WorldWideScience

Sample records for hypertension management-related errors

  1. Identification of Hypertension Management-related Errors in a Personal Digital Assistant-based Clinical Log for Nurses in Advanced Practice Nurse Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Ju Lee, DNSc, RN

    2010-03-01

    Conclusion: The Hypertension Diagnosis and Management Error Taxonomy was useful for identifying errors based on documentation in a clinical log. The results provide an initial understanding of the nature of errors associated with hypertension diagnosis and management of nurses in APN training. The information gained from this study can contribute to educational interventions that promote APN competencies in identification and management of hypertension as well as overall patient safety and informatics competencies.

  2. Hypertension

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These datasets provide de-identified insurance data for hypertension hyperlipidemia. The data is provided by three managed care organizations in Allegheny County...

  3. hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emine Hatipoglu

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a common disease associated with important cardiovascular complications. Persistent blood pressure of 140/90 or higher despite combined use of a reninangiotensin system blocker, calcium channel blocker and a diuretic at highest tolerated doses constitutes resistant hypertension. Excess sympathetic activity plays an important pathogenic role in resistant hypertension in addition to contributing to the development of metabolic problems, in particular diabetes. Reduction of renal sympathetic activity by percutaneous catheter-based radiofrequency ablation via the renal arteries has been shown in several studies to decrease blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension, and importantly is largely free of significant complications. However, longer term follow-up is required to confirm both long-term safety and efficacy.

  4. Ocular Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Ocular Hypertension Sections What Is Ocular Hypertension? Ocular Hypertension Causes ... Hypertension Diagnosis Ocular Hypertension Treatment What Is Ocular Hypertension? Leer en Español: ¿Qué Es la Hipertensión Ocular? ...

  5. [Review of mortality from hypertensive disease and diabetes mellitus after the error because of new death certificate: region of Murcia, Spain, 2009].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirera Suárez, Lluís; Martínez López, Consuelo; Navarro Sánchez, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    The Medical Death Certificate and the Death Statistics Bulletin were unified and implemented in the year 2009 in Spain. National statistics detected an unusual increase for diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertensive disease (HT) deaths in 2009, in relation to previous years trend.The objective is to study the documental causes of the increase, and describe the procedures and consequences in rates, after the revision and recodification of DM and HT. All death certificates in 2009 for diabetes and hypertension in the Region of Murcia (cases=670) were revised, according to previous guidelines for direct recoding after consultation to the certifying physician. A telephone survey to certifying physician was designed to determine the accuracy of the pattern of recoding. Kappa index and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were performed between initial and recoded causes. Confirmation rate and 95%CI was estimated after phone inquiry to the certifying physician, and the annual age-adjusted and age-specific rates from 1999 to 2009 (uncorrected and corrected) for DM and HT were calculated. Simple agreement was 37% for DM and 30% for HT. The Kappa index between the initial and final causes was 49% (95%CI, 45 to 54%). Confirmation rates were 47% (95%CI, 43 to 52%) for DM and 38% (95%CI, 34 to 43%) for HT. The initial annual rates of 2009 for DM were corrected from 21.4 per 100,000 inhabitants to 17.1, and from 19.0 to 14.0 for hypertension. The respective specific age rates of 70 to 84 and older experienced similar reductions. The revision restored temporal trends in mortality of DM and HT in 2009, and identified no variations from previous years. It was detected that the erroneous fulfillment of DM AND HT came from the new death certificate.

  6. Hypertensive crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Maria Alexandra; Kumar, Siva K; De Caro, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is a common chronic medical condition affecting over 65 million Americans. Uncontrolled hypertension can progress to a hypertensive crisis defined as a systolic blood pressure >180 mm Hg or a diastolic blood pressure >120 mm Hg. Hypertensive crisis can be further classified as a hypertensive urgency or hypertensive emergency depending on end-organ involvement including cardiac, renal, and neurologic injury. The prompt recognition of a hypertensive emergency with the appropriate diagnostic tests and triage will lead to the adequate reduction of blood pressure, ameliorating the incidence of fatal outcomes. Severely hypertensive patients with acute end-organ damage (hypertensive emergencies) warrant admission to an intensive care unit for immediate reduction of blood pressure with a short-acting titratable intravenous antihypertensive medication. Hypertensive urgencies (severe hypertension with no or minimal end-organ damage) may in general be treated with oral antihypertensives as an outpatient. Rapid and short-lived intravenous medications commonly used are labetalol, esmolol, fenoldopam, nicardipine, sodium nitroprusside, and clevidipine. Medications such as hydralazine, immediate release nifedipine, and nitroglycerin should be avoided. Sodium nitroprusside should be used with caution because of its toxicity. The risk factors and prognosticators of a hypertensive crisis are still under recognized. Physicians should perform complete evaluations in patients who present with a hypertensive crisis to effectively reverse, intervene, and correct the underlying trigger, as well as improve long-term outcomes after the episode.

  7. Hypertensive Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Hypertensive Crisis: When You Should Call 9-1-1 for ... the Facts About HBP • Know Your Numbers Introduction Hypertensive Crisis Monitoring Your Blood Pressure At Home • Understand Symptoms ...

  8. Hypertension crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Dimitris P; Mourouzis, Iordanis; Thomopoulos, Costas; Makris, Thomas; Papademetriou, Vasilios

    2010-12-01

    Hypertensive crises (76% urgencies, 24% emergencies) represented more than one fourth of all medical urgencies/emergencies. Hypertensive urgencies frequently present with headache (22%), epistaxis (17%), faintness, and psychomotor agitation (10%) and hypertensive emergencies frequently present with chest pain (27%), dyspnea (22%) and neurological deficit (21%). Types of end-organ damage associated with hypertensive emergencies include cerebral infarction (24%), acute pulmonary edema (23%) and hypertensive encephalopathy (16%), as well as cerebral hemorrhage (4.5%). The most important factor that limits morbidity and mortality from these disorders is prompt and carefully considered therapy. Unfortunately, hypertensive emergencies and urgencies are among the most misunderstood and mismanaged of acute medical problems seen today. The primary goal of intervention in a hypertensive crisis is to safely reduce BP. Immediate reduction in BP is required only in patients with acute end-organ damage (i.e. hypertensive emergency). This requires treatment with a titratable short-acting intravenous (IV) antihypertensive agent, while severe hypertension with no acute end-organ damage is usually treated with oral antihypertensive agents. Patients with hypertensive emergencies are best treated in an intensive care unit (ICU) with titratable IV hypotensive agents. The aim of this review is to summarize the details regarding the definition-impact, causes, clinical condition and management of hypertensive crises.

  9. Pulmonary Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Goetting, Michael; Schwarzer, Mario; Gerber, Alexander; Klingelhoefer, Doris; David A. Groneberg

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is characterized by the increase of the mean pulmonary arterial pressure in the lung circulation. Despite the large number of experimental and clinical studies conducted on pulmonary hypertension, there is no comprehensive work that analyzed the global research activity on PH so far. We retrieved the bibliometric data of the publications on pulmonary hypertension for two periods from the Web of science database. Here, we set the first investigation period from 1900...

  10. Medication Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for You Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: Medical Errors and Patient Safety Centers for Disease Control and ... Quality Chasm Series National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention ... Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & ...

  11. School Management Related Knowledge Levels of Primary School Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugurlu, Celal Teyyar

    2013-01-01

    The knowledge levels of the teachers affect the qualifications of operations and transactions in schools. School management related knowledge of the teachers is an essential tool to reach the targets of the school. The objective of this study was to determine the school management related knowledge levels of the teachers. Qualitative and…

  12. Error Patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoede, C.; Li, Z.

    2001-01-01

    In coding theory the problem of decoding focuses on error vectors. In the simplest situation code words are $(0,1)$-vectors, as are the received messages and the error vectors. Comparison of a received word with the code words yields a set of error vectors. In deciding on the original code word,

  13. Hypertension hos gravide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Johansen, Marianne; Kamper, Anne Lise

    2009-01-01

    There are four major hypertensive disorders in pregnancy: chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia. The indications and efficacy of antihypertensive treatment of the different hypertensive disorders are assessed. Advantages...

  14. [Hypertension during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, E.R.; Johansen, M.; Kamper, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    There are four major hypertensive disorders in pregnancy: chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia. The indications and efficacy of antihypertensive treatment of the different hypertensive disorders are assessed. Advantages...

  15. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Hypertension Pulmonary Hypertension What Is Pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI- ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  16. Living with Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Hypertension Pulmonary Hypertension What Is Pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI- ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  17. Renovascular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitkar, M

    2005-01-01

    Renovascular hypertension results from a lesion that impairs blood flow to a part or all, of one or both kidneys. 3-10% of children referred for the evaluation of severe hypertension are subsequently found to have clinically significant renovascular lesions Renovascular hypertension is the second most common cause of correctable hypertension in children second only to coarctation of the aorta. Specific therapeutic options now available, justify the often-invasive investigations required to confirm the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension. A systematic evaluation of the child with hypertension will help the pediatrician select correctly, the child most likely to have renovascular hypertension, thus reducing the number of children exposed to the risks involved with diagnostic but invasive investigations like renal arteriography which remains the gold standard Other non-invasive newer modalities like doppler ultrasonography, computed duplex sonography, ACE inhibited radionuclide imaging, and MR/CT/spiral CT angiography may be used depending on the availability of the facilities. Definite therapeutic options for renal artery stenosis include angioplasty, stenting and surgical re-vascularization using a bypass graft.

  18. Secondary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... thyroid gland doesn't produce enough thyroid hormone (hypothyroidism) or produces too much thyroid hormone (hyperthyroidism), high ... pressure. All of these factors can cause hypertension. Pregnancy. Pregnancy can make existing high blood pressure worse, ...

  19. Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... that carry blood from your heart to your lungs become hard and narrow. Your heart has to ...

  20. Hypertension screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  1. 76 FR 28034 - Labor-Management Relations Information Collection Requests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-13

    ... CONCILIATION SERVICE Labor-Management Relations Information Collection Requests AGENCY: Federal Mediation and... information collection requests. The information collection requests are FMCS forms: Arbitrator's Report and... Request for Arbitration Services (Agency Form R-43). These information collection requests were previously...

  2. The Law of Federal Labor-Management Relations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1999-01-01

    This compilation of cases and materials on labor-management relations is designed to provide primary source materials for students in the Graduate Course and those attending Continuing Legal Education...

  3. The Law of Federal Labor-Management Relations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    This compilation of cases and materials on labor-management relations is designed to provide primary source materials for students in the Graduate Course and those attending Continuing Legal Education...

  4. Endokrin hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Ibsen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Endocrine hypertension is rare, but frequently refractory. Adenomas are common incidental findings. Biochemical tests confirm the diagnosis. Primary aldosteronism is the most common form. Hypokalaemia is an important sign, but 50% of patients may be normokalaemic. The plasma-aldosterone-to-renin ......Endocrine hypertension is rare, but frequently refractory. Adenomas are common incidental findings. Biochemical tests confirm the diagnosis. Primary aldosteronism is the most common form. Hypokalaemia is an important sign, but 50% of patients may be normokalaemic. The plasma...

  5. Pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Martins Júnior

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is a pathological condition associated with various diseases, which must be remembered by the physicians, since early diagnosis may anticipate and avoid dangerous complications and even death if appropriate measures were not taken. The relationship with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, important pathological process that is in increasing prevalence in developing countries, and leading position as cause of death, emphasizes its importance. Here are presented the classifications, pathophysiology, and general rules of treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  6. Medical error

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    Studies in the USA have shown that medical error is the 8th most common cause of death.2,3. The most common causes of medical error are:- administration of the wrong medication or wrong dose of the correct medication, using the wrong route of administration, giving a treatment to the wrong patient or at the wrong time.4 ...

  7. Perioperative hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pinna

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Perioperative hypertension is a situation whose management is suggested by the clinical judgement much more than clinical evidences. JNC 7 guidelines give a classification of blood pressure (BP, without any mention specifically dedicated to patients undergoing surgery. The ACC/AHA guidelines recommend deferring surgery if diastolic BP is above 110 mmHg and systolic BP is above 180 mmHg. AIM OF THE STUDY In this review we considered pathogenetic, clinical and therapeutic factors related to perioperative management of hypertensive patients. DISCUSSION In actual trend of the preoperative evaluation, alone hypertension is considered as a minor risk factor. BP values ≤ 180/110 mmHg do not influence the outcomes in patients who underwent noncardiac surgery. Therefore, in these conditions it’s not necessary to delay surgery. Hypertensive picks are possible during the operation, mostly because of the intubation, but, much more dangerous, falls of pressure are possible. The intraoperative arterial pressure should be maintained within 20% of the best estimated preoperative arterial pressure, especially in patients with markedly elevated preoperative pressures. After surgery the arterial BP can increase for stress factors, pain, hypoxia and hypercapnia, hypothermia and infusional liquids overload. For all these reasons a careful monitoring is mandatory. Anti-hypertensive medication should be continued during the postoperative period in patients with known and treated hypertension, as unplanned withdrawal of treatment can result in rebounded hypertension. The decision to give anti-hypertensive drugs must be made for each patient, taking into account their normal BP and their postoperative BP. With regard to the optimal treatment of the patient with poorly or uncontrolled hypertension in the perioperative evaluation, recent guidelines suggest that the best treatment may consider cardioselective β-blockers therapy, but also clonidin by

  8. Refractive Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... halos around bright lights, squinting, headaches, or eye strain. Glasses or contact lenses can usually correct refractive errors. Laser eye surgery may also be a possibility. NIH: National Eye ...

  9. Refractive errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefer, Ulrich; Kraus, Christina; Baumbach, Peter; Ungewiß, Judith; Michels, Ralf

    2016-10-14

    All over the world, refractive errors are among the most frequently occuring treatable distur - bances of visual function. Ametropias have a prevalence of nearly 70% among adults in Germany and are thus of great epidemiologic and socio-economic relevance. In the light of their own clinical experience, the authors review pertinent articles retrieved by a selective literature search employing the terms "ametropia, "anisometropia," "refraction," "visual acuity," and epidemiology." In 2011, only 31% of persons over age 16 in Germany did not use any kind of visual aid; 63.4% wore eyeglasses and 5.3% wore contact lenses. Refractive errors were the most common reason for consulting an ophthalmologist, accounting for 21.1% of all outpatient visits. A pinhole aperture (stenopeic slit) is a suitable instrument for the basic diagnostic evaluation of impaired visual function due to optical factors. Spherical refractive errors (myopia and hyperopia), cylindrical refractive errors (astigmatism), unequal refractive errors in the two eyes (anisometropia), and the typical optical disturbance of old age (presbyopia) cause specific functional limitations and can be detected by a physician who does not need to be an ophthalmologist. Simple functional tests can be used in everyday clinical practice to determine quickly, easily, and safely whether the patient is suffering from a benign and easily correctable type of visual impairment, or whether there are other, more serious underlying causes.

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ankles A bluish color on your lips and skin Diagnosis Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) based ... and legs for swelling and your lips and skin for a bluish color. These are signs of ... and procedures to confirm a diagnosis of PH and to look for its underlying ...

  11. Job Security, Labour-Management Relations and Perceived ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This Study Investigated The Influence Of Technological Innovation On Job Security, Labour-Management Relations And Perceived Workers` Productivity In Industrial Organizations In Nigeria. The Descriptive Ex-Post-Facto Research Method Was Adopted For The Study. A Total Of 321 Respondents Were Selected For The ...

  12. Intracranial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xenophon Sinopidis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 4-year-old boy who was admitted to hospital with intracranial hypertension, headache, diplopia, papilledema, and a normal brain MRI. Brucella melitensis in the cerebrospinal fluid was confirmed with PCR assay. We believe that neurobrucellosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when headaches persist following brucellosis. In addition, we suggest that when cerebrospinal fluid culture is negative, PCR may prove to be an optimal alternative tool for an immediate and accurate diagnosis.

  13. Hypertension Subtypes among Hypertensive Patients in Ibadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiodun M. Adeoye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Certain hypertension subtypes have been shown to increase the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and may be related to specific underlying genetic determinants. Inappropriate characterization of subtypes of hypertension makes efforts at elucidating the genetic contributions to the etiology of hypertension largely vapid. We report the hypertension subtypes among patients with hypertension from South-Western Nigeria. Methods. A total of 1858 subjects comprising 76% female, hypertensive, aged 18 and above were recruited into the study from two centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. Hypertension was identified using JNCVII definition and was further grouped into four subtypes: controlled hypertension (CH, isolated systolic hypertension (ISH, isolated diastolic hypertension (IDH, and systolic-diastolic hypertension (SDH. Results. Systolic-diastolic hypertension was the most prevalent. Whereas SDH (77.6% versus 73.5% and IDH (4.9% versus 4.7% were more prevalent among females, ISH (10.1% versus 6.2% was higher among males (P=0.048. Female subjects were more obese (P<0.0001 and SDH was prevalent among the obese group. Conclusion. Gender and obesity significantly influenced the distribution of the hypertension subtypes. Characterization of hypertension by subtypes in genetic association studies could lead to identification of previously unknown genetic variants involved in the etiology of hypertension. Large-scale studies among various ethnic groups may be needed to confirm these observations.

  14. Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, John S.; McSweeney, Julia; Lee, Joanne; Ivy, Dunbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Review the pharmacologic treatment options for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the cardiac intensive care setting and summarize the most-recent literature supporting these therapies. Data Sources and Study Selection Literature search for prospective studies, retrospective analyses, and case reports evaluating the safety and efficacy of PAH therapies. Data Extraction Mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics, treatment recommendations, safety considerations, and outcomes for specific medical therapies. Data Synthesis Specific targeted therapies developed for the treatment of adult patients with PAH have been applied for the benefit of children with PAH. With the exception of inhaled nitric oxide, there are no PAH medications approved for children in the US by the FDA. Unfortunately, data on treatment strategies in children with PAH are limited by the small number of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of specific treatments. The treatment options for PAH in children focus on endothelial-based pathways. Calcium channel blockers are recommended for use in a very small, select group of children who are responsive to vasoreactivity testing at cardiac catheterization. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor therapy is the most-commonly recommended oral treatment option in children with PAH. Prostacyclins provide adjunctive therapy for the treatment of PAH as infusions (intravenous and subcutaneous) and inhalation agents. Inhaled nitric oxide is the first line vasodilator therapy in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and is commonly used in the treatment of PAH in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Endothelin receptor antagonists have been shown to improve exercise tolerance and survival in adult patients with PAH. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators are the first drug class to be FDA approved for the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Conclusions Literature and data supporting the

  15. Hypertension hos gravide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Johansen, Marianne; Kamper, Anne Lise

    2009-01-01

    There are four major hypertensive disorders in pregnancy: chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia. The indications and efficacy of antihypertensive treatment of the different hypertensive disorders are assessed. Advantages...... and disadvantages of different classes of antihypertensive drugs during pregnancy and lactation are described....

  16. Hypertension and Spina Bifida

    Science.gov (United States)

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Hypertension A disease that often goes undetected. What is hypertension? Hypertension, also called high blood pressure , is a condition in which the arteries of ...

  17. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout your body. While the heart is one organ, it ...

  18. Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Espanol. PARTNERSHIPS Meet our Fundraising Partners Tweet Welcome Intracranial hypertension (IH) is the general term for the neurological ... too high. (Old names for IH include Benign Intracranial Hypertension and Pseudotumor Cerebri). The Intracranial Hypertension Research Foundation ...

  19. Hormones and Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fact Sheet Hormones and Hypertension What is hypertension? Hypertension, or chronic (long-term) high blood pressure, is a main cause of ... tobacco, alcohol, and certain medications play a part. Hormones made in the kidneys and in blood vessels ...

  20. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Hypertension Pulmonary Hypertension What Is Pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI- ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  1. Hypertensive patients in a general practice setting: comparative analysis between controlled and uncontrolled hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santiago, Luiz Miguel; Pereira, Carolina; Botas, Philippe; Simões, Ana Rita; Carvalho, Rosa; Pimenta, Gonçalo; Neto, Glória

    2014-01-01

    To study the differences between controlled and uncontrolled hypertensive patients. This was a cross-sectional observational study of the hypertensive population on the lists of three general practitioners in the district of Coimbra in central Portugal in 2013, with a margin of error of 6% and 95% confidence interval in each sample, organized in ascending order of health care user numbers. Data were gathered electronically by the investigators after approval by the Regional Health Authority's ethics committee. A sample of 201 individuals was studied, of whom 104 (51.7%) were male and 86 (42.8%) were aged under 65 (p=0.127 for gender and age-group). Hypertension was controlled in 130 (64.7%). We found significant differences in target organ damage, more frequent in those with controlled hypertension (33.1% vs. 19.7%, p=0.031), in hypertension control, better in those taking at least one anti-hypertensive drug at night (56.9% vs. 29.6%, p<0.001), and in prescription of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, more frequent in those with uncontrolled hypertension (11.3% vs. 3.8%, p=0.043). Hypertension control is significantly associated with target organ damage, taking at least one anti-hypertensive drug at night and not taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs simultaneously. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Error Budgeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinyard, Natalia Sergeevna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Perry, Theodore Sonne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Usov, Igor Olegovich [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-10-04

    We calculate opacity from k (hn)=-ln[T(hv)]/pL, where T(hv) is the transmission for photon energy hv, p is sample density, and L is path length through the sample. The density and path length are measured together by Rutherford backscatter. Δk = $\\partial k$\\ $\\partial T$ ΔT + $\\partial k$\\ $\\partial (pL)$. We can re-write this in terms of fractional error as Δk/k = Δ1n(T)/T + Δ(pL)/(pL). Transmission itself is calculated from T=(U-E)/(V-E)=B/B0, where B is transmitted backlighter (BL) signal and B0 is unattenuated backlighter signal. Then ΔT/T=Δln(T)=ΔB/B+ΔB0/B0, and consequently Δk/k = 1/T (ΔB/B + ΔB$_0$/B$_0$ + Δ(pL)/(pL). Transmission is measured in the range of 0.2

  3. [Hypertensive crisis: urgency and hypertensive emergency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino Martínez, Javier; Doménech Feria-Carot, Mónica; Morales Salinas, Alberto; Coca Payeras, Antonia

    2016-11-18

    Hypertensive crises lumped several clinical situations with different seriousness and prognosis. The differences between hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergency depends on if this situation involves a vital risk for the patient. This risk is defined more by the severity of the organ damage than for the higher values of blood pressure. The hypertensive urgency not involves an immediately risk for the patient, for these reason, the treatment can be completed after discharged. Otherwise, the hypertensive emergency is a critical clinical condition that requires hospital assistance. Faced with a patient, with severe hypertension, asymptomatic or with unspecific symptoms we must be careful. First, we need to confirm the values of blood pressure, with several measures of blood pressure and investigate and treat factors, which triggered this situation. The objective of medical treatment for hypertensive urgency is to reduce blood pressure values (at least 20% of baseline values) but to avoid sudden reduction of these values. In hypertensive urgencies rapid acting drug should not be used because of the risk of ischemic stroke and use drugs with longer half-life. The cardiovascular risk of these patients is higher than that do not suffer hypertensive crisis. The treatment must be personalized in each hypertensive emergency and intravenous it’s the best route to treat these patients.

  4. Monitoring asthma in childhood: management-related issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart L. Rottier

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Management-related issues are an important aspect of monitoring asthma in children in clinical practice. This review summarises the literature on practical aspects of monitoring including adherence to treatment, inhalation technique, ongoing exposure to allergens and irritants, comorbid conditions and side-effects of treatment, as agreed by the European Respiratory Society Task Force on Monitoring Asthma in Childhood. The evidence indicates that it is important to discuss adherence to treatment in a non-confrontational way at every clinic visit, and take into account a patient's illness and medication beliefs. All task force members teach inhalation techniques at least twice when introducing a new inhalation device and then at least annually. Exposure to second-hand tobacco smoke, combustion-derived air pollutants, house dust mites, fungal spores, pollens and pet dander deserve regular attention during follow-up according to most task force members. In addition, allergic rhinitis should be considered as a cause for poor asthma control. Task force members do not screen for gastro-oesophageal reflux and food allergy. Height and weight are generally measured at least annually to identify individuals who are susceptible to adrenal suppression and to calculate body mass index, even though causality between obesity and asthma has not been established. In cases of poor asthma control, before stepping up treatment the above aspects of monitoring deserve closer attention.

  5. Barriers to and facilitators of hypertension management in Asmara, Eritrea: patients' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebrezgi, Merhawi Teklezgi; Trepka, Mary Jo; Kidane, Eyob Azaria

    2017-04-13

    Personal hypertension management is a cornerstone in the prevention of hypertension complications. In Eritrea, the increase in the national life expectancy rate has been accompanied by an increase in hypertension complications such as stroke. Hence, this study was designed to identify barriers and facilitates to hypertension management from the perspective of the patients. This was a qualitative study of a total of 48 individual in-depth interviews and two focus group discussions. It was conducted among hypertensive patients who were attending outpatient services at two hospitals in Asmara, Eritrea. This study identified barriers and facilitators of hypertension management related to the individual patient, family and community, and healthcare system. With respect to individual factors, economic barriers, stress, non-adherence to medications due to the use of traditional remedies, and difficulties and misconceptions about following physical activity guidelines were mentioned as barriers to hypertension management. Related to the community and healthcare system, low community awareness, community stigma, and inadequate health promotion materials were stated as barriers. Individual knowledge, family, and government support were reported as very important factors to the patient's success in the personal hypertension management. Counseling patients about adherence to medication, strengthening family and government support, and empowering families and the community with appropriate knowledge of hypertension management could potentially help in an individual's adherence.

  6. Modeling coherent errors in quantum error correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Daniel; Dutton, Zachary

    2018-01-01

    Analysis of quantum error correcting codes is typically done using a stochastic, Pauli channel error model for describing the noise on physical qubits. However, it was recently found that coherent errors (systematic rotations) on physical data qubits result in both physical and logical error rates that differ significantly from those predicted by a Pauli model. Here we examine the accuracy of the Pauli approximation for noise containing coherent errors (characterized by a rotation angle ɛ) under the repetition code. We derive an analytic expression for the logical error channel as a function of arbitrary code distance d and concatenation level n, in the small error limit. We find that coherent physical errors result in logical errors that are partially coherent and therefore non-Pauli. However, the coherent part of the logical error is negligible at fewer than {ε }-({dn-1)} error correction cycles when the decoder is optimized for independent Pauli errors, thus providing a regime of validity for the Pauli approximation. Above this number of correction cycles, the persistent coherent logical error will cause logical failure more quickly than the Pauli model would predict, and this may need to be combated with coherent suppression methods at the physical level or larger codes.

  7. Pregnancy and pulmonary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, Petronella G.; Lameijer, Heleen; Hoendermis, Elke S.

    Pulmonary hypertension during pregnancy is associated with considerable risks of maternal mortality and morbidity. Our systematic review of the literature on the use of targeted treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension during pregnancy indicates a considerable decrease of mortality since a

  8. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... two types of high blood pressure. Primary (essential) hypertension For most adults, there's no identifiable cause of ... tends to develop gradually over many years. Secondary hypertension Some people have high blood pressure caused by ...

  9. Hypertensive heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000163.htm Hypertensive heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hypertensive heart disease refers to heart problems that occur because of ...

  10. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... al. Overview of hypertension in adults. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 19, 2015. Egan BM. Treatment of hypertension in blacks. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March 19, 2015. Kaplan NM. ...

  11. Maskeret hypertension i graviditeten

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Margit Bistrup; Thingaard, Ebbe; Andersen, Anita Sylvest

    2018-01-01

    Hypertension during pregnancy is one of the leading causes of maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. Monitoring of blood pressure is therefore an essential part of prenatal care. Masked hypertension, where blood pressure levels are elevated at home despite normal blood pressure levels...... monitored in a clinical setting, may lead to cardiovascular and obstetric complications equal to those of sustained hypertension. This article discusses masked hypertension and the need for further investigation of blood pressure monitoring during pregnancy....

  12. Combination treatment for hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pressure, and the potential benefit of a low dose of aspirin in the treatment of hypertension. 18 790 patients, aged 50-80 years ... In addition, 9 399 patients were randomly assigned 75 mg/day aspirin and. 9 391 patients were ... hypertensive and non-hypertensive patients with a history of stroke or transient ischaemic attack.

  13. Hypertension in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ungar

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most common medical problem encountered during pregnancy, complicating 2-3% of pregnancies. Hypertensive disorders during pregnancy are classified into 4 categories: chronic hypertension, pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, pre-eclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension, and gestational hypertension. A relative paucity of investigative data, as well as the frequent difficulty in making an etiological diagnosis, may lead to problems in its management. This case report analyses current concepts regarding the hypertensive disorders of gestation, focusing on chronic hypertension. Chronic hypertension is defined as blood pressure exceeding 140/90 mmHg before pregnancy or before 20 weeks gestation. Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy may cause maternal and fetal morbidity and remain a leading source of maternal mortality. A prompt diagnosis is needed also because hypertension may be an indicator of pre-eclampsia, a condition which can evolve into serious complications. Maintaining blood pressure below 140/90 mmHg is recommended, although treatment should be determined on an individual basis. Many anti-hypertensive agents appear to be safe for use during pregnancy: methildopa has been the most studied of the anti-hypertensive drugs and has the best safety record. Labetalol, idralazine and nifedipine also have been found to be safe; ACE-inhibitors are absolutely contraindicated, because they are associated with intrauterine growth retardation.

  14. Genetik og hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Tarnow, Lise; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard

    2009-01-01

    Monogenic forms of hypertension are very rare, but have a well-characterized heredity. Primary hypertension is very common with a complex and polygenic heredity. Primary hypertension arises due to an interaction between multiple genetic and environmental factors. Its heredity is unknown, although...

  15. Hypertension in Danish seafarers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tu, Mingshan; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    Background: Due to the high prevalence of arterial hypertension and its role in the development of athe- rosclerosis, myocardial infarction and stroke, hypertension is a major public health challenge worldwide. There is limited knowledge of the prevalence of hypertension among seafarers who......, however, are known to have an excess morbidity and mortality from these disorders. This article addresses the prevalence of hypertension among Danish seafarers and discusses potential risk factors for hypertension in maritime settings. Materials and methods: A representative sample of 629 Danish seafarers...... who had statutory medical examinations was studied from the beginning of October 2011 to the end of June 2012. The medical examination included measurements of blood pressure. The prevalence of hypertension in the study po- pulation was stratified by age, work place on board, smoking status, alcohol...

  16. Hypertensive crisis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandar, Jayanthi; Zilleruelo, Gastón

    2012-05-01

    Hypertensive crisis is rare in children and is usually secondary to an underlying disease. There is strong evidence that the renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the genesis of hypertensive crisis. An important principle in the management of children with hypertensive crisis is to determine if severe hypertension is chronic, acute, or acute-on-chronic. When it is associated with signs of end-organ damage such as encephalopathy, congestive cardiac failure or renal failure, there is an emergent need to lower blood pressures to 25-30% of the original value and then accomplish a gradual reduction in blood pressure. Precipitous drops in blood pressure can result in impairment of perfusion of vital organs. Medications commonly used to treat hypertensive crisis in children are nicardipine, labetalol and sodium nitroprusside. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology, differential diagnosis and recent developments in management of hypertensive crisis in children.

  17. Medical errors in neurosurgery

    OpenAIRE

    Rolston, John D.; Zygourakis, Corinna C.; Han, Seunggu J.; Lau, Catherine Y.; Berger, Mitchel S.; Parsa, Andrew T

    2014-01-01

    Background: Medical errors cause nearly 100,000 deaths per year and cost billions of dollars annually. In order to rationally develop and institute programs to mitigate errors, the relative frequency and costs of different errors must be documented. This analysis will permit the judicious allocation of scarce healthcare resources to address the most costly errors as they are identified. Methods: Here, we provide a systematic review of the neurosurgical literature describing medical errors...

  18. Hypertension og hyperlipidaemi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik Steen; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension and hyperlipidemia are well-established and partially overlapping risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Analyses of cardiovascular morbidity in relationship to changes in blood pressure and in serum cholesterol levels have shown that combined reduction of both risk factors...... are important to achieve a reduction in morbidity. Statins have been shown to be effective in preventing both coronary and cerebrovascular events in both hypertensive and normotensive cases. Consequently, most recent guidelines recommend that statin treatment be considered in hypertensive patients aged less...

  19. Hypertension and cerebrovascular dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iadecola, Costantino; Davisson, Robin L

    2008-06-01

    Essential hypertension has devastating effects on the brain, being the major cause of stroke and a leading cause of dementia. Hypertension alters the structure of cerebral blood vessels and disrupts intricate vasoregulatory mechanisms that assure an adequate blood supply to the brain. These alterations threaten the cerebral blood supply and increase the susceptibility of the brain to ischemic injury as well as Alzheimer's disease. This review focuses on the mechanisms by which hypertension disrupts cerebral blood vessels, highlighting recent advances and outstanding issues.

  20. Obesity-Related Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Re, Richard N.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity-associated arterial hypertension is characterized by activation of the sympathetic nervous system, activation of the renin-angiotensin system, and sodium retention, among other abnormalities. In this review, the following 3 facets of the obesity/hypertension nexus will be discussed: the potential mechanisms by which obesity can lead to elevated arterial pressure, the interaction of obesity with the sequelae of hypertension, and the therapies that are believed to optimally treat obesit...

  1. Valproate Induced Hypertensive Urgency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauran Sivananthan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Valproate is a medication used in the treatment of seizures, bipolar disorder, migraines, and behavioral problems. Here we present a case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with hypertensive urgency after initiation of valproate. Primary treatment of his hypertension was ineffective. Blood pressure stabilization was achieved following discontinuation of valproate. Clinicians should be aware of the risk of developing hypertensive urgency with administration of valproate.

  2. Valproate Induced Hypertensive Urgency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivananthan, Mauran; Mohiuddin, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Valproate is a medication used in the treatment of seizures, bipolar disorder, migraines, and behavioral problems. Here we present a case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with hypertensive urgency after initiation of valproate. Primary treatment of his hypertension was ineffective. Blood pressure stabilization was achieved following discontinuation of valproate. Clinicians should be aware of the risk of developing hypertensive urgency with administration of valproate.

  3. Valproate Induced Hypertensive Urgency

    OpenAIRE

    Mauran Sivananthan; Sarah Mohiuddin

    2016-01-01

    Valproate is a medication used in the treatment of seizures, bipolar disorder, migraines, and behavioral problems. Here we present a case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with hypertensive urgency after initiation of valproate. Primary treatment of his hypertension was ineffective. Blood pressure stabilization was achieved following discontinuation of valproate. Clinicians should be aware of the risk of developing hypertensive urgency with administration of valproate.

  4. Medication errors: prescribing faults and prescription errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velo, Giampaolo P; Minuz, Pietro

    2009-06-01

    1. Medication errors are common in general practice and in hospitals. Both errors in the act of writing (prescription errors) and prescribing faults due to erroneous medical decisions can result in harm to patients. 2. Any step in the prescribing process can generate errors. Slips, lapses, or mistakes are sources of errors, as in unintended omissions in the transcription of drugs. Faults in dose selection, omitted transcription, and poor handwriting are common. 3. Inadequate knowledge or competence and incomplete information about clinical characteristics and previous treatment of individual patients can result in prescribing faults, including the use of potentially inappropriate medications. 4. An unsafe working environment, complex or undefined procedures, and inadequate communication among health-care personnel, particularly between doctors and nurses, have been identified as important underlying factors that contribute to prescription errors and prescribing faults. 5. Active interventions aimed at reducing prescription errors and prescribing faults are strongly recommended. These should be focused on the education and training of prescribers and the use of on-line aids. The complexity of the prescribing procedure should be reduced by introducing automated systems or uniform prescribing charts, in order to avoid transcription and omission errors. Feedback control systems and immediate review of prescriptions, which can be performed with the assistance of a hospital pharmacist, are also helpful. Audits should be performed periodically.

  5. The hypertensive dental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, B C; Glick, M

    1997-08-01

    The dental team plays an integral role in safeguarding the general health of patients. Dental health care workers should be able to recognize risk factors associated with hypertension and counsel patients in an effort to reduce those that are present. In addition, dental professionals should recognize how these risk factors and associated hypertension affect the provision of dental care. This article reviews recent findings and therapies for hypertension, evaluates historically accepted but unsupported anecdotal information on the dental management of hypertensive patients and proposes guidelines for the dental management of these patients.

  6. 42. Hypertension: Morbidity review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzullah khan

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: hypertension is a major modifiable risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke, eye abnormalities and end stage renal disease, which require proper counseling and management of patients.

  7. 75 FR 28307 - National Council on Federal Labor-Management Relations Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... responsibilities and functions listed in Section 1(b) of the Executive Order. The meetings are open to the public... MANAGEMENT National Council on Federal Labor-Management Relations Meeting AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Council on Federal Labor-Management Relations is...

  8. 75 FR 81678 - National Council on Federal Labor-Management Relations Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... responsibilities and functions listed in Section 1(b) of the Executive Order. The meetings are open to the public... MANAGEMENT National Council on Federal Labor-Management Relations Meeting AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Council on Federal Labor-Management Relations...

  9. 75 FR 47033 - National Council on Federal Labor-Management Relations Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-04

    ... responsibilities and functions listed in Section 1(b) of the Executive Order. The meetings are open to the public... MANAGEMENT National Council on Federal Labor-Management Relations Meeting AGENCY: Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The National Council on Federal Labor-Management Relations is...

  10. Medical errors in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolston, John D; Zygourakis, Corinna C; Han, Seunggu J; Lau, Catherine Y; Berger, Mitchel S; Parsa, Andrew T

    2014-01-01

    Medical errors cause nearly 100,000 deaths per year and cost billions of dollars annually. In order to rationally develop and institute programs to mitigate errors, the relative frequency and costs of different errors must be documented. This analysis will permit the judicious allocation of scarce healthcare resources to address the most costly errors as they are identified. Here, we provide a systematic review of the neurosurgical literature describing medical errors at the departmental level. Eligible articles were identified from the PubMed database, and restricted to reports of recognizable errors across neurosurgical practices. We limited this analysis to cross-sectional studies of errors in order to better match systems-level concerns, rather than reviewing the literature for individually selected errors like wrong-sided or wrong-level surgery. Only a small number of articles met these criteria, highlighting the paucity of data on this topic. From these studies, errors were documented in anywhere from 12% to 88.7% of cases. These errors had many sources, of which only 23.7-27.8% were technical, related to the execution of the surgery itself, highlighting the importance of systems-level approaches to protecting patients and reducing errors. Overall, the magnitude of medical errors in neurosurgery and the lack of focused research emphasize the need for prospective categorization of morbidity with judicious attribution. Ultimately, we must raise awareness of the impact of medical errors in neurosurgery, reduce the occurrence of medical errors, and mitigate their detrimental effects.

  11. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri) En Español Read in Chinese What is idiopathic intracranial hypertension? Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a disorder that ...

  12. Field error lottery

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Elliott, C.; McVey, Brian D.; Quimby, David C.

    1991-07-01

    The level of field errors in a free electron laser (FEL) is an important determinant of its performance. We have computed 3D performance of a large laser subsystem subjected to field errors of various types. These calculations have been guided by simple models such as SWOOP. The technique of choice is use of the FELEX free electron laser code that now possesses extensive engineering capabilities. Modeling includes the ability to establish tolerances of various types: fast and slow scale field bowing, field error level, beam position monitor error level, gap errors, defocusing errors, energy slew, displacement and pointing errors. Many effects of these errors on relative gain and relative power extraction are displayed and are the essential elements of determining an error budget. The random errors also depend on the particular random number seed used in the calculation. The simultaneous display of the performance versus error level of cases with multiple seeds illustrates the variations attributable to stochasticity of this model. All these errors are evaluated numerically for comprehensive engineering of the system. In particular, gap errors are found to place requirements beyond convenient mechanical tolerances of ± 25 μm, and amelioration of these may occur by a procedure using direct measurement of the magnetic fields at assembly time.

  13. Hypertension Briefing: Technical documentation

    OpenAIRE

    Institute of Public Health in Ireland (IPH)

    2012-01-01

    Blood pressure is the force exerted on artery walls as the heart pumps blood through the body. Hypertension, or high blood pressure, occurs when blood pressure is constantly higher than the pressure needed to carry blood through the body. This document details how the IPH uses a systematic and consistent method to produce prevalence data for hypertension on the island of Ireland.

  14. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Talking to Your Parents - or Other Adults Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) Print ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  15. Noncirrhotic Portal Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajekar, Harshal; Vasishta, Rakesh K; Chawla, Yogesh K; Dhiman, Radha K

    2011-01-01

    Portal hypertension is characterized by an increase in portal pressure (> 10 mmHg) and could be a result of cirrhosis of the liver or of noncirrhotic diseases. When portal hypertension occurs in the absence of liver cirrhosis, noncirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) must be considered. The prognosis of this disease is much better than that of cirrhosis. Noncirrhotic diseases are the common cause of portal hypertension in developing countries, especially in Asia. NCPH is a heterogeneous group of diseases that is due to intrahepatic or extrahepatic etiologies. In general, the lesions in NCPH are vascular in nature and can be classified based on the site of resistance to blood flow. In most cases, these disorders can be explained by endothelial cell lesions, intimal thickening, thrombotic obliterations, or scarring of the intrahepatic portal or hepatic venous circulation. Many different conditions can determine NCPH through the association of these various lesions in various degrees. Many clinical manifestations of NCPH result from the secondary effects of portal hypertension. Patients with NCPH present with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, splenomegaly, ascites after gastrointestinal bleeding, features of hypersplenism, growth retardation, and jaundice due to portal hypertensive biliopathy. Other sequelae include hyperdynamic circulation, pulmonary complications, and other effects of portosystemic collateral circulation like portosystemic encephalopathy. At present, pharmacologic and endoscopic treatments are the treatments of choice for portal hypertension. The therapy of all disorders causing NCPH involves the reduction of portal pressure by pharmacotherapy or portosystemic shunting, apart from prevention and treatment of complications of portal hypertension. PMID:25755321

  16. Hypertension and Anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cardiovascular risk in white-coat and sustained hypertensive patients. Blood Pressure 2002;11:352–356. 15. Balick Weber CC, Brillouet Banchereau AC, Blanchet AD, Blanchet P,. Safar ME, et al. General Anesthesia in Hypertensive Patients: Impact of. Pulse Pressure but not Cardiac Diastolic Dysfunction on Intraoperative.

  17. Noncirrotisk intrahepatisk portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Fialla, Annette; Havelund, Troels

    2007-01-01

    Non-cirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension is characterized by portal hypertension in the absence of liver cirrhosis or portal vein thrombosis. The disease is common in the East and rarely seen in the West. Two cases with oesophageal varices are described. The histopathology is heterogeneous...

  18. Hypertension og hjernen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne; Strandgaard, Svend

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a major and modifiable risk factor of stroke and dementia. Hypertension causes remodelling of the cerebral resistance vessels, impairing their tolerance to very low blood pressure. In primary prevention of stroke, the effect of beta-blockers is inferior to other classes...

  19. Hypertension and liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic...

  20. Hypertension and Anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Anaesthetics Supplement: Hypertension and Anaesthesia. S Afr Fam Pract 2014. Vol 56 No 2 Supplement 1. Introduction. Hypertension affects more than 1 billion people worldwide, and is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, cardiac failure, stroke, cerebrovascular events including dementia,.

  1. Hypertension after clonidine withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husserl, F E; deCarvalho, J G; Batson, H M; Frohlich, E D

    1978-05-01

    Rebound hypertension occurred in two patients upon clonidine withdrawal. Treatment of the hypertensive crisis consists of both alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor blockade, reserpine, or the reintroduction of clonidine. With effective control of pressure during the crisis, long-term antihypertensive therapy must be resumed.

  2. Epigenomics of Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mingyu; Cowley, Allen W.; Mattson, David L.; Kotchen, Theodore A.; Liu, Yong

    2013-01-01

    Multiple genes and pathways are involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Epigenomic studies of hypertension are beginning to emerge and hold great promise of providing novel insights into the mechanisms underlying hypertension. Epigenetic marks or mediators including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and non-coding RNA can be studied at a genome or near-genome scale using epigenomic approaches. At the single gene level, several studies have identified changes in epigenetic modifications in genes expressed in the kidney that correlate with the development of hypertension. Systematic analysis and integration of epigenetic marks at the genome scale, demonstration of cellular and physiological roles of specific epigenetic modifications, and investigation of inheritance are among the major challenges and opportunities for future epigenomic and epigenetic studies of hypertension. Essential hypertension is a multifactorial disease involving multiple genetic and environmental factors and mediated by alterations in multiple biological pathways. Because the non-genetic mechanisms may involve epigenetic modifications, epigenomics is one of the latest concepts and approaches brought to bear on hypertension research. In this article, we summarize briefly the concepts and techniques for epigenomics, discuss the rationale for applying epigenomic approaches to study hypertension, and review the current state of this research area. PMID:24011581

  3. [Hypertension and renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A.L.; Pedersen, E.B.; Strandgaard, S.

    2009-01-01

    Renal mechanisms, in particular the renin-angiotensin system and renal salt handling, are of major importance in blood pressure regulation. Co-existence of hypertension and decreased renal function may be due to nephrosclerosis secondary to hypertension, or primary renal disease with secondary...

  4. Hypertension og nyresygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Anne-Lise; Pedersen, Erling B; Strandgaard, Svend

    2009-01-01

    Renal mechanisms, in particular the renin-angiotensin system and renal salt handling, are of major importance in blood pressure regulation. Co-existence of hypertension and decreased renal function may be due to nephrosclerosis secondary to hypertension, or primary renal disease with secondary...

  5. Hypertension and cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su-hang SHANG

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available As a leading risk factor for stroke, hypertension is also an important risk factor for cognitive impairment. Midlife hypertension doubles the risk of dementia later in life and accelerates the progression of dementia, but the correlation between late-life blood pressure and cognitive impairment is still unclear. Beside blood pressure, the effect of pulse pressure, blood pressure variability and circadian rhythm of blood pressure on cognition is currently attracting more and more attention. Hypertension induces alterations in cerebrovascular structure and functions, which lead to brain lesions including cerebral atrophy, stroke, lacunar infarcts, diffuse white matter damage, microinfarct and microhemorrhage, resuling in cognitive impairment. Hypertension also impairs the metabolism and transfer of amyloid-β protein (Aβ, thus accelerates cognitive impairment. Individualized therapy, focusing on characteristics of hypertensive patients, may be a good choice for prevention and treatment of cognitive impairment. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.08.004

  6. Prevention of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slama, Michel; Susic, Dinko; Frohlich, Edward D

    2002-09-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for many cardiovascular diseases including stroke, coronary heart disease, cardiac failure, and endstage renal disease. Therefore, prevention of hypertension becomes an important goal in overall efforts to control blood pressure and reduce the incidence of hypertension-related cardiovascular and renal complications and outcomes. Many risk factors underlying hypertension have been identified including nonmodifiable factors such as age, gender, genetic factors, and race, as well as modifiable factors including overweight, high sodium intake, low potassium intake, alcohol consumption, and reduced physical activity. A number of studies have demonstrated that interventions aimed at changing these modifiable factors might decrease blood pressure and even prevent the development of hypertension. Thus, present national recommendations and guidelines include lifestyle modifications ranging from weight loss in case of obesity, engagement in regular isotonic physical activity, reduced sodium diet (alcohol moderation (<1 ounce of ethanol or its equivalent per day).

  7. Immunological Aspects of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Daniela; Lembo, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, being the major risk factor for stroke, heart failure and kidney diseases. During past decades, several therapies have been developed to afford an optimal regulation of blood pressure levels. However, the prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension still represents an unsolved problem, with a number of patients resistant as well to all ongoing antihypertensive treatments, raising unsolved mechanistic challenges. In the last years, the most attractive novelty in hypertension research postulated that immune system may have a crucial role in blood pressure elevation, as well as in end-organ damage. Here we briefly review the most important contribution revealing the role of innate and adaptive immune system in hypertension. Moreover, we discuss evidence showing that, in the regulation of body hemodynamics, the immune system and the autonomic nervous systems serve as two major sensory organs whose interaction is crucial for blood pressure increase and target organ damage in hypertension.

  8. Overweight, adipocytokines and hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seven, Ekim; Husemoen, Lise L N; Wachtell, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The adipocytokines, leptin, adiponectin, and interleukin-6, which stimulate liver C-reactive protein (CRP) production, are regarded as potential candidate intermediates between adipose tissue and overweight-induced hypertension. METHODS: We examined the associations between leptin......, adiponectin, and CRP levels with both prevalent and 5-year incident hypertension (IHT) in a general population of Danish adults (n = 5,868, 51.3% women, mean age 45.8 ± 7.9 years). RESULTS: We recorded 2195 prevalent and 379 incident cases of hypertension. In models including leptin, CRP, adiponectin, sex.......023) in the fully adjusted model. The population attributable risk estimate of IHT owing to overweight was 31%. CONCLUSION: Leptin, but not adiponectin or CRP, may play a mediating role in overweight-induced hypertension. However, as BMI was a strong independent predictor of hypertension, other factors than leptin...

  9. Hypertension and liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic...... to increased arterial blood pressure. Subjects with established arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin...... activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial hypertension. This is a topic for future research....

  10. Emerging concepts in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Joseph; Davisson, Robin L

    2014-01-01

    Cellular redox balance is vital in health and disease. In this Forum, we highlight the importance of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the regulation of redox balance in different organ systems of the body and ROS contribution to the development of hypertension. The Forum examines interactions between oxidative and nitrosative stress in the brain, vasculature, and kidney, and redox effect on end-organ damage and hypertension. Furthermore, the Forum examines the role of immune cells in the modulation of hypertension. We also introduce a new role for endoplasmic reticulum stress in the induction of ROS and its possible contribution to the development of hypertension. Finally, we explore the clinical relevance of increased ROS in the setting of human hypertension.

  11. Epigenomics of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Mingyu; Cowley, Allen W; Mattson, David L; Kotchen, Theodore A; Liu, Yong

    2013-07-01

    Multiple genes and pathways are involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Epigenomic studies of hypertension are beginning to emerge and hold great promise of providing novel insights into the mechanisms underlying hypertension. Epigenetic marks or mediators including DNA methylation, histone modifications, and noncoding RNA can be studied at a genome or near-genome scale using epigenomic approaches. At the single gene level, several studies have identified changes in epigenetic modifications in genes expressed in the kidney that correlate with the development of hypertension. Systematic analysis and integration of epigenetic marks at the genome-wide scale, demonstration of cellular and physiological roles of specific epigenetic modifications, and investigation of inheritance are among the major challenges and opportunities for future epigenomic and epigenetic studies of hypertension. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. [Hypertension and arteriosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamura, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a known risk factor for arteriosclerosis, and causes both atherosclero= sis of medium-large arteries and arteriolosclerosis of the arterioles. Elevated blood pressure causes damage to the endothelium and vascular wall through both mechanical and humoral factors. We and others have shown that inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system at a 'critical period' during the development of hypertension results in a permanent suppression of hypertension in animal models. We have also reported that high-dose renin-angiotensin inhibition results in regression of hypertension, possibly by regression of renal arteriolar hypertrophy. These results suggest that understanding the process of arterial remodeling may play a key role in the development of new strategies for prevention and regression of hypertension and arteriosclerosis.

  13. ATC operational error analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The primary causes of operational errors are discussed and the effects of these errors on an ATC system's performance are described. No attempt is made to specify possible error models for the spectrum of blunders that can occur although previous res...

  14. Drug Errors in Anaesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajnish Kumar Jain

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Medication errors are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. The incidence of these drug errors during anaesthesia is not certain. They impose a considerable financial burden to health care systems apart from the patient losses. Common causes of these errors and their prevention is discussed.

  15. Error patterns II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoede, C.; Li, Z.

    2002-01-01

    In coding theory the problem of decoding focuses on error vectors. In the simplest situation code words are $(0,1)$-vectors, as are the received messages and the error vectors. Comparison of a received word with the code words yields a set of error vectors. In deciding on the original code word,

  16. Hypertension and HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balt, Christine A

    2013-01-01

    As persons living with HIV infection (PLWH) live longer, primary health care and comorbidity issues have come to the forefront. The diagnosis and treatment of hypertension can affect a number of other comorbid conditions, including metabolic syndrome, lipid abnormalities, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. Literature specific to hypertension and HIV is limited and most often presented in theory-based, rather than empirically based, articles, with hypertension-specific information presented in small sections of articles on cardiovascular disease. A systematic literature review was conducted to evaluate current research evidence to determine prevalence of hypertension in PLWH and its association with antiretroviral therapy (ART) and HIV-related and traditional risk factors. Evidence surrounding the cause and effect of HIV and ART on hypertension is conflicting and inconclusive; however, the importance of hypertension diagnosis and treatment is clear. Evidence supports use of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of Hypertension Guidelines when treating PLWH. Copyright © 2013 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Interpretive Error in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waite, Stephen; Scott, Jinel; Gale, Brian; Fuchs, Travis; Kolla, Srinivas; Reede, Deborah

    2017-04-01

    Although imaging technology has advanced significantly since the work of Garland in 1949, interpretive error rates remain unchanged. In addition to patient harm, interpretive errors are a major cause of litigation and distress to radiologists. In this article, we discuss the mechanics involved in searching an image, categorize omission errors, and discuss factors influencing diagnostic accuracy. Potential individual- and system-based solutions to mitigate or eliminate errors are also discussed. Radiologists use visual detection, pattern recognition, memory, and cognitive reasoning to synthesize final interpretations of radiologic studies. This synthesis is performed in an environment in which there are numerous extrinsic distractors, increasing workloads and fatigue. Given the ultimately human task of perception, some degree of error is likely inevitable even with experienced observers. However, an understanding of the causes of interpretive errors can help in the development of tools to mitigate errors and improve patient safety.

  18. Hypertension og nyresygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Anne-Lise; Pedersen, Erling B; Strandgaard, Svend

    2009-01-01

    hypertension. Mild degrees of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be detected in around 10% of the population, and detection is important as CKD is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Conversely, heart failure may cause an impairment of renal function. In chronic progressive......Renal mechanisms, in particular the renin-angiotensin system and renal salt handling, are of major importance in blood pressure regulation. Co-existence of hypertension and decreased renal function may be due to nephrosclerosis secondary to hypertension, or primary renal disease with secondary...

  19. Hypertension og nyresygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Anne-Lise; Pedersen, Erling B; Strandgaard, Svend

    2009-01-01

    Renal mechanisms, in particular the renin-angiotensin system and renal salt handling, are of major importance in blood pressure regulation. Co-existence of hypertension and decreased renal function may be due to nephrosclerosis secondary to hypertension, or primary renal disease with secondary...... hypertension. Mild degrees of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be detected in around 10% of the population, and detection is important as CKD is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Conversely, heart failure may cause an impairment of renal function. In chronic progressive...

  20. Official Time as a Form of Union Security in Federal Sector Labor-Management Relations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bullock, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Can a nationwide labor-management relations system based on the principle of exclusive representation operate effectively, even if the law deprives the unions of the ability to obtain adequate financial support...

  1. Hypothalamic signaling mechanisms in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Casey Y; Wainford, Richard D

    2015-05-01

    The etiology of hypertension, a critical public health issue affecting one in three US adults, involves the integration of the actions of multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system. Increased activation of the central nervous system, driving enhanced sympathetic outflow and increased blood pressure, has emerged as a major contributor to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The hypothalamus is a key brain site acting to integrate central and peripheral inputs to ultimately impact blood pressure in multiple disease states that evoke hypertension. This review highlights recent advances that have identified novel signal transduction mechanisms within multiple hypothalamic nuclei (e.g., paraventricular nucleus, arcuate nucleus) acting to drive the pathophysiology of hypertension in neurogenic hypertension, angiotensin II hypertension, salt-sensitive hypertension, chronic intermittent hypoxia, and obesity-induced hypertension. Increased understanding of hypothalamic activity in hypertension has the potential to identify novel targets for future therapeutic interventions designed to treat hypertension.

  2. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood vessels, induction of a high fever, and strict low-sodium diets. Case studies suggested that each ... with scientific and medical communities to update hypertension management guidelines (JNC-8), including integrating them with updated ...

  3. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease, stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal insufficiency. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation (AF). Both......, hypomagnesemia), further contributing to arrhythmias, whereas effective control of blood pressure may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF. In recognizing this close relationship between hypertension and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society...... supraventricular and ventricular arrhythmias may occur in hypertensive patients, especially in those with left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or HF. Also, some of the antihypertensive drugs commonly used to reduce blood pressure, such as thiazide diuretics, may result in electrolyte abnormalities (e.g. hypokalaemia...

  4. Allegheny County Hypertension Hospitalization

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data provides hypertension prevalence data for each Zip Code in Allegheny County. The information was produced by Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment...

  5. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arisya Agita; M Thaha Alsagaff

    2017-01-01

    The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage...

  6. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has high ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  7. Hydrogen sulfide in hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Harry; van den Born, Joost C; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Joles, Jaap A

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Hypertension is an important determinant of cardiovascular disease, and strict blood pressure regulation is beneficially associated with the risk for cardiovascular events or all-cause mortality. However, intensive antihypertensive treatment is not always sufficient to reach

  8. Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... serious, your doctor may use medicine (such as oxytocin) to start your labor, and you can deliver ... by: familydoctor.org editorial staff Categories: Pregnancy and Childbirth, WomenTags: blood, chronic, chronicle, disorder, gestational, high, hypertension, ...

  9. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Matter Find HBP Tools & Resources Stroke Vascular Health Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Pulmonary ... five groups of pulmonary hypertension. Group 1 pulmonary arterial ... chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and interstitial lung disease, as ...

  10. Diabetes + Hypertension (comorbidity)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data set provides de-identified population data for diabetes and hypertension comorbidity prevalence in Allegheny County.

  11. Pediatric Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaswamy, Lalitha

    2016-10-01

    Investigators from the Ohio State University, Oregon Health and Science University and Rosalind Franklin School of Medicine examined the presenting manifestations, demographics and treatment strategies in children enrolled in the Intracranial Hypertension Registry (IHR).

  12. Treatment of pediatric hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, M E; Nahata, M C

    2000-02-01

    We conducted a MEDLINE search from January 1966-March 1999 to obtain information on clinical trials of treatment of pediatric hypertension. An article was selected for review if it described a randomized or nonrandomized study; randomized studies were given priority. Case reports were considered when studies were unavailable. Review articles were useful in identifying references. According to data we collected, hypertension is present in 1-3% of the pediatric population. Nonpharmacologic treatment may be effective initially in those with mild to moderate disease or as an adjunct to drug therapy. Drugs for treatment of chronic hypertension include calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, diuretics, and beta-blockers. Patient and drug characteristics determine therapy. Intravenous labetalol, nicardipine, and nitroprusside are effective for treating hypertensive emergencies.

  13. Clinical Manifestations of Portal Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Said A. Al-Busafi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The portal hypertension is responsible for many of the manifestations of liver cirrhosis. Some of these complications are the direct consequences of portal hypertension, such as gastrointestinal bleeding from ruptured gastroesophageal varices and from portal hypertensive gastropathy and colopathy, ascites and hepatorenal syndrome, and hypersplenism. In other complications, portal hypertension plays a key role, although it is not the only pathophysiological factor in their development. These include spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, hepatic encephalopathy, cirrhotic cardiomyopathy, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and portopulmonary hypertension.

  14. Liver cirrhosis and arterial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    2006-01-01

    blood pressure. This review considers the alterations in systemic hemodynamics in patients with cirrhosis in relation to essential hypertension and arterial hypertension of the renal origin. Subjects with arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development...... of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homoeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial hypertension. This most...

  15. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The aims of this article are to characterize the headache in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and to field-test the ICHD diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to IIH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We included 44 patients with new-onset IIH. Thirty-four patients with suspected...... tinnitus may suggest intracranial hypertension. Based on data from a well-defined IIH cohort, we propose a revision of the ICDH-3 beta diagnostic criteria with improved clinical applicability and increased sensitivity and specificity....

  16. Intraoral radiographic errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, J R

    1979-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to investigate intraoral radiography in regards to the frequency of errors, the types of error necessitating retakes, and the relationship of error frequency to the teeth area examined and type x-ray cone used. The present study used 283 complete mouth radiographic surveys made, and 890 radiographs were found to be clinically unacceptable for one or more errors in technique. Thirteen and one-tenth errors per one hundred radiographs were found in this study. The three major radiographic errors occurring in this study were incorrect film placement (49.9 percent), cone-cutting (20.8 percent), and incorrect vertical angulation (12.5 percent).

  17. Glucocorticoid-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Julie E; Geller, David S

    2012-07-01

    Glucocorticoid-induced hypertension is a common clinical problem that is poorly understood, thus rendering treatment strategies sub-optimal. This form of hypertension has been commonly thought to be mediated by excess sodium and water reabsorption by the renal mineralocorticoid receptor. However, experimental and clinical data in both humans and animal models suggest important roles for the glucocorticoid receptor as well, in both the pathogenesis and maintenance of this hypertension. The glucocorticoid receptor is widely expressed in a number of organ systems relevant to blood pressure regulation, including the kidney, the brain and the vasculature. In vitro studies in isolated kidney tissues as well as in vascular smooth muscle and vascular endothelial cells have attempted to elucidate the molecular physiology of glucocorticoid-induced hypertension, but have generally been limited by the inability to study signaling pathways in an intact organism. More recently, the power of mouse genetics has been employed to examine the tissue-specific contributions of vascular and extra-vascular tissues to this form of hypertension. Here we review recent developments in our understanding of the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid-induced hypertension.

  18. Error coding simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Viveca K.

    1993-11-01

    There are various elements such as radio frequency interference (RFI) which may induce errors in data being transmitted via a satellite communication link. When a transmission is affected by interference or other error-causing elements, the transmitted data becomes indecipherable. It becomes necessary to implement techniques to recover from these disturbances. The objective of this research is to develop software which simulates error control circuits and evaluate the performance of these modules in various bit error rate environments. The results of the evaluation provide the engineer with information which helps determine the optimal error control scheme. The Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) recommends the use of Reed-Solomon (RS) and convolutional encoders and Viterbi and RS decoders for error correction. The use of forward error correction techniques greatly reduces the received signal to noise needed for a certain desired bit error rate. The use of concatenated coding, e.g. inner convolutional code and outer RS code, provides even greater coding gain. The 16-bit cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code is recommended by CCSDS for error detection.

  19. Inflammation markers in essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsounis, Dimitrios; Bouras, Georgios; Giannopoulos, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Charalampos; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Deftereos, Spyridon

    2014-01-01

    Essential hypertension is a common health disorder with uncertain etiology and unclear pathophysiology. There is evidence that various systems interact in uncertain ways and mechanisms to cause hypertension. It is also well known that inflammation is a key feature in the initiation, progression and clinical implication of several cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it has become evident that the immune system and inflammatory response are also essential in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Many inflammation markers such as CRP, cytokines, and adhesion molecules have been found elevated in hypertensive patients supporting the role of inflammation in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Also, in normotensive individuals, these markers have been associated with the risk of developing hypertension, whereas in hypertensive patients they have been associated with target organ damage as well as with the risk for future cardiovascular events. Thus, understanding the role of inflammation in hypertension provides new insights for novel therapeutic approaches, targeting inflammation for the treatment of hypertension and its complications.

  20. Action errors, error management, and learning in organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frese, Michael; Keith, Nina

    2015-01-03

    Every organization is confronted with errors. Most errors are corrected easily, but some may lead to negative consequences. Organizations often focus on error prevention as a single strategy for dealing with errors. Our review suggests that error prevention needs to be supplemented by error management--an approach directed at effectively dealing with errors after they have occurred, with the goal of minimizing negative and maximizing positive error consequences (examples of the latter are learning and innovations). After defining errors and related concepts, we review research on error-related processes affected by error management (error detection, damage control). Empirical evidence on positive effects of error management in individuals and organizations is then discussed, along with emotional, motivational, cognitive, and behavioral pathways of these effects. Learning from errors is central, but like other positive consequences, learning occurs under certain circumstances--one being the development of a mind-set of acceptance of human error.

  1. Correction for quadrature errors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netterstrøm, A.; Christensen, Erik Lintz

    1994-01-01

    In high bandwidth radar systems it is necessary to use quadrature devices to convert the signal to/from baseband. Practical problems make it difficult to implement a perfect quadrature system. Channel imbalance and quadrature phase errors in the transmitter and the receiver result in error signals...

  2. Medical error and disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Andrew A; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2013-01-01

    Errors occur commonly in healthcare and can cause significant harm to patients. Most errors arise from a combination of individual, system, and communication failures. Neurologists may be involved in harmful errors in any practice setting and should familiarize themselves with tools to prevent, report, and examine errors. Although physicians, patients, and ethicists endorse candid disclosure of harmful medical errors to patients, many physicians express uncertainty about how to approach these conversations. A growing body of research indicates physicians often fail to meet patient expectations for timely and open disclosure. Patients desire information about the error, an apology, and a plan for preventing recurrence of the error. To meet these expectations, physicians should participate in event investigations and plan thoroughly for each disclosure conversation, preferably with a disclosure coach. Physicians should also anticipate and attend to the ongoing medical and emotional needs of the patient. A cultural change towards greater transparency following medical errors is in motion. Substantial progress is still required, but neurologists can further this movement by promoting policies and environments conducive to open reporting, respectful disclosure to patients, and support for the healthcare workers involved. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Proofreading for word errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilotti, Maura; Chodorow, Martin; Agpawa, Ian; Krajniak, Marta; Mahamane, Salif

    2012-04-01

    Proofreading (i.e., reading text for the purpose of detecting and correcting typographical errors) is viewed as a component of the activity of revising text and thus is a necessary (albeit not sufficient) procedural step for enhancing the quality of a written product. The purpose of the present research was to test competing accounts of word-error detection which predict factors that may influence reading and proofreading differently. Word errors, which change a word into another word (e.g., from --> form), were selected for examination because they are unlikely to be detected by automatic spell-checking functions. Consequently, their detection still rests mostly in the hands of the human proofreader. Findings highlighted the weaknesses of existing accounts of proofreading and identified factors, such as length and frequency of the error in the English language relative to frequency of the correct word, which might play a key role in detection of word errors.

  4. I RBH - First Brazilian Hypertension Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardim, Paulo César Brandão Veiga; Souza, Weimar Kunz Sebba Barroso de; Lopes, Renato Delascio; Brandão, Andréa Araújo; Malachias, Marcus V Bolívar; Gomes, Marco Mota; Moreno Júnior, Heitor; Barbosa, Eduardo Costa Duarte; Póvoa, Rui Manoel Dos Santos

    2016-08-01

    A registry assessing the care of hypertensive patients in daily clinical practice in public and private centers in various Brazilian regions has not been conducted to date. Such analysis is important to elucidate the effectiveness of this care. To document the current clinical practice for the treatment of hypertension with identification of the profile of requested tests, type of administered treatment, level of blood pressure (BP) control, and adherence to treatment. National, observational, prospective, and multicenter study that will include patients older than 18 years with hypertension for at least 4 weeks, following up in public and private centers and after signing a consent form. The study will exclude patients undergoing dialysis, hospitalized in the previous 30 days, with class III or IV heart failure, pregnant or nursing, with severe liver disease, stroke or acute myocardial infarction in the past 30 days, or with diseases with a survival prognosis profile, metabolic syndrome, and adherence to treatment. The primary outcomes will be hospitalization due to hypertensive crisis, cardiocirculatory events, and cardiovascular death, while secondary outcomes will be hospitalization for heart failure and requirement of dialysis. A subgroup analysis of 15% of the sample will include noninvasive central pressure evaluation at baseline and study end. The estimated sample size is 3,000 individuals for a prevalence of 5%, sample error of 2%, and 95% confidence interval. The results will be presented after the final evaluation, which will occur at the end of a 1-year follow-up. The analysis of this registry will improve the knowledge and optimize the treatment of hypertension in Brazil, as a way of modifying the prognosis of cardiovascular disease in the country.

  5. I RBH - First Brazilian Hypertension Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo César Brandão Veiga Jardim

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: A registry assessing the care of hypertensive patients in daily clinical practice in public and private centers in various Brazilian regions has not been conducted to date. Such analysis is important to elucidate the effectiveness of this care. Objective: To document the current clinical practice for the treatment of hypertension with identification of the profile of requested tests, type of administered treatment, level of blood pressure (BP control, and adherence to treatment. Methods: National, observational, prospective, and multicenter study that will include patients older than 18 years with hypertension for at least 4 weeks, following up in public and private centers and after signing a consent form. The study will exclude patients undergoing dialysis, hospitalized in the previous 30 days, with class III or IV heart failure, pregnant or nursing, with severe liver disease, stroke or acute myocardial infarction in the past 30 days, or with diseases with a survival prognosis < 1 year. Evaluations will be performed at baseline and after 1 year of follow-up. The parameters that will be evaluated include anthropometric data, lifestyle habits, BP levels, lipid profile, metabolic syndrome, and adherence to treatment. The primary outcomes will be hospitalization due to hypertensive crisis, cardiocirculatory events, and cardiovascular death, while secondary outcomes will be hospitalization for heart failure and requirement of dialysis. A subgroup analysis of 15% of the sample will include noninvasive central pressure evaluation at baseline and study end. The estimated sample size is 3,000 individuals for a prevalence of 5%, sample error of 2%, and 95% confidence interval. Results: The results will be presented after the final evaluation, which will occur at the end of a 1-year follow-up. Conclusion: The analysis of this registry will improve the knowledge and optimize the treatment of hypertension in Brazil, as a way of

  6. Migraine and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Tabeeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of a relationship between migraine and hypertension are being continued. In spite of numerous studies, the association of some types of migraine (migraine with aura and migraine without aura with hypertension has not been fully elucidated. This issue is particularly relevant since these forms differ both clinically and pathophysiologically. Of even greater importance are the analysis and prediction of associations between migraine and cardiovascular diseases (ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease. The review deals with the clinical and pathophysiological features of the relationship between hypertension and migraine. There is evidence for the anatomic and functional correlation between the antinociceptive system and blood pressure (BP regulation control. It has been speculated that the increase in pain threshold is not the result of just hypertension as a disease, but it is caused by elevated BP-related hypalgesia. The efficacy of antihypertensive drugs is the fact that supports the association between hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. Identification of groups of patients having migraine and a high cardiovascular risk will allow timely early primary prevention and therapy. Introduction of a stratification approach at diagnostic stages may cause a reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates.

  7. Management of diabetic hypertensives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Ganesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension occurs twice as commonly in diabetics than in comparable nondiabetics. Patients with both disorders have a markedly higher risk for premature microvascular and macrovascular complications. Aggressive control of blood pressure (BP reduces both micro- and macrovascular complications. In diabetic hypertensives, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs are the first line in management of hypertension, and can be replaced by angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs if patients are intolerant of them. Recent studies suggest ARBs to be on par with ACEI in reducing both macro- and microvascular risks. Adding both these agents may have a beneficial effect on proteinuria, but no extra macrovascular risk reduction. Thiazides can also be used as first line drugs, but are better used along with ACEI/ARBs. Beta-blockers [especially if the patient has coronary artery disease] and calcium channel blockers are used as second line add-on drugs. Multidrug regimens are commonly needed in diabetic hypertensives. Achieving the target BP of <130/80 is the priority rather than the drug combination used in order to arrest and prevent the progression of macro- and microvascular complications in diabetic hypertensives.

  8. Carvedilol in hypertension treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis C Stafylas

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Panagiotis C Stafylas, Pantelis A Sarafidis1st Department of Medicine, AHEPA University Hospital, Aristotle University, Thessaloniki, GreeceAbstract: Although β-blockers have been previously shown to effectively reduce blood pressure (BP and have been used for hypertension treatment for over 40 years, their effect on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in hypertensive patients remains controversial and its use in uncomplicated hypertension is currently under debate. However, data on the above field derive mainly from studies which were conducted with older agents, such as atenolol and metoprolol, while considerable pharamacokinetic and pharmacodynamic heterogeneity is present within the class of β-blockers. Carvedilol, a vasodilating non-cardioselective β-blocker, is a compound that seems to give the opportunity to the clinician to use a cardioprotective agent without the concerning hemodynamic and metabolic actions of traditional β-blocker therapy. In contrast with conventional β-blockers, carvedilol maintains cardiac output, has a less extended effect on heart rate and reduces BP by decreasing vascular resistance. Further, several studies has shown that carvedilol has a beneficial or at least neutral effect on metabolic parameters, such as glycemic control, insulin sensitivity, and lipid metabolism, suggesting that they could be used in subjects with the metabolic syndrome or diabetes without negative consequences. This article summarizes the distinct pharmacologic, hemodynamic, and metabolic properties of carvedilol in relation to conventional β-blockers, attempting to examine the potential use of this agent for hypertension treatment.Keywords: carvedilol, β-blockers, hypertension treatment

  9. Hypertensive crisis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groshong, T

    1996-07-01

    Children presenting with hypertension should be considered for emergency treatment when there is evidence of end-organ toxicity. Complications of extreme hypertension may be very serious, even life threatening, with the potential for life-long sequelae. Of greatest significance is damage to the central nervous system. Treatment of hypertensive emergencies should be directed toward the lowering of blood pressure enough to reduce toxicity, but not at a rate likely to cause hypoperfusion of vital organs. This blood pressure reduction should, in general, be carefully controlled in an intensive care unit, with attention to central nervous system, cardiac, and renal function. Intravenous agents are preferable under these circumstances, due to greater ease in modulating blood pressure. In the absence of specific contraindications, a continuous infusion of nicardipine or sodium nitroprusside is preferable. Intravenous labetalol by bolus injection, followed by continuous infusion, also may be used. Oral agents should be reserved for circumstances in which symptoms of end-organ toxicity are mild or absent. Since general pediatricians have limited experience with the treatment of hypertensive emergencies, consultation with physicians experienced in treating hypertensive emergencies is suggested when possible.

  10. Hypertension and experimental stroke therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Collins, Victoria E; Donnan, Geoffrey A; Macleod, Malcolm R; Howells, David W

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is an established target for long-term stroke prevention but procedures for management of hypertension in acute stroke are less certain. Here, we analyze basic science data to examine the impact of hypertension on candidate stroke therapies and of anti-hypertensive treatments on stroke outcome. Methods: Data were pooled from 3,288 acute ischemic stroke experiments (47,899 animals) testing the effect of therapies on infarct size (published 1978–2010). Data were combined using meta-analysis and meta-regression, partitioned on the basis of hypertension, stroke model, and therapy. Results: Hypertensive animals were used in 10% of experiments testing 502 therapies. Hypertension was associated with lower treatment efficacy, especially in larger infarcts. Overall, anti-hypertensives did not provide greater benefit than other drugs, although benefits were evident in hypertensive animals even when given after stroke onset. Fifty-eight therapies were tested in both normotensive and hypertensive animals: some demonstrated superior efficacy in hypertensive animals (hypothermia) while others worked better in normotensive animals (tissue plasminogen activator, anesthetic agents). Discussion: Hypertension has a significant effect on the efficacy of candidate stroke drugs: standard basic science testing may overestimate the efficacy which could be reasonably expected from certain therapies and for hypertensive patients with large or temporary occlusions. PMID:23736641

  11. Manifestations of Pediatric Intracranial Hypertension From the Intracranial Hypertension Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Shawn C; Waslo, Carin S; Au, Johnathan N; Tanne, Emanuel

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the presenting symptoms, demographics, and interventions in pediatric patients enrolled in the Intracranial Hypertension Registry. We analyzed confirmed intracranial hypertension patients ≤18 years at the time of initial diagnosis who were enrolled in the registry. A total of 203 patients met the criteria for inclusion; 142 (70%) were considered primary intracranial hypertension. Females made up 72.5% (103 of 142) and 75.8% (47 of 61) in the primary intracranial hypertension and secondary intracranial hypertension groups, respectively. There were no clinically significant differences in age, body mass index, or opening pressure between the primary intracranial hypertension and secondary intracranial hypertension groups. Symptoms most often reported were headache and blurred vision. Bilateral optic disc edema occurred in 89.3% of primary intracranial hypertension and 78.7% of secondary intracranial hypertension patients. When divided into pre- and postpubertal status, 32.5% of patients were classified prepubertal; 77.3% of these had primary intracranial hypertension. This resulted in a female to male ratio of 1:1.04 for prepubertal and 6:1 for postpubertal primary intracranial hypertension patients. The body mass index was significantly higher in the postpubertal primary intracranial hypertension group (P = 0.0014). There was no significant difference in opening pressure. The common symptoms of intracranial hypertension, including headache, optic disc edema, and vision changes, occurred with similar frequencies in our cohort to those reported in the literature. In separate subanalyses, we found significantly higher rates of obesity in postpubertal females with primary intracranial hypertension. The female-to-male ratios in the postpubertal primary intracranial hypertension and secondary intracranial hypertension groups were higher than reported in the literature. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Uncorrected refractive errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovin S Naidoo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC, were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship.

  13. Uncorrected refractive errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship.

  14. Uncorrected refractive errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naidoo, Kovin S; Jaggernath, Jyoti

    2012-01-01

    Global estimates indicate that more than 2.3 billion people in the world suffer from poor vision due to refractive error; of which 670 million people are considered visually impaired because they do not have access to corrective treatment. Refractive errors, if uncorrected, results in an impaired quality of life for millions of people worldwide, irrespective of their age, sex and ethnicity. Over the past decade, a series of studies using a survey methodology, referred to as Refractive Error Study in Children (RESC), were performed in populations with different ethnic origins and cultural settings. These studies confirmed that the prevalence of uncorrected refractive errors is considerably high for children in low-and-middle-income countries. Furthermore, uncorrected refractive error has been noted to have extensive social and economic impacts, such as limiting educational and employment opportunities of economically active persons, healthy individuals and communities. The key public health challenges presented by uncorrected refractive errors, the leading cause of vision impairment across the world, require urgent attention. To address these issues, it is critical to focus on the development of human resources and sustainable methods of service delivery. This paper discusses three core pillars to addressing the challenges posed by uncorrected refractive errors: Human Resource (HR) Development, Service Development and Social Entrepreneurship. PMID:22944755

  15. Hypertension and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) is a common cardiovascular risk factor leading to heart failure (HF), coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, peripheral artery disease and chronic renal failure. Hypertensive heart disease can manifest as many types of cardiac arrhythmias, most commonly being atrial fibrillation......, hypomagnesaemia), contributing further to arrhythmias, while effective Blood pressure control may prevent the development of the arrhythmias such as AF.In recognizing this close relationship between HTN and arrhythmias, the European Heart Rhythm Association (EHRA) and the European Society of Cardiology (ESC......) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence...

  16. Knowing hypertension and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whyte, Susan Reynolds

    2016-01-01

    In Uganda, hypertension and diabetes have only recently been included in the health policy agenda. As they become treatable disorders, they take on more distinct contours in people's minds. This article relates knowledge about these two conditions to health institutions and technology for diagnos......In Uganda, hypertension and diabetes have only recently been included in the health policy agenda. As they become treatable disorders, they take on more distinct contours in people's minds. This article relates knowledge about these two conditions to health institutions and technology...... for diagnosing and treating them. The response to the AIDS epidemic in Uganda provides an important context for, and contrast with, the emergence of hypertension and diabetes as social phenomena. Ethnographic fieldwork shows the interplay between experience of these conditions and the political economy...

  17. Understanding idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markey, Keira A; Mollan, Susan P; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2016-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension is a disorder characterised by raised intracranial pressure that predominantly affects young, obese women. Pathogenesis has not been fully elucidated, but several causal factors have been proposed. Symptoms can include headaches, visual loss, pulsatile tinnitus...... of the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Treatment Trial (IIHTT) reported beneficial effects of acetazolamide in patients with mild visual loss. Studies have also established weight loss as an effective disease-modifying treatment, and further clinical trials to investigate new treatments are underway....... The incidence of idiopathic intracranial hypertension is expected to increase as rates of obesity increase; efforts to reduce diagnostic delays and identify new, effective approaches to treatment will be key to meeting the needs of a growing number of patients....

  18. [Mineralocorticoid syndromes and hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldhäusl, W

    1976-08-26

    Mineralocorticoids are out of the causes of secondary hypertension. Excess production of mineralocorticoids induces sodium and fluid retention, loss of potassium and metabolic alcalosis. The diagnosis of mineralocorticoid syndromes depends on the interpretation of the functional status of the renin-mineralocorticoid-system, which is in part responsible for the maintenance of normal blood pressure. The classical representative of this group is the syndrome of primary aldosteronism. Causes of mineralocorticoid syndromes associated with hypertension are: 1. autonomous production of mineralo-corticoids by an adrenal adenoma or by idiopathic bilateral adrenal hyperplasia; 2. deficiency of adrenal 17-alpha-hydroxylase or of 11-beta-hydroxylase; 3. secondary aldosteronism associated with primary reninism, or renal arterial stenosis; and 4. pseudo aldosteronism due to excessive ingestion of licorice. Malign or essential hypertension may also often be followed by secondary aldosteronism.

  19. Hypertension og nyresygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Anne-Lise; Pedersen, Erling B; Strandgaard, Svend

    2009-01-01

    Renal mechanisms, in particular the renin-angiotensin system and renal salt handling, are of major importance in blood pressure regulation. Co-existence of hypertension and decreased renal function may be due to nephrosclerosis secondary to hypertension, or primary renal disease with secondary...... hypertension. Mild degrees of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be detected in around 10% of the population, and detection is important as CKD is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Conversely, heart failure may cause an impairment of renal function. In chronic progressive...... nephropathy, effective blood pressure lowering is of paramount importance, and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are agents of choice. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun-15...

  20. Labetalol in essential hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breckenridge, A.; Orme, M.; Serlin, M. J.; Maciver, M.

    1982-01-01

    1 Labetalol is an effective agent in essential hypertension as documented in open studies and controlled studies in which its efficacy has been compared with both placebo and a variety of other anti-hypertensive drugs. 2 Labetalol given by mouth lowers blood pressure rapidly. There is no evidence of tolerance to its anti-hypertensive action. 3 Adverse effects include excessive hypotension, but only when the drug is given in large doses. Epigastric discomfort and scalp tingling have been documented especially after intravenous administration. 4 From a pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic point of view, labetalol can be given once daily, but postural hypotension after large (> 1 g) single doses may limit the usefulness of once daily regimes. Twice daily administration appears an acceptable compromise. PMID:6124264

  1. Disclosure of medical errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlow, Anne; Stevens, Polly; Harrison, Christine; Laxer, Ronald M

    2006-12-01

    The 1999 release of the Institute of Medicine's document To Err is Human was akin to removing the lid of Pandora's box. Not only were the magnitude and impact of medical errors now apparent to those working in the health care industry, but consumers or health care were alerted to the occurrence of medical events causing harm. One specific solution advocated was the disclosure to patients and their families of adverse events resulting from medical error. Knowledge of the historical perspective, ethical underpinnings, and medico-legal implications gives us a better appreciation of current recommendations for disclosing adverse events resulting from medical error to those affected.

  2. Pre-Hypertension And Hypertension In Apparently Healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertension is a major public health burden in sub-Saharan Africa. It has been shown to track from adolescence to adulthood. Pre-hypertension refers to consistent systolic and/or diastolic blood pressure (BP) measurement between 90 - < 95th percentile, while hypertension is when systolic and/or diastolic BP ≥ 95th ...

  3. Immune mechanisms in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ciuceis, Carolina; Rossini, Claudia; La Boria, Elisa; Porteri, Enzo; Petroboni, Beatrice; Gavazzi, Alice; Sarkar, Annamaria; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Rizzoni, Damiano

    2014-12-01

    Low grade inflammation may have a key role in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Several studies showed that both innate and adaptive immune systems may be involved, being T cells the most important players. Particularly, the balance between Th1 effector lymphocytes and Treg lymphocytes may be crucial for blood pressure elevation and related organ damage development. In the presence of a mild elevation of blood pressure, neo-antigens are produced. Activated Th1 cells may then contribute to the persistent elevation of blood pressure by affecting vasculature, kidney and perivascular fat. On the other hand, Tregs represent a lymphocyte subpopulation with an anti-inflammatory role, being their activity crucial for the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. Indeed, Tregs were demonstrated to be able to protect from blood pressure elevation and from the development of organ damage, including micro and macrovascular alterations, in different animal models of genetic or experimental hypertension. In the vasculature, inflammation leads to vascular remodeling through cytokine activity, smooth muscle cell proliferation and oxidative stress. It is also known that a consistent part of ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury is mediated by inflammatory infiltration and that Treg cell infusion have a protective role. Also the central nervous system has an important role in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. In conclusion, hypertension development involves chronic inflammatory process. Knowledge of cellular and molecular players in the progression of hypertension has dramatically improved in the last decade, by assessing the central role of innate and adaptive immunity cells and proinflammatory cytokines driving the development of target organ damage. The new concept of role of immunity, especially implicating T lymphocytes, will eventually allow discovery of new therapeutic targets that may improve outcomes in hypertension and

  4. [Hypertension after gestational hyperglycemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Luciana C; Silva, Márcia R Gabaldi; Peraçoli, José Carlos; de Silveira, Liciana Vaz A; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; de Pimenta, Walkyria P

    2005-04-01

    To compare hypertension frequency in women, 3 to 12 years after the index-pregnancy, when they were classified into 4 groups: NGT: normal glucose tolerance; GHG: gestational hyperglycemia; GDM: gestacional diabetes mellitus; GDM plus GHG. From 3,113 pregnant women, 535 were participants and selected by a process that was randomized and proportional to the group number. NGT women were different from the others in most of the clinical parameters. All women had their blood pressure evaluated. Statistical analyses were performed by Goodman's and chi-square tests. Hypertension frequency was higher in GDM plus GHG women than in NGT women (40.9 vs. 23.6%; Pdiabetes.

  5. Hypertension and renovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasbak, P; Ibsen, H; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn

    2002-01-01

    The clinical value of renal vein renin sampling (RVRS) as a prognostic tool in the treatment of renovascular hypertension was evaluated. One hundred consecutive patients were included over a 4-year period of time. About half of the patients (49%) were treated interventionally by PTRA (21%), nephr......The clinical value of renal vein renin sampling (RVRS) as a prognostic tool in the treatment of renovascular hypertension was evaluated. One hundred consecutive patients were included over a 4-year period of time. About half of the patients (49%) were treated interventionally by PTRA (21...

  6. Hypertension og det metaboliske syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael Hecht; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a relatively prevalent condition characterized by co-existence of several metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension. Patients with hypertension have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome which, in turn, increases the cardiovascular...

  7. Intracranial Hypertension: Medication and Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have little effect on headaches caused by intracranial hypertension, they may temporarily affect the intensity of a ... study in which 26 patients with idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) were treated with octreotide, a synthetic hormone ...

  8. [Cardiovascular complications of hypertensive crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    It is inexorable that a proportion of patients with systemic arterial hypertension will develop a hypertensive crisis at some point in their lives. The hypertensive crises can be divided in hypertensive patients with emergency or hypertensive emergency, according to the presence or absence of acute end-organ damage. In this review, we discuss the cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies, including acute coronary syndrome, congestive heart failure, aortic dissection and sympathomimetic hypertensive crises (those caused by cocaine use included). Each is presented in a unique way, although some patients with hypertensive emergency report non-specific symptoms. Treatment includes multiple medications for quick and effective action with security to reduce blood pressure, protect the function of organs remaining, relieve symptoms, minimize the risk of complications and improve patient outcomes.

  9. Inborn errors of metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... metabolism. A few of them are: Fructose intolerance Galactosemia Maple sugar urine disease (MSUD) Phenylketonuria (PKU) Newborn ... disorder. Alternative Names Metabolism - inborn errors of Images Galactosemia Phenylketonuria test References Bodamer OA. Approach to inborn ...

  10. Medical Errors Reduction Initiative

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mutter, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    The Valley Hospital of Ridgewood, New Jersey, is proposing to extend a limited but highly successful specimen management and medication administration medical errors reduction initiative on a hospital-wide basis...

  11. Design for Error Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    1983-01-01

    An important aspect of the optimal design of computer-based operator support systems is the sensitivity of such systems to operator errors. The author discusses how a system might allow for human variability with the use of reversibility and observability.......An important aspect of the optimal design of computer-based operator support systems is the sensitivity of such systems to operator errors. The author discusses how a system might allow for human variability with the use of reversibility and observability....

  12. Interruption Practice Reduces Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    dangers of errors at the PCS. Electronic health record systems are used to reduce certain errors related to poor- handwriting and dosage...Arlington VA 22202-4302 Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to...RESPONSIBLE PERSON a REPORT unclassified b ABSTRACT unclassified c THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39

  13. Inpatients’ medical prescription errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Melo Santos Silva

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify and quantify the most frequent prescription errors in inpatients’ medical prescriptions. Methods: A survey of prescription errors was performed in the inpatients’ medical prescriptions, from July 2008 to May 2009 for eight hours a day. Rresults: At total of 3,931 prescriptions was analyzed and 362 (9.2% prescription errors were found, which involved the healthcare team as a whole. Among the 16 types of errors detected in prescription, the most frequent occurrences were lack of information, such as dose (66 cases, 18.2% and administration route (26 cases, 7.2%; 45 cases (12.4% of wrong transcriptions to the information system; 30 cases (8.3% of duplicate drugs; doses higher than recommended (24 events, 6.6% and 29 cases (8.0% of prescriptions with indication but not specifying allergy. Cconclusion: Medication errors are a reality at hospitals. All healthcare professionals are responsible for the identification and prevention of these errors, each one in his/her own area. The pharmacist is an essential professional in the drug therapy process. All hospital organizations need a pharmacist team responsible for medical prescription analyses before preparation, dispensation and administration of drugs to inpatients. This study showed that the pharmacist improves the inpatient’s safety and success of prescribed therapy.

  14. EMERGENCY STATES IN ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Gurevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes in detail potential emergency states in patients with different stages of arterial hypertension with special attention to diagnosis and rational management of hypertensive crisis. Differentiated approach to management of different forms of hypertensive crisis is specified.

  15. Hypertensive Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Hypertensive heart disease is prevalent and during the last decade it has been determined that patients with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy have increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, many have doubted the effectiveness of LV mass assessment because it is difficult...

  16. Vitamin D and Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zamzam Paknahad

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, hypertension is one of the most important causes of death all over the world because of its adverse effects on cardiovascular system. For this reason its study is very valuable. Vitamin D is one of the important factors that may influence blood pressure. Many studies have shown the modulatory effect of this vitamin on rennin-angiotensin system as well as its inhibitory effect on vascular smooth muscle hypertrophy. According to the fact that vitamin receptors are distributed in almost all organs of human body, we can't consider its role just as factor in calcium homeostasis. Therefore many other important roles could be attributed to it. So vitamin D deficiency could arise many problems. There are many causes for vitamin D deficiency. The most important is insufficient exposure to UV-B. In epidemiological studies the vitamin D deficiency is considered to be associated with high blood pressure, as emphasized in many cross-sectional studies. Concerning the cohort prospective studies, the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and hypertension is reported in some cases. The interventional studies about the association between vitamin D and hypertension are not many and the results are different or contradictory. Controversial results might be due to differences in dose of supplements or duration of supplement therapy. The aim of this systematic review is to assess the researches about the association between vitamin D deficiency and hypertension and discuss the power of them. This can be helpful to lighten the path to prospective investigations.

  17. [Hypertension and sports activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mos, Lucio; Driussi, Caterina; Mihaleje, Martina

    2010-10-01

    The importance of physical activity in primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease has been demonstrated in many studies. In particular, the effect of exercise, especially aerobioc exercise, is to reduce blood pressure and heart rate by reducing sympathetic tone, and to correct many factors of the metabolic syndrome. Exercise prescription should be based on knowledge of the changes induced by training, but also on risk assessment, both cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular, of hypertensive subjects. It is generally accepted that for prevention and treatment of hypertension is useful to perform 3-4 weekly sessions of aerobic exercise for 30-45 min, at 50-70% of maximum working capacity. The recommended activities are walking, running, cycling and programs of mixed aerobic exercise. People with hypertension may follow their own personal inclinations, by choosing a sport and doing it at a competitive level. In hypertensive athletes the eligibility for competitive sports activities implies a careful medical evaluation, according to the recently published Italian COCIS cardiac guidelines.

  18. Hypertension and Anaesthesia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Hypertension affects more than 1 billion people worldwide, and is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, cardiac failure, stroke, cerebrovascular events including dementia, atherosclerosis and the development of renal failure. It is also associated with dyslipidaemia, diabetes.

  19. Hypertension og hjertet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian; Svendsen, Tage Lysbo; Andersen, Niels Holmark

    2009-01-01

    of left ventricular mass is associated with substantial and significant reduction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Hypertension is strongly associated with increased risk of subsequent heart failure. Meta analysis data suggests that reduction in blood pressure is also associated with very...

  20. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Pulmonary Hypertension - High Blood Pressure in the Heart-to-Lung System Updated:Jan ... Pressure" This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  1. Fermented milk for hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usinger, Lotte; Reimer, Christina; Ibsen, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Fermented milk has been suggested to have a blood pressure lowering effect through increased content of proteins and peptides produced during the bacterial fermentation. Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease world wide and new blood pressure reducing lifestyle...

  2. Nitroglycerin kan give hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Peter; Levinsen, Tine Holbæk; Hovind, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Hg. The conclusion was that her response was a paradoxical response to glycerylnitrate, orthostatism and a pathological response to massage of the carotid artery. This is the third reported case on paradoxical hypertension induced by glyceryl nitrates. It is speculated that dysfunction of the cerebral bloodflow...

  3. Hypertension og nyresygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Anne-Lise; Pedersen, Erling B; Strandgaard, Svend

    2009-01-01

    hypertension. Mild degrees of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be detected in around 10% of the population, and detection is important as CKD is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Conversely, heart failure may cause an impairment of renal function. In chronic progressive...

  4. Pediatric pulmonary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ivy, D. Dunbar; Abman, Steven H.; Barst, Robyn J.; Berger, Rolf M.F.; Bonnet, Damien; Fleming, Thomas R.; Haworth, Sheila G.; Raj, J. Usha; Rosenzweig, Erika B.; Schulze Neick, Ingram; Steinhorn, Robin H.; Beghetti, Maurice

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a rare disease in newborns, infants, and children that is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. In the majority of pediatric patients, PH is idiopathic or associated with congenital heart disease and rarely is associated with other conditions such as

  5. 22 CFR 1421.1 - Foreign Service Labor-Management Relations Statute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Foreign Service Labor-Management Relations Statute. 1421.1 Section 1421.1 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE LABOR RELATIONS BOARD; FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY; GENERAL COUNSEL OF THE FEDERAL LABOR RELATIONS AUTHORITY; AND THE FOREIGN SERVICE...

  6. Oxidative stress and hypertension: Possibility of hypertension therapy with antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azar Baradaran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a major risk factor for myocardial infarction, heart failure, stroke, peripheral arterial disease, and aortic aneurysm, and is a cause of chronic kidney disease. Hypertension is often associated with metabolic abnormalities such as diabetes and dyslipidemia, and the rate of these diseases is increasing nowadays. Recently it has been hypothesized that oxidative stress is a key player in the pathogenesis of hypertension. A reduction in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activity has been observed in newly diagnosed and untreated hypertensive subjects, which are inversely correlated with blood pressure. Hydrogen peroxide production is also higher in hypertensive subjects. Furthermore, hypertensive patients have higher lipid hydroperoxide production. Oxidative stress is also markedly increased in hypertensive patients with renovascular disease. If oxidative stress is indeed a cause of hypertension, then, antioxidants should have beneficial effects on hypertension control and reduction of oxidative damage should result in a reduction in blood pressure. Although dietary antioxidants may have beneficial effects on hypertension and cardiovascular risk factors, however, antioxidant supplementation has not been shown consistently to be effective and improvement is not usually seen in blood pressure after treatment with single or combination antioxidant therapy in subjects thought to be at high risk of cardiovascular disease. This matter is the main focus of this paper. A list of medicinal plants that have been reported to be effective in hypertension is also presented.

  7. Error monitoring in musicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens eMaidhof

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available To err is human, and hence even professional musicians make errors occasionally during their performances. This paper summarizes recent work investigating error monitoring in musicians, i.e. the processes and their neural correlates associated with the monitoring of ongoing actions and the detection of deviations from intended sounds. EEG Studies reported an early component of the event-related potential (ERP occurring before the onsets of pitch errors. This component, which can be altered in musicians with focal dystonia, likely reflects processes of error detection and/or error compensation, i.e. attempts to cancel the undesired sensory consequence (a wrong tone a musician is about to perceive. Thus, auditory feedback seems not to be a prerequisite for error detection, consistent with previous behavioral results. In contrast, when auditory feedback is externally manipulated and thus unexpected, motor performance can be severely distorted, although not all feedback alterations result in performance impairments. Recent studies investigating the neural correlates of feedback processing showed that unexpected feedback elicits an ERP component after note onsets, which shows larger amplitudes during music performance than during mere perception of the same musical sequences. Hence, these results stress the role of motor actions for the processing of auditory information. Furthermore, recent methodological advances like the combination of 3D motion capture techniques with EEG will be discussed. Such combinations of different measures can potentially help to disentangle the roles of different feedback types such as proprioceptive and auditory feedback, and in general to derive at a better understanding of the complex interactions between the motor and auditory domain during error monitoring. Finally, outstanding questions and future directions in this context will be discussed.

  8. Hypertension, a health economics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcocer, Luis; Cueto, Liliana

    2008-06-01

    The economic aspects of hypertension are critical to modern medicine. The medical, economic, and human costs of untreated and inadequately controlled hypertension are enormous. Hypertension is distributed unequally and with iniquity in different countries and regions of the world. Treatment of hypertension requires an investment over many years to prolong disease-free quality years of life. The high prevalence and high cost of the disease impacts on the microeconomics and macroeconomics of countries and regions. The criteria used for inclusion in clinical guidelines for hypertension impact on the cost and cost/utility of diagnosis or treatment.

  9. Learning from Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA. Lendita Kryeziu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available “Errare humanum est”, a well known and widespread Latin proverb which states that: to err is human, and that people make mistakes all the time. However, what counts is that people must learn from mistakes. On these grounds Steve Jobs stated: “Sometimes when you innovate, you make mistakes. It is best to admit them quickly, and get on with improving your other innovations.” Similarly, in learning new language, learners make mistakes, thus it is important to accept them, learn from them, discover the reason why they make them, improve and move on. The significance of studying errors is described by Corder as: “There have always been two justifications proposed for the study of learners' errors: the pedagogical justification, namely that a good understanding of the nature of error is necessary before a systematic means of eradicating them could be found, and the theoretical justification, which claims that a study of learners' errors is part of the systematic study of the learners' language which is itself necessary to an understanding of the process of second language acquisition” (Corder, 1982; 1. Thus the importance and the aim of this paper is analyzing errors in the process of second language acquisition and the way we teachers can benefit from mistakes to help students improve themselves while giving the proper feedback.

  10. Hypertension in children: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Andres; Roldan, Rosie; Sollecito, Thomas P

    2006-04-01

    Hypertension in children is an increasing concern for health care professionals. Updated guidelines for the treatment of hypertension in children and adolescents were published in 2004. This report reviews the epidemiology and management of pediatric hypertension and suggests an oral health protocol to apply to hypertensive children in the dental setting. A web search was performed using Medline, PubMed, ISI Citation Index, and Cochrane evidence-based databases for articles regarding hypertension in children published in English between 1998 and 2004. Relevant articles describing the epidemiology, classification, pathophysiology, and management of pediatric hypertension are discussed, and recommendations for dental treatment of pediatric patients are suggested. The incidence of pediatric hypertension can reach 5 percent. Data on the prevalence of pediatric hypertension in the dental setting is scarce. However, using the prevalence in the general population, at least fifty young patients will be hypertensive in a busy general or pediatric practice. Dental students and residents should have the opportunity to screen for hypertension during their training and familiarize themselves with the appropriate techniques in children. Oral health professionals should become aware of the implications of hypertension in children.

  11. Hypertension in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrahian, Seyed Mehrdad; Falkner, Bonita

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension, a global public health problem, is currently the leading factor in the global burden of disease. It is the major modifiable risk factor for heart disease, stroke and kidney failure. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is both a common cause of hypertension and CKD is also a complication of uncontrolled hypertension. The interaction between hypertension and CKD is complex and increases the risk of adverse cardiovascular and cerebrovascular outcomes. This is particularly significant in the setting of resistant hypertension commonly seen in patient with CKD. The pathophysiology of CKD associated hypertension is multi-factorial with different mechanisms contributing to hypertension. These pathogenic mechanisms include sodium dysregulation, increased sympathetic nervous system and alterations in renin angiotensin aldosterone system activity. Standardized blood pressure (BP) measurement is essential in establishing the diagnosis and management of hypertension in CKD. Use of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring provides an additional assessment of diurnal variation in BP commonly seen in CKD patients. The optimal BP target in the treatment of hypertension in general and CKD population remains a matter of debate and controversial despite recent guidelines and clinical trial data. Medical therapy of patients with CKD associated hypertension can be difficult and challenging. Additional evaluation by a hypertension specialist may be required in the setting of treatment resistant hypertension by excluding pseudo-resistance and treatable secondary causes. Treatment with a combination of antihypertensive drugs, including appropriate diuretic choice, based on estimated glomerular filtration rate, is a key component of hypertension management in CKD patients. In addition to drug treatment non-pharmacological approaches including life style modification, most important of which is dietary salt restriction, should be included in the management of hypertension in CKD patients.

  12. Errors in Neonatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Boldrini

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Danger and errors are inherent in human activities. In medical practice errors can lean to adverse events for patients. Mass media echo the whole scenario. Methods: We reviewed recent published papers in PubMed database to focus on the evidence and management of errors in medical practice in general and in Neonatology in particular. We compared the results of the literature with our specific experience in Nina Simulation Centre (Pisa, Italy. Results: In Neonatology the main error domains are: medication and total parenteral nutrition, resuscitation and respiratory care, invasive procedures, nosocomial infections, patient identification, diagnostics. Risk factors include patients’ size, prematurity, vulnerability and underlying disease conditions but also multidisciplinary teams, working conditions providing fatigue, a large variety of treatment and investigative modalities needed. Discussion and Conclusions: In our opinion, it is hardly possible to change the human beings but it is likely possible to change the conditions under they work. Voluntary errors report systems can help in preventing adverse events. Education and re-training by means of simulation can be an effective strategy too. In Pisa (Italy Nina (ceNtro di FormazIone e SimulazioNe NeonAtale is a simulation center that offers the possibility of a continuous retraining for technical and non-technical skills to optimize neonatological care strategies. Furthermore, we have been working on a novel skill trainer for mechanical ventilation (MEchatronic REspiratory System SImulator for Neonatal Applications, MERESSINA. Finally, in our opinion national health policy indirectly influences risk for errors. Proceedings of the 9th International Workshop on Neonatology · Cagliari (Italy · October 23rd-26th, 2013 · Learned lessons, changing practice and cutting-edge research

  13. Error Free Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    A mathematical theory for development of "higher order" software to catch computer mistakes resulted from a Johnson Space Center contract for Apollo spacecraft navigation. Two women who were involved in the project formed Higher Order Software, Inc. to develop and market the system of error analysis and correction. They designed software which is logically error-free, which, in one instance, was found to increase productivity by 600%. USE.IT defines its objectives using AXES -- a user can write in English and the system converts to computer languages. It is employed by several large corporations.

  14. Hypertensive Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Hypertensive heart disease is prevalent and during the last decade it has been determined that patients with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy have increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, many have doubted the effectiveness of LV mass assessment because it is difficult...... to measure, and there were no data showing a relation between reduced LV mass and improvement in LV systolic and diastolic function and improved cardiovascular outcome. However, improvements to echocardiographic equipment have made it possible to measure LV mass with the same precision as for aortic valve......% associated risk reduction in cardiovascular mortality if patients with LV hypertrophy were treated to limits of LV mass. Hypertension causes impaired LV systolic function by increased afterload and LV hypertrophy. Normal estimations of LV ejection fraction tend to overestimate LV systolic function; however...

  15. Hypertension og hjertet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian; Andersen, Niels Holmark; Svendsen, Tage Lysbo

    2009-01-01

    of left ventricular mass is associated with substantial and significant reduction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Hypertension is strongly associated with increased risk of subsequent heart failure. Meta analysis data suggests that reduction in blood pressure is also associated with very...... substantial reductions in incident heart failure. In addition, the authors suggest that atrial fibrillation should be considered target organ damage with the resulting implications in terms of blood pressure reduction in guidelines, and that modern treatment of atrial fibrillation should also include...

  16. Error Correcting Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 10. Error Correcting Codes How Numbers Protect Themselves. Priti Shankar. Series Article Volume 1 ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India ...

  17. Random errors revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Finn

    2000-01-01

    the random errors of estimates of the sound intensity in, say, one-third octave bands from the power and cross power spectra of the signals from an intensity probe determined with a dual channel FFT analyser. This is not very practical, though. In this paper it is demonstrated that one can predict the random...

  18. Error Correcting Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 3. Error Correcting Codes - Reed Solomon Codes. Priti Shankar. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 3 March 1997 pp 33-47. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/002/03/0033-0047 ...

  19. Errors in uroradiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viamonte, M. Jr. (Miami Univ., Miami Beach, FL (United States). Dept. of Radiology)

    1992-01-01

    This book covering errors in urologic radiology, takes into account the imaging modalities presently used for examining the urinary tract: excretory urography, ultrasonography, computerized tomography and angiography. The author gives examples of anatomical variations, developmental anomalies, and benign conditions that simulate neoplasias and lead to mistakes. (orig.) With 148 figs.

  20. Error Correcting Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 2; Issue 1. Error Correcting Codes The Hamming Codes. Priti Shankar. Series Article Volume 2 Issue 1 January ... Author Affiliations. Priti Shankar1. Department of Computer Science and Automation, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, India ...

  1. Orwell's Instructive Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julian, Liam

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about George Orwell, his instructive errors, and the manner in which Orwell pierced worthless theory, faced facts and defended decency (with fluctuating success), and largely ignored the tradition of accumulated wisdom that has rendered him a timeless teacher--one whose inadvertent lessons, while infrequently…

  2. Neurological disorders in hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Vakhnina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common vascular diseases. The brain as target organs in hypertension is damaged more often and earlier. Neurological complications due to hypertension are frequently hyperdiagnosed in Russian neurological practice. Thus, headache, dizziness, impaired recall of recent events, nocturnal sleep disorders, and many other complaints in a hypertensive patient are usually regarded as a manifestation of dyscirculatory encephalopathy. At the same time headaches (tension headache and migraine in hypertensive patients are predominantly primary; headache associated with dramatic marked elevations in blood pressure is encountered in only a small number of patients. The role of cerebrovascular diseases in the development of dizziness in hypertensive patients is also overestimated. The vast majority of cases, patients with this complaint are in fact identified to have benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, Mеniеre’s disease, vestibular neuronitis, or vestibular migraine. Psychogenic disorders or multisensory insufficiency are generally responsible for non-systemic vertigo in hypertensive patients. Chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency may cause non-systemic vertigo as a subjective equivalent of postural instability.Cognitive impairments (CIs are the most common and earliest manifestation of cerebrovascular lesion in hypertension. In most cases, CIs in hypertension were vascular and associated with cerebrovascular lesion due to lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis. However, mixed CIs frequently occur when hypertensive patients are also found to have signs of a degenerative disease, most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease.

  3. Error management in audit firms: Error climate, type, and originator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gold, A.H.; Gronewold, U.; Salterio, S.E.

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how the treatment of audit staff who discover errors in audit files by superiors affects their willingness to report these errors. The way staff are treated by superiors is labelled as the audit office error management climate. In a "blame-oriented" climate errors are not

  4. [Portopulmonary hypertension: Updated review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Almendros, Nielzer; Toapanta-Yanchapaxi, Liz N; Aguirre Valadez, Jonathan; Espinola Zavaleta, Nilda; Muñoz-Martínez, Sergio G; García-Juárez, Ignacio

    Portopulmonary hypertension (PPH) is a rare condition worldwide, although epidemiological data are unknown in Mexico. However, chronic liver diseases are very prevalent in Mexico. PPH is the 4th subtype in frequency in the group of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Its diagnosis is made within 2 scenarios: patients with suspected pulmonary hypertension and candidates for orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). Both echocardiogram and a right cardiac catheterisation are crucial for diagnosis in both cases. PPH is a challenge for OLT, since it can significantly increase perioperative mortality. The use of specific therapy is the cornerstone of this disease, as a measure to improve the outcome of those who become candidates for OLT with moderate to severe PPH. It is important to recognise that PPH can be a contraindication to OLT. The role of lung-liver transplantation or heart-lung-liver transplantation as a measure to heal pulmonary vascular disease in patients with PPH is still uncertain. Copyright © 2016 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. [Resistant hypertension: An update].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renna, N F

    2018-01-31

    An estimated 10% to 20% of hypertensive patients could be considered resistant to treatment (RH). These are patients who are not controlled using three drugs, at the maximum tolerated doses, including a diuretic, as well as those with high blood pressure controlled using four or more drugs. The term is used to identify patients that might benefit from special diagnostic and/or therapeutic consideration. The term 'refractory hypertension' has recently been proposed as a novel phenotype of antihypertensive failure. It refers to patients whose blood pressure cannot be controlled with maximum treatment. The first studies of this phenotype indicate that it is rare and affects less than 5% of patients with RH. Adherence to or compliance with medical treatment is key to defining resistant hypertension. Closer attention has been paid to clinical and experimental research since the first scientific statement for the diagnosis, assessment and treatment of RH from the American Heart Association, and in the European guidelines, was published in 2008. This review will set out the concepts relating to prevalence, prognosis and compliance and cover the latest developments on this subject. Copyright © 2018 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Taste and hypertension in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roura, Eugeni; Foster, Simon; Winklebach, Anja

    2016-01-01

    The association between salty taste and NaCl intake with hypertension is well-established, although it is far from completely understood. Other taste types such as sweet, umami or bitter have also been related to alterations in blood pressure. Here, we review the mutual relationship between taste...... and hypertension to identify potential avenues to better control blood pressure. This review focuses on published data involving humans, with the exception of a section on molecular mechanisms. There is compelling evidence to suggest that changes in salty taste sensitivity can be used to predict the onset...... of hypertension. This goes hand in hand with the medical concept of sodium sensitivity, which also increases with age, particularly in hypertensive patients. The association of hypertension with the loss of taste acuity less definitive with some data/conclusions masked by the use of anti-hypertensive drugs...

  7. [Control of hypertension in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J M; Alvarez, W; Mulaj, M; De Breucker, S; Leeman, M; Pepersack, T

    2006-09-01

    In a cross sectional study we determined prevalence of hypertension among institutionalized old subjects. Prevalence of hypertension was 69%. Among detected hypertensive patients, 76% received an antihypertensive drug treatment. 61% of the declared hypertensive patients and 80% of the treated hypertensive patients had their blood pressure controlled. The general practitioners should better detect and treat this common geriatric problem associated with a high comorbidity.

  8. Automatic Error Analysis Using Intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothwell, E. J.; Cloud, M. J.

    2012-01-01

    A technique for automatic error analysis using interval mathematics is introduced. A comparison to standard error propagation methods shows that in cases involving complicated formulas, the interval approach gives comparable error estimates with much less effort. Several examples are considered, and numerical errors are computed using the INTLAB…

  9. The immune system and hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Madhu V.; Chapleau, Mark W.; Harwani, Sailesh C; Abboud, Francois M.

    2014-01-01

    A powerful interaction between the autonomic and the immune systems plays a prominent role in the initiation and maintenance of hypertension and significantly contributes to cardiovascular pathology, end-organ damage and mortality. Studies have shown consistent association between hypertension, proinflammatory cytokines and the cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. The sympathetic nervous system, a major determinant of hypertension, innervates the bone marrow, spleen and peripheral...

  10. Hypertension og det metaboliske syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Larsen, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a relatively prevalent condition characterized by co-existence of several metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension. Patients with hypertension have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome which, in turn, increases the cardiovascular...... syndrome is of clinical importance as it makes the treating physician test for other elements of the syndrome in patients with one of the elements, e.g. hypertension. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun-15...

  11. Masked Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Stanley S.; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan; Hansen, Tine W.; Boggia, José; Liu, Yanping; Asayama, Kei; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Dolan, Eamon; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Sandoya, Edgardo; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Filipovský, Jan; Imai, Yutaka; Wang, Jiguang; Ibsen, Hans; O’Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    Although distinguishing features of masked hypertension in diabetics are well known, the significance of antihypertensive treatment on clinical practice decisions has not been fully explored. We analyzed 9691 subjects from the population-based 11-country International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes. Prevalence of masked hypertension in untreated normotensive participants was higher (Phypertensives tended to be higher than in normotensives (hazard rate [HR], 1.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97–3.97; P=0.059), similar to untreated stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 1.07; CI, 0.58–1.98; P=0.82), but less than stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.53; CI, 0.29–0.99; P=0.048). In contrast, cardiovascular risk was not significantly different in antihypertensive-treated diabetic-masked hypertensives, as compared with the normotensive comparator group (HR, 1.13; CI, 0.54–2.35; P=0.75), stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 0.91; CI, 0.49–1.69; P=0.76), and stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.65; CI, 0.35–1.20; P=0.17). In the untreated diabetic-masked hypertensive population, mean conventional systolic/diastolic blood pressure was 129.2±8.0/76.0±7.3 mm Hg, and mean daytime systolic/diastolic blood pressure 141.5±9.1/83.7±6.5 mm Hg. In conclusion, masked hypertension occurred in 29% of untreated diabetics, had comparable cardiovascular risk as stage 1 hypertension, and would require considerable reduction in conventional blood pressure to reach daytime ambulatory treatment goal. Importantly, many hypertensive diabetics when receiving antihypertensive therapy can present with normalized conventional and elevated ambulatory blood pressure that mimics masked hypertension. PMID:23478096

  12. Hypertension og det metaboliske syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael Hecht; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a relatively prevalent condition characterized by co-existence of several metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension. Patients with hypertension have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome which, in turn, increases the cardiovascular...... syndrome is of clinical importance as it makes the treating physician test for other elements of the syndrome in patients with one of the elements, e.g. hypertension. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun...

  13. Hypertension--forekomst og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Hans; Jørgensen, Torben; Jensen, Gorm B

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, less than half of all hypertensives have their blood pressure reduced to relevant goals. The prevalence of hypertension in Denmark was found to be between 26% and 40% of the adult population. Just over ...... half were aware of the diagnosis, but less than half were in treatment. Blood pressure control in patients who are undergoing treatment has improved during recent years, but there is still a gap to achievable control rates....

  14. Learning from Galileo's errors

    CERN Document Server

    Bernieri, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Four hundred years after its publication, Galileo's masterpiece Sidereus Nuncius is still a mine of useful information for historians of science and astronomy. In his short book Galileo reports a large amount of data that, despite its age, has not yet been fully explored. In this paper Galileo's first observations of Jupiter's satellites are quantitatively re-analysed by using modern planetarium software. All the angular records reported in the Sidereus Nuncius are, for the first time, compared with satellites' elongations carefully reconstructed taking into account software accuracy and the indeterminacy of observation time. This comparison allows us to derive the experimental errors of Galileo's measurements and gives us direct insight into the effective angular resolution of Galileo's observations. Until now, historians of science have mainly obtained these indirectly and they are often not correctly estimated. Furthermore, a statistical analysis of Galileo's experimental errors shows an asymmetrical distr...

  15. Error-Free Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    001 is an integrated tool suited for automatically developing ultra reliable models, simulations and software systems. Developed and marketed by Hamilton Technologies, Inc. (HTI), it has been applied in engineering, manufacturing, banking and software tools development. The software provides the ability to simplify the complex. A system developed with 001 can be a prototype or fully developed with production quality code. It is free of interface errors, consistent, logically complete and has no data or control flow errors. Systems can be designed, developed and maintained with maximum productivity. Margaret Hamilton, President of Hamilton Technologies, also directed the research and development of USE.IT, an earlier product which was the first computer aided software engineering product in the industry to concentrate on automatically supporting the development of an ultrareliable system throughout its life cycle. Both products originated in NASA technology developed under a Johnson Space Center contract.

  16. Correction of refractive errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Pfeifer

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spectacles and contact lenses are the most frequently used, the safest and the cheapest way to correct refractive errors. The development of keratorefractive surgery has brought new opportunities for correction of refractive errors in patients who have the need to be less dependent of spectacles or contact lenses. Until recently, RK was the most commonly performed refractive procedure for nearsighted patients.Conclusions: The introduction of excimer laser in refractive surgery has given the new opportunities of remodelling the cornea. The laser energy can be delivered on the stromal surface like in PRK or deeper on the corneal stroma by means of lamellar surgery. In LASIK flap is created with microkeratome in LASEK with ethanol and in epi-LASIK the ultra thin flap is created mechanically.

  17. Obesity: A Perspective from Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susic, Dinko; Varagic, Jasmina

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity-related hypertension is high worldwide and has become a major health issue. The mechanisms by which obesity relates to hypertensive disease are still under intense research scrutiny, and include altered hemodynamics, impaired sodium homeostasis, renal dysfunction, autonomic nervous system imbalance, endocrine alterations, oxidative stress and inflammation, and vascular injury. Most of these contributing factors interact with each other at multiple levels. Thus, as a multifactorial and complex disease, obesity-related hypertension should be recognized as a distinctive form of hypertension, and specific considerations should apply in planning therapeutic approaches to treat obese individuals with high blood pressure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Vascular inflammatory cells in hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Harrison

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a common disorder with uncertain etiology. In the last several years, it has become evident that components of both the innate and adaptive immune system play an essential role in hypertension. Macrophages and T cells accumulate in the perivascular fat, the heart and the kidney of hypertensive patients and in animals with experimental hypertension. Various immunosuppressive agents lower blood pressure and prevent end-organ damage. Mice lacking lymphocytes are protected against hypertension, and adoptive transfer of T cells, but not B cells in the animals restores their blood pressure response to stimuli such as angiotensin II or high salt. Recent studies have shown that mice lacking macrophages have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II and that genetic deletion of macrophages markedly reduces experimental hypertension. Dendritic cells have also been implicated in this disease. Many hypertensive stimuli have triggering effects on the central nervous system and signals arising from the circumventricular organ seem to promote inflammation. Studies have suggested that central signals activate macrophages and T cells, which home to the kidney and vasculature and release cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-17, which in turn cause renal and vascular dysfunction and lead to blood pressure elevation. These recent discoveries provide a new understanding of hypertension and provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treatment of this serious disease.

  19. IMPROVEMENT OF SCHISTOSOMAL PORTAL HYPERTENSIVE COLOPATHY AFTER SURGICAL TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Angelina Carvalho MIRANDA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Context Data on vascular alterations in patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis and portal hypertensive colopathy and changes in these after surgery to decrease portal hypertension are limited. Objective The purpose of this study was to analyse the alterations of portal hypertensive colopathy previously and 6-12 months after splenectomy and gastric devascularization. Methods Twelve patients with hepatosplenic schistosomiasis who also had upper gastrointestinal bleeding were studied prospectively. Their endoscopic findings before and 6-12 months after the surgery were analysed. In addition, mucosal biopsies from ascending colon, sigmoid colon and rectum at these time points were subjected to histological and histomorphometric assessment. It was used a control group due to lack of normal pattern of the histomorphometric measures of vessels in individuals without portal hypertension. The critical level of significance adopted in all tests was of a maximum probability error of 5%. Results Surgery did not lead to significant improvement in histological and endoscopic findings. However, on histomorphometry, there was a significant decrease in the area, diameter and thickness of the vessels in mucosa at all colonic sites. Conclusion Surgery for decompression of schistosomal portal hypertension has a beneficial effect on the associated colopathy, being best indicated in patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and esophageal varices.

  20. Racial differences in hypertension knowledge: effects of differential item functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Brian J; Trivedi, Ranak; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2009-01-01

    Health-related knowledge is an important component in the self-management of chronic illnesses. The objective of this study was to more accurately assess racial differences in hypertension knowledge by using a latent variable modeling approach that controlled for sociodemographic factors and accounted for measurement issues in the assessment of hypertension knowledge. Cross-sectional data from 1,177 participants (45% African American; 35% female) were analyzed using a multiple indicator multiple causes (MIMIC) modeling approach. Available sociodemographic data included race, education, sex, financial status, and age. All participants completed six items on a hypertension knowledge questionnaire. Overall, the final model suggested that females, Whites, and patients with at least a high school diploma had higher latent knowledge scores than males, African Americans, and patients with less than a high school diploma, respectively. The model also detected differential item functioning (DIF) based on race for two of the items. Specifically, the error rate for African Americans was lower than would be expected given the lower level of latent knowledge on the items, on the questions related to: (a) the association between high blood pressure and kidney disease, and (b) the increased risk African Americans have for developing hypertension. Not accounting for DIF resulted in the difference between Whites and African Americans to be underestimated. These results are discussed in the context of the need for careful measurement of health-related constructs, and how measurement-related issues can result in an inaccurate estimation of racial differences in hypertension knowledge.

  1. ESSENTIAL ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AND RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH HYPERTENSIVE NEPHROPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boban Milojković

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Arterial hypertension is a major risk factor that predisposes to cardiovascular disorders and is responsible for most of the morbidity and mortality in patients. Hypertension is closely associated with the kidney, because kidney disease can be both the cause and consequence of increased blood pressure. Elevation of blood pressure is a strong independent risk factor for hypertensive nephropathy and development of ESRD. The pathogenesis of ischemic hypertensive nephropathy (IHN is multifactoral, and in addition to blood pressure other factors contribute to the development of this renal pathology and its progression to end-stage renal disease. These include obesity, smoking, male gender and other still unknown risk factors. The aim of this paper was to analyse the association between essential arterial hypertension and renal hypertensive disease and prevalence of other atherosclerotic risk factors in patients with developed hypertensive renal disease. In this prospective cross sectional study 283 patients of both genders with diagnosed essential hypertension and hypertensive renal disease were analysed. The anamnestic data related to age, duration of hypertension, history of smoking, presence of hypertensive retinopathy, hypertrophy of the left chamber and data about previous renal diseases were collected through conversation and medical documentation. The clinical examination comprise determination of blood pressure, body mass index (BMI, lipid parameters (total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, serum urea and creatinine, urine, albumin and protein concentration. The total number of 283 patients (185 males and 98 females with HN was analyzed. The analysis revealed significantly higher proportion of males aged over 60 years with IHN. The mean age of examined hypertensive patients with IHN is 62.6±8.8 years with duration of hypertension 19.8±5.9 years. All examined patients had hypertensive retinopathy and

  2. Reporting Self-Made Errors: The Impact of Organizational Error-Management Climate and Error Type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gold, A.H.; Gronewold, U.; Salterio, S.E.

    2013-01-01

    We study how an organization's error-management climate affects organizational members' beliefs about other members' willingness to report errors that they discover when chance of error detection by superiors and others is extremely low. An error-management climate, as a component of the

  3. Pre-Hypertension and Hypertension in Adolescence: How much ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypertension is an important worldwide public-health challenge because of its high frequency and concomitant risks of cardiovascular and kidney disease. Previous studies have documented that hypertension may begin in adolescence, perhaps even in childhood. Objectives: This study set out to determine ...

  4. Childhood hypertension and family history of hypertension in

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2012-11-11

    Nov 11, 2012 ... Abstract Objective: To determine the relationship between childhood hypertension and family history of hypertension in primary school children in Port Harcourt. Methods: A stratified multi-staged sampling technique was used to recruit pupils between 6-12 years of age, from thirteen primary schools.

  5. Childhood hypertension and family history of hypertension in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the relationship between childhood hypertension and family history of hypertension in primary school children in Port Harcourt. Methods: A stratified multi-staged sampling technique was used to recruit pupils between 6-12 years of age, from thirteen primary schools located in three school districts.

  6. Evaluation and management of pediatric hypertensive crises: hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel NH

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nirali H Patel,1 Sarah K Romero,2 David C Kaelber31Division of Emergency Medicine, Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, OH, USA; 2Division of Emergency Medicine, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, OH, USA; 3Departments of Information Services, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The Center for Clinical Informatics Research and Education, The MetroHealth System and School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH, USAAbstract: Hypertension (HTN in the pediatric population is estimated to have a world-wide prevalence of 2%-5%. As with adults, pediatric patients with HTN can present with hypertensive crises include hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies. However, pediatric blood pressure problems have a greater chance of being from secondary causes of HTN, as opposed to primary HTN, than in adults. Thorough evaluation of a child with a hypertensive emergency includes accurate blood pressure readings, complete and focused symptom history, and appropriate past medical, surgical, and family history. Physical exam should include height, weight, four-limb blood pressures, a general overall examination and especially detailed cardiovascular and neurological examinations, including fundoscopic examination. Initial work-up should typically include electrocardiography, chest X-ray, serum chemistries, complete blood count, and urinalysis. Initial management of hypertensive emergencies generally includes the use of intravenous or oral antihypertensive medications, as well as appropriate, typically outpatient, follow-up. Emergency department goals for hypertensive crises are to (1 safely lower blood pressure, and (2 treat/minimize acute end organ damage, while (3 identifying underlying etiology. Intravenous antihypertensive medications are the treatment modality of choice for hypertensive emergencies with the goal of reducing systolic blood pressure by 25% of the original value over an 8

  7. Pharmacotherapy for mild hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Diao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: People with no previous cardiovascular events or cardiovascular disease represent a primary prevention population. The benefits and harms of treating mild hypertension in primary prevention patients are not known at present. This review examines the existing randomized controlled trial (RCT evidence. OBJECTIVE: Primary objective: To quantify the effects of antihypertensive drug therapy on mortality and morbidity in adults with mild hypertension (systolic blood pressure (BP 140-159 mmHg and/or diastolic BP 90-99 mmHg and without cardiovascular disease. METHODS: Search: We searched CENTRAL (2011, Issue 1, MEDLINE (1948 to May 2011, EMBASE (1980 to May 2011 and reference lists of articles. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE were searched for previous reviews and meta-analyses of anti-hypertensive drug treatment compared to placebo or no treatment trials up until the end of 2011. Selection criteria: RCTs of at least 1 year duration. Data collection and analysis: The outcomes assessed were mortality, stroke, coronary heart disease (CHD, total cardiovascular events (CVS, and withdrawals due to adverse effects. MAIN RESULTS: Of 11 RCTs identified 4 were included in this review, with 8,912 participants. Treatment for 4 to 5 years with antihypertensive drugs as compared to placebo did not reduce total mortality (RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.63, 1.15. In 7,080 participants treatment with antihypertensive drugs as compared to placebo did not reduce coronary heart disease (RR 1.12, 95% CI 0.80, 1.57, stroke (RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.24, 1.08, or total cardiovascular events (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.72, 1.32. Withdrawals due to adverse effects were increased by drug therapy (RR 4.80, 95% CI 4.14, 5.57, ARR 9%. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Antihypertensive drugs used in the treatment of adults (primary prevention with mild hypertension (systolic BP 140-159 mmHg and/or diastolic BP 90-99 mmHg have not been

  8. Incranial hypertension management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gonçalves Nordon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Intracranial hypertension is a hazardous and common situation in the emergency room. Every effort must be made in order to avoid or reduce its secondary lesions. Advanced Trauma Life Support in the first evaluation is important, along with head computerized tomography, which is useful to identify surgical cases or anatomical lesions, and intracranial pressure monitoring. Mannitol is the mostly used drug to reduce intracranial pressure, but it must be used attentively, otherwise it may cause hypovolemic shock. Barbiturate coma and decompressive craniectomy are reserved to the refractory cases, as second tier procedures.

  9. Genetics Home Reference: pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Pulmonary arterial hypertension Pulmonary arterial hypertension Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive disorder characterized by abnormally high ...

  10. Psychological Factors in Essential Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbaros Özdemir

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Essential hypertension is one of the most emphasized psychosomatic disorders. Age, sexuality, excessive salt and alcohol consumption, lower activity level, fatigue, personality traits, emotional factors and stress are some of the risk factors for essential hypertension. The presence of emotional factors in the etiology of the essential hypertension and the emergence of psychiatric symptoms in the course of the illness has driven considerable attention from mental health workers on the disease for a long time. Some of the personality traits that make a person vulnerable to hypertension are being over controlled, being submissive, and hardworking. Hypertension is accepted to be a reaction against suppressed emotions and an adaptive and defense mechanism of the body. Among persons who are prone to hypertension, sympathetic nerve system is affected as a response to emotional stress and hypertension appears as a result of vasoconstriction and other autonomous responses. All at once, it was also shown that vasoconstrictor response continues much longer in hypertensive individuals than in normotensive patients. Autonomic response to stress almost always displays itself as hypertension in individuals who are prone to hypertension. Moreover, normotensive children of hypertensive parents also have elevation in blood pressures as a response to emotional stress almost without exception. The increase in sympathetic stimulus, re-modulation of bar receptors by structural and functional changes are the main features of the most commonly valid hypothesis in essential hypertension, currently. According to this hypothesis: as a result of emotional stress, inhibition over vasomotor center decreases and output of stimulus increases; epigenetic changes in endothelial structure of carotid sinus and/or aortic arch and/or vasomotor centers occurs; and finally stress increases sympathetic stimulus output. This situation leads to neurohormonal excitation; increases in

  11. Pediatric Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aylward, Shawn C; Reem, Rachel E

    2017-01-01

    Primary (idiopathic) intracranial hypertension has been considered to be a rare entity, but with no precise estimates of the pediatric incidence in the United States. There have been attempts to revise the criteria over the years and adapt the adult criteria for use in pediatrics. The clinical presentation varies with age, and symptoms tending to be less obvious in younger individuals. In the prepubertal population, incidentally discovered optic disc edema is relatively common. By far the most consistent symptom is headache; other symptoms include nausea, vomiting tinnitus, and diplopia. Treatment mainstays include weight loss when appropriate and acetazolamide. Furosemide may exhibit a synergistic benefit when used in conjunction with acetazolamide. Surgical interventions are required relatively infrequently, but include optic nerve sheath fenestration and cerebrospinal fluid shunting. Pain and permanent vision loss are the two major complications of this disorder and these manifestations justify aggressive treatment. Once intracranial hypertension has resolved, up to two thirds of patients develop a new or chronic headache type that is different from their initial presenting headache. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agita, Arisya; Alsagaff, M Thaha

    2017-04-01

    The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  13. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arisya Agita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  14. Hypertensive emergencies in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hari, Pankaj; Sinha, Aditi

    2011-05-01

    Hypertensive emergencies, though uncommon in children, are potentially life threatening. While targeting blood pressure reduction to below the 90th percentile for age, gender and height, mean arterial blood pressure should be gradually lowered by one-fourth of the planned reduction over 8-12 h, a further fourth over the next 8-12 h, and the final 50% over the 24 h after that. Frequent invasive or non-invasive blood pressure monitoring is essential, as is monitoring for sensorial alteration and loss of papillary reflexes. Few antihypertensive agents have been examined in children. Continuous intravenous infusions of short acting drugs such as nitroprusside, labetalol and nicardipine are preferred to intravenous boluses of hydralazine or diazoxide. If severe symptoms are absent, oral agents such as nifedipine, clonidine, minoxidil, hydralazine, labetalol, captopril, and prazosin may be used. Nicardipine and labetalol are particularly suited in emergencies with intracranial bleeding or ischemic stroke, while furosemide, sodium nitroprusside and nitroglycerine are useful in congestive cardiac failure. Therapy with oral antihypertensive drugs should be instituted within 6-12 h of parenteral therapy, and the latter gradually withdrawn over the next 12-48 h. Oral agents have limited application as primary therapy, except when administration of intravenous infusion is likely to be delayed. This article provides a summary of the clinical approach to evaluation and management of severe symptomatic hypertension in children.

  15. Resistant Hypertension and Cardiorenovascular Risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prkacin Ingrid

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Studies have documented independent contribution of sympathetic activation to the cardiovascular disease continuum. Hypertension is one of the leading modifiable factors. Most if not all the benefit of antihypertensive treatment depends on blood pressure lowering, regardless how it is obtained. Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains uncontrolled in spite of the concurrent use of three antihypertensive drugs of different classes. Ideally, one of the three drugs should be a diuretic, and all drugs should be prescribed at optimal dose amounts. Poor adherence to antihypertensive therapy, undiscovered secondary causes (e.g. obstructive sleep apnea, primary aldosteronism, renal artery stenosis, and lifestyle factors (e.g. obesity, excessive sodium intake, heavy alcohol intake, various drug interactions are the most common causes of resistant hypertension. Cardio(renovascular morbidity and mortality are significantly higher in resistant hypertensive than in general hypertensive population, as such patients are typically presented with a long-standing history of poorly controlled hypertension. Early diagnosis and treatment is needed to avoid further end-organ damage to prevent cardiorenovascular remodeling. Treatment strategy includes lifestyle changes, adding a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, treatment adherence in cardiovascular prevention and, in case of failure to control blood pressure, renal sympathetic denervation or baroreceptor activation therapy. The comparative outcomes in resistant hypertension deserve better understanding. In this review, the most current approaches to resistant hypertension and cardiovascular risk based on the available literature evidence will be discussed.

  16. What is hypertension in diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, K W; Poulsen, P L; Ebbehøj, E

    2001-01-01

    AIMS: To establish reference data for ambulatory blood pressure (AMBP) in normotensive, normoalbuminuric Type 1 diabetic patients and characterize the relation to clinic blood pressure (BP). To evaluate the statement of the third working party of the British Hypertension Society (BHS) that a target...... clinic BP in diabetes hypertensive drugs. Clinic BP was determined as the mean of at least three auscultatory...

  17. Masked hypertension in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franklin, Stanley S; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Although distinguishing features of masked hypertension in diabetics are well known, the significance of antihypertensive treatment on clinical practice decisions has not been fully explored. We analyzed 9691 subjects from the population-based 11-country International Database on Ambulatory Blood...... Pressure in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes. Prevalence of masked hypertension in untreated normotensive participants was higher (P...

  18. The Immune System in Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  19. Guide of Hypertensive Crisis Pharmacotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani-Parekh, Priyanka; Blanco-Garcia, Carlos; Mendez, Melissa; Mukherjee, Debabrata

    2017-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the number one cause of death globally compared to any other cause. CVD accounts for approximately 17.3 million deaths per year and are rising. Hypertension is the leading risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. Approximately, 80 million people suffer from hypertension in the U.S. While, majority of these individuals are on antihypertensive medications only 54% of individuals with hypertension are optimally controlled. Heart failure and stroke are some of the devastating complications of uncontrolled hypertension. Hypertensive crisis can be classified as either an urgency or emergency; difference between the two is the presence of end organ damage, which is noted in hypertensive emergency. Hypertensive crisis is usually treated by parenteral antihypertensive medications. The main drug classes of drugs for treatment are nitrates, calcium channel blockers, dopamine-1 agonists, adrenergic-blocking agents etc. In this review, we discuss approach to management of hypertensive crisis and each drug class with its physiology and complications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. Capsaicin and arterial hypertensive crisis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; La Rosa, Felice Carmelo; La Rocca, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    ...] . A case has also been reported of an arterial hypertensive crisis in a patient with a large ingestion of peppers and chili peppers the day before [5] . We present a case of an arterial hypertensive crisis in a 19-year-old Italian man with an abundant ingestion of peppers and chili peppers the preceding day. On August 4, 2008, a 19-year-...

  1. (POAG) in hypertensive North Indians

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PPAR-γ and CYP46A1 genes polymorphism is associated with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) in hypertensive North Indians. ... a significantly decreased risk of POAG whereas the CT, CC genotypes and C allele were associated with an increased risk of POAG in both hypertensive and normotensive individuals.

  2. Los errores cometidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Martínez Terrero

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Durante el Encuentro sobre Comunicación Alternativa y Popular, José Martínez Terrero, SJ, repasó las principales corrientes de la Comunicación Alternativa y Popular, desde los años 60 hasta el presente, rescatando sus aportes conceptuales y prácticos, así como los errores cometidos. A continuación publicamos un extracto que destaca la reflexión crítica y autocrítica.

  3. Performance, postmodernity and errors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Peter

    2013-01-01

    with the prestige variety, and conflate non-standard variation with parole/performance and class both as erroneous. Nowadays the anti-structural sentiment of present-day linguistics makes it tempting to confuse the rejection of ideal abstract structure with a rejection of any distinction between grammatical...... as deviant from the perspective of function-based structure and discuss to what extent the recognition of a community langue as a source of adaptive pressure may throw light on different types of deviation, including language handicaps and learner errors....

  4. Hypertensive Encephalopathy with Reversible Brainstem Edema

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lee, Sungjoon; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Kim, Hoon

    2013-01-01

    .... The patient's condition was thus interpreted as hypertensive brainstem encephalopathy. While many consider this a vasogenic phenomenon, induced by sudden, severe hypertension, the precise mechanism remains unclear...

  5. Hypertension, Anti-Hypertensive Medication Use, and Risk of Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaowei; Han, Jiali; Li, Wen-Qing; Qureshi, Abrar A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance Individuals with psoriasis are shown to have an elevated risk of hypertension, and anti-hypertensive medications, especially beta-blockers, have been linked to psoriasis development. However, the association of prior existing hypertension and anti-hypertensive medications with risk of incident psoriasis has not been accessed using prospective data. Objective To evaluate the association of hypertension and anti-hypertensive medications with risk of psoriasis based on data from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS). Design Prospective cohort study (1996–2008). Setting Nurses’ Health Study. Participants A total of 77,728 U.S. women who provided biennially updated data on hypertension and anti-hypertensive medications. Main Outcome and Measure Physician-diagnosed psoriasis. Results We documented a total of 843 incident psoriasis cases during 1,066,339 person-years of follow-up. Compared to normotensive women, women with hypertension duration more than 6 years were at a higher risk of developing psoriasis [HR=1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03–1.57]. In stratified analysis, the risk of psoriasis was higher among hypertensive women without medication [HR=1.49, 95% CI, 1.15–1.92] and among hypertensive women with current medication [HR=1.31, 95% CI, 1.10–1.55] when compared to normotensive participants without medication. Compared to women who never used beta-blockers, the multivariate HRs for psoriasis were 1.11 (95% CI, 0.82–1.51) for women who regularly used 1–2 years, 1.06 (95% CI, 0.79–1.40) for 3–5 years, and 1.39 (95% CI, 1.11–1.73) for 6 or more years (P for trend=0.009). There was no association between other individual anti-hypertensive drugs and risk of psoriasis. Conclusions Long-term hypertensive status is associated with an increased risk of psoriasis. Long-term regular use of beta-blockers may also increase the risk of psoriasis. PMID:24990147

  6. Parathyroid hypertension. A reversible disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, T W; Botha, J R; Wing, J; Meyers, A M; Kalk, W J

    1986-09-01

    A retrospective study of 75 patients who were surgically cured of primary hyperparathyroidism from 1976 to 1984 was performed to evaluate the blood pressure and metabolic responses to parathyroid surgery. Published data on the population prevalence of hypertension (HT) in South Africa were used for comparison. The overall prevalence of HT before surgery was 47%, compared with 23% in the general population. Hypertension was most frequent in patients older than 60 years (62% vs 39% expected). Renal insufficiency was found in 13 of 35 hypertensive patients and in two of 40 normotensive patients. However, the prevalence of HT in patients with normal creatinine levels (37%) exceeded that expected. The frequency of urolithiasis and mean levels of serum and urine calcium and phosphate were similar in normotensive and hypertensive patients. Parathyroidectomy resulted in a substantial fall in both mean systolic and mean diastolic blood pressures in 54% of the hypertensive subjects, unrelated to improvement in renal function.

  7. Dietary approaches to prevent hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazzano, Lydia A; Green, Torrance; Harrison, Teresa N; Reynolds, Kristi

    2013-12-01

    Elevated blood pressure arises from a combination of environmental and genetic factors and the interactions of these factors. A substantial body of evidence from animal studies, epidemiologic studies, meta-analyses, and randomized controlled trials has demonstrated that certain dietary patterns and individual dietary elements play a prominent role in the development of hypertension. Changes in diet can lower blood pressure, prevent the development of hypertension, and reduce the risk of hypertension-related complications. Dietary strategies for the prevention of hypertension include reducing sodium intake, limiting alcohol consumption, increasing potassium intake, and adopting an overall dietary pattern such as the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet or a Mediterranean diet. In order to reduce the burden of blood pressure-related complications, efforts that focus on environmental and individual behavioral changes that encourage and promote healthier food choices are warranted.

  8. Hypertension with diabetes mellitus complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Daisuke; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Nishiyama, Akira

    2018-01-22

    Chronic diabetic complications are classified as microvascular or macrovascular and contribute to mortality and loss of quality of life. Hyperglycemia plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of microvascular complications, such as diabetic retinopathy, incipient nephropathy, and neuropathy, while atherosclerosis contributes to the pathogenesis of macrovascular complications. Diabetes mellitus and hypertension are frequently present together. Among many microvascular diabetic complications, hypertension plays a predominant role in the progression of diabetic nephropathy by glomerular hyperfiltration. Hypertension also induces atherosclerosis in diabetes. Thus, hypertension is a high-risk factor for both microvascular and macrovascular chronic diabetic complications. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on the pathophysiological mechanisms of microvascular and macrovascular chronic diabetic complications with particular emphasis on the contribution of hypertension. We also briefly discuss various options available for the treatment of each diabetic complication.

  9. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Pulmonary Hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Hypertension Pulmonary Hypertension What Is Pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI- ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  10. [Comparison of hypertensive and non-hypertensive lacunar infarcts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez, P; Castillo, J; Pardellas, H; Vadillo, J; Lema, M; Noya, M

    1998-05-01

    Arterial hypertension and hypohyalinosis of the arterias perforantes are said to be the commonest cause of lacunar infarcts, although other etiological factors and anatomo-pathological lesions are described more and more frequently. We designed a study to compare the clinical topographic and prognostic characteristics of patients with hypertensive and non-hypertensive lacunar infarcts. We selected 51 patients with lacunar infarcts: in 23 (45%) arterial hypertension was the only etiological factor recognized. In 28 (55%) other risk factors (16 diabetes mellitus, 17 cardiopathy, 8 hyperlipemia, 13 cigarette smoking and 11 alcoholism) were seen. We evaluated the form of presentation, the type of infarct and whether this was associated with headache. The degree of defect was determined on admission using the Canadian scale. The size of the infarct was measured on CT or RM, using whichever measurement was greater. The evolution of the condition was determined on the Canadian scale and the index of Barthel after three months. Age and sex distribution was similar to both groups. Motor hemiparesia was the commonest lacunar syndrome and the distribution was similar. There was no difference in form of onset, association with headache or neurological defect between the hypertensive and non-hypertensive lacunar infarcts. The topographical distribution, the presentation of single or multiple lesions, the size of the infarcts and the prognosis were similar in both groups. Lacunar infarcts, whether hypertensive or not, show no differences regarding clinical, neuro-radiological or evolutionary characteristics.

  11. Skylab water balance error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of the precision of the net water balance were obtained for the entire Skylab preflight and inflight phases as well as for the first two weeks of flight. Quantitative estimates of both total sampling errors and instrumentation errors were obtained. It was shown that measurement error is minimal in comparison to biological variability and little can be gained from improvement in analytical accuracy. In addition, a propagation of error analysis demonstrated that total water balance error could be accounted for almost entirely by the errors associated with body mass changes. Errors due to interaction between terms in the water balance equation (covariances) represented less than 10% of the total error. Overall, the analysis provides evidence that daily measurements of body water changes obtained from the indirect balance technique are reasonable, precise, and relaible. The method is not biased toward net retention or loss.

  12. Evaluation and management of pediatric hypertensive crises: hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Nirali H; Romero, Sarah K; Kaelber, David C

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) in the pediatric population is estimated to have a world-wide prevalence of 2%–5%. As with adults, pediatric patients with HTN can present with hypertensive crises include hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies. However, pediatric blood pressure problems have a greater chance of being from secondary causes of HTN, as opposed to primary HTN, than in adults. Thorough evaluation of a child with a hypertensive emergency includes accurate blood pressure readings, complete and focused symptom history, and appropriate past medical, surgical, and family history. Physical exam should include height, weight, four-limb blood pressures, a general overall examination and especially detailed cardiovascular and neurological examinations, including fundoscopic examination. Initial work-up should typically include electrocardiography, chest X-ray, serum chemistries, complete blood count, and urinalysis. Initial management of hypertensive emergencies generally includes the use of intravenous or oral antihypertensive medications, as well as appropriate, typically outpatient, follow-up. Emergency department goals for hypertensive crises are to (1) safely lower blood pressure, and (2) treat/minimize acute end organ damage, while (3) identifying underlying etiology. Intravenous antihypertensive medications are the treatment modality of choice for hypertensive emergencies with the goal of reducing systolic blood pressure by 25% of the original value over an 8-hour period. PMID:27147865

  13. Improving the error backpropagation algorithm with a modified error function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, S H

    1997-01-01

    This letter proposes a modified error function to improve the error backpropagation (EBP) algorithm of multilayer perceptrons (MLPs) which suffers from slow learning speed. To accelerate the learning speed of the EBP algorithm, the proposed method reduces the probability that output nodes are near the wrong extreme value of sigmoid activation function. This is acquired through a strong error signal for the incorrectly saturated output node and a weak error signal for the correctly saturated output node. The weak error signal for the correctly saturated output node, also, prevents overspecialization of learning for training patterns. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated in a handwritten digit recognition task.

  14. [The error, source of learning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyeux, Stéphanie; Bohic, Valérie

    2016-05-01

    The error itself is not recognised as a fault. It is the intentionality which differentiates between an error and a fault. An error is unintentional while a fault is a failure to respect known rules. The risk of error is omnipresent in health institutions. Public authorities have therefore set out a series of measures to reduce this risk. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Pseudotumour cerebri Idiopathic intracranial hypertension and vascular intracranial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iencean St. M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available From the first to use of “pseudotumor cerebri” by Nonne in 1904, the historic evolution of the knowledge on pseudotumor cerebri has been marked by several periods (the otologic stage, the neurosurgical stage, the neuro-ophthalmologic stage; today there are clear diagnosis criteria for the idiopathic intracranial hypertension, there is a clear differentiation between idiopathic intracranial hypertension and vascular intracranial hypertension, also the comprehension of the illness pathogeny is based on the dynamics of the intracranial fluids, which allows the auto-regulation of the cerebral circulation within quasi-normal limits, despite the very high intracranial pressure.

  16. Uncertainty quantification and error analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higdon, Dave M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderson, Mark C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Habib, Salman [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Klein, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berliner, Mark [OHIO STATE UNIV.; Covey, Curt [LLNL; Ghattas, Omar [UNIV OF TEXAS; Graziani, Carlo [UNIV OF CHICAGO; Seager, Mark [LLNL; Sefcik, Joseph [LLNL; Stark, Philip [UC/BERKELEY; Stewart, James [SNL

    2010-01-01

    UQ studies all sources of error and uncertainty, including: systematic and stochastic measurement error; ignorance; limitations of theoretical models; limitations of numerical representations of those models; limitations on the accuracy and reliability of computations, approximations, and algorithms; and human error. A more precise definition for UQ is suggested below.

  17. Genetic Programming of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sun-Young; Gupta, Charu

    2017-01-01

    The heritability of hypertension (HTN) is widely recognized and as a result, extensive studies ranging from genetic linkage analyses to genome-wide association studies are actively ongoing to elucidate the etiology of both monogenic and polygenic forms of HTN. Due to the complex nature of essential HTN, however, single genes affecting blood pressure (BP) variability remain difficult to isolate and identify and have rendered the development of single-gene targeted therapies challenging. The roles of other causative factors in modulating BP, such as gene-environment interactions and epigenetic factors, are increasingly being brought to the forefront. In this review, we discuss the various monogenic HTN syndromes and corresponding pathophysiologic mechanisms, the different methodologies employed in genetic studies of essential HTN, the mechanisms for epigenetic modulation of essential HTN, pharmacogenomics and HTN, and finally, recent advances in genetic studies of essential HTN in the pediatric population.

  18. Genetic Programming of Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Young Ahn

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The heritability of hypertension (HTN is widely recognized and as a result, extensive studies ranging from genetic linkage analyses to genome-wide association studies are actively ongoing to elucidate the etiology of both monogenic and polygenic forms of HTN. Due to the complex nature of essential HTN, however, single genes affecting blood pressure (BP variability remain difficult to isolate and identify and have rendered the development of single-gene targeted therapies challenging. The roles of other causative factors in modulating BP, such as gene–environment interactions and epigenetic factors, are increasingly being brought to the forefront. In this review, we discuss the various monogenic HTN syndromes and corresponding pathophysiologic mechanisms, the different methodologies employed in genetic studies of essential HTN, the mechanisms for epigenetic modulation of essential HTN, pharmacogenomics and HTN, and finally, recent advances in genetic studies of essential HTN in the pediatric population.

  19. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Barbosa de Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib, corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  20. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vinicius Barbosa de; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade, E-mail: wolney@cardiol.br [Curso de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Cardiovasculares da Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  1. [Risk profile of hypertensive patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulas, J; Ilcík, M; Kozlíková, K; Murín, J

    2010-08-01

    Arterial hypertension is an important component of global cardiovascular risk profile of an individual patient. Estimation of global cardiovascular risk besides the blood pressure level incorporates all risk factors (RF), preclinical cardiovascular diseases (hypertension--induced target organ disease--TOD) and associated clinical conditions, and it should influence the therapy and long-term patient management. A group of metabolic risk factors comprizes several modifyable risk factors, detection of which influences the antihypertensive drug selection. The main goal of antihypertensive therapy is to achieve maximum reduction in the long-term total risk of cardiovascular disease, treating all modifyable risk factors in hypertensive patients. In this work we present the results of group of 60 hypertensive patients examined for different risk factors detection and subsequent total cardiovascular risk estimation. The mean number of risk factors per patient was 4,1 (3% of patients had two RF, 22% of patients had three RF, 37% patients had four factors and 38% patients had five RF present). The ischaemic heart disease was found more frequently among hypertensives with higher number of RF. Metabolic syndrom (MS) was present in 53% of patients. Hypertensives with MS have higher rate of RF (4.9 per person) comparing to thouse without MS (3.6 RF per person). We found a quite high number of RF per individual hypertensive patient; the serious unfavourable consequence of this finding was the increased rate of coronary heart disease with the increasing number of risk factors found.

  2. Hypertension awareness and psychological distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamer, Mark; Batty, G David; Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Kivimaki, Mika

    2010-09-01

    There is conflicting evidence regarding the association of hypertension with psychological distress, such as anxiety and depressive symptoms. The association may be because of a direct effect of the raised blood pressure, adverse effects of treatment, or the consequences of labeling. In a representative study of 33 105 adults (aged 51.7+/-12.1 years; 45.8% men), we measured levels of psychological distress using the 12-item General Health Questionnaire and collected blood pressure, data on history of hypertension diagnosis, and medication usage. Awareness of hypertension was confirmed through a physician diagnosis or the use of antihypertensive medication, and unaware hypertension was defined by elevated clinic blood pressure (systolic/diastolic > or =140/90 mm Hg) without previous treatment or diagnosis. In comparison with normotensive participants, an elevated risk of distress (General Health Questionnaire score > or =4) was observed in aware hypertensive participants (multivariable adjusted odds ratio: 1.57 [95% CI: 1.41 to 1.74]) but not in unaware hypertensives (odds ratio: 0.91 [95% CI: 0.78 to 1.07]). Antihypertensive medication and comorbidity were also associated with psychological distress, although this did not explain the greater risk of distress in aware hypertensives. We observed a weak curvilinear association between systolic blood pressure and distress, which suggested that distressed participants were more likely to have low or highly elevated blood pressure. These findings suggest that labeling individuals as hypertensive, rather than having elevated blood pressure, per se, may partially explain the greater levels of distress in patients treated for hypertension.

  3. Rapid mapping of volumetric errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krulewich, D.; Hale, L.; Yordy, D.

    1995-09-13

    This paper describes a relatively inexpensive, fast, and easy to execute approach to mapping the volumetric errors of a machine tool, coordinate measuring machine, or robot. An error map is used to characterize a machine or to improve its accuracy by compensating for the systematic errors. The method consists of three steps: (1) modeling the relationship between the volumetric error and the current state of the machine; (2) acquiring error data based on length measurements throughout the work volume; and (3) optimizing the model to the particular machine.

  4. The Implication of Diagnostic Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Raghav

    2017-10-01

    Diagnostic errors are mistakes in the diagnostic process that lead to a misdiagnosis, a missed diagnosis, or a delayed diagnosis. While the past decade's impetus to improve patient safety has focused on medication errors, health care-associated infections, and postsurgical complications, diagnostic errors have received comparatively less attention. Diagnostic errors will continue to play a major role in the patient safety and quality improvement movement because of their burden on care and their financial burden. Developing a patient-partnered diagnostic approach with self-reflection and awareness of cognitive biases is the key to minimizing the impact of diagnostic errors.

  5. Manifestations of Pediatric Intracranial Hypertension From the Intracranial Hypertension Registry

    OpenAIRE

    Sivaswamy, Lalitha

    2016-01-01

    Investigators from the Ohio State University, Oregon Health and Science University and Rosalind Franklin School of Medicine examined the presenting manifestations, demographics and treatment strategies in children enrolled in the Intracranial Hypertension Registry (IHR).

  6. Ethical Dilemmas when Diagnosing Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Santana López

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A review on the ethical dilemmas in the diagnosis of hypertension and some elements in the emergence of the bioethics concept was performed. Ethical conflicts that appear at each stage of diagnosis of hypertension: at the time of providing the information, at the point of indication and performance of diagnostic tests, when communicating the diagnosis and during subsequent decision making were identified. We conclude that technological development will introduce new ethical decisions in the diagnosis of hypertension that will increasingly involve the interests of society and create, in one way or another, ethical and moral conflict in the decision making process.

  7. Hypertension--forekomst og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Hans; Jørgensen, Torben; Jensen, Gorm B

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, less than half of all hypertensives have their blood pressure reduced to relevant goals. The prevalence of hypertension in Denmark was found to be between 26% and 40% of the adult population. Just over ...... half were aware of the diagnosis, but less than half were in treatment. Blood pressure control in patients who are undergoing treatment has improved during recent years, but there is still a gap to achievable control rates. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun-8...

  8. Controlling errors in unidosis carts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inmaculada Díaz Fernández

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify errors in the unidosis system carts. Method: For two months, the Pharmacy Service controlled medication either returned or missing from the unidosis carts both in the pharmacy and in the wards. Results: Uncorrected unidosis carts show a 0.9% of medication errors (264 versus 0.6% (154 which appeared in unidosis carts previously revised. In carts not revised, the error is 70.83% and mainly caused when setting up unidosis carts. The rest are due to a lack of stock or unavailability (21.6%, errors in the transcription of medical orders (6.81% or that the boxes had not been emptied previously (0.76%. The errors found in the units correspond to errors in the transcription of the treatment (3.46%, non-receipt of the unidosis copy (23.14%, the patient did not take the medication (14.36%or was discharged without medication (12.77%, was not provided by nurses (14.09%, was withdrawn from the stocks of the unit (14.62%, and errors of the pharmacy service (17.56% . Conclusions: It is concluded the need to redress unidosis carts and a computerized prescription system to avoid errors in transcription.Discussion: A high percentage of medication errors is caused by human error. If unidosis carts are overlooked before sent to hospitalization units, the error diminishes to 0.3%.

  9. Study on the medical meteorological forecast of the number of hypertension inpatient based on SVR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Guangyu; Chai, Guorong; Zhang, Haifeng

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to build a hypertension prediction model by discussing the meteorological factors for hypertension incidence. The research method is selecting the standard data of relative humidity, air temperature, visibility, wind speed and air pressure of Lanzhou from 2010 to 2012(calculating the maximum, minimum and average value with 5 days as a unit ) as the input variables of Support Vector Regression(SVR) and the standard data of hypertension incidence of the same period as the output dependent variables to obtain the optimal prediction parameters by cross validation algorithm, then by SVR algorithm learning and training, a SVR forecast model for hypertension incidence is built. The result shows that the hypertension prediction model is composed of 15 input independent variables, the training accuracy is 0.005, the final error is 0.0026389. The forecast accuracy based on SVR model is 97.1429%, which is higher than statistical forecast equation and neural network prediction method. It is concluded that SVR model provides a new method for hypertension prediction with its simple calculation, small error as well as higher historical sample fitting and Independent sample forecast capability.

  10. Input error versus output error model reference adaptive control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodson, Marc; Sastry, Shankar

    1987-01-01

    Algorithms for model reference adaptive control were developed in recent years, and their stability and convergence properties have been investigated. Typical algorithms in continuous time involve strictly positive real conditions on the reference model, while similar discrete time algorithms do not require such conditions. It is shown how algorithms differ by the use of an input error versus an output error, and present a continuous time input error adaptive control algorithm which does not involve SPR conditions. The connections with other schemes are discussed. The input error scheme has general stability and ocnvergence properties that are similar to the output error scheme. However, analysis using averaging methods reveals some preferable convergence properties of the input error scheme. Several other advantages are also discussed.

  11. [Surgically curable hypertension (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilloz, A; Tostain, J; Richard, A; Peyrard, A; Drogue, M

    A case of hypertension was cured by simultaneous surgical treatment of an obstructive urolithiasis associated with a pheochromocytoma. Primary devascularization of the adrenal tumor, reducing blood pressure and cardiac rhythm variations was allowed by preoperative arteriography.

  12. Novel Pathophysiological Mechanisms in Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Rohan; Lee, Andrew; Lawless, Sean; Hsu, Robert; Sander, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension is the most common disease affecting humans and imparts a significant cardiovascular and renal risk to patients. Extensive research over the past few decades has enhanced our understanding of the underlying mechanisms in hypertension. However, in most instances, the cause of hypertension in a given patient continues to remain elusive. Nevertheless, achieving aggressive blood pressure goals significantly reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, as demonstrated in the recently concluded SPRINT trial. Since a large proportion of patients still fail to achieve blood pressure goals, knowledge of novel pathophysiologic mechanisms and mechanism based treatment strategies is crucial. The following chapter will review the novel pathophysiological mechanisms in hypertension, with a focus on role of immunity, inflammation and vascular endothelial homeostasis. The therapeutic implications of these mechanisms will be discussed where applicable.

  13. Liver Hypertension: Treatment in Infancy !

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Liver Hypertension: Treatment in Infancy ! Liver Disease > Heart. No good non-invasive method. Repeated measurements problematic. Drug efficacy 50% at best. No predictors of response. We Need YOU !!

  14. Sex differences in primary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Men have higher blood pressure than women through much of life regardless of race and ethnicity. This is a robust and highly conserved sex difference that it is also observed across species including dogs, rats, mice and chickens and it is found in induced, genetic and transgenic animal models of hypertension. Not only do the differences between the ovarian and testicular hormonal milieu contribute to this sexual dimorphism in blood pressure, the sex chromosomes also play a role in and of themselves. This review primarily focuses on epidemiological studies of blood pressure in men and women and experimental models of hypertension in both sexes. Gaps in current knowledge regarding what underlie male-female differences in blood pressure control are discussed. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying sex differences in hypertension may lead to the development of anti-hypertensives tailored to one's sex and ultimately to improved therapeutic strategies for treating this disease and preventing its devastating consequences. PMID:22417477

  15. Hypertensive Medications in Competitive Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelto, Henry

    Hypertension is the most common cardiovascular disease in athletes. It is an important cause of long-term morbidity and mortality, even in a fit, athletic population. Management options to reduce these long-term risks exist that have minimal impact on athletic performance. Identification and management of underlying lifestyle factors and diseases that may lead to secondary hypertension is critical. These include substance abuse, medications, and underlying medical conditions. After evaluation and management of these issues, medications can be used to reduce blood pressure. In the athletic population, first-line medication treatment should include ACE inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARB), and calcium channel blockers (CCB). The response to treatment should be followed closely to ensure adequate blood pressure control. Athletic participation in sports with high dynamic load should be limited in individuals with stage 2 hypertension or stage 1 hypertension with evidence of end organ damage.

  16. Role of magnesium in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sontia, Bruno; Touyz, Rhian M

    2007-02-01

    Magnesium affects blood pressure by modulating vascular tone and reactivity. It acts as a calcium channel antagonist, it stimulates production of vasodilator prostacyclins and nitric oxide and it alters vascular responses to vasoactive agonists. Magnesium deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension with epidemiological and experimental studies demonstrating an inverse correlation between blood pressure and serum magnesium levels. Magnesium also influences glucose and insulin homeostasis, and hypomagnesemia is associated with metabolic syndrome. Although most epidemiological and experimental studies support a role for low magnesium in the pathophysiology of hypertension, data from clinical studies have been less convincing. Furthermore, the therapeutic value of magnesium in the management of hypertension is unclear. The present review addresses the role of magnesium in the regulation of vascular function and blood pressure and discusses the implications of magnesium deficiency in experimental and clinical hypertension, in metabolic syndrome and in pre-eclampsia.

  17. [Menopause: Hypertension and vascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, J M

    2018-01-28

    Hypertension is the main cardiovascular risk factor affecting 25% of women. Hormone changes and hypertension after menopause may lead to higher target organ damage and cardiovascular disease such as increased arterial stiffness, coronary diseases, chronic heart failure and stroke. The physiopathological mechanisms involved in the development of hypertension and cardiovascular diseases in menopausal women are controversial. There are pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic differences in both sexes, the women have more coughing when using the converting-enzyme inhibitors, more cramps when using thiazide diuretics and more oedema in the inferior limbs when using calcium antagonists. The aim of this review is to analyse possible physiopathological mechanisms involved in hypertension after menopause and to gain a better understanding of the biological effects mediated by vascular ageing in women when the level of oestrogen protective effect decreases over the vascular system. Copyright © 2017 SEH-LELHA. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Management of Hypertension in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurike S Mudjari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension-related maternal mortality reaches 16% when it is compared to other causes of maternal mortality such as sepsis, bleeding or abortus. Pregnant women with hypertension disorder are at increased risk for experiencing numerous complications including disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, cerebral hemorrhage, liver dysfunction and acute renal failure; while to the fetus, it may cause intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and perinatal mortality. Hypertension in pregnancy should be managed appropriately to reduce maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality rate, i.e. by preventing women from getting the risks of increased blood pressure, preventing disease progression and preventing the development of seizure and considering termination of pregnancy in lifethreatening situation for maternal and fetal health. Key words: blood pressure, hypertension, eclampsia, preeclampsia, pregnant women, gestational.

  19. Errors in clinical laboratories or errors in laboratory medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory testing is a highly complex process and, although laboratory services are relatively safe, they are not as safe as they could or should be. Clinical laboratories have long focused their attention on quality control methods and quality assessment programs dealing with analytical aspects of testing. However, a growing body of evidence accumulated in recent decades demonstrates that quality in clinical laboratories cannot be assured by merely focusing on purely analytical aspects. The more recent surveys on errors in laboratory medicine conclude that in the delivery of laboratory testing, mistakes occur more frequently before (pre-analytical) and after (post-analytical) the test has been performed. Most errors are due to pre-analytical factors (46-68.2% of total errors), while a high error rate (18.5-47% of total errors) has also been found in the post-analytical phase. Errors due to analytical problems have been significantly reduced over time, but there is evidence that, particularly for immunoassays, interference may have a serious impact on patients. A description of the most frequent and risky pre-, intra- and post-analytical errors and advice on practical steps for measuring and reducing the risk of errors is therefore given in the present paper. Many mistakes in the Total Testing Process are called "laboratory errors", although these may be due to poor communication, action taken by others involved in the testing process (e.g., physicians, nurses and phlebotomists), or poorly designed processes, all of which are beyond the laboratory's control. Likewise, there is evidence that laboratory information is only partially utilized. A recent document from the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) recommends a new, broader definition of the term "laboratory error" and a classification of errors according to different criteria. In a modern approach to total quality, centered on patients' needs and satisfaction, the risk of errors and mistakes

  20. Biomarkers in white-coat hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Catherine Ann

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in the 1960s provided new insights into the nature of high blood pressure disorders. Blood pressure is now categorised into four quadrants:normotension, masked hypertension, hypertension and white-coat hypertension. In white-coat hypertension blood pressure is elevated when taken at the doctor’s office but normal if taken outside the doctor’s office. Several controversies are associated with white-coat hypertension, which are discuss...

  1. Clinical overview of hypertensive crisis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Chieh; Lin, Mao-Jen; Chen, Chun-Yu; Wu, Han-Ping

    2015-06-16

    Hypertensive emergencies and hypertensive urgencies in children are uncommonly encountered in the pediatric emergency department and intensive care units, but the diseases are potentially a life-threatening medical emergency. In comparison with adults, hypertension in children is mostly asymptomatic and most have no history of hypertension. Additionally, measuring accurate blood pressure values in younger children is not easy. This article reviews current concepts in pediatric patients with severe hypertension.

  2. Least Squared Simulated Errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J. Veazie

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Estimation by minimizing the sum of squared residuals is a common method for parameters of regression functions; however, regression functions are not always known or of interest. Maximizing the likelihood function is an alternative if a distribution can be properly specified. However, cases can arise in which a regression function is not known, no additional moment conditions are indicated, and we have a distribution for the random quantities, but maximum likelihood estimation is difficult to implement. In this article, we present the least squared simulated errors (LSSE estimator for such cases. The conditions for consistency and asymptotic normality are given. Finite sample properties are investigated via Monte Carlo experiments on two examples. Results suggest LSSE can perform well in finite samples. We discuss the estimator’s limitations and conclude that the estimator is a viable option. We recommend Monte Carlo investigation of any given model to judge bias for a particular finite sample size of interest and discern whether asymptotic approximations or resampling techniques are preferable for the construction of tests or confidence intervals.

  3. Contour Error Map Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merceret, Francis; Lane, John; Immer, Christopher; Case, Jonathan; Manobianco, John

    2005-01-01

    The contour error map (CEM) algorithm and the software that implements the algorithm are means of quantifying correlations between sets of time-varying data that are binarized and registered on spatial grids. The present version of the software is intended for use in evaluating numerical weather forecasts against observational sea-breeze data. In cases in which observational data come from off-grid stations, it is necessary to preprocess the observational data to transform them into gridded data. First, the wind direction is gridded and binarized so that D(i,j;n) is the input to CEM based on forecast data and d(i,j;n) is the input to CEM based on gridded observational data. Here, i and j are spatial indices representing 1.25-km intervals along the west-to-east and south-to-north directions, respectively; and n is a time index representing 5-minute intervals. A binary value of D or d = 0 corresponds to an offshore wind, whereas a value of D or d = 1 corresponds to an onshore wind. CEM includes two notable subalgorithms: One identifies and verifies sea-breeze boundaries; the other, which can be invoked optionally, performs an image-erosion function for the purpose of attempting to eliminate river-breeze contributions in the wind fields.

  4. Error analysis in laparoscopic surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantert, Walter A.; Tendick, Frank; Bhoyrul, Sunil; Tyrrell, Dana; Fujino, Yukio; Rangel, Shawn; Patti, Marco G.; Way, Lawrence W.

    1998-06-01

    Iatrogenic complications in laparoscopic surgery, as in any field, stem from human error. In recent years, cognitive psychologists have developed theories for understanding and analyzing human error, and the application of these principles has decreased error rates in the aviation and nuclear power industries. The purpose of this study was to apply error analysis to laparoscopic surgery and evaluate its potential for preventing complications. Our approach is based on James Reason's framework using a classification of errors according to three performance levels: at the skill- based performance level, slips are caused by attention failures, and lapses result form memory failures. Rule-based mistakes constitute the second level. Knowledge-based mistakes occur at the highest performance level and are caused by shortcomings in conscious processing. These errors committed by the performer 'at the sharp end' occur in typical situations which often times are brought about by already built-in latent system failures. We present a series of case studies in laparoscopic surgery in which errors are classified and the influence of intrinsic failures and extrinsic system flaws are evaluated. Most serious technical errors in lap surgery stem from a rule-based or knowledge- based mistake triggered by cognitive underspecification due to incomplete or illusory visual input information. Error analysis in laparoscopic surgery should be able to improve human performance, and it should detect and help eliminate system flaws. Complication rates in laparoscopic surgery due to technical errors can thus be considerably reduced.

  5. Sepsis: Medical errors in Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rorat, Marta; Jurek, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Health, safety and medical errors are currently the subject of worldwide discussion. The authors analysed medico-legal opinions trying to determine types of medical errors and their impact on the course of sepsis. The authors carried out a retrospective analysis of 66 medico-legal opinions issued by the Wroclaw Department of Forensic Medicine between 2004 and 2013 (at the request of the prosecutor or court) in cases examined for medical errors. Medical errors were confirmed in 55 of the 66 medico-legal opinions. The age of victims varied from 2 weeks to 68 years; 49 patients died. The analysis revealed medical errors committed by 113 health-care workers: 98 physicians, 8 nurses and 8 emergency medical dispatchers. In 33 cases, an error was made before hospitalisation. Hospital errors occurred in 35 victims. Diagnostic errors were discovered in 50 patients, including 46 cases of sepsis being incorrectly recognised and insufficient diagnoses in 37 cases. Therapeutic errors occurred in 37 victims, organisational errors in 9 and technical errors in 2. In addition to sepsis, 8 patients also had a severe concomitant disease and 8 had a chronic disease. In 45 cases, the authors observed glaring errors, which could incur criminal liability. There is an urgent need to introduce a system for reporting and analysing medical errors in Poland. The development and popularisation of standards for identifying and treating sepsis across basic medical professions is essential to improve patient safety and survival rates. Procedures should be introduced to prevent health-care workers from administering incorrect treatment in cases. © The Author(s) 2015.

  6. Update on idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Beau B; Biousse, Valérie; Newman, Nancy J

    2011-08-01

    To provide an update on various features of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Perspective. Selected articles on the epidemiology, clinical and imaging features, natural history, pathophysiology, and treatment of idiopathic intracranial hypertension were reviewed and interpreted in the context of the authors' clinical and research experience. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension primarily is a disease of obese women of childbearing age, but it can affect patients of any weight, sex, and age. Although a relatively rare disorder, idiopathic intracranial hypertension's associated costs in the United States entail hundreds of millions of dollars. Even after treatment, headaches frequently are persistent and may require the continued involvement of a neurologist. Quality-of-life reductions and depression are common among idiopathic intracranial hypertension patients. However, visual dysfunction, especially visual field abnormalities, represents the major morbidity of this disorder, and serial automated perimetry remains the primary method of patient monitoring. Patients who are men, black, very obese, or anemic are at higher risk of visual loss. Vitamin A metabolism, adipose tissue as an actively secreting endocrine tissue, and cerebral venous abnormalities are areas of active study regarding the pathophysiology of idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Treatment studies show that lumbar puncture is a valuable treatment (in addition to its crucial diagnostic role), and that weight management is critical. However, open questions remain regarding the efficacy of acetazolamide, cerebrospinal fluid diversion procedures, and cerebral venous stenting. Many questions remain unanswered about idiopathic intracranial hypertension. Ongoing studies, especially an ongoing National Institutes of Health-funded clinical trial of acetazolamide, should provide more insight into this important, yet poorly understood, syndrome of isolated intracranial hypertension. Copyright © 2011

  7. Hypothalamic Signaling Mechanisms in Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Carmichael, Casey Y.; Wainford, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    The etiology of hypertension, a critical public health issue affecting one in three US adults, involves the integration of the actions of multiple organ systems, including the central nervous system. Increased activation of the central nervous system, driving enhanced sympathetic outflow and increased blood pressure, has emerged as a major contributor to the pathogenesis of hypertension. The hypothalamus is a key brain site acting to integrate central and peripheral inputs to ultimately impac...

  8. Hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips CL

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Craig L Phillips,1–3 Denise M O'Driscoll4,51Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia; 2National Health and Medical Research Council Center for Integrated Research and Understanding of Sleep, Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 3Discipline of Sleep Medicine, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 4Monash Lung and Sleep, Monash Medical Centre, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; 5Department of Medicine, Southern Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is increasingly being recognized as a major health burden with strong focus on the associated cardiovascular risk. Studies from the last two decades have provided strong evidence for a causal role of OSA in the development of systemic hypertension. The acute physiological changes that occur during apnea promote nocturnal hypertension and may lead to the development of sustained daytime hypertension via the pathways of sympathetic activation, inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction. This review will focus on the acute hemodynamic disturbances and associated intermittent hypoxia that characterize OSA and the potential pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the development of hypertension in OSA. In addition the epidemiology of OSA and hypertension, as well as the role of treatment of OSA, in improving blood pressure control will be examined.Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, intermittent hypoxia, ambulatory blood pressure, sympathetic activation

  9. Correlation between religion and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Qingtao; Zhang, Xin; Shi, Rufeng; Liao, Hang; Chen, Xiaoping

    2018-01-25

    The objectives of the study were to investigate the relationship between religion and hypertension, as well as the theoretical mechanism through which religion exerts effect on hypertension. A MEDLINE literature search was performed on articles describing religion and hypertension (N = 543) excluding unqualified ones such as those without expected information, those neither correcting confounding factors nor matching the comparison groups and those reporting repeated trials. Eight extra articles from references of reviews were added to the included studies. Finally, 79 articles were formerly evaluated. Briefly, there are limited trials on correlation between religion and hypertension and their results are inconsistent. First of all, longitudinal investigations, especially the high-quality ones, are deficient. Secondly, studies evaluating religion as an integral are scarce, although they can assess religions most comprehensively. Third, few studies use several religious measurements that represent distinct dimensions of religion. Moreover, divergence exists among diverse populations, even if they are assessed by the same indicator. In addition, 59% studies are concerned with an unspecified species of religion, and Christianity is studied the most among those with a specific category of religion. Finally, the possible mechanism underlying religion and hypertension is complex, which can partially explain the different results among various populations. Comprehensive evaluation of a specific religion should be encouraged. In addition, for a specific population, the correlation between religion and hypertension should be examined particularly, even if similar investigations in other populations have been conducted. Finally, more evidence focused on the effects of distinct religions/sects is also required.

  10. [Hypertension during pregnancy: Epidemiology, definition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvel, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy has several forms that differ by their mechanisms and their consequences for mothers and fetus. Chronic hypertension is defined by SBP≥140mm Hg or DBP≥90mm Hg before pregnancy or before the 20th week of amenorrhea. Gestational hypertension is defined by SBP≥140mm Hg or DBP≥90mm Hg during or after the 20th week of amenorrhea. Preeclampsia is the occurrence of hypertension and proteinuria after 20weeks of amenorrhea. Severe preeclampsia is accompanied by clinical signs and symptoms indicating visceral pain. The HELLP syndrome is a severe preeclampsia accompanied by intravascular hemolysis and hepatic cytolysis. Eclampsia is characterized by seizures of the tonic-clonic type. A chronic hypertension is observed in 1-5% of pregnancies. Gestational hypertension without proteinuria appears in 5-6% of pregnancies. A preeclampsia develops in 1-2% of pregnancies, but much more frequently (up 34%) in the presence of risk factors. High blood pressure during pregnancy remains, by its complications, the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. [Acute intracranial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilo Arrojo, F; Herrera Muñoz, A; Anciones, B

    2010-10-01

    Acute intracranial hypertension is a syndrome with multiple etiologies. Diagnosis and treatment must be performed urgently to save the patient's life and prevent the development of significant disabilities. The appearance of this syndrome is due to intracraincreased volumes and -in turn- the pressure of the intracranial contents, either through an increase in the physiological components (blood, cerebrospinal fluid and brain parenchyma), or through the appearance of a volume in the form of added mass. The underlying brain edema in this condition may be of several types: cytotoxic, vasogenic, interstitial, or hydrostatic. Increased intracranial pressure decreases cerebral perfusion pressure, creating a vicious cycle because of the resulting cerebral ischemia, which progressively increases cerebral blood volume by decreasing resistance and further increases intracranial pressure. Treatment depends on the etiology and will generally require medical and surgical care. Patient management is usually carried out in neurocritical units and involves intracranial pressure monitoring to guide treatment. Correction of all hemostasis disorders is also crucial to patient survival. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. The Usability-Error Ontology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkin, Peter L.; Beuscart-zephir, Marie-Catherine; Pelayo, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    in patients coming to harm. Often the root cause analysis of these adverse events can be traced back to Usability Errors in the Health Information Technology (HIT) or its interaction with users. Interoperability of the documentation of HIT related Usability Errors in a consistent fashion can improve our...... ability to do systematic reviews and meta-analyses. In an effort to support improved and more interoperable data capture regarding Usability Errors, we have created the Usability Error Ontology (UEO) as a classification method for representing knowledge regarding Usability Errors. We expect the UEO...... will grow over time to support an increasing number of HIT system types. In this manuscript, we present this Ontology of Usability Error Types and specifically address Computerized Physician Order Entry (CPOE), Electronic Health Records (EHR) and Revenue Cycle HIT systems....

  13. Processor register error correction management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Pradip; Cher, Chen-Yong; Gupta, Meeta S.

    2016-12-27

    Processor register protection management is disclosed. In embodiments, a method of processor register protection management can include determining a sensitive logical register for executable code generated by a compiler, generating an error-correction table identifying the sensitive logical register, and storing the error-correction table in a memory accessible by a processor. The processor can be configured to generate a duplicate register of the sensitive logical register identified by the error-correction table.

  14. [DIAGNOSTIC ERRORS IN INTERNAL MEDICINE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattner, Ami

    2017-02-01

    Diagnostic errors remain an important target in improving the quality of care and achieving better health outcomes. With a relatively steady rate estimated at 10-15% in many settings, research aiming to elucidate mechanisms of error is highly important. Results indicate that not only cognitive mistakes but a number of factors acting together often culminate in a diagnostic error. Far from being 'unpreventable', several methods and techniques are suggested that may show promise in minimizing diagnostic errors. These measures should be further investigated and incorporated into all phases of medical education.

  15. Structure Errors in System Identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekey, G. A.; Hadaegh, F. Y.

    1984-01-01

    An approach to system identification is presented which explicitly takes structure errors into account and hence provides a systematic way for answering questions concerning the magnitude of estimated parameter errors resulting from structural errors. It is indicated that, from this point of view, it is possible to define near equivalence between process and model and to obtain meaningful theoretical results on solution error system identification. It remains to apply these results to large realistic problems such as those involving models of complex man machine systems.

  16. Identifying Error in AUV Communication

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Coleman, Joseph; Merrill, Kaylani; O'Rourke, Michael; Rajala, Andrew G; Edwards, Dean B

    2006-01-01

    Mine Countermeasures (MCM) involving Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs) are especially susceptible to error, given the constraints on underwater acoustic communication and the inconstancy of the underwater communication channel...

  17. Heuristic errors in clinical reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rylander, Melanie; Guerrasio, Jeannette

    2016-08-01

    Errors in clinical reasoning contribute to patient morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to determine the types of heuristic errors made by third-year medical students and first-year residents. This study surveyed approximately 150 clinical educators inquiring about the types of heuristic errors they observed in third-year medical students and first-year residents. Anchoring and premature closure were the two most common errors observed amongst third-year medical students and first-year residents. There was no difference in the types of errors observed in the two groups. Errors in clinical reasoning contribute to patient morbidity and mortality Clinical educators perceived that both third-year medical students and first-year residents committed similar heuristic errors, implying that additional medical knowledge and clinical experience do not affect the types of heuristic errors made. Further work is needed to help identify methods that can be used to reduce heuristic errors early in a clinician's education. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Measurement Error and Equating Error in Power Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Gary W.; Jiang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Power analysis is a fundamental prerequisite for conducting scientific research. Without power analysis the researcher has no way of knowing whether the sample size is large enough to detect the effect he or she is looking for. This paper demonstrates how psychometric factors such as measurement error and equating error affect the power of…

  19. A Hybrid Unequal Error Protection / Unequal Error Resilience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The quality layers are then assigned an Unequal Error Resilience to synchronization loss by unequally allocating the number of headers available for synchronization to them. Following that Unequal Error Protection against channel noise is provided to the layers by the use of Rate Compatible Punctured Convolutional ...

  20. Error coding simulations in C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Viveca K.

    1994-10-01

    When data is transmitted through a noisy channel, errors are produced within the data rendering it indecipherable. Through the use of error control coding techniques, the bit error rate can be reduced to any desired level without sacrificing the transmission data rate. The Astrionics Laboratory at Marshall Space Flight Center has decided to use a modular, end-to-end telemetry data simulator to simulate the transmission of data from flight to ground and various methods of error control. The simulator includes modules for random data generation, data compression, Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) transfer frame formation, error correction/detection, error generation and error statistics. The simulator utilizes a concatenated coding scheme which includes CCSDS standard (255,223) Reed-Solomon (RS) code over GF(2(exp 8)) with interleave depth of 5 as the outermost code, (7, 1/2) convolutional code as an inner code and CCSDS recommended (n, n-16) cyclic redundancy check (CRC) code as the innermost code, where n is the number of information bits plus 16 parity bits. The received signal-to-noise for a desired bit error rate is greatly reduced through the use of forward error correction techniques. Even greater coding gain is provided through the use of a concatenated coding scheme. Interleaving/deinterleaving is necessary to randomize burst errors which may appear at the input of the RS decoder. The burst correction capability length is increased in proportion to the interleave depth. The modular nature of the simulator allows for inclusion or exclusion of modules as needed. This paper describes the development and operation of the simulator, the verification of a C-language Reed-Solomon code, and the possibility of using Comdisco SPW(tm) as a tool for determining optimal error control schemes.

  1. Dual Processing and Diagnostic Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Geoff

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, I review evidence from two theories in psychology relevant to diagnosis and diagnostic errors. "Dual Process" theories of thinking, frequently mentioned with respect to diagnostic error, propose that categorization decisions can be made with either a fast, unconscious, contextual process called System 1 or a slow, analytical,…

  2. Barriers to Medical Error Reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poorolajal, Jalal; Rezaie, Shirin; Aghighi, Negar

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to explore the prevalence of medical error underreporting and associated barriers. This cross-sectional study was performed from September to December 2012. Five hospitals, affiliated with Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, in Hamedan, Iran were investigated. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Participants consisted of physicians, nurses, midwives, residents, interns, and staffs of radiology and laboratory departments. Overall, 50.26% of subjects had committed but not reported medical errors. The main reasons mentioned for underreporting were lack of effective medical error reporting system (60.0%), lack of proper reporting form (51.8%), lack of peer supporting a person who has committed an error (56.0%), and lack of personal attention to the importance of medical errors (62.9%). The rate of committing medical errors was higher in men (71.4%), age of 50-40 years (67.6%), less-experienced personnel (58.7%), educational level of MSc (87.5%), and staff of radiology department (88.9%). This study outlined the main barriers to reporting medical errors and associated factors that may be helpful for healthcare organizations in improving medical error reporting as an essential component for patient safety enhancement.

  3. Barriers to medical error reporting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalal Poorolajal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was conducted to explore the prevalence of medical error underreporting and associated barriers. Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed from September to December 2012. Five hospitals, affiliated with Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, in Hamedan,Iran were investigated. A self-administered questionnaire was used for data collection. Participants consisted of physicians, nurses, midwives, residents, interns, and staffs of radiology and laboratory departments. Results: Overall, 50.26% of subjects had committed but not reported medical errors. The main reasons mentioned for underreporting were lack of effective medical error reporting system (60.0%, lack of proper reporting form (51.8%, lack of peer supporting a person who has committed an error (56.0%, and lack of personal attention to the importance of medical errors (62.9%. The rate of committing medical errors was higher in men (71.4%, age of 50-40 years (67.6%, less-experienced personnel (58.7%, educational level of MSc (87.5%, and staff of radiology department (88.9%. Conclusions: This study outlined the main barriers to reporting medical errors and associated factors that may be helpful for healthcare organizations in improving medical error reporting as an essential component for patient safety enhancement.

  4. Explaining Errors in Children's Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Caroline F.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to explain the occurrence of errors in children's speech is an essential component of successful theories of language acquisition. The present study tested some generativist and constructivist predictions about error on the questions produced by ten English-learning children between 2 and 5 years of age. The analyses demonstrated that,…

  5. Hypertension and counter-hypertension mechanisms in giraffes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiong Gus

    2006-03-01

    The giraffe is unique as its head is 2500-3000 millimeters above its heart, thus the giraffe's heart must pump hard enough to overcome the huge hydrostatic pressure generated by the tall column of blood in its neck in order to provide its head with sufficient nutrients and oxygen. Giraffes therefore have exceptionally high blood pressure (hypertension) by human standards. Interestingly, the "unnaturally" high blood pressure in giraffes does not culminate in severe vascular lesions, nor does it lead to heart and kidney failure, whereas in humans, the same blood pressure is exceedingly dangerous and will cause severe vascular damage. Intrinsically, natural selection likely has provided an important protective mechanism, because hypertension develops as soon as the giraffe stands up and erects its neck immediately after birth. Therefore, those individual giraffes who did not tolerate the burden of hypertension presumably developed acute heart failure and renal failure, not surviving to reproductive age. The genes and genotypes of animals that did not survive are thus predicted to have been gradually eliminated from the gene pool by natural selection. By the same process, genes that protect against hypertensive damage would be preserved and inherited from generation to generation. Some unique ingredients of the giraffe's diet may also provide an extrinsic mechanism for the prevention of hypertension and the prevention of fatal end-stage organ damage. The fascinating nature of the protective mechanisms in giraffes may provide a conceptual framework for further experimental investigations into mechanisms as well as prevention and treatment of human hypertension and cardiovascular disease.

  6. Relationship Between OSA and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Gerard; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel; Barbé, Ferran

    2015-09-01

    There is a bidirectional association between OSA and systemic hypertension. The strengths of this relationship appear to be modulated by factors such as age, sex, and somnolence. The 24-h BP circadian pattern also appears to be influenced by OSA. Patients with this syndrome exhibit a high prevalence of nondipping or riser circadian patterns, which are related to clinical and subclinical organ damage in the heart and brain. However, the influence of OSA on nocturnal hypertension development has not yet been clarified. A special area of interest is the recognized relationship between OSA and resistant hypertension. The majority of patients with resistant hypertension suffer OSA. CPAP treatment significantly reduces BP in such patients and could play a clinical role in the management of BP in these patients. Several meta-analyses have demonstrated a concordant mild effect of CPAP on systemic hypertension. This effect is related to CPAP compliance, somnolence status, and baseline BP. The effects of oral appliances on BP in patients with OSA must be evaluated in randomized controlled trials. In the absence of additional data reported by clinical studies on other antihypertensive drug treatments, diuretics, particularly antialdosteronic diuretic agents, should be considered the first-line antihypertensive drug treatment in patients with OSA. By reducing parapharyngeal edema and secondary upper airway obstruction, these drugs appear to improve OSA severity and also to reduce BP.

  7. Hypertension Management in Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weltermann, Birgitta; Kersting, Christine; Viehmann, Anja

    2016-03-11

    To improve hypertension control, this cluster randomized trial evaluated the effectiveness of physician manager education about hypertension management. After randomization at practice level, primary care physicians of the intervention arm, whose practices collaborated with a university department, participated in a three-session education on evidence-based hypertensiology and practice implementation strategies. The primary outcome was blood pressure (BP) control (ambulatory blood pressure [ABP] hypertension management. Following an intention-to-treat approach, data analyses included crude and adjusted generalized mixed models and sensitivity analyses. These took into account sex, age, ≥ hypertension-related disease and resistant hypertension (RH). The analysis included 103 of 169 patients from 22 practices. Overall, BP decrease was -8.2 systolic and -4.1 mmHg diastolic. The intervention had no effect on BP control (odds ratio 0.84 [95% CI 0.29-2.43]) and BP changes (interventional effect: systolic -2.48 mmHg [95% CI -7.24 to 2.29], diastolic -0.25 mmHg [95% CI 3.31 to 2.82]). Sensitivity analysis indicated effect modification in patients with RH. Intervention practices requested educational input on difficult cases, and newly implemented 3 practice strategies (14.5±2.6 versus 11.4±2.2; P=0.005). After the short follow-up of 5 months, the intervention had no impact on BP control but improved the use of practice strategies.

  8. Pulmonary hypertension in bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Mourani, Peter

    2014-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is common in bronchopulmonary dysplasia and is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. This pulmonary hypertension is due to abnormal microvascular development and pulmonary vascular remodeling resulting in reduced cross-sectional area of pulmonary vasculature. The epidemiology, etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, suggested management, and outcomes of pulmonary hypertension in the setting of bronchopulmonary dysplasia are reviewed. In summary, pulmonary hypertension is noted in a fifth of extremely low birth weight infants, primarily those with moderate or severe bronchopulmonary dysplasia, and persists to discharge in many infants. Diagnosis is generally by echocardiography, and some infants require cardiac catheterization to identify associated anatomic cardiac lesions or systemic-pulmonary collaterals, pulmonary venous obstruction or myocardial dysfunction. Serial echocardiography and B-type natriuretic peptide measurement may be useful for following the course of pulmonary hypertension. Currently, there is not much evidence to indicate optimal management approaches, but many clinicians maintain oxygen saturation in the range of 91 to 95%, avoiding hypoxia and hyperoxia, and often provide inhaled nitric oxide, sometimes combined with sildenafil, prostacyclin, or its analogs, and occasionally endothelin-receptor antagonists. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Accelerated Hypertension after Venlafaxine Usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksel Kıvrak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Venlafaxine is the first antidepressant that acts via inhibiting serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake. Hypertension is observed in doses exceeding 300 mg/day and is the most feared complication. We report a patient with accelerated hypertension after venlafaxine use observed at a dose of 150 mg/day. A 23-year-old patient with symptoms of insomnia, depression, anhedonia, fatigue admitted our clinic. Venlafaxine at a dose of 75 mg/day was initiated after he was diagnosed with major depressive disorder. After 5 months, venlafaxine dose was uptitrated to 150 mg/day due to inadequate response to drug. After using venlafaxine for ten months at the dose of 150 mg/day, he admitted our clinic with headache and epistaxis. He was hospitalized after his blood pressure was measured as 210/170 mmHg. No secondary causes for hypertension were found, and venlafaxine treatment was considered possible etiologic factor. After stopping venlafaxine treatment, his blood pressure was reverted back to normal limits. While mild elevation of blood pressure could be observed after venlafaxine treatment, this case shows that accelerated hypertension with a diastolic blood pressure rise above 120 mmHg could be observed at relatively low doses of venlafaxine. Close monitoring of blood pressure is necessary after initiation of treatment, as accelerated hypertension could cause endorgan damage with potentially catastrophic results.

  10. Onorbit IMU alignment error budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The Star Tracker, Crew Optical Alignment Sight (COAS), and Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) from a complex navigation system with a multitude of error sources were combined. A complete list of the system errors is presented. The errors were combined in a rational way to yield an estimate of the IMU alignment accuracy for STS-1. The expected standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 type alignments was determined to be 72 arc seconds per axis for star tracker alignments and 188 arc seconds per axis for COAS alignments. These estimates are based on current knowledge of the star tracker, COAS, IMU, and navigation base error specifications, and were partially verified by preliminary Monte Carlo analysis.

  11. Prioritising interventions against medication errors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lisby, Marianne; Pape-Larsen, Louise; Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard

    experts appointed by 13 healthcare-, professional- and scientific organisations in Denmark. Test of definition: The definition was applied to historic data from a somatic hospital (2003; 64 patients) [2] and further, prospectively tested in comparable studies of medication errors in a psychiatric hospital...... errors was compared between the somatic hospital (2003), the nursing homes and the psychiatric hospital whereas comparison of prescribing errors included all four clinical settings. Results: Definition: The expert panel reached consensus of the following definition “An error in the stages...... of the medication process - ordering, transcribing, dispensing, administering and monitoring the effect - causing harm or implying a risk of harming the patient”. In addition, consensus for 60 of 76 error types covering all stages in the medication process was achieved. Test of definition: The definition...

  12. Factors associated with hypertension prevalence, unawareness and treatment among Costa Rican elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-Chacón, Ericka; Santamaría-Ulloa, Carolina; Rosero-Bixby, Luis

    2008-08-05

    Reliable information on the prevalence of hypertension is crucial in the development of health policies for prevention, control, and early diagnosis of this condition. This study describes the prevalence of hypertension among Costa Rican elderly, and identifies co-factors associated with its prevalence, unawareness and treatment. The prevalence of hypertension is estimated for the Costa Rican elderly. Measurement error is assessed, and factors associated with high blood pressure are explored. Data for this study came from a nationally representative sample of about 2,800 individuals from CRELES (Costa Rica: Longevity and Healthy Aging Study). Two blood pressure measures were collected using digital monitors. Self reports of previous diagnosis, and medications taken were also recorded as part of the study. No evidence of information bias was found among interviewers, or over time. Hypertension prevalence in elderly Costa Ricans was found to be 65% (Males = 60%, Females = 69%). Twenty-five percent of the studied population did not report previous diagnoses of hypertension, but according to our measurement they had high blood pressure. The proportion of unaware men is higher than the proportion of unaware women (32% vs. 20%). The main factors associated with hypertension are: age, being overweight or obese, and family history of hypertension. For men, current smokers are 3 times more likely to be unaware of their condition than non smokers. Both men and women are less likely to be unaware of their condition if they have a family history of hypertension. Those women who are obese, diabetic, have suffered heart disease or stroke, or have been home visited by community health workers are less likely to be unaware of their hypertension. The odds of being treated are higher in educated individuals, those with a family history of hypertension, elderly with diabetes or those who have had heart disease. Sex differences in terms of hypertension prevalence, unawareness, and

  13. Factors associated with hypertension prevalence, unawareness and treatment among Costa Rican elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santamaría-Ulloa Carolina

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reliable information on the prevalence of hypertension is crucial in the development of health policies for prevention, control, and early diagnosis of this condition. This study describes the prevalence of hypertension among Costa Rican elderly, and identifies co-factors associated with its prevalence, unawareness and treatment. Methods The prevalence of hypertension is estimated for the Costa Rican elderly. Measurement error is assessed, and factors associated with high blood pressure are explored. Data for this study came from a nationally representative sample of about 2,800 individuals from CRELES (Costa Rica: Longevity and Healthy Aging Study. Two blood pressure measures were collected using digital monitors. Self reports of previous diagnosis, and medications taken were also recorded as part of the study. Results No evidence of information bias was found among interviewers, or over time. Hypertension prevalence in elderly Costa Ricans was found to be 65% (Males = 60%, Females = 69%. Twenty-five percent of the studied population did not report previous diagnoses of hypertension, but according to our measurement they had high blood pressure. The proportion of unaware men is higher than the proportion of unaware women (32% vs. 20%. The main factors associated with hypertension are: age, being overweight or obese, and family history of hypertension. For men, current smokers are 3 times more likely to be unaware of their condition than non smokers. Both men and women are less likely to be unaware of their condition if they have a family history of hypertension. Those women who are obese, diabetic, have suffered heart disease or stroke, or have been home visited by community health workers are less likely to be unaware of their hypertension. The odds of being treated are higher in educated individuals, those with a family history of hypertension, elderly with diabetes or those who have had heart disease. Conclusion Sex

  14. Pulmonary hypertension and hepatic cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Téllez Villajos, L; Martínez González, J; Moreira Vicente, V; Albillos Martínez, A

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a relatively common phenomenon in patients with hepatic cirrhosis and can appear through various mechanisms. The most characteristic scenario that binds portal and pulmonary hypertension is portopulmonary syndrome. However, hyperdynamic circulation, TIPS placement and heart failure can raise the mean pulmonary artery pressure without increasing the resistances. These conditions are not candidates for treatment with pulmonary vasodilators and require a specific therapy. A correct assessment of hemodynamic, ultrasound and clinical variables enables the differential diagnosis of each situation that produces pulmonary hypertension in patients with cirrhosis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  15. Renovascular hypertension. Diagnosis and intervention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomsen, H.S.; Sos, T.A.; Nielsen, S.L.

    Hypertension constitutes a major health problem and the challenge is to identify patients having 'surgically' curable renal vascular disease among the majority with so-called essential hypertension. The best of unsatisfactory diagnostic tests are renography and plasma renin activity both before and during angiotensin II blockade. The necessity of better screening tests has increased because of the recent advances in surgical techniques and especially percutaneous transluminal renal angioplasty. The latter has definitely become the method of choice for correction of suspected hemodynamically significant artery stenoses whenever technically feasible. With improved angioplasty techniques the risk of treating renal artery stenosis without hemodynamic and clinical importance (so-called cosmetic repair) has increased. Unfortunately randomized trials including surgery versus angioplasty are not available. It should be kept in mind that only after correction of the stenosis is achieved and the blood pressure has become normal, can the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension be made with certainty.

  16. Hypertension og det metaboliske syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael Hecht; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a relatively prevalent condition characterized by co-existence of several metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension. Patients with hypertension have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome which, in turn, increases the cardiovascular...... risk associated with increased blood pressure. As the definition of the metabolic syndrome is based on dichotomization of cardiovascular risk factors with a continuously increasing risk, it cannot match risk stratification tools like the HeartScore for calculation of prognosis. However, the metabolic...... syndrome is of clinical importance as it makes the treating physician test for other elements of the syndrome in patients with one of the elements, e.g. hypertension. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun-15...

  17. The immune system and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Madhu V; Chapleau, Mark W; Harwani, Sailesh C; Abboud, Francois M

    2014-08-01

    A powerful interaction between the autonomic and the immune systems plays a prominent role in the initiation and maintenance of hypertension and significantly contributes to cardiovascular pathology, end-organ damage and mortality. Studies have shown consistent association between hypertension, proinflammatory cytokines and the cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. The sympathetic nervous system, a major determinant of hypertension, innervates the bone marrow, spleen and peripheral lymphatic system and is proinflammatory, whereas the parasympathetic nerve activity dampens the inflammatory response through α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The neuro-immune synapse is bidirectional as cytokines may enhance the sympathetic activity through their central nervous system action that in turn increases the mobilization, migration and infiltration of immune cells in the end organs. Kidneys may be infiltrated by immune cells and mesangial cells that may originate in the bone marrow and release inflammatory cytokines that cause renal damage. Hypertension is also accompanied by infiltration of the adventitia and perivascular adipose tissue by inflammatory immune cells including macrophages. Increased cytokine production induces myogenic and structural changes in the resistance vessels, causing elevated blood pressure. Cardiac hypertrophy in hypertension may result from the mechanical afterload and the inflammatory response to resident or migratory immune cells. Toll-like receptors on innate immune cells function as sterile injury detectors and initiate the inflammatory pathway. Finally, abnormalities of innate immune cells and the molecular determinants of their activation that include toll-like receptor, adrenergic, cholinergic and AT1 receptors can define the severity of inflammation in hypertension. These receptors are putative therapeutic targets.

  18. Dealing with Drought: Decoupling Climatic and Management-Related Drivers of Water Conservation Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemati, A.; Rippy, M.; Grant, S. B.

    2015-12-01

    As global populations grow, cities in drought prone regions of the world such as California and South East Australia are faced with escalating water scarcity and water security challenges. The management approaches geared towards addressing these challenges are diverse. Given the myriad of possible approaches and the tendency to apply them in combination, successful management actions can be difficult to identify. Background climactic variability further complicates the story, making transfer of management lessons from one drought stressed region to another difficult. Here we use Melbourne, a city of 4.3 million people in South East Australia that recently faced and overcame a > 10 year "Millennium" drought, as a test case for evaluating the relative importance of various management-related and climactic factors in driving reductions in municipal water consumption (~60% in 12 years). Our analysis suggests that Melbourne's declining municipal consumption cannot be explained by potable substitution alone, as reductions in municipal consumption were not matched by increased use of alternative sources (e.g., urban rain or recycled water). Thus, water conservation behavior (not source switching) may be responsible for the majority of demand reduction in Melbourne. Interestingly, while voluntary or mandatory water restrictions appear to have substantially altered the rate of change of consumption near the end of Melbourne's Millennium drought (e.g., forcing a period of intense conservation), overall conservation behavior precedes these restrictions. This suggests that other rapidly implemented (and hither too unquantified) management approaches such as advertising or newspapers may have driven water conservation behavior early in the drought. Climatic factors, particularly precipitation may also have influenced conservation behavior; changes in precipitation were significantly positively correlated with changes in water consumption at a lag of 18 months. Similar

  19. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype...... or an atypical disease course should alert the physician to reevaluate a presumed IIH-diagnosis. The authors report a case of a 32-year-old non-obese male with intracranial hypertension, secondary to a syphilitic central nervous system infection, initially misdiagnosed as being idiopathic. Upon relevant...

  20. Scorpion sting and hypertensive crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ratti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Scorpion stings are very frequent in Centre-South America. The most frequently observed clinical symptoms are: local pain and redness, tachycardia, irritability, hypertensive crisis; but it differs with the scorpion species involved. CLINICAL CASE We describe a scorpion sting in a woman who came back from a holiday in Mexico. Consequently she had a hypertensive crisis treated with furosemide. DISCUSSION The scorpion sting can be very dangerous. There are many species which could be lethal; in these cases, identifying the exact species can be essential to save the patient’s life. The treatment consists of symptomatic measures, support of vital functions and i.v. antivenom.

  1. Accelerated hypertension: Treatable yet underdiagnosed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Ish

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients who present in young age with accelerated hypertension (HTN should always be evaluated for secondary causes of hypertension. Renal parenchyma and vascular diseases constitute the majority of the etiology. Other causes include endocrine diseases such as pheochromocytoma, pregnancy-related HTN, and sleep apnea. We report a 23-year-old female who presented with palpitations and headache under treatment for anxiety from a tertiary care hospital. She was found to have accelerated HTN and was thoroughly worked up for etiology and treatment.

  2. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy Healthy Food Shopping Healthy Drinks for Kids High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) KidsHealth > For Parents > High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) ... How Is High Blood Pressure Treated? What Is High Blood Pressure? Blood pressure is the pressure of blood against ...

  3. Autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Pons, Héctor; Quiroz, Yasmir; Lanaspa, Miguel A; Johnson, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension affects more than one-third of the adult population of the world. However, the cause of high blood pressure is unknown in the vast majority of patients, classified as patients with essential hypertension. Evidence accumulated over the past decade supports the participation of inflammation in the development of experimental hypertension. Investigations have also demonstrated that immune reactivity to overexpressed heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) is involved in the pathogenesis of salt-induced hypertension. This article reviews, first, the role of T cell-induced inflammation in the arteries, kidney and central nervous system in hypertension and the amelioration of hypertension induced by regulatory T cells. Second, experiments showing that autoimmunity directed to HSP70 in the kidney impairs the pressure natriuresis relationship and has a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of salt sensitive hypertension. Finally, we highlight the clinical evidence that supports the participation of autoimmunity in essential hypertension.

  4. Isolated Systolic Hypertension: A Health Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... D. Treatment of isolated systolic hypertension in the elderly. Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy. 2012;10:1367. April 19, 2017 Original article: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/high-blood-pressure/expert-answers/hypertension/FAQ- ...

  5. Hypercortisolism in obesity-associated hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Amy G; Nimkevych, Oksana; Uwaifo, Gabriel I

    2014-07-01

    Obesity is prevalent worldwide and associated with co-morbidities that result in increased cardiovascular risk. Hypertension is the most prevalent obesity comorbidity associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Obesity hypertension is a distinct subtype of essential hypertension. While endogenous Cushing's syndrome is an uncommon cause of both obesity and hypertension, the recent recognition of other hypercortisolemic states has raised the profile of hypercortisolism as an important contributor in obesity hypertension. The high prevalence of exogenous, iatrogenic, pseudo, and subclinical Cushing's syndromes makes hypercortisolism an important diagnostic consideration in the evaluation and management of patients with obesity hypertension who are resistant to conventional management. Available data suggest that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system modulating antihypertensives have the best efficacy in hypercortisolism-mediated obesity hypertension. Strategies aimed at reducing cortisol production and action also have utility. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the epidemiology, etiopathogenesis and management options available for glucocorticoid-mediated obesity hypertension.

  6. Linear network error correction coding

    CERN Document Server

    Guang, Xuan

    2014-01-01

    There are two main approaches in the theory of network error correction coding. In this SpringerBrief, the authors summarize some of the most important contributions following the classic approach, which represents messages by sequences?similar to algebraic coding,?and also briefly discuss the main results following the?other approach,?that uses the theory of rank metric codes for network error correction of representing messages by subspaces. This book starts by establishing the basic linear network error correction (LNEC) model and then characterizes two equivalent descriptions. Distances an

  7. pre-hypertension and hypertension in apparently healthy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Jenkins 2000) and anabolic steroids (Jenkins. 2000) by males for body building to improve appearance and enhanced athletic performance. So far there's paucity of information on the prevalence of hypertension among adolescents in this environment. The aim of this study therefore was to determine the prevalence of.

  8. Pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension: pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Humbert

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH are two of the key subgroups of pulmonary hypertension. They are characterised by different risk factors. PAH can be associated with mutations in the gene encoding bone morphogenetic protein receptor type II (BMPR2, HIV infection, congenital heart disease, connective tissue disease (such as systemic sclerosis, and exposure to particular drugs and toxins including fenfluramine derivatives. In contrast, CTEPH can be associated with anti-phospholipid antibodies, splenectomy and the presence of a ventriculo-atrial shunt or an infected pacemaker. The first-line therapies used to treat PAH and CTEPH also differ. While medical therapy tends to be used for patients with PAH, pulmonary endarterectomy is the treatment of choice for patients with CTEPH. However, there are possible common mechanisms behind the two diseases, including endothelial cell dysfunction and distal pulmonary artery remodelling. Further research into these similarities is needed to assist the development of targeted pharmacological therapies for patients with inoperable CTEPH and patients who have persistent pulmonary hypertension after endarterectomy.

  9. Current management approaches to portopulmonary hypertension.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH) is a rare but life-threatening complication of portal hypertension that is characterised by proliferative changes in the pulmonary microvasculature indistinguishable from other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Although PoPH is most commonly observed in the setting of cirrhosis, patients with noncirrhotic portal hypertension are also at risk of developing the disorder. A definitive diagnosis requires invasive hemodynamic co...

  10. Hyponatremic hypertensive syndrome - a retrospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Devdeep; Sinha, Rajiv,; Akhtar, Md Shakil; Saha, Agni Sekhar

    2017-01-01

    AIM To ascertain the frequency of hyponatremic hypertensive syndrome (HHS) in a cohort of children with hypertensive emergency in a tertiary pediatric hospital. METHODS A retrospective review was undertaken among children with hypertensive emergency admitted in our tertiary children hospital between June 2014 and December 2015 with an aim to identify any children with HHS. Three children with HHS were identified during this period. RESULTS The 3 patients with HHS presented with hypertensive e...

  11. Hypertensive Crisis During Norepinephrine Syringe Exchange: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijder, Roland A; Knape, Johannes T A; Egberts, Toine C G; Timmerman, Annemoon M D E

    2017-04-01

    A 67-year critically ill patient suffered from a hypertensive crisis (200 mm Hg) because of a norepinephrine overdose. The overdose occurred when the clinician exchanged an almost-empty syringe and the syringe pump repeatedly reported an error. We hypothesized that an object between the plunger and the syringe driver may have caused the exertion of too much force on the syringe. Testing this hypothesis in vitro showed significant peak dosing errors (up to +572%) but moderate overdose (0.07 mL, +225%) if a clamp was used on the intravenous infusion line and a large overdose (0.8 mL, +2700%) if no clamp was used. Clamping and awareness are advised.

  12. No Hypertensive Disorder of Pregnancy; No Preeclampsia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    No Hypertensive Disorder of Pregnancy; No Preeclampsia-eclampsia; No Gestational Hypertension; No Hellp Syndrome. Vascular Disorder of Pregnancy ... Hypertensive disorders complicate 5%-10% of pregnancies with increasing incidence mainly due to upward trends in obesity globally. In the last century, several ...

  13. Orthostatic hypertension: profile of a Nigerian population ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence, age, sex distribution and blood pressure (BP) pattern of patients with orthostatic hypertension in a cohort of hypertensives. Method: A total of 179 patients on follow-up treatment in a hypertension clinic were assessed for age, sex and BP in the seated ...

  14. Prevalence of Adolescent Hypertension in Zaria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bugaje MA, Yakubu AM, Ogala WN Prevalence of Adolescent Hypertension in Zaria. Nigerian fwnalrf Paedzkzm'cs 2005; 32: 77. Background: Although there are several epidemiological reports on the prevalence of hypertension in adult population, a dearth of information continues to exist on adolescent hypertension in ...

  15. Prevalence and Predictors of Hypertension History among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypertension is one of the leading causes of mortality and morbidity around the world and has become a public health problem. Meanwhile, information on predictors of hypertension in Ghana seldom focuses on men. This study, therefore, sought to determine the prevalence and predictors of hypertension ...

  16. Therapeutic Exercise and Hypertension | Sikiru | African Research ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypertension implies chronic elevation in SBP and DBP above levels considered desirable or healthy for the person\\'s age and size. The focus of this review is to discuss the therapeutic efficacy of exercise on human hypertension. The paper revealed that hypertension is common among African, also that acute exercise ...

  17. The renal transcriptome in experimental hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesseling, S.

    2007-01-01

    The renal transcriptome in experimental hypertension The kidneys importantly determine blood pressure. Kidney dysfunction can result in hypertension, which in turn leads to renal damage. In primary hypertension the cause is unknown. The condition is polygenic, however, which genetic defects cause

  18. Hypertension and renal disease : Role of microalbuminuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, WMT; deJong, PE; deZeeuw, D

    1996-01-01

    Risks associated with hypertension Hypertension is a risk factor for cardiovascular and possibly renal organ damage. Microalbuminuria is a newly recognized cardiovascular and renal risk factor in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. The prevalence of microalbuminuria is enhanced in hypertensive

  19. hypertension among dental patients attending tertiary

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This was to determine the prevalence of hypertension among dental patients and their common ... care . This study became necessary because of the increasing number of hypertensive patients detected at the dental clinic. Not much work has been done in .... relationship between hypertension and dental.

  20. Insulin resistance in Nigerians with essential hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... Essential hypertension accounts for as many as 95% of cases of hypertension2. Hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) are interrelated metabolic disorders that strongly predispose an individual to macrovascular and microvascular complications. In recent years insulin resistance has been shown ...

  1. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis presenting with hypertensive emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Samrat; Das, Mousumi; Bagchi, Nilay Ranjan

    2014-04-01

    We report a 12-year-old girl presenting with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) along with hypertensive emergency. Hypertension persisted for few weeks following recovery and subsided with oral clonidine. Although autonomic instability in ADEM has been reported before, hypertensive emergency was not previously documented as presenting feature of ADEM.

  2. Childhood hypertension: what does the radiologist contribute?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roebuck, Derek [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    Hypertension may be essential (primary) or secondary to a variety of causes. The most important risk factors for essential hypertension are obesity and a family history of high BP, but there are also associations with sleep apnoea, low birth weight and prematurity. The most important cause of secondary hypertension in childhood is chronic renal disease. (orig.)

  3. [Knowledge level of hypertensive patients about hypertension. Relationship between knowledge level and hypertension control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez Camps, M; Egocheaga Cabello, M Isabel; Dalfó Baqué, A; Bajo García, J; Vara González, L; Sanchis Doménech, C; Martín Rioboo, E; Ureña Fernández, T; Domínguez Sardiña, M; Bonet Pla, A

    2015-01-01

    To assess the knowledge of the hypertensive patients about their hypertension and their relation to its control. Cross-sectional study among 400 hypertensive patients, all over 18 years, selected from 50 primary-care centres, who responded to an hypertension-related survey. Included variables were survey items, age, gender, educational level, professional occupation, blood pressure data and antihypertensive treatment. The obtained differences were analyzed using the chi-square test, Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, Anova and Bonferroni methods. There were 323 valid surveys. 52.9% of respondents were women, the average age: 65.4 years (SD: 11.2), 54.8% of them had primary education. 39.6% were aware of the objectives of systolic BP control. Only 19.6% having knowledge of those for diastolic BP control, with no differences between controlled and uncontrolled (systolic BP: 39% vs 38.1%, P=.887; diastolic BP: 19.2% vs 21%, P=.721). Over 70% knew about lifestyle changes, without significant differences between controlled and uncontrolled respondents. 82% of controlled respondents, and 79% of those uncontrolled, recognized the chronical nature of the treatment (P=.548), but 15.1% of the controlled respondents and 12.4% of uncontrolled respondents did not see the relation between the treatment and hypertension control (P=.525). 31.1% believed to be well-controlled, but in fact was not. Our patients doesn't know blood pressure targets of control. There isn't relationship between this knowledge and control of hypertension. Copyright © 2014 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  4. How Labor Management Relations and Human Resource Policies Affect the Process of Teacher Assignment in Urban School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngs, Peter; Pogodzinski, Ben; Galey, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined how labor-management relations between school districts and teacher associations seem to affect teacher contract provisions regarding the role of seniority in teacher assignment and how contract provisions and teacher assignment policies seem to affect beginning teachers' perceptions about their work environments.…

  5. 29 CFR 1420.1 - Functions of the Service in health care industry bargaining under the Labor-Management Relations...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Functions of the Service in health care industry bargaining under the Labor-Management Relations Act, as amended (hereinafter âthe Actâ). 1420.1 Section 1420.1 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE-ASSISTANCE IN...

  6. Asymmetrical Search Errors in Infancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterworth, George

    1976-01-01

    To establish the spatial generality of perseverative errors in infant manual search, a group of infants aged 8-11 months performed Piaget's Stage IV task with an object hidden at successive locations in the vertical plane. (Author/JMB)

  7. Numerical optimization with computational errors

    CERN Document Server

    Zaslavski, Alexander J

    2016-01-01

    This book studies the approximate solutions of optimization problems in the presence of computational errors. A number of results are presented on the convergence behavior of algorithms in a Hilbert space; these algorithms are examined taking into account computational errors. The author illustrates that algorithms generate a good approximate solution, if computational errors are bounded from above by a small positive constant. Known computational errors are examined with the aim of determining an approximate solution. Researchers and students interested in the optimization theory and its applications will find this book instructive and informative. This monograph contains 16 chapters; including a chapters devoted to the subgradient projection algorithm, the mirror descent algorithm, gradient projection algorithm, the Weiszfelds method, constrained convex minimization problems, the convergence of a proximal point method in a Hilbert space, the continuous subgradient method, penalty methods and Newton’s meth...

  8. Quantile Regression With Measurement Error

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Ying

    2009-08-27

    Regression quantiles can be substantially biased when the covariates are measured with error. In this paper we propose a new method that produces consistent linear quantile estimation in the presence of covariate measurement error. The method corrects the measurement error induced bias by constructing joint estimating equations that simultaneously hold for all the quantile levels. An iterative EM-type estimation algorithm to obtain the solutions to such joint estimation equations is provided. The finite sample performance of the proposed method is investigated in a simulation study, and compared to the standard regression calibration approach. Finally, we apply our methodology to part of the National Collaborative Perinatal Project growth data, a longitudinal study with an unusual measurement error structure. © 2009 American Statistical Association.

  9. The uncorrected refractive error challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovin Naidoo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Refractive error affects people of all ages, socio-economic status and ethnic groups. The most recent statistics estimate that, worldwide, 32.4 million people are blind and 191 million people have vision impairment. Vision impairment has been defined based on distance visual acuity only, and uncorrected distance refractive error (mainly myopia is the single biggest cause of worldwide vision impairment. However, when we also consider near visual impairment, it is clear that even more people are affected. From research it was estimated that the number of people with vision impairment due to uncorrected distance refractive error was 107.8 million,1 and the number of people affected by uncorrected near refractive error was 517 million, giving a total of 624.8 million people.

  10. Comprehensive Error Rate Testing (CERT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) implemented the Comprehensive Error Rate Testing (CERT) program to measure improper payments in the Medicare...

  11. Error correcting coding for OTN

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Jørn; Larsen, Knud J.; Pedersen, Lars A.

    2010-01-01

    Forward error correction codes for 100 Gb/s optical transmission are currently receiving much attention from transport network operators and technology providers. We discuss the performance of hard decision decoding using product type codes that cover a single OTN frame or a small number...... of such frames. In particular we argue that a three-error correcting BCH is the best choice for the component code in such systems....

  12. Eliminating US hospital medical errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sameer; Steinebach, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Healthcare costs in the USA have continued to rise steadily since the 1980s. Medical errors are one of the major causes of deaths and injuries of thousands of patients every year, contributing to soaring healthcare costs. The purpose of this study is to examine what has been done to deal with the medical-error problem in the last two decades and present a closed-loop mistake-proof operation system for surgery processes that would likely eliminate preventable medical errors. The design method used is a combination of creating a service blueprint, implementing the six sigma DMAIC cycle, developing cause-and-effect diagrams as well as devising poka-yokes in order to develop a robust surgery operation process for a typical US hospital. In the improve phase of the six sigma DMAIC cycle, a number of poka-yoke techniques are introduced to prevent typical medical errors (identified through cause-and-effect diagrams) that may occur in surgery operation processes in US hospitals. It is the authors' assertion that implementing the new service blueprint along with the poka-yokes, will likely result in the current medical error rate to significantly improve to the six-sigma level. Additionally, designing as many redundancies as possible in the delivery of care will help reduce medical errors. Primary healthcare providers should strongly consider investing in adequate doctor and nurse staffing, and improving their education related to the quality of service delivery to minimize clinical errors. This will lead to an increase in higher fixed costs, especially in the shorter time frame. This paper focuses additional attention needed to make a sound technical and business case for implementing six sigma tools to eliminate medical errors that will enable hospital managers to increase their hospital's profitability in the long run and also ensure patient safety.

  13. Errors in Chemical Sensor Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur Dybko

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Various types of errors during the measurements of ion-selective electrodes, ionsensitive field effect transistors, and fibre optic chemical sensors are described. The errors were divided according to their nature and place of origin into chemical, instrumental and non-chemical. The influence of interfering ions, leakage of the membrane components, liquid junction potential as well as sensor wiring, ambient light and temperature is presented.

  14. Factors effective on medication errors: A nursing view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrokhi, Akram; Ebrahimpour, Fatemeh; Ghodousi, Arash

    2013-01-01

    Medication errors are the most common medical errors, which may result in some complications for patients. This study was carried out to investigate what influence medication errors by nurses from their viewpoint. In this descriptive study, 150 nurses who were working in Qazvin Medical University teaching hospitals were selected by proportional random sampling, and data were collected by means of a researcher-made questionnaire including demographic attributes (age, gender, working experience,…), and contributing factors in medication errors (in three categories including nurse-related, management-related, and environment-related factors). The mean age of the participant nurses was 30.7 ± 6.5 years. Most of them (87.1%) were female with a Bachelor of Sciences degree (86.7%) in nursing. The mean of their overtime working was 64.8 ± 38 h/month. The results showed that the nurse-related factors are the most effective factors (55.44 ± 9.14) while the factors related to the management system (52.84 ± 11.24) and the ward environment (44.0 ± 10.89) are respectively less effective. The difference between these three groups was significant (P = 0.000). In each aforementioned category, the most effective factor on medication error (ranked from the most effective to the least effective) were as follow: The nurse's inadequate attention (98.7%), the errors occurring in the transfer of medication orders from the patient's file to kardex (96.6%) and the ward's heavy workload (86.7%). In this study nurse-related factors were the most effective factors on medication errors, but nurses are one of the members of health-care providing team, so their performance must be considered in the context of the health-care system like work force condition, rules and regulations, drug manufacturing that might impact nurses performance, so it could not be possible to prevent medication errors without paying attention to our health-care system in a holistic approach.

  15. Quantum error correction for beginners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Simon J.; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae

    2013-07-01

    Quantum error correction (QEC) and fault-tolerant quantum computation represent one of the most vital theoretical aspects of quantum information processing. It was well known from the early developments of this exciting field that the fragility of coherent quantum systems would be a catastrophic obstacle to the development of large-scale quantum computers. The introduction of quantum error correction in 1995 showed that active techniques could be employed to mitigate this fatal problem. However, quantum error correction and fault-tolerant computation is now a much larger field and many new codes, techniques, and methodologies have been developed to implement error correction for large-scale quantum algorithms. In response, we have attempted to summarize the basic aspects of quantum error correction and fault-tolerance, not as a detailed guide, but rather as a basic introduction. The development in this area has been so pronounced that many in the field of quantum information, specifically researchers who are new to quantum information or people focused on the many other important issues in quantum computation, have found it difficult to keep up with the general formalisms and methodologies employed in this area. Rather than introducing these concepts from a rigorous mathematical and computer science framework, we instead examine error correction and fault-tolerance largely through detailed examples, which are more relevant to experimentalists today and in the near future.

  16. Medical Error and Moral Luck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbeling, Dieneke

    2016-09-01

    This paper addresses the concept of moral luck. Moral luck is discussed in the context of medical error, especially an error of omission that occurs frequently, but only rarely has adverse consequences. As an example, a failure to compare the label on a syringe with the drug chart results in the wrong medication being administered and the patient dies. However, this error may have previously occurred many times with no tragic consequences. Discussions on moral luck can highlight conflicting intuitions. Should perpetrators receive a harsher punishment because of an adverse outcome, or should they be dealt with in the same way as colleagues who have acted similarly, but with no adverse effects? An additional element to the discussion, specifically with medical errors, is that according to the evidence currently available, punishing individual practitioners does not seem to be effective in preventing future errors. The following discussion, using relevant philosophical and empirical evidence, posits a possible solution for the moral luck conundrum in the context of medical error: namely, making a distinction between the duty to make amends and assigning blame. Blame should be assigned on the basis of actual behavior, while the duty to make amends is dependent on the outcome.

  17. Error image aware content restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sungwoo; Lee, Moonsik; Jung, Byunghee

    2015-12-01

    As the resolution of TV significantly increased, content consumers have become increasingly sensitive to the subtlest defect in TV contents. This rising standard in quality demanded by consumers has posed a new challenge in today's context where the tape-based process has transitioned to the file-based process: the transition necessitated digitalizing old archives, a process which inevitably produces errors such as disordered pixel blocks, scattered white noise, or totally missing pixels. Unsurprisingly, detecting and fixing such errors require a substantial amount of time and human labor to meet the standard demanded by today's consumers. In this paper, we introduce a novel, automated error restoration algorithm which can be applied to different types of classic errors by utilizing adjacent images while preserving the undamaged parts of an error image as much as possible. We tested our method to error images detected from our quality check system in KBS(Korean Broadcasting System) video archive. We are also implementing the algorithm as a plugin of well-known NLE(Non-linear editing system), which is a familiar tool for quality control agent.

  18. Hypertension in Juba, South Sudan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cardiovascular disease, stroke and renal failure are costly both to patients and to health systems that are already under strain. Building a body of data on the prevalence of hypertension in these countries is of fundamental importance for planning .... bleeding and for babies with anaemia and decompensated heart failure.

  19. Intraabdominal hypertension og abdominalt kompartmentsyndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Morten; Hillingsø, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Intraabdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are rare conditions with high mortality. IAH is an intraabdominal pressure (IAP) above 12 mmHg and ACS an IAP above 20 mmHg with evidence of organ dysfunction. IAP is measured indirectly via the bladder or stomach. Various...

  20. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ankles A bluish color on your lips and skin Diagnosis Your doctor will diagnose pulmonary hypertension (PH) based ... and legs for swelling and your lips and skin for a bluish color. These are signs of ... and procedures to confirm a diagnosis of PH and to look for its underlying ...

  1. Management of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Judge, Eoin P

    2013-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex disease with a high mortality. Management of this disease is underpinned by supportive and general therapies delivered by multidisciplinary teams in specialist centres. In recent years, a number of PAH-specific therapies have improved patient outcomes. This article will discuss the management of PAH in the context of relevant recently published studies in this area.

  2. Hypertensive crisis secondary to pheochromocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, Christopher E; Griffin, Laura A; Shake, Jay G; Orr, Wayne S

    2017-07-01

    Pheochromocytoma is an uncommon tumor of the adrenal glands that can present with headaches, sweating, palpitations, and paroxysmal hypertension. Pheochromocytoma crisis can lead to cardiomyopathy, pulmonary edema, and even total circulatory collapse. We describe a patient with hypoxic respiratory failure requiring extracorporeal membrane oxygenation to stabilize until the pheochromocytoma was discovered and treated.

  3. Hypertensive disorders in twin pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Santema (Job); E. Koppelaar (Elin); H.C.S. Wallenburg (Henk)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare the incidence and severity of pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders in twin pregnancy and in singleton gestation. Study design: Case-control study in the setting of a University Hospital. Each pregnancy of a consecutive series of 187 twin pregnancies attending

  4. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/258116129; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should

  5. Hypertension control in brazilian publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinho, Natália de Alencar; Pierin, Angela Maria Geraldo, E-mail: pierin@usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo, Escola de Enfermagem, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Hypertension is a major public health problem due to its high prevalence and cardiovascular complications. Its treatment is aimed at reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, its goal being to maintain blood pressure levels below 140/90 mm Hg. Hypertension control in Brazil is low, and nationwide rates are unknown. The objective of this review was to provide an overview on hypertension control in Brazil from publications in a database. We identified 45 publications. In population-based studies, the highest control rate (57.6%) was reported in a multicenter study in 100 municipalities and the city of São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo state (52.4%), while the lowest rates (around 10%) were identified in microregions of the Rio Grande do Sul state and in the city of Tubarão, Santa Catarina state. In conclusion, the studies assessed showed a wide variation in hypertension control rates. It is worth noting that the comparison between studies was a major limiting factor, because of the different methods used.

  6. Labetalol for hypertension in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Laura A; Namouz-Haddad, Shirin; Cao, Vivien; Koren, Gideon; von Dadelszen, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Labetalol is one of the most commonly used antihypertensive medications for the treatment of hypertension during pregnancy, an increasingly common and leading cause of maternal mortality and morbidity worldwide. The literature reviewed included the 2014 Canadian national pregnancy hypertension guideline and its references. The additional published literature was retrieved through searches of Medline, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., pregnancy, hypertension, pre-eclampsia, pregnancy toxemias) and key words (e.g., diagnosis, evaluation, classification, prediction, prevention, prognosis, treatment, and postpartum follow-up).Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, and observational studies published in French or English, Jan-Mar/14. The unpublished literature was identified by searching websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. We evaluated the impact of interventions on substantive clinical outcomes for mothers and babies. Labetalol is a reasonable choice for treatment of severe or non-severe hypertension in pregnancy. However, we should continue our search for other therapeutic options.

  7. Medication Distribution in Hospital: Errors Observed X Errors Perceived

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. N. Silva

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The aim of the present study was to compare errors committed in the distribution of medicationsat a hospital pharmacy with those perceived by staff members involved in the distributionprocess. Medications distributed to the medical and surgical wards were analyzed. The drugswere dispensed in individualized doses per patient, separated by administration time in boxes orplastic bags for 24 hours of care and using the carbon copy of the prescription. Nineteen staffmembers involved in the drug-dispensing process were also interviewed. In the observationphase, 1963 drugs dispensed in 259 prescriptions were analyzed, with a total of 61 dispensingerrors (3.2% of the medications. The most frequent errors were omission of the prescribedmedication (23% and distribution of non-prescribed medication (14.8%. In the interviews, themain errors perceived by the staff were medications dispensed at a concentration other thanthat prescribed (22% and the distribution of non-prescribed medication or medication differentfrom that prescribed (20%. Differences were found between the most frequent errors observedand those reported by staff members. Nonetheless, the views of the staff proved coherent withthe literature on this issue.Keywords: medication errors, hospital medication system.

  8. Portal hypertensive polyps: distinct entity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarapurkar, Anjali D; Amarapurkar, Deepak; Choksi, Mehul; Bhatt, Nirav; Amarapurkar, Pooja

    2013-05-01

    Gastric mucosal changes in portal hypertension (PH) are well known, but gastroduodenal polyps in PH are rarely described. This study aims to estimate prevalence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) polyps in patients with PH of any etiology and to evaluate the role of angiogenesis in portal hypertensive polyps. This is a retrospective analysis of all patients undergoing upper GI endoscopy to compare the etiology of the polyps in the portal hypertensive group vs. those without PH. The diagnosis of polyps was done using standard histological criteria. Another part of the study consisted of prospective analysis of vascular proliferative marker CD 34 and morphometry in 47 patients. A total of 3,811 upper GI endoscopies were done of which 121 patients (3.2 %) had polyps in upper GI tract. In patients with PH (=631), polyps were noted in 16, portal hypertensive polyps in 9, hyperplastic in 6, and fundic gland polyp in 1. In the patients without PH (n = 3,180), polyps of various etiologies were noted in 105 patients. The prevalence of polyps of all causes was similar in both groups (2.5 % vs. 3.3 %, p = 0.3957). Prevalence of hyperplastic polyps was similar in PH (0.95 %) and non-PH group (1.3 %). On immunohistochemistry, PH polyps and PH gastric mucosa had significantly higher vessel diameter of >50 μm, increased vascular density as compared to non-portal hypertensive polyps (PHP) and normal gastric mucosa. PHP are definite identifiable lesion in patients of cirrhosis with PH. PHP are probably related to increased angiogenesis in gastric mucosa.

  9. Dexmedetomidine for Refractory Intracranial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomer, Kendra J; Sebat, Christian M; Adams, Jason Y; Duby, Jeremiah J; Shahlaie, Kiarash; Louie, Erin L

    2017-01-01

    Dexmedetomidine (DEX) is a selective α2 adrenergic agonist that is commonly used for sedation in the intensive care unit (ICU). The role of DEX for adjunctive treatment of refractory intracranial hypertension is poorly defined. The primary objective of this study was to determine the effect of DEX on the need for rescue therapy (ie, hyperosmolar boluses, extraventricular drain [EVD] drainages) for refractory intracranial hypertension. Secondary objectives included the number of intracranial pressure (ICP) excursions, bradycardic, hypotensive, and compromised cerebral perfusion pressure episodes. This retrospective cohort study evaluated patients admitted to the neurosurgical ICU from August 1, 2009, to July 29, 2015, and who received DEX for refractory intracranial hypertension. The objectives were compared between the 2 time periods-before (pre-DEX) and during therapy (DEX). Twenty-three patients with 26 episodes of refractory intracranial hypertension met the inclusion criteria. The number of hyperosmolar boluses was decreased after DEX therapy was initiated. Mannitol boluses required were statistically reduced (1 vs 0.5, P = .03); however, reduction in hypertonic boluses was not statistically significant (1.3 vs 0.9, P = .2). The mean number of EVD drainages per 24 hours was not significantly different between the time periods (15.7 vs 14.0, P = .35). The rate of ICP excursions did not differ between the 2 groups (24.3 vs 22.5, P = .62). When compared to pre-DEX data, there was no difference in the median number of hypotensive (0 vs 0), bradycardic (0 vs 0), or compromised cerebral perfusion pressure episodes (0.5 vs 1.0). Dexmedetomidine may avoid increases in the need for rescue therapy when used as an adjunctive treatment of refractory intracranial hypertension without compromising hemodynamics.

  10. Misconceptions and facts about treating hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argulian, Edgar; Grossman, Ehud; Messerli, Franz H

    2015-05-01

    Hypertension is a powerful risk factor strongly linked to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Because of its high prevalence, health care providers at many levels are involved in treating hypertension. Distinct progress has been made in improving the rates of hypertension awareness and treatment over years, but the overall control of hypertension remains inadequate. Several recent guidelines from different sources have been put forward in an attempt to bridge the gap between existing evidence and clinical practice. Despite this effort, several misconceptions about treating hypertensive cardiovascular disease continue to persist among clinicians. This review highlights some of the misconceptions regarding antihypertensive therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Predictors of Errors of Novice Java Programmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringula, Rex P.; Manabat, Geecee Maybelline A.; Tolentino, Miguel Angelo A.; Torres, Edmon L.

    2012-01-01

    This descriptive study determined which of the sources of errors would predict the errors committed by novice Java programmers. Descriptive statistics revealed that the respondents perceived that they committed the identified eighteen errors infrequently. Thought error was perceived to be the main source of error during the laboratory programming…

  12. Learning time-dependent noise to reduce logical errors: real time error rate estimation in quantum error correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Ming-Xia; Li, Ying

    2017-12-01

    Quantum error correction is important to quantum information processing, which allows us to reliably process information encoded in quantum error correction codes. Efficient quantum error correction benefits from the knowledge of error rates. We propose a protocol for monitoring error rates in real time without interrupting the quantum error correction. Any adaptation of the quantum error correction code or its implementation circuit is not required. The protocol can be directly applied to the most advanced quantum error correction techniques, e.g. surface code. A Gaussian processes algorithm is used to estimate and predict error rates based on error correction data in the past. We find that using these estimated error rates, the probability of error correction failures can be significantly reduced by a factor increasing with the code distance.

  13. Somatic gene therapy for hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips M.I.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy for hypertension is needed for the next generation of antihypertensive drugs. Current drugs, although effective, have poor compliance, are expensive and short-lasting (hours or one day. Gene therapy offers a way to produce long-lasting antihypertensive effects (weeks, months or years. We are currently using two strategies: a antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (AS-ODN and b antisense DNA delivered in viral vectors to inhibit genes associated with vasoconstrictive properties. It is not necessary to know all the genes involved in hypertension, since many years of experience with drugs show which genes need to be controlled. AS-ODN are short, single-stranded DNA that can be injected in naked form or in liposomes. AS-ODN, targeted to angiotensin type 1 receptors (AT1-R, angiotensinogen (AGT, angiotensin converting enzyme, and ß1-adrenergic receptors effectively reduce hypertension in rat models (SHR, 2K-1C and cold-induced hypertension. A single dose is effective up to one month when delivered with liposomes. No side effects or toxic effects have been detected, and repeated injections can be given. For the vector, adeno-associated virus (AAV is used with a construct to include a CMV promoter, antisense DNA to AGT or AT1-R and a reporter gene. Results in SHR demonstrate reduction and slowing of development of hypertension, with a single dose administration. Left ventricular hypertrophy is also reduced by AAV-AGT-AS treatment. Double transgenic mice (human renin plus human AGT with high angiotensin II causing high blood pressure, treated with AAV-AT1-R-AS, show a normalization of blood pressure for over six months with a single injection of vector. We conclude that ODNs will probably be developed first because they can be treated like drugs for the treatment of hypertension with long-term effects. Viral vector delivery needs more engineering to be certain of its safety, but one day may be used for a very prolonged control of blood pressure.

  14. Orbit IMU alignment: Error analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive accuracy analysis of orbit inertial measurement unit (IMU) alignments using the shuttle star trackers was completed and the results are presented. Monte Carlo techniques were used in a computer simulation of the IMU alignment hardware and software systems to: (1) determine the expected Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) manual mode IMU alignment accuracy; (2) investigate the accuracy of alignments in later shuttle flights when the automatic mode of star acquisition may be used; and (3) verify that an analytical model previously used for estimating the alignment error is a valid model. The analysis results do not differ significantly from expectations. The standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 alignments was determined to the 68 arc seconds per axis. This corresponds to a 99.7% probability that the magnitude of the total alignment error is less than 258 arc seconds.

  15. Negligence, genuine error, and litigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sohn DH

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available David H SohnDepartment of Orthopedic Surgery, University of Toledo Medical Center, Toledo, OH, USAAbstract: Not all medical injuries are the result of negligence. In fact, most medical injuries are the result either of the inherent risk in the practice of medicine, or due to system errors, which cannot be prevented simply through fear of disciplinary action. This paper will discuss the differences between adverse events, negligence, and system errors; the current medical malpractice tort system in the United States; and review current and future solutions, including medical malpractice reform, alternative dispute resolution, health courts, and no-fault compensation systems. The current political environment favors investigation of non-cap tort reform remedies; investment into more rational oversight systems, such as health courts or no-fault systems may reap both quantitative and qualitative benefits for a less costly and safer health system.Keywords: medical malpractice, tort reform, no fault compensation, alternative dispute resolution, system errors

  16. Medication errors in pediatric inpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rishoej, Rikke Mie; Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Christesen, Henrik Thybo

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to describe medication errors (MEs) in hospitalized children reported to the national mandatory reporting and learning system, the Danish Patient Safety Database (DPSD). MEs were extracted from DPSD from the 5-year period of 2010-2014. We included reports from public hospitals...... on patients aged 0-17 years and categorized by reporters as medication-related. Reports from psychiatric wards and outpatient clinics were excluded. A ME was defined as any medication-related error occurring in the medication process whether harmful or not. MEs were categorized as harmful if they resulted...... in actual harm or interventions to prevent harm. MEs were further categorized according to occurrence in the medication process, type of error, and the medicines involved. A total of 2071 MEs including 487 harmful MEs were identified. Most MEs occurred during prescribing (40.8%), followed by dispensing (38...

  17. Masked Hypertension and Incident Clinic Hypertension among African Americans in the Jackson Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Marwah; Booth, John N.; Seals, Samantha R.; Spruill, Tanya M.; Viera, Anthony J.; Diaz, Keith M.; Sims, Mario; Muntner, Paul; Shimbo, Daichi

    2016-01-01

    Masked hypertension, defined as non-elevated clinic blood pressure and elevated out-of-clinic blood pressure may be an intermediary stage in the progression from normotension to hypertension. We examined the associations of out-of-clinic blood pressure and masked hypertension using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring with incident clinic hypertension in the Jackson Heart Study, a prospective cohort of African Americans. Analyses included 317 participants with clinic blood pressure hypertension was defined as mean daytime blood pressure ≥135/85mmHg; masked nighttime hypertension as mean nighttime blood pressure ≥120/70mmHg; and masked 24-hour hypertension as mean 24-hour blood pressure ≥130/80mmHg. Incident clinic hypertension, assessed at study visits in 2005–2008 and 2009–2012, was defined as the first visit with clinic systolic/diastolic blood pressure ≥140/90mmHg or antihypertensive medication use. During a median follow-up of 8.1 years, there were 187 (59.0%) incident cases of clinic hypertension. Clinic hypertension developed in 79.2% and 42.2% of participants with and without any masked hypertension, 85.7% and 50.4% with and without masked daytime hypertension, 79.9% and 43.7% with and without masked nighttime hypertension and 85.7% and 48.2% with and without masked 24-hour hypertension, respectively. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) of incident clinic hypertension for any masked hypertension and masked daytime, nighttime, and 24-hour hypertension were 2.13 (1.51–3.02), 1.79 (1.24–2.60), 2.22 (1.58–3.12), and 1.91 (1.32–2.75), respectively. These findings suggest that ambulatory blood pressure monitoring can identify African Americans at increased risk for developing clinic hypertension. PMID:27185746

  18. Masked Hypertension and Incident Clinic Hypertension Among Blacks in the Jackson Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Marwah; Booth, John N; Seals, Samantha R; Spruill, Tanya M; Viera, Anthony J; Diaz, Keith M; Sims, Mario; Muntner, Paul; Shimbo, Daichi

    2016-07-01

    Masked hypertension, defined as nonelevated clinic blood pressure (BP) and elevated out-of-clinic BP may be an intermediary stage in the progression from normotension to hypertension. We examined the associations of out-of-clinic BP and masked hypertension using ambulatory BP monitoring with incident clinic hypertension in the Jackson Heart Study, a prospective cohort of blacks. Analyses included 317 participants with clinic BP hypertension was defined as mean daytime blood pressure ≥135/85 mm Hg, masked night-time hypertension as mean night-time BP ≥120/70 mm Hg, and masked 24-hour hypertension as mean 24-hour BP ≥130/80 mm Hg. Incident clinic hypertension, assessed at study visits in 2005 to 2008 and 2009 to 2012, was defined as the first visit with clinic systolic/diastolic BP ≥140/90 mm Hg or antihypertensive medication use. During a median follow-up of 8.1 years, there were 187 (59.0%) incident cases of clinic hypertension. Clinic hypertension developed in 79.2% and 42.2% of participants with and without any masked hypertension, 85.7% and 50.4% with and without masked daytime hypertension, 79.9% and 43.7% with and without masked night-time hypertension, and 85.7% and 48.2% with and without masked 24-hour hypertension, respectively. Multivariable-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of incident clinic hypertension for any masked hypertension and masked daytime, night-time, and 24-hour hypertension were 2.13 (1.51-3.02), 1.79 (1.24-2.60), 2.22 (1.58-3.12), and 1.91 (1.32-2.75), respectively. These findings suggest that ambulatory BP monitoring can identify blacks at increased risk for developing clinic hypertension. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Reward positivity: Reward prediction error or salience prediction error?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Sepideh; Holroyd, Clay B

    2016-08-01

    The reward positivity is a component of the human ERP elicited by feedback stimuli in trial-and-error learning and guessing tasks. A prominent theory holds that the reward positivity reflects a reward prediction error signal that is sensitive to outcome valence, being larger for unexpected positive events relative to unexpected negative events (Holroyd & Coles, 2002). Although the theory has found substantial empirical support, most of these studies have utilized either monetary or performance feedback to test the hypothesis. However, in apparent contradiction to the theory, a recent study found that unexpected physical punishments also elicit the reward positivity (Talmi, Atkinson, & El-Deredy, 2013). The authors of this report argued that the reward positivity reflects a salience prediction error rather than a reward prediction error. To investigate this finding further, in the present study participants navigated a virtual T maze and received feedback on each trial under two conditions. In a reward condition, the feedback indicated that they would either receive a monetary reward or not and in a punishment condition the feedback indicated that they would receive a small shock or not. We found that the feedback stimuli elicited a typical reward positivity in the reward condition and an apparently delayed reward positivity in the punishment condition. Importantly, this signal was more positive to the stimuli that predicted the omission of a possible punishment relative to stimuli that predicted a forthcoming punishment, which is inconsistent with the salience hypothesis. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  20. A Hybrid Unequal Error Protection / Unequal Error Resilience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admpather

    Following that Unequal Error Protection against channel noise is provided to the layers by the use of ... of the Peak to Peak Signal to Noise power Ratio (PSNR) and the Mean Structural Similarity. Index (MSSIM) metric. Keywords: ..... compensation. IEEE Trans. on Circuits and Systems for Video Technology. pp. 438–452.

  1. Student Errors in Fractions and Possible Causes of These Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Nuri Can; Yazlik, Derya Ozlem

    2017-01-01

    In this study, it was aimed to determine the errors and misunderstandings of 5th and 6th grade middle school students in fractions and operations with fractions. For this purpose, the case study model, which is a qualitative research design, was used in the research. In the study, maximum diversity sampling, which is a purposeful sampling method,…

  2. Medication errors: definitions and classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Jeffrey K

    2009-01-01

    To understand medication errors and to identify preventive strategies, we need to classify them and define the terms that describe them. The four main approaches to defining technical terms consider etymology, usage, previous definitions, and the Ramsey–Lewis method (based on an understanding of theory and practice). A medication error is ‘a failure in the treatment process that leads to, or has the potential to lead to, harm to the patient’. Prescribing faults, a subset of medication errors, should be distinguished from prescription errors. A prescribing fault is ‘a failure in the prescribing [decision-making] process that leads to, or has the potential to lead to, harm to the patient’. The converse of this, ‘balanced prescribing’ is ‘the use of a medicine that is appropriate to the patient's condition and, within the limits created by the uncertainty that attends therapeutic decisions, in a dosage regimen that optimizes the balance of benefit to harm’. This excludes all forms of prescribing faults, such as irrational, inappropriate, and ineffective prescribing, underprescribing and overprescribing. A prescription error is ‘a failure in the prescription writing process that results in a wrong instruction about one or more of the normal features of a prescription’. The ‘normal features’ include the identity of the recipient, the identity of the drug, the formulation, dose, route, timing, frequency, and duration of administration. Medication errors can be classified, invoking psychological theory, as knowledge-based mistakes, rule-based mistakes, action-based slips, and memory-based lapses. This classification informs preventive strategies. PMID:19594526

  3. Analysis of Medication Error Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitney, Paul D.; Young, Jonathan; Santell, John; Hicks, Rodney; Posse, Christian; Fecht, Barbara A.

    2004-11-15

    In medicine, as in many areas of research, technological innovation and the shift from paper based information to electronic records has created a climate of ever increasing availability of raw data. There has been, however, a corresponding lag in our abilities to analyze this overwhelming mass of data, and classic forms of statistical analysis may not allow researchers to interact with data in the most productive way. This is true in the emerging area of patient safety improvement. Traditionally, a majority of the analysis of error and incident reports has been carried out based on an approach of data comparison, and starts with a specific question which needs to be answered. Newer data analysis tools have been developed which allow the researcher to not only ask specific questions but also to “mine” data: approach an area of interest without preconceived questions, and explore the information dynamically, allowing questions to be formulated based on patterns brought up by the data itself. Since 1991, United States Pharmacopeia (USP) has been collecting data on medication errors through voluntary reporting programs. USP’s MEDMARXsm reporting program is the largest national medication error database and currently contains well over 600,000 records. Traditionally, USP has conducted an annual quantitative analysis of data derived from “pick-lists” (i.e., items selected from a list of items) without an in-depth analysis of free-text fields. In this paper, the application of text analysis and data analysis tools used by Battelle to analyze the medication error reports already analyzed in the traditional way by USP is described. New insights and findings were revealed including the value of language normalization and the distribution of error incidents by day of the week. The motivation for this effort is to gain additional insight into the nature of medication errors to support improvements in medication safety.

  4. ERROR HANDLING IN INTEGRATION WORKFLOWS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey M. Nazarenko

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation experiments performed while solving multidisciplinary engineering and scientific problems require joint usage of multiple software tools. Further, when following a preset plan of experiment or searching for optimum solu- tions, the same sequence of calculations is run multiple times with various simulation parameters, input data, or conditions while overall workflow does not change. Automation of simulations like these requires implementing of a workflow where tool execution and data exchange is usually controlled by a special type of software, an integration environment or plat- form. The result is an integration workflow (a platform-dependent implementation of some computing workflow which, in the context of automation, is a composition of weakly coupled (in terms of communication intensity typical subtasks. These compositions can then be decomposed back into a few workflow patterns (types of subtasks interaction. The pat- terns, in their turn, can be interpreted as higher level subtasks.This paper considers execution control and data exchange rules that should be imposed by the integration envi- ronment in the case of an error encountered by some integrated software tool. An error is defined as any abnormal behavior of a tool that invalidates its result data thus disrupting the data flow within the integration workflow. The main requirementto the error handling mechanism implemented by the integration environment is to prevent abnormal termination of theentire workflow in case of missing intermediate results data. Error handling rules are formulated on the basic pattern level and on the level of a composite task that can combine several basic patterns as next level subtasks. The cases where workflow behavior may be different, depending on user's purposes, when an error takes place, and possible error handling op- tions that can be specified by the user are also noted in the work.

  5. Human Error and Organizational Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alecxandrina DEACONU

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The concern for performance is a topic that raises interest in the businessenvironment but also in other areas that – even if they seem distant from thisworld – are aware of, interested in or conditioned by the economy development.As individual performance is very much influenced by the human resource, wechose to analyze in this paper the mechanisms that generate – consciously or not–human error nowadays.Moreover, the extremely tense Romanian context,where failure is rather a rule than an exception, made us investigate thephenomenon of generating a human error and the ways to diminish its effects.

  6. Malignant hypertension and hypertensive encephalopathy in primary aldosteronism caused by adrenal adenoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortolotto Luiz Aparecido

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Two cases are reported as follows: 1 1 female patient with accelerated-malignant hypertension secondary to an aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma; and 2 1 female patient with adrenal adenoma, severe hypertension, and hypertensive encephalopathy. This association is a rare clinical finding, and malignant hypertension may modify the hormonal characteristic of primary aldosteronism, making its diagnosis more difficult. The diagnosis of primary aldosteronism should be considered in patients with malignant hypertension or hypertensive encephalopathy if persistent hypokalemia occurs. Identification of primary aldosteronism is of paramount importance for the patient's evolution, because the surgical treatment makes the prognosis more favorable.

  7. Non-cirrhotic portal hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarin, Shiv K; Khanna, Rajeev

    2014-05-01

    Non-cirrhotic portal hypertension (NCPH) encompasses a wide range of disorders, primarily vascular in origin, presenting with portal hypertension (PHT), but with preserved liver synthetic functions and near normal hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG). Non-cirrhotic portal fibrosis/Idiopathic PHT (NCPF/IPH) and extrahepatic portal venous obstruction (EHPVO) are two prototype disorders in the category. Etiopathogenesis in both of them centers on infections and prothrombotic states. Presentation and management strategies focus on repeated well tolerated episodes of variceal bleed and moderate to massive splenomegaly and other features of PHT. While the long-term prognosis is generally good in NCPF, portal biliopathy and parenchymal extinction after prolonged PHT makes outcome somewhat less favorable in EHPVO. While hepatic schistosomiasis, congenital hepatic fibrosis and nodular regenerative hyperplasia have their distinctive features, they often present with NCPH. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. [Intracranial hypertension in Proteus syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dandine, J-B; James, S; Van Garsse, A; Born, J-D

    2007-11-01

    Proteus syndrome, described for the first time in 1979, is a sporadic congenital poly-malformation syndrome named for its highly variable manifestations. We report the case of a 36-year-old male patient with several malformations including skull hyperostosis and huge frontal sinus hypertrophy compressing the brain. He complained of increasing headache for 5 years. Cerebrospinal fluid pressure monitoring revealed severe hypertension. The patient underwent frontoparietal craniectomy, which allowed partial decompression. Postoperatively headaches decreased and the intracranial pressure normalized. Proteus syndrome is a genetic disease with a mosaic pattern. Only a hundred cases have been reported, mostly in childhood. Common manifestations include disproportionate overgrowth of the limbs and the skull, various subcutaneous tumors, vascular, renal and pulmonary malformations. Brain abnormalities are not common in this syndrome. When present, retardation or seizure disorders are typically seen. Intracranial hypertension is described for the first time in this syndrome.

  9. Metabolic Syndrome, Androgens, and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and met...

  10. Beta-blockers in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, C Venkata S

    2010-12-15

    Beta blockers have been used in the treatment of cardiovascular conditions for decades. Despite a long history and status as a guideline-recommended treatment option for hypertension, recent meta-analyses have brought into question whether β blockers are still an appropriate therapy given outcomes data from other antihypertensive drug classes. However, β blockers are a heterogenous class of agents with diverse pharmacologic and physiologic properties. Much of the unfavorable data revealed in the recent meta-analyses were gleaned from studies involving nonvasodilating, traditional β blockers, such as atenolol. However, findings with traditional β blockers may not be extrapolated to other members of the class, particularly those agents with vasodilatory activity. Vasodilatory β blockers (i.e., carvedilol and nebivolol) reduce blood pressure in large part through reducing systemic vascular resistance rather than by decreasing cardiac output, as is observed with traditional β blockers. Vasodilating ability may also ameliorate some of the concerns associated with traditional β blockade, such as the adverse effects on metabolic and lipid parameters, including an increased risk for new-onset diabetes. Furthermore, vasodilating ability is physiologically relevant and important in treating a condition with common co-morbidities involving metabolic and lipid abnormalities such as hypertension. In patients with hypertension and diabetes or coronary artery disease, vasodilating β blockers provide effective blood pressure control with neutral or beneficial effects on important parameters for the co-morbid disease. In conclusion, it is time for a reexamination of the clinical evidence for the use of β blockers in hypertension, recognizing that there are patients for whom β blockers, particularly those with vasodilatory actions, are an appropriate treatment option. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype or a...... antibiotic treatment, signs and symptoms of elevated intracranial pressure resolved completely. Syphilis is a rare, but very important, differential diagnosis that in this case was clinically indistinguishable from IIH....

  12. Food Patterns, Lifestyle, and Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golnaz Arjmand

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available High blood pressure (BP is considered as a strong predisposing factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD Environmental and genetic factors may have a role in high blood pressures. Nutrition has a potential role in the prevention of hypertension and its sequelae. Effect of lowering blood pressure by modification of complex dietary patterns may be the result of synergism between the various components of certain foods or food combinations rather than of the specific effect of a particular nutrient. Vegetarian Diet, Mediterranean Diet, and Dash Diet are three food patterns which have been associated with lowering BP. Vegetarian Diet are characterized by high intake of legumes, nuts, vegetables, and fruits. A relatively high polyunsaturated to saturated fat ratio will make by this kind of diet. Low fat content and high potassium, magnesium, and fiber content of this diet, all factors possibly cooperating to the reduction of blood pressure. Mediterranean Diet has low animal and dairy products as well as saturated fatty acids and cholesterol; it is rich in plant food, legumes, fiber, and antioxidant vitamins with olive oil as the main source of fat. The dietary approaches to stop hypertension (DASH is a success process in control of hypertension, which emphasizes vegetables and fruits and dairy foods with low-fat, it also includes more nuts, poultry, fish, and, whole grains and lower amounts of red meat, fats, sweets, and sugar-containing beverages. DASH diet is poorer in total and saturated fat and cholesterol and richer in potassium, magnesium, calcium, and fiber in comparison to the habitual Western diet. In conclusion, although multiple dietary factors can influence on BP and each factor has a modest effect; the combined effects of those factors can be substantial. In the current study, we review food patterns, lifestyle, and their relationship with hypertension and the possible mechanisms involved.

  13. The valuation error in the compound values

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Ciuna

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In appraising the “valore di trasformazione” the valuation error is composed by the error on market value and the error on construction cost.  In appraising the “valore complementare” the valuation error is composed by the error on market value of complex real property and on market value of the residual part. The final error is a function of the partial errors and it can be studied using estimative and market ratios. The application of the compounds values to real estate appraisal misleads unacceptable errors if carried out with the expertise.

  14. Emergency Management of Hypertension in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Systemic arterial hypertension in children has traditionally been thought to be secondary in origin. Increased incidence of risk factors like obesity, sedentary life-styles, and faulty dietary habits has led to increased prevalence of the primary arterial hypertension (PAH, particularly in adolescent age children. PAH has become a global epidemic worldwide imposing huge economic constraint on health care. Sudden acute increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure can lead to hypertensive crisis. While it generally pertains to secondary hypertension, occurrence of hypertensive crisis in PAH is however rare in children. Hypertensive crisis has been further subclassified depending on presence or absence of end-organ damage into hypertensive emergency or urgency. Both hypertensive emergencies and urgencies are known to cause significant morbidity and mortality. Increasing awareness among the physicians, targeted at investigation of the pathophysiology of hypertension and its complications, better screening methods, generation, and implementation of novel treatment modalities will impact overall outcomes. In this paper, we discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, and management of hypertensive crisis in children. An extensive database search using keywords was done to obtain the information.

  15. Emergency Management of Hypertension in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dinesh; Akingbola, Olugbenga; Yosypiv, Ihor; El-Dahr, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension in children has traditionally been thought to be secondary in origin. Increased incidence of risk factors like obesity, sedentary life-styles, and faulty dietary habits has led to increased prevalence of the primary arterial hypertension (PAH), particularly in adolescent age children. PAH has become a global epidemic worldwide imposing huge economic constraint on health care. Sudden acute increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure can lead to hypertensive crisis. While it generally pertains to secondary hypertension, occurrence of hypertensive crisis in PAH is however rare in children. Hypertensive crisis has been further subclassified depending on presence or absence of end-organ damage into hypertensive emergency or urgency. Both hypertensive emergencies and urgencies are known to cause significant morbidity and mortality. Increasing awareness among the physicians, targeted at investigation of the pathophysiology of hypertension and its complications, better screening methods, generation, and implementation of novel treatment modalities will impact overall outcomes. In this paper, we discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, and management of hypertensive crisis in children. An extensive database search using keywords was done to obtain the information. PMID:22577545

  16. [Hypertensive crisis in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypczyk, Piotr; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Daniel, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Hypertensive crisis is a sudden rise in blood pressure above 99 c. for sex, age and height +5 mm Hg. Depending on patient's symptoms, hypertensive crisis can be divided into hypertensive emergency severe arterial hypertension with target organ insufficiency and/r damage (central nervous system, heart, kidney, eye), and hypertensive urgency - severe arterial hypertension without target organ insufficiency and damage with non-specific symptoms like: headaches, vertigo, nasal bleeding, nausea, and vomiting. The most common causes of hypertensive crisis in neonates and infants are renal artery thrombosis, broncho-pulmonary dysplasia, and coarctation of aorta; in older children - kidney diseases and renal artery stenosis. In neonates and infants symptoms of cardiac failure predominate, whereas in older children symptoms from central nervous system (headaches, nausea, vomiting, changes in level of consciousness, seizures, focal deficits). Hypertensive crisis is treated with fast- and short-acting medications; 25% reduction of blood pressure within first 8 hours is recommended, with complete normalization within 24-48 hours. Hypertensive emergency should be treated with intravenous agents (labetalol, hydralazine, nicardipine, and sodium nitroprusside), hypertensive urgency with intravenous or oral agents like nifedipine, isradipine, clonidine and minoxidil. Nicardipine is a first-choice medication in neonates.

  17. Emergency management of hypertension in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dinesh; Akingbola, Olugbenga; Yosypiv, Ihor; El-Dahr, Samir

    2012-01-01

    Systemic arterial hypertension in children has traditionally been thought to be secondary in origin. Increased incidence of risk factors like obesity, sedentary life-styles, and faulty dietary habits has led to increased prevalence of the primary arterial hypertension (PAH), particularly in adolescent age children. PAH has become a global epidemic worldwide imposing huge economic constraint on health care. Sudden acute increase in systolic and diastolic blood pressure can lead to hypertensive crisis. While it generally pertains to secondary hypertension, occurrence of hypertensive crisis in PAH is however rare in children. Hypertensive crisis has been further subclassified depending on presence or absence of end-organ damage into hypertensive emergency or urgency. Both hypertensive emergencies and urgencies are known to cause significant morbidity and mortality. Increasing awareness among the physicians, targeted at investigation of the pathophysiology of hypertension and its complications, better screening methods, generation, and implementation of novel treatment modalities will impact overall outcomes. In this paper, we discuss the etiology, pathogenesis, and management of hypertensive crisis in children. An extensive database search using keywords was done to obtain the information.

  18. The immunological basis of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Iturbe, Bernardo; Pons, Héctor; Quiroz, Yasmir; Johnson, Richard J

    2014-11-01

    A large number of investigations have demonstrated the participation of the immune system in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Studies focusing on macrophages and Toll-like receptors have documented involvement of the innate immunity. The requirements of antigen presentation and co-stimulation, the critical importance of T cell-driven inflammation, and the demonstration, in specific conditions, of agonistic antibodies directed to angiotensin II type 1 receptors and adrenergic receptors support the role of acquired immunity. Experimental findings support the concept that the balance between T cell-induced inflammation and T cell suppressor responses is critical for the regulation of blood pressure levels. Expression of neoantigens in response to inflammation, as well as surfacing of intracellular immunogenic proteins, such as heat shock proteins, could be responsible for autoimmune reactivity in the kidney, arteries, and central nervous system. Persisting, low-grade inflammation in these target organs may lead to impaired pressure natriuresis, an increase in sympathetic activity, and vascular endothelial dysfunction that may be the cause of chronic elevation of blood pressure in essential hypertension. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. High-altitude pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X-Q. Xu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available High-altitude pulmonary hypertension (HAPH is a specific disease affecting populations that live at high elevations. The prevalence of HAPH among those residing at high altitudes needs to be further defined. Whereas reduction in nitric oxide production may be one mechanism for the development of HAPH, the roles of endothelin-1 and prostaglandin I2 pathways in the pathogenesis of HAPH deserve further study. Although some studies have suggested that genetic factors contribute to the pathogenesis of HAPH, data published to date are insufficient for the identification of a significant number of gene polymorphims in HAPH. The clinical presentation of HAPH is nonspecific. Exertional dyspnoea is the most common symptom and signs related to right heart failure are common in late stages of HAPH. Echocardiography is the most useful screening tool and right heart catheterisation is the gold standard for the diagnosis of HAPH. The ideal management for HAPH is migration to lower altitudes. Phosphodiesterase 5 is an attractive drug target for the treatment of HAPH. In addition, acetazolamide is a promising therapeutic agent for high-altitude pulmonary hypertension. To date, no evidence has confirmed whether endothelin-receptor antagonists have efficacy in the treatment of high-altitude pulmonary hypertension.

  20. Intracranial hypotension and intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuh, Esther L; Dillon, William P

    2010-11-01

    Intracranial pressure (ICP) is the pressure within the intracranial space. Intracranial hypotension is a clinical syndrome in which low cerebrospinal fluid volume (CSF) results in orthostatic headache. Severe cases can result in nausea, vomiting, photophobia, and, rarely, decreased level of consciousness and coma. CSF opening pressure can be within the normal range in spontaneous intracranial hypotension. Imaging tests therefore play a key and decisive role in the diagnosis, as well as treatment, of intracranial hypotension. Intracranial hypertension occurs in a chronic form known as idiopathic intracranial hypertension, as well as in a large variety of neurologic and systemic disorders. Symptoms include headache, nausea and vomiting, blurred vision, and in severe cases, altered level of consciousness that can progress to coma and death. Direct measurements of CSF pressure through lumbar puncture (in idiopathic intracranial hypotension) or invasive ICP monitoring (in acute intracranial hypertension) are the key diagnostic tests. Imaging is used primarily to determine treatable causes of increased ICP, to assess for impending brain herniation, and to evaluate ventricular size. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Papilledema and idiopathic intracranial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Deborah I

    2014-08-01

    Papilledema is one of the most concerning physical examination findings in neurology: it has a broad differential diagnosis of intracranial (and occasionally spinal) pathology associated with increased intracranial pressure. Papilledema impairs axoplasmic flow within the optic nerves and compresses the optic nerves externally; it may lead to profound visual loss. Thus, detection of papilledema and assessment of visual function are essential to patient management. This article reviews the treatment of papilledema-related visual loss in pseudotumor cerebri syndrome, one of the most common causes of papilledema encountered by neurologists. Results from the Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension Trial (IIHTT), the first randomized, double-masked, placebo-controlled trial for the treatment of patients with mild visual loss from idiopathic intracranial hypertension, were published in April 2014. The IIHTT provides the first evidence-based treatment recommendations, showing the benefit of acetazolamide and weight loss for improving visual status in patients with mild visual field loss from idiopathic intracranial hypertension. A detailed ophthalmic examination, including perimetry, is critical to the evaluation, treatment, and assessment of treatment response in patients with papilledema.

  2. Capsaicin and arterial hypertensive crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patanè, Salvatore; Marte, Filippo; La Rosa, Felice Carmelo; La Rocca, Roberto

    2010-10-08

    Chili peppers are rich in capsaicin. The potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is stored in a population of C-fiber afferents that are sensitive to capsaicin. CGRP and peptides released from cardiac C fibers have a beneficial effect in myocardial ischemia and reperfusion. It has been reported that capsaicin pretreatment can deplete cardiac C-fiber peptide stores. Furthermore, it has also been reported that capsaicin-treated pigs have significantly increased mean arterial blood pressure compared with controls, and that the decrease in CGRP synthesis and release contributes to the elevated blood pressure. A case has also been reported of an arterial hypertensive crisis in a patient with a large ingestion of peppers and chili peppers the day before. We present a case of an arterial hypertensive crisis in a 19-year-old Italian man with an abundant ingestion of peppers and of chili peppers the preceding day. This case describes an unusual pattern of arterial hypertensive crisis due to capsaicin. Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cadmium in blood and hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eum, Ki-Do; Lee, Mi-Sun [Department of Environmental Health, Graduate School of Public Health and Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Paek, Domyung [Department of Environmental Health, Graduate School of Public Health and Institute of Health and Environment, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: paekdm@snu.ac.kr

    2008-12-15

    Objectives:: This study is to examine the effect of cadmium exposure on blood pressure in Korean general population. Methods:: The study population consisted of 958 men and 944 women who participated in the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), in which blood pressure and blood cadmium were measured from each participant. Results:: The mean blood cadmium level was 1.67 {mu}g/L (median level 1.55). The prevalence of hypertension was 26.2%. The blood cadmium level was significantly higher among those subjects with hypertension than those without (mean level 1.77 versus 1.64 {mu}g/dL). After adjusting for covariates, the odds ratio of hypertension comparing the highest to the lowest tertile of cadmium in blood was 1.51 (95% confidence interval 1.13 to 2.05), and a dose-response relationship was observed. Systolic, diastolic, and mean arterial blood pressure were all positively associated with blood cadmium level, and this effect of cadmium on blood pressure was markedly stronger when the kidney function was reduced. Conclusions:: Cadmium exposures at the current level may have increased the blood pressure of Korean general population.

  4. Pulmonary hypertension in dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmadakis, George; Aguilera, Didier; Carceles, Odette; Da Costa Correia, Enrique; Boletis, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in end-stage renal disease patients is associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in dialysis patients is relatively high and varies in different studies from 17% to 49.53% depending on the mode of dialysis and other selection factors, such as the presence of other cardiovascular comorbidities. The etiopathogenic mechanisms that have been studied in relatively small studies mainly include arteriovenous fistula-induced increased cardiac output, which cannot be accomodated by, the spacious under normal conditions pulmonary circulation. Additionally, pulmonary vessels show signs of endothelial dysfunction, dysregulation of vascular tone due to an imbalance in vasoactive substances, and local as well as systemic inflammation. It is also believed that microbubbles escaping from the dialysis circuit can trigger vasoconstriction and vascular sclerosis. The non-specific therapeutic options that proved to be beneficial in pulmonary artery pressure reduction are endothelin inhibitors, phosphodiesterase inhibitor sildenafil, and vasodilatory prostaglandins in various forms. The specific modes of treatment are renal transplantation, size reduction or closure of high-flow arteriovenous fistulas, and transfer from hemodialysis to peritoneal dialysis-a modality that is associated with a lesser prevalence of pulmonary hypertension.

  5. Alarming Prevalence of Emergency Hypertension Levels in the General Public Identified by a Hypertension Awareness Campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caligiuri, Stephanie P B; Austria, Jose Alejandro; Pierce, Grant N

    2017-03-01

    Hypertension is a major cause of mortality and morbidity today. The "silent" nature of hypertension makes it critical to determine its prevalence and its severity in the general public and to identify strategies to identify people unaware of its presence. A mobile hypertension awareness campaign was created to: (i) determine the prevalence and types of hypertension in an urban North American center, (ii) increase hypertension awareness, and (iii) identify reasons for lack of therapy adherence. Mobile clinics were provided at shopping malls, workplaces, hospitals, and community centres to measure blood pressure in the public. Blood pressure recordings were done on a voluntary basis. Of 1097 participants, 50% presented with high blood pressure which was higher than expected. Of particular clinical significance, an unexpectedly large number of participants (2%) exhibited a hypertensive urgency/emergency. Most of these people were not adherent to medications (if their hypertension was detected previously), were unaware of their hypertensive state, and/or unwilling to acknowledge or ignored the clinical significance of the extremely high blood pressure readings. Reasons for lack of adherence included: denial, being unaware of health consequences, and proper management of hypertension. A relatively large segment of an urban population lives unaware of severe emergency levels of hypertension. A public mobile hypertension clinic provides a valuable strategy for identifying hypertension in the general public and for knowledge translation of hypertension management.

  6. Having Fun with Error Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Peter

    2007-01-01

    We present a fun activity that can be used to introduce students to error analysis: the M&M game. Students are told to estimate the number of individual candies plus uncertainty in a bag of M&M's. The winner is the group whose estimate brackets the actual number with the smallest uncertainty. The exercise produces enthusiastic discussions and…

  7. and Correlated Error-Regressor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    in queuing theory and econometrics, where the usual assumption of independent error terms may not be plausible in most cases. Also, when using time-series data on a number of micro-economic units, such as households and service oriented channels, where the stochastic disturbance terms in part reflect variables which ...

  8. Typical errors of ESP users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremina, Svetlana V.; Korneva, Anna A.

    2004-07-01

    The paper presents analysis of the errors made by ESP (English for specific purposes) users which have been considered as typical. They occur as a result of misuse of resources of English grammar and tend to resist. Their origin and places of occurrence have also been discussed.

  9. Learner Corpora without Error Tagging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastelli, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The article explores the possibility of adopting a form-to-function perspective when annotating learner corpora in order to get deeper insights about systematic features of interlanguage. A split between forms and functions (or categories is desirable in order to avoid the "comparative fallacy" and because – especially in basic varieties – forms may precede functions (e.g., what resembles to a "noun" might have a different function or a function may show up in unexpected forms. In the computer-aided error analysis tradition, all items produced by learners are traced to a grid of error tags which is based on the categories of the target language. Differently, we believe it is possible to record and make retrievable both words and sequence of characters independently from their functional-grammatical label in the target language. For this purpose at the University of Pavia we adapted a probabilistic POS tagger designed for L1 on L2 data. Despite the criticism that this operation can raise, we found that it is better to work with "virtual categories" rather than with errors. The article outlines the theoretical background of the project and shows some examples in which some potential of SLA-oriented (non error-based tagging will be possibly made clearer.

  10. Serial and spatial error correlation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elhorst, J. Paul

    This paper demonstrates that jointly modeling serial and spatial error correlation results in a trade-off between the serial and spatial autocorrelation coefficients. Ignoring this trade-off causes inefficiency and may lead to nonstationarity. (C) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Finding errors in big data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puts, Marco; Daas, Piet; de Waal, A.G.

    No data source is perfect. Mistakes inevitably creep in. Spotting errors is hard enough when dealing with survey responses from several thousand people, but the difficulty is multiplied hugely when that mysterious beast Big Data comes into play. Statistics Netherlands is about to publish its first

  12. Magnitude control of commutator errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, Bernardus J.; Wesseling, P.; Oñate, E.; Périaux, J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-uniform filtering of the Navier-Stokes equations expresses itself, next to the turbulent stresses, in additional closure terms known as commutator errors. These terms require explicit subgrid modeling if the non-uniformity of the filter is sufficiently pronounced. We derive expressions for the

  13. Theory of Test Translation Error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano-Flores, Guillermo; Backhoff, Eduardo; Contreras-Nino, Luis Angel

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we present a theory of test translation whose intent is to provide the conceptual foundation for effective, systematic work in the process of test translation and test translation review. According to the theory, translation error is multidimensional; it is not simply the consequence of defective translation but an inevitable fact…

  14. Error signals driving locomotor adaptation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choi, Julia T; Jensen, Peter; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    anaesthesia (n = 5) instead of repetitive nerve stimulation. Foot anaesthesia reduced ankle adaptation to external force perturbations during walking. Our results suggest that cutaneous input plays a role in force perception, and may contribute to the 'error' signal involved in driving walking adaptation when...

  15. What Is a Reading Error?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labov, William; Baker, Bettina

    2010-01-01

    Early efforts to apply knowledge of dialect differences to reading stressed the importance of the distinction between differences in pronunciation and mistakes in reading. This study develops a method of estimating the probability that a given oral reading that deviates from the text is a true reading error by observing the semantic impact of the…

  16. Error Detection in Numeric Codes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    engineering at IIT Patna. His interests include watching and playing cricket, listening to music and playing sitar. His research interests include cryptography and pattern recognition. This article investigates the e±ciency of four com- monly used methods for detecting the most fre- quent types of errors committed by individuals.

  17. Error and its meaning in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Angi M; Crowder, Christian M; Ousley, Stephen D; Houck, Max M

    2014-01-01

    The discussion of "error" has gained momentum in forensic science in the wake of the Daubert guidelines and has intensified with the National Academy of Sciences' Report. Error has many different meanings, and too often, forensic practitioners themselves as well as the courts misunderstand scientific error and statistical error rates, often confusing them with practitioner error (or mistakes). Here, we present an overview of these concepts as they pertain to forensic science applications, discussing the difference between practitioner error (including mistakes), instrument error, statistical error, and method error. We urge forensic practitioners to ensure that potential sources of error and method limitations are understood and clearly communicated and advocate that the legal community be informed regarding the differences between interobserver errors, uncertainty, variation, and mistakes. © 2013 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  18. Hypertension as an autoimmune and inflammatory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Yalcin; Afsar, Baris; Vaziri, Nosratola D; Aslan, Gamze; Yalcin, Can Ege; Covic, Adrian; Kanbay, Mehmet

    2016-08-01

    Hypertension that is considered idiopathic is called essential hypertension and accordingly has no clear culprit for its cause. However, basic research and clinical studies in recent years have expanded our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of essential hypertension. Of these, increased oxidative stress, both in the kidney and arterial wall, closely coupled with inflammatory infiltration now appear to have a prominent role. Discovery of regulatory and interleukin-17-producing T cells has enabled us to better understand the mechanism by which inflammation and autoimmunity, or autoinflammation, lead to the development of hypertension. Despite achieving considerable progress, the intricate interactions between oxidative stress, the immune system and the development of hypertension remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, we summarize recent developments in the pathophysiology of hypertension with a focus on the oxidant stress-autoimmunity-inflammation interaction.

  19. Resistant Hypertension Workup and Approach to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasios Makris

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure above the patient's goal despite the use of 3 or more antihypertensive agents from different classes at optimal doses, one of which should ideally be a diuretic. Evaluation of patients with resistive hypertension should first confirm that they have true resistant hypertension by ruling out or correcting factors associated with pseudoresistance such as white coat hypertension, suboptimal blood pressure measurement technique, poor adherence to prescribed medication, suboptimal dosing of antihypertensive agents or inappropriate combinations, the white coat effect, and clinical inertia. Management includes lifestyle and dietary modification, elimination of medications contributing to resistance, and evaluation of potential secondary causes of hypertension. Pharmacological treatment should be tailored to the patient's profile and focus on the causative pathway of resistance. Patients with uncontrolled hypertension despite receiving an optimal therapy are candidates for newer interventional therapies such as carotid baroreceptor stimulation and renal denervation.

  20. Secondary headaches attributed to arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assarzadegan, Farhad; Hesami, Omid; Aryani, Omid; Mansouri, Behnam; Beladi moghadam, Nahid

    2013-01-01

    Mild (140 to 159/90 to 99 mmHg) or moderate (160 to 179/100 to 109 mmHg) chronic arterial hypertension does not appear to cause headache. Whether moderate hypertension predisposes patients to headache at all remains controversial, but there is little evidence that it does. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in patients with mild and moderate hypertension has shown no convincing relationship between blood pressure fluctuations over a 24-hour period and presence or absence of headache. However, headaches are associated to various disorders that lead to abrupt, severe, and paroxysmal elevations in blood pressure. In this paper, the secondary headaches attributed to acute crises of hypertension and the criteria for diagnosing each of them have been reviewed. These are headaches attributed to pheochromocytoma, hypertensive crisis without encephalopathy, hypertensive encephalopathy, pre-eclampsia, eclampsia, and acute pressure response to exogenous agents. PMID:24250915

  1. Dutch guideline for the management of hypertensive crisis -- 2010 revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Born, B J H; Beutler, J J; Gaillard, C A J M; de Gooijer, A; van den Meiracker, A H; Kroon, A A

    2011-05-01

    Hypertensive crises are divided into hypertensive urgencies and emergencies. Together they form a heterogeneous group of acute hypertensive disorders depending on the presence or type of target organs involved. Despite better treatment options for hypertension, hypertensive crisis and its associated complications remain relatively common. In the Netherlands the number of patients starting renal replacement therapy because of 'malignant hypertension' has increased in the past two decades. In 2003, the first Dutch guideline on hypertensive crisis was released to allow a standardised evidence-based approach for patients presenting with a hypertensive crisis. In this paper we give an overview of the current management of hypertensive crisis and discuss several important changes incorporated in the 2010 revision. These changes include a modification in terminology replacing 'malignant hypertension' with 'hypertensive crisis with retinopathy and reclassification of hypertensive crisis with retinopathy under hypertensive emergencies instead of urgencies. With regard to the treatment of hypertensive emergencies, nicardipine instead of nitroprusside or labetalol is favoured for the management of perioperative hypertension, whereas labetalol has become the drug of choice for the treatment of hypertension associated with pre-eclampsia. For the treatment of hypertensive urgencies, oral administration of nifedipine retard instead of captopril is recommended as first-line therapy. In addition, a section on the management of hypertensive emergencies according to the type of target organ involved has been added. Efforts to increase the awareness and treatment of hypertension in the population at large may lower the incidence of hypertensive crisis and its complications.

  2. Resistance Training in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with Severe Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vanerson Passos Neves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Resistance training (RT has been recommended as a non-pharmacological treatment for moderate hypertension. In spite of the important role of exercise intensity on training prescription, there is still no data regarding the effects of RT intensity on severe hypertension (SH. Objective: This study examined the effects of two RT protocols (vertical ladder climbing, performed at different overloads of maximal weight carried (MWC, on blood pressure (BP and muscle strength of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR with SH. Methods: Fifteen male SHR ENT#091;206 ± 10 mmHg of systolic BP (SBPENT#093; and five Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY; 119 ± 10 mmHg of SBP were divided into 4 groups: sedentary (SED-WKY and SHR (SED-SHR; RT1-SHR training relative to body weight (~40% of MWC; and RT2-SHR training relative to MWC test (~70% of MWC. Systolic BP and heart rate (HR were measured weekly using the tail-cuff method. The progression of muscle strength was determined once every fifteen days. The RT consisted of 3 weekly sessions on non-consecutive days for 12-weeks. Results: Both RT protocols prevented the increase in SBP (delta - 5 and -7 mmHg, respectively; p > 0.05, whereas SBP of the SED-SHR group increased by 19 mmHg (p 0.05. Conclusions: Our data indicated that both RT protocols were effective in preventing chronic elevation of SBP in SH. Additionally, a higher RT overload induced a greater increase in muscle strength.

  3. Management of the hypertensive dental patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagiela, John A; Haymore, T Lant

    2007-01-01

    Hypertension is a common malady and a harbinger of such diseases as heart attack and stroke. Because millions of Americans are not aware they are hypertensive or it is not adequately controlled, dentists can contribute significantly to national health by screening their patients. Dentists must also be cognizant of the implications high blood pressure has for dental practice. Specific treatment recommendations include limiting dental care in patients with severe hypertension, reducing stress, and periodically monitoring blood pressure.

  4. Renin in differential diagnosis of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oparil, S.; Haber, E.

    1971-01-01

    Renin is a proteolytic enzyme secreted by the kidney. Techniques for the direct measurement of renin content of human blood are not available at the present time. Two of the best known causes of remediable hypertension can be diagnosed from abnormalities in renin activity and aldosterone production. In renovascular hypertension, renin secretion is increased because of impaired glomerular perfusion. The renin activity assay, when applied in a carefully controlled fashion, is a useful screening test for treatable causes of hypertension.

  5. Clinical Observation on Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus(Hypertension : Pathophysiology and Treatment)

    OpenAIRE

    奈良, 芳則; 尾崎, 信紘; 山田, 彬; 浜, 斉; 谷, 長行; Nara, Yoshinori; Ozaki, Nobuhiro; Yamada, Akira; Hama, Hitoshi; Tani, Nagayuki

    1989-01-01

    The incidence of hypertension is approximately twice as common in patients with diabetes mellitus as it is in those without. Both hypertension and diabetes mellitus are major risk factors for arteriosclerotic diseases (cerebral infarction, cardiovascular disease etw). A positive correlation exists between the presence of hypertension and retinopathy or nephropathy in patients with diabetes mellitus. This article provides practical approach in the management of hypertension with diabetes melli...

  6. The Sources of Error in Spanish Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justicia, Fernando; Defior, Sylvia; Pelegrina, Santiago; Martos, Francisco J.

    1999-01-01

    Determines the pattern of errors in Spanish spelling. Analyzes and proposes a classification system for the errors made by children in the initial stages of the acquisition of spelling skills. Finds the diverse forms of only 20 Spanish words produces 36% of the spelling errors in Spanish; and substitution is the most frequent type of error. (RS)

  7. Error Analysis of Band Matrix Method

    OpenAIRE

    Taniguchi, Takeo; Soga, Akira

    1984-01-01

    Numerical error in the solution of the band matrix method based on the elimination method in single precision is investigated theoretically and experimentally, and the behaviour of the truncation error and the roundoff error is clarified. Some important suggestions for the useful application of the band solver are proposed by using the results of above error analysis.

  8. Error Correction in Oral Classroom English Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Huang; Xiaodong, Hao; Yu, Liu

    2016-01-01

    As is known to all, errors are inevitable in the process of language learning for Chinese students. Should we ignore students' errors in learning English? In common with other questions, different people hold different opinions. All teachers agree that errors students make in written English are not allowed. For the errors students make in oral…

  9. Pathologists' Perspectives on Disclosing Harmful Pathology Error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dintzis, Suzanne M; Clennon, Emily K; Prouty, Carolyn D; Reich, Lisa M; Elmore, Joann G; Gallagher, Thomas H

    2017-06-01

    - Medical errors are unfortunately common. The US Institute of Medicine proposed guidelines for mitigating and disclosing errors. Implementing these recommendations in pathology will require a better understanding of how errors occur in pathology, the relationship between pathologists and treating clinicians in reducing error, and pathologists' experiences with and attitudes toward disclosure of medical error. - To understand pathologists' attitudes toward disclosing pathology error to treating clinicians and patients. - We conducted 5 structured focus groups in Washington State and Missouri with 45 pathologists in academic and community practice. Participants were questioned about pathology errors, how clinicians respond to pathology errors, and what roles pathologists should play in error disclosure to patients. - These pathologists believe that neither treating physicians nor patients understand the subtleties and limitations of pathologic diagnoses, which complicates discussions about pathology errors. Pathologists' lack of confidence in communication skills and fear of being misrepresented or misunderstood are major barriers to their participation in disclosure discussions. Pathologists see potential for their future involvement in disclosing error to patients, but at present advocate reliance on treating clinicians to disclose pathology errors to patients. Most group members believed that going forward pathologists should offer to participate more actively in error disclosure to patients. - Pathologists lack confidence in error disclosure communication skills with both treating physicians and patients. Improved communication between pathologists and treating physicians could enhance transparency and promote disclosure of pathology errors. Consensus guidelines for best practices in pathology error disclosure may be useful.

  10. Correction of errors in power measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Knud Ole Helgesen

    1998-01-01

    Small errors in voltage and current measuring transformers cause inaccuracies in power measurements.In this report correction factors are derived to compensate for such errors.......Small errors in voltage and current measuring transformers cause inaccuracies in power measurements.In this report correction factors are derived to compensate for such errors....

  11. Error-Related Psychophysiology and Negative Affect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajcak, G.; McDonald, N.; Simons, R.F.

    2004-01-01

    The error-related negativity (ERN/Ne) and error positivity (Pe) have been associated with error detection and response monitoring. More recently, heart rate (HR) and skin conductance (SC) have also been shown to be sensitive to the internal detection of errors. An enhanced ERN has consistently been observed in anxious subjects and there is some…

  12. Total Survey Error for Longitudinal Surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lynn, Peter; Lugtig, P.J.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the application of the total survey error paradigm to longitudinal surveys. Several aspects of survey error, and of the interactions between different types of error, are distinct in the longitudinal survey context. Furthermore, error trade-off decisions in survey design and

  13. Normotension, hypertension and body fluid regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bie, Peter; Evans, R G

    2017-01-01

    The fraction of hypertensive patients with essential hypertension (EH) is decreasing as the knowledge of mechanisms of secondary hypertension increases, but in most new cases of hypertension the pathophysiology remains unknown. Separate neurocentric and renocentric concepts of aetiology have...... prevailed without much interaction. In this regard, several questions regarding the relationships between body fluid and blood pressure regulation are pertinent. Are all forms of EH associated with sympathetic overdrive or a shift in the pressure-natriuresis curve? Is body fluid homoeostasis normally driven...

  14. Arterial hypertension in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez, Javier

    2014-04-01

    Hypertensive heart disease (HHD) has been considered the adaptive hypertrophy of the left ventricle wall to increased blood pressure. Recent findings in hypertensive animals and patients now challenge this paradigm by showing that HHD also results from pathologic structural remodeling of the myocardium in response to hemodynamic and nonhemodynamic factors that are altered in arterial hypertension. The possibility that hypertensive patients predisposed to develop heart failure may be detected before the appearance of clinical manifestations provides a new way to prevent this major arterial complication. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Contrast stress echocardiography in hypertensive heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lønnebakken Mai

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypertension is associated with atherosclerosis and cardiac and vascular structural and functional changes. Myocardial ischemia may arise in hypertension independent of coronary artery disease through an interaction between several pathophysiological mechanisms, including left ventricular hypertrophy, increased arterial stiffness and reduced coronary flow reserve associated with microvascular disease and endothelial dysfunction. The present case report demonstrates how contrast stress echocardiography can be used to diagnose myocardial ischemia in a hypertensive patient with angina pectoris but without significant obstructive coronary artery disease. The myocardial ischemia was due to severe resistant hypertension complicated with concentric left ventricular hypertrophy and increased arterial stiffness.

  16. [Neuroendocrine factors in hypertension during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaconu, Minodora; Ghiciuc, Cristina-Mihaela; Tarţău, Liliana; Lupuşoru, Cătălina-Elena

    2011-01-01

    Pregnancy induced hypertension is a condition of high blood pressure during early and mid-pregnancy. This type of hypertension is much like the chronic type, but it occurs only when the woman is pregnant and resolves completely after delivery. to evaluate some stress hormones in both normotensive and hypertensive pregnant women. The study investigated the correlation between pregnancy induced hypertension and different immune/inflammatory and other markers. This exploratory investigation was performed on pregnant women diagnosed with pregnancy-induced hypertension, admitted to the lasi Cuza Voda Hospital. The psychometric assessment was performed by using the daily stress test, daily hassle scale, blood pressure measurements, and determination of anthropometrical parameters. Some parameters, such as the neuroendocrine and immune/inflammatory ones, and specific parameters for pregnancy hypertension were determined. Our study revealed that blood pressure values presented significant differences between systolic, but not diastolic blood pressure values (p < 0.05). In 75% of subjects blood cortisol levels were not changed. Daily stress level assessment proved that low potential factors and an annoying environment had a high influence on both normotensive and hypertensive pregnant women. Hypertensive women also presented leukocytosis and thrombocytopenia. The research results showed that plasma cortisol level was higher in hypertensive pregnant women, compared with normotensives.

  17. Gut Dysbiosis Is Linked to Hypertension

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Tao; Santisteban, Monica M; Rodriguez, Vermali; Li, Eric; Ahmari, Niousha; Carvajal, Jessica Marulanda; Zadeh, Mojgan; Gong, Minghao; Qi, Yanfei; Zubcevic, Jasenka; Sahay, Bikash; Pepine, Carl J; Raizada, Mohan K; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    .... This study was designed to test the hypothesis that dysbiosis in gut microbiota is associated with hypertension because genetic, environmental, and dietary factors profoundly influence both gut...

  18. Aortic histomine syntesis in experimental neurogenic hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolitho, G A; Hollis, T M

    1975-04-01

    Aortic histamine synthesis of normotensive rats has been compared to that of rats rendered hypertensive via production carotid sinus ischemia and to animals additionally subjected to bilateral adrenalectomy. Results indicate that the aortic histamine-forming capacities (HFC's) of rats sacrificed 24 hr after surgical treatment were elevated 83% and 103% for hypertensive rats and those additionally subjected to adrenalectomy, respectively. At an 8-day postoperative interval, the respective aortic HFC's were elevated over control by 33% and 45%, although at this time interval animals were not considered hypertensive. This study thus offers suggestive evidence that hypertension causes increased vascular permeability by increasing the histamine-forming capacity of the vessel wall.

  19. Association between Hypertension and Periodontitis: Possible Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badiah, Baharin

    2014-01-01

    This review is to examine the current literatures on the relationship between periodontitis and hypertension as well as to explore the possible biological pathways underlying the linkage between these health conditions. Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are among the critical components in the development of hypertension. Inflammation has received much attention recently and may contribute to a pivotal role in hypertension. Periodontitis, a chronic low-grade inflammation of gingival tissue, has been linked to endothelial dysfunction, with blood pressure elevation and increased mortality risk in hypertensive patients. Inflammatory biomarkers are increased in hypertensive patients with periodontitis. Over the years, various researches have been performed to evaluate the involvement of periodontitis in the initiation and progression of hypertension. Many cross-sectional studies documented an association between hypertension and periodontitis. However, more well-designed prospective population trials need to be carried out to ascertain the role of periodontitis in hypertension. PMID:24526921

  20. CARDIAC METABOLIC ALTERATIONS IN HYPERTENSIVE OBESE PIGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Li, Zi-Lun; Eirin, Alfonso; Ebrahimi, Behzad; Pawar, Aditya S.; Zhu, Xiang-Yang; Lerman, Amir; Lerman, Lilach O.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity and hypertension are major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and their growing coexistence accounts for an increase in adverse cardiac events, but the mechanisms are yet to be determined. We hypothesized that obesity exacerbates mitochondrial dysregulation imposed by hypertension and augments left ventricular dysfunction. Obesity-prone Ossabaw pigs were randomized to lean (standard diet) and obese (high-fat diet), without (Lean-sham, Obese-sham) or with renovascular hypertension (Lean-Hypertension, Obese-Hypertension), induced after 12 weeks of diet (n=7 each). Cardiac function, myocardial perfusion and oxygenation, and microvascular remodeling were assessed 4 weeks later. Mitochondrial biogenesis signals and structural proteins, respiratory chain complex activities, and mitochondrial self-degradation were examined, as was fibrosis. Obesity alone exerted no apparent effect on mitochondrial dynamics, but aggravated in hypertensive hearts the reduction of mitochondrial proteins, deoxyribonucleic acid content, and respiratory chain complex IV subunits activity, and amplified mitochondrial self-degradation. Synergistic interaction of obesity with hypertension also exacerbated myocardial fibrosis and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Mitochondrial content, respiratory chain complex IV subunits activity, and mitophagy were correlated with myocardial fibrosis. These findings suggest that obesity aggravates in renovascular hypertension cardiac mitochondrial aberrations. Mitochondrial function may regulate the progression of cardiac injury and functional deterioration in hypertension concomitant with obesity. PMID:26077566

  1. The prevalence of secondary and curable hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, M; Dammström, B

    1981-01-01

    The prevalence of secondary and curable hypertension was studied retrospectively in 1000 patients. The concept of "secondary hypertension" was used when hypertension was combined with a disease which may have affected the individual's blood pressure. When this definition was applied, 47 of the patients displayed some form of secondary hypertension: stenosis of the renal artery in 10, renoparenchymal disease in 21, hydronephrosis in 3, and endocrine hypertension in 13 (8 of the latter were using oral contraceptives). The blood pressure normalized in 11 and improved in 7 of these patients after operative treatment of the underlying disease or, when appropriate, discontinuance of intake of contraceptive pills. The incidence of secondary hypertension in this and other series is low, and the number of patients with curable hypertension is even lower. In the majority of cases, secondary hypertension can be diagnosed by anamnesis, physical examination and simple tests of blood and urine. If this basic investigation can be extended, the incidence of stenosis of the renal artery should be examined in the first place. Hypertension in young patient and in patients who are difficult to treat often justifies a more extensive investigation.

  2. Optimal management of hypertension in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Czarina Acelajado

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Maria Czarina AcelajadoVascular Biology and Hypertension Program, Division of Cardiovascular Disease, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: Hypertension is a common and important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney diseases. The prevalence of hypertension, particularly isolated systolic hypertension, increases with advancing age, and this is partly due to the age-related changes in the arterial tree, leading to an increase in arterial stiffness. Therapeutic lifestyle changes, such as reduced dietary sodium intake, weight loss, regular aerobic activity, and moderation of alcohol consumption, have been shown to benefit elderly patients with hypertension. Lowering blood pressure (BP using pharmacological agents reduces the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, with no difference in risk reduction in elderly patients compared to younger hypertensives. Guidelines recommend a BP goal of <140/90 in hypertensive patients regardless of age and <130/80 in patients with concomitant diabetes or kidney disease, and lowering the BP further has not been shown to confer any additional benefit. Moreover, the choice of antihypertensive does not seem to be as important as the degree of BP lowering. Special considerations in the treatment of elderly hypertensive patients include cognitive impairment, dementia, orthostatic ­hypotension, and polypharmacy.Keywords: hypertension, elderly, treatment, blood pressure

  3. Association between Hypertension and Periodontitis: Possible Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Fang Leong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This review is to examine the current literatures on the relationship between periodontitis and hypertension as well as to explore the possible biological pathways underlying the linkage between these health conditions. Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. Oxidative stress and endothelial dysfunction are among the critical components in the development of hypertension. Inflammation has received much attention recently and may contribute to a pivotal role in hypertension. Periodontitis, a chronic low-grade inflammation of gingival tissue, has been linked to endothelial dysfunction, with blood pressure elevation and increased mortality risk in hypertensive patients. Inflammatory biomarkers are increased in hypertensive patients with periodontitis. Over the years, various researches have been performed to evaluate the involvement of periodontitis in the initiation and progression of hypertension. Many cross-sectional studies documented an association between hypertension and periodontitis. However, more well-designed prospective population trials need to be carried out to ascertain the role of periodontitis in hypertension.

  4. Entropic error-disturbance relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Patrick; Furrer, Fabian

    2014-03-01

    We derive an entropic error-disturbance relation for a sequential measurement scenario as originally considered by Heisenberg, and we discuss how our relation could be tested using existing experimental setups. Our relation is valid for discrete observables, such as spin, as well as continuous observables, such as position and momentum. The novel aspect of our relation compared to earlier versions is its clear operational interpretation and the quantification of error and disturbance using entropic quantities. This directly relates the measurement uncertainty, a fundamental property of quantum mechanics, to information theoretical limitations and offers potential applications in for instance quantum cryptography. PC is funded by National Research Foundation Singapore and Ministry of Education Tier 3 Grant ``Random numbers from quantum processes'' (MOE2012-T3-1-009). FF is funded by Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, KAKENHI grant No. 24-02793.

  5. Error studies of Halbach Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2017-03-02

    These error studies were done on the Halbach magnets for the CBETA “First Girder” as described in note [CBETA001]. The CBETA magnets have since changed slightly to the lattice in [CBETA009]. However, this is not a large enough change to significantly affect the results here. The QF and BD arc FFAG magnets are considered. For each assumed set of error distributions and each ideal magnet, 100 random magnets with errors are generated. These are then run through an automated version of the iron wire multipole cancellation algorithm. The maximum wire diameter allowed is 0.063” as in the proof-of-principle magnets. Initially, 32 wires (2 per Halbach wedge) are tried, then if this does not achieve 1e-­4 level accuracy in the simulation, 48 and then 64 wires. By “1e-4 accuracy”, it is meant the FOM defined by √(Σn≥sextupole an 2+bn 2) is less than 1 unit, where the multipoles are taken at the maximum nominal beam radius, R=23mm for these magnets. The algorithm initially uses 20 convergence interations. If 64 wires does not achieve 1e-­4 accuracy, this is increased to 50 iterations to check for slow converging cases. There are also classifications for magnets that do not achieve 1e-4 but do achieve 1e-3 (FOM ≤ 10 units). This is technically within the spec discussed in the Jan 30, 2017 review; however, there will be errors in practical shimming not dealt with in the simulation, so it is preferable to do much better than the spec in the simulation.

  6. Changes of color vision in ocular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mäntyjärvi, M; Tuppurainen, K

    Fifty-six ocular hypertension (OHT) patients were examined for 2-3 days in the Eye Clinic of Kuopio University Hospital. No glaucomatous changes were found. Twenty-seven of them were found to have several risk factors for developing glaucoma and medication was started. Twenty-nine of the patients did not show risk factors and had no medication. Color vision was examined with the Farnsworth-Munsell 100 (FM 100) hue test and Besançon anomalometer, later Color Vision Meter 712 at the beginning of the study and 3 years later. None of the 56 patients showed any glaucomatous changes after 3 years of the study. In the treatment group, the FM 100 test showed significantly (paired t-test, p = 0.004) improved error scores after 3 years. In the non-treatment group, 19 patients did not develop risk factors; they had no significant changes in the color vision results. In 10 patients of the non-treatment group, risk factors had developed with elevated intraocular pressure and medication was started for them after 3 years. Their color vision results in the blue anomalous quotient (AQ) of the anomalometer had significantly shifted to the blue part of the equation (paired t-test, p = 0.04). The other color vision results had not changed significantly. The significantly improved FM 100 scores in the treatment group could mean, that the treatment has a beneficial effect for the OHT eyes at risk for developing glaucoma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Strategy for Syntax Error Recovering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry F Báez

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a new strategy for syntax error recovering for a compiler that does not have instruction separators like ";" or opening and closing brackets like "{" and "}". This strategy is based on 4 steps. 1. Find a set of tokens (called ACEPTA set for each non terminal symbol of the grammar. 2. During the syntax analysis of each non terminal symbol, eliminate the tokens that are not in the ACEPTA set. 3. Eliminate repeated tokens that are not accepted by the grammar, and 4. Complete symbols in the syntax analysis with the hope that the token that has not been erased later will match with a terminal symbol expected by the syntax analyser; otherwise the symbol will be eliminated in some particular productions. The strategy for sintax error recovering is a method that can be used in whatever not ambiguos context free grammar includying those that use instruction separators like ";". It is implemented with an algorithm and it is much more easy to implement than other strategies for syntax error recovering like those based on stacks.

  8. Human error in anesthetic mishaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaba, D M

    1989-01-01

    While adverse outcomes linked to anesthesia are uncommon in healthy patients, they do occasionally happen. There is rarely a single cause. Anesthesia and surgery bring the patient into a complex world in which innumerable small failings can converge to produce an eventual catastrophe. And for all the technology involved, the anesthesiologist remains the cornerstone of safe anesthesia care, protecting the patient from harm regardless of its source. Responding to the demands of the operating room environment requires on-the-spot decision making in a complex, uncertain, and risky setting. Only responsible, professional human beings acting in concert can perform this task; no machine that we devise now or in the foreseeable future will suffice. I have outlined the components of a dynamic decision-making process that successfully protects patients in almost all cases. However, being human, anesthesiologists do make errors along the way--errors we are just beginning to understand. Sometimes these errors are due to faulty vigilance or incompetence, but usually they are made by appropriately trained, competent practitioners. Anesthesiologists can err in many ways, and recognizing these ways makes it easier to analyze the events leading to an anesthetic accident. More importantly, it better equips us to eliminate or minimize them in the future--and this is the real challenge.

  9. Diuretics in primary hypertension - Reloaded.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Sundeep

    Diuretics have long been cherished as drugs of choice for uncomplicated primary hypertension. Robust mortality and morbidity data is available for diuretics to back this strategy. Off-late the interest for diuretics has waned off perhaps due to availability of more effective drugs but more likely due to perceived lack of tolerance and side-effect profile of high-dose of diuretics required for mortality benefit. Low-dose diuretics particularly thiazide diuretics are safer but lack the mortality benefit shown by high-dose. However, indapamide and low dose chlorthalidone have fewer side-effects but continue to provide mortality benefit. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. [Hypertensive crisis: pathogenesis, clinic, treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertkin, A L; Topolianskiĭ, A V; Abdullaeva, A U; Alekseev, M A; Shakhmanaev, Kh A

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary data on mechanisms of development, types, and clinical picture of hypertensive crisis (HC) are presented. Algorithms of rational therapy of uncomplicated and complicated HC are considered. Appropriateness of the use in HC of antihypertensive drugs with multifactorial action is stressed. These drugs include urapidil - an antihypertensive agent with complex mechanism of action. Blocking mainly the postsynaptic 1-adrenoreceptors urapidil attenuates vasoconstrictor effect of catecholamines and decreases total peripheral resistance. Stimulation of 5HT1-receptors of medullary vasculomotor center promotes lowering of elevated vascular tone and prevents development of reflex tachycardia.

  11. Hypertensive encephalopathy in a patient with neonatal thyrotoxicosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijnenburg, MWH; Zweens, MJ; Bink, MTE; Odink, RJ

    1999-01-01

    Neonatal hyperthyroidism may give rise to serious cardiovascular complications. A girl with severe thyrotoxicosis in whom hypertensive encephalopathy developed is described. Conclusion Neonatal thyrotoxicosis can give rise to hypertension and may lead to hypertensive encephalopathy.

  12. Pre-hypertension and hypertension in college students in Kuwait: A neglected issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hana T Al-Majed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the proportion of pre-hypertension and hypertension in college students in Kuwait and their related risk factors. Materials and Methods: A total of 803, randomly selected students aged 17 to 23 years (346 male, 457 female from different colleges in Kuwait, were included in the study between 2009 and 2010. Systolic and diastolic blood pressure measurements were taken by trained personnel. Pre-hypertension was defined as systolic pressure between 120 and 139 mm Hg or diastolic pressure between 80 and 89 mm Hg. Risk factor measurements that were determined, included smoking, body mass index (BMI, and family history of hypertension. Blood samples were collected and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT and lipid profile levels were determined. Results: There were no hypotensive students. Normotensives constituted 53.5% (n = 430, pre-hypertensives formed 39.5% (n = 317, and hypertensive students comprised of 7% (n = 56. The overall proportions of hypertension and pre-hypertension were higher among male students (85.7 and 64.4% than female students (14.3 and 35.6%, respectively. Hypertensive and pre-hypertensive students versus normotensive students had significantly higher levels of BMI-based obesity, smoking, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, and IGT. Also, hypertensive and pre-hypertensive, compared to normotensive students, had significantly higher proportions (21.4, 18.3, and 4.0%, respectively of risky high-density lipoprotein (HDL level (< 1 mg / dL, cholesterol (7.1, 3.8, and 1.4%, respectively, and triglycerides (TG (17.9, 9.1, and 7.9%, respectively where p was< 0.001, 0.016, and 0.051, respectively. Conclusion: Hypertensive and pre-hypertensive students showed elevated levels of lipids and BMI-based obesity more than normotensive students. TG, HDL, HbA1c, and cholesterol appeared to influence pre-hypertension.

  13. Socioeconomic inequality in hypertension in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fateh, Mansooreh; Emamian, Mohammad Hassan; Asgari, Fereshteh; Alami, Ali; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2014-09-01

    Hypertension covers a large portion of burden of diseases, especially in the developing countries. The unequal distribution of hypertension in the population may affect 'health for all' goal. This study aimed to investigate the socioeconomic inequality of hypertension in Iran and to identify its influencing factors. We used data from Iran's surveillance system for risk factors of noncommunicable diseases which was conducted on 89 400 individuals aged 15-64 years in 2005. To determine the socioeconomic status of participants, a new variable was created using a principal component analysis. We examined hypertension at different levels of this new variable and calculated slop index of inequality (SII) and concentration index (C) for hypertension. We then applied Oaxaca-Blinder decomposition analysis to determine the causes of inequality. The SII and C for hypertension were -32.3 and -0.170, respectively. The concentration indices varied widely between different provinces in Iran and was lower (more unequal) in women than in men. There was significant socioeconomic inequality in hypertension. The results of decomposition indicated that 40.5% of the low-socioeconomic group (n = 18190) and 16.4% of the high-socioeconomic group (n = 16335) had hypertension. Age, education level, sex and residency location were the main associated factors of the difference among groups. According to our results, there was an inequality in hypertension in Iran, so that individuals with low socioeconomic status had a higher prevalence of hypertension. Age was the most contributed factor in this inequality and women in low-socioeconomic group were the most vulnerable people for hypertension.

  14. Hypertensive crisis during pregnancy and postpartum period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Too, Gloria T; Hill, James B

    2013-08-01

    Hypertension affects 10% of pregnancies, many with underlying chronic hypertension, and approximately 1-2% will undergo a hypertensive crisis at some point during their lives. Hypertensive crisis includes hypertensive urgency and emergency; the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists describes a hypertensive emergency in pregnancy as persistent (lasting 15 min or more), acute-onset, severe hypertension, defined as systolic BP greater than 160 mmHg or diastolic BP >110 mmHg in the setting of pre-eclampsia or eclampsia. Pregnancy may be complicated by hypertensive crisis, with lower blood pressure threshold for end-organ damage than non-pregnant patients. Maternal assessment should include a thorough history. Fetal assessment should include heart rate tracing, ultrasound for growth and amniotic assessment, and Doppler evaluation if growth restriction is suspected. Initial management of hypertensive emergency (systolic BP >160 mmHg or diastolic BP >110 mmHg in the setting of pre-eclampsia or eclampsia) generally includes the rapid reduction of blood pressure through the use of intravenous antihypertensive medications, with goal systolic blood pressure between 140 mmHg and 150 mmHg and diastolic pressure between 90 mmHg and 100 mmHg. First-line intravenous drugs include labetalol and hydralazine, but other agents may be used, including esmolol, nicardipine, nifedipine, and, as a last resort, sodium nitroprusside. Among patients with hypertensive urgency, slower blood pressure reduction can be provided with oral agents. The objective of this article is to review the current understanding, diagnosis, and management of hypertensive crisis during pregnancy and the postpartum period. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cardiovascular Hypertensive Crisis: Recent Evidence and Review of the Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Varounis, Christos; Katsi, Vasiliki; Nihoyannopoulos, Petros; Lekakis, John; Tousoulis, Dimitris

    2017-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of hypertension (HTN), only a small proportion of the hypertensive patients will ultimately develop hypertensive crisis. In fact, some patients with hypertensive crisis do not report a history of HTN or previous use of antihypertensive medication. The majority of the patients with hypertensive crisis often report non-specific symptoms, whereas heart-related symptoms (dyspnea, chest pain, arrhythmias, and syncope) are less common. Hypertensive crises can be divided ...

  16. Righting errors in writing errors: the Wing and Baddeley (1980) spelling error corpus revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wing, Alan M; Baddeley, Alan D

    2009-03-01

    We present a new analysis of our previously published corpus of handwriting errors (slips) using the proportional allocation algorithm of Machtynger and Shallice (2009). As previously, the proportion of slips is greater in the middle of the word than at the ends, however, in contrast to before, the proportion is greater at the end than at the beginning of the word. The findings are consistent with the hypothesis of memory effects in a graphemic output buffer.

  17. Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone Abuse Peer ... Endocrinologist Clinical Trials Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone Abuse Peer ...

  18. Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone Abuse Peer ... About Clinical Trials Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone Abuse Peer ...

  19. Error tracking in a clinical biochemistry laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szecsi, Pal Bela; Ødum, Lars

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We report our results for the systematic recording of all errors in a standard clinical laboratory over a 1-year period. METHODS: Recording was performed using a commercial database program. All individuals in the laboratory were allowed to report errors. The testing processes were...... classified according to function, and errors were classified as pre-analytical, analytical, post-analytical, or service-related, and then further divided into descriptive subgroups. Samples were taken from hospital wards (38.6%), outpatient clinics (25.7%), general practitioners (29.4%), and other hospitals....... RESULTS: A total of 1189 errors were reported in 1151 reports during the first year, corresponding to an error rate of 1 error for every 142 patients, or 1 per 1223 tests. The majority of events were due to human errors (82.6%), and only a few (4.3%) were the result of technical errors. Most of the errors...

  20. The Immunological Basis of Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Héctor; Quiroz, Yasmir; Johnson, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    A large number of investigations have demonstrated the participation of the immune system in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Studies focusing on macrophages and Toll-like receptors have documented involvement of the innate immunity. The requirements of antigen presentation and co-stimulation, the critical importance of T cell–driven inflammation, and the demonstration, in specific conditions, of agonistic antibodies directed to angiotensin II type 1 receptors and adrenergic receptors support the role of acquired immunity. Experimental findings support the concept that the balance between T cell–induced inflammation and T cell suppressor responses is critical for the regulation of blood pressure levels. Expression of neoantigens in response to inflammation, as well as surfacing of intracellular immunogenic proteins, such as heat shock proteins, could be responsible for autoimmune reactivity in the kidney, arteries, and central nervous system. Persisting, low-grade inflammation in these target organs may lead to impaired pressure natriuresis, an increase in sympathetic activity, and vascular endothelial dysfunction that may be the cause of chronic elevation of blood pressure in essential hypertension. PMID:25150828

  1. Progression is Accelerated from Pre-Hypertension to Hypertension in African Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selassie, Anbesaw; Wagner, C. Shaun; Laken, Marilyn L.; Ferguson, M. LaFrance; Ferdinand, Keith C.; Egan, Brent M.

    2011-01-01

    Pre-hypertension is a major risk factor for hypertension. African Americans (blacks) have more prevalent and severe hypertension than whites, but it is unknown whether progression from pre-hypertension is accelerated in blacks. We examined this question in a prospective cohort study of 18,865 non-hypertensive persons (5,733 [30.4% black, 13,132 [69.6%]) white) 18–85 years old. Electronic health record data were obtained from 197 community-based outpatient clinics in the Southeast U.S. Days elapsing from study entry to hypertension diagnosis, mainly blood pressure [BP] ≥140 systolic and/or ≥90 mmHg diastolic on two consecutive visits established conversion time within a maximum observation period of 2550 days. Cox regression modeling was used to examine conversion to hypertension as a function of race, while controlling for age, sex, baseline systolic and diastolic BP, body mass index [BMI], diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease. The covariable adjusted median conversion time when 50% became hypertensive was 365 days earlier for blacks than whites (626 vs 991 days, phypertension. Additional predictors included age 35–54 years, diastolic BP 80–89 mmHg, overweight and obesity, and diabetes mellitus (all phypertension to hypertension is accelerated in blacks, which suggests that effective interventions in pre-hypertension could reduce racial disparities in prevalent hypertension. PMID:21911708

  2. Transient receptor potential channels in essential hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Daoyan; Scholze, Alexandra; Zhu, Zhiming

    2006-01-01

    The role of nonselective cation channels of the transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) family in essential hypertension has not yet been investigated.......The role of nonselective cation channels of the transient receptor potential channel (TRPC) family in essential hypertension has not yet been investigated....

  3. Hypertension among dental patients attending tertiary health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Hypertension is one of the cardiovascular diseases which has been reported as one of the common causes of death worldwide. Some medical conditions including hypertension could alter the course of oral disease; modify dental treatment and response to such treatment. Objective: This was to determine the ...

  4. Endocrine hypertension - Cushing′s syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashpal Singh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a major and frequent comorbid finding of Cushing′s syndrome. This review discusses the etiology and pathophysiology of hypertension in Cushing′s syndrome, while suggesting methods of management of this condition. It also provides an overview of diagnosis and management strategies in this disease.

  5. Renal Dysfunction and Hyperlipidaemia in Hypertensive and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 84 adults' subjects aged between 20 and 65 years consisting of 22hypertensive, 22 hypertensive diabetics, 20 diabetics and 20 apparently healthy individuals (which served as control) were used for the study all within Aba Metropolitan.The investigations were done with serum and the biochemical parameters ...

  6. Pulmonary hypertension and thyrotoxicosis | Conradie | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pulmonary hypertension and thyrotoxicosis. M Conradie, C Koegelenberg, M Conradie, BH Ascott-Evans, FS Hough. Abstract. Thyrotoxicosis is listed as a cause of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The aetiopathogenesis remains largely uncertain, but an autoimmune mechanism has been postulated, among others.

  7. SHORT COMMUNICATION Prevalence of hypertension and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SHORT COMMUNICATION. Prevalence of hypertension and variation of blood pressure with age among adolescents in. Chetla, India. I. SAHA1* ... becoming important. Hypertension is becoming the commonest cardiovascular disorder posing a challenge to the societies in socioeconomic and epidemiologi- cal transition ...

  8. Hypertension guideline adherence of private practitioners and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypertension remains a healthcare problem in South Africa. When prescribing evidence-based, cost-effective anti-hypertensive treatment, guideline adherence is essential. The Joint National Committee's Sixth Report (JNC VI) built its evidence-based review on the outcome of clinical trials. The objective of this ...

  9. Prevalence factors associated with Hypertension in Rukungiri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypertension is a growing public health problem in Uganda and Africa as a whole. We conducted a study to determine the prevalence and identify factors associated withy hypertension among residents of the rural district of Rukungiri, Uganda. Methods: A community-based cross-sectional study design was ...

  10. Hypertension management: Perspectives of complementary and al ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information available on the various forms of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) used in the management of hypertension is inadequate and conflicting. The primary objective of this study was to assess the use of CAM in the management of hypertension by CAM practition-ers. A qualitative study utilizing ...

  11. Indoramin pregnancy in the treatment hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hypertension of. A placebo-controlled trial comparing the efficacy of indoramin with alpha-methyldopa. J. ANTHONY, A. E. REES, D. A. DAVEY. Summary. A placebo-controlled trial ... gestation attending the Pregnancy Hypertension Clinic at. Groote Schuur ..... >roteinuric patients and employed different criteria to establish.

  12. An unusual cause of hypertension in pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vriend, Joris W. J.; van Montfrans, Gert A.; van der Post, Joris A. M.; Lam, Jan; Mulder, Barbara J. M.

    2004-01-01

    Aortic coarctation is an unusual cause of hypertension in pregnancy. We report the case of a 34-year-old woman with severe hypertension after surgical repair of aortic coarctation in childhood. An MRI showed a residual stenosis of the aortic arch and a small aneurysm. Pregnant postcoarctectomy

  13. Is "benign intracranial hypertension" really benign?

    OpenAIRE

    Barber, S G; Garvan, N

    1980-01-01

    Hypothalamic-hypophyseal insufficiency has been found in seven of eight patients with so-called benign intracranial hypertension, of whom four showed an inadequate adrenal response to stress. The syndrome of benign intracranial hypertension cannot therefore be considered entirely benign and patients should receive full endocrinological assessment and follow up.

  14. nigerian mothers with hypertensive disorders in pregnancy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hypertension with superimposed pre-eclampsia had treatment similar to that of the mothers with severe pre-eclampsia. (vi) Those with chronic hypertension had alpha-methyl-dopa orally. Supportive therapy, monitoring of the patient and delivery were according to standard obstetric practices at the. UBTH. Following delivery ...

  15. Management issues in hypertensive diabetics | Thaver | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article discusses seven issues in the management of hypertension in diabetic patients, namely the importance of blood pressure control, optimal blood pressure control levels, the importance of blocking the renin-angiotensin system, the inevi-tability of combination anti-hypertensive therapy, drug choices, the ...

  16. Cardiac Arrhythmias in Recently Diagnosed Hypertensive Patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various forms of cardiac arrhythmias have been documented in hypertensive subjects, and hypertension is an important risk factor for the development of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias and sudden death. Electrocardiography at rest easily documents significant arrhythmias in patients, and this study was carried out to ...

  17. Hypertension, the kidney, and cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sande, N.G.C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/413971244

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension and chronic kidney disease are both independent risk factors for first or subsequent cardiovascular events. Blood pressure-lowering therapy is recommended in patients with hypertension and chronic kidney disease, in order to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and kidney failure.

  18. Recurrence of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Oostwaard, Miriam F; Langenveld, Josje; Schuit, Ewoud

    2015-01-01

    delivery, and perinatal death. Normotensive women experienced chronic hypertension after pregnancy more often after experiencing recurrence (odds ratio, 3.7; 95% CI, 2.3-6.1). CONCLUSION: Among women that experience hypertension in pregnancy, the recurrence rate in a next pregnancy is relatively low...

  19. Resistant hypertension: Current status, future challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niloofar Hajizadeh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistant hypertension in adolescents is increasing in frequency and is increasingly recognized as having significant short- and long-term health consequences. It may be seen in up to 30% of all hypertensive patients cared for. Adolescents with resistant hypertension are at higher cardiovascular (CV risk due to a long history of severe hypertension complicated by other CV risk factors such as obesity. Common causes of resistant hypertension include primary aldosteronism, sleep apnea, diabetes and chronic kidney disease. Careful blood pressure (BP measurement and thorough evaluation of patients with sustained BP elevation should make a possible early diagnosis of resistant hypertension. Successful treatment requires identification and reversal of life-style factors contributing to treatment resistant and diagnosis and appropriate treatment of causes of hypertension. Improved pharmacologic therapies may offer the potential for preventing or at least ameliorating early CV disease. This review highlights these and other important issues in the evaluation and management of adolescents with resistant hypertension and provides practical guidance to the practitioners involved in caring for such patients.

  20. Hypertension in people living with HIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zoest, Rosan A.; van den Born, Bert-Jan H.; Reiss, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of review This review describes what is known concerning the burden of hypertension among people living with HIV (PLHIV), and also addresses relevant topics with respect to its risk factors and clinical management. Recent findings Hypertension is highly prevalent in HIV-positive populations,

  1. Determinants of isolated systolic hypertension among diabetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypertension and diabetes mellitus, two of the leading risk factors for atherosclerosis, are associated with numerous complications, including heart attacks and strokes. Aim: This study established the prevalence and determinants of isolated systolic hypertension (ISH) in diabetes mellitus patients visiting the ...

  2. The Evolving Classification of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foshat, Michelle; Boroumand, Nahal

    2017-05-01

    - An explosion of information on pulmonary hypertension has occurred during the past few decades. The perception of this disease has shifted from purely clinical to incorporate new knowledge of the underlying pathology. This transfer has occurred in light of advancements in pathophysiology, histology, and molecular medical diagnostics. - To update readers about the evolving understanding of the etiology and pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension and to demonstrate how pathology has shaped the current classification. - Information presented at the 5 World Symposia on pulmonary hypertension held since 1973, with the last meeting occurring in 2013, was used in this review. - Pulmonary hypertension represents a heterogeneous group of disorders that are differentiated based on differences in clinical, hemodynamic, and histopathologic features. Early concepts of pulmonary hypertension were largely influenced by pharmacotherapy, hemodynamic function, and clinical presentation of the disease. The initial nomenclature for pulmonary hypertension segregated the clinical classifications from pathologic subtypes. Major restructuring of this disease classification occurred between the first and second symposia, which was the first to unite clinical and pathologic information in the categorization scheme. Additional changes were introduced in subsequent meetings, particularly between the third and fourth World Symposia meetings, when additional pathophysiologic information was gained. Discoveries in molecular diagnostics significantly progressed the understanding of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Continued advancements in imaging modalities, mechanistic pathogenicity, and molecular biomarkers will enable physicians to define pulmonary hypertension phenotypes based on the pathobiology and allow for treatment customization.

  3. Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berthelot, Emmanuelle; Bailly, Minh Tam; Hatimi, Safwane El; Robard, Ingrid; Rezgui, Hatem; Bouchachi, Amir; Montani, David; Sitbon, Olivier; Chemla, Denis; Assayag, Patrick

    Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart disease, also known as group 2 pulmonary hypertension according to the European Society of Cardiology/European Respiratory Society classification, is the most common cause of pulmonary hypertension. In patients with left heart disease, the development of pulmonary hypertension favours right heart dysfunction, which has a major impact on disease severity and outcome. Over the past few years, this condition has been considered more frequently. However, epidemiological studies of group 2 pulmonary hypertension are less exhaustive than studies of other causes of pulmonary hypertension. In group 2 patients, pulmonary hypertension may be caused by an isolated increase in left-sided filling pressures or by a combination of this condition with increased pulmonary vascular resistance, with an abnormally high pressure gradient between arteries and pulmonary veins. A better understanding of the conditions underlying pulmonary hypertension is of key importance to establish a comprehensive diagnosis, leading to an adapted treatment to reduce heart failure morbidity and mortality. In this review, epidemiology, mechanisms and diagnostic approaches are reviewed; then, treatment options and future approaches are considered. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  4. Survey of Hypertension in Dhaka, Bangladesh: Changing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess changes in the prescribing pattern of antihypertensive drugs and lifestyle factors associated with hypertensive patients in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 50 hypertensive patients in various heart disease hospitals and the consulting rooms of 10 cardiologists ...

  5. HYPERTENSION AU COURS DE LA GROSSESSE: Aspects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    7 déc. 2009 ... Superimposed preeclampsia came third in 5.76% of the patients, and only 0.96% had chronic hypertension. An important ... morbidity and mortality in our milieu, and preeclampsia is the most frequent condition and is the major cause of hypertension .... on prevention, detection and treatment of high blood.

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Hypertension Guideline 2003 Update

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The control of hypertension in conjunction with other major risk factors such as cigarette smoking, dyslipidaemia and diabetes mellitus constitutes the ideal approach to the ... Adalat® XL reduces morbidity and mortality associated with hypertension- giving benefits beyond BP control < ..... Athletes & physically active patients.

  7. Pediatric Hypertension Specialists' Perspectives About Adolescent Hypertension Management: Implications for Primary Care Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Esther; McCool, Brigitte; Filipp, Stephanie; Rocchini, Albert; Kershaw, David; Clark, Sarah

    2015-06-01

    The current specialty-centric hypertension paradigm is unsustainable given the high prevalence of primary hypertension in adolescents. To describe specialists' perspectives on referral and comanagement for adolescents with hypertension. Cross-sectional mailed survey of a national sample of 397 pediatric cardiologists and 389 pediatric nephrologists, conducted January to May 2014. Response rate was 61%. Both specialties agreed that primary care providers can make the hypertension diagnosis, try lifestyle changes, and comanage monitoring of patient blood pressure control and medication side effects, but they felt antihypertensive medication use should mainly occur in the specialty setting. Our study suggests specialist support for changing the hypertension paradigm to encourage primary care providers, in collaboration with specialists, to diagnose hypertension, initiate lifestyle changes, and monitor progress and side effects. Future work should focus on supporting primary care physician comanagement of adolescents with hypertension. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. An adaptive orienting theory of error processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessel, Jan R

    2017-12-11

    The ability to detect and correct action errors is paramount to safe and efficient goal-directed behaviors. Existing work on the neural underpinnings of error processing and post-error behavioral adaptations has led to the development of several mechanistic theories of error processing. These theories can be roughly grouped into adaptive and maladaptive theories. While adaptive theories propose that errors trigger a cascade of processes that will result in improved behavior after error commission, maladaptive theories hold that error commission momentarily impairs behavior. Neither group of theories can account for all available data, as different empirical studies find both impaired and improved post-error behavior. This article attempts a synthesis between the predictions made by prominent adaptive and maladaptive theories. Specifically, it is proposed that errors invoke a nonspecific cascade of processing that will rapidly interrupt and inhibit ongoing behavior and cognition, as well as orient attention toward the source of the error. It is proposed that this cascade follows all unexpected action outcomes, not just errors. In the case of errors, this cascade is followed by error-specific, controlled processing, which is specifically aimed at (re)tuning the existing task set. This theory combines existing predictions from maladaptive orienting and bottleneck theories with specific neural mechanisms from the wider field of cognitive control, including from error-specific theories of adaptive post-error processing. The article aims to describe the proposed framework and its implications for post-error slowing and post-error accuracy, propose mechanistic neural circuitry for post-error processing, and derive specific hypotheses for future empirical investigations. © 2017 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  9. Renal denervation for treatment-resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mafeld, Sebastian; Vasdev, Nikhil; Haslam, Philip

    2012-12-01

    Hypertension is a major public health concern that is increasing in prevalence. Lifestyle and pharmacological management are not always sufficient to control blood pressure and treatment-resistant hypertension is a recognized clinical challenge. Renal sympathetic denervation (RSD) represents a new frontier in the treatment of resistant hypertension. from the Symplicity HTN-1 and HTN-2 trials have demonstrated evidence that suggests RSD can safely reduce blood pressure in patients with this condition. More research is needed to verify these data, clarify unanswered questions and assess future applications of RSD. This review provides a detailed overview on the history of hypertension, treatment-resistant hypertension, the rationale behind RSD, current evidence and potential future applications of RSD. An overview of current and upcoming RSD devices is also included.

  10. Recent Advances in Immunity and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Gelston, Catalina A; Mitchell, Brett M

    2017-07-01

    Persistent immune system activation plays an important role in the development of various forms of hypertension. Activation of the innate immune system, inflammation, and subsequent adaptive immune system response causing end-organ injury and dysfunction ultimately leads to hypertension and its associated sequelae including coronary artery disease, heart failure, stroke, and chronic kidney disease. In this review, we will provide updates on the innate and adaptive immune cells involved in hypertension, the current understanding of how the immune system gets activated, and examine the recently discovered mechanisms involved in several forms of experimental hypertension. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2017. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Hotel housekeeping work influences on hypertension management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanon, Marie-Anne

    2013-12-01

    Characteristics of hotel housekeeping work increase the risk for hypertension development. Little is known about the influences of such work on hypertension management. For this qualitative study, 27 Haitian immigrant hotel housekeepers from Miami-Dade County, FL were interviewed. Interview transcripts were analyzed with the assistance of the Atlas.ti software for code and theme identification. Influences of hotel housekeeping work on hypertension management arose both at the individual and system levels. Factors at the individual level included co-worker dynamics and maintenance of transmigrant life. Factors at the system level included supervisory support, workload, work pace, and work hiring practices. No positive influences were reported for workload and hiring practices. Workplace interventions may be beneficial for effective hypertension management among hotel housekeepers. These work influences must be considered when determining effective methods for hypertension management among hotel housekeepers. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Hypertension and color blindness in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, W E

    1975-05-01

    Medical data from Selective Service registrants born from 1939 to 1941 were studied in Oregon and Colorado. Among 29,119 registrants with medical information (41.3% of all registrants), 1,073 (3.6%) had definite hypertension, and 1,226 (4.2%) had some type of color blindness. In both states, there was a highly significant association between the prevalence of hypertension and the prevalence of color blindness. Thus, definite hypertension was present in 6.0% of color clind individuals but in only 3.6% of those with unimparied color vision, while color blindness occurred in 6.8% with definite hypertension, in 5.8% with borderline hypertension, and in only 4.0% with normal blood pressure. The data did not differentiate among types of color blindness, and the reason for the association is not yet evident.

  13. [Hypertensive crisis in infancy and childhood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirbelauer, J; Strotmann, J; Kirchhoff, A; Darge, K; Thomas, W

    2008-01-01

    The extended physical examination of a patient includes measurement of blood pressure. In infancy and childhood the blood pressure measurement may be difficult due to an uncooperative and restless patient. In a 16-month-old girl apparently unmeasurable blood pressure was a hypertensive crisis with systolic blood pressure of more than 200 mmHg. The cause of the hypertension was found to be a nephroblastoma. In the case of rapidly progressive arterial hypertension in another 16-month-old girl with left ventricular dilatation and reduced function was a consequence of kidney dysplasia. Headache attacks lead to diagnosis of a subtotal coarctation of the aortic isthmus in a 17-year-old boy. Hypertensive crisis in infancy, childhood and adolescence is discussed based on these case reports. Special features of blood pressure measurement in the pediatric age group, pathogenesis of hypertensive crisis and the potential therapies are discussed incorporating a brief review of the literature.

  14. Increased aldosterone: mechanism of hypertension in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Colleen

    2014-05-01

    The prevalence of both obesity and hypertension are increasing worldwide. Hypertension is a common consequence of obesity. Increased central adiposity is associated with increased aldosterone levels and blood pressure in human beings. A number of small studies have shown an association between obesity-mediated hypertension and mechanisms directly linked to increased levels of aldosterone. These studies have shown a trend toward relatively greater blood pressure reduction using aldosterone-receptor blockers compared with other classes of antihypertensive agents. Other than treatment for weight loss, treatment of hypertension with specific antihypertensive medications that block or reduce aldosterone action are appropriate in obese patients. Further research is needed to understand the exact role of the adipocyte in obesity-mediated hypertension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hypertension in Women: Evaluation and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weyer, George W; Dunlap, Beth; Shah, Sachin D

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is the most commonly encountered chronic medical condition in primary care and one of the most significant modifiable cardiovascular risk factors for women and men. Timely diagnosis and evidence-based management offer an important opportunity to reduce the risk of hypertension-related morbidity and mortality, including cardiovascular events, end-stage renal disease, and heart failure. Clinical trials have shown significant improvements in patient-oriented outcomes when hypertension is well-controlled, yet many hypertensive patients remain undiagnosed, uncontrolled, or managed with inappropriate pharmacotherapy. This article discusses the initial diagnosis, evaluation, and management of hypertension in nonpregnant women, with topics for obstetrician-gynecologists and women's health providers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Hyponatremic hypertensive syndrome - a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Devdeep; Sinha, Rajiv; Akhtar, Md Shakil; Saha, Agni Sekhar

    2017-01-06

    To ascertain the frequency of hyponatremic hypertensive syndrome (HHS) in a cohort of children with hypertensive emergency in a tertiary pediatric hospital. A retrospective review was undertaken among children with hypertensive emergency admitted in our tertiary children hospital between June 2014 and December 2015 with an aim to identify any children with HHS. Three children with HHS were identified during this period. The 3 patients with HHS presented with hypertensive emergency. They were initially managed with Labetalol infusion and thereafter switched to oral anti-hypertensives (combination of Nifedipine sustained release, Hydralazine and Beta Blocker). All 3 were diagnosed to have unilateral renal artery stenosis. One child was lost to follow up, whereas the other 2 underwent renal angioplasty which was followed with normalization of blood pressure. Despite activation of renin angiotensin axis secondary to renal artery stenosis, these groups of children have significant hyponatremia. Renal re-vascularisation produces excellent results in most of them.

  17. Human Errors and Bridge Management Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle; Nowak, A. S.

    Human errors are divided in two groups. The first group contains human errors, which effect the reliability directly. The second group contains human errors, which will not directly effect the reliability of the structure. The methodology used to estimate so-called reliability distributions...... on basis of reliability profiles for bridges without human errors are extended to include bridges with human errors. The first rehabilitation distributions for bridges without and with human errors are combined into a joint first rehabilitation distribution. The methodology presented is illustrated...

  18. Hypertension and frailty in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprahamian, Ivan; Sassaki, Eduardo; Dos Santos, Marília F; Izbicki, Rafael; Pulgrossi, Rafael C; Biella, Marina M; Borges, Ana Camila N; Sassaki, Marcela M; Torres, Leonardo M; Fernandez, Ícaro S; Pião, Olívia A; Castro, Paula L M; Fontenele, Pedro A; Yassuda, Mônica S

    2017-11-05

    The association between hypertension and frailty syndrome in older adults remains unclear. There is scarce information about the prevalence of hypertension among frail elderly patients or on its relationship with frailty. Up to one quarter of frail elderly patients present without comorbidity or disability, yet frailty is a leading cause of death. The knowledge and better control of frailty risk factors could influence prognosis. The present study evaluated: (1) the prevalence of hypertension in robust, prefrail, and frail elderly; and (2) factors that might be associated with frailty including hypertension. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 619 older adults at a university-based outpatient center. Study protocol included sociodemographic data, measures of blood pressure and body mass index, frailty screening according to the internationally validated FRAIL (fatigue, resistance, ambulation, illnesses, and loss of weight) scale, number of comorbidities, drug use assessment, physical activity, cognitive status, and activities of daily living. Ordinal logistic regression was used to evaluate factors associated with frailty. Prevalence of hypertension and frailty was 67.3% and 14.8%, respectively, in the total sample. Hypertension was more prevalent in the prefrail (72.5%) and frail (83%) groups than among controls (51.7%). Hypertension, physical activity, number of prescribed drugs, and cognitive performance were significantly associated with frailty status. Hypertension presented an odds ratio of 1.77 towards frailty (95% confidence interval, 1.21-2.60; P = .002). Hypertension was more prevalent in frail elderly patients and was significantly associated with frailty. Intensive control of hypertension could influence the trajectory of frailty, and this hypothesis should be explored in future prospective clinical trials. ©2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Right heart catheterisation: best practice and pitfalls in pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Rosenkranz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Right heart catheterisation (RHC plays a central role in identifying pulmonary hypertension (PH disorders, and is required to definitively diagnose pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH. Despite widespread acceptance, there is a lack of guidance regarding the best practice for performing RHC in clinical practice. In order to ensure the correct evaluation of haemodynamic parameters directly measured or calculated from RHC, attention should be drawn to standardising procedures such as the position of the pressure transducer and catheter balloon inflation volume. Measurement of pulmonary arterial wedge pressure, in particular, is vulnerable to over- or under-wedging, which can give rise to false readings. In turn, errors in RHC measurement and data interpretation can complicate the differentiation of PAH from other PH disorders and lead to misdiagnosis. In addition to diagnosis, the role of RHC in conjunction with noninvasive tests is widening rapidly to encompass monitoring of treatment response and establishing prognosis of patients diagnosed with PAH. However, further standardisation of RHC is warranted to ensure optimal use in routine clinical practice.

  20. MATERNAL AND FOETAL OUTCOMES IN GESTATIONAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha Janakiram

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Hypertensive disorders are a common cause of maternal morbidity and mortality and they have been recognised since the times of Hippocrates. Hypertension in pregnancy is defined as systolic blood pressure of more than or equal to 140 mmHg and diastolic blood pressure of 90mmHg or more, recorded on two occasions atleast 6 hours apart within 7 days. These disorders are a common cause of maternal morbidity and mortality complicating 3-10% of all pregnancies.1 The primary aim of this study is to establish the incidence, risk factors and its complications to mother and foetus. In cases of mild gestational hypertension, severe gestational hypertension with proteinuria(preeclampsiaand eclampsia and their effects on the maternal and foetal morbidity and mortality. In developing countries, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy has its own raised incidence of maternal morbidity and mortality. MATERIALS AND METHODS This is retrospective study conducted in Government K.A.P.V. Medical College, Trichy, South India. This is a tertiary health centre, where we receive complicated obstetric cases, sometimes in early stage or in late stages. This study is conducted from August 2016 to October 2016.Total number of deliveries during this period was 1440,of which 96 patients were diagnosed to have gestational hypertension, thus incidence accounts to 6.66%1 of which those with mild GHT found to be 2.36%,severe preeclampsia were 3.61%and incidence of eclampsia was 1.4%.We analysed the data of the mother, which included the age, parity, socioeconomic class, any risk factors for developing gestational hypertension, any associated risk factors, the mode of termination of pregnancy, maternal morbidity in the form of intensive care admission and number of days stayed there, usage of blood and blood products for treating disseminated intravascular coagulation and HELLP syndrome if any. The foetal outcome was studied and their association with maternal gestational

  1. Q-circle measurement error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hearn, Chase P.; Bradshaw, Edward S.

    1991-05-01

    High-Q lumped and distributed networks near resonance are generally modeled as elementary three element RLC circuits. The widely used Q-circle measurement technique is based on this assumption. It is shown that this assumption can lead to errors when measuring the Q-factor of more complex resonators, particularly when heavily loaded by the external source. In the Q-circle technique, the resonator is assumed to behave as a pure series (or parallel) RLC circuit and the intercept frequencies are found experimentally at which the components of impedance satisfy the absolute value of Im(Z) = Re(Z) (unloaded Q) and absolute value of Im(Z) = Ro+Re(Z) (loaded Q). The Q-factor is then determined as the ratio of the resonant frequency to the intercept bandwidth. This relationship is exact for simple series or parallel RLC circuits, regardless of the Q-factor, but not for more complex circuits. This is shown to be due to the fact that the impedance components of the circuit vary with frequency differently from those in a pure series RLC circuit, causing the Q-factor as determined above to be in error.

  2. Ecological Study of HIV Infection and Hypertension in Sub-Saharan Africa: Is There a Double Burden of Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Angkurawaranon

    Full Text Available Data on prevalence of hypertension were derived from a systematic search of literature published between 1975 and 2014 with corresponding national estimates on HIV prevalence and antiretroviral therapy (ART coverage from the Demographic and Health Surveys and the joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS databases. National estimates on gross national income (GNI and under-five mortality were obtained from the World Bank database. Linear regression analyses using robust standard errors (allowing for clustering at country level were carried out for associations of age-standardised hypertension prevalence ratios (standardized to rural Uganda's hypertension prevalence data with HIV prevalence, adjusted for national indicators, year of study and sex of the study population.In total, 140 estimates of prevalence of hypertension representing 25 nations were sex-and area-matched with corresponding HIV prevalence. A two-fold increase in HIV prevalence was associated with a 9.29% increase in age, sex and study year-adjusted prevalence ratio for hypertension (95% CI 2.0 to 16.5, p = 0.01, which increased to 16.3% (95% CI 9.3 to 21.1 after adjusting for under-five mortality, GNI per capita and ART coverage.Countries with a pronounced burden of HIV may also have an increased burden of non-communicable diseases such as hypertension with potential economic and health systems implications.

  3. An Error Analysis on TFL Learners’ Writings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arif ÇERÇİ

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of the present study is to identify and represent TFL learners’ writing errors through error analysis. All the learners started learning Turkish as foreign language with A1 (beginner level and completed the process by taking C1 (advanced certificate in TÖMER at Gaziantep University. The data of the present study were collected from 14 students’ writings in proficiency exams for each level. The data were grouped as grammatical, syntactic, spelling, punctuation, and word choice errors. The ratio and categorical distributions of identified errors were analyzed through error analysis. The data were analyzed through statistical procedures in an effort to determine whether error types differ according to the levels of the students. The errors in this study are limited to the linguistic and intralingual developmental errors

  4. A Comparative Study on Error Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chun

    2015-01-01

    students (N= 54 students from LU; and N= 33 students from AU) participating in the studies, among them 44 are 2nd-year students (n=28 from LU and n=16 from AU) and 43 3rd-year students (n=26 from LU and n=17 from AU). Students’ writing samples were first collected and the errors on the use of comparative...... of the grammatical errors with using comparative sentences is developed, which include comparative item-related errors, comparative result-related errors and blend errors. The results further indicate that these errors could attribute to negative L1 transfer and overgeneralization of grammatical rule and structures......Title: A Comparative Study on Error Analysis Subtitle: - Belgian (L1) and Danish (L1) learners’ use of Chinese (L2) comparative sentences in written production Xiaoli Wu, Chun Zhang Abstract: Making errors is an inevitable and necessary part of learning. The collection, classification and analysis...

  5. Cognitive Diagnostic Error in Internal Medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.K.A. van den Berge (Kees)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on the subject of cognitive diagnostic error in internal medicine; mistakes resulting from flaws in physicians’ reasoning processes. More specifically, this thesis addresses errors caused by confirmation and availability bias. Recently, the potential of cognitive

  6. Game Design Principles based on Human Error

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Zaffari

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper displays the result of the authors’ research regarding to the incorporation of Human Error, through design principles, to video game design. In a general way, designers must consider Human Error factors throughout video game interface development; however, when related to its core design, adaptations are in need, since challenge is an important factor for fun and under the perspective of Human Error, challenge can be considered as a flaw in the system. The research utilized Human Error classifications, data triangulation via predictive human error analysis, and the expanded flow theory to allow the design of a set of principles in order to match the design of playful challenges with the principles of Human Error. From the results, it was possible to conclude that the application of Human Error in game design has a positive effect on player experience, allowing it to interact only with errors associated with the intended aesthetics of the game.

  7. Understanding human management of automation errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Sara E.; Rogers, Wendy A.; Fisk, Arthur D.

    2013-01-01

    Automation has the potential to aid humans with a diverse set of tasks and support overall system performance. Automated systems are not always reliable, and when automation errs, humans must engage in error management, which is the process of detecting, understanding, and correcting errors. However, this process of error management in the context of human-automation interaction is not well understood. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review of the variables that contribute to error management. We examined relevant research in human-automation interaction and human error to identify critical automation, person, task, and emergent variables. We propose a framework for management of automation errors to incorporate and build upon previous models. Further, our analysis highlights variables that may be addressed through design and training to positively influence error management. Additional efforts to understand the error management process will contribute to automation designed and implemented to support safe and effective system performance. PMID:25383042

  8. Intravenous labetalol in severe hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Palu, C.; Pessina, A. C.; Semplicini, A.; Hlede, M.; Morandin, F.; Palatini, P.; Sperti, G.; Rossi, G. P.

    1982-01-01

    1 Labetalol was administered by intravenous infusion or by the combination of intravenous bolus injection plus infusion to 15 patients with severe essential hypertension and to one with phaeochromocytoma. 2 With the infusion alone the reduction of arterial pressure was slow to develop and limited in degree, but with the combination of the bolus injection plus the infusion the reduction in pressure was more prompt, more pronounced and longer lasting. Apart from an uncomplicated syncopal attack in one patient, no serious side — effects were encountered. 3 Subsequent treatment with oral labetalol usually required the addition of a diuretic to control the blood pressure probably due to sodium and fluid retention during treatment with labetalol alone. PMID:7093106

  9. Awareness, Treatment and Control of Pre-hypertension and Hypertension among Adults in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteghamati, Alireza; Etemad, Koorosh; Koohpayehzadeh, Jalil; Abbasi, Mehrshad; Meysamie, Alipasha; Khajeh, Elias; Asgari, Fereshteh; Noshad, Sina; Rafei, Ali; Mousavizadeh, Mostafa; Neishaboury, Mohamad Reza; Afarideh, Mohsen; Nakhjavani, Manouchehr

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for non-communicable diseases. Yet, Nation-wide prevalence and trend reports in developing countries are sparsely available. Data from three cycles of Survey of Risk Factors of Non-communicable Diseases (SuRFNCD) 2005 - 2011 were aggregated. In 2011, 8218 adults aged 25 - 70 years were enrolled. For trend analysis 68850, 4184, and 7416 adults aged 25 - 64 years were included from 2005, 2007, and 2011 surveys, respectively. Hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure (SBP) ≥ 140 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) ≥ 90 mmHg, or receiving anti-hypertensive medication. Pre-hypertension was defined as SBP between 120 - 139 or DBP between 80 - 89 mmHg. The status of awareness, non-pharmacologic treatment (management), pharmacologic treatment, and control (SBP hypertensive individuals were also determined. 25.6% (95%CI: 23.5 - 27.5) of the adults aged 25 - 70 years had hypertension and 39.8% (95%CI: 37.8 - 41.9) had pre-hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension was greater among older adults (P adults with hypertension (25.7% to 24.1%) and pre-hypertension (45.5% to 40.4%) significantly decreased. In 2011, rates for awareness, management, treatment, and control among hypertensives were 43.2% (95%CI: 40.0 - 46.4), 40.3% (95%CI: 37.0 - 43.6), 34.8% (95%CI: 31.5 - 38.2), and 38.6% (95%CI: 33.1 - 44.2), respectively. Over time, status of awareness, management, treatment and control was significantly improved and was more salient among men (P hypertension and pre-hypertension is gradually declining. Despite improvements in awareness, management, treatment and control, these decline rates are still low and initiative strategies need to be implemented to further improve the current status.

  10. Error Propagation in a System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloegel, Kirk (Inventor); Bhatt, Devesh (Inventor); Oglesby, David V. (Inventor); Madl, Gabor (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Embodiments of the present subject matter can enable the analysis of signal value errors for system models. In an example, signal value errors can be propagated through the functional blocks of a system model to analyze possible effects as the signal value errors impact incident functional blocks. This propagation of the errors can be applicable to many models of computation including avionics models, synchronous data flow, and Kahn process networks.

  11. Protecting weak measurements against systematic errors

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, Shengshi; Alonso, Jose Raul Gonzalez; Brun, Todd A.; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we consider the systematic error of quantum metrology by weak measurements under decoherence. We derive the systematic error of maximum likelihood estimation in general to the first-order approximation of a small deviation in the probability distribution, and study the robustness of standard weak measurement and postselected weak measurements against systematic errors. We show that, with a large weak value, the systematic error of a postselected weak measurement when the probe u...

  12. Nursing Errors in Intensive Care Unit by Human Error Identification in Systems Tool: A Case Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nezamodini, Zeynab Sadat; Khodamoradi, Fatemeh; Malekzadeh, Maryam; Vaziri, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    ...’ community that are preventable and require serious attention. Objectives The current study aimed to identify possible nursing errors applying human error identification in systems tool (HEIST...

  13. Therapeutic strategies in pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonello eFuso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is a life-threatening condition characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure. It is clinically classified into five groups: patients in the first group are considered to have pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH whereas patients of the other groups have PH that is due to cardiopulmonary or other systemic diseases. The management of patients with PH has advanced rapidly over the last decade and the introduction of specific treatments especially for PAH has lead to an improved outcome. However, despite the progress in the treatment, the functional limitation and the survival of these patients remain unsatisfactory and there is no cure for PAH. Therefore the search for an ideal therapy still goes on. At present, two levels of treatment can be identified: primary and specific therapy. Primary therapy is directed at the underlying cause of the PH. It also includes a supportive therapy consisting in oxygen supplementation, diuretics, and anticoagulation which should be considered in all patients with PH. Specific therapy is directed at the PH itself and includes treatment with vasodilatators such as calcium channel blockers and with vasodilatator and pathogenetic drugs such as prostanoids, endothelin receptor antagonists and phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors. These drugs act in several pathogenetic mechanisms of the PH and are specific for PAH although they might be used also in the other groups of PH. Finally, atrial septostomy and lung transplantation are reserved for patients refractory to medical therapy. Different therapeutic approaches can be considered in the management of patients with PH. Therapy can be established on the basis of both the clinical classification and the functional class. It is also possible to adopt a goal-oriented therapy in which the timing of treatment escalation is determined by inadequate response to known prognostic indicators.

  14. GUT MICROBIOTA DYSBIOSIS IS LINKED TO HYPERTENSION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Santisteban, Monica M.; Rodriguez, Vermali; Li, Eric; Ahmari, Niousha; Carvajal, Jessica Marulanda; Zadeh, Mojgan; Gong, Minghao; Qi, Yanfei; Zubcevic, Jasenka; Sahay, Bikash; Pepine, Carl J.; Raizada, Mohan K.; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that gut microbiota is critical in the maintenance of physiological homeostasis. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that dysbiosis in gut microbiota is associated with hypertension since genetic, environmental, and dietary factors profoundly influence both gut microbiota and blood pressure. Bacterial DNA from fecal samples of two rat models of hypertension and a small cohort of patients was used for bacterial genomic analysis. We observed a significant decrease in microbial richness, diversity, and evenness in the spontaneously hypertensive rat, in addition to an increased Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio. These changes were accompanied with decreases in acetate- and butyrate-producing bacteria. Additionally, the microbiota of a small cohort of human hypertension patients was found to follow a similar dysbiotic pattern, as it was less rich and diverse than that of control subjects. Similar changes in gut microbiota were observed in the chronic angiotensin II infusion rat model, most notably decreased microbial richness and an increased Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio. In this model, we evaluated the efficacy of oral minocycline in restoring gut microbiota. In addition to attenuating high blood pressure, minocycline was able to rebalance the dysbiotic hypertension gut microbiota by reducing the Firmicutes to Bacteroidetes ratio. These observations demonstrate that high BP is associated with gut microbiota dysbiosis, both in animal and human hypertension. They suggest that dietary intervention to correct gut microbiota could be an innovative nutritional therapeutic strategy for hypertension. PMID:25870193

  15. Gut dysbiosis is linked to hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tao; Santisteban, Monica M; Rodriguez, Vermali; Li, Eric; Ahmari, Niousha; Carvajal, Jessica Marulanda; Zadeh, Mojgan; Gong, Minghao; Qi, Yanfei; Zubcevic, Jasenka; Sahay, Bikash; Pepine, Carl J; Raizada, Mohan K; Mohamadzadeh, Mansour

    2015-06-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that gut microbiota is critical in the maintenance of physiological homeostasis. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that dysbiosis in gut microbiota is associated with hypertension because genetic, environmental, and dietary factors profoundly influence both gut microbiota and blood pressure. Bacterial DNA from fecal samples of 2 rat models of hypertension and a small cohort of patients was used for bacterial genomic analysis. We observed a significant decrease in microbial richness, diversity, and evenness in the spontaneously hypertensive rat, in addition to an increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio. These changes were accompanied by decreases in acetate- and butyrate-producing bacteria. In addition, the microbiota of a small cohort of human hypertensive patients was found to follow a similar dysbiotic pattern, as it was less rich and diverse than that of control subjects. Similar changes in gut microbiota were observed in the chronic angiotensin II infusion rat model, most notably decreased microbial richness and an increased Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio. In this model, we evaluated the efficacy of oral minocycline in restoring gut microbiota. In addition to attenuating high blood pressure, minocycline was able to rebalance the dysbiotic hypertension gut microbiota by reducing the Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio. These observations demonstrate that high blood pressure is associated with gut microbiota dysbiosis, both in animal and human hypertension. They suggest that dietary intervention to correct gut microbiota could be an innovative nutritional therapeutic strategy for hypertension. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. Single dose regorafenib-induced hypertensive crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, B; Kemal, Y; Teker, F; Kut, E; Demirag, G; Yucel, I

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are uncommon tumors of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Regorafenib is a new multikinase inhibitor and is approved for the treatment of GISTs in patients who develop resistance to imatinib and sunitinib. The most common drug-related adverse events with regorafenib are hypertension, hand-foot skin reactions, and diarrhea. Grade IV hypertensive side effect has never been reported after a single dose. In this report, we present a case of Grade IV hypertensive side effect (hypertensive crisis and seizure) after a single dose of regorafenib. A 54-year-old male normotensive GIST patient was admitted to the emergency department with seizure and encephalopathy after the first dosage of regorafenib. His blood pressure was 240/140 mmHg upon admission. After intensive treatment with nitrate and nitroprusside, his blood pressure returned to normal levels in five days. Regorafenib was discontinued, and he did not experience hypertension again. This paper reports the first case of Grade IV hypertension after the first dosage of regorafenib. We can suggest that hypertension is an idiosyncratic side effect unrelated to the dosage.

  17. Factors Affecting Hypertension among the Malaysian Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sima Ataollahi Eshkoor

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a common chronic disease in the elderly. This study aimed to determine the effects of age, ethnicity, gender, education, marital status, nutritional parameters, and blood elements on the risk of high blood pressure in the Malaysian elderly. This research was conducted on a group of 2322 non-institutionalized Malaysian elderly. The hierarchy binary logistic regression analysis was applied to estimate the risk of hypertension in respondents. Approximately, 45.61% of subjects had hypertension. The findings indicated that the female gender (Odds ratio (OR = 1.54, an increase in body weight (OR = 1.61, and an increase in the blood levels of albumin (OR = 1.51, glucose (OR = 1.92, and triglycerides (OR = 1.27 significantly increased the risk of hypertension in subjects (p < 0.05. Conversely, an increase in both dietary carbohydrates (OR = 0.74, and blood cholesterol level (OR = 0.42 significantly reduced the risk of hypertension in samples (p < 0.05. Furthermore, the results showed that ethnicity was a non-relevant factor to increase the risk of hypertension in subjects. It was concluded that female gender, an increase in body weight, and an increase in the blood levels of glucose, triglycerides, and albumin enhanced the risk of high blood pressure in the Malaysian elderly. In addition, an increase in both dietary carbohydrates and blood cholesterol level decreased hypertension in subjects.

  18. Error Analysis and the EFL Classroom Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fang; Jiang, Xue-mei

    2007-01-01

    This paper makes a study of error analysis and its implementation in the EFL (English as Foreign Language) classroom teaching. It starts by giving a systematic review of the concepts and theories concerning EA (Error Analysis), the various reasons causing errors are comprehensively explored. The author proposes that teachers should employ…

  19. Error Analysis in Mathematics. Technical Report #1012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Cheng-Fei

    2012-01-01

    Error analysis is a method commonly used to identify the cause of student errors when they make consistent mistakes. It is a process of reviewing a student's work and then looking for patterns of misunderstanding. Errors in mathematics can be factual, procedural, or conceptual, and may occur for a number of reasons. Reasons why students make…

  20. Immediate error correction process following sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Shulan; Cheng, I-Chen; Tsai, Ling-Ling

    2007-06-01

    Previous studies have suggested that one night of sleep deprivation decreases frontal lobe metabolic activity, particularly in the anterior cingulated cortex (ACC), resulting in decreased performance in various executive function tasks. This study thus attempted to address whether sleep deprivation impaired the executive function of error detection and error correction. Sixteen young healthy college students (seven women, nine men, with ages ranging from 18 to 23 years) participated in this study. Participants performed a modified letter flanker task and were instructed to make immediate error corrections on detecting performance errors. Event-related potentials (ERPs) during the flanker task were obtained using a within-subject, repeated-measure design. The error negativity or error-related negativity (Ne/ERN) and the error positivity (Pe) seen immediately after errors were analyzed. The results show that the amplitude of the Ne/ERN was reduced significantly following sleep deprivation. Reduction also occurred for error trials with subsequent correction, indicating that sleep deprivation influenced error correction ability. This study further demonstrated that the impairment in immediate error correction following sleep deprivation was confined to specific stimulus types, with both Ne/ERN and behavioral correction rates being reduced only for trials in which flanker stimuli were incongruent with the target stimulus, while the response to the target was compatible with that of the flanker stimuli following sleep deprivation. The results thus warrant future systematic investigation of the interaction between stimulus type and error correction following sleep deprivation.