to standardize and improve the data recording, to then describe and evaluate uniform toxicity at regular time intervals. The current proposed scale is not yet validated, and should be used cautiously. (authors)

  8. Early and Late Side Effects Associated with Photo(chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günseli Öztürk

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Phototherapy (PUVA ve UVB is a widely used and effective treatment method for a variety of dermatological diseases. Adverse effects associated with phototherapy can be classified as acute and chronic side effects. Acute side effects are mostly related with UV doses and drug intolerance, and include itching, nausea, erythema, edema and phototoxic reactions that sometimes blister formation is seen. Acute side effects are usually moderate and transient. Chronic side effects of phototherapy are early aging of skin, pigmentary changes and increased risk of skin carcinogenesis. The major concern is development of skin cancer. This risk is especially related to long-term exposure and high cumulative doses of PUVA, increase in time and is persistent. Therefore, risk/advantage ratio of phototherapy should be carefully evaluated in each patient, and treatment protocols with minimal UV exposure should be chosen according to the phototherapy guides. Follow-up of the patients for long terms is important in prevention or in reduction of this risk by detecting and treating any premalignant or malignant lesion early. In this article, acute and chronic side effects of phototherapy are reviewed with recent literature findings.

  9. Re-irradiation of the chest wall for local breast cancer recurrence. Results of salvage brachytherapy with hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auoragh, A. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Hospital Fuerth, Department of Radiation Oncology, Fuerth (Germany); Strnad, V.; Ott, O.J.; Fietkau, R. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Beckmann, M.W. [University Hospital Erlangen, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    Following mastectomy and adjuvant external beam radiation therapy in patients with breast cancer, the incidence of local or locoregional recurrence is approximately 9 % (2-20 %). Alongside the often limited possibilities of surgical treatment, radiation therapy combined with superficial hyperthermia is the most effective local therapy. In the present work, a retrospective analysis of salvage brachytherapy combined with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is presented. Between 2004 and 2011, 18 patients with a total of 23 target volumes resulting from chest wall recurrences after previously mastectomy and external beam radiation therapy (median 56 Gy, range 50-68 Gy) were treated with superficial brachytherapy as salvage treatment: 8 patients (44 %) had macroscopic tumor, 3 (17 %) had microscopic tumor (R1), and 7 (39 %) had undergone R0 resection and were treated due to risk factors. A dose of 50 Gy was given (high-dose rate [HDR] and pulsed-dose rate [PDR] procedures). In all, 5 of 23 patients (22 %) received additional concurrent chemotherapy, and in 20 of 23 (87 %) target volumes additional superficial hyperthermia was carried out twice weekly. The 5-year local recurrence-free survival was 56 %, the disease-free survival was 28 %, and a 5-year overall survival was 22 %. Late side effects Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC) grade 3 were reported in 17 % of the patients: 2 of 18 (11 %) had CTC grade 3 fibrosis, and 1 of 18 (6 %) had a chronic wound healing disorder. Re-irradiation as salvage brachytherapy with superficial hyperthermia for chest wall recurrences is a feasible and safe treatment with good local control results and acceptable late side effects. (orig.) [German] Nach einer Mastektomie und adjuvanter Strahlentherapie bei Patientinnen mit Mammakarzinom kommt es bei 9 % (2-20 %) zum lokalen bzw. lokoregionaeren Rezidiv. Neben den oft limitierten operativen Behandlungsmoeglichkeiten ist die Strahlentherapie mit Oberflaechenhyperthermie die

  10. Late health effects of radiation for Eustachian tube dysfunction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verduijn, P.G.

    1988-01-01

    A non-concurrent cohort study is described in which the effects of the Crowe therapy were examined with regard to the health of a population of persons who were irradiated in their youth. 284 refs.; 16 figs.; 45 tabs

  11. narrow sense heritability and gene effects for late leaf spot

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    (33-55%) and protein (19- 31%) (Jambunathan,. 1991; Shilpa et ... information on non-allelic interactions for LLS resistance in ..... molecular breeding for rust resistance in groundnut ... Comperative simulation studies on the effect of selection.

  12. Narrow sense heritability and gene effects for late leaf spot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SM 03590, Valencia C × ICGV-SM 02501 and NuMex-M3 × ICGV-SM 02501 crosses, respectively. Both additive and dominance gene effects contributed significantly to the inheritance of LLS resistance in all the crosses, except in Redbeauty ...

  13. The Perception of Physical Activity in Ambulatory Persons with Late Effects of Polio: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winberg, Cecilia; Carlsson, Gunilla; Brogårdh, Christina; Lexell, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Maintaining regular physical activity (PA) can be challenging for persons with late effects of polio. This qualitative study of ambulatory persons with late effects of polio explored their perceptions of PA, as well as facilitators of and barriers to PA. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 persons and analyzed with content analysis using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) as a framework. The participants described positive perceptions of PA and its health benefits. PA was used to prevent further decline in functioning, and the type and frequency of activities had changed over time. Past experiences and personal characteristics impacted PA. Support from close relatives, knowledgeable health care professionals, mobility devices, and accessible environments facilitated PA, whereas impairments, inaccessible environments, and cold weather were the main barriers. To perform PA regularly, persons with late effects of polio may benefit from individualized advice based on their disability and personal and environmental factors.

  14. Combination of hyperthermia and radiation in the treatment of experimental tumours in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, W.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of hyperthermia as a single agent and in interaction with ionizing radiation are investigated on tumours in mice. The degree of enhancement of the radiation reaction by heat proved to be similar to that found for mouse skin. (Auth.)

  15. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 2. Normal tissue specific sites and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S. [Univ. Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Marks, Lawrence B. (ed.) [Univ. North Carolina and Lineberger, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-09-01

    Comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue sites in the human body. Considers in detail the detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects and discusses prognostic outcomes. Clearly presents radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects. Provides the most current evidence-based medicine for cancer care survivorship guidelines. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 2 of this two-volume work comprehensively documents potential late effects in all the normal tissue anatomic sites in the human body. The detection, diagnosis, management and prevention of effects are all considered in detail, and prognostic outcomes are discussed. Radiation risk factors and interactions with chemotherapy effects are clearly presented. The text is accompanied by numerous supportive illustrations and tables.

  16. Experimental animal data and modeling of late somatic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1988-01-01

    This section is restricted to radiation-induced life shortening and cancer and mainly to studies with external radiation. The emphasis will be on the experimental data that are available and the experimental systems that could provide the type of data with which to either formulate or test models. Genetic effects which are of concern are not discussed in this section. Experimental animal radiation studies fall into those that establish general principles and those that demonstrate mechanisms. General principles include the influence of dose, radiation quality, dose rate, fractionation, protraction and such biological factors as age and gender. The influence of these factors are considered as general principles because they are independent, at least qualitatively, of the species studied. For example, if an increase in the LET of the radiation causes an increased effectiveness in cancer induction in a mouse a comparable increase in effectiveness can be expected in humans. Thus, models, whether empirical or mechanistic, formulated from experimental animal data should be generally applicable

  17. Late effects of breast cancer treatment and potentials for rehabilitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ewertz, Marianne (Dept. of Oncology, Odense Univ. Hospital, Odense (Denmark)); Bonde Jensen, Anders (Inst. of Clinical Research, Univ. of Southern Denmark (Denmark))

    2011-02-15

    Background. Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant disease among women world wide. Survival has been improving leading to an increasing number of breast cancer survivors, in the US estimated to about 2.6 million. Material and methods. The literature was reviewed with focus on data from the Nordic countries. Results. Local therapies such as breast cancer surgery and radiotherapy may cause persistent pain in the breast area, arm, and shoulder reported by 30-50% of patients after three to five years, lymphedema in 15-25% of patients, and restrictions of arm and shoulder movement in 35%. Physiotherapy is the standard treatment for the latter while no pain intervention trials have been published. Chemotherapy may cause infertility and premature menopause, resulting in vasomotor symptoms, sexual dysfunction, and osteoporosis, which are similar to the side effects of endocrine treatment in postmenopausal women. Awareness of cardiotoxicity is needed since anthracyclines, trastuzumab, and radiotherapy can damage the heart. Breast cancer survivors have an increased risk of a major depression and far from all receive adequate anti-depressive treatment. Other psychological symptoms include fear of recurrence, sleep disturbances, cognitive problems, fatigue, and sexual problems. Discussion. To improve rehabilitation, specific goals have to be formulated into national guidelines and high priority directed towards research into developing and testing new interventions for alleviating symptoms and side effects experienced by breast cancer survivors

  18. Late effects of breast cancer treatment and potentials for rehabilitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ewertz, Marianne; Bonde Jensen, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Background. Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant disease among women world wide. Survival has been improving leading to an increasing number of breast cancer survivors, in the US estimated to about 2.6 million. Material and methods. The literature was reviewed with focus on data from the Nordic countries. Results. Local therapies such as breast cancer surgery and radiotherapy may cause persistent pain in the breast area, arm, and shoulder reported by 30-50% of patients after three to five years, lymphedema in 15-25% of patients, and restrictions of arm and shoulder movement in 35%. Physiotherapy is the standard treatment for the latter while no pain intervention trials have been published. Chemotherapy may cause infertility and premature menopause, resulting in vasomotor symptoms, sexual dysfunction, and osteoporosis, which are similar to the side effects of endocrine treatment in postmenopausal women. Awareness of cardiotoxicity is needed since anthracyclines, trastuzumab, and radiotherapy can damage the heart. Breast cancer survivors have an increased risk of a major depression and far from all receive adequate anti-depressive treatment. Other psychological symptoms include fear of recurrence, sleep disturbances, cognitive problems, fatigue, and sexual problems. Discussion. To improve rehabilitation, specific goals have to be formulated into national guidelines and high priority directed towards research into developing and testing new interventions for alleviating symptoms and side effects experienced by breast cancer survivors

  19. Mild hyperthermia can induce adaptation to cytogenetic damage caused by subsequent X irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Lu.; Jiang, Jie.

    1995-01-01

    Many low-level environmental agents are able to induce an increased resistance to subsequent mutagenic effects induced by ionizing radiation. In this paper, an induced cytogenetic adaptation to radiation in human lymphocytes was studied with mild hyperthermia as the adaptive treatment and compared with that induced by low-dose radiation. We found that this adaptation could be induced not only in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes (at 14, 38 and 42 h after addition of PHA), but also in unstimulated G 0 -phase cells (before addition of PHA) by mild hyperthermia (41 degrees C for 1 h) as well as 50 mGy X rays. When the two adaptive treatments were combined, no additive effects on the magnitude of the adaptation induced were observed, suggesting that low-dose radiation and hyperthermia may share one mechanism of induction of adaptation to cytogenetic damage. Some mechanisms which may be involved in the induction of adaptation to cytogenetic damage by low-dose radiation are discussed and compared with the effects of mild hyperthermia in inducing thermotolerance and radioresistance. 56 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  20. Late effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brilliant, M.D.; Vorob'ev, A.I.; Gogin, E.E.

    1987-01-01

    One of the most important problems, being stated before the medicine by the accident, which took place in Chernobyl in 1986- the problem of the so-called ionizing radiation low dose effect on a man's organism, is considered because a lot of people were subjected to low dose action. The concept of low doses of radiaion action and specificity of its immediate action in comparison with high dose action is considered. One of the most important poit while studying low dose action is the necessity to develop a system including all irradiated people and dosimetry, and espicially to study frequencies and periods of tumor appearance in different irradiated tissues. The results obtained when examining people who survived the atomic explosion in Japan and on the Marshall islands are analyzed. They testify to the fact that radiation affets more tissues than the clinical picture about the acute radiation sickness tells, and that tumors developing in them many years after radiation action tell about radiosensitivity in some tissues

  1. Late effects of cancer therapy on the central nervous system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, J.; Moore, I.M.

    1989-01-01

    The number of studies documenting the long-term morbidity of CNS treatment has increased dramatically in recent years. Cranial irradiation, in particular, has been associated with cognitive deficits and neuroanatomic pathology. Children who are treated at an early age and individuals who receive higher doses (2,400 cGy or greater) appear to be at greatest risk for these sequelae. Much more research on the pathogenesis of delayed injury following CNS treatment is needed. Although several compelling mechanisms have been proposed, little empirical evidence is available. This knowledge is essential to the identification of agents that may protect normal brain tissue from injury. Even less is known about the effects of age at time of treatment, type of treatment (radiation v chemotherapy), or dose of radiation in relation to delayed injury. Of utmost importance are studies that will establish the predictive relationship between brain injury and cognitive deficits. This would allow clinicians to predict patients who are at risk for cognitive impairment in order to institute appropriate preventive or remedial interventions.65 references

  2. Late effects of 1H irradiation on hippocampal physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiffer, Frederico; Howe, Alexis K.; Carr, Hannah; Wang, Jing; Alexander, Tyler; Anderson, Julie E.; Groves, Thomas; Seawright, John W.; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Carter, Gwendolyn; Boerma, Marjan; Allen, Antiño R.

    2018-05-01

    NASA's Missions to Mars and beyond will expose flight crews to potentially dangerous levels of charged-particle radiation. Of all charged nuclei, 1H is the most abundant charged particle in both the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) and solar particle event (SPE) spectra. There are currently no functional spacecraft shielding materials that are able to mitigate the charged-particle radiation encountered in space. Recent studies have demonstrated cognitive injuries due to high-dose 1H exposures in rodents. Our study investigated the effects of 1H irradiation on neuronal morphology in the hippocampus of adult male mice. 6-month-old mice received whole-body exposure to 1H at 0.5 and 1 Gy (150 MeV/n; 0.35-0.55 Gy/min) at NASA's Space Radiation Laboratory in Upton, NY. At 9-months post-irradiation, we tested each animal's open-field exploratory performance. After sacrifice, we dissected the brains along the midsagittal plane, and then either fixed or dissected further and snap-froze them. Our data showed that exposure to 0.5 Gy or 1 Gy 1H significantly increased animals' anxiety behavior in open-field testing. Our micromorphometric analyses revealed significant decreases in mushroom spine density and dendrite morphology in the Dentate Gyrus, Cornu Ammonis 3 and 1 of the hippocampus, and lowered expression of synaptic markers. Our data suggest 1H radiation significantly increased exploration anxiety and modulated the dendritic spine and dendrite morphology of hippocampal neurons at a dose of 0.5 or 1 Gy.

  3. The case for SAR as the major component of a hyperthermia treatment unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    A major problem facing clinical hyperthermia is the lack of a useful unit of treatment. Most attempts at a treatment unit have utilized some function of temperature and time. Having accepted the validity of such a hypothetical units, one is faced with the formidable problem of obtaining a three dimensional temperature profile so that thermal dose can be determined. A corollary is the desirability of obtaining uniform temperature in the treatment volume. Various studies suggest that a uniform SAR is a more desirable goal when radiotherapy is to be used in combination with hyperthermia. The synergy between radiation and hyperthermia is maximized in low pH regions of tumor which are presumably also hypoxic. These regions are poorly perfused, likely to heat readily, and are resistant to the cytotoxic effects of radiation alone. On the other hand, well perfused regions of tumor are likely sensitive to radiation, and benefit less from the combination treatment. Other studies have definitely shown that tissue temperatures in the range normally associated with desirable hyperthermia treatment result in severe vascular damage. This damage could be expected to unnecessarily compromise the effectiveness of radiotherapy. Models in the literature can be combined to verify these observations

  4. A randomized clinical trial of hyperthermia and radiation versus radiation alone for superficially located cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egawa, Sunao; Tsukiyama, Iwao; Watanabe, Shaw

    1989-01-01

    A randomized clinical trial was performed in order to evaluate the effect of combined hyperthermia and radiation for superficially located tumors. Ten institutions participated in this study and 92 evaluable patients were entered from September 1985 to March 1987 (44 patients for radiation plus hyperthermia and 48 for radiation only). Superficially located tumors, more than 3x3 cm in diameter, regardless of whether they were primary or metastatic, and of their histology, were included in the study. Radiotherapy was performed by the conventional fractionation method (2 Gyx5/week). Hyperthermia was conducted once a week. There was no statistical difference between the two groups regarding age, sex, the distribution of tumors and treatment parameters. The complete response (CR) and partial response (PR) rate for the hyperthermia plus radiation group was 81.8%, while the rate for the radiation alone group was 62.6% (p<0.05). Six factors were selected for analysis of the above effect by a multiple logistic model. Sex contributed the most (p=0.001), then the site of the tumor (p=0.016) and the method of treatment (p=0.023). Sex and the site influenced the results. Age, irradiation dose and frequency and duration of heating were not significant factors for response to treatment. (author)

  5. Hyperthermia-induced alteration of yeast susceptibility to mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchel, R.E.J.; Morrison, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    Diploid yeast (s. cerevisiae) were examined for alterations in susceptibility to induced mutation following hyperthermia treatment. In cells grown at 23 0 C, a non-lethal heat exposure (38 0 C, 30 min) markedly suppressed mutation induced by a subsequent non-killing dose of MNNG of MNU. Mutation by ENU, 8-MOP + UVA, or γ-rays was not affected. An intermediate level of mutation suppression was observed for mutation by 254nm UV or MMS. Mutation by MNNG was not suppressed by the same heat treatment delivered after the mutagen exposure. In a split dose experiment (two MNNG treatments separated by a heat exposure) no suppression of mutation was observed. Treatment with cycloheximide mimicked the effect of heat treatment. These data suggest that mutation induction by MNNG or MNU is protein synthesis dependent, i.e. an error-prone repair system is induced by exposure to MNNG or MNU but not by ENU, 8-MOP+UVA or γ-irradiation. We propose that hyperthermia treatment, by inducing stress protein synthesis at the expense of normal protein synthesis, precludes induction of this error-prone system. Therefore, in heat treated cells, DNA lesions produced by MNNG or MNU exposure must be resolved by an essentially constitutive system which is less error-prone than the inducible one

  6. Childhood abuse and late-life depression: Mediating effects of psychosocial factors for early- and late-onset depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wielaard, Ilse; Hoyer, Mathijs; Rhebergen, Didi; Stek, Max L; Comijs, Hannie C

    2018-03-01

    Childhood abuse makes people vulnerable to developing depression, even in late life. Psychosocial factors that are common in late life, such as loneliness or lack of a partner, may explain this association. Our aim was to investigate whether the association between childhood abuse and depression in older adults can be explained by psychosocial factors. Cross-sectional data were derived from the Netherlands Study of Depression in Older Persons (aged 60-93), including 132 without lifetime depression, 242 persons with an early-onset depression (Childhood abuse (yes/no) and a frequency-based childhood abuse index were included. Multinomial regression and multivariable mediation analyses were used to examine the association between childhood abuse and the onset of depression, and the influence of loneliness, social network, and partner status. Multinomial regression analyses showed a significant association between childhood abuse and the childhood abuse index with early- and late-onset depression. Multivariable mediation analyses showed that the association between childhood abuse and early-onset depression was partly mediated by social network size and loneliness. This was particularly present for emotional neglect and psychological abuse, but not for physical and sexual abuse. No psychosocial mediators were found for the association between childhood abuse and late-onset depression. A smaller social network and feelings of loneliness mediate the association between childhood abuse and early-onset depression in older adults. Our findings show the importance of detecting childhood abuse as well as the age at depression onset and mapping of relevant psychosocial factors in the treatment of late-life depression. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Induced apoptosis by mild hyperthermia occurs via telomerase inhibition on the three human myeloid leukemia cell lines: TF-1, K562, and HL-60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deezagi, Abdolkhaleg; Manteghi, Sanaz; Khosravani, Pardis; Vaseli-Hagh, Neda; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to understand the effect of hyperthermia on the telomerase activity in human leukemic cell lines (HL-60, K562, and TF-1). The cells were treated by hyperthermia at the range of 41-44 degrees C for 120 min and incubated for 96 h. Then telomerase activity, cell proliferation, and apoptosis were assessed. The results indicated that hyperthermia significantly induced apoptosis on the cells. The cells exhibited pre-apoptotic pattern at 41 and 42 degrees C at 60-120 min and apoptotic pattern at 43 and 44 degrees C over 30 min after hyperthermia. Telomerase activity (that was assayed immediately after hyperthermia) was stable at 41-42 degrees C for 60 min but decreased to 35-40% at 120 min. However, at severe hyperthermia (43-44 degrees C) telomerase activity was decreased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Following hyperthermia (41-44 degrees C up to 120 min), the cells were incubated for 96 h. In these conditions, the telomerase activity was decreased by about 60-80% in comparison with that untreated control cells.

  8. Interaction of hyperthermia and radiation: radiation quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loshek, D.D.; Orr, J.S.; Solomonidis, E.

    1981-01-01

    Cell-survival data were collected to determine the survival response of asynchronous CHO cells subject to radiation and hyperthermia. The irradiation was at room temperature 100 minutes before exposure to hyperthermia at 42 0 C. The survival response to the combination of these two agents is expressed by means of a survival surface, a three-dimensional concept relating cell survival to heat dose and radiation dose. The survival surface could be approximately described by a survival model comprising three components of cell killing: the unperturbed radiation component, the unperturbed hyperthermia component and the interaction component. The dependence of the radiation component and the interaction component on radiation quality were investigated by irradiating with either 60 Co γ rays, 250 kV X rays or 14.7 MeV neutrons. An analysis suggests that the interaction component and the radiation component exhibit similar dependencies on radiation quality both for the deposition of damage and the repair or accumulation of that damage. (U.K.)

  9. Effect of early vs. late tracheostomy on clinical outcomes in critically ill pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J-H; Koo, C-H; Lee, S-Y; Kim, E-H; Song, I-K; Kim, H-S; Kim, C-S; Kim, J-T

    2016-10-01

    Few studies investigated the optimal timing for tracheostomy and its influence on the clinical outcomes in critically ill pediatric patients. This study evaluated the differences in clinical outcomes between early and late tracheostomy in pediatric intensive care unit (ICU) patients. We assessed 111 pediatric patients. Patients who underwent a tracheostomy within 14 days of mechanical ventilation (MV) were assigned to the early tracheostomy group, whereas those who underwent tracheostomy after 14 days of MV were included in the late tracheostomy group. Clinical outcomes, including mortality, duration of MV, length of ICU and hospital stays, and incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) were compared between the groups. Of the 111 pediatric patients, 61 and 50 were included in the early and late tracheostomy groups, respectively. Total MV duration and the length of ICU and hospital stay were significantly longer in the late tracheostomy group than in the early tracheostomy group (all P tracheostomy was 2.6 and 3.8 in the early and late tracheostomy groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in mortality rate between the groups. No severe complications were associated with tracheostomy itself. Tracheostomy performed within 14 days after the initiation of MV was associated with reduced duration of MV and length of ICU and hospital stay. Although there was no effect on mortality rate, children may benefit from early tracheostomy without severe complications. © 2016 The Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 1. General concepts and specific precepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S. [Univ. Rochester Medical Center, NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Marks, Lawrence B. (ed.) [Univ. North Carolina and Lineberger, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2014-09-01

    Considers in detail the general concepts and principles relevant to the adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Explains the molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Includes chapters on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 1 of this two-volume work focuses on the general concepts and principles relevant to late effects and on the dynamic interplay of molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Chapters are also included on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life.

  11. Ecological effects of Spring and late Summer applications of Lambda-Cyhalothrin on freshwater microcosms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijngaarden, van R.P.A.; Brock, T.C.M.; Brink, van den P.J.; Gylstra, R.; Maund, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin (treated at 10, 25, 50, 100, 250 ng active ingredient a.i./L) on a drainage ditch ecosystem in spring and late summer. Microcosms (water volume approximately 430 L) were established using enclosures in a

  12. Effect of ocean gateways on the global ocean circulation in the late Oligocene and early Miocene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    von der Heydt, A.S.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/245567526; Dijkstra, H.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073504467

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the effect of changes in the tectonic boundary conditions on global ocean circulation patterns. Using a fully coupled climate model in an idealized setup, we compare situations corresponding to the late Oligocene, the early Miocene, and present day. The model results show the

  13. Late cardiac effects of anthracycline containing therapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Carlsen, Niels L T; Oxhøj, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    At present about 80% of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) will be cured following treatment with multi-drug chemotherapy. A major concern for this growing number of survivors is the risk of late effects of treatment. The aim of this study was to determine whether signs...

  14. Late-onset Tay-Sachs disease: adverse effects of medications and implications for treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, B E; Hatters-Friedman, S; Fernandes-Filho, J A; Anthony, K; Natowicz, M R

    2006-09-12

    The authors conducted a retrospective and brief prospective study of adverse effects of approximately 350 medications in 44 adults with late-onset Tay-Sachs disease (LOTS). Some medications were relatively safe, whereas others, particularly haloperidol, risperidone, and chlorpromazine, were associated with neurologic worsening.

  15. Ecological effects of spring and late summer applications of lambda-cyhalothrin on freshwater microcosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wijngaarden, R P A; Brock, T C M; van den Brink, P J; Gylstra, R; Maund, S J

    2006-02-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effects of the pyrethroid insecticide lambda-cyhalothrin (treated at 10, 25, 50, 100, 250 ng active ingredient a.i./L) on a drainage ditch ecosystem in spring and late summer. Microcosms (water volume approximately 430 L) were established using enclosures in a 50-cm-deep experimental ditch system containing communities typical of macrophyte-dominated freshwater ecosystems. Effects on macroinvertebrates, zooplankton, phytoplankton, macrophytes, and community metabolism were assessed and evaluated using univariate and multivariate statistical techniques. The macroinvertebrate community responded most clearly to treatment and, as anticipated, insects and crustaceans were among the most sensitive organisms. Statistical analysis showed that the underlying community structure was significantly different between the spring and summer experiments. However, the most sensitive species (Chaoborus obscuripes and Gammarus pulex) were abundant in spring as well as in late summer. In spring and late summer, only slight and transient effects were observed at the community level in the 10-ng/L treatment. Overall, the study did not show substantial differences in the responses of sensitive taxa between spring and late summer treatments, and effects thresholds were similar irrespective of season of treatment.

  16. Late effects of X-irradiation on the ultrastructure of the cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyners, H.; Gianfelici de Reyners, E.; Maisin, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The glial population balance is significantly distributed by low dose X-rays even after a very short time following irradiation. The effects are able to persist for a large period of time and may possibly be involved in the onset of late radionecrosis phenomena, often noted as consequences of therapeutic irradiation in brain [fr

  17. ALERT. Adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Vol. 1. General concepts and specific precepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, Philip; Constine, Louis S.; Marks, Lawrence B.

    2014-01-01

    Considers in detail the general concepts and principles relevant to the adverse late effects of cancer treatment. Explains the molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Includes chapters on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life. The literature on the late effects of cancer treatment is widely scattered in different journals since all major organ systems are affected and management is based on a variety of medical and surgical treatments. The aim of ALERT - Adverse Late Effects of Cancer Treatment is to offer a coherent multidisciplinary approach to the care of cancer survivors. The central paradigm is that cytotoxic multimodal therapy results in a perpetual cascade of events that affects each major organ system differently and is expressed continually over time. Essentially, radiation and chemotherapy are intense biologic modifiers that allow for cancer cure and cancer survivorship but accelerate senescence of normal tissues and increase the incidence of age-related diseases and second malignant tumors. Volume 1 of this two-volume work focuses on the general concepts and principles relevant to late effects and on the dynamic interplay of molecular, cytologic and histopathologic events that lead to altered physiologic and metabolic functions and their clinical manifestations. Chapters are also included on legal issues, economic aspects, nursing, psychological issues and quality of life.

  18. Use of extremity insulation during whole body hyperthermia to reduce temperature nonuniformity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thrall, D.E.; Page, R.L.

    1987-01-01

    The author previously documented during whole body hyperthermia in dogs using a radiant heating device that temperature at superficial sites, including tibial bone marrow, falls below systemic arterial temperature during the plateau phase of heating. This may be due to direct heat loss to the environment. Sites where temperature is lower than systemic arterial temperature during the plateau phase may become sanctuary sites where tumor deposits are spared because they do not receive the prescribed thermal dose. In an attempt to decrease temperature nonuniformity and increase thermal dose delivered to such superficial sites, extremity insulation has been employed during whole body hyperthermia in dogs. The author measured temperature at cutaneous and subcutaneous sites and within tibial bone marrow in insulated and noninsulated extremities of dogs undergoing whole body hyperthermia in the radiant heating device. The author found that extremity insulation is effective in reducing extremity temperature nonuniformity. Specific results are presented. Extremity insulation may be necessary during whole body hyperthermia to assure that extremity tumor deposits receive a thermal dose similar to that prescribed for the entire body

  19. Interstitial hyperthermia using 8 MHz radiofrequency and stereotaxic brachytherapy for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Satoshi

    1990-01-01

    As a preliminary study of the interstitial hyperthermia combined with interstitial irradiation (brachytherapy) for the treatment of malignant brain tumors, we performed an experiment of interstitial hyperthermia of brain tissue of dogs. Nine afterloading tubes, four for needle electrodes and five for thermisters, were inserted in the brain tissue of dogs. Rise and stability of temperature were ascertained, and clinical safety was confirmed. Thereafter this combined therapy was applied on seven cases, in which three were malignant gliomas and four were metastatic tumors. Through the guide tubes, 192 Ir thin wires were implanted stereotaxically, and interstitial irradiation was carried out. After removal of 192 Ir wires, needle electrodes were inserted through the same tubes, and also a thermister was guided at the center of electrodes. And interstitial hyperthermia using 8 MHz radiofrequency was carried out. The results of the treatment were evaluated with CT scan based on criteria of the Japan Neurological Society. In cases of malignant gliomas, 2 PRs (partial remission), and 1 NC (no change) were obtained. In cases of metastatic tumors, 1 CR (complete remission), 2 PRs, 1 NC were obtaind. In cases of NCs, progression of tumors have been suppressed for 10 and 17 months, and still alive. As complication, transient worsening of neurological symptoms were observed in four cases (increased paresis: two cases, nausea and vomiting: two cases). The author have had an impression that interstitial hyperthermia combined with interstitial irradiation might become an effective means of treatment of brain tumors. (author)

  20. SR-1000 radiofrequency chemo-hyperthermia for recurrent and metastatic peritoneo-pelvic malignant tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Jingwei; Xiong Jinghong; Xu Guozhen; Yu Zihao; Li Yexiong; Yin Weibo

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and tolerance of intraperitoneal chemo-hyperthermia (IPCH) with SR-1000 radiofrequency (RF) for recurrent or metastatic peritoneo-pelvic malignant tumors. Methods: Twenty-one patients with recurrent or metastatic peritoneo-pelvic malignant tumors received chemo-hyperthermia, with 9 having local pain and 14 having ascites. The Karnofsky scores were 40-80. After abdominal cavity aspiration and infusion of hot NS and chemotherapeutic agents, the temperature of abdominal cavity was increased and maintained at 40.5-42.5 degree C for 60-90 minutes with SR-1000 RF. Hyperthermia was given twice per week and chemotherapy once per week, with the whole treatment lasting for 2-4 weeks. The commonly used drugs were DDP, MMC, 5-FU and so on. Results: Local pain was relieved in 8 of 9 patients, complete disappearance of ascites in 10 of 14. The common side-effects were fat necrosis (14.3%) and abdominal pain (24.8%). Conclusions: Intraperitoneal chemo-hyperthermia with SR-1000 RF appears to be a promising new approach for patients with recurrent or metastatic peritoneo-pelvic malignant tumors, especially for those who did not response to systemic chemotherapy or whose tumor recurred after chemotherapy. As to bulky lesions, local supplementary radiotherapy should be given in order to obtain better local control

  1. Alternate day treatment and late effects: The concept of an effective dose per fraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courdi, A.; Hery, M.; Gabillat, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    Although most institutions treat all fields each day, some radiotherapists continue to adopt an alternate day schedule. The resulting daily variations of the dose per fraction in laterally located targets have been analyzed using the linear-quadratic model. Patients with breast carcinoma treated with definitive radiotherapy in 1974-1975 with one field a day were studied. An effective dose per fraction was derived, with a value higher than the average dose per fraction received by the reference point. The greater the fluctuations between the doses per fraction on successive days, the higher the effective dose per fraction. The corresponding cell survival due to alternate treatment as compared to survival with daily treatment depends on the alpha/beta ratio. For a late effect with low alpha/beta ratio, an alternate treatment may lead to almost 10-fold increase in cell kill in these lateral targets such as those responsible for subcutaneous sclerosis as compared to daily treatment of all fields with the same total dose. Taking the average effective dose per fraction in our series, the increase in cell kill was 4-fold. Acute effects would suffer less damage due to alternate treatment because of a high alpha/beta ratio. Treatment on an alternate schedule should be restricted to palliative radiotherapy

  2. Use of the Concept of Equivalent Biologically Effective Dose (BED) to Quantify the Contribution of Hyperthermia to Local Tumor Control in Radiohyperthermia Cervical Cancer Trials, and Comparison With Radiochemotherapy Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plataniotis, George A.; Dale, Roger G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To express the magnitude of contribution of hyperthermia to local tumor control in radiohyperthermia (RT/HT) cervical cancer trials, in terms of the radiation-equivalent biologically effective dose (BED) and to explore the potential of the combined modalities in the treatment of this neoplasm. Materials and Methods: Local control rates of both arms of each study (RT vs. RT+HT) reported from randomized controlled trials (RCT) on concurrent RT/HT for cervical cancer were reviewed. By comparing the two tumor control probabilities (TCPs) from each study, we calculated the HT-related log cell-kill and then expressed it in terms of the number of 2 Gy fraction equivalents, for a range of tumor volumes and radiosensitivities. We have compared the contribution of each modality and made some exploratory calculations on the TCPs that might be expected from a combined trimodality treatment (RT+CT+HT). Results: The HT-equivalent number of 2-Gy fractions ranges from 0.6 to 4.8 depending on radiosensitivity. Opportunities for clinically detectable improvement by the addition of HT are only available in tumors with an alpha value in the approximate range of 0.22-0.28 Gy -1 . A combined treatment (RT+CT+HT) is not expected to improve prognosis in radioresistant tumors. Conclusion: The most significant improvements in TCP, which may result from the combination of RT/CT/HT for locally advanced cervical carcinomas, are likely to be limited only to those patients with tumors of relatively low-intermediate radiosensitivity.

  3. Endocrinological and Cardiological Late Effects Among Survivors of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Ören

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Survival rates for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL have significantly improved and late effects of therapy have been important in the follow-up of survivors. The objective of this study is to identify the endocrinological and cardiological late effects of ALL patients treated in our pediatric hematology unit. Materials and Methods: Patients treated for ALL with BFM protocols after at least 5 years of diagnosis and not relapsed were included in the study. Endocrinological late effects (growth failure, obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, thyroid gland disorders, osteopenia/osteoporosis, and pubertal disorders and cardiological late effects were evaluated. The study group was evaluated with anthropometric measurements, body mass index, and laboratory testing of fasting glucose, insulin, serum lipids, thyroid functions, and bone mineral densities. Echocardiography and pulsed wave Doppler imaging were performed for analysis of cardiac functions. Results: Of the 38 ALL survivors, at least 1 adverse event occurred in 23 (60%, with 8 of them (21% having multiple problems. Six (16% of the survivors were obese and 8 (21% of them were overweight. Subjects who were overweight or obese at the time of diagnosis were more likely to be overweight or obese at last follow-up. Obesity was more frequently determined in patients who were younger than 6 years of age at the time of diagnosis. Insulin resistance was observed in 8 (21% subjects. Insulin resistance was more frequently seen in subjects who had family history of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Hyperlipidemia was detected in 8 (21% patients. Hypothyroidism or premature thelarche were detected in 2 children. Two survivors had osteopenia. Cardiovascular abnormalities occurred in one of the subjects with hypertension and cardiac diastolic dysfunction. Conclusion: We point out the necessity of follow-up of these patients for endocrinological and cardiological late effects, since at least

  4. Differential effects of estradiol on carotid artery inflammation when administered early versus late after surgical menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophonsritsuk, Areepan; Appt, Susan E; Clarkson, Thomas B; Shively, Carol A; Espeland, Mark A; Register, Thomas C

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of estrogen therapy (ET) on carotid artery inflammation when initiated early and late relative to surgical menopause. Female cynomolgus macaques consuming atherogenic diets were ovariectomized and randomized to control or oral estradiol (E2; human equivalent dose of 1 mg/d micronized E2) initiated at 1 month (early menopause, n = 24) or 54 months (late menopause, n = 40) after ovariectomy. The treatment period was 8 months. Carotid artery expression of the markers of monocyte/macrophages (CD68 and CD163), dendritic cells (CD83), natural killer cells (neural cell adhesion molecule-1), and interferon-γ was significantly lower in E2-treated animals in the early menopause group but not in the late menopause group (P menopausal stage (P menopause inhibits macrophage accumulation in the carotid artery, an effect that is not observed when E2 is administered after several years of estrogen deficiency. No evidence for pro-inflammatory effects of late ET is observed. The results provide support for the timing hypothesis of postmenopausal ET with implications for the interpretation of outcomes in the Women's Health Initiative.

  5. Parent perspectives on information about late effects of childhood cancer treatment and their role in initial treatment decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenzang, Katie A; Dauti, Angela; Mack, Jennifer W

    2018-06-01

    Though most childhood cancer survivors experience late effects of treatment, we know little about parent preferences for late effects information during therapy, or how parents weigh late effects when making treatment decisions. Our objective was to explore how parents of children with cancer consider late effects in initial treatment decision making and during active cancer treatment. Semistructured interviews were conducted with 12 parents of children with cancer who were actively receiving treatment at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and qualitatively analyzed using thematic analysis. Ten of 12 parents reported that they had to decide between two or more treatment options for their child's cancer. Of those, 50% (5/10) considered late effects to be an important factor in their decision making. Most parents wanted early and detailed information about their child's risk of late effects to make treatment decisions and to feel prepared for the future. However, a few parents felt too overwhelmed to focus on late effects at diagnosis. While many recalled extensive late effects information in informed consent discussions, some parents felt these issues were minimally addressed. Parents desire detailed information about late effects to make informed treatment decisions and prepare for the future. Despite the role of late effects in treatment decision making, some parents feel that late effects are either inadequately addressed or too overwhelming to process at diagnosis. Parents may benefit from early assessment of their information needs and a return to these issues over time. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Rats' learned preferences for flavors encountered early or late in a meal paired with the postingestive effects of glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kevin P; Whitney, Margaret C

    2011-03-28

    Rats learn to prefer flavors that are followed by postingestive effects of nutrients. This experiment investigated whether the timing of a flavor (specifically, in the first or second half of the meal) influences learning about that flavor. Stronger learning about earlier or later flavors would indicate when the rewarding postingestive effects of nutrients are sensed. Rats with intragastric (IG) catheters drank saccharin-sweetened, calorically-dilute solutions with distinct flavors added, accompanied by IG infusion of glucose (+sessions) or water (-sessions). In both types of sessions, an "Early" flavor was provided for the first 8 min and a "Late" flavor for the last 8 min. Thus, rats were trained with Early(+) and Late(+) in high-calorie meals, and Early(-) and Late(-) in low-calorie meals. Strength of the learned preference for Early(+) and Late(+) was then assessed in a series of two-bottle choice tests between Early(+) vs. Early(-), Late(+) vs. Late(-), Early(+) vs. Late(+), and Early(-) vs. Late(-). Rats preferred both Early(+) and Late(+) over the respective (-) flavors. But Early(+) was only preferred when rats were tested hungry. Late(+) was preferred when rats were tested hungry or recently satiated. This indicates qualitatively different associations learned about flavors at different points in the meal. While not supporting the idea that postingestive effects become most strongly associated with later-occurring ("dessert") flavors, it does suggest a reason dessert flavors may remain attractive in the absence of hunger. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Late radiation effects to the rectum and bladder in gynecologic cancer patients: the comparison of LENT/SOMA and RTOG/EORTC late-effects scoring systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anacak, Yavuz; Yalman, Deniz; Oezsaran, Zeynep; Haydaroglu, Ayfer

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To test the correlation of LENT/SOMA and RTOG/EORTC late-effect scales for rectum and bladder, 116 cases with gynecologic malignancies that were treated with radiotherapy were assessed with both scales. Methods and Materials: All cases had been treated at least 6 months before the date of assessment with external beam radiotherapy (50-54 Gy to midline) and 1-2 fractions of HDR brachytherapy (2x8.5 Gy to point-A for 32 inoperable cases; 1x9.25 Gy to 5-9 mm from the ovoid surface for 84 postoperative cases). The patients were questioned with both scales, and the correlation between the two scales was analyzed by Spearman's rho (rank correlation) test. Results: There were 64 cases with uterine cervix carcinoma and 52 cases with endometrium carcinoma, The overall (external + brachy) doses to ICRU points were 57.8±3.8 Gy for rectum and 59.3±4.9 Gy for bladder. The statistical analysis of LENT/SOMA and RTOG/EORTC scales revealed a very good correlation for rectum (r=0.81; p<0.01) and a good correlation for bladder (r=0.72; p<0.01). Conclusion: The LENT/SOMA system is a further step on the reporting of late radiation effects. Some modifications will improve its precision, and multicentric randomized studies are needed to test its validity

  8. EFFECTIVENESS AND SAFETY OF INFLIXIMAB IN PATIENTS WITH EARLY AND LATE JUVENILE RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е.I. Alexeeva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of a study of effectiveness and safety of infliximab — monoclonal antibodies to the tumor necrotizing factor (TNF in treatment of 100 patients11 months — 17 years old with early and late articular types of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The duration of treatment was 3 months — 2 years. Infliximap was delivered intravenously by scheme: infusion on 0, 2nd, 6th weeks and then every 8th week. The single dose of infliximab in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis was 6.7 (5.5; 9.0 mg/kg, with late type — 6.0 (5.0; 7.0 mg/kg of body weight. 102 weeks of treatment with anti-TNF-agent provided development of clinical remission, decrease and normalization of laboratory tests of disease’s activity, total restoration of joint’s function, increase of quality of life (on 97% in patients with early type, and 72% 0 in ones with late type. The drug was abolished in 39 (39% of patients, 23% — due to the development of secondary inefficiency, and 11% — due to the development of unfavorable effects.Key words: children, early and late rheumatoid arthritis, treatment, infliximab.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(3:30-42

  9. Late effects of ionizing radiation on the eye and ocular adnexa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romestaing, P.; Hullo, A.

    1997-01-01

    Late ocular effects after irradiation of the eyes and ocular adnexa are reviewed. Ocular and orbital injuries occur more often after irradiation of central nervous system neoplasms or treatment of paranasal sinus malignancies. The complete loss of vision is the major complication which is multi-factorial. This paper describes the radiation effects and grading of ocular adnexa, lens, retina, optic nerves and orbit. The tolerance doses and treatment are described. (authors)

  10. Thermo-radiosensitivity of the granulocyte and macrophage precursor cells of mice. I I . - X- irradiation effects and influence of hyperthermia on the radiosensitivity; Termo-radiosensibilidad del precursor hematopoyetico que origina las series granulocitica y macrofaga de raton. II. - Efectos producidos por la radiacion X e influencia de la hipertermia sobre la radiosensibilidad celular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueren, J A; Nieto, M

    1983-07-01

    The effects of the X-irradiation on the viability of the granulocyte-macrophage precursors, has been determined by means of the agar diffusion chamber culture technique. The results show the high radiosensitivity of these cells, with survival parameter similar to those previously reported in the literature about different granulocyte-macrophage precursors. When a hyperthermic treatment is performed prior to the X-irradiation, a radiosensitization phenomenon is observed due to the synergism existent between hyperthermia and X rays on the lethality of the precursors. (Authors) 37 refs.

  11. Hyperthermia for the Treatment of Locally Advanced Cervix Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Franckena (Martine)

    2010-01-01

    textabstract(English): There is a strong biological rationale for the use of hyperthermia as an oncological treatment modality. Fifteen randomized trials have shown significant improvement in clinical outcome when hyperthermia was added to radiotherapy, chemotherapy or both. At temperatures ≥ 40

  12. Multidisciplinary approach to radiation late effects in the brain circulatory system: First results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keyeux, A.J.M.; Reinhold, H.S.; Gerber, G.B.; Maisin, J.R.; Reyners, H.; Gianfelici de Reyners, E.; Calvo, W.

    1976-01-01

    Although acute vascular damage and the early functional impairment of the central nervous system has been studied relatively frequently, the pathophysiological mechanisms of late radiation effects and their relevance to vascular damage, are less well investigated and are poorly understood. As the possibility of later radiation damage is a factor which limits the therapist in the radiation dose, he can give to effect a local tumour cure, it is essential that the mechanisms and importance of vascular irradiation damage be determined before late effects can either be treated or avoided. In view of the inconclusive results obtained by previous authors, it was felt that a multidisciplinary approach might better be suited to solve this problem. Thus, in 1973 a research project was initiated by EULEP to investigate the origins and consequences of radiation induced vascular changes after local irradiation of the brain. In this preliminary report, data on morphological, circulatory and biochemical parameters are presented and discussed. (GC)

  13. CURED I - LENT. Late effects of cancer treatment on normal tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, P.; Okunieff, P.; Constine, L.S.; Rochester Univ. School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, NY; Marks, L.B.

    2008-01-01

    The search for the most favorable therapeutic ratio - at which ablation of cancer is achieved while normal tissues are conserved - has been modern radiation oncology's equivalent of the quest for the Holy Grail. Our awareness of the late effects of radiation grew during the past century as new modalities were introduced. Heightened normal tissue reactions accompanied the higher rates of cancer ablation achieved by escalation of radiation doses, accelerated fractionated radiotherapy, and aggressive concurrent chemotherapy and radiation regimens. This volume is based on the LENT V NCI-sponsored meeting held in May 2004 and the CURED I conference held in 2006. Written by experts in the field, it addresses a number of critical topics relating to late effects, such as mechanisms of injury, the role of screening, options for interventions, second malignancies, and prevention. It is hoped that it will assist the reader in understanding how to prevent and treat the long-term side-effects of irradiation. (orig.)

  14. Comparison of radiosensitization by 41 deg. C hyperthermia during low dose rate irradiation and during pulsed simulated low dose rate irradiation in human glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaphorst, G. Peter; Ng, Cheng E.; Shahine, Bilal

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Long duration mild hyperthermia has been shown to be an effective radiosensitizer when given concurrently with low dose rate irradiation. Pulsed simulated low dose rate (PSLDR) is now being used clinically, and we have set out to determine whether concurrent mild hyperthermia can be an effective radiosensitizer for the PSLDR protocol. Materials and Methods: Human glioma cells (U-87MG) were grown to plateau phase and treated in plateau phase in order to minimize cell cycle redistribution during protracted treatments. Low dose rate (LDR) irradiation and 41 deg. C hyperthermia were delivered by having a radium irradiator inside a temperature-controlled incubator. PSLDR was given using a 150 kVp X-ray unit and maintaining the cells at 41 deg. C between irradiations. The duration of irradiation and concurrent heating depended on total dose and extended up to 48 h. Results: When 41 deg. C hyperthermia was given currently with LDR or PSLDR, the thermal enhancement ratios (TER) were about the same if the average dose rate for PSLDR was the same as for LDR. At higher average dose rates for PSLDR the TERs became less. Conclusions: Our data show that concurrent mild hyperthermia can be an effective sensitizer for PSLDR. This sensitization can be as effective as for LDR if the same average dose rate is used and the TER increases with decreasing dose rate. Thus mild hyperthermia combined with PSLDR may be an effective clinical protocol

  15. Prospective phase II trial of regional hyperthermia and whole liver irradiation for numerous chemorefratory liver metastases from colerectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jeong Il; Park, Hee Chul; Choi, Doo Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2016-03-15

    A prospective phase II trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness and toxicity of regional hyperthermia and whole liver irradiation (WLI) for numerous chemorefractory liver metastases from colorectal cancer. Enrolled patients had numerous chemorefractory hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer. Five sessions of hyperthermia and seven fractions of 3-gray WLI were planned. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) was determined using the Korean version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer quality of life questionnaire C-30 and the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Hepatobiliary version 4.0. Objective and pain response was evaluated. A total of 12 patients consented to the study and the 10 who received WLI and hyperthermia were analyzed. WLI was completed as planned in nine patients and hyperthermia in eight. Pain response was partial in four patients and stable in four. Partial objective response was achieved in three patients (30.0%) and stable disease was seen in four patients at the 1-month follow-up. One patient died 1 month after treatment because of respiratory failure related to pleural metastasis progression. Other grade III or higher toxicities were detected in three patients; however, all severe toxicities were related to disease progression rather than treatment. No significant difference in HRQoL was noted at the time of assessment for patients who were available for questionnaires. Combined WLI and hyperthermia were well tolerated without severe treatment-related toxicity with a promising response from numerous chemorefractory hepatic metastases from colorectal cancer.

  16. Biodegradable magnesium nanoparticle-enhanced laser hyperthermia therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Q

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Qian Wang,1 Liping Xie,1 Zhizhu He,2 Derui Di,2 Jing Liu1,21Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, 2Key Laboratory of Cryogenics, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaBackground: Recently, nanoparticles have been demonstrated to have tremendous merit in terms of improving the treatment specificity and thermal ablation effect on tumors. However, the potential toxicity and long-term side effects caused by the introduced nanoparticles and by expelling them out of the body following surgery remain a significant challenge. Here, we propose for the first time to directly adopt magnesium nanoparticles as the heating enhancer in laser thermal ablation to avoid these problems by making full use of the perfect biodegradable properties of this specific material.Methods: To better understand the new nano “green” hyperthermia modality, we evaluated the effects of magnesium nanoparticles on the temperature transients inside the human body subject to laser interstitial heating. Further, we experimentally investigated the heating enhancement effects of magnesium nanoparticles on a group of biological samples: oil, egg white, egg yolk, in vitro pig tissues, and the in vivo hind leg of rabbit when subjected to laser irradiation.Results: Both the theoretical simulations and experimental measurements demonstrated that the target tissues injected with magnesium nanoparticles reached much higher temperatures than tissues without magnesium nanoparticles. This revealed the enhancing behavior of the new nanohyperthermia method.Conclusion: Given the unique features of magnesium nanoparticles – their complete biological safety and ability to enhance heating – which most other advanced metal nanoparticles do not possess, the use of magnesium nanoparticles in hyperthermia therapy offers an important “green” nanomedicine modality for treating tumors

  17. Invited review: heat stress effects during late gestation on dry cows and their calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, S; Dahl, G E

    2013-07-01

    In dairy cattle, late gestation is a critical period for fetal growth and physiological transition into the next lactation. Environmental factors, such as temperature and light, exert dramatic effects on the production, health, and well-being of animals during this period and after parturition. The aim of this review was to introduce effects of heat stress during late gestation on dairy cattle, and discuss the biological mechanisms that underlie the observed production and health responses in the dam and her fetus. Relative to cooled cows, cows that are heat stressed during late gestation have impaired mammary growth before parturition and decreased milk production in the subsequent lactation. In response to higher milk yield, cows cooled prepartum undergo a series of homeorhetic adaptations in early lactation to meet higher demand for milk synthesis compared with heat-stressed cows, but no direct effect of environmental heat stress on metabolism exists during the dry period. Prepartum cooling improves immune status of transition cows and evidence suggests that altered prolactin signaling in immune cells mediates the effects of heat stress on immune function. Late-gestation heat stress compromises placental development, which results in fetal hypoxia, malnutrition, and eventually fetal growth retardation. Maternal heat stress may also have carryover effects on the postnatal growth of offspring, but direct evidence is still lacking. Emerging evidence suggests that offspring from prepartum heat-stressed cows have compromised passive immunity and impaired cell-mediated immune function compared with those from cooled cows. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Trial of radiation therapy combined with hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takegawa, Y; Fujiwara, K; Oe, J; Nagase, M; Akiyama, H [Tokushima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1978-08-01

    Nine patients were treated by the combination therapy of external irradiation and hyperthermia, 5 patients with metastatic lesions; two breast cancer, one lung cancer, one malignant melanoma, one vulva cancer, 1 patient with recurrent lesion of skin cancer and 3 patients with bladder cancer. All patients were treated by heating locally (42/sup 0/C, 30 min) followed by external irradiation with 4,000 - 5,000 rad over 4 to 5 weeks. No local recurrence was found in 4 of 9 patients.

  19. Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia as an adjuvant cancer therapy with chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryk, Alicia Ailie

    Magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (mNPH) is an emerging cancer therapy which has shown to be most effective when applied in the adjuvant setting with chemotherapy, radiation or surgery. Although mNPH employs heat as a primary therapeutic modality, conventional heat may not be the only cytotoxic effect. As such, my studies have focused on the mechanism and use of mNPH alone and in conjunction with cisplatinum chemotherapy in murine breast cancer cells and a related in vivo model. MNPH was compared to conventional microwave tumor heating, with results suggesting that mNPH (mNP directly injected into the tumor and immediately activated) and 915 MHz microwave hyperthermia, at the same thermal dose, result in similar tumor regrowth delay kinetics. However, mNPH shows significantly less peri-tumor normal tissue damage. MNPH combined with cisplatinum also demonstrated significant improvements in regrowth delay over either modality applied as a monotherapy. Additional studies demonstrated that a relatively short tumor incubation time prior to AMF exposure (less than 10 minutes) as compared to a 4-hour incubation time, resulted in faster heating rates, but similar regrowth delays when treated to the same thermal dose. The reduction of heating rate correlated well with the observed reduction in mNP concentration in the tumor observed with 4 hour incubation. The ability to effectively deliver cytotoxic mNPs to metastatic tumors is the hope and goal of systemic mNP therapy. However, delivering relevant levels of mNP is proving to be a formidable challenge. To address this issue, I assessed the ability of cisplatinum to simultaneously treat a tumor and improve the uptake of systemically delivered mNPs. Following a cisplatinum pretreatment, systemic mNPs uptake was increased by 3.1 X, in implanted murine breast tumors. Additional in vitro studies showed the necessity of a specific mNP/ Fe architecture and spatial relation for heat-based cytotoxicity in cultured cells.

  20. The effects of phosphatidylserine and omega-3 fatty acid-containing supplement on late life depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teruhisa Komori

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Late life depression is often associated with a poor response to antidepressants; therefore an alternative strategy for therapy is required. Although several studies have reported that phosphatidylserine (PS may be effective for late life depression and that omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA have also proven beneficial for many higher mental functions, including depression, no concrete conclusion has been reached. This study was performed to clarify the effect of PS and omega-3 fatty acid-containing supplement for late life depression by not only clinical evaluation but also salivary cortisol levels. Eighteen elderly subjects with major depression were selected for the study. In all, insufficient improvement had been obtained by antidepressant therapy for at least 6 months. The exclusion criteria from prior brain magnetic resonance images (MRI included the presence of structural MRI findings compatible with stroke or other gross brain lesions or malformations, but not white matter hypersensitivities. They took a supplement containing PS 100 mg, DHA 119 mg and EPA 70 mg three times a day for 12 weeks. The effects of the supplement were assessed using the 17-item Hamilton depression scale (HAM-D17 and the basal levels and circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol. The study adopted them as indices because: salivary cortisol levels are high in patients with depression, their circadian rhythm related to salivary cortisol is often irregular, and these symptoms are alleviated as depression improves. The mean HAM-D17 in all subjects taking the supplement was significantly improved after 12 weeks of taking the supplement. These subjects were divided into 10 non-responders and 8 responders. The basal levels and circadian rhythm of salivary cortisol were normalized in the responders while not in non-responders. PS and omega-3 fatty acids, or other elements of the supplement, may be effective for late life depression, associated with the correction of basal

  1. Gender moderates valence effects on the late positive potential to emotional distracters

    OpenAIRE

    Syrjänen, Elmeri

    2013-01-01

    Attention is captured more strongly by emotional pictures than by neutral pictures. This allocation of attention to emotional pictures is commonly indexed by the late positive potential (LPP), an event-related potential (ERP) that is larger for negative and positive pictures than for neutral pictures. However, findings are mixed in regards to valence effects, that is, whether the LPP is larger for negative pictures than for positive pictures (negativity bias) or vice versa (positivity bias). ...

  2. Late rectal toxicity: dose-volume effects of conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Eugene H.; Pollack, Alan; Levy, Larry; Starkschall, George; Lei Dong; Rosen, Isaac; Kuban, Deborah A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors that correlate with late rectal toxicity after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively analyzed the dose-volume histograms and clinical records of 163 Stage T1b-T3c prostate cancer patients treated between 1992 and 1999 with 3D-CRT, to a total isocenter dose of 74-78 Gy at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The median follow-up was 62 months (range 24-102). All late rectal complications were scored using modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force criteria. The 6-year toxicity rate was assessed using Kaplan-Meier analysis and the log-rank test. A univariate proportional hazards regression model was used to test the correlation between Grade 2 or higher toxicity and the dosimetric, anatomic, and clinical factors. In a multivariate regression model, clinical factors were added to the dosimetric and anatomic variables to determine whether they significantly altered the risk of developing late toxicity. Results: At 6 years, the rate of developing Grade 2 or higher late rectal toxicity was 25%. A significant volume effect was observed at rectal doses of 60, 70, 75.6, and 78 Gy, and the risk of developing rectal complications increased exponentially as greater volumes were irradiated. Although the percentage of rectal volume treated correlated significantly with the incidence of rectal complications at all dose levels (p 3 of the rectum. Of the clinical variables tested, only a history of hemorrhoids correlated with rectal toxicity (p=0.003). Multivariate analysis showed that the addition of hemorrhoids increased the risk of toxicity for each dosimetric variable found to be significant on univariate analysis (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Conclusion: Dose-volume histogram analyses clearly indicated a volume effect on the probability of developing late rectal complications

  3. Controlled Hyperthermia with MRI-guided Focused Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, Steffen; Salomir, Rares; Pedersen, Michael

    Introduction: Hyperthermia is an appealing oncological treatment since the significant regions of hypoxia contained in most solid tumours are known to be sensitive to the cytotoxic effect of heat. However, due to the seemingly insurmountable technical difficulties associated with delivering thermal......-sensitive promoters and localized drug delivery using thermo-sensitive micro-carriers. Subjects Here we will present some of the recent advances in MRI-FUS, and their technical background. This will include: 1) Real-time MRI-thermometry. 2) FUS-technology. 3) Temporal and Spatial temperature control using MRI...... and penetration depth are governed by the wavelength. Hence for US it is possible to body non-invasively position sub-millimeter focal points in deep seated regions of the. Temperature Control: Most solid tumours cover volumes larger than that of the focal region. This problem may be reduced somewhat...

  4. Extrapolation of experimental data on late effects of low-dose radionuclides in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalistratova, V.S.; Nisimov, P.G.

    1997-01-01

    The situation of living of population on radionuclide contamination areas was simulated in the experimental study using white strainless rats of different ages. The significance of age for late stochastic effects of internal radionuclide contamination with low doses of 131 I, 137 Cs, 144 Ce and 106 Ru was studied. Some common regularities and differences in late effects formation depending on age were found. Results of the study showed that the number of tumors developed increased in groups of animals exposed at the youngest age. The younger animal at the moment of internal radionuclide contamination, the higher percentage of malignant tumors appeared. It was especially so for tumors of endocrine glands (pituitary, suprarenal,- and thyroid). Differences in late effects formation related to different type of radionuclide distribution within the body were estimated. On the base of extrapolation the conclusion was made that human organism being exposed at early postnatal or pubertal period could be the most radiosensitive (1.5-2.0 or sometimes even 3-5 times higher than adults). Data confirmed the opinion that children are the most critical part of population even in case of low dose radiation exposure. (author)

  5. Physical activity in persons with late effects of polio: a descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winberg, Cecilia; Flansbjer, Ulla-Britt; Carlsson, Gunilla; Rimmer, James; Lexell, Jan

    2014-07-01

    To promote a healthy and active lifestyle there is a need to increase our knowledge of the level of physical activity (PA) among people with late effects of polio. To examine PA in people with late effects of polio and to assess the relationship between PA, life satisfaction and various sociodemographic factors. PA was assessed in 81 persons with late effects of polio using the Physical Activity and Disability Survey (PADS) and by a pedometer. Life satisfaction was assessed with the Life Satisfaction Questionnaire (LiSat-11). The amount of PA varied considerably but on average the participants were physically active almost 3 h per day, mostly in household activities. The mean value of the pedometer counts was 6212 steps per day (SD = 3208). Sixty-nine percent of the participants rated themselves as satisfied with life as a whole. The sum of PADS was positively and significantly related to the number of steps (r = 0.39, p satisfaction with life (rho = 0.23, p satisfaction with life (rho = 0.37, p satisfaction and age further supports the general contention that an active lifestyle is an important factor for perceived well-being among older people. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Pharmacological modulation of late radio-induced side effects; Modulation pharmacologique des effets tardifs de l'irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourgier, C.; Bourhis, J.; Deutsch, E. [Departement de radiotherapie, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Unite mixte de recherche ' radiotherapie moleculaire' , Inserm unite 1030, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, universite Paris Sud 11, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Monceau, V. [Unite mixte de recherche ' radiotherapie moleculaire' , Inserm unite 1030, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, universite Paris Sud 11, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Vozenin, M.C. [Unite mixte de recherche ' radiotherapie moleculaire' , Inserm unite 1030, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, universite Paris Sud 11, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); UMR 1030, institut de cancerologie Gustave-Roussy, 114, rue edouard-Vaillant, 94805 Villejuif (France); Unite mixte de recherche ' cellules souches et radiations' , Inserm unite 967, 18, route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); UMR 967, institut de radiobiologie cellulaire et moleculaire (iRCM), direction des sciences du vivant, CEA, 18, route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); UMR 967, universite Paris-Diderot Paris 7, 18, route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France); UMR 967, universite Paris Sud 11, 18, route du Panorama, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses cedex (France)

    2011-08-15

    After normal tissue exposure to radiation therapy, late side effects can occur and may reduce patients' quality of life due to their progressive nature. Late toxicities occurrence is the main limiting factor of radiotherapy. Various biological disorders related to irradiation are involved in the development of late toxicities including fibrosis. The present review will focus on the recent physiopathological and molecular mechanisms described to be involved in the development of late radio-induced toxicities, that provide therapeutic perspective for pharmaco-modulation. (authors)

  7. Polyamines and polyamine biosynthesis in cells exposed to hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerner, E.W.; Stickney, D.G.; Herman, T.S.; Fuller, D.J.

    1983-02-01

    The issue of how polyamines act to sensitize cultured cells to the lethal effects of hyperthermia was investigated using Chinese hamster cells which were induced to express thermotolerance. Intracellular levels of these naturally occurring polycations were manipulated in certain situations by treating whole cells with methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone), an inhibitor of the S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylases. Exogenous spermine as low as 100 ..mu..M in the culture media dramatically sensitized cells expressing thermotolerance to the lethal effects of subsequent 42/sup 0/C exposures. When thermotolerance was differentially induced in cultures exposed to 42.4/sup 0/C by varying the rate of heating from 37 to 42.4/sup 0/C, the most resistant cells and the highest levels of intracellular spermidine and spermine. This finding was explainable in part by the observation that the putrescine-dependent S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase activity was minimally affected in cells expressng the greatest degree of thermotolerance. When this enzyme activity was inhibited by drug, lowered intracellular polyamine levels did not correspond with subsequent survival responses to heat. Interestingly, cultures treated with methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) 24 hr previous to heat exposure showed a reduced capacity to express rate of heating-induced thermotolerance. Together, these results demonstrate that the polyamines, especially spermidine and spermine, enhance hyperthermia-induced cell killing by some mechanism involving the plasma membrane. Further, our data suggest that methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) can act to affect thermal responses by a mechanism(s) other than modification of intracellular polyamine levels.

  8. Multidisciplinary approach to identification and remedial intervention for adverse late effects of cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCalla, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    Because of advances in surgical technique, radiation therapy, and combined chemotherapy regimens, there has been a dramatic improvement in the survival of children with pediatric malignancies. All treatment modalities are associated with adverse effects that may be manifested months to years after therapy. This article has provided an overview of the physiologic and psychologic adverse effects of antineoplastic therapy and described the multidisciplinary approach used by one institution to identify and initiate appropriate remedial intervention. Nurses can learn to assist in the identification of adverse late effects, provide support to the family, and facilitate appropriate intervention

  9. Do negative emotions expressed during follow-up consultations with adolescent survivors of childhood cancer reflect late effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellblom, Anneli V; Ruud, Ellen; Loge, Jon Håvard; Lie, Hanne C

    2017-11-01

    To explore whether negative emotions expressed by adolescent cancer survivors during follow-up consultations were associated with potential late effects (persisting disease or treatment-related health problems). We video-recorded 66 follow-up consultations between 10 pediatricians and 66 adolescent survivors of leukemia, lymphoma or stem-cell transplantations. In transcripts of the recordings, we identified utterances coded as both 1) expressions of negative emotions (VR-CoDES), and 2) late effect-related discussions. Principles of thematic content analysis were used to investigate associations between the two. Of the 66 video-recorded consultations, 22 consultations contained 56 (49%) utterances coded as both emotional concerns and discussions of potential late effects. Negative emotions were most commonly associated with late effects such as fatigue ("I'm struggling with not having energy"), psychosocial distress ("When I touch this (scar) I become nauseous"), pain ("I'm wondering how long I am going to have this pain?"), and treatment-related effects on physical appearance ("Am I growing?"). Negative emotions expressed by adolescent cancer survivors during follow-up consultations were frequently associated with potential late effects. These late effects were not the medically most serious ones, but reflected issues affecting the adolescents' daily life. Eliciting and exploring patients' emotional concerns serve as means to obtain clinically relevant information regarding potential late effect and to provide emotional support. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Grading-system-dependent volume effects for late radiation-induced rectal toxicity after curative radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Hans Paul; van den Bergh, Alphons; Schilstra, C; Vlasman, Renske; Meertens, Harm; Langendijk, Johannes A

    2008-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the association between the dose distributions in the rectum and late Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC), Late Effects of Normal Tissue SOMA, and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE)

  11. Agreement of quadratic and CRE models in predicting the late effects of continuous low dose-rate radiotherapy; and reply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Donoghue, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    These letters discuss the problems associated with the fact that the normal tissue isoeffect formulae based on the Ellis equation (1969) do not correctly account for the late-occurring effects of fractionated radiotherapy, and with the extension of the linear quadratic model to include continuous low dose-rate radiotherapy with constant or decaying sources by R.G. Dale (1985). J.A. O'Donoghue points out that the 'late effects' and CRE curves correspond closely, whilst the 'acute effects; and CRE curves are in obvious disagreement. For continuous low-dose-rate radiotherapy, the CRE and late effects quadratic model are in agreement. Useful bibliography. (U.K.)

  12. Normal tissue complication probabilities correlated with late effects in the rectum after prostate conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dale, Einar; Olsen, Dag R.; Fossa, Sophie D.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy of deep-sited tumours will always result in normal tissue doses to some extent. The aim of this study was to calculate different risk estimates of late effects in the rectum for a group of cancer prostate patients treated with conformal radiation therapy (CRT) and correlate these estimates with the occurrences of late effects. Since the rectum is a hollow organ, several ways of generating dose-volume distributions over the organ are possible, and we wanted to investigate two of them. Methods and Materials: A mathematical model, known as the Lyman-Kutcher model, conventionally used to estimate normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP) associated with radiation therapy, was applied to a material of 52 cancer prostate patients. The patients were treated with a four field box technique, with the rectum as organ at risk. Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were generated for the whole rectum (including the cavity) and of the rectum wall. One to two years after the treatment, the patients completed a questionnaire concerning bowel (rectum) related morbidity quantifying the extent of late effects. Results: A correlation analysis using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, for NTCP values calculated from the DVHs and the patients' scores, gave correlation coefficients which were not statistically significant at the p max , of the whole rectum, correlated better to observed late toxicity than D max derived from histograms of the rectum wall. Correlation coefficients from 'high-dose' measures were larger than those calculated from the NTCP values. Accordingly, as the volume parameter of the Lyman-Kutcher model was reduced, raising the impact of small high-dose volumes on the NTCP values, the correlation between observed effects and NTCP values became significant at p < 0.01 level. Conclusions: 1) High-dose levels corresponding to small volume fractions of the cumulative dose-volume histograms were best correlated with the occurrences of late

  13. Cardioprotective effects of early and late aerobic exercise training in experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Gonçalves, Daniel; Ferreira, Rita; Fonseca, Hélder; Padrão, Ana Isabel; Moreno, Nuno; Silva, Ana Filipa; Vasques-Nóvoa, Francisco; Gonçalves, Nádia; Vieira, Sara; Santos, Mário; Amado, Francisco; Duarte, José Alberto; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago

    2015-11-01

    Clinical studies suggest that aerobic exercise can exert beneficial effects in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We compared the impact of early or late aerobic exercise training on right ventricular function, remodeling and survival in experimental PAH. Male Wistar rats were submitted to normal cage activity (SED), exercise training in early (EarlyEX) and in late stage (LateEX) of PAH induced by monocrotaline (MCT, 60 mg/kg). Both exercise interventions resulted in improved cardiac function despite persistent right pressure-overload, increased exercise tolerance and survival, with greater benefits in EarlyEX+MCT. This was accompanied by improvements in the markers of cardiac remodeling (SERCA2a), neurohumoral activation (lower endothelin-1, brain natriuretic peptide and preserved vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA), metabolism and mitochondrial oxidative stress in both exercise interventions. EarlyEX+MCT provided additional improvements in fibrosis, tumor necrosis factor-alpha/interleukin-10 and brain natriuretic peptide mRNA, and beta/alpha myosin heavy chain protein expression. The present study demonstrates important cardioprotective effects of aerobic exercise in experimental PAH, with greater benefits obtained when exercise training is initiated at an early stage of the disease.

  14. Membrane defect in procine malignant hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Brien, P.J.

    1985-01-01

    Malignant hyperthermia (MH) has been proposed to result from abnormal calcium-homeostasis in skeletal muscle. This study tested the hypothesis that calcium-sequestration or calcium-release by sarcoplasmic reticulum was abnormal in MH-susceptible swine. A heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum fraction (HSR), enriched in terminal cisternae, was isolated from MH and control muscle using differential and density-gradient centrifugation. Calcium transport was studied using 45 Ca radioisotope and Millipore filtration. Enzymatic activities, cholesterol, phospholipid, and protein composition were determined using spectrophotometric techniques and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Properties of calcium-sequestration by MH and control HSR were indistinguishable, although Ca 2+ -ATPase and calsequestrin content were 100% increased in MH HSR. However when muscle homogenate pH was decreased due to MH, calcium-uptake activity was depressed to <5% of control values. Results of this study indicate a model for the etiopathogenesis of MH, and for the inheritance and diagnosis of susceptibility to MH. Malignant hyperthermia is initiated due to a hypersensitive HSR calcium-release mechanism and propagated by a loss of calcium-sequestering function as acidosis develops. Susceptibility is inherited in an autosomal, codominant pattern and may be diagnosed most definitively and sensitively on the basis of calcium-release sensitivity-tests, performed on isolated HSR

  15. A thermocouple thermometry system for ultrasound hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozarka, M.; Gharakhani, A.; Magin, R.; Cain, C.

    1984-01-01

    A thermometry system designed to be used in the treatment of cancer by ultrasound hyperthermia is described. The system monitors tumor temperatures using 16 type T (copper-constantan) thermocouples and is controlled by a 12 MHz Intel 8031 microcomputer. An analog circuit board contains the thermocouple amplifiers, an analog multiplexer, scaling circuitry, and an analog to digital converter. A digital board contains the Intel 8031, program memory, data memory, as well as circuitry for control and data communications. Communication with the hyperthermia system control computer is serially by RS-232 with selectable baud rate. Since the thermocouple amplifiers may have slight differences in gain and offset, a calibrated offset is added to a lookup table value to obtain the proper display temperature to within +- 0.1 0 C. The calibration routine, implemented in software, loads a nonvolatile random access memory chip with the proper offset values based on the outputs of each thermocouple channel at known temperatures which bracket a range of interest

  16. Photoacoustic-Based-Close-Loop Temperature Control for Nanoparticle Hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaohua, Feng; Fei, Gao; Yuanjin, Zheng

    2015-07-01

    Hyperthermia therapy requires tight temperature control to achieve selective killing of cancerous tissue with minimal damage on surrounding healthy tissues. To this end, accurate temperature monitoring and subsequent heating control are critical. However, an economic, portable, and real-time temperature control solution is currently lacking. To bridge this gap, we present a novel portable close-loop system for hyperthermia temperature control, in which photoacoustic technique is proposed for noninvasive real-time temperature measurement. Exploiting the high sensitivity of photoacoustics, the temperature is monitored with an accuracy of around 0.18 °C and then fed back to a controller implemented on field programmable gate array (FPGA) for temperature control. Dubbed as portable hyperthermia feedback controller (pHFC), it stabilizes the temperature at preset values by regulating the hyperthermia power with a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) algorithm; and to facilitate digital implementation, the pHFC further converts the PID output into switching values (0 and 1) with the pulse width modulation (PWM) algorithm. Proof-of-concept hyperthermia experiments demonstrate that the pHFC system is able to bring the temperature from baseline to predetermined value with an accuracy of 0.3° and a negligible temperature overshoot. The pHFC can potentially be translated to clinical applications with customized hyperthermia system design. This paper can facilitate future efforts in seamless integration of close-loop temperature control solution and various clinical hyperthermia systems.

  17. Feasibility study of local ultrasound hyperthermia in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.G.; Straube, W.; Emami, B.; Perez, C.A.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a retrospective analysis of patients treated at Washington University for recurrent or persistent cancer with Ultrasound Hyperthermia between October 1984 and June 1986. Fifteen of 102 lesions were treated during this time period with Ultrasound Hyperthermia instead of microwave hyperthermia due to the size of the lesion needing heat at depths greater than 4 cm. Also, the patients' lesion could not be implanted for interstitial microwave hyperthermia. Fourteen of the treated patients received concomitant radiotherapy, while one received concomitant Bleomycin. There were 79 total hyperthermia treatments delivered, of which 67 achieved a therapeutic temperature of 43 0 C for 60 minutes. During 15/79 treatments, patients experienced pain; of which 11/15 lead to poor heating. Only one treatment of the twelve poor treatments was secondary to technical difficulties. Complete local control was accomplished in seven patients, a partial response in four patients. The results of therapeutic heating and its relationship to the site of treatment and local control are presented, along with phantom studies of Ultrasound microwave hyperthermia reemphasizing the feasibility of using Ultrasound Hyperthermia

  18. THE FIRST EXPERIENCE OF USING LOCAL HYPERTHERMIA IN COMBINED MODALITY TREATMENT OF OPERABLE NON-SMALL CELL LUNG CANCER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Yu. Dobrodeev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the first experience in treating 5 patients with stage II–III non-small cell lung cancer using combined modality treatment including 40 Gy preoperative hyperfractionated radiotherapy with concurrent 2 cycles of paclitaxel/carboplatin chemotherapy and local hyperthermia (10 sessions followed by radical surgery. The overal response rate to preoperative treatment was 80 %. Chemotherapy was well tolerated and hyperthermia resulted no in adverse effects. All patients underwent surgery (4 lobectomies and 1 pneumonectomy. No complications were observed in the postoperative period. The follow-up period ranged from 6 to 20 months. No evidence of disease progression and radiation-induced damages were observed.

  19. Effect of late planting and shading on cellulose synthesis during cotton fiber secondary wall development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Chen

    Full Text Available Cotton-rapeseed or cotton-wheat double cropping systems are popular in the Yangtze River Valley and Yellow River Valley of China. Due to the competition of temperature and light resources during the growing season of double cropping system, cotton is generally late-germinating and late-maturing and has to suffer from the coupling of declining temperature and low light especially in the late growth stage. In this study, late planting (LP and shading were used to fit the coupling stress, and the coupling effect on fiber cellulose synthesis was investigated. Two cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L. cultivars were grown in the field in 2010 and 2011 at three planting dates (25 April, 25 May and 10 June each with three shading levels (normal light, declined 20% and 40% PAR. Mean daily minimum temperature was the primary environmental factor affected by LP. The coupling of LP and shading (decreased cellulose content by 7.8%-25.5% produced more severe impacts on cellulose synthesis than either stress alone, and the effect of LP (decreased cellulose content by 6.7%-20.9% was greater than shading (decreased cellulose content by 0.7%-5.6%. The coupling of LP and shading hindered the flux from sucrose to cellulose by affecting the activities of related cellulose synthesis enzymes. Fiber cellulose synthase genes expression were delayed under not only LP but shading, and the coupling of LP and shading markedly postponed and even restrained its expression. The decline of sucrose-phosphate synthase activity and its peak delay may cause cellulose synthesis being more sensitive to the coupling stress during the later stage of fiber secondary wall development (38-45 days post-anthesis. The sensitive difference of cellulose synthesis between two cultivars in response to the coupling of LP and shading may be mainly determined by the sensitiveness of invertase, sucrose-phosphate synthase and cellulose synthase.

  20. 5-HT1A receptor blockade reverses GABA(A) receptor alpha(3) subunit-mediated anxiolytic effects on stress-induced hyperthermia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinkers, Christiaan H.; van Oorschot, Ruud; Korte, S. Mechiel; Olivier, Berend; Groenink, Lucianne

    Stress-related disorders are associated with dysfunction of both serotonergic and GABAergic pathways, and clinically effective anxiolytics act via both neurotransmitter systems. As there is evidence that the GABA(A) and the serotonin receptor system interact, a serotonergic component in the

  1. Eight-MHz RF-hyperthermia for advanced urological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisazumi, Haruo; Nakajima, Kazuyoshi

    1986-01-01

    Eight-MHz radiofrequency hyperthermia (H) using a Thermotron-RF Model 8, and its combination with irradiation (RH), anticancer drugs (CH) or anticancer drugs plus irradiation (CRH), were carried out for a total of 48 urological malignancies: 10 cases of renal cancer, 1 of renal pelvic cancer, 2 of uretetral cancer, 19 of bladder cancer, 5 of prostatic cancer, 9 of metastatic lesion of urological cancers and 2 of other urological cancers. All had failed in previous treatments, or had not undergone surgery because of their poor general condition. Four cases, including 2 of bladder cancer, 1 of prostatic cancer and 1 of metastatic lesion of bladder cancer, were treated with H. Twenty-five cases, including 3 renal cancer cases, were treated with RH. Seven of the 10 cases of renal cancer were treated with mitomycin C-microcapsule embolization prior to RH (CRH). Twelve of the 23 cases with urothelial cancer or its metastasis, including 1 of renal pelvic cancer, 10 of bladder cancer and 1 of metastatic lesion of bladder cancer, received combined treatment of THP-adriamycin, one of the derivatives of adriamycin, by i.v. and RF-heating (CH). Hyperthermia was given twice a week, totalling 10 sessions in 5 weeks. Intratumoral temperature was kept above 42.5 deg C for 30 to 40 minutes during one-hour heating. Complete tumor disappearance was obtained in the 5 bladder cancer cases. Partial tumor regression, defined as a regression of 50 % or more, was obtained in 11 cases. As side effects, mild skin burns and anorexia were observed in approximately 30 to 40 % of cases. Seven obese cases, who had subcutaneous tissue 15 mm thick or more, developed fat tissue induration after treatment. (author)

  2. Thermal dosimetry for bladder hyperthermia treatment. An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schooneveldt, Gerben; Bakker, Akke; Balidemaj, Edmond; Chopra, Rajiv; Crezee, Johannes; Geijsen, Elisabeth D; Hartmann, Josefin; Hulshof, Maarten C C M; Kok, H Petra; Paulides, Margarethus M; Sousa-Escandon, Alejandro; Stauffer, Paul R; Maccarini, Paolo F

    2016-06-01

    The urinary bladder is a fluid-filled organ. This makes, on the one hand, the internal surface of the bladder wall relatively easy to heat and ensures in most cases a relatively homogeneous temperature distribution; on the other hand the variable volume, organ motion, and moving fluid cause artefacts for most non-invasive thermometry methods, and require additional efforts in planning accurate thermal treatment of bladder cancer. We give an overview of the thermometry methods currently used and investigated for hyperthermia treatments of bladder cancer, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages within the context of the specific disease (muscle-invasive or non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer) and the heating technique used. The role of treatment simulation to determine the thermal dose delivered is also discussed. Generally speaking, invasive measurement methods are more accurate than non-invasive methods, but provide more limited spatial information; therefore, a combination of both is desirable, preferably supplemented by simulations. Current efforts at research and clinical centres continue to improve non-invasive thermometry methods and the reliability of treatment planning and control software. Due to the challenges in measuring temperature across the non-stationary bladder wall and surrounding tissues, more research is needed to increase our knowledge about the penetration depth and typical heating pattern of the various hyperthermia devices, in order to further improve treatments. The ability to better determine the delivered thermal dose will enable clinicians to investigate the optimal treatment parameters, and consequentially, to give better controlled, thus even more reliable and effective, thermal treatments.

  3. Combined transperineal radiofrequency (RF) interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer (PC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urakami, Shinji; Gonda, Nobuko; Kikuno, Nobuyuki

    2001-01-01

    Hyperthermia has been used effectively as a radiation sensitizer. Interstitial hyperthermoradiotherapy has been therefore utilized as a minimal invasive therapy in attempts to improve local tumor control for various cancers, but not for urological cancer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and feasibility of transperineal hyperthermoradiotherapy for localized PC. Based on our basic study of hyperthermoradiotherapy, we devised the procedure of combined transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia and brachytherapy for localized prostate cancer. Two patients with localized PC underwent transperineal RF interstitial hyperthermia combined with brachytherapy operation the 192-Ir remote after-loading system (RALS). Under transrectal ultrasound guidance, a total number of 12-18 stainless steel needles for 192-Ir RALS were implanted into the prostatic gland and seminal vesicles (SV) in an optimized pattern. Eight of the needles were used as electrodes for hyperthermia, and were electrically insultated using the vinyl catheter along the length of the subdermal fatty tissue to protect from overheating. Three other needles were utilized for continuous temperature mapping in the prostate. Rectal temperature was also monitored. Total radiation doses of 70 Gy to the prostate and SV were planned as a combination of brachytherapy (24 Gy/4 fraction) and external irradiation using a four-field box technique (46 Gy/23 fraction). Hyperthermic treatment (goal of 42 to 43 deg C for 60 minutes) was performed twice following the 1st and 4th brachytherapy at an interval of more than 48 hours for the recovery of cancer cells from thermotolerance. Both patients reached the treatment goal of all intraprostatic temperatures >43.0 deg C, which was considered favorable for hyperthermia, and the rectal temperatures of both patients remained <38 deg C during hyperthermia. In serial PSA measurements of both patients, serum PSA was less than 1.0 ng/ml within 3 months and has since

  4. Experimental examinations of the late effect of ionizing radiation in fowl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djukic, B.; Rusov, C.

    1975-01-01

    Late effects of X-irradiation on the reproductive system of chickens and on the leukosis rate were determined. No cases of leukosis were observed in White Rock and Leghorn chickens, which were irradiated with 500 R at the age of 1, 6 and 12 days. Aplasia of reproductive organs was recorded in 84% of the animals, whereas in 12% hypoplasia of oviduct and ovary took place. In Leghorn chickens which were irradiated with 400 R at the age of 1 and 6 days and parallely treated with methyl methanosulphonate, leukosis was established in 8% of all treated animals, i.e. in 22% of chickens that survived the acute toxic effect

  5. Late effects of tumour treatment. Structural changes in the spinal column seen on X-ray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutyahr, P; Greinacher, I; Kutzner, J [Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Kinderklinik; Mainz Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Klinische Strahlenkunde)

    1976-06-01

    Cure rates are increasing in pediatric oncology; simultaneously the numbers of late effects of therapy are also increasing. 64 children with malignant neoplastic disease in whom the spine had been partially or totally exposed during X-ray treatment were re-investigated for radiographically visible irradiation effects on the vertebral column. 140 different abnormalities were found in 56 children of which scolioses were the most important. Irradiation for Wilms' tumour produced more numerous changes than direct irradiation of the vertebral column. In spite of the unexpectedly high number of growth defects rigorous X-ray treatment is indicated in certain circumstances. The growth abnormalities were of only minor clinical significance.

  6. Effects of Group Prenatal Care on Food Insecurity during Late Pregnancy and Early Postpartum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberlein, Emily C; Frongillo, Edward A; Picklesimer, Amy H; Covington-Kolb, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    This study compared the effects of group to individual prenatal care in late pregnancy and early postpartum on (1) women's food security and (2) psychosocial outcomes among food-insecure women. We recruited 248 racially diverse, low-income, pregnant women receiving CenteringPregnancy™ group prenatal care (N = 124) or individual prenatal care (N = 124) to complete surveys in early pregnancy, late pregnancy, and early postpartum, with 84 % completing three surveys. Twenty-six percent of group and 31 % of individual care participants reported food insecurity in early pregnancy (p = 0.493). In multiple logistic regression models, women choosing group versus individual care were more likely to report food security in late pregnancy (0.85 vs. 0.66 average predicted probability, p care average predicted probability, p care average predicted probability, p = 0.052) in intention-to-treat models. Group participants were more likely to change perceptions on affording healthy foods and stretching food resources. Group compared to individual care participants with early pregnancy food insecurity demonstrated higher maternal-infant attachment scale scores (89.8 vs. 86.2 points for individual care, p = 0.032). Group prenatal care provides health education and the opportunity for women to share experiences and knowledge, which may improve food security through increasing confidence and skills in managing household food resources. Health sector interventions can complement food assistance programs in addressing food insecurity during pregnancy.

  7. Part-body hyperthermia with a radiofrequency multiantenna applicator under online control in 1,5 T MR-tomograph

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wust, P.; Gellermann, J.; Faehling, H.; Wlodarczyk, W.; Felix, R.; Seebass, M.; Turner, P.; Nadobny, J.; Rau, B.; Hildebrandt, B.; Schlag, P.M.; Oppelt, A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective of this study is the integration of a multiantenna applicator for part-body hyperthermia (BSD 2000/3D) in a 1.5 T MR-tomograph (Siemens Magnetom Symphony) in order to perform noninvasive MR monitoring in real time to increase safety and effectiveness of heat treatments. The positioning unit is mechanically coupled to the MR gantry from the back side and the body coil is utilised for imaging. For that purpose, the hyperthermia antenna system (100 MHz, 1.500 W) and the MR receiver(63.9 MHs) have to be decoupled in terms of high frequency (filter) and electromagnetically (emc). The processing of MR data sets is performed in a hyperthermia planning system. A simultaneous operation of radiofrequency hyperthermia and MR system is possible at clinically relevant power levels. MR imaging is used for tumor diagnostics (standard spin echo sequences), for hyperthermia planning (T1-weighted gradient echo sequences in equal- and opposed-phase techniques), and for temperature measurements according to the proton resonance frequency method (PRF method, phase evaluation registration using a gradient echo sequence with long echo time). In 33 patients with advanced pelvic and abdominal tumors we performed 150 heat sessions under MR monitoring. For 70% of these patients a visualisation of temperature sensitive data during treatment was possible. The evaluated difference images represent a superposition of real temperature increase and a (temperature-induced) perfusion elevation. The hybrid approach renders development of part body hyperthermia possible as an MR-controlled intervention in radiology. (orig.) [de

  8. Recognizing and managing a malignant hyperthermia crisis: guidelines from the European Malignant Hyperthermia Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glahn, K P E; Ellis, F R; Halsall, P J

    2010-01-01

    Survival from a malignant hyperthermia (MH) crisis is highly dependent on early recognition and prompt action. MH crises are very rare and an increasing use of total i.v. anaesthesia is likely to make it even rarer, leading to the potential risk of reduced awareness of MH. In addition, dantrolene....... The guidelines consist of two textboxes: Box 1 on recognizing MH and Box 2 on the treatment of an MH crisis....

  9. Late health effects of radiation. Knowledge gained through 60 years experience in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Shunichi

    2005-01-01

    The proceedings begin with Preface by World Health Organization (WHO) and Message from Nagasaki University, and contain the topics of Health studies on atomic bomb survivors, WHO programs on radiation and health, Round-table discussion, and Special articles. The first topic involves the Radiation effects studies of RERF (Radiation Effects Research Foundation, the Japanese-US research organization focused on the study of health effects of radiation in survivors of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki), Activities at the atomic bomb survivors health care commission, Late health effects of atomic bomb survivors, Late medical effects of atomic bombs still persisting after over sixty years, Solid cancer incidence among atomic bomb survivors/ preliminary data from a second follow-up, and Multiple primary cancers in Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. The second; Key radiation projects at the WHO, The role of the WHO in strengthening capacity of the member states for preparedness and response to radiation emergencies, and Diagnostic imaging in a global perspective. A moderator and 8 discussants concerned with topics above give their issues in the third topic. Special articles describe about Historical role of L. S. Taylor in American radiation safety and protection, and Responsibility beyond 60 years. (T.I.)

  10. Modification of radiosensitivity of mammalian cells by means of hyperthermia and chemical agent. Coordinated programme on improvement of cancer therapy by the combination of treatment by conventional radiation and physical or chemical means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djordjevic, O.

    1984-11-01

    The effect of the treatment of the cultured mammalian cells with a relatively new anti-cancer drug teniposide (VM26), radiation (4 Gy), hyperthermia (42 deg. C and 45 deg. C) and caffeine, in various combinations, has been studied. The following conclusions can be drawn from the data obtained: The cultured mammalian cells respond to the anti-cancer drug VM26 treatment in a dose and time dependent manner. Significant potentiation of cell killing was demonstrated when they are exposed simultaneously to VM26 and hyperthermia. Post-treatment incubation of the cells in non-toxic concentration of caffeine (2 mM) has produced a marked potentiation of the lethal effect, indicating that caffeine interferes with the repair processes in these cells. Combination of VM26, hyperthermia and caffeine produced a maximum killing effect compared to VM26 treatment only. When the cells are exposed to initial (90 min. at 42 deg. C or 40 min. at 45 deg. C) and subsequent hyperthermia (60 min. at 42 deg. C or 60 min. at 45 deg. C) the thermotolerance will develop depending on the degree of initial and subsequent temperature. The combination of hyperthermia with irradiation results in a potentiation of the effect of treatment compared to the treatment with only irradiation or hyperthermia. Maximum killing of the cells will be obtained when irradiation is applied immediately after hyperthermia. The results obtained should be regarded as useful in case of clinical application of the tested agents

  11. Water dispersible superparamagnetic Cobalt iron oxide nanoparticles for magnetic fluid hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salunkhe, Ashwini B. [Centre for advanced materials research, Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India); Soft matter and molecular biophysics group, Department of Applied Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Khot, Vishwajeet M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom); Ruso, Juan M. [Soft matter and molecular biophysics group, Department of Applied Physics, University of Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Patil, S.I., E-mail: patil@physics.unipune.ac.in [Centre for advanced materials research, Department of Physics, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007 (India)

    2016-12-01

    Superparamagnetic nanoparticles of Cobalt iron oxide (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) are synthesized chemically, and dispersed in an aqueous suspension for hyperthermia therapy application. Different parameters such as magnetic field intensity, particle concentration which regulates the competence of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticle as a heating agents in hyperthermia are investigated. Specific absorption rate (SAR) decreases with increase in the particle concentration and increases with increase in applied magnetic field intensity. Highest value of SAR is found to be 91.84 W g{sup −1} for 5 mg. mL{sup −1} concentration. Oleic acid conjugated polyethylene glycol (OA-PEG) coated CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles have shown superior cyto-compatibility over uncoated nanoparticles to L929 mice fibroblast cell lines for concentrations below 2 mg. mL{sup −1}. Present work provides the underpinning for the use of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles as a potential heating mediator for magnetic fluid hyperthermia. - Highlights: • Superparamagnetic, water dispersible CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs were synthesized by simple and cost effective Co precipitation route. • Effect of coating on various physical and chemical properties of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} NPs were studied. • The effect of coating on induction heating as well as biocompatibility of NPs were studied.

  12. Chemotherapy and Radiofrequency-Induced Mild Hyperthermia Combined Treatment of Orthotopic Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzykawska-Serda, Martyna; Agha, Mahdi S; Ho, Jason Chak-Shing; Ware, Matthew J; Law, Justin J; Newton, Jared M; Nguyen, Lam; Curley, Steven A; Corr, Stuart J

    2018-04-02

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) have one of the poorest survival rates of all cancers. The main reason for this is related to the unique tumor stroma and poor vascularization of PDAC. As a consequence, chemotherapeutic drugs, such as nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine, cannot efficiently penetrate into the tumor tissue. Non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) mild hyperthermia treatment was proposed as a synergistic therapy to enhance drug uptake into the tumor by increasing tumor vascular inflow and perfusion, thus, increasing the effect of chemotherapy. RF-induced hyperthermia is a safer and non-invasive technique of tumor heating compared to conventional contact heating procedures. In this study, we investigated the short- and long-term effects (~20 days and 65 days, respectively) of combination chemotherapy and RF hyperthermia in an orthotopic PDAC model in mice. The benefit of nab-paclitaxel and gemcitabine treatment was confirmed in mice; however, the effect of treatment was statistically insignificant in comparison to saline treated mice during long-term observation. The benefit of RF was minimal in the short-term and completely insignificant during long-term observation. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Late adverse effects of whole cranial irradiation in childhood hematological disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Someya, Masanori; Nakata, Kensei; Nagakura, Hisayasu; Oouchi, Atsushi; Sakata, Kohichi; Hareyama, Masato [Sapporo Medical Coll. (Japan)

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the late adverse effects of childhood hematological disorders treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy including whole cranial irradiation at Sapporo Medical University Hospital. Twenty-eight patients were treated with chemotherapy and 18-24 Gy of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and 14 patients were treated with 3-12.8 Gy of total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) for ALL, acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), malignant lymphoma, and aplastic anemia (AA). Age at diagnosis ranged from 2 to 15 years old, and 28 were males and 14 were females. All patients were disease-free more than 2 years after diagnosis. Of 42 patients, 4 patients had decreased height (less than -2 S.D.), 3 patients required hormone replacement therapy, 2 patients had mental retardation, 3 patients had leukoencephalopathy, and 1 patient had a second malignancy. Except for the cases of decreased height, 3 of 7 late adverse effects were occurred in patients who had relapse of disease, and the risk of the adverse effects seemed to be higher for those patients whose doses of PCI were 22 Gy or more, or who received an additional craniospinal irradiation due to relapse of disease, and 18 Gy of PCI did not increase the risk of adverse effects. (author)

  14. Analgesic effect of breast milk versus sucrose for analgesia during heel lance in late preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonse, Eva; Mulder, Paul G H; van Beek, Ron H T

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this trial was to investigate whether breast milk (either breastfed or bottle-fed) has a better analgesic effect than sucrose in newborns born at a postmenstrual age between 32 and 37 weeks. We conducted a randomized controlled trial at a secondary care neonatal unit in the Netherlands on 71 preterm neonates (postmenstrual age at birth 32-37 weeks), undergoing heel lance with an automated piercing device. Newborns were randomly assigned to breast milk (either breastfed or bottle-fed) administered during heel lance or oral sucrose administered before heel lance. We assessed the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) score (range, 0-21) to investigate whether there was a difference in pain score between neonates receiving breast milk and those receiving sucrose solution. There was no significant difference in mean PIPP score between neonates receiving breast milk (6.1) and those receiving sucrose (5.5), with a mean difference of 0.6 (95% confidence interval -1.6 to 2.8; P = .58). From this study, it cannot be concluded that breast milk has a better analgesic effect than sucrose in late preterm infants. From the results, it follows with 95% confidence that the analgesic effect of breast milk is not >1.6 points better and not > 2.8 points worse on the PIPP scale (SD 3.7) than the analgesic effect of sucrose in late preterm infants.

  15. Assessment of acute and late effects to high-LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blakely, E.A.; Castro, J.R.; California Univ., San Francisco, CA

    1994-11-01

    We have begun to reassess late tissue effects available from the Charged Particle Cancer Radiotherapy program at Berkeley. Our quantitative approach is limited in the analysis of these Phase I/II studies by not having equivalent patient numbers for each of the particle beams studied, by not having completely comparable follow-up times, by variations in the sizes of the fields compared, by variations in the skin scoring photographic documentation available from the patient charts, and by variations in the fractionation sizes, numbers and schedules. Despite these limitations, preliminary evidence demonstrates acute skin reactions with a shift to increasing lower dose per fraction per field for the maximum skin reactions of helium, carbon and neon ions compared to electrons. Comparisons with skin reactions from low-energy neutrons indicate that Bragg peak carbon ions (initial energy 308 MeV/nucleon) are slightly less effective than 7.5 MeV neutrons. Bragg peak neon ions (initial energy 670 MeV/nucleon) corrected for differences in reference radiation are slightly more effective than 7.5 MeV neutrons. Bragg peak silicon (initial energy 670 MeV/nucleon) result in an enhanced acute skin reaction, and a premature appearance of late effects that may indicate a significantly different mechanism of damage and/or repair

  16. Looking for trouble: Adherence to late-effects surveillance among childhood cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reppucci, Marina L; Schleien, Charles L; Fish, Jonathan D

    2017-02-01

    Childhood cancer survivors (CCSs) are at high risk of morbidity and mortality from long-term complications of their cancer treatment. The Children's Oncology Group developed screening guidelines to enable the early identification of and intervention for late effects of cancer treatment. There is a paucity of data on the adherence of CCSs to screening recommendations. A retrospective analysis of medical records to evaluate the rate of adherence of CCSs to the personalized, risk-based recommendations provided to them in the context of a structured long-term follow-up program over a 3-year period. Two hundred eighty-six CCSs visited the survivorship clinic 542 times during the 3-year study period. The overall rate of adherence to recommended screening was 74.2%. Using a univariate model and greater age at diagnosis and at screening recommendation were associated with decreased screening adherence. Gender, cancer diagnosis, radiation therapy, anthracycline exposure, and hematopoietic stem cell transplant were not significantly associated with adherence. In a multivariate model, age over 18 years at the time of the visit was significantly associated with decreased adherence (P < 0.0329) (odds ratio: 1.53, 95% confidence interval: 1.04-2.25). Adherence to recommended screening tests is suboptimal among CCSs, with lower rates of adherence in CCSs older than 18 years of age compared with those younger than 18 years of age. Given the morbidity and mortality from the late effects of therapy among young adult CCSs, it is critically important to identify and remove barriers to late-effects screening among CCSs. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Current Status and Perspectives of Hyperthermia in Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nagata, Yasushi; Mitsumori, Michihide; Sakamoto, Masashi; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro

    2004-08-01

    Clinical trials of hyperthermia in combination with radiation therapy or chemotherapy undertaken over the past decades in Japan have been reviewed. Originally developed heating devices were mostly used for these trials, which include RF (radiofrequency) capacitive heating devices, a microwave heating device with a lens applicator, an RF intracavitary heating device, an RF current interstitial heating device, and ferromagnetic implant heating device. Non-randomized trials for various cancers, demonstrated higher response rate in thermoradiotherapy than in radiotherapy alone. Randomized trials undertaken for esophageal cancers also demonstrated improved local response with the combined use of hyperthermia. Furthermore, the complications associated with treatment were not generally serious. These clinical results indicate the benefit of combined treatment of hyperthermia and radiotherapy for various malignancies. On the other hand, the presently available heating devices are not satisfactory from the clinical viewpoints. With the advancement of heating and thermometry technologies, hyperthermia will be more widely and safely used in the treatment of cancers.

  18. Late effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. Studies of the resident population in the Semipalatinsk area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenson, R.I.; Tchaijunusova, N.J.; Gusev, B.I.; Katoh, O.; Kimura, A.; Hoshi, M.; Kamada, N.; Satow, Y.

    1995-01-01

    The early and late radiation effects on residents of the nuclear test site in Semipalatinsk, Kazakhstan, were studied. In Semipalatinsk area hundreds of on-the-ground and underground nuclear tests had been conducted between 1949 and 1989. The collected biological data was investigated in terms of the following points, i.e., cancer incidence, mortality rates from malignant tumors, infant mortality and congenital anomalies, overall mortality, hemopoiesis, chromosomal aberrations in the somatic cells, immune system parameters, cardiovascular system findings, and thyroid gland disorders. The individual points were investigated according to the exposure level, resident areas, years after exposure, age, and sex. The significant findings are given and discussed. (S.Y.)

  19. Investigations about late effects of exclusive radiotherapy of tumors of the epipharynx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richter, E

    1982-09-01

    The late effects of ionizing radiation after radiotherapeutic healing of malignant tumors are of great interest. A report is given on sixteen patients with a malignant tumor of the epipharynx, who had been exclusively treated by radiotherapy and are regarded as cured. Only four of these patients had no complaints when examined, the others presented symptoms which were partly due to radiotherapy. The most important symptoms were rhinitis sicca and pharyngitis sicca induced by radiation. The complaints now indicated by the patients and the results of thorough clinical examinations are discussed and compared to communications of literature.

  20. Effects of late-gestation heat stress on immunity and performance of calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, G E; Tao, S; Monteiro, A P A

    2016-04-01

    Lactating cows that experience heat stress will have reduced dry matter intake and milk yield and shift metabolism, which ultimately reduces the efficiency of milk production. Dry cows that are heat stressed similarly experience lower intake, reduced mammary growth, and compromised immune function that ultimately results in a poorer transition into lactation and lower milk yield in the next lactation. A recent focus in our laboratory is on the effects of late gestation, in utero heat stress on calf survival and performance. We have completed a series of studies to examine preweaning growth and health, and later reproductive and productive responses, in an attempt to quantify acute and persistent effects of in utero heat strain. Late gestation heat stress results in calves with lower body weight at birth, shorter stature at weaning, and failure to achieve the same weight or height at 12 mo of age observed in calves from dams that are cooled when dry. A portion of the reduced growth may result from the lower immune status observed in calves heat stressed in utero, which begins with poorer apparent efficiency of immunoglobulin absorption and extends to lower survival rates through puberty. Heat-stressed calves, however, have permanent shifts in metabolism that are consistent with greater peripheral accumulation of energy and less lean growth relative to those from cooled dams. Comparing reproductive performance in calves heat stressed versus those cooled in utero, we observe that the cooled heifers require fewer services to attain pregnancy and become pregnant at an earlier age. Tracking the milk production in calves that were heat stressed in utero versus those cooled in late gestation revealed a significant reduction of yield in the first lactation, approximately 5 kg/d through 35 wk of lactation, despite similar body weight and condition score at calving. These observations indicate that a relatively brief period of heat stress in late gestation dramatically alters

  1. Growth hormone deficiency and hyperthermia during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, A; Hjortskov, N; Jepsen, Leif

    1995-01-01

    -deficiency may be at risk for developing hyperthermia. To pursue this, we performed a controlled study on sweating and body temperature regulation during exercise in the heat in 16 GH-treated GH-deficient patients with normalized insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor/binding protein-3 serum.......001]. Consequently, the core temperatures of the patients increased significantly after exercise compared with those of the CTs [38.3 C (0.10 C) (MPD) and 38.1 C (0.06 C) (isolated GH deficiency) vs. 37.5 C (0.2 C) (CTs) (P temperature increased significantly during exercise in the patients...... but remained unaltered in the CTs. Sweat secretion rates, as determined by the pilocarpine method, were significantly lower in the MPD patients [77 (SE +/- 10) mg/30 min] than in the CTs [115 (SE +/- 7) mg/30 min] (P

  2. Malignant Hyperthermia and Idiopathic HyperCKemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashtoon Murtaza Kasi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant hyperthermia (MH is a rare but life-threatening condition that is more frequently encountered and discussed within the anesthesia literature. Here we through a case specifically discuss the susceptibility of individuals and/or families with asymptomatic unexplained elevations of creatine kinase (CK, also frequently referred to as hyperCKemia or idiopathic hyperCKemia (IHCK in recent reports. The clinical implications would be to underscore the importance of this as a susceptibility to developing MH and highlight the importance of genetic susceptibility testing in such cases. Anesthesiologists and critical care intensivists as well as primary care physicians should keep this in mind when seeing patients with asymptomatic hyperCKemia and potentially inform them about the possibility of developing MH if exposed to triggering agents. Genetic susceptibility testing should be considered if available and family members should also receive nontriggering agents when undergoing anesthesia and wear Medic Alert tags.

  3. Partial body hyperthermia: a potent radioprotector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baydoun, S.; Alya, GH.; Taleb, M.; Mohammad, A.

    1995-12-01

    With the aim to investigate the potential role of some radioprotectors, partial body hyperthermia (PBH) was tested as a protector against the lethality induced by γ irradiation. Two groups of Wistar rats [gr.(1): Females and gr.(2): Males] were treated with PBH by 'dipping' the lower parts of the animals in water-bath at 43 C for 1 hr. Animals were, then, irradiated with a lethal dose of γ radiation (9 Gy) 20 hrs post PBH. Our results show that: -PHB has a protecting role against the lethality induced by γ irradiation with a protection factor [Survival in rats treated with PBH and radiation / survival in rats treated with radiation] of 10 in gr.(1) and 7 in gr.(2) - The role of PBH was more enhanced in females As compared with males. (author). 19 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  4. Partial Body Hyperthermia: A Potent radioprotector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baydoun, S.A.; Mohammad, A.; Alya, Gh.; Taleb, M.

    1998-01-01

    With the aim to investigate the potential role of some radioprotectors, partial body hyperthermia (PBH) was tested as a protector against the lethality induced by gamma-irradiation. Two groups of Wistar rats [ gr. (1): females and gr. (2): males] were treated with PBH by dipping the lower parts of the animals in water-bath at 43 degree for 1 hr. Animals were, then, irradiated with a lethal dose of gamma-radiation (9 Gy) 20 hr s post PBH. Our results show that: PBH has a protecting role against the lethality induced by gamma-irradiation with a protection factor [survival in rats treated with PBH and radiation/ survival in rats treated with radiation] of 10 in gr.(1) and 7 in gr. (2). The role of PBH was more enhanced in females as compared with males

  5. Destruction of radiation-resistant cell populations by hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roettinger, E.M.; Gerweck, L.E.

    1979-01-01

    Animal experiments with local hyperthermia have shown that the radiauion dose necessary for the local control of 50% of the tumours examined was essentially reduced by heating to 42,5 0 C. In-vitro experients indicated selective destruction of relatively radiation-resistent cell populations by the combination of hyperthermie and reduced hydrogen ion concentration. Experiments with glioblastoma cells confirmed these results qualitatively, but showed quantitatively considerably lower sensitivity towards hyperthermia. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 RDG [de

  6. The application of hyperthermia in regional chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Filippo, F; Anzà, M; Rossi, C R; Cavaliere, F; Botti, C; Lise, M; Garinei, R; Giannarelli, D; Vasselli, S; Zupi, G; Cavaliere, R

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the role of hyperthermia combined with chemotherapy in the loco-regional treatment of tumors, a retrospective analysis was done with 228 limb melanoma patients treated with hyperthermic antiblastic perfusion (HAP). A series of treatment- and tumor-related prognostic factors was analyzed to establish their influence on tumor response, loco-regional control, and survival. Concerning tumor response, the logistic model showed that the number of lesions and the minimal tumor temperature (min T) maintained their individual predictive values (P < 0.000001 and P = 0.04, respectively). For loco-regional control, only the number of lesions had a significant predictive value. No direct correlation was found between the treatment-related variables and loco-regional control. However, the 5-year survival rate was significantly higher for patients who achieved a complete response (CR) (51.5%, P = 0.0033) as compared to those who did not (33.3%), providing indirect evidence of the role of the treatment. Multivariate analysis showed that both disease-free and overall survival are strongly influenced by numerous clinical variables and the min T always maintained its significance. When analyzing the subgroup of 119 patients evaluable for tumor response, the Cox model selected the tumor response as the dominant factor for both disease-free and overall survival. These data seem to demonstrate that the optimization of treatment parameters is crucial in determining the CR rate, which, in turn, positively affects the disease outcome. HAP is the treatment of choice for recurrent limb melanoma, and hyperthermia plays an important role in exploiting the efficacy of this technique.

  7. Transient mild hyperthermia induces E-selectin mediated localization of mesoporous silicon vectors in solid tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickson K Kirui

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hyperthermia treatment has been explored as a strategy to overcome biological barriers that hinder effective drug delivery in solid tumors. Most studies have used mild hyperthermia treatment (MHT to target the delivery of thermo-sensitive liposomes carriers. Others have studied its application to permeabilize tumor vessels and improve tumor interstitial transport. However, the role of MHT in altering tumor vessel interfacial and adhesion properties and its relationship to improved delivery has not been established. In the present study, we evaluated effects of MHT treatment on tumor vessel flow dynamics and expression of adhesion molecules and assessed enhancement in particle localization using mesoporous silicon vectors (MSVs. We also determined the optimal time window at which maximal accumulation occur. RESULTS: In this study, using intravital microscopy analyses, we showed that temporal mild hyperthermia (∼1 W/cm(2 amplified delivery and accumulation of MSVs in orthotopic breast cancer tumors. The number of discoidal MSVs (1000×400 nm adhering to tumor vasculature increased 6-fold for SUM159 tumors and 3-fold for MCF-7 breast cancer tumors. By flow chamber experiments and Western blotting, we established that a temporal increase in E-selectin expression correlated with enhanced particle accumulation. Furthermore, MHT treatment was shown to increase tumor perfusion in a time-dependent fashion. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings reveal that well-timed mild hyperthermia treatment can transiently elevate tumor transport and alter vascular adhesion properties and thereby provides a means to enhance tumor localization of non-thermally sensitive particles such as MSVs. Such enhancement in accumulation could be leveraged to increase therapeutic efficacy and reduce drug dosing in cancer therapy.

  8. Late endocrine effects of cancer and cancer therapies in survivors of childhood malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Pedro; Van Huellen, Hans; Fitzpatrick, Ailbhe; Druce, Maralyn

    2016-03-01

    The development of several cancer treatment modalities including surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy has improved the survival rates of childhood cancers over recent decades, leading to an increase in the population of childhood cancer survivors. Detailed epidemiological studies have demonstrated that childhood cancer survivors frequently develop medical complications months or years after cancer treatment. Endocrine complications are common in survivors, particularly those exposed to radiotherapy, total body irradiation and alkylating agents, and may involve dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary axes, gonads, thyroid gland, bone and body composition as well as metabolic abnormalities. Early identification and proper management of these disorders can significantly improve the quality of life and reduce the morbidity and potentially mortality in this population. Multidisciplinary teams, expert physicians and the development of healthcare structures are key elements for improving the screening, surveillance, cost effectiveness and overall management of endocrine late effects of cancer therapies in childhood cancer survivors. The aim of the present review was to discuss the most important and common late endocrine effects of childhood cancer treatment.

  9. Late effects of chronic low dose-rate γ-rays irradiation on mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Satoshi; Sasagawa, Sumiko; Ichinohe, Kazuaki; Matsumoto, Tsuneya; Otsu, Hiroshi; Sato, Fumiaki

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate late biological effects of chronic low dose-rate radiation, we are conducting two experiments. Experiment 1 - Late effects of chronic low dose-rate g-rays irradiation on SPF mice, using life-span and pathological changes as parameters. Continuous irradiation with g-rays for 400 days was performed using 137 Cs γ-rays at dose-rates of 20 mGy/day, 1 mGy/day and 0.05 mGy/day with accumulated doses equivalent to 8,000 mGy, 400 mGy and 20 mGy, respectively. All mice were kept until they died a natural death. As of 2002 March 31, 3,999 of the total 4,000 mice have died. Preliminary analyses of data show that 20 mGy/day suggested a shortened life span in both sexes. Partial results show that the most common lethal neoplasms in the pooled data of non-irradiated control and irradiated male mice, in order of frequency, were neoplasms of the lymphohematopoietic system, liver, and lung. In female mice, neoplasms of the lymphohematopoietic system, soft tissue, and endocrine system were common. Experiment 2 - Effects on the progeny of chronic low dose-rate g-ray irradiated SPF mice: pilot study, was started in 1999 and is currently in progress. (author)

  10. Late effects of treatment in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, P.

    1987-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was a comprehensive assessment of the nature and severity of the late effects of treatment in a group of children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. In the absence of damage preceding treatment, late effects could be ascribed to treatment. Cranial irradiation, methotrexate, L-asparaginase and cytosine arabinoside are therapeutic modalities most likely to cause injury to the central nervous system. Survivors of childhood leukaemia also showed an increase in weight-for-height during and after therapy which appeared to be the consequence of a loss in statural growth as well as increasing weight-for-age. Assessment of endocrine function in leukaemia survivors indicated abnormalities in the regulation of growth hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone in some patients. Survivors of childhood leukaemia were shown to have an intellectual deficit compared with their siblings and a high incidence of visual-perceptual defects. The intellectual effects of lower doses of cranial irradiation are as yet unknown. A variety of minor neurological abnormalities were detected among leukaemia survivors and thought to be related to preceding central nervous system 'prophylactic' chemotherapy and irradiation. A new instrument, the functional deficit score, was derived to reflect overall outcome in survivors of childhood leukaemia. With few exceptions, leukaemia survivors in this study had received 2400 rads of deep x-ray therapy as cranial irradiation. This dosage has since been reduced world-wide. Current cranial irradiation 'prophylaxis' consists of 1800 rad of megavoltage radiotherapy

  11. Late effects of treatment in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, P

    1987-01-01

    The overall aim of this study was a comprehensive assessment of the nature and severity of the late effects of treatment in a group of children surviving acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. In the absence of damage preceding treatment, late effects could be ascribed to treatment. Cranial irradiation, methotrexate, L-asparaginase and cytosine arabinoside are therapeutic modalities most likely to cause injury to the central nervous system. Survivors of childhood leukaemia also showed an increase in weight-for-height during and after therapy which appeared to be the consequence of a loss in statural growth as well as increasing weight-for-age. Assessment of endocrine function in leukaemia survivors indicated abnormalities in the regulation of growth hormone and thyroid stimulating hormone in some patients. Survivors of childhood leukaemia were shown to have an intellectual deficit compared with their siblings and a high incidence of visual-perceptual defects. The intellectual effects of lower doses of cranial irradiation are as yet unknown. A variety of minor neurological abnormalities were detected among leukaemia survivors and thought to be related to preceding central nervous system 'prophylactic' chemotherapy and irradiation. A new instrument, the functional deficit score, was derived to reflect overall outcome in survivors of childhood leukaemia. With few exceptions, leukaemia survivors in this study had received 2400 rads of deep x-ray therapy as cranial irradiation. This dosage has since been reduced world-wide. Current cranial irradiation 'prophylaxis' consists of 1800 rad of megavoltage radiotherapy.

  12. Modeling of heat transfer in a vascular tissue-like medium during an interstitial hyperthermia process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassanpour, Saeid; Saboonchi, Ahmad

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to evaluate the role of small vessels in heat transfer mechanisms of a tissue-like medium during local intensive heating processes, for example, an interstitial hyperthermia treatment. To this purpose, a cylindrical tissue with two co- and counter-current vascular networks and a central heat source is introduced. Next, the energy equations of tissue, supply fluid (arterial blood), and return fluid (venous blood) are derived using porous media approach. Then, a 2D computer code is developed to predict the temperature of blood (fluid phase) and tissue (solid phase) by conventional volume averaging method and a more realistic solution method. In latter method, despite the volume averaging the blood of interconnect capillaries is separated from the arterial and venous blood phases. It is found that in addition to blood perfusion rate, the arrangement of vascular network has considerable effects on the pattern and amount of the achieved temperature. In contrast to counter-current network, the co-current network of vessels leads to considerable asymmetric pattern of temperature contours and relocation of heat affected zone along the blood flow direction. However this relocation can be prevented by changing the site of hyperthermia heat source. The results show that the cooling effect of co-current blood vessels during of interstitial heating is more efficient. Despite much anatomical dissimilarities, these findings can be useful in designing of protocols for hyperthermia cancer treatment of living tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Experimental febrile seizures are precipitated by a hyperthermia-induced respiratory alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuchmann, Sebastian; Schmitz, Dietmar; Rivera, Claudio; Vanhatalo, Sampsa; Salmen, Benedikt; Mackie, Ken; Sipilä, Sampsa T; Voipio, Juha; Kaila, Kai

    2006-07-01

    Febrile seizures are frequent during early childhood, and prolonged (complex) febrile seizures are associated with an increased susceptibility to temporal lobe epilepsy. The pathophysiological consequences of febrile seizures have been extensively studied in rat pups exposed to hyperthermia. The mechanisms that trigger these seizures are unknown, however. A rise in brain pH is known to enhance neuronal excitability. Here we show that hyperthermia causes respiratory alkalosis in the immature brain, with a threshold of 0.2-0.3 pH units for seizure induction. Suppressing alkalosis with 5% ambient CO2 abolished seizures within 20 s. CO2 also prevented two long-term effects of hyperthermic seizures in the hippocampus: the upregulation of the I(h) current and the upregulation of CB1 receptor expression. The effects of hyperthermia were closely mimicked by intraperitoneal injection of bicarbonate. Our work indicates a mechanism for triggering hyperthermic seizures and suggests new strategies in the research and therapy of fever-related epileptic syndromes.

  14. The Impact of Dealing with the Late Effects of National Socialist Terror on West German Psychiatric Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söhner, Felicitas; Baader, Gerhard

    2018-06-01

    Health damages and the late effects of NS trauma were largely ignored in German-speaking countries. This paper describes how dealing with the late effects of Nazi terror influenced post-war psychiatry in West Germany and thus the development of the psychiatric reform. As part of a greater overview study of the impulses and framework conditions of the reform-orientated development of post-war psychiatry in West Germany, this analysis is based on a thorough literary and documentary analysis. The sources show that publications by Helmut Paul and Herberg [81] as well as Baeyer et al. [12] can be considered as remarkable milestones. The awareness of psychological late effects of NS persecution was only reluctantly taken up by the scientific community. Nevertheless, this discussion was an essential component of the reform-orientated psychiatry in West Germany in the late 1960s to 1970s.

  15. Geographic Variations of Colorectal and Breast Cancer Late-Stage Diagnosis and the Effects of Neighborhood-Level Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Wimberly, Michael C

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the geographic variations of late-stage diagnosis in colorectal cancer (CRC) and breast cancer as well as to investigate the effects of 3 neighborhood-level factors-socioeconomic deprivation, urban/rural residence, and spatial accessibility to health care-on the late-stage risks. This study used population-based South Dakota cancer registry data from 2001 to 2012. A total of 4,878 CRC cases and 6,418 breast cancer cases were included in the analyses. Two-level logistic regression models were used to analyze the risk of late-stage CRC and breast cancer. For CRC, there was a small geographic variation across census tracts in late-stage diagnosis, and residing in isolated small rural areas was significantly associated with late-stage risk. However, this association became nonsignificant after adjusting for census-tract level socioeconomic deprivation. Socioeconomic deprivation was an independent predictor of CRC late-stage risk, and it explained the elevated risk among American Indians. No relationship was found between spatial accessibility and CRC late-stage risk. For breast cancer, no geographic variation in the late-stage diagnosis was observed across census tracts, and none of the 3 neighborhood-level factors was significantly associated with late-stage risk. Results suggested that socioeconomic deprivation, rather than spatial accessibility, contributed to CRC late-stage risks in South Dakota as a rural state. CRC intervention programs could be developed to target isolated small rural areas, socioeconomically disadvantaged areas, as well as American Indians residing in these areas. © 2016 National Rural Health Association.

  16. Do personality traits moderate the effect of late-life spousal loss on psychological distress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pai, Manacy; Carr, Deborah

    2010-06-01

    We use data from the Changing Lives of Older Couples (CLOC) study to investigate the extent to which: (1) five personality traits (agreeableness, conscientiousness, emotional stability/neuroticism, extraversion, and openness) moderate the effect of late-life spousal loss on depressive symptoms; (2) these patterns vary based on the expectedness of the death; and (3) the patterns documented in (1) and (2) are explained by secondary stressors and social support. Widowed persons report significantly more depressive symptoms than married persons, yet the deleterious effects of loss are significantly smaller for highly extraverted and conscientious individuals. The protective effects of personality traits, however, vary based on the expectedness of the death. Extraversion is protective against depression only for persons who had forewarning of the death. Extraverts may be particularly good at marshalling social support during prolonged periods of spousal illness. We discuss the ways that extraversion and conscientiousness may buffer against bereavement-related stressors.

  17. Relative effects of different modalities of brachytherapy on late responding tissues and tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malgieri, F.

    1996-01-01

    To compare the effects of different available modalities of brachytherapy (continuous LDR, fractionated HDR and pulsed MDR) for late responding normal tissues and tumours, we have set up a 'unitary' L-Q model, based on Liversage's and Dale's works, that include also the dose rate value and a correction factor of the β parameter depending on the sublethal damage repair time constant, on the length of time of each irradiation and on the time interval between following irradiation for to realize the effect of the incomplete repair when the time interval is short, as in the PMDR. This 'unitary' L-Q model is, of course, usable in the same way also in external beam therapy and in the cases of integration of brachytherapy and external beam therapy. We show and discuss the resulting relationships of the ratio BED 'late'/BED tumour changing the time-dose parameters, expressing the different modalities of radiotherapy, and the values of the biological characteristic parameters T p , α/β and μ, for defined size of tumour control. The general results are largely in accordance with clinical evidence and the application of the model would give basic indications in the definition of clinical protocols. Its preliminary use could have made it possible to avoid the numerous and documented consequences produced in even recent clinical trials

  18. A review of endocrine late effects in children after brain tumor therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marx, M.; Langer, T.; Beck, J.D.; Doerr, H.G.

    1999-01-01

    Background: Advances in the therapy of malignant brain tumors in children have led to a significant improvement in survival rates over the last few decades. As a result, the recognition and treatment of late effects have become more important. In addition to secondary tumors and deficiencies in cognitive and intellectual skills, the resulting endocrine disturbances play an important role. Method: Own data and literature review. Results: Deviations from the normal growth hormone secretion are usually recognized first and are most common, and have already been observed after conventional whole brain irradiation with 18 G. With some delay, other hypothalamopituitary deficiencies may occur, including panhypopituitarism. Puberty may come too early or too late or may not appear at all. Girls in particular, frequently experience an early and rapid pubertal development after brain tumor therapy, which may lead to further reduction in height due to an accelerated bone maturation. Functional disturbances of the thyroid and adrenal glands due to hypothalamic or pituitary deficiency are less common, and usually seen only after a radiation dose of over 40 Gy. Conclusion: Survivors of childhood brain tumors must be considered as long-term survivors, in whom the first therapy-induced long-term side effects appear almost immediately after the end of therapy. Maximum quality of life for the individual patient can only be achieved by long-term care and close cooperation of specialists in the different medical disciplines involved. (orig.) [de

  19. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis -- Late health effects uncertain assessment. Volume 2: Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Little, M.P.; Muirhead, C.R. [National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom); Goossens, L.H.J.; Kraan, B.C.P.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Harper, F.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the consequence from the accidental releases of radiological material from hypothesized accidents at nuclear installations. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Commission of the European Communities began cosponsoring a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of this joint effort was to systematically develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the respective code input variables. A formal expert judgment elicitation and evaluation process was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for these consequence parameters. This report focuses on the results of the study to develop distribution for variables related to the MACCS and COSYMA late health effects models. This volume contains appendices that include (1) a summary of the MACCS and COSYMA consequence codes, (2) the elicitation questionnaires and case structures, (3) the rationales and results for the expert panel on late health effects, (4) short biographies of the experts, and (5) the aggregated results of their responses.

  20. A case of anemia with left atrial myxoma suspected as late effect of an atomic bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugahara, Hiroko; Aosaki, Noboru; Kurita, Akira

    1980-01-01

    A 43 years old housewife with a history of exposure to an atomic bomb at 8 years old, recently developed anemia and palpitation. The laboratory data showed accelerated ESR, anemia (Hb 10.0 g/dl), and hyper γ-globulinemia. Despite the suspicion of late effect of atomic radiation, further examinations confirmed the diagnosis of left atrial myxoma. The echocardiographic studies revealed the decrease of diastolic descent rate, and multiple echos reflected from the tumor within the mitral orifice during diastole. Cardiac catheterization demonstrated remarkably high value of PCWP (V-wave 38 mmHg) and space filling defect moving from left atrium to left ventricle by cineangiography. Phonecardiographic studies were similar to mitral stenosis. After left atrial myxoma was removed, her symptoms and laboratory data including all noninvasive findings were improved. Therefore we suspected that her symptoms was related with left atrial myxoma rather than the late effect of atomic bomb exposure. We have discussed its significance and usefulness of noninvasive diagnostic approaches as well as whole body computed tomography in heart tumor. (author)

  1. Thrombopoietin has a differentiative effect on late-stage human erythropoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W; Wang, M; Tang, D C; Ding, I; Rodgers, G P

    1999-05-01

    To further explore the mechanism of the effect of thrombopoietin (TPO) on erythropoiesis, we used a two-phase culture system to investigate the effect of TPO on late-stage human erythroid lineage differentiation. In serum-free suspension and semisolid cultures of human peripheral blood derived erythroid progenitors, TPO alone did not produce benzidine-positive cells. However, in serum-containing culture, TPO alone stimulated erythroid cell proliferation and differentiation, demonstrated by erythroid colony formation, production of benzidine-positive cells and haemoglobin (Hb) synthesis. Monoclonal anti-human erythropoietin antibody and anti-human erythropoietin receptor antibody completely abrogated the erythroid differentiative ability of TPO in the serum-containing systems. This implied that binding of EPO and EPO-R was essential for erythropoiesis and the resultant signal transduction may be augmented by the signals emanating from TPO-c-Mpl interaction. Experiment of withdrawal of TPO further demonstrated the involvement of TPO in late-stage erythropoiesis. RT-PCR results showed that there was EPO-R but not c-Mpl expression on developing erythroblasts induced by TPO in serum-containing system. Our results establish that TPO affects not only the proliferation of erythroid progenitors but also the differentiation of erythroid progenitors to mature erythroid cells.

  2. Late A-bomb effects on proliferation and mitotic inhibition of T- and B-lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Kazuo; Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko; Sasagawa, Sumiko; Sakatani, Tatsuichiro; Macchi, M; Fujikura, Toshio; Pirofsky, B; Hamada, Tadao

    1984-11-01

    In order to investigate late effects of ionization radiation and aging on T- and B-lymphocytes, mitotic ability of T- and B-lymphocytes in the peripheral blood of 266 A-bomb survivors was examined by determining the incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-thymidine. Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) were used as inducers. Furthermore, mitotic inhibition of lymphocytes induced by a lymphatic inhibitor which was in part prepared from ulex seed extracts (USE) was examined. A decreased reaction of peripheral lymphocytes to PHA was seen in men exposed to 100-199 rad; a decreased reaction to PWM was seen in women exposed to more than 200 rad. According to the age group at examination, these decreased reactions were remarkable in men aged 60 years or younger and women aged 60 years or older. Among men less than 60-year-old exposed to 100-199 rad, PWM-induced mitosis of lymphocytes tended to be inhibited remarkably by USE. These results suggest the involvement of late A-bomb effects in mitotic regulation of T- and B-lymphocytes of aged A-bomb survivors.

  3. Targeting to carcinoma cells with chitosan- and starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles for magnetic hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Kyoung-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Mahn; Lee, Yong-Keun

    2009-01-01

    The delivery of hyperthermic thermoseeds to a specific target site with minimal side effects is an important challenge in targeted hyperthermia, which employs magnetic method and functional polymers. An external magnetic field is used to control the site-specific targeting of the magnetic nanoparticles. Polymer-coated magnetic nanoparticles can confer a higher affinity to the biological cell membranes. In this study, uncoated, chitosan-coated, and starch-coated magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized for use as a hyperthermic thermoseed. Each sample was examined with respect to their applications to hyperthermia using XRD, VSM, and FTIR. In addition, the temperature changes under an alternating magnetic field were observed. As in vitro tests, the magnetic responsiveness of chitosan- and starch-coated magnetite was determined by a simple blood vessel model under various intensities of magnetic field. L929 normal cells and KB carcinoma cells were used to examine the cytotoxicity and affinity of each sample using the MTT method. The chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles generated a higher DeltaT of 23 degrees C under an AC magnetic field than the starch-coated magnetite, and the capturing rate of the particles was 96% under an external magnetic field of 0.4 T. The highest viability of L929 cells was 93.7%. Comparing the rate of KB cells capture with the rate of L929 cells capture, the rate of KB cells capture relatively increased with 10.8% in chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles. Hence, chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles are biocompatible and have a selective affinity to KB cells. The targeting of magnetic nanoparticles in hyperthermia was improved using a controlled magnetic field and a chitosan-coating. Therefore, chitosan-coated magnetic nanoparticles are expected to be promising materials for use in magnetic targeted hyperthermia. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Role of blood flow and blood flow modifiers in clinical hyperthermia therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olch, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    A quantitative assessment of the effect of localized magnetic-loop hyperthermia on blood flow was performed on 12 patients (19 tumor studies) using the Xenon-133 clearance method. After it was discovered that blood flow in most of the tumors increased in response to needle injection, a physiologically based, one compartment model was developed that included both a hyperemic (transient) and a steady state component. In the tumors of six patients, increases in blood flow induced by heat were also observed. The same model was used to describe the measured clearance data for both types of hyperemic response. The ability of tumor vessels to respond dynamically to stress and the degree of response may be predictive of tumor heating efficiency and subsequent therapeutic response. Many tumors treated by hyperthermia, therefore, do not reach therapeutic temperatures (42 0 C). One explanation for this may be that some tumors react to thermal stress in a manner similar to normal tissues; i.e., they increase blood flow during hyperthermia in order to dissipate heat. Higher temperatures might be achieved in these heat-resistant tumors by administering vasoconstrictive agents in an effort to reduce blood flow. In the second part of this research study, the extent to which pharmacologic inhibition of local blood flow might allow higher temperatures to develop in normal muscles exposed to localized radiofrequency hyperthermia was determined. It was found that the local muscle temperature rise could be increased by at least 90% in dogs and rabbits with the use of a local vasoconstrictive drug

  5. Hyperthermia-induced disruption of functional connectivity in the human brain network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Sun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Passive hyperthermia is a potential risk factor to human cognitive performance and work behavior in many extreme work environments. Previous studies have demonstrated significant effects of passive hyperthermia on human cognitive performance and work behavior. However, there is a lack of a clear understanding of the exact affected brain regions and inter-regional connectivities. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We simulated 1 hour environmental heat exposure to thirty-six participants under two environmental temperature conditions (25 °C and 50 °C, and collected resting-state functional brain activity. The functional connectivities with a preselected region of interest (ROI in the posterior cingulate cortex and precuneus (PCC/PCu, furthermore, inter-regional connectivities throughout the entire brain using a prior Anatomical Automatic Labeling (AAL atlas were calculated. We identified decreased correlations of a set of regions with the PCC/PCu, including the medial orbitofrontal cortex (mOFC and bilateral medial temporal cortex, as well as increased correlations with the partial orbitofrontal cortex particularly in the bilateral orbital superior frontal gyrus. Compared with the normal control (NC group, the hyperthermia (HT group showed 65 disturbed functional connectivities with 50 of them being decreased and 15 of them being increased. While the decreased correlations mainly involved with the mOFC, temporal lobe and occipital lobe, increased correlations were mainly located within the limbic system. In consideration of physiological system changes, we explored the correlations of the number of significantly altered inter-regional connectivities with differential rectal temperatures and weight loss, but failed to obtain significant correlations. More importantly, during the attention network test (ANT we found that the number of significantly altered functional connectivities was positively correlated with an increase in

  6. Physical exercise for late life depression: effects on cognition and disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neviani, Francesca; Belvederi Murri, Martino; Mussi, Chiara; Triolo, Federico; Toni, Giulio; Simoncini, Elisabetta; Tripi, Ferdinando; Menchetti, Marco; Ferrari, Silvia; Ceresini, Graziano; Cremonini, Alessandro; Bertolotti, Marco; Neri, Giovanni; Squatrito, Salvatore; Amore, Mario; Zanetidou, Stamatula; Neri, Mirco

    2017-07-01

    Late-life depression is often associated with cognitive impairments and disability, which may persist even after adequate antidepressant drug treatment. Physical exercise is increasingly recognized as an effective antidepressant agent, and may exert positive effects on these features too. However, few studies examined this issue, especially by comparing different types of exercises. We performed secondary analyses on data from the Safety and Efficacy of Exercise for Depression in Seniors study, a trial comparing the antidepressant effectiveness of sertraline (S), sertraline plus thrice-weekly non-progressive exercise (S+NPE), and sertraline plus thrice-weekly progressive aerobic exercise (S+PAE). Exercise was conducted in small groups and monitored by heart rate meters. Patients with late-life depression without severe cognitive impairment were recruited from primary care and assessed at baseline and 24 weeks, using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MOCA, total and subdomain scores) and Brief Disability Questionnaire. Analyses were based on Generalized Linear Models. In total, 121 patients (mean age 75, 71% females) were randomized to the study interventions. Compared with the S group, patients in the S+PAE group displayed greater improvements of MOCA total scores (p=0.006, effect size=0.37), visuospatial/executive functions (p=0.001, effect size=0.13), and disability (p=0.02, effect size=-0.31). Participants in the S+NPE group did not display significant differences with the control group. Adding aerobic, progressive exercise to antidepressant drug treatment may offer significant advantages over standard treatment for cognitive abilities and disability. These findings suggest that even among older patients exercise may constitute a valid therapeutic measure to improve patients' outcomes.

  7. Acute toxicity of quantum dots on late pregnancy mice: Effects of nanoscale size and surface coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wanyi [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang 330000 (China); Yang, Lin; Kuang, Huijuan; Yang, Pengfei [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Aguilar, Zoraida P.; Wang, Andrew [Ocean NanoTech, LLC, Springdale, AR72764 (United States); Fu, Fen, E-mail: fu_fen@163.com [The Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang 330000 (China); Xu, Hengyi, E-mail: kidyxu@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Graphical abstract: In spite of the immense benefits from quantum dots (QDs), there is scanty information regarding their toxicity mechanisms against late pregnancy. - Highlights: • QDs and CdCl{sub 2} were effectively blocked by the placental barrier. • CdSe QDs more effectively altered the expression levels of susceptive genes. • Nanoscale size of QDs is more important than free Cd in inducing toxicity. • Outer surface shell coating of QDs played a protective role. - Abstract: In this study, the effects of cadmium containing QDs (such as CdSe/ZnS and CdSe QDs) and bulk CdCl{sub 2} in pregnant mice, their fetuses, and the pregnancy outcomes were investigated. It was shown that although the QDs and bulk CdCl{sub 2} were effectively blocked by the placental barrier, the damage on the placenta caused by CdSe QDs still led to fetus malformation, while the mice in CdSe/ZnS QDs treatment group exhibited slightly hampered growth but showed no significant abnormalities. Moreover, the Cd contents in the placenta and the uterus of CdSe QDs and CdSe/ZnS QDs treatment groups showed significantly higher than the CdCl{sub 2} treated group which indicated that the nanoscale size of the QDs allowed relative ease of entry into the gestation tissues. In addition, the CdSe QDs more effectively altered the expression levels of susceptive genes related to cell apoptosis, dysplasia, metal transport, cryptorrhea, and oxidative stress, etc. These findings suggested that the nanoscale size of the QDs were probably more important than the free Cd in inducing toxicity. Furthermore, the results indicated that the outer surface shell coating played a protective role in the adverse effects of QDs on late pregnancy mice.

  8. The Effects of Intensive Nutrition Education on Late Middle-Aged Adults with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Xu, Meihong; Fan, Rui; Ma, Xiaotao; Gu, Jiaojiao; Cai, Xiaxia; Liu, Rui; Chen, Qihe; Ren, Jinwei; Mao, Ruixue; Bao, Lei; Zhang, Zhaofeng; Wang, Junbo; Li, Yong

    2016-09-08

    Many patients with type 2 diabetes find it difficult to maintain good glycemic control. Undesirable glycemic control occurs greatly due to deficiencies of nutritional knowledge and difficulty in obtaining dietary prescriptions. The late middle-aged and elder individuals are the main populations that are affected by type 2 diabetes. The main purpose of this study was to investigate whether intensive nutrition education would make benefits for late middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes. 196 patients between 50 to 65 years old meeting type 2 diabetes criteria and eligible for the program were included in a single-blinded, 30-day centralized management of an education program in China. Participants in the program were randomly divided into a usual nutrition education group or an intensive nutrition education group. The usual nutrition education group was used as a control group and received only basic health advice and principles of diabetic diets at the beginning and the end of the study. Participants in the intensive nutrition education group were arranged to receive intensive nutritional lectures about diabetes for 30 days. The primary outcomes were the changes in weight, body mass index (BMI), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2-h postprandial plasma glucose (PG), glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), total glycerin (TG), total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c). After 30 days of intervention, FPG, PG, and HbA1c in the treatment group decreased significantly than the control group (p nutrition education group. However, there was no statistical significance between groups. Intensive nutrition education has significant effects on blood glucose control in late middle-aged adults with type 2 diabetes. Intensive education can cultivate good diet habits and increase physical activity, which are important for diabetes patients in the short and long terms. These findings may contribute to improving

  9. Inhibition by hyperthermia of repair synthesis and chromatin reassembly of ultraviolet-induced damage to DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodell, W.J.; Cleaver, J.E.; Roti Roti, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of hyperthermia treatment on sequential steps of the repair of UV-induced DNA damage in HeLa cells. DNA repair synthesis was inhibited by 40% after 15 min of hyperthermia treatment at 45 0 C; greater inhibition of repair synthesis occurred with prolonged incubation at 45 0 C. Enzymatic digestion of repair-labeled DNA with Exonuclease III indicated that once DNA repair was initiated, the DNA repair patch was synthesized to completion and that ligation of the DNA repair patch occurred. Thus, the observed inhibition of UV-induced DNA repair synthesis by hyperthermia treatment may be the result of inhibition of enzymes involved in the initiating steps(s) of DNA repair. DNA repair patches synthesized in UV-irradiated cells labeled at 37 0 C with[ 3 H]Thd were 2.2-fold more sensitive to micrococcal nuclease digestion than was parental DNA; if the length of the labeling period was prolonged, the nuclease sensitivity of the repair patch synthesized approached that of the parental DNA. DNA repair patches synthesized at 45 0 C, however, remained sensitive to micrococcal nuclease digestion even after long labeling periods, indicating that heat treatment inhibits the reassembly of the DNA repair patch into nucleosomal structures. 23 references, 3 figures, 2 tables

  10. Pathological changes in the rabbit lungs after irradiation and after combined irradiation and hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zinner, M.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of combined irradiation and hyperthermia and of irradiation alone on normal lung tissue was investigated in rabbits. The animals of both therapy groups were irradiated with 2 Gy five times a week for a 6-week period. The animals of group 1 were additionally exposed to hyperthermia 3 times a week after irradiation. The method applied was the condenser field method (25 to 35 Watt/min). Only the right lung was treated in all animals. The animals were sacrificed 3 months after termination of the therapy, and large-surface lung sections were prepared. The following results were obtained: There is a quantifiable difference in the severeness of fibrosis between groups 1 and 2. Fibrosis was more pronounced in group 1 but the difference was not statistically significant. In both groups, fibrosis was unevenly distributed in the different lung areas. Fibrosis was highest in the ventral and apical regions. These were the regions where the highest local temperature rise was recorded during hyperthermia and where the highest local radiation dose was applied. Histologically, signs of acute inflammatory processes were observed in both groups in parallel to regeneration and repair processes involving neogenesis. (orig./MG) [de

  11. Magnetic Hyperthermia and Oxidative Damage to DNA of Human Hepatocarcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Cellai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is addressing major urgent needs for cancer treatment. We conducted a study to compare the frequency of 3-(2-deoxy-β-d-erythro-pentafuranosylpyrimido[1,2-α]purin-10(3H-one deoxyguanosine (M1dG and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG adducts, biomarkers of oxidative stress and/or lipid peroxidation, on human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells exposed to increasing levels of Fe3O4-nanoparticles (NPs versus untreated cells at different lengths of incubations, and in the presence of increasing exposures to an alternating magnetic field (AMF of 186 kHz using 32P-postlabeling. The levels of oxidative damage tended to increase significantly after ≥24 h of incubations compared to controls. The oxidative DNA damage tended to reach a steady-state after treatment with 60 μg/mL of Fe3O4-NPs. Significant dose–response relationships were observed. A greater adduct production was observed after magnetic hyperthermia, with the highest amounts of oxidative lesions after 40 min exposure to AMF. The effects of magnetic hyperthermia were significantly increased with exposure and incubation times. Most important, the levels of oxidative lesions in AMF exposed NP treated cells were up to 20-fold greater relative to those observed in nonexposed NP treated cells. Generation of oxidative lesions may be a mechanism by which magnetic hyperthermia induces cancer cell death.

  12. Magnetic Hyperthermia and Oxidative Damage to DNA of Human Hepatocarcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cellai, Filippo; Munnia, Armelle; Viti, Jessica; Doumett, Saer; Ravagli, Costanza; Ceni, Elisabetta; Mello, Tommaso; Polvani, Simone; Giese, Roger W; Baldi, Giovanni; Galli, Andrea; Peluso, Marco E M

    2017-04-29

    Nanotechnology is addressing major urgent needs for cancer treatment. We conducted a study to compare the frequency of 3-(2-deoxy-β-d-erythro-pentafuranosyl)pyrimido[1,2-α]purin-10(3 H )-one deoxyguanosine (M₁dG) and 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) adducts, biomarkers of oxidative stress and/or lipid peroxidation, on human hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells exposed to increasing levels of Fe₃O₄-nanoparticles (NPs) versus untreated cells at different lengths of incubations, and in the presence of increasing exposures to an alternating magnetic field (AMF) of 186 kHz using 32 P-postlabeling. The levels of oxidative damage tended to increase significantly after ≥24 h of incubations compared to controls. The oxidative DNA damage tended to reach a steady-state after treatment with 60 μg/mL of Fe₃O₄-NPs. Significant dose-response relationships were observed. A greater adduct production was observed after magnetic hyperthermia, with the highest amounts of oxidative lesions after 40 min exposure to AMF. The effects of magnetic hyperthermia were significantly increased with exposure and incubation times. Most important, the levels of oxidative lesions in AMF exposed NP treated cells were up to 20-fold greater relative to those observed in nonexposed NP treated cells. Generation of oxidative lesions may be a mechanism by which magnetic hyperthermia induces cancer cell death.

  13. Modeling the heat transfer problem for the novel combined cryosurgery and hyperthermia system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gang; Bai, Xue-Fei; Luo, Da-Wei; Gao, Da-Yong

    2006-01-01

    A multidimensional, finite element analysis (FEA) for the freezing, holding, rewarming and heating processes of biological tissues during the cryosurgery process of the new Combined Cryosurgery/Hyperthermia System is presented to theoretically test its validity. The tissues are treated as nonideal materials freezing over a temperature range, and the thermophysical properties of which are temperature dependent. The enthalpy method is applied to solve the highly nonlinear problem. It was found that when the same boundary condition and the same target tissue presented, the novel Cryosurgery/Hyperthermia System could supply the target tissue an approximative cooling rate, a much lower minimal temperature, a much greater warming rate, and a much greater thermal gradients compared with that of the simplified Endocare system. The numerical simulation indicates that the novel combined cryosurgery and hyperthermia system can provide an excellent curative effect in the corresponding cryotherapy. And the most attractive feature of this FEA framework is that it can be easily mastered by the surgeon without in-depth theory of heat transfer to analyze the cryosurgery process beforehand due to the friendly GUI (graphical user interface) of Ansys software.

  14. Magnetic fluid hyperthermia probed by both calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guibert, Clément; Fresnais, Jérôme; Peyre, Véronique; Dupuis, Vincent, E-mail: vincent.dupuis@upmc.fr

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we report an investigation of magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) using combined calorimetric and newly implemented dynamic hysteresis measurements for two sets of well characterized size-sorted maghemite nanoparticles (with diameters of about 10 nm and 20 nm) dispersed in water and in glycerol. Our primary goal was to assess the influence of viscosity on the heating efficiency of magnetic nanoparticles described in terms of specific loss power (SLP or specific absorption rate, SAR) and dynamic hysteresis. In particular, we aimed to investigate how this SLP depends on the transition from Néelian to Brownian behavior of nanoparticles expected to occur between 10 nm and 20 nm (for maghemite) and dependent on the viscosity. While we observed a good agreement between calorimetric and dynamic hysteresis measurements, we found that the SLP measured for the different systems do not depend noticeably on the viscosity of solvent. Calculations performed according to Rosensweig's linear model [1] allow us to quantitatively reproduce our results at low field intensities, provided we use a value for the magnetic anisotropy constant much smaller than the one commonly used in the literature. This raises the question of the temperature dependance of the magnetic anisotropy constant and its relevance for a quantitative description of MFH. - Highlights: • Dynamic hysteresis measurements are a promising tool to study magnetic hyperthermia. • Dynamic hysteresis cycles can be reproduced using a simple model. • The effect of viscosity on hyperthermia of maghemite is weaker than expected.

  15. Formula to estimate the thermal enhancement ratio of a single simultaneous hyperthermia and radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overgaard, J.

    1984-01-01

    An experimental model composed of a C 3 H mammary carcinoma and its surrounding skin has been exposed to simultaneous radiation and hyperthermia given with different combinations of the heating time and temperature. Based on the thermal enhancement ratio (TER) values obtained in the temperature range 41.5 to 43.5 0 C, a linear relationship between TER and the heating time was achieved at each temperature. The slopes of the curves drawn at each temperature were found to have a log-linear relationship with the treatment temperature. With these relationships it was possible to make a formula expressing the TER as a function of treatment temperature and time. This formula gives a crude but probably acceptable estimate of the TER following a single simultaneous radiation and heat treatment. Although subject to several limitations, the formula represents an attempt to describe a heat dose concept for the radiosensitizing effect of hyperthermia. This may be useful to establish the tolerance level of a given radiation treatment when combined with hyperthermia. (Auth.)

  16. Water bath hyperthermia is a simple therapy for psoriasis and also stimulates skin tanning in response to sunlight

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreham, D.R.; Gasmann, H.C.; Mitchel, R.E.J

    1994-07-01

    An eight week trial, involving superficial hyperthermia delivered biweekly via simple water bath immersion, was tested for its ability to clear mild to moderate psoriatic lesions. Seven patients were treated and three cases rapidly improved. In the remaining patients, the treatment frequency was increased to alternate days; two cases improved significantly, one patient showed a partial response, and the fourth had no visible change (this was the only patient taking concurrent drug therapy - etretinate). In addition to resolving psoriatic lesions, water bath hyperthermia also reduced edema (swelling) and relieved pruritus (itching) in all patients, both during the treatment period and for up to several months after lesions had returned. Lesion reappearance occurred within one to three months after the last heat treatment. We retreated one patient and produced a second complete remission. These results indicate that simple repetitive water bath hyperthermia alone is effective in the treatment of psoriatic lesions in heatable locations. An unexpected side effect was enhanced melanin content (tanning) in all areas where hyperthermia treated skin was exposed to sunlight. (author)

  17. A JASTRO study group report. A randomized phase III trial of hyperthermia in combination with radiotherapy for superficial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiraoka, Masahiro; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Mitsumori, Michihide

    1998-01-01

    Result of study about local effect of hyperthermia in combination with radiotherapy for superficial tumors was reported. The irradiation was more than 90% isodose for lesion, and total dose was 60 Gy in cases with anamnesis and 40-50 Gy and without anamnesis at a rate of five times a week and 2 Gy at one time. Hyperthermia was carried out four times; once a week, at 42.5 degrees on tumor side edge, and for 40 minutes. Total 53 cases (neck lymph node metastasis 30 cases, relapse breast cancer 11, advanced breast cancer 1, other superficial tumor 11) were divided into 2 groups. Radiotherapy without hyperthermia (group R) was 27 cases, radiotherapy with hyperthermia (group H) was 26 cases. CR and CR+PR within 2 months after treatment were as follows: Group R: 50%, 85%, Group H: 64%, 100%. The CR+PR was superior in group H (p=0.0497). The CR at maximum effect after treatment was 65% of group R and 86% of group H (p=0.17). The local control rate after CR was not different in both groups. (K.H.)

  18. Hyperthermia-enhanced TRAIL- and mapatumumab-induced apoptotic death is mediated through mitochondria in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xinxin; Kim, Han-Cheon; Kim, Seog-Young; Basse, Per; Park, Bae-Hang; Lee, Byeong-Chel; Lee, Yong J

    2012-05-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality in the world; death usually results from uncontrolled metastatic disease. Previously, we developed a novel strategy of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (Apo2L/TRAIL) in combination with hyperthermia to treat hepatic colorectal metastases. However, previous studies suggest a potential hepatocyte cytotoxicity with TRAIL. Unlike TRAIL, anti-human TRAIL receptor antibody induces apoptosis without hepatocyte toxicity. In this study, we evaluated the anti-tumor efficacy of humanized anti-death receptor 4 (DR4) antibody mapatumumab (Mapa) by comparing it with TRAIL in combination with hyperthermia. TRAIL, which binds to both DR4 and death receptor 5 (DR5), was approximately tenfold more effective than Mapa in inducing apoptosis. However, hyperthermia enhances apoptosis induced by either agent. We observed that the synergistic effect was mediated through elevation of reactive oxygen species, c-Jun N-terminal kinase activation, Bax oligomerization, and translocalization to the mitochondria, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c to cytosol, activation of caspases, and increase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. We believe that the successful outcome of this study will support the application of Mapa in combination with hyperthermia to colorectal hepatic metastases. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Right away: A late, right-lateralized category effect complements an early, left-lateralized category effect in visual search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constable, Merryn D; Becker, Stefanie I

    2017-10-01

    According to the Sapir-Whorf hypothesis, learned semantic categories can influence early perceptual processes. A central finding in support of this view is the lateralized category effect-namely, the finding that categorically different colors (e.g., blue and green hues) can be discriminated faster than colors within the same color category (e.g., different hues of green), especially when they are presented in the right visual field. Because the right visual field projects to the left hemisphere, this finding has been popularly couched in terms of the left-lateralization of language. However, other studies have reported bilateral category effects, which has led some researchers to question the linguistic origins of the effect. Here we examined the time course of lateralized and bilateral category effects in the classical visual search paradigm by means of eyetracking and RT distribution analyses. Our results show a bilateral category effect in the manual responses, which is combined of an early, left-lateralized category effect and a later, right-lateralized category effect. The newly discovered late, right-lateralized category effect occurred only when observers had difficulty locating the target, indicating a specialization of the right hemisphere to find categorically different targets after an initial error. The finding that early and late stages of visual search show different lateralized category effects can explain a wide range of previously discrepant findings.

  20. Multimodal Characterization of the Late Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury: A Methodological Overview of the Late Effects of Traumatic Brain Injury Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlow, Brian L; Keene, C Dirk; Perl, Daniel P; Iacono, Diego; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Stewart, William; Mac Donald, Christine L; Augustinack, Jean; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Estrada, Camilo; Flannery, Elissa; Gordon, Wayne A; Grabowski, Thomas J; Hansen, Kelly; Hoffman, Jeanne; Kroenke, Christopher; Larson, Eric B; Lee, Patricia; Mareyam, Azma; McNab, Jennifer A; McPhee, Jeanne; Moreau, Allison L; Renz, Anne; Richmire, KatieRose; Stevens, Allison; Tang, Cheuk Y; Tirrell, Lee S; Trittschuh, Emily H; van der Kouwe, Andre; Varjabedian, Ani; Wald, Lawrence L; Wu, Ona; Yendiki, Anastasia; Young, Liza; Zöllei, Lilla; Fischl, Bruce; Crane, Paul K; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen

    2018-05-03

    Epidemiological studies suggest that a single moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with an increased risk of neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Histopathological studies describe complex neurodegenerative pathologies in individuals exposed to single moderate-to-severe TBI or repetitive mild TBI, including chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). However, the clinicopathological links between TBI and post-traumatic neurodegenerative diseases such as AD, PD, and CTE remain poorly understood. Here, we describe the methodology of the Late Effects of TBI (LETBI) study, whose goals are to characterize chronic post-traumatic neuropathology and to identify in vivo biomarkers of post-traumatic neurodegeneration. LETBI participants undergo extensive clinical evaluation using National Institutes of Health TBI Common Data Elements, proteomic and genomic analysis, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and prospective consent for brain donation. Selected brain specimens undergo ultra-high resolution ex vivo MRI and histopathological evaluation including whole-mount analysis. Co-registration of ex vivo and in vivo MRI data enables identification of ex vivo lesions that were present during life. In vivo signatures of postmortem pathology are then correlated with cognitive and behavioral data to characterize the clinical phenotype(s) associated with pathological brain lesions. We illustrate the study methods and demonstrate proof of concept for this approach by reporting results from the first LETBI participant, who despite the presence of multiple in vivo and ex vivo pathoanatomic lesions had normal cognition and was functionally independent until her mid-80s. The LETBI project represents a multidisciplinary effort to characterize post-traumatic neuropathology and identify in vivo signatures of postmortem pathology in a prospective study.

  1. Quantitation of the late effects of x radiation on the large intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Black, W.C.; Gomez, L.S.; Yuhas, J.M.; Kligerman, M.M.

    1980-01-01

    A model for quantitating late effects of x radiation on the large intestine utilizing the rectum of the Sprague-Dawley rat is reported. This model was constructed prefatory to establishing relative biological effectiveness for negative pions as a component of preclinical trials at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility. The endpoint involves microscopic evaluation of the severity of the experimental lesion, compared with surgically resected bowel lesions we have studied following clinical radiation exposure of the bowel. Individual components of the overall lesion include mucosal ulceration, a typical epithelial regeneration, colitis cystica profunda, fibrosis, and vascular sclerosis. Dose response curves were established for animals receiving 1, 2, 5 and 10 fractions with groups sacrificed at both four and 12 months after completion of radiation exposures

  2. Effect of chorioamnionitis on regulatory T cells in moderate/late preterm neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Cesar M; Wells, Casey B; Gisslen, Tate; Jobe, Alan H; Kallapur, Suhas G; Chougnet, Claire A

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Treg) have a protective role for the control of immune activation and tissue damage. The effects of chorioamnionitis (chorio) on Treg in moderate/late preterm newborns are not known. We hypothesized that infants exposed to chorio would have decreased Treg frequency and/or function. We isolated mononuclear cells from adult peripheral blood and cord blood from term and moderate/late preterm infants who were classified for severity of chorio exposure. Mononuclear cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for Treg frequency and phenotype. Treg suppression of activation of conventional T-cells (Tcon) was also quantified. Treg frequencies were similar in all groups of neonates, but lower than that found in adults. Newborn Treg had a naïve phenotype, with decreased levels of CD45RO, HLA-DR, CD39 and TIGIT compared to adult Treg and chorio did not affect the phenotype. Treg from preterm newborns exposed to severe chorio had higher expression of Ki67 compared to the other groups. Treg from preterm newborns were less suppressive than Treg from adults or term, and the level of suppression was reduced with severe chorio. Relative to term, Treg frequency and phenotype were not affected by prematurity and chorio but their functionality was decreased. Lower Treg activity may contribute to inflammation in newborns that is often associated with chorioamnionitis. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Quantitative Effects of Early and Late Blights on Tomato Yields in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontem, DA.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Early blight caused by Alternaria solani and late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans are the major diseases of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum in Cameroon. The effect of both diseases on fruit yield was evaluated during the 1995 growing season in Dschang, Cameroon.Ten varieties were planted in the first trial (March-July and nine in the second (July- November. In both trials, plots were sprayed weekly with Ridomil Plus (2.0 kg/ha before flowering and with maneb (1.6 kg/ha after flowering. Early blight was more severe in the early part of the first trial, while late blight caused most damage during the second. Marketable yields varied according to variety. High yields in sprayed plots were obtained in Dona F1 (61.63 t/ha and Heinz 1370 (68.24 t/ha during the first trial, and in Fline (58.35 t/ha, Mecline (64.25 t/ha, and Moboline (55.16 t/ha during the second trial. Percent fruit infection in sprayed plots caused by both diseases varied according to variety from 12 to 65% in the first season and from 14 to 52% in the second, while losses in marketable yields for both blights were as high as 100% in unsprayed plots.

  4. Effect of High Thermal Manipulations during Early and Late Embryogenesis on Asymmetry for Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sezai Alkan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of thermal manipulations during early and late embryogenesis on asymmetry in terms of sides of shank length, shank width and face length of broilers. Incubation conditions were 37.5°C and 55% relative humidity for control group throughout the incubation period until the 19th days. In the thermally treated eggs during early embryogenesis (8-10 days, incubation temperature was increased to 41°C and relative humidity to 65% for 3 hours (12.00-15.00 on the 8th-10th days of incubation. Also, in the late embryogenesis stage (16-18 days incubation temperature was increased to 41°C and relative humidity to 65 % for 3 hours (12.00-15.00 on the 16th-18th days of incubation. Total 16 chickens were selected at randomly from all experimental groups to determine the asymmetry. The weekly left and right sides of shank length, shank width and face length of chickens were measured from 7 days of age to 35 days of age, and relative asymmetry values were calculated. There was no significant difference among the groups in point of relative asymmetry. Asymmetry values were reduced due to aging.

  5. The Effect of Vascular Neuropathology on Late-life Cognition: Results from the SMART Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryscio, R J; Abner, E L; Nelson, P T; Bennett, D; Schneider, J; Yu, L; Hemmy, L S; Lim, K O; Masaki, K; Cairns, N; Xiong, C; Woltjer, R; Dodge, H H; Tyas, S; Fardo, D W; Lou, W; Wan, L; Schmitt, F A

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral vascular pathology may contribute to cognitive decline experienced by some elderly near death. Given evidence for mixed neuropathologies in advanced age, preventing or reducing cerebrovascular burden in late life may be beneficial. To correlate measures of cerebral vascular pathology with cognitive trajectories. Observational study. A cohort of 2,274 individuals who came to autopsy at a mean age of 89.3 years and 82 percent of whom had at least two cognitive assessments within the last six years of life was compiled from six centers conducting longitudinal studies. For each cognitive domain: immediate and delayed memory, language, and naming, three trajectories were examined: good, intermediate, and poor cognition. The probability of a participant belonging to each trajectory was associated with measures of cerebral vascular pathology after adjustment for demographics, APOE, and Alzheimer neuropathology. A large proportion of the cohort (72-94%) experienced good or intermediate cognition in the four domains examined. The presence of arteriolosclerosis and the presence of lacunar infarcts doubled the odds of belonging to the poor cognitive trajectory for language when compared to the good trajectory. The presence of lacunar infarcts increased the odds of an intermediate or poor trajectory for immediate and delayed recall while the presence of large artery infarcts increased the odds of poor trajectories for all four cognitive domains examined. Microinfarcts and cerebral amyloid angiopathy had little effect on the trajectories. Indicators of cerebral vascular pathology act differently on late life cognition.

  6. Evidence Report: Risk of Acute and Late Central Nervous System Effects from Radiation Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory A.; Simonsen, Lisa; Huff, Janice L.

    2016-01-01

    Possible acute and late risks to the central nervous system (CNS) from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) are concerns for human exploration of space. Acute CNS risks may include: altered cognitive function, reduced motor function, and behavioral changes, all of which may affect performance and human health. Late CNS risks may include neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia and premature aging. Although detrimental CNS changes are observed in humans treated with high-dose radiation (e.g., gamma rays and 9 protons) for cancer and are supported by experimental evidence showing neurocognitive and behavioral effects in animal models, the significance of these results on the morbidity to astronauts has not been elucidated. There is a lack of human epidemiology data on which to base CNS risk estimates; therefore, risk projection based on scaling to human data, as done for cancer risk, is not possible for CNS risks. Research specific to the spaceflight environment using animal and cell models must be compiled to quantify the magnitude of CNS changes in order to estimate this risk and to establish validity of the current permissible exposure limits (PELs). In addition, the impact of radiation exposure in combination with individual sensitivity or other space flight factors, as well as assessment of the need for biological/pharmaceutical countermeasures, will be considered after further definition of CNS risk occurs.

  7. Effect of chorioamnionitis on regulatory T cells in moderate/late preterm neonates☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda, Cesar M.; Wells, Casey B.; Gisslen, Tate; Jobe, Alan H.; Kallapur, Suhas G.; Chougnet, Claire A.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Treg) have a protective role for the control of immune activation and tissue damage. The effects of chorioamnionitis (chorio) on Treg in moderate/late preterm newborns are not known. We hypothesized that infants exposed to chorio would have decreased Treg frequency and/or function. We isolated mononuclear cells from adult peripheral blood and cord blood from term and moderate/late preterm infants who were classified for severity of chorio exposure. Mononuclear cells were analyzed by flow cytometry for Treg frequency and phenotype. Treg suppression of activation of conventional T-cells (Tcon) was also quantified. Treg frequencies were similar in all groups of neonates, but lower than that found in adults. Newborn Treg had a naïve phenotype, with decreased levels of CD45RO, HLA-DR, CD39 and TIGIT compared to adult Treg and chorio did not affect the phenotype. Treg from preterm newborns exposed to severe chorio had higher expression of Ki67 compared to the other groups. Treg from preterm newborns were less suppressive than Treg from adults or term, and the level of suppression was reduced with severe chorio. Relative to term, Treg frequency and phenotype were not affected by prematurity and chorio but their functionality was decreased. Lower Treg activity may contribute to inflammation in newborns that is often associated with chorioamnionitis. PMID:25451985

  8. Effect of Antenatal Steroids on Respiratory Morbidity of Late Preterm Newborns: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontela, Vijaya; Dorairajan, Gowri; Bhat, Vishnu B; Chinnakali, Palanivel

    2018-01-22

    The objective of this article was to study the effect of antenatal dexamethasone on the respiratory morbidity of late preterm newborns. A randomized controlled trial, conducted in Obstetrics and Gynecology Department in collaboration with Neonatology department at JIPMER, India. In total, 155 women were studied in each group. Intention to treat analysis and per protocol analysis were done. Overall 31 (10%) newborns were admitted to intensive care unit. The composite respiratory morbidity (defined as respiratory distress syndrome and/or transient tachypnea of newborn) was observed in 64 (41.6%) infants in the study and 56 (36.2%) infants in the control group. On multivariable-adjusted analysis, use of steroids was not found to be associated with decrease in composite respiratory morbidity [adjusted relative risk 0.91 (95% confidence interval: 0.7-1.2)]. Antenatal dexamethasone does not reduce the composite respiratory morbidity of babies born vaginally or by emergency cesarean to women with late preterm labor. © The Author(s) [2018]. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  9. The effect of vertical and horizontal symmetry on memory for tactile patterns in late blind individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Vecchi, Tomaso; Fantino, Micaela; Herbert, Andrew M; Merabet, Lotfi B

    2013-02-01

    Visual stimuli that exhibit vertical symmetry are easier to remember than stimuli symmetric along other axes, an advantage that extends to the haptic modality as well. Critically, the vertical symmetry memory advantage has not been found in early blind individuals, despite their overall superior memory, as compared with sighted individuals, and the presence of an overall advantage for identifying symmetric over asymmetric patterns. The absence of the vertical axis memory advantage in the early blind may depend on their total lack of visual experience or on the effect of prolonged visual deprivation. To disentangle this issue, in this study, we measured the ability of late blind individuals to remember tactile spatial patterns that were either vertically or horizontally symmetric or asymmetric. Late blind participants showed better memory performance for symmetric patterns. An additional advantage for the vertical axis of symmetry over the horizontal one was reported, but only for patterns presented in the frontal plane. In the horizontal plane, no difference was observed between vertical and horizontal symmetric patterns, due to the latter being recalled particularly well. These results are discussed in terms of the influence of the spatial reference frame adopted during exploration. Overall, our data suggest that prior visual experience is sufficient to drive the vertical symmetry memory advantage, at least when an external reference frame based on geocentric cues (i.e., gravity) is adopted.

  10. [Effects of the late marriage of Korean women on the first-birth interval].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woojin; Lee, Kyoungae; Lee, Sunmi

    2006-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of women's late age of marriage on the interval between marriage and their first birth. Data from Year 2000 Korea National Fertility Survey was collected through direct interview questionings, and the data was analyzed based on randomly selected sampling. In particular, the married women (N=5,648) were analyzed for the factors that determined the first-birth interval by performing Cox's proportional hazard model survival analysis. Unlike previous findings, the woman whose age of marriage was 30 or more was more likely to delay the birth of her first baby than were the other women who married earlier. Further, a woman's age at marriage, a woman's residence before marriage, her husband's religion, her husband's level of education and the difference in age between the woman and her husband significantly influenced the first-birth interval. In contrast, for a married woman, her age, level of education, current residence and religion were not significant predictors of her first birth interval. Our study showed that women who married at the age of 30 years or more tend to postpone their first birth in Korea. When facing the increasing number of women who marry at a late age, the Korean government should implement population and social policies to encourage married women have their first child as early as possible.

  11. Tumor histology and location predict deep nuclei toxicity: Implications for late effects from focal brain irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaga, Alexis; Shields, Lisa B E; Sun, David A; Vitaz, Todd W; Spalding, Aaron C

    2012-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity resulting from both disease and treatment is an adverse side effect in the management of patients with central nervous system malignancies. We tested the hypothesis that despite these improvements, certain tumors place patients at risk for neurocognitive, neuroendocrine, and neurosensory late effects. Defining patient groups at risk for these effects could allow for development of preventive strategies. Fifty patients with primary brain tumors underwent radiation planning with magnetic resonance imaging scan and computed tomography datasets. Organs at risk (OAR) responsible for neurocognitive, neuroendocrine, and neurosensory function were defined. Inverse-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy was optimized with priority given to target coverage while penalties were assigned to exceeding normal tissue tolerances. Tumor laterality, location, and histology were compared with OAR doses, and analysis of variance was performed to determine the significance of any observed correlation. The ipsilateral hippocampus exceeded dose limits in frontal (74%), temporal (94%), and parietal (100%) lobe tumor locations. The contralateral hippocampus was at risk in the following tumor locations: frontal (53%), temporal (83%), or parietal (50%) lobe. Patients with high-grade glioma were at risk for ipsilateral (88%) and contralateral (73%) hippocampal damage (P <0.05 compared with other histologies). The pituitary gland and hypothalamus exceeded dose tolerances in patients with pituitary tumors (both 100%) and high-grade gliomas (50% and 75%, P <0.05 compared with other histologies), respectively. Despite application of modern radiation therapy, certain tumor locations and histologies continue to place patients at risk for morbidity. Patients with high-grade gliomas or tumors located in the frontal, temporal, or parietal lobes are at risk for neurocognitive decline, likely because of larger target volumes and higher radiation doses. Data from this study

  12. Tumor histology and location predict deep nuclei toxicity: Implications for late effects from focal brain irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plaga, Alexis; Shields, Lisa B.E.; Sun, David A.; Vitaz, Todd W.; Spalding, Aaron C.

    2012-01-01

    Normal tissue toxicity resulting from both disease and treatment is an adverse side effect in the management of patients with central nervous system malignancies. We tested the hypothesis that despite these improvements, certain tumors place patients at risk for neurocognitive, neuroendocrine, and neurosensory late effects. Defining patient groups at risk for these effects could allow for development of preventive strategies. Fifty patients with primary brain tumors underwent radiation planning with magnetic resonance imaging scan and computed tomography datasets. Organs at risk (OAR) responsible for neurocognitive, neuroendocrine, and neurosensory function were defined. Inverse-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy was optimized with priority given to target coverage while penalties were assigned to exceeding normal tissue tolerances. Tumor laterality, location, and histology were compared with OAR doses, and analysis of variance was performed to determine the significance of any observed correlation. The ipsilateral hippocampus exceeded dose limits in frontal (74%), temporal (94%), and parietal (100%) lobe tumor locations. The contralateral hippocampus was at risk in the following tumor locations: frontal (53%), temporal (83%), or parietal (50%) lobe. Patients with high-grade glioma were at risk for ipsilateral (88%) and contralateral (73%) hippocampal damage (P <0.05 compared with other histologies). The pituitary gland and hypothalamus exceeded dose tolerances in patients with pituitary tumors (both 100%) and high-grade gliomas (50% and 75%, P <0.05 compared with other histologies), respectively. Despite application of modern radiation therapy, certain tumor locations and histologies continue to place patients at risk for morbidity. Patients with high-grade gliomas or tumors located in the frontal, temporal, or parietal lobes are at risk for neurocognitive decline, likely because of larger target volumes and higher radiation doses. Data from this study

  13. Tumor histology and location predict deep nuclei toxicity: Implications for late effects from focal brain irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaga, Alexis; Shields, Lisa B.E. [Norton Neuroscience Institute, Louisville, KY (United States); Sun, David A.; Vitaz, Todd W. [Norton Neuroscience Institute, Louisville, KY (United States); Brain Tumor Center, Norton Healthcare, Louisville, KY (United States); Spalding, Aaron C., E-mail: acspalding1@gmail.com [Brain Tumor Center, Norton Healthcare, Louisville, KY (United States); Norton Cancer Institute, Radiation Center, Kosair Children' s Hospital, Louisville, KY (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Normal tissue toxicity resulting from both disease and treatment is an adverse side effect in the management of patients with central nervous system malignancies. We tested the hypothesis that despite these improvements, certain tumors place patients at risk for neurocognitive, neuroendocrine, and neurosensory late effects. Defining patient groups at risk for these effects could allow for development of preventive strategies. Fifty patients with primary brain tumors underwent radiation planning with magnetic resonance imaging scan and computed tomography datasets. Organs at risk (OAR) responsible for neurocognitive, neuroendocrine, and neurosensory function were defined. Inverse-planned intensity-modulated radiation therapy was optimized with priority given to target coverage while penalties were assigned to exceeding normal tissue tolerances. Tumor laterality, location, and histology were compared with OAR doses, and analysis of variance was performed to determine the significance of any observed correlation. The ipsilateral hippocampus exceeded dose limits in frontal (74%), temporal (94%), and parietal (100%) lobe tumor locations. The contralateral hippocampus was at risk in the following tumor locations: frontal (53%), temporal (83%), or parietal (50%) lobe. Patients with high-grade glioma were at risk for ipsilateral (88%) and contralateral (73%) hippocampal damage (P <0.05 compared with other histologies). The pituitary gland and hypothalamus exceeded dose tolerances in patients with pituitary tumors (both 100%) and high-grade gliomas (50% and 75%, P <0.05 compared with other histologies), respectively. Despite application of modern radiation therapy, certain tumor locations and histologies continue to place patients at risk for morbidity. Patients with high-grade gliomas or tumors located in the frontal, temporal, or parietal lobes are at risk for neurocognitive decline, likely because of larger target volumes and higher radiation doses. Data from this study

  14. Effects of Atorvastatin on Ventricular Late Potentials and Repolarization Dispersion in Patients with Hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Sheng Chu

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Emerging evidence suggests that statins have a favorable impact on the reduction of arrhythmia events and sudden cardiac death in patients with structural heart disease. We aimed to investigate the possibly and directly favorable effects of statins on ventricular late potentials, QT dispersion, and transmural dispersion of repolarization attained by analyzing clinical electrocardiography (ECG risk stratification parameters in patients with hypercholesterolemia without structural heart disease. In total, 82 patients (45 females; mean age, 62 ± 10 years with hypercholesterolemia were enrolled in this prospective study to examine the effects of statin therapy (atorvastatin 10mg/day for 3 months on ECG risk stratification parameters. Surface 12-lead ECG and signal-average ECG (SAECG were recorded before and after statin treatment. The SAECG parameters, QT dispersion, Bazett-corrected QT (QTc dispersion, T wave peak-to-end interval (Tpe, and percentage of Tpe/QT interval were calculated and compared before and after statin therapy. Twelve-lead ambulatory 24-hour ECGs were recorded in 12 patients. The results demonstrated that after statin therapy for 3 months, serum levels of total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly reduced (both p values < 0.001. However, neither significant changes of each SAECG parameter nor the frequency of late potentials were demonstrated after atorvastatin therapy. In addition, no significant changes in QT dispersion, QTc dispersion, Tpe, or Tpe/QT were found. However, 24-hour ambulatory ECG revealed a flattening effect of circadian variation of QTc dispersion after atorvastatin therapy. In conclusion, the favorable antiarrhythmia effect of atorvastatin (10 mg/day therapy cannot be directly reflected by analyzing these noninvasive ECG risk stratification parameters in low-risk patients with hypercholesterolemia.

  15. Short- and long-term cognitive effects of chronic cannabinoids administration in late-adolescence rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hila Abush

    Full Text Available The use of cannabis can impair cognitive function, especially short-term memory. A controversial question is whether long-term cannabis use during the late-adolescence period can cause irreversible deficits in higher brain function that persist after drug use stops. In order to examine the short- and long-term effects of chronic exposure to cannabinoids, rats were administered chronic i.p. treatment with the CB1/CB2 receptor agonist WIN55,212-2 (WIN; 1.2 mg/kg for two weeks during the late adolescence period (post-natal days 45-60 and tested for behavioral and electrophysiological measures of cognitive performance 24 hrs, 10 and 30 days after the last drug injection. The impairing effects of chronic WIN on short-term memory in the water maze and the object recognition tasks as well as long-term potentiation (LTP in the ventral subiculum (vSub-nucleus accumbens (NAc pathway were temporary as they lasted only 24 h or 10 d after withdrawal. However, chronic WIN significantly impaired hippocampal dependent short-term memory measured in the object location task 24 hrs, 10, 30, and 75 days after the last drug injection. Our findings suggest that some forms of hippocampal-dependent short-term memory are sensitive to chronic cannabinoid administration but other cognitive impairments are temporary and probably result from a residue of cannabinoids in the brain or acute withdrawal effects from cannabinoids. Understanding the effects of cannabinoids on cognitive function may provide us with tools to overcome these impairments and for cannabinoids to be more favorably considered for clinical use.

  16. Covalent DNA-protein crosslinking occurs after hyperthermia and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cress, A.E.; Bowden, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    Covalent DNA-protein crosslinks occur in exponentially growing mouse leukemia cells (L1210) after exposure to ionizing radiation. The amount of DNA-protein crosslinks as measured by a filter binding assay is dose dependent upon X irradiation. Although hyperthermia and radiation in combination are synergistic with respect to cell lethality, the combination does not result in an increase of DNA-protein crosslinks when assayed immediately following treatments. Hyperthermia (43 degrees C/15 min) given prior to radiation does not alter the radiation dose dependency of the amount of initial crosslinking. In addition, the amount of DNA-protein crosslinking produced by heat plus radiation is independent of the length of heating the cells at 43 degrees C. The DNA-protein crosslinks produced by 50-Gy X ray alone are removed after 2 hr at 37 degrees C. However, if hyperthermia (43 degrees C/15 min) is given prior to 100-Gy X ray, the removal of DNA-protein crosslinks is delayed until 4.0 hr after radiation. Phospho-serine and phospho-threonine bonds are not produced with either radiation or the combination of hyperthermia plus radiation as judged by the resistance of the bonds to guanidine hydrochloride. However, hyperthermia plus radiation causes an increase in phosphate to nitrogen type bonding. These results show that radiation alone causes covalent DNA-protein crosslinks. Hyperthermia in combination with radiation does not increase the total amount of the crosslinks but delays the removal of the crosslinks and alters the distribution of the types of chemical bonding. These data suggest that the synergistic action on hyperthermia with radiation is more related to the rate of removal and the type of chemical bonding involved in the covalent DNA-protein crosslinks rather than the amount of DNA-protein crosslinks

  17. Morphologic categorization of cell death induced by mild hyperthermia and comparison with death induced by ionizing radiation and cytotoxic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allan, D.J.; Harmon, B.V.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of the morphological categorization of cell death, results of two in vivo studies on the cell death induced by mild hyperthermia in rat small intestine and mouse mastocytoma, and a comparison of the cell death induced by hyperthermia, radiation and cytotoxic drugs. Two distinct forms of cell death, apoptosis and necrosis, can be recognized on morphologic grounds. Apoptosis appears to be a process of active cellular self-destruction to which a biologically meaningful role can usually be attributed, whereas necrosis is a passive degenerative phenomenon that results from irreversible cellular injury. Light and transmission electron microscopic studies showed that lower body hyperthermia (43 degrees C for 30 min) induced only apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells, and of lymphocytes, plasma cells, and eosinophils. In the mastocytoma, hyperthermia (43 degrees C for 15 min) produced widespread tumor necrosis and also enhanced apoptosis of tumor cells. Ionizing radiation and cytotoxic drugs are also known to induce apoptosis in a variety of tissues. It is attractive to speculate that DNA damage by each agent is the common event which triggers the same process of active cellular self-destruction that characteristically effects selective cell deletion in normal tissue homeostasis

  18. The correlation of acute toxicity and late rectal injury in radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma: Evidence suggestive of consequential late effect (CQLE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.-J.; Leung, Stephen Wan; Chen, H.-C.; Sun, L.-M.; Fang, F.-M.; Huang, E.-Y.; Hsiung, C.-Y.; Changchien, C.-C.

    1998-01-01

    increased the risk of late rectal injury. This result suggested that early excessive damage of acute-responding component of rectal wall may play an important role in the initiation of late rectal injury. Radiation proctitis can be accounted, in part, as a consequential late effect

  19. Late-life effects on rat reproductive system after developmental exposure to mixtures of endocrine disrupters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isling, Louise Krag; Boberg, Julie; Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold; Mandrup, Karen Riiber; Axelstad, Marta; Christiansen, Sofie; Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Taxvig, Camilla; Kortenkamp, Andreas; Hass, Ulla

    2014-01-01

    This study examined late-life effects of perinatal exposure of rats to a mixture of endocrine-disrupting contaminants. Four groups of 14 time-mated Wistar rats were exposed by gavage from gestation day 7 to pup day 22 to a mixture of 13 anti-androgenic and estrogenic chemicals including phthalates, pesticides, u.v.-filters, bisphenol A, parabens, and the drug paracetamol. The groups received vehicle (control), a mixture of all 13 chemicals at 150-times (TotalMix150) or 450-times (TotalMix450) high-end human exposure, or 450-times a mixture of nine predominantly anti-androgenic chemicals (AAMix450). Onset of puberty and estrous cyclicity at 9 and 12 months of age were assessed. Few female offspring showed significantly regular estrus cyclicity at 12 months of age in the TotalMix450 and AAMix450 groups compared with controls. In 19-month-old male offspring, epididymal sperm counts were lower than controls, and in ventral prostate an overrepresentation of findings related to hyperplasia was observed in exposed groups compared with controls, particularly in the group dosed with anti-androgens. A higher incidence of pituitary adenoma at 19 months of age was found in males and females in the AAMix450 group. Developmental exposure of rats to the highest dose of a human-relevant mixture of endocrine disrupters induced adverse effects late in life, manifested as earlier female reproductive senescence, reduced sperm counts, higher score for prostate atypical hyperplasia, and higher incidence of pituitary tumors. These delayed effects highlight the need for further studies on the role of endocrine disrupters in hormone-related disorders in aging humans.

  20. Online Adaptive Hyperthermia Treatment Planning During Locoregional Heating to Suppress Treatment-Limiting Hot Spots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, H. Petra; Korshuize-van Straten, Linda; Bakker, Akke; de Kroon-Oldenhof, Rianne; Geijsen, Elisabeth D.; Stalpers, Lukas J. A.; Crezee, Johannes

    2017-01-01

    Adequate tumor temperatures during hyperthermia are essential for good clinical response, but excessive heating of normal tissue should be avoided. This makes locoregional heating using phased array systems technically challenging. Online application of hyperthermia treatment planning could help to

  1. Magnetic Nanoparticles Coated with a Thermosensitive Polymer with Hyperthermia Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felisa Reyes-Ortega

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs have been widely used to increase the efficacy of chemotherapeutics, largely through passive accumulation provided by the enhanced permeability and retention effect. Their incorporation into biopolymer coatings enables the preparation of magnetic field-responsive, biocompatible nanoparticles that are well dispersed in aqueous media. Here we describe a synthetic route to prepare functionalized, stable magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs coated with a temperature-responsive polymer, by means of the hydrothermal method combined with an oil/water (o/w emulsion process. The effects of both pH and temperature on the electrophoretic mobility and surface charge of these MNPs are investigated. The magnetite/polymer composition of these systems is detected by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR and quantified by thermogravimetric analysis. The therapeutic possibilities of the designed nanostructures as effective heating agents for magnetic hyperthermia are demonstrated, and specific absorption rates as high as 150 W/g, with 20 mT magnetic field and 205 kHz frequency, are obtained. This magnetic heating response could provide a promising nanoparticle system for combined diagnostics and cancer therapy.

  2. ISPC effect is not observed when the word comes too late: A time course analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nart Bedin Atalay

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The item-specific proportion congruency (ISPC effect is demonstrated by a smaller Stroop effect observed for mostly incongruent items compared to mostly congruent items. Currently, there is a continuing debate on whether conflict driven item-specific control processes or stimulus-response contingency learning account for the ISPC effect. In the present study, we conducted two experiments to investigate the time course of the ISPC effect with a stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA manipulation. Both negative and positive SOAs were used in order to manipulate the contingency learning between the word and the color dimensions. We also combined this SOA manipulation with a set size manipulation (Bugg & Hutchison, 2013 to moderate the contribution of contingency learning and item-specific processes to the observed ISPC effect. We expected that the change in the magnitude of the ISPC effect as a result of SOA would follow different patterns for the 2-item and 4-item set conditions. Results showed that the SOA manipulation influenced the ISPC effect. Specifically, when the word followed the color with a 200 ms delay, the observed ISPC effect was smaller, if at all present, than the ISPC effects in other negative and positive SOA conditions, regardless of set size. In conclusion, our results showed that the ISPC effect was not observed if the word arrived too late. We also conducted additional awareness and RT distribution analyses (delta plots to further investigate the ISPC effect. These analyses showed that a higher percentage of participants were aware of the ISPC manipulation in the 2-item set condition compared to the 4-item set condition. Delta plots revealed that the ISPC effect was smaller for fastest responses and increased as the responses got slower.

  3. Cisplatin combined with hyperthermia kills HepG2 cells in intraoperative blood salvage but preserves the function of erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin-ting; Tang, Li-hui; Liu, Yun-qing; Wang, Yin; Wang, Lie-ju; Zhang, Feng-jiang; Yan, Min

    2015-05-01

    The safe use of intraoperative blood salvage (IBS) in cancer surgery remains controversial. Here, we investigated the killing effect of cisplatin combined with hyperthermia on human hepatocarcinoma (HepG2) cells and erythrocytes from IBS in vitro. HepG2 cells were mixed with concentrated erythrocytes and pretreated with cisplatin (50, 100, and 200 μg/ml) alone at 37 °C for 60 min and cisplatin (25, 50, 100, and 200 μg/ml) combined with hyperthermia at 42 °C for 60 min. After pretreatment, the cell viability, colony formation and DNA metabolism in HepG2 and the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activity, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) concentration, free hemoglobin (Hb) level, osmotic fragility, membrane phosphatidylserine externalization, and blood gas variables in erythrocytes were determined. Pretreatment with cisplatin (50, 100, and 200 μg/ml) combined with hyperthermia (42 °C) for 60 min significantly decreased HepG2 cell viability, and completely inhibited colony formation and DNA metabolism when the HepG2 cell concentration was 5×10(4) ml(-1) in the erythrocyte (P2,3-DPG level, phosphatidylserine externalization, and extra-erythrocytic free Hb were significantly altered by hyperthermia plus high concentrations of cisplatin (100 and 200 μg/ml) (P0.05). In conclusion, pretreatment with cisplatin (50 μg/ml) combined with hyperthermia (42 °C) for 60 min effectively eliminated HepG2 cells from IBS but did not significantly affect erythrocytes in vitro.

  4. Late effects of adjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative radiotherapy on quality of life among breast cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berglund, G.; Bolund, C.; Fornander, T.; Rutqvist, L.E.; Sjoeden, P.-O.

    1991-01-01

    Late effects of adjuvant treatment on perceived health and quality of life were assessed through a questionnaire mailed to 448 premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer patients, free from recurrence 2-10 years after primary therapy. The patients had been randomised to postoperative radiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy as adjuncts to primary surgery. The differences between the two treatments were generally small. However, the radiotherapy patients had significantly greater problems with decreased stamina, symptoms related to the operation scar and anxiety. The chemotherapy patients had significantly more problems with smell aversion. Activity level inside and outside the home, anxiousness and depressive symptoms were similar in both groups. The chemotherapy patients scored their overall quality of life higher than the radiotherapy patients. (author)

  5. Late effects of adjuvant chemotherapy and postoperative radiotherapy on quality of life among breast cancer patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berglund, G.; Bolund, C.; Fornander, T.; Rutqvist, L.E. (Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm (Sweden)); Sjoeden, P.-O. (Uppsala Univ. (Sweden))

    1991-09-01

    Late effects of adjuvant treatment on perceived health and quality of life were assessed through a questionnaire mailed to 448 premenopausal and postmenopausal breast cancer patients, free from recurrence 2-10 years after primary therapy. The patients had been randomised to postoperative radiotherapy or adjuvant chemotherapy as adjuncts to primary surgery. The differences between the two treatments were generally small. However, the radiotherapy patients had significantly greater problems with decreased stamina, symptoms related to the operation scar and anxiety. The chemotherapy patients had significantly more problems with smell aversion. Activity level inside and outside the home, anxiousness and depressive symptoms were similar in both groups. The chemotherapy patients scored their overall quality of life higher than the radiotherapy patients. (author).

  6. Late-life effects on rat reproductive system after developmental exposure to mixtures of endocrine disrupters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isling, Louise Krag; Boberg, Julie; Jacobsen, Pernille Rosenskjold

    2014-01-01

    ). Onset of puberty and estrous cyclicity at 9 and 12 months of age were assessed. Few female offspring showed significantly regular estrus cyclicity at 12 months of age in the TotalMix450 and AAMix450 groups compared with controls. In 19-month-old male offspring, epididymal sperm counts were lower than...... controls, and in ventral prostate an overrepresentation of findings related to hyperplasia was observed in exposed groups compared with controls, particularly in the group dosed with anti-androgens. A higher incidence of pituitary adenoma at 19 months of age was found in males and females in the AAMix450...... group. Developmental exposure of rats to the highest dose of a human-relevant mixture of endocrine disrupters induced adverse effects late in life, manifested as earlier female reproductive senescence, reduced sperm counts, higher score for prostate atypical hyperplasia, and higher incidence...

  7. Effect of topical anti-glaucoma medications on late pupillary light reflex, as evaluated by pupillometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ba-Ali, Shakoor; Sander, Birgit; Brøndsted, Adam Elias

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The late post-illumination pupillary response (PIPR 10-30s ) to blue light is reduced in glaucoma, suggesting that pupillometry can be used in clinical glaucoma evaluation. Since animal studies have indicated that common anti-glaucomatous agents affect the iris muscle, we investigated...... the short-term effect of the anti-glaucoma drugs on the pupillary light reflex and in particular on the PIPR10-30s. METHODS: In this randomized, double-masked, crossover trial, pupillometry was performed before and after topical administration of latanoprost, dorzolamide, and timolol in 20 healthy subjects....... Stimulus was blue (463 nm) and red light (633 nm) of 2 log (lux). Main outcome was the PIPR10-30s to blue light. Additionally, pupil size, maximal contraction, and the early post-illumination pupillary response (PIPR 0-10s ) to blue and red light were investigated. Pupil response variations between 8 a...

  8. Effect of glucocorticosteroid treatment on ovalbumin-induced IgE-mediated immediate and late allergic response in guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, P; Brange, C; von Kogerer, B; Sonmark, B; Stahre, G

    1988-01-01

    The effect of glucocorticosteroid (GCS) treatment on ovalbumine-induced IgE-mediated immediate and late allergic response was studied in sensitized guinea pigs. The results show that the GCS budesonide (BUD) inhibits the allergen-induced IgE-mediated immediate and late bronchial obstruction. The effect on the early reaction is correlated to the inhibition of leukotrienes and histamine release. The importance of mediator release inhibition for the antianaphylactic effect of GCS is discussed. In examining the effect on the late reaction, it was found that BUD had to be present during the early reaction but did not inhibit the early reaction. Furthermore, the effect on the late reaction was correlated to the inhibition of vascular leakage but not to the infiltration of inflammatory cells as examined in bronchoalveolar lavage. The results indicate that some triggering factors important for the development of the late reaction are released during the early reaction. Inhibition of the release of that factor or the activation of inflammatory cells by that factor might be the mechanism behind the antiinflammatory activities of GCS.

  9. Modeling the effects of late cycle oxygen enrichment on diesel engine combustion and emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, D. K.; Foster, D. E.; Poola, R. B.; Longman, D. E.; Chanda, A.; Vachon, T. J.

    2002-01-01

    A multidimensional simulation of Auxiliary Gas Injection (AGI) for late cycle oxygen enrichment was exercised to assess the merits of AGI for reducing the emissions of soot from heavy duty diesel engines while not adversely affecting the NO(sub x) emissions of the engine. Here, AGI is the controlled enhancement of mixing within the diesel engine combustion chamber by high speed jets of air or another gas. The engine simulated was a Caterpillar 3401 engine. For a particular operating condition of this engine, the simulated soot emissions of the engine were reduced by 80% while not significantly affecting the engine-out NO(sub x) emissions compared to the engine operating without AGI. The effects of AGI duration, timing, and orientation are studied to confirm the window of opportunity for realizing lower engine-out soot while not increasing engine out NO(sub x) through controlled enhancement of in-cylinder mixing. These studies have shown that this window occurs during the late combustion cycle, from 20 to 60 crank angle degrees after top-dead-center. During this time, the combustion chamber temperatures are sufficiently high that soot oxidation increases in response in increased mixing, but the temperature is low enough that NO(sub x) reactions are quenched. The effect of the oxygen composition of the injected air is studied for the range of compositions between 21% and 30% oxygen by volume. This is the range of oxygen enrichment that is practical to produce from an air separation membrane. Simulations showed that this level of oxygen enrichment is insufficient to provide an additional benefit by either increasing the level of soot oxidation or prolonging the window of opportunity for increasing soot oxidation through enhanced mixing

  10. Effects of atrazine on endocrinology and physiology in juvenile barramundi, Lates calcarifer (Bloch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroon, Frederieke J; Hook, Sharon E; Jones, Dean; Metcalfe, Suzanne; Osborn, Hannah L

    2014-07-01

    Exposure to certain environmental contaminants such as agricultural pesticides can alter normal endocrine and reproductive parameters in wild fish populations. Recent studies have found widespread pesticide contamination across the rivers that discharge into the Great Barrier Reef lagoon. Potential impacts on native fish species exposed to known endocrine disrupting chemicals such as atrazine, simazine, and diuron have not been assessed. In the present study, the authors examined the endocrine and physiological effects of short-term, acute exposure of environmentally relevant concentrations of analytical grade atrazine in juvenile barramundi (Lates calcarifer) in a controlled laboratory experiment. Expression of hepatic vitellogenin was not affected, supporting results of previous studies that showed that atrazine does not have a direct estrogenic effect via mediation of estrogen receptors. The lack of effect on brain cytochrome P19B (CYP19B) expression levels, combined with increases in testosterone (T) and 17β estradiol and a stable T:17β estradiol ratio, does not support the hypothesis that atrazine has an indirect estrogenic effect via modulation of aromatase expression. Gill ventilation rate, a measure of oxidative stress, did not change in contrast to other studies finding enhanced osmoregulatory disturbance and gill histopathology after atrazine exposure. To more closely reflect field conditions, the authors recommend that laboratory studies should focus more on examining the effects of commercial pesticide formulations that contain additional ingredients that have been found to be disruptive to endocrine function. © 2014 SETAC.

  11. 500 kHZ intracavitary hyperthermia in the treatment of patients with cervical and endometrial cancer - preliminary results and treatment description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piotrowicz, N.; Lyczek, J.; Zielinski, J.; Debicki, P.

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of elevated temperature (hyperthermia) in cancer treatment is a well-known issue. However, due to technical problems with generating hyperthermia within the tumour and, at the same time, sparing the healthy tissues, in practice this modality is not widely used. Local hyperthermia was induced by a computer-controlled generator (500 kHz) with three amplifiers transmitting energy to the lesion via a modified uterine brachytherapy applicator. Temperature was measured with 3 thermocouples.Total treatment time was 60-90 minutes. 10 patients with cervical and endometrial cancer were enrolled into this study and 11 procedures were performed. Prior to hyperthermia all patients were treated with external field irradiation to the pelvis to the dose of 45-46 Gy. Intracavitary LDR/HDR brachytherapy (dose of 45 Gy/point Ai n two fractions) with colpostat used for the hyperthermia procedure was than performed. In all cases, except one, caused by equipment failure, biologically stable temperature was observed. No severe side effects of treatment were observed. There was no need to terminate treatment due to high temperature intolerance. (author)

  12. Interaction of hyperthermia and photoradiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldow, S.M.; Dougherty, T.J.

    1984-01-01

    Local microwave hyperthermia (2450 MHz) was applied to auxillary implants of the SMT-F mammary carcinoma in mice in combination with photoradiation therapy (PRT) in an attempt to determine if the two modalities interact. When 40.5 0 C was applied for 30 min immediately prior to or immediately following PRT enhancement of tumor response over that of PRT alone was seen as judged by lack of tumor regrowth (35 days or longer after treatment). A temperature of 41.5 0 C applied for 30 min immediately following the 30-min PRT treatment produced a result slightly greater than that seen at 40.5 0 C. When a temperature of 44.5 0 C for 30 min was applied immediately following PRT, a substantial enhancement of tumor control at 35 days post-treatment was found. These results suggest that tumor response to PRT is enhanced by both a sublethal hyperthermic treatment (40.5 0 C, 41.5 0 C) and a moderately lethal heat treatment (44.5 0 C) given for a short duration, when applied immediately before or after photoradiation

  13. The Effects of Intensive Nutrition Education on Late Middle-Aged Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Li

    2016-09-01

    , there was no statistical significance between groups. Conclusions: Intensive nutrition education has significant effects on blood glucose control in late middle-aged adults with type 2 diabetes. Intensive education can cultivate good diet habits and increase physical activity, which are important for diabetes patients in the short and long terms. These findings may contribute to improving education methodology and nutrition therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  14. A seven-year disease-free survivor of malignant pleural mesothelioma treated with hyperthermia and chemotherapy: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okonogi Noriyuki

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Malignant pleural mesothelioma was once a rare finding but its incidence is increasing worldwide, most likely because of widespread exposure to asbestos. Although complete surgical resection is considered the only curative treatment, the results of surgery have shown a median survival time of only one year. In inoperable cases, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and a combination of both have been considered as palliative therapy. Therefore, outcomes for inoperable cases have been poor. Here, we report the case of a long-term survivor treated with hyperthermia and chemotherapy. Case presentation A 61-year-old Japanese man with a performance status of 1 due to chest pain was referred to our hospital. He had a history of asbestos exposure for approximately five years. A computed tomography scan showed diffuse extensive right pleural thickening with small nodular lesions, and video-assisted thoracoscopy revealed tumor invasion of the ipsilateral chest wall muscles. The histopathologic findings were consistent with a diagnosis of malignant pleural mesothelioma (sarcomatoid type. The tumor was diagnosed as being stage cT3N0M0. Our patient refused any invasive therapies including surgery and radiotherapy, and was therefore treated with hyperthermia and systemic chemotherapy with agents such as cisplatin and irinotecan. He underwent three hyperthermia sessions and a single course of chemotherapy without any severe complications. One month after treatment, a follow-up computed tomography scan showed no definitive abnormality in the thoracic space. Our patient has subsequently survived without any evident disease for more than seven years. Conclusions The combination of hyperthermia and chemotherapy may be a novel and safe therapeutic option for malignant pleural mesothelioma, and can be considered for patients ineligible for radical treatment. Further clinical studies of the combination of hyperthermia and chemotherapy are needed to

  15. Proceedings of the 43rd Research Society for the Late Effects of the A-Bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2002-01-01

    This issue is the collection of study papers presented in the meeting in the title, which including the special review lecture concerning the subjects and prospects in studies on the late health effects of A-bomb radiation; symposia concerning the significance and summary of health effects study of the children of A-bomb survivors at Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), the ethical issues on human genome and genetic analyses, and on materials of survivors and their biology in the archive, and the technology (genetic effects of radiation in human mini-satellite loci and microarray-based comparative genome hybridization as its efficient methodology); and 40 general presentations. The general presentations involve 19 clinical health examination studies of A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, related to cancer (4 presentations), immunology (4) and other general clinical observations; 7 clinical and basic studies on patients generated in the Tokai criticality accident (1), in Chernobyl (3), Belarus (1) and Nagasaki (2); 5 application studies of histological specimens; and 9 basic radiation biology studies related to carcinogenesis, p53, radio-sensitization or -sensitivity etc. (N.I.)

  16. The effect of pentoxifylline on early and late radiation injury following fractionated irradiation in C3H mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dion, M.W.; Hussey, D.H.; Osborne, J.W.

    1989-07-01

    An experiment was performed to test the effectiveness of pentoxifylline in reducing late radiation injury. One hundred and four C3H mice were randomized into eight groups of 13 mice each, and the right hind limbs were irradiated with 4000, 5000, 6000, or 7000 cGy in ten fractions. Each group was treated with once daily injections of either pentoxifylline or saline for 30+ weeks. An additional ten mice received daily injections of pentoxifylline or saline, but no irradiation. The pentoxifylline animals demonstrated significantly less late injury than the saline treated animals. The most obvious differences were observed in the 5000 and 6000 cGy groups. There were seven radiation related deaths in the saline treated control groups, but only one radiation related death in the pentoxifylline treated groups. Whereas 42% (20/48) of the saline treated animals had a late injury score of 3.0 or greater, only 8% (4/51) of the pentoxifylline treated animals had a late skin score as high as 3.0. Pentoxifylline had no effect on the acute radiation injury scores. The drug was well tolerated with no toxic effects noted. Pentoxifylline is a methyl xanthine derivative that is used to treat vascular occlusive disease in humans. It improves perfusion through small capillaries by improving the deformability of red blood cells, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and stimulating the release of prostacyclin. This study shows that the prophylactic administration of pentoxifylline can modify late radiation induced injury in the mouse extremity. It may have value in the prevention or treatment of late radiation induced injury in humans, and it could be a useful tool to help define the mechanisms of late radiation injury in specific organs.

  17. The effect of pentoxifylline on early and late radiation injury following fractionated irradiation in C3H mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dion, M.W.; Hussey, D.H.; Osborne, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    An experiment was performed to test the effectiveness of pentoxifylline in reducing late radiation injury. One hundred and four C3H mice were randomized into eight groups of 13 mice each, and the right hind limbs were irradiated with 4000, 5000, 6000, or 7000 cGy in ten fractions. Each group was treated with once daily injections of either pentoxifylline or saline for 30+ weeks. An additional ten mice received daily injections of pentoxifylline or saline, but no irradiation. The pentoxifylline animals demonstrated significantly less late injury than the saline treated animals. The most obvious differences were observed in the 5000 and 6000 cGy groups. There were seven radiation related deaths in the saline treated control groups, but only one radiation related death in the pentoxifylline treated groups. Whereas 42% (20/48) of the saline treated animals had a late injury score of 3.0 or greater, only 8% (4/51) of the pentoxifylline treated animals had a late skin score as high as 3.0. Pentoxifylline had no effect on the acute radiation injury scores. The drug was well tolerated with no toxic effects noted. Pentoxifylline is a methyl xanthine derivative that is used to treat vascular occlusive disease in humans. It improves perfusion through small capillaries by improving the deformability of red blood cells, inhibiting platelet aggregation, and stimulating the release of prostacyclin. This study shows that the prophylactic administration of pentoxifylline can modify late radiation induced injury in the mouse extremity. It may have value in the prevention or treatment of late radiation induced injury in humans, and it could be a useful tool to help define the mechanisms of late radiation injury in specific organs

  18. Iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine in the assessment of late cardiac effects from cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes Olmos, R.A.; Bokkel Huinink, W.W. ten; Dewit, L.G.H.; Hoefnagel, C.A.; Liem, I.H.; Tinteren, H. van

    1996-01-01

    Recognition of adverse late cardiac effects from cancer therapy may enable identification of patients with risk of cardiotoxicity upon cancer retreatment. In this study the feasibility of using iodine-123 metaiodobenzylguanidine ( 123 I-MIBG) heart scintigraphy to detect abnormalities of the myocardial adrenergic neurone function in the late period after cancer therapy was evaluated in relation to the left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) in 18 cancer patients: 11 had undergone thoracic irradiation involving the heart, in five cases in combination with anthracycline therapy, 11-228 months (median 60 months) before radionuclide tests, while seven had not received previous anthracycline and/or radiotherapy (controls). The 123 I-MIBG cardiac uptake, expressed as a heart-to-mediastinum ratio on planar images after 4 h, ranged from 1.21 to 1.76 (median 1.56) in cancer therapy patients, which was significantly decreased (P=0.0006) in comparison with controls (range 1.81-2.06, median 1.9). The myocardial 123 I-MIBG washout, calculated from planar images after 15 min and 4 h, and LVEF also showed significant differences, but with some overlap in individual cases. In cancer therapy patients, cardiac abnormalities seen on planar images and additional single-photon emission tomographic images varied from focal defects to diffusely reduced myocardial uptake. It is concluded that 123 I-MIBG heart scintigraphy, which is able to identify cardiac adrenergic neurone abnormalities in the follow-up period after cancer therapy, may help to identify relapsed patients who are at increased risk of developing cardiotoxicity during retreatment with cardiotoxic therapy modalities. (orig.). With 4 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Effects of Spring Late Frost on Black Seed (Nigella sativa L. under Controlled Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Khorsandi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In many years plant growth strongly affected by late spring frost. In order to evaluate the effects of late frost on Black Seed plants, a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with three replications was carried out in college of agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad and five Black Seed ecotypes (Birjsnd, Sabzewar, Ferdows, Gonabad and Neyshabour after two months growth and hardening in natural environment, were exposed to seven temperatures (0, -1.5, -3, -4.5, -6, -7.5 and -9°C in termogradient freezer. For determining cold stress damages, Lethal Temperature (LT for 50% of plants according to the Electrolyte Leakage percentage (LT50el, LT for 50% of plants according to the Survival percentage (LT50su, LT for 50% of plants according to the plant necrose in Test Tube (LT50tt and Reduced Dry Matter Temperature 50 (RDMT50 were measured. Ability of plants for recovery was recorded based on leaf number and leaf area, plant dry weight and cold damage percentage of leaves. According to the LT50tt, LT50su and RDMT50 Black Seed plants can tolerated cold stress in range between -5.7 to -9.0 °C and Sabzewar and Ferdows ecotypes had the most and the least cold tolerance, respectively. At the point of ability of plants for recovery, Ferdows ecotype had the least and Sabzewar and Neyshabour ecotypes had the best plant recovery. Moreover there were high correlations between LT50tt and LT50 based on electrolyte leakage, survival and RDMT50. Electrolyte leakage and visual scoring of cold damage in test tube are rapid methods, so for assessing cold tolerance in plants LT50el and LT50tt indeces may be useful.

  20. Association between late effects assessed by physicians and quality of life reported by head-and-neck cancer survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugaard, Rikke; Kjaer, Trille; Johansen, Christoffer

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Many survivors of head-and-neck cancer (HNC) suffer from late effects. Their overall quality of life deteriorates during treatment, followed by a slow recovery up to five years after treatment. We examined the association between the severity of physician-assessed late effects...... and the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) reported by survivors of HNC. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The analysis was based on data collected during follow-up for 136 survivors of cancer in the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or salivary glands. Physicians' assessments of dysphagia, xerostomia, fibrosis...... models were used to examine the association between the severity of each late effect and HRQoL. RESULTS: Quality of life was decreased among patients with moderate to severe dysphagia compared to patients without dysphagia (-16 points; 95% CI -21;-3). Also role functioning (-20 points; 95% CI -38...

  1. Proceedings of the 3. Muenster symposium on late effects after tumor therapy in childhood and adolescence. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willich, Normann; Boelling, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    The volume on the 3rd Muenster Symposion on late effects after tumor therapy in childhood and adolescence contains 7 contributions: Evaluation of side effects after radiotherapy in childhood and adolescence; from retrospective case reports to a perspective, multicentric and transnational approach; late effects surveillance system after childhood cancer in Germany, Austria and parts of Switzerland - update 2009; second malignant neoplasm after childhood cancer in Germany - results from the long-term follow-up of the German childhood cancer registry; secondary neoplasm after Wilm's tumor in Germany; second cancer after total-body irradiation (TBI) in childhood; late toxicity in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with TBI-containing conditioning regimens for hematological malignancies; radiation toxicity following busulfan/melphalan high-dose chemotherapy in the EURO-EWING-99-trials: review of GPOH data

  2. Proceedings of the 3. Muenster symposium on late effects after tumor therapy in childhood and adolescence. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willich, Normann; Boelling, Tobias (eds.) [Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2009-08-15

    The volume on the 3rd Muenster Symposion on late effects after tumor therapy in childhood and adolescence contains 7 contributions: Evaluation of side effects after radiotherapy in childhood and adolescence; from retrospective case reports to a perspective, multicentric and transnational approach; late effects surveillance system after childhood cancer in Germany, Austria and parts of Switzerland - update 2009; second malignant neoplasm after childhood cancer in Germany - results from the long-term follow-up of the German childhood cancer registry; secondary neoplasm after Wilm's tumor in Germany; second cancer after total-body irradiation (TBI) in childhood; late toxicity in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with TBI-containing conditioning regimens for hematological malignancies; radiation toxicity following busulfan/melphalan high-dose chemotherapy in the EURO-EWING-99-trials: review of GPOH data.

  3. No consistent effects of prenatal or neonatal exposure to Spanish flu on late-life mortality in 24 developed countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Alan; Tillinghast, J; Canudas-Romo, V

    2010-01-01

    We test the effects of early life exposure to disease on later health by looking for differences in late-life mortality in cohorts born around the 1918-1919 flu pandemic using data from the Human Mortality Database for 24 countries. After controlling for age, period, and sex effects, residual...

  4. TU-EF-210-02: MRg Hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, R.

    2015-01-01

    The use of therapeutic ultrasound to provide targeted therapy is an active research area that has a broad application scope. The invited talks in this session will address currently implemented strategies and protocols for both hyperthermia and ablation applications using therapeutic ultrasound. The role of both ultrasound and MRI in the monitoring and assessment of these therapies will be explored in both pre-clinical and clinical applications. Katherine Ferrara: High Intensity Focused Ultrasound, Drug Delivery, and Immunotherapy Rajiv Chopra: Translating Localized Doxorubicin Delivery to Pediatric Oncology using MRI-guided HIFU Elisa Konofagou: Real-time Ablation Monitoring and Lesion Quantification using Harmonic Motion Imaging Keyvan Farahani: AAPM Task Groups in Interventional Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy Learning Objectives: Understand the role of ultrasound in localized drug delivery and the effects of immunotherapy when used in conjunction with ultrasound therapy. Understand potential targeted drug delivery clinical applications including pediatric oncology. Understand the technical requirements for performing targeted drug delivery. Understand how radiation-force approaches can be used to both monitor and assess high intensity focused ultrasound ablation therapy. Understand the role of AAPM task groups in ultrasound imaging and therapies. Chopra: Funding from Cancer Prevention and Research Initiative of Texas (CPRIT), Award R1308 Evelyn and M.R. Hudson Foundation; Research Support from Research Contract with Philips Healthcare; COI are Co-founder of FUS Instruments Inc Ferrara: Supported by NIH, UCDavis and California (CIRM and BHCE) Farahani: In-kind research support from Philips Healthcare

  5. TU-EF-210-02: MRg Hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, R. [UT Southwestern Medical Ctr at Dallas (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The use of therapeutic ultrasound to provide targeted therapy is an active research area that has a broad application scope. The invited talks in this session will address currently implemented strategies and protocols for both hyperthermia and ablation applications using therapeutic ultrasound. The role of both ultrasound and MRI in the monitoring and assessment of these therapies will be explored in both pre-clinical and clinical applications. Katherine Ferrara: High Intensity Focused Ultrasound, Drug Delivery, and Immunotherapy Rajiv Chopra: Translating Localized Doxorubicin Delivery to Pediatric Oncology using MRI-guided HIFU Elisa Konofagou: Real-time Ablation Monitoring and Lesion Quantification using Harmonic Motion Imaging Keyvan Farahani: AAPM Task Groups in Interventional Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy Learning Objectives: Understand the role of ultrasound in localized drug delivery and the effects of immunotherapy when used in conjunction with ultrasound therapy. Understand potential targeted drug delivery clinical applications including pediatric oncology. Understand the technical requirements for performing targeted drug delivery. Understand how radiation-force approaches can be used to both monitor and assess high intensity focused ultrasound ablation therapy. Understand the role of AAPM task groups in ultrasound imaging and therapies. Chopra: Funding from Cancer Prevention and Research Initiative of Texas (CPRIT), Award R1308 Evelyn and M.R. Hudson Foundation; Research Support from Research Contract with Philips Healthcare; COI are Co-founder of FUS Instruments Inc Ferrara: Supported by NIH, UCDavis and California (CIRM and BHCE) Farahani: In-kind research support from Philips Healthcare.

  6. Iron oxide nanoparticle hyperthermia and chemotherapy cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryk, A. A.; Giustini, A. J.; Ryan, P.; Strawbridge, R. R.; Hoopes, P. J.

    2009-02-01

    The benefit of combining hyperthermia and chemotherapy to treat cancer is well established. However, combined therapy has not yet achieved standard of care status. The reasons are numerous and varied, however the lack of significantly greater tumor cell sensitivity to heat (as compared to normal cells) and the inability to deliver heat to the tumor in a precise manner have been major factors. Iron oxide nanoparticle (IONP) hyperthermia, alone and combined with other modalities, offers a new direction in hyperthermia cancer therapy via improved tumor targeting and an improved therapeutic ratio. Our preliminary studies have demonstrated tumor cell cytotoxicity (in vitro and in vivo) with IONP heat and cisplatinum (CDDP) doses lower than those necessary when using conventional heating techniques or cisplatinum alone. Ongoing studies suggest such treatment could be further improved through the use of targeted nanoparticles.

  7. Early experience in the combination of regional hyperthermia and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, G.C.W.; Bleehen, N.M.

    1987-01-01

    An annular array of radiative radiofrequency applicators (APA) has been developed by the BSD Corporation, Salt Lake City (USA) which has been shown to be capable of deep heating. The BSD 1000 clinical hyperthermia system has been installed at Cambridge for 18 months and a pilot study has been performed to assess the feasibility of pelvic regional hyperthermia in the treatment of extensive pelvic malignancy. The study confirms published data that the APA is capable of heating at depth within the pelvis. Therapeutic temperatures may be reached in the majority of treatments but are difficult to maintain due to acute toxicity. Steering of the area of maximal energy deposition may improve treatments considerably. A randomised trial is now being designed to assess whether the synergism between radiation and hyperthermia seen in superficial lesions can be demonstrated in tumours occurring in the pelvis. (orig./MG)

  8. Proceedings of the 45th Research Society for the Late Effects of the A-Bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    This issue is the collection of study papers presented in the meeting in the title (in Nagasaki City, June 6, 2004), which containing documents of the special review lecture concerning The late effects research study on A-bomb survivors in RERF (Radiation Effects Research Foundation); 6 symposia of An outline of Hiroshima University 21st Century COE (Center of Excellence) program, The prospect of Nagasaki University COE program of a consortium for radiation medical science, Radiation induced damage and mechanisms for genome stability, Establishment of the molecular-based long-term follow-up system for the detection of leukemia following exposure to high-dose radiation, Pathological and epidemiological study for double cancer in Nagasaki A-bomb survivors, and International medical cooperation for Hibakusha/promotion of molecular epidemiological investigations and emergency radiation medicine; and 41 general presentations. The general presentations involve 16 clinical and social examination-related studies of Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors and of people in Chernobyl and Semipalatinsk with respect to cancer (3 presentations, partly overlapped with other items), ophthalmology (2), cholesterol (1), life style and sense (7), rest life time (1), diabetes (1), tuberculosis (1) and arteriosclerosis (1); 4 basic studies on the survivors like immunological one; and 21 basic radiation biology studies related to DNA damage, chromatin, bystander effects, p53, thyroid cancer, genome analysis in the survivors and in experimental cells/animals. (N.I.)

  9. Proceedings of the 45th Research Society for the Late Effects of the A-Bomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon,

    2004-09-01

    This issue is the collection of study papers presented in the meeting in the title (in Nagasaki City, June 6, 2004), which containing documents of the special review lecture concerning The late effects research study on A-bomb survivors in RERF (Radiation Effects Research Foundation); 6 symposia of An outline of Hiroshima University 21st Century COE (Center of Excellence) program, The prospect of Nagasaki University COE program of a consortium for radiation medical science, Radiation induced damage and mechanisms for genome stability, Establishment of the molecular-based long-term follow-up system for the detection of leukemia following exposure to high-dose radiation, Pathological and epidemiological study for double cancer in Nagasaki A-bomb survivors, and International medical cooperation for Hibakusha/promotion of molecular epidemiological investigations and emergency radiation medicine; and 41 general presentations. The general presentations involve 16 clinical and social examination-related studies of Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors and of people in Chernobyl and Semipalatinsk with respect to cancer (3 presentations, partly overlapped with other items), ophthalmology (2), cholesterol (1), life style and sense (7), rest life time (1), diabetes (1), tuberculosis (1) and arteriosclerosis (1); 4 basic studies on the survivors like immunological one; and 21 basic radiation biology studies related to DNA damage, chromatin, bystander effects, p53, thyroid cancer, genome analysis in the survivors and in experimental cells/animals. (N.I.)

  10. Potential effects of diurnal temperature oscillations on potato late blight with special reference to climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakya, S K; Goss, E M; Dufault, N S; van Bruggen, A H C

    2015-02-01

    Global climate change will have effects on diurnal temperature oscillations as well as on average temperatures. Studies on potato late blight (Phytophthora infestans) development have not considered daily temperature oscillations. We hypothesize that growth and development rates of P. infestans would be less influenced by change in average temperature as the magnitude of fluctuations in daily temperatures increases. We investigated the effects of seven constant (10, 12, 15, 17, 20, 23, and 27°C) and diurnally oscillating (±5 and ±10°C) temperatures around the same means on number of lesions, incubation period, latent period, radial lesion growth rate, and sporulation intensity on detached potato leaves inoculated with two P. infestans isolates from clonal lineages US-8 and US-23. A four-parameter thermodynamic model was used to describe relationships between temperature and disease development measurements. Incubation and latency progression accelerated with increasing oscillations at low mean temperatures but slowed down with increasing oscillations at high mean temperatures (P effects of global climate change on disease development.

  11. Implications of tissue target-cell survival-curve shape for values of split-dose recovery doses: late versus early effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redpath, J.L.; Peel, D.M.; Hopewell, J.W.

    1984-01-01

    Recent data from this laboratory on split-dose recovery for early and late effects in pig skin are consistent with the linear-quadratic model for cell survival, and with relative cell survival-curve shapes for early- and late-effect target cells where the early-effect cells have an intially steeper and straighter survival-curve than the late-effect cells. (author)

  12. The effect of maternal nutrient restriction during late gestation on muscle, bone and meat parameters in five month old lambs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Harrison, Adrian Paul; Therkildsen, M.

    2007-01-01

    rate from birth to weaning, yet compensatory growth after weaning. No relation was found between maternal nutrient restriction during late gestation and meat quality in terms of proteolytic potential, myofibrillar fragmentation index or shear force measured in meat from 5 month old lambs. The data do...... not support the hypothesis of a long-term programming effect of maternal nutrient restriction during late gestation on meat ternderness. However, a long-term effect of maternal nutrient restirction was found for bone trowth. Femur weight was significantly reduced in L-lambs and cortical bone density and mean...

  13. Covalent DNA-protein crosslinking occurs after hyperthermia and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cress, A.E.; Bowden, G.T.

    1983-01-01

    Covalent DNA-protein crosslinks occur in exponentially growing mouse leukemia cells (L1210) after exposure to ionizing radiation. The amount of DNA-protein crosslinks as measured by a filter binding assay is dose dependent upon x irradiation. Although hyperthermia and radiation in combination are synergistic with respect to cell lethality, the combination does not result in an increase of DNA-protein crosslinks when assayed immediately following treatments. Hyperthermia (43 0 C/15 min) given prior to radiation dose not alter the radiation dose dependency of the amount of initial crosslinking. In addition, the amount of DNA-protein crosslinking produced by heat plus radiation is independent of the length of heating the cells at 43 0 C. The DNA-protein crosslinks produced y 50-Gy x ray alone are removed after 2 hr at 37 0 C. However, if hyperthermia (43 0 C/15 min) is given prior to 100-Gy x ray, the removal of DNA-protein crosslinks is delayed until 4.0 hr after radiation. Phospho-serine and phospho-threonine bonds are not produced with either radiation or the combination of hyperthermia plus radiation as judged by the resistance of the bonds to guanidine hydrochloride. However, hyperthermia plus radiation causes an increase in phosphate to nitrogen type bonding. These results show that radiation alone causes covalent DNA-protein crosslinks. Hyperthermia in combination with radiation does not increase the total amount of the crosslinks but delays the removal of the crosslinks and alters the distribution of the types of chemical bonding

  14. Fractionation Spares Mice From Radiation-Induced Reductions in Weight Gain But Does Not Prevent Late Oligodendrocyte Lineage Side Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Begolly, Sage; Shrager, Peter G.; Olschowka, John A.; Williams, Jacqueline P.; O'Banion, M. Kerry

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the late effects of fractionated versus single-dose cranial radiation on murine white matter. Methods and Materials: Mice were exposed to 0 Gy, 6 × 6 Gy, or 1 × 20 Gy cranial irradiation at 10 to 12 weeks of age. Endpoints were assessed through 18 months from exposure using immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and electrophysiology. Results: Weight gain was temporarily reduced after irradiation; greater loss was seen after single versus fractionated doses. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were reduced early and late after both single and fractionated irradiation. Both protocols also increased myelin g-ratio, reduced the number of nodes of Ranvier, and promoted a shift in the proportion of small, unmyelinated versus large, myelinated axon fibers. Conclusions: Fractionation does not adequately spare normal white matter from late radiation side effects.

  15. Fractionation Spares Mice From Radiation-Induced Reductions in Weight Gain But Does Not Prevent Late Oligodendrocyte Lineage Side Effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Begolly, Sage [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Shrager, Peter G. [Department of Neuroscience, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Physiology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Olschowka, John A. [Department of Neuroscience, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Williams, Jacqueline P. [Department of Environmental Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); O' Banion, M. Kerry, E-mail: Kerry_OBanion@URMC.Rochester.edu [Department of Neuroscience, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States); Department of Neurology, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Purpose: To determine the late effects of fractionated versus single-dose cranial radiation on murine white matter. Methods and Materials: Mice were exposed to 0 Gy, 6 × 6 Gy, or 1 × 20 Gy cranial irradiation at 10 to 12 weeks of age. Endpoints were assessed through 18 months from exposure using immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, and electrophysiology. Results: Weight gain was temporarily reduced after irradiation; greater loss was seen after single versus fractionated doses. Oligodendrocyte progenitor cells were reduced early and late after both single and fractionated irradiation. Both protocols also increased myelin g-ratio, reduced the number of nodes of Ranvier, and promoted a shift in the proportion of small, unmyelinated versus large, myelinated axon fibers. Conclusions: Fractionation does not adequately spare normal white matter from late radiation side effects.

  16. The Dartmouth Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence: magnetic hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Ian; Fiering, Steve N; Griswold, Karl E; Hoopes, P Jack; Kekalo, Katerina; Ndong, Christian; Paulsen, Keith; Petryk, Alicea A; Pogue, Brian; Shubitidze, Fridon; Weaver, John

    2015-01-01

    The Dartmouth Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence - one of nine funded by the National Cancer Institute as part of the Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer - focuses on the use of magnetic nanoparticles for cancer diagnostics and hyperthermia therapy. It brings together a diverse team of engineers and biomedical researchers with expertise in nanomaterials, molecular targeting, advanced biomedical imaging and translational in vivo studies. The goal of successfully treating cancer is being approached by developing nanoparticles, conjugating them with Fabs, hyperthermia treatment, immunotherapy and sensing treatment response.

  17. Targeting therapy-resistant cancer stem cells by hyperthermia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oei, A L; Vriend, L E M; Krawczyk, P M

    2017-01-01

    Eradication of all malignant cells is the ultimate but challenging goal of anti-cancer treatment; most traditional clinically-available approaches fail because there are cells in a tumour that either escape therapy or become therapy-resistant. A subpopulation of cancer cells, the cancer stem cells...... are limited. Here, we argue that hyperthermia - a therapeutic approach based on local heating of a tumour - is potentially beneficial for targeting CSCs in solid tumours. First, hyperthermia has been described to target cells in hypoxic and nutrient-deprived tumour areas where CSCs reside and ionising...

  18. The effects of the late 2000s global financial crisis on Australia’s construction demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Jiang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available An accurate measurement of the impacts of external shocks on construction demand will enable construction industry policymakers and developers to make allowances for future occurrences and advance the construction industry in a sustainable manner. This paper aims to measurethe dynamic effects of the late 2000s global financial crisis on the level of demand in the Australian construction industry. The vector error correction (VEC model with intervention indicators is employed to estimate the external impact from the crisis on a macro-level construction economic indicator, namely construction demand. The methodology comprises six main stages to produce appropriate VEC models that describe the characteristics of the underlying process. Research findings suggestthat overall residential and non-residential construction demand were affected significantly by the recent crisis and seasonality. Non-residentialconstruction demand was disrupted more than residential construction demand at the crisis onset. The residential constructionindustry is more reactive and is able to recover faster following the crisis in comparison with the non-residential industry. The VEC model with intervention indicators developed in this study can be used as an experiment for an advanced econometric method. This can be used to analyse the effects of special eventsand factors not only on construction but also on other industries.

  19. Proceedings of the 46th Research Society for the Late Effects of A-Bomb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Chikako; Shimizu, Yukiko; Tomonaga, Masao

    2006-01-01

    This issue is the collection of study papers presented in the meeting in the title (in Hiroshima City, June 5, 2005), which containing following documents: the special lecture concerning The 60-year history after A-bomb by a doctor who has pursued the medical works for the survivors for about 40 years; 4 symposia on the view in coming decade of researches for the late effects of A-Bomb concerning Solid cancer risks, Blood disease risks (leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome/MDS and multiple myeloma), Mechanism of radiation carcinogenesis, and Health problems in the second generations of survivors; and 30 general presentations. The general presentations involve 10 clinical and social examination-related studies of Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors, a study on the internal exposure dose evaluation in residents around Chernobyl, 5 clinical and basic studies on thyroid, 2 studies on MDS, 3 basic or epidemiological studies on A-bomb radiation effects, 9 basic radiation biology studies related to gene analysis, DNA, apoptosis, 40 K and p53 in the survivors and/or in experimental cells/animals. (T.I.)

  20. ERP evidence for own-age effects on late stages of processing sad faces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fölster, Mara; Werheid, Katja

    2016-08-01

    Faces convey important information on interaction partners, such as their emotional state and age. Faces of the same age are, according to recent research, preferentially processed. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the neural processes underlying this own-age effect are influenced by the emotional expression of the face, and to explore possible explanations such as the frequency or quality of contact to own-age versus other-age groups. Event-related potentials were recorded while 19 younger (18-30 years) and 19 older (64-86 years) observers watched younger and older sad and happy faces. Sad but not happy faces elicited higher late positive potential amplitudes for own-age than for other-age faces. This own-age effect was significant for older, but not for younger, observers, and correlated with the quality of contact with the own-age versus the other-age group. This pattern suggests that sad own-age faces are motivationally more relevant.

  1. Relative effect of dose-rate values and fractionation on late responding tissues and tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malgieri, F.

    1995-01-01

    There are currently available different facilities for radiotherapy also with regard to the dose-rate values (in the ranges LDR - MDR - HDR), sometimes used alternatively or subsequently for the same tumour. We have set up a 'unitary' L-Q model, based on Liversage's and Dale's works, that explicitly include also the dose-rate value and a correction factor of the β parameter depending on the sublethal damage repair time constant, on the length of time of each irradiation and on the time interval between following irradiation for to realize the effect of the incomplete repair when the time interval is short as, for example, in the PLDR. This 'unitary' L-Q model is, of course, usable in the same way both for external beam therapy and for curietherapy and make possible to compute and compare, for each kind of tumour and normal tissue, the relative effect of the different available modality of radiotherapy also with regard to the dose-rate. We show and discuss the resulting relationships of the ratio BED 'late'/BED tumour changing the time-dose parameters and the values of the biological characteristic parameters T p , α/β and μ, for defined size of tumour control and different value of the doserate

  2. The Early Facilitative and Late Contextual Specific Effect of the Color Red on Attentional Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Xia

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Many studies have proved that color represents a variety of emotionally meaningful information. Researchers have proposed that context information endows colors with different associated meanings, and elicits corresponding behavior. Others have contended that the color red intensifies the stimulus’ existing valence or motivation tendency in the early processing step. The present study attempts to incorporate these two effects of the color red to explore their differences in a dot probe task, using event-related potential (ERP. Our ERP results indicate that the color red intensifies the initial attention to emotion-congruent conditions, as indicated by the P1 component. However, the colors red and green lead to sustained attention to the expression of anger and happiness, respectively, but not fear, as shown by the late positive complex component (all results are available at: https://osf.io/k3b8c/. This study found the different processing stages of the effect of the color red during attentional processing in a discrete emotional context, using ERPs, and may refine the Color-in-Context theory.

  3. Hepatic Late Effects of Radio-chemotherapy In Pediatric Hodgkin's Lymphoma [HL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abaza, A.; EL-Khouly, W.A.

    2013-01-01

    To identify the hepatic long-term effect of radio-chemotherapy in childhood and adolescence Hodgkin's disease (HD) patients regularly attending the pediatric oncology clinic of National Cancer Institute (NCI), 42 long-term survivors (LTS) were studied, together with 26 newly-diagnosed (ND) HD patients and 28 healthy controls. During 3 years period, all patients subjected to thorough clinical history/ examination. Files of LTS were revised for date of diagnoses, original site(s), stage, histopathological subtypes and dose/ duration of therapy. Clinical examination was done with laying stress on blood pressure, visceromegaly and the presence of lymphadenopathy. Lab investigations included CBC, ESR, bone marrow biopsy, liver function tests and Liver biopsy. Radiodiagnostic studies were done whenever indicated. ESR and anemia were significantly higher in ND patients. Serum alkaline phosphatase enzyme was significantly higher in LTS and ND patients, compared to the controls. Finally, the study documented that there is increased serum alkaline phosphatase enzyme and anemia as a long-term complications of radio-chemotherapy in survivors HD patients. Recommendations regarding the comprehensive follow-up of therapy for HD were discussed. Well-Designed studies are needed to reliably evaluate the prevalence of, and risk factors for, hepatic late adverse effects after antineoplastic treatment for childhood cancer

  4. Late radiation effects in Marshall Islanders exposed to fallout 28 years ago

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conard, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    In 1954, following detonation of a megaton nuclear device at Bikini, an unfortunate accident occurred owing to an unpredicted shift in winds resulting in exposure to radioactive fallout of 250 Marshallese people, 28 American servicemen on atolls to the east, and 23 Japanese fishermen on their fishing vessel. In this presentation, medical findings in the exposed Marshallese noted over the past 28 years is briefly reviewed with particular emphasis on late effects on the thyroid gland. The Marshallese were too far distant from the detonation for any direct effects, and their exposure was due entirely to fallout radiation during the 2 days prior to evacuation. This consisted of penetrating whole-body gamma radiation, irradiation of the skin (principally beta radiation) from fallout deposited on the skin, and internal absorption of radionuclides from ingestion of contaminated food and water. The most serious internal exposure was that to the thyroid from radioiodines, which were relatively abundant in the fallout. 63 references, 1 figure, 4 tables

  5. Role of neutrons in late effects of radiation among A-Bomb survivors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beebe, Gilbert W [Clinical Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Land, Charles E [Environmental Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States); Jablon, Seymour [Medical Follow-Up Agency, National Research Council, National Academy of Sciences, Washington, DC (United States)

    1978-12-01

    Experimental findings of many kinds as well as the Rossi-Kellerer theory of dual radiation action suggest that neutrons and gamma rays may differ in their biological effects, especially carcinogenesis, upon man. In particular, for many but not necessarily all cancers the carcinogenic effect of neutrons may be linear, and that of gamma- or X-radiation, a more complex function with linear and quadratic terms; in addition, dose-response functions for both types of radiation probably require a modifying factor to account for the frequently observed turn-down of dose-response curves in the high-dose region. In a further analysis of leukemia among A-Bomb survivors, Ishimaru et al. have fitted the function y a{sub 0} + a{sub 1}n + a{sub 2}{gamma}{sup 2} where the a's are constants and n and {gamma} the respective neutron and gamma doses. They find not only that this function fits the data well, although not significantly better than a straight line, but also that the best estimate of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for neutrons is 44n{sup -1/2}. In the present paper we report our efforts to re-analyze ABCC-RERF data on a variety of late radiation effects in an effort to distinguish between neutron and gamma radiation more sharply than has been possible in the past. The effects examined include: chromosomal aberrations, small heads and mental retardation, leukemia, thyroid cancer, lung cancer, breast cancer, stomach cancer, esophageal cancer, lymphomas. The results of fitting various models will be reported. Goodness of fit will be examined and efforts will be made to derive RBE estimates. (author)

  6. Priority effects of early successional insects influence late successional fungi in dead wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Rannveig Margrete; Birkemoe, Tone; Sverdrup-Thygeson, Anne

    2015-11-01

    Community assembly is an integral process in all ecosystems, producing patterns of species distributions, biodiversity, and ecosystem functioning. Environmental filters and colonization history govern the assembly process, but their relative importance varies depending on the study system. Dead wood decomposition is a slow process, allowing decomposer communities to develop within a slowly changing substrate for decades. Despite this, there are few long-term studies of priority effects from colonization history in this ecosystem. In this study, we investigate the importance of insects in early succession of dead wood on the fungal community present one decade later. Sixty aspen trees were killed in two study landscapes, each tree producing one aspen high stump and log. Insects were sampled with flight interception traps during the first 4 years after tree death, and fungal fruiting bodies were registered in year twelve. We found positive priority effects of two fungivorous beetles, the sap beetle Glischrochilus quadripunctatus and the round fungus beetle Agathidium nigripenne, on the Artist's bracket (Ganoderma applanatum) and a positive priority effect of wood-boring beetles on the ascomycete Yellow fairy cup (Bisporella citrina). The Aspen bracket (Phellinus tremulae) did not respond to insects in early succession of the dead wood. Our results suggest that early successional insects can have significant, long-lasting effects on the late successional fungal community in dead wood. Also, the effect can be specific, with one fungus species depending on one or a few fungivorous beetle species. This has implications for decomposition and biodiversity in dead wood, as loss of early colonizing beetles may also affect the successional pathways they seem to initiate.

  7. Whole body hyperthermia, but not skin hyperthermia, accelerates brain and locomotor limb circulatory strain and impairs exercise capacity in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trangmar, Steven J; Chiesa, Scott T; Kalsi, Kameljit K

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular strain and hyperthermia are thought to be important factors limiting exercise capacity in heat-stressed humans, however, the contribution of elevations in skin (Tsk) versus whole body temperatures on exercise capacity has not been characterized. To ascertain their relationships...... was associated with a plateau in MCA and two-legged vascular conductance (VC). Mechanistically, the falling MCA VC was coupled to reductions in PaCO2, whereas the plateau in leg vascular conductance was related to markedly elevated plasma [NA] and a plateau in plasma ATP These findings reveal that whole-body...... hyperthermia, but not skin hyperthermia, compromises exercise capacity in heat-stressed humans through the early attenuation of brain and active muscle blood flow....

  8. Late effects of craniospinal irradiation for standard risk medulloblastoma in paediatric patients: A comparison of treatment techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leman, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Survival rates for standard risk medulloblastoma are favourable, but craniospinal irradiation (CSI) necessary to eradicate microscopic spread causes life limiting late effects. Aims: The aim of this paper is to compare CSI techniques in terms of toxicity and quality of life for survivors. Methods and materials: A literature search was conducted using synonyms of ‘medulloblastoma’, ’craniospinal’, ‘radiotherapy’ and ‘side effects’ to highlight 29 papers that would facilitate this discussion. Results and discussion: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), tomotherapy and protons all provide CSI which can reduce dose to normal tissue, however photon methods cannot eliminate exit dose as well as protons can. Research for each technique requires longer term follow up in order to prove that survival rates remain high whilst reducing late effects. Findings/conclusion: Proton therapy is the superior method of CSI in term of late effects, but more research is needed to evidence this. Until proton therapy is available in the UK IMRT should be utilised. - Highlights: • Craniospinal irradiation is vital in the treatment of medulloblastoma. • Survivors often suffer long term side effects which reduce quality of life. • Tomotherapy, IMRT and proton therapy reduce late effects by sparing normal tissue. • Proton therapy offers superior dose distribution but further research is necessary. • IMRT should be employed for photon radiotherapy.

  9. Quantification of the clinical synergy between hyperthermia and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crezee, Johannes; Kok, Petra; Bel, Arjan; Stalpers, Lukas; Franken, Klaas

    2014-01-01

    Hyperthermia (HT) therapy, raising tumor temperature to 41-45℃, enhances the effect of radiotherapy (RT) in tumor tissue. Combined HT-RT treatment is successfully applied for different tumors. The sensitizing effect of HT is maximal when given simultaneously with RT, but HT is more tumor selective when given before or after RT. Our purpose was to integrate existing preclinical and clinical data into an integrated RT-HT treatment planning system (R-HTP) to predict the biological effect of different sequences of RT and HT for clinically realistic temperatures and dose distributions. We developed a prototype R-HTP system and applied this for a retrospective analysis and comparison of RT+HT with RT alone for 15 prostate cancer patients. We used the linear quadratic (LQ) model with temperature dependent parameters alpha and beta obtained from the literature. The original RT plans were used which at 70 Gy on the PTV, in 35 2 Gy fractions. HT was simulated to be given with a phased array loco-regional HT system with realistic temperature distributions optimized to achieve maximal tumor temperature while maintaining normal tissue below 45℃. For the 15 patients an average median tumor temperature of 41.6℃ was achieved. This yielded an average effective radiotherapy dose of 86.1 Gy for the combined RT+HT treatment, compared to an average effective dose of 75.9 Gy when RT was given alone. The resulting increase in local tumor control probability (TCP) varies between 10% for low risk prostate cancer patients to 40% for high risk prostate cancer patients. This form of multi-modality planning is useful to predict the enhancement of RT by HT. (author)

  10. Effectiveness of muscle coverage to manage osteomyelitis of very late onset in the irradiated chest wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funayama, Emi; Minakawa, Hidehiko; Otani, Hidekazu; Saito, Noriko; Oyama, Akihiko; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Toshihiko; Saito, Akira; Yamamoto, Yuhei

    2012-01-01

    Radiation therapy for breast cancer has improved survival rates; however, a consequence of this is treatment-induced complications in longer-living patients. Decades after chest wall irradiation, very late onset radiation-induced osteomyelitis can develop, caused by osteoradionecrosis. This may lead to the development of small, but very refractory, skin ulcers. Many reports recommend well-vascularized tissue coverage after appropriate debridement for irradiation ulcers; however, when the ulcers are of very late onset, this sometimes causes recurrence of ulceration in non-muscle-covered areas after flap transfer. Thus, for very late onset cases, we propose treatment with an absolute muscle flap to cover both the obviously infected focus and the surrounding irradiated area. A muscle flap consisting of the entire latissimus dorsi, the shape of which is very large in the horizontal direction, satisfies this requirement. Latissimus dorsi muscle coverage for the treatment of very late onset osteomyelitis should be reappraised. (author)

  11. In vitro and in vivo effect of poplar bud (Populi gemma Extracts on late blight (Phytophthora infestans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bálint János

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of populin extract from black poplar (Populus nigra on late blight was assessed under laboratory and field conditions. The growth rate of hyphae was found to be significantly lower after 1v/v% populin application, and no hyphae growth was detected under 3 and 6v/v% populin application. Populin also reduced the light blight severity on potato leaves under field conditions. From our results, we have concluded that populin extract can be considered as a new and environmentally-friendly alternative for the control of late blight under field conditions.

  12. Micronucleus formation compared to the survival rate of human melanoma cells after X-ray and neutron irradiation and hyperthermia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Beuningen, D.; Streffer, C.; Bertholdt, G.

    1981-09-01

    After neutron and X-ray irradiation and combined X-ray irradiation and hyperthermia (3 hours, 42/sup 0/C), the survival rate of human melanoma cells was measured by means of the colony formation test and compared to the formation of micronuclei. Neutrons had a stronger effect on the formation of micronuclei than the combination of X-rays and hyperthermia. X-rays had the lowest effect. The dose effect curve showed a break at that dose level at which a reduction of cells was observed in the cultures. A good relation between survival rate and formation of micronuclei was found for the X-ray irradiation, but not for the neutron irradiation and the combined treatment. These observations are discussed. At least for X-rays, the micronucleus test has turned out to be a good screening method for the radiosensitivity of a biologic system.

  13. TARGETED DELETION OF INDUCIBLE HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN 70 ABROGATES THE LATE INFARCT-SPARING EFFECT OF MYOCARDIAL ISCHEMIC PRECONDITIONING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract submitted for 82nd annual meeting of the American Association for Thoracic Surgery, May 4-8, 2002 in Washington D.C.Targeted Deletion of Inducible Heat Shock Protein 70 Abrogates the Late Infarct-Sparing Effect of Myocardial Ischemic PreconditioningCraig...

  14. Proceedings of 42nd Research Society for the Late Effects of the A-Bomb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, Hideo [Hiroshima Atomic Bomb Casualty Council Health Management and Promotion Center (Japan); Nakane, Yoshibumi [Nagasaki Univ. Graduate School of Bio-medicine (Japan); Suzuki, Gen [Radiation Effect Research Foundation, Hiroshima (JP)] [and others

    2002-03-01

    This issue is the collection of study papers presented in the meeting in the title: the special review lecture concerning the epidemiological evidences of multiple myeloma examination in A-bomb survivors (12-year study), the symposium concerning the medical care of A-bomb survivors in 21st century (5 presentations of medical care for the aged survivors, psychiatric approach and psychological care, future clinical studies and survivors' children in RERF, epidemiological study on the late effect of A-bomb radiation,