WorldWideScience

Sample records for hypertension apasl recommendations

  1. Challenges and scientific considerations in hypertension management reflected in the 2012 recommendations of the Canadian Hypertension Education Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobe, Sheldon W; Poirier, Luc; Tremblay, Guy; Lindsay, Patrice; Reid, Debra; Campbell, Norman Rc; Khan, Nadia; Quinn, Robert R; Rabi, Doreen

    2012-01-01

    This article provides the scientific rationale and background information for the Canadian Hypertension Education Program's 2012 recommendations for the management of hypertension. It also summarizes the key new recommendations and the theme for 2012, which is the prevention of hypertension. The full recommendations are available at www.hypertension.ca.

  2. Hypertension: What Can Be Learned from Current Recommendations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanier Coll Muñoz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Management of hypertension remains an objective for physicians and health professionals in order to achieve comprehensive control and prevention of complications during its course. Some aspects in the management of hypertensive patients are still controversial, and despite the current evidence provided by different studies, the actions to take with this group of patients remain complex and interdisciplinary. The new guidelines for the management of hypertension in different societies and groups are useful for professionals; however, they should not be regarded as a rule. Thus, we must adapt our actions and recommendations to the individual characteristics of each patient.

  3. Practical recommendations for treatment of hypertension in older patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip A Kithas

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Philip A Kithas, Mark A SupianoGeriatric Research, Education, and Clinical Center, George E Wahlen Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatrics, University of Utah School of Medicine, Salt Lake City, Utah, USABackground: By the year 2030 the percent of the population over the age of 65 years is projected to range from 3.7% (in sub-Saharan Africa to almost 22% (in Europe. Accompanying this unprecedented growth will be a significant increase in many of the disease processes or “comorbidities” associated with aging, not the least of which is hypertension. Global health care resources and economies in general will be stressed to breaking point if this condition is not dealt with in an aggressive and timely manner because the consequences of untreated hypertension such as stroke, myocardial infarction, and dementia are exceedingly costly in the long term.Methods: To help focus attention on the worldwide epidemic of hypertension, the current literature and guidelines were reviewed, along with information on the various classes of medications indicated in the treatment of hypertension in the elderly. Results: Recent, large, randomized trials indicate that hypertension in the elderly can and should be treated to lower the incidence of stroke, myocardial infarction, and chronic kidney disease. Although thiazide-type diuretics are the recommended first-line agents in most cases of uncomplicated hypertension, multiple drug classes have been shown to be useful. In addition, and where feasible, a multidisciplinary team approach has demonstrated the most durable results.Conclusion: Thiazide diuretics should be the first-line agents in uncomplicated, isolated systolic hypertension. Starting at low doses and proceeding in a gradual manner, these agents have proven efficacy in decreasing the risk of stroke and cardiovascular events. It is now recommended that these agents be used in low

  4. The 2015 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, prevention, and treatment of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Rabi, Doreen M; Zarnke, Kelly B; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Nerenberg, Kara; Cloutier, Lyne; Gelfer, Mark; Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime; Milot, Alain; Bolli, Peter; McKay, Donald W; Tremblay, Guy; McLean, Donna; Tobe, Sheldon W; Ruzicka, Marcel; Burns, Kevin D; Vallée, Michel; Ramesh Prasad, G V; Lebel, Marcel; Feldman, Ross D; Selby, Peter; Pipe, Andrew; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; McFarlane, Philip A; Oh, Paul; Hegele, Robert A; Khara, Milan; Wilson, Thomas W; Brian Penner, S; Burgess, Ellen; Herman, Robert J; Bacon, Simon L; Rabkin, Simon W; Gilbert, Richard E; Campbell, Tavis S; Grover, Steven; Honos, George; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D; Coutts, Shelagh B; Gubitz, Gord; Campbell, Norman R C; Moe, Gordon W; Howlett, Jonathan G; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Prebtani, Ally; Larochelle, Pierre; Leiter, Lawrence A; Jones, Charlotte; Ogilvie, Richard I; Woo, Vincent; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Trudeau, Luc; Petrella, Robert J; Hiremath, Swapnil; Stone, James A; Drouin, Denis; Lavoie, Kim L; Hamet, Pavel; Fodor, George; Grégoire, Jean C; Fournier, Anne; Lewanczuk, Richard; Dresser, George K; Sharma, Mukul; Reid, Debra; Benoit, Geneviève; Feber, Janusz; Harris, Kevin C; Poirier, Luc; Padwal, Raj S

    2015-05-01

    The Canadian Hypertension Education Program reviews the hypertension literature annually and provides detailed recommendations regarding hypertension diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment. This report provides the updated evidence-based recommendations for 2015. This year, 4 new recommendations were added and 2 existing recommendations were modified. A revised algorithm for the diagnosis of hypertension is presented. Two major changes are proposed: (1) measurement using validated electronic (oscillometric) upper arm devices is preferred over auscultation for accurate office blood pressure measurement; (2) if the visit 1 mean blood pressure is increased but blood pressure measurements using ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (preferably) or home blood pressure monitoring should be performed before visit 2 to rule out white coat hypertension, for which pharmacologic treatment is not recommended. A standardized ambulatory blood pressure monitoring protocol and an update on automated office blood pressure are also presented. Several other recommendations on accurate measurement of blood pressure and criteria for diagnosis of hypertension have been reorganized. Two other new recommendations refer to smoking cessation: (1) tobacco use status should be updated regularly and advice to quit smoking should be provided; and (2) advice in combination with pharmacotherapy for smoking cessation should be offered to all smokers. The following recommendations were modified: (1) renal artery stenosis should be primarily managed medically; and (2) renal artery angioplasty and stenting could be considered for patients with renal artery stenosis and complicated, uncontrolled hypertension. The rationale for these recommendation changes is discussed.

  5. The 2013 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, prevention, and treatment of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackam, Daniel G; Quinn, Robert R; Ravani, Pietro; Rabi, Doreen M; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Khan, Nadia A; Herman, Robert J; Bacon, Simon L; Cloutier, Lyne; Dawes, Martin; Rabkin, Simon W; Gilbert, Richard E; Ruzicka, Marcel; McKay, Donald W; Campbell, Tavis S; Grover, Steven; Honos, George; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Bolli, Peter; Wilson, Thomas W; Feldman, Ross D; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D; Gelfer, Mark; Burns, Kevin D; Vallée, Michel; Prasad, G V Ramesh; Lebel, Marcel; McLean, Donna; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Moe, Gordon W; Howlett, Jonathan G; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Larochelle, Pierre; Leiter, Lawrence A; Jones, Charlotte; Ogilvie, Richard I; Woo, Vincent; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Trudeau, Luc; Petrella, Robert J; Milot, Alain; Stone, James A; Drouin, Denis; Lavoie, Kim L; Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime; Godwin, Marshall; Tremblay, Guy; Hamet, Pavel; Fodor, George; Carruthers, S George; Pylypchuk, George B; Burgess, Ellen; Lewanczuk, Richard; Dresser, George K; Penner, S Brian; Hegele, Robert A; McFarlane, Philip A; Sharma, Mukul; Reid, Debra J; Tobe, Sheldon W; Poirier, Luc; Padwal, Raj S

    2013-05-01

    We updated the evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in adults for 2013. This year's update includes 2 new recommendations. First, among nonhypertensive or stage 1 hypertensive individuals, the use of resistance or weight training exercise does not adversely influence blood pressure (BP) (Grade D). Thus, such patients need not avoid this type of exercise for fear of increasing BP. Second, and separately, for very elderly patients with isolated systolic hypertension (age 80 years or older), the target for systolic BP should be patients. We also discuss 2 additional topics at length (the pharmacological treatment of mild hypertension and the possibility of a diastolic J curve in hypertensive patients with coronary artery disease). In light of several methodological limitations, a recent systematic review of 4 trials in patients with stage 1 uncomplicated hypertension did not lead to changes in management recommendations. In addition, because of a lack of prospective randomized data assessing diastolic BP thresholds in patients with coronary artery disease and hypertension, no recommendation to set a selective diastolic cut point for such patients could be affirmed. However, both of these issues will be examined on an ongoing basis, in particular as new evidence emerges.

  6. The 2014 Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations for blood pressure measurement, diagnosis, assessment of risk, prevention, and treatment of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Kaberi; Quinn, Robert R; Zarnke, Kelly B; Rabi, Doreen M; Ravani, Pietro; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Rabkin, Simon W; Trudeau, Luc; Feldman, Ross D; Cloutier, Lyne; Prebtani, Ally; Herman, Robert J; Bacon, Simon L; Gilbert, Richard E; Ruzicka, Marcel; McKay, Donald W; Campbell, Tavis S; Grover, Steven; Honos, George; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; Bolli, Peter; Wilson, Thomas W; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D; Coutts, Shelagh B; Gubitz, Gord; Gelfer, Mark; Vallée, Michel; Prasad, G V Ramesh; Lebel, Marcel; McLean, Donna; Arnold, J Malcolm O; Moe, Gordon W; Howlett, Jonathan G; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Larochelle, Pierre; Leiter, Lawrence A; Jones, Charlotte; Ogilvie, Richard I; Woo, Vincent; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Burns, Kevin D; Petrella, Robert J; Hiremath, Swapnil; Milot, Alain; Stone, James A; Drouin, Denis; Lavoie, Kim L; Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime; Tremblay, Guy; Hamet, Pavel; Fodor, George; Carruthers, S George; Pylypchuk, George B; Burgess, Ellen; Lewanczuk, Richard; Dresser, George K; Penner, S Brian; Hegele, Robert A; McFarlane, Philip A; Khara, Milan; Pipe, Andrew; Oh, Paul; Selby, Peter; Sharma, Mukul; Reid, Debra J; Tobe, Sheldon W; Padwal, Raj S; Poirier, Luc

    2014-05-01

    Herein, updated evidence-based recommendations for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension in Canadian adults are detailed. For 2014, 3 existing recommendations were modified and 2 new recommendations were added. The following recommendations were modified: (1) the recommended sodium intake threshold was changed from ≤ 1500 mg (3.75 g of salt) to approximately 2000 mg (5 g of salt) per day; (2) a pharmacotherapy treatment initiation systolic blood pressure threshold of ≥ 160 mm Hg was added in very elderly (age ≥ 80 years) patients who do not have diabetes or target organ damage (systolic blood pressure target in this population remains at hypertension to only those ≥ 50 years of age. The 2 new recommendations are: (1) advice to be cautious when lowering systolic blood pressure to target levels in patients with established coronary artery disease if diastolic blood pressure is ≤ 60 mm Hg because of concerns that myocardial ischemia might be exacerbated; and (2) the addition of glycated hemoglobin (A1c) in the diagnostic work-up of patients with newly diagnosed hypertension. The rationale for these recommendation changes is discussed. In addition, emerging data on blood pressure targets in stroke patients are discussed; these data did not lead to recommendation changes at this time. The Canadian Hypertension Education Program recommendations will continue to be updated annually.

  7. Context-Awareness Based Personalized Recommendation of Anti-Hypertension Drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dexin; Jin, Dawei; Goh, Tiong-Thye; Li, Na; Wei, Leiru

    2016-09-01

    The World Health Organization estimates that almost one-third of the world's adult population are suffering from hypertension which has gradually become a "silent killer". Due to the varieties of anti-hypertensive drugs, patients are interested in how these drugs can be selected to match their respective conditions. This study provides a personalized recommendation service system of anti-hypertensive drugs based on context-awareness and designs a context ontology framework of the service. In addition, this paper introduces a Semantic Web Rule Language (SWRL)-based rule to provide high-level context reasoning and information recommendation and to overcome the limitation of ontology reasoning. To make the information recommendation of the drugs more personalized, this study also devises three categories of information recommendation rules that match different priority levels and uses a ranking algorithm to optimize the recommendation. The experiment conducted shows that combining the anti-hypertensive drugs personalized recommendation service context ontology (HyRCO) with the optimized rule reasoning can achieve a higher-quality personalized drug recommendation service. Accordingly this exploratory study of the personalized recommendation service for hypertensive drugs and its method can be easily adopted for other diseases.

  8. [Adherence to physical activity recommendations in a hypertensive primary care population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guitard Sein-Echaluce, M Luisa; Torres Puig-gros, Joan; Farreny Justribó, Divina; Gutiérrez Vilaplana, Josep M; Martínez Orduna, Miguela; Artigues Barberá, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of adherence to physical activity recommendations in the hypertensive population of Lerida (Spain) attended in primary care and to identify related factors. A cross sectional study was carried out in hypertensive adults. The dependent variable was adherence to physical activity recommendations measured with the Minnesota Questionnaire. The independent variables were sociodemographic factors, the information received, and attitudes to physical activity. A total of 786 hypertensive patients participated in this study; 53.9% were women and the mean age was 66.0±10.2 years. Adherence to recommendations was found in 64.3% (95% CI: 60.9-67.6); this percentage was 65.2% in men (95% CI: 60.2-70.0) and 63.4% in women (95% CI: 58.8-67.9). Greater adherence was associated with age in men and with residence in a rural area in women. In both genders, greater adherence was associated with unpaid work and with having a favorable attitude to physical activity. No association was observed with the number of recommendations received in the last 6 months. More than half the hypertensive population adhered to physical activity recommendations. To improve physical activity levels, recommendations can be tailored to the attitudes of individual patients. Copyright © 2012 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Drug treatment of hypertension in pregnancy: a critical review of adult guideline recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khaja, Khalid A J; Sequeira, Reginald P; Alkhaja, Alwaleed K; Damanhori, Awatif H H

    2014-03-01

    This review evaluates the guideline recommendations for the management of hypertension in pregnancy as presented by 25 national/international guidelines developed for the management of arterial hypertension in adults. There is a general consensus that oral α-methyldopa and parenteral labetalol are the drugs of choice for nonsevere and severe hypertension in pregnancy, respectively. Long-acting nifedipine is recommended by various guidelines as an alternative for first-line and second-line therapy in nonsevere and severe hypertension. The safety of β-blockers, atenolol in particular, in early and late stages of pregnancy is unresolved; their use is contraindicated according to several guidelines. Diuretic-associated harmful effects on maternal and fetal outcomes are controversial: their use is discouraged in pregnancy. It is important to develop specific guidelines for treating hypertension in special groups such as adult females of childbearing age and sexually active female adolescents to minimize the risk of adverse effects of drugs on the fetus. In several guidelines, the antihypertensive classes, recommended drug(s), intended drug formulation, and route of administration are not explicit. These omissions should be addressed in future guideline revisions in order to enhance the guidelines' utility and credibility in clinical practice.

  10. Do Recommendations for the Management of Hypertension Improve Cardiovascular Outcome? The Canadian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bolli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The Canadian Hypertension Education Program (CHEP was established in 1999 as a response to the result of a national survey that showed that a high percentage of Canadians were unaware of having hypertension with only 13% of those treated for hypertension having their blood pressure controlled. The CHEP formulates yearly recommendations based on published evidence. A repeat survey in 2006 showed that the percentage of treated hypertensive patients with the blood pressure controlled had risen to 65.7%. Over the first decade of the existence of the CHEP, the number of prescriptions for antihypertensive medications had increased by 84.4% associated with a significant greater decline in the yearly mortality from stroke, heart failure and myocardial infarction and a significant decrease in the hospitalization for stroke and heart failure. Therefore, the introduction of the CHEP and the yearly issue of updated recommendations resulted in a significant increase in the awareness, diagnosis and treatment of hypertension and in a significant reduction in stroke and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. The CHEP model could serve as a template for its adoption to other regions or countries.

  11. Do Hypertensive Individuals Who Are Aware of Their Disease Follow Lifestyle Recommendations Better than Those Who Are Not Aware?

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    Yuna Kim

    Full Text Available Lifestyle modification is the first step in hypertension management. Our objective was to assess adherence to lifestyle recommendations by individuals who were aware of their hypertension and to identify characteristics associated with non-adherence. Using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey conducted in 2010-2012, we compared the adherence to six lifestyle recommendations of hypertensive subjects aware of the status of their condition with that of those who were not aware, based on survey regression analysis. The characteristics associated with non-adherence were assessed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Of all hypertensive subjects, <20% adhered to a healthy diet and reduced salt intake and about 80% moderated alcohol consumption and did not smoke. Half of all subjects maintained normal body weight and engaged in physical activity. Most lifestyle features of aware hypertensive Koreans did not differ greatly from those of hypertensive individuals who were not aware. Reduction in salt intake was slightly more prevalent among those aware of their hypertensive status. Obesity was more prevalent among the aware hypertensive subjects, and the prevalence of obesity increased with the duration of hypertension. Male gender, younger age, residence in a rural area, low income, and the use of antihypertensive medication were associated with non-adherence to lifestyle recommendations by hypertensive individuals. Many hypertensive Koreans do not comply with lifestyle recommendations for the management of hypertension. The association between the use of antihypertensive medications and non-adherence suggested an over-reliance on medication rather than a commitment to a healthy lifestyle. Our study highlights that efforts encouraging healthy lifestyles, as the first step in hypertension management, need to be increased.

  12. Frequency and predictors of non-compliance to dietary recommendations among hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Shahzeb; Bawany, Faizan Imran; Mirza, Arslan; Hussain, Mehwish; Khan, Asadullah; Lashari, Muhammad Nawaz

    2014-08-01

    Compliance to dietary recommendations among hypertensive people is a major health care issue. Non-compliance can nullify the effects of even the most scientific and optimum treatment plan. The main aim of this study was to determine the frequency and predictors of non-adherence in our region. We also investigated the possible factors based on patient opinions that could increase compliance. A sample of 400 adult patients, diagnosed with hypertension for at least 3 years, who visited Civil Hospital during the time period April-June 2013 were included in this cross sectional study. Patient data and opinions were collected by two trained interviewers using a pre-coded questionnaire. Compliance was assessed based on patients self report. More than three quarters (n = 310, 77.5%) of the hypertensive patients were non-compliant. More than one social gathering in a week, peer-influence, no friends to follow the recommended diet plan and lack of believe regarding diet as an effective measure to control blood pressure were found to be the significant predictors of non-compliance (P values compliance to dietary recommendations is a major problem prevalent especially in Pakistan. There is an urgent need for doctors and nurses to counsel their patients effectively to prevent future morbidities and mortalities because of non-compliance.

  13. Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hypertension Triglycerides Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Hypertension March 2010 Download PDFs English Espanol Editors Robert ... Additional Resources MedlinePlus (NIH) Mayo Clinic What is hypertension? Hypertension, or chronic (long-term) high blood pressure, ...

  14. Clinical management of drug-induced hypertension: 2013 Practical Recommendations of the Italian Society of Hypertension (SIIA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virdis, Agostino; Ghiadoni, Lorenzo; Taddei, Stefano

    2014-03-01

    Results from recent observational studies conducted in our country and including approximately 160,000 patients with hypertension, reported that only 37 % of patients achieve effective blood pressure control under treatment. These data confirm that blood pressure control amongst the hypertensive population is still largely unsatisfactory in Italy. For this reason, the Italian Society of Hypertension aims to generate a number of interventions to improve blood pressure control in Italy, including integrated actions with General Practitioners, the implementation of hypertension awareness in the general population, a larger use of home blood pressure measurements, and a survey aimed at identifying all clinical and excellence centers for hypertension diagnosis and treatment throughout the whole national territory. Many therapeutic agents or chemical substances can induce a persistent or transient increase in blood pressure or interfere with the effect of antihypertensive drugs, causing sodium retention and expansion of the extra-cellular volume, activating the sympathetic nervous system and inducing vasoconstriction. This aspect represents one of the most common cause of secondary forms of hypertension, which often is under-evaluated by the physicians. In this review article, the potential causes of secondary forms of hypertension caused by use/abuse of drugs or substances are summarized.

  15. Capacity of Health Facilities to Manage Hypertension in Mukono and Buikwe Districts in Uganda: Challenges and Recommendations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geofrey Musinguzi

    Full Text Available The burden of chronic diseases is increasing in both low- and middle-income countries. However, healthcare systems in low-income countries are inadequately equipped to deal with the growing disease burden, which requires chronic care for patients. The aim of this study was to assess the capacity of health facilities to manage hypertension in two districts in Uganda.In a cross-sectional study conducted between June and October 2012, we surveyed 126 health facilities (6 hospitals, 4 Health Center IV (HCIV, 23 Health Center III (HCIII, 41 Health Center II (HCII and 52 private clinics/dispensaries in Mukono and Buikwe districts in Uganda. We assessed records, conducted structured interviews with heads of facilities, and administered questionnaires to 271 health workers. The study assessed service provision for hypertension, availability of supplies such as medicines, guidelines and equipment, in-service training for hypertension, knowledge of hypertension management, challenges and recommendations.Of the 126 health facilities, 92.9% reported managing (diagnosing/treating patients with hypertension, and most (80.2% were run by non-medical doctors or non-physician health workers (NPHW. Less than half (46% of the facilities had guidelines for managing hypertension. A 10th of the facilities lacked functioning blood pressure devices and 28% did not have stethoscopes. No facilities ever calibrated their BP devices except one. About a half of the facilities had anti-hypertensive medicines in stock; mainly thiazide diuretics (46%, beta blockers (56% and calcium channel blockers (48.4%. Alpha blockers, mixed alpha & beta blockers and angiotensin II receptor antagonists were only stocked by private clinics/dispensaries. Most HCIIs lacked anti-hypertensive medicines, including the first line thiazide diuretics. Significant knowledge gaps in classification of patients as hypertensive were noted among respondents. All health workers (except 5, 1.9% indicated

  16. Australian perspective regarding recommendations for physical activity and exercise rehabilitation in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabbay E

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Robin Fowler1–3, Sue Jenkins2,3,5, Andrew Maiorana2,4, Kevin Gain2,3,6,7, Gerry O'Driscoll7–9, Eli Gabbay1–3,7–91Advanced Lung Disease Program, Royal Perth Hospital, 2School of Physiotherapy and Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, 3Lung Institute of Western Australia (LIWA, Centre for Asthma, Allergy and Respiratory Research, University of Western Australia, 4Advanced Heart Failure and Cardiac Transplant Service, Royal Perth Hospital, 5Physiotherapy Department, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, 6Respiratory Medicine Department, Royal Perth Hospital, 7School of Medicine, University of Western Australia, 8School of Medicine, University of Notre Dame, 9Heart and Lung Transplant Foundation of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, AustraliaAim: To determine the opinion of health care professionals within Australia, regarding acceptable levels of exertion and symptoms, and referral for exercise rehabilitation in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH.Method: In 2010, 76 health care professionals at a specialist pulmonary hypertension meeting in Australia were surveyed using a self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire included case studies of patients with PAH in World Health Organization (WHO functional classes II–IV. For each case study, respondents were asked to report their opinion regarding the acceptable level of exertion and symptoms during daily activities, and whether they would refer the patient for exercise rehabilitation. Three additional questions asked about advice in relation to four specific physical activities.Results: The response rate was 70% (n = 53. Overall, 58% of respondents recommended patients undertake daily activities 'as tolerated'. There was no consensus regarding acceptable levels of breathlessness or fatigue, but the majority of respondents considered patients should have no chest pain (73% and no more than mild light-headedness (92% during daily activities

  17. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 4. Recommendations on physical exercise training. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cléroux, J; Feldman, R D; Petrella, R J

    1999-01-01

    To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for health care professionals concerning the effects of regular physical activity on the prevention and control of hypertension in otherwise healthy adults...

  18. [Hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohishi, Mitsuru

    2014-04-01

    Hypertension is well known to one of the risk factors to reduce cognitive function, however, it is still unclear whether anti-hypertensive therapy is effective to prevent development of dementia or Alzheimer's disease. Epidemiological studies suggested antihypertensive therapy from the middle-age could reduce risk of dementia. The meta-analysis including HYVET also suggested blood pressure lowering from the elderly might be also effective to prevent development of dementia. The network meta-analysis and the cohort study using mega-data bank suggested ARB might be effective to prevent development of dementia or Alzheimer's disease compared to administration with other anti-hypertensive drugs. Although the further major clinical investigation is required, anti-hypertensive treatment might be useful to manage hypertensive patients with dementia.

  19. [Management of high blood pressure in children and adolescents: Recommendations of the European Society of hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurbe, E; Cifkova, R; Cruickshank, J K; Dillon, M J; Ferreira, I; Invitti, C; Kuznetsova, T; Laurent, S; Mancia, G; Morales-Olivas, F; Rascher, W; Redon, J; Schaefer, F; Seeman, T; Stergiou, G; Wühl, E; Zanchetti, A

    2010-07-01

    Hypertension in children and adolescents has been gaining ground in cardiovascular medicine, mainly due to the advances made in several areas of pathophysiological and clinical research. These guidelines arose from the consensus reached by specialists in the detection and control of hypertension in children and adolescents. Furthermore, these guidelines are a compendium of scientific data and the extensive clinical experience it contains represents the most complete information that doctors, nurses and families should take into account when making decisions. These guidelines, which stress the importance of hypertension in children and adolescents, and its contribution to the current epidemic of cardiovascular disease, should act as a stimulus for governments to develop a global effort for the early detection and suitable treatment of high pressure in children and adolescents. J Hypertens 27:1719-1742 Q 2009 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

  20. Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazelton, G. Blue; Renn, Kristen A.; Stewart, Dafina-Lazarus

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, the editors provide a summary of the information shared in this sourcebook about the success of students who have minoritized identities of sexuality or gender and offer recommendations for policy, practice, and further research.

  1. Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Hypertension is responsible for roughly one-in-six adult deaths annually in the United States and is associated with five of the top nine causes of death. 1 Ten trillion dollars is the estimated annual cost worldwide of the direct and indirect effects of hypertension. 2,3 In the U.S. alone, costs estimated at almost $74 billion in 2009 placed a huge economic burden on the health care system. 4 The prevalence of hypertension increases with advancing age to the point where more than half of peo...

  2. 2013 ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recommendations for the diagnosis of adult hypertension, assessment of cardiovascular and other hypertension-associated risk, and attainment of therapeutic goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermida, Ramón C; Smolensky, Michael H; Ayala, Diana E; Portaluppi, Francesco

    2013-04-01

    Correlation between systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure (BP) level and target organ damage, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and long-term prognosis is much greater for ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) than daytime office measurements. The 2013 ABPM guidelines specified herein are based on ABPM patient outcomes studies and constitute a substantial revision of current knowledge. The asleep SBP mean and sleep-time relative SBP decline are the most significant predictors of CVD events, both individually as well as jointly when combined with other ABPM-derived prognostic markers. Thus, they should be preferably used to diagnose hypertension and assess CVD and other associated risks. Progressive decrease by therapeutic intervention of the asleep BP mean is the most significant predictor of CVD event-free interval. The 24-h BP mean is not recommended to diagnose hypertension because it disregards the more valuable clinical information pertaining to the features of the 24-h BP pattern. Persons with the same 24-h BP mean may display radically different 24-h BP patterns, ranging from extreme-dipper to riser types, representative of markedly different risk states. Classification of individuals by comparing office with either the 24-h or awake BP mean as "masked normotensives" (elevated clinic BP but normal ABPM), which should replace the terms of "isolated office" or "white-coat hypertension", and "masked hypertensives" (normal clinic BP but elevated ABPM) is misleading and should be avoided because it disregards the clinical significance of the asleep BP mean. Outcome-based ABPM reference thresholds for men, which in the absence of compelling clinical conditions are 135/85 mmHg for the awake and 120/70 mmHg for the asleep SBP/DBP means, are lower by 10/5 mmHg for SBP/DBP in uncomplicated, low-CVD risk, women and lower by 15/10 mmHg for SBP/DBP in male and female high-risk patients, e.g., with diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and/or past CVD

  3. Recommendations for the management of patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parati, Gianfranco; Lombardi, Carolina; Hedner, Jan

    2013-01-01

    This article is aimed at addressing the current state-of-the-art in epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic procedures and treatment options for appropriate management of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) in cardiovascular (in particular hypertensive) patients, as well as for the management of car...

  4. Hypertension

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — These datasets provide de-identified insurance data for hypertension hyperlipidemia. The data is provided by three managed care organizations in Allegheny County...

  5. Management of high blood pressure in children and adolescents: recommendations of the European Society of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurbe, Empar; Cifkova, Renata; Cruickshank, J Kennedy; Dillon, Michael J; Ferreira, Isabel; Invitti, Cecilia; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Laurent, Stephane; Mancia, Giuseppe; Morales-Olivas, Francisco; Rascher, Wolfgang; Redon, Josep; Schaefer, Franz; Seeman, Tomas; Stergiou, George; Wühl, Elke; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2009-09-01

    Hypertension in children and adolescents has gained ground in cardiovascular medicine, thanks to the progress made in several areas of pathophysiological and clinical research. These guidelines represent a consensus among specialists involved in the detection and control of high blood pressure in children and adolescents. The guidelines synthesize a considerable amount of scientific data and clinical experience and represent best clinical wisdom upon which physicians, nurses and families should base their decisions. They call attention to the burden of hypertension in children and adolescents, and its contribution to the current epidemic of cardiovascular disease, these guidelines should encourage public policy makers, to develop a global effort to improve identification and treatment of high blood pressure among children and adolescents.

  6. Screening for Hypertension in Children and Adolescents: Methodology and Current Practice Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michaela N.; Shatat, Ibrahim F.; Phillips, Shannon M.

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension (HTN) requires urgent, uniform, and consistent attention across all frontiers of pediatric health care not only because of established links between the onset of HTN during one’s youth and its sustenance throughout adulthood but also because of the sequelae associated with the disease’s trajectory, such as cardiovascular disease, end organ damage, and decreased quality of life. Although national guidelines for the diagnosis and management of pediatric HTN have been available for nearly 40 years, knowledge and recognition of the problem by clinicians remain poor due to a host of influencing factors. The purpose of this article is to explicate key issues contributing to the inaccurate measurement of blood pressure and misclassification of HTN among children and to present strategies to address these issues.

  7. Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Defining hypertension in pregnancy is challenging because blood pressure levels in pregnancy are dynamic, having a circadian rhythm and also changing with advancing gestational age. The accepted definition is a sustained systolic (sBP) of ≥140 mmHg or a sustained diastolic blood pressure (dBP) ≥90 mmHg, by office (or in-hospital) measurement. Measurement of blood pressure in pregnancy should follow standardised methods, as outside pregnancy. Blood pressure measurement may occur in three types...

  8. ARBs and ACEis together in the treatment of hypertension and its complications? current practical recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruilope, Luis M; Segura, Julian

    2010-11-01

    Arterial hypertension is highly prevalent in the general population. Its contribution to the development and evolution of cardiovascular and renal disease is well recognized. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEi) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) have demonstrated favorable effects on cardiovascular and renal prognosis; however, some limitations have been described, for example angiotensin and aldosterone breakthrough. This article describes several therapeutical strategies that can be administered with an ACEi or ARB, such as the direct renin inhibitors or the aldosterone receptor antagonists. The addition of an ACEi to an ARB or vice versa was initially considered as a way of obtaining a stronger suppression of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), but recent evidence has shown that the combination of the two classes of drugs does not seem to afford the expected increase in benefit. RAAS suppression with monotherapy is associated with beneficial cardiovascular effects, but has several limitations. Direct renin inhibitors and aldosterone receptor antagonists will increase the benefits of dual blockade. We need randomized trial data supporting reduction of cardiovascular events with an adequate safety profile using combination therapies.

  9. Prevalence of Sodium and Fluid Restriction Recommendations for Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tonya Zeiger

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH are often afflicted with the consequences of right heart failure including volume overload. Counseling to assist the patient in the dietary restriction of sodium and fluid may be underutilized. Methods: Consecutive patients seen in the PH Clinic at Mayo Clinic in Florida from June to November 2013. Results: 100 patients were included; 70 were women and most had group 1 PH (n = 69. Patient characteristics using mean (±SD were: Age 63 ± 13 years, functional class 3 ± 1, brain natriuretic peptide 302 ± 696 pg/mL, 6-min walk 337 ± 116 m, right atrial pressure 8 ± 5 mmHg, and mean pulmonary artery pressure 42 ± 13 mmHg. Overall, 79 had had complete (32 or partial instruction (47 and 21 had no prior counseling to restrict sodium or fluid. Of the 47 with partial instruction, 42 received complete education during the PH Clinic visit. Of the 21 without prior instruction, 19 received complete education during the PH visit. Seven patients with the opportunity to have their education enhanced or provided did not receive any additional counseling during the PH visit. Conclusion: Sodium and fluid restriction is an important but perhaps underutilized strategy to manage volume overload in patients with right heart failure. Focused questioning and education may permit an increase in the patients receiving instruction in this regard.

  10. Achievement of recommended glucose and blood pressure targets in patients with type 2 diabetes and hypertension in clinical practice – study rationale and protocol of DIALOGUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitt Anselm K

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with type 2 diabetes have 2–4 times greater risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality than those without, and this is even further aggravated if they also suffer from hypertension. Unfortunately, less than one third of hypertensive diabetic patients meet blood pressure targets, and more than half fail to achieve target HbA1c values. Thus, appropriate blood pressure and glucose control are of utmost importance. Since treatment sometimes fails in clinical practice while clinical trials generally suggest good efficacy, data from daily clinical practice, especially with regard to the use of newly developed anti-diabetic and anti-hypertensive compounds in unselected patient populations, are essential. The DIALOGUE registry aims to close this important gap by evaluating different treatment approaches in hypertensive type 2 diabetic patients with respect to their effectiveness and tolerability and their impact on outcomes. In addition, DIALOGUE is the first registry to determine treatment success based on the new individualized treatment targets recommended by the ADA and the EASD. Methods DIALOGUE is a prospective observational German multicentre registry and will enrol 10,000 patients with both diabetes and hypertension in up to 700 sites. After a baseline visit, further documentations are scheduled at 6, 12 and 24 months. There are two co-primary objectives referring to the most recent guidelines for the treatment of diabetes and hypertension: 1 individual HbA1c goal achievement with respect to anti-diabetic pharmacotherapy and 2 individual blood pressure goal achievement with different antihypertensive treatments. Among the secondary objectives the rate of major cardio-vascular and cerebro-vascular events (MACCE and the rate of hospitalizations are the most important. Conclusion The registry will be able to gain insights into the reasons for the obvious gap between the demonstrated efficacy and safety of anti

  11. Detailed EFSUM recommendations on the scope of ultrasound assessment in patients with portal hypertension considering the diagnostic reference level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Smereczyński

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An important paper describing the Standards of the Polish Ultrasound Society regarding the assessment of portal and hepatic vasculature was published in the Journal of Ultrasonography. Due to the multiplicity of morphological and hemodynamic data required, the time needed to obtain these data and the legal responsibility of doctors for the results, there seems to be a need to determine a clear range of the assessed parameters depending on the reference level of a given healthcare facility. Therefore, the aim of the paper was to present the EFSUMB recommendations on the range of the evaluated ultrasonographic parameters in portal hypertension depending on the reference level. European healthcare institutions are characterized by a clear three-level reference network. Due to the lack of a similar division in Poland, we propose our own classification of the competence of medical entities. The first reference level: ultrasound assessments in a primary health care setting (performed by GPs, emergency physicians, non-specialist private practice physicians, non-specialist practice physicians; at least one mid-class ultrasound scanner with pulsed and color Doppler options, equipped with convex 3–5 MHz and linear 7–12 MHz transducers should be available at physician’s disposal. The second reference level: ultrasound assessments in the hospital setting and specialist outpatient clinics, performed by specialist private practice physicians, radiologists, gastroenterologists and hepatologists; top class (premium digital ultrasound scanner should be available at physician’s disposal. Third reference level: ultrasound assessments performed in gastroenterology, hepatology and liver surgery departments as well as their specialist outpatient clinics; physicians should use top class digital ultrasound equipment. At every reference level, physicians performing abdominal ultrasound should have the appropriate certification to perform such an assessment or

  12. Lifestyle modifications to prevent and control hypertension. 4. Recommendations on physical exercise training. Canadian Hypertension Society, Canadian Coalition for High Blood Pressure Prevention and Control, Laboratory Centre for Disease Control at Health Canada, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cléroux, J; Feldman, R D; Petrella, R J

    1999-05-04

    To provide updated, evidence-based recommendations for health care professionals concerning the effects of regular physical activity on the prevention and control of hypertension in otherwise healthy adults. People may engage in no, sporadic or regular physical activity that may be of low, moderate or vigorous intensity. For sedentary people with hypertension, the options are to undertake or maintain regular physical activity and to avoid or moderate medication use; to use another lifestyle modification technique; to commence or continue antihypertensive medication; or to take no action and remain at increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The health outcomes considered were changes in blood pressure and in morbidity and mortality rates. Because of insufficient evidence, no economic outcomes were considered. A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period 1966-1997 with the terms exercise, exertion, physical activity, hypertension and blood pressure. Both reports of trials and review articles were obtained. Other relevant evidence was obtained from the reference lists of these articles, from the personal files of the authors and through contacts with experts. The articles were reviewed, classified according to study design and graded according to level of evidence. A high value was placed on avoidance of cardiovascular morbidity and premature death caused by untreated hypertension. Physical activity of moderate intensity involving rhythmic movements with the lower limbs for 50-60 minutes, 3 or 4 times per week, reduces blood pressure and appears to be more effective than vigorous exercise. Harm is uncommon and is generally restricted to the musculoskeletal injuries that may occur with any repetitive activity. Injury occurs more often with jogging than with walking, cycling or swimming. The costs include the costs of appropriate shoes, garments and equipment, but these were not specifically measured. (1) People with mild hypertension should engage in 50-60 minutes

  13. Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Mammaro, Alessia; Carrara, Sabina; Cavaliere, Alessandro; Ermito, Santina; Dinatale, Angela; Pappalardo, Elisa Maria; Militello, Mariapia; Pedata, Rosa

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is the most common medical problem encountered during pregnancy, complicating 2-3% of pregnancies. Hypertensive disorders during pregnancy are classified into 4 categories, as recommended by the National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Pregnancy: 1) chronic hypertension, 2) preeclampsia-eclampsia, 3) preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension, and 4) gestational hypertension (transient hypertension of pregnancy or chronic hyper...

  14. Olmesartan vs ramipril in the treatment of hypertension and associated clinical conditions in the elderly: a reanalysis of two large double-blind, randomized studies at the light of the most recent blood pressure targets recommended by guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omboni, Stefano; Malacco, Ettore; Mallion, Jean-Michel; Volpe, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a reanalysis of the data of two large randomized, double-blind, parallel group studies with a similar design, comparing the efficacy of an angiotensin-receptor blocker (olmesartan medoxomil) with that of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ramipril), by applying two different blood pressure targets recently recommended by hypertension guidelines for all patients, irrespective of the presence of diabetes (hypertensive patients (hypertension type, diabetes status or other concomitant clinical conditions, or cardiovascular risk factors. In most cases, olmesartan provided better blood pressure control than ramipril. Olmesartan was significantly more effective than ramipril in male patients, in younger patients (aged 65–69 years), in those with metabolic syndrome, obesity, dyslipidemia, preserved renal function, diastolic ± systolic hypertension, and, in general, in patients with a high or very high cardiovascular risk. Interestingly, patients previously untreated or treated with two or more antihypertensive drugs showed a significantly larger response with olmesartan than with ramipril. Thus, our results confirm the good efficacy of olmesartan in elderly hypertensives even when new blood pressure targets for antihypertensive treatment are considered. Such results may be relevant for the clinical practice, providing some hint on the possible different response of elderly hypertensive patients to two different drugs acting on the renin–angiotensin system, when patients are targeted according to the blood pressure levels recommended by recent hypertension guidelines. PMID:26491273

  15. Olmesartan vs ramipril in the treatment of hypertension and associated clinical conditions in the elderly: a reanalysis of two large double-blind, randomized studies at the light of the most recent blood pressure targets recommended by guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omboni, Stefano; Malacco, Ettore; Mallion, Jean-Michel; Volpe, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a reanalysis of the data of two large randomized, double-blind, parallel group studies with a similar design, comparing the efficacy of an angiotensin-receptor blocker (olmesartan medoxomil) with that of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ramipril), by applying two different blood pressure targets recently recommended by hypertension guidelines for all patients, irrespective of the presence of diabetes (olmesartan was not negatively affected by age, sex, hypertension type, diabetes status or other concomitant clinical conditions, or cardiovascular risk factors. In most cases, olmesartan provided better blood pressure control than ramipril. Olmesartan was significantly more effective than ramipril in male patients, in younger patients (aged 65-69 years), in those with metabolic syndrome, obesity, dyslipidemia, preserved renal function, diastolic ± systolic hypertension, and, in general, in patients with a high or very high cardiovascular risk. Interestingly, patients previously untreated or treated with two or more antihypertensive drugs showed a significantly larger response with olmesartan than with ramipril. Thus, our results confirm the good efficacy of olmesartan in elderly hypertensives even when new blood pressure targets for antihypertensive treatment are considered. Such results may be relevant for the clinical practice, providing some hint on the possible different response of elderly hypertensive patients to two different drugs acting on the renin-angiotensin system, when patients are targeted according to the blood pressure levels recommended by recent hypertension guidelines.

  16. Adherence to recommended lifestyle modifications and factors associated for hypertensive patients attending chronic follow-up units of selected public hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibebu, Abel; Mengistu, Daniel; Negesa, Lemma

    2017-01-01

    Introduction One of the most prevalent noncommunicable diseases is hypertension (HTN). The availability of effective antihypertensive medications does not result in the expected outcomes in terms of controlling blood pressure. The rationale for these and other findings of uncontrolled HTN points toward poor adherence. The most neglected causes of uncontrolled HTN are unhealthy lifestyles. Few studies have been conducted to show the gap and magnitude of self-management adherence. Objective This study aimed to assess adherence to recommended lifestyle modifications of hypertensive patients undergoing follow-up at chronic follow-up units of public health hospitals in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2016. Methods Institutional-based cross-sectional study was conducted in four public health hospitals which were selected by drawing lots. Systematic random sampling was used to select study subjects. The results of the descriptive statistics were expressed as percentages and frequencies. Associations between lifestyle modification and independent variables were ana-lyzed using bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis. The study was conducted from February 15, 2016 to April 15, 2016. Results The study included 404 respondents with a 97% response rate; 210 (52%) were male and the mean age was 54.00±10.77 years. The respondents’ adherence to lifestyle modifications was 23%. The lifestyle adherence was found to be better in females, patients who had comorbidities, and had been knowledgeable about the disease and was poor among young adult respondents. Conclusion The rates of adherence to lifestyle changes were generally found to be low. Educational sessions that especially focus on lifestyle modifications and ongoing support for patients should be designed and studies which assess all the components of self-management should be conducted for comparison among different subgroups. PMID:28280305

  17. Olmesartan vs ramipril in the treatment of hypertension and associated clinical conditions in the elderly: a reanalysis of two large double blind, randomized studies at the light of the most recent blood pressure targets recommended by guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omboni S

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Stefano Omboni,1 Ettore Malacco,2 Jean-Michel Mallion,3 Massimo Volpe4,5 1Clinical Research Unit, Italian Institute of Telemedicine, Solbiate Arno, Varese, Italy; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Ospedale L Sacco, University of Milan, Milan, Italy; 3Cardiology and Arterial Hypertension, CHU de Grenoble, Grenoble, France; 4Division of Cardiology, II Faculty of Medicine, University of Rome “La Sapienza”, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Rome, Italy; 5IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli, Isernia, Italy Abstract: In this paper, we present the results of a reanalysis of the data of two large randomized, double-blind, parallel group studies with a similar design, comparing the efficacy of an angiotensin-receptor blocker (olmesartan medoxomil with that of an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (ramipril, by applying two different blood pressure targets recently recommended by hypertension guidelines for all patients, irrespective of the presence of diabetes (<140/90 mmHg, and for elderly hypertensive patients (<150/90 mmHg. The efficacy of olmesartan was not negatively affected by age, sex, hypertension type, diabetes status or other concomitant clinical conditions, or cardiovascular risk factors. In most cases, olmesartan provided better blood pressure control than ramipril. Olmesartan was significantly more effective than ramipril in male patients, in younger patients (aged 65–69 years, in those with metabolic syndrome, obesity, dyslipidemia, preserved renal function, diastolic ± systolic hypertension, and, in general, in patients with a high or very high cardiovascular risk. Interestingly, patients previously untreated or treated with two or more antihypertensive drugs showed a significantly larger response with olmesartan than with ramipril. Thus, our results confirm the good efficacy of olmesartan in elderly hypertensives even when new blood pressure targets for antihypertensive treatment are considered. Such results may be relevant for the clinical

  18. Ocular Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Eye Health / Eye Health A-Z Ocular Hypertension Sections What Is Ocular Hypertension? Ocular Hypertension Causes ... Hypertension Diagnosis Ocular Hypertension Treatment What Is Ocular Hypertension? Written By: Kierstan Boyd Reviewed By: J Kevin ...

  19. Perioperative hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Pinna

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Perioperative hypertension is a situation whose management is suggested by the clinical judgement much more than clinical evidences. JNC 7 guidelines give a classification of blood pressure (BP, without any mention specifically dedicated to patients undergoing surgery. The ACC/AHA guidelines recommend deferring surgery if diastolic BP is above 110 mmHg and systolic BP is above 180 mmHg. AIM OF THE STUDY In this review we considered pathogenetic, clinical and therapeutic factors related to perioperative management of hypertensive patients. DISCUSSION In actual trend of the preoperative evaluation, alone hypertension is considered as a minor risk factor. BP values ≤ 180/110 mmHg do not influence the outcomes in patients who underwent noncardiac surgery. Therefore, in these conditions it’s not necessary to delay surgery. Hypertensive picks are possible during the operation, mostly because of the intubation, but, much more dangerous, falls of pressure are possible. The intraoperative arterial pressure should be maintained within 20% of the best estimated preoperative arterial pressure, especially in patients with markedly elevated preoperative pressures. After surgery the arterial BP can increase for stress factors, pain, hypoxia and hypercapnia, hypothermia and infusional liquids overload. For all these reasons a careful monitoring is mandatory. Anti-hypertensive medication should be continued during the postoperative period in patients with known and treated hypertension, as unplanned withdrawal of treatment can result in rebounded hypertension. The decision to give anti-hypertensive drugs must be made for each patient, taking into account their normal BP and their postoperative BP. With regard to the optimal treatment of the patient with poorly or uncontrolled hypertension in the perioperative evaluation, recent guidelines suggest that the best treatment may consider cardioselective β-blockers therapy, but also clonidin by

  20. Hypertension og hyperlipidaemi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik Steen; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension and hyperlipidemia are well-established and partially overlapping risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Analyses of cardiovascular morbidity in relationship to changes in blood pressure and in serum cholesterol levels have shown that combined reduction of both risk factors...... are important to achieve a reduction in morbidity. Statins have been shown to be effective in preventing both coronary and cerebrovascular events in both hypertensive and normotensive cases. Consequently, most recent guidelines recommend that statin treatment be considered in hypertensive patients aged less...

  1. Hypertension in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ungar

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is the most common medical problem encountered during pregnancy, complicating 2-3% of pregnancies. Hypertensive disorders during pregnancy are classified into 4 categories: chronic hypertension, pre-eclampsia/eclampsia, pre-eclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension, and gestational hypertension. A relative paucity of investigative data, as well as the frequent difficulty in making an etiological diagnosis, may lead to problems in its management. This case report analyses current concepts regarding the hypertensive disorders of gestation, focusing on chronic hypertension. Chronic hypertension is defined as blood pressure exceeding 140/90 mmHg before pregnancy or before 20 weeks gestation. Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy may cause maternal and fetal morbidity and remain a leading source of maternal mortality. A prompt diagnosis is needed also because hypertension may be an indicator of pre-eclampsia, a condition which can evolve into serious complications. Maintaining blood pressure below 140/90 mmHg is recommended, although treatment should be determined on an individual basis. Many anti-hypertensive agents appear to be safe for use during pregnancy: methildopa has been the most studied of the anti-hypertensive drugs and has the best safety record. Labetalol, idralazine and nifedipine also have been found to be safe; ACE-inhibitors are absolutely contraindicated, because they are associated with intrauterine growth retardation.

  2. Noncirrotisk intrahepatisk portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Fialla, Annette; Havelund, Troels

    2007-01-01

    Non-cirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension is characterized by portal hypertension in the absence of liver cirrhosis or portal vein thrombosis. The disease is common in the East and rarely seen in the West. Two cases with oesophageal varices are described. The histopathology is heterogeneous...... but includes vascular lesions and portal fibrosis. Patient management follows the current recommendations for variceal bleeding....

  3. Hypertension and hypertensive encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Raymond S; Kasner, Scott E

    2014-01-01

    The definition of hypertension has continuously evolved over the last 50 years. Hypertension is currently defined as a blood pressure greater than 140/90mmHg. One in every four people in the US has been diagnosed with hypertension. The prevalence of hypertension increases further with age, affecting 75% of people over the age of 70. Hypertension is by far the most common risk factor identified in stroke patients. Hypertension causes pathologic changes in the walls of small (diameter<300 microns) arteries and arterioles usually at short branches of major arteries, which may result in either ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage. Reduction of blood pressure with diuretics, β-blockers, calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have all been shown to markedly reduce the incidence of stroke. Hypertensive emergency is defined as a blood pressure greater than 180/120mmHg with end organ dysfunction, such as chest pain, shortness of breath, encephalopathy, or focal neurologic deficits. Hypertensive encephalopathy is believed to be caused by acute failure of cerebrovascular autoregulation. Hypertensive emergency is treated with intravenous antihypertensive agents to reduce blood pressure by 25% within the first hour. Selective inhibition of cerebrovascular blood vessel permeability for the treatment of hypertensive emergency is beginning early clinical trials. © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A comparison of food-based recommendations and nutrient values of three food guides: USDA's MyPyramid, NHLBI's Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Eating Plan, and Harvard's Healthy Eating Pyramid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reedy, Jill; Krebs-Smith, Susan M

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this research was to compare food-based recommendations and nutrient values of three food guides: the US Department of Agriculture's MyPyramid; the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension Eating Plan, and Harvard University's Healthy Eating Pyramid. Estimates of nutrient values associated with following each of the food guides at the 2,000-calorie level were made using a composite approach. This approach calculates population-weighted nutrient composites for each food group and subgroup, assuming average choices within food groups. Nutrient estimates were compared to the Dietary Reference Intakes and other goals and limits. Recommendations were similar regarding almost all food groups for both the type and amount of foods. Primary differences were seen in the types of vegetables and protein sources recommended and the amount of dairy products and total oil recommended. Overall nutrient values were also similar for most nutrients, except vitamin A, vitamin E, and calcium. These food guides were derived from different types of nutrition research, yet they share consistent messages: eat more fruits, vegetables, legumes, and whole grains; eat less added sugar and saturated fat; and emphasize plant oils.

  5. [2013 Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring recommendations for the diagnosis of adult hypertension, assessment of cardiovascular and other hypertension-associated risk, and attainment of therapeutic goals (summary). Joint recommendations from the International Society for Chronobiology (ISC), American Association of Medical Chronobiology and Chronotherapeutics (AAMCC), Spanish Society of Applied Chronobiology, Chronotherapy, and Vascular Risk (SECAC), Spanish Society of Atherosclerosis (SEA), and Romanian Society of Internal Medicine (RSIM)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermida, Ramón C; Smolensky, Michael H; Ayala, Diana E; Portaluppi, Francesco; Crespo, Juan J; Fabbian, Fabio; Haus, Erhard; Manfredini, Roberto; Mojón, Artemio; Moyá, Ana; Piñeiro, Luis; Ríos, María T; Otero, Alfonso; Balan, Horia; Fernández, José R

    2013-01-01

    Correlation between systolic (SBP) and diastolic (DBP) blood pressure (BP) level and target organ damage, cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, and long-term prognosis is much greater for ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM) than daytime office measurements. The 2013 ABPM guidelines specified herein are based on ABPM patient outcomes studies and constitute a substantial revision of current knowledge. The asleep SBP mean and sleep-time relative SBP decline are the most significant predictors of CVD events, both individually as well as jointly when combined with other ABPM-derived prognostic markers. Thus, they should be preferably used to diagnose hypertension and assess CVD and other associated risks. Progressive decrease by therapeutic intervention in the asleep BP mean is the most significant predictor of CVD event-free interval. The 24 h BP mean is not recommended to diagnose hypertension because it disregards the more valuable clinical information pertaining to the features of the 24 h BP pattern. Persons with the same 24 h BP mean may display radically different 24 h BP patterns, ranging from extreme-dipper to riser types, representative of markedly different risk states. Classification of individuals by comparing office with either the 24 h or awake BP mean as "masked normotensives" (elevated clinic BP but normal ABPM), which should replace the terms of "isolated office" or "white-coat hypertension", and "masked hypertensives" (normal clinic BP but elevated ABPM) is misleading and should be avoided because it disregards the clinical significance of the asleep BP mean. Outcome-based ABPM reference thresholds for men, which in the absence of compelling clinical conditions are 135/85 mmHg for the awake and 120/70 mmHg for the asleep SBP/DBP means, are lower by 10/5 mmHg for SBP/DBP in uncomplicated, low-CVD risk, women and lower by 15/10 mmHg for SBP/DBP in male and female high-risk patients, e.g., with diabetes, chronic kidney disease (CKD), and/or past CVD events. In

  6. Screening for Primary Hypertension in Children and Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Recommendations Screening for Primary Hypertension in Children and Adolescents The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) ... on Screening for Primary Hypertension in Children and Adolescents . This final recommendation statement applies to children and ...

  7. [Treatment for pulmonary arterial hypertension under the new French hospital financing system. Recommendations of the Pulmonary Vascular Diseases Working Group of the French Society of Pulmonary Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitbon, O; Humbert, M; Simonneau, G

    2005-11-05

    Activity-based financing (that is, casemix-based hospital payments, known as T2A) is intended to harmonize and improve the fairness of remuneration of public and private hospitals. T2A will ultimately rely mainly on a flat rate per admission, set according to the diagnosis-related group (DRG). Although payment for drugs is usually included in the DRG price, some expensive drugs will be reimbursed on an additional cost basis after implementation of a "best practices" agreement. Four drugs used for treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension are eligible for this additional reimbursement: 3 prostacyclin derivatives (intravenous epoprostenol, inhaled iloprost, and subcutaneous treprostinil), and oral bosentan, an endothelin receptor antagonist. The Pulmonary Vascular Diseases working group of the French Society of Pulmonary Medicine has developed guidelines for the best practices in use of these drugs.

  8. Thiazide diuretics in the management of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nadia A; Campbell, Norman R C

    2004-01-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent in Canada, affecting more than 20% of all adults. Thiazide diuretics have been shown in numerous studies to be effective agents for controlling blood pressure and reducing cardiovascular disease and death in hypertensive patients. Thiazide diuretics are recommended as initial first line therapy for uncomplicated hypertension in the 2003 Canadian Hypertension recommendations. However, these agents are underutilized and in Canada, the proportion of persons with hypertension treated with diuretics is declining. To improve understanding of thiazide diuretic use, this document outlines the clinical pharmacology of thiazide diuretics, evidence for effectiveness in treating hypertension, as well as the side effects and controversies surrounding their use.

  9. Evaluation of hypertension in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Gaurav; Baracco, Rossana

    2013-10-01

    Hypertension is an important public health problem, and increasingly children are being diagnosed with primary hypertension. As the list of secondary causes of hypertension is extensive, pediatric practitioners increasingly need to decide on investigations needed for evaluating children presenting with high blood pressure. The differentiation between primary and secondary hypertension is paramount to understanding this important health issue, since many forms of secondary hypertension require specific treatment. The review evaluates the current available guidelines and practice patterns for evaluating children with elevated blood pressure. The review also aims to provide a framework for cost-effective evaluation strategies for children with elevated blood pressure based on current recommendations and evidence.

  10. Evaluation the effectiveness of remote blood pressure monitoring technology in patients with hypertension on the basis of clinical recommendations performance measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Posnenkova O.M.

    2015-06-01

    Material and Methods ― Remote BP monitoring was organized on the basis of computer system which automatically in text messages send requests about BP level to Htn patients. Obtained BP results were stored in the system and automatically worked. A doctor corrected a patient’s therapy if necessary based on this information. To evaluate the effectiveness of a new technology one year observation of 97 Htn patients was organized (54.6% – male aged 49±11 years. Patients regularly responded to automated SMS requests the computer system about the level of blood pressure. The effectiveness was evaluated with the help of the following hypertension guidelines performance measures: 1 a part of patients with four or more BP results during the previous 12 months; 2 a part of patients with BP above the goal level who prescribed two or more antihypertensive drugs on the last visit during the previous 12 months; 3 a part of patients with BP above the goal level 140/90 mm Hg who prescribed two or more antihypertensive drugs on the last visit during the previous 12 months; 4 a part of patients with goal blood pressure (less than 140/90 mmHg on the last visit during the previous 12 months. To evaluate a performance of these measures before BP monitoring the data extracted from patients’ ambulatory cards were used. Results ― 62 patients completed one-year BP monitoring A part of patients with four or more BP results during the previous 12 months increased from 21% to 100% (p<0.001. From 70% to 82% increased the part of patients who were prescribed two or more antihypertensive drugs (p=0.091. From 31% to 15% reduced the part of hypertensives with uncontrolled BP who were prescribed less than two antihypertensive drugs on the last visit (p=0.044. After one-year monitoring a goal BP was registered in 77% of Htn patients versus 13% at the start of the observation (p<0.001. Conclusion ― Htn guidelines performance measures allowed evaluate quantitatively the positive influence

  11. Pharmacologic Management of Pediatric Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misurac, Jason; Nichols, Kristen R; Wilson, Amy C

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension in children is common, and the prevalence of primary hypertension is increasing with the obesity epidemic and changing dietary choices. Careful measurement of blood pressure is important to correctly diagnose hypertension, as many factors can lead to inaccurate blood pressure measurement. Hypertension is diagnosed based on comparison of age-, sex-, and height-based norms with the average systolic and diastolic blood pressures on three separate occasions. In the absence of hypertensive target organ damage (TOD), stage I hypertension is managed first by diet and exercise, with the addition of drug therapy if this fails. First-line treatment of stage I hypertension with TOD and stage II hypertension includes both lifestyle changes and medications. First-line agents include angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, thiazide diuretics, and calcium-channel blockers. Hypertensive emergency with end-organ effects requires immediate modest blood pressure reduction to alleviate symptoms. This is usually accomplished with IV medications. Long-term reduction in blood pressure to normal levels is accomplished gradually. Specific medication choice for outpatient hypertension management is determined by the underlying cause of hypertension and the comparative adverse effect profiles, along with practical considerations such as cost and frequency of administration. Antihypertensive medication is initiated at a starting dose and can be gradually increased to effect. If ineffective at the recommended maximum dose, an additional medication with a complementary mechanism of action can be added.

  12. Hypertensive Crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Hypertensive Crisis: When You Should Call 9-1-1 for ... 18,2017 Know the two types of HBP crisis to watch for A hypertensive ( high blood pressure ) ...

  13. Portal Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Obesity to Liver Cancer Additional Content Medical News Portal Hypertension By Steven K. Herrine, MD, Thomas Jefferson ... Liver Hepatic Encephalopathy Jaundice in Adults Liver Failure Portal Hypertension (See also Overview of Liver Disease .) Portal ...

  14. Dutch guideline for the management of hypertensive crisis -- 2010 revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Born, B J H; Beutler, J J; Gaillard, C A J M; de Gooijer, A; van den Meiracker, A H; Kroon, A A

    2011-05-01

    Hypertensive crises are divided into hypertensive urgencies and emergencies. Together they form a heterogeneous group of acute hypertensive disorders depending on the presence or type of target organs involved. Despite better treatment options for hypertension, hypertensive crisis and its associated complications remain relatively common. In the Netherlands the number of patients starting renal replacement therapy because of 'malignant hypertension' has increased in the past two decades. In 2003, the first Dutch guideline on hypertensive crisis was released to allow a standardised evidence-based approach for patients presenting with a hypertensive crisis. In this paper we give an overview of the current management of hypertensive crisis and discuss several important changes incorporated in the 2010 revision. These changes include a modification in terminology replacing 'malignant hypertension' with 'hypertensive crisis with retinopathy and reclassification of hypertensive crisis with retinopathy under hypertensive emergencies instead of urgencies. With regard to the treatment of hypertensive emergencies, nicardipine instead of nitroprusside or labetalol is favoured for the management of perioperative hypertension, whereas labetalol has become the drug of choice for the treatment of hypertension associated with pre-eclampsia. For the treatment of hypertensive urgencies, oral administration of nifedipine retard instead of captopril is recommended as first-line therapy. In addition, a section on the management of hypertensive emergencies according to the type of target organ involved has been added. Efforts to increase the awareness and treatment of hypertension in the population at large may lower the incidence of hypertensive crisis and its complications.

  15. TREATMENT OF HYPERTENSION IN PREGNANCY: GUIDELINES AND CLINICAL EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Gaisenok

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Topical issues of the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy are presented. Examples from clinical practice are discussed as well as possible medical treatment of hypertension in pregnant women taking into account actual recommendations.

  16. TREATMENT OF HYPERTENSION IN PREGNANCY: GUIDELINES AND CLINICAL EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Gaisenok

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Topical issues of the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy are presented. Examples from clinical practice are discussed as well as possible medical treatment of hypertension in pregnant women taking into account actual recommendations.

  17. TREATMENT OF HYPERTENSION IN PREGNANCY: GUIDELINES AND CLINICAL EXPERIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    O. V. Gaisenok; O. A. Zamyatina; N. Yu. Denisova; A. S. Leonov

    2015-01-01

    Topical issues of the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy are presented. Examples from clinical practice are discussed as well as possible medical treatment of hypertension in pregnant women taking into account actual recommendations.

  18. TREATMENT OF HYPERTENSION IN PREGNANCY: GUIDELINES AND CLINICAL EXPERIENCE

    OpenAIRE

    O. V. Gaisenok; O. A. Zamyatina; N. Yu. Denisova; A. S. Leonov

    2014-01-01

    Topical issues of the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy are presented. Examples from clinical practice are discussed as well as possible medical treatment of hypertension in pregnant women taking into account actual recommendations.

  19. Consensus conference definitions and recommendations on intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) and the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS)--the long road to the final publications, how did we get there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malbrain, M L N G; De laet, I; Cheatham, M

    2007-01-01

    There has been an exponentially increasing interest in intraabdominal hypertension (IAH) and the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) over the last decade, and different definitions have been suggested. Nevertheless, there has been an impetus from experts in the field to modify these definitions to reflect our current understanding of the pathophysiology of these syndromes. An international multidisciplinary group of interested doctors met with the goal of agreeing on a set of definitions that could be applied to patients with IAH and ACS. The goal of this consensus group was to provide a conceptual and practical framework to further define ACS, a progressive injurious process that falls under the generalized term 'IAH' and that includes IAH-associated organ dysfunction. In total, 21 North American, Australasian and European surgical, trauma and critical care specialists agreed to standardize the current definitions for IAH, ACS and related conditions in preparation for the second World Congress on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WCACS). The WCACS-meeting was endorsed by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) and the World Society on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WSACS). The consensus conference (Noosa, Australia; December 7, 2004) was attended by 21 specialists from Europe, Australasia and North America and approximately 70 other congress participants. In advance of the conference, a blueprint for the various definitions was suggested. After the conference the participants corresponded electronically with feedback. A writing committee was formed at the conference and developed the final manuscript based on executive summary documents generated by each participant. The final report of the 2004 International ACS Consensus Definitions Conference has recently been published. This article will describe the long road towards this final publication with the evolution of the different definitions and recommendations from the initial suggestions in 2004

  20. Consensus conference definitions and recommendations on intra-abdominal hypertension (iah) and the abdominal compartment syndrome (acs) - the long road to the final publications, how did we get there?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malbrain, M L N G; De Laet, I; Cheatham, M

    2007-01-01

    There has been an exponentially increasing interest in intraabdominal hypertension (IAH) and the abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) over the last decade, and different definitions have been suggested. Nevertheless, there has been an impetus from experts in the field to modify these definitions to reflect our current understanding of the pathophysiology of these syndromes. An international multidisciplinary group of interested doctors met with the goal of agreeing on a set of definitions that could be applied to patients with IAH and ACS. The goal of this consensus group was to provide a conceptual and practical framework to further define ACS, a progressive injurious process that falls under the generalized term 'IAH' and that includes IAH-associated organ dysfunction. In total, 21 North American, Australasian and European surgical, trauma and critical care specialists agreed to standardize the current definitions for IAH, ACS and related conditions in preparation for the second World Congress on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WCACS). The WCACS-meeting was endorsed by the European Society of Intensive Care Medicine (ESICM) and the World Society on Abdominal Compartment Syndrome (WSACS). The consensus conference (Noosa, Australia; December 7, 2004) was attended by 21 specialists from Europe, Australasia and North America and approximately 70 other congress participants. In advance of the conference, a blueprint for the various definitions was suggested. After the conference the participants corresponded electronically with feedback. A writing committee was formed at the conference and developed the final manuscript based on executive summary documents generated by each participant. The final report of the 2004 International ACS Consensus Definitions Conference has recently been published. This article will describe the long road towards this final publication with the evolution of the different definitions and recommendations from the initial suggestions in 2004

  1. Update in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía Chew, C R; Alcolea Batres, S; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2016-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare and progressive disease that mainly affects the pulmonary arterioles (precapillary), regardless of the triggering aetiology. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension in Spain is estimated at 19.2 and 16 cases per million inhabitants, respectively. The diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension is based on haemodynamic criteria (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25mmHg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤15mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance >3 Wood units) and therefore requires the implementation of right cardiac catheterisation. Sequential therapy with a single drug has been used in clinical practice. However, recent European guidelines recommend combined initial therapy in some situations. This review conducts a critical update of our knowledge of this disease according to the latest guidelines and recommendations.

  2. Treatment of portal hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khurram Bari; Guadalupe Garcia-Tsao

    2012-01-01

    Portal hypertension is the main complication of cirrhosis and is defined as an hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG) of more than 5 mmHg.Clinically significant portal hypertension is defined as HVPG of 10 mmHg or more.Development of gastroesophageal varices and variceal hemorrhage are the most direct consequence of portal hypertension.Over the last decades significant advancements in the field have led to standard treatment options.These clinical recommendations have evolved mostly as a result of randomized controlled trials and consensus conferences among experts where existing evidence has been reviewed and future goals for research and practice guidelines have been proposed.Management of varices/variceal hemorrhage is based on the clinical stage of portal hypertension.No specific treatment has shown to prevent the formation of varices.Prevention of first variceal hemorrhage depends on the size/characteristics of varices.In patients with small varices and high risk of bleeding,nonselective β-blockers are recommended,while patients with medium/large varices can be treated with either β-blockers or esophageal band ligation.Standard of care for acute variceal hemorrhage consists of vasoactive drugs,endoscopic band ligation and antibiotics prophylaxis.Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is reserved for those who fail standard of care or for patients who are likely to fail ("early TIPS").Prevention of recurrent variceal hemorrhage consists of the combination of β-blockers and endoscopic band ligation.

  3. Hypertension Canada's 2016 Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines for Blood Pressure Measurement, Diagnosis, Assessment of Risk, Prevention, and Treatment of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Alexander A; Nerenberg, Kara; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; McBrien, Kerry; Zarnke, Kelly B; Dasgupta, Kaberi; Cloutier, Lyne; Gelfer, Mark; Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime; Milot, Alain; Bolli, Peter; Tremblay, Guy; McLean, Donna; Tobe, Sheldon W; Ruzicka, Marcel; Burns, Kevin D; Vallée, Michel; Prasad, G V Ramesh; Lebel, Marcel; Feldman, Ross D; Selby, Peter; Pipe, Andrew; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; McFarlane, Philip A; Oh, Paul; Hegele, Robert A; Khara, Milan; Wilson, Thomas W; Penner, S Brian; Burgess, Ellen; Herman, Robert J; Bacon, Simon L; Rabkin, Simon W; Gilbert, Richard E; Campbell, Tavis S; Grover, Steven; Honos, George; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D; Coutts, Shelagh B; Gubitz, Gord; Campbell, Norman R C; Moe, Gordon W; Howlett, Jonathan G; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Prebtani, Ally; Larochelle, Pierre; Leiter, Lawrence A; Jones, Charlotte; Ogilvie, Richard I; Woo, Vincent; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Trudeau, Luc; Petrella, Robert J; Hiremath, Swapnil; Drouin, Denis; Lavoie, Kim L; Hamet, Pavel; Fodor, George; Grégoire, Jean C; Lewanczuk, Richard; Dresser, George K; Sharma, Mukul; Reid, Debra; Lear, Scott A; Moullec, Gregory; Gupta, Milan; Magee, Laura A; Logan, Alexander G; Harris, Kevin C; Dionne, Janis; Fournier, Anne; Benoit, Geneviève; Feber, Janusz; Poirier, Luc; Padwal, Raj S; Rabi, Doreen M

    2016-05-01

    Hypertension Canada's Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines Task Force provides annually updated, evidence-based recommendations to guide the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension. This year, we present 4 new recommendations, as well as revisions to 2 previous recommendations. In the diagnosis and assessment of hypertension, automated office blood pressure, taken without patient-health provider interaction, is now recommended as the preferred method of measuring in-office blood pressure. Also, although a serum lipid panel remains part of the routine laboratory testing for patients with hypertension, fasting and nonfasting collections are now considered acceptable. For individuals with secondary hypertension arising from primary hyperaldosteronism, adrenal vein sampling is recommended for those who are candidates for potential adrenalectomy. With respect to the treatment of hypertension, a new recommendation that has been added is for increasing dietary potassium to reduce blood pressure in those who are not at high risk for hyperkalemia. Furthermore, in selected high-risk patients, intensive blood pressure reduction to a target systolic blood pressure ≤ 120 mm Hg should be considered to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events. Finally, in hypertensive individuals with uncomplicated, stable angina pectoris, either a β-blocker or calcium channel blocker may be considered for initial therapy. The specific evidence and rationale underlying each of these recommendations are discussed. Hypertension Canada's Canadian Hypertension Education Program Guidelines Task Force will continue to provide annual updates.

  4. Screening for renovascular hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunnick, N R; Sfakianakis, G N

    1991-05-01

    The most common curable cause of high blood pressure is renovascular hypertension. Although hypertension is common in the United States, only a minority, approximately 1%, of patients have a renovascular cause. Using clinical criteria, a subgroup of these patients can be selected in which the prevalence of renovascular hypertension will be approximately 15%. In these selected patients, it is appropriate to proceed to a radiographic screening modality to look for a significant renal artery stenosis. The choice of modality should reflect the strengths and expertise of each specific institution. Hypertensive urography is no longer recommended for screening. Excellent results have been reported with intravenous DSRA in institutions where a strong interest in this procedure exists. Furthermore, intravenous DSRA is easily coupled with the collection of renal vein samples for renin assay. Intravenous DSRA, however, has not maintained widespread use. Although the radionuclide renogram is no longer adequate as a radiographic screening tool, stimulation with an ACE inhibitor, such as captopril or enalaprilat, may produce excellent results. In many institutions, this is the most appropriate examination. Furthermore, it is relatively noninvasive. Merely detecting a significant renal artery stenosis does not, however, mean the patient has renovascular hypertension. Both hypertension and a renal artery stenosis may be present and not be causally related. Because renovascular hypertension is, at least initially, renin mediated, the demonstration of increased renin production by the ipsilateral kidney should confirm renovascular hypertension. Prospective application of these results to patients undergoing revascularization techniques, however, has been disappointing. This may be related to problems in patient preparation, sample collection, renin assay, or even the physiology of chronic hypertension, which is incompletely renin mediated. Thus, offering revascularization only to

  5. Hypertension, the kidney, and cardiovascular risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Sande, N.G.C.

    2017-01-01

    Hypertension and chronic kidney disease are both independent risk factors for first or subsequent cardiovascular events. Blood pressure-lowering therapy is recommended in patients with hypertension and chronic kidney disease, in order to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease and kidney failure.

  6. Hypertension screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  7. Hypertension screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulke, J. M.

    1975-01-01

    An attempt was made to measure the response to an announcement of hypertension screening at the Goddard Space Center, to compare the results to those of previous statistics. Education and patient awareness of the problem were stressed.

  8. Endokrin hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Ibsen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Endocrine hypertension is rare, but frequently refractory. Adenomas are common incidental findings. Biochemical tests confirm the diagnosis. Primary aldosteronism is the most common form. Hypokalaemia is an important sign, but 50% of patients may be normokalaemic. The plasma-aldosterone-to-renin ......Endocrine hypertension is rare, but frequently refractory. Adenomas are common incidental findings. Biochemical tests confirm the diagnosis. Primary aldosteronism is the most common form. Hypokalaemia is an important sign, but 50% of patients may be normokalaemic. The plasma...

  9. Pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Martins Júnior

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is a pathological condition associated with various diseases, which must be remembered by the physicians, since early diagnosis may anticipate and avoid dangerous complications and even death if appropriate measures were not taken. The relationship with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, important pathological process that is in increasing prevalence in developing countries, and leading position as cause of death, emphasizes its importance. Here are presented the classifications, pathophysiology, and general rules of treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  10. Pulmonary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, more than 800 papers were published in the field of pulmonary hypertension. A Clinical Year in Review article cannot possibly incorporate all this work and needs to be selective. The recently published European guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension contain an inclusive summary of all published clinical studies conducted until very recently. Here, we provide an overview of papers published after the finalisation of the guideline. In addition, we summaris...

  11. Recommender Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Lü, Linyuan; Yeung, Chi Ho; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhang, Zi-Ke; Zhou, Tao

    2012-01-01

    The ongoing rapid expansion of the Internet greatly increases the necessity of effective recommender systems for filtering the abundant information. Extensive research for recommender systems is conducted by a broad range of communities including social and computer scientists, physicists, and interdisciplinary researchers. Despite substantial theoretical and practical achievements, unification and comparison of different approaches are lacking, which impedes further advances. In this article, we review recent developments in recommender systems and discuss the major challenges. We compare and evaluate available algorithms and examine their roles in the future developments. In addition to algorithms, physical aspects are described to illustrate macroscopic behavior of recommender systems. Potential impacts and future directions are discussed. We emphasize that recommendation has a great scientific depth and combines diverse research fields which makes it of interests for physicists as well as interdisciplinar...

  12. [Hypertensive crisis: problems of diagnostics and paradigm of the treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fursov, A N; Potekhin, N P; Chernov, S A; Vereshchagina, A V; Zakharova, E G; Olondar', N N

    2012-07-01

    Analysis of causes of increase of the uncomplicated hypertensive crisis (HC) from 46 to 61% indicates that in the half of cases the cause was only high ABP with minimal clinical symptomatology. To refer all cases of the catadrome of hypertensive disease to hypertensive crisis is inappropriately. It is recommended to use with such concepts as "complicated" and "uncomplicated" HC also term "catadrome of hypertensive disease (instability of ABP)". It allows to except the hyperdiagnosis of HC and to optimize indication for hospital admission. There are recommendations for medical actions in case of complicated and uncomplicated HC and catadrome of hypertensive disease.

  13. Hypertensive Encephalopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa SHARIFIAN

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available How to cite this article: Sharifian M. Hypertensive Encephalopathy. Iran J Child Neurol 2012; 6(3:1-7.Hypertension is called the silent killer and vital organs such as the brain, eyes,kidneys and the heart are the targets. Seizure, central nervous system (CNShemorrhage, and cerebrovascular accident (CVA, blindness and heart attacksare the end points.The prevalence of hypertension in children is much less than adults, but evidencereveals that the source of hypertension in adulthood goes back to childhood. In70-80% of cases hypertension is due to renal diseases. In children, hypertensiveencephalopathy (HE may be the first manifestation of renal diseases. Seizure isone of the most common manifestations of HE.In this article, definitions, etiology, pathophysiology and finally the acute andchronic managements of HE will be discussed.ReferencesSawicka K, Szczyrek M, Jastrzębska I, Prasal M, ZwolakA, Jadwiga D. Hypertension – The silent killer. J Pre-Clin Clin Res 2011;5(2:43-6.Croix B, Feig DI. Childhood hypertension is not a silent disease. Pediatr Nephrol 2006 Apr;21(4:527-32.Wong TY, Mitchell P. Hypertensive retinopathy. N Engl J Med 2004 Nov;351(22:2310-7.Krzesinski JM, Cohen EP.Hypertension and the kidney.Acta Clin Belg 2007 Jan-Feb;62(1:5-14.Report of the Second Task Force on Blood Pressure Control in Children – 1987. Task Force on Blood Pressure Control in Children. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, Bethesda, Maryland. Pediatrics 1987Jan;79(1:1-25.Update on the 1987 Task Force Report on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents: a working group report from the National High Blood Pressure Education Program. National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on Hypertension Control in Children and Adolescents. Pediatrics 1996 Oct;98(4 Pt1:649-58.Ataei N, Aghamohammadi A, Yousefi E, Hosseini M, Nourijelyani K, Tayebi M, et al. Blood pressure nomograms for school children in Iran. Pediatr Nephrol 2004 Feb;19

  14. An approach to the young hypertensive patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangena, P; Saban, S; Hlabyago, K E; Rayner, B

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is the leading cause of death worldwide. Globally and locally there has been an increase in hypertension in children, adolescents and young adultsdiet and physical inactivity, which lead to overweight and obesity. The majority (>90%) of young patients will have essential or primary hypertension, while only a minority (diet with reduced salt and refined carbohydrate intake, an exercise programme and management of substance abuse issues. Failure of lifestyle measures or the presence of target-organ damage should prompt the clinician to initiate pharmacotherapy. We recommend referral to a specialist practitioner in cases of resistant hypertension, where there is severe target-organ damage and when a secondary cause is suspected.

  15. Management of severe hypertension in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Leslie A; Simpson, Lynn L; Rochelson, Burton

    2016-03-01

    While hemorrhage is the leading cause of maternal death in most of the world, hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are the leading cause of maternal mortality in the United States. The opportunity to improve outcomes lies in timely and appropriate response to severe hypertension. The purpose of this article is to review the diagnostic criteria for severe hypertension, choice of antihypertensive agents, and recommended algorithms for evaluation and management of acute changes in clinical status. Adhering to standard practices ensures that care teams can timely and appropriate care to these high risk patients. With heightened surveillance and prompt evaluation of signs and symptoms of worsening hypertension, maternal morbidity and mortality can be decreased.

  16. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  17. Recommended Wilderness

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Recommended wilderness is an Arcview shapefile representing the porposed wilderness areas throughout the park. The boundaries for this data set were digitized by...

  18. Recommender systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kembellec, Gérald; Saleh, Imad

    2014-01-01

    Acclaimed by various content platforms (books, music, movies) and auction sites online, recommendation systems are key elements of digital strategies. If development was originally intended for the performance of information systems, the issues are now massively moved on logical optimization of the customer relationship, with the main objective to maximize potential sales. On the transdisciplinary approach, engines and recommender systems brings together contributions linking information science and communications, marketing, sociology, mathematics and computing. It deals with the understan

  19. Endokrin hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Per Løgstrup; Ibsen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Endocrine hypertension is rare, but frequently refractory. Adenomas are common incidental findings. Biochemical tests confirm the diagnosis. Primary aldosteronism is the most common form. Hypokalaemia is an important sign, but 50% of patients may be normokalaemic. The plasma-aldosterone-to-renin ...

  20. [Hypertensive crisis in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzypczyk, Piotr; Roszkowska-Blaim, Maria; Daniel, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Hypertensive crisis is a sudden rise in blood pressure above 99 c. for sex, age and height +5 mm Hg. Depending on patient's symptoms, hypertensive crisis can be divided into hypertensive emergency severe arterial hypertension with target organ insufficiency and/r damage (central nervous system, heart, kidney, eye), and hypertensive urgency - severe arterial hypertension without target organ insufficiency and damage with non-specific symptoms like: headaches, vertigo, nasal bleeding, nausea, and vomiting. The most common causes of hypertensive crisis in neonates and infants are renal artery thrombosis, broncho-pulmonary dysplasia, and coarctation of aorta; in older children - kidney diseases and renal artery stenosis. In neonates and infants symptoms of cardiac failure predominate, whereas in older children symptoms from central nervous system (headaches, nausea, vomiting, changes in level of consciousness, seizures, focal deficits). Hypertensive crisis is treated with fast- and short-acting medications; 25% reduction of blood pressure within first 8 hours is recommended, with complete normalization within 24-48 hours. Hypertensive emergency should be treated with intravenous agents (labetalol, hydralazine, nicardipine, and sodium nitroprusside), hypertensive urgency with intravenous or oral agents like nifedipine, isradipine, clonidine and minoxidil. Nicardipine is a first-choice medication in neonates.

  1. Treatment Resistant Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Brent M

    2015-11-05

    Treatment resistant hypertension (TRH) is defined by office blood pressure (BP) uncontrolled on ≥ 3 or controlled on ≥ 4 antihypertensive medications, preferably at optimal doses and including a diuretic. Apparent (a)TRH is used when optimal therapy, adherence, and measurement artifacts are unknown. Among treated hypertensives, ~30% of uncontrolled and 10% of controlled individuals have aTRH, with a higher prevalence in Blacks than other race-ethnicity groups. In ≥ 50% of aTRH patients, BP measurement artifacts ('office' TRH), suboptimal regimens, or suboptimal adherence are present, ie, pseudo-resistance. While patients with 'office' TRH have fewer cardiovascular events than those with 'true' TRH, no evidence confirms that patients with suboptimal regimens or adherence are spared. Averaging several office BPs obtained with an automated monitor can reduce 'office' TRH. Home or ambulatory BP monitoring can identify office resistance. Prescribing ≥ 3 different antihypertensive medication classes, eg, thiazide-type diuretic, renin-angiotensin blocker and calcium antagonist at ≥ 50% of maximum recommended doses reasonably defines optimal therapy. Intensifying diuretic therapy, eg, adding an aldosterone antagonist, is effective for many TRH patients who are volume expanded. Clinical information, hemodynamic and renin-guided therapeutics can inform other treatment options. Attention to adverse effects, medication costs, and pill burden can improve adherence and control. Patients with aTRH and suspected secondary hypertension should be evaluated. Interfering substances or medications should be discontinued. These approaches will identify or correct the problem in ~80% of aTRH patients. Referral to a hypertension specialist and newer therapeutic approaches are options for TRH patients who cannot take or do not respond to optimal therapy.

  2. Hypertension Subtypes among Hypertensive Patients in Ibadan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiodun M. Adeoye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Certain hypertension subtypes have been shown to increase the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and may be related to specific underlying genetic determinants. Inappropriate characterization of subtypes of hypertension makes efforts at elucidating the genetic contributions to the etiology of hypertension largely vapid. We report the hypertension subtypes among patients with hypertension from South-Western Nigeria. Methods. A total of 1858 subjects comprising 76% female, hypertensive, aged 18 and above were recruited into the study from two centers in Ibadan, Nigeria. Hypertension was identified using JNCVII definition and was further grouped into four subtypes: controlled hypertension (CH, isolated systolic hypertension (ISH, isolated diastolic hypertension (IDH, and systolic-diastolic hypertension (SDH. Results. Systolic-diastolic hypertension was the most prevalent. Whereas SDH (77.6% versus 73.5% and IDH (4.9% versus 4.7% were more prevalent among females, ISH (10.1% versus 6.2% was higher among males (P=0.048. Female subjects were more obese (P<0.0001 and SDH was prevalent among the obese group. Conclusion. Gender and obesity significantly influenced the distribution of the hypertension subtypes. Characterization of hypertension by subtypes in genetic association studies could lead to identification of previously unknown genetic variants involved in the etiology of hypertension. Large-scale studies among various ethnic groups may be needed to confirm these observations.

  3. Hypertension Briefing

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Blood pressure is the force exerted on artery walls as the heart pumps blood through the body. Hypertension, or high blood pressure, occurs when blood pressure is constantly higher than the pressure needed to carry blood through the body. The Chronic Conditions Hub is a website that brings together information on chronic health conditions. It allows you to easily access, manage and share relevant information resources. The Chronic Conditions Hub includes the Institute of Public Health in Irel...

  4. Resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armario, P; Oliveras, A; de la Sierra, A

    2013-11-01

    A 53 year old woman with hypercholesterolemia treated with statins, with no history of cardiovascular disease, was referred to the Hypertension and Vascular Risk Unit for management of hypertension resistant to 4 antihypertensive agents at full doses. The patient had obesity, with a body mass index of 36.3kg/m(2) and office blood pressure 162/102mm Hg. Physical examination showed no data of interest. glucose 120mg/dl, glycated Hb: 6.4%, albuminuria 68mg/g, kidney function and study of the renin angiotensin system and other biochemical parameters were normal. Echocardiography: left ventricular mass, 131g/m(2) (normal, <110g/m(2)). True resistant hypertension was confirmed by ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure during 24h (153/89mm Hg). Spironolactone treatment (25mg/day) was added and was well tolerated, with no change in renal function and kaliemia within normal (4.1mmol/l) following the treatment. After 8 weeks, blood pressure was well controlled: office blood pressure 132/86mm Hg and 24h-ambulatory blood pressure: 128/79mm Hg. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. The Canadian Hypertension Education Program – a unique Canadian knowledge translation program

    OpenAIRE

    Tobe, Sheldon W; Touyz, Rhian M.; Campbell, Norm RC

    2007-01-01

    The Canadian Hypertension Education Program annually appraises data from hypertension research and updates clinical practice recommendation for the diagnosis and management of hypertension. Enormous effort is devoted to disseminating these recommendations to target groups throughout the country and, through the use of institutional databases, to evaluating their effectiveness in improving the health of Canadians by lowering blood pressure in people with hypertension. The mission of the Canadi...

  6. HYPERTENSION IN PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Chaturvedi, Santosh K.; Michael, Albert

    1986-01-01

    SUMMARY Known cases of hypertension and those fulfilling WHO criteria for diagnosis of hypertension were identified in psychiatric patients and compared with non - hypertensive psychiatric patients. Hypertension was detected in 141 (9.98%) cases, and was significantly more associated with elder age, married status, urban background and neurotic illness. The implications are in early detection and effective management of hypertension in psychiatric patients.

  7. Hypertension hos gravide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Johansen, Marianne; Kamper, Anne Lise;

    2009-01-01

    There are four major hypertensive disorders in pregnancy: chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia. The indications and efficacy of antihypertensive treatment of the different hypertensive disorders are assessed. Advantages...... and disadvantages of different classes of antihypertensive drugs during pregnancy and lactation are described....

  8. [Hypertension during pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, E.R.; Johansen, M.; Kamper, A.L.;

    2009-01-01

    There are four major hypertensive disorders in pregnancy: chronic hypertension, gestational hypertension, preeclampsia and chronic hypertension with superimposed preeclampsia. The indications and efficacy of antihypertensive treatment of the different hypertensive disorders are assessed. Advantages...... and disadvantages of different classes of antihypertensive drugs during pregnancy and lactation are described Udgivelsesdato: 2009/6/15...

  9. Optimal management of hypertension in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Czarina Acelajado

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Maria Czarina AcelajadoVascular Biology and Hypertension Program, Division of Cardiovascular Disease, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, AL, USAAbstract: Hypertension is a common and important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular and kidney diseases. The prevalence of hypertension, particularly isolated systolic hypertension, increases with advancing age, and this is partly due to the age-related changes in the arterial tree, leading to an increase in arterial stiffness. Therapeutic lifestyle changes, such as reduced dietary sodium intake, weight loss, regular aerobic activity, and moderation of alcohol consumption, have been shown to benefit elderly patients with hypertension. Lowering blood pressure (BP using pharmacological agents reduces the risk for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, with no difference in risk reduction in elderly patients compared to younger hypertensives. Guidelines recommend a BP goal of <140/90 in hypertensive patients regardless of age and <130/80 in patients with concomitant diabetes or kidney disease, and lowering the BP further has not been shown to confer any additional benefit. Moreover, the choice of antihypertensive does not seem to be as important as the degree of BP lowering. Special considerations in the treatment of elderly hypertensive patients include cognitive impairment, dementia, orthostatic ­hypotension, and polypharmacy.Keywords: hypertension, elderly, treatment, blood pressure

  10. Managing hypertension in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horr, Samuel; Nissen, Steven

    2016-06-01

    Hypertension is a common problem in the diabetic population with estimates suggesting a prevalence exceeding 60%. Comorbid hypertension and diabetes mellitus are associated with high rates of macrovascular and microvascular complications. These two pathologies share overlapping risk factors, importantly central obesity. Treatment of hypertension is unequivocally beneficial and improves all-cause mortality, cardiovascular mortality, major cardiovascular events, and microvascular outcomes including nephropathy and retinopathy. Although controversial, current guidelines recommend a target blood pressure in the diabetic population of diabetes. Management of blood pressure in patients with diabetes includes both lifestyle modifications and pharmacological therapies. This article reviews the evidence for management of hypertension in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and provides a recommended treatment strategy based on the available data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Hypertension in children and adolescents: an approach to management of complex hyper-tension in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Kevin; Falkner, Bonita

    2009-10-01

    Although primary (essential) hypertension is detectable in childhood, secondary causes of hypertension must be considered in evaluating and managing hypertension in children and adolescents. Very young children and children with severe hypertension may have an underlying cause of the hypertension. Interventions to control elevated blood pressure (BP) are clinically important for all children with high BP. Nonpharmacologic approaches are recommended for all asymptomatic children with hypertension and prehypertension. Some children and adolescents will require pharmacologic therapy to control BP and to optimize organ protection. Recent advancements in pediatric clinical trials of antihypertensive agents have provided data on BP-lowering effects and safety in children. Little has been published on the choice and use of various classes of antihypertensive drugs for management of secondary hypertension in children and adolescents. This review focuses on the clinical management of specific types of secondary hypertension in pediatric patients.

  12. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout your body. While the heart is one organ, it ...

  13. Treating Hypertension in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlembach, Dietmar; Homuth, Volker; Dechend, Ralf

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension is present in about 10 % of all pregnancies. The frequency of chronic hypertension and that of gestational hypertension is increasing. The management of pregnant women with hypertension remains a significant, but controversial, public health problem. Although treatment of hypertension in pregnancy has shown to reduce maternal target organ damage, considerable debate remains concerning treatment. We review current evidence regarding treatment goals, the ideal treatment starting time, and which drugs are available for the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy.

  14. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Treated? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) has no cure. However, ... Types of Pulmonary Hypertension." ) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) includes PH ...

  15. Illness beliefs in African Americans with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickett, Stephanie; Allen, Wilfred; Franklin, Mary; Peters, Rosalind M

    2014-02-01

    Guided by Leventhal's common sense model of illness representations, this study examined the relationship between hypertension beliefs and self-care behaviors necessary for blood pressure (BP) control in a sample of 111 community-dwelling African Americans with hypertension. Participants completed the revised Illness Perception Questionnaire, BP Self-Care Scale, and a demographic data sheet, and had BP measured. Analyses revealed that beliefs about the causes of hypertension differed by gender and educational level. Stress-related causal attributions accounted for 34.7% of the variance in hypertension beliefs. Participants who believed stress or external factors caused hypertension were less likely to engage in healthy self-care behaviors (e.g., keeping doctor visits, eating low-salt, low-fat diets). Results suggest that patients who are nonadherent with hypertension self-care recommendations may hold hypertension beliefs that are not consistent with the medically endorsed views of this disease. To more effectively treat and control BP, providers should assess patients' hypertension beliefs.

  16. Hypertensive Emergencies in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson-Chen, Courtney; Seligman, Neil S

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy is increasing. The etiology and pathophysiology of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy remain poorly understood. Hypertensive disorders are a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. Treatment of hypertension decreases the incidence of severe hypertension, but it does not impact rates of preeclampsia or other pregnancy complications. Several antihypertensive medications are commonly used in pregnancy, although there is a lack of randomized controlled trials. Severe hypertension should be treated immediately to prevent maternal end-organ damage. Appropriate antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum management is important in caring for patients with hypertensive disorders.

  17. Hypertension management in primary care in Belarus and The Netherlands.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellevis, F.G.; Rusovich, V.; Egorov, K.N.; Podpalov, V.P.; Boerma, W.G.W.

    2005-01-01

    Both in Belarus and in the Netherlands, guidelines on the management of hypertension in primary care have been developed, including recommendations about detection, treatment and follow-up. These guidelines are meant to harmonize actual practice management of hypertension of improve the quality of c

  18. Latest data on metabolic diseases: Arterial Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelidi Angeliki

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is closely related with increased cardiovascular risk and renal damage and its prevalence is even greater in elderly patients that are a highly heterogeneous group. The identification of hypertensive patients, as well as prompt initiation and timely titration of pharmacologic therapy in addition to lifestyle therapy in order to achieve blood pressure goals is of paramount importance. In general population, blood pressure goals of <140/90mmHg are recommended. However, treatment strategies and pharmacological therapy should be personalized depending on patient characteristics and comorbidities. Some drug agents or combinations should be considered as the preferential choice in specific conditions. However, the combination of two antagonists of the Renin Angiotensin System (RAS is not recommended and should be discouraged. In elderly hypertensives, it is recommended to reduce Systolic Blood Pressure (SBP between 150 and 140mmHg, provided they are in good physical and mental conditions, while a target of SBP <140mmHg may be considered, if treatment is also well tolerated. Lifestyle changes, and particularly weight loss and physical exercise, are to be recommended to all individuals with the metabolic syndrome. These interventions improve not only blood pressure, but the metabolic components of the syndrome. Antihypertensive agents that potentially improve or at least not worsen insulin sensitivity, such as RAS blockers and calcium antagonists, should be considered as the preferred drugs. Regarding patients with diabetes, lifestyle therapy and blood pressure goals of <140/90mmHg is generally recommended (American Diabetes Association, 2017. An ACE inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker, at the maximum tolerated dose indicated for blood pressure treatment, is the recommended first-line treatment for hypertension in patients with diabetes and albuminuria. Taking into account several studies and meta-analyses recently published

  19. Hypertension in Danish seafarers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tu, Mingshan; Jepsen, Jørgen Riis

    2016-01-01

    intake, and body mass index. Results: The overall prevalence of hypertension in the study population was 44.7% (95% CI 40.8–48.6). In a comparison sample of adult Danes, the crude rate of hypertension was 12.6%. In addition, 41.8% (95% CI 38.0–45.7) of seafarers were pre-hypertensive. Hypertension......Background: Due to the high prevalence of arterial hypertension and its role in the development of athe- rosclerosis, myocardial infarction and stroke, hypertension is a major public health challenge worldwide. There is limited knowledge of the prevalence of hypertension among seafarers who......, however, are known to have an excess morbidity and mortality from these disorders. This article addresses the prevalence of hypertension among Danish seafarers and discusses potential risk factors for hypertension in maritime settings. Materials and methods: A representative sample of 629 Danish seafarers...

  20. Non-interventional management of resistant hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael; Doumas; Costas; Tsioufis; Charles; Faselis; Antonios; Lazaridis; Haris; Grassos; Vasilios; Papademetriou

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is one of the most popular fields of re-search in modern medicine due to its high prevalence and its major impact on cardiovascular risk and con-sequently on global health. Indeed, about one third of individuals worldwide has hypertension and is under increased long-term risk of myocardial infarction, stroke or cardiovascular death. On the other hand, resistant hypertension, the "uncontrollable" part of arterial hy-pertension despite appropriate therapy, comprises a much greater menace since long-standing, high levels of blood pressure along with concomitant debilitating entities such as chronic kidney disease and diabetes mellitus create a prominent high cardiovascular risk milieu. However, despite the alarming consequences, resistant hypertension and its effective management still have not received proper scientific attention. As-pects like the exact prevalence and prognosis are yet tobe clarified. In an effort to manage patients with resis-tant hypertension appropriately, clinical doctors are still racking their brains in order to find the best therapeutic algorithm and surmount the substantial difficulties in controlling this clinical entity. This review aims to shed light on the effective management of resistant hyper-tension and provide practical recommendations for cli-nicians dealing with such patients.

  1. Hypertension and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Amanda; Parto, Parham; Krim, Selim R

    2016-07-01

    Despite its continued increase in prevalence in minorities, data regarding hypertension (HTN) control among such ethnic groups remains limited. This review highlights the most recent literature on the epidemiology, prevalence, and treatment strategies of HTN among four racial groups (non-Hispanic Whites (NHW), Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians). Overall awareness and treatment of HTN were found to be higher in blacks when compared with NHWs. Access to health insurance is associated with successful HTN control, particularly among the Hispanic populations. Recent data from SBP Intervention Trial suggests the blood pressure control and adherence rates in blacks were highest among men, with a higher number of comorbidities, and on diuretic therapy. Additionally, the initiation of thiazide-type diuretics and calcium channel blocker was superior to β-adrenergic blockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blockers in blood pressure lowering among blacks. However, no specific treatment recommendations exist for Hispanics or Asians. Finally, recent guidelines from the Joint National Commission recommend initial treatment with a thiazide-type diuretic regardless of race. Despite recent progress, racial disparities in awareness and treatment of HTN continue to exist. To reduce this important gap, future research should focus on epidemiologic, genetic, and sociologic factors as well as specific therapies to achieve maximum medical benefit in these subgroups.

  2. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Hypertension Guideline 2003 Update

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recommendations. Correct BP measurement procedure is ... impact of hypertension in this country. The control of ... However, there have been advances in automatic devices and ... according to acceptable international standards before purchase and must ...... Newton; Sanofi-Synthelabo: M Palane; Servier Laboratories:.

  3. Farmakologisk behandling af mild ukompliceret hypertension i almen praksis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Maja Skov; Christensen, Bo; Søndergaard, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In Denmark, patients with hypertension are primarily managed in primary care. A recent Cochrane review concluded that pharmacotherapy of patients with mild hypertension (systolic blood pressure 140-159 mmHg; diastolic blood...... pressure 90-99 mmHg; no diabetes or cardiovascular disease) did not reduce mortality or morbidity. The evidence for pharmacotherapy in patients having mild/uncomplicated hypertension is weak. However, current Danish guidelines have taken this into consideration in their recommendations of pharmacotherapy...

  4. Treatment of high blood pressure in elderly and octogenarians: European Society of Hypertension statement on blood pressure targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjeldsen, Sverre E; Stenehjem, Aud; Os, Ingrid; Van de Borne, Philippe; Burnier, Michel; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Redon, Josep; Agabiti Rosei, Enrico; Mancia, Giuseppe

    2016-12-01

    The European Society of Hypertension recommend the following main rules for treatment of hypertension in elderly and octogenarians: 1) In elderly hypertensives with SBP ≥ 160 mmHg there is solid evidence to recommend reducing SBP to between 140 mmHg and 150 mmHg. 2) In fit elderly patients less than 80 years old treatment may be considered at SBP ≥ 140 mmHg with a target SBP hypertensive agents are recommended and can be used in the elderly, although diuretics and calcium antagonists may be preferred in isolated systolic hypertension.

  5. Focus on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of hypertension in children and adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Spagnolo, Amedeo; Giussani, Marco; Ambruzzi, Amalia Maria; Bianchetti, Mario; Maringhini, Silvio; Matteucci, Maria Chiara; Menghetti, Ettore; Salice, Patrizia; Simionato, Loredana; Strambi, Mirella; Virdis, Raffaele; Genovesi, Simonetta

    2013-01-01

    The European Society of Hypertension has recently published its recommendations on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of high blood pressure in children and adolescents. Taking this contribution as a starting point the Study Group of Hypertension of the Italian Society of Pediatrics together with the Italian Society of Hypertension has conducted a reappraisal of the most recent literature on this subject. The present review does not claim to be an exhaustive description of hypertension in th...

  6. Combination therapy in hypertension: an Asia-Pacific consensus viewpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahman, Abdul Rashid; Reyes, Eugenio B; Sritara, Piyamitr; Pancholia, Arvind; Van Phuoc, Dang; Tomlinson, Brian

    2015-05-01

    Hypertension incurs a significant healthcare burden in Asia-Pacific countries, which have suboptimal rates of blood pressure (BP) treatment and control. A consensus meeting of hypertension experts from the Asia-Pacific region convened in Hanoi, Vietnam, in April 2013. The principal objectives were to discuss the growing problem of hypertension in the Asia-Pacific region, and to develop consensus recommendations to promote standards of care across the region. A particular focus was recommendations for combination therapy, since it is known that most patients with hypertension will require two or more antihypertensive drugs to achieve BP control, and also that combinations of drugs with complementary mechanisms of action achieve BP targets more effectively than monotherapy. The expert panel reviewed guidelines for hypertension management from the USA and Europe, as well as individual Asia-Pacific countries, and devised a treatment matrix/guide, in which they propose the preferred combination therapy regimens for patients with hypertension, both with and without compelling indications. This report summarizes key recommendations from the group, including recommended antihypertensive combinations for specific patient populations. These strategies generally entail initiating therapy with free drug combinations, starting with the lowest available dosage, followed by treatment with single-pill combinations once the BP target has been achieved. A single reference for the whole Asia-Pacific region may contribute to increased consistency of treatment and greater proportions of patients achieving BP control, and hence reducing hypertension-related morbidity and mortality.

  7. Pregnancy and pulmonary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, Petronella G.; Lameijer, Heleen; Hoendermis, Elke S.

    Pulmonary hypertension during pregnancy is associated with considerable risks of maternal mortality and morbidity. Our systematic review of the literature on the use of targeted treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension during pregnancy indicates a considerable decrease of mortality since a

  8. HIV and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 03-13T18:29:11+00:00 PH and HIV Print PH and HIV Brochure (PDF) Order Copies ... to know about pulmonary hypertension in connection with HIV? Although pulmonary hypertension and HIV are two separate ...

  9. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) Print ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  10. An evidence-based practice case study: white coat hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mary Ellis

    2015-01-01

    White coat hypertension, also referred to as isolated clinical hypertension, is a condition in which blood pressure rises in the medical setting due to anxiety. White coat hypertension causes no more than 15 mmHg increase in systolic blood pressure or 7 mmHg increase in diastolic blood pressure in normotensive patients, and these increases in blood pressures should return to baseline within 3 visits to the medical provider. In this case, a 77-year-old white man presented to preoperative testing, with a blood pressure of 265/101 mmHg, claiming to have white coat hypertension. This case discusses the interventions implemented for this particular patient and the misdiagnosis and misperceptions of white coat hypertension by both clinicians and patients. This article also addresses recommendations for diagnosis, treatment options, and follow-up for patients with true white coat hypertension.

  11. Hypertension in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibazarwa, Kemi B; Damasceno, Albertino A

    2014-05-01

    The past 2 decades have seen a considerable global increase in cardiovascular disease, with hypertension remaining by far the most common. More than one-third of adults in Africa are hypertensive; as in the urban populations of most developing countries. Being a condition that occurs with relatively few symptoms, hypertension remains underdetected in many countries; especially in developing countries where routine screening at any point of health care is grossly underutilized. Because hypertension is directly related to cardiovascular disease, this has led to hypertension being the leading cause of adverse cardiovascular outcomes, as a result of patients living, often unknowingly, with uncontrolled hypertension for prolonged periods of time. In Africa, hypertension is the leading cause of heart failure; whereas at global levels, hypertension is responsible for more than half of deaths from stroke, just less than half of deaths from coronary artery disease, and for more than one-tenth of all global deaths. In this review, we discuss the escalating occurrence of hypertension in developing countries, before exploring the strengths and weaknesses of different measures to control hypertension, and the challenges of adopting these measures in developing countries. On a broad level, these include steps to curb the ripple effect of urbanization on the health and disease profile of developing societies, and suggestions to improve loopholes in various aspects of health care delivery that affect surveillance and management of hypertension. Furthermore, we consider how the industrial sectors' contributions toward the burden of hypertension can also be the source of the solution.

  12. Genetik og hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellervik, Christina; Tarnow, Lise; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard

    2009-01-01

    Monogenic forms of hypertension are very rare, but have a well-characterized heredity. Primary hypertension is very common with a complex and polygenic heredity. Primary hypertension arises due to an interaction between multiple genetic and environmental factors. Its heredity is unknown, although...

  13. Pulmonary Hypertension Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at www.AHeartCures.org . Help Kickoff November’s Pulmonary Hypertension Awareness Month Want to help raise awareness for ... Heart2CurePH | Help promote Awareness Month Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension (CTEPH) Awareness Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is ...

  14. Prevalence of Hypertension and Association of Obesity with Hypertension in School Ggoing Children of Surat City, Western India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvi S. Shah

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The association of obesity with hypertension has been recognized for the decades which are the important risk factors for the cardiovascular disease. So the purpose of the present study was to determine association of obesity with hypertension in school going children of Surat. Methodology: School going children aged between 12-18 years, of five schools in Surat were selected for the study. Height and weight were measured and BMI was calculated. Blood pressure measurements were taken as per recommendation of American heart society and family history of hypertension has also been assessed. Hypertension was considered if blood pressure is more than 95th percentile according to the update of task force report and Obesity was diagnosed by BMI for age. Results: Of 682 children, 8.94% were obese and 20.09% were hypertensive. Conclusion: Obesity is strongly associated with hypertension in children and both together may risk factors for later coronary disease.

  15. Resistance Training in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with Severe Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Rodrigo Vanerson Passos; Souza, Michel Kendy; Passos, Clévia Santos; Bacurau, Reury Frank Pereira; Simoes, Herbert Gustavo; Prestes, Jonato; Boim, Mirian Aparecida; Câmara, Niels Olsen Saraiva; Franco, Maria do Carmo Pinho; Moraes, Milton Rocha

    2016-01-01

    Background Resistance training (RT) has been recommended as a non-pharmacological treatment for moderate hypertension. In spite of the important role of exercise intensity on training prescription, there is still no data regarding the effects of RT intensity on severe hypertension (SH). Objective This study examined the effects of two RT protocols (vertical ladder climbing), performed at different overloads of maximal weight carried (MWC), on blood pressure (BP) and muscle strength of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) with SH. Methods Fifteen male SHR [206 ± 10 mmHg of systolic BP (SBP)] and five Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY; 119 ± 10 mmHg of SBP) were divided into 4 groups: sedentary (SED-WKY) and SHR (SED-SHR); RT1-SHR training relative to body weight (~40% of MWC); and RT2-SHR training relative to MWC test (~70% of MWC). Systolic BP and heart rate (HR) were measured weekly using the tail-cuff method. The progression of muscle strength was determined once every fifteen days. The RT consisted of 3 weekly sessions on non-consecutive days for 12-weeks. Results Both RT protocols prevented the increase in SBP (delta - 5 and -7 mmHg, respectively; p > 0.05), whereas SBP of the SED-SHR group increased by 19 mmHg (p 0.05). Conclusions Our data indicated that both RT protocols were effective in preventing chronic elevation of SBP in SH. Additionally, a higher RT overload induced a greater increase in muscle strength. PMID:26840054

  16. The International Society of Hypertension and World Hypertension League call on governments, nongovernmental organizations and the food industry to work to reduce dietary sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Norman R C; Lackland, Daniel T; Chockalingam, Arun; Lisheng, Liu; Harrap, Stephen B; Touyz, Rhian M; Burrell, Louise M; Ramírez, Agustín J; Schmieder, Roland E; Schutte, Aletta E; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2014-02-01

    The International Society of Hypertension and the World Hypertension League have developed a policy statement calling for reducing dietary salt. The policy supports the WHO and the United Nations recommendations, which are based on a comprehensive and up-to-date review of relevant research. The policy statement calls for broad societal action to reduce dietary salt, thus reducing blood pressure and preventing hypertension and its related burden of cardiovascular disease. The hypertension organizations and experts need to become more engaged in the efforts to prevent hypertension and to advocate strongly to have dietary salt reduction policies implemented. The statement is being circulated to national hypertension organizations and to international nongovernmental health organizations for consideration of endorsement. Member organizations of the International Society of Hypertension and the World Hypertension League are urged to support this effort.

  17. Exercise in hypertension. A clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Janet P

    2003-01-01

    The current exercise prescription for the treatment of hypertension is: cardiovascular mode, for 20-60 minutes, 3-5 days per week, at 40-70% of maximum oxygen uptake (VO2(max)). Cardiovascular exercise training is the most effective mode of exercise in the prevention and treatment of hypertension. Resistance exercise is not the preferred mode of exercise treatment, but can be incorporated into an exercise regime provided the diastolic blood pressure response is within safe limits. It is inconclusive whether durations longer than 30 minutes produce significantly greater reductions in blood pressure. A frequency of three exercise sessions per week has been considered to be the minimal frequency for blood pressure reduction. Higher frequencies tended to produce greater reductions, although not significantly different. Evidence still exists that high intensity exercise (>75% VO2(max)) may not be as effective as low intensity exercise (VO2(max)) in reducing elevated blood pressures. Exercise can be effective without a change in bodyweight or body fat. Bodyweight or body fat loss and anti-hypertensive medications do not have an added effect on blood pressure reduction associated with exercise. beta-blockade is not the recommended anti-hypertensive medication for effective exercise performance in non-cardiac patients. Not all hypertensive patients respond to exercise treatment. Differences in genetics and pathophysiology may be responsible for the inability of some hypertensive patients to respond to exercise. Ambulatory technology may allow advances in individualising a more effective exercise prescription for low-responders and non-responders.

  18. Obesity-Related Hypertension in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tammy M. Brady

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity and hypertension have both been on the rise in children. Each is associated with increased cardiovascular disease risk and both track into adulthood, increasing the prevalence of heart disease and related morbidity and mortality. All children should be screened for hypertension, but children with comorbid obesity may not only particularly benefit from the screening but may also prove the most challenging to screen. Increased arm circumference and conical arm shape are particularly problematic when attempting to obtain an accurate blood pressure (BP measurement. This review focuses on the unique aspects of hypertension evaluation and management in the child with comorbid obesity. Specific traditional and non-traditional risk factors that may contribute to elevated BP in children with obesity are highlighted. Current proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms by which obesity may contribute to elevated BP and hypertension is reviewed, with focus on the role of the sympathetic nervous system and the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system. This review also presents a targeted treatment approach to children with obesity-related hypertension, providing evidence for the recommended therapeutic lifestyle change that should form the basis of any antihypertensive treatment plan in this population of at-risk children. Advantages of specific pharmacologic agents in the treatment of obesity-related hypertension are also reviewed.

  19. Hypertensive Nephrosclerosis Pathogenesis, Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyrier Alain

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Nephrovasculopathies are an increasing cause of end-stage renal failure. Hypertensive nephroscierosis is an old concept. In fact, the renal vascular lesions corresponding to this term can result from aging or a host of parenchymal renal diseases in the absence of elevated blood pressure. Nephrosclerosis is overdiagnosed. The diagnosis should rest only on renal biopsy, which is not usually done in an elderly patient with chronic renal insufficiency, hypertension and atrophic kidneys. Atherosclerotic renal disease and renal cholesterol crystal embolism are often misdiagnosed for nephro-sclerosis. The classical picture of nephrosclerosis is the patient with primary hypertension accompanied by arterio-and arteriolonephrosclerosis, focal and segmental glomerulo-sclerosis leading to glomerular obsolescence, interstitial fibrosis and inflammatory infiltrates. However, similar lesions can be observed in animal models as well as in some humans, especially blacks, in the absence of, or preceding the onset of hypertension. This suggests that nephrosclerosis might stem from a genetic defect in the renal vascular bed, a defect closely associated with the hypertensive trait. Recent data regarding the link between low birthweight and hypertension of early onset might have bearing on future developments in understanding the pathogenesis of nephrosclerosis. Treatment pursues two goals: normalizing blood pressure according to international recommendations and retarding sclerosis with a regimen essentially based on angiotensin II antagonists.

  20. Hypertension in postmenopausal women: pathophysiology and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuzzi, Chiara; Modena, Maria Grazia

    2011-03-01

    Hypertension is the most common chronic disease in industrialized countries and represents the most common major cardiovascular risk factor after the fifth decade of life in both men and women. The prevalence of hypertension is lower in premenopausal women than men, whereas in postmenopausal women it is higher than in men. Mechanisms responsible for the increase in blood pressure are complex and multifactorial, including loss of estrogen, oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, modification in renin-angiotensin system spillover and sympathetic activation. In addition, postmenopausal hypertension can be considered an isolated disease, more typical of elderly women, or part of the metabolic syndrome, which is indeed more common in early postmenopausal women. In particular, metabolic syndrome may be considered a potentially unfavourable prognostic factor in hypertensive postmenopausal women, because it seems to worsen the severity of hypertension and reduce the capacity to respond to specific treatments. This article summarizes the different causes of postmenopausal hypertension and the specific treatment recommended by guidelines for this condition.

  1. Insulin Resistance and Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张建华; 张春秀

    2002-01-01

    Summary: The insulin sensitivity in hypertensive patients with normal glucose tolerance (NGT),impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) and the insulin resistance(IR) under the disorder of glucose metabolism and hypertension were studied. By glucose toler-ance test and insulin release test, insulin sensitivity index (ISI) and the ratio of area under glucosetolerance curve (AUCG) to area under insulin release curve (AUC1) were calculated and analyzed.The results showed that ISI was decreased to varying degrees in the patients with hypertension,the mildest in the group of NGT with hypertension, followed by the group of IGT without hyper-tension, the group of IGT with hypertension and DM (P=0). There was very significant differ-ence in the ratio of AUCG/AUC1 between the hypertensive patients with NGT and controls (P=0). It was concluded that a significant IR existed during the development of IGT both in hyperten-sion and nonhypertension. The increase of total insulin secretion (AUC1) was associated with non-hypertension simultaneously. IR of the hypertensive patients even existed in NGT and was wors-ened with the deterioration of glucose metabolism disorder, but the AUC1 in the HT groupchanged slightly. A relative deficiency of insulin secretion or dysfunction of β-cell of islet existed inIGT and DM of the hypertensive patients.

  2. Secondary Hypertension in Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malha, Line; August, Phyllis

    2015-07-01

    Hypertension is a common medical complication of pregnancy. Although 75-80 % of women with preexisting essential hypertension will have uncomplicated pregnancies, the presence of secondary forms of hypertension adds considerably to both maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Renovascular hypertension, pheochromocytoma, and Cushing's syndrome in particular are associated with accelerating hypertension, superimposed preeclampsia, preterm delivery, and fetal loss. Primary aldosteronism is a more heterogeneous disorder; there are well-documented cases where blood pressure and hypokalemia are improved during pregnancy due to elevated levels of progesterone. However, superimposed preeclampsia, worsening hypertension, and early delivery are also reported. When possible, secondary forms of hypertension should be diagnosed and treated prior to conception in order to avoid these complications.

  3. Metabolomics in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolic, Sonja B; Sharman, James E; Adams, Murray J; Edwards, Lindsay M

    2014-06-01

    Hypertension is the most prevalent chronic medical condition and a major risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. In the majority of hypertensive cases, the underlying cause of hypertension cannot be easily identified because of the heterogeneous, polygenic and multi-factorial nature of hypertension. Metabolomics is a relatively new field of research that has been used to evaluate metabolic perturbations associated with disease, identify disease biomarkers and to both assess and predict drug safety and efficacy. Metabolomics has been increasingly used to characterize risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including hypertension, and it appears to have significant potential for uncovering mechanisms of this complex disease. This review details the analytical techniques, pre-analytical steps and study designs used in metabolomics studies, as well as the emerging role for metabolomics in gaining mechanistic insights into the development of hypertension. Suggestions as to the future direction for metabolomics research in the field of hypertension are also proposed.

  4. The Universal Recommender

    CERN Document Server

    Kunegis, Jérôme; Umbrath, Winfried

    2009-01-01

    We describe the Universal Recommender, a recommender system for semantic datasets that generalizes domain-specific recommenders such a content-based, collaborative, social, bibliographic, lexicographic, hybrid and other recommenders. In contrast to existing recommender systems, the Universal Recommender applies to any dataset that allows a semantic representation. We describe the scalable three-stage architecture of the Universal Recommender and its application to Internet Protocol Television (IPTV). To achieve good recommendation accuracy, several novel machine learning and optimization problems are identified. We finally give a brief argument supporting the need for machine learning recommenders.

  5. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  6. TIME LINE OF HISTORY OF HYPERTENSION TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Golam Saklayen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available It is surprising that only about 50 years ago hypertension was considered an essential malady and not a treatable condition. Introduction of thiazide diuretics in late 50’s made some headway in successful treatment of hypertension and ambitious multicenter VA co-operative study (phase 1 and 2 started in 1964 for diastolic hypertension ranging between 90 to 129 mmHg and completed by 1971 established for the first time that treating diastolic hypertension reduced CV events like stroke and heart failure and improved mortality. In the following decade these results were confirmed for the wider US and Non-US population, including women and goal oriented BP treatment to diastolic 90 became the standard therapy recommendation. But isolated systolic hypertension (accounting for two thirds of the 70 million hypertensive population in USA alone was not considered treatable until 1991 when SHEP study (systolic hypertension in elderly program was completed and showed tremendous benefits of treating systolic BP over 160 mmHg using only a simple regimen using small dose Chlorthalidone with addition of Atenolol if needed. In the next 2 decades ALLHAT and other studies examined the comparability of outcomes with use of different classes and combinations of antihypertensive drugs. While diastolic BP goal was established as 90 in late 70’s and later confirmed by HOT study, the goal BP for systolic hypertension was not settled until very recently with completion of SPRINT study. ACCORD study showed no significant difference in outcome with sys 140 vs 120 in diabetics . But recently completed SPRINT study with somewhat similar protocol as in ACCORD but in nondiabetic, showed almost one quarter reduction in all-cause mortality and one-third reduction of CV events with systolic BP goal 120.

  7. Primary pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, A; Lehrman, S; Romano, P; Frishman, W; Dobkin, J; Reichel, J

    2000-01-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) is a condition characterized by sustained elevation of pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) without demonstrable cause. The most common symptom at presentation is dyspnea. Other complaints include fatigue, chest pain, syncope, leg edema, and palpitations. Right heart catheterization is diagnostic, showing a mean PAP >25 mmHg at rest and >30 mmHg during exercise, with a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. In the National Institutes of Health-PPH registry, the median survival period was 2.8 years. Treatment is aimed at lowering PAP, increasing cardiac output, and decreasing in situ thrombosis. Vasodilators have been used with some success in the treatment of PPH. They include prostacyclin, calcium-channel blockers, nitric oxide and adenosine. Anticoagulation has also been advised for the prevention of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and in situ thromboses of the lungs. New drug treatments under investigation include L-arginine, plasma endothelin-I, and bosentan. Use of oxygen, digoxin, and diuretics for symptomatic relief have also been recommended. Patients with severe PPH refractory to medical management should be considered for surgery.

  8. Overcoming therapeutic inertia in patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, Shawna D

    2010-01-01

    Uncontrolled blood pressure (BP) remains a leading contributor to cardiovascular disease and mortality worldwide. Although current practice guidelines recommend treating patients with hypertension to defined BP goals, the approach is not widely implemented, and BP control in clinical practice is much worse than that attained in clinical trials. Recent and ongoing clinical trials are utilizing more aggressive approaches with combination therapy as initial treatment. This article discusses the problem of therapeutic or clinical inertia when attempting to control hypertension and highlights differences in BP control rates between clinical trials and real-world practice. Additionally, the rationale for an ongoing treat-to-goal study using a fixed-dose combination of amlodipine/olmesartan medoxomil in patients with hypertension not controlled on monotherapy is provided.

  9. Hypertensive crisis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandar, Jayanthi; Zilleruelo, Gastón

    2012-05-01

    Hypertensive crisis is rare in children and is usually secondary to an underlying disease. There is strong evidence that the renin-angiotensin system plays an important role in the genesis of hypertensive crisis. An important principle in the management of children with hypertensive crisis is to determine if severe hypertension is chronic, acute, or acute-on-chronic. When it is associated with signs of end-organ damage such as encephalopathy, congestive cardiac failure or renal failure, there is an emergent need to lower blood pressures to 25-30% of the original value and then accomplish a gradual reduction in blood pressure. Precipitous drops in blood pressure can result in impairment of perfusion of vital organs. Medications commonly used to treat hypertensive crisis in children are nicardipine, labetalol and sodium nitroprusside. In this review, we discuss the pathophysiology, differential diagnosis and recent developments in management of hypertensive crisis in children.

  10. Hypertension in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Venecia, Toni; Lu, Marvin; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension remains a major societal problem affecting 76 million, or approximately one third, of US adults. While more prevalent in the older population, an increasing incidence in the younger population, including athletes, is being observed. Active individuals, like the young and athletes, are viewed as free of diseases such as hypertension. However, the increased prevalence of traditional risk factors in the young, including obesity, diabetes mellitus, and renal disease, increase the risk of developing hypertension in younger adults. Psychosocial factors may also be contributing factors to the increasing incidence of hypertension in the younger population. Increased left ventricular wall thickness and mass are increasingly found in young adults on routine echocardiograms and predict future cardiovascular events. This increasing incidence of hypertension in the young calls for early surveillance and prompt treatment to prevent future cardiac events. In this review we present the current epidemiological data, potential mechanisms, clinical implications, and treatment of hypertension in young patients and athletes.

  11. TCM Dietotherapy for Hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Zi; DUAN Shu-min

    2010-01-01

    @@ Hypertension is a common cardiovascular disease with a group of symptoms and signs, mainly the increased blood pressure of the arteries.It may be primary or secondary.The former, accounting for90%, refers to an independent disease mainly manifested by increased blood pressure with the cause unknown.Primary hypertension is related to nervousness, emotional fluctuation, heredity, obesity and high-salt diet.Secondary hypertension is one of the manifestations in certain disorders.

  12. Valproate Induced Hypertensive Urgency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauran Sivananthan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Valproate is a medication used in the treatment of seizures, bipolar disorder, migraines, and behavioral problems. Here we present a case of an 8-year-old boy who presented with hypertensive urgency after initiation of valproate. Primary treatment of his hypertension was ineffective. Blood pressure stabilization was achieved following discontinuation of valproate. Clinicians should be aware of the risk of developing hypertensive urgency with administration of valproate.

  13. Obesity-Related Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Re, Richard N.

    2009-01-01

    Obesity-associated arterial hypertension is characterized by activation of the sympathetic nervous system, activation of the renin-angiotensin system, and sodium retention, among other abnormalities. In this review, the following 3 facets of the obesity/hypertension nexus will be discussed: the potential mechanisms by which obesity can lead to elevated arterial pressure, the interaction of obesity with the sequelae of hypertension, and the therapies that are believed to optimally treat obesit...

  14. 42. Hypertension: Morbidity review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamzullah khan

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: hypertension is a major modifiable risk factor for coronary artery disease, stroke, eye abnormalities and end stage renal disease, which require proper counseling and management of patients.

  15. Dopamine receptor and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chunyu; Eisner, Gilbert M; Felder, Robin A; Jose, Pedro A

    2005-01-01

    Dopamine plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension by regulating epithelial sodium transport and reactive oxygen and by interacting with vasopressin, renin-angiotensin, and the sympathetic nervous system. Decreased renal dopamine production and/or impaired dopamine receptor function have been reported in hypertension. Disruption of any of the dopamine receptors (D(1), D(2), D(3), D(4), and D(5)) results in hypertension. In this paper, we review the mechanisms by which hypertension develops when dopamine receptor function is perturbed.

  16. [Hypertension in women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagle, Rodrigo; Tagle V, Rodrigo; Acevedo, Mónica; Valdés, Gloria

    2013-02-01

    The present review examines the types of hypertension that women may suffer throughout life, their physiopathological characteristics and management. In early life, the currently used low-dose oral contraceptives seldom cause hypertension. Pregnancy provokes preeclampsia, its main medical complication, secondary to inadequate transformation of the spiral arteries and the subsequent multisystem endothelial damage caused by deportation of placental factors and microparticles. Hypertension in preeclampsia is an epiphenomenon which needs to be controlled at levels that reduce maternal risk without impairing placental perfusion. The hemodynamic changes of pregnancy may unmask a hypertensive phenotype, may exacerbate a chronic hypertension, or may complicate hypertension secondary to lupus, renovascular lesions, and pheochromocytoma. On the other hand a primary aldosteronism may benefit from the effect of progesterone and present as a postpartum hypertension. A hypertensive pregnancy, especially preeclampsia, represents a risk for cardiac, vascular and renal disease in later life. Menopause may mimic a pheochromocytoma, and is associated to endothelial dysfunction and salt-sensitivity. Among women, non-pharmacological treatment should be forcefully advocated, except for sodium restriction during pregnancy. The blockade of the renin-angiotensin system should be avoided in women at risk of pregnancy; betablockers could be used with precautions during pregnancy; diuretics, ACE inhibitors and angiotensin receptor antagonists should not be used during breast feeding. Collateral effects of antihypertensives, such as hyponatremia, cough and edema are more common in women. Thus, hypertension in women should be managed according to the different life stages.

  17. Arterial pulmonary hypertension in noncardiac intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mykola V Tsapenko

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Mykola V Tsapenko1,5, Arseniy V Tsapenko2, Thomas BO Comfere3,5, Girish K Mour1,5, Sunil V Mankad4, Ognjen Gajic1,51Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine; 3Division of Critical Care Medicine; 4Division of Cardiovascular Diseases, Mayo Epidemiology and Translational Research in Intensive Care (M.E.T.R.I.C, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA; 2Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Brown University, Miriam Hospital, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Pulmonary artery pressure elevation complicates the course of many complex disorders treated in a noncardiac intensive care unit. Acute pulmonary hypertension, however, remains underdiagnosed and its treatment frequently begins only after serious complications have developed. Significant pathophysiologic differences between acute and chronic pulmonary hypertension make current classification and treatment recommendations for chronic pulmonary hypertension barely applicable to acute pulmonary hypertension. In order to clarify the terminology of acute pulmonary hypertension and distinguish it from chronic pulmonary hypertension, we provide a classification of acute pulmonary hypertension according to underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms, clinical features, natural history, and response to treatment. Based on available data, therapy of acute arterial pulmonary hypertension should generally be aimed at acutely relieving right ventricular (RV pressure overload and preventing RV dysfunction. Cases of severe acute pulmonary hypertension complicated by RV failure and systemic arterial hypotension are real clinical challenges requiring tight hemodynamic monitoring and aggressive treatment including combinations of pulmonary vasodilators, inotropic agents and systemic arterial vasoconstrictors. The choice of vasopressor and inotropes in patients with acute pulmonary hypertension should take into consideration their effects on vascular resistance and cardiac output when used alone or in

  18. African Americans,hypertension and the renin angiotensin system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sandra; F; Williams; Susanne; B; Nicholas; Nosratola; D; Vaziri; Keith; C; Norris

    2014-01-01

    African Americans have exceptionally high rates of hypertension and hypertension related complications. It is commonly reported that the blood pressure lowering efficacy of renin angiotensin system(RAS) inhibitors is attenuated in African Americans due to a greater likelihood of having a low renin profile. Therefore these agents are often not recommended as initial therapy in African Americans with hypertension. However, the high prevalence of comorbid conditions, such as diabetes, cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease makes treatment with RAS inhibitors more compelling. Despite lower circulating renin levels and a less significant fall in blood pressure in response to RAS inhibitors in African Americans, numerous clinical trials support the efficacy of RAS inhibitors to improve clinical outcomes in this population, especially in those with hypertension and risk factors for cardiovascular and related diseases. Here, we discuss the rationale of RAS blockade as part of a comprehensive approach to attenuate the high rates of premature morbidity and mortality associated with hypertension among African Americans.

  19. Pre-Hypertension in Adolescents: Risk and Progression

    OpenAIRE

    Redwine, Karen M.; Daniels, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    In 2004, the National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group on High Blood Pressure in Children and Adolescents recommended a new designation of pre-hypertension for children with mildly elevated BP. This description was intended to help identify those children most at risk for the development of persistent hypertension for whom targeted prevention programs would be most beneficial and was based largely on expert opinions and epidemiological normal values. This review summarizes ...

  20. Treatment of systemic hypertension associated with kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoncompagni, Simona; Bowles, Mary H

    2013-05-01

    Systemic hypertension is an increasingly diagnosed disorder in dogs and cats and frequently occurs secondary to chronic kidney disease. Prevention of damage to organs such as the kidneys, brain, heart, and eyes is one of the primary concerns in the management of veterinary patients with hypertension. This article reviews the guidelines for antihypertensive therapy in patients with, or at risk for, kidney disease, including the initiation of treatment and currently recommended medications.

  1. Cardiac status in juvenile borderline hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culpepper, W S; Sodt, P C; Messerli, F H; Ruschhaupt, D G; Arcilla, R A

    1983-01-01

    A prospective M-mode echocardiographic study was done to look for early cardiovascular changes in children prone to hypertension with blood pressures between the 75th and 95th percentiles for age. Average systolic/diastolic pressures in 27 children with borderline hypertension were 137/89 mm Hg compared to 110/68 mm Hg for the 26 controls. Echocardiographic measurements were normalized for comparison using two methods. The borderline hypertensive group mean values were significantly greater than controls for left ventricular wall thickness (p less than 0.05 for method 1; p less than 0.001 for method 2), left ventricular mass (p less than 0.001; p less than 0.005) and left ventricular wall thickness to radius ratio (p less than 0.001, both methods). Echocardiographic estimates of left ventricular function were lower in the hypertensive group. This study suggests that cardiac hypertrophy can be shown by noninvasive means in some children before arterial pressure becomes elevated. To assess the incidence and possible consequences of early target organ changes, more extensive clinical evaluation of borderline hypertension in children is recommended.

  2. Drug treatment of hypertension in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Catherine M; Garovic, Vesna D

    2014-03-01

    Hypertensive disorders represent major causes of pregnancy-related maternal mortality worldwide. Similar to the non-pregnant population, hypertension is the most common medical disorder encountered during pregnancy and is estimated to occur in about 6-8 % of pregnancies. A recent report highlighted hypertensive disorders as one of the major causes of pregnancy-related maternal deaths in the USA, accounting for 579 (12.3 %) of the 4,693 maternal deaths that occurred between 1998 and 2005. In low-income and middle-income countries, preeclampsia and its convulsive form, eclampsia, are associated with 10-15 % of direct maternal deaths. The optimal timing and choice of therapy for hypertensive pregnancy disorders involves carefully weighing the risk-versus-benefit ratio for each individual patient, with an overall goal of improving maternal and fetal outcomes. In this review, we have compared and contrasted the recommendations from different treatment guidelines and outlined some newer perspectives on management. We aim to provide a clinically oriented guide to the drug treatment of hypertension in pregnancy.

  3. Hypertension in the elderly: unique challenges and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Faruk; Yesil, Yusuf; Balogun, Rasheed A; Abdel-Rahman, Emaad M

    2013-08-01

    Elderly individuals, worldwide, are on the rise, posing new challenges to care providers. Hypertension is highly prevalent in elderly individuals, and multiple challenges face care providers while managing it. In addition to treating hypertension, the physician must treat other modifiable cardiovascular risk factors in patients with or without diabetes mellitus or chronic kidney disease to reduce cardiovascular events and mortality. This review discusses some of the unique characteristics of high blood pressure in the elderly and provides an overview of the challenges facing care providers, as well as the current recommendations for management of hypertension in the elderly.

  4. Hypertension after clonidine withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husserl, F E; deCarvalho, J G; Batson, H M; Frohlich, E D

    1978-05-01

    Rebound hypertension occurred in two patients upon clonidine withdrawal. Treatment of the hypertensive crisis consists of both alpha- and beta-adrenergic receptor blockade, reserpine, or the reintroduction of clonidine. With effective control of pressure during the crisis, long-term antihypertensive therapy must be resumed.

  5. Hypertension and liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic...

  6. Hypertension Briefing: Technical documentation

    OpenAIRE

    Institute of Public Health in Ireland

    2012-01-01

    Blood pressure is the force exerted on artery walls as the heart pumps blood through the body. Hypertension, or high blood pressure, occurs when blood pressure is constantly higher than the pressure needed to carry blood through the body. This document details how the IPH uses a systematic and consistent method to produce prevalence data for hypertension on the island of Ireland.

  7. Hypertension (High Blood Pressure)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) KidsHealth > For Teens > Hypertension (High Blood Pressure) A ... rest temperature diet emotions posture medicines Why Is High Blood Pressure Bad? High blood pressure means a person's heart ...

  8. Pregnancy and pulmonary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, Petronella G.; Lameijer, Heleen; Hoendermis, Elke S.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension during pregnancy is associated with considerable risks of maternal mortality and morbidity. Our systematic review of the literature on the use of targeted treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension during pregnancy indicates a considerable decrease of mortality since a pre

  9. Pulmonary Hypertension Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chest X-ray, a breathing test called a pulmonary function test and an echocardiogram (sometimes called an “echo”). Your doctor may also need to do other tests to find out whether another medical condition is causing your pulmonary hypertension. TreatmentHow is pulmonary hypertension treated?If the ...

  10. Noncirrotisk intrahepatisk portal hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Fialla, Annette; Havelund, Troels

    2007-01-01

    Non-cirrhotic intrahepatic portal hypertension is characterized by portal hypertension in the absence of liver cirrhosis or portal vein thrombosis. The disease is common in the East and rarely seen in the West. Two cases with oesophageal varices are described. The histopathology is heterogeneous...

  11. Hypertension og hjernen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Hanne; Strandgaard, Svend

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is a major and modifiable risk factor of stroke and dementia. Hypertension causes remodelling of the cerebral resistance vessels, impairing their tolerance to very low blood pressure. In primary prevention of stroke, the effect of beta-blockers is inferior to other classes...

  12. Resistance Training in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats with Severe Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vanerson Passos Neves

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Resistance training (RT has been recommended as a non-pharmacological treatment for moderate hypertension. In spite of the important role of exercise intensity on training prescription, there is still no data regarding the effects of RT intensity on severe hypertension (SH. Objective: This study examined the effects of two RT protocols (vertical ladder climbing, performed at different overloads of maximal weight carried (MWC, on blood pressure (BP and muscle strength of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR with SH. Methods: Fifteen male SHR ENT#091;206 ± 10 mmHg of systolic BP (SBPENT#093; and five Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY; 119 ± 10 mmHg of SBP were divided into 4 groups: sedentary (SED-WKY and SHR (SED-SHR; RT1-SHR training relative to body weight (~40% of MWC; and RT2-SHR training relative to MWC test (~70% of MWC. Systolic BP and heart rate (HR were measured weekly using the tail-cuff method. The progression of muscle strength was determined once every fifteen days. The RT consisted of 3 weekly sessions on non-consecutive days for 12-weeks. Results: Both RT protocols prevented the increase in SBP (delta - 5 and -7 mmHg, respectively; p > 0.05, whereas SBP of the SED-SHR group increased by 19 mmHg (p 0.05. Conclusions: Our data indicated that both RT protocols were effective in preventing chronic elevation of SBP in SH. Additionally, a higher RT overload induced a greater increase in muscle strength.

  13. Hypertension in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blas Gil-Extremera

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The incidence of hypertension in the Western countries is continuously increasing in the elderly population and remains the leading cause of cardiovascular and morbidity. Methods. we analysed some significant clinical trials in order to present the relevant findings on those hypertensive population. Results. Several studies (SYST-EUR, HYVET, CONVINCE, VALUE, etc. have demonstrated the benefits of treatment (nitrendipine, hydrochrotiazyde, perindopril, indapamide, verapamil, or valsartan in aged hypertensive patients not only concerning blood pressure values but also the other important risk factors. Conclusion. Hypertension is the most prevalent cardiovascular disorder in the Western countries, and the relevance of receiving pharmacological treatment of hypertension in aged patients is crucial; in addition, the results suggest that combination therapy—nitrendipine plus enalapril—could have more benefits than those observed with the use of nitrendipine alone.

  14. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schölzel, B E; Snijder, R J; Mager, J J; van Es, H W; Plokker, H W M; Reesink, H J; Morshuis, W J; Post, M C

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease is an important cause of severe pulmonary hypertension, and as such is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis of this condition reflects the degree of associated right ventricular dysfunction, with predictable mortality related to the severity of the underlying pulmonary hypertension. Left untreated, the prognosis is poor. Pulmonary endarterectomy is the treatment of choice to relieve pulmonary artery obstruction in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and has been remarkably successful. Advances in surgical techniques along with the introduction of pulmonary hypertension-specific medication provide therapeutic options for the majority of patients afflicted with the disease. However, a substantial number of patients are not candidates for pulmonary endarterectomy due to either distal pulmonary vascular obstruction or significant comorbidities. Therefore, careful selection of surgical candidates in expert centres is paramount. The current review focuses on the diagnostic approach to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and the available surgical and medical therapeutic options.

  15. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Amanda R; Cho, Leslie S

    2014-03-01

    Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy represent the second commonest cause of direct maternal death and complicate an estimated 5-10 % of pregnancies. Classification systems aim to separate hypertension similar to that seen outside pregnancy (chronic and gestational hypertension) from the potentially fatal pregnancy-specific conditions. Preeclampsia, HELLP syndrome, and eclampsia represent increasing severities of this disease spectrum. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists' 2013 guidelines no longer require proteinuria as a diagnostic criterion, because of its variable appearance in the disease spectrum. The cause involves inadequate cytotrophoblastic invasion of the myometrium, resulting in placental hypoperfusion and diffuse maternal endothelial dysfunction. Changes in angiogenic and antiangiogentic peptide profiles precede the onset of clinical preeclampsia. Women with preeclampsia should be closely monitored and receive magnesium sulfate intravenously if severe features, HELLP syndrome, or eclampsia occur. Definitive therapy is delivery of the fetus. Hypertension in pregnancy increases future maternal risk of hypertension and cardiovascular disorders.

  16. [Hypertension and arteriosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasamura, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    Hypertension is a known risk factor for arteriosclerosis, and causes both atherosclero= sis of medium-large arteries and arteriolosclerosis of the arterioles. Elevated blood pressure causes damage to the endothelium and vascular wall through both mechanical and humoral factors. We and others have shown that inhibition of the renin-angiotensin system at a 'critical period' during the development of hypertension results in a permanent suppression of hypertension in animal models. We have also reported that high-dose renin-angiotensin inhibition results in regression of hypertension, possibly by regression of renal arteriolar hypertrophy. These results suggest that understanding the process of arterial remodeling may play a key role in the development of new strategies for prevention and regression of hypertension and arteriosclerosis.

  17. Overweight, adipocytokines and hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seven, Ekim; Husemoen, Lise L N; Wachtell, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    , adiponectin, and CRP levels with both prevalent and 5-year incident hypertension (IHT) in a general population of Danish adults (n = 5,868, 51.3% women, mean age 45.8 ± 7.9 years). RESULTS: We recorded 2195 prevalent and 379 incident cases of hypertension. In models including leptin, CRP, adiponectin, sex......OBJECTIVE: The adipocytokines, leptin, adiponectin, and interleukin-6, which stimulate liver C-reactive protein (CRP) production, are regarded as potential candidate intermediates between adipose tissue and overweight-induced hypertension. METHODS: We examined the associations between leptin.......023) in the fully adjusted model. The population attributable risk estimate of IHT owing to overweight was 31%. CONCLUSION: Leptin, but not adiponectin or CRP, may play a mediating role in overweight-induced hypertension. However, as BMI was a strong independent predictor of hypertension, other factors than leptin...

  18. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindheimer, Marshall D; Taler, Sandra J; Cunningham, F Gary

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension complicates 5% to 7% of all pregnancies. A subset of preeclampsia, characterized by new-onset hypertension, proteinuria, and multisystem involvement, is responsible for substantial maternal and fetal morbidity and is a marker for future cardiac and metabolic disease. This American Society of Hypertension (ASH) position paper summarizes the clinical spectrum of hypertension in pregnancy, focusing on preeclampsia. Recent research breakthroughs relating to etiology are briefly reviewed. Topics include classification of the different forms of hypertension during pregnancy, and status of the tests available to predict preeclampsia, and strategies to prevent preeclampsia and to manage this serious disease. The use of antihypertensive drugs in pregnancy, and the prevention and treatment of the convulsive phase of preeclampsia, eclampsia, with intravenous MgSO(4) is also highlighted. Of special note, this guideline article, specifically requested, reviewed, and accepted by ASH, includes solicited review advice from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

  19. Group 2 Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary Venous Hypertension: Epidemiology and Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Craig B; Horn, Evelyn M

    2016-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension from left heart disease (PH-LHD) is the most common form of PH, defined as mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25 mm Hg and pulmonary artery wedge pressure ≥15 mm Hg. PH-LHD development is associated with more severe left-sided disease and its presence portends a poor prognosis, particularly once right ventricular failure develops. Treatment remains focused on the underlying LHD and despite initial enthusiasm for PH-specific therapies, most studies have been disappointing and their routine clinical use cannot be recommended. More work is urgently needed to better understand the pathophysiology underlying this disease and to develop effective therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Advice on exercise for pregnant women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Shalini; Anim-Nyame, Nick

    2015-03-01

    Reports on advice about exercise for women with hypertensive disorders of pregnancy are reviewed and how exercise could influence long-term cardiovascular risk is assessed. Exercise in pregnancy seems to be beneficial in pregnancies complicated by hypertension. However, the intensity of the exercise to be recommended remains unclear. Further research is required to inform national and international guidelines for women who develop hypertension during pregnancy.

  1. The physician's role in prescribing physical activity for the prevention and treatment of essential hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, John H M; Albert Ferro

    2012-01-01

    Blood pressure control and prevention of hypertension can be achieved by both pharmacological and lifestyle interventions; one important lifestyle intervention is physical activity. Participation in regular physical activity can modestly lower blood pressure by reducing total peripheral resistance; it can also reduce the risk of developing hypertension and improve morbidity and mortality outcomes. Therefore, physical activity is a recommended intervention for the majority of hypertensive or p...

  2. Hypertension: physiology and pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, John E; Granger, Joey P; do Carmo, Jussara M; da Silva, Alexandre A; Dubinion, John; George, Eric; Hamza, Shereen; Speed, Joshua; Hall, Michael E

    2012-10-01

    Despite major advances in understanding the pathophysiology of hypertension and availability of effective and safe antihypertensive drugs, suboptimal blood pressure (BP) control is still the most important risk factor for cardiovascular mortality and is globally responsible for more than 7 million deaths annually. Short-term and long-term BP regulation involve the integrated actions of multiple cardiovascular, renal, neural, endocrine, and local tissue control systems. Clinical and experimental observations strongly support a central role for the kidneys in the long-term regulation of BP, and abnormal renal-pressure natriuresis is present in all forms of chronic hypertension. Impaired renal-pressure natriuresis and chronic hypertension can be caused by intrarenal or extrarenal factors that reduce glomerular filtration rate or increase renal tubular reabsorption of salt and water; these factors include excessive activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems, increased formation of reactive oxygen species, endothelin, and inflammatory cytokines, or decreased synthesis of nitric oxide and various natriuretic factors. In human primary (essential) hypertension, the precise causes of impaired renal function are not completely understood, although excessive weight gain and dietary factors appear to play a major role since hypertension is rare in nonobese hunter-gathers living in nonindustrialized societies. Recent advances in genetics offer opportunities to discover gene-environment interactions that may also contribute to hypertension, although success thus far has been limited mainly to identification of rare monogenic forms of hypertension. © 2012 American Physiological Society

  3. Mechanisms responsible for pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Pulmonary hypertension is a pathophysiologic process characterized by progressive elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance and right heart failure, which is a common complication of many diseases. Pulmonary hypertension with no apparent causes (unknown etiology) is termed primary pulmonary hypertension or, more recently, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH).

  4. Exercise and cardiovascular risk in patients with hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, James E; La Gerche, Andre; Coombes, Jeff S

    2015-02-01

    Evidence for the benefits of regular exercise is irrefutable and increasing physical activity levels should be a major goal at all levels of health care. People with hypertension are less physically active than those without hypertension and there is strong evidence supporting the blood pressure-lowering ability of regular exercise, especially in hypertensive individuals. This narrative review discusses evidence relating to exercise and cardiovascular (CV) risk in people with hypertension. Comparisons between aerobic, dynamic resistance, and static resistance exercise have been made along with the merit of different exercise volumes. High-intensity interval training and isometric resistance training appear to have strong CV protective effects, but with limited data in hypertensive people, more work is needed in this area. Screening recommendations, exercise prescriptions, and special considerations are provided as a guide to decrease CV risk among hypertensive people who exercise or wish to begin. It is recommended that hypertensive individuals should aim to perform moderate intensity aerobic exercise activity for at least 30 minutes on most (preferably all) days of the week in addition to resistance exercises on 2-3 days/week. Professionals with expertise in exercise prescription may provide additional benefit to patients with high CV risk or in whom more intense exercise training is planned. Despite lay and media perceptions, CV events associated with exercise are rare and the benefits of regular exercise far outweigh the risks. In summary, current evidence supports the assertion of exercise being a cornerstone therapy in reducing CV risk and in the prevention, treatment, and control of hypertension. © American Journal of Hypertension, Ltd 2014. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Hypertension in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Caren G; Seely, Ellen W

    2011-12-01

    Hypertension is a common complication of pregnancy. Preeclampsia, in particular, is associated with substantial risk to both the mother and the fetus. Several risk factors have been recognized to predict risk for preeclampsia. However, at present no biomarkers have sufficient discriminatory ability to be useful in clinical practice, and no effective preventive strategies have yet been identified. Commonly used medications for the treatment of hypertension in pregnancy include methyldopa and labetalol. Blood pressure thresholds for initiating antihypertensive therapy are higher than outside of pregnancy. Women with prior preeclampsia are at increased risk of hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and renal disease.

  6. Anesthesia and pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlothlin, Dana; Ivascu, Natalia; Heerdt, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia and surgery are associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension due mainly to right ventricular failure, arrhythmias, postoperative hypoxemia, and myocardial ischemia. Preoperative risk assessment and successful management of patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing cardiac surgery involve an understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, screening of patients at-risk for pulmonary arterial hypertension, analysis of preoperative and operative risk factors, thorough multidisciplinary planning, careful intraoperative management, and early recognition and treatment of postoperative complications. This article will cover each of these aspects with particular focus on the anesthetic approach for non-cardiothoracic surgeries.

  7. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAlindon, T. E.; Driban, J. B.; Henrotin, Y.;

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this document is to update the original OARSI recommendations specifically for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). To develop recommendations for the design, conduct...... and index knee, describing interventions, patient-reported and physical performance measures, structural outcome measures, biochemical biomarkers, and reporting recommendations. In summary, the working group identified 25 recommendations that represent the current best practices regarding clinical trials...... that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee OA. These updated recommendations incorporate novel technologies (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) and strategies to address the heterogeneity of knee OA....

  8. Trust for intelligent recommendation

    CERN Document Server

    Bhuiyan, Touhid

    2013-01-01

    Recommender systems are one of the recent inventions to deal with the ever-growing information overload in relation to the selection of goods and services in a global economy. Collaborative Filtering (CF) is one of the most popular techniques in recommender systems. The CF recommends items to a target user based on the preferences of a set of similar users known as the neighbors, generated from a database made up of the preferences of past users. In the absence of these ratings, trust between the users could be used to choose the neighbor for recommendation making. Better recommendations can b

  9. Diagnosis of renovascular hypertension: current practice; Diagnostic de l`hypertention renovasculaire: donnees actuelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prigent, A.; Froissart, M.; Hignette, C. [Hopital Broussais, 75 - Paris (France); Maksud, P. [Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, 75 - Paris (France); Archambaud, F. [Hopital de Bicetre, 94 - le Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    1995-12-31

    This article aims to review the efficacy of the different methods used for thee screening of renal artery stenoses in hypertensive patients and the diagnosis of renovascular hypertension in order to propose some current recommendations for the diagnostic strategy. (authors). 80 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Substandard care in maternal mortality due to hypertensive disease in pregnancy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, J. M.; Schuitemaker, N. W. E.; van Roosmalen, J.; Steegers, E. A. P.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To review the standard of care in cases of maternal mortality due to hypertensive diseases in pregnancy and to make recommendations for its improvement. Design Care given to women with hypertensive disease in pregnancy was audited and substandard care factors identified. Setting Confidenti

  11. Our correspondence with the World Health Organization about the hypertension guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-12-01

    (1) Following publication of the hypertension guidelines by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Society of Hypertension (ISH) we wrote to Dr Brundtland, criticizing the recommendations that markedly conflicted with reliable published data. (2) We were not happy with Dr Brundtland's response to our letter, so we have stopped the process to become a WHO collaborating centre.

  12. Substandard care in maternal mortality due to hypertensive disease in pregnancy in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutte, J. M.; Schuitemaker, N. W. E.; van Roosmalen, J.; Steegers, E. A. P.

    Objective To review the standard of care in cases of maternal mortality due to hypertensive diseases in pregnancy and to make recommendations for its improvement. Design Care given to women with hypertensive disease in pregnancy was audited and substandard care factors identified. Setting

  13. Therapeutic Exercise and Hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    focus of this review is to discuss the therapeutic efficacy of exercise on ... as high level of sodium in diet, alcohol consumption, obesity, physical inactivity, age, and .... idiopathic (essential) hypertension, there are two modes or approaches.

  14. Hypertension and liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens H; Møller, Søren

    2004-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is a common disorder with a frequency of 10% to 15% in subjects in the 40- to 60-year age group. Yet most reports find the prevalence of arterial hypertension in patients with chronic liver disease (cirrhosis) much lower. In this review, we consider the alterations in systemic......, neuropituitary release of vasopressin), and resistance to vasopressors. The vasodilatory state is mediated through nitric oxide, calcitonin gene-related peptide, adrenomedullin, and other vasodilators, and is most pronounced in the splanchnic area. This constitutes an effective (although relative) counterbalance...... to increased arterial blood pressure. Subjects with established arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin...

  15. Diabetes + Hypertension (comorbidity)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data set provides de-identified population data for diabetes and hypertension comorbidity prevalence in Allegheny County.

  16. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  17. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... already been diagnosed with high blood pressure. Try yoga and meditation. Yoga and meditation not only can strengthen your body ... Accessed Sept. 21, 2015. Hu B, et al. Effects of psychological stress on hypertension in middle-aged ...

  18. Hydrogen sulfide in hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Harry; van den Born, Joost C; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Joles, Jaap A

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Hypertension is an important determinant of cardiovascular disease, and strict blood pressure regulation is beneficially associated with the risk for cardiovascular events or all-cause mortality. However, intensive antihypertensive treatment is not always sufficient to reach

  19. Allegheny County Hypertension Hospitalization

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — This data provides hypertension prevalence data for each Zip Code in Allegheny County. The information was produced by Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment...

  20. Apelin and pulmonary hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte Uggerhøj; Hilberg, Ole; Mellemkjær, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease characterized by pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary arterial remodeling, abnormal angiogenesis and impaired right ventricular function. Despite progress in pharmacological therapy, there is still no cure for PAH. The peptide apelin...... vasoconstriction, and has positive inotropic and cardioprotective effects. Apelin attenuates vasoconstriction in isolated rat pulmonary arteries, and chronic treatment with apelin attenuates the development of pulmonary hypertension in animal models. The existing literature thus renders APLNR an interesting...

  1. Hypertension and pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deak, Teresa M; Moskovitz, Joshua B

    2012-11-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy is increasing in prevalence and incidence and its treatment becoming more commonplace. Associated complications of pregnancy, including end-organ damage, preeclampsia, eclampsia, and postpartum eclampsia, are leading sources of maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality, requiring an emergency physician to become proficient with their identification and treatment. This article reviews hypertension in pregnancy as it relates to outcomes, with special emphasis on preeclampsia, eclampsia, and postpartum eclampsia.

  2. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne M; Jensen, Rigmor H

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: The aims of this article are to characterize the headache in idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) and to field-test the ICHD diagnostic criteria for headache attributed to IIH. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We included 44 patients with new-onset IIH. Thirty-four patients with suspected...... tinnitus may suggest intracranial hypertension. Based on data from a well-defined IIH cohort, we propose a revision of the ICDH-3 beta diagnostic criteria with improved clinical applicability and increased sensitivity and specificity....

  3. Resistant Hypertension and Chronotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prkacin, Ingrid; Balenovic, Diana; Djermanovic-Dobrota, Vesna; Lukac, Iva; Drazic, Petra; Pranjic, Iva-Klara

    2015-01-01

    Resistant hypertension is defined as blood pressure that remains above 140/90 mmHg in spite of the continuous use of three antihypertensive agents in optimal dose, including diuretic, and lifestyle changes. According to data from United States of America and Europe, the prevalence ranges from 10 up to 30% in patients with hypertension. Numerous biological and lifestyle factors can contribute to the development of resistant hypertension: medications, volume overload, obesity, diabetes mellitus, older age, renal parenchymal and renovascular disease, primary aldosteronism, obstructive sleep apnea, pheochormocytoma, Cushing’s syndrome, thyroid diseases, aortic coarctation. For diagnosing patient’s history is important, assessing compliance, regular blood pressure measurement, physical examination, biochemical evaluation and noninvasive imaging. The evaluation including 24h ambulatory monitoring of blood pressure (ABPM) in the identification of “non-dipper” hypertension. Non-dipper has particular importance and the prevalence of abnormally high sleep blood pressure is very often in chronic kidney patients. Therapeutic restoration of normal physiologic blood pressure reduction during night-time sleep (circadial variation) is the most significant independent predictor of decreased risk and the basis for the chronotherapy. The resistant hypertension treatment is achieved with nonpharmacological and pharmacological approach, treating secondary hypertension causes and invasive procedures. PMID:26005390

  4. Hypertension Canada's 2017 Guidelines for Diagnosis, Risk Assessment, Prevention, and Treatment of Hypertension in Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Alexander A; Daskalopoulou, Stella S; Dasgupta, Kaberi; McBrien, Kerry; Butalia, Sonia; Zarnke, Kelly B; Nerenberg, Kara; Harris, Kevin C; Nakhla, Meranda; Cloutier, Lyne; Gelfer, Mark; Lamarre-Cliche, Maxime; Milot, Alain; Bolli, Peter; Tremblay, Guy; McLean, Donna; Tobe, Sheldon W; Ruzicka, Marcel; Burns, Kevin D; Vallée, Michel; Prasad, G V Ramesh; Gryn, Steven E; Feldman, Ross D; Selby, Peter; Pipe, Andrew; Schiffrin, Ernesto L; McFarlane, Philip A; Oh, Paul; Hegele, Robert A; Khara, Milan; Wilson, Thomas W; Penner, S Brian; Burgess, Ellen; Sivapalan, Praveena; Herman, Robert J; Bacon, Simon L; Rabkin, Simon W; Gilbert, Richard E; Campbell, Tavis S; Grover, Steven; Honos, George; Lindsay, Patrice; Hill, Michael D; Coutts, Shelagh B; Gubitz, Gord; Campbell, Norman R C; Moe, Gordon W; Howlett, Jonathan G; Boulanger, Jean-Martin; Prebtani, Ally; Kline, Gregory; Leiter, Lawrence A; Jones, Charlotte; Côté, Anne-Marie; Woo, Vincent; Kaczorowski, Janusz; Trudeau, Luc; Tsuyuki, Ross T; Hiremath, Swapnil; Drouin, Denis; Lavoie, Kim L; Hamet, Pavel; Grégoire, Jean C; Lewanczuk, Richard; Dresser, George K; Sharma, Mukul; Reid, Debra; Lear, Scott A; Moullec, Gregory; Gupta, Milan; Magee, Laura A; Logan, Alexander G; Dionne, Janis; Fournier, Anne; Benoit, Geneviève; Feber, Janusz; Poirier, Luc; Padwal, Raj S; Rabi, Doreen M

    2017-05-01

    Hypertension Canada provides annually updated, evidence-based guidelines for the diagnosis, assessment, prevention, and treatment of hypertension. This year, we introduce 10 new guidelines. Three previous guidelines have been revised and 5 have been removed. Previous age and frailty distinctions have been removed as considerations for when to initiate antihypertensive therapy. In the presence of macrovascular target organ damage, or in those with independent cardiovascular risk factors, antihypertensive therapy should be considered for all individuals with elevated average systolic nonautomated office blood pressure (non-AOBP) readings ≥ 140 mm Hg. For individuals with diastolic hypertension (with or without systolic hypertension), fixed-dose single-pill combinations are now recommended as an initial treatment option. Preference is given to pills containing an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor or angiotensin receptor blocker in combination with either a calcium channel blocker or diuretic. Whenever a diuretic is selected as monotherapy, longer-acting agents are preferred. In patients with established ischemic heart disease, caution should be exercised in lowering diastolic non-AOBP to ≤ 60 mm Hg, especially in the presence of left ventricular hypertrophy. After a hemorrhagic stroke, in the first 24 hours, systolic non-AOBP lowering to hypertension arising from fibromuscular dysplasia. The specific evidence and rationale underlying each of these guidelines are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Pregnancy in pulmonary arterial hypertension patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengarten, Dror; Kramer, Mordechai R

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a disorder defined by elevated mean pulmonary arterial pressure. PAH can be idiopathic or associated with a variety of medical conditions such as scleroderma, congenital heart disease, left heart failure, lung disease or chronic pulmonary thromboembolism. This progressive disease can cause severe right heart failure and death. Normal physiologic changes that occur during pregnancy may produce fatal consequences in PAH patients. Current guidelines recommend that pregnancy be avoided or terminated early in women with PAH. During the past decade, new advanced therapies for PAH have emerged gathering reports of successful pregnancies in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Substantial risk still exists and current recommendations have not changed. Nevertheless, in selected cases, if a patient insists on continuing the pregnancy, being fully aware of the risks involved, an intensive treatment approach should be implemented in experienced centers. This is necessary in order to control pulmonary hypertension during pregnancy and reduce the risk so as to improve outcomes. This review will focus on the pathophysiology of PAH in pregnancy and appropriate management during pregnancy, delivery and the post-partum period.

  6. Juvenile Spondyloarthritis Treatment Recommendations

    OpenAIRE

    Tse, Shirley; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Colbert, Robert A

    2012-01-01

    No specific recommendations for the treatment of juvenile spondyloarthritis have been established. Important differences exist in how spondyloarthritis begins and progresses in children and adults, supporting the need for pediatric-specific recommendations. Recently published recommendations for the treatment of juvenile arthritis consider children with sacroiliitis in a separate group, and allow for more accelerated institution of a TNF inhibitor depending on disease activity and prognostic ...

  7. [Sodium and hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wardener, H E

    1996-09-01

    Over several million years the human race was programmed to eat a diet which contained about 15 mmol of sodium (1 g of sodium chloride) per day. It is only five to ten thousand years ago that we became addicted to salt. Today we eat about 150 mmol of sodium (9-12 g of salt) per day. It is now apparent that this sudden rise in sodium intake (in evolutionary terms) is the most likely cause for the rise in blood pressure with age that occurs in the majority of the world's population. Those which consume less than 60 mmol/day do not develop hypertension. The reason for the rise in sodium intake is not known but it is probable that an important stimulus was the discovery that meat could be preserved by immersion into a concentrated salt solution. This seemingly miraculous power endowed salt with such magical and medicinal qualities that it became a symbol of goodness and health. It was not until 1904 Ambard and Beaujard suggested that on the contrary dietary salt could be harmful and raise the blood pressure. At first the idea did not prosper and it continues to be opposed by a diminishing band. The accumulated evidence that sodium intake is related to the blood pressure in normal man and animals and in inherited forms of hypertension has been obtained from experimental manipulations and studies of human populations. The following observation links sodium and hypertension. An increase in sodium intakes raises the blood pressure of the normal rat, dog, rabbit, baboon, chimpanzee and man. Population studies have demonstrated a significant correlation between sodium intake and the customary rise in blood pressure with age. The development of hypertensive strains of rats has revealed that the primary genetic lesion which gives rise to hypertension resides in the kidney where it impairs the urinary excretion of sodium. There is similar but less convincing evidence in essential hypertension. The kidney in both essential hypertension and hypertensive strains of rats share a

  8. Severe hypertension in pregnancy: Using dynamic checklists to save lives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodley, Jack; Ngene, N C

    2016-07-01

    Severe hypertension is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The South African Saving Mothers report (2011 - 2013) indicates that cerebral injury due to severe hypertension is resulting in avoidable maternal deaths. This demands that management of severe hypertension in pregnancy needs to be improved. A rapid-acting antihypertensive is recommended for the initial management of severe hypertension during pregnancy. A single dose of a rapid-acting agent may be ineffective, in which case incremental doses of the same medication or another antihypertensive may be required for adequate blood pressure control. To ensure that appropriate antihypertensives at the correct doses are administered, the use of a guideline in a dynamic checklist format is advocated and discussed in this article. It is envisaged that the use of dynamic checklists will be valuable to all healthcare professionals providing care during pregnancy and the puerperium.

  9. Assessment of pulmonary hypertension by CT and MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ley, Sebastian [Department of Radiology, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131, Mainz (Germany); Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich; Heussel, Claus P. [Department of Radiology, Johannes Gutenberg University, Langenbeckstrasse 1, 55131, Mainz (Germany); Fink, Christian; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich [Department of Radiology, Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120, Heidelberg (Germany); Borst, Mathias M. [Department of Internal Medicine III, Ruprecht-Karls University, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2004-03-01

    In the recent World Health Organization (WHO) classification the group of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH) comprises the classic primary pulmonary hypertension and several conditions with definite or very high risk factors to develop pulmonary arterial hypertension. Therapeutic advances drive the need for a comprehensive pre-therapeutic evaluation for optimal treatment. Furthermore, follow-up examinations need to be performed to monitor changes in disease status and response to therapy. Up to now, the diagnostic imaging work-up of PH comprises mainly echocardiography, invasive right heart catheterization and ventilation/perfusion scintigraphy. Due to technical advances helical computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) became more important in the evaluation and for differential diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension. Both modalities are reviewed and recommendations for clinical use are given. (orig.)

  10. Dietary Salt Intake and Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Over the past century, salt has been the subject of intense scientific research related to blood pressure elevation and cardiovascular mortalities. Moderate reduction of dietary salt intake is generally an effective measure to reduce blood pressure. However, recently some in the academic society and lay media dispute the benefits of salt restriction, pointing to inconsistent outcomes noted in some observational studies. A reduction in dietary salt from the current intake of 9-12 g/day to the recommended level of less than 5-6 g/day will have major beneficial effects on cardiovascular health along with major healthcare cost savings around the world. The World Health Organization (WHO) strongly recommended to reduce dietary salt intake as one of the top priority actions to tackle the global non-communicable disease crisis and has urged member nations to take action to reduce population wide dietary salt intake to decrease the number of deaths from hypertension, cardiovascular disease and stroke. However, some scientists still advocate the possibility of increased risk of CVD morbidity and mortality at extremes of low salt intake. Future research may inform the optimal sodium reduction strategies and intake targets for general populations. Until then, we have to continue to build consensus around the greatest benefits of salt reduction for CVD prevention, and dietary salt intake reduction strategies must remain at the top of the public health agenda. PMID:25061468

  11. Loop Diuretics in the Treatment of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malha, Line; Mann, Samuel J

    2016-04-01

    Loop diuretics are not recommended in current hypertension guidelines largely due to the lack of outcome data. Nevertheless, they have been shown to lower blood pressure and to offer potential advantages over thiazide-type diuretics. Torsemide offers advantages of longer duration of action and once daily dosing (vs. furosemide and bumetanide) and more reliable bioavailability (vs. furosemide). Studies show that the previously employed high doses of thiazide-type diuretics lower BP more than furosemide. Loop diuretics appear to have a preferable side effect profile (less hyponatremia, hypokalemia, and possibly less glucose intolerance). Studies comparing efficacy and side effect profiles of loop diuretics with the lower, currently widely prescribed, thiazide doses are needed. Research is needed to fill gaps in knowledge and common misconceptions about loop diuretic use in hypertension and to determine their rightful place in the antihypertensive arsenal.

  12. Pediatric pulmonary arterial hypertension : on the eve of growing up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douwes, Johannes M.; Berger, Rolf M. F.

    Purpose of review Current recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) during childhood are expert opinion based, because of lacking pediatric data. In recent years, however, important pediatric data have emerged on PAH. Recent findings PAH in children shows

  13. Etiopathogenetic Mechanisms of Pulmonary Hypertension in Sleep-Related Breathing Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodeji Adegunsoye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a common disorder with significant health consequences and is on the rise in consonance with the obesity pandemic. In view of the association between sleep-disordered breathing and pulmonary hypertension as depicted by multiple studies, current clinical practice guidelines categorize obstructive sleep apnea as a risk factor for pulmonary hypertension and recommend an assessment for sleep disordered breathing in evaluating patients with pulmonary hypertension. The dysregulatory mechanisms associated with hypoxemic episodes observed in sleep related breathing disorders contribute to the onset of pulmonary hypertension and identification of these potentially treatable factors might help in the reduction of overall cardiovascular mortality.

  14. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Običan, Sarah G; Cleary, Kirsten L

    2014-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a medical condition characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and secondary right heart failure. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a subset of pulmonary hypertension, which is characterized by an underlying disorder of the pulmonary arterial vasculature. Pulmonary hypertension can also occur secondarily to structural cardiac disease, autoimmune disorders, and toxic exposures. Although pregnancies affected by pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension are rare, the pathophysiology exacerbated by pregnancy confers both high maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. In light of new treatment modalities and the use of a multidisciplinary approach to care, maternal outcomes may be improving.

  15. [Hypertensive crisis in kidney patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scrivano, Jacopo; Giuliani, Anna; Pettorini, Laura; Punzo, Giorgio; Mene', Paolo; Pirozzi, Nicola

    2011-01-01

    The classification and management of hypertensive crisis have been recently reviewed in the context of both European and American guidelines. The key points for proper blood pressure control in severe arterial hypertension are: 1 - Distinction between urgent intervention and emergencies 2 - Choice of the best drug(s) 3 - Choice of the correct route of administration. In patients with renal disease, beside the common causes of hypertension/ hypertensive crises, kidney-specific causes should be taken into account such as renal parenchymal hypertension, renovascular hypertension, sclerodermic crises, and preeclampsia.

  16. Endocrine hypertension in small animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reusch, Claudia E; Schellenberg, Stefan; Wenger, Monique

    2010-03-01

    Hypertension is classified as idiopathic or secondary. In animals with idiopathic hypertension, persistently elevated blood pressure is not caused by an identifiable underlying or predisposing disease. Until recently, more than 95% of cases of hypertension in humans were diagnosed as idiopathic. New studies have shown, however, a much higher prevalence of secondary causes, such as primary hyperaldosteronism. In dogs and cats, secondary hypertension is the most prevalent form and is subclassified into renal and endocrine hypertension. This review focuses on the most common causes of endocrine hypertension in dogs and cats.

  17. Efficiently Computing Private Recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkin, Z.; Beye, M.; Veugen, P.J.M.; Lagendijk, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    Online recommender systems enable personalized service to users. The underlying collaborative filtering techniques operate on privacy sensitive user data, which could be misused by the service provider. To protect user privacy, we propose to encrypt the data and generate recommendations by processin

  18. Efficiently computing private recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkin, Z.; Beye, M.; Veugen, T.; Lagendijk, R.L.

    2011-01-01

    Online recommender systems enable personalized service to users. The underlying collaborative filtering techniques operate on privacy sensitive user data, which could be misused by the service provider. To protect user privacy, we propose to encrypt the data and generate recommendations by processin

  19. Search and Recommendation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Toine

    2014-01-01

    -scale application by companies like Amazon, Facebook, and Netflix. But are search and recommendation really two different fields of research that address different problems with different sets of algorithms in papers published at distinct conferences? In my talk, I want to argue that search and recommendation...

  20. Hypertension in postmenopausal women: how to approach hypertension in menopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modena, Maria Grazia

    2014-09-01

    During fertile life women are usually normo or hypotensive. Hypertension may appear during pregnancy and this represents a peculiar phenomenon increasing nowadays for delay time of pregnancy. Gestational hypertension appears partially similar to hypertension in the context of metabolic syndrome for a similar condition of increased waste circumference. Parity, for the same pathogenesis, has been reported to be associated to peri and postmenopausal hypertension, not confirmed by our study of parous women with transitional non persistent perimenopausal hypertension. Estrogen's deficiency inducing endothelial dysfunction and increased body mass index are the main cause for hypertension in this phase of life. For these reasons lifestyle modification, diet and endothelial active drugs represent the ideal treatment. Antioxidant agents may have a role in prevention and treatment of hypertension. In conclusion, hypertension in women represents a peculiar constellation of different biological and pathogenic factors, which need a specific gender related approach, independent from the male model.

  1. Migraine and hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. R. Tabeeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of a relationship between migraine and hypertension are being continued. In spite of numerous studies, the association of some types of migraine (migraine with aura and migraine without aura with hypertension has not been fully elucidated. This issue is particularly relevant since these forms differ both clinically and pathophysiologically. Of even greater importance are the analysis and prediction of associations between migraine and cardiovascular diseases (ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease. The review deals with the clinical and pathophysiological features of the relationship between hypertension and migraine. There is evidence for the anatomic and functional correlation between the antinociceptive system and blood pressure (BP regulation control. It has been speculated that the increase in pain threshold is not the result of just hypertension as a disease, but it is caused by elevated BP-related hypalgesia. The efficacy of antihypertensive drugs is the fact that supports the association between hypertension and endothelial dysfunction. Identification of groups of patients having migraine and a high cardiovascular risk will allow timely early primary prevention and therapy. Introduction of a stratification approach at diagnostic stages may cause a reduction in cardiovascular morbidity and mortality rates.

  2. Dopamine receptors and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, Anees Ahmad; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2008-08-01

    Dopamine plays an important role in regulating renal function and blood pressure. Dopamine synthesis and dopamine receptor subtypes have been shown in the kidney. Dopamine acts via cell surface receptors coupled to G proteins; the receptors are classified via pharmacologic and molecular cloning studies into two families, D1-like and D2-like. Two D1-like receptors cloned in mammals, the D1 and D5 receptors (D1A and D1B in rodents), are linked to adenylyl cyclase stimulation. Three D2-like receptors (D2, D3, and D4) have been cloned and are linked mainly to adenylyl cyclase inhibition. Activation of D1-like receptors on the proximal tubules inhibits tubular sodium reabsorption by inhibiting Na/H-exchanger and Na/K-adenosine triphosphatase activity. Reports exist of defective renal dopamine production and/or dopamine receptor function in human primary hypertension and in genetic models of animal hypertension. In humans with essential hypertension, renal dopamine production in response to sodium loading is often impaired and may contribute to hypertension. A primary defect in D1-like receptors and an altered signaling system in proximal tubules may reduce dopamine-mediated effects on renal sodium excretion. The molecular basis for dopamine receptor dysfunction in hypertension is being investigated, and may involve an abnormal posttranslational modification of the dopamine receptor.

  3. Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leeman, Lawrence; Dresang, Lee T; Fontaine, Patricia

    2016-01-15

    Elevated blood pressure in pregnancy may represent chronic hypertension (occurring before 20 weeks' gestation or persisting longer than 12 weeks after delivery), gestational hypertension (occurring after 20 weeks' gestation), preeclampsia, or preeclampsia superimposed on chronic hypertension. Preeclampsia is defined as hypertension and either proteinuria or thrombocytopenia, renal insufficiency, impaired liver function, pulmonary edema, or cerebral or visual symptoms. Proteinuria is not essential for the diagnosis and does not correlate with outcomes. Severe features of preeclampsia include a systolic blood pressure of at least 160 mm Hg or a diastolic blood pressure of at least 110 mm Hg, platelet count less than 100 × 103 per µL, liver transaminase levels two times the upper limit of normal, a doubling of the serum creatinine level or level greater than 1.1 mg per dL, severe persistent right upper-quadrant pain, pulmonary edema, or new-onset cerebral or visual disturbances. Preeclampsia without severe features can be managed with twice-weekly blood pressure monitoring, antenatal testing for fetal well-being and disease progression, and delivery by 37 weeks' gestation. Preeclampsia with any severe feature requires immediate stabilization and inpatient treatment with magnesium sulfate, antihypertensive drugs, corticosteroids for fetal lung maturity if less than 34 weeks' gestation, and delivery plans. Preeclampsia can worsen or initially present after delivery. Women with hypertensive disorders should be monitored as inpatients or closely at home for 72 hours postpartum.

  4. Management of diabetic hypertensives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jai Ganesh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension occurs twice as commonly in diabetics than in comparable nondiabetics. Patients with both disorders have a markedly higher risk for premature microvascular and macrovascular complications. Aggressive control of blood pressure (BP reduces both micro- and macrovascular complications. In diabetic hypertensives, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs are the first line in management of hypertension, and can be replaced by angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs if patients are intolerant of them. Recent studies suggest ARBs to be on par with ACEI in reducing both macro- and microvascular risks. Adding both these agents may have a beneficial effect on proteinuria, but no extra macrovascular risk reduction. Thiazides can also be used as first line drugs, but are better used along with ACEI/ARBs. Beta-blockers [especially if the patient has coronary artery disease] and calcium channel blockers are used as second line add-on drugs. Multidrug regimens are commonly needed in diabetic hypertensives. Achieving the target BP of <130/80 is the priority rather than the drug combination used in order to arrest and prevent the progression of macro- and microvascular complications in diabetic hypertensives.

  5. Nonnarcotic analgesics and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaziano, J Michael

    2006-05-01

    In 2004, individuals in the United States spent >$2.5 billion on over-the-counter (OTC) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and filled >100 million NSAID prescriptions. The most commonly used OTC analgesics include aspirin, acetaminophen, and nonaspirin NSAIDs. Nonnarcotic analgesics are generally considered safe when used as directed but do have the potential to increase blood pressure in patients with hypertension treated with antihypertensives. This is important because hypertension alone has been correlated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease or stroke. Small increases in blood pressure in patients with hypertension also have been shown to increase cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therefore, when nonnarcotic analgesics are taken by patients with hypertension, there may be important implications. This review explores the potential connection among analgesic agents, blood pressure, and hypertension, and discusses possible mechanisms by which analgesics might cause increases in blood pressure. This is followed by a summary of data on the relation between analgesics and blood pressure from both observational and randomized trials.

  6. How will the growing threat of resistant hypertension impact the future treatment of high blood pressure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lackland, Daniel T

    2013-11-01

    Hypertension treatment and control efforts represent a major component of primary care with dedicated clinical guidelines and recommendations. However, high blood pressure (BP) control rates are complicated with the difficult to treat and resistant hypertensive patients. This category of patient, therefore, affects the development and implementation of the clinical guidelines. The recommendations of specific algorithms for resistant hypertension and difficult-to-treat patients with elevated BPs have been developed in consideration of new therapies and combination drug treatment. Hypertension treatment guidelines include and will continue to grade evidence from randomized clinical trials with detailed strategies on the management of these high-risk patients. Although resistant hypertension affects high BP control rates, the inclusion of refined pharmaceutical and device treatment strategies in evidence-based guidelines will be expected to have a significant impact on the clinical management of this high-risk patient population.

  7. Hypertension criterion for stroke prevention--to strengthen the principle of individualization in guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yicong; Chen, Xinran; Dang, Ge; Zhao, Yuhui; Ouyang, Fubing; Su, Zhenpei; Zeng, Jinsheng

    2015-03-01

    The diagnosis of hypertension, as recommended by most guidelines, is determined by systolic blood pressure ≥140 mm Hg and/or diastolic blood pressure ≥90 mm Hg. A threshold-based definition of hypertension, however, ignores sex and age, pathophysiology, and disparities in patient-specific conditions. Moreover, the harmful effects of hypertension-induced target organ damage cannot be ignored. Although the principle of individualization for hypertension management is recommended, especially for stroke prevention, how to practice it in a clinical setting has not been clearly elaborated. Therefore, we put forward a proposal for individualized hypertension management incorporating target organ damage, the main harmful effect of hypertension. We propose that hypertension should be diagnosed when an individual's blood pressure exceeds some difference from their own baseline in young adulthood, accompanied by any hypertension-induced target organ damage, confirmed by various detection methods. Application of this proposal to stroke prevention will hopefully strengthen the principle of individualized hypertension management. ©2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Awareness of salt restriction is not reflected in the actual salt intake in Japanese hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Tanabe, Kazuaki; Adachi, Tomoko; Nakashima, Ryuma; Sugamori, Takashi; Endo, Akihiro; Ito, Takafumi; Yoshitomi, Hiroyuki; Ishibashi, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    The Japanese guidelines for hypertension management recommend reducing salt intake to awareness of the recommended reduced salt diet correlates with their actual intake. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between actual salt intake of Japanese hypertensive patients and their awareness of the recommended guidelines for reduced dietary salt intake. In total, 236 outpatients (146 males and 90 females) with a mean age 69.7 ± 12.5 years were included in this study. Daily dietary salt intake was estimated using sodium and creatinine concentrations detected in spot urine samples. The patients filled out a questionnaire regarding their awareness of recommended salt restriction for hypertension management. The questionnaire distinguished the patients' awareness of recommended salt restriction in four levels (low, moderate, high and very high). The mean estimated salt intake was 9.72 ± 2.43 g/day. Patients' awareness regarding salt intake in all levels provided in the questionnaire did not correlate with actual salt intake (p = 0.731). Our results demonstrated that Japanese hypertensive outpatients consumed higher levels of salt than the target value recommended by Japanese guidelines. There was no correlation between actual salt intake and patients' awareness of the recommended reduction in salt. These results suggest that monitoring salt intake and informing patients of their actual salt intake are necessary for effective hypertension management.

  9. Knowing hypertension and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whyte, Susan Reynolds

    2016-01-01

    In Uganda, hypertension and diabetes have only recently been included in the health policy agenda. As they become treatable disorders, they take on more distinct contours in people's minds. This article relates knowledge about these two conditions to health institutions and technology for diagnos......In Uganda, hypertension and diabetes have only recently been included in the health policy agenda. As they become treatable disorders, they take on more distinct contours in people's minds. This article relates knowledge about these two conditions to health institutions and technology...... for diagnosing and treating them. The response to the AIDS epidemic in Uganda provides an important context for, and contrast with, the emergence of hypertension and diabetes as social phenomena. Ethnographic fieldwork shows the interplay between experience of these conditions and the political economy...

  10. Hypertension and Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dzeshka, Mikhail S.; Shahid, Farhan; Shantsila, Alena

    2017-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most prevalent sustained arrhythmia found in clinical practice. AF rarely exists as a single entity but rather as part of a diverse clinical spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, related to structural and electrical remodeling within the left atrium, leading to AF o...... of complications as the first clinical manifestation of the disease. Antithrombotic prevention in AF combined with strict blood pressure control is of primary importance, since stroke risk and bleeding risk are both greater with underlying hypertension....... onset, perpetuation, and progression. Due to the high overall prevalence within the AF population arterial hypertension plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of AF and its complications. Fibroblast proliferation, apoptosis of cardiomyocytes, gap junction remodeling, accumulation of collagen both...... in atrial and ventricular myocardium all accompany ageing-related structural remodeling with impact on electrical activity. The presence of hypertension also stimulates oxidative stress, systemic inflammation, rennin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic activation, which further drives the remodeling...

  11. [Hypertension and heart].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennersdorf, Marcus G; Strauer, Bodo E

    2006-03-22

    The term hypertensive heart disease covers the entities left ventricular hypertrophy, microangiopathy, diastolic and systolic dysfunction, und increased risk of arrhythmias. From the pathophysiological point of view this is caused by hypertrophy of cardiac myocytes, interstitial fibrosis and media hypertrophy of the arterioles. As an earliest sign of hypertensive heart disease a microangiopathy can be diagnosed. Also a diastolic dysfunction can be found as an early change. In further persisting arterial hypertension left ventricular hypertrophy develops (often asymmetric), and later a systolic dysfunction. Clinically, the patients suffer from angina pectoris, dyspnea and rhythm disorders. Left ventricular hypertrophy is associated with an increased risk of ventricular malignant arrhythmias. Thus, the main therapeutic principle should be antihypertensive therapy with the goal of regression of hypertrophy and, as a consequence, a decreased mortality risk.

  12. Snakes and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Edward D

    2017-02-01

    Inhibition of Angiotensin Conversion in Experimental Renovascular Hypertension. By Miller ED Jr, Samuels A, Haber E, and Barger AC. Science 1972; 177:1108-9. Reprinted with permission from AAAS.Constriction of the renal artery and controlled reduction of renal perfusion pressure is followed by a prompt increase in systemic renin activity and a concomitant rise in blood pressure in trained, unanesthetized dogs. The elevated blood pressure induced by the renal artery stenosis can be prevented by prior treatment with the nonapeptide Pyr-Trp-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gln-Ile-Pro-Pro, which blocks conversion of angiotensin I to angiotensin II. Further, the nonapeptide can restore systemic pressure to normal in the early phase of renovascular hypertension. These results offer strong evidence that the renin- angiotensin system is responsible for the initiation of hypertension in the unilaterally nephrectomized dog with renal artery constriction.

  13. [Obesity and hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonyi, Gábor; Kollár, Réka

    2013-11-01

    The frequency of hypertension and obesity is gradually growing in Hungary. At present 68.5% of men and 78% of women are obese. Hypertension and obesity are the most important risk factors of morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. The relationship between increased sympathetic activity and hypertension is well known. Waist circumference and body fat mass correlate significantly with sympathetic activity, in which hyperlipidemia plays also a role. The increased activity of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system via its vascular and renal effects also contributes to an increase of blood pressure. Increased sympathetic activity with decreasing vagal tone accompanying the imbalance of the autonomous nervous system is independent and significant risk factor of cardiovascular events including sudden cardiac death.

  14. Hypertension and Its Correlates Among School Adolescents in Delhi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Tanu; Ingle, G. K.; Meena, G. S.; Kishore, Jugal; Kumar, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hypertension is fast emerging as a major health problem amongst all school adolescents, particularly in urban areas. Regular screening of the students for this is required for preventing the emergence of complications later in life. Therefore, the present study was undertaken with the objective to determine the prevalence of hypertension amongst urban school adolescents and its correlation with anthropometric measurements. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in a school in Central Delhi involving all 315 students of 9th and 11th standard. A preforma was filled by the students and anthropometric measurements along with blood pressure (BP) measurements were taken for each student. Data was analyzed using Epi-info 2005 and SPSS 16.0. Results: Out of the total 315 students, 208 (66%) were boys and 107 (34%) were girls and the mean age was 14.31 ± 0.96 years. Overall prevalence of malnutrition was 24% and boys were found to be more obese as compared to girls. There were 5 students (1.6%) who were found to have systolic hypertension while 17 (5.4%) were found to have diastolic hypertension while 4.1% (n = 13) of the participants were systolic pre-hypertensive and 26% (n = 82) were in stage of diastolic pre-hypertension. Body mass index and gender were found to be independent predictor for systolic hypertension. Conclusions: Prevalence of hypertension and pre-hypertension was high amongst the school children. BP check-up for children and adolescents is thus recommended to take remedial action on time. PMID:24791194

  15. Hypertension og det metaboliske syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael Hecht; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a relatively prevalent condition characterized by co-existence of several metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension. Patients with hypertension have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome which, in turn, increases the cardiovascular...

  16. Pulmonary arterial hypertension : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoendermis, E. S.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), defined as group 1 of the World Heart Organisation (WHO) classification of pulmonary hypertension, is an uncommon disorder of the pulmonary vascular system. It is characterised by an increased pulmonary artery pressure, increased pulmonary vascular resistance

  17. [Cardiovascular complications of hypertensive crisis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Peralta, Martín; Borrayo-Sánchez, Gabriela; Madrid-Miller, Alejandra; Ramírez-Arias, Erick; Pérez-Rodríguez, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    It is inexorable that a proportion of patients with systemic arterial hypertension will develop a hypertensive crisis at some point in their lives. The hypertensive crises can be divided in hypertensive patients with emergency or hypertensive emergency, according to the presence or absence of acute end-organ damage. In this review, we discuss the cardiovascular hypertensive emergencies, including acute coronary syndrome, congestive heart failure, aortic dissection and sympathomimetic hypertensive crises (those caused by cocaine use included). Each is presented in a unique way, although some patients with hypertensive emergency report non-specific symptoms. Treatment includes multiple medications for quick and effective action with security to reduce blood pressure, protect the function of organs remaining, relieve symptoms, minimize the risk of complications and improve patient outcomes.

  18. Lung Transplantation for Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the page. Answers about Lung Transplantation for PULMONARY HYPERTENSION Part One: Overview From the development of epoprostenol ... decades, expansion of medical treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has improved survival and quality of life ...

  19. Immune mechanisms in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Ciuceis, Carolina; Rossini, Claudia; La Boria, Elisa; Porteri, Enzo; Petroboni, Beatrice; Gavazzi, Alice; Sarkar, Annamaria; Rosei, Enrico Agabiti; Rizzoni, Damiano

    2014-12-01

    Low grade inflammation may have a key role in the pathogenesis of hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Several studies showed that both innate and adaptive immune systems may be involved, being T cells the most important players. Particularly, the balance between Th1 effector lymphocytes and Treg lymphocytes may be crucial for blood pressure elevation and related organ damage development. In the presence of a mild elevation of blood pressure, neo-antigens are produced. Activated Th1 cells may then contribute to the persistent elevation of blood pressure by affecting vasculature, kidney and perivascular fat. On the other hand, Tregs represent a lymphocyte subpopulation with an anti-inflammatory role, being their activity crucial for the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. Indeed, Tregs were demonstrated to be able to protect from blood pressure elevation and from the development of organ damage, including micro and macrovascular alterations, in different animal models of genetic or experimental hypertension. In the vasculature, inflammation leads to vascular remodeling through cytokine activity, smooth muscle cell proliferation and oxidative stress. It is also known that a consistent part of ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury is mediated by inflammatory infiltration and that Treg cell infusion have a protective role. Also the central nervous system has an important role in the maintenance of cardiovascular homeostasis. In conclusion, hypertension development involves chronic inflammatory process. Knowledge of cellular and molecular players in the progression of hypertension has dramatically improved in the last decade, by assessing the central role of innate and adaptive immunity cells and proinflammatory cytokines driving the development of target organ damage. The new concept of role of immunity, especially implicating T lymphocytes, will eventually allow discovery of new therapeutic targets that may improve outcomes in hypertension and

  20. Oxidative stress and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, David G; Gongora, Maria Carolina

    2009-05-01

    This review has summarized some of the data supporting a role of ROS and oxidant stress in the genesis of hypertension. There is evidence that hypertensive stimuli, such as high salt and angiotensin II, promote the production of ROS in the brain, the kidney, and the vasculature and that each of these sites contributes either to hypertension or to the untoward sequelae of this disease. Although the NADPH oxidase in these various organs is a predominant source, other enzymes likely contribute to ROS production and signaling in these tissues. A major clinical challenge is that the routinely used antioxidants are ineffective in preventing or treating cardiovascular disease and hypertension. This is likely because these drugs are either ineffective or act in a non-targeted fashion, such that they remove not only injurious ROS Fig. 5. Proposed role of T cells in the genesis of hypertension and the role of the NADPH oxidase in multiple cells/organs in modulating this effect. In this scenario, angiotensin II stimulates an NADPH oxidase in the CVOs of the brain, increasing sympathetic outflow. Sympathetic nerve terminals in lymph nodes activate T cells, and angiotensin II also directly activates T cells. These stimuli also activate expression of homing signals in the vessel and likely the kidney, which attract T cells to these organs. T cells release cytokines that stimulate the vessel and kidney NADPH oxidases, promoting vasoconstriction and sodium retention. SFO, subfornical organ. 630 Harrison & Gongora but also those involved in normal cell signaling. A potentially important and relatively new direction is the concept that inflammatory cells such as T cells contribute to hypertension. Future studies are needed to understand the interaction of T cells with the CNS, the kidney, and the vasculature and how this might be interrupted to provide therapeutic benefit.

  1. Recommender Systems for Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Manouselis, Nikos; Verbert, Katrien; Duval, Erik

    2013-01-01

    Technology enhanced learning (TEL) aims to design, develop and test sociotechnical innovations that will support and enhance learning practices of both individuals and organisations. It is therefore an application domain that generally covers technologies that support all forms of teaching and learning activities. Since information retrieval (in terms of searching for relevant learning resources to support teachers or learners) is a pivotal activity in TEL, the deployment of recommender systems has attracted increased interest. This brief attempts to provide an introduction to recommender systems for TEL settings, as well as to highlight their particularities compared to recommender systems for other application domains.

  2. Hypertension in postmenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Roberta; Wofford, Marion; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2012-06-01

    Blood pressure is typically lower in premenopausal women than in men. However, after menopause, the prevalence of hypertension in women is higher than it is in men. Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease in women and men, but cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in women. Furthermore, there is evidence that blood pressure may not be as well-controlled in women as in men, despite the fact that most women adhere better to their therapeutic regimens and medications than do men, and have their blood pressures measured more frequently than do men. This review describes possible mechanisms by which blood pressure may be increased in postmenopausal women.

  3. Hypertension and renovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasbak, P; Ibsen, H; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn

    2002-01-01

    The clinical value of renal vein renin sampling (RVRS) as a prognostic tool in the treatment of renovascular hypertension was evaluated. One hundred consecutive patients were included over a 4-year period of time. About half of the patients (49%) were treated interventionally by PTRA (21%), nephr......The clinical value of renal vein renin sampling (RVRS) as a prognostic tool in the treatment of renovascular hypertension was evaluated. One hundred consecutive patients were included over a 4-year period of time. About half of the patients (49%) were treated interventionally by PTRA (21...

  4. Malignant hypertension: a preventable emergency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Merwe, Walter; van der Merwe, Veronica

    2013-08-16

    The Waitemata Hypertension Clinic Database 2009-2012 (Auckland, New Zealand) was searched for patients meeting the definition of Malignant Hypertension. Eighteen of 565 patients met the criteria. All patients had essential hypertension which was either undiagnosed, untreated or undertreated. Most cases responded satisfactorily to standard drug therapy, but a number were left with significant chronic kidney disease. Malignant hypertension is a life-threatening disease which should be entirely preventable with regular blood pressure checks in primary care.

  5. Integrating Out-of-Office Blood Pressure in the Diagnosis and Management of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jordana B; Cohen, Debbie L

    2016-11-01

    Guidelines for the diagnosis and monitoring of hypertension were historically based on in-office blood pressure measurements. However, the US Preventive Services Task Force recently expanded their recommendations on screening for hypertension to include out-of-office blood pressure measurements to confirm the diagnosis of hypertension. Out-of-office blood pressure monitoring modalities, including ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and home blood pressure monitoring, are important tools in distinguishing between normotension, masked hypertension, white-coat hypertension, and sustained (including uncontrolled or drug-resistant) hypertension. Compared to in-office readings, out-of-office blood pressures are a greater predictor of renal and cardiac morbidity and mortality. There are multiple barriers to the implementation of out-of-office blood pressure monitoring which need to be overcome in order to promote more widespread use of these modalities.

  6. EMERGENCY STATES IN ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Gurevich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes in detail potential emergency states in patients with different stages of arterial hypertension with special attention to diagnosis and rational management of hypertensive crisis. Differentiated approach to management of different forms of hypertensive crisis is specified.

  7. Hypertension--forekomst og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Hans; Jørgensen, Torben; Jensen, Gorm B

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, less than half of all hypertensives have their blood pressure reduced to relevant goals. The prevalence of hypertension in Denmark was found to be between 26% and 40% of the adult population. Just over...

  8. [Hypertensive emergency and urgence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegenhuber, Alfons; Lenz, Kurt

    2003-12-01

    DEFINITION, PATHOPHYSIOLOGY, THERAPY: The hypertensive crisis is characterized by a massive, acute rise in blood pressure. Patients with underlying hypertensive disease usually have an increase in systolic blood pressure values > 220 mmHg and diastolic values > 120 mmHg. The severity of the condition, however, is not determined by the absolute blood pressure level but by the magnitude of the acute increase in blood pressure. Thus, in the presence of primarily normotensive baseline values (such as those in eclampsia), even a systolic blood pressure > 170 mmHg may lead to a life-threatening condition. The most important causes are non-compliance (reduction or interruption of therapy), inadequate therapy, endocrine disease, renal (vessel) disease, pregnancy and intoxication (drugs). The management of this condition greatly depends on whether the patient has a hypertensive crisis with organ manifestation (hypertensive emergency) or a crisis without organ manifestation (hypertensive urgency). By documenting the medical history, the medical status and by simple diagnostic procedures, the differential diagnosis can be established at the emergency site within a very short period of time. In the absence of organ manifestations (hypertensive urgency) the patient may have non-specific symptoms such as palpitations, headache, malaise and a general feeling of illness in addition to the increase in blood pressure. In a hypertensive urgency the patient's blood pressure should not be reduced within a few minutes but within a period of 24 to 48 hours. Such adjustment can be achieved on an out-patient basis, however, only if the patient can be followed up adequately for early detection of a renewed attack. In the absence of follow-up facilities, the patient's blood pressure should be reduced over a period of 4 to 6 hours, if necessary in an out-patient emergency service. While intravenous medication is given preference when a rapid effect is desired, oral medication may be used for

  9. Management recommendations: Tewaukon Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Tewaukon Complex, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and additional comments are...

  10. Recommended Textbooks (Booksearch).

    Science.gov (United States)

    English Journal, 1988

    1988-01-01

    Evaluates four textbooks recommended by junior high and high school teachers for teaching writing and literature: "Enjoying Literature" (published by Macmillan, 1985); "Exposition: Critical Writing and Thinking" (Robert J. Gula); "Situational Writing" (Gene Krupa); and "Double Exposure: Composing through Writing…

  11. Management recommendations: Kirwin Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Kirwin National Wildlife Refuge, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and additional...

  12. Probabilistic approaches to recommendations

    CERN Document Server

    Barbieri, Nicola; Ritacco, Ettore

    2014-01-01

    The importance of accurate recommender systems has been widely recognized by academia and industry, and recommendation is rapidly becoming one of the most successful applications of data mining and machine learning. Understanding and predicting the choices and preferences of users is a challenging task: real-world scenarios involve users behaving in complex situations, where prior beliefs, specific tendencies, and reciprocal influences jointly contribute to determining the preferences of users toward huge amounts of information, services, and products. Probabilistic modeling represents a robus

  13. Exercise as medicine: role in the management of primary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millar, Philip J; Goodman, Jack M

    2014-07-01

    Primary hypertension affects ∼1 in 5 Canadians and significantly increases the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, and early mortality. Guidelines for the management of hypertension recommend lifestyle modifications (e.g., increased physical activity, smoking cessation, moderate alcohol consumption, improved dietary choices) as the frontline strategy to prevent and manage high blood pressure (BP). In particular, acute and chronic aerobic exercise has consistently been shown to reduce resting and ambulatory BP, with the largest effects in hypertensive patients. Current guidelines recommend 30-60 min of moderate- to vigorous-intensity aerobic exercise 4-7 days per week, in addition to activities of daily living. The role of resistance training in the management of hypertension is less clear, although available data suggests resistance exercise can be performed safely without risk of increasing BP or adverse events. Presently, resistance exercise (8-10 exercises, 1-2 set(s) of 10-15 repetitions, 2-3 days/week) is advocated only as an adjunct exercise modality. Patients desiring to begin an exercise program should complete the Physical Activity Readiness Questionnaire (PAR-Q or PAR-Q+) or as required, the Electronic Physical Activity Readiness Medical Examination (ePARmed-X) or Physician Clearance Form in consultation with their clinician and (or) trained exercise professional. A greater emphasis on utilizing exercise as medicine will produce positive nonpharmacologic benefits for hypertensive patients and improve overall cardiovascular risk profiles.

  14. [Management of hypertension (ESC Guideline 2007/DHL Guideline 2008)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Timothy; Schunkert, Heribert

    2009-02-01

    The 2007 ESH/ESC (European Society of Hypertension/European Society of Cardiology) guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension focus on the individual patient with his specific cardiovascular risk profile. The existing hypertension classification remains the same as in previous editions. However, specific patient characteristics and risk profiles require a more individualized approach. Recommended diagnostic procedures have been extended in order to detect existing subclinical organ damage and/or established cardiovascular or renal diseases at an early stage. Urgency and mode of therapeutic approach can directly be derived from the relevant risk stratification matrix which continues to be an integral component of the current guidelines. The primary goal of treatment of the hypertensive patient is to achieve a maximum reduction in the long-term total risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Since blood pressure lowering per se is thought to be of major importance to achieve these goals, a number of well-established pharmaceutical substances remain at hand of the practitioner. In addition, lifestyle changes are increasingly regarded to be of high importance. In patients with established comorbidities and in young subjects the choice of a specific pharmaceutical substance class is fundamental. The gap between guideline recommendations and poor blood pressure control in medical practice remains and needs to be closed. Therefore, a collective striving of all parties involved for early detection and effective treatment is needed to overcome the current and future burden of arterial hypertension.

  15. New Insulin Delivery Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frid, Anders H; Kreugel, Gillian; Grassi, Giorgio; Halimi, Serge; Hicks, Debbie; Hirsch, Laurence J; Smith, Mike J; Wellhoener, Regine; Bode, Bruce W; Hirsch, Irl B; Kalra, Sanjay; Ji, Linong; Strauss, Kenneth W

    2016-09-01

    Many primary care professionals manage injection or infusion therapies in patients with diabetes. Few published guidelines have been available to help such professionals and their patients manage these therapies. Herein, we present new, practical, and comprehensive recommendations for diabetes injections and infusions. These recommendations were informed by a large international survey of current practice and were written and vetted by 183 diabetes experts from 54 countries at the Forum for Injection Technique and Therapy: Expert Recommendations (FITTER) workshop held in Rome, Italy, in 2015. Recommendations are organized around the themes of anatomy, physiology, pathology, psychology, and technology. Key among the recommendations are that the shortest needles (currently the 4-mm pen and 6-mm syringe needles) are safe, effective, and less painful and should be the first-line choice in all patient categories; intramuscular injections should be avoided, especially with long-acting insulins, because severe hypoglycemia may result; lipohypertrophy is a frequent complication of therapy that distorts insulin absorption, and, therefore, injections and infusions should not be given into these lesions and correct site rotation will help prevent them; effective long-term therapy with insulin is critically dependent on addressing psychological hurdles upstream, even before insulin has been started; inappropriate disposal of used sharps poses a risk of infection with blood-borne pathogens; and mitigation is possible with proper training, effective disposal strategies, and the use of safety devices. Adherence to these new recommendations should lead to more effective therapies, improved outcomes, and lower costs for patients with diabetes.

  16. Gender differences in hypertension and hypertension awareness among young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, Bethany; Zajacova, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has shown that men have higher levels of hypertension and lower levels of hypertension awareness than women, but it remains unclear if these differences emerge among young adults. Using the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health), this study examines gender differences in hypertension and hypertension awareness among U.S. young adults, with special focus on factors that may contribute to observed disparities (N = 14,497). Our results show that the gender disparities in hypertension status were already evident among men and women in their twenties: women were far less likely to be hypertensive compared to men (12% vs. 27%). The results also reveal very low levels of hypertension awareness among young women (32% of hypertensive women were aware of their status) and even lower levels among men (25%). Finally, this study identifies key factors that contribute to these observed gender disparities. In particular, health care use, while not related to the actual hypertension status, fully explains the gender differences in hypertension awareness. The findings thus suggest that regular medical visits are critical for improving hypertension awareness among young adults and reducing gender disparities in cardiovascular health.

  17. Hypertension and cardiac arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y.H.; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    of Cardiology (ESC) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS), and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit to comprehensively review the available...

  18. Hypertension and Cardiac Arrhythmias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Coca, Antonio; Kahan, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    ) Council on Hypertension convened a Task Force, with representation from the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS), Asia-Pacific Heart Rhythm Society (APHRS) and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Estimulación Cardíaca y Electrofisiología (SOLEACE), with the remit of comprehensively reviewing the available evidence...

  19. Fermented milk for hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usinger, Lotte; Reimer, Christina; Ibsen, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Fermented milk has been suggested to have a blood pressure lowering effect through increased content of proteins and peptides produced during the bacterial fermentation. Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease world wide and new blood pressure reducing lifestyle...... interventions, such as fermented milk, would be of great importance....

  20. Combination treatment for hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On average, one in four adults has hypertension.1 This figure is higher in certain regions of the world, .... doses favours the development of diabetes and should be ... New and old evidence strongly supports combination treatment .... cardiovascular death, stroke and myocardial infarction, cognitive function and dementia.

  1. Hypertension og nyresygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, Anne-Lise; Pedersen, Erling B; Strandgaard, Svend

    2009-01-01

    hypertension. Mild degrees of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be detected in around 10% of the population, and detection is important as CKD is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Conversely, heart failure may cause an impairment of renal function. In chronic progressive...

  2. [Hypertension and renal disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper, A.L.; Pedersen, E.B.; Strandgaard, S.

    2009-01-01

    hypertension. Mild degrees of chronic kidney disease (CKD) can be detected in around 10% of the population, and detection is important as CKD is an important risk factor for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Conversely, heart failure may cause an impairment of renal function. In chronic progressive...

  3. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Pulmonary Hypertension - High Blood Pressure in the Heart-to-Lung System Updated:Sep ... Pressure" This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  4. Hypertension og hjertet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian; Andersen, Niels Holmark; Svendsen, Tage Lysbo

    2009-01-01

    of left ventricular mass is associated with substantial and significant reduction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Hypertension is strongly associated with increased risk of subsequent heart failure. Meta analysis data suggests that reduction in blood pressure is also associated with very...

  5. Hypertensive Heart Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Hypertensive heart disease is prevalent and during the last decade it has been determined that patients with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy have increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, many have doubted the effectiveness of LV mass assessment because it is difficult...

  6. Hydrogen sulfide in hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Harry; van den Born, Joost C.; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Joles, Jaap A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Hypertension is an important determinant of cardiovascular disease, and strict blood pressure regulation is beneficially associated with the risk for cardiovascular events or all-cause mortality. However, intensive antihypertensive treatment is not always sufficient to reach normo

  7. Hypertension og hjertet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wachtell, Kristian; Svendsen, Tage Lysbo; Andersen, Niels Holmark

    2009-01-01

    of left ventricular mass is associated with substantial and significant reduction of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Hypertension is strongly associated with increased risk of subsequent heart failure. Meta analysis data suggests that reduction in blood pressure is also associated with very...

  8. Nitroglycerin kan give hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Peter; Levinsen, Tine Holbæk; Hovind, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Hg. The conclusion was that her response was a paradoxical response to glycerylnitrate, orthostatism and a pathological response to massage of the carotid artery. This is the third reported case on paradoxical hypertension induced by glyceryl nitrates. It is speculated that dysfunction of the cerebral bloodflow...

  9. Decoding white coat hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomfield, Dennis A; Park, Alex

    2017-03-16

    There is arguably no less understood or more intriguing problem in hypertension that the "white coat" condition, the standard concept of which is significantly blood pressure reading obtained by medical personnel of authoritative standing than that obtained by more junior and less authoritative personnel and by the patients themselves. Using hospital-initiated ambulatory blood pressure monitoring, the while effect manifests as initial and ending pressure elevations, and, in treated patients, a low daytime profile. The effect is essentially systolic. Pure diastolic white coat hypertension appears to be exceedingly rare. On the basis of the studies, we believe that the white coat phenomenon is a common, periodic, neuro-endocrine reflex conditioned by anticipation of having the blood pressure taken and the fear of what this measurement may indicate concerning future illness. It does not change with time, or with prolonged association with the physician, particularly with advancing years, it may be superimposed upon essential hypertension, and in patients receiving hypertensive medication, blunting of the nighttime dip, which occurs in about half the patients, may be a compensatory mechanisms, rather than an indication of cardiovascular risk. Rather than the blunted dip, the morning surge or the widened pulse pressure, cardiovascular risk appears to be related to elevation of the average night time pressure.

  10. Studies in portal hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.R. van Buuren (Henk)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractOur work focussed on one of the most frequent and serious complications of portal hypertension i.e. variceal bleeding. In particular, studies were initiated aimed at developing a more effective therapeutic strategy for the primary and secondary prevention of variceal bleeding. Aspects of

  11. Hypertension, a health economics perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcocer, Luis; Cueto, Liliana

    2008-06-01

    The economic aspects of hypertension are critical to modern medicine. The medical, economic, and human costs of untreated and inadequately controlled hypertension are enormous. Hypertension is distributed unequally and with iniquity in different countries and regions of the world. Treatment of hypertension requires an investment over many years to prolong disease-free quality years of life. The high prevalence and high cost of the disease impacts on the microeconomics and macroeconomics of countries and regions. The criteria used for inclusion in clinical guidelines for hypertension impact on the cost and cost/utility of diagnosis or treatment.

  12. [Hypertension In pregnancy: practical considerations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaafar, Jaafar; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Ditisheim, Agnès

    2014-09-10

    Hypertension is the most frequent medical disorder of pregnancy. Whether in the form of a chronic hypertension or a pregnancy induced-hypertension, or preeclampsia, it is associated with major maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. Improvement of prenatal care allowed a reduction in the number of poor outcomes. However, our partial understanding of the origin of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia limits the establishment of robust prediction models and efficient preventive interventions. This review discusses actual considerations on the clinical approach to hypertension in pregnancy.

  13. PREVALENCE OF DIABETES MELLITUS AMONG PATIENTS WITH ESSENTIAL ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahoud, Jad; Mrad, Jad; Semaan, Adele; Asmar, Roland

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluates the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) among patients with arterial hypertension, and indirectly, the crucial impact of adopting screening for diabetes as a standard procedure for all patients diagnosed with arterial hypertension. This cross-sectional study was performed on a sample of hypertensive patients recruited from three different university hospitals in Lebanon. Blood pressure and glycemic blood measurements were determined in all subjects. In addition, a complete clinical history and physical exam were performed. Data was entered and analyzed using SPSS 19.0. Frequencies for the different variables were calculated, and the chi-square and independent sample t-tests were conducted. This study included 294 patients. Prevalence of diabetes was 27%, and 23% of diabetic patients were newly diagnosed. More than half of the subjects suffering from DM had uncontrolled blood pressure, contrasted with only one third of the non-diabetic subjects with uncontrolled hypertension. The prevalence of DM in patients with essential hypertension was more than double that of the general population. Therefore, major recommendations would be to adopt strictly the diabetes screening requirements and aggressive management among hypertensive patients to minimize both the health and cost burdens associated with undetected DM.

  14. Normalization effect of sports training on blood pressure in hypertensives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Liang; Liu, Yuh-Feng; Huang, Chih-Yang; Lee, Shin-Da; Chan, Yi-Sheng; Chen, Chiu-Chou; Harris, Brennan; Kuo, Chia-Hua

    2010-02-01

    Exercise is recommended as a lifestyle intervention in preventing hypertension based on epidemiological findings. However, previous intervention studies have presented mixed results. This discrepancy could be associated with shortcomings related to sample sizes or the inclusion of normotensive participants. The aim of this prospective cohort study (N = 463) was to compare the chronic effect of increasing sports training time on resting blood pressure for normotensives and hypertensives. We assessed systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for 69 untreated hypertensive patients (age 20.6 +/- 0.1 years, systolic blood pressure >140 mmHg) and 394 normotensive controls (age 20.6 +/- 0.1 years) before training and at follow-up visits at 12 months. All participants enrolled in various sports training lessons for 8 hours a week. The baseline BMI and HOMA-IR in the hypertensive group were significantly higher than those in the control group. For the normotensive control group, no significant changes in systolic and diastolic blood pressure were observed after training. However, for the hypertensives, systolic and diastolic blood pressure were significantly reduced after training by approximately 15 mmHg and approximately 4 mmHg, respectively, and HOMA-IR was reduced by approximately 25%. In conclusion, the effect of sports training to lower blood pressure was confined to the group of hypertensives, which may account for the overall minimal reduction in blood pressure observed in previous intervention studies.

  15. The Hypertension in Diabetes Study (HDS): a catalyst for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B

    2008-08-01

    Hypertension is now established as a major risk factor for premature cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in people with Type 2 diabetes and all modern treatment guidelines recommend the routine treatment of hypertension in these patients. However, these developments have been relatively recent. Only a decade ago, outside of small studies in patients with nephropathy, there was little evidence with regard to the efficacy and safety of treating elevated blood pressure in people with Type 2 diabetes. Consequently, for many patients, elevated blood pressure remained undetected and untreated. This changed with the publication of the Hypertension in Diabetes Study (HDS) in 1998. This study revealed that hypertension was very common in people with Type 2 diabetes and demonstrated the dramatic benefits of blood pressure lowering in reducing their risk of major macrovascular and microvascular complications. The unequivocal evidence from this study provided a much-needed catalyst for change, propelling blood pressure measurement and its treatment to the forefront of risk management in these patients. Many studies have followed and many questions remain with regard to the preferred anti-hypertensive treatment strategy and optimal treatment targets for blood pressure. In the meantime, many millions of patients with Type 2 diabetes worldwide have benefited and will continue to benefit from the therapeutic insights gained from the treatment of blood pressure in the 1148 patients enrolled in the Hypertension in Diabetes Study in the UK Prospective Diabetes Study.

  16. Aerobic exercise reduces blood pressure in resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimeo, Fernando; Pagonas, Nikolaos; Seibert, Felix; Arndt, Robert; Zidek, Walter; Westhoff, Timm H

    2012-09-01

    Regular physical exercise is broadly recommended by current European and American hypertension guidelines. It remains elusive, however, whether exercise leads to a reduction of blood pressure in resistant hypertension as well. The present randomized controlled trial examines the cardiovascular effects of aerobic exercise on resistant hypertension. Resistant hypertension was defined as a blood pressure ≥140/90 mm Hg in spite of 3 antihypertensive agents or a blood pressure controlled by ≥4 antihypertensive agents. Fifty subjects with resistant hypertension were randomly assigned to participate or not to participate in an 8- to 12-week treadmill exercise program (target lactate, 2.0±0.5 mmol/L). Blood pressure was assessed by 24-hour monitoring. Arterial compliance and cardiac index were measured by pulse wave analysis. The training program was well tolerated by all of the patients. Exercise significantly decreased systolic and diastolic daytime ambulatory blood pressure by 6±12 and 3±7 mm Hg, respectively (P=0.03 each). Regular exercise reduced blood pressure on exertion and increased physical performance as assessed by maximal oxygen uptake and lactate curves. Arterial compliance and cardiac index remained unchanged. Physical exercise is able to decrease blood pressure even in subjects with low responsiveness to medical treatment. It should be included in the therapeutic approach to resistant hypertension.

  17. [Differences between the 2013 and 2014 hypertension guidelines.: Position of the Central American and Caribbean Society for Hypertension and Cardiovascular Prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Salinas, Alberto; Wyss, Fernando; Coca, Antonio; Ramírez, Agustín J; Valdez, Osiris; Valerio, Luis F

    2015-03-01

    Between the end of 2013 and the beginning of 2014 the most internationally influential hypertension guidelines were published. Although there are no major differences between them, there are discrepancies that can have an impact on treatment and prognosis for individuals with hypertension. This article analyzes the main controversial elements in the guides and presents the recommendations of the Sociedad Centroamericana y del Caribe de Hipertensión y Prevención Cardiovascular (Caribbean Society for Hypertension and Cardiovascular Prevention). The main differences are found a) in the categorization of prehypertension, b) in the use of global cardiovascular risk in the decision to begin antihypertensive treatment, c) in the validity of beta-blockers as first-line drugs in treating uncomplicated hypertension, and d) the increase in the therapeutic goal of maintaining values between global cardiovascular risk. Finally, seven recommendations by the Society based on the analysis are included.

  18. Masked hypertension: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrie, Guillaume; Clerson, Pierre; Ménard, Joël; Postel-Vinay, Nicolas; Chatellier, Gilles; Plouin, Pierre-François

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to review the literature on masked hypertension. Studies, reviews and editorials on masked hypertension were identified by PubMed, Pascal BioMed and Cochrane literature systematic searches. Then, we carried out a meta-analysis of the six cohort studies reporting quantitative data for masked hypertension prognosis. There is still no clear consensus definition of masked hypertension and the reproducibility of the phenomenon is unknown. Nevertheless, the prevalence of masked hypertension seems to lie between 8 and 20%, and can be up to 50% in treated hypertensive patients. Subjects with masked hypertension have a higher risk of cardiovascular accidents [hazard ratios: 1.92 (1.51-2.44)] than normotensive subjects. This is due to a possible failure to recognize and appropriately manage this particular form of hypertension, the frequent association with other risk factors and coexisting target organ damage. The remaining unresolved questions are as follows: is masked hypertension a clinical entity that requires identification and characterization or a statistical phenomenon linked to the variability of blood pressure measurements?; because screening of the entire population is not feasible, how to identify individuals with masked hypertension?; and, in the absence of randomized trial, how to treat masked hypertension?

  19. [Pathophysiology of hypertension: what's new?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büchner, Nikolaus; Vonend, Oliver; Rump, Lars Christian

    2006-06-01

    The pathophysiology of primary hypertension is still unresolved and appears more complex than ever. It is beyond the scope of this article to review all new scientific developments in this field. On clinical grounds, hypertension is divided into primary and secondary forms. Here, the authors discuss the pathophysiology of hypertension associated with three common disease entities showing a large overlap with primary hypertension: chronic kidney disease (CKD), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and hyperaldosteronism. Especially in CKD and OSA, the activation of the sympathetic nervous system plays a crucial role. It is the authors' belief that hypertension due to these three diseases is more common than previously appreciated and may account for about 20% of the hypertensive population. The knowledge of the underlying pathophysiology allows early diagnosis and guides optimal treatment of these hypertensive patients.

  20. Distributed Deliberative Recommender Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recio-García, Juan A.; Díaz-Agudo, Belén; González-Sanz, Sergio; Sanchez, Lara Quijano

    Case-Based Reasoning (CBR) is one of most successful applied AI technologies of recent years. Although many CBR systems reason locally on a previous experience base to solve new problems, in this paper we focus on distributed retrieval processes working on a network of collaborating CBR systems. In such systems, each node in a network of CBR agents collaborates, arguments and counterarguments its local results with other nodes to improve the performance of the system's global response. We describe D2ISCO: a framework to design and implement deliberative and collaborative CBR systems that is integrated as a part of jcolibritwo an established framework in the CBR community. We apply D2ISCO to one particular simplified type of CBR systems: recommender systems. We perform a first case study for a collaborative music recommender system and present the results of an experiment of the accuracy of the system results using a fuzzy version of the argumentation system AMAL and a network topology based on a social network. Besides individual recommendation we also discuss how D2ISCO can be used to improve recommendations to groups and we present a second case of study based on the movie recommendation domain with heterogeneous groups according to the group personality composition and a group topology based on a social network.

  1. Sedentary Behavior and Light Physical Activity Are Associated with Brachial and Central Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerage, A. M.; Benedetti, T. R. B.; Farah, B. Q.

    2015-01-01

    Background Physical activity is recommended as a part of a comprehensive lifestyle approach in the treatment of hypertension, but there is a lack of data about the relationship between different intensities of physical activity and cardiovascular parameters in hypertensive patients. The purpose o...

  2. Order Theoretical Semantic Recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Peterson, Elena S.; Stephan, Eric G.; Thomas, Dennis G.

    2013-07-23

    Mathematical concepts of order and ordering relations play multiple roles in semantic technologies. Discrete totally ordered data characterize both input streams and top-k rank-ordered recommendations and query output, while temporal attributes establish numerical total orders, either over time points or in the more complex case of startend temporal intervals. But also of note are the fully partially ordered data, including both lattices and non-lattices, which actually dominate the semantic strcuture of ontological systems. Scalar semantic similarities over partially-ordered semantic data are traditionally used to return rank-ordered recommendations, but these require complementation with true metrics available over partially ordered sets. In this paper we report on our work in the foundations of partial order measurement in ontologies, with application to top-k semantic recommendation in workflows.

  3. Archetypal Game Recommender Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sifa, Rafet; Bauckhage, C.; Drachen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    feedback are presented: factor- and neighborhood-oriented models. These form the rst application of rec- ommender systems to digital games. Both models are tested on a dataset of 500,000 users of the game distribution platform Steam, covering game ownership and playtime data across more than 3000 games....... Compared to four other recommender models (nearest neighbor, two popularity mod- els, random baseline), the archetype based models provide the highest recall rates showing that Archetypal Analysis can be successfully applied for Top-L recommendation purposes...

  4. Sexual function in hypertensive patients receiving treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Reffelmann

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Thorsten Reffelmann, Robert A KlonerUniversity of Southern California, The Heart Institute, Good Samaritan Hospital, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USAAbstract: In many forms of erectile dysfunction (ED, cardiovascular risk factors, in particular arterial hypertension, seem to be extremely common. While causes for ED are related to a broad spectrum of diseases, a generalized vascular process seems to be the underlying mechanism in many patients, which in a large portion of clinical cases involves endothelial dysfunction, ie, inadequate vasodilation in response to endothelium-dependent stimuli, both in the systemic vasculature and the penile arteries. Due to this close association of cardiovascular disease and ED, patients with ED should be evaluated as to whether they may suffer from cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension, cardiovascular disease or silent myocardial ischemia. On the other hand, cardiovascular patients, seeking treatment of ED, must be evaluated in order to decide whether treatment of ED or sexual activity can be recommended without significantly increased cardiac risk. The guideline from the first and second Princeton Consensus Conference may be applied in this context. While consequent treatment of cardiovascular risk factors should be accomplished in these patients, many antihypertensive drugs may worsen sexual function as a drug specific side-effect. Importantly, effective treatment for arterial hypertension should not be discontinued as hypertension itself may contribute to altered sexual functioning; to the contrary, alternative antihypertensive regimes should be administered with individually tailored drug regimes with minimal side-effects on sexual function. When phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors, such as sildenafil, tadalafil and vardenafil, are prescribed to hypertensive patients on antihypertensive drugs, these combinations of antihypertensive drugs and

  5. A practice guideline revisited: screening for hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Littenberg, B

    1995-06-15

    In 1993, the Clinical Efficacy Assessment Subcommittee began evaluation of new topics and reevaluation of previous guidelines on common screening tests, which were published in Annals of Internal Medicine between 1988 and 1990 and republished as a collection in 1991 (Eddy DM, ed. Common Screening Tests. Philadelphia: American College of Physicians; 1991). Of the 11 guidelines contained in Common Screening Tests, only 3 (for breast, colon, and cholesterol screening) will be published with new data supporting new recommendations. Dr. Littenberg's analysis of the evidence that has appeared since the publication of the original paper on screening for hypertension (Littenberg B, Garber AM, Sox HC. Screening for Hypertension. Ann Intern Med. 1990;112:192-202) presents a new format for updating Clinical Efficacy Assessment Project (CEAP) guidelines that have not been altered by new evidence. This "updated guideline" reports on new published studies and its analysis affirms the approved American College of Physicians recommendations of 1990. The Clinical Efficacy Assessment Subcommittee carried out the Internal and external review procedures that are used for all CEAP guidelines. The plan is to keep all American College of Physicians guidelines updated in this way on a regular basis. Direct any comments or suggestions to Director, Scientific Policy, American College of Physicians, 6th Street at Race, Philadelphia, PA 19106.

  6. Neurological disorders in hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Vakhnina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is one of the most common vascular diseases. The brain as target organs in hypertension is damaged more often and earlier. Neurological complications due to hypertension are frequently hyperdiagnosed in Russian neurological practice. Thus, headache, dizziness, impaired recall of recent events, nocturnal sleep disorders, and many other complaints in a hypertensive patient are usually regarded as a manifestation of dyscirculatory encephalopathy. At the same time headaches (tension headache and migraine in hypertensive patients are predominantly primary; headache associated with dramatic marked elevations in blood pressure is encountered in only a small number of patients. The role of cerebrovascular diseases in the development of dizziness in hypertensive patients is also overestimated. The vast majority of cases, patients with this complaint are in fact identified to have benign paroxysmal postural vertigo, Mеniеre’s disease, vestibular neuronitis, or vestibular migraine. Psychogenic disorders or multisensory insufficiency are generally responsible for non-systemic vertigo in hypertensive patients. Chronic cerebral circulatory insufficiency may cause non-systemic vertigo as a subjective equivalent of postural instability.Cognitive impairments (CIs are the most common and earliest manifestation of cerebrovascular lesion in hypertension. In most cases, CIs in hypertension were vascular and associated with cerebrovascular lesion due to lacunar infarcts and leukoaraiosis. However, mixed CIs frequently occur when hypertensive patients are also found to have signs of a degenerative disease, most commonly in Alzheimer’s disease.

  7. [Hyperuricemia, diabetes and hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viazzi, Francesca; Bonino, Barbara; Ratto, Elena; Desideri, Giovambattista; Pontremoli, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Hyperuricemia is frequently found in association with several condition predisposing to cardiovascular events such as arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus. This has led researchers to investigate possible pathogenetic mechanisms underlying this association. Several experimental studies and some indirect clinical evidence support a causal link between mild hyperuricemia and the developement of hypertension as well as new onset diabetes. At the tissue level, chronic exposure to increased uric acid has been shown to promote vascular changes leading to renal ischemia as well as stimulation of the renin angiotensin system. Furthermore, uric acid has been shown to promote the development of insulin resistance, hypertrglyceridemia and haepatic steatosis through pro-oxidative mechanisms. These experimental pathophysiological changes may be partly preventable by hypouricemic treatments. Whether clinical implications of these findings are confirmed by solid clinical intervention trials, mild hyperuricemia may soon change its status from risk predictor to treatment target for patients at high cardiovascular and renal risk.

  8. Towards Geosocial Recommender Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graaff, de Victor; Keulen, van Maurice; By, de Rolf A.

    2012-01-01

    The usage of social networks sites (SNSs), such as Facebook, and geosocial networks (GSNs), such as Foursquare, has increased tremendously over the past years. The willingness of users to share their current locations and experiences facilitate the creation of geographical recommender systems based

  9. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emery, C. A.; Roos, Ewa M.; Verhagen, E.;

    2015-01-01

    The risk of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) substantially increases following joint injury. Research efforts should focus on investigating the efficacy of preventative strategies in high quality randomized controlled trials (RCT). The objective of these OARSI RCT recommendations is to inform...

  10. ICRS Recommendation Document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Ewa M.; Engelhart, Luella; Ranstam, Jonas

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of this article is to describe and recommend patient-reported outcome instruments for use in patients with articular cartilage lesions undergoing cartilage repair interventions. Methods: Nonsystematic literature search identifying measures addressing pain and funct......Abstract Objective: The purpose of this article is to describe and recommend patient-reported outcome instruments for use in patients with articular cartilage lesions undergoing cartilage repair interventions. Methods: Nonsystematic literature search identifying measures addressing pain...... constructs at all levels according to the International Classification of Functioning. Conclusions: Because there is no obvious superiority of either instrument at this time, both outcome measures are recommended for use in cartilage repair. Rescaling of the Lysholm Scoring Scale has been suggested......, and confirmatory longitudinal studies are needed prior to recommending this scale for use in cartilage repair. Inclusion of a generic measure is feasible in cartilage repair studies and allows analysis of health-related quality of life and health economic outcomes. The Marx or Tegner Activity Rating Scales...

  11. Privacy in recommender systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeckmans, Arjan; Beye, Michael; Erkin, Zekeriya; Hartel, Pieter; Lagendijk, Reginald; Tang, Qiang; Ramzan, Naeem; Zwol, van Roelof; Lee, Jong-Seok; Clüver, Kai; Hua, Xian-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In many online applications, the range of content that is offered to users is so wide that a need for automated recommender systems arises. Such systems can provide a personalized selection of relevant items to users. In practice, this can help people find entertaining movies, boost sales through ta

  12. The ICRP 2007 recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streffer, C. [Chairman of ICRP Committee 2, Institute of Science and Ethics, University Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The last comprehensive International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) recommendations have been published in 1991(1). Since that time new data in physics and biology that are relevant for radiological protection have appeared in the scientific literature. Also, the general thinking about safety standards at the workplace as well as for the protection of the public has developed. Thus, a review of the recommendations is needed. However, as the present standards have worked well, these new recommendations should build on the present ones. Only a process of further development should take place allowing for the following key points: - new biological and physical information and trends in the setting of safety standards; - improvement in the presentation of the recommendations; as much stability in the recommendations as is consistent with the new information and environmental aspects will be included. The fundamental principles of radiological protection will remain the same as they have been described in ICRP publication 60(1): Justification: Actions involving new exposures or changes in exposures of individuals have to be justified in advance. A positive net benefit must result. Optimisation: Exposures should be as low as reasonably achievable and should be optimised in relation to with dose constraints. Dose limits: The values will not to be changed from Publication 60. Dose constraints: Development of the concept proposed in Publication 60 will be explained. The ICRP Committees have prepared foundation documents in the fields for which they are responsible and their members have the corresponding expertise. These foundation documents will support the decisions and explain the various statements of the Main Commission in a broader sense. Some of them will be published as Annexes to the recommendations (Annex A: Biological and Epidemiological Information on Health Risks Attributable to Ionising Radiation; Annex B: Quantities used in Radiological

  13. Renal denervation and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaich, Markus P; Krum, Henry; Sobotka, Paul A; Esler, Murray D

    2011-06-01

    Essential hypertension remains one of the biggest challenges in medicine with an enormous impact on both individual and society levels. With the exception of relatively rare monogenetic forms of hypertension, there is now general agreement that the condition is multifactorial in nature and hence requires therapeutic approaches targeting several aspects of the underlying pathophysiology. Accordingly, all major guidelines promote a combination of lifestyle interventions and combination pharmacotherapy to reach target blood pressure (BP) levels in order to reduce overall cardiovascular risk in affected patients. Although this approach works for many, it fails in a considerable number of patients for various reasons including drug-intolerance, noncompliance, physician inertia, and others, leaving them at unacceptably high cardiovascular risk. The quest for additional therapeutic approaches to safely and effectively manage hypertension continues and expands to the reappraisal of older concepts such as renal denervation. Based on the robust preclinical and clinical data surrounding the role of renal sympathetic nerves in various aspects of BP control very recent efforts have led to the development of a novel catheter-based approach using radiofrequency (RF) energy to selectively target and disrupt the renal nerves. The available evidence from the limited number of uncontrolled hypertensive patients in whom renal denervation has been performed are auspicious and indicate that the procedure has a favorable safety profile and is associated with a substantial and presumably sustained BP reduction. Although promising, a myriad of questions are far from being conclusively answered and require our concerted research efforts to explore the full potential and possible risks of this approach. Here we briefly review the science surrounding renal denervation, summarize the current data on safety and efficacy of renal nerve ablation, and discuss some of the open questions that need

  14. Portal hypertensive enteropathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Parit Mekaroonkamol; Robert Cohen; Saurabh Chawla

    2015-01-01

    Portal hypertensive enteropathy (PHE) is a conditionthat describes the pathologic changes and mucosalabnormalities observed in the small intestine of patientswith portal hypertension. This entity is being increasinglyrecognized and better understood over the past decadedue to increased accessibility of the small intestine madepossible by the introduction of video capsule endoscopyand deep enteroscopy. Though challenged by its diverseendoscopic appearance, multiple scoring systems havebeen proposed to classify the endoscopic presentationand grade its severity. Endoscopic findings can be broadlycategorized into vascular and non-vascular lesions withmany subtypes of both categories. Clinical manifestationsof PHE can range from asymptomatic incidental findingsto fatal gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Classic endoscopicfindings in the setting of portal hypertension may leadto a prompt diagnosis. Occasionally histopathologyand cross sectional imaging like computed tomographyor magnetic resonance imaging may be helpful inestablishing a diagnosis. Management of overt bleedingrequires multidisciplinary approach involving hepatologists,endoscopists, surgeons, and interventionalradiologists. Adequate resuscitation, reduction of portalpressure, and endoscopic therapeutic intervention remainthe main principles of the initial treatment. This articlereviews the existing evidence on PHE with emphasison its classification, diagnosis, clinical manifestations,endoscopic appearance, pathological findings, and clinicalmanagement. A new schematic management of ectopicvariceal bleed is also proposed.

  15. Obesity and hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Shu-Zhong; Lu, Wen; Zong, Xue-Feng; Ruan, Hong-Yun; Liu, Yi

    2016-01-01

    The imbalance between energy intake and expenditure is the main cause of excessive overweight and obesity. Technically, obesity is defined as the abnormal accumulation of ≥20% of body fat, over the individual's ideal body weight. The latter constitutes the maximal healthful value for an individual that is calculated based chiefly on the height, age, build and degree of muscular development. However, obesity is diagnosed by measuring the weight in relation to the height of an individual, thereby determining or calculating the body mass index. The National Institutes of Health have defined 30 kg/m2 as the limit over which an individual is qualified as obese. Accordingly, the prevalence of obesity in on the increase in children and adults worldwide, despite World Health Organization warnings. The growth of obesity and the scale of associated health issues induce serious consequences for individuals and governmental health systems. Excessive overweight remains among the most neglected public health issues worldwide, while obesity is associated with increasing risks of disability, illness and death. Cardiovascular diseases, the leading cause of mortality worldwide, particularly hypertension and diabetes, are the main illnesses associated with obesity. Nevertheless, the mechanisms underlying obesity-associated hypertension or other associated metabolic diseases remains to be adequately investigated. In the present review, we addressed the association between obesity and cardiovascular disease, particularly the biological mechanisms linking obesity and hypertension. PMID:27703502

  16. Hypertension: issues in control and resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Marion R; Minor, Deborah S

    2009-10-01

    Hypertension remains uncontrolled in more than 50% of treated patients. Barriers to hypertension control include those that are patient-related, physician-related, and related to the health system. Identification of uncontrolled hypertension, pseudoresistant hyper-tension, and resistant hypertension require thoughtful attention to accurate blood pressure measurement, lifestyle factors, evaluation for secondary causes of hypertension, and proper treatment. Recent guidelines emphasize the importance of aggressive treatment and referral to hypertension specialists for patients with resistant hypertension, defined as blood pressure that remains above goal despite the use of three appropriate anti-hypertensive agents.

  17. [Chronobiology of blood pressure and chronopharmacotherapy of arterial hypertension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmieder, R E; Bramlage, P; Schunkert, H

    2012-02-01

    Arterial blood pressure is subject to a circadian rhythm that results in a fall of blood pressure during the night. In patients with diabetes, renal insufficiency, left-ventricular hypertrophy, sleep apnea, hypertension of pregnancy, and different forms of secondary hypertension a nocturnal fall of blood pressure is even abandoned or reverted. Diagnosis is made using 24-h blood pressure measurement, which is however used not frequently enough for a clinical assessment or adjustment of therapy. An adaption of the selection or the time of administration of antihypertensive drugs with respect to the circadian rhythm is beneficial to control blood pressure and reduce cardiovascular morbidity. This is particularly true for patients with an a non- or inverted dipping blood pressure pattern, in which the bedtime dosing may result in a normalization of blood pressure and restoration of a normal circadian rhythm. The present manuscript reviews the chronopharmacotherapy of arterial hypertension and grant practical recommendations for their translation into clinical practice.

  18. Update on pathophysiology and treatment of hypertension in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Debbie L; Townsend, Raymond R

    2011-10-01

    Hypertension is common in the elderly, and its prevalence increases with aging. The vascular system is a prototypical aging tissue, and arterial stiffness plays a major role in hypertension as the individual ages. Some unique aging changes in the nitric oxide and angiotensin II pathways are particularly important for vascular aging. Studies focusing on direct measures of vascular stiffness have increased understanding of the pathophysiology behind increased arterial stiffness. Goal blood pressure in the elderly is debated, but based on current outcome data, a goal blood pressure of 150/80-90 mm Hg is reasonable in at least the very elderly. This review discusses in detail the various landmark hypertension studies in the elderly. We recommend use of thiazide diuretics, long-acting calcium channel blockers, and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers as either monotherapy or in combination, with beta-blockers reserved for patients with specific indications.

  19. The medieval origins of the concept of hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Heydari

    2014-01-01

    The definition, symptoms and treatments presented for the Imtela are compared with the current knowledge on hypertension. Akhawayni believed that Imtela could result from the excessive amount of blood within the blood vessels. It can manifest with symptoms including the presence of a pulsus magnus, sleepiness, weakness, dyspnea, facial blushing, engorgement of the vessels, thick urine, vascular rupture, and hemorrhagic stroke. He also suggested some ways to manage al-Imtela′. These include recommendations of changes in lifestyle (staying away from anger and sexual intercourse and dietary program for patients (avoiding the consumption of wine, meat, and pastries, reducing the volume of food in a meal, maintaining a low-energy diet and the dietary usage of spinach and vinegar. Al-Akhawayni′s description of "Imtela," despite of its numerous differences with current knowledge of hypertension, can be considered as medieval origin of the concept of hypertension.

  20. Calcium channel antagonists in hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosioni, E; Borghi, C

    1989-02-01

    The clinical usefulness of calcium entry-blockers for the treatment of high blood pressure is related to their capacity to act upon the primary hemodynamic derangement in hypertension: the increased peripheral vascular resistance. They can be used alone or in combination with other antihypertensive agents for the treatment of various forms of hypertensive disease. The calcium entry-blockers appear to be the most useful agents for the treatment of hypertension in the elderly and for the treatment of hypertension associated with ischemic heart disease, pulmonary obstructive disease, peripheral vascular disease, and supraventricular arrhythmias. They are effective in reducing blood pressure in pregnancy-associated hypertension and must be considered as first-line therapy for the treatment of hypertensive crisis.

  1. Taste and hypertension in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roura, Eugeni; Foster, Simon; Winklebach, Anja;

    2016-01-01

    The association between salty taste and NaCl intake with hypertension is well-established, although it is far from completely understood. Other taste types such as sweet, umami or bitter have also been related to alterations in blood pressure. Here, we review the mutual relationship between taste...... and hypertension to identify potential avenues to better control blood pressure. This review focuses on published data involving humans, with the exception of a section on molecular mechanisms. There is compelling evidence to suggest that changes in salty taste sensitivity can be used to predict the onset...... of hypertension. This goes hand in hand with the medical concept of sodium sensitivity, which also increases with age, particularly in hypertensive patients. The association of hypertension with the loss of taste acuity less definitive with some data/conclusions masked by the use of anti-hypertensive drugs...

  2. Investigation into Differences in Level of Knowledge about Hypertension between High School Students and Elderly People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanagawa, Akimasa; Ogasawara, Misa; Kusahara, Yuri; Yasumoto, Miki; Iwaki, Soichiro; Fujii, Satoshi

    2017-01-01

     As a major chronic non-communicable disease, hypertension is the most important risk factor for cardiovascular disease, chronic kidney disease, stroke and, if not treated appropriately, premature death. A population-based approach aimed at decreasing high blood pressure among the general population is an important component of any comprehensive plan to prevent hypertension. However, few studies have investigated generational differences in knowledge about, and consciousness of, hypertension. Thus, we conducted a questionnaire survey about hypertension, with the aim of clarifying differences of understanding about hypertension between high school students and elderly people. The results of this investigation suggested that there is indeed a generational difference: knowledge about hypertension, and awareness of its relationship with salt intake, was higher in elderly people than in high school students. Furthermore, our study showed that among high school students, salt intake consciousness correlated with a family history of hypertension. By contrast, in elderly people, salt intake consciousness is related to age and to an awareness of recommended daily salt intake. This study strongly showed that knowledge and consciousness of hypertension varied among generations, with the elderly being more aware and conscientious about salt intake. Acknowledgement of this generational diversity is critical to developing an effective overall preventive strategy for hypertension.

  3. Eplerenone for hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Tina Sc; Wu, May Hy; Masson, Sarah C; Tsang, Matthew P; Stabler, Sarah N; Kinkade, Angus; Tung, Anthony; Tejani, Aaron M

    2017-02-28

    Eplerenone is an aldosterone receptor blocker that is chemically derived from spironolactone. In Canada, it is indicated for use as adjunctive therapy to reduce mortality for heart failure patients with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II systolic chronic heart failure and left ventricular systolic dysfunction. It is also used as adjunctive therapy for patients with heart failure following myocardial infarction. Additionally, it is indicated for the treatment of mild and moderate essential hypertension for patients who cannot be treated adequately with other agents. It is important to determine the clinical impact of all antihypertensive medications, including aldosterone antagonists, to support their continued use in essential hypertension. No previous systematic reviews have evaluated the effect of eplerenone on cardiovascular morbidity, mortality, and magnitude of blood pressure lowering in patients with hypertension. To assess the effects of eplerenone monotherapy versus placebo for primary hypertension in adults. Outcomes of interest were all-cause mortality, cardiovascular events (fatal or non-fatal myocardial infarction), cerebrovascular events (fatal or non fatal strokes), adverse events or withdrawals due to adverse events, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure. We searched the Cochrane Hypertension Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, and two trials registers up to 3 March 2016. We handsearched references from retrieved studies to identify any studies missed in the initial search. We also searched for unpublished data by contacting the corresponding authors of the included studies and pharmaceutical companies involved in conducting studies on eplerenone monotherapy in primary hypertension. The search had no language restrictions. We selected randomized placebo-controlled trials studying adult patients with primary hypertension. We excluded studies in people with secondary or gestational hypertension and studies where participants

  4. Hypertension--forekomst og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Hans; Jørgensen, Torben; Jensen, Gorm B;

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, less than half of all hypertensives have their blood pressure reduced to relevant goals. The prevalence of hypertension in Denmark was found to be between 26% and 40% of the adult population. Just over ...... half were aware of the diagnosis, but less than half were in treatment. Blood pressure control in patients who are undergoing treatment has improved during recent years, but there is still a gap to achievable control rates....

  5. Masked Hypertension in Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Stanley S.; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan; Hansen, Tine W.; Boggia, José; Liu, Yanping; Asayama, Kei; Björklund-Bodegård, Kristina; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Dolan, Eamon; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Stolarz-Skrzypek, Katarzyna; Tikhonoff, Valérie; Malyutina, Sofia; Casiglia, Edoardo; Nikitin, Yuri; Lind, Lars; Sandoya, Edgardo; Kawecka-Jaszcz, Kalina; Filipovský, Jan; Imai, Yutaka; Wang, Jiguang; Ibsen, Hans; O’Brien, Eoin; Staessen, Jan A.

    2013-01-01

    Although distinguishing features of masked hypertension in diabetics are well known, the significance of antihypertensive treatment on clinical practice decisions has not been fully explored. We analyzed 9691 subjects from the population-based 11-country International Database on Ambulatory Blood Pressure in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes. Prevalence of masked hypertension in untreated normotensive participants was higher (Phypertensives tended to be higher than in normotensives (hazard rate [HR], 1.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.97–3.97; P=0.059), similar to untreated stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 1.07; CI, 0.58–1.98; P=0.82), but less than stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.53; CI, 0.29–0.99; P=0.048). In contrast, cardiovascular risk was not significantly different in antihypertensive-treated diabetic-masked hypertensives, as compared with the normotensive comparator group (HR, 1.13; CI, 0.54–2.35; P=0.75), stage 1 hypertensives (HR, 0.91; CI, 0.49–1.69; P=0.76), and stage 2 hypertensives (HR, 0.65; CI, 0.35–1.20; P=0.17). In the untreated diabetic-masked hypertensive population, mean conventional systolic/diastolic blood pressure was 129.2±8.0/76.0±7.3 mm Hg, and mean daytime systolic/diastolic blood pressure 141.5±9.1/83.7±6.5 mm Hg. In conclusion, masked hypertension occurred in 29% of untreated diabetics, had comparable cardiovascular risk as stage 1 hypertension, and would require considerable reduction in conventional blood pressure to reach daytime ambulatory treatment goal. Importantly, many hypertensive diabetics when receiving antihypertensive therapy can present with normalized conventional and elevated ambulatory blood pressure that mimics masked hypertension. PMID:23478096

  6. Management of Hypertension in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Nurike S Mudjari; Nur Samsu

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension-related maternal mortality reaches 16% when it is compared to other causes of maternal mortality such as sepsis, bleeding or abortus. Pregnant women with hypertension disorder are at increased risk for experiencing numerous complications including disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), cerebral hemorrhage, liver dysfunction and acute renal failure; while to the fetus, it may cause intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and perinatal mortality. Hypertension in pregnan...

  7. Hypertension og det metaboliske syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, MH; Jeppesen, J; Larsen, Mogens Lytken

    2009-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a relatively prevalent condition characterized by co-existence of several metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension. Patients with hypertension have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome which, in turn, increases the cardiovascular...... syndrome is of clinical importance as it makes the treating physician test for other elements of the syndrome in patients with one of the elements, e.g. hypertension. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun-15...

  8. Hypertension--forekomst og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Hans; Jørgensen, Torben; Jensen, Gorm B

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, less than half of all hypertensives have their blood pressure reduced to relevant goals. The prevalence of hypertension in Denmark was found to be between 26% and 40% of the adult population. Just over ...... half were aware of the diagnosis, but less than half were in treatment. Blood pressure control in patients who are undergoing treatment has improved during recent years, but there is still a gap to achievable control rates....

  9. Pharmacologic Treatment of Pediatric Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhull, Rachita S; Baracco, Rossana; Jain, Amrish; Mattoo, Tej K

    2016-04-01

    Prevalence of hypertension is increasing in children and adolescents. Uncontrolled hypertension in children not only causes end organ damage but also increases the risk of adult hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Clinical trials have proven efficacy of antihypertensive medications in children. These medications are well tolerated by children with acceptable safety profile. The choice of agent is usually driven by underlying etiology of hypertension, profile of its side effects, and clinician's preference. This article will review currently available pediatric data on mechanism of action, common adverse effects, pediatric indication, recent clinical trial, and newer drugs in the common classes of antihypertensive medications.

  10. Vascular inflammatory cells in hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Harrison

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a common disorder with uncertain etiology. In the last several years, it has become evident that components of both the innate and adaptive immune system play an essential role in hypertension. Macrophages and T cells accumulate in the perivascular fat, the heart and the kidney of hypertensive patients and in animals with experimental hypertension. Various immunosuppressive agents lower blood pressure and prevent end-organ damage. Mice lacking lymphocytes are protected against hypertension, and adoptive transfer of T cells, but not B cells in the animals restores their blood pressure response to stimuli such as angiotensin II or high salt. Recent studies have shown that mice lacking macrophages have blunted hypertension in response to angiotensin II and that genetic deletion of macrophages markedly reduces experimental hypertension. Dendritic cells have also been implicated in this disease. Many hypertensive stimuli have triggering effects on the central nervous system and signals arising from the circumventricular organ seem to promote inflammation. Studies have suggested that central signals activate macrophages and T cells, which home to the kidney and vasculature and release cytokines, including IL-6 and IL-17, which in turn cause renal and vascular dysfunction and lead to blood pressure elevation. These recent discoveries provide a new understanding of hypertension and provide novel therapeutic opportunities for treatment of this serious disease.

  11. Obesity: A Perspective from Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susic, Dinko; Varagic, Jasmina

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity-related hypertension is high worldwide and has become a major health issue. The mechanisms by which obesity relates to hypertensive disease are still under intense research scrutiny, and include altered hemodynamics, impaired sodium homeostasis, renal dysfunction, autonomic nervous system imbalance, endocrine alterations, oxidative stress and inflammation, and vascular injury. Most of these contributing factors interact with each other at multiple levels. Thus, as a multifactorial and complex disease, obesity-related hypertension should be recognized as a distinctive form of hypertension, and specific considerations should apply in planning therapeutic approaches to treat obese individuals with high blood pressure.

  12. Sex differences in hypertension prevalence and control: Analysis of the 2010-2014 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hayon Michelle; Kim, Hyeon Chang; Kang, Dae Ryong

    2017-01-01

    Although not fully understood, sex may affect both the prevalence and control rate of hypertension. The present study was designed to investigate factors associated with hypertension prevalence and control among Korean adults. We analyzed 27,887 individuals (12,089 males and 15,798 females) aged 30 years or older who participated in the fifth (2010-2012) and sixth (2013-2014) Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Multiple logistic regression models were applied to delineate factors associated with the prevalence and control of hypertension separately for men and women. Overall, the prevalence of hypertension was higher in men (34.6%) than in women (30.8%). However, after the age of 60 years, hypertension was more prevalent in females than in males. Regardless of sex, the older the participants were, the more likely they were to have hypertension. Factors positively associated with hypertension prevalence were old age, low education, and high BMI in women (pFactors decreasing hypertension control were white-collared women and young age, alcohol consumption in men. Sex differences in hypertension prevalence and control were discovered among Korean adults. After the age of 60, females were more likely to have hypertension and less likely to maintain hypertension control than males of the same age range. Accordingly, sex-specific approaches are recommended for effective blood pressure management.

  13. Rheumatologic rehabilitation: towards recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Maddali Bongi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatic patients are highly complex and often affected by chronic diseases. Rehabilitation is generally needed for proper management of the underlying disease. This article describes the characteristics of an effective rheumatologic rehabilitation, takes into account data published in international literature, suggests recommendations based on scientific evidence to develop a correct rehabilitation plan for rheumatic patients and proposes the basis to draw up guidelines in the field of rheumatologic rehabilitation.

  14. Recommending Given Names

    CERN Document Server

    Mitzlaff, Folke

    2013-01-01

    All over the world, future parents are facing the task of finding a suitable given name for their child. This choice is influenced by different factors, such as the social context, language, cultural background and especially personal taste. Although this task is omnipresent, little research has been conducted on the analysis and application of interrelations among given names from a data mining perspective. The present work tackles the problem of recommending given names, by firstly mining for inter-name relatedness in data from the Social Web. Based on these results, the name search engine "Nameling" was built, which attracted more than 35,000 users within less than six months, underpinning the relevance of the underlying recommendation task. The accruing usage data is then used for evaluating different state-of-the-art recommendation systems, as well our new \\NR algorithm which we adopted from our previous work on folksonomies and which yields the best results, considering the trade-off between prediction ...

  15. Differences in need for antihypertensive drugs among those aware and unaware of their hypertensive status: a cross sectional survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Norman RC

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lack of antihypertensive use among hypertensive individuals is a major public health problem. It remains unclear as to how much of this lack of treatment is because of failure to diagnose hypertension or failure to initiate drug treatment for those with a diagnosis of hypertension. The primary aim of this study was to determine the proportion of those untreated individuals who would be recommended to start drug therapy for control of blood pressure among those aware or unaware of their diagnosis of hypertension. Methods The Canadian Heart Health Surveys (1986 – 1992, a national, cross-sectional descriptive survey (n = 23 129, was used to determine the proportion of individuals who were untreated, yet satisfied the 2004 Canadian hypertension guidelines for initiating drug therapy. Patients were divided into subgroups of those aware and unaware of having a diagnosis of hypertension according to self reported awareness from the survey. Results Of those with untreated hypertension (= 140/90 mmHg, only 37% were aware of their diagnosis. 74% of untreated individuals aware of their diagnosis of hypertension would require drug therapy, compared to 57% of those who were unaware. Of those >65 years of age, 52% of aware individuals needed drug therapy whereas only 34% of unaware elderly would need drug treatment. Conclusion In both unaware and aware subgroups, the majority of patients with untreated hypertension would benefit from antihypertensive drug therapy according to the 2004 Canadian Hypertension recommendations. The proportion of untreated patients that still need drug therapy was higher among those who were aware compared to those who were unaware. This finding suggests that the major gap in hypertension control may be in initiating drug therapy rather than in diagnosing hypertension. Further studies are needed to confirm these results to ultimately help strategize public health efforts in controlling hypertension.

  16. ESSENTIAL ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION AND RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH HYPERTENSIVE NEPHROPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boban Milojković

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Arterial hypertension is a major risk factor that predisposes to cardiovascular disorders and is responsible for most of the morbidity and mortality in patients. Hypertension is closely associated with the kidney, because kidney disease can be both the cause and consequence of increased blood pressure. Elevation of blood pressure is a strong independent risk factor for hypertensive nephropathy and development of ESRD. The pathogenesis of ischemic hypertensive nephropathy (IHN is multifactoral, and in addition to blood pressure other factors contribute to the development of this renal pathology and its progression to end-stage renal disease. These include obesity, smoking, male gender and other still unknown risk factors. The aim of this paper was to analyse the association between essential arterial hypertension and renal hypertensive disease and prevalence of other atherosclerotic risk factors in patients with developed hypertensive renal disease. In this prospective cross sectional study 283 patients of both genders with diagnosed essential hypertension and hypertensive renal disease were analysed. The anamnestic data related to age, duration of hypertension, history of smoking, presence of hypertensive retinopathy, hypertrophy of the left chamber and data about previous renal diseases were collected through conversation and medical documentation. The clinical examination comprise determination of blood pressure, body mass index (BMI, lipid parameters (total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol and triglycerides, serum urea and creatinine, urine, albumin and protein concentration. The total number of 283 patients (185 males and 98 females with HN was analyzed. The analysis revealed significantly higher proportion of males aged over 60 years with IHN. The mean age of examined hypertensive patients with IHN is 62.6±8.8 years with duration of hypertension 19.8±5.9 years. All examined patients had hypertensive retinopathy and

  17. Diagnosing and Managing Primary Aldosteronism in Hypertensive Patients: a Case-Based Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Robert M

    2016-10-01

    Primary aldosteronism with a prevalence of 8 % of hypertension and 20 % of pharmacologically resistant hypertension is the most common secondary cause of hypertension. Yet, the diagnosis is missed in the vast majority of patients. Current clinical practice guidelines recommend screening for primary aldosteronism in patients with sustained elevation of blood pressure (BP) ≥150/100 mmHg if possible prior to initiation of antihypertensive therapy, and in patients with resistant hypertension, spontaneous or diuretic-induced hypokalemia, adrenal incidentaloma, obstructive sleep apnea, a family history of early onset of hypertension or cerebrovascular accident

  18. High sodium causes hypertension: evidence from clinical trials and animal experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Vamsi; Sridhar, Arvind; Machado, Roberto F; Chen, Jiwang

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension is a cardiovascular disease affecting approximately one out of every seven people worldwide. High-sodium consumption has been generally accepted as a risk factor for developing hypertension. Today, global sodium consumption greatly exceeds guidelines recommended by all medical institutions. This review synthesizes the data of landmark mammalian and human studies which investigated the role of sodium in the pathogenesis of hypertension, along with modern studies questioning this relationship. Recent studies concerning the potential pathways by which high-sodium concentration induces hypertension were reviewed. Human trials and population studies revealed a strong correlation between high blood pressure and average dietary sodium; and animal studies found a dramatic reduction in vascular function in a variety of mammals treated with high-sodium diets. In spite of a few contrarian studies, we found overwhelming evidence that elevated sodium consumption could cause hypertension.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions pulmonary arterial hypertension pulmonary arterial hypertension Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive disorder characterized by abnormally high ...

  20. Liquorice: a root cause of secondary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Calum N.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a patient presenting with hypertension and hypokalaemia who was ultimately diagnosed with liquorice- induced pseudohyperaldosteronism. This rare cause of secondary hypertension illustrates the importance of a methodical approach to the assessment of hypertension. PMID:28210494

  1. Prevalence factors associated with Hypertension in Rukungiri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hypertension is a growing public health problem in Uganda ... Hypertension was defined as systolic blood pressure (BP) equal or greater ... Logistic regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with hypertension.

  2. Hypertension in the African American population: A succinct look at its epidemiology, pathogenesis, and therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ortega, Luis M; Emad Sedki; Ali Nayer

    2015-01-01

    Arterial hypertension is prevalent in the black population in the United States. It is directly related to cardiovascular and kidney damage. Its pathogenesis is complex and includes the high incidence of obesity, salt sensitivity and the activation of the renin-angiotensinaldosterone system. This complexity requires a therapeutic combination that includes changes in dietary habits and appropriate antihypertensive regimes. The International Society of Hypertension in Blacks recommends initiati...

  3. Pulmonary hypertensive crisis following ethanol sclerotherapy for a complex vascular malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero-Schmidt, G; Wallenstein, M B; Ozen, M; Shah, N A; Jackson, E; Hovsepian, D M; Palma, J P

    2014-09-01

    Anhydrous ethanol is a commonly used sclerotic agent for treating vascular malformations. We describe the case of a full-term 15-day-old female with a complex venolymphatic malformation involving the face and orbit. During treatment of the lesion with ethanol sclerotherapy, she suffered acute pulmonary hypertensive crisis. We discuss the pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension related to ethanol sclerotherapy, and propose that hemolysis plays a significant role. Recommendations for evaluation, monitoring and management of this complication are also discussed.

  4. [Treatment of systemic hypertension associated with kidney disease in the dog and cat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoncompagni, S; Bowles, M H

    2014-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is an increasingly diagnosed disorder in dogs and cats and frequently occurs secondary to chronic kidney disease. Prevention of damage to organs such as the kidneys, brain, heart, and eyes is one of the primary concerns in the management of veterinary patients with hypertension. This article reviews the guidelines for antihypertensive therapy in patients with, or at risk for, kidney disease, including the initiation of treatment and currently recommended medications.

  5. Evaluation and management of pediatric hypertensive crises: hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel NH

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nirali H Patel,1 Sarah K Romero,2 David C Kaelber31Division of Emergency Medicine, Akron Children's Hospital, Akron, OH, USA; 2Division of Emergency Medicine, Rainbow Babies and Children's Hospital, Cleveland, OH, USA; 3Departments of Information Services, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and Epidemiology and Biostatistics, The Center for Clinical Informatics Research and Education, The MetroHealth System and School of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH, USAAbstract: Hypertension (HTN in the pediatric population is estimated to have a world-wide prevalence of 2%-5%. As with adults, pediatric patients with HTN can present with hypertensive crises include hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergencies. However, pediatric blood pressure problems have a greater chance of being from secondary causes of HTN, as opposed to primary HTN, than in adults. Thorough evaluation of a child with a hypertensive emergency includes accurate blood pressure readings, complete and focused symptom history, and appropriate past medical, surgical, and family history. Physical exam should include height, weight, four-limb blood pressures, a general overall examination and especially detailed cardiovascular and neurological examinations, including fundoscopic examination. Initial work-up should typically include electrocardiography, chest X-ray, serum chemistries, complete blood count, and urinalysis. Initial management of hypertensive emergencies generally includes the use of intravenous or oral antihypertensive medications, as well as appropriate, typically outpatient, follow-up. Emergency department goals for hypertensive crises are to (1 safely lower blood pressure, and (2 treat/minimize acute end organ damage, while (3 identifying underlying etiology. Intravenous antihypertensive medications are the treatment modality of choice for hypertensive emergencies with the goal of reducing systolic blood pressure by 25% of the original value over an 8

  6. Rationale for combination therapy as initial treatment for hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Thomas D

    2003-01-01

    Recent hypertension guidelines recommend initiating antihypertensive therapy with a combination of two or more agents in patients whose blood pressure exceeds their appropriate blood pressure goal by 20/10 mm Hg. This recommendation is based on the knowledge that the majority of patients with blood pressures of this magnitude will not achieve sufficient blood pressure reduction with monotherapy. Further, compared with high-dose monotherapy, combination therapy is often associated with fewer adverse effects and, for this reason, may improve patient adherence. Bringing patients to blood pressure goal quickly is likely to improve clinical outcomes. This article discusses the rationale for using combination antihypertensive therapy as initial therapy for high blood pressure in selected patients and reviews data from a study of 364 high-risk patients with Stage 2 hypertension in which a fixed-dose combination product (amlodipine besylate/benazepril HCl) proved more successful as initial therapy than high-dose monotherapy (amlodipine besylate) in reducing blood pressure.

  7. Prevalence and persistence of masked hypertension in treated hypertensive patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberk, Willem J.; Thien, Theo; Kroon, Abraham A.; Lenders, Jacques W. M.; van Montfrans, Gert A.; Smit, Andries J.; de Leeuw, Peter W.

    2007-01-01

    Background: Masked hypertension (MH) is defined as a normal blood pressure in the physician's office and an elevated blood pressure when measured out-of-office. The cause of MH may be termed the masked hypertension effect (MHE), and is not restricted to blood-pressure (BP) values around the threshol

  8. Hypertension and hypertensive heart disease in African women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliwa, Karen; Ojji, Dike; Bachelier, Katrin; Böhm, Michael; Damasceno, Albertino; Stewart, Simon

    2014-07-01

    Hypertension and hypertensive heart disease is one of the main contributors to a growing burden of non-communicable forms of cardiovascular disease around the globe. The recently published global burden of disease series showed a 33 % increase of hypertensive disorders in pregnancy in the past two decades with long-term consequences. Africans, particularly younger African women, appear to be bearing the brunt of this increasing public health problem. Hypertensive heart disease is particularly problematic in pregnancy and is an important contributor to maternal case-fatality. European physicians increasingly need to attend to patients from African decent and need to know about unique aspects of disease presentation and pharmacological as well as non-pharmacological care. Reductions in salt consumption, as well as timely detection and treatment of hypertension and hypertensive heart disease remain a priority for effective primary and secondary prevention of CVD (particularly stroke and CHF) in African women. This article reviews the pattern, potential causes and consequences and treatment of hypertension and hypertensive heart disease in African women, identifying the key challenges for effective primary and secondary prevention in this regard.

  9. Essential hypertensive controlled and normotensive patients. If there are differences?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Syvolap

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM is a modern method of blood pressure (BP investigation recommended by international scientific associations for diagnostics of essential hypertension (EH. However, there are some methodological aspects which are not regulated. Particularly, ABPM parameters have not yet established for those patients in different age groups and pathologies. The aim of the study was to determine peculiarities of ABPM parameters in treated controlled hypertensive and normotensive patients. Materials and methods. 71 patients were included into the study and divided into two groups according to the level of 24-h systolic BP (SBP and 24-h diastolic BP (DBP. There were 50 controlled patients with EH in the first group and 21 normotensive individuals without EH in the second group. Results. In EH patients and normotensive individuals we had statistician difference of such parameters, like the hypertension time index (TI of day SBP parameters (20 (8–31 % vs. 8 (4–18 %; р=0.040; of the square index (SI of hypertension (24 (11–41 mm2/h vs. 8 (2–23 mm2/h; р=0.021; of the square index normalized (SIN of hypertension (1.4 (0.6–2.4 U vs. 0.4 (0.1–1.2 U; р=0.018, and the morning surge of SBP (45±14 mm Hg vs. 37±14 mm Hg; р=0.028, respectively. There is no different in other ABPM parameters. Conclusion. The present data shows that treated controlled hypertensive patients and individuals without EH have statistician difference only in daily SBP of hypertensive indexes (TI, SI, SIN and the morning surge of SBP. The other ABPM parameters, included new one, such as the arterial stiffness index, did not represent statistical difference between groups.

  10. Device-Guided Breathing for Hypertension: a Summary Evidence Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahtani, Kamal R; Beinortas, Tumas; Bauza, Karolis; Nunan, David

    2016-04-01

    Persistently raised blood pressure is one of the major risk factors for diseases such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Uncontrolled hypertension is also associated with high rates of mortality, particularly in middle and high-income countries. Lifestyle factors such as poor diet, obesity, physical inactivity and smoking are all thought to contribute to the development of hypertension. As a result, the management of hypertension should begin with modifying these lifestyle factors. Beyond this, drug interventions are used as the predominant form of management. However, adherence to medications can be highly variable, medication side effects are common, and may require regular monitoring or, in some individuals may be ineffective. Therefore, additional non-pharmacologic interventions that lower blood pressure may be advantageous when combined with lifestyle modifications. Such interventions may include relaxation therapies such as slow breathing exercises, which can be initiated by means of specific devices. The technique of device-guided breathing (DGB) has been considered by guideline developers in the management of hypertension. One specific device, the Resperate, has received US FDA and UK NHS approval over the last few years. In this review, we summarise the evidence base on efficacy and find that although some clinical trials exist that demonstrate a BP-lowering effect, others do not. There is currently insufficient evidence from pooled data to recommend the routine use of device-guided breathing in hypertensive patients.

  11. Estimating Probabilities in Recommendation Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Mingxuan; Kidwell, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Recommendation systems are emerging as an important business application with significant economic impact. Currently popular systems include Amazon's book recommendations, Netflix's movie recommendations, and Pandora's music recommendations. In this paper we address the problem of estimating probabilities associated with recommendation system data using non-parametric kernel smoothing. In our estimation we interpret missing items as randomly censored observations and obtain efficient computation schemes using combinatorial properties of generating functions. We demonstrate our approach with several case studies involving real world movie recommendation data. The results are comparable with state-of-the-art techniques while also providing probabilistic preference estimates outside the scope of traditional recommender systems.

  12. Fermented milk for hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usinger, Lotte; Reimer, Christina; Ibsen, Hans

    2012-04-18

    Fermented milk has been suggested to have a blood pressure lowering effect through increased content of proteins and peptides produced during the bacterial fermentation. Hypertension is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular disease world wide and new blood pressure reducing lifestyle interventions, such as fermented milk, would be of great importance. To investigate whether fermented milk or similar products produced by lactobacilli fermentation of milk proteins has any blood pressure lowering effect in humans when compared to no treatment or placebo. The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), English language databases, including MEDLINE (1966-2011), EMBASE (1974-2011), Cochrane Complementary Medicine Trials Register, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED) (1985-2011), Food science and technology abstracts (1969-2011). Randomised controlled trials; cross over and parallel studies evaluating the effect on blood pressure of fermented milk in humans with an intervention period of 4 weeks or longer. Data was extracted individually by two authors, afterwards agreement had to be obtained before imputation in the review. A modest overall effect of fermented milk on SBP was found (MD -2.45; 95% CI -4.30 to -0.60), no effect was evident on DBP (MD -0.67; 95% CI -1.48, 0.14). The review does not support an effect of fermented milk on blood pressure. Despite the positive effect on SBP the authors conclude, for several reasons, that fermented milk has no effect on blood pressure. The effect found was very modest and only on SBP, the included studies were very heterogeneous and several with weak methodology. Finally, sensitivity and subgroup analyses could not reproduce the antihypertensive effect. The results do not give notion to the use of fermented milk as treatment for hypertension or as a lifestyle intervention for pre-hypertension nor would it influence population blood pressure.

  13. Psychological Factors in Essential Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbaros Özdemir

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Essential hypertension is one of the most emphasized psychosomatic disorders. Age, sexuality, excessive salt and alcohol consumption, lower activity level, fatigue, personality traits, emotional factors and stress are some of the risk factors for essential hypertension. The presence of emotional factors in the etiology of the essential hypertension and the emergence of psychiatric symptoms in the course of the illness has driven considerable attention from mental health workers on the disease for a long time. Some of the personality traits that make a person vulnerable to hypertension are being over controlled, being submissive, and hardworking. Hypertension is accepted to be a reaction against suppressed emotions and an adaptive and defense mechanism of the body. Among persons who are prone to hypertension, sympathetic nerve system is affected as a response to emotional stress and hypertension appears as a result of vasoconstriction and other autonomous responses. All at once, it was also shown that vasoconstrictor response continues much longer in hypertensive individuals than in normotensive patients. Autonomic response to stress almost always displays itself as hypertension in individuals who are prone to hypertension. Moreover, normotensive children of hypertensive parents also have elevation in blood pressures as a response to emotional stress almost without exception. The increase in sympathetic stimulus, re-modulation of bar receptors by structural and functional changes are the main features of the most commonly valid hypothesis in essential hypertension, currently. According to this hypothesis: as a result of emotional stress, inhibition over vasomotor center decreases and output of stimulus increases; epigenetic changes in endothelial structure of carotid sinus and/or aortic arch and/or vasomotor centers occurs; and finally stress increases sympathetic stimulus output. This situation leads to neurohormonal excitation; increases in

  14. Nocturnal Hypertension: Neglected Issue in Comprehensive Hypertension Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Kristanto

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The body circardian rhythm affects blood pressure variability at day and night, therefore blood pressure at day and night might be different. Nocturnal hypertension is defined as increase of blood pressure >120/70mmHg at night, which is caused by disturbed circadian rhythm, and associated with higher cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events also mortality in hypertensive patients. Nocturnal hypertension and declining blood pressure pattern, can only be detected by continuous examination for 24 hours, also known as ambulatory blood pressure measurement (ABPM. Chronotherapy, has become a strategy for managing the hypertensive nocturnal patients, by taking hypertensive medication at night to obtain normal blood pressure decrease in accordance with the normal circadian rhythm and, improving blood pressure control.

  15. Pharmacotherapy for mild hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Diao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: People with no previous cardiovascular events or cardiovascular disease represent a primary prevention population. The benefits and harms of treating mild hypertension in primary prevention patients are not known at present. This review examines the existing randomized controlled trial (RCT evidence. OBJECTIVE: Primary objective: To quantify the effects of antihypertensive drug therapy on mortality and morbidity in adults with mild hypertension (systolic blood pressure (BP 140-159 mmHg and/or diastolic BP 90-99 mmHg and without cardiovascular disease. METHODS: Search: We searched CENTRAL (2011, Issue 1, MEDLINE (1948 to May 2011, EMBASE (1980 to May 2011 and reference lists of articles. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE were searched for previous reviews and meta-analyses of anti-hypertensive drug treatment compared to placebo or no treatment trials up until the end of 2011. Selection criteria: RCTs of at least 1 year duration. Data collection and analysis: The outcomes assessed were mortality, stroke, coronary heart disease (CHD, total cardiovascular events (CVS, and withdrawals due to adverse effects. MAIN RESULTS: Of 11 RCTs identified 4 were included in this review, with 8,912 participants. Treatment for 4 to 5 years with antihypertensive drugs as compared to placebo did not reduce total mortality (RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.63, 1.15. In 7,080 participants treatment with antihypertensive drugs as compared to placebo did not reduce coronary heart disease (RR 1.12, 95% CI 0.80, 1.57, stroke (RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.24, 1.08, or total cardiovascular events (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.72, 1.32. Withdrawals due to adverse effects were increased by drug therapy (RR 4.80, 95% CI 4.14, 5.57, ARR 9%. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Antihypertensive drugs used in the treatment of adults (primary prevention with mild hypertension (systolic BP 140-159 mmHg and/or diastolic BP 90-99 mmHg have not been

  16. Incranial hypertension management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gonçalves Nordon

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Intracranial hypertension is a hazardous and common situation in the emergency room. Every effort must be made in order to avoid or reduce its secondary lesions. Advanced Trauma Life Support in the first evaluation is important, along with head computerized tomography, which is useful to identify surgical cases or anatomical lesions, and intracranial pressure monitoring. Mannitol is the mostly used drug to reduce intracranial pressure, but it must be used attentively, otherwise it may cause hypovolemic shock. Barbiturate coma and decompressive craniectomy are reserved to the refractory cases, as second tier procedures.

  17. Pharmacotherapy for mild hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Diao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: People with no previous cardiovascular events or cardiovascular disease represent a primary prevention population. The benefits and harms of treating mild hypertension in primary prevention patients are not known at present. This review examines the existing randomized controlled trial (RCT evidence. OBJECTIVE: Primary objective: To quantify the effects of antihypertensive drug therapy on mortality and morbidity in adults with mild hypertension (systolic blood pressure (BP 140-159 mmHg and/or diastolic BP 90-99 mmHg and without cardiovascular disease. METHODS: Search: We searched CENTRAL (2011, Issue 1, MEDLINE (1948 to May 2011, EMBASE (1980 to May 2011 and reference lists of articles. The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE were searched for previous reviews and meta-analyses of anti-hypertensive drug treatment compared to placebo or no treatment trials up until the end of 2011. Selection criteria: RCTs of at least 1 year duration. Data collection and analysis: The outcomes assessed were mortality, stroke, coronary heart disease (CHD, total cardiovascular events (CVS, and withdrawals due to adverse effects. MAIN RESULTS: Of 11 RCTs identified 4 were included in this review, with 8,912 participants. Treatment for 4 to 5 years with antihypertensive drugs as compared to placebo did not reduce total mortality (RR 0.85, 95% CI 0.63, 1.15. In 7,080 participants treatment with antihypertensive drugs as compared to placebo did not reduce coronary heart disease (RR 1.12, 95% CI 0.80, 1.57, stroke (RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.24, 1.08, or total cardiovascular events (RR 0.97, 95% CI 0.72, 1.32. Withdrawals due to adverse effects were increased by drug therapy (RR 4.80, 95% CI 4.14, 5.57, ARR 9%. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Antihypertensive drugs used in the treatment of adults (primary prevention with mild hypertension (systolic BP 140-159 mmHg and/or diastolic BP 90-99 mmHg have not been

  18. The growing epidemic of hypertension among children and adolescents: a challenging road ahead.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assadi, Farahnak

    2012-10-01

    Currently, it is clear that primary hypertension begins in childhood and that it contributes to the early development of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Hypertension also increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and that risk rises as blood pressure levels escalate. As among adult patients, overweight and obesity rates are on the rise among children and adolescents with primary hypertension and can develop target organ damage including left ventricular hypertrophy. An elevated level of C-reactive protein (CRP) and microalbuminuria are early manifestations of cardiovascular disease and CKD in hypertensive patients. Lifestyle interventions are recommended for all children with hypertension. Pharmacologic therapy should be added for symptomatic children, those with stage 2 hypertension, and children with prehypertension and stage 1 hypertension who exhibit an insufficient response to lifestyle modifications. Although the recommendations for choice of drugs generally are similar for children and adults, dosages for children should be lower, based on weight, and adjusted very carefully. Medications that are effective and safe for children and adolescents include thiazide diuretics, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin receptor blockers, beta-blockers, and calcium channel-blockers. Hypertension is not being detected early enough for initiation of a treatment regimen to reduce death and disability. Initiatives should be undertaken to make health care providers and the general population more aware of the seriousness of hypertension in children and adolescents. This review focuses on the principles underlying the importance of a team approach for hypertension control, especially one that incorporates increased data sharing using enhanced health information technology for early detection and intervention.

  19. Severe obesity in children: prevalence, persistence and relation to hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Joan C. Lo; Chandra, Malini; Sinaiko, Alan; Daniels, Stephen R.; Prineas, Ronald J; Maring, Benjamin; Parker, Emily D; Sherwood, Nancy E.; Daley, Matthew F.; Kharbanda, Elyse O.; Adams, Kenneth F.; David J. Magid; O’Connor, Patrick J; Greenspan, Louise C

    2014-01-01

    Background Newer approaches for classifying gradations of pediatric obesity by level of body mass index (BMI) percentage above the 95th percentile have recently been recommended in the management and tracking of obese children. Examining the prevalence and persistence of severe obesity using such methods along with the associations with other cardiovascular risk factors such as hypertension is important for characterizing the clinical significance of severe obesity classification methods. Met...

  20. How to manage hypertension with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricco, Jean-Baptiste; Belmonte, Romain; Illuminati, Guilio; Barral, Xavier; Schneider, Fabrice; Chavent, Bertrand

    2017-04-01

    The management of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) in patients with hypertension has been the topic of great controversy. Major contemporary clinical trials such as the Cardiovascular Outcomes for Renal Artery lesions (CORAL) and Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Atherosclerotic lesions (ASTRAL) have failed to show significant benefit of revascularization over medical management in controlling blood pressure and preserving renal function. We present here the implications and limitations of these trials and formulate recommendations for management of ARAS.

  1. Disulfiram induced reversible hypertension: A prospective case study and brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranganath R Kulkarni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Disulfiram (DSF is one of the recommended aids in the management of alcohol dependence. Hypertension may be a clinically significant, dose-dependent, and usually reversible adverse event of DSF therapy. We report 6 month prospective study of normotensive case of comorbid alcohol and tobacco dependence that developed reversible stage-II hypertension within 2-4 weeks of DSF therapy. We suggest that regular monitoring of blood pressure at least fortnightly for 1 st 3 months, followed by monthly for next 3 months, and later once in 3 months, may possibly detect "silent" adverse event of DSF - hypertension.

  2. Disulfiram Induced Reversible Hypertension: A Prospective Case Study and Brief Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Ranganath R.; Bairy, Bhavya K.

    2013-01-01

    Disulfiram (DSF) is one of the recommended aids in the management of alcohol dependence. Hypertension may be a clinically significant, dose-dependent, and usually reversible adverse event of DSF therapy. We report 6 month prospective study of normotensive case of comorbid alcohol and tobacco dependence that developed reversible stage-II hypertension within 2-4 weeks of DSF therapy. We suggest that regular monitoring of blood pressure at least fortnightly for 1st 3 months, followed by monthly for next 3 months, and later once in 3 months, may possibly detect “silent” adverse event of DSF – hypertension. PMID:24049238

  3. Mechanisms and management of hypertension in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbari-Oskoui, Frederic; Williams, Olubunmi; Chapman, Arlene

    2014-12-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most commonly inherited kidney disease, characterized by progressive cyst growth and renal enlargement, resulting in renal failure. Hypertension is common and occurs early, prior to loss of kidney function. Whether hypertension in ADPKD is a primary vasculopathy secondary to mutations in the polycystin genes or secondary to activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system by cyst expansion and intrarenal ischemia is unclear. Dysregulation of the primary cilium causing endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction is a component of ADPKD. In this article, we review the epidemiology, pathophysiology and clinical characteristics of hypertension in ADPKD and give specific recommendations for its treatment.

  4. The contribution of the ACCOMPLISH trial to the treatment of stage 2 hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, James Brian; Bakris, George; Jamerson, Kenneth

    2014-03-01

    The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation, and Treatment of High Blood Pressure (JNC 7) recommended a thiazide-like diuretic, alone or in combination with other antihypertensive drug classes, as initial therapy for hypertension. JNC 7, however, did not specify preferred combinations. The Avoiding Cardiovascular Events through Combination Therapy in Patients Living with Systolic Hypertension (ACCOMPLISH) trial was completed five years after the JNC 7 and demonstrated a 20 % advantage in cardiovascular risk reduction when blood pressure was lowered using the single-pill combination of benazepril-amlodipine compared to benazepril-hydrochlorothiazide (Jamerson et al. 359(23):2417-28 [1]). This new and significant finding provided compelling evidence that the long-standing preference for diuretics as initial therapy could be refuted, but it may also be relevant to the lower-than-expected reduction in coronary disease related events (compared to stroke) observed for decades prior to the ACCOMPLISH approach to therapy. The JNC 8 panel members recently published their recommendations, and while the group did not recommend benazepril-hydrochlorothiazide over other combinations, they did highlight the findings of ACCOMPLISH, rating the primary ACCOMPLISH paper as "good." The American Society of Hypertension position paper and the European Hypertension Society guidelines endorse such combinations as a first-line agent for patients with stage 2 hypertension. We review the current position of ACCOMPLISH in the guidelines regarding treatment of stage 2 hypertension.

  5. Approach to Severe Hypertension in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammet Şükrü Paksu

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Severe symptomatic hypertension which is also called hypertensive crisis is an acute elevation in blood pressure to a level that has the potential to cause end-organ damage. Although not common in childhood, it is a life-threatening medical emergency. Hypertensive crises are classically distinguished into hypertensive urgency and hypertensive emergency depending on end-organ involvement including central nervous system (CNS, heart, eye, and kidney. A severe elevation in blood pressure without evidence of acute target organ damage describes hypertensive urgency. Hypertensive emergency is defined as severe hypertension complicated with severe symptoms or acute target organ dysfunction. (Journal of Current Pediatrics 2011; 9: 133-6

  6. Intracranial Hypertension in Children without Papilledema

    OpenAIRE

    Chelse, Ana B.; Epstein, Leon G.

    2015-01-01

    Researchers at Nationwide Children's Memorial Hospital studied the frequency of intracranial hypertension without papilledema in children followed in a multispecialty pediatric intracranial hypertension clinic.

  7. Personalized professional content recommendation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Songhua

    2015-10-27

    A personalized content recommendation system includes a client interface configured to automatically monitor a user's information data stream transmitted on the Internet. A hybrid contextual behavioral and collaborative personal interest inference engine resident to a non-transient media generates automatic predictions about the interests of individual users of the system. A database server retains the user's personal interest profile based on a plurality of monitored information. The system also includes a server programmed to filter items in an incoming information stream with the personal interest profile and is further programmed to identify only those items of the incoming information stream that substantially match the personal interest profile.

  8. Clinical Recommendation: Vulvovaginitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckerman, Andrea; Romano, Mary

    2016-12-01

    Vulvovaginitis is a commonly encountered condition among prepubertal and adolescent females. The objective of this report is to provide the latest evidence regarding the diagnosis and management of vulvovaginitis in prepubertal and adolescent females. In this systematic review we used the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation evidence system. Vulvovaginal complaints are common in the pediatric and adolescent age group. The patient's age in conjunction with history and associated complaints will guide evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment. Treatment should include counseling on hygiene and voiding techniques as well as therapy for any specific pathogens identified.

  9. Archetypal Game Recommender Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sifa, Rafet; Bauckhage, C.; Drachen, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary users (players, consumers) of digital games have thousands of products to choose from, which makes nding games that t their interests challenging. Towards addressing this challenge, in this paper two dierent formulations of Archetypal Analysis for Top-L recommender tasks using implicit...... feedback are presented: factor- and neighborhood-oriented models. These form the rst application of rec- ommender systems to digital games. Both models are tested on a dataset of 500,000 users of the game distribution platform Steam, covering game ownership and playtime data across more than 3000 games...

  10. Mining and representing recommendations in actively evolving recommender systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assent, Ira

    2010-01-01

    ) recommender connections. In this work, we propose mining such active systems to generate easily understandable representations of the recommender network. Users may review these representations to provide active feedback. This approach further enhances the quality of recommendations, especially as topics......Recommender systems provide an automatic means of filtering out interesting items, usually based on past similarity of user ratings. In previous work, we have suggested a model that allows users to actively build a recommender network. Users express trust, obtain transparency, and grow (anonymous...... of interest change over time. Most notably, it extends the amount of control users have over the model that the recommender network builds of their interests....

  11. The Immune System in Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  12. The Immune System in Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Daniel W.; Harrison, David G.

    2014-01-01

    While hypertension has predominantly been attributed to perturbations of the vasculature, kidney, and central nervous system, research for almost 50 yr has shown that the immune system also contributes to this disease. Inflammatory cells accumulate in the kidneys and vasculature of humans and experimental animals with hypertension and likely…

  13. HYPERTENSION IN RENAL ALLOGRAFT RECIPIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Objective To further evaluate the effect of hypertension on renal graft function, and the relationship between hypertension, hyperlipoidemia and ischemic heart disease. Methods 102 renal transplant recipients with a functioning renal graft for more than 1 year were enrolled in this study. Renal function was followed for the further 24 months. Results The overall prevalence of hypertension was 89.2%(91/102) and 36.2%(33/91) hypertensive patients had uncontrolled blood pressure. After 24 months those with high blood pressure had significantly higher Scr levels than normotensive patients (P<0.05). The number of different antihypertensive classes required was related to Scr (P<0.05). Plasma cholesterol levels in hypertension patients especially in blood pressure uncontrolled group were significantly elevated (P<0.01). Ischemic heart disease was more common in hypertensive patients (P<0.05). Cyclosporine A was associated with hypertension more frequently than azathioprine and FK506, whereas low-dose prednisolone did not appear to influence blood pressure. Conclusion The data further confirmed that hypertension was associated with hyperlipidemia and ischemic heart disease, and emerged as a predictor of renal graft dysfunction. Whether cyclosporine A should be converted to new immunosuppressive agents and which class of antihypertensive medication is more effective in this population remain open questions.

  14. Inflammation in hypertension: primary evidence

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian-jun

    2006-01-01

    @@ Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of hospitalization and a major contributor to mortality in the western world. Since hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease,kidney failure and stroke, control of hypertension is an important goal of cardiovascular therapies.

  15. Current practice for pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Toru Satoh

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the current practice of pulmonary hypertension including current epidemiology,diagnosis and treatment.Data sources The review was based on data obtained from the published articles and guidelines.Study selection Articles with high level of evidence or current best evidence in each issue were selected to be reviewed.Results Overall prevalence of pulmonary hypertension was 0.3% to 6% with left heart disease occupying the most proportion,followed by pulmonary disease,pulmonary arterial hypertension and chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.In diagnosis,a flow diagram of diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension,differential diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension and how to determine the severity of pulmonary hypertension are explained including recent development of magnetic resonance imaging and gene abnormality study on bone morphogenetic protein receptor Ⅱ.In treatment,newlydeveloped pulmonary vasodilators and the way to use them are shown to treat pulmonary hypertension.Conclusion Safer and more effective treatment algorithm and basic researches and clinical trials are warranted to be explored.

  16. Endocrine causes of secondary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Domenic A

    2008-07-01

    Secondary hypertension is common in clinical practice if a broad definition is applied. Various patterns of hypertension exist in the patient with an endocrine source of their disease, including new-onset hypertension in a previously normotensive individual, a loss of blood pressure control in a patient with previously well-controlled blood pressure, and/or labile blood pressure in the setting of either of these 2 patterns. A thorough history and physical exam, which can rule out concomitant medications, alcohol intake, and over-the-counter medication use, is an important prerequisite to the workup for endocrine causes of hypertension. Endocrine forms of secondary hypertension, such as pheochromocytoma and Cushing's disease, are extremely uncommon. Conversely, primary aldosteronism now occurs with sufficient frequency so as to be considered "top of the list" for secondary endocrine causes in otherwise difficult-to-treat or resistant hypertension. Primary aldosteronism can be insidious in its presentation since a supposed hallmark finding, hypokalemia, may be variable in its presentation. It is important to identify secondary causes of hypertension that are endocrine in nature because surgical intervention may result in correction or substantial improvement of the hypertension.

  17. Masked hypertension in diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franklin, Stanley S; Thijs, Lutgarde; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    Although distinguishing features of masked hypertension in diabetics are well known, the significance of antihypertensive treatment on clinical practice decisions has not been fully explored. We analyzed 9691 subjects from the population-based 11-country International Database on Ambulatory Blood...... Pressure in Relation to Cardiovascular Outcomes. Prevalence of masked hypertension in untreated normotensive participants was higher (P...

  18. Pulmonary arterial hypertension : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoendermis, E. S.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), defined as group 1 of the World Heart Organisation (WHO) classification of pulmonary hypertension, is an uncommon disorder of the pulmonary vascular system. It is characterised by an increased pulmonary artery pressure, increased pulmonary vascular resistance a

  19. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agita, Arisya; Alsagaff, M Thaha

    2017-04-01

    The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs) that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  20. Inflammation, Immunity, and Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arisya Agita

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The immune system, inflammation and hypertension are related to each other. Innate and adaptive immunity system triggers an inflammatory process, in which blood pressure may increase, stimulating organ damage. Cells in innate immune system produce ROS, such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, which aimed at killing pathogens. Long-term inflammation process increases ROS production, causing oxidative stress which leads to endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial function is to regulate blood vessel tone and structure. When inflammation lasts, NO bioavailability decreases, disrupting its main function as vasodilator, so that blood vessels relaxation and vasodilatation are absent. Effector T cells and regulatory lymphocytes, part of the adaptive immune system, plays role in blood vessels constriction in hypertension. Signals from central nervous system and APC activates effector T lymphocyte differentiation and accelerate through Th-1 and Th-17 phenotypes. Th-1 and Th-17 effectors participate in inflammation which leads to increased blood pressure. One part of CD4+ is the regulatory T cells (Tregs that suppress immune response activation as they produce immunosuppressive cytokines, such as TGF-β and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs cells can reduce oxidative stress in blood vessels, endothelial dysfunction, infiltration of aortic macrophages and T cells as well as proinflammatory cytokine levels in plasma circulation.

  1. Dopamine, hypertension and obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, F; Fouillioux, C; Bolívar, A; Simonovis, N; Hernández-Hernández, R; Armas-Hernandez, M J; Velasco, M

    2002-03-01

    Dopamine, a neurotransmitter, precursor of noradrenaline, is responsible for cardiovascular and renal actions, such as increase in myocardial contractility and cardiac output, without changes in heart rate, producing passive and active vasodilatation, diuresis and natriuresis. These cardiovascular and renal actions take place through the interaction with dopamine receptors, D(1), D(2), D(3), D(4), and D(5). Recent findings point to the possibility of D(6) and D(7)receptors. Dopamine is known to influence the control of arterial pressure by influencing the central and peripheral nervous system and target organs such as kidneys and adrenal glands, in some types of hypertension. Although dopamine and its derivatives have been shown to have antihypertensive effects, these are still being studied; therefore it is important to explain some physiological and pharmacological aspects of dopamine, its receptors, and the clinical uses it could have in the treatment of arterial hypertension and more recently in obesity, based on evidence proving a clear association between obesity and the decrease in the expression of D(2) receptors in the brain of obese persons.

  2. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Challenges in managing pulmonary hypertension in the developing countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sastry K S Bhagavatula

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is scant published data about pulmonary hypertension (PH from the developing countries. True prevalence of the disease, its biology, etiology and response to treatment are not well known, and they are likely to be somewhat different from that of the developed countries. In this review, we will discuss the main challenges for managing PH in developing countries and propose real-life recommendations to deal with such difficulties.

  3. New Standards for Diagnosing Hypertension Are Met with Skepticism | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Members of the Eighth Joint National Committee recently released new standards for treating hypertension, also referred to as high blood pressure (BP). The new standards do not recommend treatment changes for individuals under 60 years of age. However, treatment changes were recommended for people over the age of 60 who do not have conditions such as diabetes or chronic kidney disease (CKD), but whose BP numbers are 150/90 or higher. This BP threshold is up from the previously recommended threshold of 140/90. The panel also recommended that for people over 60 years of age who have diabetes or CKD, treatment should begin when BP is 140/90, which is an increase from 130/80. Treatment may involve lifestyle changes and/or medication to bring the BP numbers into a healthy range.

  4. Liver cirrhosis and arterial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    2006-01-01

    blood pressure. This review considers the alterations in systemic hemodynamics in patients with cirrhosis in relation to essential hypertension and arterial hypertension of the renal origin. Subjects with arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development...... of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homoeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial hypertension. This most......Characteristic findings in patients with cirrhosis are vasodilatation with low overall systemic vascular resistance, high arterial compliance, increased cardiac output, secondary activation of counter-regulatory systems (renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic nervous system, release...

  5. Liver cirrhosis and arterial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren

    2006-01-01

    blood pressure. This review considers the alterations in systemic hemodynamics in patients with cirrhosis in relation to essential hypertension and arterial hypertension of the renal origin. Subjects with arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development...... of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homoeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial hypertension. This most...... likely includes the combination of vasodilatation and vasoconstriction in parallel. Arterial compliance; Central vascular filling; Chyperdynamic circulation; Kidney function, Nitric oxide; Blood pressure regulation; Renin–angiotensin–aldosterone system; Sympathetic nervous system; Vasodilatation...

  6. Exercise, the Brain, and Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peri-Okonny, Poghni; Fu, Qi; Zhang, Rong; Vongpatanasin, Wanpen

    2015-10-01

    Exercise training is the cornerstone in the prevention and management of hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. However, blood pressure (BP) response to exercise is exaggerated in hypertension often to the range that raises the safety concern, which may prohibit patients from regular exercise. This augmented pressor response is shown to be related to excessive sympathetic stimulation caused by overactive muscle reflex. Exaggerated sympathetic-mediated vasoconstriction further contributes to the rise in BP during exercise in hypertension. Exercise training has been shown to reduce both exercise pressor reflex and attenuate the abnormal vasoconstriction. Hypertension also contributes to cognitive impairment, and exercise training has been shown to improve cognitive function through both BP-dependent and BP-independent pathways. Additional studies are still needed to determine if newer modes of exercise training such as high-intensity interval training may offer advantages over traditional continuous moderate training in improving BP and brain health in hypertensive patients.

  7. Hypertension in Renal Allograft Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waiser Johannes

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension is a frequent complication after renal transplantation. It contributes to the considerable cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in renal allograft recipients. Additionally, it has a major impact on long-term allograft survival. The pathogenesis of post transplant hypertension is multifactorial. Besides common risk factors, renal allograft recipients accumulate specific risk factors related to the original renal disease, renal transplantation per se and the immunosuppressive regimen. Chronic allograft dysfunction is the main cause of post transplant hypertension. The introduction of calcineurin inhibitors, such as cyclosporine, has increased the prevalence of hypertension. At present, the growing manual of diagnostic and therapeutic tools enables us to adapt better antihypertensive therapy. Tight monitoring, individualization of the immunosuppressive protocol, inclusion of non-pharmacological measures and aggressive antihypertensive treatment should help to minimize the negative implications of post transplant hypertension. Probably, this goal can only be reached by "normalization" of systolic and diastolic blood pressure to below 135/85 mmHg.

  8. A clinical classification of hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Hypertension is a common cardiovascular problem worldwide. As with any other disease it is important to assess the severity of the disease. However the present classification of hypertension by the Joint National Committee in its seventh report (JNC 7) with numerical values staging the severity of hypertension is theoretically correct but difficult to apply in practice (Table 1).1 Admittedly this is a step in the right direction with lesser number of stages compared to the sixth report.2 The World Health Organization- International Society of Hypertension (WHO-ISH)-1999 3 and the European Society of Hypertension - European Society of Cardiology (ESH-ESC)4 guidelines follow similar numerical classifications (Table 2). All these papers are referred to as 'guidelines' in this article.

  9. Ebola virus: recommendations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Medical Service

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Medical Service has been closely following, in particular via the WHO, the development of the Ebola virus outbreak currently affecting some African countries. This infectious disease may be passed on through direct contact with the bodily fluids of a sick person.   Based on the recommendations of the WHO and the two Host States, Switzerland and France, as updated on their respective websites, so far there has been no ban on travel to the countries concerned. However, unless it is absolutely essential, you are advised not to visit any of the countries affected by Ebola (Guinea, Republic of Sierra Leone, Liberia, Nigeria). The two Host States have established an alert system, and a check is carried out on departure from the airports of those countries. It is strongly recommended that you contact the Medical Service if you are travelling to those countries. We remind you to observe the basic rules of hygiene such as frequent hand washing, whatever your destination. The Medical Service is...

  10. Maximizing profit using recommender systems

    CERN Document Server

    Das, Aparna; Ricketts, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Traditional recommendation systems make recommendations based solely on the customer's past purchases, product ratings and demographic data without considering the profitability the items being recommended. In this work we study the question of how a vendor can directly incorporate the profitability of items into its recommender so as to maximize its expected profit while still providing accurate recommendations. Our approach uses the output of any traditional recommender system and adjust them according to item profitabilities. Our approach is parameterized so the vendor can control how much the recommendation incorporating profits can deviate from the traditional recommendation. We study our approach under two settings and show that it achieves approximately 22% more profit than traditional recommendations.

  11. Description of antihypertensive use in patients with resistant hypertension prescribed four or more agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanselin, Michele R; Saseen, Joseph J; Allen, Richard R; Marrs, Joel C; Nair, Kavita V

    2011-12-01

    Data describing the use of recommended antihypertensive agents in the resistant hypertension population are limited. Treatment recommendations for resistant hypertension include maximizing diuretic therapy by using chlorthalidone and/or adding an aldosterone antagonist. Additional recommendations include combining antihypertensive agents from different drug classes. This retrospective cohort study describes antihypertensive use in patients with resistant hypertension defined as the concurrent use of ≥4 antihypertensive agents. Claims data from the Medstat MarketScan Commercial Claims and Encounter database were used to identify patients with resistant hypertension based on International Classification of Diseases, 9th Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnosis codes and National Drug Codes between May 1, 2008 and June 30, 2009. Of the 5 442 410 patients with hypertension in the database, 140 126 met study criteria. The most frequently prescribed antihypertensive classes were angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and/or angiotensin receptor blockers (96.2%), diuretics (93.2%), calcium channel blockers (83.6%), and β-blockers (80.0%). Only 3.0% and 5.9% of patients were on chlorthalidone or an aldosterone antagonist, respectively. A total of 15.6% of patients were treated with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor plus angiotensin receptor blocker. Our findings demonstrate that frequently prescribed antihypertensive agents for the treatment of resistant hypertension included guideline-recommended first-line agents. However, evidence-based and recommended agents, such as chlorthalidone and aldosterone antagonists, were underused. Moreover, minimally efficacious combinations, such as an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor with an angiotensin receptor blocker, were prescribed at higher rates than evidence-based and recommended agents.

  12. Preventing Recommendation Attack in Trust-Based Recommender Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu-Guo Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Despite its success,similarity-based collaborative filtering suffers from some limitations,such as scalability,sparsity and recommendation attack.Prior work has shown incorporating trust mechanism into traditional collaborative filtering recommender systems can improve these limitations.We argue that trust-based recommender systems are facing novel recommendation attack which is different from the profile injection attacks in traditional recommender system.To the best of our knowledge,there has not any prior study on recommendation attack in a trust-based recommender system.We analyze the attack problem,and find that "victim" nodes play a significant role in the attack.Furthermore,we propose a data provenance method to trace malicious users and identify the "victim" nodes as distrust users of recommender system.Feasibility study of the defend method is done with the dataset crawled from Epinions website.

  13. Wind Farm Recommendation Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Reisenauer

    2011-05-01

    On April 21, 2011, an Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Land Use Committee meeting was convened to develop a wind farm recommendation for the Executive Council and a list of proposed actions for proceeding with the recommendation. In terms of land use, the INL Land Use Committee unanimously agrees that Site 6 is the preferred location of the alternatives presented for an INL wind farm. However, further studies and resolution to questions raised (stated in this report) by the INL Land Use Committee are needed for the preferred location. Studies include, but are not limited to, wind viability (6 months), bats (2 years), and the visual impact of the wind farm. In addition, cultural resource surveys and consultation (1 month) and the National Environmental Policy Act process (9 to 12 months) need to be completed. Furthermore, there is no documented evidence of developers expressing interest in constructing a small wind farm on INL, nor a specific list of expectations or concessions for which a developer might expect INL to cover the cost. To date, INL assumes the National Environmental Policy Act activities will be paid for by the Department of Energy and INL (the environmental assessment has only received partial funding). However, other concessions also may be expected by developers such as roads, fencing, power line installation, tie-ins to substations, annual maintenance, snow removal, access control, down-time, and remediation. These types of concessions have not been documented, as a request, from a developer and INL has not identified the short and long-term cost liabilities for such concessions should a developer expect INL to cover these costs. INL has not identified a go-no-go funding level or the priority this Wind Farm Project might have with respect to other nuclear-related projects, should the wind farm remain an unfunded mandate. The Land Use Committee recommends Legal be consulted to determine what, if any, liabilities exist with the Wind Farm Project and

  14. Hypertension and hemodialysis: pathophysiology and outcomes in adult and pediatric populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Buren, Peter N; Inrig, Jula K

    2012-03-01

    Hypertension is prevalent in adult and pediatric end-stage renal disease patients on hemodialysis. Volume overload is a primary factor contributing to hypertension, and attaining true dry weight remains a priority for nephrologists. Other contributing factors to hypertension include activation of the sympathetic and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone systems, endothelial cell dysfunction, arterial stiffness, exposure to hypertensinogenic drugs, and electrolyte imbalances during hemodialysis. Epidemiologic studies in adults show that uncontrolled hypertension results in cardiovascular morbidity, but reveal increased mortality risk at low blood pressure, so that it remains unclear what the target blood pressure should be. Despite the lack of a definitive BP target, gradual dry weight reduction should be the first intervention for BP control. Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors have been shown to improve cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and are recommended as the initial pharmacologic therapy for hypertensive hemodialysis patients. Short-daily or nocturnal hemodialysis are also good therapeutic options for these patients. It is already established that hypertension in pediatric hemodialysis patients is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes, and there is emerging evidence that the mechanisms causing hypertension are similar to adults. Hypertension in adult and pediatric hemodialysis patients warrants aggressive management, although clinical trial evidence of a target BP that improves mortality does not currently exist.

  15. Recommendation Process in SR1 Web Document Recommender System

    OpenAIRE

    Munteanu, Dan

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a recommender system for web documents (given as bookmarks). The system uses for classification a combination of content, event and collaborative filters and for recommendation a modified Pearson-r algorithm. The algorithm for recommendation is using not only the correlation between users but also the similarity between classes. Some experimental results that support this approach are also presented.

  16. Personalized professional content recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Songhua

    2015-10-27

    A personalized content recommendation system includes a client interface configured to automatically monitor a user's information data stream transmitted on the Internet. A hybrid contextual behavioral and collaborative personal interest inference engine resident to a non-transient media generates automatic predictions about the interests of individual users of the system. A database server retains the user's personal interest profile based on a plurality of monitored information. The system also includes a server programmed to filter items in an incoming information stream with the personal interest profile and is further programmed to identify only those items of the incoming information stream that substantially match the personal interest profile.

  17. On Imprecise Investment Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piasecki Krzysztof

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The return rate is considered here as a fuzzy probabilistic set. Then the expected return is obtained as a fuzzy subset in the real line. This result is a theoretical foundation for new investment strategies. All considered strategies result of comparison profit fuzzy index and limit value. In this way we obtain an imprecise investment recommendation. Financial equilibrium criteria are a special case of comparison of the profit index and the limit value. The following criteria are generalized here: the Sharpe's Ratio, the Jensen's Alpha and the Treynor's Ratio. Moreover, the safety-first criteria are generalized here for the fuzzy case. The Roy Criterion, the Kataoka Criterion and the Telser Criterion are also generalized. Obtained results show that proposed theory is useful for the investment applications.

  18. "Highly recommended introduction"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Ask Vest

    2009-01-01

    by detachment, normatively and morally. Besides researching the actual abuse, individually and in aggregate, they also study structural circumstances that promote the use of drugs in sports; besides evaluations of the efficacy of the anti-doping efforts, they consider the effects of various anti-doping schemes...... on the integrity and privacy of the athletes. Ask Vest Christiansen, himself an internationally renowned scholar in the field, has read a recent, thus detached, introduction to drug use in sports, An Introduction to Drugs in Sport: Addicted to Winning by Ivan Waddington and Andy Smith (Routledge). Christiansen...... finds much to appreciate in the book, and a couple of disconcerting mistakes and misjudgments notwithstanding, he recommends the book as a solid introduction to the problem of doping – knowledgeable, well written and easy to read....

  19. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to describe requirements for inclusion of soluble biomarkers in osteoarthritis (OA) clinical trials and progress toward OA-related biomarker qualification. The Guidelines for Biomarkers Working Group, representing experts in the field of OA biomarker research from...... of reasons but in particular, to determine whether biomarkers are useful in identifying those individuals most likely to receive clinically important benefits from an intervention; and to determine whether biomarkers are useful for identifying individuals at earlier stages of OA in order to institute...... both academia and industry, convened to discuss issues related to soluble biomarkers and to make recommendations for their use in OA clinical trials based on current knowledge and anticipated benefits. This document summarizes current guidance on use of biomarkers in OA clinical trials...

  20. Recommendation in evolving online networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao; Zeng, An; Shang, Ming-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    Recommender system is an effective tool to find the most relevant information for online users. By analyzing the historical selection records of users, recommender system predicts the most likely future links in the user-item network and accordingly constructs a personalized recommendation list for each user. So far, the recommendation process is mostly investigated in static user-item networks. In this paper, we propose a model which allows us to examine the performance of the state-of-the-art recommendation algorithms in evolving networks. We find that the recommendation accuracy in general decreases with time if the evolution of the online network fully depends on the recommendation. Interestingly, some randomness in users' choice can significantly improve the long-term accuracy of the recommendation algorithm. When a hybrid recommendation algorithm is applied, we find that the optimal parameter gradually shifts towards the diversity-favoring recommendation algorithm, indicating that recommendation diversity is essential to keep a high long-term recommendation accuracy. Finally, we confirm our conclusions by studying the recommendation on networks with the real evolution data.

  1. American College of Sports Medicine. Position Stand. Physical activity, physical fitness, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Hypertension is present in epidemic proportions in adults of industrialized societies and is associated with a markedly increased risk of developing numerous cardiovascular pathologies. There is a continuing debate as to the efficacy of aggressive pharmacological therapy in individuals with mild to moderate elevations in blood pressure. This has led to a search for nonpharmacological therapies, such as exercise training, for these individuals. The available evidence indicates that endurance exercise training by individuals at high risk for developing hypertension will reduce the rise in blood pressure that occurs with time. Thus, it is the position of the American College of Sports Medicine that endurance exercise training is recommended as a nonpharmacological strategy to reduce the incidence of hypertension in susceptible individuals. A large number of studies indicate that endurance exercise training will elicit a 10 mm Hg average reduction in both systolic and diastolic blood pressures in individuals with mild essential hypertension (blood pressures 140-180/90-105 mm Hg). Endurance exercise training also has the capacity to improve other risk factors for cardiovascular disease in hypertensive individuals. Endurance exercise training appears to elicit even greater reductions in blood pressure in patients with secondary hypertension due to renal dysfunction. The mode (large muscle activities), frequency (3-5 d.wk-1), duration (20-60 min), and intensity (50-85% of maximal oxygen uptake) of the exercise recommended to achieve this effect are generally the same as those prescribed for developing and maintaining cardiovascular fitness in healthy adults. Exercise training at somewhat lower intensities (40-70% VO2max) appears to lower blood pressure as much, or more, than exercise at higher intensities, which may be important in specific hypertensive populations. Physically active and fit individuals with hypertension have markedly lower rates of mortality than

  2. WNK kinases and essential hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chou-Long; Kuo, Elizabeth; Toto, Robert D

    2008-03-01

    The present review summarizes recent literature and discusses the potential roles of WNKs in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. WNKs (with-no-lysine [K]) are a recently discovered family of serine-threonine protein kinases with unusual protein kinase domains. The role of WNK kinases in the control of blood pressure was first revealed by the findings that mutations of two members, WNK1 and WNK4, cause Gordon's syndrome. Laboratory studies have revealed that WNK kinases play important roles in the regulation of sodium and potassium transport. Animal models have been created to unravel the pathophysiology of sodium transport disorders caused by mutations of the WNK4 gene. Potassium deficiency causes sodium retention and increases hypertension prevalence. The expression of WNK1 is upregulated by potassium deficiency, raising the possibility that WNK1 may contribute to salt-sensitive essential hypertension associated with potassium deficiency. Associations of polymorphisms of WNK genes with essential hypertension in the general population have been reported. Mutations of WNK1 and WNK4 cause hypertension at least partly by increasing renal sodium retention. The role of WNK kinases in salt-sensitive hypertension within general hypertension is suggested, but future work is required to firmly establish the connection.

  3. Vascular Remodeling in Experimental Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma R. Risler

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic hemodynamic abnormality in hypertension is an increased peripheral resistance that is due mainly to a decreased vascular lumen derived from structural changes in the small arteries wall, named (as a whole vascular remodeling. The vascular wall is an active, flexible, and integrated organ made up of cellular (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, adventitia cells, and fibroblasts and noncellular (extracellular matrix components, which in a dynamic way change shape or number, or reorganize in response to physiological and pathological stimuli, maintaining the integrity of the vessel wall in physiological conditions or participating in the vascular changes in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension. Research focused on new signaling pathways and molecules that can participate in the mechanisms of vascular remodeling has provided evidence showing that vascular structure is not only affected by blood pressure, but also by mechanisms that are independent of the increased pressure. This review will provide an overview of the evidence, explaining some of the pathophysiologic mechanisms participating in the development of the vascular remodeling, in experimental models of hypertension, with special reference to the findings in spontaneously hypertensive rats as a model of essential hypertension, and in fructose-fed rats as a model of secondary hypertension, in the context of the metabolic syndrome. The understanding of the mechanisms producing the vascular alterations will allow the development of novel pharmacological tools for vascular protection in hypertensive disease.

  4. Pathophysiology of salt sensitivity hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Katsuyuki; Fujita, Toshiro

    2012-06-01

    Dietary salt intake is the most important factor contributing to hypertension, but the salt susceptibility of blood pressure (BP) is different in individual subjects. Although the pathogenesis of salt-sensitive hypertension is heterogeneous, it is mainly attributable to an impaired renal capacity to excrete sodium (Na(+) ). We recently identified two novel mechanisms that impair renal Na(+) -excreting function and result in an increase in BP. First, mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) activation in the kidney, which facilitates distal Na(+) reabsorption through epithelial Na(+) channel activation, causes salt-sensitive hypertension. This mechanism exists not only in models of high-aldosterone hypertension as seen in conditions of obesity or metabolic syndrome, but also in normal- or low-aldosterone type of salt-sensitive hypertension. In the latter, Rac1 activation by salt excess causes MR stimulation. Second, renospecific sympathoactivation may cause an increase in BP under conditions of salt excess. Renal beta2 adrenoceptor stimulation in the kidney leads to decreased transcription of the gene encoding WNK4, a negative regulator of Na(+) reabsorption through Na(+) -Cl (-) cotransporter in the distal convoluted tubules, resulting in salt-dependent hypertension. Abnormalities identified in these two pathways of Na(+) reabsorption in the distal nephron may present therapeutic targets for the treatment of salt-sensitive hypertension.

  5. Paradoxical hypertension with cardiac tamponade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argulian, Edgar; Herzog, Eyal; Halpern, Dan G; Messerli, Franz H

    2012-10-01

    Subacute (medical) tamponade develops over a period of days or even weeks. Previous studies have shown that subacute tamponade is uncommonly associated with hypotension. On the contrary, many of those patients are indeed hypertensive at initial presentation. We sought to determine the prevalence and predictors of hypertensive cardiac tamponade and hemodynamic response to pericardial effusion drainage. We conducted a retrospective study of patients who underwent pericardial effusion drainage for subacute pericardial tamponade. Diagnosis of pericardial tamponade was established by the treating physician based on clinical data and supportive echocardiographic findings. Patients were defined as hypertensive if initial systolic blood pressure (BP) was ≥140 mm Hg. Thirty patients with subacute tamponade who underwent pericardial effusion drainage were included in the analysis. Eight patients (27%) were hypertensive with a mean systolic BP of 167 compared to 116 mm Hg in 22 nonhypertensive patients. Hypertensive patients with tamponade were more likely to have advanced renal disease (63% vs 14%, p tamponade after pericardial effusion drainage. Those results are consistent with previous studies with an estimated prevalence of hypertensive tamponade from 27% to 43%. In conclusion, a hypertensive response was observed in approximately 1/3 of patients with subacute pericardial tamponade. Relief of cardiac tamponade commonly resulted in a decrease in BP.

  6. Dermatoglyphics in hypertension: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijerathne, Buddhika T B; Meier, Robert J; Agampodi, Thilini C; Agampodi, Suneth B

    2015-08-12

    Hypertension is a major contributor to the global burden of disease and mortality. A major medical advancement would be a better means to ascertain which persons are at higher risk for becoming hypertensive beforehand. To that end, there have been a number of studies showing that certain dermatoglyphic markers are associated with hypertension. This association could be explained if the risk toward developing hypertension later on in life is somehow connected with fetal development of dermatoglyphics. It would be highly valuable from a clinical standpoint if this conjecture could be substantiated since dermatoglyphic markers could then be used for screening out individuals who might be at an elevated risk of becoming hypertensive. The aim of this review was to search for and appraise available studies that pertain to the association between hypertension and dermatoglyphics.A systematic literature search conducted using articles from MEDLINE (PubMed), Trip, Cochran, Google scholar, and gray literature until December 2014. Of the 37 relevant publications, 17 were included in the review. The review performed according to the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) statement.This review showed a fairly consistent finding of an increased frequency of whorl patterns along with a higher mean total ridge count in digital dermatoglyphic results in hypertensive samples compared to controls. However, it was imperative to discuss several limitations found in the studies that could make this association as yet unsettled.

  7. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Vinicius Barbosa de; Silva, Eduardo Nani; Ribeiro, Mario Luiz; Martins, Wolney de Andrade, E-mail: wolney@cardiol.br [Curso de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Cardiovasculares da Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-03-15

    There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib), corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  8. Hypertension in Patients with Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinicius Barbosa de Souza

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a known association between chemotherapy and radiotherapy for treatment of cancer patients and development or worsening of hypertension. The aim of this article is to review this association. A literature search was conducted for articles reporting this association on the databases PubMed, SciELO and LILACS between 1993 and 2013. There was a high coprevalence of hypertension and cancer, since both diseases share the same risk factors, such as sedentary lifestyle, obesity, smoking, unhealthy diet and alcohol abuse. The use of chemotherapy and adjuvant drugs effective in the treatment of cancer increased the survival rate of these patients and, consequently, increased the incidence of hypertension. We described the association between the use of angiogenesis inhibitors (bevacizumab, sorafenib and sunitinib, corticosteroids, erythropoietin and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with the development of hypertension. We also described the relationship between hypertension and carotid baroreceptor injury secondary to cervical radiotherapy. Morbidity and mortality increased in patients with cancer and hypertension without proper antihypertensive treatment. We concluded that there is need for early diagnosis, effective monitoring and treatment strategies for hypertension in cancer patients in order to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  9. Recent clinical and translational advances in pediatric hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falkner, Bonita

    2015-05-01

    Epidemiological reports describe a child population increase in BP level and an increase in prevalence of hypertension, that is largely, but not entirely, driven by a concurrent increase in childhood obesity. Given current estimates, ≈10% of adolescents have hypertension or prehypertension. In addition to obesity, dietary salt intake and waist circumference, a marker of visceral obesity, are found to be independently associated with the rise in BP among children and adolescents. Dietary salt intake in urban children is well above recommended levels largely because of consumption of processed and fast foods. Childhood exposures, such as stress,52 salt, and fructose, as well as lifestyles, including food sources, sleep patterns, and reductions in physical activity may have a role in obesity-high BP associations. In addition, clinical and translational evidence is mounting that intrauterine exposures alter can effect changes in fetal development that have an enduring effect on cardiovascular and metabolic function later in life. These effects can be detected even in children who are products of a term otherwise normal pregnancy. Hypertension in childhood has been defined statistically (BP ≥ 95th percentile) because of lack of outcome data that links a BP level with heightened risk for future cardiovascular events. Therefore, primary hypertension had been considered a risk factor for later hypertension in adulthood. Intermediate markers of TOD, including cardiac hypertrophy, vascular stiffness, and increases in cIMT, are detectable in adolescents with primary hypertension. Evidence that vascular injury is present in the early phase of hypertension and even in prehypertension warrants consideration on the current definition of pediatric hypertension. With further studies on TOD and other risk factors in addition to high BP, it may be possible to shift from a statistical definition to a definition of childhood hypertension that is evidence based. Preventing or

  10. National Recommended Water Quality Criteria

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Recommended Water Quality Criteria is a compilation of national recommended water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life and human health...

  11. Classification of Recommender Expertise in the Wikipedia Recommender System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian D.; Pilkauskas, Povilas; Lefévre, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    feedback from recommenders that the user has agreed with in the past. This exposes the problem that most recommenders are not equally competent in all subject areas. The first WRS prototype did not include an evaluation of the areas of expertise of recommenders, so the trust metric used in the article...... ratings reflected the average competence of recommenders across all subject areas. We have now developed a new version of the WRS, which evaluates the expertise of recommenders within different subject areas. In order to do this, we need to identify a way to classify the subject area of all the articles...

  12. Masked Uncontrolled Hypertension in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rajiv; Pappas, Maria K; Sinha, Arjun D

    2016-03-01

    Masked uncontrolled hypertension (MUCH) is diagnosed in patients treated for hypertension who are normotensive in the clinic but hypertensive outside. In this study of 333 veterans with CKD, we prospectively evaluated the prevalence of MUCH as determined by ambulatory BP monitoring using three definitions of hypertension (daytime hypertension ≥135/85 mmHg; either nighttime hypertension ≥120/70 mmHg or daytime hypertension; and 24-hour hypertension ≥130/80 mmHg) or by home BP monitoring (hypertension ≥135/85 mmHg). The prevalence of MUCH was 26.7% by daytime ambulatory BP, 32.8% by 24-hour ambulatory BP, 56.1% by daytime or night-time ambulatory BP, and 50.8% by home BP. To assess the reproducibility of the diagnosis, we repeated these measurements after 4 weeks. Agreement in MUCH diagnosis by ambulatory BP was 75-78% (κ coefficient for agreement, 0.44-0.51), depending on the definition used. In contrast, home BP showed an agreement of only 63% and a κ coefficient of 0.25. Prevalence of MUCH increased with increasing clinic systolic BP: 2% in the 90-110 mmHg group, 17% in the 110-119 mmHg group, 34% in the 120-129 mmHg group, and 66% in the 130-139 mmHg group. Clinic BP was a good determinant of MUCH (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve 0.82; 95% confidence interval 0.76-0.87). In diagnosing MUCH, home BP was not different from clinic BP. In conclusion, among people with CKD, MUCH is common and reproducible, and should be suspected when clinic BP is in the prehypertensive range. Confirmation of MUCH diagnosis should rely on ambulatory BP monitoring.

  13. Hypertension--forekomst og behandling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Hans; Jørgensen, Torben; Jensen, Gorm B

    2009-01-01

    Hypertension is the most important modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, less than half of all hypertensives have their blood pressure reduced to relevant goals. The prevalence of hypertension in Denmark was found to be between 26% and 40% of the adult population. Just over ...... half were aware of the diagnosis, but less than half were in treatment. Blood pressure control in patients who are undergoing treatment has improved during recent years, but there is still a gap to achievable control rates. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun-8...

  14. Animal models of portal hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Juan G Abraldes; Marcos Pasarín; Juan Carlos; García-Pagán

    2006-01-01

    Animal models have allowed detailed study of hemodynamic alterations typical of portal hypertension and the molecular mechanisms involved in abnormalities in splanchnic and systemic circulation associated with this syndrome. Models of prehepatic portal hypertension can be used to study alterations in the splanchnic circulation and the pathophysiology of the hyperdynamic circulation. Models of cirrhosis allow study of the alterations in intrahepatic microcirculation that lead to increased resistance to portal flow. This review summarizes the currently available literature on animal models of portal hypertension and analyzes their relative utility. The criteria for choosing a particular model,depending on the specific objectives of the study, are also discussed.

  15. Urgent recommendation. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Masayuki [International Affairs and Safeguards Division, Atomic Energy Bureau, Science and Technology Agency, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-12-01

    The Investigation Committee for Critical Accident at Uranium Processing Plant was founded immediately after the accident to investigate the cause of the accident and to establish measures to prevent the similar accident. On September 30, 1999 around 10:35, the Japan's first criticality accident occurred at JCO Co. Ltd. Uranium processing plant (auxiliary conversion plant) located at Tokai-mura Ibaraki-ken. The criticality continued on and off for approximately 20 hours after the first instantaneous criticality. The accident led the recommendation of tentative evacuation and sheltering indoors for residents living in the neighborhood. The serious exposure to neutrons happened to three workers. The dominant effect is dose due to neutrons and gamma rays from the precipitation tank. When the accident took place, three workers dissolved sequentially about 2.4 kg uranium powder with 18.8 % enrichment in the 10-litter bucket with nitric acid. The procedure of homogenization of uranium nitrate was supposed to be controlled using the shape-limited narrow storage column. Actually, however, the thick and large precipitation tank was used. As a result, about 16.6 kg of uranium was fed into the tank, which presumably caused criticality. The first notification by JCO was delayed and the following communication was not smooth. This led to the delay of correct understanding of the situation and made the initial proper response difficult, then followed by insufficient communication between the nation, prefecture, and local authority. Urgent recommendations were made on the following items; (1) Safety measures to be taken at the accident site, (2) health cares for residents and others, (3) Comprehensive safety securing at nuclear operators such as Establishment of the effective audit system, Safety education for employees and Qualification and licensing system, Safety related documents, etc. (4) Reconstruction of the government's safety regulations such as How safety

  16. [Recommendations for physical exercise practice during pregnancy: a critical review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Simony Lira; Godoy, Ana Carolina; Surita, Fernanda Garanhani; Pinto e Silva, João Luiz

    2014-09-01

    Physical exercise is recommended for all healthy pregnant women. Regular practice of exercises during pregnancy can provide many physical and psychological benefits, with no evidence of adverse outcomes for the fetus or the newborn when exercise is performed at mild to moderate intensity. However, few pregnant women engage in this practice and many still have fears and doubts about the safety of exercise. The objective of the present study was to inform the professionals who provide care for Brazilian pregnant women about the current recommendations regarding physical exercise during pregnancy based on the best scientific evidence available. In view of the perception that few systematic models are available about this topic and after performing several studies in this specific area, we assembled practical information of interest to both the professionals and the pregnant women. We also provide recommendations about the indications, contraindications, modalities (aerobics, resistance training, stretching and pelvic floor training), frequency, intensity and duration indicated for each gestational trimester. The review addresses physical exercise recommendation both for low risk pregnant women and for special populations, such as athletes and obese, hypertensive and diabetic subjects. The advantages of an active and healthy lifestyle should be always reinforced during and after gestation since pregnancy is an appropriate period to introduce new habits because pregnant women are usually more motivated to adhere to recommendations. Thus, routine exams, frequent returns and supervision are recommended in order to provide new guidelines that will have long-term beneficial effects for both mother and child.

  17. SMFM Statement: benefit of antihypertensive therapy for mild-to-moderate chronic hypertension during pregnancy remains uncertain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Chronic hypertension is present in up to 5% of pregnant women and constitutes a major cause of maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this document is to summarize the current recommendations regarding use of antihypertensive medications during pregnancy for women with mild-to-moderate chronic hypertension in the setting of the recently published Control of Hypertension in Pregnancy Study (CHIPS). The recently published CHIPS trial was a multicenter international randomized controlled trial comparing "less tight control" to "tight control" of blood pressure for pregnant women with hypertension. The most updated recommendations regarding management of pregnant women with hypertension are found from the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Task Force on Hypertension in Pregnancy, which are endorsed by the Society of Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM). SMFM recommends that clinicians continue to follow existing guidelines for management of pregnant women with mild-to-moderate chronic hypertension due to the fact that the benefits and risks of pharmacologic treatment for these women remain uncertain, and adequately powered randomized controlled trials are needed to address the less common but clinically significant nonsurrogate perinatal outcomes.

  18. Optimal blood pressure targets in 2014 - Does the guideline recommendation match the evidence base?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alviar, C L; Bangalore, S; Messerli, F H

    2015-01-01

    Various scientific societies have recently published practice guidelines for the diagnosis and management of arterial hypertension with no clear consensus on a blood pressure target. This article reviews those recommendations and critically examines if they are based on sound evidence. Copyright © 2015 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  19. Pulmonary Hypertension in Pregnancy: Critical Care Management

    OpenAIRE

    Bassily-Marcus, Adel M.; Carol Yuan; John Oropello; Anthony Manasia; Roopa Kohli-Seth; Ernest Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is common in critical care settings and in presence of right ventricular failure is challenging to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in pregnant patients carries a high mortality rates between 30–56%. In the past decade, new treatments for pulmonary hypertension have emerged. Their application in pregnant women with pulmonary hypertension may hold promise in reducing morbidity and mortality. Signs and symptoms of pulmonary hypertension are nonspecific in pregnant women. Im...

  20. Clinical overview of hypertensive crisis in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Chieh; Lin, Mao-Jen; Chen, Chun-Yu; Wu, Han-Ping

    2015-06-16

    Hypertensive emergencies and hypertensive urgencies in children are uncommonly encountered in the pediatric emergency department and intensive care units, but the diseases are potentially a life-threatening medical emergency. In comparison with adults, hypertension in children is mostly asymptomatic and most have no history of hypertension. Additionally, measuring accurate blood pressure values in younger children is not easy. This article reviews current concepts in pediatric patients with severe hypertension.

  1. Sex differences in primary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Men have higher blood pressure than women through much of life regardless of race and ethnicity. This is a robust and highly conserved sex difference that it is also observed across species including dogs, rats, mice and chickens and it is found in induced, genetic and transgenic animal models of hypertension. Not only do the differences between the ovarian and testicular hormonal milieu contribute to this sexual dimorphism in blood pressure, the sex chromosomes also play a role in and of themselves. This review primarily focuses on epidemiological studies of blood pressure in men and women and experimental models of hypertension in both sexes. Gaps in current knowledge regarding what underlie male-female differences in blood pressure control are discussed. Elucidating the mechanisms underlying sex differences in hypertension may lead to the development of anti-hypertensives tailored to one's sex and ultimately to improved therapeutic strategies for treating this disease and preventing its devastating consequences. PMID:22417477

  2. Idiopathic Intracranial Hypertension (Pseudotumor Cerebri)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children and tends to be “secondary” which affects males and females equally. The second group, post pubescent teenagers, tends to fit the adult stereotype. How is pediatric idiopathic intracranial hypertension diagnosed? If ...

  3. Management of Hypertension in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurike S Mudjari

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypertension-related maternal mortality reaches 16% when it is compared to other causes of maternal mortality such as sepsis, bleeding or abortus. Pregnant women with hypertension disorder are at increased risk for experiencing numerous complications including disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC, cerebral hemorrhage, liver dysfunction and acute renal failure; while to the fetus, it may cause intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and perinatal mortality. Hypertension in pregnancy should be managed appropriately to reduce maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality rate, i.e. by preventing women from getting the risks of increased blood pressure, preventing disease progression and preventing the development of seizure and considering termination of pregnancy in lifethreatening situation for maternal and fetal health. Key words: blood pressure, hypertension, eclampsia, preeclampsia, pregnant women, gestational.

  4. Pulmonary Hypertension: Diagnosis and Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dunlap, Beth; Weyer, George

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a common, complex group of disorders that result from different pathophysiologic mechanisms but are all defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure of 25 mm Hg or greater...

  5. Dopamine, the kidney, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Raymond C; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2012-04-01

    There is increasing evidence that the intrarenal dopaminergic system plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure, and defects in dopamine signaling appear to be involved in the development of hypertension. Recent experimental models have definitively demonstrated that abnormalities in intrarenal dopamine production or receptor signaling can predispose to salt-sensitive hypertension and a dysregulated renin-angiotensin system. In addition, studies in both experimental animal models and in humans with salt-sensitive hypertension implicate abnormalities in dopamine receptor regulation due to receptor desensitization resulting from increased G-protein receptor kinase 4 (GRK4) activity. Functional polymorphisms that predispose to increased basal GRK4 activity both decrease dopamine receptor activity and increase angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor activity and are associated with essential hypertension in a number of different human cohorts.

  6. Renal denervation for resistant hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Manuel de Sousa; Gonçalves, Pedro de Araújo; Oliveira, Eduardo Infante de; Carvalho, Henrique Cyrne de

    2015-02-01

    There is a marked contrast between the high prevalence of hypertension and the low rates of adequate control. A subset of patients with suboptimal blood pressure control have drug-resistant hypertension, in the pathophysiology of which chronic sympathetic hyperactivation is significantly involved. Sympathetic renal denervation has recently emerged as a device-based treatment for resistant hypertension. In this review, the pathophysiological mechanisms linking the sympathetic nervous system and cardiovascular disease are reviewed, focusing on resistant hypertension and the role of sympathetic renal denervation. An update on experimental and clinical results is provided, along with potential future indications for this device-based technique in other cardiovascular diseases. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  7. Exercise and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... exercise is very beneficial for healthy individuals, increasing cardiovascular and muscular fitness, improving mood, controlling weight and lowering the risk of systemic hypertension and heart disease. Exercise may help lower the risk of chronic illnesses ...

  8. STROKE PREVENTION IN HYPERTENSIVE PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Y. Martsevich

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Importance of the stroke as one of the main reason of population mortality and invalidity is considered. Stroke risk factors including arterial hypertension are described. The main pharmacotherapy ways of primary and secondary stroke prevention are discussed.

  9. Hypertension in Juba, South Sudan

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    of hypertension in these countries is of fundamental importance ... screening, prevention and control measures. Method. This is a retrospective cohort study of routine one- off blood ... 2012 were reviewed and data including age, sex, infection.

  10. Do recommender systems benefit users?

    CERN Document Server

    Yeung, Chi Ho

    2015-01-01

    Recommender systems are present in many web applications to guide our choices. They increase sales and benefit sellers, but whether they benefit customers by providing relevant products is questionable. Here we introduce a model to examine the benefit of recommender systems for users, and found that recommendations from the system can be equivalent to random draws if one relies too strongly on the system. Nevertheless, with sufficient information about user preferences, recommendations become accurate and an abrupt transition to this accurate regime is observed for some algorithms. On the other hand, we found that a high accuracy evaluated by common accuracy metrics does not necessarily correspond to a high real accuracy nor a benefit for users, which serves as an alarm for operators and researchers of recommender systems. We tested our model with a real dataset and observed similar behaviors. Finally, a recommendation approach with improved accuracy is suggested. These results imply that recommender systems ...

  11. A focus on paediatric hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Pier Paolo Bassareo; Giuseppe Mercuro

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension can begin early in childhood, as occasional increases in blood pressure or abnormal blood pressure responses to physical or emotional stress. High blood pressure in juvenile age is defined as a blood pressure repeatedly above the 95th percentile of specific nomograms. Its worldwide prevalence ranges from 1% to about 10%. The purpose of this paper is to perform an overview about characteristics, diagnosis, risk factors, therapy, and prognosis of paediatric hypertension.

  12. Dopamine, the Kidney, and Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond C. Harris; Zhang, Ming-Zhi

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the intrarenal dopaminergic system plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure, and defects in dopamine signaling appear to be involved in the development of hypertension. Recent experimental models have definitively demonstrated that abnormalities in intrarenal dopamine production or receptor signaling can predispose to salt-sensitive hypertension and a dysregulated renin-angiotensin system. In addition, studies in both experimental animal mo...

  13. ALCOHOL AND ARTERIAL HYPERTENSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Ostroumova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the questions of the relationship between the amount of the consumed alcohol, the type of alcoholic beverage, pattern of alcohol consumption and the blood pressure level. The article presents data on the positive effect of alcohol intake restrictions and recommendations for permissible limits of alcohol consumption. New possibilities of drug therapy aimed at limiting alcohol consumption are being reported.

  14. [Recommendations for neonatal transport].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Hernando, J; Thió Lluch, M; Salguero García, E; Rite Gracia, S; Fernández Lorenzo, J R; Echaniz Urcelay, I; Botet Mussons, F; Herranz Carrillo, G; Sánchez Luna, M

    2013-08-01

    During pregnancy, it is not always possible to identify maternal or foetal risk factors. Infants requiring specialised medical care are not always born in centres providing intensive care and will need to be transferred to a referral centre where intensive care can be provided. Therefore Neonatal Transport needs to be considered as part of the organisation of perinatal health care. The aim of Neonatal Transport is to transfer a newborn infant requiring intensive care to a centre where specialised resources and experience can be provided for the appropriate assessment and continuing treatment of a sick newborn infant. Intrauterine transfer is the ideal mode of transport when the birth of an infant with risk factors is diagnosed. Unfortunately, not all problems can be detected in advance with enough time to safely transfer a pregnant woman. Around 30- 50% of risk factors will be diagnosed during labour or soon after birth. Therefore, it is important to have the knowledge and resources to resuscitate and stabilise a newborn infant, as well as a specialised neonatal transport system. With this specialised transport it is possible to transfer newly born infants with the same level of care that they would receive if they had been born in a referral hospital, without increasing their risks or affecting the wellbeing of the newborn. The Standards Committee of the Spanish Society of Neonatology reviewed and updated recommendations for intrauterine transport and indications for neonatal transfer. They also reviewed organisational and logistic factors involved with performing neonatal transport. The Committee review included the type of personnel who should be involved; communication between referral and receiving hospitals; documentation; mode of transport; equipment to stabilise newly born infants; management during transfer, and admission at the referral hospital.

  15. Classification of Recommender Expertise in the Wikipedia Recommender System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian D.; Pilkauskas, Povilas; Lefevre, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    to the quality of articles. The Wikipedia Recommender System (WRS) was developed to help users determine the credibility of articles based on feedback from other Wikipedia users. The WRS implements a collaborative filtering system with trust metrics, i.e., it provides a rating of articles "which emphasizes...... feedback from recommenders that the user has agreed with in the past. This exposes the problem that most recommenders are not equally competent in all subject areas. The first WRS prototype did not include an evaluation of the areas of expertise of recommenders, so the trust metric used in the article...... ratings reflected the average competence of recommenders across all subject areas. We have now developed a new version of the WRS, which evaluates the expertise of recommenders within different subject areas. In order to do this, we need to identify a way to classify the subject area of all the articles...

  16. The medieval origins of the concept of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydari, Mojtaba; Dalfardi, Behnam; Golzari, Samad E J; Habibi, Hamzeh; Zarshenas, Mohammad Mehdi

    2014-07-01

    Despite the well-known history of hypertension research in the modern era, like many other cardiovascular concepts, main points in the medieval concept of this disease and its early management methods remain obscure. This article attempts to make a brief review on the medieval origin of the concept of this disease from the Hidayat of Al-Akhawayni (?-983 AD). This article has reviewed the chapter of "Fi al-Imtela" (About the Fullness) from the Hidβyat al-Muta'allimin fi al-Tibb (The Students' Handbook of Medicine) of Al-Akhawayni. The definition, symptoms and treatments presented for the Imtela are compared with the current knowledge on hypertension. Akhawayni believed that Imtela could result from the excessive amount of blood within the blood vessels. It can manifest with symptoms including the presence of a pulsus magnus, sleepiness, weakness, dyspnea, facial blushing, engorgement of the vessels, thick urine, vascular rupture, and hemorrhagic stroke. He also suggested some ways to manage al-Imtela'. These include recommendations of changes in lifestyle (staying away from anger and sexual intercourse) and dietary program for patients (avoiding the consumption of wine, meat, and pastries, reducing the volume of food in a meal, maintaining a low-energy diet and the dietary usage of spinach and vinegar). Al-Akhawayni's description of "Imtela," despite of its numerous differences with current knowledge of hypertension, can be considered as medieval origin of the concept of hypertension.

  17. Latin American guidelines on hypertension. Latin American Expert Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Ramiro A; Ayala, Miryam; Baglivo, Hugo; Velazquez, Carlos; Burlando, Guillermo; Kohlmann, Oswaldo; Jimenez, Jorge; Jaramillo, Patricio López; Brandao, Ayrton; Valdes, Gloria; Alcocer, Luis; Bendersky, Mario; Ramirez, Agustín José; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2009-05-01

    Hypertension is a highly prevalent cardiovascular risk factor in the world and particularly overwhelming in low and middle-income countries. Recent reports from the WHO and the World Bank highlight the importance of chronic diseases such as hypertension as an obstacle to the achievement of good health status. It must be added that for most low and middle-income countries, deficient strategies of primary healthcare are the major obstacles for blood pressure control. Furthermore, the epidemiology of hypertension and related diseases, healthcare resources and priorities, the socioeconomic status of the population vary considerably in different countries and in different regions of individual countries. Considering the low rates of blood pressure control achieved in Latin America and the benefits that can be expected from an improved control, it was decided to invite specialists from different Latin American countries to analyze the regional situation and to provide a consensus document on detection, evaluation and treatment of hypertension that may prove to be cost-utility adequate. The recommendations here included are the result of preparatory documents by invited experts and a subsequent very active debate by different discussion panels, held during a 2-day sessions in Asuncion, Paraguay, in May 2008. Finally, in order to improve clinical practice, the publication of the guidelines should be followed by implementation of effective interventions capable of overcoming barriers (cognitive, behavioral and affective) preventing attitude changes in both physicians and patients.

  18. [Hypertension during pregnancy: Epidemiology, definition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauvel, Jean-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension in pregnancy has several forms that differ by their mechanisms and their consequences for mothers and fetus. Chronic hypertension is defined by SBP≥140mm Hg or DBP≥90mm Hg before pregnancy or before the 20th week of amenorrhea. Gestational hypertension is defined by SBP≥140mm Hg or DBP≥90mm Hg during or after the 20th week of amenorrhea. Preeclampsia is the occurrence of hypertension and proteinuria after 20weeks of amenorrhea. Severe preeclampsia is accompanied by clinical signs and symptoms indicating visceral pain. The HELLP syndrome is a severe preeclampsia accompanied by intravascular hemolysis and hepatic cytolysis. Eclampsia is characterized by seizures of the tonic-clonic type. A chronic hypertension is observed in 1-5% of pregnancies. Gestational hypertension without proteinuria appears in 5-6% of pregnancies. A preeclampsia develops in 1-2% of pregnancies, but much more frequently (up 34%) in the presence of risk factors. High blood pressure during pregnancy remains, by its complications, the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality.

  19. The hidden epidemic of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenfell, Robert; Lee, Rebecca; Stavreski, Bill; Page, Karen

    2014-04-01

    The majority of cardiovascular disease (CVD) is caused by risk factors that can be controlled, treated or modified. In terms of attributable deaths, the leading cardiovascular disease risk factor is hypertension. The Australian Health Survey results showed some startling figures-4.6 million adult Australians are hypertensive (>140/90 mmHg). Further, a fifth of the adult population experience hypertension, with more than two out of three not attaining blood pressure target levels. This is despite an estimated cost of $1 billion per annum spent on managing hypertension. It is now well recognised that the level of risk for coronary heart disease is linked to an individual's risk profile. Results indicate that many Australians have multiple risk factors, including hypertension. It could be considered that these numbers provide a proxy indicator of secondary prevention failure. Considerable attention needs to be given to the assessment of the combined risk of those with hypertension enabling effective management of identified, modifiable risk factors. We look forward to presenting the absolute risk profiles when the Australian Health Survey biometric results are released.

  20. Hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips CL

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Craig L Phillips,1–3 Denise M O'Driscoll4,51Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, Australia; 2National Health and Medical Research Council Center for Integrated Research and Understanding of Sleep, Woolcock Institute of Medical Research, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 3Discipline of Sleep Medicine, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, Australia; 4Monash Lung and Sleep, Monash Medical Centre, Monash University, Melbourne, Australia; 5Department of Medicine, Southern Clinical School, Monash University, Melbourne, AustraliaAbstract: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is increasingly being recognized as a major health burden with strong focus on the associated cardiovascular risk. Studies from the last two decades have provided strong evidence for a causal role of OSA in the development of systemic hypertension. The acute physiological changes that occur during apnea promote nocturnal hypertension and may lead to the development of sustained daytime hypertension via the pathways of sympathetic activation, inflammation, oxidative stress, and endothelial dysfunction. This review will focus on the acute hemodynamic disturbances and associated intermittent hypoxia that characterize OSA and the potential pathophysiological mechanisms responsible for the development of hypertension in OSA. In addition the epidemiology of OSA and hypertension, as well as the role of treatment of OSA, in improving blood pressure control will be examined.Keywords: obstructive sleep apnea, hypertension, intermittent hypoxia, ambulatory blood pressure, sympathetic activation

  1. Evidence-based guidelines for the management of hypertension in children with chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionne, Janis M

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is common in children with chronic kidney disease and early evidence suggests that it is a modifiable risk factor for renal and cardiovascular outcomes. Recommendations for blood pressure management in children with chronic kidney disease can be found in various clinical practice guidelines including the 4th Task Force Report, the European Society of Hypertension pediatric recommendations, and the National Kidney Foundation Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative (K/DOQI) and Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) guidelines for the management of blood pressure in chronic kidney disease. Unfortunately, as pediatric trial evidence is limited, there are discrepancies in the recommendations that may lead to inconsistent clinical care and practice variation. This article reviews the strength of evidence behind each of the clinical practice guideline recommendations regarding blood pressure assessment, treatment targets, and first-line antihypertensive medications. The benefits and cautions of use of clinical practice guidelines are described with emphasis on the importance of reading beyond the summary statements.

  2. Prevalence of hypertension, its correlates and awareness among adult tribal population of Kerala state, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I I Meshram

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Increasing prevalence of hypertension is a public health problem in India. Aims: To study prevalence, correlates, and awareness of hypertension among tribal adult population in Kerala. Setting and Design: A community-based, cross-sectional study was carried out in tribal areas of Kerala by adopting multistage random sampling procedure. Materials and Methods: Data was collected on socio-demographic and behavioral factors, and anthropometric measurements were carried out. Body mass index (BMI was categorized using the classification recommended for Asians. Waist circumference ≥90 cm for men and ≥80 cm for women was used cut off for defining an abdominal obesity. Bivariate and multivariate analysis was carried out to study association of hypertension with socio-demographic variables, personal habits, and obesity. Results: A total of 4,193 adults (men 1,891, women: 2,302 of ≥20 years of age were covered. The overall prevalence of hypertension was 40% (n=1671. The prevalence of hypertension increases with increase in age among both the genders. Regression analysis showed that the risk of hypertension was significantly (P<0.001 lower among educated and among higher socio-economic status group. Sedentary activity had 1.3 times (CI=1.09-1.60 and alcohol consumption had 1.4 (CI=1.17-1.73 times higher risk of hypertension. The risk of hypertension was 1.7 times higher among overweight/obese subjects. Overall, only 10% (n=164 of the adult population was aware of hypertension status, and about 8% (n=129 were on regular treatment. Conclusion: It was observed that the prevalence of hypertension was higher among tribal adult population of Kerala and was associated with age, gender, education, HHs wealth index, physical inactivity, alcohol consumption, and overweight/obesity.

  3. Prevalence rates of hypertension self-care activities among African Americans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Findlow, Jan; Seymour, Rachel B

    2011-06-01

    A comprehensive understanding of the self-care activities that contribute to blood pressure control may explain health disparities experienced by African Americans with hypertension. This study assessed the prevalence of self-care activities among African Americans with high blood pressure and examined differences between adherers and nonadherers to self-care activities. Interviews were conducted with 186 African Americans. Self-care activities were measured using the H-SCALE (Hypertension Self-Care Activity Level Effects), which was developed to assess the behavioral activities recommended for optimal management of high blood pressure. More than half of participants reported adhering to medication recommendations and prescribed physical activity levels (58.6% and 52.2%, respectively). Following practices related to weight management was less frequent, (30.1%) and adherence to low-salt diet recommendations was also low (22.0%). Three-fourths were nonsmokers and 65% abstained from alcohol. Across the self-care activities, adherers were more likely to be older and female. Nonadherers were more likely to be uninsured. Many African Americans still face challenges related to hypertension self-care, particularly with weight management and salt reduction. The H-SCALE was a valid and reliable measure of hypertension self-care activities. In addition to monitoring blood pressure, health care providers should assess patients' hypertension self-care activities using the H-SCALE.

  4. Recommendation Process in SR1 Web Document Recommender System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan MUNTEANU

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a recommender system for web documents (given as bookmarks. The system uses for classification a combination of content, event and collaborative filters and for recommendation a modified Pearson-r algorithm. The algorithm for recommendation is using not only the correlation between users but also the similarity between classes. Some experimental results that support this approach are also presented.

  5. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Adnan I.

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction. PMID:27366297

  6. Management of Acute Hypertensive Response in Patients With Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSibai, Ahmad; Qureshi, Adnan I

    2016-07-01

    High blood pressure (BP) >140/90 mm Hg is seen in 75% of patients with acute ischemic stroke and in 80% of patients with acute intracerebral hemorrhages and is independently associated with poor functional outcome. While BP reduction in patients with chronic hypertension remains one of the most important factors in primary and secondary stroke prevention, the proper management strategy for acute hypertensive response within the first 72 hours of acute ischemic stroke has been a matter of debate. Recent guidelines recommend clinical trials to ascertain whether antihypertensive therapy in the acute phase of stroke is beneficial. This review summarizes the current data on acute hypertensive response or elevated BP management during the first 72 hours after an acute ischemic stroke. Based on the potential deleterious effect of lowering BP observed in some clinical trials in patients with acute ischemic stroke and because of the lack of convincing evidence to support acute BP lowering in those situations, aggressive BP reduction in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke is currently not recommended. While the early use of angiotensin receptor antagonists may help reduce cardiovascular events, this benefit is not necessarily related to BP reduction.

  7. Correlative research between homocysteine,cystatin C and patients with essential hypertension and hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙屿

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the correlation between homocysteine(Hcy),cystatin C(Cys C)and patients with essential hypertension and hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage.Methods Subjects were divided into hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage group(108 cases),essential hypertension group(100 cases)and control group(100 cases),and their cystatin C,homocysteine and total cholesterol(TC)and triglycerides(TG)were surveyed.Results The patients with hypertensive intracerebral hemorrhage and essential hypertension had higher

  8. Caution is recommended prior to sildenafil use in vascular anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Hannah; Zwicker, Kelley; Trenor, Cameron C

    2015-11-01

    Since publication of a single case report of lymphatic malformation improvement during sildenafil therapy for pulmonary hypertension, sildenafil use has propagated across multiple vascular anomalies diagnoses. Vascular anomalies are rare conditions, often with poor long-term outcomes from available therapies, making these patients vulnerable to novel therapy use. We have retrospectively reviewed 14 children with vascular anomalies treated with sildenafil. None of these patients reported improvement of disease while on treatment and some reported side effects including infections and bleeding. Pending more convincing prospective data, we recommend caution prior to sildenafil use for vascular anomalies.

  9. Inflammation and pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Rajamma

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a serious disorder with high morbidity and mortality rate. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that inflammation plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of PH. Endothelial cells play an important role in inflammation and immune reactions, and inflammatory cytokines cause endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial dysfunction is a hallmark of PH, consisting of reduced availability of vasodilators and antiproliferative factors and increased production of vasoconstrictors and vascular proliferative factors. Up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and perivascular inflammatory cell infiltration have been detected in the lungs of patients with idiopathic PH. Prevalence of PH in patients with systemic inflammatory diseases is well documented. Interestingly, a significant loss of endothelial caveolin-1, a potent immunomodulator and an inhibitor of cell proliferation, has been reported in human and experimental forms of PH. Reduction in the expression of caveolin-1 is known to result in the removal of antiproliferative activities, thus, leading to deregulated vascular cell proliferation. This article summarizes the roles of inflammation and endothelial caveolin-1 and their possible interrelationship in PH.

  10. [Hypertension and dementia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanon, O

    2014-06-01

    Prevention and treatment of dementia has turned into a major public health challenge. Several epidemiological studies have indicated a significant association between the presence of hypertension and the onset of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type) several years later. Cognitive disorder may be related to focal cerebral lesions of vascular origin (infarctus, lacunae) and/or chronic ischemia of the white matter (white matter lesions) related to arteriosclerosis and/or lipohyalinosis of small perforating arteries high blood pressure in mid-life to later cognitive decline and dementia. Moreover, disorders of cerebral microcirculation and endothelial dysfunction may be associated to blood brain barrier dysfunction and amyloid plaques formation leading to Alzheimer's process. Few randomized clinical trials have included a cognitive assessment and dementia as outcome in their design. They all raise some major criticisms: cognitive assessment was never the main outcome, too short follow-up to study dementia; incomplete assessment of cognition, lost of follow-up and a small proportion of subjects at risk for dementia at inclusion. However, the results of therapeutic trials (SYST-EUR, PROGRESS) open the way to the prevention of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type) or cognitive decline by antihypertensive treatments. A meta-analysis including randomized controlled studies, suggests a significant decrease in the risk of dementia with antihypertensive treatment compared to placebo.

  11. Blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol targets for prevention of recurrent strokes and cognitive decline in the hypertensive patient: design of the European Society of Hypertension-Chinese Hypertension League Stroke in Hypertension Optimal Treatment randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetti, Alberto; Liu, Lisheng; Mancia, Giuseppe; Parati, Gianfranco; Grassi, Guido; Stramba-Badiale, Marco; Silani, Vincenzo; Bilo, Grzegorz; Corrao, Giovanni; Zambon, Antonella; Scotti, Lorenza; Zhang, Xinhua; Wang, HayYan; Zhang, Yuqing; Zhang, Xuezhong; Guan, Ting Rui; Berge, Eivind; Redon, Josep; Narkiewicz, Krzysztof; Dominiczak, Anna; Nilsson, Peter; Viigimaa, Margus; Laurent, Stéphane; Agabiti-Rosei, Enrico; Wu, Zhaosu; Zhu, Dingliang; Rodicio, José Luis; Ruilope, Luis Miguel; Martell-Claros, Nieves; Pinto, Fernando; Schmieder, Roland E; Burnier, Michel; Banach, Maciej; Cifkova, Renata; Farsang, Csaba; Konradi, Alexandra; Lazareva, Irina; Sirenko, Yuriy; Dorobantu, Maria; Postadzhiyan, Arman; Accetto, Rok; Jelakovic, Bojan; Lovic, Dragan; Manolis, Athanasios J; Stylianou, Philippos; Erdine, Serap; Dicker, Dror; Wei, Gangzhi; Xu, Chengbin; Xie, Hengge; Coca, Antonio; O'Brien, John; Ford, Gary

    2014-09-01

    The SBP values to be achieved by antihypertensive therapy in order to maximize reduction of cardiovascular outcomes are unknown; neither is it clear whether in patients with a previous cardiovascular event, the optimal values are lower than in the low-to-moderate risk hypertensive patients, or a more cautious blood pressure (BP) reduction should be obtained. Because of the uncertainty whether 'the lower the better' or the 'J-curve' hypothesis is correct, the European Society of Hypertension and the Chinese Hypertension League have promoted a randomized trial comparing antihypertensive treatment strategies aiming at three different SBP targets in hypertensive patients with a recent stroke or transient ischaemic attack. As the optimal level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level is also unknown in these patients, LDL-C-lowering has been included in the design. The European Society of Hypertension-Chinese Hypertension League Stroke in Hypertension Optimal Treatment trial is a prospective multinational, randomized trial with a 3 × 2 factorial design comparing: three different SBP targets (1, hypertension and a stroke or transient ischaemic attack 1-6 months before randomization. Antihypertensive and statin treatments will be initiated or modified using suitable registered agents chosen by the investigators, in order to maintain patients within the randomized SBP and LDL-C windows. All patients will be followed up every 3 months for BP and every 6 months for LDL-C. Ambulatory BP will be measured yearly. Primary outcome is time to stroke (fatal and non-fatal). Important secondary outcomes are: time to first major cardiovascular event; cognitive decline (Montreal Cognitive Assessment) and dementia. All major outcomes will be adjudicated by committees blind to randomized allocation. A Data and Safety Monitoring Board has open access to data and can recommend trial interruption for safety. It has been calculated that 925 patients would reach the primary

  12. Systemic hypertension and associated factors in school adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma B. Galal

    2011-02-01

    -14 year old school adolescents in this study have systemic hypertension. The main associated factors are obesity, overuse of salt and less sleeping hours. A larger study is needed to assess the prevalence of hypertension in all ages of school children. A population-based case-control study is recommended for the future. School physicians and pediatricians need to measure routinely blood pressure of children to prevent hypertension.

  13. [Hypertension and pregnancy. Expert consensus statement from the French Society of Hypertension, an affiliate of the French Society of Cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mounier-Vehier, Claire; Amar, Jacques; Boivin, Jean-Marc; Denolle, Thierry; Fauvel, Jean-Pierre; Plu-Bureau, Geneviève; Tsatsaris, Vassilis; Blacher, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    High blood pressure in pregnancy remains, by its complications, the leading cause of morbidity and maternal and fetal mortality. The frequency (5 to 10% of pregnancies) and the potential severity of this disease, both for mother and child, encourage to standardize and to optimize our medical practices. This is the main objective of this work. If the short-term complications for the mother and child are well known, long-term ones for the mother beginning to be better identified (in particular, the risk of recurrence in a subsequent pregnancy, the risk of chronic hypertension and the increased risk of cardiovascular events). The occurrence of hypertension during pregnancy disturbs the "classic" organization of care. Several health professionals are involved, the general practitioner, obstetrician, gynecologist, midwife, cardiologist, nephrologist… There is not always a care coordinator and decisions are sometimes taken with delay. These data encouraged the French Society of Hypertension to write a consensus offering easy and efficient recommendations. Educate women and all health professionals to hypertension and its management, in line with current scientific data, is one of the major challenges of this consensus.

  14. Perioperative management of pulmonary hypertension during lung transplantation (a lesson for other anaesthesia settings).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabanal, J M; Real, M I; Williams, M

    2014-10-01

    Patients with pulmonary hypertension are some of the most challenging for an anaesthesiologist to manage. Pulmonary hypertension in patients undergoing surgical procedures is associated with high morbidity and mortality due to right ventricular failure, arrhythmias and ischaemia leading to haemodynamic instability. Lung transplantation is the only therapeutic option for end-stage lung disease. Patients undergoing lung transplantation present a variety of challenges for anaesthesia team, but pulmonary hypertension remains the most important. The purpose of this article is to review the anaesthetic management of pulmonary hypertension during lung transplantation, with particular emphasis on the choice of anaesthesia, pulmonary vasodilator therapy, inotropic and vasopressor therapy, and the most recent intraoperative monitoring recommendations to optimize patient care. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  15. Portopulmonary hypertension: from diagnosis to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giusca, Sorin; Jinga, Mariana; Jurcut, Ciprian; Jurcut, Ruxandra; Serban, Marinela; Ginghina, Carmen

    2011-10-01

    Portopulmonary hypertension is a form of pulmonary arterial hypertension that has gained interest in recent years with the development of liver transplantation techniques and new pulmonary vasodilator therapies. Portopulmonary hypertension is defined as pulmonary artery hypertension associated with portal hypertension with or without advanced hepatic disease. Echocardiography plays a major role in screening for portopulmonary hypertension but right heart catheterization remains the gold standard for diagnosis. The treatment of patients with portopulmonary hypertension consists of general measures that apply to all patients that carry the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension and specific vasodilator therapies. These new therapies showed encouraging results in patients who would otherwise have a contraindication for liver transplantation. The review presents a summary of the current knowledge on the epidemiology, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of patients with portopulmonary hypertension.

  16. Physical activity overcomes the effects of cumulative work time on hypertension prevalence among Brazilian taxi drivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Marcelo C; Sperandei, Sandro; Reis, Arianne C

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the physical activity profile of taxi drivers and its relationship with hypertension prevalence in this group of workers. Cross sectional exploratory study. Between November 2008 and April 2009, 491 taxi drivers from Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, answered a questionnaire focusing on previous hypertension diagnosis, occupational characteristics and physical activity habits. Two logistic models were developed to determine risk factors related to hypertension and to find variables associated with a higher probability of sedentarism. Hypertension prevalence was 22.6%. The workload of the group investigated was high. Results indicate that 'age', 'Body Mass Index', 'physical activity', and 'years as a taxi driver' are related to the probability of hypertension. Physical activity was shown to be a protection factor for hypertension, even considering the deleterious effect of time as a taxi driver. Our results also determined that the practice of physical activity is influenced by age, level of education and workload. It is recommended that programs to combat sedentary lifestyles as well as measures to reduce workloads be developed as strategies to prevent hypertension.

  17. PREVALENCE OF HYPERTENSION AMONG FIREFIGHTERS IN RIVERS STATE, SOUTH-SOUTH, NIGERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Kingsley Enyinnah; Oraekesi, Chidi Kelvin

    2015-01-01

    High blood pressure is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Sub-Saharan Africa and firemen (firefighters) may be especially predisposed to it or even exacerbate pre-existing hypertension as a result of the nature of their job. This study was to determine the prevalence of hypertension among firemen in Rivers state, South-South Nigeria. Following ethical clearance, 125 consenting firemen of the Rivers State Fire Service were recruited in this descriptive cross sectional study. They responded to a pre-tested, structured, closed-ended self-administered questionnaire which probed their socio-demographics, knowledge, attitude and practice towards hypertension. Also, their blood pressures heights and weights were measured from where Body Mass Index (BMI) was calculated. A WalkThrough Survey for immediate work place situation and safety was carried out. Data collected were later analyzed using descriptive and analytical statistical tools. There was a 9.6% prevalence of hypertension among this group of workers in Rivers State. The workforce was essentially young with a modal age group of between 31-36 years. The attendant associated risk factors included altered sleep patterns, over weight and smoking which were all statistically significant P hypertension was high (96%), the behaviour of respondents towards prevention and control of hypertension was poor. There is hypertension among firemen of the Rivers State Fire Service occasioned by modifiable risk factors despite adequate knowledge. It is recommended that intensive health education, early detection and treatment be instituted among this group of workers.

  18. Economic assessment of nutritional recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irz, Xavier; Leroy, Pascal; Réquillart, Vincent; Soler, Louis-Georges

    2015-01-01

    The effect of consumers' compliance with nutritional recommendations is uncertain because of potentially complex substitutions. To lift this uncertainty, we adapt a model of consumer behaviour under rationing to the case of linear nutritional constraints. Dietary adjustments are derived from information on consumer preferences, consumption levels, and nutritional contents of foods. A calibration exercise simulates, for different income groups, how the French diet would respond to various nutrition recommendations, and those behavioural adjustments are translated into health outcomes through the DIETRON epidemiological model. This allows for the ex-ante comparison of the efficiency, equity and health effects of ten nutritional recommendations. Although most recommendations impose significant taste costs on consumers, they are highly cost-effective, with the recommendations targeting salt, saturated fat, and fruits and vegetables (F&V) ranking highest in terms of efficiency. Most recommendations are also economically progressive, with the exception of that targeting F&V.

  19. Recommender systems in industrial contexts

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This thesis consists of four parts: - An analysis of the core functions and the prerequisites for recommender systems in an industrial context: we identify four core functions for recommendation systems: Help do Decide, Help to Compare, Help to Explore, Help to Discover. The implementation of these functions has implications for the choices at the heart of algorithmic recommender systems. - A state of the art, which deals with the main techniques used in automated recommendation system: the two most commonly used algorithmic methods, the K-Nearest-Neighbor methods (KNN) and the fast factorization methods are detailed. The state of the art presents also purely content-based methods, hybridization techniques, and the classical performance metrics used to evaluate the recommender systems. This state of the art then gives an overview of several systems, both from academia and industry (Amazon, Google ...). - An analysis of the performances and implications of a recommendation system developed during this thesis: ...

  20. Recommendation systems in software engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Robillard, Martin P; Walker, Robert J; Zimmermann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    With the growth of public and private data stores and the emergence of off-the-shelf data-mining technology, recommendation systems have emerged that specifically address the unique challenges of navigating and interpreting software engineering data.This book collects, structures and formalizes knowledge on recommendation systems in software engineering. It adopts a pragmatic approach with an explicit focus on system design, implementation, and evaluation. The book is divided into three parts: "Part I - Techniques" introduces basics for building recommenders in software engineering, including techniques for collecting and processing software engineering data, but also for presenting recommendations to users as part of their workflow.?"Part II - Evaluation" summarizes methods and experimental designs for evaluating recommendations in software engineering.?"Part III - Applications" describes needs, issues and solution concepts involved in entire recommendation systems for specific software engineering tasks, fo...

  1. Central Systolic Hypertension in Patients with Well-Controlled Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potočárová, Mária; Murín, Ján; Kozlíková, Katarína; Luha, Ján; Čaprnda, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Background. Central systolic blood pressure (CSBP) has prognostic significance and simplified devices for its estimation have been introduced recently. The aim of this study was to assess the achievement of the target CSBP in treated hypertensive patients. Subjects and Methods. One hundred patients with well-controlled hypertension were analysed. For CSBP estimation, we used the Arteriograph (TensioMed Ltd.), which uses one cuff for all measurements, the “single-point measurement” approach. Results. We found that 62% of patients had CSBP ≥ 130 mmHg, the suggested cut-off value for hypertension. When sex-specific classification was employed (CSBP ≥ 137 mmHg for female and CSBP ≥ 133 mmHg for male), only 13% of patients (mainly women) remained in the hypertensive range. We also found that 55% of patients had a CSBP higher than brachial pressure. Multiple analyses showed that CSBP was significantly associated with sex, height, and return time. Conclusions. A high proportion of treated hypertensive patients had CSBP levels that exceeded their brachial BP. CSBP positively correlated with lower height and shorter return time of the reflected pressure wave and was significantly higher in females compared to males. These findings suggest that, for CSBP classification, it is important to take height and sex-specific differences into account. PMID:28127560

  2. A quality improvement plan for hypertension control: the INCOTECA Project (INterventions for COntrol of hyperTEnsion in CAtalonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vallès-Fernandez Roser

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Different studies have shown insufficient blood pressure (BP control in hypertensive patients. Multiple factors influence hypertension management, and the quality of primary care is one of them. We decided therefore to evaluate the effectiveness of a quality improvement plan directed at professionals of Primary Health Care Teams (PHCT with the aim to achieve a better control of hypertension. The hypothesis of the study is that the implementation of a quality improvement plan will improve the control of hypertension. The primary aim of this study will be to evaluate the effectiveness of this plan. Methods and design Design: multicentric study quasi-experimental before – after with control group. The non-randomised allocation of the intervention will be done at PHCT level. Setting: 18 PHCT in the Barcelona province (Spain. Sample: all patients with a diagnosis of hypertension (population based study. Exclusion criteria: patients with a diagnosis of hypertension made later than 01/01/2006 and patients younger than 18 years. Intervention: a quality improvement plan, which targets primary health care professionals and includes educational sessions, feedback to health professionals, audit and implementation of recommended clinical practice guidelines for the management of hypertensive patients. Measurements: age, sex, associated co-morbidity (diabetes mellitus type I and II, heart failure and renal failure. The following variables will be recorded: BP measurement, cardiovascular risk and antihypertensive drugs used. Results will be measured before the start of the intervention and twelve months after the start of the study. Dependent variable: prevalence of hypertensive patients with poor BP control. Analysis: Chi-square test and Student's t-test will be used to measure the association between independent qualitative and quantitative variables, respectively. Non-parametric tests will be used for the analysis of non

  3. [Epidemiological survey on pre-hypertension and hypertension prevalence among adolescents aged 11 to 17 years in Shanghai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Bin; Jin, Xue-juan; Su, Yan-ling; Xiao, Lei; Cai, Qian-fang; Zou, Hui-fei; Ge, Jun-bo

    2012-05-01

    To assess the prevalence of pre-hypertension and hypertension as well as the association with overweight/obesity in Shanghai adolescents. School children aged 11 - 17 years in four schools in Shanghai were included in this survey. All students were visited in May 2010 at school by trained nurses or physicians who administered a questionnaire and carried out anthropometric measurements. Anthropometric measurements included height, weight, heart rate and blood pressure. Repeat measurements were performed in school children with elevated blood pressure within one month. The pre-hypertension and hypertension was defined on the basis of the 2004 National High Blood Pressure Education Program Working Group definitions. The overweight and obesity was defined using cutoff points recommended by Working Group of Obesity, China (WGOC). There were 4175 school children aged 11 - 17 years [mean (15.0 ± 1.9) years, 52.3% (n = 2183) girls and 47.7% (n = 1992) boys]. There were 72.5% (n = 3025) participants with normal blood pressure [ girls (n = 1666) 76.3% and boys (n = 1361) 68.3%], 18.0% (n = 750)participants with pre-hypertension [14.2% (n = 310) for girls and 22.1% (n = 440) for boys], 8.3% (n = 346) participants with stage 1 hypertension [8.2% (n = 179) for girls and 8.3% (n = 165) for boys] and 1.3% (n = 54) participants with stage 2 hypertension [1.3% (n = 28) for girls and 1.3% (n = 26) for boys]. The prevalence of overweight and obesity was 6.7% (n = 147) and 3.0% (n = 66) for girls and 13.7% (n = 273) and 6.3% (n = 125) for boys. After adjusting for gender, age, parental history of hypertension and physical activities, multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that the overweight [adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval: 1.42 (1.16 - 1.75)] and obesity [adjusted odds ratio and 95% confidence interval: 2.35 (1.78 - 3.11)] were independent predictors of elevated blood pressure in this cohort. The prevalence of elevated blood pressure is common in

  4. New therapies for arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliaro, Beniamino; Santolamazza, Caterina; Rubattu, Speranza; Volpe, Massimo

    2016-03-01

    Arterial hypertension is the most common chronic disease in developed countries and it is the leading risk factor for stroke, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, chronic renal failure and peripheral artery disease. Its prevalence appears to be about 30-45% of the general population. Recent European guidelines estimate that up to 15-20% of the hypertensive patients are not controlled on a dual antihypertensive combination and they require three or more different antihypertensive drug classes to achieve adequate blood pressure control. The guidelines confirmed that diuretics, beta-blockers, calcium-channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin receptor blockers are suitable for the initiation and maintenance of antihypertensive treatment, either as monotherapy or in combination therapy. Very few antihypertensive agents have reached the market over the last few years, but no new therapeutic class has really emerged. The long-term adherence to cardiovascular drugs is still low in both primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular diseases. In particular, the issue of compliance is persistently high in hypertension, despite the fixed-dose combination therapy. As a consequence, a cohort of high-risk hypertensive population, represented by patients affected by refractory and resistant hypertension, can be identified. Therefore, the need of controlling BP in high-risk patients may be addressed, in part, by the development of new drugs, devices and procedures that are designed to treat hypertension and comorbidities. In this review we will comprehensively discuss the current literature on recent therapeutic advances in hypertension, including both medical therapy and interventional procedures.

  5. Recommendation Sets and Choice Queries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viappiani, Paolo Renato; Boutilier, Craig

    2011-01-01

    Utility elicitation is an important component of many applications, such as decision support systems and recommender systems. Such systems query users about their preferences and offer recommendations based on the system's belief about the user's utility function. We analyze the connection between...... the problem of generating optimal recommendation sets and the problem of generating optimal choice queries, considering both Bayesian and regret-based elicitation. Our results show that, somewhat surprisingly, under very general circumstances, the optimal recommendation set coincides with the optimal query....

  6. Joint statement of the European Association for the Study of Obesity and the European Society of Hypertension: obesity and difficult to treat arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jens; Yumuk, Volkan; Schlaich, Markus; Nilsson, Peter M; Zahorska-Markiewicz, Barbara; Grassi, Guido; Schmieder, Roland E; Engeli, Stefan; Finer, Nick

    2012-06-01

    Obese patients are prone to arterial hypertension, require more antihypertensive medications, and have an increased risk of treatment-resistant arterial hypertension. Obesity-induced neurohumoral activation appears to be involved. The association between obesity and hypertension shows large inter-individual variability, likely through genetic mechanisms. Obesity affects overall cardiovascular and metabolic risk; yet, the relationship between obesity and cardiovascular risk is complex and not sufficiently addressed in clinical guidelines. The epidemiological observation that obesity may be protective in patients with established cardiovascular disease is difficult to translate into clinical experience and practice. Weight loss is often recommended as a means to lower blood pressure. However, current hypertension guidelines do not provide evidence-based guidance on how to institute weight loss. In fact, weight loss influences on blood pressure may be overestimated. Nevertheless, weight loss through bariatric surgery appears to decrease cardiovascular risk in severely obese patients. Eventually, most obese hypertensive patients will require antihypertensive medications. Data from large-scale studies with hard clinical endpoints on antihypertensive medications specifically addressing obese patients are lacking and the morbidity from the growing population of severely obese patients is poorly recognized or addressed. Because of their broad spectrum of beneficial effects, renin-angiotensin system inhibitors are considered to be the most appropriate drugs for antihypertensive treatment of obese patients. Most obese hypertensive patients require two or more antihypertensive drugs. Finally, how to combine weight loss strategies and antihypertensive treatment to achieve an optimal clinical outcome is unresolved.

  7. [Hypertension: prevalence, early diagnosis, control and trends in Mexican adults].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos-Nonato, Ismael; Hernández-Barrera, Lucía; Rojas-Martínez, Rosalba; Pedroza, Adolfo; Medina-García, Catalina; Barquera-Cervera, Simón

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to describe the prevalence, distribution and trends of hypertension (HT) in Mexican adults ≥20 years, and to describe the prevalence of early diagnosis and treatment of HT. A total of 10 898 adults were considered. The measurement of blood pressure was performed following the procedures recommended by the American Heart Association. An adult was considered, hypertensive when he met the diagnostic criteria of JNC-7. The prevalence of HT was 31.5%, of which 47.3% were unaware of their condition. Pharmacological treatment was not associated with a higher percentage of subjects under control. Prevalences from 2000, 2006 and 2012 suggest that there is a stabilization. A health problem of this magnitude requires better diagnosis, care and training of the medical sector so that appropriate treatments are prescribed and HT control can be enhanced.

  8. Feature Analysis of Recommender Techniques Employed in the Recommendation Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopinath Ganapathy

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Recommender Systems (RS have become a widely researched area as it is extensively used in web usage mining and E-commerce platforms. Approach: There were a number of recommender systems available to suggest the web pages for the web users. Results: A recommender system acted as an intelligent intermediary that automatically generates and predicts information and web pages, which suit the users’ behavior and users’ needs. Conclusion: The various recommender models and analyzing the key features of those models and analyzing the features of portal sites that employ recommender systems to help the research community are the key features of this study and survey.

  9. Applicability of the current hypertension guidelines in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcocer, Luis; Meaney, Eduardo; Hernandez-Hernandez, Hector

    2015-08-01

    Recent research has focused on the development of evidence-based guidelines that are intended to regulate the conduct of physicians in the diagnosis and control of hypertension, with the goal of achieving greater effectiveness and equity at the lowest possible cost. In Latin America, guidelines are available for the management of hypertension at three levels: national, regional and international. The national and regional Latin American and Caribbean (LAC) guidelines are in fact adaptations of the international guidelines. The potential benefit of applying guidelines developed in other regions to local healthcare decision making is that it will enable decision makers to take advantage of existing analyses and transfer or adapt them to their local contexts. However, this adaptation precludes the assessment of their generalizability and potential transferability. In addition, this region is characterized by wide socioeconomic differences between its inhabitants, both among and within nations. Therefore, new guidelines for the LAC region must include recommendations that are common to all hypertensive patients in the region. Moreover, we advocate the inclusion of a specific section that makes comprehensive recommendations and provides strategies for implementation according to the socioeconomic conditions of particular groups. In addition to developing guidelines that are truly applicable to the LAC region, it seems sensible to consider information that is specific to this region. Furthermore, developing evidence-based guidelines is not enough to affect positively the burden of disease caused by hypertension. Therefore, professional programs are required for the implementation of such guidelines as well as the auditing of their results. Achieving these ambitious goals will require collaborative efforts by many groups including policymakers, international organizations, healthcare providers, universities and society.

  10. The impact of hypertension on diastolic left ventricular function, evaluated by quantitative ECG-gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed H.M. Sayed

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Quantitative ECG-gated Tc-99m tetrofosmin SPECT reveals that hypertensive patients with preserved global LV systolic function may have significant changes in diastolic LV function. Gated myocardial perfusion SPECT reports are always lacking in these changes in diastolic function. We recommend inclusion of such changes in diastolic function in gated myocardial perfusion SPECT reports that can help in proper management of hypertensive patients.

  11. Liver cirrhosis and arterial hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jens H Henriksen; Soren Moller

    2006-01-01

    Characteristic findings in patients with cirrhosis are vasodilatation with low overall systemic vascular resistance, high arterial compliance, increased cardiac output, secondary activation of counter-regulatory systems (renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system,sympathetic nervous system, release of vasopressin),and resistance to vasopressors. The vasodilatory state is mediated through adrenomedullin, calcitonin generelated peptide, nitric oxide, and other vasodilators,and is most pronounced in the splanchnic area.This constitutes an effective (although relative)counterbalance to increased arterial blood pressure.This review considers the alterations in systemic hemodynamics in patients with cirrhosis in relation to essential hypertension and arterial hypertension of the renal origin. Subjects with arterial hypertension (essential, secondary) may become normotensive during the development of cirrhosis, and arterial hypertension is rarely manifested in patients with cirrhosis, even in cases with renovascular disease and high circulating renin activity. There is much dispute as to the understanding of homoeostatic regulation in cirrhotic patients with manifest arterial hypertension. This most likely includes the combination of vasodilatation and vasoconstriction in parallel.

  12. Accelerated Hypertension after Venlafaxine Usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yüksel Kıvrak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Venlafaxine is the first antidepressant that acts via inhibiting serotonin and noradrenaline reuptake. Hypertension is observed in doses exceeding 300 mg/day and is the most feared complication. We report a patient with accelerated hypertension after venlafaxine use observed at a dose of 150 mg/day. A 23-year-old patient with symptoms of insomnia, depression, anhedonia, fatigue admitted our clinic. Venlafaxine at a dose of 75 mg/day was initiated after he was diagnosed with major depressive disorder. After 5 months, venlafaxine dose was uptitrated to 150 mg/day due to inadequate response to drug. After using venlafaxine for ten months at the dose of 150 mg/day, he admitted our clinic with headache and epistaxis. He was hospitalized after his blood pressure was measured as 210/170 mmHg. No secondary causes for hypertension were found, and venlafaxine treatment was considered possible etiologic factor. After stopping venlafaxine treatment, his blood pressure was reverted back to normal limits. While mild elevation of blood pressure could be observed after venlafaxine treatment, this case shows that accelerated hypertension with a diastolic blood pressure rise above 120 mmHg could be observed at relatively low doses of venlafaxine. Close monitoring of blood pressure is necessary after initiation of treatment, as accelerated hypertension could cause endorgan damage with potentially catastrophic results.

  13. Renal dopamine receptors and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Tahir; Lokhandwala, Mustafa F

    2003-02-01

    Dopamine has been recognized as an important modulator of central as well as peripheral physiologic functions in both humans and animals. Dopamine receptors have been identified in a number of organs and tissues, which include several regions within the central nervous system, sympathetic ganglia and postganglionic nerve terminals, various vascular beds, the heart, the gastrointestinal tract, and the kidney. The peripheral dopamine receptors influence cardiovascular and renal function by decreasing afterload and vascular resistance and promoting sodium excretion. Within the kidney, dopamine receptors are present along the nephron, with highest density on proximal tubule epithelial cells. It has been reported that there is a defective dopamine receptor, especially D(1) receptor function, in the proximal tubule of various animal models of hypertension as well as in humans with essential hypertension. Recent reports have revealed the site of and the molecular mechanisms responsible for the defect in D(1) receptors in hypertension. Moreover, recent studies have also demonstrated that the disruption of various dopamine receptor subtypes and their function produces hypertension in rodents. In this review, we present evidence that dopamine and dopamine receptors play an important role in regulating renal sodium excretion and that defective renal dopamine production and/or dopamine receptor function may contribute to the development of various forms of hypertension.

  14. Hypertension in the nursing home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronow, Wilbert S

    2008-09-01

    Hypertension in a nursing home patient is a systolic blood pressure of 140 mm Hg or higher and 130 mm Hg or higher in a patient with diabetes mellitus or chronic renal insufficiency, or a diastolic blood pressure of 90 mm Hg or higher and 80 mm Hg or higher in a patient with diabetes mellitus or chronic renal insufficiency. Numerous prospective, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled studies have demonstrated that antihypertensive drug therapy reduces the development of new coronary events, stroke, and congestive heart failure in older persons. The goal of treatment of hypertension in elderly persons is to lower the blood pressure to less than 140/90 mm Hg and to less than 130/80 mm Hg in older persons with diabetes mellitus or chronic renal insufficiency. Elderly persons with diastolic hypertension should have their diastolic blood pressure reduced to 80 to 85 mm Hg. Diuretics should be used as initial drugs in the treatment of older persons with hypertension and no associated medical conditions. The selection of antihypertensive drug therapy in persons with associated medical conditions depends on their associated medical conditions. If the blood pressure is more than 20/10 mm Hg above the goal blood pressure, drug therapy should be initiated with 2 antihypertensive drugs, one of which should be a thiazide-type diuretic. Other coronary risk factors must be treated in patients with hypertension.

  15. Arterial Stiffness: Recommendations and Standardization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Raymond R.

    2017-01-01

    The use of arterial stiffness measurements in longitudinal cohorts of normal populations, hypertensive patients, diabetic patients, healthy elderly, and patients on hemodialysis have confirmed the value of this important measure of arterial health, and established its complementary role to measures of blood pressure. Its contribution to understanding cardiovascular and mortality risk beyond blood pressure measurements has moved measures of arterial stiffness into the ranks of factors such as elevated cholesterol, diabetes, and left ventricular hypertrophy in considering cardiovascular risk. The recent international collaboration's publication of reference ranges for normal people and those with hypertension, along with the American Heart Association's recent scientific statement on standardizing arterial stiffness measurements are important aspects to consider in future studies employing these valuable methods, particularly as interventions that not only lower blood pressure but improve arterial function are tested in the clinical arena. PMID:28275588

  16. Tom Pickering as a clinical scientist: masked hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Kazuo

    2010-04-01

    Masked hypertension has been 'unmasked' by the use of the out-of-office measurement of blood pressure, as home BP monitoring or ambulatory blood pressure monitoring has become available. The term masked hypertension could be used more widely than the original version of masked hypertension; morning hypertension, stress-induced hypertension, and nocturnal hypertension are all classified as subtypes of masked hypertension. Masked hypertension can also be seen in patients with diabetes, that could change clinical practice in diabetes. Masked hypertension is associated with cardiovascular events, but most of the outcome studies are on antihypertensive medications. Therefore, masked hypertension includes insufficient treatment of hypertension. In Dr Pickering's latest review of masked hypertension, prehypertension or high normal blood pressure was stressed as an associating factor with masked hypertension. The biggest theme in the field of hypertension is how we can detect masked hypertension. I present two interesting cases of possible masked hypertension in this commentary.

  17. Context-Aware Recommender Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adomavicius, Gediminas; Tuzhilin, Alexander

    The importance of contextual information has been recognized by researchers and practitioners in many disciplines, including e-commerce personalization, information retrieval, ubiquitous and mobile computing, data mining, marketing, and management. While a substantial amount of research has already been performed in the area of recommender systems, most existing approaches focus on recommending the most relevant items to users without taking into account any additional contextual information, such as time, location, or the company of other people (e.g., for watching movies or dining out). In this chapter we argue that relevant contextual information does matter in recommender systems and that it is important to take this information into account when providing recommendations. We discuss the general notion of context and how it can be modeled in recommender systems. Furthermore, we introduce three different algorithmic paradigms - contextual prefiltering, post-filtering, and modeling - for incorporating contextual information into the recommendation process, discuss the possibilities of combining several contextaware recommendation techniques into a single unifying approach, and provide a case study of one such combined approach. Finally, we present additional capabilities for context-aware recommenders and discuss important and promising directions for future research.

  18. From micronutrient recommendations to policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timotijevic, Lada; Raats, Monique M.; Barnett, Julie

    2010-01-01

    Background/Objectives: To achieve the nutritional goals stipulated by micronutrient recommendations, greater attention must be paid to the behavioural routes to such nutritional outcomes. Coopting stakeholders and consumers into decisions regarding micronutrient recommendations is an important step...... towards achieving a greater link between micronutrient recommendations and behaviour. This study aims to examine the rationale and processes associated with consumer and stakeholder involvement in setting micronutrient recommendations across Europe. Subjects/Methods: Using the contacts established through...... the Eurreca network of excellence (commissioned by the European Commission), the research involved in-depth desk research of key documents and communication channels linked to the process of setting micronutrient recommendations across seven countries: the United Kingdom, Norway, Denmark, Germany, Spain...

  19. Football as a treatment for hypertension in untrained 30-55-year-old men: a prospective randomized study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, L J; Randers, M B; Westh, K;

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated whether football has favorable effects in the treatment of mild-to-moderate arterial hypertension in untrained middle-aged men. Twenty-five untrained males aged 31-54 year with mild-to-moderate hypertension were randomized to a football training group (FTG, two 1-h...... to the treatment of mild-to-moderate arterial hypertension in untrained middle-aged men....... sessions per week) and a control group receiving physician-guided traditional recommendations on cardiovascular risk factor modification (doctoral advice group, DAG). After 3 months, systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were lowered (P

  20. [State of the dopamine system activity, as one of factors for the development of arterial hypertension and obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyzogub, V H; Dolynna, O V; Bogdan, T V; Sobol', V O

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of 5 subtypes of dopamine receptors revealed their important role in development of arterial hypertension and obesity. Reduce of their functional activity or number with age conduces to the increase of tone of the sympathetic nervous system, dyspoiesis of leptin, hyperphagia, development of obesity and arterial hypertension. Prescription of dopamine agonists conduces to reduction of in, normalization of leptin, diminishing of appetite and body mass, decrease of blood pressure. Combination of arterial hypertension and obesity is recommended to determine dopamine excretion and to appoint dopamine agonists at level of < 600 nmol/24 hours.

  1. Management of hypertension in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudjari, Nurike S; Samsu, Nur

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension-related maternal mortality reaches 16% when it is compared to other causes of maternal mortality such as sepsis, bleeding or abortus. Pregnant women with hypertension disorder are at increased risk for experiencing numerous complications including disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), cerebral hemorrhage, liver dysfunction and acute renal failure; while to the fetus, it may cause intrauterine growth retardation, prematurity and perinatal mortality. Hypertension in pregnancy should be managed appropriately to reduce maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality rate, i.e. by preventing women from getting the risks of increased blood pressure, preventing disease progression and preventing the development of seizure and considering termination of pregnancy in life-threatening situation for maternal and fetal health.

  2. Taste and hypertension in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roura, Eugeni; Foster, Simon; Winklebach, Anja

    2016-01-01

    approaches to mitigate cardiovascular disease (CVD) could well take a different spin in the future following the discovery of taste receptors (TAS1R and TAS2R) in the cardiovascular system. Finally, long-term dietary strategies to minimize the risk of development of hypertension and CVD are discussed......The association between salty taste and NaCl intake with hypertension is well-established, although it is far from completely understood. Other taste types such as sweet, umami or bitter have also been related to alterations in blood pressure. Here, we review the mutual relationship between taste...... and hypertension to identify potential avenues to better control blood pressure. This review focuses on published data involving humans, with the exception of a section on molecular mechanisms. There is compelling evidence to suggest that changes in salty taste sensitivity can be used to predict the onset...

  3. [Hypertension and the metabolic syndrome.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Michael; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Larsen, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    risk associated with increased blood pressure. As the definition of the metabolic syndrome is based on dichotomization of cardiovascular risk factors with a continuously increasing risk, it cannot match risk stratification tools like the HeartScore for calculation of prognosis. However, the metabolic......The metabolic syndrome is a relatively prevalent condition characterized by co-existence of several metabolic and cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension. Patients with hypertension have an increased risk of developing the metabolic syndrome which, in turn, increases the cardiovascular...... syndrome is of clinical importance as it makes the treating physician test for other elements of the syndrome in patients with one of the elements, e.g. hypertension. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jun-15...

  4. An Update on Inpatient Hypertension Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axon, R Neal; Turner, Mason; Buckley, Ryan

    2015-11-01

    Hypertension is highly prevalent affecting nearly one third of the US adult population. Though generally approached as an outpatient disorder, elevated blood pressure is observed in a majority of hospitalized patients. The spectrum of hypertensive disease ranges from patients with hypertensive emergency including markedly elevated blood pressure and associated end-organ damage to asymptomatic patients with minimally elevated pressures of unclear significance. It is important to note that current evidence-based hypertension guidelines do not specifically address inpatient hypertension. This narrative review focuses primarily on best practices for diagnosing and managing nonemergent hypertension in the inpatient setting. We describe examples of common hypertensive syndromes, provide suggestions for optimal post-acute management, and point to evidence-based or consensus guidelines where available. In addition, we describe a practical approach to managing asymptomatic elevated blood pressure observed in the inpatient setting. Finally, arranging effective care transitions to ensure optimal ongoing hypertension management is appropriate in all cases.

  5. Hypertension: The Demographics of Management and Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ames, Natalie

    1985-01-01

    The ultimate goal of any hypertension control program is reduction of excessive morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. Factors affecting detection of hypertension and compliance with educational intervention are discussed and implications drawn. (MT)

  6. Sickle Cell Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... My doctor wants to screen me for pulmonary hypertension. Why is this? Sickle cell disease (SCD), a ... What are some of the symptoms of pulmonary hypertension? Because they are somewhat general symptoms, the characteristics ...

  7. Insulin resistance in Nigerians with essential hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    2013-09-03

    Sep 3, 2013 ... Strategies to reduce insulin resistance such as physical exercise, weight loss and a healthy diet should be included in the treatment of hypertensive ... Treatment of High Blood Pressure. Hypertension. 2003; 42: 1206-52. 12.

  8. Awareness, Treatment and Control of Hypertension among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Awareness, Treatment and Control of Hypertension among Hypertensives in Zaria. ... consistent with follow up and 67.3% reported compliance with their medication. ... Awareness rate did not seem to have affected blood pressure control.

  9. Indoramin in the treatment of hypertension

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1983-02-26

    Feb 26, 1983 ... the treatment of essential hypertension in South Africa, it is appropriate to provide a brief ... essential hypertension, and since a-adrenocepror-blocking drugs .... blocking drugs and of diuretics can be reduced by non-steroidal.

  10. Hypercortisolism in obesity-associated hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Amy G; Nimkevych, Oksana; Uwaifo, Gabriel I

    2014-07-01

    Obesity is prevalent worldwide and associated with co-morbidities that result in increased cardiovascular risk. Hypertension is the most prevalent obesity comorbidity associated with increased cardiovascular risk. Obesity hypertension is a distinct subtype of essential hypertension. While endogenous Cushing's syndrome is an uncommon cause of both obesity and hypertension, the recent recognition of other hypercortisolemic states has raised the profile of hypercortisolism as an important contributor in obesity hypertension. The high prevalence of exogenous, iatrogenic, pseudo, and subclinical Cushing's syndromes makes hypercortisolism an important diagnostic consideration in the evaluation and management of patients with obesity hypertension who are resistant to conventional management. Available data suggest that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system modulating antihypertensives have the best efficacy in hypercortisolism-mediated obesity hypertension. Strategies aimed at reducing cortisol production and action also have utility. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the epidemiology, etiopathogenesis and management options available for glucocorticoid-mediated obesity hypertension.

  11. Refeeding hypertension in dietary obesity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernsberger, P.; Nelson, D.O. (Northwestern Univ. Medical School, Chicago, IL (USA))

    1988-01-01

    A novel model of nutritionally induced hypertension in the rat is described. Dietary obesity was produced by providing sweet milk in addition to regular chow, which elicited a 52% increase in caloric intake. Despite 54% greater body weight gain and 139% heavier retroperitoneal fat pads, 120 days of overfeeding failed to increase systolic pressure in the conscious state or mean arterial pressure under urethan anesthesia. In contrast, mild hypertension developed in intermittantly fasted obese animals. The first 4-day supplemented fast was initiated 4 wk after the introduction of sweet milk, when the animals were 47 g overweight relative to chow-fed controls. Thereafter, 4 days of starvation were alternated with 2 wk of refeeding for a total of 4 cycles. A rapid fall in systolic blood pressure accompanied the onset of supplemented fasting and was maintained thereafter. With refeeding, blood pressure rose precipitously, despite poststarvation anorexia. Blood pressure tended to rise slightly over the remainder of the realimentation period. After the 4th supplemented fast, hypertension was sustained during 30 days of refeeding. Cumulative caloric intake in starved-refed rats fell within 2% of that in chow-fed controls. Refeeding hypertension appeared to be due to increased sympathetic nervous activity, since (1) cardiac {beta}-adrenergic receptors were downregulated, as indicated by a 40% decrease in the maximum binding of ({sup 3}H)dihydroalpranolol; and (2) the decrease in heart rate as a result of {beta}-blockade was enhanced. Refeeding hypertension in the dietary obese rat may be a potential animal model for some forms of human obesity-related hypertension.

  12. The immune system and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Madhu V; Chapleau, Mark W; Harwani, Sailesh C; Abboud, Francois M

    2014-08-01

    A powerful interaction between the autonomic and the immune systems plays a prominent role in the initiation and maintenance of hypertension and significantly contributes to cardiovascular pathology, end-organ damage and mortality. Studies have shown consistent association between hypertension, proinflammatory cytokines and the cells of the innate and adaptive immune systems. The sympathetic nervous system, a major determinant of hypertension, innervates the bone marrow, spleen and peripheral lymphatic system and is proinflammatory, whereas the parasympathetic nerve activity dampens the inflammatory response through α7-nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. The neuro-immune synapse is bidirectional as cytokines may enhance the sympathetic activity through their central nervous system action that in turn increases the mobilization, migration and infiltration of immune cells in the end organs. Kidneys may be infiltrated by immune cells and mesangial cells that may originate in the bone marrow and release inflammatory cytokines that cause renal damage. Hypertension is also accompanied by infiltration of the adventitia and perivascular adipose tissue by inflammatory immune cells including macrophages. Increased cytokine production induces myogenic and structural changes in the resistance vessels, causing elevated blood pressure. Cardiac hypertrophy in hypertension may result from the mechanical afterload and the inflammatory response to resident or migratory immune cells. Toll-like receptors on innate immune cells function as sterile injury detectors and initiate the inflammatory pathway. Finally, abnormalities of innate immune cells and the molecular determinants of their activation that include toll-like receptor, adrenergic, cholinergic and AT1 receptors can define the severity of inflammation in hypertension. These receptors are putative therapeutic targets.

  13. The association of duration of hypertension and changes in cognitive function in hypertension patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李拓

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between duration of hypertension and cognitive function in adult hypertension patients.Methods A total of 224 subjects with normal blood pressure were enrolled in group A,and 1 296 patients with poorly controlled hypertension were further divided by the duration of hypertension into

  14. Scorpion sting and hypertensive crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ratti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Scorpion stings are very frequent in Centre-South America. The most frequently observed clinical symptoms are: local pain and redness, tachycardia, irritability, hypertensive crisis; but it differs with the scorpion species involved. CLINICAL CASE We describe a scorpion sting in a woman who came back from a holiday in Mexico. Consequently she had a hypertensive crisis treated with furosemide. DISCUSSION The scorpion sting can be very dangerous. There are many species which could be lethal; in these cases, identifying the exact species can be essential to save the patient’s life. The treatment consists of symptomatic measures, support of vital functions and i.v. antivenom.

  15. Syphilis mimicking idiopathic intracranial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yri, Hanne; Wegener, Marianne; Jensen, Rigmor

    2011-01-01

    or an atypical disease course should alert the physician to reevaluate a presumed IIH-diagnosis. The authors report a case of a 32-year-old non-obese male with intracranial hypertension, secondary to a syphilitic central nervous system infection, initially misdiagnosed as being idiopathic. Upon relevant......Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH) is a condition of yet unknown aetiology affecting predominantly obese females of childbearing age. IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion as raised cerebrospinal fluid pressure may occur secondary to numerous other medical conditions. An atypical phenotype...

  16. Current management approaches to portopulmonary hypertension.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Portopulmonary hypertension (PoPH) is a rare but life-threatening complication of portal hypertension that is characterised by proliferative changes in the pulmonary microvasculature indistinguishable from other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Although PoPH is most commonly observed in the setting of cirrhosis, patients with noncirrhotic portal hypertension are also at risk of developing the disorder. A definitive diagnosis requires invasive hemodynamic co...

  17. Dangerous versus useful hypertension (a holistic view of hypertension).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulin, I; Duris, I; Paulis, L; Sapakova, E; Mravec, B

    2009-03-01

    The authors aim to offer a holistic view on hypertension and its treatment. Their approach is fairly confrontational, particularly by suggesting that hypertension may play a role in optimizing the blood flow and enhancing oxygen delivery. An increase in blood pressure brings about a threat of catastrophes. Therefore hypertension might be considered as either a subsequent complication, or an inevitable adaptation. When changes of many complicated and complex mechanisms result in retention of sodium and water, then the treatment of this condition is so far the most logical conclusion, and possibly beneficial to the patient. This can be done by influencing the peripheral resistance or the load of vascular bed. However, in some cases a moderate overfilling of the system with no increase in heart rate could be interpreted as an optimal solution for organism that does not necessarily need to be medically treated. This may apply especially to young hypertensive patients, and in cases when no catastrophe is assumed to take place. Lowering the blood pressure to average population levels in each case, especially by means of aggressive therapy may not necessarily lead to improved tissue perfusion. A decrease in blood pressure reduces the risk of catastrophes. However, on the other hand, it can deteriorate the tissue perfusion and cause unfavorable long-term consequences.

  18. 76 FR 81 - Adoption of Recommendation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-03

    ...; ] ADMINISTRATIVE CONFERENCE OF THE UNITED STATES Adoption of Recommendation AGENCY: Administrative Conference of... the attached recommendation at its Fifty-third Plenary Session. The recommendation addresses issues... makes recommendations for improvements to the agencies, collectively or individually, and to...

  19. Health utilities of hypertensive patients in Vietnam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.P.; Postma, M.J.; Veninga, Catharina

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: With a lack of an essential evidence on utilities to support cost-effectiveness analysis of hypertension management in Vietnam, we aimed to gather data on health utilities for hypertensive patients and identify predictors of utility. Methods: Hypertensive patients, from 40 to 80 years ol

  20. Renovascular hypertension: Pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glorioso, N.; Laragh, J.H.; Rappelli, A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 42 selections. Some of the titles are: Clinical Pharmacology of Two Synthetic Atrial Natriuretics Peptides; Reflex Control of Renin Release in Normotensive and Hypertensive Humans; Renal Blood flow in Renovascular Hypertension; and Radioisotopic Studies in Renovascular Hypertension Before and After Surgery or Percutaneous Transluminal Renal Angioplasty.

  1. Childhood hypertension: what does the radiologist contribute?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roebuck, Derek [Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust, Radiology Department, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    Hypertension may be essential (primary) or secondary to a variety of causes. The most important risk factors for essential hypertension are obesity and a family history of high BP, but there are also associations with sleep apnoea, low birth weight and prematurity. The most important cause of secondary hypertension in childhood is chronic renal disease. (orig.)

  2. The renal transcriptome in experimental hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wesseling, S.

    2007-01-01

    The renal transcriptome in experimental hypertension The kidneys importantly determine blood pressure. Kidney dysfunction can result in hypertension, which in turn leads to renal damage. In primary hypertension the cause is unknown. The condition is polygenic, however, which genetic defects cause el

  3. Hypertension and renal disease : Role of microalbuminuria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, WMT; deJong, PE; deZeeuw, D

    1996-01-01

    Risks associated with hypertension Hypertension is a risk factor for cardiovascular and possibly renal organ damage. Microalbuminuria is a newly recognized cardiovascular and renal risk factor in diabetic and non-diabetic subjects. The prevalence of microalbuminuria is enhanced in hypertensive subje

  4. [Knowledge level of hypertensive patients about hypertension. Relationship between knowledge level and hypertension control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez Camps, M; Egocheaga Cabello, M Isabel; Dalfó Baqué, A; Bajo García, J; Vara González, L; Sanchis Doménech, C; Martín Rioboo, E; Ureña Fernández, T; Domínguez Sardiña, M; Bonet Pla, A

    2015-01-01

    To assess the knowledge of the hypertensive patients about their hypertension and their relation to its control. Cross-sectional study among 400 hypertensive patients, all over 18 years, selected from 50 primary-care centres, who responded to an hypertension-related survey. Included variables were survey items, age, gender, educational level, professional occupation, blood pressure data and antihypertensive treatment. The obtained differences were analyzed using the chi-square test, Kruskal-Wallis, Wilcoxon, Anova and Bonferroni methods. There were 323 valid surveys. 52.9% of respondents were women, the average age: 65.4 years (SD: 11.2), 54.8% of them had primary education. 39.6% were aware of the objectives of systolic BP control. Only 19.6% having knowledge of those for diastolic BP control, with no differences between controlled and uncontrolled (systolic BP: 39% vs 38.1%, P=.887; diastolic BP: 19.2% vs 21%, P=.721). Over 70% knew about lifestyle changes, without significant differences between controlled and uncontrolled respondents. 82% of controlled respondents, and 79% of those uncontrolled, recognized the chronical nature of the treatment (P=.548), but 15.1% of the controlled respondents and 12.4% of uncontrolled respondents did not see the relation between the treatment and hypertension control (P=.525). 31.1% believed to be well-controlled, but in fact was not. Our patients doesn't know blood pressure targets of control. There isn't relationship between this knowledge and control of hypertension. Copyright © 2014 SEHLELHA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinical efficacy and safety of olmesartan/hydrochlorothiazide combination therapy in patients with essential hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M Ruilope

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Luis M RuilopeUnidad de Hipertensión, Hospital 12 de Octubre, Madrid, SpainAbstract: Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease that contributes to the premature death of millions of people each year, and identification and treatment of hypertension continues to be a challenge. Guidelines recommend that many patients will require two or more antihypertensive agents from different classes. Combining an angiotensin II receptor blocker (ARB with hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ has been shown in clinical studies to increase the antihypertensive efficacy of both agents compared with either agent alone. This review covers several clinical trials and aims to examine several aspects of the efficacy of the combination of olmesartan and HCTZ, including dose-responsiveness, long-term efficacy, goal rate achievement, and efficacy in patients with moderate to severe hypertension. The results presented here demonstrate that olmesartan is effective when added to HCTZ monotherapy or when HCTZ is added to olmesartan monotherapy, both over the short and long term. Moderate to severe hypertension responds well to olmesartan/HCTZ combination therapy, and the great majority of patients are able to achieve recommended blood pressure targets. Thus olmesartan/HCTZ is a well-tolerated option for patients who fail to respond to monotherapy and as initial therapy in those who require large reductions in diastolic blood pressure or systolic blood pressure to achieve goal blood pressure.Keywords: hypertension, olmesartan medoxomil; hydrochlorothiazide, angiotensin II receptor blocker, thiazide diuretic

  6. [Expert consensus statement on interventional renal sympathetic denervation for hypertension treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoud, F; Vonend, O; Bruck, H; Clasen, W; Eckert, S; Frye, B; Haller, H; Hausberg, M; Hoppe, U C; Hoyer, J; Hahn, K; Keller, T; Krämer, B K; Kreutz, R; Potthoff, S A; Reinecke, H; Schmieder, R; Schwenger, V; Kintscher, U; Böhm, M; Rump, L C

    2011-11-01

    This commentary summarizes the expert consensus and recommendations of the working group 'Herz und Niere' of the German Society of Cardiology (DGK), the German Society of Nephrology (DGfN) and the German Hypertension League (DHL) on renal denervation for antihypertensive treatment. Renal denervation is a new, interventional approach to selectively denervate renal afferent and efferent sympathetic fibers. Renal denervation has been demonstrated to reduce office systolic and diastolic blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension, defined as systolic office blood pressure ≥ 160 mm Hg and ≥ 150 mm Hg in patients with diabetes type 2, which should currently be used as blood pressure thresholds for undergoing the procedure. Exclusion of secondary hypertension causes and optimized antihypertensive drug treatment is mandatory in every patient with resistant hypertension. In order to exclude pseudoresistance, 24-hour blood pressure measurements should be performed. Preserved renal function was an inclusion criterion in the Symplicity studies, therefore, renal denervation should be only considered in patients with a glomerular filtration rate > 45 ml/min. Adequate centre qualification in both, treatment of hypertension and interventional expertise are essential to ensure correct patient selection and procedural safety. Long-term follow-up after renal denervation and participation in the German Renal Denervation (GREAT) Registry are recommended to assess safety and efficacy after renal denervation over time.

  7. Management recommendations: Lee Metcalf Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and...

  8. Disability: recommendations for eye programmes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2012, CBM’s Medical Eye Care Advisory Working Group met in Hyderabad, India to discuss the inclusion of people with disabilities in eye care.As a result of these discussions, recommendations were made.

  9. Management recommendations: Sand Lake Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and...

  10. Strategic Arrivals Recommendation Tool Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During the conduct of a NASA Research Announcement (NRA) in 2012 and 2013, the Mosaic ATM team first developed the Strategic Arrivals Recommendation Tool concept, or...

  11. Management recommendations: Benton Lake Complex

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This document is a review of land management practices at the Benton Lake Complex, by a land use specialist. Recommendations, time frame and additional comments are...

  12. Dietary Recommendations for Healthy Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Restaurant Deciphering the Menu Ordering Your Meal Eating Fast Food Dining Out Tips by Cuisine Physical Activity Fitness ... Food and Beverage Toolkit Dietary Recommendations for Healthy Children Updated:Jul 22,2016 The American Heart Association ...

  13. RECOMMENDER SYSTEMS IN SOCIAL NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cleomar Valois Batista Jr

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The continued and diversified growth of social networks has changed the way in which users interact with them. With these changes, what once was limited to social contact is now used for exchanging ideas and opinions, creating the need for new features. Users have so much information at their fingertips that they are unable to process it by themselves; hence, the need to develop new tools. Recommender systems were developed to address this need and many techniques were used for different approaches to the problem. To make relevant recommendations, these systems use large sets of data, not taking the social network of the user into consideration. Developing a recommender system that takes into account the social network of the user is another way of tackling the problem. The purpose of this project is to use the theory of six degrees of separation (Watts 2003 amongst users of a social network to enhance existing recommender systems.

  14. Management of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Judge, Eoin P

    2013-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a complex disease with a high mortality. Management of this disease is underpinned by supportive and general therapies delivered by multidisciplinary teams in specialist centres. In recent years, a number of PAH-specific therapies have improved patient outcomes. This article will discuss the management of PAH in the context of relevant recently published studies in this area.

  15. Intraabdominal hypertension og abdominalt kompartmentsyndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Morten; Hillingsø, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Intraabdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) are rare conditions with high mortality. IAH is an intraabdominal pressure (IAP) above 12 mmHg and ACS an IAP above 20 mmHg with evidence of organ dysfunction. IAP is measured indirectly via the bladder or stomach. Various...

  16. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should

  17. Methamphetamine Use and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other problems, diagnosing a case of pulmonary hyper- tension can be difficult and may require a specialist. Once pulmonary hyperten- sion is diagnosed, however, treatment can begin immediately. One form of PH is called pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In PAH, the blood vessels that ...

  18. Hypertension control in brazilian publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinho, Natália de Alencar; Pierin, Angela Maria Geraldo, E-mail: pierin@usp.br [Universidade de São Paulo, Escola de Enfermagem, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-09-15

    Hypertension is a major public health problem due to its high prevalence and cardiovascular complications. Its treatment is aimed at reducing cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, its goal being to maintain blood pressure levels below 140/90 mm Hg. Hypertension control in Brazil is low, and nationwide rates are unknown. The objective of this review was to provide an overview on hypertension control in Brazil from publications in a database. We identified 45 publications. In population-based studies, the highest control rate (57.6%) was reported in a multicenter study in 100 municipalities and the city of São José do Rio Preto, São Paulo state (52.4%), while the lowest rates (around 10%) were identified in microregions of the Rio Grande do Sul state and in the city of Tubarão, Santa Catarina state. In conclusion, the studies assessed showed a wide variation in hypertension control rates. It is worth noting that the comparison between studies was a major limiting factor, because of the different methods used.

  19. Hypertensive disorders in twin pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.G. Santema (Job); E. Koppelaar (Elin); H.C.S. Wallenburg (Henk)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractObjective: To compare the incidence and severity of pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorders in twin pregnancy and in singleton gestation. Study design: Case-control study in the setting of a University Hospital. Each pregnancy of a consecutive series of 187 twin pregnancies attending th

  20. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should

  1. Recommended Practices for Spreadsheet Testing

    CERN Document Server

    Panko, Raymond R

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the authors recommended practices for spreadsheet testing. Documented spreadsheet error rates are unacceptable in corporations today. Although improvements are needed throughout the systems development life cycle, credible improvement programs must include comprehensive testing. Several forms of testing are possible, but logic inspection is recommended for module testing. Logic inspection appears to be feasible for spreadsheet developers to do, and logic inspection appears to be safe and effective.

  2. Tourism recommendation system: empirical investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Petrevska, Biljana; Saso KOCESKI

    2012-01-01

    The paper makes an attempt to justify the necessity of implementing recommendation system which will assist tourists in identification of their ideal holiday. The proposed recommendation system based on collaborative filtering notes positive impulses in the case of Macedonia. A software module is developed being capable to generate a personalized list of favorable and tailor-made items. The research outcomes indicate that the designed national tourism web portal can provide satisfactory perfo...

  3. User Profiling for Recommendation System

    OpenAIRE

    Kanoje, Sumitkumar; Girase, Sheetal; Mukhopadhyay, Debajyoti

    2015-01-01

    Recommendation system is a type of information filtering systems that recommend various objects from a vast variety and quantity of items which are of the user interest. This results in guiding an individual in personalized way to interesting or useful objects in a large space of possible options. Such systems also help many businesses to achieve more profits to sustain in their filed against their rivals. But looking at the amount of information which a business holds it becomes difficult to...

  4. Introduction on health recommender systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Bocanegra, C L; Sanchez-Laguna, F; Sevillano, J L

    2015-01-01

    People are looking for appropriate health information which they are concerned about. The Internet is a great resource of this kind of information, but we have to be careful if we don't want to get harmful info. Health recommender systems are becoming a new wave for apt health information as systems suggest the best data according to the patients' needs.The main goals of health recommender systems are to retrieve trusted health information from the Internet, to analyse which is suitable for the user profile and select the best that can be recommended, to adapt their selection methods according to the knowledge domain and to learn from the best recommendations.A brief definition of recommender systems will be given and an explanation of how are they incorporated in the health sector. A description of the main elementary recommender methods as well as their most important problems will also be made. And, to finish, the state of the art will be described.

  5. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maceira Alicia M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension.

  6. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in systemic hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Systemic hypertension is a highly prevalent potentially modifiable cardiovascular risk factor. Imaging plays an important role in the diagnosis of underlying causes for hypertension, in assessing cardiovascular complications of hypertension, and in understanding the pathophysiology of the disease process. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) provides accurate and reproducible measures of ventricular volumes, mass, function and haemodynamics as well as uniquely allowing tissue characterization of diffuse and focal fibrosis. In addition, CMR is well suited for exclusion of common secondary causes for hypertension. We review the current and emerging clinical and research applications of CMR in hypertension. PMID:22559053

  7. Hypertension in obesity: is leptin the culprit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonds, Stephanie E; Cowley, Michael A

    2013-02-01

    The number of obese or overweight humans continues to increase worldwide. Hypertension is a serious disease that often develops in obesity, but it is not clear how obesity increases the risk of hypertension. However, both obesity and hypertension increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). In this review, we examine how obesity may increase the risk of developing hypertension. Specifically, we discuss how the adipose-derived hormone leptin influences the sympathetic nervous system (SNS), through actions in the brain to elevate energy expenditure (EE) while also contributing to hypertension in obesity.

  8. Australian association for exercise and sports science position statement on exercise and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharman, James E; Stowasser, Michael

    2009-03-01

    Hypertension (high blood pressure; BP) is a leading contributor to premature death and disability from cardiovascular disease. Lifestyle modification that includes regular physical activity is often recommended to patients with hypertension as one of the first line treatments for lowering BP, as well as improving overall risk for cardiovascular events. It is recognised that allied health care professionals play an important role in helping patients to achieve BP control by influencing and reinforcing appropriate lifestyle behavior. The minimum amount of exercise that is recommended in patients with hypertension comprises a mix of moderate to vigorous aerobic (endurance) activity (up to 5 days/week) in addition to resistance (strength) training (on 2 or more non-consecutive days/week). However, due to the dose-response relationship between physical activity and health, exercise levels performed beyond the minimum recommendations are expected to confer additional health benefits. Vigorous exercise training is generally safe and well tolerated by most people, including those with hypertension, although some special considerations are required and these are discussed in this review.

  9. Duration of lactation and incidence of maternal hypertension: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuebe, Alison M; Schwarz, Eleanor B; Grewen, Karen; Rich-Edwards, Janet W; Michels, Karin B; Foster, E Michael; Curhan, Gary; Forman, John

    2011-11-15

    Never or curtailed lactation has been associated with an increased risk for incident hypertension, but the effect of exclusive breastfeeding is unknown. The authors conducted an observational cohort study of 55,636 parous women in the US Nurses' Health Study II. From 1991 to 2005, participants reported 8,861 cases of incident hypertension during 660,880 person-years of follow-up. Never or curtailed lactation was associated with an increased risk of incident hypertension. Compared with women who breastfed their first child for ≥12 months, women who did not breastfeed were more likely to develop hypertension (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.27, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.18, 1.36), adjusting for family history and lifestyle covariates. Women who never breastfed were more likely to develop hypertension than women who exclusively breastfed their first child for ≥6 months (HR = 1.29, 95% CI: 1.20, 1.40). The authors found similar results for women who had never breastfed compared with those who had breastfed each child for an average of ≥12 months (HR = 1.22, 95% CI: 1.13, 1.32). In conclusion, never or curtailed lactation was associated with an increased risk of incident maternal hypertension, compared with the recommended ≥6 months of exclusive or ≥12 months of total lactation per child, in a large cohort of parous women.

  10. Hypertension in rural communities in Delta State, Nigeria: Prevalence, risk factors and barriers to health care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary I. Ofili

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Hypertension is a global health challenge and its prevalence is increasing rapidly amongst adults in many African countries. Some studies on the prevalence and risk factors of hypertension have been conducted in Nigeria, but none within Delta State. We assessed the prevalence of hypertension and associated risk factors amongst adults in three villages in the Ibusa community in Delta State, Nigeria.Method: Homesteads were randomly selected and all consenting adults (≥ 18 years of age were recruited for this cross-sectional study (134 individuals: 48 men, 86 women. Sociodemographic data and anthropometric measurements (weight, height and abdominal circumference were recorded. Diagnosis of hypertension was based on blood pressure≥ 140/90 mmHg.Result: Hypertension prevalence in this rural community was 44%. Results from one village (Ogboli: 82% and ethnic group (Ibo: 50% were significantly higher than in others in the same variable category. Multivariate logistic regression analysis suggested increasing age, increasing body mass index and high salt intake as prominent risk factors for hypertension. Lack of funds and equipment shortage in clinics were most often reported as barriers to healthcare.Conclusion: A nutritional education programme to promote low-cholesterol and low-salt diets is recommended to specifically target people in higher-risk areas and of higher-risk ethnicity. Local barriers to accessing health care need to be addressed.

  11. High prevalence of hypertension among an ethnic group in Sudan: implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noor, Sufian K; Elsugud, Nada A; Bushara, Sarra O; Elmadhoun, Wadie M; Ahmed, Mohamed H

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension is an emerging non-communicable disease in developing countries. Due to its silent nature and serious complications, active screening is essential in order to prevent complications. For instance, premature mortality from cardiovascular diseases could be prevented by the effective control of hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of undiagnosed hypertension among Nuba ethnic group living in Atbara city, north Sudan and to identify the associated risk factors. All consenting 500 adults from Nuba tribe who live in El Wihda District, Atbara were included. Blood pressure (BP) and body mass index were measured. Standard interviewing procedures were used to record medical history, socio-demographic data, and lifestyle characteristics. Among the 500 participants, females were 364 (72.8%) and males were 136 (27.2%). The overall prevalence of undiagnosed hypertension was 49.4% (30.8% stage 1 hypertension and 18.6% stage 2 hypertension). In addition, 41% of the population was having prehypertension. The significant risk factors for high BP were: male sex, age above 45 years, overweight, illiteracy, and alcohol consumption. Undiagnosed high BP is very common among Nuba ethnic group; therefore, active screening and early management are recommended to prevent complications.

  12. Age, hypertension and arterial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEniery, Carmel M; Wilkinson, Ian B; Avolio, Albert P

    2007-07-01

    1. Ageing exerts a marked effect on the cardiovascular system and, in particular, the large arteries. Using a variety of techniques to assess arterial stiffness, many cross-sectional studies have demonstrated a significant relationship between age and aortic stiffness, although the age-related changes observed in peripheral arteries appear to be less marked. 2. The relationship between arterial stiffness and hypertension is more complex. The distending, or mean arterial, pressure is an important confounder of measurements of arterial stiffness and, therefore, must be taken into consideration when assessing arterial stiffness in hypertensive subjects or investigating the effect of antihypertensive agents. Current methods for correcting for differences in distending pressure involve pharmacological manipulation, statistical correction or mathematical manipulation of stiffness indices. 3. Many studies have provided evidence that both peripheral (muscular) and central (elastic) arteries are stiffer in subjects with mixed (systolic/diastolic) hypertension compared with normotensive subjects. However, it is unclear to what extent differences in mean arterial pressure explain the observed differences in hypertensive subjects. In contrast, isolated systolic hypertension is associated with increased aortic, but not peripheral artery, stiffness, although the underlying mechanisms are somewhat unclear. 4. Traditional antihypertensive agents appear to reduce arterial stiffness, but mostly via an indirect effect of lowering mean pressure. Therefore, therapies that target the large arteries to reduce stiffness directly are urgently required. Agents such as nitric oxide donors and phosphodiesterase inhibitors may be useful in reducing stiffness via functional mechanisms. In addition, inhibitors or breakers of advanced glycation end-product cross-links between proteins, such as collagen and elastin, hold substantial promise.

  13. Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring (ABPM) as the reference standard for diagnosis of hypertension and assessment of vascular risk in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermida, Ramón C; Smolensky, Michael H; Ayala, Diana E; Portaluppi, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    New information has become available since the ISC, AAMCC, and SECAC released their first extensive guidedelines to improve the diagnosis and treatment of adult arterial hypertension. A critical assessment of evidence and a comparison of what international guidelines now propose are the basis for the following statements, which update the recommendations first issued in 2013. Office blood pressure (BP) measurements should no longer be considered to be the "gold standard" for the diagnosis of hypertension and assessment of cardiovascular risk. Relying on office BP, even when supplemented with at-home wake-time self-measurements, to identify high-risk individuals, disregarding circadian BP patterning and asleep BP level, leads to potential misclassification of 50% of all evaluated persons. Accordingly, ambulatory BP monitoring is the recommended reference standard for the diagnosis of true hypertension and accurate assessment of cardiovascular risk in all adults ≥18 yrs of age, regardless of whether office BP is normal or elevated. Asleep systolic BP mean is the most significant independent predictor of cardiovascular events. The sleep-time relative SBP decline adds prognostic value to the statistical model that already includes the asleep systolic BP mean and corrected for relevant confounding variables. Accordingly, the asleep systolic BP mean is the recommended protocol to diagnose hypertension, assess cardiovascular risk, and predict cardiovascular event-free interval. In men, and in the absence of compelling clinical conditions, reference thresholds for diagnosing hypertension are 120/70 mmHg for the asleep systolic/diastolic BP means derived from ambulatory BP monitoring. However, in women, in the absence of complicating co-morbidities, the same thresholds are lower by 10/5 mmHg, i.e., 110/65 mmHg for the asleep means. In high-risk patients, including those diagnosed with diabetes or chronic kidney disease, and/or those having experienced past

  14. Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumeister, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses three book publications: C. Kerez: Uncertain Certainty, Tokyo, 2013 H. Hertzberger: Lessons for students in architecture, Rotterdam, 2006, (1991) A. Jorn: Om Formen, Silkeborg, 2014, (1958)...

  15. The treatment of hypertension in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Marion R; Smith, Grant; Minor, Deborah S

    2008-04-01

    Hypertension causes a significant disease burden in all racial and ethnic groups and is directly attributable to excess weight in most cases. The relationship between increasing body mass index and hypertension prevalence has been recognized for decades. Epidemiologic studies clearly demonstrate the correlation between body weight and blood pressure in obese and lean populations. Most patients with hypertension are overweight or obese, and loss of excess weight lowers blood pressure. Although the epidemiologic relationship is clear, the understanding of mechanisms linking hypertension and weight gain is still evolving. Lifestyle modifications and specific pharmacologic agents address many of the known mechanisms; however, blood pressure remains difficult to control in obese hypertensive patients. This review highlights the association of obesity and hypertension, identifies potential mechanisms for this association, and describes nonpharmacologic and pharmacologic strategies that offer potential benefits for the obese patient with hypertension.

  16. Animal models in obesity and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal-Lieberman, Gabriella; Rosenthal, Talma

    2013-06-01

    Although obesity is a well-known risk factor for hypertension, the mechanisms by which hypertension develops in obese patients are not entirely clear. Animal models of obesity and their different susceptibilities to develop hypertension have revealed some of the mechanisms linking obesity and hypertension. Adipose tissue is an endocrine organ secreting hormones that impact blood pressure, such as elements of the renin-angiotensin system whose role in hypertension have been established. In addition, the appetite-suppressing adipokine leptin activates the sympathetic nervous system via the melanocortin system, and this activation, especially in the kidney, increases blood pressure. Leptin secretion from adipocytes is increased in most models of obesity due to leptin resistance, although the resistance is often selective to the anorexigenic effect, while the susceptibility to the hypertensive effect remains intact. Understanding the pathways by which obesity contributes to increased blood pressure will hopefully pave the way to and better define the appropriate treatment for obesity-induced hypertension.

  17. Elemental mercury poisoning presenting as hypertension in a young child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brannan, Elizabeth H; Su, Sharon; Alverson, Brian K

    2012-08-01

    Mercury intoxication is an uncommon cause of hypertension in children and can mimic several other diseases, such as pheochromocytoma and vasculitis. Mercury intoxication can present as a diagnostic challenge because levels of catecholamines may be elevated, suggesting that the etiology is a catecholamine-secreting tumor. Once acrodynia is identified as a primary symptom, a 24-hour urine mercury level can confirm the diagnosis. Inclusion of mercury intoxication in the differential diagnosis early on can help avoid unnecessary and invasive diagnostic tests and therapeutic interventions. We discuss a case of mercury intoxication in a 3-year-old girl presenting with hypertension and acrodynia, without a known history of exposure. Chelation therapy successfully treated our patient's mercury intoxication. However, it was also necessary to concurrently treat her hypertension and the pain associated with her acrodynia. Because there were no known risk factors for mercury poisoning in this case, and because ritual use of mercury is common in much of the United States, we recommend high clinical suspicion and subsequent testing in all cases of acrodynia.

  18. Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Cirrhotic Patients with Portal Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biecker, Erwin

    2013-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding related to portal hypertension is a serious complication in patients with liver cirrhosis. Most patients bleed from esophageal or gastric varices, but bleeding from ectopic varices or portal hypertensive gastropathy is also possible. The management of acute bleeding has changed over the last years. Patients are managed with a combination of endoscopic and pharmacologic treatment. The endoscopic treatment of choice for esophageal variceal bleeding is variceal band ligation. Bleeding from gastric varices is treated by injection with cyanoacrylate. Treatment with vasoactive drugs as well as antibiotic treatment is started before or at the time point of endoscopy. The first-line treatment for primary prophylaxis of esophageal variceal bleeding is nonselective beta blockers. Pharmacologic therapy is recommended for most patients; band ligation is an alternative in patients with contraindications for or intolerability of beta blockers. Treatment options for secondary prophylaxis include variceal band ligation, beta blockers, a combination of nitrates and beta blockers, and combination of band ligation and pharmacologic treatment. A clear superiority of one treatment over the other has not been shown. Bleeding from portal hypertensive gastropathy or ectopic varices is less common. Treatment options include beta blocker therapy, injection therapy, and interventional radiology. PMID:27335828

  19. Dynamic Recommendation: Disease Prediction and Prevention Using Recommender System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Nasiri

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In today’s world, chronic diseases are predominant health problems and cause heavy burden on society; therefore early diagnosis and even prediction of the disease is a way to reduce this burden. In this project, we tried to use recommender system to predict which other diseases a chronic patient is susceptible for. Methods: In this study, through a dynamic recommender system, we evaluated patients’ treatment destiny during the time. Results: It was shown that our method increased accuracy and reduced error compared with other recommendation methods in disease prediction. Conclusion: Compared to current usual methods, in our method we used previous patients’ characteristics as one of the factorization variables to predict destiny of future patients. Furthermore, using this method, we can predict which complication or disease the patient would suffer from first in future. Therefore, we can manage policies toward disease burden reduction by implementing prevention programs.

  20. Classification of Recommender Expertise in the Wikipedia Recommender System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Christian D.; Pilkauskas, Povilas; Lefévre, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    to the quality of articles. The Wikipedia Recommender System (WRS) was developed to help users determine the credibility of articles based on feedback from other Wikipedia users. The WRS implements a collaborative filtering system with trust metrics, i.e., it provides a rating of articles which emphasizes...... ratings reflected the average competence of recommenders across all subject areas. We have now developed a new version of the WRS, which evaluates the expertise of recommenders within different subject areas. In order to do this, we need to identify a way to classify the subject area of all the articles......The Wikipedia is a web-based encyclopedia, written and edited collaboratively by Internet users. The Wikipedia has an extremely open editorial policy that allows anybody, to create or modify articles. This has promoted a broad and detailed coverage of subjects, but also introduced problems relating...