WorldWideScience

Sample records for hyperfractionated tbi thiotepa

  1. Thiotepa-based versus total body irradiation-based myeloablative conditioning prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission: a retrospective analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Sandra; Labopin, Myriam; Arcese, William; Or, Reuven; Majolino, Ignazio; Bacigalupo, Andrea; de Rosa, Gennaro; Volin, Liisa; Beelen, Dietrich; Veelken, Hendrik; Schaap, Nicolaas P M; Kuball, Jurgen; Cornelissen, Jan; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Thiotepa is an alkylating compound with an antineoplastic and myeloablative activity and can mimic the effect of radiation. However, it is unknown whether this new regimen could safely replace the long-established ones. This retrospective matched-pair analysis evaluated the outcome of adults with acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission who received myeloablative conditioning either with a thiotepa-based (n = 121) or a cyclophosphamide/total body irradiation-based (TBI; n = 358) regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-matched sibling or an unrelated donor. With a median follow-up of 44 months, the outcome was similar in both groups. Acute graft-versus-host disease grade II-IV was observed in 25% after thiotepa-containing regimen versus 35% after TBI (P = 0.06). The 2-yr cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease was 40.5% for thiotepa and 41% for TBI (P = 0.98). At 2 yrs, the cumulative incidences of non-relapse mortality and relapse incidence were 23.9% (thiotepa) vs. 22.4% (TBI; P = 0.66) and 17.2% (thiotepa) vs. 23.3% (TBI; P = 0.77), respectively. The probabilities of leukaemia-free and overall survival at 2 yrs were not significantly different between the thiotepa and TBI groups, at 58.9% vs. 54.2% (P = 0.95) and 61.4% vs. 58% (P = 0.72), respectively. Myeloablative regimens using combinations including thiotepa can provide satisfactory outcomes, but the optimal conditioning remains unclear for the individual patient in this setting.

  2. Adult Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation Using Myeloablative Thiotepa, Total Body Irradiation, and Fludarabine Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sarah; Thomas, Samantha; Corbet, Kelly; Gasparetto, Cristina; Long, Gwynn D; Lopez, Richard; Morris, Ashley K; Rizzieri, David A; Sullivan, Keith M; Sung, Anthony D; Sarantopoulos, Stefanie; Chao, Nelson J; Horwitz, Mitchell E

    2017-07-17

    Treatment-related mortality (TRM) remains elevated in adult patients undergoing umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT), including an early rise in TRM suggestive of excessive toxicity associated with the standard myeloablative total body irradiation (TBI), fludarabine, and cyclophosphamide regimen. In an attempt to reduce regimen-related toxicity, we previously studied a modified myeloablative regimen with TBI (1350 cGy) and fludarabine (160 mg/m(2)); TRM was decreased, but neutrophil engraftment was suboptimal. Therefore, to improve engraftment while still minimizing regimen-related toxicity, we piloted a myeloablative regimen with the addition of thiotepa (10 mg/kg) to TBI and fludarabine conditioning. Thirty-one adult patients (median age, 46 years; range, 19 to 65) with hematologic malignancies (acute leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome, 77%; lymphoid malignancy, 23%) underwent single (n = 1) or double (n = 30) UCBT from 2010 to 2015 at our institution. The cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraftment was 90% (95% confidence interval [CI], 70% to 97%) by 60 days, with a median time to engraftment of 21 days (95% CI, 19 to 26). The cumulative incidence of platelet engraftment was 77% (95% CI, 57% to 89%) by 100 days, with a median time to engraftment of 47 days (95% CI, 37 to 73). Cumulative incidences of grades II to IV and grades III to IV acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) at day 100 were 45% (95% CI, 27% to 62%) and 10% (95% CI, 2% to 23%), respectively. The overall incidence of chronic GVHD at 2 years was 40% (95% CI, 22% to 57%), with 17% of patients (95% CI, 6% to 33%) experiencing moderate to severe chronic GVHD by 2 years. TRM at 180 days was 13% (95% CI, 4% to 27%), at 1 year 24% (95% CI, 10% to 41%), and at 3 years 30% (95% CI, 13% to 49%). Relapse at 1 year was 13% (95% CI, 4% to 27%) and at 3 years 19% (95% CI, 6% to 38%). With a median follow-up of 35.5 months (95% CI, 12.7 to 52.2), disease-free and overall survival at 3 years

  3. Second Study of Hyper-Fractionated Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jacob

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Method. Hyper-fractionated radiotherapy for treatment of soft tissue sarcomas is designed to deliver a higher total dose of radiation without an increase in late normal tissue damage. In a previous study at the Royal Marsden Hospital, a total dose of 75 Gy using twice daily 1.25 Gy fractions resulted in a higher incidence of late damage than conventional radiotherapy using 2 Gy daily fractions treating to a total of 60 Gy. The current trial therefore used a lower dose per fraction of 1.2 Gy and lower total dose of 72 Gy, with 60 fractions given over a period of 6 weeks.

  4. Lung damage following bone marrow transplantation after hyperfractionated total body irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latini, Paolo; Aristei, Cynthia; Checcaglini, Franco; Maranzano, Ernesto; Panizza, B.M.; Perrucci, Elisabetta (University and Hospital, Policlinico, Perugia (Italy). Radiation Oncology Service); Aversa, Franco; Martelli, M.F. (University and Hospital, Policlinico, Perugia (Italy). Department of Haematology); Raymondi, Carlo (University and Hospital, Policlinico, Perugia (Italy). Radiation Physics Service)

    1991-10-01

    From July 1985 to December 1989, 72 evaluable patients aged 6-51 (median age 27) suffering from hematological malignancies received allo-geneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) depleted of T-lymphocytes to reduce risks of graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD); 57 were matched and 15 mis-matched. Three different conditioning regiments were used in an effort to enhance cytoreduction without increase extramedullary toxicity. Mis-matched patients were treated with more immunosuppressive regimens. Total body irradiation (TBI) was given in 3 doses/day, 5 h apart over 4 days for a total of 12 fractions. The dose to the lungs was 14.4, 15.6 and 9 Gy according to the conditioning regimen. The incidence of inter-stitial pneumonia (IP) was 12.3 percent in matched and 46.7 in mis-matched patients. The results seem to indicate that lung toxicity is correlated with the intensity of the conditioning regimen, the stage of disease and, in mismatched patients, with the degree of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) disparity and the poor post-BMT reconstitution, rather than the radiotherapy dose delivered to the lungs. On the contrary, the hyperfractionated scheme adopted, the absence of GvHD and, perhaps, the post-TBI administration of cyclophosphamide all seem to have contributed to the low incidence of IP in the matched patients. (author). 30 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab.

  5. Thiotepa improves allogeneic bone marrow engraftment without enhancing stem cell depletion in irradiated mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Down, JD; Westerhof, GR; Boudewijn, A; Setroikromo, R; Ploemacher, RE

    1998-01-01

    Thiotepa (TT) has long been considered for inclusion in clinical bone marrow transplant (BMT) conditioning regimens in an attempt to prevent allograft rejection and leukemia relapse, These studies have been encouraged by initial murine experiments showing a clear improvement in allogeneic bone marro

  6. TBI Endpoints Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    and serum samples that include TBI of different severities, and the inclusion of non-TBI trauma controls and normal controls for standardization and... Trauma Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Combine the expertise physicians/surgeons in critical care facilities, along with computational... psychosocial risk factors (such as physical activity, diet, depression, social support) on cognitive function and 5-year change at mid-life with

  7. Opioid use after TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    with reward/risk circuitry including the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, hippocampus , and prefrontal-parietal white matter tracts ACUTELY after TBI in...Five days prior to injury, animals underwent surgical implantation of a chronic indwelling venous catheter under isoflurane anesthesia with morphine ...the nucleus accumbens, amygdala, hippocampus , and prefrontal-parietal white matter tracts after TBI in rats o Obtain and optimize protocols for the

  8. Opioid Abuse after TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0373 TITLE: " Opioid Abuse after TBI...2014 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 July 2013 - 30 June 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE " Opioid Abuse after TBI" 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...the brain’s reward circuitry which may make an injured brain more susceptible to the rewarding effects of opioids . We are currently conducting

  9. Liquid chromatography-thermospray mass spectrometry of DNA adducts formed with mitomycin C, porfiromycin and thiotepa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musser, S M; Pan, S S; Callery, P S

    1989-07-14

    High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and thermospray mass spectrometry were combined for the analysis of DNA adducts formed from the interaction of the anticancer drugs mitomycin C, porfiromycin and thiotepa with calf thymus DNA. The adducts formed from reaction of mitomycin C and porfiromycin with DNA were separated from unmodified nucleosides by HPLC on a C18 column and identified by thermospray mass spectrometry. Thiotepa DNA adducts readily depurinated from DNA and were chromatographed and identified by thermospray liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry as the modified bases without the ribose moiety attached. The utility of thermospray mass spectrometry for the identification of microgram quantities of nucleoside adducts and depurinated base adducts of these anticancer drugs was demonstrated.

  10. TBI-ROC Part Nine: Diagnosing TBI and Psychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, Eileen; Weider, Katie; Mustafa, Ruman

    2011-01-01

    This article is the ninth of a multi-part series on traumatic brain injury (TBI). It focuses on the process of diagnosing TBI and psychiatric disorders. Diagnosing traumatic brain injury can be challenging. It can be difficult differentiating TBI and psychiatric symptoms, as both have similar symptoms (e.g., memory problems, emotional outbursts,…

  11. TBI-ROC Part Six: Lifelong Living after TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boeing, Marianne; Barton, Barbara; Zinsmeister, Paula; Brouwers, Lynn; Trudel, Tina M.; Elias, Eileen; Weider, Katie

    2010-01-01

    This article is the sixth of a multi-part series on traumatic brain injury (TBI) and discusses lifelong living after TBI. Following TBI, lifelong outcomes vary depending on the individual affected, treatment provided and severity of injury. Fortunately, many individuals who experience mild concussions common to childhood have no lasting symptoms.…

  12. Myelopathy following hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy for anaplastic thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, C S; Van Dyk, J; Simpson, W J

    1991-01-01

    From 1975 to 1982, 32 patients with a diagnosis of anaplastic carcinoma of the thyroid were entered into a protocol of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy. The tumor dose was 30-45 Gy at 1 Gy per fraction given 4 times a day at 3-h intervals. The results were disappointing with a median survival of less than 6 months. Two patients developed radiation myelopathy at 8 and 13 months, total spinal cord dose being 39.9 and 48.3 Gy, respectively. The risk of spinal cord damage was much higher than expected. The possible radiobiological causes and clinical implications are discussed.

  13. Opioid Abuse after TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    VCU We continued our examination of neuronal cell death in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of animals in the various experimental group. An...the side of the brain contralateral to the injury. However, in the dentate gyrus ipsilateral to the injury, we saw a significant reduction in the...found no significant differences in the number of neurons in the dentate gyrus of rats from the Sham or TBI group, regardless of oxycodone

  14. Accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Kazuo; Sekiya, Yuichi; Araki, Hitoshi; Sakai, Mitsuhiro; Togawa, Takashi [Chiba Cancer Center (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    From May 1994 to May 1997, 52 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer were treated with accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation (1.6 Gy, twice daily, 10 times a week, with minimum interval of 6 hours between fractions and the total dose to 67.2-70.4 Gy) and concomitant use of daily low-dose Carboplatin. The median follow-up period was 19.8 months with a range of 2-44 months. Complete response rate was 73% (38/52). Cumulative survival rate at 3 years was 46.7% and the relapse rate was 21.1% (8/38). The relapse sites were as follows, primary site; 2 cases, lymphnodes; 4 cases and distant metastases; 2 cases. The major acute toxicity was stomatitis. Grade 3-4 late sequelae was observed in 7 cases. Grade 3 xerostomia was observed in 2 cases, esophageal stenosis was observed in 2 cases and arytenoid necrosis was observed in 2 cases. There were no fatal sequelae. Acute sequelae are very variable and it will be necessary to individualize the treatment time according to the state of their stomatitis. (author)

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury Registry (TBI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — As the number of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) patients has grown, so has the need to track and monitor...

  16. TBI Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Past Issues Cover Story: Traumatic Brain Injury TBI Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Prevention Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of ... turn Javascript on. Photo courtesy of ABC News Symptoms Mild: Person may remain conscious or be briefly ...

  17. Hyperfractionated stereotactic reirradiation for recurrent head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvek, Jakub; Knybel, Lukas; Skacelikova, Eva; Otahal, Bretislav; Molenda, Lukas; Feltl, David [University Hospital Ostrava, Department of Oncology, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Stransky, Jiri; Res, Oldrich [University Hospital Ostrava, Department of Maxilofacial Surgery, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Matousek, Petr; Zelenik, Karol [University Hospital Ostrava, Department of Otolaryngology, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-01-15

    The goal of this work was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of hyperfractionated stereotactic reirradiation (re-RT) as a treatment for inoperable, recurrent, or second primary head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) that is not suitable for systemic treatment. Forty patients with recurrent or second primary HNSCC were included in this study. The patients had a median gross tumor volume of 76 ml (range 14-193 ml) and a previous radiotherapy dose greater than 60 Gy. Treatment was designed to cover 95 % of the planning target volume (PTV, defined as gross tumor volume [GTV] + 3 mm to account for microscopic spreading, with no additional set-up margin) with the prescribed dose (48 Gy in 16 fractions b.i.d.). Treatment was administered twice daily with a minimum 6 h gap. Uninvolved lymph nodes were not irradiated. Treatment was completed as planned for all patients (with median duration of 11 days, range 9-14 days). Acute toxicity was evaluated using the RTOG/EORTC scale. A 37 % incidence of grade 3 mucositis was observed, with recovery time of ≤ 4 weeks for all of these patients. Acute skin toxicity was never observed to be higher than grade 2. Late toxicity was also evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. Mandible radionecrosis was seen in 4 cases (10 %); however, neither carotid blowout syndrome nor other grade 4 late toxicity occurred. One-year overall survival (OS) and local progression-free survival (L-PFS) were found to be 33 and 44 %, respectively. Performance status and GTV proved to be significant prognostic factors regarding local control and survival. Hyperfractionated stereotactic re-RT is a reasonable treatment option for patients with recurrent/second primary HNSCC who were previously exposed to high-dose irradiation and who are not candidates for systemic treatment or hypofractionation. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war es, die Effektivitaet und Toxizitaet der hyperfraktionierten akzelerierten stereotaktischen Wiederbestrahlung (re

  18. Large indoor cage study of the suppression of stable Aedes aegypti populations by the release of thiotepa-sterilised males

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Gato

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The sterile insect technique (SIT is a promising pest control method in terms of efficacy and environmental compatibility. In this study, we determined the efficacy of thiotepa-sterilised males in reducing the target Aedes aegypti populations. Treated male pupae were released weekly into large laboratory cages at a constant ratio of either 5:1 or 2:1 sterile-to-fertile males. A two-to-one release ratio reduced the hatch rate of eggs laid in the cage by approximately a third and reduced the adult catch rate by approximately a quarter, but a 5:1 release drove the population to elimination after 15 weeks of release. These results indicate that thiotepa exposure is an effective means of sterilising Ae. aegypti and males thus treated are able to reduce the reproductive capacity of a stable population under laboratory conditions. Further testing of the method in semi-field enclosures is required to evaluate the mating competitiveness of sterile males when exposed to natural environmental conditions. If proven effective, SIT using thiotepa-sterilised males may be incorporated into an integrated programme of vector control to combat dengue in Cuba.

  19. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy for inoperable non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Atsushi; Shimokata, Kaoru; Nomura, Fumio; Saka, Hideo (Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine); Horio, Yoshitsugu; Minami, Hironobu; Iwahara, Tsuyoshi; Shibagaki, Tomohisa; Sakai, Shuzo

    1991-02-01

    Eleven cases of inoperable non-small cell lung cancer were treated with hyperfractionated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy consisted of 1.6 Gy per fraction, 2 fractions a day with 6 hours between fractions, 5 days a week for a total of 60.8 Gy. After 38.4 Gy of irradiation to the primary tumor, hilar, and mediastinal lymph nodes, an additional 22.4 Gy was given to primary lesion. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin, 80 mg/m{sup 2} day 1, mitomycin C, 10 mg/m{sup 2} day 1, and vinblastine, 5 mg/m{sup 2}, days 1 and 15. At least 2 courses were administered. The combination of radiotherapy and chemotherapy was sequential. Of 6 patients in whom hyperfractionated radiotherapy was performed first, 5 achieved partial response (PR). Of 5 patients in whom chemotherapy was performed first, 2 achieved PR. Median survival time was 300 days. Nine of the eleven patients experienced esophagitis, but in all patients this was controlled easily by oral antacids and/or H{sub 2} blockers. In regard to radiation pneumonitis, fibrosis occurred in seven of nine cases, but they did not require corticosteroids. Levels of hematological toxicity were similar to previous reports, but were somewhat severe in cases receiving chemotherapy after irradiation. We conclude that hyperfractionated radiotherapy combined with chemotherapy including cisplatin is safe, but further evaluation to determine optimal dose and combination methods is necessary. (author).

  20. Hyperfractionated or accelerated radiotherapy in head and neck cancer: a meta-analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bourhis, J.; Overgaard, Jens; Audry, H.

    2006-01-01

    -specified categories: hyperfractionated, accelerated, and accelerated with total dose reduction. FINDINGS: 15 trials with 6515 patients were included. The median follow-up was 6 years. Tumours sites were mostly oropharynx and larynx; 5221 (74%) patients had stage III-IV disease (International Union Against Cancer...

  1. Continuous hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with/without mitomycin C in head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobrowsky, W; Naude, J; Widder, J; Dobrowsky, E; Millesi, W; Pavelka, R; Grasl, C; Reichel, M

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effect of mitomycin C to an accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy. The aim was to test a very short schedule with/without mitomycin C (MMC) with conventional fractionation in histologically verified squamous cell carinoma of the head and neck region. Methods and Ma

  2. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiochemotherapy (HFA-RCT) with mitomycin C for advanced head and neck cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, J; Dobrowsky, W; Schmid, R; Pokrajac, B; Selzer, E; Potter, R

    2004-01-01

    To investigate efficacy and feasibility of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy combined with mitomycin C, patients with locally advanced unresectable squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck region were administered 64-66 Gy in four weeks and mitomycin C (20 mg/m(2)) on day five. Twenty-

  3. Prospective randomized comparison of single-dose versus hyperfractionated total-body irradiation in patients with hematologic malignancies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girinsky, T.; Benhamou, E.; Bourhis, J.H.; Dhermain, F.; Guillot-Valls, D.; Ganansia, V.; Luboinski, M.; Perez, A.; Cosset, J.M.; Socie, G.; Baume, D.; Bouaouina, N.; Briot, E.; Baudre, A.; Bridier, A.; Pico, J.L

    2001-02-01

    The efficiency of the two irradiation modes are similar, but the hyperfractionated irradiation seems superior in term of global and specific survival. The incidence rates of pneumopathies are not different between the two groups but the incidence rate of the liver vein-occlusive illness is superior in the group treated by non fractionated whole body irradiation. The cost of the hyperfractionated whole body irradiation is superior to this one of the non fractionated whole body irradiation around a thousand dollars. (N.C.)

  4. What Are Common Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Symptoms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Trials Resources and Publications What are common TBI symptoms? Skip sharing on social media links Share this: ... is not always a sign of severe TBI. Symptoms of Mild TBI A person with a mild ...

  5. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Condition Information Skip sharing on social ... external force that affects the functioning of the brain. It can be caused by a bump or ...

  6. Hyperfractionated versus conventional radiotherapy followed by chemotherapy in standard-risk medulloblastoma: Results from the randomized multicenter HIT-SIOP PNET 4 trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Lannering (Birgitta); P. Rutkowski (Piotr); F.F. Doz (François); B. Pizer (Barry); G. Gustafsson (Göran); A. Navajas (Aurora); M. Massimino (Maura); R.E. Reddingius (Roel); M. Benesch (Martin); C. Carrie (Christian); R. Taylor; L. Gandola (Lorenza); T. Bjor̈k-Eriksson (Thomas); S. Giralt; F. Oldenburger (Foppe); T. Pietsch (Torsten); D. Figarella-Branger (Dominique); K. Robson (Kathryn); G. Forni (Gianluca); S.C. Clifford (Steven); M. Warmuth-Metz (Monica); D.D. Von Hoff; A. Faldum (Andreas); V. Mosseri (Véronique); B. Kortmann

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To compare event-free survival (EFS), overall survival (OS), pattern of relapse, and hearing loss in children with standard-risk medulloblastoma treated by postoperative hyperfractionated or conventionally fractionated radiotherapy followed by maintenance chemotherapy. Patients

  7. Analysis of late complications after rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy in advanced head and neck cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Panis, X.; Froissart, D.; Legros, M.; Coninx, P.; Loirette, M.

    1988-01-01

    Late effects were analyzed in a series of 39 patients with a 2-year minimal follow-up who were treated by rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. The total dose was 66-72 Gy delivered in two series of 33-36 Gy separated by a 2-4 week rest interval. The number of daily fractions ranged from 8 to 6 and the interval between each fraction was 2 hr. Late complications consisted of cervical fibrosis, mucosal necrosis, bone necrosis, trismus, and laryngeal edema. Seventy percent of patients experienced late complications, and in 54% of cases, these reactions were considered severe, causing death in 13% of patients. No relationship was found between field sizes, dosimetric data and type and frequency of late effects. It is therefore suggested that the interval between two daily sessions in any multifractionated protocol may be of critical importance.

  8. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy and hyperfractionated radiation therapy for the urinary bladder carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishibashi, Ryochi; Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Kawada, Tetsuya; Nakayama, Toshitake; Andou, Yutaka; Kubo, Atsushi; Tachibana, Masaaki [Keio Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine; Ito, Hisao

    1997-06-01

    The standard treatment for an invasive bladder cancer is radical surgery; however, the quality of life of the patients who undergo total cystectomy is unfavorable even when the ileal conduits were constructed. We carried out a bladder-conserving treatment for 8 bladder cancer patients by using a hyperfractionated radiotherapy together with low dose of cis-platinum or carboplatinum daily as a radiosensitizer following trans-urethral tumor resection and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Cystoscopic findings and biopsies at one month after completing radiation showed complete remission (CR) and partial response (PR) for 5 and 3 patients, respectively. All of the PR cases had T4 tumors and the patients with tumors smaller than T3 and without lymph node metastasis achieved CR. All patients completed radiotherapy without acute severe complications. Six patients have remained alive for more than 10 months and radiation induced late complications such as bladder or intestinal insufficiency have not been observed thus far. (author)

  9. Genetics and outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI): what do we know about pediatric TBI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowski, Brad; Martin, Lisa J; Wade, Shari L

    2012-01-01

    Human genetic association studies in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) have increased rapidly over the past few years. Recently, several review articles evaluated the association of genetics with outcomes after TBI. However, almost all of the articles discussed in these reviews focused on adult TBI. The primary objective of this review is to gain a better understanding of which genes and/or genetic polymorphisms have been evaluated in pediatric TBI. Our initial search identified 113 articles. After review of these articles only 5 genetic association studies specific to pediatric TBI were identified. All five of these studies evaluated the apolipoprotein (APOE) gene. The study design and methods of these identified papers will be discussed. An additional search was then performed to evaluate genes beyond APOE that have been evaluated in adult TBI; findings from these studies are highlighted. Larger genetic studies will need to be performed in the future to better elucidate the association of APOE and other genes with outcomes after TBI in children. There is great potential to utilized genetic information to inform prognosis and management after TBI in children; however, we have much work ahead of us to reach the goal of individualized management.

  10. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics and TBI Pathophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Diane Fischer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial function is intimately linked to cellular survival, growth, and death. Mitochondria not only generate ATP from oxidative phosphorylation, but also mediate intracellular calcium buffering, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and apoptosis. Electron leakage from the electron transport chain, especially from damaged or depolarized mitochondria, can generate excess free radicals that damage cellular proteins, DNA, and lipids. Furthermore, mitochondrial damage releases pro-apoptotic factors to initiate cell death. Previous studies have reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI reduces mitochondrial respiration, enhances production of ROS, and triggers apoptotic cell death, suggesting a prominent role of mitochondria in TBI pathophysiology. Mitochondria maintain cellular energy homeostasis and health via balanced processes of fusion and fission, continuously dividing and fusing to form an interconnected network throughout the cell. An imbalance of these processes, particularly an excess of fission, can be detrimental to mitochondrial function, causing decreased respiration, ROS production, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission is regulated by the cytosolic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1, which translocates to the mitochondrial outer membrane to initiate fission. Aberrant Drp1 activity has been linked to excessive mitochondrial fission and neurodegeneration. Measurement of Drp1 levels in purified hippocampal mitochondria showed an increase in TBI animals as compared to sham controls. Analysis of cryo-electron micrographs of these mitochondria also showed that TBI caused an initial increase in the length of hippocampal mitochondria at 24 hours post-injury, followed by a significant decrease in length at 72 hours. Post-TBI administration of Mdivi-1, a pharmacological inhibitor of Drp1, prevented this decrease in mitochondria length. Mdivi-1 treatment also reduced the loss of newborn neurons in the hippocampus and improved

  11. Altered Mitochondrial Dynamics and TBI Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Tara D; Hylin, Michael J; Zhao, Jing; Moore, Anthony N; Waxham, M Neal; Dash, Pramod K

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial function is intimately linked to cellular survival, growth, and death. Mitochondria not only generate ATP from oxidative phosphorylation, but also mediate intracellular calcium buffering, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and apoptosis. Electron leakage from the electron transport chain, especially from damaged or depolarized mitochondria, can generate excess free radicals that damage cellular proteins, DNA, and lipids. Furthermore, mitochondrial damage releases pro-apoptotic factors to initiate cell death. Previous studies have reported that traumatic brain injury (TBI) reduces mitochondrial respiration, enhances production of ROS, and triggers apoptotic cell death, suggesting a prominent role of mitochondria in TBI pathophysiology. Mitochondria maintain cellular energy homeostasis and health via balanced processes of fusion and fission, continuously dividing and fusing to form an interconnected network throughout the cell. An imbalance of these processes, particularly an excess of fission, can be detrimental to mitochondrial function, causing decreased respiration, ROS production, and apoptosis. Mitochondrial fission is regulated by the cytosolic GTPase, dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), which translocates to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) to initiate fission. Aberrant Drp1 activity has been linked to excessive mitochondrial fission and neurodegeneration. Measurement of Drp1 levels in purified hippocampal mitochondria showed an increase in TBI animals as compared to sham controls. Analysis of cryo-electron micrographs of these mitochondria also showed that TBI caused an initial increase in the length of hippocampal mitochondria at 24 h post-injury, followed by a significant decrease in length at 72 h. Post-TBI administration of Mitochondrial division inhibitor-1 (Mdivi-1), a pharmacological inhibitor of Drp1, prevented this decrease in mitochondria length. Mdivi-1 treatment also reduced the loss of newborn neurons in the

  12. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    TBI Translational Research Consortium Executive Committee Steering Committee Model of Injury Working Group Neuroprotection Working Group Regeneration ...Report, Holcomb Page 22 Specific aim #3.1: To study neuroprotection and enhanced neurological recovery with erythropoietin ( Epo ) and Epo ...derivatives after MTBI. - #3.1.1 To study the effects of Epo and Epo derivatives on neurogenesis, angiogenesis, and outcome after experimental MTBI

  13. Mapping the Vasculome for Biomarkers in TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    various times after TBI, ranging from initial injury (minutes to hrs) to delayed recovery (weeks). Total RNA is prepared and analyzed on the...model. Note that the experiments were performed by different lab members, and analysis was performed in two separate batches of micro -arrays. Our studies

  14. Preventing Older Adult Falls and TBI

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-03-05

    This podcast provides tips on how older adults can prevent falls and related injuries, such as traumatic brain injuries (TBI).  Created: 3/5/2008 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 3/7/2008.

  15. Cerebrovascular Pressure Reactivity in Children with TBI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Ducharme-Crevier

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from University of Melbourne, Australia, studied Pressure-Reactivity Index (PRx and optimal Cerebral Perfusion Pressure (CPP in 36 children aged between 6 months and 16 years treated for traumatic brain injury (TBI at the Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne, from 2007 to 2013.

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Studies at Grady Memorial Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    management of adult, blunt-mechanism traumatic brain injury ( TBI ) patients and assess the overall mortality of this cohort at Grady...this study is to determine the current compliance with widely accepted guidelines for the management of severe traumatic brain injury ( TBI ) patients...AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-09-2-0145 Study Title: Traumatic Brain Injury ( TBI

  17. TBI-the most complex disease in the most complex organ: the CENTER-TBI trial-a commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheble, Joanna L C; Menon, D K

    2016-04-01

    Each year, approximately 2.5 million people experience some form of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Europe. One million of these are admitted to hospital and 75 000 will die. TBI represents a major cause of death and disability, particularly among those of working age. Substantial investments have been made in an effort to improve diagnosis, management and survival in TBI, but with little success. The Collaborative European Neuro-Trauma Effectiveness Research in TBI (CENTER-TBI) study promises to use the natural variability seen in the management of TBI across Europe with the application of Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER). It will generate repositories of baseline and comprehensive TBI patient data, neuroimaging, neurogenetics and biomarkers, which aim to improve the diagnosis, stratification, management and prognostication of patients with TBI.

  18. Extra lethal damage due to residual incompletely repaired sublethal damage in hyperfractionated and continuous radiation treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.; van de Geijn, J.; Goffman, T. (ROB, DCT, NCI, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland 20892 (US))

    1991-05-01

    In the conventional linear--quadratic model of single-dose response, the {alpha} and {beta} terms reflect lethal damage created {ital during} the delivery of a dose, from two different presumed molecular processes, one linear with dose, the other quadratic. With the conventional one-fraction-per-day (or less) regimens, the sublethal damage (SLD), presumably repairing exponentially over time, is essentially completely fixed by the time of the next dose of radiation. If this assumption is true, the effects of subsequent fractions of radiation should be independent, that is, there should be little, if any, reversible damage left from previous fractions, at the time of the next dose. For multiple daily fractions, or for the limiting case, continuous radiation, this simplification may overlook damaged cells that have had insufficient time for repair. A generalized method is presented for accounting for extra lethal damage (ELD) arising from such residual SLD for hyperfractionation and continuous irradiation schemes. It may help to predict differences in toxicity and tumor control, if any, obtained with unconventional'' treatment regimens. A key element in the present model is the finite size and the dynamic character of the pool of sublethal damage. Besides creating the usual linear and quadratic components of lethal damage, each new fraction converts a certain fraction of the existing SLD into ELD, and creates some new SLD.

  19. Phase I study of temozolomide in combination with thiotepa and carboplatin with autologous hematopoietic cell rescue in patients with malignant brain tumors with minimal residual disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, G; Cervone, K A; Philips, P C; Belasco, J B; Finlay, J L; Gardner, S L

    2016-04-01

    Recurrence of malignant brain tumors results in a poor prognosis with limited treatment options. High-dose chemotherapy with autologous hematopoietic cell rescue (AHCR) has been used in patients with recurrent malignant brain tumors and has shown improved outcomes compared with standard chemotherapy. Temozolomide is standard therapy for glioblastoma and has also shown activity in patients with medulloblastoma/primitive neuro-ectodermal tumor (PNET), particularly those with recurrent disease. Temozolomide was administered twice daily on days -10 to -6, followed by thiotepa 300 mg/m(2) per day and carboplatin dosed using the Calvert formula or body surface area on days -5 to -3, with AHCR day 0. Twenty-seven patients aged 3-46 years were enrolled. Diagnoses included high-grade glioma (n=12); medulloblastoma/PNET (n=9); central nervous system (CNS) germ cell tumor (n=4); ependymoma (n=1) and spinal cord PNET (n=1). Temozolomide doses ranged from 100 mg/m(2) per day to 400 mg/m(2) per day. There were no toxic deaths. Prolonged survival was noted in several patients including those with recurrent high-grade glioma, medulloblastoma and CNS germ cell tumor. Increased doses of temozolomide are feasible with AHCR. A phase II study using temozolomide, carboplatin and thiotepa with AHCR for children with recurrent malignant brain tumors is being conducted through the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplant Consortium.

  20. Advanced MRI in Acute Military TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    clinical data for comparison. In addition, we were unable to get good measures of sleep disorders using approaches such as actigraphy due to limited...connectivity at the follow-ups do not necessarilymean complete restoration of bTBI pa- tients’ network architectures to baseline. Marginally perturbed within...scanners, medications between the time of the ini- tial and follow-up scans and sleep deprivation at the time of the initial scans prevented us from

  1. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    increased chronic inflammation we saw increased IBA 1 and ATF3 with decreased BDNF . Figure 10. Vimentin, like GFAP, appears upregulated in astrocytes...moderate TBI and/or stroke ) we also assessed the presence of blood borne proteins in brain at 18 days post-trauma. When we stained for albumin and...Yi and Hazell. 2004. J. Stroke Cerebrovasc. Dis. 13:129-137. Appendices None

  2. Update on TBI and Cognitive Impairment in Military Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elder, Gregory A

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in military life. Interest in military TBI has increased recently due to the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. Certain types of TBI are relatively unique to the military, the most prominent being blast-related TBI. Blast-related mild TBI has been of particular concern in veterans from the most recent conflicts although controversy remains concerning its separation from post-traumatic stress disorder. TBI is also a risk factor for the later development of neurodegenerative diseases in which cognitive impairment is prominent putting veterans at risk for disorders including Alzheimer's disease and chronic traumatic encephalopathy. Recent evidence associating TBI with chronic cognitive impairment is reviewed in the context of its relevance to military veterans.

  3. Induction chemotherapy followed by simultaneous hyperfractionated radiochemotherapy in advanced head and neck cancer. A pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jereczek-Fossa, B. [European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Div. of Radiotherapy]|[Medical Univ. Gdansk (Poland). Dept. of Oncology and Radiotherapy; De Braud, F.; Gasparetto, M.; De Pas, T. [European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Div. of Medical Oncology; Tradati, N. [European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Div. of Head and Neck Surgery; Leonardi, M.C.; Marsiglia, H.R. [European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Div. of Radiotherapy; Orecchia, R. [European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy). Div. of Radiotherapy]|[Milan Univ. (Italy). Faculty of Medicine

    1998-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of induction chemotherapy followed by concomitant chemotherapy and hyperfractionated irradiation in locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. Methods: A pilot study was undertaken comprising 3 cycles of cisplatinum (100 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1) and 5-fluorouracil (1000 mg/m{sup 2} in continuous intravenous infusion over the first 120 h) followed by bifractionated radiotherapy applied to tumor/involved lymph nodes up to the dose of 74.4 Gy given in 2 fractions of 1.2 Gy daily for 5 days a week combined with concomitant weekly cisplatinum infusion (50 mg/m{sup 2}). Results: Six patients were enrolled in the study. All of them completed the protocol therapy. Severe mucositis and myelotoxicity were the most common acute side effects observed in all and in 5 of the patients, respectively. Acute toxicity required interruption of concomitant chemotherapy in 5 cases and in 2 interruption of radiotherapy was necessary. Opioid analgesic parenteral therapy was administered in 4 patients. Three of them had to be hospitalized. One patient experienced cerebral stroke 1 day after the completion of therapy and died 7 days later. Due to high acute toxicity, patient accrual was terminated after 6 patients. At the mean follow-up of 17 months, 4 patients are alive, 3 of them are free of disease and in 1 local progression has been diagnosed. Conclusions: High acute toxicity of induction cisplatinum and 5-fluorouracil followed by concomitant cisplatinum and hyperfractionated irradiation calls for less toxic treatment schedules in locally advanced inoperable head and neck cancer. (orig.) [Deutsch] Ziel: Bewertung der Durchfuehrbarkeit der Induktionschemotherapie gefolgt von begleitender hyperfraktionierter Radiotherapie und Chemotherapie, bei inoperablen, lokal fortgeschrittenen Hals-Kopf-Karzinomen. Methoden: Es wurde eine Pilotstudie mit sechs Patienten durchgefuehrt: Sie umfasste drei Zyklen mit cis-Platin (100 mg/m{sup 2}, Tag 1) und 5

  4. Short treatment time and excellent treatment outcome in accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy for T1 glottic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaki, Yukihisa; Hieda, Yoko; Yoshida, Rika; Yoshizako, Takeshi; Fuchiwaki, Takafumi; Aoi, Noriaki; Sekihara, Kazumasa; Kitajima, Kazuhiro; Kawauchi, Hideyuki; Kitagaki, Hajime; Sasaki, Ryohei; Inomata, Taisuke

    2015-11-01

    Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy was performed as treatment for patients with T1 glottic cancer, and its utility was evaluated based on treatment outcomes and adverse effects. Fifty-eight men who had undergone radiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Tumor classification was Tis in 4 patients, T1a in 38, and T1b in 16. Histological examination revealed squamous cell carcinoma in 55 patients. Travel time from home to hospital was 0-1 hour for 24 patients, 1-2 hours for 9, and >2 hours for 25. Laser vaporization was performed prior to radiotherapy in 38 patients, and 19 patients received concurrent chemotherapy with an agent such as S-1. Patients were irradiated twice daily using an irradiation container. Most patients received a dose of 1.5 Gy/fraction up to a total of 60 Gy. The median overall treatment time was 30 days, with a median observation period of 59.6 months. A complete response was observed in all patients. The 5-year overall survival, disease-free survival, and local control rates were 97.2%, 93.2%, and 97.8%, respectively. Although grade 3 pharyngeal mucositis was observed in 2 patients, there were no other grade 3 or higher acute adverse events. As late toxicity, grade 2 laryngeal edema and grade 1 laryngeal hemorrhage were observed in 1 patient each, but no serious events such as laryngeal necrosis or laryngeal stenosis were observed. In conclusion, this treatment method brings excellent outcome and will substantially reduce the treatment duration among patients who need to stay at nearby hotels while undergoing treatment at hospitals in rural areas.

  5. Rapid hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Clinical results in 178 advanced squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, T.D.; Demange, L.; Froissart, D.; Panis, X.; Loirette, M.

    1985-07-01

    The authors present a series of 178 patients with Stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck treated by rapid irradiation using multiple and small fractions per day. An initial group of 91 patients (G1) received a total dose of 72 Gy in 80 sessions and 10 days, according to the following split course schedule: J1 to J5, 36 Gy in 40 sessions, eight daily fractions of .9 Gy separated by 2 hours; J6 to J20, rest period; J21 to J25, same as in J1 except that the spinal cord was shielded. This protocol was altered for the following 87 patients (G2) by lessening the total dose to 60 to 66 Gy and the number of fractions to 60. The rest period was lengthened to 4 weeks. All patients but five completed the whole program and the minimal follow-up period was 24 months. At the end of irradiation, 121 patients achieved a total remission, but local recurrences occurred in 56%. Moreover, acute intolerance was considered as severe in 34% of G1 patients, and included extensive mucosal necrosis and bleeding. Although this rate was significantly reduced in G2 patients, late complications were observed in 20 of the 25 survivors, and included trismus, cervical sclerosis, and recurrent laryngeal edema. The crude survival rate is 13% at 2 years. Although this study was not randomized, this particular type of accelerated and hyperfractionated combination of irradiation did not really improve the clinical results in advanced carcinoma of the head and neck. Other schedules and probably other tumors, less extended, should be tested.

  6. Advanced MRI in Blast-related TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Education (years) PT SD S ev er ity : C A PS T ot al S co re Figure 7: Inverse correlation between self-reported years of formal education and PSTD ... Suicide Vehicle Born IED Rocket: 6 Grenade: 4 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 10 11 9 43 Subjects Total TBI has been called the signature injury of both...Explosive Forced Propulsive HME: 3 Home Made Explosive 600-2000lb VBIED/SVBIED : 6 Vehicle Born IED - Suicide Vehicle Born IED Rocket: 6 Grenade

  7. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiation, concurrent paclitaxel/cisplatin chemotherapy and surgery for stage III non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelstein, David J; Rice, Thomas W; Rybicki, Lisa A; Greskovich, John F; Ciezki, Jay P; Carroll, Marjorie A; DeCamp, Malcolm M

    2002-05-01

    The low surgical cure rate in patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer has prompted an exploration of multimodality treatment strategies. Mature results are presented from a phase II trial of accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy, concurrent paclitaxel/cisplatin chemotherapy and surgery for these patients. Between 1994 and 1997, 45 patients with surgically demonstrated stage III non-small cell lung cancer underwent induction treatment with a 96 h continuous cisplatin infusion (20 mg/m(2) per day) and a 24 h infusion of paclitaxel (175 mg/m(2)) given concurrently with accelerated hyperfractionated radiation therapy (1.5 Gy twice daily) to a total dose of 30 Gy. Induction was completed in ten treatment (12 total) days. Surgical resection was scheduled 4 weeks later with a second identical course of chemoradiotherapy given 4-6 weeks post-operatively, to a total radiation dose of 60-63 Gy. Thirty-five patients had stage III(A) disease and ten had stage III(B) disease (eight with N(3) tumors). Induction toxicity included nausea in 89%, dysphagia in 89%, and neutropenia tolerable despite significant myelosuppression. Locoregional control is excellent and survival is better than historical expectations. Patients downstaged to mediastinal node negativity have a prognosis similar to those with de novo stage I(B) and II disease. Distant metastases are the major cause of treatment failure.

  8. Diffusion Tensor Imaging of TBI: Potentials and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, David B; Iv, Michael; Douglas, Pamela K; Anderson, Ariana; Vos, Sjoerd B; Bammer, Roland; Zeineh, Michael; Wintermark, Max

    2015-10-01

    Neuroimaging plays a critical role in the setting in traumatic brain injury (TBI). Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is an advanced magnetic resonance imaging technique that is capable of providing rich information on the brain's neuroanatomic connectome. The purpose of this article is to systematically review the role of DTI and advanced diffusion techniques in the setting of TBI, including diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI), neurite orientation dispersion and density imaging, diffusion spectrum imaging, and q-ball imaging. We discuss clinical applications of DTI and review the DTI literature as it pertains to TBI. Despite the continued advancements in DTI and related diffusion techniques over the past 20 years, DTI techniques are sensitive for TBI at the group level only and there is insufficient evidence that DTI plays a role at the individual level. We conclude by discussing future directions in DTI research in TBI including the role of machine learning in the pattern classification of TBI.

  9. Neuroimaging biomarkers in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D

    2013-09-01

    Reviewed herein are contemporary neuroimaging methods that detect abnormalities associated with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Despite advances in demonstrating underlying neuropathology in a subset of individuals who sustain mTBI, considerable disagreement persists in neuropsychology about mTBI outcome and metrics for evaluation. This review outlines a thesis for the select use of sensitive neuroimaging methods as potential biomarkers of brain injury recognizing that the majority of individuals who sustain an mTBI recover without neuroimaging signs or neuropsychological sequelae detected with methods currently applied. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides several measures that could serve as mTBI biomarkers including the detection of hemosiderin and white matter abnormalities, assessment of white matter integrity derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and quantitative measures that directly assess neuroanatomy. Improved prediction of neuropsychological outcomes in mTBI may be achieved with the use of targeted neuroimaging markers.

  10. TBI Assessment of Readiness Using a Gait Evaluation Test (TARGET): Development of a Portable mTBI Screening Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Evaluation Test (TARGET): Development of a Portable mTBI Screening Device 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0094 5c. PROGRAM ...determine the validity and reliability of an Android device-based mTBI (mild traumatic brain injury) screening test app for assessing motor function. The...deployment. This study seeks to determine the validity and reliability of an Android device-based mTBI (mild traumatic brain injury) screening test app

  11. Pain pathoetiology after TBI: neural and nonneural mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, William C

    2004-01-01

    Individuals recovering from traumatic brain injury (TBI) frequently experience acute and chronic pain. Their pain experience is the net effect of many interacting and very complex physiologic, biochemical, and psychological mechanisms involving both the peripheral and central nervous system. This article reviews the basics of neural mechanisms and pathways of pain after TBI, and discusses clinical implications. Numerous intracranial and extracranial tissues must be considered in the evaluation of pain after TBI, with the specific mechanism of trauma influencing the anatomic distribution of injuries. The differential diagnosis usually falls into one of the following pathoetiologic classifications: primary or secondary musculoskeletal, vascular, visceral, and neural pain syndromes.

  12. Quality of Survival and Growth in Children and Young Adults in the PNET4 European Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Conventional Radiation Therapy for Standard-Risk Medulloblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Colin, E-mail: crk1@soton.ac.uk [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Bull, Kim [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Chevignard, Mathilde [Hôpitaux de Saint Maurice, Saint Maurice (France); Neurophysiology, University of Pierre et Marie-Curie Paris 6, Paris (France); Culliford, David [University of Southampton Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital Southampton National Health Service Foundation Trust, Southampton (United Kingdom); Dörr, Helmuth G. [Kinder- und Jugendklinik der Universität Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Doz, François [Institut Curie and University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité (France); Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter [Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Lannering, Birgitta [Department of Pediatrics, The Sahlgren Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Massimino, Maura [Fondazione Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori, Milan (Italy); Navajas Gutiérrez, Aurora [Hospital Universitario Cruces, Baracaldo-Vizcaya (Spain); Rutkowski, Stefan [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Spoudeas, Helen A. [Center for Pediatric Endocrinology, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Calaminus, Gabriele [Pediatric Oncology, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany)

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To compare quality of survival in “standard-risk” medulloblastoma after hyperfractionated radiation therapy of the central nervous system with that after standard radiation therapy, combined with a chemotherapy regimen common to both treatment arms, in the PNET4 randomised controlled trial. Methods and Materials: Participants in the PNET4 trial and their parents/caregivers in 7 participating anonymized countries completed standardized questionnaires in their own language on executive function, health status, behavior, health-related quality of life, and medical, educational, employment, and social information. Pre- and postoperative neurologic status and serial heights and weights were also recorded. Results: Data were provided by 151 of 244 eligible survivors (62%) at a median age at assessment of 15.2 years and median interval from diagnosis of 5.8 years. Compared with standard radiation therapy, hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with lower (ie, better) z-scores for executive function in all participants (mean intergroup difference 0.48 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.16-0.81, P=.004), but health status, behavioral difficulties, and health-related quality of life z-scores were similar in the 2 treatment arms. Data on hearing impairment were equivocal. Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was also associated with greater decrement in height z-scores (mean intergroup difference 0.43 SDs, 95% confidence interval 0.10-0.76, P=.011). Conclusions: Hyperfractionated radiation therapy was associated with better executive function and worse growth but without accompanying change in health status, behavior, or quality of life.

  13. Leveraging Game Consoles for the Delivery of TBI Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Super, Taryn; Mastaglio, Thomas; Shen, Yuzhong; Walker, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Military personnel are at a greater risk for traumatic brain injury (TBI) than the civilian population. In addition, the increase in exposure to explosives, i.e. , improvised explosive devices, in the Afghanistan and Iraq wars, along with more effective body armor, has resulted in far more surviving casualties suffering from TBI than in previous wars. This effort presents the results of a feasibility study and early prototype of a brain injury rehabilitation delivery system (BIRDS). BIRDS is designed to provide medical personnel treating TBI with a capability to prescribe game activities for patients to execute using a commercially available game console, either in a clinical setting or in their homes. These therapeutic activities will contribute to recovery or remediation of the patients' cognitive dysfunctions. Solutions such as this that provide new applications for existing platforms have significant potential to address the growing incidence of TBI today.

  14. Statistical Issues in TBI Clinical Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eRapp

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification and longitudinal assessment of traumatic brain injury presents several challenges. Because these injuries can have subtle effects, efforts to find quantitative physiological measures that can be used to characterize traumatic brain injury are receiving increased attention. The results of this research must be considered with care. Six reasons for cautious assessment are outlined in this paper. None of the issues raised here are new. They are standard elements in the technical literature that describes the mathematical analysis of clinical data. The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to these issues because they need to be considered when clinicians evaluate the usefulness of this research. In some instances these points are demonstrated by simulation studies of diagnostic processes. We take as an additional objective the explicit presentation of the mathematical methods used to reach these conclusions. This material is in the appendices. The following points are made:1. A statistically significant separation of a clinical population from a control population does not ensure a successful diagnostic procedure.2. Adding more variables to a diagnostic discrimination can, in some instances, actually reduce classification accuracy.3. A high sensitivity and specificity in a TBI versus control population classification does not ensure diagnostic successes when the method is applied in a more general neuropsychiatric population. 4. Evaluation of treatment effectiveness must recognize that high variability is a pronounced characteristic of an injured central nervous system and that results can be confounded by either disease progression or spontaneous recovery. A large pre-treatment versus post-treatment effect size does not, of itself, establish a successful treatment.5. A procedure for discriminating between treatment responders and nonresponders requires, minimally, a two phase investigation. This procedure must include a

  15. Family needs and TBI caregiver mental health in Guadalajara, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibach, Gillian G; Trapp, Stephen K; Perrin, Paul B; Everhart, Robin S; Cabrera, Teresita Villaseñor; Jimenez-Maldonado, Miriam; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death in Mexico, and Mexican TBI caregivers have been shown to experience significant mental health problems and high levels of family needs. This study investigated the associations between family needs and Mexican TBI caregiver mental health. Ninety TBI caregivers from Guadalajara, Mexico completed measures assessing their own mental health (depression, anxiety, burden, satisfaction with life, and self-esteem) and family needs (physical health, informational, financial, social support, and household). Family health needs were uniquely associated with all indices of caregiver mental health, and household needs were uniquely associated with caregiver depression, burden, and anxiety. Additionally, social support needs were related to caregiver satisfaction with life, informational needs to burden, and financial needs to self-esteem. Interventions for TBI caregivers in Mexico-and likely in other global regions with high levels of familism-should include an emphasis on overall family health, the delineation of family roles regarding household responsibilities, the improvement of social support networks and the social presence of family members, and the provision of complete and relevant information regarding TBI. When these needs are more comprehensively met, caregiver mental health will likely improve.

  16. Allogeneic bone marrow transplantation with conditioning regimen to total body irradiation + thiotepa + melphalan for 35 patients with high-risk leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yumura-Yagi, Keiko; Inoue, Masami; Okamura, Takayuki [Osaka Medical Center and Research Institute for Maternal and Child Health, Izumi (Japan)] [and others

    1997-06-01

    Thirty-five children with high-risk leukemia received an allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) following a pre-conditioning regimen consisting of total body irradiation, thiotepa and melphalan. Twenty-one patients had acute lymphocytic leukemia, 6 acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, 2 acute undifferentiated leukemia, 2 acute mixed lineage leukemia, 2 myelodysplastic syndrome and 2 juvenile chronic myeloid leukemia. Sixteen patients received BMT while in complete remission (CR), but 19 were not in CR. Eighteen patients received transplants from HLA-matched related donors, 15 from unrelated donors and 2 from HLA-mismatched related donors. Cyclosporin{+-}methotrexate was used for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis in the BMTs from related donors and tacrolimus{+-}prednisolone in the BMTs from unrelated donors. Transplant-related death occurred in 12 patients; 5 acute GVHD, 4 infections (3 fungal infections, 1 Cytomegalovirus pneumonia), 1 intracranial haemorrhage and 2 chronic GVHD. Relapses were observed in 6 patients (69, 168, 175, 222, 275 and 609 days post BMT). Event-free survival rate at 2 years is 38.1% in CR patients and 36.9% in nonCR patients. (author)

  17. Validating Multidimensional Outcome Assessment Using the TBI Common Data Elements: An Analysis of the TRACK-TBI Pilot Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lindsay D; Ranson, Jana; Ferguson, Adam R; Giacino, Joseph; Okonkwo, David O; Valadka, Alex; Manley, Geoffrey; McCrea, Michael

    2017-06-08

    The Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOSE) is often the primary outcome measure in clinical trials for traumatic brain injury (TBI). Although the GOSE's capture of global function outcome has several strengths, concerns have been raised about its limited ability to identify mild disability and failure to capture the full scope of problems patients exhibit after TBI. This analysis examined the convergence of disability ratings across a multidimensional set of outcome domains in the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury (TRACK-TBI) Pilot study. The study collected measures recommended by the TBI Common Data Elements (CDE) Workgroup. Patients presenting to 3 emergency departments with a TBI of any severity enrolled in TRACK-TBI prospectively after injury; outcome measures were collected at 3 and six months postinjury. Analyses examined frequency of impairment and overlap between impairment status across the CDE outcome domains of Global Level of Functioning (GOSE), Neuropsychological (cognitive) Impairment, Psychological Status, TBI Symptoms, and Quality of Life. GOSE score correlated in the expected direction with other outcomes (M Spearman's rho = .21 and .49 with neurocognitive and self-report outcomes, respectively). The subsample in the Upper Good Recovery (GOSE 8) category appeared quite healthy across most other outcomes, although 19.0% had impaired executive functioning (Trail Making Test Part B). A significant minority of participants in the Lower Good Recovery subgroup (GOSE 7) met criteria for impairment across numerous other outcome measures. The findings highlight the multidimensional nature of TBI recovery and the limitations of applying only a single outcome measure.

  18. Similar Survival for Patients Undergoing Reduced-Intensity Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Versus Myeloablative TBI as Conditioning for Allogeneic Transplant in Acute Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikell, John L., E-mail: jmikell@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Waller, Edmund K. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Switchenko, Jeffrey M. [Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Rangaraju, Sravanti; Ali, Zahir; Graiser, Michael [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Hall, William A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Langston, Amelia A. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Esiashvili, Natia [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khoury, H. Jean [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Khan, Mohammad K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the mainstay of treatment for adults with acute leukemia. Total body irradiation (TBI) remains an important part of the conditioning regimen for HCST. For those patients unable to tolerate myeloablative TBI (mTBI), reduced intensity TBI (riTBI) is commonly used. In this study we compared outcomes of patients undergoing mTBI with those of patients undergoing riTBI in our institution. Methods and Materials: We performed a retrospective review of all patients with acute leukemia who underwent TBI-based conditioning, using a prospectively acquired database of HSCT patients treated at our institution. Patient data including details of the transplantation procedure, disease status, Karnofsky performance status (KPS), response rates, toxicity, survival time, and time to progression were extracted. Patient outcomes for various radiation therapy regimens were examined. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed. Results: Between June 1985 and July 2012, 226 patients with acute leukemia underwent TBI as conditioning for HSCT. Of those patients, 180 had full radiation therapy data available; 83 had acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 94 had acute myelogenous leukemia; 45 patients received riTBI, and 135 received mTBI. Median overall survival (OS) was 13.7 months. Median relapse-free survival (RFS) for all patients was 10.2 months. Controlling for age, sex, KPS, disease status, and diagnosis, there were no significant differences in OS or RFS between patients who underwent riTBI and those who underwent mTBI (P=.402, P=.499, respectively). Median length of hospital stay was shorter for patients who received riTBI than for those who received mTBI (16 days vs 23 days, respectively; P<.001), and intensive care unit admissions were less frequent following riTBI than mTBI (2.22% vs 12.69%, respectively, P=.043). Nonrelapse survival rates were also similar (P=.186). Conclusions: No differences in OS or RFS were seen between

  19. Closed-Head TBI Model of Multiple Morbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Floyd J; Hou, Jiamei; Bose, Prodip K

    2016-01-01

    Successful therapy for TBI disabilities awaits refinement in the understanding of TBI neurobiology, quantitative measurement of treatment-induced incremental changes in recovery trajectories, and effective translation to human TBI using quantitative methods and protocols that were effective to monitor recovery in preclinical models. Details of the specific neurobiology that underlies these injuries and effective quantitation of treatment-induced changes are beginning to emerge utilizing a variety of preclinical and clinical models (for reviews see (Morales et al., Neuroscience 136:971-989, 2005; Fujimoto et al., Neurosci Biobehav Rev 28:365-378, 2004; Cernak, NeuroRx 2:410-422, 2005; Smith et al., J Neurotrauma 22:1485-1502, 2005; Bose et al., J Neurotrauma 30:1177-1191, 2013; Xiong et al., Nat Rev Neurosci 14:128-142, 2013; Xiong et al., Expert Opin Emerg Drugs 14:67-84, 2009; Johnson et al., Handb Clin Neurol 127:115-128, 2015; Bose et al., Brain neurotrauma: molecular, neuropsychological, and rehabilitation aspects, CRC Press/Taylor & Francis, Boca Raton, 2015)). Preclinical models of TBI, essential for the efficient study of TBI neurobiology, benefit from the setting of controlled injury and optimal opportunities for biometric quantitation of injury and treatment-induced changes in the trajectories of disability. Several preclinical models are currently used, and each offer opportunities for study of different aspects of TBI primary and secondary injuries (for review see (Morales et al., Neuroscience 136:971-989, 2005; Xiong et al., Nat Rev Neurosci 14:128-142, 2013; Xiong et al., Expert Opin Emerg Drugs 14:67-84, 2009; Johnson et al., Handb Clin Neurol 127:115-128, 2015; Dixon et al., J Neurotrauma 5:91-104, 1988)). The closed-head, impact-acceleration model of TBI designed by Marmarou et al., 1994 (J Neurosurg 80:291-300, 1994), when used to produce mild to moderate TBI, produces diffuse axonal injuries without significant additional focal injuries of the

  20. Sleep Disturbances, TBI and PTSD: Implications for Treatment and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Karina Stavitsky; Kark, Sarah M.; Gehrman, Philip; Bogdanova, Yelena

    2015-01-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and sleep problems significantly affect recovery and functional status in military personnel and Veterans returning from combat. Despite recent attention, sleep is understudied in the Veteran population. Few treatments and rehabilitation protocols target sleep, although poor sleep remains at clinical levels and continues to adversely impact functioning even after the resolution of PTSD or mild TBI symptoms. Recent developments in non-pharmacologic sleep treatments have proven efficacious as stand-alone interventions and have potential to improve treatment outcomes by augmenting traditional behavioral and cognitive therapies. This review discusses the extensive scope of work in the area of sleep as it relates to TBI and PTSD, including pathophysiology and neurobiology of sleep; existing and emerging treatment options; as well as methodological issues in sleep measurements for TBI and PTSD. Understanding sleep problems and their role in the development and maintenance of PTSD and TBI symptoms may lead to improvement in overall treatment outcomes while offering a non-stigmatizing entry in mental health services and make current treatments more comprehensive by helping to address a broader spectrum of difficulties. PMID:26164549

  1. Sleep disturbances, TBI and PTSD: Implications for treatment and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Karina Stavitsky; Kark, Sarah M; Gehrman, Philip; Bogdanova, Yelena

    2015-08-01

    Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), traumatic brain injury (TBI), and sleep problems significantly affect recovery and functional status in military personnel and Veterans returning from combat. Despite recent attention, sleep is understudied in the Veteran population. Few treatments and rehabilitation protocols target sleep, although poor sleep remains at clinical levels and continues to adversely impact functioning even after the resolution of PTSD or mild TBI symptoms. Recent developments in non-pharmacologic sleep treatments have proven efficacious as stand-alone interventions and have potential to improve treatment outcomes by augmenting traditional behavioral and cognitive therapies. This review discusses the extensive scope of work in the area of sleep as it relates to TBI and PTSD, including pathophysiology and neurobiology of sleep; existing and emerging treatment options; as well as methodological issues in sleep measurements for TBI and PTSD. Understanding sleep problems and their role in the development and maintenance of PTSD and TBI symptoms may lead to improvement in overall treatment outcomes while offering a non-stigmatizing entry in mental health services and make current treatments more comprehensive by helping to address a broader spectrum of difficulties.

  2. Pig-a gene mutation and micronucleated reticulocyte induction in rats exposed to tumorigenic doses of the leukemogenic agents chlorambucil, thiotepa, melphalan, and 1,3-propane sultone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dertinger, Stephen D; Phonethepswath, Souk; Avlasevich, Svetlana L; Torous, Dorothea K; Mereness, Jared; Cottom, John; Bemis, Jeffrey C; Macgregor, James T

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate whether blood-based genotoxicity endpoints can provide temporal and dose-response data within the low-dose carcinogenic range that could contribute to carcinogenic mode of action (MoA) assessments, we evaluated the sensitivity of flow cytometry-based micronucleus and Pig-a gene mutation assays at and below tumorigenic dose rate 50 (TD50) levels. The incidence of micronucleated reticulocytes (MN-RET) was used to evaluate chromosomal damage, and the frequency of CD59-negative reticulocytes (RET(CD59-) ) and erythrocytes (RBC(CD59-) ) served as phenotypic reporters of mutation at the X-linked Pig-a gene. Several leukemogenic agents with a presumed genotoxic MoA were studied. Specifically, male Sprague Dawley rats were treated via oral gavage for 28 days with chlorambucil, thiotepa, melphalan, and 1,3-propane sultone at doses corresponding to 0.33x, 1x, and 3x TD50, as well as at the maximum tolerated dose. Frequencies of MN-RET were determined at Days 4 and 29, and RET(CD59-) and RBC(CD59-) data were collected pretreatment as well as Days 15/16, 29, and 56/57. Dose-related increases were observed for each endpoint, and time to maximal effect was consistently: MN-RET < RET(CD59-)  < RBC(CD59-) . For each of the chemicals studied, the genotoxic events occurred long before tumors or preneoplastic lesions would be expected. Furthermore, in the case of Pig-a gene mutation, the responses were observed at or below the TD50 dose for three out of the four chemicals studied. These data illustrate the potential for quantitative blood-based analyses to provide dose-response and temporality information that relates genetic damage to cancer induction. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. The impact of previous traumatic brain injury on health and functioning: a TRACK-TBI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Spielman, Lisa; Singh, Ayushi; Gordon, Wayne A; Lingsma, Hester F; Maas, Andrew I R; Manley, Geoffrey T; Mukherjee, Pratik; Okonkwo, David O; Puccio, Ava M; Schnyer, David M; Valadka, Alex B; Yue, John K; Yuh, Esther L

    2013-12-15

    The idea that multiple traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have a cumulative detrimental effect on functioning is widely accepted. Most research supporting this idea comes from athlete samples, and it is not known whether remote history of previous TBI affects functioning after subsequent TBI in community-based samples. This study investigates whether a previous history of TBI with loss of consciousness (LOC) is associated with worse health and functioning in a sample of individuals who require emergency department care for current TBI. Twenty-three percent of the 586 individuals with current TBI in the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury study reported having sustained a previous TBI with LOC. Individuals with previous TBI were more likely to be unemployed (χ(2)=17.86; p=0.000), report a variety of chronic medical and psychiatric conditions (4.75≤χ(2)≥24.16; pTBI history. Those with a previous TBI had less-severe acute injuries, but experienced worse outcomes at 6-month follow-up. Results of a series of regression analyses controlling for demographics and acute injury severity indicated that individuals with previous TBI reported more mood symptoms, more postconcussive symptoms, lower life satisfaction, and had slower processing speed and poorer verbal learning, compared to those with no previous TBI history. These findings suggest that history of TBI with LOC may have important implications for health and psychological functioning after TBI in community-based samples.

  4. Distance perception in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciuffreda, Kenneth J; Yadav, Naveen K; Han, Esther; Ludlam, Diana P; Peddle, Angela; Hulse, Paul; Walter, Suzanne; Han, Jennifer

    2012-04-30

    The purpose of this study was to assess monocular and binocular distance perception, and stereoacuity, in individuals with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) who reported the symptom of "poor depth perception"; Ten patients with mTBI were tested and compared with ten visually-normal asymptomatic individuals in the following areas: perceived distance, stereoacuity at distance (3 meters) and near (40 cm), and a 9-item 5-point rating-scale questionnaire related to distance perception. Distance perception was assessed under monocular and binocular viewing conditions in both clustered and isolated static environments. Magnitude estimation was used to obtain the distance perception response function of physical versus perceived distance using common objects positioned at distances of 0.77 to 12.84 meters. The mean distance perception response function slopes were not significantly different in the two groups for any of the test conditions. Stereoacuity (sec arc) was slightly reduced at both near and distance in the individuals with mTBI (36 ± 24.58 and 84 ± 68.34, respectively) as compared with the normal subjects (20 ± 0 and 51 ± 9.93, respectively). The mTBI group mean symptom score was 3.24 ± 0.26 indicating a moderate problematic level; Similarity of the mean distance response functions in the mTBI group under monocular and binocular viewing conditions suggested that their misperception of distance was not due to a "binocular vergence" problem. Similarly, the slightly reduced stereoacuity in the mTBI group was not sufficient to explain their symptom of "poor depth perception." Thus, it is speculated that this problem reflects a higher-level cortical perceptual phenomenon related to diffuse brain damage in areas dealing with visuo-spatial mapping. American Optometric Association.

  5. Catecholaminergic based therapies for functional recovery after TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osier, Nicole D; Dixon, C Edward

    2016-06-01

    Among the many pathophysiologic consequences of traumatic brain injury are changes in catecholamines, including dopamine, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. In the context of TBI, dopamine is the one most extensively studied, though some research exploring epinephrine and norepinephrine have also been published. The purpose of this review is to summarize the evidence surrounding use of drugs that target the catecholaminergic system on pathophysiological and functional outcomes of TBI using published evidence from pre-clinical and clinical brain injury studies. Evidence of the effects of specific drugs that target catecholamines as agonists or antagonists will be discussed. Taken together, available evidence suggests that therapies targeting the catecholaminergic system may attenuate functional deficits after TBI. Notably, it is fairly common for TBI patients to be treated with catecholamine agonists for either physiological symptoms of TBI (e.g. altered cerebral perfusion pressures) or a co-occuring condition (e.g. shock), or cognitive symptoms (e.g. attentional and arousal deficits). Previous clinical trials are limited by methodological limitations, failure to replicate findings, challenges translating therapies to clinical practice, the complexity or lack of specificity of catecholamine receptors, as well as potentially counfounding effects of personal and genetic factors. Overall, there is a need for additional research evidence, along with a need for systematic dissemination of important study details and results as outlined in the common data elements published by the National Institute of Neurological Diseases and Stroke. Ultimately, a better understanding of catecholamines in the context of TBI may lead to therapeutic advancements. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery.

  6. Prospective memory rehabilitation using smartphones in patients with TBI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evald, Lars

    2015-01-01

    with the use of low-cost, off-the-shelf, unmodified smartphones combined with Internet calendars as a compensatory memory strategy. Thirteen community-dwelling patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) received a 6-week group-based instruction in the systematic use of a smartphone as a memory compensatory aid...... with TBI and smartphones come with features that are advantageous to other compensatory strategies. However, some benefits come hand-in-hand with drawbacks, such as the feeling of dependency. These aspects should be taken into account when choosing assistive technology as a memory compensatory strategy....

  7. Combined SCI and TBI: recovery of forelimb function after unilateral cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) is retarded by contralateral traumatic brain injury (TBI), and ipsilateral TBI balances the effects of SCI on paw placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Tomoo; Lin, Amity; Ma, Xiaokui; McKenna, Stephen L; Creasey, Graham H; Manley, Geoffrey T; Ferguson, Adam R; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C; Beattie, Michael S

    2013-10-01

    A significant proportion (estimates range from 16 to 74%) of patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) have concomitant traumatic brain injury (TBI), and the combination often produces difficulties in planning and implementing rehabilitation strategies and drug therapies. For example, many of the drugs used to treat SCI may interfere with cognitive rehabilitation, and conversely drugs that are used to control seizures in TBI patients may undermine locomotor recovery after SCI. The current paper presents an experimental animal model for combined SCI and TBI to help drive mechanistic studies of dual diagnosis. Rats received a unilateral SCI (75 kdyn) at C5 vertebral level, a unilateral TBI (2.0 mm depth, 4.0 m/s velocity impact on the forelimb sensori-motor cortex), or both SCI+TBI. TBI was placed either contralateral or ipsilateral to the SCI. Behavioral recovery was examined using paw placement in a cylinder, grooming, open field locomotion, and the IBB cereal eating test. Over 6weeks, in the paw placement test, SCI+contralateral TBI produced a profound deficit that failed to recover, but SCI+ipsilateral TBI increased the relative use of the paw on the SCI side. In the grooming test, SCI+contralateral TBI produced worse recovery than either lesion alone even though contralateral TBI alone produced no observable deficit. In the IBB forelimb test, SCI+contralateral TBI revealed a severe deficit that recovered in 3 weeks. For open field locomotion, SCI alone or in combination with TBI resulted in an initial deficit that recovered in 2 weeks. Thus, TBI and SCI affected forelimb function differently depending upon the test, reflecting different neural substrates underlying, for example, exploratory paw placement and stereotyped grooming. Concurrent SCI and TBI had significantly different effects on outcomes and recovery, depending upon laterality of the two lesions. Recovery of function after cervical SCI was retarded by the addition of a moderate TBI in the contralateral

  8. Impact of conditioning intensity and TBI on acute GVHD after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasone, H; Fukuda, T; Kanda, J; Mori, T; Yano, S; Kobayashi, T; Miyamura, K; Eto, T; Kanamori, H; Iwato, K; Uchida, N; Mori, S; Nagamura-Inoue, T; Ichinohe, T; Atsuta, Y; Teshima, T; Murata, M

    2015-04-01

    The impact of the conditioning intensity and TBI on acute GVHD (aGVHD) is still a matter of debate. We analyzed 6848 adult recipients who received allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT) between 2006 and 2011 in Japan. The subjects were divided into groups who had received myeloablative conditioning (MAC) or reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC), either with or without TBI. There was a significant difference in the incidence of aGVHD 2-4 among the different conditioning types: 39% in TBI-MAC, 35% in TBI-RIC and 32% in both no-TBI MAC and no-TBI-RIC (PTBI-MAC, but not no-TBI MAC, was significantly associated with an increased risk of aGVHD 2-4 (hazard ratio (HR) 1.33, PTBI-RIC was associated with an increased risk of GVHD 3-4 (HR 1.36, P=0.048). TBI-MAC and TBI-RIC were significantly associated with skin and gastrointestinal aGVHD. Subgroup analyses demonstrated that not only TBI-MAC, but also TBI-RIC, was significantly associated with aGVHD 2-4 in older patients. Furthermore, high-dose TBI only had an adverse impact on aGVHD 2-4 in HLA-matched HCT. Impacts of intensity and TBI on aGVHD differ by patient backgrounds, and this difference should be considered to establish a risk-adapted strategy for the prevention of aGVHD.

  9. Telerehabilitation for Veterans with Combat Related TBI/PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    signed by a proxy. Veterans and/or care givers must also possess basic computer literacy such as being able to access a web page and making entrees in...with Combat Related TBI/PTSD RTO-MP-HFM-205 15 - 7 or intervention ( diabetes , CHF, dementia etc), our cohort exhibits a very diverse population in

  10. Historical Review of the Fluid Percussion TBI Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce G Lyeth

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract:Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major health concern worldwide. Laboratory studies utilizing animal models of TBI are essential for addressing pathological mechanisms of brain injury and development of innovative treatments. Over the past 75 years, pioneering head injury researchers have devised and tested a number of fluid percussive methods to reproduce in animals the concussive clinical syndrome. The fluid percussion brain injury technique has evolved from early investigations that applied a generalized loading of the brain to more recent computer controlled systems. Of the many pre-clinical TBI models, the fluid percussion technique is one of the most extensively characterized and widely used models. Some of the most important advances involved the development of the Stalhammer device to produce concussion in cats and the later characterization of this device for application in rodents. The goal of this historical review is to provide readers with an appreciation for the time and effort expended by the pioneering researchers that have led to today’s state of the art fluid percussion animal models of TBI.

  11. Psychological Outcome in Young Survivors of Severe TBI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doser, Karoline; Poulsen, Ingrid; Norup, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To investigate the psychological outcome and the agreement between self-ratings and proxy-ratings in young individuals after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods. Twenty pairs of former patients who sustained a severe TBI in their adolescence or early adulthood and their signif......Objective. To investigate the psychological outcome and the agreement between self-ratings and proxy-ratings in young individuals after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Methods. Twenty pairs of former patients who sustained a severe TBI in their adolescence or early adulthood...... and their significant others (SOs) were contacted around 66 months after injury to complete a measure of psychological and behavioral problems. The Adult Self-Report 18-59 and the Adult Behavior Checklist 18-59 were used. Results. Results showed significant differences compared to the normative sample in the domains...... such as anxiety and depression, withdrawal, thought and attention problems, and personal strength. Conclusion. The findings show that young patients experience psychological dysfunction. Our study suggests that the use of either a self-rating or a proxy-rating would be appropriate for evaluating overt domains...

  12. Harnessing Neuroplasticity to Promote Rehabilitation: CI Therapy for TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    medical record system for the contact information of veterans with diagnostic and procedural codes reflecting a history of TBI and motor impairment of...of treatment response in patients with new onset schizophrenia and untreated psychosis. This is a new project. There is no overlap. Participation in

  13. Early Clinical Outcomes Demonstrate Preserved Cognitive Function in Children With Average-Risk Medulloblastoma When Treated With Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Tejpal, E-mail: tejpalgupta@rediffmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Jalali, Rakesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Goswami, Savita [Department of Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry Unit, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Nair, Vimoj [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Moiyadi, Aliasgar [Division of Neuro-Surgery, Department of Surgical Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Epari, Sridhar [Department of Pathology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India); Sarin, Rajiv [Department of Radiation Oncology, Advanced Centre for Treatment Research and Education in Cancer and Tata Memorial Hospital, Mumbai (India)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To report on acute toxicity, longitudinal cognitive function, and early clinical outcomes in children with average-risk medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Twenty children {>=}5 years of age classified as having average-risk medulloblastoma were accrued on a prospective protocol of hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT) alone. Radiotherapy was delivered with two daily fractions (1 Gy/fraction, 6 to 8 hours apart, 5 days/week), initially to the neuraxis (36 Gy/36 fractions), followed by conformal tumor bed boost (32 Gy/32 fractions) for a total tumor bed dose of 68 Gy/68 fractions over 6 to 7 weeks. Cognitive function was prospectively assessed longitudinally (pretreatment and at specified posttreatment follow-up visits) with the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children to give verbal quotient, performance quotient, and full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ). Results: The median age of the study cohort was 8 years (range, 5-14 years), representing a slightly older cohort. Acute hematologic toxicity was mild and self-limiting. Eight (40%) children had subnormal intelligence (FSIQ <85), including 3 (15%) with mild mental retardation (FSIQ 56-70) even before radiotherapy. Cognitive functioning for all tested domains was preserved in children evaluable at 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years after completion of HFRT, with no significant decline over time. Age at diagnosis or baseline FSIQ did not have a significant impact on longitudinal cognitive function. At a median follow-up time of 33 months (range, 16-58 months), 3 patients had died (2 of relapse and 1 of accidental burns), resulting in 3-year relapse-free survival and overall survival of 83.5% and 83.2%, respectively. Conclusion: HFRT without upfront chemotherapy has an acceptable acute toxicity profile, without an unduly increased risk of relapse, with preserved cognitive functioning in children with average-risk medulloblastoma.

  14. Rates of TBI-related Deaths by Age Group — United States, 2001–2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Changes in the rates of TBI-related deaths vary depending on age. For persons 44 years of age and younger, TBI-related deaths decreased between the periods of...

  15. Common biochemical defects linkage between post-traumatic stress disorders, mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and penetrating TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Kedar N; Bondy, Stephen C

    2015-03-02

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex mental disorder with psychological and emotional components, caused by exposure to single or repeated extreme traumatic events found in war, terrorist attacks, natural or man-caused disasters, and by violent personal assaults and accidents. Mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) occurs when the brain is violently rocked back and forth within the skull following a blow to the head or neck as in contact sports, or when in close proximity to a blast pressure wave following detonation of explosives in the battlefield. Penetrating TBI occurs when an object penetrates the skull and damages the brain, and is caused by vehicle crashes, gunshot wound to the head, and exposure to solid fragments in the proximity of explosions, and other combat-related head injuries. Despite clinical studies and improved understanding of the mechanisms of cellular damage, prevention and treatment strategies for patients with PTSD and TBI remain unsatisfactory. To develop an improved plan for treating and impeding progression of PTSD and TBI, it is important to identify underlying biochemical changes that may play key role in the initiation and progression of these disorders. This review identifies three common biochemical events, namely oxidative stress, chronic inflammation and excitotoxicity that participate in the initiation and progression of these conditions. While these features are separately discussed, in many instances, they overlap. This review also addresses the goal of developing novel treatments and drug regimens, aimed at combating this triad of events common to, and underlying, injury to the brain.

  16. Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) and Rehabilitation in the Treatment of TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    traumatic brain injury ( TBI ). The main limitation to these earlier results is that VNS treatment was initiated at either 2 hr or 24 hr after TBI ...the potential utility of VNS as a clinical treatment for human TBI . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Vagus nerve stimulation, recovery of function, brain injury ... TBI induced by Controlled Cortical Impact. A brain injury was induced over the left hemisphere at the following coordinates: Epicenter: Midpoint

  17. Blood Biomarker Profile of TBI Associated Cognitive Impairment Among Old and Young Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    distinguishable from AD and normal aging. Specifically, we hypothesize that: 1) patients with TBI associated CI will have higher phospho- tau/total tau...at both sites. As of 30-SEP- 2016, data from 134 participants has been collected (65 TBI, 48 controls, and 21 with AD and no TBI). Once data...treatment for CI and its prevention. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Traumatic brain injury (TBI), dementia , chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), blood biomarkers

  18. Traumatic brain injury: Age at injury influences dementia risk after TBI

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Victoria E.; Stewart, William

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is increasingly recognized as a risk factor for dementia. New data provide further support for this association and demonstrate the influence of age at injury and injury severity on dementia risk after TBI, revealing that even mild TBI increases dementia risk in those aged ≥65 years.

  19. TBI-ROC Part One: Understanding Traumatic Brain Injury--An Introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudel, Tina M.; Scherer, Marcia J.; Elias, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    This article is the first of a multi-part series on traumatic brain injury (TBI). Historically, TBI has received very limited national public policy attention and support. However since it has become the signature injury of the military conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, TBI has gained the attention of elected officials, military leaders,…

  20. Enhanced Cognitive Rehabilitation to Treat Comorbid TBI and PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Veterans Medical Research Foundation San Diego, CA 92161 REPORT DATE: Oct 2016 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED...YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE Oct 2016 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 15 Sep 2015 – 14 Sep 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE...to accommodate the difficulties with attention, memory , and problem solving that patients with TBI may have. Therefore, this study integrates

  1. Mechanistic Links Between PARP, NAD, and Brain Inflammation After TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-2-0091 TITLE: Mechanistic Links Between PARP, NAD, and Brain Inflammation After TBI PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR ...Raymond A. Swanson, M.D CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Northern California Institute for Research & Education San Francisco, CA 94121 REPORT DATE: October 2015...STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT This project is a pre-clinical evaluation of the

  2. Defining the Pathophysiological Role of Tau in Experimental TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0275 TITLE: Defining the Pathophysiological Role of Tau in Experimental TBI PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Dr. Robert...No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing...information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this

  3. Automated Comprehensive Evaluation of mTBI Visual Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES mild traumatic brain injury, mTBI, objective biomarkers, Neuro -Ophthalmic Device, NODe 14. ABSTRACT The purpose...of this study is to validate the Neuro -Ophthalmic Device (NODe) test battery that provides the highest sensitivity and specificity for the detection...matched controls. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE

  4. Fludarabine and 2-Gy TBI is superior to 2 Gy TBI as conditioning for HLA-matched related hematopoietic cell transplantation: a phase III randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornblit, Brian; Maloney, David G; Storb, Rainer; Storek, Jan; Hari, Parameswaran; Vucinic, Vladan; Maziarz, Richard T; Chauncey, Thomas R; Pulsipher, Michael A; Bruno, Benedetto; Petersen, Finn B; Bethge, Wolfgang A; Hübel, Kai; Bouvier, Michelle E; Fukuda, Takahiro; Storer, Barry E; Sandmaier, Brenda M

    2013-09-01

    The risks and benefits of adding fludarabine to a 2-Gy total body irradiation (TBI) nonmyeloablative regimen are unknown. For this reason, we conducted a prospective randomized trial comparing 2-Gy TBI alone, or in combination with 90 mg/m(2) fludarabine (FLU/TBI), before transplantation of peripheral blood stem cells from HLA-matched related donors. Eighty-five patients with hematological malignancies were randomized to be conditioned with TBI alone (n = 44) or FLU/TBI (n = 41). All patients had initial engraftment. Two graft rejections were observed, both in the TBI group. Infection rates, nonrelapse mortality, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were similar between groups. Three-year overall survival was lower in the TBI group (54% versus 65%; hazard ratio [HR], .57; P = .09), with higher incidences of relapse/progression (55% versus 40%; HR, .55; P = .06), relapse-related mortality (37% versus 28%; HR, .53; P = .09), and a lower progression-free survival (36% versus 53%; HR, .56; P = .05). Median donor T cell chimerism levels were significantly lower in the TBI group at days 28 (61% versus 90%; P < .0001) and 84 (68% versus 92%; P < .0001), as was NK cell chimerism on day 28 (75% versus 96%; P = .0005). In conclusion, this randomized trial demonstrates the importance of fludarabine in augmenting the graft-versus-tumor effect by ensuring prompt and durable high-level donor engraftment early after transplantation.

  5. The Neurological Outcome Scale for Traumatic Brain Injury (NOS-TBI): II. Reliability and convergent validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCauley, Stephen R; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Kelly, Tara M; Weyand, Annie M; Yallampalli, Ragini; Waldron, Eric J; Pedroza, Claudia; Schnelle, Kathleen P; Boake, Corwin; Levin, Harvey S; Moretti, Paolo

    2010-06-01

    A standardized measure of neurological dysfunction specifically designed for TBI currently does not exist and the lack of assessment of this domain represents a substantial gap. To address this, the Neurological Outcome Scale for Traumatic Brain Injury (NOS-TBI) was developed for TBI outcomes research through the addition to and modification of items specifically relevant to patients with TBI, based on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale. In a sample of 50 participants (mean age = 33.3 years, SD = 12.9) TBI, internal consistency of the NOS-TBI was high (Cronbach's alpha = 0.942). Test-retest reliability also was high (rho = 0.97, p TBI total score was excellent (W = 0.995). Convergent validity was demonstrated through significant Spearman rank-order correlations between the NOS-TBI and the concurrently administered Disability Rating Scale (rho = 0.75, p TBI is a reliable and valid measure of neurological functioning in patients with moderate to severe TBI.

  6. Clinical evaluation of accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation for locally advanced head and neck cancer with concomitant use of daily low-dose Carboplatin (CBDCA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Kazuo; Sekiya, Yuichi; Araki, Hitoshi [Chiba Cancer Center (Japan)

    1998-02-01

    From May 1994 to May 1996, 39 patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer were treated with accelerated hyperfractionated irradiation (1.6 Gy, twice daily, 10 times a week, with minimum interval of 6 hours between fractions and the total tumor dose to 70.4 Gy) and concomitant use of daily low-dose Carboplatin (30 mg/body). The average age was 64.2 years (38-85). The median follow-up period was 16.4 months with a range of 2-36 months. Complete response rate was 66.7%. The organ preservation rates were almost acceptable in advanced cases. The major acute toxicity was stomatitis, but no therapeutic interruption was observed. Grade 4 laryngeal late sequelae was observed in 2 cases. We think this method is effective for locally advanced head and neck cancer but total dose should be reduced to 67.2 Gy for laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer. (author)

  7. Harnessing Neuroplasticity to Promote Rehabilitation: CI Therapy for TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    risk-to- benefit ratio of the study has not changed. The Data & Safety Monitor for this project recommended a minor change in our telephone screening...As noted, our recruitment activities have the benefit of increasing public awareness about the effects 16 of TBI on motor function of the upper...function WMS  digit span Wechsler Memory Scale Digit Span working memory WMS  logical memory WMS  recall of details of a short narrative narrative memory

  8. Preclinical care of children with traumatic brain injury (TBI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sefrin, Peter

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The fact that injuries caused by accidents are the most common cause of death in children and adolescents in Germany gave rise to the study, which mainly deals with traffic accidents in this group. 200,221 records of emergency-service physicians in Bavaria which cover the period 1995-1999 were analysed with respect to the importance of traumatic brain injury (TBI in children and adolescents (n = 721 - representing 45.8% of traffic injuries in this age group. The highest incidence of TBI was in summer (34.3% and in the evening between 16.00 and 18.00 (23.7%. The time taken between accident and arrival of the emergency services was 8.8 ± 3.1 minutes. The preclinical phase lasted 19.3 ± 5.8 minutes. The probability of having an accident with TBI increases with age, the maximum being in the age-range 7 - 14 years (61.6%. Boys (63.2% were almost twice as susceptible to injury as girls. 36.8% of all cases had no noticeable neurological disorder, 71.1% resulted in a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score of 15. Only 6.3% had most severe neurological disorders, resulting in a GCS score of 3 - 5. Circulation parameters in the form of adapted hypotension were abnormal in only 3.4%, 21.9% of the children had a bradycardia and in 12.3% the blood oxygen saturation fell below 94%. The most frequent intervention was the laying of an i.v. line for infusions. 8.6% of the patients were intubated to allow for ventilation with oxygen. Analgesics were given in 16.7% of the cases. In 84.7% of all cases, the condition was stable and in only 3.3% was a severe deterioration to be observed. The assessments were made using both the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA and Glasgow Coma Scales (GCS. Discrepancies occurred, as a NACA scale of I - III and a GCS score of < 9 was reported in 4.9% of cases. In contrast a NACA scale of IV - VI was reported with a GCS score of 15 in 30% of all cases. TBI symptoms in children are less obvious than in adults, which leads to an

  9. Pupillometry and Saccades as Objective mTBI Biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    identifying military personnel with mTBI. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a...St. Pete Beach, August 2010, J. Neurotrauma 28 (4) (2011) 517–526, http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ neu .2010.1638 (PubMed PMID: 21265587). [16] S. Moster...http://dx.doi.org/10.1227/01. NEU .0000280001.03578.FF (PubMed PMID: 17762746) discussion 44. [23] V.E. DC, Organization of visual areas in macaque and

  10. Targeting Epigenetic Mechanisms in Pain due to Trauma and Traumatic Brain Injury(TBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AD AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0579 TITLE: Targeting Epigenetic Mechanisms in Pain due to Trauma and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeting Epigenetic Mechanisms in Pain due to Trauma and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c... brain or peripheral trauma may support chronic pain. Our work to-date has established a rodent model of TBI in combination with injury to a limb as a

  11. Blood Biomarker Profile of TBI-Associated Cognitive Impairment Among Old and Young Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    distinguishable from AD and normal aging. Specifically, we hypothesize that: 1) patients with TBI associated CI will have higher phospho-tau/total tau ratio than...sites. As of 30-SEP-2015, data from 31 participants with TBI and 30 controls has been collected. Once data collection is complete, we will examine the...SUBJECT TERMS Traumatic brain injury (TBI), dementia , chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), blood biomarkers, aging, cognitive impairment (CI

  12. SU-E-T-812: Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy-Total Body Irradiation (VMAT-TBI) V.s. Conventional Extended SSD-TBI (cTBI): A Dosimetric Comparisom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang, L; Folkerts, M; Lee, H; Ramirez, E; Timmerman, R; Abdulrahman, R; Jiang, S; Gu, X [UT Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To perform a dosimetric evaluation on a new developed volumetric modulated arc therapy based total body irradiation (VMAT-TBI). Methods: Three patients were CT scanned with an indexed rotatable body frame to get whole body CT images. Concatenated CT images were imported in Pinnacle treatment planning system and whole body and lung were contoured as PTV and organ at risk, respectively. Treatment plans were generated by matching multiple isocenter volumetric modulated arc (VMAT) fields of the upper body and multiple isocenter parallel-opposed fields of the lower body. For each plan, 1200 cGy in 8 fractions was prescribed to the whole body volume and the lung dose was constrained to a mean dose of 750 cGy. Such a two-level dose plan was achieved by inverse planning of the torso VMAT fields. For comparison, conventional standing TBI (cTBI) plans were generated on the same whole body CT images at an extended SSD (550cm).The shape of compensators and lung blocks are simulated using body segments and lung contours Compensation was calculated based on the patient CT images, in mimic of the standing TBI treatment. The whole body dose distribution of cTBI plans were calculated with a home-developed GPU Monte Carlo dose engine. Calculated cTBI dose distribution was prescribed to the mid-body point at umbilical level. Results: The VMAT-TBI treatment plans of three patients’ plans achieved 80.2%±5.0% coverage of the total body volume within ±10% of the prescription dose, while cTBI treatment plans achieved 72.2%±4.0% coverage of the total body volume. The averaged mean lung dose of all three patients is lower for VMAT-TBI (7.48 cGy) than for cTBI (8.96 cGy). Conclusion: The proposed patient comfort-oriented VMAT-TBI technique provides for a uniform dose distribution within the total body while reducing the dose to the lungs.

  13. [Late-onset Neurodegenerative Diseases Following Traumatic Brain Injury: Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) and Alzheimer's Disease Secondary to TBI (AD-TBI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahata, Keisuke; Tabuchi, Hajime; Mimura, Masaru

    2016-07-01

    Chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is a neurodegenerative disease, which is associated with mild repetitive traumatic brain injury (TBI). This long-term and progressive symptom due to TBI was initially called punch-drunk syndrome or dementia pugilistica, since it was believed to be associated with boxing. However, serial neuropathological studies of mild repetitive TBI in the last decade have revealed that CTE occurs not only in boxers but also in a wider population including American football players, wrestlers, and military personnel. CTE has gained large public interest owing to dramatic cases involving retired professional athletes wherein serious behavioral problems and tragic incidents were reported. Unlike mild repetitive TBI, a single episode of severe TBI can cause another type of late-onset neuropsychiatric disease including Alzheimer's disease (AD). Several epidemiological studies have shown that a single episode of severe TBI is one of the major risk factors of AD. Pathologically, both AD and CTE are characterized by abnormal accumulations of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. However, recent neuropathological studies revealed that CTE demonstrates a unique pattern of tau pathology in neurons and astrocytes, and accumulation of other misfolded proteins such as TDP-43. Currently, no reliable biomarkers of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI are available, and a definitive diagnosis can be made only via postmortem neuropathological examination. Development in neuroimaging techniques such as tau and amyloid positron emission tomography imaging might not only enable early diagnosis of CTE, but also contribute to the interventions for prevention of late-onset neurodegenerative diseases following TBI. Further studies are necessary to elucidate the mechanisms of neurodegeneration in the living brain of patients with TBI.

  14. Blast Loading Experiments of Surrogate Models for Tbi Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, M. D.; Son, S. F.

    2009-12-01

    This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical models. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical PMMA shells housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory test cell setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head near material interfaces due to impedance mismatches. In addition, significant relative displacement was observed between the interacting materials suggesting large strain values of nearly 5%. Further quantitative results were obtained through shadowgraph imaging of the blasts confirming a separation of time scales between blast interaction and bulk movement. These results lead to the conclusion that primary blast effects could cause TBI occurrences.

  15. Dosimetry with phantom for total body irradiation (TBI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tezuka, Takako; Sakakura, Noriyuki; Obata, Yasunori; Tabushi, Katuyoshi; Kondou, Satoru [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Health Sciences; Koyama, Syuuji; Aoyama, Yuuichi; Shimohira, Akiyo [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). Hospital

    2002-04-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) is being used as a method of preparation for bone marrow transplantation (BMT). In TBI, the dose calculation is based on dosimetry using a phantom. We measured the basic dose with a phantom using a 10 MV X-rays. We confirmed the accuracy of the dose calculation performed in our facilities and investigated a method of more accurate dosimetry. We measured the variation in dose according to the size of the phantom and the depth using a tough water phantom, and examined the difference in TMR according to SCD, field size, and size of the phantom. Consequently, the dose has been changed regardless of the size of the phantom at larger than 80 x 30 x 30 cm{sup 3}, and it is about 1% larger than 30 x 30 x 30 cm{sup 3}. Also TMR has changed according to various conditions, including the size of the phantom, field size, and SCD. Therefore, it was found that dosimetry using the 30 x 30 x 30 cm{sup 3} phantom leads to underestimation in dose calculation, and there is no difference in dose between the field size of 151.5 x 160 cm{sup 2} and 151.5 x 80 cm{sup 2}. It is also necessary to consider the effect of the vertical size of the phantom. (author)

  16. Sexual Functioning, Desire, and Satisfaction in Women with TBI and Healthy Controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strizzi, Jenna; Olabarrieta Landa, Laiene; Pappadis, Monique; Olivera, Silvia Leonor; Valdivia Tangarife, Edgar Ricardo; Fernandez Agis, Inmaculada; Perrin, Paul B; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can substantially alter many areas of a person's life and there has been little research published regarding sexual functioning in women with TBI. Methods. A total of 58 women (29 with TBI and 29 healthy controls) from Neiva, Colombia, participated. There were no statistically significant differences between groups in sociodemographic characteristics. All 58 women completed the Sexual Quality of Life Questionnaire (SQoL), Female Sexual Functioning Index (FSFI), Sexual Desire Inventory (SDI), and the Sexual Satisfaction Index (ISS). Results. Women with TBI scored statistically significantly lower on the SQoL (p lubrication (p programs.

  17. The Neurological Outcome Scale for Traumatic Brain Injury (NOS-TBI): I. Construct validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Elisabeth A; McCauley, Stephen R; Kelly, Tara M; Weyand, Annie M; Pedroza, Claudia; Levin, Harvey S; Clifton, Guy L; Schnelle, Kathleen P; Shah, Monika V; Moretti, Paolo

    2010-06-01

    The Neurological Outcome Scale for Traumatic Brain Injury (NOS-TBI) is a measure adapted from the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS), and is intended to capture essential neurological deficits impacting individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) (see Wilde et al., 2010 ). In the present study we evaluate the measure's construct validity via comparison with a quantified neurological examination performed by a neurologist. Spearman rank-order correlation between the NOS-TBI and the neurological examination was rho = 0.76, p TBI compared favorably to the neurological examination items, with correlations ranging from 0.60 to 0.99 (all p TBI, and on the NOS-TBI neurological impairment was evident in all but one participant. This study documents the presence of measurable neurological sequelae in a sample of patients with TBI in a post-acute rehabilitation setting, underscoring the need for formal measurement of the frequency and severity of neurological deficits in this population. The results suggest that the NOS-TBI is a valid measure of neurological functioning in patients with TBI.

  18. Halstead-Reitan characteristics of nonimpact and impact mTBI litigants and insurance claimants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, James Ernest; Johnson, Andrew M

    2017-08-29

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible neuropsychological differences in Halstead-Reitan characteristics between motor vehicle accident litigants and insurance claimants that sustained uncomplicated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and did or did not sustain direct impact to the head (i.e., Impact vs. Nonimpact mTBI), and to compare these clinical groups with a control group that did not suffer mTBI (No mTBI). The Tactile Form Recognition Test (TFR) was the only level of performance test in the Halstead-Reitan Battery (HRB) that generated statistically significant differences. The TFR resembles a complex reaction time test. TFR response time was significantly longer for Nonimpact mTBI patients than for Impact mTBI and No mTBI participants. Frequency comparisons of abnormal score patterns demonstrated that Nonimpact patients produced significantly more aberrant Impairment Index vs. FSIQ score patterns than Impact and No mTBI participants. Given the components of the score pattern, this finding suggests that Nonimpact patients may experience less recovery from neuropsychological deficits than Impact participants. Complex perceptual reaction times and score patterns comparing sensitive and "hold" test results may represent heuristic avenues of future research in the study of compensation-seeking Nonimpact and Impact mTBI patients.

  19. Sheep Collisions: the Good, the Bad, and the TBI

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The title page of Chapter 9 in Fundamentals of Physics (Halliday, Resnick, and Walker, 8th Edition, p. 201) shows a dramatic photograph of two Big Horn sheep butting heads and promises to explain how sheep survive such violent clashes without serious injury. However, the answer presented in sample problem 9-4 (p. 213) errs in presuming an interaction time of 0.27 s which results in an unrealistically long stopping distance of 0.62 m. Furthermore, the assertion that the horns provide necessary cushioning of the blow is inconsistent with the absence of concussions in domestic breeds of hornless sheep. Results from traumatic brain injury (TBI) research allow acceleration tolerance of sheep to be estimated as 450 g facilitating an analysis of sheep collisions that is more consistent with available observations (stopping distance less than 1 cm, impact time of roughly 2 ms).

  20. Prospective memory rehabilitation using smartphones in patients with TBI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evald, Lars

    2015-01-01

    with the use of low-cost, off-the-shelf, unmodified smartphones combined with Internet calendars as a compensatory memory strategy. Thirteen community-dwelling patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) received a 6-week group-based instruction in the systematic use of a smartphone as a memory compensatory aid...... followed by a brief structured open-ended interview regarding satisfaction with and advantages and disadvantages of the compensatory strategy. Ten of 13 participants continued to use a smartphone as their primary compensatory strategy. Audible and visual reminders were the most frequently mentioned...... advantages of the smartphone, and, second, the capability as an all-in-one memory device. In contrast, battery life was the most often mentioned disadvantage, followed by concerns about loss or failure of the device. Use of a smartphone seems to be a satisfactory compensatory memory strategy to many patients...

  1. When Injury Clouds Understanding of Others: Theory of Mind after Mild TBI in Preschool Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellerose, Jenny; Bernier, Annie; Beaudoin, Cindy; Gravel, Jocelyn; Beauchamp, Miriam H

    2015-08-01

    There is evidence to suggest that social skills, such as the ability to understand the perspective of others (theory of mind), may be affected by childhood traumatic brain injuries; however, studies to date have only considered moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study aimed to assess theory of mind after early, mild TBI (mTBI). Fifty-one children who sustained mTBI between 18 and 60 months were evaluated 6 months post-injury on emotion and desires reasoning and false-belief understanding tasks. Their results were compared to that of 50 typically developing children. The two groups did not differ on baseline characteristics, except for pre- and post-injury externalizing behavior. The mTBI group obtained poorer scores relative to controls on both the emotion and desires task and the false-belief understanding task, even after controlling for pre-injury externalizing behavior. No correlations were found between TBI injury characteristics and theory of mind. This is the first evidence that mTBI in preschool children is associated with theory of mind difficulties. Reduced perspective taking abilities could be linked with the social impairments that have been shown to arise following TBI.

  2. TBI-ROC Part Seven: Traumatic Brain Injury--Technologies to Support Memory and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Marcia; Elias, Eileen; Weider, Katie

    2010-01-01

    This article is the seventh of a multi-part series on traumatic brain injury (TBI). The six earlier articles in this series have discussed the individualized nature of TBI and its consequences, the rehabilitation continuum, and interventions at various points along the continuum. As noted throughout the articles, many individuals with TBI…

  3. Individual neuropsychological support and group sessions for relatives to TBI patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siert, Lars

    TITLE: Individual neuropsychological support and group sessions for relatives to TBI patients. OBJECTIVE: To describe how the neuropsychologist work with early and ongoing individual support and group sessions for relatives to adult TBI patients in the acute and sub acute phase and after discharge...

  4. fNIRS-based investigation of the Stroop task after TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenger, Patrick; Krishnan, Kamini; Cloud, Matthew; Bosworth, Chris; Qualls, Devin; Marquez de la Plata, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate neural changes during a Stroop task among individuals with TBI using functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Thirteen healthy controls and 14 patients with moderate to severe TBI were included in this study. Oxygenated hemoglobin (HbO) was recorded every tenth of a second using a 52-channel fNIRS unit. Data were acquired using a block design during a Stroop task (i.e., Condition A = Dot Color Naming, Condition B = Incongruent Condition). Visual stimuli were presented on a computer monitor. Behaviorally, response accuracy was similar between groups for condition A, but the TBI group made more errors than the control group during condition B. During condition A, the patient group demonstrated significant increases in HbO within bilateral frontal regions compared to controls (p TBI group (p TBI group performed as accurately as controls on the simpler dot color naming condition of the Stroop task, neural activity was greater within the frontal lobes during this relatively simple task among the TBI group suggesting neural inefficiency. Furthermore, the spatial distribution of neural activity related to the interference effect was not different among patients, suggesting the neural demand for the simpler task was comparable to that of the more cognitive demanding task among the TBI sample. The results suggest that fNIRS can identify frontal lobe inefficiency in TBI commonly observed with fMRI.

  5. TBI-ROC Part Seven: Traumatic Brain Injury--Technologies to Support Memory and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherer, Marcia; Elias, Eileen; Weider, Katie

    2010-01-01

    This article is the seventh of a multi-part series on traumatic brain injury (TBI). The six earlier articles in this series have discussed the individualized nature of TBI and its consequences, the rehabilitation continuum, and interventions at various points along the continuum. As noted throughout the articles, many individuals with TBI…

  6. Electropalatographic (EPG) Assessment of Tongue-to-Palate Contacts in Dysarthric Speakers Following TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuruvilla, Mili S.; Murdoch, Bruce E.; Goozee, Justine V.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the investigation was to compare EPG-derived spatial and timing measures between a group of 11 dysarthric individuals post-severe TBI and 10 age- and sex-matched neurologically non-impaired individuals. Participants of the TBI group were diagnosed with dysarthria ranging from mild-to-moderate-severe dysarthria. Each participant from the…

  7. The Power of Cross-Disciplinary Teams for Developing First Responder Training in TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Jo L.; Cappiccie, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Misunderstanding of the symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI) often leaves first responders ill-equipped to handle encounters involving subjects with brain injury. This paper details a cross-disciplinary project to develop and disseminate a training curriculum designed to increase first responders' knowledge of and skills with TBI survivors.…

  8. The Power of Cross-Disciplinary Teams for Developing First Responder Training in TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shackelford, Jo L.; Cappiccie, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Misunderstanding of the symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI) often leaves first responders ill-equipped to handle encounters involving subjects with brain injury. This paper details a cross-disciplinary project to develop and disseminate a training curriculum designed to increase first responders' knowledge of and skills with TBI survivors.…

  9. Clinical caveats on medical assessment and treatment of pain after TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanhoe, Cindy B; Hartman, Eric T

    2004-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of pain in the patient with traumatic brain injury (TBI) can be difficult in light of the limitations imposed by the cognitive, language, and behavioral deficits. With patients in the acute rehabilitation setting, one must be vigilant for the often subtle signs and symptoms of pain. Causes more commonly seen in the population with TBI as a consequence of the injury itself include dysautonomia, neuropathic pain, spasticity, and heterotopic ossification. Headaches may be a consequence of TBI or associated with it for other reasons. Sources of pain associated with TBI include deep venous thrombosis and others. The reader is reminded that patients with TBI are subject to all the causes of pain that affect the general population.

  10. Clarifying the Robust Foundation for and Appropriate Use of DTI in mTBI Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Michael L; Bigler, Erin D

    2014-01-01

    As clinicians and scientists, we believe scientific evidence and prudent clinical practice form the proper basis for determining the utility of diagnostic measures, which should subsequently inform forensic use. The misleading and often entirely unsubstantiated opinions and positions of Wortzel et al., in opposition to DTI as a useful measure in mTBI, are at odds with the clear consensus of the scientific literature regarding mTBI, its clinical assessment and natural history. The authors' critique contains numerous errors. We will focus on four areas: (1) the clinical reality of mTBI (2) the true substance of the scientific evidence supporting use of DTI in mTBI, (3) the authors' erroneous and off-target opinions regarding DTI analysis and (4) critical appraisal and integration of clinical information for diagnosis of mTBI.

  11. Treatment of Children With Central Nervous System Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumors/Pinealoblastomas in the Prospective Multicentric Trial HIT 2000 Using Hyperfractionated Radiation Therapy Followed by Maintenance Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerber, Nicolas U., E-mail: nicolas.gerber@kispi.uzh.ch [Department of Pediatric Oncology, University Children' s Hospital, Zurich (Switzerland); Hoff, Katja von; Resch, Anika [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Ottensmeier, Holger [Department of Pediatric Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kwiecien, Robert; Faldum, Andreas [Institute of Biostatistics and Clinical Research, University of Muenster (Germany); Matuschek, Christiane [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty, Heinrich Heine University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany); Hornung, Dagmar [Department of Radiotherapy and Radio-Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Bremer, Michael [Institute for Radiation Therapy and Special Oncology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover (Germany); Benesch, Martin [Division of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Graz (Austria); Pietsch, Torsten [Department of Neuropathology, University of Bonn, Bonn (Germany); Warmuth-Metz, Monika [Department of Neuroradiology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kuehl, Joachim [Department of Pediatric Oncology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Rutkowski, Stefan [Department of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Kortmann, Rolf D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The prognosis for children with central nervous system primitive neuroectodermal tumor (CNS-PNET) or pinealoblastoma is still unsatisfactory. Here we report the results of patients between 4 and 21 years of age with nonmetastatic CNS-PNET or pinealoblastoma diagnosed from January 2001 to December 2005 and treated in the prospective GPOH-trial P-HIT 2000-AB4. Methods and Materials: After surgery, children received hyperfractionated radiation therapy (36 Gy to the craniospinal axis, 68 Gy to the tumor region, and 72 Gy to any residual tumor, fractionated at 2 × 1 Gy per day 5 days per week) accompanied by weekly intravenous administration of vincristine and followed by 8 cycles of maintenance chemotherapy (lomustine, cisplatin, and vincristine). Results: Twenty-six patients (15 with CNS-PNET; 11 with pinealoblastoma) were included. Median age at diagnosis was 11.5 years old (range, 4.0-20.7 years). Gross total tumor resection was achieved in 6 and partial resection in 16 patients (indistinct, 4 patients). Median follow-up of the 15 surviving patients was 7.0 years (range, 5.2-10.0 years). The combined response rate to postoperative therapy was 17 of 20 (85%). Eleven of 26 patients (42%; 7 of 15 with CNS-PNET; 4 of 11 with pinealoblastoma) showed tumor progression or relapse at a median time of 1.3 years (range, 0.5-1.9 years). Five-year progression-free and overall survival rates (±standard error [SE]) were each 58% (±10%) for the entire cohort: CNS-PNET was 53% (±13); pinealoblastoma was 64% (±15%; P=.524 and P=.627, respectively). Conclusions: Postoperative hyperfractionated radiation therapy with local dose escalation followed by maintenance chemotherapy was feasible without major acute toxicity. Survival rates are comparable to those of a few other recent studies but superior to those of most other series, including the previous trial, HIT 1991.

  12. Accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy combined with induction and concomitant chemotherapy for inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer. Impact of total treatment time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nyman, J.; Mercke, C. [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden). Dept. of Oncology; Bergman, B. [Sahlgrenska Univ. Hospital, Gothenburg (Sweden). Dept. of Respiratory Medicine

    1998-12-31

    Tumour cell proliferation during conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (RT) can negatively influence the treatment outcome in patients with unresectable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Accelerated and hyperfractionated RT may therefore have an advantage over conventional RT. Moreover, earlier studies have suggested improved survival with addition of cisplatin-based chemotherapy (CT). We present here the results of combined treatment with induction and concomitant CT and accelerated hyperfractionated RT in a retrospective series of patients with advanced NSCLS. Between August 1990 and August 1995, 90 consecutive patients, aged 42-77 years (median 63 years), with locally advanced unresectable or medically inoperable NSCLC and good performance status were referred for treatment: stage: I 23%, IIIa 37%, IIIb 40%. Patient histologies included: squamous cell carcinoma 52%, adenocarcinoma 34% and large cell carcinoma 13%. The treatment consisted of two courses of CT (cisplatin 100 mg/m{sup 2} day 1 and etoposide 100 mg/m{sup 2} day 1-3 i.v.), the second course given concomitantly with RT. The total RT dose was 61.2-64.6 Gy, with two daily fractions of 1.7 Gy. A one-week interval was introduced after 40.8 Gy to reduce acute toxicity, making the total treatment time 4.5 weeks. Concerning toxicity, 33 patients had febrile neutropenia, 10 patients suffered from grade III oesophagitis and 7 patients had grade III pneumonitis. There were two possible treatment-related deaths, one due to myocardial infarction and the other due to a pneumocystis carinii infection. The 1-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 72%, 46% and 34%, respectively; median survival was 21.3 months. Fifty-nine patients had progressive disease: 21 failed locoregionally, 29 had distant metastases and 9 patients had a combination of these. Pretreatment weight loss was the only prognostic factor found, except for stage. However, the results for stage IIIb were no different from those for stage IIIa

  13. Rates of TBI-related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths by Sex — United States, 2001–2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Overall rates of TBI climbed slowly from 2001 through 2007, then spiked sharply in 2008 and continued to climb through 2010. The increase in TBI rates in 2008 was...

  14. Neuropsychological effects of self-reported deployment-related mild TBI and current PTSD in OIF/OEF veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandera-Ochsner, Anne L; Berry, David T R; Harp, Jordan P; Edmundson, Maryanne; Graue, Lili O; Roach, Abbey; High, Walter M

    2013-01-01

    Current combat veterans are exposed to many incidents that may result in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and/or posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While there is literature on the neuropsychological consequences of PTSD only (PTSD-o) and mTBI alone (mTBI-o), less has been done to explore their combined (mTBI+PTSD) effect. The goal of this study was to determine whether Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) veterans with mTBI+PTSD have poorer cognitive and psychological outcomes than veterans with PTSD-o, mTBI-o, or combat exposure-only. The final sample included 20 OIF/OEF veterans with histories of self-reported deployment mTBI (mTBI-o), 19 with current PTSD (PTSD-o), 21 with PTSD and self-reported mTBI (mTBI+PTSD), and 21 combat controls (CC) (no PTSD and no reported mTBI). Groups were formed using structured interviews for mTBI and PTSD. All participants underwent comprehensive neuropsychological testing, including neurocognitive and psychiatric feigning tests. Results of cognitive tests revealed significant differences in performance in the mTBI+PTSD and PTSD-o groups relative to mTBI-o and CC. Consistent with previous PTSD literature, significant differences were found on executive (switching) tasks, verbal fluency, and verbal memory. Effect sizes tended to be large in both groups with PTSD. Thus, PTSD seems to be an important variable affecting neuropsychological profiles in the post-deployment time period. Consistent with literature on civilian mTBI, the current study did not find evidence that combat-related mTBI in and of itself contributes to objective cognitive impairment in the late stage of injury.

  15. High pre-transplant serum ferritin and busulfan-thiotepa conditioning regimen as risk factors for hepatic sinusoidal obstructive syndrome after autologous stem cell transplantation in patients with malignant lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Doh Yu; Kim, Soo-Jeong; Cheong, June-Won; Kim, Yundeok; Jang, Ji Eun; Lee, Jung Yeon; Min, Yoo Hong; Yang, Woo Ick; Kim, Jin Seok

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the risk factors for hepatic sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) in patients with malignant lymphoma receiving autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). We retrospectively analyzed 132 malignant lymphoma patients who underwent ASCT. Intravenous busulfan-based conditioning regimens were used in 108 (81.8%) patients. The combination of heparin and ursodeoxycholic acid was used for prophylaxis of SOS. Hepatic SOS was developed in 10 (7.6%) patients at a median of 30 days post-ASCT. In nine (90.0%) patients, SOS was diagnosed after 20 days post-ASCT. Two patients developed severe SOS and eventually died from multiple organ failure. In multivariate analysis, the use of the busulfan-thiotepa conditioning regimen (p = 0.003) and a high pre-transplant serum ferritin level (≥ 950 ng/mL) (p = 0.003) were risk factors for hepatic SOS. The evaluation of pre-transplant serum ferritin may be helpful in determining the most appropriate conditioning regimen with a lower risk of SOS.

  16. Subjective Executive funtioning as a predictor of coping styl in patients with TBI at all levels of severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakers, Sandra; Scheenen, Myrthe; Evers, Herma; Keizer, Annemarie; Spikman, Jacoba

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The majority of patients with traumatic braininjury (TBI) sustain a mild TBI, of which the prognosis isgenerally favourable. However, patients with moderate-to-severe TBI can experience long-lasting cognitive, emotionaland behavioural deficits that interfere with functioning in dailylife

  17. Sexual Functioning, Desire, and Satisfaction in Women with TBI and Healthy Controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenna Strizzi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI can substantially alter many areas of a person’s life and there has been little research published regarding sexual functioning in women with TBI. Methods. A total of 58 women (29 with TBI and 29 healthy controls from Neiva, Colombia, participated. There were no statistically significant differences between groups in sociodemographic characteristics. All 58 women completed the Sexual Quality of Life Questionnaire (SQoL, Female Sexual Functioning Index (FSFI, Sexual Desire Inventory (SDI, and the Sexual Satisfaction Index (ISS. Results. Women with TBI scored statistically significantly lower on the SQoL (p<0.001, FSFI subscales of desire (p<0.05, arousal (p<0.05, lubrication (p<0.05, orgasm (p<0.05, and satisfaction (p<0.05, and the ISS (p<0.001 than healthy controls. Multiple linear regressions revealed that age was negatively associated with some sexuality measures, while months since the TBI incident were positively associated with these variables. Conclusion. These results disclose that women with TBI do not fare as well as controls in these measures of sexual functioning and were less sexually satisfied. Future research is required to further understand the impact of TBI on sexual function and satisfaction to inform for rehabilitation programs.

  18. Quality of Life (QoL in patients with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI: A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nury Sukraeny

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe the definition of quality of life (QoL and identify the most appropriate tool for QoL assessment used in patients with TBI.Method: Searching was conducted from PubMed, CINAHL, EBSCO, and ProQuest during 2000-2011. A total of 33 studies were analyzed for this review consisting of 9 review studies, 2 intervention studies, and 22 descriptive studies.Result: Two important definitions of QoL were used in studies related to TBI namely achievement and subjective well-being. Although varieties of generic measurements have been used to measure QoL in TBI patients, there was a lack of TBI-specific Health-related Quality of Life (HRQoL instrument. Despite the different approach and time measured either short or long outcomes, appropriate domains of QoL tool seem essential particularly among those with moderate and severe TBI.Conclusion: QoL is a wide concept which can be defined in several dimensions. The QOLIBRI as a new disease-specific QoL measurement in TBI seems a feasible and valid approach for the assessment of QoL in TBI. However, the application across cultural remains a challenge and needs a validation.

  19. The influence of genetic variants on striatal dopamine transporter and D2 receptor binding after TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Amy K; Scanlon, Joelle M; Becker, Carl R; Ritter, Anne C; Niyonkuru, Christian; Dixon, Clifton E; Conley, Yvette P; Price, Julie C

    2014-08-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurotransmission influences cognition and recovery after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We explored whether functional genetic variants affecting the DA transporter (DAT) and D2 receptor (DRD2) impacted in vivo dopaminergic binding with positron emission tomography (PET) using [(11)C]βCFT and [(11)C]raclopride. We examined subjects with moderate/severe TBI (N=12) ∼1 year post injury and similarly matched healthy controls (N=13). The variable number of tandem repeat polymorphism within the DAT gene and the TaqI restriction fragment length polymorphism near the DRD2 gene were assessed. TBI subjects had age-adjusted DAT-binding reductions in the caudate, putamen, and ventral striatum, and modestly increased D2 binding in ventral striatum versus controls. Despite small sample sizes, multivariate analysis showed lower caudate and putamen DAT binding among DAT 9-allele carriers and DRD2 A2/A2 homozygotes with TBI versus controls with the same genotype. Among TBI subjects, 9-allele carriers had lower caudate and putamen binding than 10/10 homozygotes. This PET study suggests a hypodopaminergic environment and altered DRD2 autoreceptor DAT interactions that may influence DA transmission after TBI. Future work will relate these findings to cognitive performance; future studies are required to determine how DRD2/DAT1 genotype and DA-ligand binding are associated with neurostimulant response and TBI recovery.

  20. Personality and neuroimaging measures differentiate PTSD from mTBI in veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, Nicholas D; Lim, Kelvin O; Sponheim, Scott R

    2015-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is common among recent veterans and often is associated with chronic post-concussive symptoms (PCS). Elevated PCS may also be a consequence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) which shares symptoms with PCS. Identification of personality, biological, and psychopathology factors that contribute to the relationship between mTBI and PCS could help isolate the sources of chronic post concussive syndrome in veterans. Clinician rated diagnoses (PTSD, Major Depression, Alcohol Dependence), personality characteristics (Multidimensional Personality Questionnaire [MPQ] subscales), white matter brain imaging measures (Mean Diffusivity, Generalized Fractional Anisotropy), and diagnoses of mTBI were collected from 125 American military veterans of Iraq or Afghanistan. Linear and logistic regression models were tested to determine contributions to PCS and whether there were similar contributors to PTSD and mTBI. PCS score was associated with personality characteristics of high Stress Reaction and Traditionalism and low Control as well as mTBI. A diagnosis of PTSD was associated with low Social Closeness, PCS, Alcohol Dependence, and abnormal white matter mean diffusivity. Diagnosis of mTBI was associated with fewer white matter mean diffusivity abnormalities, PCS, and number of deployments. As commonly observed clinically, both PTSD and mTBI were associated with higher rates of PCS, though the contribution of PTSD appears to be secondary to personality traits, particularly Stress Reaction. Furthermore, the observation of factors that are uniquely associated with Blast mTBI (number of deployments) or with PTSD (Lifetime Alcohol Dependence and low Social Closeness), as well as a factor (region of abnormal MD) that had opposite effects on the likelihood of each diagnosis, indicates that the complex relationships between personality, psychopathology, and nature of mTBI need to be considered when interpreting chronic post-concussive symptoms.

  1. Functional neuroimaging with default mode network regions distinguishes PTSD from TBI in a military veteran population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raji, Cyrus A; Willeumier, Kristen; Taylor, Derek; Tarzwell, Robert; Newberg, Andrew; Henderson, Theodore A; Amen, Daniel G

    2015-09-01

    PTSD and TBI are two common conditions in veteran populations that can be difficult to distinguish clinically. The default mode network (DMN) is abnormal in a multitude of neurological and psychiatric disorders. We hypothesize that brain perfusion SPECT can be applied to diagnostically separate PTSD from TBI reliably in a veteran cohort using DMN regions. A group of 196 veterans (36 with PTSD, 115 with TBI, 45 with PTSD/TBI) were selected from a large multi-site population cohort of individuals with psychiatric disease. Inclusion criteria were peacetime or wartime veterans regardless of branch of service and included those for whom the traumatic brain injury was not service related. SPECT imaging was performed on this group both at rest and during a concentration task. These measures, as well as the baseline-concentration difference, were then inputted from DMN regions into separate binary logistic regression models controlling for age, gender, race, clinic site, co-morbid psychiatric diseases, TBI severity, whether or not the TBI was service related, and branch of armed service. Predicted probabilities were then inputted into a receiver operating characteristic analysis to compute sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy. Compared to PSTD, persons with TBI were older, male, and had higher rates of bipolar and major depressive disorder (p TBI in the veterans with 92 % sensitivity, 85 % specificity, and 94 % accuracy. With concentration scans, there was 85 % sensitivity, 83 % specificity and 89 % accuracy. Baseline-concentration (the difference metric between the two scans) scans were 85 % sensitivity, 80 % specificity, and 87 % accuracy. In separating TBI from PTSD/TBI visual readings of baseline scans had 85 % sensitivity, 81 % specificity, and 83 % accuracy. Concentration scans had 80 % sensitivity, 65 % specificity, and 79 % accuracy. Baseline-concentration scans had 82 % sensitivity, 69 % specificity, and 81 % accuracy. For separating PTSD

  2. Normalized power transmission between ABP and ICP in TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahsavari, S; Hallen, T; McKelvey, T; Ritzen, C; Rydenhag, B

    2009-01-01

    A new approach to study the pulse transmission between the cerebrovascular bed and the intracranial space is presented. In the proposed approach, the normalized power transmission between ABP and ICP has got the main attention rather than the actual power transmission. Evaluating the gain of the proposed transfer function at any single frequency can reveal how the percentage of contribution of that specific frequency component has been changed through the cerebrospinal system. The gain of the new transfer function at the fundamental cardiac frequency was utilized to evaluate the state of the brain in three TBI patients. Results were assessed using the reference evaluations achieved by a novel CT scan-based scoring scheme. In all three study cases, the gain of the transfer function showed a good capability to follow the trend of the CT scores and describe the brain state. Comparing the new transfer function with the traditional one and also the index of compensatory reserve, the proposed transfer function was found more informative about the state of the brain in the patients under study.

  3. Blast Loading Experiments of Developed Surrogate Models for TBI Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, Matthew; Son, Steven

    2009-06-01

    This study aims to characterize the interaction of explosive blast waves through simulated anatomical systems. We have developed physical models and a systematic approach for testing traumatic brain injury (TBI) mechanisms and occurrences. A simplified series of models consisting of spherical PMMA shells followed by SLA prototyped skulls housing synthetic gelatins as brain simulants have been utilized. A series of experiments was conducted with the simple geometries to compare the sensitivity of the system response to mechanical properties of the simulants under high strain-rate explosive blasts. Small explosive charges were directed at the models to produce a realistic blast wave in a scaled laboratory setting. Blast profiles were measured and analyzed to compare system response severity. High-speed shadowgraph imaging captured blast wave interaction with the head model while particle tracking captured internal response for displacement and strain correlation. The results suggest amplification of shock waves inside the head due to impedance mismatches. Results from the strain correlations added to the theory of internal shearing between tissues.

  4. SEGMENTATION OF SERIAL MRI OF TBI PATIENTS USING PERSONALIZED ATLAS CONSTRUCTION AND TOPOLOGICAL CHANGE ESTIMATION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Prastawa, Marcel; Awate, Suyash P; Irimia, Andrei; Chambers, Micah C; Vespa, Paul M; van Horn, John D; Gerig, Guido

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to falls, car accidents, and warfare affects millions of people annually. Determining personalized therapy and assessment of treatment efficacy can substantially benefit from longitudinal (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this paper, we propose a method for segmenting longitudinal brain MR images with TBI using personalized atlas construction. Longitudinal images with TBI typically present topological changes over time due to the effect of the impact force on tissue, skull, and blood vessels and the recovery process. We address this issue by defining a novel atlas construction scheme that explicitly models the effect of topological changes. Our method automatically estimates the probability of topological changes jointly with the personalized atlas. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach on MR images with TBI that also have been segmented by human raters, where our method that integrates 4D information yields improved validation measures compared to temporally independent segmentations.

  5. Monitoring Neurocognitive Performance and Electrophysiological Activity After Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    High versus Low PTSD Symptom Severity. National Capital Area TBI Research Symposium. 2014. Bethesda, Maryland. 5. DeGraba M, Merrifield W...Localized Correlated Spectroscopy. Alzheimer Research and Therapy. (In Press) 12. APPENDICES Nothing to report.

  6. Comparative Effectiveness of Family Problem-Solving Therapy (F-PST) for Adolescent TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Tbi; Intracranial Edema; Brain Edema; Craniocerebral Trauma; Head Injury; Brain Hemorrhage, Traumatic; Subdural Hematoma; Brain Concussion; Head Injuries, Closed; Epidural Hematoma; Cortical Contusion; Wounds and Injuries; Disorders of Environmental Origin; Trauma, Nervous System; Brain Injuries

  7. Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maas, Andrew I R; Menon, David K; Steyerberg, Ewout W

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current classification of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is suboptimal, and management is based on weak evidence, with little attempt to personalize treatment. A need exists for new precision medicine and stratified management approaches that incorporate emerging technologies. OBJECTIVE...

  8. Modeling distinct imaging hemodynamics early after TBI: the relationship between signal amplitude and connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medaglia, John D; McAleavey, Andrew A; Rostami, Sohayla; Slocomb, Julia; Hillary, Frank G

    2015-06-01

    Over the past decade, fMRI studies of cognitive change following traumatic brain injury (TBI) have investigated blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) activity during working memory (WM) performance in individuals in early and chronic phases of recovery. Recently, BOLD fMRI work has largely shifted to focus on WM and resting functional connectivity following TBI. However, fundamental questions in WM remain. Specifically, the effects of injury on the basic relationships between local and interregional functional neuroimaging signals during WM processing early following moderate to severe TBI have not been examined. This study employs a mixed effects model to examine prefrontal cortex and parietal lobe signal change during a WM task, the n-back, and whether there is covariance between regions of high amplitude signal change, (synchrony of elicited activity (SEA) very early following TBI. We also examined whether signal change and SEA differentially predict performance during WM. Overall, percent signal change in the right prefrontal cortex (rPFC) was and important predictor of both reaction time (RT) and SEA in early TBI and matched controls. Right prefrontal cortex (rPFC) percent signal change positively predicted SEA within and between persons regardless of injury status, suggesting that the link between these neurodynamic processes in WM-activated regions remains unaffected even very early after TBI. Additionally, rPFC activity was positively related to RT within and between persons in both groups. Right parietal (rPAR) activity was negatively related to RT within subjects in both groups. Thus, the local signal intensity of the rPFC in TBI appears to be a critical property of network functioning and performance in WM processing and may be a precursor to recruitment observed in chronic samples. The present results suggest that as much research moves toward large scale functional connectivity modeling, it will be essential to develop integrated models of how local and

  9. Role of Sertraline in insomnia associated with post traumatic brain injury (TBI depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ansari Ahmed

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major cause of disability (1, 2. Sleep disturbances, such as insomnia, are very common following traumatic brain injury and have been reported in frequencies from 40% (3 to as high as 84% (4. Sleep disruption can be related to the TBI itself but may also be secondary to neuropsychiatric (e.g., depression or neuromuscular (e.g., pain conditions associated with TBI or to the pharmacological management of the injury and its consequences. Post-TBI insomnia has been associated with numerous negative outcomes including daytime fatigue, tiredness, difficulty functioning: impaired performance at work, memory problems, mood problems, greater functional disability, reduced participation in activities of daily living, less social and recreational activity, less employment potential, increased caregiver burden, greater sexual dysfunction, and also lower ratings of health, poor subjective wellbeing. These negative consequences can hamper the person’s reintegration into the community, adjustment after injury, and overall QOL. (5 The connection between depression and insomnia has not been investigated within the post TBI population to a great extent. For the general population, clinically significant insomnia is often associated with the presence of an emotional disorder (6. Fichtenberg et al. (2002 (7, in his study established that the strongest relationship with the diagnosis of insomnia belonged to depression. Given the high prevalence of depression during the first 2 years following TBI (8, a link between depression and insomnia among TBI patients makes innate sense. The present study aims at assessing role of sertralline in post TBI insomnia associated with depression.

  10. rTMS: A Treatment to Restore Function After Severe TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    TBI related neurologic populations combined with our preliminary findings with severe TBI, indicate that rTMS merits investigation as a...30 treatment sessions. Determine long-term effects of Active APT III+ Active iTBS according to above measures, by computing change between baseline...pain of UCPPS. Specific Aims: Aim 1: Evaluate differential efficacy for UCPPS urological pain relief between placebo and DCS. Aim 2: Evaluate

  11. Growth impairment after TBI of leukemia survivors children: a model- based investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Galletto, Chiara; Gliozzi, Antonio; Nucera, Daniele; Bertorello, Nicoletta; Biasin, Eleonora; Corrias, Andrea; Chiabotto, Patrizia; Fagioli, Franca; Guiot, Caterina

    2014-01-01

    Background Children receiving Total Body Irradiation (TBI) in preparation for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) are at risk for Growth Hormone Deficiency (GHD), which sometimes severely compromises their Final Height (FH). To better represent the impact of such therapies on growth we apply a mathematical model, which accounts both for the gompertzian-like growth trend and the hormone-related ‘spurts’, and evaluate how the parameter values estimated on the children undergoing TBI ...

  12. Minimizing the effect of TBI-related physical sequelae on vocational return.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Shane; Walker, William; Cifu, David X; Wehman, Paul H

    2009-01-01

    This article evaluated the common physical sequelae that affect return to work (RTW) after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We performed a Medline search and evaluation of current TBI rehabilitation texts. The information presented is a combination of published literature and clinical guidelines. The limitations faced by many patients with TBI can best be overcome through clever job search, job redesign, and community linkages with business and industry that are willing to partner in helping the patient with TBI regain employment. The physician plays a key role in communicating suggestions to the vocational specialist. The comorbidities described represent challenges to successful RTW. These problems are recurrent, long-term, and clearly affect job procurement, nature of job, level of required support, and likelihood of job retention. Conversely, these challenges should not be viewed as impenetrable obstacles. With appropriate supports such as compensatory strategies, job coaching, assistive technology, medical management, and job restructuring, successful RTW is viable option. Physicians must focus on employment outcomes in real jobs and not settle for volunteer work, sheltered work, or assessment and planning. Individuals should be placed in real work for real pay. Through close collaboration between the survivor of TBI, the physician, the vocational specialist, and community resources, successful employment for survivors of TBI is possible and must be prescribed a high value.

  13. Health-related quality of life and mental health outcomes in Mexican TBI caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulin, Shaina L; Perrin, Paul B; Stevens, Lillian F; Villaseñor-Cabrera, Teresita J; Jiménez-Maldonado, Miriam; Martínez-Cortes, Ma Luisa; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

    2014-03-01

    Research has documented the deleterious effects on caregivers of providing care for an individual with traumatic brain injury (TBI). TBI caregivers in Mexico specifically have reduced health-related quality of life (HRQOL) across both physical and mental health domains. The purpose of the current study was to uncover the system of connections between Mexican TBI caregivers' HRQOL and their mental health. A cross-sectional survey was conducted at a public medical facility in Guadalajara, México. Ninety family caregivers of individuals with TBI completed measures of HRQOL, satisfaction with life, depression, and burden. A canonical correlation analysis revealed that the better the caregivers' HRQOL, the better their mental health was, with the effect reaching a large-sized effect. A distinct pattern emerged linking caregivers' higher energy levels and better social functioning to lower depression and greater satisfaction with life. A series of multiple regressions similarly uncovered that the most robust independent HRQOL predictors of caregiver mental health were vitality and social functioning. Especially for TBI caregivers with poor health, behavioral health interventions in Latin America that target the HRQOL domains of social functioning and vitality may significantly improve caregiver mental health, and as a result, informal care for TBI.

  14. EYE-TRAC: monitoring attention and utility for mTBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruta, Jun; Tong, Jianliang; Lee, Stephanie W.; Iqbal, Zarah; Schonberger, Alison; Ghajar, Jamshid

    2012-06-01

    Attention is a core function in cognition and also the most prevalent cognitive deficit in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Predictive timing is an essential element of attention functioning because sensory processing and execution of goal-oriented behavior are facilitated by temporally accurate prediction. It is hypothesized that impaired synchronization between prediction and external events accounts for the attention deficit in mTBI. Other cognitive and somatic or affective symptoms associated with mTBI may be explained as secondary consequences of impaired predictive timing. Eye-Tracking Rapid Attention Computation (EYE-TRAC) is the quantification of predictive timing with indices of dynamic visuo-motor synchronization (DVS) between the gaze and the target during continuous predictive visual tracking. Such quantification allows for cognitive performance monitoring in comparison to the overall population as well as within individuals over time. We report preliminary results of normative data and data collected from subjects with a history of mTBI within 2 weeks of injury and post-concussive symptoms at the time of recruitment. A substantial proportion of mTBI subjects demonstrated DVS scores worse than 95% of normal subjects. In addition, longitudinal monitoring of acute mTBI subjects showed that initially abnormal DVS scores were followed by improvement toward the normal range. In summary, EYE-TRAC provides fast and objective indices of DVS that allow comparison of attention performance to a normative standard and monitoring of within-individual changes.

  15. Mathematical outcomes and working memory in children with TBI and orthopedic injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghubar, Kimberly P; Barnes, Marcia A; Prasad, Mary; Johnson, Chad P; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda

    2013-03-01

    This study compared mathematical outcomes in children with predominantly moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI; n550) or orthopedic injury (OI; n547) at 2 and 24 months post-injury. Working memory and its contribution to math outcomes at 24 months post-injury was also examined. Participants were administered an experimental cognitive addition task and standardized measures of calculation, math fluency, and applied problems; as well as experimental measures of verbal and visual-spatial working memory. Although children with TBI did not have deficits in foundational math fact retrieval, they performed more poorly than OIs on standardized measures of math. In the TBI group, performance on standardized measures was predicted by age at injury, socioeconomic status, and the duration of impaired consciousness. Children with TBI showed impairments on verbal, but not visual working memory relative to children with OI. Verbal working memory mediated group differences on math calculations and applied problems at 24 months post-injury. Children with TBI have difficulties in mathematics, but do not have deficits in math fact retrieval, a signature deficit of math disabilities. Results are discussed with reference to models of mathematical cognition and disability and the role of working memory in math learning and performance for children with TBI.

  16. The epidemiology of traumatic brain injuries (TBI – a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Kalyan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available A search of the literature showed limited reported research on the epidemiology of TBI in South Africa. This prompted a search of literature on the epidemiology of TBI in the rest of the world. Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a leading cause of death and disability in most western countries. Motor vehicle accidents (MVA are the main cause of TBI, followed by gunshot wounds (GSW and falls. In South Africa, road accident fatalities are 27,3 per 100 000 of the population.  The causes of death and disability vary with age, race and gender groups. Improved medical emergency care has resulted in a decrease in the mortality rate following TBI, but has increased the morbidity rate. The increase in the number of people living with neurological impairments is a significant economic burden when taking into account hospitalization, rehabilitation, medication and the loss of working hours. The emotional burden is unknown. The purpose of this paper is to place in perspective, the epidemiology of TBI, by looking at the published literature in the rest of the world.  In the developing world it is projected that the burden of disease resulting from interpersonal violence will nearly double by 2020 unless preventive action is taken. Many more people survive acts of interpersonal violence than die from them.

  17. Intracranial pressure and cerebral perfusion pressure monitoring in non-TBI patients: special considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbok, Raimund; Olson, DaiWai M; Le Roux, Peter D; Vespa, Paul

    2014-12-01

    The effect of intracranial pressure (ICP) and the role of ICP monitoring are best studied in traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, a variety of acute neurologic illnesses e.g., subarachnoid hemorrhage, intracerebral hemorrhage, ischemic stroke, meningitis/encephalitis, and select metabolic disorders, e.g., liver failure and malignant, brain tumors can affect ICP. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature about ICP monitoring in conditions other than TBI and to provide recommendations how the technique may be used in patient management. A PubMed search between 1980 and September 2013 identified 989 articles; 225 of which were reviewed in detail. The technique used to monitor ICP in non-TBI conditions is similar to that used in TBI; however, indications for ICP monitoring often are intertwined with the presence of obstructive hydrocephalus and hence the use of ventricular catheters is more frequent. Increased ICP can adversely affect outcome, particularly when it fails to respond to treatment. However, patients with elevated ICP can still have favorable outcomes. Although the influence of ICP-based care on outcome in non-TBI conditions appears less robust than in TBI, monitoring ICP and cerebral perfusion pressure can play a role in guiding therapy in select patients.

  18. The impact of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) on family functioning: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Marghalara; Goez, Helly R; Mabood, Neelam; Damanhoury, Samah; Yager, Jerome Y; Joyce, Anthony S; Newton, Amanda S

    2014-01-01

    To explore the impact moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a child has on family functioning. The search was conducted using 9 bibliographic databases for articles published between 1980 and 2013. Two reviewers independently screened for inclusion and assessed study quality. Two reviewers extracted study data and a third checked for completeness and accuracy. Findings are presented by three domains: injury-related burden and stress, family adaptability, and family cohesion. Nine observational studies were included. Across the studies, differences between study groups for family functioning varied, but there was a trend for more dysfunction in families whose child had a severe TBI as compared to families whose child had a moderate TBI or orthopedic injury. In three studies, injury-associated burden was persistent post-injury and was highest in families whose child had a severe TBI followed by families with a child who had a moderate TBI. One study found fathers reported more family dysfunction caused by their child's injury compared to mothers. Two studies found that mothers' adaptability depended on social support and stress levels while fathers' adaptability was independent of these factors and injury severity. Moderate to severe TBI has a significant, long-standing impact on family functioning. Factors associated with family adaptability vary by parental role.

  19. White matter involvement after TBI: Clues to axon and myelin repair capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Regina C; Mierzwa, Amanda J; Marion, Christina M; Sullivan, Genevieve M

    2016-01-01

    Impact-acceleration forces to the head cause traumatic brain injury (TBI) with damage in white matter tracts comprised of long axons traversing the brain. White matter injury after TBI involves both traumatic axonal injury (TAI) and myelin pathology that evolves throughout the post-injury time course. The axon response to initial mechanical forces and secondary insults follows the process of Wallerian degeneration, which initiates as a potentially reversible phase of intra-axonal damage and proceeds to an irreversible phase of axon fragmentation. Distal to sites of axon disconnection, myelin sheaths remain for prolonged periods, which may activate neuroinflammation and inhibit axon regeneration. In addition to TAI, TBI can cause demyelination of intact axons. These evolving features of axon and myelin pathology also represent opportunities for repair. In experimental TBI, demyelinated axons exhibit remyelination, which can serve to both protect axons and facilitate recovery of function. Myelin remodeling may also contribute to neuroplasticity. Efficient clearance of myelin debris is a potential target to attenuate the progression of chronic pathology. During the early phase of Wallerian degeneration, interventions that prevent the transition from reversible damage to axon disconnection warrant the highest priority, based on the poor regenerative capacity of axons in the CNS. Clinical evaluation of TBI will need to address the challenge of accurately detecting the extent and stage of axon damage. Distinguishing the complex white matter changes associated with axons and myelin is necessary for interpreting advanced neuroimaging approaches and for identifying a broader range of therapeutic opportunities to improve outcome after TBI.

  20. Neuroprotective effects of SNX-185 in an in vitro model of TBI with a second insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahlaie, Kiarash; Gurkoff, Gene G; Lyeth, Bruce G; Muizelaar, J Paul; Berman, Robert F

    2013-01-01

    Second insults following traumatic brain injury (TBI), such as ischemia and hypoxia, significantly worsen outcome in patients and in experimental models of TBI. Following TBI there is a pathological increase in intracellular calcium, triggering cellular mechanisms of dysfunction and death. N-type specific voltage gated calcium channel (VGCC) blockers reduce cell death in both in vitro mechanical strain injury (MSI) and in vivo models of TBI, but they have not been previously explored in a model of TBI followed by a second insult. In the following studies, cortical neurons and astrocytes experienced MSI followed by incubation in 20% CO2. Cultures were treated with the N-type VGCC blocker, ω-conopeptide SNX-185 (1 μM), 5-minutes post-injury and intracellular calcium accumulation was assessed at 3, 6 and 24 h. Neuronal viability was assessed 24 h after MSI. Increasing incubator CO2 to 20% significantly increased calcium accumulation and cell death regardless of MSI severity. Treatment with 1 μM of SNX-185 significantly reduced the accumulation of calcium 3 hours following injury and increased the number of viable neurons 24 h post-injury and incubation in 20% CO2. In vitro models provide a critical tool for identifying roles of cell specific mechanisms involved in neuronal dysfunction and death following injury. These data demonstrate the potential of N-type VGCC blockers in reducing the damaging effects of TBI and second insults.

  1. Concurrent hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with 5-FU and once weekly cisplatin in locally advanced head and neck cancer. The 10-year results of a prospective phase II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, V.; Boehmer, D.; Badakhshi, H.; Jahn, U.; Stromberger, C. [Campus Virchow Klinikum, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Department for Radiooncology, Clinic for Radiooncology, Berlin (Germany); Becker, E.T. [Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Berlin (Germany); Wernecke, K.D. [Sostana Statistics GmbH, Charite Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Berlin (Germany)

    2014-03-15

    In this study, the acute toxicity and long-term outcome of a hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiation regimen with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinomas of head and neck were evaluated. From 2000-2002, 38 patients with stage III (5.3 %) and stage IV (94.7 %) head and neck cancer were enrolled in a phase II study. Patients received hyperfractionated-accelerated radiotherapy with 72 Gy in 15 fractions of 2 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily with concurrent, continuous infusion 5-FU of 600 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5 and 6 cycles of weekly cisplatin (30 mg/m{sup 2}). Acute toxicities (CTCAEv2.0), locoregional control (LRC), metastases-free (MFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed and exploratively compared with the ARO 95-06 trial. Median follow-up was 11.4 years (95 % CI 8.6-14.2) and mean dose 71.6 Gy. Of the patients, 82 % had 6 (n = 15) or 5 (n = 16) cycles of cisplatin, 5 and 2 patients received 4 and 3 cycles, respectively. Grade 3 anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia were observed in 15.8, 15.8, and 2.6 %, respectively. Grade 3 mucositis in 50 %, grade 3 and 4 dysphagia in 55 and 13 %. The 2-, 5-, and 10-year LRC was 65, 53.6, and 48.2 %, the MFS was 77.5, 66.7, and 57.2 % and the OS 59.6, 29.2, and 15 %, respectively. Chemoradiation with 5-FU and cisplatin seems feasible and superior in terms of LRC and OS to the ARO 95-06C-HART arm at 2 years. However, this did not persist at the 5- and 10-year follow-ups. (orig.) [German] Untersuchung der Akuttoxizitaet und des Langzeitueberlebens einer hyperfraktioniert-akzelerierten simultanen Radiochemotherapie mit Cisplatin/5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) bei Patienten mit lokal fortgeschrittenen Kopf-Hals-Tumoren. Von 2000 bis 2002 wurden 38 Patienten mit Plattenepithelkarzinomen der Kopf-Hals-Region im Stadium III (5,3 %) und IV (94,7 %) eingeschlossen. Es erfolgte eine simultane hyperfraktionierte akzelerierte Radiochemotherapie mit 72 Gy in 15 Fraktionen a 2 Gy

  2. Hyperfractionated radiotherapy and chemotherapy for childhood ependymoma: final results of the first prospective AIEOP (Associazione Italiana di Ematologia-Oncologia Pediatrica) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimino, Maura; Gandola, Lorenza; Giangaspero, Felice; Sandri, Alessandro; Valagussa, Pinuccia; Perilongo, Giorgio; Garrè, Maria Luisa; Ricardi, Umberto; Forni, Marco; Genitori, Lorenzo; Scarzello, Giovanni; Spreafico, Filippo; Barra, Salvina; Mascarin, Maurizio; Pollo, Bianca; Gardiman, Martina; Cama, Armando; Navarria, Pierina; Brisigotti, Maurizio; Collini, Paola; Balter, Rita; Fidani, Paola; Stefanelli, Maurizio; Burnelli, Roberta; Potepan, Paolo; Podda, Marta; Sotti, Guido; Madon, Enrico

    2004-04-01

    A postsurgical "stage-based" protocol for ependymoma was designed. Children were given: (1) focal hyperfractionated radiotherapy (HFRT) if with no evidence of disease (NED), or (2) 4 courses with VEC followed by HFRT for residual disease (ED). HFRT dose was 70.4 Gy (1.1 Gy/fraction b.i.d.); VEC consisted of VCR 1.5 mg/m2 1/w, VP16 100 mg/m2/day x 3, CTX 3 g/m2 d 1. When feasible, second-look surgery was recommended. Sixty-three consecutive children were enrolled: 46 NED, 17 ED; the tumor was infratentorial in 47 and supratentorial in 16, with spinal metastasis in 1. Of NED patients, 35 of 46 have been treated with HFRT; 8 received conventionally fractionated radiotherapy, and 3 received no treatment. Of the 17 ED patients, 9 received VEC + HFRT; violations due to postsurgical morbidity were as follows: HFRT only (2), conventionally fractionated radiotherapy (3) + VEC (2), and no therapy (1). Objective responses to VEC were seen in 54%; objective responses to RT were seen in 75%. Overall survival and progression-free survival at 5 years for all 63 children were 75% and 56%, respectively; for the NED subgroup, 82% and 65%; and for the ED subgroup, 61% and 35%, respectively. All histologies were centrally reviewed. At multivariate analysis, grading, age, and site proved significant for prognosis. HFRT, despite the high total dose adopted, did not change the prognosis of childhood ependymoma as compared to historical series: New radiotherapeutic approaches are needed to improve local control. Future ependymoma strategies should consider grading when stratifying treatment indications.

  3. Usefulness of two independent histopathological classifications of tumor regression in patients with rectal cancer submitted to hyperfractionated pre-operative radiotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    (L)ukasz Liszka; Ewa Zieli(n)ska-Paj(a)k; Jacek Paj(a)k; Dariusz Go(l)ka; Jacek Starzewski; Zbigniew Lorenc

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To assess the usefulness of two independent histopathological classifications of rectal cancer regression following neo-adjuvant therapy.METHODS: Forty patients at the initial stage cT3NxMO submitted to preoperative radiotherapy (42 Gy during 18 d) and then to radical surgical treatment. The relationship between "T-downstaging" versus regressive changes expressed by tumor regression grade (TRG 1-5)and Nasierowska-Guttmejer classification (NG 1-3) was studied as well as the relationship between TRG and NG versus local tumor stage ypT and lymph nodes status,ypN.RESULTS: Complete regression (ypTO, TRG 1) was found in one patient. "T-downstaging" was observed in 11 (27.5%) patients. There was a weak statistical significance of the relationship between "T-downstaging"and TRG staging and NG stage. Patients with ypT1 were diagnosed as TRG 2-3 while those with ypT3 as TRG5.No lymph node metastases were found in patients with TRG 1-2. None of the patients without lymph node metastases were diagnosed as TRG 5. Patients in the ypT1 stage were NG 1-2. No lymph node metastases were found in NG 1. There was a significant correlation between TRG and NG.CONCLUSION: Histopathological classifications may be useful in the monitoring of the effects of hyperfractionated preoperative radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer at the stage of cT3NxMO. There is no unequivocal relationship between "T-downstaging"and TRG and NG. There is some concordance in the assessment of lymph node status with ypT, TRG and NG.TRG and NG are of limited value for the risk assessment of the lymph node involvement.

  4. Hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost of 70-75 Gy in 5 weeks for advanced head and neck cancer. A phase I dose escalation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cvek, J.; Skacelikova, E.; Otahal, B.; Halamka, M.; Feltl, D. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Oncology; Kubes, J. [University Hospital Bulovka, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Kominek, P. [University Hospital Ostrava (Czech Republic). Dept. of Otolaryngology

    2012-08-15

    Background and purpose: The present study was performed to evaluate the feasibility of a new, 5-week regimen of 70-75 Gy hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy with concomitant integrated boost (HARTCIB) for locally advanced, inoperable head and neck cancer. Methods and materials: A total of 39 patients with very advanced, stage IV nonmetastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (median gross tumor volume 72 ml) were included in this phase I dose escalation study. A total of 50 fractions intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) were administered twice daily over 5 weeks. Prescribed total dose/dose per fraction for planning target volume (PTV{sub tumor}) were 70 Gy in 1.4 Gy fractions, 72.5 Gy in 1.45 Gy fractions, and 75 Gy in 1.5 Gy fractions for 10, 13, and 16 patients, respectively. Uninvolved lymphatic nodes (PTV{sub uninvolved}) were irradiated with 55 Gy in 1.1 Gy fractions using the concomitant integrated boost. Results: Acute toxicity was evaluated according to the RTOG/EORTC scale; the incidence of grade 3 mucositis was 51% in the oral cavity/pharynx and 0% in skin and the recovery time was {<=} 9 weeks for all patients. Late toxicity was evaluated in patients in complete remission according to the RTOG/EORTC scale. No grade 3/4 late toxicity was observed. The 1-year locoregional progression-free survival was 50% and overall survival was 55%. Conclusion: HARTCIB (75 Gy in 5 weeks) is feasible for patients deemed unsuitable for chemoradiation. Acute toxicity was lower than predicted from radiobiological models; duration of dysphagia and confluent mucositis were particularly short. Better conformity of radiotherapy allows the use of more intensive altered fractionation schedules compared with older studies. These results suggest that further dose escalation might be possible when highly conformal techniques (e.g., stereotactic radiotherapy) are used.

  5. Risk–Benefit Analysis of Pediatric-Inspired Versus Hyperfractionated Cyclophosphamide, Vincristine, Doxorubicin, and Dexamethasone Protocols for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adolescents and Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzauskas, Gregory F.; Villa, Kathleen F.; Vanhove, Geertrui F.; Fisher, Vicki L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the risk–benefit trade-off of a pediatric-inspired regimen versus hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone (hyper-CVAD) for first-line treatment of adolescents/young adult (AYA; ages 16–39 years) patients with Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Patient outcomes were simulated using a 6-state Markov model, including complete response (CR), no CR, first relapse, second CR, second relapse, and death. A Weibull distribution was fit to the progression-free survival curve of hyper-CVAD–treated AYA patients from a single-center study, and comparable patient data from a retrospective study of pediatric regimen–treated AYA patients were utilized to estimate a relative progression difference (hazard ratio = 0.51) and model survival differences. Health-state utilities were estimated based on treatment stage, with an assumption that the pediatric protocol had 0.10 disutility compared with hyper-CVAD before the maintenance phase of treatment. Total life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were compared between treatment protocols at 1, 5, and 10 years, with additional probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Results: Treatment with the pediatric-inspired protocol was associated with a 0.04 increase in life-years, but a 0.01 decrease in QALYs at 1 year. By years 5 and 10, the pediatric-inspired protocol resulted in 0.18 and 0.24 increase in life-years and 0.25 and 0.32 increase in QALYs, respectively, relative to hyper-CVAD. The lower quality of life associated with the induction and intensification phases of pediatric treatment was offset by more favorable progression-free survival and overall survival relative to hyper-CVAD. Conclusions: Our exploratory analysis suggests that, compared with hyper-CVAD, pediatric-inspired protocols may increase life-years throughout treatment stages and QALYs in the long term. PMID:27779442

  6. Reliability of a computer and Internet survey (Computer User Profile) used by adults with and without traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilov, Andrea M; Togher, Leanne; Power, Emma

    2015-01-01

    To determine test-re-test reliability of the 'Computer User Profile' (CUP) in people with and without TBI. The CUP was administered on two occasions to people with and without TBI. The CUP investigated the nature and frequency of participants' computer and Internet use. Intra-class correlation coefficients and kappa coefficients were conducted to measure reliability of individual CUP items. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize content of responses. Sixteen adults with TBI and 40 adults without TBI were included in the study. All participants were reliable in reporting demographic information, frequency of social communication and leisure activities and computer/Internet habits and usage. Adults with TBI were reliable in 77% of their responses to survey items. Adults without TBI were reliable in 88% of their responses to survey items. The CUP was practical and valuable in capturing information about social, leisure, communication and computer/Internet habits of people with and without TBI. Adults without TBI scored more items with satisfactory reliability overall in their surveys. Future studies may include larger samples and could also include an exploration of how people with/without TBI use other digital communication technologies. This may provide further information on determining technology readiness for people with TBI in therapy programmes.

  7. ‘Hit & Run' model of closed-skull traumatic brain injury (TBI) reveals complex patterns of post-traumatic AQP4 dysregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Ren, Zeguang; Iliff, Jeffrey J.; Yang, LiJun; Yang, Jiankai; Chen, Xiaolin; Chen, Michael J.; Giese, Rebecca N; Wang, Baozhi; Shi, Xuefang; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a major contributor to morbidity associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The methods involved in most rodent models of TBI, including head fixation, opening of the skull, and prolonged anesthesia, likely alter TBI development and reduce secondary injury. We report the development of a closed-skull model of murine TBI, which minimizes time of anesthesia, allows the monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP), and can be modulated to produce mild and moderate grade TBI. In...

  8. Flavonoid derivative 7,8-DHF attenuates TBI pathology via TrkB activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rahul; Noble, Emily; Tyagi, Ethika; Zhuang, Yumei; Ying, Zhe; Gomez-Pinilla, Fernando

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is followed by a state of metabolic dysfunction, affecting the ability of neurons to use energy and support brain plasticity; there is no effective therapy to counteract the TBI pathology. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has an exceptional capacity to support metabolism and plasticity, which highly contrasts with its poor pharmacological profile. We evaluated the action of a flavonoid derivative 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), a BDNF receptor (TrkB) agonist with the pharmacological profile congruent for potential human therapies. Treatment with 7,8-DHF (5mg/kg, ip, daily for 7 days) was effective to ameliorate the effects of TBI on plasticity markers (CREB phosphorylation, GAP-43 and syntaxin-3 levels) and memory function in Barnes maze test. Treatment with 7,8-DHF restored the decrease in protein and phenotypic expression of TrkB phosphorylation after TBI. In turn, intrahippocampal injections of K252a, a TrkB antagonist, counteracted the 7,8-DHF induced TrkB signaling activation and memory improvement in TBI, suggesting the pivotal role of TrkB signaling in cognitive performance after brain injury. A potential action of 7,8-DHF on cell energy homeostasis was corroborated by the normalization in levels of PGC-1α, TFAM, COII, AMPK and SIRT1 in animals subjected to TBI. Results suggest a potential mechanism by which 7,8-DHF counteracts TBI pathology via activation of the TrkB receptor and engaging the interplay between cell energy management and synaptic plasticity. Since metabolic dysfunction is an important risk factor for the development of neurological and psychiatric disorders, these results set a precedent for the therapeutic use of 7,8-DHF in a larger context.

  9. Acute CSF interleukin-6 trajectories after TBI: associations with neuroinflammation, polytrauma, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, R G; Diamond, M L; Boles, J A; Berger, R P; Tisherman, S A; Kochanek, P M; Wagner, A K

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in a significant inflammatory burden that perpetuates the production of inflammatory mediators and biomarkers. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine known to be elevated after trauma, and a major contributor to the inflammatory response following TBI. Previous studies have investigated associations between IL-6 and outcome following TBI, but to date, studies have been inconsistent in their conclusions. We hypothesized that cohort heterogeneity, temporal inflammatory profiles, and concurrent inflammatory marker associations are critical to characterize when targeting subpopulations for anti-inflammatory therapies. Toward this objective, we used serial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples to generate temporal acute IL-6 trajectory (TRAJ) profiles in a prospective cohort of adults with severe TBI (n=114). We examined the impact of injury type on IL-6 profiles, and how IL-6 profiles impact sub-acute (2weeks-3months) serum inflammatory marker load and long-term global outcome 6-12months post-injury. There were two distinct acute CSF IL-6 profiles, a high and low TRAJ group. Individuals in the high TRAJ had increased odds of unfavorable Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) scores at 6months (adjusted OR=3.436, 95% CI: 1.259, 9.380). Individuals in the high TRAJ also had higher mean acute CSF inflammatory load compared to individuals in the low TRAJ (p⩽0.05). The two groups did not differ with respect acute serum profiles; however, individuals in the high CSF IL-6 TRAJ also had higher mean sub-acute serum IL-1β and IL-6 levels compared with the low TRAJ group (p⩽0.05). Lastly, injury type (isolated TBI vs. TBI+polytrauma) was associated with IL-6 TRAJ group (χ(2)=5.31, p=0.02). Specifically, there was 70% concordance between those with TBI+polytrauma and the low TRAJ; in contrast, isolated TBI was similarly distributed between TRAJ groups. These data provide evidence that sustained, elevated levels of CSF IL-6 are associated

  10. TBI lung dose comparisons using bilateral and anteroposterior delivery techniques and tissue density corrections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Daniel W; Wang, Iris Z; Lakeman, Tara; Hales, Lee D; Singh, Anurag K; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2015-03-08

    This study compares lung dose distributions for two common techniques of total body photon irradiation (TBI) at extended source-to-surface distance calculated with, and without, tissue density correction (TDC). Lung dose correction factors as a function of lateral thorax separation are approximated for bilateral opposed TBI (supine), similar to those published for anteroposterior-posteroanterior (AP-PA) techniques in AAPM Report 17 (i.e., Task Group 29). 3D treatment plans were created retrospectively for 24 patients treated with bilateral TBI, and for whom CT data had been acquired from the head to the lower leg. These plans included bilateral opposed and AP-PA techniques- each with and without - TDC, using source-to-axis distance of 377 cm and largest possible field size. On average, bilateral TBI requires 40% more monitor units than AP-PA TBI due to increased separation (26% more for 23 MV). Calculation of midline thorax dose without TDC leads to dose underestimation of 17% on average (standard deviation, 4%) for bilateral 6 MV TBI, and 11% on average (standard deviation, 3%) for 23 MV. Lung dose correction factors (CF) are calculated as the ratio of midlung dose (with TDC) to midline thorax dose (without TDC). Bilateral CF generally increases with patient separation, though with high variability due to individual uniqueness of anatomy. Bilateral CF are 5% (standard deviation, 4%) higher than the same corrections calculated for AP-PA TBI in the 6 MV case, and 4% higher (standard deviation, 2%) for 23 MV. The maximum lung dose is much higher with bilateral TBI (up to 40% higher than prescribed, depending on patient anatomy) due to the absence of arm tissue blocking the anterior chest. Dose calculations for bilateral TBI without TDC are incorrect by up to 24% in the thorax for 6 MV and up to 16% for 23 MV. Bilateral lung CF may be calculated as 1.05 times the values published in Table 6 of AAPM Report 17, though a larger patient pool is necessary to better

  11. Head Stabilization Measurements As a Potential Evaluation Tool for Comparison of Persons with TBI and Vestibular Dysfunction with Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Persons with TBI and Vestibular Dysfunction with Healty Controls 5a. Contract Number: 5b. Grant Number: R116 5c. Program Element Number: 5d...large percentage of persons with traumatic brain injury ( TBI ) incur some type of vestibular dysfunction requiring vestibular physical therapy. These...the group having a TBI did not show the same patterned motion as the control group but over time and with training, more closely resembled that of the

  12. Adolescent TBI-induced hypopituitarism causes sexual dysfunction in adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Tiffany; Hovda, David A; Prins, Mayumi L

    2015-02-01

    Adolescents are at greatest risk for traumatic brain injury (TBI) and repeat TBI (RTBI). TBI-induced hypopituitarism has been documented in both adults and juveniles and despite the necessity of pituitary function for normal physical and brain development, it is still unrecognized and untreated in adolescents following TBI. TBI induced hormonal dysfunction during a critical developmental window has the potential to cause long-term cognitive and behavioral deficits and the topic currently remains unaddressed. The purpose of this study was to determine if four mild TBIs delivered to adolescent male rats disrupts testosterone production and adult behavioral outcomes. Plasma testosterone was quantified from 72 hrs preinjury to 3 months postinjury and pubertal onset, reproductive organ growth, erectile function and reproductive behaviors were assessed at 1 and 2 months postinjury. RTBI resulted in both acute and chronic decreases in testosterone production and delayed onset of puberty. Significant deficits were observed in reproductive organ growth, erectile function and reproductive behaviors in adult rats at both 1 and 2 months postinjury. These data suggest adolescent RTBI-induced hypopituitarism underlies abnormal behavioral changes observed during adulthood. The impact of undiagnosed hypopituitarism following RTBI in adolescence has significance not only for growth and puberty, but also for brain development and neurobehavioral function as adults.

  13. Challenging the Paradigms of Experimental TBI Models: From Preclinical to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortella, Frank C

    2016-01-01

    Despite prodigious advances in TBI neurobiology research and a broad arsenal of animal models mimicking different aspects of human brain injury, this field has repeatedly experienced collective failures to translate from animals to humans, particularly in the area of therapeutics. This lack of success stems from variability and inconsistent standardization across models and laboratories, as well as insufficient objective and quantifiable diagnostic measures (biomarkers, high-resolution imaging), understanding of the vast clinical heterogeneity, and clinically centered conception of the TBI animal models. Significant progress has been made by establishing well-defined standards for reporting animal studies with "preclinical common data elements" (CDE), and for the reliability and reproducibility in preclinical TBI therapeutic research with the Operation Brain Trauma Therapy (OBTT) consortium. However, to break the chain of failures and achieve a therapeutic breakthrough in TBI will probably require the use of higher species models, specific mechanism-based injury models by which to theranostically targeted treatment portfolios are tested, more creative concepts of therapy intervention including combination therapy and regeneration neurobiology strategies, and the adoption of dosing regimens based upon pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) studies and guided by the injury severity and TBI recovery process.

  14. TBI ADAPTER: traumatic brain injury assessment diagnosis advocacy prevention and treatment from the emergency room--a prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganti, Latha; Daneshvar, Yasamin; Bodhit, Aakash; Ayala, Sarah; Patel, Pratik S; Lottenberg, Lawrence L; York, Donna; Counsell, Colleen; Peters, Keith R

    2015-04-01

    There is no standard treatment algorithm for patients who present to the emergency department (ED) with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). This is in part because of the heterogeneity of the injury pattern and the patient profile, and the lack of evidence-based guidelines, especially for mild TBI in adults. As TBI is seen more and more frequently in the ED, a standardized assessment would be beneficial in terms of efficiency. The authors present their ED approach to mild TBI evaluation in the ED, along with results to date. These data represent a prospective observational cohort study, where each patient provided individual, written informed consent.

  15. Neurotrauma and Repair Research: Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and its Treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algattas, Hanna; Huang, Jason H

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects a growing portion of the population and continues to take national spotlight with advances in imaging technology and understanding of long-term effects. However, there is large variance in TBI treatment protocols due to injury variability and lack of both mechanistic understanding and strong treatment recommendations. Recent practice suggests three disparate treatment approaches, all which aim at promoting neuroprotection after TBI, show promise: immediate hypothermia, hyperbaric oxygen, and progesterone supplementation. The research is controversial at times, yet there are abundant opportunities to develop the technology behind hypothermia and hyperbaric oxygen treatments which would surely aid in aligning the current data. Additionally, while progesterone has already been packaged in nanoparticle form it may benefit from continued formulation and administration research. The treatments and the avenues for improvement are reviewed in the present paper.

  16. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) following traumatic brain injury (TBI): Opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Theresa D; Brenner, Lisa A; Walter, Kristen H; Bormann, Jill E; Johansson, Birgitta

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is highly prevalent and occurs in a variety of populations. Because of the complexity of its sequelae, treatment strategies pose a challenge. Given this complexity, TBI provides a unique target of opportunity for complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) treatments. The present review describes and discusses current opportunitites and challenges associated with CAM research and clinical applications in civilian, veteran and military service populations. In addition to a brief overview of CAM, the translational capacity from basic to clinical research to clinical practice will be described. Finally, a systematic approach to developing an adoptable evidence base, with proof of effectiveness based on the literature will be discussed. Inherent in this discussion will be the methodological and ethical challenges associated with CAM research in those with TBI and associated comorbidities, specifically in terms of how these challenges relate to practice and policy issues, implementation and dissemination. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI:Brain injury and recovery.

  17. Versional eye tracking in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI): effects of oculomotor training (OMT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajan, Preethi; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate a range of objective measures of versional eye movements before and after oculomotor training (OMT) in individuals with mTBI. The results were compared with placebo (P) training. Twelve individuals with mTBI (mean age = 29 ± 3 years) having oculomotor-based near-vision symptoms participated in the study. Versional eye movements were recorded objectively before and after OMT (fixation, predictable saccades, simulated reading) and P training (6 weeks each, two sessions/week, 45 minutes/session). Following OMT, there was a significant (p OMT had a significant, positive effect on most aspects of versional tracking. These findings are suggestive of improved rhythmicity, accuracy and sequencing of saccades following OMT in mTBI as a result of oculomotor learning.

  18. Split Course Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radio-Chemotherapy (SCHARC for patients with advanced head and neck cancer: Influence of protocol deviations and hemoglobin on overall survival, a retrospective analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sprague Lisa D

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advantage of hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy for advanced head and neck cancer has been reported. Furthermore, randomized trials and meta-analyses have confirmed the survival benefit of additional chemotherapy to radiotherapy. We retrospectively analyzed the efficiency and toxicity of the Regensburg standard therapy protocol "SCHARC" and the overall survival of our patients. Methods From 1997 to 2004, 64 patients suffering from advanced head and neck cancer (88 % stage IV, 12 % stage III were assigned to receive the SCHARC protocol. Around half of the patients were diagnosed with oro-hypopharynx carcinoma (52 %, one third with tongue and floor of mouth tumors (29 % and one fifth (19 % suffered from H & N cancer at other sites. The schedule consisted of one therapy block with 30 Gy in 20 fractions over a two week period with concomitant chemotherapy (d 1–5: 20 mg/m2/d DDP + 750–1000 mg/m2/d 5FU (cont. infusion. This therapy block was repeated after a fortnight break up to a cumulative dose of 60 Gy and followed by a boost up to 70 Gy (69–70.5 Gy. All patients assigned to this scheme were included in the survival evaluation. Results Forty patients (63 % received both radiation and chemotherapy according to the protocol. The mean follow up was 2.3 years (829 d and the median follow up was 1.9 years (678 d, respectively. The analysis of survival revealed an estimated 3 year overall survival rate of 57 %. No patient died of complications, 52 patients (80 % had acute grade 2–3 mucositis, and 33 patients (58 % suffered from acute grade 3 skin toxicity. Leucopenia was no major problem (mean nadir 3.4 g/nl, no patient 10.5 g/dl and for patients who completed the protocol. Conclusion The SCHARC protocol was effective in patients diagnosed with advanced head and neck cancer. It led to long-term disease control and survival in about 50 % of the patients with significant but acceptable toxicity. Most patients

  19. Neuropsychological Outcome of Children Treated for Standard Risk Medulloblastoma in the PNET4 European Randomized Controlled Trial of Hyperfractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy and Maintenance Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Câmara-Costa, Hugo, E-mail: hugocamaracosta@gmail.com [National Institute of Health and Medical Research, INSERM U1178, Paris (France); Resch, Anika [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Kieffer, Virginie [Saint Maurice Hospitals, Saint Maurice (France); Lalande, Clémence [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Poggi, Geraldina [Scientific Institute, IRCCS Eugenio Medea, Bosisio Parini, Lecco (Italy); Kennedy, Colin; Bull, Kim [University of Southampton, Faculty of Medicine, Southampton (United Kingdom); Calaminus, Gabriele [Paediatric Oncology, University of Muenster, Muenster (Germany); Grill, Jacques [Institut Gustave Roussy, Villejuif (France); Doz, François [Institut Curie and University Paris Descartes, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris (France); Rutkowski, Stefan [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany); Massimino, Maura [Fondazione IRCCS, Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Milan (Italy); Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter [Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Lannering, Birgitta [Paediatric Oncology, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg (Sweden); Dellatolas, Georges [National Institute of Health and Medical Research, INSERM U1178, Paris (France); Chevignard, Mathilde [Rehabilitation Department for Children With Acquired Neurological Injury, Saint Maurice Hospitals, Saint Maurice, and Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Universités Paris, INSERM CNRS, Paris (France)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: In the European HIT-SIOP PNET4 randomized controlled trial, children with standard risk medulloblastoma were allocated to hyperfractionated radiation therapy (HFRT arm, including a partially focused boost) or standard radiation therapy (STRT arm), followed, in both arms, by maintenance chemotherapy. Event-free survival was similar in both arms. Previous work showed that the HFRT arm was associated with worse growth and better questionnaire-based executive function, especially in children <8 years of age at diagnosis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare performance-based cognitive outcomes between treatment arms. Methods and Materials: Neuropsychological data were collected prospectively in 137 patients. Using the Wechsler Intelligence Scales, Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children, and Raven's Progressive Matrices, we estimated full-scale intelligence quotient (FSIQ) and, when available, verbal IQ (VIQ), performance IQ (PIQ), working memory index (WMI), and processing speed index (PSI). Results: Among the 137 participants (HFRT arm n=71, STRT arm n=66, 63.5% males), mean (±SD) ages at diagnosis and assessment respectively were 9.3 (±3.2) years of age (40.8% < 8 years of age at diagnosis) and 14.6 (±4.3) years of age. Mean (±SD) FSIQ was 88 (±19), and mean intergroup difference was 3.88 (95% confidence interval: −2.66 to 10.42, P=.24). No significant differences were found in children >8 years of age at diagnosis. In children <8 years of age at diagnosis, a marginally significant trend toward higher VIQ was found in those treated in the HFRT arm; a similar trend was found for PSI but not for PIQ, WMI, or FSIQ (mean intergroup differences were: 12.02 for VIQ [95% CI: 2.37-21.67; P=.02]; 3.77 for PIQ [95% CI: −5.19 to 12.74; P>.10]; 5.20 for WMI [95% CI: −2.07 to 12.47; P>.10]; 10.90 for PSI [95% CI: −1.54 to 23.36; P=.08]; and 5.28 for FSIQ [95% CI: −4.23 to 14.79; P>.10]). Conclusions: HFRT was associated with

  20. Statistical machine learning to identify traumatic brain injury (TBI) from structural disconnections of white matter networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Jhimli; Shen, Kai-kai; Ghose, Soumya; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Fripp, Jurgen; Salvado, Olivier; Pannek, Kerstin; Taylor, D Jamie; Mathias, Jane L; Rose, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Identifying diffuse axonal injury (DAI) in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) presenting with normal appearing radiological MRI presents a significant challenge. Neuroimaging methods such as diffusion MRI and probabilistic tractography, which probe the connectivity of neural networks, show significant promise. We present a machine learning approach to classify TBI participants primarily with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) based on altered structural connectivity patterns derived through the network based statistical analysis of structural connectomes generated from TBI and age-matched control groups. In this approach, higher order diffusion models were used to map white matter connections between 116 cortical and subcortical regions. Tracts between these regions were generated using probabilistic tracking and mean fractional anisotropy (FA) measures along these connections were encoded in the connectivity matrices. Network-based statistical analysis of the connectivity matrices was performed to identify the network differences between a representative subset of the two groups. The affected network connections provided the feature vectors for principal component analysis and subsequent classification by random forest. The validity of the approach was tested using data acquired from a total of 179 TBI patients and 146 controls participants. The analysis revealed altered connectivity within a number of intra- and inter-hemispheric white matter pathways associated with DAI, in consensus with existing literature. A mean classification accuracy of 68.16%±1.81% and mean sensitivity of 80.0%±2.36% were achieved in correctly classifying the TBI patients evaluated on the subset of the participants that was not used for the statistical analysis, in a 10-fold cross-validation framework. These results highlight the potential for statistical machine learning approaches applied to structural connectomes to identify patients with diffusive axonal injury.

  1. Retrospective, monocentric analysis of late effects after total body irradiation (TBI) in adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boelling, Tobias [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Paracelsus Clinic Osnabrueck (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy; Kreuziger, David Christoph; Ernst, Iris; Elsayed, Hassan; Willich, Normann [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2011-05-15

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) is a standard treatment modality within the multidisciplinary approach for allogeneous stem cell or bone marrow transplantation. However, surviving patients are at risk for developing a variety of late sequelae. This analysis aimed to retrospectively characterize late effects after TBI in adults treated in a single center. Patients and Methods: Patients {>=} 18 years treated with fractionated TBI (4-12 Gy) between 1996 and 2008 were included in this study. Treatment data were collected retrospectively from the treating departments. Late effects were evaluated using the clinic charts and/or were obtained from the general practitioners using a standardized questionnaire. Analyses were performed by calculation of the cumulative incidences using the Kaplan-Meier method and the log rank test. Results: A total of 308 patients {>=} 18 years were treated including a TBI of whom 78 patients were excluded from further analysis due to death within less than 1 year after TBI. Patients suffered from leukemia in most cases. Late toxicity follow-up was available in 120 patients (mean age 46.1 years; range, 18-70 years) after a mean follow-up of 23 months (range, 12-96 months). The cumulative incidences (CI) at 3 years were 28% for pulmonary event, 8% for pulmonary toxicity, 25% for kidney toxicity, 8% for cataract, 17% for bone toxicity, and 10% for secondary malignancy. The CI of bone toxicity was higher in female than in male patients (p = 0.019). Conclusion: Late effects after TBI in the context of allogeneous stem cell or bone marrow transplantation can frequently be observed. Regular follow-up examinations are advised for the early registration and treatment of adverse effects. (orig.)

  2. 肺癌超分割同步放化疗致急性放射性食管炎的研究%Research on Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy-induced Acute Radiation Esophagitis in Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝柳; 杨春旭; 莫玉珍; 苏毅; 宁四海

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察超分割同步放化疗治疗局部晚期非小细胞肺癌(NSCLC)患者放射性食管炎的发生情况,评价其安全性,探讨超分割放疗导致放射性食管炎损伤的有效预测指标.方法 初治NSCLC 48例,采用超分割同步放化疗24例,放疗剂量:56.0~64.4 Gy/40~46次,1.4 Gy/次,2次/d;常规分割同步放化疗24例,放疗剂量:60.0~66 Gy/30~33次,2.0 Gy/次,1次/d.两组均接受依托泊苷+顺铂(EP)方案同步化疗.采用RTOG标准评价急性放射性食管炎发生情况,分析急性放射性食管炎的相关临床及物理因素.结果 48例患者均完成治疗计划.超分割组≥2级和≥3急性放射性食管炎发生率高于对照组(P<0.05).急性放射性食管炎最早在第10天发生,累计剂量为22.4 Gy,在疗程的第17天后其发生率明显上升.超分割组中食管LETT30、LETT35、V35与≥2级急性放射性食管炎显著相关(P<0.01).结论 超分割同步放化疗治疗NSCLC急性放射性食管炎的发生率及严重程度较常规分割同步放化疗明显增加,并且发生时间早;食管LETT30、LETT35、V35和周累计剂量是预测超分割同步放化疗致急性放射性食管炎的可靠指标.%Objective To observed the incidence of acute radiation esophagitis and analyze the factors as predictors of acute radiotherapy-induced acute radiation esophagitis for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer( LA-NSCLC )patients treated with 3DCRT were reviewed. To analyze the efficacy and safety of hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy for the treatment of lung cancer and assess effective indexes in those patient. Methods Forty eight patients with LA-NSCLC were allocated to treatment group( 24 cases ), treated with hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy.Radiotherapy was delivered at 1. 4 Gy/fraction ,56. 0 - 64. 4 Gy/40 - 45 fractions , twice a day. The control group( 24 cases )treated with conventional fractionation , with delivered at 2 Gy fraction , 60. 0

  3. NIR light propagation in a digital head model for traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Robert; Khan, Bilal; Alexandrakis, George; Florence, James; MacFarlane, Duncan

    2015-09-01

    Near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) is capable of detecting and monitoring acute changes in cerebral blood volume and oxygenation associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Wavelength selection, source-detector separation, optode density, and detector sensitivity are key design parameters that determine the imaging depth, chromophore separability, and, ultimately, clinical usefulness of a NIRS instrument. We present simulation results of NIR light propagation in a digital head model as it relates to the ability to detect intracranial hematomas and monitor the peri-hematomal tissue viability. These results inform NIRS instrument design specific to TBI diagnosis and monitoring.

  4. Targeting Epigenetic Mechanisms in Pain Due to Trauma and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Pain  ( nociceptive ) sensitization was followed using the von Frey method. Those measures were continued until  the resolution of sensitization. We...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0579 TITLE: Targeting Epigenetic Mechanisms in Pain due to Trauma and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE Targeting Epigenetic Mechanisms in Pain due to Trauma and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0579 5c

  5. Neurologic Functional and Quality of Life Outcomes after TBI: Clinic Attendees versus Non-Attendees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Mayur B; Wilson, Laura D; Bregman, Jana A; Leath, Taylor C; Humble, Stephen S; Davidson, Mario A; de Riesthal, Michael R; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2015-07-01

    This investigation describes the relationship between TBI patient demographics, quality of life outcome, and functional status outcome among clinic attendees and non-attendees. Of adult TBI survivors with intracranial hemorrhage, 63 attended our TBI clinic and 167 did not attend. All were telephone surveyed using the Extended-Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE), the Quality of Life after Brain Injury (QOLIBRI) scale, and a post-discharge therapy questionnaire. To determine risk factors for GOSE and QOLIBRI outcomes, we created multivariable regression models employing covariates of age, injury characteristics, clinic attendance, insurance status, post-discharge rehabilitation, and time from injury. Compared with those with severe TBI, higher GOSE scores were identified in individuals with both mild (odds ratio [OR]=2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.1-3.6) and moderate (OR=4.7; 95% CI: 1.6-14.1) TBIs. In addition, survivors with private insurance had higher GOSE scores, compared with those with public insurance (OR=2.0; 95% CI: 1.1-3.6), workers' compensation (OR=8.4; 95% CI: 2.6-26.9), and no insurance (OR=3.1; 95% CI: 1.6-6.2). Compared with those with severe TBI, QOLIBRI scores were 11.7 points (95% CI: 3.7-19.7) higher in survivors with mild TBI and 17.3 points (95% CI: 3.2-31.5) higher in survivors with moderate TBI. In addition, survivors who received post-discharge rehabilitation had higher QOLIBRI scores by 11.4 points (95% CI: 3.7-19.1) than those who did not. Survivors with private insurance had QOLIBRI scores that were 25.5 points higher (95% CI: 11.3-39.7) than those with workers' compensation and 16.8 points higher (95% CI: 7.4-26.2) than those without insurance. Because neurologic injury severity, insurance status, and receipt of rehabilitation or therapy are independent risk factors for functional and quality of life outcomes, future directions will include improving earlier access to post-TBI rehabilitation, social work services, affordable insurance

  6. The effect of moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) on different aspects of memory: a selective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, Eli

    2005-11-01

    Deficient learning and memory are frequently reported as a consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Because of the diffuse nature of the injury, patients with TBI are not the ideal group for studying brain-behavior relations. Nevertheless, characterization of the memory breakdown following TBI could contribute to the assessment and rehabilitation of this patient population. It is well documented that memory is not a unitary system. Accordingly, in this article I review studies that have investigated the long-term effect of moderate to severe TBI on different memory aspects, including explicit and implicit tests of memory. This review demonstrates that TBI affects a large range of memory aspects. One of the conclusions is that the memory impairment observed in TBI patients could be viewed, at least to some degree, as a consequence of a more general cognitive deficit. Thus, unlike patients suffering from global amnesia, memory in patients with TBI is not selectively impaired. Nevertheless, it is possible to detect a subgroup of patients that do meet the criteria of amnesia. However, the most common vulnerable memory processes following TBI very much resemble the memory deficits reported in patients following frontal lobe damage, e.g., difficulties in applying active or effortful strategy in the learning or retrieval process. The suggested similarity between patients with TBI and those suffering from frontal lobe injury should be viewed cautiously; considering the nature of TBI, patients suffering from such injuries are not a homogeneous group. In view of this limitation, the future challenge in this field will be to identify subgroups of patients, either a priori according to a range of factors such as severity of injury, or a posteriori based on their specific memory deficit characteristics. Such a research approach has the potential of explaining much of the variability in findings reported in the literature on the effect of TBI on memory.

  7. Effect of c-mpl ligands after total body irradiation (TBI) with and without allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: low-dose TBI does not prevent sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Richard A; Takatu, Alessandra; Feng, Ziding; Slichter, Sherrill; Abrams, Kraig; Espino, German; Gass, M John; Georges, George E; McSweeney, Peter A; Shulman, Howard M; Storb, Rainer

    2002-01-01

    This study investigates the potential role of the recombinant c-mpl ligands (recombinant human thrombopoietin [rhTPO] and pegylated recombinant human megakaryocyte growth and development factor [PEG-rhMGDF]) on the recovery of platelet counts after TBI with and without allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in an established canine model. Initially, 3 cohorts, each with 2 nonirradiated dogs, received increasing doses of rhTPO (5 microg/kg per day; 10 microg/kg per day; 20 microg/kg per day) for 7 days to determine the optimal dose. The dose of 10 microg/kg per day of rhTPO was selected for subsequent studies. Ten dogs then received either rhTPO or placebo for 28 days after 200 cGy TBI without HSCT. The rhTPO group had fewer days with platelet counts RhTPO-specific antibodies developed in 2 dogs, which caused a significant but transient decrease of the platelet counts. Retreatment of these sensitized dogs with rhTPO resulted in profound transient decreases in platelet counts. In the next study, 20 dogs received either PEG-rhMGDF or placebo for 21 days after 920 cGy TBI and allogeneic HSCT. The median time to platelet recovery (>20,000/microL) for the PEG-rhMGDF group (n = 10) was 14.0 days compared to 15.5 days for the control group (n = 10; log rank, P = .35). There were no significant differences in the total time to platelet counts 500/microL. The effects of rhTPO on recovery of platelet and granulocyte counts after sublethal TBI were modest, and no effects of PEG-rhMGDF were observed on hematopoietic recovery after high-dose TBI and allogeneic HSCT. The significant effect that rhTPO-specific antibodies had on the platelet counts may limit the clinical role of recombinant c-mpl ligands unless sensitization can be prevented.

  8. Reliability of the NINDS common data elements cranial tomography (CT) rating variables for traumatic brain injury (TBI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harburg, Leah; McCormack, Erin; Kenney, Kimbra; Moore, Carol; Yang, Kelly; Vos, Pieter; Jacobs, Bram; Madden, Christopher J; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Bogoslovsky, Tanya

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Non-contrast head computer tomography (CT) is widely used to evaluate eligibility of patients after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) for clinical trials. The NINDS Common Data Elements (CDEs) TBI were developed to standardize collection of CT variables. The objectives of this study wer

  9. Health-related quality of life after TBI: a systematic review of study design, instruments, measurement properties, and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polinder, Suzanne; Haagsma, Juanita A; van Klaveren, David; Steyerberg, Ewout W; van Beeck, Ed F

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of health-related quality of life (HRQL) is essential to quantify the subjective burden of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in survivors. We performed a systematic review of HRQL studies in TBI to evaluate study design, instruments used, methodological quality, and outcome. Fifty-eight studies were included, showing large variation in HRQL instruments and assessment time points used. The Short Form-36 (SF-36) was most frequently used. A high prevalence of health problems during and after the first year of TBI was a common finding of the studies included. In the long term, patients with a TBI still showed large deficits from full recovery compared to population norms. Positive results for internal consistency and interpretability of the SF-36 were reported in validity studies. The Quality of Life after Brain Injury instrument (QOLIBRI), European Brain Injury Questionnaire (EBIQ), Child Health Questionnaire (CHQ), and the World Health Organization Quality of Life short version (WHOQOL-BREF) showed positive results, but evidence was limited. Meta-analysis of SF-36 showed that TBI outcome is heterogeneous, encompassing a broad spectrum of HRQL, with most problems reported in the physical, emotional, and social functioning domain. The use of SF-36 in combination with a TBI-specific instrument, i.e., QOLIBRI, seems promising. Consensus on preferred methodologies of HRQL measurement in TBI would facilitate comparability across studies, resulting in improved insights in recovery patterns and better estimates of the burden of TBI.

  10. Reliability of the NINDS common data elements cranial tomography (CT) rating variables for traumatic brain injury (TBI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harburg, Leah; McCormack, Erin; Kenney, Kimbra; Moore, Carol; Yang, Kelly; Vos, Pieter; Jacobs, Bram; Madden, Christopher J; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon R; Bogoslovsky, Tanya

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-contrast head computer tomography (CT) is widely used to evaluate eligibility of patients after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) for clinical trials. The NINDS Common Data Elements (CDEs) TBI were developed to standardize collection of CT variables. The objectives of this study

  11. Chapter 1 Common Data Elements and Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research Informatics System for TBI Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Hilaire J; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2015-01-01

    Despite increased attention to traumatic brain injury (TBI), there remains no specific treatment and available interventions focus rather on the prevention of secondary injury. One of the reasons posited for the lack of a successful therapy is the amalgamation of various types of injuries under the same severity category in clinical trials. Informatics approaches have been suggested as a means to develop an improved classification system for TBI. As a result of federal interagency efforts, common data elements (CDEs) for TBI have now been developed. Further, the Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research Informatics System (FITBIR) has been created and is now available for TBI researchers to both add and retrieve data. This chapter will discuss the goals, development, and evolution of the CDEs and FITBIR and discuss how these tools can be used to support TBI research. A specific exemplar using the CDEs and lessons learned from working with the CDEs and FITBIR are included to aid future researchers.

  12. The consequence of spatial visual processing dysfunction caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, William V; Capo-Aponte, Jose E; Padula, William V; Singman, Eric L; Jenness, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    A bi-modal visual processing model is supported by research to affect dysfunction following a traumatic brain injury (TBI). TBI causes dysfunction of visual processing affecting binocularity, spatial orientation, posture and balance. Research demonstrates that prescription of prisms influence the plasticity between spatial visual processing and motor-sensory systems improving visual processing and reducing symptoms following a TBI. The rationale demonstrates that visual processing underlies the functional aspects of binocularity, balance and posture. The bi-modal visual process maintains plasticity for efficiency. Compromise causes Post Trauma Vision Syndrome (PTVS) and Visual Midline Shift Syndrome (VMSS). Rehabilitation through use of lenses, prisms and sectoral occlusion has inter-professional implications in rehabilitation affecting the plasticity of the bi-modal visual process, thereby improving binocularity, spatial orientation, posture and balance Main outcomes: This review provides an opportunity to create a new perspective of the consequences of TBI on visual processing and the symptoms that are often caused by trauma. It also serves to provide a perspective of visual processing dysfunction that has potential for developing new approaches of rehabilitation. Understanding vision as a bi-modal process facilitates a new perspective of visual processing and the potentials for rehabilitation following a concussion, brain injury or other neurological events.

  13. Patient Characterization Protocols for Psychophysiological Studies of Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-TBI Psychiatric Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Paul E; Rosenberg, Brenna M; Keyser, David O; Nathan, Dominic; Toruno, Kevin M; Cellucci, Christopher J; Albano, Alfonso M; Wylie, Scott A; Gibson, Douglas; Gilpin, Adele M K; Bashore, Theodore R

    2013-01-01

    Psychophysiological investigations of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are being conducted for several reasons, including the objective of learning more about the underlying physiological mechanisms of the pathological processes that can be initiated by a head injury. Additional goals include the development of objective physiologically based measures that can be used to monitor the response to treatment and to identify minimally symptomatic individuals who are at risk of delayed-onset neuropsychiatric disorders following injury. Research programs studying TBI search for relationships between psychophysiological measures, particularly ERP (event-related potential) component properties (e.g., timing, amplitude, scalp distribution), and a participant's clinical condition. Moreover, the complex relationships between brain injury and psychiatric disorders are receiving increased research attention, and ERP technologies are making contributions to this effort. This review has two objectives supporting such research efforts. The first is to review evidence indicating that TBI is a significant risk factor for post-injury neuropsychiatric disorders. The second objective is to introduce ERP researchers who are not familiar with neuropsychiatric assessment to the instruments that are available for characterizing TBI, post-concussion syndrome, and psychiatric disorders. Specific recommendations within this very large literature are made. We have proceeded on the assumption that, as is typically the case in an ERP laboratory, the investigators are not clinically qualified and that they will not have access to participant medical records.

  14. Microglia in the TBI brain: The good, the bad, and the dysregulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loane, David J; Kumar, Alok

    2016-01-01

    As the major cellular component of the innate immune system in the central nervous system (CNS) and the first line of defense whenever injury or disease occurs, microglia play a critical role in neuroinflammation following a traumatic brain injury (TBI). In the injured brain microglia can produce neuroprotective factors, clear cellular debris and orchestrate neurorestorative processes that are beneficial for neurological recovery after TBI. However, microglia can also become dysregulated and can produce high levels of pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic mediators that hinder CNS repair and contribute to neuronal dysfunction and cell death. The dual role of microglial activation in promoting beneficial and detrimental effects on neurons may be accounted for by their polarization state and functional responses after injury. In this review article we discuss emerging research on microglial activation phenotypes in the context of acute brain injury, and the potential role of microglia in phenotype-specific neurorestorative processes such as neurogenesis, angiogenesis, oligodendrogenesis and regeneration. We also describe some of the known molecular mechanisms that regulate phenotype switching, and highlight new therapeutic approaches that alter microglial activation state balance to enhance long-term functional recovery after TBI. An improved understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that control microglial phenotypic shifts may advance our knowledge of post-injury recovery and repair, and provide opportunities for the development of novel therapeutic strategies for TBI.

  15. Role of APOE Isforms in the Pathogenesis of TBI Induced Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    the inheritance of APOe4 is the only proven genetic risk factor for sporadic Alzheimer disease (AD). Importantly, TBI is a risk factor for the...mediated through ABCA1. 2 Keywords Traumatic brain injury, APOE isoforms, ABCA1, Alzheimer disease, APPmice, amyloid beta, axonal injury, inflamma

  16. A simplified technique for delivering total body irradiation (TBI) with improved dose homogeneity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Rui; Bernard, Damian; Turian, Julius; Abrams, Ross A.; Sensakovic, William; Fung, Henry C.; Chu, James C. H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, 500 South Paulina Street, Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States); Sections of Hematology and Stem Cell Transplantation, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, 500 South Paulina Street, Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, 500 South Paulina Street, Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States)

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) with megavoltage photon beams has been accepted as an important component of management for a number of hematologic malignancies, generally as part of bone marrow conditioning regimens. The purpose of this paper is to present and discuss the authors' TBI technique, which both simplifies the treatment process and improves the treatment quality. Methods: An AP/PA TBI treatment technique to produce uniform dose distributions using sequential collimator reductions during each fraction was implemented, and a sample calculation worksheet is presented. Using this methodology, the dosimetric characteristics of both 6 and 18 MV photon beams, including lung dose under cerrobend blocks was investigated. A method of estimating midplane lung doses based on measured entrance and exit doses was proposed, and the estimated results were compared with measurements. Results: Whole body midplane dose uniformity of {+-}10% was achieved with no more than two collimator-based beam modulations. The proposed model predicted midplane lung doses 5% to 10% higher than the measured doses for 6 and 18 MV beams. The estimated total midplane doses were within {+-}5% of the prescribed midplane dose on average except for the lungs where the doses were 6% to 10% lower than the prescribed dose on average. Conclusions: The proposed TBI technique can achieve dose uniformity within {+-}10%. This technique is easy to implement and does not require complicated dosimetry and/or compensators.

  17. Physics of shock tube simulated IED blast for mTBI research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mediavilla Varas, J.; Philippens, M.M.G.M.; Meijer, S.R.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research is to understand the blast propagation into the human skull and brain causing mTBI and use this knowledge for enabling design of effective protection measures against them. A shock tube including sensor system was optimized to simulate realistic IED blast profiles obta

  18. Linac-based total body irradiation (TBI) with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, B.; Durmus, I. F.; Okumus, A.; Uzel, O. E.

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate dose distribution of Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning tecnique using Versa HD® lineer accelerator to deliver Total Body Irradiation (TBI) on the coach. Eight TBI patient's Treatment Planning System (TPS) were performed with dual arc VMAT for each patient. The VMAT-TBI consisted of three isocentres and three dual overlapping arcs. The prescribed dose was 12 Gy. Mean dose to lung and kidney were restricted less than 10 Gy and max. dose to lens were restricted less than 6 Gy. The plans were verified using 2D array and ion chamber. The comparison between calculation and measurement were made by γ-index analysis and absolute dose. An average total delivery time was determined 923±34 seconds and an average MU was determined 2614±228 MUs for dual arc VMAT. Mean dose to lungs was 9.7±0.2 Gy, mean dose to kidneys was 8.8±0.3 Gy, max. dose to lens was 5.5±0.3 Gy and max. dose was 14.6±0.3 Gy, HI of PTV was 1.13±0.2, mean dose to PTV was 12.6±1.5 Gy and mean γ-index pass rate was %97.1±1.9. The results show that the tecnique for TBI using VMAT on the treatment coach is feasible.

  19. Altered Effective Connectivity of Hippocampus-Dependent Episodic Memory Network in mTBI Survivors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are generally recognized to affect episodic memory. However, less is known regarding how external force altered the way functionally connected brain structures of the episodic memory system interact. To address this issue, we adopted an effective connectivity based analysis, namely, multivariate Granger causality approach, to explore causal interactions within the brain network of interest. Results presented that TBI induced increased bilateral and decreased ipsilateral effective connectivity in the episodic memory network in comparison with that of normal controls. Moreover, the left anterior superior temporal gyrus (aSTG, the concept forming hub), left hippocampus (the personal experience binding hub), and left parahippocampal gyrus (the contextual association hub) were no longer network hubs in TBI survivors, who compensated for hippocampal deficits by relying more on the right hippocampus (underlying perceptual memory) and the right medial frontal gyrus (MeFG) in the anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC). We postulated that the overrecruitment of the right anterior PFC caused dysfunction of the strategic component of episodic memory, which caused deteriorating episodic memory in mTBI survivors. Our findings also suggested that the pattern of brain network changes in TBI survivors presented similar functional consequences to normal aging. PMID:28074162

  20. Altered Effective Connectivity of Hippocampus-Dependent Episodic Memory Network in mTBI Survivors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injuries (TBIs are generally recognized to affect episodic memory. However, less is known regarding how external force altered the way functionally connected brain structures of the episodic memory system interact. To address this issue, we adopted an effective connectivity based analysis, namely, multivariate Granger causality approach, to explore causal interactions within the brain network of interest. Results presented that TBI induced increased bilateral and decreased ipsilateral effective connectivity in the episodic memory network in comparison with that of normal controls. Moreover, the left anterior superior temporal gyrus (aSTG, the concept forming hub, left hippocampus (the personal experience binding hub, and left parahippocampal gyrus (the contextual association hub were no longer network hubs in TBI survivors, who compensated for hippocampal deficits by relying more on the right hippocampus (underlying perceptual memory and the right medial frontal gyrus (MeFG in the anterior prefrontal cortex (PFC. We postulated that the overrecruitment of the right anterior PFC caused dysfunction of the strategic component of episodic memory, which caused deteriorating episodic memory in mTBI survivors. Our findings also suggested that the pattern of brain network changes in TBI survivors presented similar functional consequences to normal aging.

  1. Using pattern analysis matching to differentiate TBI and PTSD in a military sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, John E; Miller, Ronald M; Tuita, Alexa R R

    2014-01-01

    Distinguishing between traumatic brain injury (TBI) residuals and the effects of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) during neuropsychological evaluation can be difficult because of significant overlap of symptom presentation. Using a standardized battery of tests, an artificial neural network was used to create an algorithm to perform pattern analysis matching (PAM) functions that can be used to assist with diagnosis. PAM analyzes a patient's neuropsychological data and provides a best fit classification, according to one of four groups: TBI, PTSD, malingering/invalid data, or "other" (depressed/anxious/postconcussion syndrome/normal). The original PAM was modeled on civilian data; the current study was undertaken using a database of 100 active-duty army service personnel who were referred for neuropsychological assessment in a military TBI clinic. The PAM classifications showed 90% overall accuracy when compared with clinicians' diagnoses. The PAM function is able to classify detailed neuropsychological profiles from a military population with a high degree of accuracy and is able to distinguish between TBI, PTSD, malingering/invalid data, or "other." PAM is a useful tool to help with clinical decision-making.

  2. Physics of shock tube simulated IED blast for mTBI research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mediavilla Varas, J.; Philippens, M.M.G.M.; Meijer, S.R.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this research is to understand the blast propagation into the human skull and brain causing mTBI and use this knowledge for enabling design of effective protection measures against them. A shock tube including sensor system was optimized to simulate realistic IED blast profiles

  3. TBI server: a web server for predicting ion effects in RNA folding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhong Zhu

    Full Text Available Metal ions play a critical role in the stabilization of RNA structures. Therefore, accurate prediction of the ion effects in RNA folding can have a far-reaching impact on our understanding of RNA structure and function. Multivalent ions, especially Mg²⁺, are essential for RNA tertiary structure formation. These ions can possibly become strongly correlated in the close vicinity of RNA surface. Most of the currently available software packages, which have widespread success in predicting ion effects in biomolecular systems, however, do not explicitly account for the ion correlation effect. Therefore, it is important to develop a software package/web server for the prediction of ion electrostatics in RNA folding by including ion correlation effects.The TBI web server http://rna.physics.missouri.edu/tbi_index.html provides predictions for the total electrostatic free energy, the different free energy components, and the mean number and the most probable distributions of the bound ions. A novel feature of the TBI server is its ability to account for ion correlation and ion distribution fluctuation effects.By accounting for the ion correlation and fluctuation effects, the TBI server is a unique online tool for computing ion-mediated electrostatic properties for given RNA structures. The results can provide important data for in-depth analysis for ion effects in RNA folding including the ion-dependence of folding stability, ion uptake in the folding process, and the interplay between the different energetic components.

  4. Cognitive ability predicts motor learning on a virtual reality game in patients with TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neil, Rochelle L; Skeel, Reid L; Ustinova, Ksenia I

    2013-01-01

    Virtual reality games and simulations have been utilized successfully for motor rehabilitation of individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Little is known, however, how TBI-related cognitive decline affects learning of motor tasks in virtual environments. To fill this gap, we examined learning within a virtual reality game involving various reaching motions in 14 patients with TBI and 15 healthy individuals with different cognitive abilities. All participants practiced ten 90-second gaming trials to assess various aspects of motor learning. Cognitive abilities were assessed with a battery of tests including measures of memory, executive functioning, and visuospatial ability. Overall, participants with TBI showed both reduced performance and a slower learning rate in the virtual reality game compared to healthy individuals. Numerous correlations between overall performance and several of the cognitive ability domains were revealed for both the patient and control groups, with the best predictor being overall cognitive ability. The results may provide a starting point for rehabilitation programs regarding which cognitive domains interact with motor learning.

  5. Rapidly alternating combination of cisplatin-based chemotherapy and hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in split course for Stage IIIA and Stage IIIB non-small cell lung cancer: results of a Phase I-II study by the GOTHA group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberto, P.; Mermillod, B. [Hopital Cantonal Geneve, Geneva (Switzerland); Mirimanoff, R.O.; Leyvraz, S.; Nagy-Mignotte, H.; Bolla, M.; Wellmann, D.; Moro, D.; Brambilla, E. [Hopital Cantonal Universitaire, Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1995-08-01

    The prognosis of stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) can be improved by a combination of radiotherapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). In this study, the GOTHA group evaluated the feasibility, tolerance, tumour response, pattern of failure and effect on survival of a combination alternating accelerated hyperfractionated (AH) RT and CT in patients with tumour stage III NSCLC. Toxic effects were leucopenia, nausea and vomiting, mucositis, diarrhoea, alopecia and peripheral neuropathy. Alternating CT and AHRT, as used in this study, were well tolerated and allowed full dose delivery within less than 12 weeks. Initial response was not predictive of survival. The survival curve is encouraging and the 5 year survival is superior to the 5% generally observed with conventionally fractionated radiotherapy. (author).

  6. Neuronal damage and functional deficits are ameliorated by inhibition of aquaporin and HIF1α after traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenaq, Mohammed; Kassem, Hassan; Peng, Changya; Schafer, Steven; Ding, Jamie Y; Fredrickson, Vance; Guthikonda, Murali; Kreipke, Christian W; Rafols, José A; Ding, Yuchuan

    2012-12-15

    The present study, using a rodent model of closed-head diffuse traumatic brain injury (TBI), investigated the role of dysregulated aquaporins (AQP) 4 and 9, as well as hypoxia inducible factor -1α(HIF-1α) on brain edema formation, neuronal injury, and functional deficits. TBI was induced in adult (400-425 g), male Sprague-Dawley rats using a modified Marmarou's head impact-acceleration device (450 g weight dropped from 2m height). Animals in each treatment group were administered intravenous anti-AQP4 or -AQP9 antibodies or 2-Methoxyestradiol (2ME2, an inhibitor of HIF-1α) 30 min after injury. At 24h post-TBI, animals (n=6 each group) were sacrificed to examine the extent of brain edema by water content, as well as protein expression of AQP and HIF-1α by Western immune-blotting. At 48-hours post-TBI, neuronal injury (n=8 each group) was assessed by FluoroJade (FJ) histochemistry. Spatial learning and memory deficits were evaluated by radial arm maze (n=8 each group) up to 21 days post-TBI. Compared to non-injured controls, significant (pTBI was associated with increases (p TBI animals, AQP or HIF-1α inhibition significantly (pTBI. Taken together, the present data supports a causal relation between HIF-AQP mediated cerebral edema, secondary neuronal injury, and tertiary behavioral deficits post-TBI. The data further suggests that upstream modulation of the molecular patho-trajectory effectively ameliorates both neuronal injury and behavioral deficits post-TBI.

  7. Symptomatology and functional outcome in mild traumatic brain injury: results from the prospective TRACK-TBI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Paul; Hricik, Allison; Yue, John K; Puccio, Ava M; Inoue, Tomoo; Lingsma, Hester F; Beers, Sue R; Gordon, Wayne A; Valadka, Alex B; Manley, Geoffrey T; Okonkwo, David O

    2014-01-01

    Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI), or concussion, is a major public health concern. There is controversy in the literature regarding the true incidence of postconcussion syndrome (PCS), with the constellation of physical, cognitive, emotional, and sleep symptoms after mTBI. In the current study, we report on the incidence and evolution of PCS symptoms and patient outcomes after mTBI at 3, 6, and 12 months in a large, prospective cohort of mTBI patients. Participants were identified as part of the prospective, multi-center Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Study. The study population was mTBI patients (Glasgow Coma Scale score of 13-15) presenting to the emergency department, including patients with a negative head computed tomography discharged to home without admission to hospital; 375 mTBI subjects were included in the analysis. At both 6 and 12 months after mTBI, 82% (n=250 of 305 and n=163 of 199, respectively) of patients reported at least one PCS symptom. Further, 44.5 and 40.3% of patients had significantly reduced Satisfaction With Life scores at 6 and 12 months, respectively. At 3 months after injury, 33% of the mTBI subjects were functionally impaired (Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended score ≤6); 22.4% of the mTBI subjects available for follow-up were still below full functional status at 1 year after injury. The term "mild" continues to be a misnomer for this patient population and underscores the critical need for evolving classification strategies for TBI for targeted therapy.

  8. Aggressive simultaneous radiochemotherapy with cisplatin and paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy in locally advanced head and neck tumors. Results of a phase I-II trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhnt, T.; Pigorsch, S.; Pelz, T.; Haensgen, G.; Dunst, J. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Becker, A. [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Dept. of Radiotherapy, Municipial Hospital, Dessau (Germany); Bloching, M.; Passmann, M. [Dept. of Head and Neck Surgery, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Lotterer, E. [Dept. of Internal Medicine I, Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2003-10-01

    We have tested a very aggressive combination protocol with cisplatin and escalated paclitaxel in combination with accelerated hyperfractionated radiotherapy to assess the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), overall toxicity, and response rate. Patients and Methods: The trial recruited 24 patients (21 males, three females, mean age 57 years) treated at our department from 1998 through 2001. Irradiation was administered in daily doses of 2 Gy up to 30 Gy followed by 1.4 Gy twice daily up to 70.6 Gy to the primary tumor and involved nodes and 51 Gy to the clinically negative regional nodes. The chemotherapy schedule included cisplatin in a fixed dose of 20 mg/m{sup 2} on days 1-5 and 29-33 and paclitaxel at increasing dose levels of 20, 25, 30 mg/m{sup 2} twice weekly over the whole treatment time. Patients were recruited in cohorts of three to six, and the MTD was reached if two out of six patients in one cohort developed DLT. DLT was defined as any grade 4 toxicity or any grade 3 toxicity requiring treatment interruption or unplanned hospitalization or any grade 3 neurotoxicity. We recruited mainly patients with large tumors for this protocol; all patients were stage IV, and the mean tumor volume (primary + metastases) amounted to 72 {+-} 61 cm{sup 3}. The mean follow-up was 30 months (range 4-39 months). Results: One early death (peritonitis and sepsis a t day 10) occurred, and 23 patients were evaluable for acute toxicity and response. The MTD of paclitaxel was reached at the third dose level (30 mg/m{sup 2} paclitaxel twice weekly). The DLT was severe mucositis grade 3 (n = 1) and skin erythema grade 4 (n = 2). After determining the MTD, another 14 patients were treated at the recommended dose level of paclitaxel with 25 mg/m{sup 2} twice weekly. In summary, 13/23 patients (57%) developed grade 3 and 10/23 (43%) grade 2 mucositis. Two patients (9%) had grade 4, five (22%) grade 3, and 16 (69%) grade 2 dermatitis. One patient died at day 30

  9. Greater neurobehavioral deficits occur in adult mice after repeated, as compared to single, mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Jessica N; Deshane, Alok S; Niedzielko, Tracy L; Smith, Cory D; Floyd, Candace L

    2016-02-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) accounts for the majority of all brain injuries and affected individuals typically experience some extent of cognitive and/or neuropsychiatric deficits. Given that repeated mTBIs often result in worsened prognosis, the cumulative effect of repeated mTBIs is an area of clinical concern and on-going pre-clinical research. Animal models are critical in elucidating the underlying mechanisms of single and repeated mTBI-associated deficits, but the neurobehavioral sequelae produced by these models have not been well characterized. Thus, we sought to evaluate the behavioral changes incurred after single and repeated mTBIs in mice utilizing a modified impact-acceleration model. Mice in the mTBI group received 1 impact while the repeated mTBI group received 3 impacts with an inter-injury interval of 24h. Classic behavior evaluations included the Morris water maze (MWM) to assess learning and memory, elevated plus maze (EPM) for anxiety, and forced swim test (FST) for depression/helplessness. Additionally, species-typical behaviors were evaluated with the marble-burying and nestlet shredding tests to determine motivation and apathy. Non-invasive vibration platforms were used to examine sleep patterns post-mTBI. We found that the repeated mTBI mice demonstrated deficits in MWM testing and poorer performance on species-typical behaviors. While neither single nor repeated mTBI affected behavior in the EPM or FST, sleep disturbances were observed after both single and repeated mTBI. Here, we conclude that behavioral alterations shown after repeated mTBI resemble several of the deficits or disturbances reported by patients, thus demonstrating the relevance of this murine model to study repeated mTBIs.

  10. Robust training attenuates TBI-induced deficits in reference and working memory on the radial 8-arm maze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica eSebastian

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Globally, it is estimated that nearly 10 million people sustain severe brain injuries leading to hospitalization and/or death every year. Amongst survivors, traumatic brain injury (TBI results in a wide variety of physical, emotional and cognitive deficits. The most common cognitive deficit associated with TBI is memory loss, involving impairments in spatial reference and working memory. However, the majority of research thus far has characterized the deficits associated with TBI on either reference or working memory systems separately, without investigating how they interact within in a single task. Thus we examined the effects of TBI on short-term working and long-term reference memory using the radial 8-arm maze (RAM with a sequence of 4 baited and 4 unbaited arms. Subjects were given 10 daily trials for 6 days followed by a memory retrieval test two weeks after training. Multiple training trials not only provide robust training, but also test the subjects’ ability to frequently update short-term memory while learning the reference rules of the task. Our results show that TBI significantly impaired short-term working memory function on previously acquired spatial information but has little effect on long-term reference memory. Additionally, TBI significantly increased working memory errors during acquisition and reference memory errors during retention testing two weeks later. With a longer recovery period after TBI, the robust RAM training mitigated the reference memory deficit in retention but not the short-term working memory deficit during acquisition. These results identify the resiliency and vulnerabilities of short-term working and long-term reference memory to TBI in the context of robust training. The data highlight the role of cognitive training and other behavioral remediation strategies implicated in attenuating deficits associated with TBI.

  11. Fracture of a HTR-PMI cranioplastic implant after severe TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López González, Antonio; Pérez Borredá, Pedro; Conde Sardón, Rebeca

    2015-02-01

    A 13-year-old girl with a large left fronto-parietal hard-tissue replacement patient-matched implant (HTR®-PMI) cranioplasty-since she suffered from a traumatic brain injury (TBI) 6 years ago-had a new severe TBI that detached and fractured the implant as well as caused a left subdural hematoma and a large frontal contusion. The hematoma and contusion were removed and the implant was substituted by a provisional titanium mesh. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case reported about an HTR®-PMI fracture. It is theorized that the bone ingrowth into the macroporous implants, like those of hydroxyapatite, gives strength and resistance to the implant. But in the case we describe, no macroscopic bone ingrowth was detected 6 years after implantation and the traumatic force that impacted over the cranioplasty exceeded its properties.

  12. The ESPARR cohort: the future of the serious injured aged 16 years and over (MAIS3=) with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) three years after the crash.

    OpenAIRE

    Tournier, Charlène; CHARNAY, Pierrette; LUAUTE, Jacques; Hours, Martine

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Few longitudinal studies investigated the long-term future of road accident victims. The ESPARR cohort has been followed for five years after the crash occurred. Objective To study the future of serious injured with TBI three years after their road accident. Methods The ESPARR cohort comprises 324 serious injured including 72 mild TBI (AIS2) and 70 moderate/severe TBI (AIS3+). 51 TBI2 and 49 TBI3+ responded to the questionnaire at three years. They are compared to 131 serious in...

  13. Development of Posiphen, an Inhibitor of Phosphorylated Tau Expression, as a Treatment of TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    cognitive deficits in the Y maze alternation, the novel object recognition task and the Morris water maze. A 4 weeks treatment with Posiphen (2.5, 5, and...Posiphen mitigated neurodegenerative consequences of mild TBI on the nigrostriatal pathway, which is affected in Parkinson’s disease, without improving ...showed diarrhea and bloody stools in the course of the study. At autopsy the animals injected with the highest doses (40 and 50 mg/kg Posiphen) for 21

  14. Cavitation Induced Structural and Neural Damage in Live Brain Tissue Slices: Relevance to TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-29

    the value of this experimental platform to investigate the single bubble cavitation- induced damage in a biological tissue is illustrated with an...Lei Wu, Malisa Sarntinoranont, Huikai Xie1. Refractive index measurement of acute rat brain tissue slices using optical coherence tomography, Optics...b-TBI, i.e. what is “broken”, in the brain during exposure to shock loading is currently unknown. While blast waves are well known to have negative

  15. The Separate and Cumulative Effects of TBI and PTSD on Cognitive Function and Emotional Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    sustained a traumatic brain injury ( TBI ) can show impairments in behavioral and cognitive control and increases in impulsivity. In addition, many... Traumatic Stress Disorder and Traumatic Brain Injury . Military Health Research Forum, Kansas City. 11 August 18, 2009: Neurobehavioral Brown Bag...veterans with post- traumatic stress disorder and mild traumatic brain injury . Related Publication - This work was funded by the PI’s VA Merit grant and

  16. Mechanism and Therapy for the Shared Susceptibility to Migraine and Epilepsy after Brain Injury (TBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    headache, post-traumatic epilepsy, migraine, epilepsy. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...the stage for epilepsy or chronic migraine Major Task 1. Acute/subacute experiments after controlled cortical impact (CCI) TBI (Brennan, Dudek...mice9 to compare with our wild type animals. A mutation in CK1d was identified in two families having sleep phase syndrome and typical migraine with

  17. Neural Markers and Rehabilitation of Executive Functioning in Veterans with TBI and PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    multiple domains of living and reduce emotional dysregulation and disinhibition associated with the co-occurring disorders . 15 Specific...Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). TBI and PTSD are both characterized by deficits in multiple cognitive domains, including attention, executive function...provision of law, no person shall be subject to any penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently

  18. Integrated Eye Tracking and Neural Monitoring for Enhanced Assessment of Mild TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Data analysis for USU primary study continues. Despite administrative and technical delays during Year 4, MRI data collection was initiated during...include saccadic latency, saccadic duration, saccadic reaction time, manual reaction time, pupillary response, and several EEG/ERP components. At the end...behavioral ( manual and saccadic) performance and psychophysiological responses (EEG/ERP and pupillometry) between-groups (Controls, Mild TBI, and

  19. Blue and Red Light-Evoked Pupil Responses in Photophobic Subjects with TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuhas, Phillip T; Shorter, Patrick D; McDaniel, Catherine E; Earley, Michael J; Hartwick, Andrew T E

    2017-01-01

    Photophobia is a common symptom in individuals suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI). Recent evidence has implicated blue light-sensitive intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) in contributing to the neural circuitry mediating photophobia in migraine sufferers. The goal of this work is to test the hypothesis that ipRGC function is altered in TBI patients with photophobia by assessing pupillary responses to blue and red light. Twenty-four case participants (mean age 43.3; 58% female), with mild TBI and self-reported photophobia, and 12 control participants (mean age 42.6; 58% female) were in this study. After 10 minutes of dark adaptation, blue (470 nm, 1 × 10 phots/s/cm) and red (625 nm, 7 × 10 phots/s/cm) flashing (0.1 Hz) light stimuli were delivered for 30 seconds to the dilated left eye while the right pupil was recorded. The amplitude of normalized pupil fluctuation (constriction and dilation) was quantified using Fourier fast transforms. In both case and control participants, the amplitude of pupil fluctuation was significantly less for the blue light stimuli as compared to the red light stimuli, consistent with a contribution of ipRGCs to these pupil responses. There was no significant difference in the mean pupil fluctuation amplitudes between the two participant groups, but case participants displayed greater variability in their pupil responses to the blue stimulus. Case and control participants showed robust ipRGC-mediated components in their pupil responses to blue light. The results did not support the hypothesis that ipRGCs are "hypersensitive" to light in TBI participants with photophobia. However, greater pupil response variability in the case subjects suggests that ipRGC function may be more heterogeneous in this group.

  20. Neural Markers and Rehabilitation of Executive Functioning in Veterans with TBI and PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    retention of motor function.  Timeline. This paper was published in the Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation last year, it is attached to this...the neurobiology and neuropsychology associated with an evidence-based cognitive rehabilitation intervention will allow us to identify Veterans with...both TBI and PTSD who are predisposed to positive treatment outcomes. To our knowledge, this will be the first attempt to integrate neurobiological

  1. Primary Blast Injury Criteria for Animal/Human TBI Models using Field Validated Shock Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    differential equations for the conservation of momentum, mass and energy along with the material constitutive equations and the equations defining the initial...BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a...helped identify loading pathways through which blast overpressure ‘leaks’ into the brain leading to differential loading of the tissue in various

  2. Neuromodulation and Neurorehabilitation for Treatment of Functional Deficits after mTBI plus PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Theresa Pape, DrPH CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Chicago Association for Research and Education in Science Hines, IL 60141 REPORT...TBI. Specific Aims: Aim I will determine presence, direction and sustainability of rTMS-induced neurobehavioral effects measured with the Disability...Rating Scale. Aim II will determine the presence, direction and sustainability of rTMS- induced changes in functional neural activation and whether or

  3. Pressure Autoregulation Measurement Techniques in Adult TBI, Part II: A Scoping Review of Continuous Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Frederick Adam; Donnelly, Joseph; Calviello, Leanne; Smieleweski, Peter; Menon, David; Czosnyka, Marek

    2017-07-12

    To perform systematically a scoping review of the literature on commonly described continuous autoregulation measurement techniques in adult TBI. The goal was to provide an overview of methodology and comprehensive reference library of the available literature for each technique. Five separate small systematic reviews were conducted for each of the continuous techniques: pressure reactivity index (PRx), laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF), near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) techniques, brain tissue oxygen tension (PbtO2), and thermal diffusion (TD) techniques. Articles from MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library (inception to December 2016) and reference lists of relevant articles were searched. A two-tier filter of references was conducted. The literature base identified from the individual searches was limited, except for PRx. The total number of articles utilizing each of the 5 searched techniques for continuous autoregulation in adult TBI were: PRx (28), LDF (4), NIRS (9), PbtO2 (10), and TD (8). All continuous techniques described in adult TBI are based on moving correlation coefficients. The premise behind the calculation of these moving correlation coefficients focuses on the impact of slow fluctuations in either MAP or CPP on some indirect measure of CBF, such as: intracranial pressure (ICP), LDF, NIRS signals, PbtO2 or TD CBF. The thought is the correlation between a hemodynamic driving factor, such as MAP or CPP, and a surrogate for CBF or cerebral perfusion sheds insight on the state of cerebral autoregulation. Both PRx and NIRS indices were validated experimentally against 'golden standard' static autoregulatory curve (Lassen curve) at least around lower threshold of autoregulation. PRx has the largest literature base supporting the association with patient outcome. Various methods of continuous autoregulation assessment are described within the adult TBI literature. Many studies exist on these various indices, suggesting an

  4. SU-E-T-485: In Vivo Dosimetry with EBT3 Radiochromic Films for TBI Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozares, S; Gracia, M; Olasolo, J; Gallardo, N; Fuentemilla, N; Pellejero, S; Miquelez, S; Maneru, F; Martin, M; Bragado, L; Rubio, A [Complejo Hospitalario de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra (Spain)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) is a technique that requires special equipment to control “in vivo” the dose to the patient because it is a complex technique performed in extraordinary conditions. There are several devices to perform this task (diodes, TLDs, ionization chambers, MOSFET). In this paper we study the possibility of performing these measurements with radiochromic films EBT3 properly calibrated. This method has been compared to the PTW diodes system for TBI. Methods: Once made the TC to the patients, we measured different thicknesses of the relevant areas of the body (head, neck, chest with or without arms, umbilicus area, knees and ankles); for each of these thicknesses we measured dose rate (cGy / UM) in RW3 phantom, in TBI conditions, with ionization chamber in the center; in turn, the input diode and the output of each configuration is placed to assign dose to each set of diodes. Movie calibration is performed according to manufacturer’s recommendations but TBI conditions. The dose at the center of each thickness compared to a linear interpolation of the dose at the entrance and exit, resulting in an adequate approximation. Finally in each session for each patient put a piece of film (2×2 cm2) at the entrance and another at the exit in each area, obtaining these readings and interpolating the estimated center dose, as with the diodes. Results: These results show a greater homogeneity in the distribution for use with film and validate the use of the same for this task and, if necessary, to avoid purchasing diode group if they have not. Conclusion: By using radiochromic films for this technique gives us a proper calculation of the dose received by the patient in the absence of other methods, or gives us a second additional track that already used normally.

  5. Retrospective Study: Sleep, Mental Disorders, and TBI in Deployed Military Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-06

    Wilk, J. E., Thomas, J. L., McGurk, D. M., Riviere, L. A., Castro, C. A., & Hoge, C. W. (2010). Mild traumatic brain injury ( concussion ) during...multiple cells . Comorbid substance use and adjustment disorders occurred the most frequently (18.2%), followed by substance use and mood disorders (16.3...sleep disorders had more comorbid anxiety disorders. Traumatic Brain Injury The first identified TBI diagnosis for each participant was used

  6. Toward Development of a Field-Deployable Imaging Device for TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    for many years to detect tissue stiffness and is growing in importance for breast cancer diagnoses.5 One elastographic method evaluates tissue stiffness ...treatment of prostate cancer [12]. An advantage to Vibro-acoustic images is that they do not exhibit the speckle noise traditionally associated with B-mode...reasons it is reasonable to expect that changes in the stiffness of brain accompany TBI, and that ultrasound-based ‘sonoelastic’ imaging modalities

  7. The Expression of NP847 and Sox2 after TBI and Its Influence on NSCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jun; Bao, Yifeng; Chen, Jian; Huang, Chuanjun; Zhang, Xinghua; Jiang, Rui; Liu, Qianqian; Liu, Yonghua; Xu, Xide; Shi, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) is important for neural regeneration after cerebral injury. Here, for the first time, we show that phosphorylated (p)-ser847-nNOS (NP847), rather than nNOS, may play a major role in NSC proliferation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Western blot results demonstrated that the expression of NP847 and Sox2 in the hippocampus is up-regulated after TBI, and they both peak 3 days after brain injury. In addition, an immunofluorescence experiment indicated that NP847 and Sox2 partly co-localize in the nuclei of NSCs after TBI. Further immunoprecipitation experiments found that NP847 and Sox2 can directly interact with each other in NSCs. Moreover, in an OGD model of NSCs, NP847 expression is decreased, which is followed by the down-regulation of Sox2. Interestingly, in this study, we did not observe changes in the expression of nNOS in the OGD model. Further research data suggest that the NP847-Sox2 complex may play a major role in NSCs through the Shh/Gli signaling pathway in a CaMKII-dependent manner after brain injury. PMID:28066182

  8. [New three-dimensional compensating filter for TBI using compu-former associated with RT LAN].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Masayuki; Kamikonya, Norihiko; Tsuboi, Keita; Irie, Miwa; Misawa, Mahito; Hara, Hiroshi; Kai, Syunrou; Nakao, Norio

    2003-09-01

    To shorten the TBI process, we developed a new device for making the three-dimensional (3D) compensating filter that improves dose distribution. The dose distributions in the phantom and manufacturing time were compared between the new device and the previous one. Clinical evaluations included dose distribution in patients and the clinical rate of interstitial pneumonitis (IP). Our 3D compensating filter is made of polystyrene resin and gypsum. The filter was made after performing two procedures as follows. Patient data were measured by CT, and the 3D dose-distribution data and 3D compensating-filter data were obtained from the CT data by the 3D radiation planning system. We were able to produce the new 3D compensating filter within about 4 hours, including all procedures. The average dose distribution to each site when the 3D compensating filter was used was 92.7% to the head, 102.1% to the thorax, 106.4% to the pelvis, 90.2% to the knee, and 93.8% to the ankle joint, when the scheduled dose was taken as 100%. Dose distribution was improved. IP occurred in 6 of 32 patients (18.8%). There was no significant difference between the TBI and non-TBI groups in the frequency of IP (p = 0.27).

  9. Measuring executive function in control subjects and TBI patients with question completion time (QCT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Woods

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Questionnaire completion is a complex task that places demands on cognitive functions subserving reading, introspective memory, decision-making, and motor control. Although computerized questionnaires and surveys are used with increasing frequency in clinical practice, few studies have examined question completion time (QCT, the time required to complete each question. Here, we analyzed QCTs in 172 control subjects and 31 patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI who completed two computerized questionnaires, the 17-question Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD Checklist (PCL and the 25-question Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ. In control subjects, robust correlations were found between self-paced QCTs on the PCL and CFQ (r = 0.82. QCTs on individual questions correlated strongly with the number of words in the question, indicating the critical role of reading speed. QCTs increased significantly with age, and were reduced in females and in subjects with increased education and computer experience. QCT z-scores, corrected for age, education, computer use, and sex, correlated more strongly with each other than with the results of other cognitive tests. Patients with a history of severe TBI showed significantly delayed QCTs, but QCTs fell within the normal range in patients with a history of mild TBI. When questionnaires are used to gather relevant patient information, simultaneous QCT measures provide reliable and clinically sensitive measures of processing speed and executive function.

  10. Mathematical models of blast induced TBI: current status, challenges and prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raj K Gupta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Blast induced traumatic brain injury (TBI has become a signature wound of recent military activities and is the leading cause of death and long-term disability among U.S. soldiers. The current limited understanding of brain injury mechanisms impedes the development of protection, diagnostic and treatment strategies. We believe mathematical models of blast wave brain injury biomechanics and neurobiology, complemented with in vitro and in vivo experimental studies, will enable a better understanding of injury mechanisms and accelerate the development of both protective and treatment strategies. The goal of this paper is to review the current state of the art in mathematical and computational modeling of blast induced TBI, identify research gaps and recommend future developments. A brief overview of blast wave physics, injury biomechanics and the neurobiology of brain injury is used as a foundation for a more detailed discussion of multiscale mathematical models of primary biomechanics and secondary injury and repair mechanisms. The paper also presents a discussion of model development strategies, experimental approaches to generate benchmark data for model validation and potential applications of the model for prevention and protection against blast wave TBI.

  11. An examination of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales, Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) in individuals with complicated mild, moderate and Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlozzi, Noelle E; Kirsch, Ned L; Kisala, Pamela A; Tulsky, David S

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the clinical utility of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales-Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV) in individuals with complicated mild, moderate or severe TBI. One hundred individuals with TBI (n = 35 complicated mild or moderate TBI; n = 65 severe TBI) and 100 control participants matched on key demographic variables from the WAIS-IV normative dataset completed the WAIS-IV. Univariate analyses indicated that participants with severe TBI had poorer performance than matched controls on all index scores and subtests (except Matrix Reasoning). Individuals with complicated mild/moderate TBI performed more poorly than controls on the Working Memory Index (WMI), Processing Speed Index (PSI), and Full Scale IQ (FSIQ), and on four subtests: the two processing speed subtests (SS, CD), two working memory subtests (AR, LN), and a perceptual reasoning subtest (BD). Participants with severe TBI had significantly lower scores than the complicated mild/moderate TBI on PSI, and on three subtests: the two processing speed subtests (SS and CD), and the new visual puzzles test. Effect sizes for index and subtest scores were generally small-to-moderate for the group with complicated mild/moderate and moderate-to-large for the group with severe TBI. PSI also showed good sensitivity and specificity for classifying individuals with severe TBI versus controls. Findings provide support for the clinical utility of the WAIS-IV in individuals with complicated mild, moderate, and severe TBI.

  12. The Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus on the Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contraction through PKC/MLCK/MLC Signaling Pathway in TBI Mouse Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Sun

    Full Text Available Clinical studies have shown that probiotics influence gastrointestinal motility. However, the molecular mechanisms by which probiotic Lactobacillus modulates intestinal motility in traumatic brain injury (TBI mouse model have not been explored. In the present study, we provided evidence showing that treatment of TBI mice with Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly improved the terminal ileum villus morphology, restored the impaired interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC and the disrupted ICC networks after TBI, and prevented TBI-mediated inhibition of contractile activity in intestinal smooth muscle. Mechanistically, the decreased concentration of MLCK, phospho-MLC20 and phospho-MYPT1 and increased concentration of MLCP and PKC were observed after TBI, and these events mediated by TBI were efficiently prevented by Lactobacillus acidophilus application. These findings may provide a novel mechanistic basis for the application of Lactobacillus acidophilus in the treatment of TBI.

  13. The Effects of Lactobacillus acidophilus on the Intestinal Smooth Muscle Contraction through PKC/MLCK/MLC Signaling Pathway in TBI Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Bo; Hu, Chen; Fang, Huan; Zhu, Lina; Gao, Ning; Zhu, Jingci

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies have shown that probiotics influence gastrointestinal motility. However, the molecular mechanisms by which probiotic Lactobacillus modulates intestinal motility in traumatic brain injury (TBI) mouse model have not been explored. In the present study, we provided evidence showing that treatment of TBI mice with Lactobacillus acidophilus significantly improved the terminal ileum villus morphology, restored the impaired interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC) and the disrupted ICC networks after TBI, and prevented TBI-mediated inhibition of contractile activity in intestinal smooth muscle. Mechanistically, the decreased concentration of MLCK, phospho-MLC20 and phospho-MYPT1 and increased concentration of MLCP and PKC were observed after TBI, and these events mediated by TBI were efficiently prevented by Lactobacillus acidophilus application. These findings may provide a novel mechanistic basis for the application of Lactobacillus acidophilus in the treatment of TBI.

  14. Collaborative European Neuro Trauma Effectiveness Research in traumatic brain injury (CENTER-TBI) : a prospective longitudinal observational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Naalt, Joukje; Maas, Alex; Menon, David K; Steyerberg, E.W.; Citerio, Giuseppe; Lecky, F.; Manley, G.T.; Hill, S; Legrand, Victor; Sorgner, A.

    BACKGROUND: Current classification of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is suboptimal, and management is based on weak evidence, with little attempt to personalize treatment. A need exists for new precision medicine and stratified management approaches that incorporate emerging technologies. OBJECTIVE:

  15. Rates of TBI-related Emergency Department Visits, Hospitalizations, and Deaths — United States, 2001–2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — In general, total combined rates for traumatic brain injury (TBI)-related emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalizations and deaths have increased over the past...

  16. Efficiency of high-dose cytarabine added to CY/TBI in cord blood transplantation for myeloid malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Yasuyuki; Takeda, June; Aoki, Kazunari; Kondo, Tadakazu; Takahashi, Satoshi; Onishi, Yasushi; Ozawa, Yukiyasu; Aotsuka, Nobuyuki; Kouzai, Yasuji; Nakamae, Hirohisa; Ota, Shuichi; Nakaseko, Chiaki; Yamaguchi, Hiroki; Kato, Koji; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Takami, Akiyoshi

    2015-07-16

    Cord blood transplantation (CBT) is an effective therapeutic option for adults with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) after the conventional cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation (CY/TBI) regimen, but posttransplant relapse is still of high importance. High-dose cytarabine (HDCA) can be added to CY/TBI for an intensified regimen; however, its additional effects have not yet been completely elucidated. Therefore, we conducted a cohort study to compare the prognosis of HDCA/CY/TBI (n = 617) and CY/TBI (n = 312) in CBT for AML/MDS, using a Japanese transplant registry database. The median age was 40 years, and 86.2% of the patients had AML; high-risk disease was observed in 56.2% of the patients. The median follow-up period after CBT was approximately 3.5 years. Overall survival was significantly superior in the HDCA/CY/TBI group (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.56; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45-0.69; P TBI group (HR, 1.33 and 2.30, respectively), but not grade III to IV aGVHD. Incidence of infectious episodes showed no significant difference. Nonrelapse mortality was not increased by the addition of HDCA. Higher-dose CA (12 rather than 8 g/m(2)) was more effective, particularly in patients at high-risk for disease. This study is the first to show the superiority of HDCA/CY/TBI to CY/TBI in CBT for AML/MDS. A large-scale prospective study is warranted to establish new conditioning regimens including HDCA administration.

  17. 'Hit & Run' model of closed-skull traumatic brain injury (TBI) reveals complex patterns of post-traumatic AQP4 dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zeguang; Iliff, Jeffrey J; Yang, Lijun; Yang, Jiankai; Chen, Xiaolin; Chen, Michael J; Giese, Rebecca N; Wang, Baozhi; Shi, Xuefang; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral edema is a major contributor to morbidity associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The methods involved in most rodent models of TBI, including head fixation, opening of the skull, and prolonged anesthesia, likely alter TBI development and reduce secondary injury. We report the development of a closed-skull model of murine TBI, which minimizes time of anesthesia, allows the monitoring of intracranial pressure (ICP), and can be modulated to produce mild and moderate grade TBI. In this model, we characterized changes in aquaporin-4 (AQP4) expression and localization after mild and moderate TBI. We found that global AQP4 expression after TBI was generally increased; however, analysis of AQP4 localization revealed that the most prominent effect of TBI on AQP4 was the loss of polarized localization at endfoot processes of reactive astrocytes. This AQP4 dysregulation peaked at 7 days after injury and was largely indistinguishable between mild and moderate grade TBI for the first 2 weeks after injury. Within the same model, blood-brain barrieranalysis of variance permeability, cerebral edema, and ICP largely normalized within 7 days after moderate TBI. These findings suggest that changes in AQP4 expression and localization may not contribute to cerebral edema formation, but rather may represent a compensatory mechanism to facilitate its resolution.

  18. Disconnection and hyper-connectivity underlie reorganization after TBI: A rodent functional connectomic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, N G; Verley, D R; Gutman, B A; Thompson, P M; Yeh, H J; Brown, J A

    2016-03-01

    While past neuroimaging methods have contributed greatly to our understanding of brain function after traumatic brain injury (TBI), resting state functional MRI (rsfMRI) connectivity methods have more recently provided a far more unbiased approach with which to monitor brain circuitry compared to task-based approaches. However, current knowledge on the physiologic underpinnings of the correlated blood oxygen level dependent signal, and how changes in functional connectivity relate to reorganizational processes that occur following injury is limited. The degree and extent of this relationship remain to be determined in order that rsfMRI methods can be fully adapted for determining the optimal timing and type of rehabilitative interventions that can be used post-TBI to achieve the best outcome. Very few rsfMRI studies exist after experimental TBI and therefore we chose to acquire rsfMRI data before and at 7, 14 and 28 days after experimental TBI using a well-known, clinically-relevant, unilateral controlled cortical impact injury (CCI) adult rat model of TBI. This model was chosen since it has widespread axonal injury, a well-defined time-course of reorganization including spine, dendrite, axonal and cortical map changes, as well as spontaneous recovery of sensorimotor function by 28 d post-injury from which to interpret alterations in functional connectivity. Data were co-registered to a parcellated rat template to generate adjacency matrices for network analysis by graph theory. Making no assumptions about direction of change, we used two-tailed statistical analysis over multiple brain regions in a data-driven approach to access global and regional changes in network topology in order to assess brain connectivity in an unbiased way. Our main hypothesis was that deficits in functional connectivity would become apparent in regions known to be structurally altered or deficient in axonal connectivity in this model. The data show the loss of functional connectivity

  19. Longitudinal outcome and recovery of social problems after pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI): Contribution of brain insult and family environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Nicholas P; van Bijnen, Loeka; Catroppa, Cathy; Beauchamp, Miriam H; Crossley, Louise; Hearps, Stephen; Anderson, Vicki

    2016-04-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) can result in a range of social impairments, however longitudinal recovery is not well characterized, and clinicians are poorly equipped to identify children at risk for persisting difficulties. Using a longitudinal prospective design, this study aimed to evaluate the contribution of injury and non-injury related risk and resilience factors to longitudinal outcome and recovery of social problems from 12- to 24-months post-TBI. 78 children with TBI (injury age: 5.0-15.0 years) and 40 age and gender-matched typically developing (TD) children underwent magnetic resonance imaging including a susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) sequence 2-8 weeks post-injury (M=39.25, SD=27.64 days). At 12 and 24-months post- injury, parents completed questionnaires rating their child's social functioning, and environmental factors including socioeconomic status, caregiver mental health and family functioning. Results revealed that longitudinal recovery profiles differed as a function of injury severity, such that among children with severe TBI, social problems significantly increased from 12- to 24-months post-injury, and were found to be significantly worse than TD controls and children with mild and moderate TBI. In contrast, children with mild and moderate injuries showed few problems at 12-months post-injury and little change over time. Pre-injury environment and SWI did not significantly contribute to outcome at 24-months, however concurrent caregiver mental health and family functioning explained a large and significant proportion of variance in these outcomes. Overall, this study shows that longitudinal recovery profiles differ as a function of injury severity, with evidence for late-emerging social problems among children with severe TBI. Poorer long-term social outcomes were associated with family dysfunction and poorer caregiver mental health at 24-months post injury, suggesting that efforts to optimize the child's environment and

  20. Primary blast causes mild, moderate, severe and lethal TBI with increasing blast overpressures: Experimental rat injury model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Vikas; Skotak, Maciej; Schuetz, Heather; Heller, Abi; Haorah, James; Chandra, Namas

    2016-06-01

    Injury severity in blast induced Traumatic Brain Injury (bTBI) increases with blast overpressure (BOP) and impulse in dose-dependent manner. Pure primary blast waves were simulated in compressed gas shock-tubes in discrete increments. Present work demonstrates 24 hour survival of rats in 0–450 kPa (0–800 Pa•s impulse) range at 10 discrete levels (60, 100, 130, 160, 190, 230, 250, 290, 350 and 420 kPa) and determines the mortality rate as a non-linear function of BOP. Using logistic regression model, predicted mortality rate (PMR) function was calculated, and used to establish TBI severities. We determined a BOP of 145 kPa as upper mild TBI threshold (5% PMR). Also we determined 146–220 kPa and 221–290 kPa levels as moderate and severe TBI based on 35%, and 70% PMR, respectively, while BOP above 290 kPa is lethal. Since there are no standards for animal bTBI injury severity, these thresholds need further refinements using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and behavior. Further, we specifically investigated mild TBI range (0–145 kPa) using physiological (heart rate), pathological (lung injury), immuno-histochemical (oxidative/nitrosative and blood-brain barrier markers) as well as blood borne biomarkers. With these additional data, we conclude that mild bTBI occurs in rats when the BOP is in the range of 85–145 kPa.

  1. Acute upregulation of neuronal mitochondrial type-1 cannabinoid receptor and it's role in metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis after TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhen; Lv, Xiao-Ai; Dai, Qun; Ge, Yu-Qing; Xu, Jie

    2016-08-02

    Metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis initiated by traumatic brain injury (TBI) contribute to subsequent neurodegeneration. They are all regulated by mechanisms centered around mitochondrion. Type-1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) is a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) enriched on neuronal plasma membrane. Recent evidences point to the substantial presence of CB1 receptors on neuronal mitochondrial outer membranes (mtCB1) and the activation of mtCB1 influences aerobic respiration via inhibiting mitochondrial cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA)/complex I pathway. The expression and role of neuronal mtCB1 under TBI are unknown. Using TBI models of cultured neurons, wild type and CB1 knockout mice, we found mtCB1 quickly upregulated after TBI. Activation of mtCB1 promoted metabolic defects accompanied with ATP shortage but protected neurons from apoptosis. Selective activation of plasma membrane CB1 showed no effects on neuronal metabolism and apoptosis. Activation of mtCB1 receptors inhibited mitochondrial cAMP/PKA/complex I and resulted in exacerbated metabolic defects accompanied with a higher ratio of ATP reduction to oxygen consumption decrease as well as neuronal apoptosis. Further research found the remarkable accumulation of protein kinase B (AKT) on neuronal mitochondria following TBI and the activation of mtCB1 upregulated mitochondrial AKT/complex V activity. Upregulation of mitochondrial AKT/complex V activity showed anti-apoptosis effects and alleviated ATP shortage in metabolic defects. Taken together, we have identified mtCB1 quickly upregulate after TBI and a dual role the mtCB1 might play in metabolic defects and neuronal apoptosis initiated by TBI: the inhibition of mitochondrial cAMP/PKA/complex I aggravates metabolic defects, energy insufficiency as well as neuronal apoptosis, but the coactivation of mitochondrial AKT/complex V mitigates energy insufficiency and neuronal apoptosis.

  2. Effect Size as the Essential Statistic in Developing Methods for mTBI Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Douglas Brandt

    2015-01-01

    The descriptive statistic known as "effect size" measures the distinguishability of two sets of data. Distingishability is at the core of diagnosis. This article is intended to point out the importance of effect size in the development of effective diagnostics for mild traumatic brain injury and to point out the applicability of the effect size statistic in comparing diagnostic efficiency across the main proposed TBI diagnostic methods: psychological, physiological, biochemical, and radiologic. Comparing diagnostic approaches is difficult because different researcher in different fields have different approaches to measuring efficacy. Converting diverse measures to effect sizes, as is done in meta-analysis, is a relatively easy way to make studies comparable.

  3. Consultation Dilemma Catatonia in a Patient with Prior TBI: MentaI or Medical Disorder?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalafian, Andrey; Dukes, Charles; Tucker, Phebe

    2015-08-01

    Mr. R, a 27 year old Hispanic male with history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) over ten years prior but no psychiatric history, presents to the psychiatric consultation service with recent onset of mutism, psychotic behavior and new diagnosis of epilepsy. The differential diagnosis is broad and includes both medical and psychiatric causes: post-ictal state, non-convulsive status epilepticus, delirium due to metabolic conditions, drugs, catatonia, conversion disorder, major depression with psychotic features, new onset schizophrenia or a combination of these possible diagnoses. We explore different medical causes that can present with symptoms of catatonia, as it is crucial to rule out a possible treatable medical cause.

  4. Deficits in comprehension of speech acts after TBI: The role of theory of mind and executive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honan, Cynthia A; McDonald, Skye; Gowland, Alison; Fisher, Alana; Randall, Rebekah K

    2015-11-01

    Theory of mind (ToM) is critical to effective communication following traumatic brain injury (TBI) however, whether impairments are specific to social cognition, or reflective of executive demands is unclear. This study examined whether ToM impairments are predicted by executive function difficulties using everyday conversation tasks. Twenty-five individuals with severe-TBI were compared to 25 healthy controls on low- and high-ToM tasks across four conditions: (1) low cognitive load, (2) high flexibility, (3) high working memory (WM) and (4) high inhibition. TBI individuals were impaired on high-ToM tasks in the WM condition. When the WM demands of the task were controlled, the impairments were no longer apparent. TBI individuals were not impaired on high-ToM tasks in the inhibition and flexibility conditions, suggesting these tasks may not have been sufficiently demanding of ToM abilities. The results suggest that ToM impairments in everyday communication may arise due to WM demands, in individuals with TBI. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. TBI during BM and SCT: review of the past, discussion of the present and consideration of future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill-Kayser, C E; Plastaras, J P; Tochner, Z; Glatstein, E

    2011-04-01

    TBI has been used widely in the setting of BMT over the past 3 decades. Early research demonstrated feasibility and efficacy in the myeloablative setting, in preparation first for allogenic BMT and later for autologous stem cell rescue. As experience with TBI increased, its dual roles of myeloablation and immunosuppression came to be recognized. Toxicity associated with myeloablative TBI remains significant, and this treatment is generally reserved for younger patients with excellent performance status. Reduced intensity conditioning regimens may be useful to provide immunosuppression for patients who are not candidates for myeloablative treatment. Efforts to reduce toxicity through protection of normal tissue using methods of normal tissue blocking and use of TLI, rather than TBI, continue. In the future, modalities such as helical tomotherapy, proton radiotherapy and radioimmunotherapy, may have roles in delivery of radiation to the BM and lymphoid structures with reduced normal tissue toxicity. With further investigation, these efforts may expand the therapeutic ratio associated with TBI, allowing safer delivery to a broader range of patients.

  6. To Fear Is to Gain? The Role of Fear Recognition in Risky Decision Making in TBI Patients and Healthy Controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser-Keizer, Annemarie C.; Westerhof-Evers, Herma J.; Gerritsen, Marleen J. J.; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba M.

    2016-01-01

    Fear is an important emotional reaction that guides decision making in situations of ambiguity or uncertainty. Both recognition of facial expressions of fear and decision making ability can be impaired after traumatic brain injury (TBI), in particular when the frontal lobe is damaged. So far, it has not been investigated how recognition of fear influences risk behavior in healthy subjects and TBI patients. The ability to recognize fear is thought to be related to the ability to experience fear and to use it as a warning signal to guide decision making. We hypothesized that a better ability to recognize fear would be related to a better regulation of risk behavior, with healthy controls outperforming TBI patients. To investigate this, 59 healthy subjects and 49 TBI patients were assessed with a test for emotion recognition (Facial Expression of Emotion: Stimuli and Tests) and a gambling task (Iowa Gambling Task (IGT)). The results showed that, regardless of post traumatic amnesia duration or the presence of frontal lesions, patients were more impaired than healthy controls on both fear recognition and decision making. In both groups, a significant relationship was found between better fear recognition, the development of an advantageous strategy across the IGT and less risk behavior in the last blocks of the IGT. Educational level moderated this relationship in the final block of the IGT. This study has important clinical implications, indicating that impaired decision making and risk behavior after TBI can be preceded by deficits in the processing of fear. PMID:27870900

  7. Modeling, planning and XiO R CMS validation of TBI treatment (extended SSD 400 cm); Modelacion, planificacion y validacion del XiO CMS para tratamientos TBI (SSD extendida de 400 cm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teijeiro, A.; Pereira, L.; Moral, F. del; Vazquez, J.; Lopez Medina, A.; Meal, A.; Andrade Alvarez, B.; Salgado Fernandez, M.; Munoz, V.

    2011-07-01

    The whole body irradiation (TBI) is a radiotherapy technique previously used a bone marrow transplant and for certain blood diseases, in which a patient is irradiated to extended distance (SSD from 350 to 400). The aim of the TBI is to kill tumor cells in the receiver and prevent rejection of transplanted bone marrow. The dose is prescribed at the midpoint of the abdomen around the navel wing. The most planners not permit the treatment of patients with a much higher SSD to 100 cm, also using the table TBI with spoiler to increase skin dose should be taken into account This requires measurements and checks ad hoc if you use a planner, because modeling is not optimized a priori for an SSD of 400 cm.

  8. Patient Characterization Protocols for Psychophysiological Studies of Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-TBI Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E. Rapp

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Psychophysiological investigations of traumatic brain injury (TBI are being conducted for several reasons, including the objective of learning more about the underlying physiological mechanisms of the pathological processes that can be initiated by a head injury. Additional goals include the development of objective physiologically based measures that can be used to monitor the response to treatment and to identify minimally symptomatic individuals who are at risk of delayed onset neuropsychiatric disorders following injury. Research programs studying TBI search for relationships between psychophysiological measures, particularly ERP component properties (e.g. timing, amplitude, scalp distribution, and a participant’s clinical condition. Moreover, the complex relationships between brain injury and psychiatric disorders are receiving increased research attention, and ERP technologies are making contributions to this effort. This review has two objectives supporting such research efforts. The first is to review evidence indicating that traumatic brain injury is a significant risk factor for post-injury neuropsychiatric disorders. The second objective is to introduce ERP researchers who are not familiar with neuropsychiatric assessment to the instruments that are available for characterizing traumatic brain injury, post-concussion syndrome, and psychiatric disorders. Specific recommendations within this very large literature are made. We have proceeded on the assumption that, as is typically the case in an ERP laboratory, the investigators are not clinically qualified and that they will not have access to participant medical records.

  9. Characterizing the spatial distribution of microhemorrhages resulting from Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ningzhi; Chou, Yi-Yu; Shiee, Navid; Chan, Leighton; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John A.

    2014-03-01

    This study examines the spatial distribution of microhemorrhages defined using susceptibility weighted images (SWI) in 46 patients with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and applying region of interest (ROI) analysis using a brain atlas. SWI and 3D T1-weighted images were acquired on a 3T clinical Siemens scanner. A neuroradiologist reviewed all SWI images and manually labeled all identified microhemorrhages. To characterize the spatial distribution of microhemorrhages in standard Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) space, the T1-weighted images were nonlinearly registered to the MNI template. This transformation was then applied to the co-registered SWI images and to the microhemorrhage coordinates. The frequencies of microhemorrhages were determined in major structures from ROIs defined in the digital Talairach brain atlas and in white matter tracts defined using a diffusion tensor imaging atlas. A total of 629 microhemorrhages were found with an average of 22±42 (range=1-179) in the 24 positive TBI patients. Microhemorrhages mostly congregated around the periphery of the brain and were fairly symmetrically distributed, although a number were found in the corpus callosum. From Talairach ROI analysis, microhemorrhages were most prevalent in the frontal lobes (65.1%). Restricting the analysis to WM tracts, microhemorrhages were primarily found in the corpus callosum (56.9%).

  10. Prospective memory rehabilitation using smartphones in patients with TBI: What do participants report?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evald, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Use of assistive devices has been shown to be beneficial as a compensatory memory strategy among brain injury survivors, but little is known about possible advantages and disadvantages of the technology. As part of an intervention study participants were interviewed about their experiences with the use of low-cost, off-the-shelf, unmodified smartphones combined with Internet calendars as a compensatory memory strategy. Thirteen community-dwelling patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) received a 6-week group-based instruction in the systematic use of a smartphone as a memory compensatory aid followed by a brief structured open-ended interview regarding satisfaction with and advantages and disadvantages of the compensatory strategy. Ten of 13 participants continued to use a smartphone as their primary compensatory strategy. Audible and visual reminders were the most frequently mentioned advantages of the smartphone, and, second, the capability as an all-in-one memory device. In contrast, battery life was the most often mentioned disadvantage, followed by concerns about loss or failure of the device. Use of a smartphone seems to be a satisfactory compensatory memory strategy to many patients with TBI and smartphones come with features that are advantageous to other compensatory strategies. However, some benefits come hand-in-hand with drawbacks, such as the feeling of dependency. These aspects should be taken into account when choosing assistive technology as a memory compensatory strategy.

  11. Parvalbumin immunoreactivity and expression of GABAA receptor subunits in the thalamus after experimental TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huusko, N; Pitkänen, A

    2014-05-16

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes 10-20% of acquired epilepsy in humans, resulting in an ictogenic region that is often located in the cerebral cortex. The thalamus provides heavy projections to the cortex and the activity of thalamocortical pathways is controlled by GABAergic afferents from the reticular nucleus of the thalamus (RT). As rats with TBI induced by lateral fluid-percussion injury (FPI) undergo epileptogenesis, we hypothesized that damage to the parvalbumin (PARV)-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the RT is associated with seizure susceptibility after lateral FPI. To address this hypothesis, adult Sprague-Dawley rats (n=13) were injured with lateral FPI. At 6months post-TBI, each animal underwent a pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) seizure susceptibility test and 2weeks of continuous video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring for detection of the occurrence of spontaneous seizures. Thereafter, the brain was processed for PARV immunohistochemistry. We (a) estimated the total number of PARV-ir neurons in the RT using unbiased stereology, (b) measured the volume of the ventroposteromedial (VPM) and ventroposterolateral (VPL) nuclei of the thalamus, which receive PARV-ir inputs from the RT and project to the perilesional cortex, (c) quantified the density of PARV-ir terminals in the VPM-VPL, and (d) studied the expression of GABAA receptor subunits in a separate group of rats using laser-dissection of the thalamus followed by Real-Time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) array studies. At 6months post-TBI, only 64% of PARV-ir neurons were remaining in the RT ipsilaterally (p0.05). Also, the volume of the VPM-VPL was only 51% of that in controls ipsilaterally (p<0.001) and 91% contralaterally (p<0.05). The density of PARV-ir axonal labeling was remarkably increased in the lateral aspects of the VPM and VPL (both p<0.001). Expression of the ε- and θ-subunits of the GABAA receptor was down-regulated (0.152, p<0.01 and 0.302, p<0.05, respectively), which could relate

  12. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    HONDA, Mitsuru; ICHIBAYASHI, Ryo; YOKOMURO, Hiroki; YOSHIHARA, Katsunori; MASUDA, Hiroyuki; HAGA, Daisuke; SEIKI, Yoshikatsu; KUDOH, Chiaki; KISHI, Taichi

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1–3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3–4, GCS5–6, and GCS7–8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients. PMID:27356957

  13. Effect of chromatic filters on visual performance in individuals with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI): A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimreite, Vanessa; Willeford, Kevin T; Ciuffreda, Kenneth J

    2016-01-01

    Spectral filters have been used clinically in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, they have not been formally assessed using objective techniques in this population. Thus, the aim of the present pilot study was to determine the effect of spectral filters on reading performance and visuo-cortical responsivity in adults with mTBI. 12 adults with mTBI/concussion were tested. All reported photosensitivity and reading problems. They were compared to 12 visually-normal, asymptomatic adults. There were several test conditions: three luminance-matched control filters (gray neutral density, blue, and red), the patient-selected 'precision tint lens' that provided the most comfort and clarity of text using the Intuitive Colorimeter System, and baseline without any filters. The Visagraph was used to assess reading eye movements and reading speed objectively with each filter. In addition, both the amplitude and latency of the visual-evoked potential (VEP) were assessed with the same filters. There were few significant group differences in either the reading-related parameters or VEP latency for any of the test filter conditions. Subjective improvements were noted in most with mTBI (11/12). The majority of patients with mTBI chose a tinted filter that resulted in increased visual comfort. While significant findings based on the objective testing were found for some conditions, the subjective results suggest that precision tints should be considered as an adjunctive treatment in patients with mTBI and photosensitivity. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Early Cerebral Circulation Disturbance in Patients Suffering from Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): A Xenon CT and Perfusion CT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Mitsuru; Ichibayashi, Ryo; Yokomuro, Hiroki; Yoshihara, Katsunori; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Haga, Daisuke; Seiki, Yoshikatsu; Kudoh, Chiaki; Kishi, Taichi

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is widely known to cause dynamic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF). Ischemia is a common and deleterious secondary injury following TBI. Detecting early ischemia in TBI patients is important to prevent further advancement and deterioration of the brain tissue. The purpose of this study was to clarify the cerebral circulatory disturbance during the early phase and whether it can be used to predict patient outcome. A total of 90 patients with TBI underwent a xenon-computed tomography (Xe-CT) and subsequently perfusion CT to evaluate the cerebral circulation on days 1-3. We measured CBF using Xe-CT and mean transit time (MTT: the width between two inflection points [maximum upward slope and maximum downward slope from inflow to outflow of the contrast agent]) using perfusion CT and calculated the cerebral blood volume (CBV) using the AZ-7000W98 computer system. The relationships of the hemodynamic parameters CBF, MTT, and CBV to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score were examined. There were no significant differences in CBF, MTT, and CBV among GCS3-4, GCS5-6, and GCS7-8 groups. The patients with a favorable outcome (GR and MD) had significantly higher CBF and lower MTT than those with an unfavorable one (SD, VS, or D). The discriminant analysis of these parameters could predict patient outcome with a probability of 70.6%. During the early phase, CBF reduction and MTT prolongation might influence the clinical outcome of TBI. These parameters are helpful for evaluating the severity of cerebral circulatory disturbance and predicting the outcome of TBI patients.

  15. Alterations of total non stimulated salivary flow in patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth and oropharynx submitted to hyperfractionated radiation therapy; Alteracoes do fluxo salivar total nao estimulado em pacientes portadores de carcinoma espinocelular de boca e orofaringe submetidos a radioterapia por hiperfracionamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guebur, Maria Isabela [Faculdades Integradas Espirita, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: isabelaguebur@aol.com; Rapoport, Abrao [Hospital Heliopolis (HOSPHEL), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Curso de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude; Sassi, Laurindo Moacir [Hospital Erasto Gaertner, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Cirurgia e Traumatologia Buco-Maxico-Facial; Oliveira, Benedito Valdecir de; Ramos, Gyl Henrique Albrecht [Hospital Erasto Gaertner, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Cirurgia de Cabeca e Pescoco; Pereira, Jose Carlos Gasparin [Hospital Erasto Gaertner, Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Servico de Radioterapia

    2004-07-01

    Prevention and early diagnosis are actually the most effective measures that we dispose to improve the prognostic of the malignant tumors. The mouth and oropharynx tumors are treated with success, when early diagnosed. The radiotherapy is almost always one of the selected treatments for these tumors. When cancer is diagnosed in advanced stages, many a time the treatment needs to be carried out swiftly to be efficient, and consequently the radio therapist use the hyperfractionated therapy, with the patient receiving two lower doses of radiation in two sessions daily, amounting to a higher daily dosage, of about 160 cGy/2x/day. When the major salivary glands are present in the radiated field, the xerostomia appears by the second week of treatment (1500 to 2000 cGy), changing the patient's health, and causing difficulties for him to eat, speak and sleep. The objective of this study was to evaluate the quantitative alterations of the total non stimulated salivate flow of patients who underwent hyperfractionated therapy for the treatment of squamous cell carcinoma of mouth and oropharynx. Samples of twelve male patients saliva from Erasto Gaertner Hospital in Curitiba, PR, Brazil, were examined. Two samples of saliva were collected from each patient, the first one before the beginning of the radiotherapy, and the second at the end of the treatment. As a result, we obtained salivary loss in 91.7% of the patients, with a percentage of total salivary flow loss of 62.9%, registered in the second collection. We concluded that the hyperfractionated therapy causes a marked xerostomia when the major salivary glands are in the radiated field. (author)

  16. Outcome prediction after mild and complicated mild traumatic brain injury: external validation of existing models and identification of new predictors using the TRACK-TBI pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingsma, Hester F; Yue, John K; Maas, Andrew I R; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Manley, Geoffrey T

    2015-01-15

    Although the majority of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) recover completely, some still suffer from disabling ailments at 3 or 6 months. We validated existing prognostic models for mTBI and explored predictors of poor outcome after mTBI. We selected patients with mTBI from TRACK-TBI Pilot, an unselected observational cohort of TBI patients from three centers in the United States. We validated two prognostic models for the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOS-E) at 6 months after injury. One model was based on the CRASH study data and another from Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Possible predictors of 3- and 6-month GOS-E were analyzed with univariate and multi-variable proportional odds regression models. Of the 386 of 485 patients included in the study (median age, 44 years; interquartile range, 27-58), 75% (n=290) presented with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) of 15. In this mTBI population, both previously developed models had a poor performance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.49-0.56). In multivariable analyses, the strongest predictors of lower 3- and 6-month GOS-E were older age, pre-existing psychiatric conditions, and lower education. Injury caused by assault, extracranial injuries, and lower GCS were also predictive of lower GOS-E. Existing models for mTBI performed unsatisfactorily. Our study shows that, for mTBI, different predictors are relevant as for moderate and severe TBI. These include age, pre-existing psychiatric conditions, and lower education. Development of a valid prediction model for mTBI patients requires further research efforts.

  17. Outcome Prediction after Mild and Complicated Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: External Validation of Existing Models and Identification of New Predictors Using the TRACK-TBI Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingsma, Hester F.; Yue, John K.; Maas, Andrew I.R.; Steyerberg, Ewout W.; Cooper, Shelly R.; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Gordon, Wayne A.; Menon, David K.; Mukherjee, Pratik; Okonkwo, David O.; Puccio, Ava M.; Schnyer, David M.; Valadka, Alex B.; Vassar, Mary J.; Yuh, Esther L.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Although the majority of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) recover completely, some still suffer from disabling ailments at 3 or 6 months. We validated existing prognostic models for mTBI and explored predictors of poor outcome after mTBI. We selected patients with mTBI from TRACK-TBI Pilot, an unselected observational cohort of TBI patients from three centers in the United States. We validated two prognostic models for the Glasgow Outcome Scale Extended (GOS-E) at 6 months after injury. One model was based on the CRASH study data and another from Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Possible predictors of 3- and 6-month GOS-E were analyzed with univariate and multi-variable proportional odds regression models. Of the 386 of 485 patients included in the study (median age, 44 years; interquartile range, 27–58), 75% (n=290) presented with a Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) of 15. In this mTBI population, both previously developed models had a poor performance (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.49–0.56). In multivariable analyses, the strongest predictors of lower 3- and 6-month GOS-E were older age, pre-existing psychiatric conditions, and lower education. Injury caused by assault, extracranial injuries, and lower GCS were also predictive of lower GOS-E. Existing models for mTBI performed unsatisfactorily. Our study shows that, for mTBI, different predictors are relevant as for moderate and severe TBI. These include age, pre-existing psychiatric conditions, and lower education. Development of a valid prediction model for mTBI patients requires further research efforts. PMID:25025611

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging for outcome prediction in mild traumatic brain injury: a TRACK-TBI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuh, Esther L; Cooper, Shelly R; Mukherjee, Pratik; Yue, John K; Lingsma, Hester F; Gordon, Wayne A; Valadka, Alex B; Okonkwo, David O; Schnyer, David M; Vassar, Mary J; Maas, Andrew I R; Manley, Geoffrey T

    2014-09-01

    We evaluated 3T diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for white matter injury in 76 adult mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients at the semiacute stage (11.2±3.3 days), employing both whole-brain voxel-wise and region-of-interest (ROI) approaches. The subgroup of 32 patients with any traumatic intracranial lesion on either day-of-injury computed tomography (CT) or semiacute magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in numerous white matter tracts, compared to 50 control subjects. In contrast, 44 CT/MRI-negative mTBI patients demonstrated no significant difference in any DTI parameter, compared to controls. To determine the clinical relevance of DTI, we evaluated correlations between 3- and 6-month outcome and imaging, demographic/socioeconomic, and clinical predictors. Statistically significant univariable predictors of 3-month Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOS-E) included MRI evidence for contusion (odds ratio [OR] 4.9 per unit decrease in GOS-E; p=0.01), ≥1 ROI with severely reduced FA (OR, 3.9; p=0.005), neuropsychiatric history (OR, 3.3; p=0.02), age (OR, 1.07/year; p=0.002), and years of education (OR, 0.79/year; p=0.01). Significant predictors of 6-month GOS-E included ≥1 ROI with severely reduced FA (OR, 2.7; p=0.048), neuropsychiatric history (OR, 3.7; p=0.01), and years of education (OR, 0.82/year; p=0.03). For the subset of 37 patients lacking neuropsychiatric and substance abuse history, MRI surpassed all other predictors for both 3- and 6-month outcome prediction. This is the first study to compare DTI in individual mTBI patients to conventional imaging, clinical, and demographic/socioeconomic characteristics for outcome prediction. DTI demonstrated utility in an inclusive group of patients with heterogeneous backgrounds, as well as in a subset of patients without neuropsychiatric or substance abuse history.

  19. Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Outcome Prediction in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A TRACK-TBI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuh, Esther L.; Cooper, Shelly R.; Mukherjee, Pratik; Yue, John K.; Lingsma, Hester F.; Gordon, Wayne A.; Valadka, Alex B.; Okonkwo, David O.; Schnyer, David M.; Vassar, Mary J.; Maas, Andrew I.R.; Casey, Scott S.; Cheong, Maxwell; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Hricik, Allison J.; Inoue, Tomoo; Menon, David K.; Morabito, Diane J.; Pacheco, Jennifer L.; Puccio, Ava M.; Sinha, Tuhin K.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated 3T diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) for white matter injury in 76 adult mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients at the semiacute stage (11.2±3.3 days), employing both whole-brain voxel-wise and region-of-interest (ROI) approaches. The subgroup of 32 patients with any traumatic intracranial lesion on either day-of-injury computed tomography (CT) or semiacute magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) demonstrated reduced fractional anisotropy (FA) in numerous white matter tracts, compared to 50 control subjects. In contrast, 44 CT/MRI-negative mTBI patients demonstrated no significant difference in any DTI parameter, compared to controls. To determine the clinical relevance of DTI, we evaluated correlations between 3- and 6-month outcome and imaging, demographic/socioeconomic, and clinical predictors. Statistically significant univariable predictors of 3-month Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOS-E) included MRI evidence for contusion (odds ratio [OR] 4.9 per unit decrease in GOS-E; p=0.01), ≥1 ROI with severely reduced FA (OR, 3.9; p=0.005), neuropsychiatric history (OR, 3.3; p=0.02), age (OR, 1.07/year; p=0.002), and years of education (OR, 0.79/year; p=0.01). Significant predictors of 6-month GOS-E included ≥1 ROI with severely reduced FA (OR, 2.7; p=0.048), neuropsychiatric history (OR, 3.7; p=0.01), and years of education (OR, 0.82/year; p=0.03). For the subset of 37 patients lacking neuropsychiatric and substance abuse history, MRI surpassed all other predictors for both 3- and 6-month outcome prediction. This is the first study to compare DTI in individual mTBI patients to conventional imaging, clinical, and demographic/socioeconomic characteristics for outcome prediction. DTI demonstrated utility in an inclusive group of patients with heterogeneous backgrounds, as well as in a subset of patients without neuropsychiatric or substance abuse history. PMID:24742275

  20. Variation in structure and process of care in traumatic brain injury: Provider profiles of European Neurotrauma Centers participating in the CENTER-TBI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Cnossen (Maryse); S. Polinder (Suzanne); Lingsma, H.F. (Hester F.); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew); D.K. Menon (David ); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); Adams, H. (Hadie); Alessandro, M. (Masala); J. Allanson (Judith); Amrein, K. (Krisztina); Andaluz, N. (Norberto); N. Andelic (Nada); Andrea, N. (Nanni); L. Andreassen (Lasse); Anke, A. (Audny); Antoni, A. (Anna); Ardon, H. (Hilko); G. Audibert (Gérard); Auslands, K. (Kaspars); Azouvi, P. (Philippe); Baciu, C. (Camelia); Bacon, A. (Andrew); Badenes, R. (Rafael); Baglin, T. (Trevor); Bartels, R. (Ronald); Barzó, P. (Pál); Bauerfeind, U. (Ursula); R. Beer (Ronny); Belda, F.J. (Francisco Javier); B.-M. Bellander (Bo-Michael); A. Belli (Antonio); Bellier, R. (Rémy); H. Benali (Habib); Benard, T. (Thierry); M. Berardino (Maurizio); Beretta, L. (Luigi); Beynon, C. (Christopher); Bilotta, F. (Federico); H. Binder (Harald); Biqiri, E. (Erta); Blaabjerg, M. (Morten); Borgen, L.S. (Lund Stine); Bouzat, P. (Pierre); Bragge, P. (Peter); A. Brazinova (Alexandra); F. Brehar (Felix); Brorsson, C. (Camilla); Buki, A. (Andras); M. Bullinger (Monika); Bučková, V. (Veronika); Calappi, E. (Emiliana); P. Cameron (Peter); Carbayo, L.G. (Lozano Guillermo); Carise, E. (Elsa); Carpenter, C.; Castaño-León, A.M. (Ana M.); Causin, F. (Francesco); Chevallard, G. (Giorgio); A. Chieregato (Arturo); G. Citerio (Giuseppe); M. Coburn (Mark); J.P. Coles (Jonathan P.); Cooper, J.D. (Jamie D.); Correia, M. (Marta); A. Covic (Amra); N. Curry (Nicola); E. Czeiter (Endre); M. Czosnyka (Marek); Dahyot-Fizelier, C. (Claire); F. Damas (François); P. Damas (Pierre); H. Dawes (Helen); De Keyser, V. (Véronique); F. Della Corte (Francesco); B. Depreitere (Bart); Ding, S. (Shenghao); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); K. Dizdarevic (Kemal); Dulière, G.-L. (Guy-Loup); Dzeko, A. (Adelaida); G. Eapen (George); Engemann, H. (Heiko); A. Ercole (Ari); P. Esser (Patrick); Ezer, E. (Erzsébet); M. Fabricius (Martin); V.L. Feigin (V.); Feng, J. (Junfeng); Foks, K. (Kelly); F. Fossi (Francesca); Francony, G. (Gilles); J. Frantzén (Janek); Freo, U. (Ulderico); S.K. Frisvold (Shirin Kordasti); Furmanov, A. (Alex); P. Gagliardo (Pablo); D. Galanaud (Damien); G. Gao (Guoyi); K. Geleijns (Karin); A. Ghuysen (Alexandre); Giraud, B. (Benoit); Glocker, B. (Ben); Gomez, P.A. (Pedro A.); Grossi, F. (Francesca); R.L. Gruen (Russell); Gupta, D. (Deepak); J.A. Haagsma (Juanita); E. Hadzic (Ermin); I. Haitsma (Iain); J.A. Hartings (Jed); R. Helbok (Raimund); E. Helseth (Eirik); Hertle, D. (Daniel); S. Hill (Sean); Hoedemaekers, A. (Astrid); S. Hoefer (Stefan); P.J. Hutchinson (Peter J.); Håberg, A.K. (Asta Kristine); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); Janciak, I. (Ivan); K. Janssens (Koen); J.-Y. Jiang (Ji-Yao); Jones, K. (Kelly); Kalala, J.-P. (Jean-Pierre); Kamnitsas, K. (Konstantinos); Karan, M. (Mladen); Karau, J. (Jana); A. Katila (Ari); M. Kaukonen (Maija); Keeling, D. (David); Kerforne, T. (Thomas); N. Ketharanathan (Naomi); J. Kettunen (Johannes); Kivisaari, R. (Riku); A.G. Kolias (Angelos G.); Kolumbán, B. (Bálint); E.J.O. Kompanje (Erwin); D. Kondziella (Daniel); L.-O. Koskinen (Lars-Owe); Kovács, N. (Noémi); F. Kalovits (Ferenc); A. Lagares (Alfonso); L. Lanyon (Linda); S. Laureys (Steven); Lauritzen, M. (Martin); F.E. Lecky (Fiona); C. Ledig (Christian); R. Lefering; V. Legrand (Valerie); Lei, J. (Jin); L. Levi (Leon); R. Lightfoot (Roger); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); D. Loeckx (Dirk); Lozano, A. (Angels); Luddington, R. (Roger); Luijten-Arts, C. (Chantal); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew I.R.); MacDonald, S. (Stephen); MacFayden, C. (Charles); M. Maegele; M. Majdan (Marek); Major, S. (Sebastian); A. Manara (Alex); Manhes, P. (Pauline); G. Manley (Geoffrey); Martin, D. (Didier); C. Martino (Costanza); Maruenda, A. (Armando); H. Maréchal (Hugues); Mastelova, D. (Dagmara); Mattern, J. (Julia); C. McMahon (Catherine); Melegh, B. (Béla); T. Menovsky (Tomas); C. Morganti-Kossmann (Cristina); Mulazzi, D. (Davide); Mutschler, M. (Manuel); H. Mühlan (Holger); Negru, A. (Ancuta); D. Nelson (David); E. Neugebauer (Eddy); V.F. Newcombe (Virginia F.); Noirhomme, Q. (Quentin); Nyirádi, J. (József); M. Oddo (Mauro); Oldenbeuving, A. (Annemarie); M. Oresic (Matej); Ortolano, F. (Fabrizio); A. Palotie (Aarno); P.M. Parizel; Patruno, A. (Adriana); J.-F. Payen (Jean-François); Perera, N. (Natascha); V. Perlbarg (Vincent); Persona, P. (Paolo); W.C. Peul (Wilco); N. Pichon (Nicolas); Piilgaard, H. (Henning); A. Piippo (Anna); Pili, F.S. (Floury Sébastien); M. Pirinen (Matti); H. Ples (Horia); Pomposo, I. (Inigo); M. Psota (Marek); P. Pullens (Pim); L. Puybasset (Louis); A. Ragauskas (Arminas); Raj, R. (Rahul); Rambadagalla, M. (Malinka); Rehorčíková, V. (Veronika); J.K.J. Rhodes (Jonathan K.J.); S. Richardson (Sylvia); S. Ripatti (Samuli); S. Rocka (Saulius); Rodier, N. (Nicolas); Roe, C. (Cecilie); Roise, O. (Olav); Roks, G. (Gerwin); Romegoux, P. (Pauline); J. Rosand (Jonathan); Rosenfeld, J. (Jeffrey); C. Rosenlund (Christina); G. Rosenthal (Guy); R. Rossaint (Rolf); S. Rossi (Sandra); Rostalski, T. (Tim); Rueckert, D.L. (Danie L.); Ruiz De Arcaute, F. (Felix); M. Rusnák (Martin); Sacchi, M. (Marco); Sahakian, B. (Barbara); J. Sahuquillo (Juan); O. Sakowitz (Oliver); Sala, F. (Francesca); Sanchez-Pena, P. (Paola); Sanchez-Porras, R. (Renan); Sandor, J. (Janos); Santos, E. (Edgar); N. Sasse (Nadine); Sasu, L. (Luminita); Savo, D. (Davide); I.B. Schipper (Inger); Schlößer, B. (Barbara); S. Schmidt (Silke); Schneider, A. (Annette); H. Schoechl (Herbert); G.G. Schoonman; R. Schou (Rico); E. Schwendenwein (Elisabeth); Schöll, M. (Michael); Sir, O. (Özcan); T. Skandsen (Toril); Smakman, L. (Lidwien); D. Smeets (Dirk); Smielewski, P. (Peter); Sorinola, A. (Abayomi); Stamatakis, E.L. (Emmanue L.); S. Stanworth (Simon); Stegemann, K. (Katrin); Steinbüchel, N. (Nicole); R. Stevens (Robert); W. Stewart (William); N. Stocchetti (Nino); Sundström, N. (Nina); Synnot, A. (Anneliese); J. Szabó (József); J. Söderberg (Jeannette); F.S. Taccone (Fabio); Tamás, V. (Viktória); Tanskanen, P. (Päivi); A. Tascu (Alexandru); Taylor, M.S. (Mark Steven); Te Ao, B. (Braden); O. Tenovuo (Olli); Teodorani, G. (Guido); A. Theadom (Alice); Thomas, M. (Matt); D. Tibboel (Dick); C.M. Tolias (Christos M.); Tshibanda, J.-F.L. (Jean-Flory Luaba); Tudora, C.M. (Cristina Maria); P. Vajkoczy (Peter); Valeinis, E. (Egils); W. van Hecke (Wim); D. Van Praag (Dominique); D. Van Roost (Dirk); Van Vlierberghe, E. (Eline); Vande Vyvere, T. (Thijs); Vanhaudenhuyse, A. (Audrey); A. Vargiolu (Alessia); E. Vega (Emmanuel); J. Verheyden (Jan); P.M. Vespa (Paul M.); A. Vik (Anne); R. Vilcinis (Rimantas); Vizzino, G. (Giacinta); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); V. Volovici (Victor); P. Vulekovic (Peter); Vámos, Z. (Zoltán); Wade, D. (Derick); Wang, K.K.W. (Kevin K.W.); Wang, L. (Lei); Wildschut, E. (Eno); G. Williams (Guy); Willumsen, L. (Lisette); Wilson, A. (Adam); L. Wilson (Lindsay); Winkler, M.K.L. (Maren K. L.); P. Ylén (Peter); Younsi, A. (Alexander); M. Zaaroor (Menashe); Zhang, Z. (Zhiqun); Zheng, Z. (Zelong); Zumbo, F. (Fabrizio); De Lange, S. (Stefanie); G.C.W. De Ruiter (Godard C.W.); Den Boogert, H. (Hugo); Van Dijck, J. (Jeroen); T.A. van Essen (T.); C.M. van Heugten (Caroline M.); M. van der Jagt (Mathieu); J. van der Naalt (Joukje)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The strength of evidence underpinning care and treatment recommendations in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is low. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) has been proposed as a framework to provide evidence for optimal care for TBI patients. The first step in CER is to map

  1. Variation in structure and process of care in traumatic brain injury: Provider profiles of European Neurotrauma Centers participating in the CENTER-TBI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Cnossen; S. Polinder (Suzanne); Lingsma, H.F. (Hester F.); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew); D.K. Menon (David ); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); Adams, H. (Hadie); Alessandro, M. (Masala); J. Allanson (Judith); Amrein, K. (Krisztina); Andaluz, N. (Norberto); N. Andelic (Nada); Andrea, N. (Nanni); L. Andreassen (Lasse); Anke, A. (Audny); Antoni, A. (Anna); Ardon, H. (Hilko); G. Audibert (Gérard); Auslands, K. (Kaspars); Azouvi, P. (Philippe); Baciu, C. (Camelia); Bacon, A. (Andrew); Badenes, R. (Rafael); Baglin, T. (Trevor); Bartels, R. (Ronald); Barzó, P. (Pál); Bauerfeind, U. (Ursula); R. Beer (Ronny); Belda, F.J. (Francisco Javier); B.-M. Bellander (Bo-Michael); A. Belli (Antonio); Bellier, R. (Rémy); H. Benali (Habib); Benard, T. (Thierry); M. Berardino (Maurizio); Beretta, L. (Luigi); Beynon, C. (Christopher); Bilotta, F. (Federico); H. Binder (Harald); Biqiri, E. (Erta); Blaabjerg, M. (Morten); Borgen, L.S. (Lund Stine); Bouzat, P. (Pierre); Bragge, P. (Peter); A. Brazinova (Alexandra); F. Brehar (Felix); Brorsson, C. (Camilla); Buki, A. (Andras); M. Bullinger (Monika); Bučková, V. (Veronika); Calappi, E. (Emiliana); P. Cameron (Peter); Carbayo, L.G. (Lozano Guillermo); Carise, E. (Elsa); Carpenter, C.; Castaño-León, A.M. (Ana M.); Causin, F. (Francesco); Chevallard, G. (Giorgio); A. Chieregato (Arturo); G. Citerio (Giuseppe); M. Coburn (Mark); J.P. Coles (Jonathan P.); Cooper, J.D. (Jamie D.); Correia, M. (Marta); A. Covic (Amra); N. Curry (Nicola); E. Czeiter (Endre); M. Czosnyka (Marek); Dahyot-Fizelier, C. (Claire); F. Damas (François); P. Damas (Pierre); H. Dawes (Helen); De Keyser, V. (Véronique); F. Della Corte (Francesco); B. Depreitere (Bart); Ding, S. (Shenghao); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); K. Dizdarevic (Kemal); Dulière, G.-L. (Guy-Loup); Dzeko, A. (Adelaida); G. Eapen (George); Engemann, H. (Heiko); A. Ercole (Ari); P. Esser (Patrick); Ezer, E. (Erzsébet); M. Fabricius (Martin); V.L. Feigin (V.); Feng, J. (Junfeng); Foks, K. (Kelly); F. Fossi (Francesca); Francony, G. (Gilles); J. Frantzén (Janek); Freo, U. (Ulderico); S.K. Frisvold (Shirin Kordasti); Furmanov, A. (Alex); P. Gagliardo (Pablo); D. Galanaud (Damien); G. Gao (Guoyi); K. Geleijns (Karin); A. Ghuysen (Alexandre); Giraud, B. (Benoit); Glocker, B. (Ben); Gomez, P.A. (Pedro A.); Grossi, F. (Francesca); R.L. Gruen (Russell); Gupta, D. (Deepak); J.A. Haagsma (Juanita); E. Hadzic (Ermin); I. Haitsma (Iain); J.A. Hartings (Jed); R. Helbok (Raimund); E. Helseth (Eirik); Hertle, D. (Daniel); S. Hill (Sean); Hoedemaekers, A. (Astrid); S. Hoefer (Stefan); P.J. Hutchinson (Peter J.); Håberg, A.K. (Asta Kristine); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); Janciak, I. (Ivan); K. Janssens (Koen); J.-Y. Jiang (Ji-Yao); Jones, K. (Kelly); Kalala, J.-P. (Jean-Pierre); Kamnitsas, K. (Konstantinos); Karan, M. (Mladen); Karau, J. (Jana); A. Katila (Ari); M. Kaukonen (Maija); Keeling, D. (David); Kerforne, T. (Thomas); N. Ketharanathan (Naomi); J. Kettunen (Johannes); Kivisaari, R. (Riku); A.G. Kolias (Angelos G.); Kolumbán, B. (Bálint); E.J.O. Kompanje (Erwin); D. Kondziella (Daniel); L.-O. Koskinen (Lars-Owe); Kovács, N. (Noémi); F. Kalovits (Ferenc); A. Lagares (Alfonso); L. Lanyon (Linda); S. Laureys (Steven); Lauritzen, M. (Martin); F.E. Lecky (Fiona); C. Ledig (Christian); R. Lefering; V. Legrand (Valerie); Lei, J. (Jin); L. Levi (Leon); R. Lightfoot (Roger); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); D. Loeckx (Dirk); Lozano, A. (Angels); Luddington, R. (Roger); Luijten-Arts, C. (Chantal); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew I.R.); MacDonald, S. (Stephen); MacFayden, C. (Charles); M. Maegele; M. Majdan (Marek); Major, S. (Sebastian); A. Manara (Alex); Manhes, P. (Pauline); G. Manley (Geoffrey); Martin, D. (Didier); C. Martino (Costanza); Maruenda, A. (Armando); H. Maréchal (Hugues); Mastelova, D. (Dagmara); Mattern, J. (Julia); C. McMahon (Catherine); Melegh, B. (Béla); T. Menovsky (Tomas); C. Morganti-Kossmann (Cristina); Mulazzi, D. (Davide); Mutschler, M. (Manuel); H. Mühlan (Holger); Negru, A. (Ancuta); D. Nelson (David); E. Neugebauer (Eddy); V.F. Newcombe (Virginia F.); Noirhomme, Q. (Quentin); Nyirádi, J. (József); M. Oddo (Mauro); Oldenbeuving, A. (Annemarie); M. Oresic (Matej); Ortolano, F. (Fabrizio); A. Palotie (Aarno); P.M. Parizel; Patruno, A. (Adriana); J.-F. Payen (Jean-François); Perera, N. (Natascha); V. Perlbarg (Vincent); Persona, P. (Paolo); W.C. Peul (Wilco); N. Pichon (Nicolas); Piilgaard, H. (Henning); A. Piippo (Anna); Pili, F.S. (Floury Sébastien); M. Pirinen (Matti); H. Ples (Horia); Pomposo, I. (Inigo); M. Psota (Marek); P. Pullens (Pim); L. Puybasset (Louis); A. Ragauskas (Arminas); Raj, R. (Rahul); Rambadagalla, M. (Malinka); Rehorčíková, V. (Veronika); J.K.J. Rhodes (Jonathan K.J.); S. Richardson (Sylvia); S. Ripatti (Samuli); S. Rocka (Saulius); Rodier, N. (Nicolas); Roe, C. (Cecilie); Roise, O. (Olav); Roks, G. (Gerwin); Romegoux, P. (Pauline); J. Rosand (Jonathan); Rosenfeld, J. (Jeffrey); C. Rosenlund (Christina); G. Rosenthal (Guy); R. Rossaint (Rolf); S. Rossi (Sandra); Rostalski, T. (Tim); Rueckert, D.L. (Danie L.); Ruiz De Arcaute, F. (Felix); M. Rusnák (Martin); Sacchi, M. (Marco); Sahakian, B. (Barbara); J. Sahuquillo (Juan); O. Sakowitz (Oliver); Sala, F. (Francesca); Sanchez-Pena, P. (Paola); Sanchez-Porras, R. (Renan); Sandor, J. (Janos); Santos, E. (Edgar); N. Sasse (Nadine); Sasu, L. (Luminita); Savo, D. (Davide); I.B. Schipper (Inger); Schlößer, B. (Barbara); S. Schmidt (Silke); Schneider, A. (Annette); H. Schoechl (Herbert); G.G. Schoonman; R. Schou (Rico); E. Schwendenwein (Elisabeth); Schöll, M. (Michael); Sir, O. (Özcan); T. Skandsen (Toril); Smakman, L. (Lidwien); D. Smeets (Dirk); Smielewski, P. (Peter); Sorinola, A. (Abayomi); Stamatakis, E.L. (Emmanue L.); S. Stanworth (Simon); Stegemann, K. (Katrin); Steinbüchel, N. (Nicole); R. Stevens (Robert); W. Stewart (William); N. Stocchetti (Nino); Sundström, N. (Nina); Synnot, A. (Anneliese); J. Szabó (József); J. Söderberg (Jeannette); F.S. Taccone (Fabio); Tamás, V. (Viktória); Tanskanen, P. (Päivi); A. Tascu (Alexandru); Taylor, M.S. (Mark Steven); Te Ao, B. (Braden); O. Tenovuo (Olli); Teodorani, G. (Guido); A. Theadom (Alice); Thomas, M. (Matt); D. Tibboel (Dick); C.M. Tolias (Christos M.); Tshibanda, J.-F.L. (Jean-Flory Luaba); Tudora, C.M. (Cristina Maria); P. Vajkoczy (Peter); Valeinis, E. (Egils); W. van Hecke (Wim); D. Van Praag (Dominique); D. Van Roost (Dirk); Van Vlierberghe, E. (Eline); Vande Vyvere, T. (Thijs); Vanhaudenhuyse, A. (Audrey); A. Vargiolu (Alessia); E. Vega (Emmanuel); J. Verheyden (Jan); P.M. Vespa (Paul M.); A. Vik (Anne); R. Vilcinis (Rimantas); Vizzino, G. (Giacinta); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); V. Volovici (Victor); P. Vulekovic (Peter); Vámos, Z. (Zoltán); Wade, D. (Derick); Wang, K.K.W. (Kevin K.W.); Wang, L. (Lei); Wildschut, E. (Eno); G. Williams (Guy); Willumsen, L. (Lisette); Wilson, A. (Adam); L. Wilson (Lindsay); Winkler, M.K.L. (Maren K. L.); P. Ylén (Peter); Younsi, A. (Alexander); M. Zaaroor (Menashe); Zhang, Z. (Zhiqun); Zheng, Z. (Zelong); Zumbo, F. (Fabrizio); De Lange, S. (Stefanie); G.C.W. De Ruiter (Godard C.W.); Den Boogert, H. (Hugo); Van Dijck, J. (Jeroen); T.A. van Essen (T.); C.M. van Heugten (Caroline M.); M. van der Jagt (Mathieu); J. van der Naalt (Joukje)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: The strength of evidence underpinning care and treatment recommendations in traumatic brain injury (TBI) is low. Comparative effectiveness research (CER) has been proposed as a framework to provide evidence for optimal care for TBI patients. The first step in CER is to map

  2. Meta-analytic methods and the importance of non-TBI factors related to outcome in mild traumatic brain injury: response to Bigler et al. (2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrabee, Glenn J; Binder, Laurence M; Rohling, Martin L; Ploetz, Danielle M

    2013-01-01

    Bigler et al. (2013, The Clinical Neuropsychologist) contend that weak methodology and poor quality of the studies comprising our recent meta-analysis led us to miss detecting a subgroup of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) characterized by persisting symptomatic complaint and positive biomarkers for neurological damage. Our computation of non-significant Q, tau(2), and I(2) statistics contradicts the existence of a subgroup of mTBI with poor outcome, or variation in effect size as a function of quality of research design. Consistent with this conclusion, the largest single contributor to our meta-analysis, Dikmen, Machamer, Winn, and Temkin (1995, Neuropsychology, 9, 80) yielded an effect size, -0.02, that was smaller than our overall effect size of -0.07 despite using the most liberal definition of mTBI: loss of consciousness less than 1 hour, with no exclusion of subjects who had positive CT scans. The evidence is weak for biomarkers of mTBI, such as diffusion tensor imaging and for demonstrable neuropathology in uncomplicated mTBI. Postconcussive symptoms, and reduced neuropsychological test scores are not specific to mTBI but can result from pre-existing psychosocial and psychiatric problems, expectancy effects and diagnosis threat. Moreover, neuropsychological impairment is seen in a variety of primary psychiatric disorders, which themselves are predictive of persistent complaints following mTBI. We urge use of prospective studies with orthopedic trauma controls in future investigations of mTBI to control for these confounding factors.

  3. ED disposition of the Glasgow Coma Scale 13 to 15 traumatic brain injury patient: Analysis of the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in TBI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Ratcliff (Jonathan); O. Adeoye (Opeolu); D. Lindsell; K.W. Hart (Kimberly); A. Pancioli (Arthur); D.J. McMullan (Dominic); J.K. Yue (John); D.K. Nishijima (Daniel); W.A. Gordon (Wayne); A.B. Valadka (Alex); D. Okonkwo (David); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew); G. Manley (Geoffrey)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractObjective Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients are frequently admitted to high levels of care despite limited evidence suggesting benefit. Such decisions may contribute to the significant cost of caring for mTBI patients. Understanding the factors that drive disposition decision

  4. Intensive combined modality therapy including low-dose TBI in high-risk Ewing's sarcoma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinsella, T.J.; Glaubiger, D.; Diesseroth, A.; Makuch, R.; Waller, B.; Pizzo, P.; Glatstein, E.

    1983-12-01

    Twenty-four high-risk Ewing's sarcoma patients were treated on an intensive combined modality protocol including low-dose fractionated total body irradiaiton (TBI) and autologous bone marrow infusion (ABMI). Twenty patients (83%) achieved a complete clinical response to the primary and/or metastatic sites following induction therapy. The median disease-free interval was 18 months, and nine patients remain disease-free with a follow-up of 22 to 72 months. Local failure as a manifestation of initial relapse occurred in only three patients (15%), each having synchronous distant failure. Eight patients failed initially with only distant metastases, usually within 1-2 years following a complete clinical response. Two patterns of granulocyte recovery following consolidative therapy (including TBI and ABMI) were recognized. The time to platelet recovery was different for the groups with early and late granulocyte recovery. Patients with late recovery did not tolerate maintenance chemotherapy. However, there was no difference in disease-free and overall survival, when comparing the groups with early and late granulocyte recovery. It is concluded that these high-risk Ewing's sarcoma patients remain a poor-prognosis group in spite of intensive combined modality therapy including low-dose TBI. The control of microscopic systemic disease remains the major challenge to improving the cure rate. A new combined modality protocol with high-dose 'therapeutic' TBI (800 rad/2 fractions) is being used and the protocol design is outlined.

  5. The contribution of retrospective memory, attention and executive functions to the prospective and retrospective components of prospective memory following TBI.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Clune-Ryberg, Melanie

    2011-01-01

    Despite the prevalence of prospective memory (PM) problems, relatively little is known about the processes underlying impairment following TBI. This study sought to examine PM performance, using a multiple-task, multiple-response video-based paradigm in which initial encoding of the cue-action associations was ensured (Video-Assessment of Prospective Memory; VAPM).

  6. Long-term renal toxicity in children following fractionated total-body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstein, Johanna; Meyer, Andreas; Fruehauf, Joerg; Karstens, Johann H.; Bremer, Michael [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Medical School Hannover (Germany); Sykora, Karl-Walter [Dept. of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology, Medical School Hannover (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: to retrospectively assess the incidence and time course of renal dysfunction in children ({<=} 16 years) following total-body irradiation (TBI) before allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Patients and methods: between 1986 and 2003, 92 children (median age, 11 years; range, 3-16 years) underwent TBI before allogeneic SCT. 43 of them had a minimum follow-up of 12 months (median, 51 months; range, 12-186 months) and were included into this analysis. Conditioning regimen included chemotherapy and fractionated TBI with 12 Gy (n = 26) or 11.1 Gy (n = 17). In one patient, renal dose was limited to 10 Gy by customized renal shielding due to known nephropathy prior to SCt. Renal dysfunction was defined as an increase of serum creatinine > 1.25 times the upper limit of age-dependent normal. Results: twelve children (28%) experienced an episode of renal dysfunction after a median of 2 months (range, 1-10 months) following SCT. In all but one patient renal dysfunction was transient and resolved after a median of 8 months (range, 3-16 months). One single patient developed persistent renal dysfunction with onset at 10 months after SCT. None of these patients required dialysis. The actuarial 3-year freedom from persistent renal toxicity for children surviving > 12 months after SCt was 97.3%. Conclusion: the incidence of persistent renal dysfunction after fractionated TBI with total doses {<=} 12 Gy was very low in this analysis. (orig.)

  7. Assessment and rehabilitation of central sensory impairments for balance in mTBI using auditory biofeedback: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fino, Peter C; Peterka, Robert J; Hullar, Timothy E; Murchison, Chad; Horak, Fay B; Chesnutt, James C; King, Laurie A

    2017-02-23

    Complaints of imbalance are common non-resolving signs in individuals with post-concussive syndrome. Yet, there is no consensus rehabilitation for non-resolving balance complaints following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The heterogeneity of balance deficits and varied rates of recovery suggest varied etiologies and a need for interventions that address the underlying causes of poor balance function. Our central hypothesis is that most chronic balance deficits after mTBI result from impairments in central sensorimotor integration that may be helped by rehabilitation. Two studies are described to 1) characterize balance deficits in people with mTBI who have chronic, non-resolving balance deficits compared to healthy control subjects, and 2) determine the efficacy of an augmented vestibular rehabilitation program using auditory biofeedback to improve central sensorimotor integration, static and dynamic balance, and functional activity in patients with chronic mTBI. Two studies are described. Study 1 is a cross-sectional study to take place jointly at Oregon Health and Science University and the VA Portland Health Care System. The study participants will be individuals with non-resolving complaints of balance following mTBI and age- and gender-matched controls who meet all inclusion criteria. The primary outcome will be measures of central sensorimotor integration derived from a novel central sensorimotor integration test. Study 2 is a randomized controlled intervention to take place at Oregon Health & Science University. In this study, participants from Study 1 with mTBI and abnormal central sensorimotor integration will be randomized into two rehabilitation interventions. The interventions will be 6 weeks of vestibular rehabilitation 1) with or 2) without the use of an auditory biofeedback device. The primary outcome measure is the daily activity of the participants measured using an inertial sensor. The results of these two studies will improve our

  8. Comparison of hyperfractionated conformal photon with conformal mixed neutron/photon irradiation in locally advanced prostate cancer; Comparaison d`une irradiation hyperfractionnee conformationnelle par photons seuls et d`une irradiation conformationelle combinant photons et neutrons pour le traitement des tumeurs de la prostate localement avancees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forman, J.D.; Shamsa, F.; Maughan, R.L.; Duclos, M.; Orton, C. [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States)

    1996-12-31

    In an attempt to improve the probability of complication-free local control for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer, a series of dose-finding studies have been conducted at wayne STATE University using conformal neutron and hyperfractionated photon irradiation. In total, 96 patents with locally advanced prostate cancer (T3/T4 N0/N1 M0, and/or Gleason score {>=} 8) were treated in two prospective studies. Forty-seven patients received conformal neutron/photon (15 NGy + 18 PhGy) and 49 patients were treated in a dose-escalation study using conformal photons (25 patients/78 Gy and 24 patients/83 Gy minimum dose). The median follow-up for both studies was 20 months (range 6-36 months). There was no significant difference in the rate of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) or gastro-urinary (GU) morbidity between the two groups. However, the neutron treated patients has a significantly higher rate of moderate (14 %) and severe (12 %) hip stiffness. The rates of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) decline and 12-month negative biopsy were comparable. In conclusion, the therapeutic gain of neo-adjuvant hormonal therapy in combination with photon hyperfractionation to 83 Gy appears identical to that seen with the mixed neutron-photon dose of 15 NGy + 18 PhGy. Further efforts at improving the therapeutic ratio of radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced prostate cancer should be undertaken. (author). 20 refs.

  9. Comparison of neurite density measured by MRI and histology after TBI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyang Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Functional recovery after brain injury in animals is improved by marrow stromal cells (MSC which stimulate neurite reorganization. However, MRI measurement of neurite density changes after injury has not been performed. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of MRI measurement of neurite density in an animal model of traumatic brain injury (TBI with and without MSC treatment. METHODS: Fifteen male Wistar rats, were treated with saline (n = 6 or MSCs (n = 9 and were sacrificed at 6 weeks after controlled cortical impact (CCI. Healthy non-CCI rats (n = 5, were also employed. Ex-vivo MRI scans were performed two days after the rats were sacrificed. Multiple-shell hybrid diffusion imaging encoding scheme and spherical harmonic expansion of a two-compartment water diffusion displacement model were used to extract neurite related parameters. Bielshowski and Luxol Fast blue was used for staining axons and myelin, respectively. Modified Morris water maze and neurological severity score (mNSS test were performed for functional evaluation. The treatment effects, the correlations between neurite densities measured by MRI and histology, and the correlations between MRI and functional variables were calculated by repeated measures analysis of variance, the regression correlation analysis tests, and spearman correlation coefficients. RESULTS: Neurite densities exhibited a significant correlation (R(2>0.80, p<1E-20 between MRI and immuno-histochemistry measurements with 95% lower bound of the intra-correlation coefficient (ICC as 0.86. The conventional fractional anisotropy (FA correlated moderately with histological neurite density (R(2 = 0.59, P<1E-5 with 95% lower bound of ICC as 0.76. MRI data revealed increased neurite reorganization with MSC treatment compared with saline treatment, confirmed by histological data from the same animals. mNSS were significantly correlated with MRI neurite density in the hippocampus region

  10. [Changes of EEG power spectrum in response to the emotional auditory stimuli in patients in acute and recovery stages of TBI (traumatic brain injury)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    We investigated variability of responses to emotionally important auditory stimulation in different groups of TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury) in acute state or recovery. The patients sampling consisted of three different groups: patients in coma or vegetative state, patients with Severe and Moderate TBI in recovery period. Subjects were stimulated with auditory stimuli containing important physiological sounds (coughing, vomiting), emotional sounds (laughing, crying), nature sounds (bird song, barking), unpleasant household sounds (nails scratching the glass), natural sounds (sea, rain, fire) and neutral sounds (white noise). The background encephalographic activity was registered during at least 7 minutes. EEG was recorded while using portable device "Entsefalan". Significant differences of power of the rhythmic activity registered during the presentation of different types of stimuli were analyzed using Mathlab and Statistica 6.0. Results showed that EEG-response to the emotional stimuli differed depending on consciousness level, stimuli type, severity of TBI. Most valuable changes in EEG spectrum power for a patient with TBI were found for unpleasant auditory stimulation. Responsiveness to the pleasant stimulation could be registered in later stages of coming out of coma than to unpleasant stimulation. Alpha-activity is reducing in patients with TBI: the alpha rhythm depression is most evident in the control group, less in group after moderate TBI, and even less in group after severe TBI. Patients in coma or vegetative state didn't show any response in rhythmic power in the frequency of alpha rhythm.

  11. Social communication mediates the relationship between emotion perception and externalizing behaviors in young adult survivors of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Nicholas P; Anderson, Vicki; Godfrey, Celia; Eren, Senem; Rosema, Stefanie; Taylor, Kaitlyn; Catroppa, Cathy

    2013-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a common cause of childhood disability, and is associated with elevated risk for long-term social impairment. Though social (pragmatic) communication deficits may be among the most debilitating consequences of childhood TBI, few studies have examined very long-term communication outcomes as children with TBI make the transition to young adulthood. In addition, the extent to which reduced social function contributes to externalizing behaviors in survivors of childhood TBI remains poorly understood. The present study aimed to evaluate the extent of social communication difficulty among young adult survivors of childhood TBI (n=34, injury age: 1.0-7.0 years; M time since injury: 16.55 years) and examine relations among aspects of social function including emotion perception, social communication and externalizing behaviors rated by close-other proxies. Compared to controls the TBI group had significantly greater social communication difficulty, which was associated with more frequent externalizing behaviors and poorer emotion perception. Analyses demonstrated that reduced social communication mediated the association between poorer emotion perception and more frequent externalizing behaviors. Our findings indicate that socio-cognitive impairments may indirectly increase the risk for externalizing behaviors among young adult survivors of childhood TBI, and underscore the need for targeted social skills interventions delivered soon after injury, and into the very long-term. Copyright © 2013 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Fractal Analysis of Brain Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) Signals from Children with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dona, Olga; DeMatteo, Carol; Connolly, John F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Conventional imaging techniques are unable to detect abnormalities in the brain following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Yet patients with mTBI typically show delayed response on neuropsychological evaluation. Because fractal geometry represents complexity, we explored its utility in measuring temporal fluctuations of brain resting state blood oxygen level dependent (rs-BOLD) signal. We hypothesized that there could be a detectable difference in rs-BOLD signal complexity between healthy subjects and mTBI patients based on previous studies that associated reduction in signal complexity with disease. Methods Fifteen subjects (13.4 ± 2.3 y/o) and 56 age-matched (13.5 ± 2.34 y/o) healthy controls were scanned using a GE Discovery MR750 3T MRI and 32-channel RF-coil. Axial FSPGR-3D images were used to prescribe rs-BOLD (TE/TR = 35/2000ms), acquired over 6 minutes. Motion correction was performed and anatomical and functional images were aligned and spatially warped to the N27 standard atlas. Fractal analysis, performed on grey matter, was done by estimating the Hurst exponent using de-trended fluctuation analysis and signal summation conversion methods. Results and Conclusions Voxel-wise fractal dimension (FD) was calculated for every subject in the control group to generate mean and standard deviation maps for regional Z-score analysis. Voxel-wise validation of FD normality across controls was confirmed, and non-Gaussian voxels (3.05% over the brain) were eliminated from subsequent analysis. For each mTBI patient, regions where Z-score values were at least 2 standard deviations away from the mean (i.e. where |Z| > 2.0) were identified. In individual patients the frequently affected regions were amygdala (p = 0.02), vermis(p = 0.03), caudate head (p = 0.04), hippocampus(p = 0.03), and hypothalamus(p = 0.04), all previously reported as dysfunctional after mTBI, but based on group analysis. It is well known that the brain is best modeled as a complex

  13. Using the public health model to address unintentional injuries and TBI: A perspective from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Grant; Breiding, Matt; Sleet, David

    2016-06-30

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can have long term effects on mental and physical health, and can disrupt vocational, educational, and social functioning. TBIs can range from mild to severe and their effects can last many years after the initial injury. CDC seeks to reduce the burden of TBI from unintentional injuries through a focus on primary prevention, improved recognition and management, and intervening to improve health outcomes after TBI. CDC uses a 4-stage public health model to guide TBI prevention, moving from 1) surveillance of TBI, 2) identification of risk and protective factors for TBI, 3) development and testing of evidence-based interventions, to 4) bringing effective intervention to scale through widespread adoption. CDC's unintentional injury prevention activities focus on the prevention of sports-related concussions, motor vehicle crashes, and older adult falls. For concussion prevention, CDC developed Heads Up - an awareness initiative focusing on ways to prevent a concussion in sports, and identifying how to recognize and manage potential concussions. In motor vehicle injury prevention, CDC has developed a tool (MV PICCS) to calculate the expected number of injuries prevented and lives saved using various evidence-based motor vehicle crash prevention strategies. To help prevent TBI related to older adult falls, CDC has developed STEADI, an initiative to help primary care providers identify their patients' falls risk and provide effective interventions. In the future, CDC is focused on advancing our understanding of the public health burden of TBI through improved surveillance in order to produce more comprehensive estimates of the public health burden of TBI.

  14. Targeting the nNOS/peroxynitrite/calpain system to confer neuroprotection and aid functional recovery in a mouse model of TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mushfiquddin; Dhammu, Tajinder S; Matsuda, Fumiyo; Annamalai, Balasubramaniam; Dhindsa, Tejbir Singh; Singh, Inderjit; Singh, Avtar K

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) derails nitric oxide (NO)-based anti-inflammatory and anti-excitotoxicity mechanisms. NO is consumed by superoxide to form peroxynitrite, leading to decreased NO bioavailability for S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) synthesis and regulation of neuroprotective pathways. Neuronal peroxynitrite is implicated in neuronal loss and functional deficits following TBI. Using a contusion mouse model of TBI, we investigated mechanisms for the opposed roles of GSNO versus peroxynitrite for neuroprotection and functional recovery. TBI was induced by controlled cortical impact (CCI) in adult male mice. GSNO treatment at 2h after CCI decreased the expression levels of phospho neuronal nitric oxide synthase (pnNOS), alpha II spectrin degraded products, and 3-NT, while also decreasing the activities of nNOS and calpains. Treatment of TBI with FeTPPS, a peroxynitrite scavenger, had effects similar to GSNO treatment. GSNO treatment of TBI also reduced neuronal degeneration and improved neurobehavioral function in a two-week TBI study. In a cell free system, SIN-1 (a peroxynitrite donor and 3-nitrotyrosinating agent) increased whereas GSNO (an S-nitrosylating agent) decreased calpain activity, and these activities were reversed by, respectively, FeTPPS and mercuric chloride, a cysteine-NO bond cleaving agent. These data indicate that peroxynitrite-mediated activation and GSNO-mediated inhibition of the deleterious nNOS/calpain system play critical roles in the pathobiology of neuronal protection and functional recovery in TBI disease. Given GSNO׳s safety record in other diseases, its neuroprotective efficacy and promotion of functional recovery in this TBI study make low-dose GSNO a potential candidate for preclinical evaluation.

  15. ACPSEM ROSG TBI working group recommendations for quality assurance in total body irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelligan, Raelene; Bailey, Michael; Tran, Thu; Baldwin, Zoë

    2015-06-01

    The Australasian College of Physical Scientists and Engineers in Medicine (ACPSEM) radiation oncology specialty group (ROSG) formed a series of working groups in 2011 to develop recommendations for guidance of radiation oncology medical physics practice within the Australasian setting. These recommendations are intended to provide guidance for safe work practices and a suitable level of quality control without detailed work instructions. It is the responsibility of the medical physicist to ensure that locally available equipment and procedures are sufficiently sensitive to establish compliance to these recommendations. The recommendations are endorsed by the ROSG, and have been subject to independent expert reviews. For the Australian audience, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with the tripartite radiation oncology practice standards [1, 2]. This publication presents the recommendations of the ACPSEM total body irradiation working group (TBIWG) and has been developed in alignment with other international associations. However, these recommendations should be read in conjunction with relevant national, state or territory legislation and local requirements, which take precedence over the ACPSEM recommendations. It is hoped that the users of this and other ACPSEM recommendations will contribute to the development of future versions through the ROSG of the ACPSEM. This document serves as a guideline for calibration and quality assurance of equipment used for TBI in Australasia.

  16. Efficacy of memory rehabilitation therapy: a meta-analysis of TBI and stroke cognitive rehabilitation literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Madison; Parente, Frederick

    2014-01-01

    To examine the efficacy of cognitive rehabilitation strategies specifically designed to improve memory after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and stroke vs. memory improvement with the passage of time. A meta-analysis was performed on 26 studies of memory retraining and recovery that were published between the years of 1985 and 2013. Effect sizes (ESs) from each study were calculated and converted to Pearson's r and then analysed to assess the overall effect size and the relationship among the ESs, patient demographics and treatment interventions. RESULTS indicated a significant average ES (r = 0.51) in the treatment intervention conditions, as well as a significant average ES (r = 0.31) in the control conditions, in which participants did not receive any treatment. The largest ESs occurred in studies of stroke patients and studies concerning working memory rehabilitation. RESULTS showed that memory rehabilitation was an effective therapeutic intervention, especially for stroke patients and for working memory as a treatment domain. However, the results also indicated that significant memory improvement occurred spontaneously over time.

  17. Interrelation between Neuroendocrine Disturbances and Medical Complications Encountered during Rehabilitation after TBI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline I. E. Renner

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury is not a discrete event but an unfolding sequence of damage to the central nervous system. Not only the acute phase but also the subacute and chronic period after injury, i.e., during inpatient rehabilitation, is characterized by multiple neurotransmitter alterations, cellular dysfunction, and medical complications causing additional secondary injury. Neuroendocrine disturbances also influence neurological outcome and are easily overlooked as they often present with diffuse symptoms such as fatigue, depression, poor concentration, or a decline in overall cognitive function; these are also typical sequelae of traumatic brain injury. Furthermore, neurological complications such as hydrocephalus, epilepsy, fatigue, disorders of consciousness, paroxysmal sympathetic hyperactivity, or psychiatric-behavioural symptoms may mask and/or complicate the diagnosis of neuroendocrine disturbances, delay appropriate treatment and impede neurorehabilitation. The present review seeks to examine the interrelation between neuroendocrine disturbances with neurological complications frequently encountered after moderate to severe TBI during rehabilitation. Common neuroendocrine disturbances and medical complications and their clinical implications are discussed.

  18. Effect of Black Grape Juice against Heart Damage from Acute Gamma TBI in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Ramos de Andrade

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential positive effect of black grape juice (BGJ on lipid peroxidation considering Total Body Irradiation (TBI in Wistar rats. As a potential feasible means of evaluation in situ, blood serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH levels were evaluated as a marker for heart damage from acute radiation syndrome (ARS. Twenty rats were divided into four groups, two of them being irradiated by gamma-rays from a Co-60 source. Animals were treated by gavage with 2 mL per day of BGJ or placebo for one week before and 4 days after 6 Gy whole body gamma-irradiation, when they were euthanasiated. LDH on serum and lipid peroxidation on heart tissue were evaluated. High concentration of metabolites from lipid peroxidation in heart, and high LDH level on serum were found only in gamma-irradiated group given placebo, mainly at the first 24 h after radiation. Phytochemical analysis of BGJ was performed by determining total phenolics, flavonoids, and tannins followed by a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC/DAD analysis, which showed resveratrol as the major constituent. Results suggest that BGJ is a good protective candidate compound against heart damage from ARS and its effects suggest its use as a radiomodifier.

  19. Music therapy for early cognitive rehabilitation post-childhood TBI: an intrinsic mixed methods case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Janeen; Catroppa, Cathy; Grocke, Denise; Shoemark, Helen

    2014-10-01

    The primary aim of this case study was to explore the behavioural changes of a paediatric patient in post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) during a music therapy session. A secondary objective was to measure the effect of the music therapy intervention on agitation. Video data from pre, during and post-music therapy sessions were collected and analysed using video micro-analysis and the Agitated Behaviour Scale. The participant displayed four discrete categories of behaviours: Neutral, Acceptance, Recruitment and Rejection. Further analysis revealed brief but consistent and repeated periods of awareness and responsiveness to the live singing of familiar songs, which were classified as Islands of Awareness. Song offered an Environment of Potential to maximise these periods of emerging consciousness. The quantitative data analysis yielded inconclusive results in determining if music therapy was effective in reducing agitation during and immediately post the music therapy sessions. The process of micro-analysis illuminated four discrete participant behaviours not apparent in the immediate clinical setting. The results of this case suggest that the use of familiar song as a music therapy intervention may harness early patient responsiveness to foster cognitive rehabilitation in the early acute phase post-TBI.

  20. Uncovering latent deficits due to mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI by using normobaric hypoxia stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonard eTemme

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Memory deficits and other cognitive symptoms frequently associated with mTBI are commonly thought to resolve within 7 to 10 days. This generalization is based principally on observations made in individuals who are in the unstressed environmental conditions typical to a clinic and so does not consider the impact of physiologic, environmental or psychological stress. Normobaric Hypoxia (NH stress can be generated by mixing normal mean sea level air (MSL containing 21% oxygen (O2 with nitrogen, which is biologically inert, so that the resultant mixed gas has a partial pressure of O2 approximating that of specified altitudes. This technique was used to generate NH equivalents of 8,000, 12,000 and 14,000 feet above MSL in a group of 36 volunteers with an mTBI history and an equal number of controls matched on the basis of age, gender, weight, etc. Short term visual memory was tested using Matching to Sample (M2S subtest of the BrainCheckers analogue of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM. Although there were no significant differences in M2S performance between the two groups of subjects at MSL, with increased altitude, performance deteriorated in the mTBI group as predicted to be significantly worse than that of the controls. When the subjects were returned to MSL, the difference disappeared. This finding suggests that the hypoxic challenge paradigm developed here has potential clinical utility for assessing the effects of mTBI in individuals who appear asymptomatic under normal conditions.

  1. The Role of PP2A Methylation in Susceptibility and Resistance to TBI and AD-Induced Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    development and characterization in mice. J Neurotrauma 28, 2171-2183. Wood , G.W., Panzer, M.B., Yu, A.W., Rafaels, K.A., Matthews, K.A., Bass, C.R...INTRODUCTION: Neurodegeneration resulting from both traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is characterized by aggregates of...we are staining paraffin embedded sections with H&E stain to examine general anatomical and cellular morphology, and performing

  2. Quantitative Tractography and Volumetric MRI in Blast and Blunt Force TBI: Predictors of Neurocognitive and Behavioral Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    middle frontal and left inferior parietal regions, as well as with the left caudate and right lateral and medial orbital-frontal regions (Orff et al...within cortical and subcortical regions within the frontal and temporal lobes including prefrontal cortices, the anterior cingulate, the temporal cortex... lobe volumes. Initial efforts have proved that volumetric analyses are not as sensitive to the effects of TBI (at least in this subset of

  3. Project Career: Perceived benefits of iPad apps among college students with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, K; Leopold, A; Hendricks, D J; Sampson, E; Nardone, A; Lopez, K B; Rumrill, P; Stauffer, C; Elias, E; Scherer, M; Dembe, J

    2017-09-14

    Project Career is an interprofessional five-year development project designed to improve academic and employment success of undergraduate students with a traumatic brain injury (TBI) at two- and four-year colleges and universities. Students receive technology in the form of iPad applications ("apps") to support them in and out of the classroom. To assess participants' perspectives on technology at baseline and perceived benefit of apps after 6 and 12 months of use. This article address a component of a larger study. Participants included 50 college-aged students with traumatic brain injuries. Statistical analysis included data from two Matching Person and Technology (MPT) assessment forms, including the Survey of Technology Use at baseline and the Assistive Technology Use Follow-Up Survey: Apps Currently Using, administered at 6- and 12-months re-evaluation. Analyses included frequencies and descriptives. Average scores at baseline indicated positive perspectives on technology. At 6 months, quality of life (67%) and academics (76%) improved moderately or more from the use of iPad apps. At 12 months, quality of life (65%) and academics (82%) improved moderately or more from the use of iPad apps. Students with a TBI have positive perspectives on technology use. The results on perceived benefit of apps indicated that students with a TBI (including civilians and veterans) report that the apps help them perform in daily life and academic settings.

  4. Variation in monitoring and treatment policies for intracranial hypertension in traumatic brain injury: A survey in 66 neurotrauma centers participating in the CENTER-TBI study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Cnossen (Maryse); Huijben, J.A. (Jilske A.); van der Jagt, M. (Mathieu); Volovici, V. (Victor); van Essen, T. (Thomas); S. Polinder (Suzanne); D. Nelson (David); Ercole, A. (Ari); Stocchetti, N. (Nino); Citerio, G. (Giuseppe); W.C. Peul (Wilco); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew I.R.); D.K. Menon (David ); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout W.); Lingsma, H.F. (Hester F.); Adams, H. (Hadie); Alessandro, M. (Masala); J. Allanson (Judith); Amrein, K. (Krisztina); Andaluz, N. (Norberto); N. Andelic (Nada); Andrea, N. (Nanni); L. Andreassen (Lasse); Anke, A. (Audny); Antoni, A. (Anna); Ardon, H. (Hilko); Audibert, G. (Gérard); Auslands, K. (Kaspars); Azouvi, P. (Philippe); Baciu, C. (Camelia); Bacon, A. (Andrew); Badenes, R. (Rafael); Baglin, T. (Trevor); R.H.M.A. Bartels (Ronald); P. Barzo (P.); Bauerfeind, U. (Ursula); R. Beer (Ronny); Belda, F.J. (Francisco Javier); B.-M. Bellander (Bo-Michael); A. Belli (Antonio); Bellier, R. (Rémy); H. Benali (Habib); Benard, T. (Thierry); M. Berardino (Maurizio); L. Beretta (Luigi); Beynon, C. (Christopher); Bilotta, F. (Federico); H. Binder (Harald); Biqiri, E. (Erta); Blaabjerg, M. (Morten); Lund, S.B. (Stine Borgen); Bouzat, P. (Pierre); Bragge, P. (Peter); Brazinova, A. (Alexandra); F. Brehar (Felix); Brorsson, C. (Camilla); Buki, A. (Andras); M. Bullinger (Monika); Bucková, V. (Veronika); Calappi, E. (Emiliana); P. Cameron (Peter); Carbayo, L.G. (Lozano Guillermo); Carise, E. (Elsa); K.L.H. Carpenter (Keri L.H.); Castaño-León, A.M. (Ana M.); Causin, F. (Francesco); Chevallard, G. (Giorgio); A. Chieregato (Arturo); G. Citerio (Giuseppe); Cnossen, M. (Maryse); M. Coburn (Mark); J.P. Coles (Jonathan P.); Cooper, J.D. (Jamie D.); Correia, M. (Marta); A. Covic (Amra); N. Curry (Nicola); E. Czeiter (Endre); M. Czosnyka (Marek); Dahyot-Fizelier, C. (Claire); F. Damas (François); P. Damas (Pierre); H. Dawes (Helen); De Keyser, V. (Véronique); F.D. Corte (Francesco); B. Depreitere (Bart); Ding, S. (Shenghao); D.W.J. Dippel (Diederik); K. Dizdarevic (Kemal); Dulière, G.-L. (Guy-Loup); Dzeko, A. (Adelaida); G. Eapen (George); Engemann, H. (Heiko); A. Ercole (Ari); P. Esser (Patrick); Ezer, E. (Erzsébet); M. Fabricius (Martin); V.L. Feigin (V.); Feng, J. (Junfeng); Foks, K. (Kelly); F. Fossi (Francesca); Francony, G. (Gilles); J. Frantzén (Janek); Freo, U. (Ulderico); S.K. Frisvold (Shirin Kordasti); Furmanov, A. (Alex); Gagliardo, P. (Pablo); D. Galanaud (Damien); G. Gao (Guoyi); K. Geleijns (Karin); A. Ghuysen (Alexandre); Giraud, B. (Benoit); Glocker, B. (Ben); Gomez, P.A. (Pedro A.); Grossi, F. (Francesca); R.L. Gruen (Russell); Gupta, D. (Deepak); J.A. Haagsma (Juanita); E. Hadzic (Ermin); I. Haitsma (Iain); J.A. Hartings (Jed); R. Helbok (Raimund); E. Helseth (Eirik); Hertle, D. (Daniel); S. Hill (Sean); Hoedemaekers, A. (Astrid); S. Hoefer (Stefan); P.J. Hutchinson (Peter J.); Håberg, K.A. (Kristine Asta); B.C. Jacobs (Bart); Janciak, I. (Ivan); K. Janssens (Koen); Jiang, J.-Y. (Ji-Yao); Jones, K. (Kelly); Kalala, J.-P. (Jean-Pierre); Kamnitsas, K. (Konstantinos); Karan, M. (Mladen); Karau, J. (Jana); A. Katila (Ari); M. Kaukonen (Maija); Keeling, D. (David); Kerforne, T. (Thomas); N. Ketharanathan (Naomi); Kettunen, J. (Johannes); Kivisaari, R. (Riku); A.G. Kolias (Angelos G.); Kolumbán, B. (Bálint); E.J.O. Kompanje (Erwin); D. Kondziella (Daniel); L.-O. Koskinen (Lars-Owe); Kovács, N. (Noémi); F. Kalovits (Ferenc); A. Lagares (Alfonso); L. Lanyon (Linda); S. Laureys (Steven); Lauritzen, M. (Martin); F.E. Lecky (Fiona); C. Ledig (Christian); R. Lefering; V. Legrand (Valerie); Lei, J. (Jin); L. Levi (Leon); R. Lightfoot (Roger); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); D. Loeckx (Dirk); Lozano, A. (Angels); Luddington, R. (Roger); Luijten-Arts, C. (Chantal); Maas, A.I.R. (Andrew I.R.); MacDonald, S. (Stephen); MacFayden, C. (Charles); M. Maegele; M. Majdan (Marek); Major, S. (Sebastian); A. Manara (Alex); Manhes, P. (Pauline); G. Manley (Geoffrey); Martin, D. (Didier); C. Martino (Costanza); Maruenda, A. (Armando); H. Maréchal (Hugues); Mastelova, D. (Dagmara); Mattern, J. (Julia); McMahon, C. (Catherine); Melegh, B. (Béla); Menon, D. (David); T. Menovsky (Tomas); Morganti-Kossmann, C. (Cristina); Mulazzi, D. (Davide); Mutschler, M. (Manuel); H. Mühlan (Holger); Negru, A. (Ancuta); Nelson, D. (David); E. Neugebauer (Eddy); V.F. Newcombe (Virginia F.); Noirhomme, Q. (Quentin); Nyirádi, J. (József); M. Oddo (Mauro); A.W. Oldenbeuving; M. Oresic (Matej); Ortolano, F. (Fabrizio); A. Palotie (Aarno); P.M. Parizel; Patruno, A. (Adriana); J.-F. Payen (Jean-François); Perera, N. (Natascha); V. Perlbarg (Vincent); Persona, P. (Paolo); Peul, W. (Wilco); N. Pichon (Nicolas); Piilgaard, H. (Henning); A. Piippo (Anna); S.P. Floury (Sébastien Pili); M. Pirinen (Matti); H. Ples (Horia); Polinder, S. (Suzanne); Pomposo, I. (Inigo); M. Psota (Marek); P. Pullens (Pim); L. Puybasset (Louis); A. Ragauskas (Arminas); R. Raj (Rahul); Rambadagalla, M. (Malinka); Rehorcíková, V. (Veronika); J.K.J. Rhodes (Jonathan K.J.); S. Richardson (Sylvia); S. Ripatti (Samuli); S. Rocka (Saulius); Rodier, N. (Nicolas); Roe, C. (Cecilie); Roise, O. (Olav); G. Roks (Gerwin); Romegoux, P. (Pauline); J. Rosand (Jonathan); Rosenfeld, J. (Jeffrey); C. Rosenlund (Christina); G. Rosenthal (Guy); R. Rossaint (Rolf); S. Rossi (Sandra); Rostalski, T. (Tim); D. Rueckert (Daniel); de Ruiz, A.F. (Arcaute Felix); M. Rusnák (Martin); Sacchi, M. (Marco); Sahakian, B. (Barbara); J. Sahuquillo (Juan); O. Sakowitz (Oliver); Sala, F. (Francesca); Sanchez-Pena, P. (Paola); Sanchez-Porras, R. (Renan); Sandor, J. (Janos); Santos, E. (Edgar); N. Sasse (Nadine); Sasu, L. (Luminita); Savo, D. (Davide); I.B. Schipper (Inger); Schlößer, B. (Barbara); S. Schmidt (Silke); Schneider, A. (Annette); H. Schoechl (Herbert); G.G. Schoonman; Rico, F.S. (Frederik Schou); E. Schwendenwein (Elisabeth); Schöll, M. (Michael); Sir, O. (özcan); T. Skandsen (Toril); Smakman, L. (Lidwien); D. Smeets (Dominique); Smielewski, P. (Peter); Sorinola, A. (Abayomi); E. Stamatakis (Emmanuel); S. Stanworth (Simon); Stegemann, K. (Katrin); Steinbüchel, N. (Nicole); R. Stevens (Robert); W. Stewart (William); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout); N. Stocchetti (Nino); Sundström, N. (Nina); Synnot, A. (Anneliese); J. Szabó (József); J. Söderberg (Jeannette); F.S. Taccone (Fabio); Tamás, V. (Viktória); Tanskanen, P. (Päivi); A. Tascu (Alexandru); Taylor, M.S. (Mark Steven); Te, A.B. (Ao Braden); O. Tenovuo (Olli); Teodorani, G. (Guido); A. Theadom (Alice); Thomas, M. (Matt); D. Tibboel (Dick); C.M. Tolias (Christos M.); Tshibanda, J.-F.L. (Jean-Flory Luaba); Tudora, C.M. (Cristina Maria); P. Vajkoczy (Peter); Valeinis, E. (Egils); Hecke, W.V. (Wim Van); Praag, D.V. (Dominique Van); Dirk, V.R. (Van Roost); Vlierberghe, E.V. (Eline Van); Vyvere, T.V. (Thijs vande); Vanhaudenhuyse, A. (Audrey); A. Vargiolu (Alessia); E. Vega (Emmanuel); J. Verheyden (Jan); Vespa, P.M. (Paul M.); A. Vik (Anne); R. Vilcinis (Rimantas); Vizzino, G. (Giacinta); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); V. Volovici (Victor); P. Vulekovic (Peter); Vámos, Z. (Zoltán); Wade, D. (Derick); Wang, K.K.W. (Kevin K.W.); Wang, L. (Lei); E.D. Wildschut (Enno); G. Williams (Guy); Willumsen, L. (Lisette); Wilson, A. (Adam); Wilson, L. (Lindsay); Winkler, M.K.L. (Maren K.L.); P. Ylén (Peter); Younsi, A. (Alexander); M. Zaaroor (Menashe); Zhang, Z. (Zhiqun); Zheng, Z. (Zelong); Zumbo, F. (Fabrizio); de Lange, S. (Stefanie); G.C.W. De Ruiter (Godard C.W.); den Boogert, H. (Hugo); van Dijck, J. (Jeroen); T.A. van Essen (T.); C.M. van Heugten (Caroline M.); M. van der Jagt (Mathieu); J. van der Naalt (Joukje)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractBackground: No definitive evidence exists on how intracranial hypertension should be treated in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is therefore likely that centers and practitioners individually balance potential benefits and risks of different intracranial pressure (ICP)

  5. Pressure Autoregulation Measurement Techniques in Adult TBI, Part I: A Scoping Review of Intermittent/Semi-Intermittent Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeiler, Frederick Adam; Donnelly, Joseph; Calviello, Leanne; Menon, David; Smieleweski, Peter; Czosnyka, Marek

    2017-06-24

    To perform a systematic, scoping review of commonly described intermittent/semi-intermittent autoregulation measurement techniques in adult TBI. Nine separate systematic reviews were conducted for each intermittent technique: Computed tomographic perfusion (CTP)/Xenon-CT (Xe-CT), positron emission tomography (PET), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), arterio-venous difference in oxygen (AVDO2) technique, thigh cuff deflation technique (TCDT), transient hyperemic response test (THRT), orthostatic hypotension test (OHT), mean flow index (Mx) and transfer function ARI (TF-ARI). MEDLINE, BIOSIS, EMBASE, Global Health, Scopus, Cochrane Library (inception to December 2016) and reference lists of relevant articles were searched. A two-tier filter of references was conducted. The total number of articles utilizing each of the 9 searched techniques for intermittent/semi-intermittent autoregulation techniques in adult TBI were: CTP/Xe-CT (10), PET (6), MRI (0), AVDO2 (10), autoregulation index (ARI) based TCDT (9), THRT (6), OHT (3), Mx (17) and TF-ARI (6). The premise behind all of the intermittent techniques is manipulation of systemic blood pressure/blood volume via either chemical (such as vasopressors) or mechanical (such as thigh cuffs or carotid compression) means. Exceptionally, Mx and TF-ARI are based on spontaneous fluctuations of CPP or MAP. The method for assessing the cerebral circulation during these manipulations varies, with both imaging based techniques and TCD utilized. Despite the limited literature for intermittent/semi-intermittent techniques in adult TBI (minus Mx), it is important to acknowledge the availability of such tests. They have provided fundamental insight into human autoregulatory capacity, leading to the development of continuous and more commonly applied techniques in the ICU. Numerous methods of intermittent/semi-intermittent pressure autoregulation assessment in adult TBI exist, including: CTP/Xe-CT, PET, AVDO2 technique, TCDT based ARI

  6. Validity of the RIAS for assessing children with traumatic brain injury: sensitivity to TBI and comparability to the WISC-III and WISC-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Daniel N; Stolberg, Paul C; Thaler, Nicholas S; Sutton, Griffin; Mayfield, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Intelligence tests are commonly administered to children following moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The Reynolds Intellectual Assessment Scales (RIAS) is a recently developed measure of intellectual ability that has a number of appealing features for assessing individuals with brain damage, but as yet has little validity information when applied to children with TBI or other forms of brain injury. It is therefore unclear whether RIAS scores are sensitive to brain injury and how they compare to older more well-established tests such as the Wechsler scales. The current article reports two studies that examine these matters in youth with TBI. The first study examined sensitivity of the RIAS to TBI in 110 children. Results indicated the TBI sample performed significantly worse compared with the standardization sample on all RIAS index scores. The second study included 102 children who were administered either the RIAS, Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition (WISC-III), or WISC-Fourth Edition (WISC-IV; 34 children in each group). Comparisons among the RIAS, WISC-III, and WISC-IV groups indicated no significant differences among the measures on verbal, nonverbal, and Composite Index/Full-Scale IQs. Results provide support for the sensitivity of the RIAS to TBI in children and also suggest that IQs produced by the RIAS, WISC-III, and WISC-IV do not significantly vary from one test to the other, which is particularly true of the verbal and Composite Index/Full-Scale IQs.

  7. Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiation Therapy (HART) of 70.6 Gy With Concurrent 5-FU/Mitomycin C Is Superior to HART of 77.6 Gy Alone in Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Long-term Results of the ARO 95-06 Randomized Phase III Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budach, Volker, E-mail: volker.budach@charite.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Stromberger, Carmen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Poettgen, Christoph [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Essen (Germany); Baumann, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Dresden (Germany); Budach, Wilfried [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heinrich Heine Universität Düsseldorf (Germany); Grabenbauer, Gerhard [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospitals of Erlangen (Germany); Marnitz, Simone [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Olze, Heidi [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany); Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter [Sostana GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Ghadjar, Pirus [Department of Radiation Oncology, Charité Universitätsmedizin Berlin (Germany)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: To report the long-term results of the ARO 95-06 randomized trial comparing hyperfractionated accelerated chemoradiation with mitomycin C/5-fluorouracil (C-HART) with hyperfractionated accelerated radiation therapy (HART) alone in locally advanced head and neck cancer. Patients and Methods: The primary endpoint was locoregional control (LRC). Three hundred eighty-four patients with stage III (6%) and IV (94%) oropharyngeal (59.4%), hypopharyngeal (32.3%), and oral cavity (8.3%) cancer were randomly assigned to 30 Gy/2 Gy daily followed by twice-daily 1.4 Gy to a total of 70.6 Gy concurrently with mitomycin C/5-FU (C-HART) or 16 Gy/2 Gy daily followed by twice-daily 1.4 Gy to a total dose of 77.6 Gy alone (HART). Statistical analyses were done with the log-rank test and univariate and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results: The median follow-up time was 8.7 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 7.8-9.7 years). At 10 years, the LRC rates were 38.0% (C-HART) versus 26.0% (HART, P=.002). The cancer-specific survival and overall survival rates were 39% and 10% (C-HART) versus 30.0% and 9% (HART, P=.042 and P=.049), respectively. According to multivariate Cox regression analysis, the combined treatment was associated with improved LRC (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.6 [95% CI: 0.5-0.8; P=.002]). The association between combined treatment arm and increased LRC appeared to be limited to oropharyngeal cancer (P=.003) as compared with hypopharyngeal or oral cavity cancer (P=.264). Conclusions: C-HART remains superior to HART in terms of LRC. However, this effect may be limited to oropharyngeal cancer patients.

  8. Activation-induced spatiotemporal cerebral blood flow changes and behavioral deficit after developmental mTBI in rats can be favorably altered by facilitating mitochondrial calcium uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuvika eMurugan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (mTBI leads to secondary neuronal loss via excitotoxic mechanisms, including mitochondrial Ca2+ overload. However in the surviving cellular population, mitochondrial Ca2+ influx and oxidative metabolism are diminished leading to suboptimal neuronal circuit activity and poor prognosis. Hence we tested the impact of boosting neuronal electrical activity and oxidative metabolism by facilitating mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in a rat model of mTBI. In developing rats (P25-P26 sustaining an mTBI, we demonstrate post-traumatic changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF in the sensorimotor cortex in response to whisker stimulation compared to sham using functional Laser Doppler Imaging (fLDI at adulthood (P67-P73. Compared to sham, whisker stimulation-evoked positive CBF responses decreased while negative CBF responses increased in the mTBI animals. The spatiotemporal CBF changes representing underlying neuronal activity suggested profound changes to neurovascular activity after mTBI. Behavioral assessment of the same cohort of animals prior to fLDI showed that mTBI resulted in persistent contralateral sensorimotor behavioral deficit along with ipsilateral neuronal loss compared to sham. Treating mTBI rats with Kaempferol, a dietary flavonol compound that enhanced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake, eliminated the inter-hemispheric asymmetry in the whisker stimulation-induced positive CBF responses and the ipsilateral negative CBF responses otherwise observed in the untreated and vehicle-treated mTBI animals in adulthood. Kaempferol also improved somatosensory behavioral measures compared to untreated and vehicle treated mTBI animals without augmenting post-injury neuronal loss. The results indicate that reduced mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in the surviving populations affect post-traumatic neural activation leading to persistent behavioral deficits. Improvement in sensorimotor behavior and spatiotemporal neurovascular activity

  9. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) findings in adult civilian, military, and sport-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI): a systematic critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asken, Breton Michael; DeKosky, Steven T; Clugston, James R; Jaffee, Michael S; Bauer, Russell M

    2017-03-24

    This review seeks to summarize diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies that have evaluated structural changes attributed to the mechanisms of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in adult civilian, military, and athlete populations. Articles from 2002 to 2016 were retrieved from PubMed/MEDLINE, EBSCOhost, and Google Scholar, using a Boolean search string containing the following terms: "diffusion tensor imaging", "diffusion imaging", "DTI", "white matter", "concussion", "mild traumatic brain injury", "mTBI", "traumatic brain injury", and "TBI". We added studies not identified by this method that were found via manually-searched reference lists. We identified 86 eligible studies from English-language journals using, adult, human samples. Studies were evaluated based on duration between injury and DTI assessment, categorized as acute, subacute/chronic, remote mTBI, and repetitive brain trauma considerations. Since changes in brain structure after mTBI can also be affected by other co-occurring medical and demographic factors, we also briefly review DTI studies that have addressed socioeconomic status factors (SES), major depressive disorder (MDD), and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The review describes population-specific risks and the complications of clinical versus pathophysiological outcomes of mTBI. We had anticipated that the distinct population groups (civilian, military, and athlete) would require separate consideration, and various aspects of the study characteristics supported this. In general, study results suggested widespread but inconsistent differences in white matter diffusion metrics (primarily fractional anisotropy [FA], mean diffusivity [MD], radial diffusivity [RD], and axial diffusivity [AD]) following mTBI/concussion. Inspection of study designs and results revealed potential explanations for discrepant DTI findings, such as control group variability, analytic techniques, the manner in which regional differences were reported, and

  10. Development of a 3D immersive videogame to improve arm-postural coordination in patients with TBI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassavaugh Nicholas D

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI disrupts the central and executive mechanisms of arm(s and postural (trunk and legs coordination. To address these issues, we developed a 3D immersive videogame-- Octopus. The game was developed using the basic principles of videogame design and previous experience of using videogames for rehabilitation of patients with acquired brain injuries. Unlike many other custom-designed virtual environments, Octopus included an actual gaming component with a system of multiple rewards, making the game challenging, competitive, motivating and fun. Effect of a short-term practice with the Octopus game on arm-postural coordination in patients with TBI was tested. Methods The game was developed using WorldViz Vizard software, integrated with the Qualysis system for motion analysis. Avatars of the participant's hands precisely reproducing the real-time kinematic patterns were synchronized with the simulated environment, presented in the first person 3D view on an 82-inch DLP screen. 13 individuals with mild-to-moderate manifestations of TBI participated in the study. While standing in front of the screen, the participants interacted with a computer-generated environment by popping bubbles blown by the Octopus. The bubbles followed a specific trajectory. Interception of the bubbles with the left or right hand avatar allowed flexible use of the postural segments for balance maintenance and arm transport. All participants practiced ten 90-s gaming trials during a single session, followed by a retention test. Arm-postural coordination was analysed using principal component analysis. Results As a result of the short-term practice, the participants improved in game performance, arm movement time, and precision. Improvements were achieved mostly by adapting efficient arm-postural coordination strategies. Of the 13 participants, 10 showed an immediate increase in arm forward reach and single-leg stance time. Conclusion

  11. Cognitive control of conscious error awareness: error awareness and error positivity (Pe) amplitude in moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Dustin M; Hill, Kyle R; Larson, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Poor awareness has been linked to worse recovery and rehabilitation outcomes following moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (M/S TBI). The error positivity (Pe) component of the event-related potential (ERP) is linked to error awareness and cognitive control. Participants included 37 neurologically healthy controls and 24 individuals with M/S TBI who completed a brief neuropsychological battery and the error awareness task (EAT), a modified Stroop go/no-go task that elicits aware and unaware errors. Analyses compared between-group no-go accuracy (including accuracy between the first and second halves of the task to measure attention and fatigue), error awareness performance, and Pe amplitude by level of awareness. The M/S TBI group decreased in accuracy and maintained error awareness over time; control participants improved both accuracy and error awareness during the course of the task. Pe amplitude was larger for aware than unaware errors for both groups; however, consistent with previous research on the Pe and TBI, there were no significant between-group differences for Pe amplitudes. Findings suggest possible attention difficulties and low improvement of performance over time may influence specific aspects of error awareness in M/S TBI.

  12. WAIS-III processing speed index scores after TBI: the influence of working memory, psychomotor speed and perceptual processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Jan E; Clement, Pamelia F; Curtiss, Glenn

    2003-08-01

    This study investigates the extent to which working memory, motor speed and perceptual processing speed influence Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) Processing Speed Index (PSI) scores. Sixty-eight adult outpatients with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) of varying severity and complete data on all outcome measures were identified. Two cases with outlying values on one outcome measure were omitted from the final sample. Working memory was measured by the Working Memory Index score from the WAIS-III. Motor speed was measured as score on the Halstead-Reitan Finger Oscillation Test (finger tapping) and perceptual processing as score on the Trail Making Test--Part B. In hierarchical multiple regression analyses, working memory accounted for 10% of the variance in PSI scores, whereas motor speed only accounted for 3%. An independent measure of perceptual processing, Trail Making Test--B, accounted for 26% of the variance in WAIS-III PSI scores. The total variance accounted for by the three factors was 56%. Findings confirm that the WAIS-III PSI scores of individuals who have received a TBI reflect perceptual processing speed, with an additional component attributable to working memory. Motor speed made only a small contribution to WAIS-III PSI scores in the present sample.

  13. Language and cognitive communication disorder during post-traumatic amnesia: Profiles of recovery after TBI from three cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Joanne; Ferguson, Alison; Spencer, Elizabeth; Togher, Leanne

    2017-09-25

    There has been limited empirical speech-language pathology (SLP) study of language and cognitive communication during post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) and the early stages after TBI. The purpose of the current research was to explore the potential means and utility of assessing cognitive communication during PTA and the post-acute recovery period. This research used a longitudinal mixed methods design to describe language and cognitive communication assessment and recovery profiles of three patients with TBI. Cognitive communication was assessed with repeated standardised and non-standardised methods during PTA (rated with Westmead PTA Scale) and at follow-up 3 months after PTA emergence. All participants demonstrated a profile of language and cognitive communication strengths and weaknesses during PTA and the post-acute period, also evident at follow-up. Improvement occurred gradually throughout PTA, although with individual fluctuation across test occasions. There was no marked change in communication function immediately before and after PTA emergence, indicating that cognitive communication ability and those functions measured on the Westmead PTA Scale (memory and orientation) did not recover at the same rate. It was feasible to assess language and cognitive communication throughout PTA and the post-acute period, and early assessment results were relevant to the patient's ongoing communicative function. It is suggested that early and repeated SLP assessment may contribute to the prediction of persisting cognitive communication issues.

  14. Predicting 14-day mortality after severe traumatic brain injury: application of the IMPACT models in the brain trauma foundation TBI-trac® New York State database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozenbeek, Bob; Chiu, Ya-Lin; Lingsma, Hester F; Gerber, Linda M; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Ghajar, Jamshid; Maas, Andrew I R

    2012-05-01

    Prognostic models for outcome prediction in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are important instruments in both clinical practice and research. To remain current a continuous process of model validation is necessary. We aimed to investigate the performance of the International Mission on Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI (IMPACT) prognostic models in predicting mortality in a contemporary New York State TBI registry developed and maintained by the Brain Trauma Foundation. The Brain Trauma Foundation (BTF) TBI-trac® database contains data on 3125 patients who sustained severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score ≤ 8) in New York State between 2000 and 2009. The outcome measure was 14-day mortality. To predict 14-day mortality with admission data, we adapted the IMPACT Core and Extended models. Performance of the models was assessed by determining calibration (agreement between observed and predicted outcomes), and discrimination (separation of those patients who die from those who survive). Calibration was explored graphically with calibration plots. Discrimination was expressed by the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). A total of 2513 out of 3125 patients in the BTF database met the inclusion criteria. The 14-day mortality rate was 23%. The models showed excellent calibration. Mean predicted probabilities were 20% for the Core model and 24% for the Extended model. Both models showed good discrimination with AUCs of 0.79 (Core) and 0.83 (Extended). We conclude that the IMPACT models validly predict 14-day mortality in the BTF database, confirming generalizability of these models for outcome prediction in TBI patients.

  15. Evaluating a Novel Sleep-Focused Mind-body Rehabilitative Program for Veterans. Veterans with mTBI and Other Polytrauma Symptoms: An RCT Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Veterans with mTBI and other “ polytrauma ” symptoms: An RCT study PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yoshio Nakamura, Ph.D. CONTRACTING...Veterans with mTBI and other “ polytrauma ” symptoms: An RCT study 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0385 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0385...DoD HRPO and started planning study logistics and refined them by meeting with the Polytrauma clinic to inform their personnel about the study and

  16. Decreasing adrenergic or sympathetic hyperactivity after severe traumatic brain injury using propranolol and clonidine (DASH After TBI Study: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Mayur B

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe TBI, defined as a Glasgow Coma Scale ≤ 8, increases intracranial pressure and activates the sympathetic nervous system. Sympathetic hyperactivity after TBI manifests as catecholamine excess, hypertension, abnormal heart rate variability, and agitation, and is associated with poor neuropsychological outcome. Propranolol and clonidine are centrally acting drugs that may decrease sympathetic outflow, brain edema, and agitation. However, there is no prospective randomized evidence available demonstrating the feasibility, outcome benefits, and safety for adrenergic blockade after TBI. Methods/Design The DASH after TBI study is an actively accruing, single-center, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, two-arm trial, where one group receives centrally acting sympatholytic drugs, propranolol (1 mg intravenously every 6 h for 7 days and clonidine (0.1 mg per tube every 12 h for 7 days, and the other group, double placebo, within 48 h of severe TBI. The study uses a weighted adaptive minimization randomization with categories of age and Marshall head CT classification. Feasibility will be assessed by ability to provide a neuroradiology read for randomization, by treatment contamination, and by treatment compliance. The primary endpoint is reduction in plasma norepinephrine level as measured on day 8. Secondary endpoints include comprehensive plasma and urine catecholamine levels, heart rate variability, arrhythmia occurrence, infections, agitation measures using the Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale and Agitated Behavior scale, medication use (anti-hypertensive, sedative, analgesic, and antipsychotic, coma-free days, ventilator-free days, length of stay, and mortality. Neuropsychological outcomes will be measured at hospital discharge and at 3 and 12 months. The domains tested will include global executive function, memory, processing speed, visual-spatial, and behavior. Other assessments include

  17. Total body irradiation (TBI) in pediatric patients. A single-center experience after 30 years of low-dose rate irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linsenmeier, Claudia; Thoennessen, Daniel; Negretti, Laura; Streller, Tino; Luetolf, Urs Martin [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation-Oncology; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre [University Children' s Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Hemato-Oncology; Oertel, Susanne [University Hospital Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Radiation-Oncology; Heidelberg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2010-11-15

    To retrospectively analyze patient characteristics, treatment, and treatment outcome of pediatric patients with hematologic diseases treated with total body irradiation (TBI) between 1978 and 2006. 32 pediatric patients were referred to the Department of Radiation-Oncology at the University of Zurich for TBI. Records of regular follow-up of 28 patients were available for review. Patient characteristics as well as treatment outcome regarding local control and overall survival were assessed. A total of 18 patients suffered from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 5 from acute and 2 from chronic myelogenous leukemia, 1 from non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and 2 from anaplastic anemia. The cohort consisted of 15 patients referred after first remission and 13 patients with relapsed leukemia. Mean follow-up was 34 months (2-196 months) with 15 patients alive at the time of last follow-up. Eight patients died of recurrent disease, 1 of graft vs. host reaction, 2 of sepsis, and 2 patients died of a secondary malignancy. The 5-year overall survival rate (OS) was 60%. Overall survival was significantly inferior in patients treated after relapse compared to those treated for newly diagnosed leukemia (24% versus 74%; p=0.004). At the time of last follow-up, 11 patients survived for more than 36 months following TBI. Late effects (RTOG {>=}3) were pneumonitis in 1 patient, chronic bronchitis in 1 patient, cardiomyopathy in 2 patients, severe cataractogenesis in 1 patient (48 months after TBI with 10 Gy in a single dose) and secondary malignancies in 2 patients (36 and 190 months after TBI). Growth disturbances were observed in all patients treated prepubertally. In 2 patients with identical twins treated at ages 2 and 7, a loss of 8% in final height of the treated twin was observed. As severe late sequelae after TBI, we observed 2 secondary malignancies in 11 patients who survived in excess of 36 months. However, long-term morbidity is moderate following treatment with the fractionated

  18. The family experiences of in-hospital care questionnaire in severe traumatic brain injury (FECQ-TBI): a validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anke, Audny; Manskow, Unn Sollid; Friborg, Oddgeir; Røe, Cecilie; Arntzen, Cathrine

    2016-11-28

    Family members are important for support and care of their close relative after severe traumas, and their experiences are vital health care quality indicators. The objective was to describe the development of the Family Experiences of in-hospital Care Questionnaire for family members of patients with severe Traumatic Brain Injury (FECQ-TBI), and to evaluate its psychometric properties and validity. The design of the study is a Norwegian multicentre study inviting 171 family members. The questionnaire developmental process included a literature review, use of an existing instrument (the parent experience of paediatric care questionnaire), focus group with close family members, as well as expert group judgments. Items asking for family care experiences related to acute wards and rehabilitation were included. Several items of the paediatric care questionnaire were removed or the wording of the items was changed to comply with the present purpose. Questions covering experiences with the inpatient rehabilitation period, the discharge phase, the family experiences with hospital facilities, the transfer between departments and the economic needs of the family were added. The developed questionnaire was mailed to the participants. Exploratory factor analyses were used to examine scale structure, in addition to screening for data quality, and analyses of internal consistency and validity. The questionnaire was returned by 122 (71%) of family members. Principal component analysis extracted six dimensions (eigenvalues > 1.0): acute organization and information (10 items), rehabilitation organization (13 items), rehabilitation information (6 items), discharge (4 items), hospital facilities-patients (4 items) and hospital facilities-family (2 items). Items related to the acute phase were comparable to items in the two dimensions of rehabilitation: organization and information. All six subscales had high Cronbach's alpha coefficients >0.80. The construct validity was

  19. Molecular programs induced by heat acclimation confer neuroprotection against TBI and hypoxic insults via cross-tolerance mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal eHorowitz

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprotection following prolonged exposure to high ambient temperatures (heat acclimation HA develops via altered molecular programs such as cross-tolerance (Heat Acclimation -Neuroprotection Cross-Tolerance -HANCT. The mechanisms underlying cross-tolerance depend on enhanced on-demand protective pathways evolving during acclimation. The protection achieved is long lasting and limits the need for de novo recruitment of cytoprotective pathways upon exposure to novel stressors. Using mouse and rat acclimated phenotypes, we will focus on the impact of heat acclimation on Angiotensin II-AT2 receptors in neurogenesis and on HIF-1 as key mediators in spontaneous recovery and HANCT after traumatic brain injury (TBI. The neuroprotective consequences of heat acclimation on NMDA and AMPA receptors will be discussed using the global hypoxia model. A behavioral-molecular link will be crystallized. The differences between HANCT and consensus preconditioning will be reviewed.

  20. PENINGKATAN KETERAMPILAN BERBICARA BAHASA INGGRIS DENGAN METODE SUGGESTOPEDIA PADA MAHASISWA SEMESTER II-E TBI STAIN PAMEKASAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumihatul Ummah

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There are two problems in the result of research that will be discussed in this article. They are (1 how are the steps of the implementation of suggestopedia method in learning speaking English at the second semester students of E class TBI STAIN Pamekasan and (2 How are the increasing of speaking English skill for the second semester students of E class TBI STAIN Pamekasan in learning speaking English by using the suggestopedia method. The research method is classroom action research by using research strategy of Kemmis and Mc Taggert Model which consist of four (4 steps, namely planning, acting, observing, and reflecting. The result of research provided that classically for the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd cycle indicated the increasing of students learning completeness scores, each of them are 38.23%, 67.54%, and 82.35%. While the students performance for each aspects are increasing from the 1st cycle up to 3rd cycle. The students performance of speaking English activities in the classroom from each aspects that more appear was grammar with score 85.2%. for the 2nd cycle was comprehensibility with score 88.2% and vocabulary with score 88.2%, and for the 3rd  cycle that more appear was fluency with score 91.2%.  Besides, for the frequency percentage of students performance from each cycles are more increasing, by the 1st  cycle 55% (enough, the 2nd cycle 70% (good, and the 3rd cycle 85% (very good. Finally, the suggestopedia method in learning speaking English can increase the result of students learning. In fact, the students look like be enthusiastic in learning speaking English. The students were active to joint with this subject from each cycle. By the good atmosphere, conducive situation of the classroom, and soft music made the students to be relax in learning the subject. It also was increase imagination, concentration, and liveliness for the students.

  1. TBI Patient, Injury, Therapy, and Ancillary Treatments Associated with Outcomes at Discharge and 9 Months Post-discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Susan D.; Corrigan, John D.; Beaulieu, Cynthia L.; Bogner, Jennifer; Barrett, Ryan S.; Giuffrida, Clare G.; Ryser, David K.; Cooper, Kelli; Carroll, Deborah M.; Deutscher, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine associations of patient and injury characteristics, inpatient rehabilitation therapy activities, and neurotropic medications with outcomes at discharge and 9 months post-discharge for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) Design Prospective, longitudinal observational study Setting 10 inpatient rehabilitation centers (9 US, 1 Canada) Participants Consecutive patients (n=2130) enrolled between 2008 and 2011, admitted for inpatient rehabilitation after an index TBI injury Interventions Not applicable Main Outcome Measures Rehabilitation length of stay, discharge to home, and Functional Independence Measure (FIM) at discharge and 9 months post-discharge Results The admission FIM Cognitive score was used to create 5 relatively homogeneous subgroups for subsequent analysis of treatment outcomes. Within each subgroup, significant associations were found between outcomes and patient and injury characteristics, time spent in therapy activities, and medications used. Patient and injury characteristics explained on average 35.7% of the variation in discharge outcomes and 22.3% in 9-month outcomes. Adding time spent and level of effort in therapy activities, as well as percent of stay using specific medications, explained approximately 20.0% more variation for discharge outcomes and 12.9% for 9-month outcomes. After patient, injury, and treatment characteristics were used to predict outcomes, center differences added only approximately 1.9% additional variance explained. Conclusions At discharge, greater effort during therapy sessions, time spent in more complex therapy activities, and use of specific medications were associated with better outcomes for patients in all admission FIM Cognitive subgroups. At 9 months post-discharge, similar but less pervasive associations were observed for therapy activities, but not classes of medications. Further research is warranted to examine more specific combinations of therapy activities and medications that

  2. Increased prognostic accuracy of TBI when a brain electrical activity biomarker is added to loss of consciousness (LOC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Dallas; Huff, J Stephen; Curley, Kenneth; Naunheim, Roseanne; Ghosh Dastidar, Samanwoy; Prichep, Leslie S

    2017-07-01

    Extremely high accuracy for predicting CT+ traumatic brain injury (TBI) using a quantitative EEG (QEEG) based multivariate classification algorithm was demonstrated in an independent validation trial, in Emergency Department (ED) patients, using an easy to use handheld device. This study compares the predictive power using that algorithm (which includes LOC and amnesia), to the predictive power of LOC alone or LOC plus traumatic amnesia. ED patients 18-85years presenting within 72h of closed head injury, with GSC 12-15, were study candidates. 680 patients with known absence or presence of LOC were enrolled (145 CT+ and 535 CT- patients). 5-10min of eyes closed EEG was acquired using the Ahead 300 handheld device, from frontal and frontotemporal regions. The same classification algorithm methodology was used for both the EEG based and the LOC based algorithms. Predictive power was evaluated using area under the ROC curve (AUC) and odds ratios. The QEEG based classification algorithm demonstrated significant improvement in predictive power compared with LOC alone, both in improved AUC (83% improvement) and odds ratio (increase from 4.65 to 16.22). Adding RGA and/or PTA to LOC was not improved over LOC alone. Rapid triage of TBI relies on strong initial predictors. Addition of an electrophysiological based marker was shown to outperform report of LOC alone or LOC plus amnesia, in determining risk of an intracranial bleed. In addition, ease of use at point-of-care, non-invasive, and rapid result using such technology suggests significant value added to standard clinical prediction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. ABI and TBI in diabetics%糖尿病病人的踝肱指数和趾肱指数

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈若飞; 罗文军; 唐博

    2006-01-01

    目的探讨踝肱指数(ABI)、趾肱指数(TBI)在2型糖尿病(T2DM)病人中的变化、影响因素.方法 142例2型糖尿病病人和40例非糖尿病病人对照进行ABI与TBI测量.记录病人高血压、血脂异常、吸烟、是否行胰岛素治疗等病史,检测血糖、血脂,测量血压.根据ABI和临床资料分组,进行统计学分析.结果 T2DM组TBI低于对照组TBI (P<0.01).ABI<1.3组与ABI≥1.3组间ABI比较,差异有统计学意义(P<0.01), TBI比较差异无统计学意义.T2DM组中,ABI和TBI在有和无高血压病史、有和无血脂异常及有和无吸烟病史比较差异均有统计学意义(P<0.01).在对照组和T2DM未合并下肢动脉疾病组,ABI与TBI相关系数r分别为0.44(P<0.05)、0.32(P<0.01).T2DM组中,ABI与TBI的一致性检验P<0.05.结论 2型糖尿病病人的TBI较正常人低,ABI与TBI受年龄、糖尿病病程、高血压、血脂异常、吸烟等因素影响.ABI与TBI的相关性不高.

  4. Clinical and diagnostic approach to patients with hypopituitarism due to traumatic brain injury (TBI), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and ischemic stroke (IS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karamouzis, Ioannis; Pagano, Loredana; Prodam, Flavia; Mele, Chiara; Zavattaro, Marco; Busti, Arianna; Marzullo, Paolo; Aimaretti, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary dysfunction attributable to traumatic brain injury (TBI), aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and ischemic stroke (IS) has been lately highlighted. The diagnosis of TBI-induced-hypopituitarism, defined as a deficient secretion of one or more pituitary hormones, is made similarly to the diagnosis of classical hypopituitarism because of hypothalamic/pituitary diseases. Hypopituitarism is believed to contribute to TBI-associated morbidity and to functional and cognitive final outcome, and quality-of-life impairment. Each pituitary hormone must be tested separately, since there is a variable pattern of hormone deficiency among patients with TBI-induced-hypopituitarism. Similarly, the SAH and IS may lead to pituitary dysfunction although the literature in this field is limited. The drive to diagnose hypopituitarism is the suspect that the secretion of one/more pituitary hormone may be subnormal. This suspicion can be based upon the knowledge that the patient has an appropriate clinical context in which hypopituitarism can be present, or a symptom known as caused by hypopituitarism. Hypopituitarism should be diagnosed as a combination of low peripheral and inappropriately normal/low pituitary hormones although their basal evaluation may be not distinctive due to pulsatile, circadian, or situational secretion of some hormones. Evaluation of the somatotroph and corticotroph axes require dynamic stimulation test (ITT for both axes, GHRH + arginine test for somatotroph axis) in order to clearly separate normal from deficient responses.

  5. Feasibility of TBI Assessment Measures in a Field Environment: A Pilot Study for the Environmental Sensors in Training (ESiT) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    assigned to one of two conditions. Condition 1 included neurocognitive performance tests (Continuous Performance, Symbol Digit Coding, Stroop and Four-Part...22 1 Introduction Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been labeled the “ signature injury” of...timely and accurate detection of head injury include the neuropsychological measures Continuous Performance, Symbol Digit Coding, Stroop, and Four

  6. Facial Emotion Recognition Deficits following Moderate-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Re-examining the Valence Effect and the Role of Emotion Intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberg, H.; McDonald, S.; Dethier, M.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Westbrook, R.F.

    2014-01-01

    Many individuals who sustain moderate-severe traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are poor at recognizing emotional expressions, with a greater impairment in recognizing negative (e.g., fear, disgust, sadness, and anger) than positive emotions (e.g., happiness and surprise). It has been questioned whether

  7. Facial Emotion Recognition Deficits following Moderate-Severe Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Re-examining the Valence Effect and the Role of Emotion Intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenberg, H.; McDonald, S.; Dethier, M.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Westbrook, R.F.

    2014-01-01

    Many individuals who sustain moderate-severe traumatic brain injuries (TBI) are poor at recognizing emotional expressions, with a greater impairment in recognizing negative (e.g., fear, disgust, sadness, and anger) than positive emotions (e.g., happiness and surprise). It has been questioned whether

  8. Synchronization between the anterior and posterior cortex determines consciousness level in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Carrion, Jose; Leon-Dominguez, Umberto; Pollonini, Luca; Wu, Meng-Hung; Frye, Richard E; Dominguez-Morales, Maria Rosario; Zouridakis, George

    2012-10-02

    Survivors of traumatic brain injury (TBI) often suffer disorders of consciousness as a result of a breakdown in cortical connectivity. However, little is known about the neural discharges and cortical areas working in synchrony to generate consciousness in these patients. In this study, we analyzed cortical connectivity in patients with severe neurocognitive disorder (SND) and in the minimally conscious state (MCS). We found two synchronized networks subserving consciousness; one retrolandic (cognitive network) and the other frontal (executive control network). The synchrony between these networks is severely disrupted in patients in the MCS as compared to those with better levels of consciousness and a preserved state of alertness (SND). The executive control network could facilitate the synchronization and coherence of large populations of distant cortical neurons using high frequency oscillations on a precise temporal scale. Consciousness is altered or disappears after losing synchrony and coherence. We suggest that the synchrony between anterior and retrolandic regions is essential to awareness, and that a functioning frontal lobe is a surrogate marker for preserved consciousness. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Brain Integration. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. SU-C-213-04: Application of Depth Sensing and 3D-Printing Technique for Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Patient Measurement and Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, M; Suh, T [Department of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, B; Xing, L [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Jenkins, C [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To develop and validate an innovative method of using depth sensing cameras and 3D printing techniques for Total Body Irradiation (TBI) treatment planning and compensator fabrication. Methods: A tablet with motion tracking cameras and integrated depth sensing was used to scan a RANDOTM phantom arranged in a TBI treatment booth to detect and store the 3D surface in a point cloud (PC) format. The accuracy of the detected surface was evaluated by comparison to extracted measurements from CT scan images. The thickness, source to surface distance and off-axis distance of the phantom at different body section was measured for TBI treatment planning. A 2D map containing a detailed compensator design was calculated to achieve uniform dose distribution throughout the phantom. The compensator was fabricated using a 3D printer, silicone molding and tungsten powder. In vivo dosimetry measurements were performed using optically stimulated luminescent detectors (OSLDs). Results: The whole scan of the anthropomorphic phantom took approximately 30 seconds. The mean error for thickness measurements at each section of phantom compare to CT was 0.44 ± 0.268 cm. These errors resulted in approximately 2% dose error calculation and 0.4 mm tungsten thickness deviation for the compensator design. The accuracy of 3D compensator printing was within 0.2 mm. In vivo measurements for an end-to-end test showed the overall dose difference was within 3%. Conclusion: Motion cameras and depth sensing techniques proved to be an accurate and efficient tool for TBI patient measurement and treatment planning. 3D printing technique improved the efficiency and accuracy of the compensator production and ensured a more accurate treatment delivery.

  10. Evaluating a Novel Sleep-Focused Mind-Body Rehabilitative Program for Veterans with mTBI and Other Polytrauma Symptoms: An RCT Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    34 Polytrauma " Symptoms: An RCT Study PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Yoshio Nakamura, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Utah , Salt Lake City, UT 84112...Rehabilitative Program for Veterans with mTBI and Other " Polytrauma " Symptoms: An RCT Study 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...our recruiting effort. We screened the patient lists obtained from Polytrauma Clinic at VA, sent recruitment letters and made phone calls to follow

  11. SU-E-T-515: Field-In-Field Compensation Technique Using Multi-Leaf Collimator to Deliver Total Body Irradiation (TBI) Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lakeman, T [The State University of New York at Buffalo (United States); Wang, IZ [The State University of New York at Buffalo (United States); Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) uses large parallel-opposed radiation fields to suppress the patient's immune system and eradicate the residual cancer cells in preparation of recipient for bone marrow transplant. The manual placement of lead compensators has been used conventionally to compensate for the varying thickness through the entire body in large-field TBI. The goal of this study is to pursue utilizing the modern field-in-field (FIF) technique with the multi-leaf collimator (MLC) to more accurately and efficiently deliver dose to patients in need of TBI. Method: Treatment plans utilizing the FIF technique to deliver a total body dose were created retrospectively for patients for whom CT data had been previously acquired. Treatment fields include one pair of opposed open large fields (collimator=45°) with a specific weighting and a succession of smaller fields (collimator=90°) each with their own weighting. The smaller fields are shaped by moving MLC to block the sections of the patient which have already received close to 100% of the prescribed dose. The weighting factors for each of these fields were calculated using the attenuation coefficient of the initial lead compensators and the separation of the patient in different positions in the axial plane. Results: Dose-volume histograms (DVH) were calculated for evaluating the FIF compensation technique. The maximum body doses calculated from the DVH were reduced from the non-compensated 179.3% to 148.2% in the FIF plans, indicating a more uniform dose with the FIF compensation. All calculated monitor units were well within clinically acceptable limits and exceeded those of the original lead compensation plan by less than 50 MU (only ~1.1% increase). Conclusion: MLC FIF technique for TBI will not significantly increase the beam on time while it can substantially reduce the compensator setup time and the potential risk of errors in manually placing lead compensators.

  12. ED disposition of the Glasgow Coma Scale 13 to 15 traumatic brain injury patient: analysis of the Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in TBI study☆,☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeoye, Opeolu; Lindsell, Christopher J.; Hart, Kimberly W.; Pancioli, Arthur; McMullan, Jason T.; Yue, John K.; Nishijima, Daniel K.; Gordon, Wayne A.; Valadka, Alex B.; Okonkwo, David O.; Lingsma, Hester F.; Maas, Andrew I.R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients are frequently admitted to high levels of care despite limited evidence suggesting benefit. Such decisions may contribute to the significant cost of caring for mTBI patients. Understanding the factors that drive disposition decision making and how disposition is associated with outcomes is necessary for developing an evidence-base supporting disposition decisions. We evaluated factors associated with emergency department triage of mTBI patients to 1 of 3 levels of care: home, inpatient floor, or intensive care unit (ICU). Methods This multicenter, prospective, cohort study included patients with isolated head trauma, a cranial computed tomography as part of routine care, and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 13 to 15. Data analysis was performed using multinomial logistic regression. Results Of the 304 patients included, 167 (55%) were discharged home, 76 (25%) were admitted to the inpatient floor, and 61 (20%) were admitted to the ICU. In the multivariable model, admission to the ICU, compared with floor admission, varied by study site, odds ratio (OR) 0.18 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.06–0.57); antiplatelet/anticoagulation therapy, OR 7.46 (95% CI, 1.79–31.13); skull fracture, OR 7.60 (95% CI, 2.44–23.73); and lower GCS, OR 2.36 (95% CI, 1.05–5.30). No difference in outcome was observed between the 3 levels of care. Conclusion Clinical characteristics and local practice patterns contribute to mTBI disposition decisions. Level of care was not associated with outcomes. Intracranial hemorrhage, GCS 13 to 14, skull fracture, and current antiplatelet/anticoagulant therapy influenced disposition decisions. PMID:24857248

  13. The impact of self-awareness and depression on subjective reports of memory, quality-of-life and satisfaction with life following TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goverover, Yael; Chiaravalloti, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    To determine the relationship between self-awareness and depressive symptomatology with self-reports of memory, Quality-of-Life (QoL) and satisfaction with life in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Cross-sectional survey of 30 community dwelling adults, who sustained a TBI at least 1 year prior to study enrolment. Participants completed questionnaires to assess the constructs of depression, self-awareness, QoL, satisfaction with life and memory. Symptoms of depression were significantly associated with self-reports of poor memory abilities, lower QoL and lower satisfaction with life. Additionally, higher levels of self-awareness were associated with lower ratings of QoL and reduced memory abilities and better strategy use regarding memory. However, when examining the contribution of each construct individually, depressive symptomatology, and not self-awareness, was significantly associated with subjective self-reports of memory, QoL and satisfaction with life. This pattern of relationships illustrates that, when a person has a low level of depressive symptoms, his/her reports of QoL, memory and satisfaction with life will be more positive; however, he/she will demonstrate more difficulty with self-awareness. Thus, psychological aspects of recovery must, therefore, be taken into account when using self-reported measures in the evaluation of persons who have sustained TBI.

  14. Treatment of patients with unresectable squamous head and neck cancer with induction chemotherapy followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy; Traitement de patients atteints d'un cancer irresecable de la tete et du cou avec une chimiotherapie d'induction suivie d'une radiotherapie hyperfractionnee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesia, R.; Majem, M.; Barretina Ginesta, M.P.; Montes, A.; Cardenal, F. [Institut Catala d' Oncologia-Duran i Reynals, Dept. of Medical Oncology, L' Hospitalet de LLobregat-Barcelona (Spain); Galiana, R.; Guedea, F. [Institut Catala d' Oncologia-Duran i Reynals, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, L' Hospitalet de LLobregat-Barcelona (Spain); Manos, M. [Institut Catala d' Oncologia-Duran i Reynals, Dept. of ENT, L' Hospitalet de LLobregat-Barcelona (Spain); Monner, A. [Institut Catala d' Oncologia-Duran i Reynals, Dept. of Dept. of Maxillofacial Surgery, L' Hospitalet de LLobregat-Barcelona (Spain); Perez, J. [Institut Catala d' Oncologia-Duran i Reynals, Clinical Investigation Unit, L' Hospitalet de LLobregat-Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-03-15

    Purpose: the contribution of induction chemotherapy (CT) followed by hyperfractionated radiotherapy (h.f.R.T.) in unresectable squamous head and neck cancer has been evaluated in a single institution as an assistancial protocol. Patients and methods: from March 1994 to June 2000 all consecutive patients with unresectable disease were treated with four courses of platin plus fluorouracil based CT followed by h.f.R.T.. Tumor resectability and response was assessed by a multidisciplinary committee. Results: ninety-nine patients (pts) were treated. All of them had stage IV-M0 disease: 67 T4, 88 N2-N3. Tumor location: 62 oropharynx, 22 hypopharynx, eight oral cavity and seven larynx. Tumor response at the end of treatment: 61 patients complete response, 17 partial response, two stable disease, 10 progressive disease and nine unevaluated. With a median follow-up of 70 months the 5-year loco-regional control and overall survival was 30.3% (95% CI: 21.9-38.6) and 21.6% (95% CI: 13.4-29.8), respectively. Loco-regional control and overall survival is significantly influenced by prior response to induction CT. Main grade 3-4 toxicity related to CT was stomatitis, but there were five patients with an ischemic event. Grade 3-4 acute toxicity related to h.f.R.T.: 47 stomatitis, 20 epithelitis. Chronic toxicity related to h.f.R.T.: six emergency tracheotomies due to laryngeal edema, five pneumonia and one mucous/soft-tissue necrosis. There were eight toxic related deaths. Conclusion: induction CT followed by h.f.R.T. might increase the overall survival rate in unresectable disease. H.f.R.T. resulted in a high rate of acute toxicity and its use would not be warranted in those patients with no response to induction CT who had a low probability of long-term control. (authors)

  15. Advanced Sensors for TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    definition provides a variety of advantages to the overall process: • The cavity definition requires a plasma etch that is a challenging operation to perform...to this time is plasma etch to singulate the die. If a substitute for this process can be identified, no backside processing will be required of the...considered including laser dicing, sidewall polishing or reverting back to plasma etching . To determine whether this process would weaken or compromise

  16. Opioid Use after TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    abused prescription pain medications is oxycodone, especially in its sustained release formulation OxyContin3. This pain medication and others in the...suggestive of increased impulsivity • No differences were detected between groups in baseline nociception or in response to the acute anti- nociceptive ...performance was stable ( 3 days >20% change) Assessment of nociception with warm water tail withdrawal: • Rats were habituated to the test apparatus

  17. Advanced Sensors for TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    degrees C) in temperature within the biological range of 34-45 degrees C (Figure 14). REPORTABLE OUTCOMES: Lyeth B., Bonner D., Van K ...seizures, fever, and neurotrauma. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 1113:173-177. Bauman, R.A., Ling, G., Tong, L., Januszkiewicz , A., Agoston, D., Delanerolle, N., Kim

  18. Advanced Sensors for TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    value) • Producing the reference volume cavity requires a hermetic seal that requires a high temperature operation that is difficult to perform later in... CMOS clean • Commercialization of the sensor is aided by this process as use of CMOS -clean commercial foundries will not be restricted Bench...proposed to use miniaturized, state-of-the-art pressure/ temperature sensors engineered at LLNL to measure the immediate increases in ICP combined

  19. Evidence of increased brain amyloid in severe TBI survivors at 1, 12, and 24 months after injury: report of 2 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatson, Joshua W; Stebbins, Cari; Mathews, Dana; Harris, Thomas S; Madden, Christopher; Batjer, Hunt; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Minei, Joseph P

    2016-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease. With respect to amyloid deposition, there are no published serial data regarding the deposition rate of amyloid throughout the brain after TBI. The authors conducted serial (18)F-AV-45 (florbetapir F18) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in 2 patients with severe TBI at 1, 12, and 24 months after injury. A total of 12 brain regions were surveyed for changes in amyloid levels. Case 1 involved a 50-year-old man who experienced a severe TBI. Compared with the 1-month time point, of the 12 brain regions that were surveyed, a decrease in amyloid (as indicated by standard uptake value ratios) was only observed in the hippocampus (-16%, left; -12%, right) and caudate nucleus (-18%, left; -18%, right), suggesting that initial amyloid accumulation in the brain was cleared between time points 1 and 12 months after injury. Compared to the scan at 1 year, a greater increase in amyloid (+15%) was observed in the right hippocampus at the 24-month time point. The patient in Case 2 was a 37-year-old man who suffered severe trauma to the head and a subsequent stroke; he had poor cognitive/functional outcomes and underwent 1.5 years of rehabilitation. Due to a large infarct area on the injured side of the brain (right side), the authors focused primarily on brain regions affected within the left hemisphere. Compared with the 1-month scan, they only found an increase in brain amyloid within the left anterior putamen (+11%) at 12 months after injury. In contrast, decreased amyloid burden was detected in the left caudate nucleus (-48%), occipital cortex (-21%), and precuneus (-19%) brain regions at the 12-month time point, which is indicative of early accumulation and subsequent clearance. In comparison with 12-month values, more clearance was observed, since a reduction in amyloid was found at 24 months after trauma within the left anterior putamen (-12%) and occipital cortex (-15%). Also, by 24

  20. Stretch and/or oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) in an in vitro traumatic brain injury (TBI) model induces calcium alteration and inflammatory cascade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, Ellaine; Burek, Malgorzata; Förster, Carola Y

    2015-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), made up of endothelial cells of capillaries in the brain, maintains the microenvironment of the central nervous system. During ischemia and traumatic brain injury (TBI), cellular disruption leading to mechanical insult results to the BBB being compromised. Oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD) is the most commonly used in vitro model for ischemia. On the other hand, stretch injury is currently being used to model TBI in vitro. In this paper, the two methods are used alone or in combination, to assess their effects on cerebrovascular endothelial cells cEND in the presence or absence of astrocytic factors. Applying severe stretch and/or OGD to cEND cells in our experiments resulted to cell swelling and distortion. Damage to the cells induced release of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme (LDH) and nitric oxide (NO) into the cell culture medium. In addition, mRNA expression of inflammatory markers interleukin (I L)-6, IL-1α, chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α also increased. These events could lead to the opening of calcium ion channels resulting to excitotoxicity. This could be demonstrated by increased calcium level in OGD-subjected cEND cells incubated with astrocyte-conditioned medium. Furthermore, reduction of cell membrane integrity decreased tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin expression. In addition, permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer increased. Also, since cell damage requires an increased uptake of glucose, expression of glucose transporter glut1 was found to increase at the mRNA level after OGD. Overall, the effects of OGD on cEND cells appear to be more prominent than that of stretch with regards to TJ proteins, NO, glut1 expression, and calcium level. Astrocytes potentiate these effects on calcium level in cEND cells. Combining both methods to model TBI in vitro shows a promising improvement to currently available models.

  1. Stretch and/or oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD in an in vitro traumatic brain injury (TBI model induces calcium alteration and inflammatory cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellaine eSalvador

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The blood-brain barrier (BBB, made up of endothelial cells of capillaries in the brain, maintains the microenvironment of the central nervous system. During ischemia and traumatic brain injury (TBI, cellular disruption leading to mechanical insult results to the BBB being compromised. Oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD is the most commonly used in vitro model for ischemia. On the other hand, stretch injury is currently being used to model TBI in vitro. In this paper, the two methods are used alone or in combination, to assess their effects on cerebrovascular endothelial cells cEND in the presence or absence of astrocytic factors. Applying severe stretch and/or OGD to cEND cells in our experiments resulted to cell swelling and distortion. Damage to the cells induced release of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme (LDH and nitric oxide (NO into the cell culture medium. In addition, mRNA expression of inflammatory markers interleukin (IL-6, IL-1α, chemokine (C-C motif ligand 2 (CCL2 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α also increased. These events could lead to the opening of calcium ion channels resulting to excitotoxicity. This could be demonstrated by increased calcium level in OGD-subjected cEND cells incubated with astrocyte-conditioned medium. Furthermore, reduction of cell membrane integrity decreased tight junction proteins claudin-5 and occludin expression. In addition, permeability of the endothelial cell monolayer increased. Also, since cell damage requires an increased uptake of glucose, expression of glucose transporter glut1 was found to increase at the mRNA level after OGD. Overall, the effects of OGD on cEND cells appear to be more prominent than that of stretch with regards to TJ proteins, NO, glut1 expression and calcium level. Astrocytes potentiate these effects on calcium level in cEND cells. Combining both methods to model TBI in vitro shows a promising improvement to currently available models.

  2. Group therapy use and its impact on the outcomes of inpatient rehabilitation following traumatic brain injury: Data from TBI-PBE project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Flora M.; Barrett, Ryan; Dijkers, Marcel P.; Zanca, Jeanne M.; Horn, Susan D.; Smout, Randall J.; Guerrier, Tami; Hauser, Elizabeth; Dunning, Megan R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the amount and content of group therapies provided during inpatient rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury (TBI), and assess the relationships of group therapy with patient, injury, and treatment factors as well as outcomes. Design Prospective observational cohort. Setting Inpatient rehabilitation. Participants 2,130 consecutive admissions for initial TBI rehabilitation at 10 inpatient rehabilitation facilities (9 in US and 1 Canada) from October 2008 to September 2011. Interventions n/a Main Outcome Measure(s) proportion of sessions that were group therapy (two or more patients were treated simultaneously by one or more clinicians); proportion of patients receiving group therapy; type of activity performed and amount of time spent in group therapy, by discipline; rehabilitation length of stay (RLOS); discharge location; FIM Cognitive and Motor scores at discharge. Results 79% of patients received at least 1 session of group therapy, with group therapy accounting for 13.7% of all therapy sessions and 15.8% of therapy hours. On average, patients spent 2.9 hours per week in group therapy. The greatest proportion of treatment time in group format was in Therapeutic Recreation (25.6%), followed by Speech Therapy (16.2%), Occupational Therapy (10.4%), Psychology (8.1%), and Physical Therapy (7.9%). Group therapy time and type of treatment activities varied among admission FIM cognitive subgroups and treatment sites. Several factors appear to be predictive of receiving group therapy, with treatment site being a major influence. However, group therapy as a whole offered little explanation of differences in the outcomes studied. Conclusion(s) Group therapy is commonly used in TBI rehabilitation, to varying degrees among disciplines, sites, and cognitive impairment subgroups. Various therapeutic activities take place in group therapy, indicating its perceived value in addressing many domains of functioning. Variation in outcomes is not explained

  3. Using Information from the Electronic Health Record to Improve Measurement of Unemployment in Service Members and Veterans with mTBI and Post-Deployment Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillahunt-Aspillaga, Christina; Finch, Dezon; Massengale, Jill; Kretzmer, Tracy; Luther, Stephen L.; McCart, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this pilot study is 1) to develop an annotation schema and a training set of annotated notes to support the future development of a natural language processing (NLP) system to automatically extract employment information, and 2) to determine if information about employment status, goals and work-related challenges reported by service members and Veterans with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and post-deployment stress can be identified in the Electronic Health Record (EHR). Design Retrospective cohort study using data from selected progress notes stored in the EHR. Setting Post-deployment Rehabilitation and Evaluation Program (PREP), an in-patient rehabilitation program for Veterans with TBI at the James A. Haley Veterans' Hospital in Tampa, Florida. Participants Service members and Veterans with TBI who participated in the PREP program (N = 60). Main Outcome Measures Documentation of employment status, goals, and work-related challenges reported by service members and recorded in the EHR. Results Two hundred notes were examined and unique vocational information was found indicating a variety of self-reported employment challenges. Current employment status and future vocational goals along with information about cognitive, physical, and behavioral symptoms that may affect return-to-work were extracted from the EHR. The annotation schema developed for this study provides an excellent tool upon which NLP studies can be developed. Conclusions Information related to employment status and vocational history is stored in text notes in the EHR system. Information stored in text does not lend itself to easy extraction or summarization for research and rehabilitation planning purposes. Development of NLP systems to automatically extract text-based employment information provides data that may improve the understanding and measurement of employment in this important cohort. PMID:25541956

  4. Three-year outcome following moderate-to-severe TBI in U.S. military service members: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickell, Tracey A; Lange, Rael T; French, Louis M

    2014-08-01

    This study examined the prospective course of neurobehavioral symptom reporting and health-related quality of life within the first 3 years following moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Participants were 52 U.S. service members who were evaluated following a moderate-to-severe TBI sustained in the combat theater during Operations Iraqi and Enduring Freedom (90.4%), or from other noncombat-related incidents. Participants completed the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder-Checklist within 3 months postinjury, and at least one follow-up telephone interview at 12 (n = 27), 24 (n = 31), or 36 months (n = 22) postinjury. Approximately half of the sample (41.9%-63.0%) reported "persistent" symptoms from baseline to follow-up. A substantial minority also "improved" (22.2%-31.8%) or "developed" new symptoms (3.7%-16.1%). Ongoing physical and mental health problems were also reported. The number of service members receiving mental health treatment significantly reduced between 12 and 36 months postinjury (48.1%-18.2%), while complaints of bodily pain significantly increased (40.7%-68.2%). Despite ongoing symptom reporting, few reported suicidal/homicidal ideation (6.5%-9.1%), and a substantial majority reported good/excellent health status (74.1%-90.9%) and satisfaction with their life (81.5%-90.9%). Continued support and care for all service members who sustain a combat-related moderate-to-severe TBI is recommended, regardless of the presence or absence of symptom reporting within the first few months postinjury.

  5. Reintegrating Troops with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) into Their Communities: Understanding the Scope and Timeline of Post-Deployment Driving Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Driving Problems PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Erica Stern Todd Rockwood CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: University of Minnesota...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 15 Sep 2008 – 14 Sep 2009 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Reintegrating Troops with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) into...fUll .V’!/I./j/ Ii"", dll....’ F’’’’’’’’’ ,nldy IS n«<kd to d<t" mlM ,f"’.. accurat.1y I.Oem til. ltOlld ordlanlIe. 0< ,rdl< d,Ke..".... du.1O

  6. Impact of conditioning with TBI in adult patients with T-cell ALL who receive a myeloablative allogeneic stem cell transplantation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cahu, X; Labopin, M; Giebel, S

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is a therapeutic option for adult patients with T-cell ALL (T-ALL). Meanwhile, few allo-SCT data specific to adult T-ALL have been described thus far. Specifically, the optimal myeloablative conditioning regimen is unknown. In this ret...... patients with T-ALL entitled to receive a myeloablative allo-SCT may benefit from TBI-based regimens.Bone Marrow Transplantation advance online publication, 30 November 2015; doi:10.1038/bmt.2015.278....

  7. Earlier low-dose TBI or DST overcomes CD8+ T-cell-mediated alloresistance to allogeneic marrow in recipients of anti-CD40L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yasuo; Ito, Hiroshi; Kurtz, Josef; Wekerle, Thomas; Ho, Leon; Sykes, Megan

    2004-01-01

    Treatment with a single injection of anti-CD40L (CD154) monoclonal antibody (mAb) and fully mismatched allogeneic bone marrow transplant (BMT) allows rapid tolerization of CD4+ T cells to the donor. The addition of in vivo CD8 T-cell depletion leads to permanent mixed hematopoietic chimerism and tolerance. We now describe two approaches that obviate the requirement for CD8 T-cell depletion by rapidly tolerizing recipient CD8 T cells in addition to CD4 cells. Administration of donor-specific transfusion (DST) to mice receiving 3 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), BMT and anti-CD40L mAb on day 0 uniformly led to permanent mixed chimerism and tolerance, compared with only 40% of mice receiving similar treatment without DST. In the absence of DST, moving the timing of 3 Gy TBI to day -1 or day -2 instead of day 0 led to rapid (by 2 weeks) induction of CD8+ cell tolerance, and also permitted uniform achievement of permanent mixed chimerism and donor-specific tolerance in recipients of anti-CD40L and BMT on day 0. These nontoxic regimens overcome CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell-mediated alloresistance without requiring host T-cell depletion, permitting the induction of permanent mixed chimerism and tolerance.

  8. Rehabilitation of Communicative Abilities in Patients with a History of TBI: Behavioral Improvements and Cerebral Changes in Resting-State Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, Katiuscia; Gabbatore, Ilaria; Geda, Elisabetta; Duca, Sergio; Cauda, Franco; Bara, Bruno G.; Bosco, Francesca M.

    2016-01-01

    A targeted training program for the rehabilitation of communicative abilities—Cognitive Pragmatic Treatment (CPT)—has been developed and previously tested on a sample of patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI), whose performance was found to have improved. Since cortical plasticity has been recognized as the main mechanism of functional recovery, we investigated whether and how behavioral improvements following the training program are accompanied by brain modifications. Eight TBI patients took part in the training program and were behaviorally assessed pre- and post-treatment; six of these patients were also evaluated with pre- and post-treatment resting state (rs) functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). At the end of the rehabilitation program patients showed improvement in overall communicative performance, in both comprehension and production tasks. A follow-up retest revealed the stability of these results 3 months after completing the training program. At the brain level, we found significant increases in the amplitude of low frequency fluctuation (ALFF) index in the bilateral precentral gyrus, in the right middle and superior temporal gyri, in the right cingulate gyrus, and in the left inferior parietal lobule. We discuss these differences of brain activity in terms of their possible contribution to promoting recovery. PMID:27047353

  9. Assessment of Health-Related Quality of Life after TBI: Comparison of a Disease-Specific (QOLIBRI) with a Generic (SF-36) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Steinbuechel, Nicole; Covic, Amra; Polinder, Suzanne; Kohlmann, Thomas; Cepulyte, Ugne; Poinstingl, Herbert; Backhaus, Joy; Bakx, Wilbert; Bullinger, Monika; Christensen, Anne-Lise; Formisano, Rita; Gibbons, Henning; Höfer, Stefan; Koskinen, Sanna; Maas, Andrew; Neugebauer, Edmund; Powell, Jane; Sarajuuri, Jaana; Sasse, Nadine; Schmidt, Silke; Mühlan, Holger; von Wild, Klaus; Zitnay, George; Truelle, Jean-Luc

    2016-01-01

    Psychosocial, emotional, and physical problems can emerge after traumatic brain injury (TBI), potentially impacting health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Until now, however, neither the discriminatory power of disease-specific (QOLIBRI) and generic (SF-36) HRQoL nor their correlates have been compared in detail. These aspects as well as some psychometric item characteristics were studied in a sample of 795 TBI survivors. The Shannon H' index absolute informativity, as an indicator of an instrument's power to differentiate between individuals within a specific group or health state, was investigated. Psychometric performance of the two instruments was predominantly good, generally higher, and more homogenous for the QOLIBRI than for the SF-36 subscales. Notably, the SF-36 “Role Physical,” “Role Emotional,” and “Social Functioning” subscales showed less satisfactory discriminatory power than all other dimensions or the sum scores of both instruments. The absolute informativity of disease-specific as well as generic HRQoL instruments concerning the different groups defined by different correlates differed significantly. When the focus is on how a certain subscale or sum score differentiates between individuals in one specific dimension/health state, the QOLIBRI can be recommended as the preferable instrument. PMID:27022207

  10. Exposure to a predator scent induces chronic behavioral changes in rats previously exposed to low-level blast: Implications for the relationship of blast-related TBI to PTSD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Perez-Garcia

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Blast-related mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI has been unfortunately common in veterans who served in the recent conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. The postconcussion syndrome associated with these mTBIs has frequently appeared in combination with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. The presence of PTSD has complicated diagnosis since clinically PTSD and the postconcussion syndrome of mTBI have many overlapping symptoms. In particular establishing how much of the symptom complex can be attributed to the psychological trauma associated with PTSD in contrast to the physical injury of TBI has proven difficult. Indeed some have suggested that much of what is now being called blast-related postconcussion syndrome is better explained by PTSD. The relationship between the postconcussion syndrome of mTBI and PTSD is complex. Association of the two disorders might be viewed as additive effects of independent psychological and physical traumas suffered in a war zone. However we previously found that rats exposed to repetitive low-level blast exposure in the absence of a psychological stressor developed a variety of anxiety and PTSD-related behavioral traits that were present months following the last blast exposure. Here we show that a single predator scent challenge delivered 8 months after the last blast exposure induces chronic anxiety related changes in blast-exposed rats that are still present 45 days later. These observations suggest that in addition to independently inducing PTSD-related traits, blast exposure sensitizes the brain to react abnormally to a subsequent psychological stressor. These studies have implications for conceptualizing the relationship between blast-related mTBI and PTSD and suggest that blast-related mTBI in humans may predispose to the later development of PTSD in reaction to subsequent psychological stressors.

  11. Whither the "signature wounds of the war" after the war: estimates of incidence rates and proportions of TBI and PTSD diagnoses attributable to background risk, enhanced ascertainment, and active war zone service, active component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2003-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundage, John F; Taubman, Stephen B; Hunt, Devin J; Clark, Leslie L

    2015-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are "signature wounds" of the Afghanistan/Iraq wars; however, many TBI/PTSD cases are not war related. During the wars, diagnoses of TBI/PTSD among military members increased because risks of TBI/PTSD, and capabilities to detect cases, increased. This report summarizes TBI/PTSD diagnosis experiences of three cohorts of overseas deployers in relation to the natures of their exposures to active war service and enhanced case ascertainment efforts. The findings suggest that, during the war, the proportions of PTSD diagnoses attributable to war zone service decreased from approximately 80% to less than 50%, while the proportions attributable to enhanced case ascertainment increased from less than 10% to nearly 50%. The proportions of TBI diagnoses attributable to war zone service more than tripled from 2003-2005 (13.1%) through 2007-2009 (44.8%); the proportions attributable to enhanced ascertainment also markedly increased, but not until after 2007. By the end of the war, war zone service and enhanced ascertainment accounted for similar proportions of all PTSD and TBI diagnoses. If programs and resources currently focused on TBI and PTSD continue, rates of diagnoses post-war will greatly exceed those pre-war.

  12. Non-spatial pre-training in the water maze as a clinically relevant model for evaluating learning and memory in experimental TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Amy K; Brayer, Samuel W; Hurwitz, Max; Niyonkuru, Christian; Zou, Huichao; Failla, Michelle; Arenth, Patricia; Manole, Mioara D; Skidmore, Elizabeth; Thiels, Edda

    2013-11-01

    Explicit and implicit learning and memory networks exist where each network can facilitate or inhibit cognition. Clinical evidence suggests that implicit networks are relatively preserved after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Non-spatial pre-training (NSPT) in the Morris Water Maze (MWM) provides the necessary behavioral components to complete the task, while limiting the formation of spatial maps. Our study utilized NSPT in the MWM to assess implicit and explicit learning and memory system deficits in the controlled cortical impact (CCI) model of TBI. 76 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided: CCI vs. sham surgery, NSPT vs. No-NSPT, and cued vs. non-cued groups. NSPT occurred for 4d prior to surgery (dynamic hidden platform location, extra-maze cues covered, static pool entry point). Acquisition (d14-18), Probe/Visible Platform (d19), and Reversal (d20-21) trials were conducted with or without extra-maze cues. Novel time allocation and search strategy selection metrics were utilized. Results indicated implicit and explicit learning/memory networks are distinguishable in the MWM. In the cued condition, NSPT reduced thigmotaxis, improved place learning, and largely eliminated the apparent injury-induced deficits typically observed between untrained CCI and sham rats. However, among NSPT groups, incorporation of cues into search strategy selection for CCI rats was relatively impaired compared to shams. Non-cued condition performance showed sham/NSPT and CCI/NSPT rats perform similarly, suggesting implicit memory networks are largely intact 2weeks after CCI. Place learning differences between CCI/NSPT and sham/NSPT rats more accurately reflect spatial deficits in our CCI model compared to untrained controls. These data suggest NSPT as a clinically relevant construct for evaluating potential neurorestorative and neuroprotective therapies. These findings also support development of non-spatial cognitive training paradigms for evaluating rehabilitation relevant

  13. Correlation of ABI、color doppler ultrasound spectrum and TBI of lower extremity artery in diabetic patients%ABI与彩超频谱、TBI在糖尿病下肢动脉疾病中相关性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓迎红; 潘玲; 宋婉华; 肖菁

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨糖尿病下肢动脉病变踝肱指数(ABI)与超声彩色多普勒频谱、趾肱指数(TBI)相关性分析.方法 采用多功能外周血管检查仪及超声彩色多普勒检查仪对55位糖尿病患者行109例下肢动脉检查,测定ABI、TBI及彩色多普勒血流频谱.结果 A1组(0.9TBI<0.7)TBI和光电容积描记(PPG)波形改变差异有统计学意义P<0.05.结论 ABI测压检查与超声彩色多普勒相结合,避免了单纯使用多普勒测定血流波形的不足和动脉中层钙化对ABI结果的影响.ABI、TBI、PPG波形与彩色多普勒血流频谱等多项检测相结合能早期确定病变.%Objective To investigate the correlation of ankle-brachial index( ABI)., color doppler ultrasound spectrum and toe-brachial index (TBI) of lower extremity artery in diabetic patients. Methods ABI, TBI and color doppler ultrasound spectrum measurement were carried out on 109 lower extremity artery of 55 diabetic patients. Croups were assigned according to ABI and TBI values and the correlation of ABI and color doppler ultrasound spectrum as well as ABI and TBI. Results The changes of ABI and of color doppler ultrasound spectrum in Group A1(0.9TBI in Group A1 and A2. The changes of TBI in group B1 (TBI≥0.7) and B2 (TBI<0.7) and the change of photoplethysmographg(PPG) waveform were statistically significant. Conclusion The limitation of measuring the waveform with dopplor as well as the influence of calcification of artery can be avoided by combining ABI and color doppler ultrasound spectrum measurement. Early diagnosis of pathological changes of diabetic patients can be realized exactly by combing ABI、TBI and color doppler ultrasound spectrum.

  14. 2型糖尿病患者趾臂指数(TBI)与动脉粥样硬化的相关性研究%Association between toe brachial index and atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯佳宁; 徐敏; 黄韵; 毕宇芳; 顾卫琼; 李小英; 陈宇红; 宁光

    2010-01-01

    Objective Measurement of ankle brachial index (ABI) is a simple method of assessing lower limb arterial blood supply,while measurement of toe brachial index (TBI)has only been advocated as an alternative.The aim of this study was to obtain information about whether TBI should be taken in type 2 diabetes,even when ABI is normal,and to evaluate the relationship between TBI and atherosclerosis.Methods In a crosssection study,ABI,TBI,and carotid intimal-medial thickness (IMT) were measured on 979 outpatients with type 2 diabetes in Ruijin Hospital.Those with normal ABI (0.9 ≤ABI < 1.3,n = 945) were divided into two groupsnormal TBI group(TBI≥0.6,n=893) and low TBI group(TBI<0.6,n=52),and then the clinical and laboratory data were compared between these two groups.Furthermore,the relationship between TBI and atherosclerosis was investigated.Atherosclerosis was defined as the maximum IMT ≥ 1.1 mm.Results Low ABI and low TBI were detected in 1.3% and 6.6% of the patients,respectively.Comparison of the clinical and laboratory data between the two groups showed that age and HbA1C values were significantly higher in the low TBI group.Furthermore,TBI was inversely associated with IMT(β=-0.217,P<0.01),an indicator for atherosclerosis of the carotid artery.Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that decline of TBI was an independent risk factor of atherosclerosis (OR=1.30,95% CI 1.01-1.69,P<0.05).Conclusion In type 2 diabetes,the decline of TBI is associated with atherosclerosis,indicating the necessity for diabetic patients to detect TBI,even when ABI is within normal range,in order to detect peripheral artery disease in early stage,and reduce the risk for atherosclerosis.%目的 研究踝臂指数(ABI)正常的2型糖尿病患者趾臂指数(TBI)与动脉粥样硬化的相关性.方法 瑞金医院内分泌代谢病科门诊收集的945例ABI正常(0.9≤ABI<1.3)患者,根据TBI分为正常组(TBI≥0.6,n=893)和降低组(TBI<0.6,n=52).分析TBI与

  15. A Study of TBI Mode in Reading Teaching%基于主题依托教学的阅读教学模式研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余方敏

    2015-01-01

    首先构建了一个基于主题依托教学(Theme-based Instruction,简称TBI)阅读教学模式,然后通过教学实验、问卷调查和个人访谈等手段对其有效性进行科学评估。研究发现:TBI阅读教学模式有利于培养学生的英语学习情感,提高其阅读技能和阅读水平,但还存在形式关注不足、阅读量过大等问题。解决的措施为:指导学生学习词汇和处理难句的方法、在查找文章环节给学生提供帮助、培养学生查找资料的能力等。%This paper conducted a survey on the validity of the established TBI mode in reading teaching by means of teaching experiment, questionnaire and interviews. The results showed that the mode is effective in cultivating students’ enthusiasm for English learning, improving students’ reading skills and reading proficiency while issues await resolutions in language form and excessive reading. It suggested that students need assistance in vocabulary and sentence learning techniques as well as articles index and literature research.

  16. Intension of Technology Business Incubator (TBI) Definitions%科技企业孵化器内涵界定的理论梳理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李恒光

    2007-01-01

    科技企业孵化器(TBI)作为一种发展较快的典型科技中介,它的相关研究可谓是科技中介研究的最佳切入点之一.TBI既不同于科技园区,又不同于一般的生产型和服务型企业,而与在孵企业及毕业企业均存在密切的联系.西方学者强调TBI的创新服务功能,认为TBI主要是培育企业适应市场竞争的能力.国内学者强调TBI的孵化空间,认为TBI是一种减少干扰、具有温室效应的避风港.笔者认为TBI是新生中小企业聚集的拥有企业生存和成长所需的服务的系统空间,是以制度框架与中介体系为根本特征的智能服务产业.

  17. 神经干细胞移植治疗创伤性脑损伤的研究进展%The Research Progress of Neural Stem Cells in the Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马明; 杨华林

    2013-01-01

    创伤性脑损伤目前仍然是全世界死亡和致残的最主要原因之一,伤后的功能恢复仍是治疗面临的难题,神经干细胞移植为促进伤后神经功能恢复带来了光明的前景。%Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a major cause of neurological mortality and morbidity throughout the world. After the injury the functional recovery is still the dififcult problems in treatment. Neural stem cells therapy is a burgeoning ifeld of experimental treatment that has shown promise in the management of TBI.

  18. Impact of Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography (SPECT/CT) and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography (PET/CT) in the Diagnosis of Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Vicenty, Irma L; Santiago-Sánchez, Michelaldemar; Vélez-Miró, Iván; Motta-Valencia, Keryl

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as damage to the brain resulting from an external force. TBI, a global leading cause of death and disability, is associated with serious social, economic, and health problems. In cases of mild-to-moderate brain damage, conventional anatomical imaging modalities may or may not detect the cascade of metabolic changes that have occurred or are occurring at the intracellular level. Functional nuclear medicine imaging and neurophysiological parameters can be used to characterize brain damage, as the former provides direct visualization of brain function, even in the absence of overt behavioral manifestations or anatomical findings. We report the case of a 30-year-old Hispanic male veteran who, after 2 traumatic brain injury events, developed cognitive and neuropsychological problems with no clear etiology in the presence of negative computed tomography (CT) findings.

  19. Structural Studies of Layered Cuprates LnLn'CaBa_2Cu_2Ti_3O_14 (LnLn' = NdY, Tb2, TbY, Dy2 and DyY) by Neutron Powder Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Z.; Jorgensen, J. D.; Short, S.; Otzschi, K. D.; Poeppelmeier, K. R.; Vander Griend, D.; Kane, M. H.

    1998-03-01

    In this presentation we report the neutron powder diffraction studies on several compounds in a new family of layered cuprates, LnLn'CaBa_2Cu_2Ti_3O_14 (LnLn' = NdY, Tb2, TbY, Dy2 and DyY). All compounds are found to crystallize in space group P 4/mmm. Strong site preferences of B-action (Cu and Ti) are observed in the NdY, Tb2 and TbY systems where Cu atoms strongly prefer 2g (0 0 0.084) sites. Due to the similar neutron scattering length of Nd, Tb, and Y, it is difficult to determine A-cation distributions in the NdY, Tb2 and TbY systems. In the DyY case, however, Dy atoms are found to strongly prefer site the 1 c (0.5 0.5 0) and do not mix with Y atoms on the (0.5 0.5 0.188) sites. The mechanism for these site preferences will be discussed. The oxygen content is found to be slightly different from the theoretical value for all compounds.

  20. Virtual Environment TBI Screen (VETS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    irm F oa m S ta tic SCALE: 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 0. 4 0. 6 0. 8 1. 0 1. 2 1. 4 1. 6 1. 8 2. 0 2. 2 SampEn D ar k SCALE: 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20...co nf id en ce in te rv al F irm F oa m S ta tic SCALE: 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 0. 2 0. 4 0. 6 0. 8 1. 0 1. 2 1. 4 1. 6 1. 8 2. 0 ApEn D ar k...in te rv al F irm F oa m S ta tic

  1. CBI教学理念与TBI教学法对医学英语教学的启示%Revelation of CBI Teaching Philosophy and TBI Teaching Method to Medical English Teaching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张景发; 黄大鹏

    2012-01-01

    CBI(内容型教学理念)和TBI(任务型教学法)是在交际教学法基础上的新发展,给医学专业英语教学带来很好的启示,本文将在内容型教学理念和任务型教学法的理论框架内对医学专业英语教学进行探讨。%CBI (content-based teaching philosophy) and TBI (task-based teaching methods) is a new development on the basis of the communicative approach, bring good inspiration to teaching issues, this article will be in the content-based teaching philosophy and task-based approach theoretical framework to explore the medical professional English teaching.

  2. 造血干细胞移值 TBI治疗中直线加速器参数测试与调校%Measurement and adjustment the line accelerator's parameters for TBI IN HSCT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牟志坚; 陈渝; 张曦; 陈政颂

    2001-01-01

    在进行造血干细胞移植 (HSCT)病人全身放射治疗 (TBI)前 , 对直线加速器的各项参数作正确、有效地调校是 TBI治疗的关键性环节和基本保证 . 本文介绍了 TBI治疗前瑞典医科达公司 SLi型直线加速器各项参数的测试与调校 , 并根据机器的性能状况和病人的实际情况 , 按 TBI治疗要求合理地安排机器的出束时间 , 力求在减少加速器损耗的同时完成 TBI治疗工作 .

  3. 450例全身照射患者的照射方法及结果分析%Radiation method and result of TBI: Analysis of 450 Cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张绍刚; 李高峰; 刘明远; 徐勇刚

    2008-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the radiation method and resuh of 450 patients received TBI(total body irradiation).Methods Single-dose Measurement was used to mark dose of TLD(thermo luminescence dosimeter).The values of actual dose in body midline were evaluated by calculating and correcting mean dose of incidence and emergence.Radiation methods:In four-field Irradiation.diagonals of fields coinside with the longitudinal axis of the patients,patient in supine and lateral positions received two pairs of parallel opposite radiation.Scheme of TBI came from a preparative radiation about one week before,and this four-field and equal-in-dose(about 10%of TBI)preparative radiation offered US the optimal scheme with aminimal dose non-uniformity by adjusting different dose proportion of supine and lateral position.In small field irradiation,patients received one pair of parallel opposite radiation from lateral side sitting on a special stool with backrest,the stool can be rotated CW or CCW,pedals can be move forward or backward and fixed.In opposite lateral irradiation,similar to four-field irradiation,patients received one pair of horizontal opposite radiation only in supine position.Five of these patients received FTBI(Fractional TBI). Results The average non-uniformity in midline of patients in four-field irradiation group(87 patients).small field irradiation group(91patients)and opposite lateral irradiation group(272 patients)is respectively ±8.1%,±7.4% and ±4.9%. Conclusions It iS a important process for QA and Qc to measure the dose of incidence and emergence real-timely with TLD or semiconductor dosimeter.We can adopt small field irradiation when the field iS not large enough to contain the patient from head to foot,and it showed advantages over four-field irradiation in treatment process and outcomes.We found the uniformity in body midline would be much better in supine position with diagonal>180 cm than that in four-field irradiation and small field irradiation with

  4. 基于3C的科技企业孵化器绩效评价实证分析%Empirical Analysis of 3C-based TBI's Performance Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李恒光

    2008-01-01

    为了使基于3C的科技企业孵化器绩效评价能够得到迅速的应用与推广.有必要检验并论证该理论与方法的系统性、科学性和有效性.文中实证分析的对象是长三角地区的10个TBI.在对其现状分析的基础上.构建了目标TBI绩效评价人力资源管理委员会,并由该委员会基于本地区及待测TBI的具体特征建立了TBI绩效评价指标体系;实施了待测TBI的数据采集、实际测评及其评价结果分析;给出了基于3C的TBI绩效评价的宏观政策及具体推进建议.

  5. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Masel Annual Report 2015 Page4 • A paper entitled: The Effects of Growth Hormone Replacement Therapy on Cognition after Traumatic Brain Injury...Hormone Replacement Therapy on Cognition after Traumatic Brain Injury, Journal ofNeurotrauma 27:1565-1585 (September 2010). • Dr. Masel was a co-author...subjects. Total testosterone was tested in male subjects, and 17 P-estradiols was tested in females. As of August 1, 2015, 71 subjects completed the 6

  6. Identifying Concussion / Mild TBI in Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    more concussions o Median time between concussions equals 40 days o Based on reports from 2004-2008 in Iraq treated at Navy/Marine Corps facilities...Important because multiple concussions are often associated with slower recovery and increased risk of long-term sequelae Reference: *Wilk et...Injury Guidance 35 Screening Challenges for the Military  Concussions that occur in theater occur under unique circumstances: o In the context of

  7. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Enduring Freedom and BINT is one of the most common causes of mortality. Even mild BIBI may be associated with chronic cognitive and emotional deficits...The development of effective therapies for BIBI requires experimental models that replicate important features of BINT in humans. Currently

  8. Neurophysiological Outcomes of mTBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-28

    drastically increase the severity of the injury . Thus, it is important to establish a method to accurately detect and track progress in order to prevent re...Pan, J, Connolly ID, Dangelmajer S, Kintzing J, Ho AL, Grant G (2016). Sports -related brain injuries : connecting pathology to diagnosis. Neurosurg...Leverenz LJ, Nauman EA, Talavage TM, Dydak U (2014). MR Spectroscopic evidence of brain injury in the non-diagnosed collision sport athlete

  9. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    and covered with dental acrylic. Isoflurane was discontinued; rats were connected to the trauma device and subjected to a mild 1.0-atm fluid-percussion...return of consciousness in the rat.39,40 Comparison with sham-treated rats allows extrapolating the effects of anesthesia and handling alone; sham

  10. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) Data and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Traumatic Brain Injury & Concussion Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Traumatic Brain Injury & Concussion Basic Information Get the Facts Signs and ...

  11. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    R, Hahn D, Haase A. Fast T1 mapping on a whole-body scanner. Magn. Reson. Med. 1999; 42(1): 206–209. 11. Shah NJ, Zaitsev M, Steinhoff S, Zilles K. A...new method for fast multislice T1 mapping. Neuroimage, 2001; 14(5): 1175–1185. 12. Steinhoff S, Zaitsev M, Zilles K, Shah NJ. Fast T1 mapping with

  12. Advanced MRI in Acute Military TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    major psychiatric disorder, 8) agreement to communicate by telephone or email 255 monthly for 6-12 months and then travel to Washington University for in...social and leisure activities 284 outside the home 3) psychological problems which have frequently resulted in ongoing family disruption or 285...time of follow-up at Washington University. Active duty military subjects were not paid for participation, 356 though travel expenses to Washington

  13. Advanced MRI in Acute Military TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    435 24. Guskiewicz KM, Ross SE, Marshall SW. Postural Stability and Neuropsychological Deficits After 436 Concussion in Collegiate Athletes. Journal...imaging study on the white 454 matter skeleton in individuals with sports-related concussion. Journal of neurotrauma. Feb 455 2011;28(2):189-201...41. 55 The neurological examination consisted of cranial nerve, motor, sensory, coordination, 56 deep tendon reflex, posture and gait assessments

  14. Exploiting Gene Expression Kinetics in Conventional Radiotherapy, Hyperfractionation, and Hypofractionation for Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makinde, Adeola Y; Eke, Iris; Aryankalayil, Molykutty J; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Coleman, C Norman

    2016-10-01

    The dramatic changes in the technological delivery of radiation therapy, the repertoire of molecular targets for which pathway inhibitors are available, and the cellular and immunologic responses that can alter long-term clinical outcome provide a potentially unique role for using the radiation-inducible changes as therapeutic targets. Various mathematical models of dose and fractionation are extraordinarily useful in guiding treatment regimens. However, although the model may fit the clinical outcome, a deeper understanding of the molecular and cellular effect of the individual dose size and the adaptation to repeated exposure, called multifraction (MF) adaptation, may provide new therapeutic targets for use in combined modality treatments using radiochemotherapy and radioimmunotherapy. We discuss the potential of using different radiation doses and MF adaptation for targeting transcription factors, immune and inflammatory response, and cell "stemness." Given the complex genetic composition of tumors before treatment and their adaptation to drug treatment, innovative combinations using both the pretreatment molecular data and also the MF-adaptive response to radiation may provide an important role for focused radiation therapy as an integral part of precision medicine and immunotherapy.

  15. Continuous Hyperfractionated Accelerated Radiation Therapy In Head And Neck Cancers- A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thejaswini B

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion:CHART achieves good locoregional response in stages III and IV of head and neck cancer. The acute mucosal reactions were within acceptable limits. The compliance to the treatment was good. [Natl J Med Res 2014; 4(3.000: 218-221

  16. Outcomes of Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation for Lymphoma with Melphalan-Based Conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brammer, Jonathan E; Khouri, Issa; Gaballa, Sameh; Anderlini, Paolo; Tomuleasa, Ciprian; Ahmed, Sairah; Ledesma, Celina; Hosing, Chitra; Champlin, Richard E; Ciurea, Stefan O

    2016-03-01

    Haploidentical transplantation (Haplo-SCT) with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) is increasingly utilized for the treatment of lymphoma and almost exclusively with the nonmyeloablative fludarabine (Flu)/cyclophosphamide/total body irradiation (TBI) conditioning regimen. We present early results of a reduced-intensity (RIC) regimen utilizing fludarabine and melphalan (FM) for the treatment of advanced lymphoma. All patients with a diagnosis of lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) who received Haplo-SCT at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center between 2009 and 2014 were reviewed (N = 22). Patients received Flu 160 mg/m(2) and melphalan 100 mg/m(2) to 140 mg/m(2) with thiotepa 5 mg/kg or 2 Gy TBI. Because of concerns of increased treatment-related mortality (TRM) with the melphalan 140 mg/m(2) regimen (FM140), a RIC regimen with melphalan 100 mg/m(2) (FM100) was devised. Rituximab was included for CD20(+) disease. Graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis consisted of PTCy 50 mg/kg on days +3 and + 4, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil. Sixty-eight percent of all patients were not in complete remission at the time of transplantation. The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) for the entire cohort were 54%, 1-year TRM was 19%, and the cumulative incidence of relapse at 2 years was 27%. Two-year PFS for Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and CLL/small lymphocytic lymphoma were 57%, 51%, and 75%. Patients treated with FM100 compared to FM140 had equivalent PFS (71% versus 37%, P = .246) and OS (71% versus 58%, P = .32). These early results establish Flu and melphalan 100 mg/m(2) with 2 Gy TBI or thiotepa 5 mg/kg as a very promising conditioning regimen for the treatment of advanced lymphoma with Haplo-SCT and PTCy.

  17. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy with Concurrent Cisplatin/5-Fluorouracil for Locoregional Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Analysis of 105 Consecutive Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Zaboli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. We reviewed a cohort of patients with previously untreated locoregional advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC who received a uniform chemoradiotherapy regimen. Methods. Retrospective review was performed of 105 patients with stage III or IV HNSCC treated at Greater Baltimore Medical Center from 2000 to 2007. Radiation included 125 cGy twice daily for a total 70 Gy to the primary site. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (12 mg/m2/h daily for five days and 5-fluorouracil (600 mg/m2/20 h daily for five days, given with weeks one and six of radiation. All but seven patients with N2 or greater disease received planned neck dissection after chemoradiotherapy. Primary outcomes were overall survival (OS, locoregional control (LRC, and disease-free survival (DFS. Results. Median followup of surviving patients was 57.6 months. Five-year OS was 60%, LRC was 68%, and DFS was 56%. Predictors of increased mortality included age ≥55, female gender, hypopharyngeal primary, and T3/T4 stage. Twelve patients developed locoregional recurrences, and 16 patients developed distant metastases. Eighteen second primary malignancies were diagnosed in 17 patients. Conclusions. The CRT regimen resulted in favorable outcomes. However, locoregional and distant recurrences cause significant mortality and highlight the need for more effective therapies to prevent and manage these events.

  18. Hyperfractionated Radiotherapy with Concurrent Cisplatin/5-Fluorouracil for Locoregional Advanced Head and Neck Cancer: Analysis of 105 Consecutive Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaboli, David; Tan, Marietta; Gogineni, Hrishikesh; Lake, Spencer; Fan, Katherine; Zahurak, Marianna L.; Messing, Barbara; Ulmer, Karen; Zinreich, Eva S.; Levine, Marshall A.; Tang, Mei; Pai, Sara I.; Blanco, Ray G.; Saunders, John R.; Best, Simon R.; Califano, Joseph A.; Ha, Patrick K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. We reviewed a cohort of patients with previously untreated locoregional advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) who received a uniform chemoradiotherapy regimen. Methods. Retrospective review was performed of 105 patients with stage III or IV HNSCC treated at Greater Baltimore Medical Center from 2000 to 2007. Radiation included 125 cGy twice daily for a total 70 Gy to the primary site. Chemotherapy consisted of cisplatin (12 mg/m2/h) daily for five days and 5-fluorouracil (600 mg/m2/20 h) daily for five days, given with weeks one and six of radiation. All but seven patients with N2 or greater disease received planned neck dissection after chemoradiotherapy. Primary outcomes were overall survival (OS), locoregional control (LRC), and disease-free survival (DFS). Results. Median followup of surviving patients was 57.6 months. Five-year OS was 60%, LRC was 68%, and DFS was 56%. Predictors of increased mortality included age ≥55, female gender, hypopharyngeal primary, and T3/T4 stage. Twelve patients developed locoregional recurrences, and 16 patients developed distant metastases. Eighteen second primary malignancies were diagnosed in 17 patients. Conclusions. The CRT regimen resulted in favorable outcomes. However, locoregional and distant recurrences cause significant mortality and highlight the need for more effective therapies to prevent and manage these events. PMID:22778748

  19. 36. Study on p16INK4a and p15INK4b genes of human bronchial epithelial cells malignantly transformed by cyclophosphamide and thiotepa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@Transformed human bronchial epithelial cells BEAS-2B induced by CP and TEPA were used to study abnormity of the tumor suppressor genes p15INK4b and p16INK4a, through which we can provide clues for explanations of the molecular mechanism in carcinogenesis of human bronchial epithelial cells induced by CP and TEPA. Analysis of the genomic DNA from the transformed BEAS-CP, and BEAS-T cells using PCR amplification, singe strand conformation polymorphism(SSCP) and DNA sequencing

  20. Rapid Isolation and Detection for RNA Biomarkers for TBI Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    detection is very important for enabling future “liquid biopsy ” molecular diagnostics. 4.3 Impact on technology transfer The results of...transfer as it demonstrates overall viability of the DEP technology for a wide variety of diagnostic applications, including liquid biopsy cancer...Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Our project work is focused on using a new dielectrophoresis (DEP) microarray technology for

  1. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium, Post Traumatic Hypopituitarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-01

    10 Aug 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Mission Connect MTBI Translational Research Consortium 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Post traumatic hypopituitarism 5b...distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The purpose of this project is to identify the incidence of post traumatic hypopituitarism ...June 21, 2010; however, none have reached the six month milestone for blood testing 15. SUBJECT TERMS post traumatic hypopituitarism 16. SECURITY

  2. Sheep Collisions: the Good, the Bad, and the TBI

    OpenAIRE

    Courtney, Michael; Courtney, Amy

    2007-01-01

    The title page of Chapter 9 in Fundamentals of Physics (Halliday, Resnick, and Walker, 8th Edition, p. 201) shows a dramatic photograph of two Big Horn sheep butting heads and promises to explain how sheep survive such violent clashes without serious injury. However, the answer presented in sample problem 9-4 (p. 213) errs in presuming an interaction time of 0.27 s which results in an unrealistically long stopping distance of 0.62 m. Furthermore, the assertion that the horns provide necessary...

  3. Enhanced Cognitive Rehabilitation to Treat Comorbid TBI and PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    These practice standards have been organized into a manualized treatment, Cognitive Symptom Management and Rehabilitation Therapy (CogSMART), which...Psychological Association ( APA ) to contribute to a symposium for the APA Convention in August 2014. The 2- hour symposium entitled “Active Recovery

  4. Rapid Isolation and Detection for RNA Biomarkers for TBI Diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    CSR = transpose(chol(S)); % Cholesky Square Root of S CSR * transpose( CSR ) - S % Check for round-off errors A = inv( CSR ); % Mahalanobis scaling Z... transport RNA and proteins that promote tumour growth and provide diagnostic biomarkers. Nature cell biology. 2008;10:1470-6. 57

  5. Treatment of TBI and Concomitant Hemorrhage with Ghrelin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    battlefield setting. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Traumatic brain injury ; hemorrhagic shock; ghrelin; treatment 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U 17...hemorrhagic shock. 2. Ghrelin treatment improves sensorimotor and reflex function after traumatic brain injury and uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock...3. Ghrelin treatment reduces cortical apoptosis after traumatic brain injury and uncontrolled hemorrhagic shock. 4. Ghrelin treatment

  6. Enhanced Cognitive Rehabilitation to Treat Comorbid TBI and PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    study brochures more widely to other relevant clinics within the VA (e.g., Member Services, Polytrauma , Social Work). The study coordinator 5  has also...In addition, the study coordinator worked closely with the Polytrauma Clinic at the VA to build a more efficient system to reach Veterans who are

  7. Prospective memory rehabilitation using smartphones in patients with TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evald, Lars

    2017-06-07

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effectiveness of a prospective memory aid that combines smartphones with Internet-based calendars among community-dwelling patients with traumatic brain injury. An uncontrolled pre- and post-assessment design was employed to study the use of unmodified, low-cost, off-the-shelf smartphones combined with Internet-calendars as a compensatory memory strategy in community-dwelling patients with traumatic brain injury. Thirteen participants received a 6-week group-based intervention with pre-, post- and 2-month follow-up-assessments by questionnaires and by daily assessment of target behaviors for 2-week periods. Participants reported significantly fewer retro- and prospective memory problems on questionnaires after the intervention and at follow-up with large effect sizes. The performance of target behaviors, however, improved insignificantly with moderate effect sizes. There were no changes in quality of life or symptoms of emotional distress. This study adds to a growing body of evidence that smartphones are a useful compensatory aid in rehabilitation of prospective memory that should routinely be considered in rehabilitation of traumatic brain injury patients. Implication for rehabilitation Smartphones are easy-to-use and accessible assistive technology for compensatory memory rehabilitation to most traumatic brain injury patients. By using low-cost, off-the-shelf devices, the technology becomes available to a broader range of patients. By combining smartphones with Internet-based and cross-platform services (e.g., calendars, contacts) the participants are less device-dependent and less vulnerable to data loss. Smartphones should routinely be considered as compensatory aid in rehabilitation of prospective memory of traumatic brain injured patients.

  8. Novel Treatment for Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    with pressors after traumatic brain injury. J Am Coll Surg. 2005 Oct;201(4):536-45. 21. Earle SA, de Moya MA, Zuccarelli JE , Norenberg MD, Proctor KG... JE . Impact ofLow- dose Vasopressin on Trauma Outcome: Prospective Randomized Study. World Journal of Surgery. 2011 Feb;35(2):430-9. 30. Andrews PI

  9. EyeRobot TBI unmanned TelePresence reconnaissance mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breejen, E. den; Jansen, C.

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing use of unmanned systems in military operations. Effective use of unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) for counter IED and reconnaissance tasks under battlefield conditions has been reported. For operations in urban environment, good real time situational awareness for the operator

  10. Mechanistic Links between PARP, NAD, and Brain Inflammation after TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    completely immobilize the head, and in addition placed the diffuser component to mitigate post-blast airflow against the head. Under these...recovery of forelimb function. See 2 panels below: A Scm B ·• c Bihemispheric EcoG Sign.als Bihtmi$pherlc Etecb’ocotti<:ogr’tllpl\\y (E.CoG) RecO

  11. Frontoparietal priority maps as biomarkers for mTBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    imaging will allow us to measure (1) integrity in cortical networks in frontal and parietal brain regions responsible for attention allocation and eye ...networks that control attention allocation and eye movements. A combination of functional MRI and diffusion-weighted imaging will allow us to measure (1...integrity in cortical networks in frontal and parietal brain regions responsible for attention allocation and eye -movement planning, (2) integrity in

  12. EyeRobot TBI unmanned TelePresence reconnaissance mission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breejen, E. den; Jansen, C.

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing use of unmanned systems in military operations. Effective use of unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) for counter IED and reconnaissance tasks under battlefield conditions has been reported. For operations in urban environment, good real time situational awareness for the operator

  13. Frontoparietal Priority Maps as Biomarkers for mTBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    vision convergence insufficiency ACCOMPLISHMENTS Specific Aim 1: behavioral characterization of convergence insufficiency, tracking in 3D , spatial...studies 3-6 Underway. Phantom studies on 7T scanner to establish QA protocol 7 Delayed to month 15 due to recruitment delays. Milestone Achieved

  14. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4 [top] Speech and Language Tests A speech-language pathologist completes a formal evaluation of speech and language skills, including an oral motor evaluation of the strength and coordination of the muscles ...

  15. Therapeutic Targeting of P2X7 after TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    Pradillo, J. M., Hurtado, O., Lorenzo , P., Moro, M. A., & Lizasoain, I. (2007). Toll-like receptor 4 is involved in brain damage and inflammation...management in traumatic brain injury. Emerg Med Australas, 23(6), 665-676. Taupin, V., Toulmond, S., Serrano, A., Benavides, J., & Zavala , F. (1993

  16. Legacy Clinical Data from the Epo TBI Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    impact on other disciplines? Nothing to report What was the impact on technology transfer? Nothing to report What was the impact on society...Robertson, MD CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Baylor College of Medicine Houston, Texas 77030 REPORT DATE: June 2016 TYPE OF REPORT: Final PREPARED FOR: U.S...Baylor College of Medicine 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER One Baylor Plaza Houston, Texas 77030 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME

  17. Pupillometry and Saccades as Objective mTBI Biomark

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    concussive trauma . Consequently, there is a quest for objective markers (e.g., protein, imaging, cognitive, neurosensory) to objectively diagnose...RTD or evacuation. Objectives Introduction 4 • Since approximately 30 areas of the brain, and 7 of the 12 cranial nerves deal with vision, it...of neuropathology and neurological recovery after traumatic brain injury. J Head Trauma Rehabil, 2005. 20(1): p. 76-94. • 10. Khan, F., I.J. Baguley

  18. Pupillometry and Saccades as Objective mTBI Biomark

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    related hospitalizations , emergency department visits, and deaths climbed from a rate of 521.0 per 100,000 in 2001 to a rate of 823.7 per 100,000 in...to accommodation and to prevent 6 recording artifacts by blinking during PLR recordings. The PLR was recorded twice in each eye, alternating

  19. Defining the Pathophysiological Role of Tau in Experimental TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    neurodegenerative condition. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON...DARPA award NEU -92-2913 Joshua Duckworth, Principal Investigator Robert Siman, Co-Investigator (1.8 calendar months effort) Period: 7/1/16 – 6/30

  20. TBI Assessment of Readiness Using a Gait Evaluation Test (TARGET): Development of a Portable mTBI Screening Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    one-time publications. Report any book, monograph , dissertation, abstract, or the like published as or in a separate publication, rather than a...cell lines, DNA probes, animal models);  clinical interventions;  new business creation; and  other. Nothing to

  1. Treatment of TBI with Hormonal and Pharmacological Support, Preclinical Validation Using Diffuse and Mechanical TBI Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    adjacent graph to the right, above, reveals an important aspect of the LFP model, which is the necessity of creating a trephine to allow for the percussion...sagittal sutures as well as the lateral ridges. A 4.8-mm craniectomy was trephined over the right parietal cortex, midway between bregma and lambda

  2. Changes Of GR and hippocampal NR1 and effect of midazolam-Ketamine in mice after severe TBI%小鼠严重颅脑撞击伤早期咪唑安定-氯胺酮对肝脏GR与海马NR1变化的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈强; 史忠; 粟永萍

    2010-01-01

    目的 研究小鼠闭合性严重颅脑损伤(TBI)后肝脏糖皮质激素受体(GR)、海马N-甲基-D-天门冬氨酸受体(NR)蛋白功能亚单位1(NR1)蛋白水平变化及其与血清TNF-α、IL-1β变化的关系,以及应用咪唑安定-氯胺酮干预后的变化.方法 利用BIM-Ⅲ型小型多功能动物撞击机对小鼠清醒致伤后将其随机分为5组,即假致伤组(J组)、致伤对照组(N组)、致伤后氯胺酮治疗组(K组)、致伤后咪唑安定治疗组(M组)、致伤后复合用药治疗组(F组).于致伤后30 min及2、8、24、48、72 h采用Western blot免疫印迹法检测大脑皮质和肝脏GR蛋白水平变化,用酶联免疫吸附法(ELISA)检测各组外周血清中TNF-α、IL-1β含量.结果 肝脏GR蛋白表达在致伤2 h开始降低,8 h呈现恢复趋势,72 h仍未完全正常;海马NR1蛋白表达在致伤后2 h开始明显降低,24 h基本恢复,72 h明显增加;应用咪唑安定-氯胺酮干预后可明显降低GR、NR1蛋白表达的这种变化趋势;外周血中TNF-α、IL-1β含量致伤后明显升高,均具有两个峰值特征,应用咪唑安定-氯胺酮干预后可明显降低二者的升高.结论 严重TBI后存在糖皮质激素抵抗,NR激活可能是其中一个重要原因.咪唑安定、氯胺酮能明显抑制HPA轴的兴奋性,改善糖皮质激素抵抗,调控应激反应.其作用机制除直接抑制炎性细胞因子释放外,还可能有中枢性的作用机制,其中之一可能与调节NR1蛋白表达有关.

  3. G-CSF plus preemptive plerixafor vs hyperfractionated CY plus G-CSF for autologous stem cell mobilization in multiple myeloma: effectiveness, safety and cost analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antar, A; Otrock, Z K; Kharfan-Dabaja, M A; Ghaddara, H A; Kreidieh, N; Mahfouz, R; Bazarbachi, A

    2015-06-01

    The optimal stem cell mobilization regimen for patients with multiple myeloma (MM) remains undefined. We retrospectively compared our experience in hematopoietic cell mobilization in 83 MM patients using fractionated high-dose CY and G-CSF with G-CSF plus preemptive plerixafor. All patients in the CY group (n=56) received fractionated high-dose CY (5 g/m(2) divided into five doses of 1 g/m(2) every 3 h) with G-CSF. All patients in the plerixafor group (n=27) received G-CSF and plerixafor preemptively based on an established algorithm. Compared with plerixafor, CY use was associated with higher total CD34+ cell yield (7.5 × 10(6) vs 15.5 × 10(6) cells/kg, P=0.005). All patients in both groups yielded ⩾4 × 10(6) CD34+ cells/kg. Conversely, CY use was associated with high frequency of febrile neutropenia, blood and platelet transfusions need and hospitalizations. The average total cost of mobilization in Lebanon was slightly higher in the plerixafor group ($7886 vs $7536; P=0.16). Our data indicate robust stem cell mobilization in MM patients with either fractionated high-dose CY and G-CSF or G-CSF alone with preemptive plerixafor. The chemo-mobilization approach was associated with twofold stem cell yield, slightly lower cost but significantly increased toxicity.

  4. Drug: D00583 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CYP inhibition: CYP2B6 [HSA:1555] map07040 Antineoplastics - alkylating agents Anatomical Therapeutic Chemi...S L01 ANTINEOPLASTIC AGENTS L01A ALKYLATING AGENTS L01AC Ethylene imines L01AC01 Thiotepa D00583 Thiotepa (JP16/USP/INN) Antineoplast...ics [BR:br08308] Alkylating agents Ethylene imines Thiotepa [ATC:L01AC01] D00583 Th

  5. Mission Connect Mild TBI Translational Research Consortium: To Study the Role of IL-1 and TNF Receptor Activation in Neurological Deficits after TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    2013 and for blast injury rats are anesthetized with isoflurane and their heads shaved, plugging the external auditory canals with foam plugs and...each day based on these quadrants, one trial is started from each quadrant. The SMART computer system is used to track and monitor the animal during...727-40. Wolf HK1, Buslei R, Schmidt-Kastner R, Schmidt-Kastner PK, Pietsch T, Wiestler OD, Blümcke I. (1996) NeuN: a useful neuronal marker for diagnostic histopathology. J Histochem Cytochem. 44:1167- 71. Appendices n/a

  6. Assessment of the Ability of the Health Care Provider to Detect Manifestations Indicative of TBI Management of care for TBI Through the Utilization of High Fidelity Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Amnesia/memory loss – no Unusual behavior /aggression – no Unequal pupils – no Seizure – no Repeated vomiting – no Double vision – no Worsening...comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE...trying to answer questions (verbal=4); He localizes pain (motor = 5) His pupils are 4 mm, equal and reactive to light. AVPU (Alert/Verbal/Painful

  7. Aspects of radioprotection in whole body irradiation treatments (TBI); Aspectos de proteccion radiologica en tratamientos de irradiacion de cuerpo total (TBI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinella, Yuliana M. Ayala, E-mail: yayala@crlima.com [Centro de Radioterapia de Lima S.A., Lima (Peru); Chavez, Cesar Picon, E-mail: cesarpicon@yahoo.com [Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria (UNI), Lima (Peru)

    2013-11-01

    Radiation protection occupationally exposed personnel and the public is considered in this study. It was done the experimental determination of the exposure rates at critical points in the area of radiotherapy and it was evaluated the staff dosimetry.

  8. Unmanipulated haploidentical bone marrow transplantation and post-transplant cyclophosphamide for hematologic malignanices following a myeloablative conditioning: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacigalupo, A; Dominietto, A; Ghiso, A; Di Grazia, C; Lamparelli, T; Gualandi, F; Bregante, S; Van Lint, M T; Geroldi, S; Luchetti, S; Grasso, R; Pozzi, S; Colombo, N; Tedone, E; Varaldo, R; Raiola, A M

    2015-06-01

    This is a report of 148 patients with hematologic malignancies who received an unmanipulated haploidentical bone marrow transplant (BMT), followed by post-transplant high-dose cyclophosphamide (PT-CY). All patients received a myeloablative conditioning consisting of thiotepa, busulfan, fludarabine (n=92) or TBI, fludarabine (n=56). The median age was 47 years (17-74); 47 patients were in first remission (CR1), 37 in second remission (CR2) and 64 had an active disease; all patients were first grafts. The diagnosis was acute leukemia (n=75), myelodisplastic syndrome (n=24), myelofibrosis (n=16), high-grade lymphoma (n=15) and others (n=18). GVHD prophylaxis consisted in PT-CY on days +3 and +5, cyclosporine (from day 0), and mycophenolate (from day +1). The median day for neutrophil engraftment was day +18 (13-32). The cumulative incidence of grades II-IV acute GVHD was 24%, and of grades III-IV GVHD 10%. The incidence of moderate-severe chronic GVHD was 12%. With a median follow-up for the surviving patients of 313 days (100-1162), the cumulative incidence of transplant-related mortality (TRM) is 13%, and the relapse-related death is 23%. The actuarial 22 months overall survival is 77% for CR1 patients, 49% for CR2 patients and 38% for patients grafted in relapse (Ptransplant.

  9. Underbody Blast Models of TBI Caused by Hyper-Acceleration and Secondary Head Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    synaptophysin, and synaptophilin are three proteins crucial for maintaining functional synapses. Immunoblot measurements of these proteins revealed a...energy test- ing of small projectiles, ranging in shape and size, showed the steel sphere produced the highest impact energy and the most consistent...impact characteristics. Additional tests confirmed the steel sphere produced linear and rotational motions on the rat’s head while remaining within a

  10. Investigation of Prognostic Ability of Novel Imaging Markers for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    Standard? Yes No 4 Cancer Center Criteria - Answer the following to determine if review by the Cancer Center ( Hematology -Oncology) may be required...cicero.umaryland.edu/CICERO/ResourceAdministration/Project/PrintSmartForms?Project... 26 of 45 5/3/2011 6:29 AM 3 Gender: Male Female 4 Age(s) Nonviable Neonates ...or Neonates of Uncertain Viability 0 to 27 days (Term newborn infants) 28 days to 12 months (Infant) 13 months to 23 months (Toddler) 2 to 5

  11. Mechanism and Therapy for the Shared Susceptibility to Migraine and Epilepsy after Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    temperature-controlled heating pad. Next, a mid-sagittal skin incision was made from the occipital notch to the forehead. A dental drill was used to...electrodes placed on the dura over the CCI-injury site. The entire electrode unit was secured to the skull with dental cement. The skin surrounding...and 7, 14, 21 and 28 after photothrombosis. Last column shows overlay of pre-stroke and 28 day post-stroke maps. B, C. Area of activation (mean±SEM

  12. Analysis of sports related mTBI injuries caused by elastic wave propagation through brain tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Case

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Repetitive concussions and sub-concussions suffered by athletes have been linked to a series of sequelae ranging from traumatic encephalopathy to dementia pugilistica. A detailed finite element model of the human head was developed based on standard libraries of medical imaging. The model includes realistic material properties for the brain tissue, bone, soft tissue, and CSF, as well as the structure and properties of a protective helmet. Various impact scenarios were studied, with a focus on the strains/stresses and pressure gradients and concentrations created in the brain tissue due to propagation of waves produced by the impact through the complex internal structure of the human head. This approach has the potential to expand our understanding of the mechanism of brain injury, and to better assess the risk of delayed neurological disorders for tens of thousands of young athletes throughout the world.

  13. Are Blast Brain Injuries Fundamentally Different Than Traditional Experimental Models of TBI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    moderate (unconscious for 140-300 s) or severe (300-840 s) concussions showed remarkably similar early physiological responses, but recovered behaviorally...being “mild.” Reportable Outcomes • Lee, S.M. Long-term consequence of moderate concussions : Increased vulnerability to epileptic seizures...functional outcome following experimental concussions . Neurosurgery Focus (Manuscript #FOCUS-10-189, in press). 11 • “New Advances in the

  14. Integrated Eye Tracking and Neural Monitoring for Enhanced Assessment of Mild TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    recruitment efforts, including initiation ofcollaborative efforts with the Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (CNRM), have helped to... Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine (CNRM) was approved by USU IRB #1 on 22/DEC/2015. The CNRM recruitment core enrolls participants into one of two...Advertisements have also been sent out electronically via the WRNMMC Intranet, and various list servs at NIH and UMCP. The study team conducts biweekly

  15. Integrated Eye Tracking and Neural Monitoring for Enhanced Assessment of Mild TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    current final versions for the primary study. The fMRI-based Fusion task has been developed and will be tested in the near future . The goal of the...Preliminary ERP analyses were completed for the Fusion Color Match Task and indicate that there appears to be an effect of condition and cue type in...150ms post cue onset (see Graphs 12 and 13). Additional ERP analyses will be completed following refinements to the analysis pipeline

  16. Blast Concussion mTBI, Hypopituitarism, and Psychological Health in OIF/OEF Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) synthesis were observed in large areas of the ipsilateral hemisphere (Holmin and Mathiesen...73 Medical News Today, April 24, 2013 http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/releases/259496. php Science Daily - Featured Research, April...1, 2013 http://whatayear.org/09_13. php 74 Live interview on Leonard Lopate Show, New York City NPR affiliate WNYC, September 5, 2013

  17. Hydrocephalus during rehabilitation following severe TBI. Relation to recovery, outcome, and length of stay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linnemann, Mia; Tibæk, Maiken; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2014-01-01

    ), level of consciousness, injury severity (ISS), and admission FIM™), and PTH were related to recovery (discharge FIM™), outcome (GOS), and length of rehabilitation stay. RESULTS: Patients with PTH were older, brain injury more severe, and acute treatment was longer. At discharge they had more disability...

  18. Compensating for Executive Function Impairments after TBI: A Single Case Study of Functional Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkstra, Lyn S.; Flora, Tracy L.

    2002-01-01

    Compensatory strategies were designed to enable a client with traumatic brain injury to obtain professional employment. In a series of speech-language therapy sessions, compensatory strategies targeting impairments in executive function were developed, refined, and trained in mock-interview situations. Significant improvements were noted in…

  19. Toward Development of a Field-Deployable Imaging Device for TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    ultrasound/Optison mediated cerebrovascular effects in vivo. J Cerebral Blood Flow & Metabolism. 27: 393–403. J. A. Rooney, Hemolysis near an ultrasonically...weighted imaging that is sensitive to venous blood and hemorrhage. (C) shows co-registration of MRI images with a rat-brain atlas, each of the major...in vitro as well as to rodent brain tissue samples dominated by one of each of normal gray and white matter; hemorrhagic brain; edematous brain

  20. Blast Concussion mTBI, Hypopituitarism, and Psychological Health in OIF/OEFVeterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    function of age and Alzheimer s disease /mild cognitive impairment. Gerontologist 53(S1):639, 2013. http://gerontologist.oxfordjournals.org/content/53/S1...clinical signs and symptoms are essential for definitive diagnoses in all cases. Previous studies have found GHD to be the most prevalent chronic... Disease Control and Prevention. Park, K. D., Kim, D. Y., Lee, J. K., Nam, H.- S ., and Park, Y.-G. (2010). Anterior pituitary dysfunction in moderate-to

  1. Improving Balance in TBI Using a Low-Cost Customized Virtual Reality Rehabilitation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    language  to  flyers  to  local  IRB  (7/16/15).  Received   approval  (7/17...2016.   • Co-­‐PI  Krch  presented  Virtual  Reality   didactic  lecture  for  Rutgers,  KF,  and  Children’s  Specalized...Institute  for  Rehabiliation  Brain   Injury  PTs  July,  2016.   • Co-­‐PI  Krch  presented  Virtual  Reality   didactic

  2. National Intrepid Center of Excellence: Cutting Edge Interdisciplinary Care for TBI & PH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    interdisciplinary approach and calming milieu • Actigraphy and sleep diary/assessment early in the program allows for modification of sleep architecture ...Interdisciplinary Team interview (Day One) – Internist, Neuro/ Sleep , Psych, Neuropsych, Family Therapy, Chaplain • First Four days - initial...including Sleep Evaluation) ― Clinical Pharmacy Evaluation ― PM&R/OT/PT assessments 28 Comprehensive Neuro-Imaging • Brain Structure • Brain Lesions • Brain

  3. Neurocognitive and Biomarker Evaluation of Combination mTBI from Blast Overpressure and Traumatic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Definitions BOP: Blast overpressure. In our procedure, we are using three exposures at 75 kPa (~10.8 psi). CER: Conditioned emotional response. With...Tissue Harvesting. 4.1 Euthanasia . A single dose mixture containing 70 mg/kg ketamine and 6 mg/kg xylazine was administered to the rat via...forceps. In all rats, blood and CSF samples are taken for biomarker analysis. Additionally, after euthanasia , brain tissue from each rat is collected for

  4. Bright Light Therapy for Treatment of Sleep Problems Following Mild TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    imaging, light therapy, neuropsychological performance, neurocognitive performance, sleep 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18...Correlates of Electroencephalographic Activity During Stage 2 and Slow Wave Sleep : An H215O PET Study: Presented at the Bi- Annual 71F Research...cerebral metabolic correlates of electroencephalographic activity during stage -2 and slow-wave sleep : An H215O PET Study, 18th Associated

  5. The Separate and Cumulative Effects of TBI and PTSD on Cognitive Function and Emotional Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    in children with ADHD (Suskauer et al., 2008), and is viewed as another facet of their response inhibition impairments. Stuss et al. (2003) has...Haditha Nairobi justice outrage retired Kandahar Damascus liberty destroy arrange caves trunk magical divorce history behead bestow blossom penalty...T.C., & Forneris, C.A. (1996). Psychometric properties of the PTSD Checklist (PCL). Behaviour Research and Therapy, 34, 669–673. Botvinick, M.M

  6. Role of APOE Isoforms in the Pathogenesis of TBI Induced Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    global deletion, APOE targeted replacement , complex breeding, CCI model optimization, mRNA library generation, high throughput massive parallel...taking into account the difference in the performance between E3 and E4 expressing mice: it has been repeat- edly demonstrated that E4 expressingmice...size. B) Progress after the last Quarterly report Upon adding more mice to the young mice groups (n=6-7)(Figure 8), there are no changes in values of

  7. Non-Impact, Blast-Induced Mild TBI and PTSD: Concepts and Caveats

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-01

    mouth, aggression, anxiety, depression and may continue developing Alzheimer -like dementia and Parkinson’s disease [3–5]. Battlefield PTSD is an anxiety...brain. Secondary neuronal damage is a cascade of progres- sive neural injury and neuronal cell death that is triggered by the initial injury and...brain stem through organs in the neck, thorax and abdomen. The vagus nerve helps to regulate breathing and heart beat, to control the functions of the

  8. Molecular Signatures and Diagnostic Biomarkers of Cumulative Blast-Graded Mild TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    recorded. 2.2.2 SD Card The SD card is formatted in the FAT format and needs to have a file called config.txt containing two values separated by a...1989. Biophysics of impact injury to the chest and abdomen . J R Army Med Corps 135:58-67. 22. Cooper, P.W. 1996. Explosives Engineering: Wiley-VCH...overpressure. J Trauma 61:933-942. 21. Cooper, G.J., and Taylor, D.E. 1989. Biophysics of impact injury to the chest and abdomen . J R Army Med Corps 135

  9. Survival and Injury Outcome After TBI: Influence of Pre- and Post-Exposure to Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Epilepsia 21, 541–548. During, M.J., Spencer, D.D., 1992. Adenosine: a potential mediator of seizure arrest and postictal refractoriness. Ann. Neurol. 32...Neurobiol. 63, 191–270. Frey, L.C., 2003. Epidemiology of posttraumatic epilepsy: a critical review. Epilepsia 44, 11–17. Golarai, G., Greenwood, A.C...cortical impact model. Neuroscience 151, 1198–1207. Lowenstein, D.H., 2009. Epilepsy after head injury: an overview. Epilepsia 50 (Suppl 2), 4–9. McCarley

  10. High Resolution Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Cortical-Subcortical White Matter Tracts in TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    injury. DTI data acquisition Studies were acquired on a 3.0- Tesla whole body scanner (Signa VHi, General Electric Medical Systems, Waukesha, WI) using...grouped using some mnemonic by the individual (e.g., car full of lettuce) or words that share phonemic qualities (e.g., sofa/soup). The observed...clustering score minus the expected subjective clustering score. An example is if the word pair car /lettuce (subjective observed score of 1) is recalled

  11. Proceedings of the Military mTBI Diagnostics Workshop, St. Pete Beach, August 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke , Bethesda, Maryland. JOURNAL OF NEUROTRAUMA 28:517–526 (April 2011) ª Mary Ann Liebert, Inc...can be used to detect abnormal patterns of metabolic activity similarly to functional magnetic resonance imaging ( fMRI ), and for detecting superficial...Medicine, Richmond, Virginia Maj. Jeffrey Lewis, U.S.A.F. and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke , Bethesda, Maryland Deborah M

  12. Neural Markers and Rehabilitation of Executive Functioning in Veterans with TBI and PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    between brain function and connectivity in selective pathways/circuits, neuropsychological functioning, and cognitive rehabilitation response in...function and connectivity in selective pathways/circuits, neuropsychological functioning, and cognitive rehabilitation response in Veterans with both...data are collected.  We have started to examine cross-sectional baseline data on fMRI, EEG, and neuropsychological functioning with respect to

  13. Neural Markers and Rehabilitation of Executive Functioning in Veterans with TBI and PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    conference in month 11.  We participated in a Military and Veterans Networking Fair in Raleigh, NC in month 12.  We created a Facebook Page at UNC...to further advertise for the study in month 14.  We started recruitment through local universities and community colleges in month 17. We have had

  14. High Resolution Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Cortical-Subcortical White Matter Tracts in TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology , 15...2007 ). Neurocognitive and neuroimaging correlates of pediatric traumatic brain injury: A diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) study . Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology , 22... of Clinical Neuropsychology , 16 , 689 – 695 . Levin , H. ( 1992 ). Neurobehavioral recovery . Journal of Neu- rotrauma , 9 , S359 –

  15. Prediction of employment outcome one to three years following traumatic brain injury (TBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollaher, K; High, W; Sherer, M; Bergloff, P; Boake, C; Young, M E; Ivanhoe, C

    1998-04-01

    The current study investigated the relationship between age, education (EDUC), pre-injury productivity (PIP), Glasgow Coma Scale score, and a functional rating score at admittance and discharge from rehabilitation (Disability Rating Scale [DRS]) to employment status at one to three years following traumatic brain injury. EDUC, admit DRS, discharge DRS, and PIP all correlated significantly with follow-up employment status, 0.29, -0.32, -0.36, and 0.25 respectively. All possible combinations were then evaluated by Mallow's Cp statistic. The best fitting model was then used in a discriminant function analysis. The discriminant function correctly classified 84% of the employed subjects, 66% of the unemployed, and 75% across both groups. The current results compare favourably with those obtained in previous studies.

  16. rTMS: A Treatment to Restore Function After Severe TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Chicago Association for Research and Education in Science Hines, IL 60141 REPORT DATE: October 2016 TYPE OF REPORT...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Chicago Association for Research and Education 5000 South 5th Avenue...proper approvals through the VA to approach and screen for potential inclusion . What opportunities for training and professional development has

  17. High Resolution Diffusion Tensor Imaging of Cortical-Subcortical White Matter Tracts in TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    of Trauma on Cerebral White Matter To assess the effects of trauma on DTI three analyses were applied. Gross measures of whole brain FA and thalamic...segmentation of the human thalamus. Cerebral Cortex 15, 31-39 (2005). 4 Magnotta, V., Gold, S., Andreasen , N., Ehrhardt, J. & Yuh, W. Visualization of sub...sensitive in acute severe trauma in predicting necrosis and outcome [42]. In summary, conventional structural MRI is an excellent tool for

  18. Implementation of a Lateral TBI protocol in a Mexican Cancer Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Francisco; Esquivel, Carlos; Eng, Tony; Papanikolaou, Niko; Sosa, Modesto A.

    2008-08-01

    The development of a Lateral Total Body Irradiation protocol to be implemented at a High Specialty Medical Unit in Mexico as preparatory regimen for bone marrow transplant and treatment of several lymphomas is presented. This protocol was developed following AAPM specifications and has been validated for application at a cancer care center in United States. This protocol fundamentally focuses on patient care, avoiding instability and discomfort that may be encountered by other treatment regimes. In vivo dose verification with TLD-100 chips for each anatomical region of interest was utilized. TLD-100 chips were calibrated using a 6 MV photon beam for 10-120 cGy. Experimental results show TLD measurements with an error less than 1%. Standard deviations for calculated and measured doses for seven patients have been obtained. Data gathered for different levels of compensation indicate that a 3% measured tolerance level is acceptable. TLD point-dose measurements have been used to verify the dose beyond partial transmission lung blocks. Dose measurements beyond the lung block showed variation about 50% respects to prescribe dose. Midplane doses to the other anatomical sites were less than 2.5% respect of the prescribed dose.

  19. Oligomeric Neuronal Protein Aggregates as Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    avidin-hors utilizing pos /ml) and 1/ le dilution concentratio ration and 1 signal was or the target e due to lim One of th ic a-syn lev ht at 4oC...or 13  ditions for ylation me A system. r target dete ing monom n, we are ab etect up to f e radish pe t- mortem P 140 (0.1mg gave better n (Figure

  20. Physics of IED blast shock tube simulations for mTBI research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mediavilla Varas, J.; Philippens, M.M.G.M.; Meijer, S.R.; Berg, A.C. van den; Sibma, P.C.; Bree, J.L.M.J. van; Vries, D.V.W.M. de

    2011-01-01

    Shock tube experiments and simulations are conducted with a spherical gelatin filled skull- brain surrogate, in order to study the mechanisms leading to blast induced mild traumatic brain injury. A shock tube including sensor system is optimized to simulate realistic impro-vised explosive device bla

  1. Physics of IED Blast Shock Tube Simulations for mTBI Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla Varas, Jesus; Philippens, M; Meijer, S R; van den Berg, A C; Sibma, P C; van Bree, J L M J; de Vries, D V W M

    2011-01-01

    Shock tube experiments and simulations are conducted with a spherical gelatin filled skull-brain surrogate, in order to study the mechanisms leading to blast induced mild traumatic brain injury. A shock tube including sensor system is optimized to simulate realistic improvised explosive device blast profiles obtained from full scale field tests. The response of the skull-brain surrogate is monitored using pressure and strain measurements. Fluid-structure interaction is modeled using a combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations for the air blast, and a finite element model for the structural response. The results help to understand the physics of wave propagation, from air blast into the skull-brain. The presence of openings on the skull and its orientation does have a strong effect on the internal pressure. A parameter study reveals that when there is an opening in the skull, the skull gives little protection and the internal pressure is fairly independent on the skull stiffness; the gelatin shear stiffness has little effect on the internal pressure. Simulations show that the presence of pressure sensors in the gelatin hardly disturbs the pressure field.

  2. Multimodal Approach to Testing the Acute Effects of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    engineering & computing, 32(1), 35-42. [12]  Huang, M. X., Mosher , J. C., Leahy, R. M. (1999). A sensor- weighted overlapping-sphere head model and... Mosher , J. C., Pantazis, D., Leahy, R. M. (2011). Brainstorm: A User-Friendly Application for MEG/EEG Analysis. Computational Intelligence and

  3. Can Post mTBI Neurological Soft Signs Predict Postconcussive and PTSD Symptoms: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    reported post-concussive symptoms or functional incapacity at Day 30 or Day 90 (Appendix B: Correlation between average NSS level at Day 4 and RPG...BC-PSI, and MPAI-4 at Day 90). Early depressive mood was highly predictive of later post-concussive symptoms and functional incapacity (Appendix C

  4. Patient Characterization Protocols for Psychophysiological Studies of Traumatic Brain Injury and Post-TBI Psychiatric Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-22

    Distinguishing opti- mism from neuroticism (and trait anxiety, self-mastery and self-esteem): a re-evaluation of the life orientation test. J Pers...22202-4302. Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law, no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply...LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report (SAR) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 35 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT unclassified

  5. Brain and Plasma Molecular Characterization of the Pathogenic TBI-AD Interrelationship in Mouse Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Chartier -Harlin et al., 1991; Mullan et al., 1992) and identification of a novel therapeutic target for AD which has resulted in human clinical...28, 571-594. Chartier -Harlin, M.C., Crawford, F., Houlden, H., Warren, A., Hughes, D., Fidani, L., Goate, A., Rossor, M., Roques, P., and Hardy, J...but not Alzheimer-type pathology, in a young boxer. Neuropathol Appl Neurobiol 22, 12-16. Goate, A., Chartier -Harlin, M.C., Mullan, M., Brown, J

  6. Molecular Signatures and Diagnostic Biomarkers of Cumulative, Blast-Graded Mild TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    THexpression. For example,we have demonstrated that carbachol, a mixed nicotinic -muscarinic agonist, stimulates both TH and NPY mRNA expression [27]. NPY may...blast, not abrupt changes in pressure alone, generate calcium activity in 28  human brain cells. PLoS One 7, e39421. 29  Readnower, R.D., Chavko, M

  7. Does Environmental Enrichment Exposure Prior to Injury Influence Biomarkers Associated with Chronic Stage TBI?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) is a complex sensory-motor stimulation that provides rodents with an increased opportunity for physical exercise, various...the items were replaced by new toys in order to provide the animals with novel stimuli. Enriched animals also received acrobatic training and were... enriched animals compared to standard housed rodents . This elevation is supported by Benaroya et al. (2004) and is thought to be due to the constant

  8. Improving Balance in TBI Using a Low Cost Customized Virtual Reality Rehabilitation Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    study methods, including evaluation of balance , global functioning, and cognition. 12/31/14 - 03/30/15 65% 7. Train study personnel in double-blind...meetings with KF, Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation (KIR), and USC ICT regarding study methodology. • Completed POs for balance intervention...KF’s study team conducted a thorough review of the software and identified areas in need of refinement. Since then, we have been working diligently

  9. Examining Intrinsic Thalamic Resting State Networks Using Graph Theory Analysis : Implications for mTBI detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    al., “Functional disintegration in paranoid schizophrenia using resting-state fMRI”, Schiz. Res, vol. 97, pp. 194–205, 2007. [24] L.Q. Uddin, et al...disruptions in the resting state networks and neurocognitive pathologies such as schizophrenia , Alzheimer’s disease and attention deficit hyperactive

  10. Invisible Wounds: Serving Service Members and Veterans with PTSD and TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Council on Disability, 2009

    2009-01-01

    More than 1.6 million American service members have deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan in Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF) and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF). As of December 2008, more than 4,000 troops have been killed and over 30,000 have returned from a combat zone with visible wounds and a range of permanent disabilities. In addition, an…

  11. The Separate and Cumulative Effects of TBI and PTSD on Cognitive Function and Emotional Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    BDI: Twenty-five years of evaluation. Clinical Psychology Review , 8, 77–100. Beck, A. T., Ward, C. H., Mendelson, M., Mock, J. & Erbaugh, J. (1961...empirical literature. Clinical Psychology Review , 20, 1041-1065. Buckley, T. C., Galovski, T., Blanchard, E. B. & Hickling, E. J. (2003). Is the...J. L. (2011). The emotional Stroop task and posttraumatic stress disorder: A meta-analysis. Clinical Psychology Review , 31, 817-828. Constans, J

  12. Cognitive functioning and postconcussive symptoms in trauma patients with and without mild TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landre, Nancy; Poppe, Christopher J; Davis, Nancy; Schmaus, Brian; Hobbs, Susan E

    2006-05-01

    Although there is a large body of research on mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), the portion that pertains to acute patients (those less than 1 month postinjury) is relatively small and yields inconsistent findings. The potential contribution of non-neurological factors, such as pain and emotional distress, to the clinical picture in this population is also lacking. To address these issues, the cognitive performance and symptom complaints of 37 hospitalized MTBI subjects were compared to those of 39 hospitalized trauma subjects, averaging 4.5 days postinjury. MTBI subjects performed significantly worse on all cognitive measures, but did not differ from trauma subjects in their report of postconcussive symptoms. Analyses also revealed that cognitive performance was unrelated to pain severity and emotional distress. Postconcussive symptoms were similarly unrelated to pain severity, but were consistently related to emotional distress. Results are discussed in terms of their etiological and treatment implications.

  13. Applying a traumatic stress approach to understanding PCS following pediatric mild TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlon, Katharine; Jones, Russell T

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury is a significant public health concern affecting hundreds of thousands of children each year. The majority of children who sustain traumatic brain injuries are classified as having a mild traumatic brain injury, and a subset of these children go on to experience persistent physical, cognitive, and emotional symptoms. These symptoms, known as postconcussive symptoms, can endure for months and even years after injury. The outcomes of mild traumatic brain injury are variable and not well understood for a small percentage of children who experience persistent symptoms. The current article explores the potential influence of children's posttraumatic stress symptoms on persistent postconcussive symptoms. Despite the high incidence of posttraumatic stress symptoms after pediatric accidental injury, they have not yet been identified as an important factor for consideration in the understanding of pediatric postconcussive outcomes. The article will review the literature on posttraumatic stress and postconcussive symptoms after pediatric injury and consider neurobiological and cognitive factors to propose a model explaining a pathway through which posttraumatic stress reactions may serve as the mechanism for the expression and maintenance of postconcussive symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury. The clinical implications for the proposed relationship between posttraumatic stress symptoms and postconcussive symptoms are considered prior to the conclusion of the article, which acknowledges limitations in the current literature and provides suggestions for future research.

  14. Underbody Blast Models of TBI Caused by Hyper-Acceleration and Secondary Head Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    related products is the high transcript coverage (every exon of every transcript is probed , and median of 22 probes per gene) that yields accurate...accelerometer on the plate. The high speed camera is set-up and the image adjusted, following which a dummy charge is fired to make sure all data...acquisition systems are functioning properly. After the dummy round, the charge lead wires are connected to the firing module and the charge is

  15. Assessment and Rehabilitation of Central Sensory Impairments for Balance in mTBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Objectives: Control of balance requires complex integration of sensory and motor systems. In the clinic or in the field...that define behavioral characteristics of the balance control system and quantify how these characteristics are modified to account for changing...The neural controller parameters quantify the sensory-to- motor transformation that converts combined sensory orientation information into a motor

  16. Blast Concussion mTBI, Hypopituitarism, and Psychological Health in OIF/OEF Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    more vulnerable to damage because of their location in the pituitary’s exposed lateral wings and their primary dependence on vascular input from the...portal system alone. Gonadotrophs are distributed throughout the anterior pituitary, and the cells in the lateral wings are relatively vulnerable. In...the sphenoid bone, and because of this restriction it is subject to damage from compression resulting from brain movement or edema. Furthermore, the

  17. Toward Development of a Field-Deployable Imaging Device for TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-01

    high-­­level ionizing radiation .12 8 Figure 5: [Left] Schematic graph of MRI (left) and CT scanner (right) 12 [Right] Brain image from MRI...129 130 131 SSI to remove this aliasing effect by tracking individual shear waves between scattering events. Their maps of brain -tissue...For example, our observed global increase in measured brain -tissue stiffness across hemispheres through time may have arisen due the combined effect

  18. Finding What Works in a Complicated Transition: Considerations for Soldiers with PTSD and mTBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    railway or workplace accidents. In the 1890s Sigmund Freud proposed a theory on seduction; he later abandoned the theory, however he created a paradigm...historical evolution of PTSD diagnostic criteria: from Freud to DSM-IV. The Journal of Traumatic Stress 7, no. 4 (October): 681-698. X4I-OIF/OEF

  19. Changing the Odds A North Carolina family's search to help those with TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the U.S. National Highway Transportation Safety Authority, auto accidents claim one life every 13 minutes. Phillip ... who to contact, and how to proceed. We help them." To Find Out More For more information, ...

  20. Neurocognitive and Biomarker Evaluation of Combination mTBI from Blast Overpressure and Traumatic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Tissue Harvesting. 1.1. Euthanasia . A single-dose mixture containing 70 mg/kg ketamine and 6 mg/kg xylazine was administered to the rat via...In all rats, blood and CSF samples are taken for biomarker analysis. Additionally, after euthanasia , brain tissue from each rat is collected for...during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain

  1. Development and implementation of In-vivo dosimetry with OSL in special techniques (IMRT, TBI, TSE); Desarrollo e implementacion de dosimetria In-vivo con OSL en tecnicas especiales (IMRT, TBI, TSE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourel, V., E-mail: vbourel@favaloro.edu.ar [Universidad Favaloro, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Special techniques of radiation treatments generally require a quality control very thorough because in general tend to be high-risk techniques of complications due to imparting high doses in a small volume or involve a very large volume of the patient are the techniques of total body irradiation either photons or electrons. In these techniques a moderate error in the given dose can mean a very significant variation in tumor control probability (Tcp) or the likelihood of complications in normal tissues has happened in known published accidents and can be deduced from the typical sigmoid curve of response vs. dose. The technique In-vivo dosimetry has proved useful a final tool to detect any possible error in the chain of procedures to which is subjected prior to radiation treatment. This chain of procedures includes initial imaging, treatment planning involving the calibration of the equipment s, location and immobilization of the patient. The In-vivo dosimetry involves a measurement of the dose delivered to the patient in the treatment conditions to detect a possible deviation between the prescribed and the delivered dose. The experience so far has been done mainly with semiconductor elements (diodes) or thermoluminescent dosimetry. The advent of the optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLD), particularly in the nano Dots form, is a very appropriate tool for its size, ease of handling, accurate and fast reading. With these dosimeters has been developed and implemented the In-vivo dosimetry in three techniques in which the accuracy of the dose delivered is extremely important. These techniques are the treatment of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) that seeks to impart a very high dose in the tumor tissues protecting organs in risk around the target and the techniques of total body irradiation with photons, whose function is to generate immune suppression in patients before being transplanted, or with electrons for the treatment of generalized skin diseases. The characterization of the nano Dots dosimeters in terms of dose response, dose rate, angulation and other parameters in measuring conditions is the essential step before beginning the ultimate goal. The nano Dots showed their capacity for use In-vivo dosimetry, after tests on phantoms for both characterization and for treatment simulation. Finally, in clinical practice results in the three irradiation techniques raised they showed highly satisfactory results with acceptable deviations and comparable with existing previous techniques, proving the feasibility of conducting In-vivo dosimetry with OSL easily and efficiently. (Author)

  2. TBI绩效评价相关理论及基于3C评价之理论基础%Correlative Theory of TBI PE Appraisal and the Theoretical Principle of 3C-Based TBI PE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李恒光

    2006-01-01

    与TBI绩效评价密切相关的理论主要包括国家创新体系理论、增长极理论和区位优势理论.基于3C系统的TBI绩效评价的理论基础,同样涉及到评价的对象、评价的目的及评价的原则等几大层面.

  3. Dose Response for Radiation Cataractogenesis: A Meta-Regression of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Regimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Matthew D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Schultheiss, Timothy E., E-mail: schultheiss@coh.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Smith, David D. [Division of Biostatistics, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Nguyen, Khanh H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Bayhealth Cancer Center, Dover, Delaware (United States); Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, California (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective(s): To perform a meta-regression on published data and to model the 5-year probability of cataract development after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) with and without total body irradiation (TBI). Methods and Materials: Eligible studies reporting cataract incidence after HSCT with TBI were identified by a PubMed search. Seventeen publications provided complete information on radiation dose schedule, fractionation, dose rate, and actuarial cataract incidence. Chemotherapy-only regimens were included as zero radiation dose regimens. Multivariate meta-regression with a weighted generalized linear model was used to model the 5-year cataract incidence and contributory factors. Results: Data from 1386 patients in 21 series were included for analysis. TBI was administered to a total dose of 0 to 15.75 Gy with single or fractionated schedules with a dose rate of 0.04 to 0.16 Gy/min. Factors significantly associated with 5-year cataract incidence were dose, dose times dose per fraction (D•dpf), pediatric versus adult status, and the absence of an ophthalmologist as an author. Dose rate, graft versus host disease, steroid use, hyperfractionation, and number of fractions were not significant. Five-fold internal cross-validation showed a model validity of 83% ± 8%. Regression diagnostics showed no evidence of lack-of-fit and no patterns in the studentized residuals. The α/β ratio from the linear quadratic model, estimated as the ratio of the coefficients for dose and D•dpf, was 0.76 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.05-1.55). The odds ratio for pediatric patients was 2.8 (95% CI, 1.7-4.6) relative to adults. Conclusions: Dose, D•dpf, pediatric status, and regimented follow-up care by an ophthalmologist were predictive of 5-year cataract incidence after HSCT. The low α/β ratio indicates the importance of fractionation in reducing cataracts. Dose rate effects have been observed in single institution studies but not in the

  4. VA/DoD Clinical Practice Guideline for Management of Concussion/Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    D-1: Headache • Physical Therapy 8 Visual dysfunction • Dizziness • Disequilibrium • Blurred vision • Diplopia • Impaired visual-spatial...Ataxia • Drop attacks • Diplopia • Headaches • Related to an event • Usually symptoms induced by cervical extension and rotation • Neurology...Difficulties  BACKGROUND Vision difficulties, including sensitivity to light, diplopia , blurring and other difficulties seeing, occur acutely in up to half of

  5. Proceedings of the 2011 AFMS Medical Research Symposium. Volume 6. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) & Psychological Health Track

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    resources aimed at increasing household literacy practices. Proceedings of the 2011 AFMS Medical Research Symposium Volume 6 Traumatic Brain Injury...temperature regulation sexual function Dysfunction leads to or exacerbates: Hypertension Obesity Diabetes Depression Stroke and heart attack

  6. Quantitative Tractography and Volumetric MRI in Blast and Blunt Force TBI: Predictors of Neurocognitive and Behavioral Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    aneurysm ) of individuals with chronic symptoms of fatigue follow- ing brain injury (mean = 44 months since injury), the FIS provided the most...582. 61. Wozniak JR, Krach L, Ward E, et al. Neurocognitive and neu- roimaging correlates of pediatric traumatic brain injury: a diffusion tensor

  7. Combat Veterans with Comorbid PTSD and Mild TBI Exhibit a Greater Inhibitory Processing ERP from the Dorsal Anterior Cingulate Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-08

    Jolicoeur, P., 2013. Long-term attenuated electrophysiological response to errors following multiple sports concussions . Journal of Clinical and...Diddams, M.J., Puente, A.N., Miller, L.S., 2012. Lack of long-term fMRI differences after multiple sports-related concussions . Brain Injury 26, 1684

  8. Diffuse optical systems and methods to image physiological changes of the brain in response to focal TBI (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abookasis, David; Volkov, Boris; Kofman, Itamar

    2017-02-01

    During the last four decades, various optical techniques have been proposed and intensively used for biomedical diagnosis and therapy both in animal model and in human. These techniques have several advantages over the traditional existing methods: simplicity in structure, low-cost, easy to handle, portable, can be used repeatedly over time near the patient bedside for continues monitoring, and offer high spatiotemporal resolution. In this work, we demonstrate the use of two optical imaging modalities namely, spatially modulated illumination and dual-wavelength laser speckle to image the changes in brain tissue chromophores, morphology, and metabolic before, during, and after the onset of focal traumatic brain injury in intact mouse head (n=15). Injury was applied in anesthetized mice by weight-drop apparatus using 50gram metal rod striking the mouse's head. Following data analysis, we show a series of hemodynamic and structural changes over time including higher deoxyhemoglobin, reduction in oxygen saturation and blood flow, cell swelling, etc., in comparison with baseline measurements. In addition, to validate the monitoring of cerebral blood flow by the imaging system, measurements with laser Doppler flowmetry were also performed (n=5), which confirmed reduction in blood flow following injury. Overall, our result demonstrates the capability of diffuse optical modalities to monitor and map brain tissue optical and physiological properties following brain trauma.

  9. Parallel Human and Animal Models of Blast- and Concussion-Induced Tinnitus and Related Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    No skull fractures, respiratory depression or seizures were observed in any of the rats. 40 µm thick sections of brainstem were subjected to...middle-ear disease. Results from the ANOVA are depicted in Table A1. Degrees of freedom , sum of squares, mean square, and expected mean square can be...Haas et al., 2012), juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (Keller et al., 2011), cryptogenic temporal-lobe epilepsy (Rugg-Gunn et al., 2001), recurrent

  10. Use of the Photo-Electromyogram to Objectively Diagnose and Monitor Treatment of Post-TBI Light Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    Warrier I, Aranda JV. Neonatal facial coding system scores and spectral characteristics of infant crying during newborn circumcision. Clin. J. Pain ...EMG recording with surface skin electrodes to an electrode-free system that will take advantage of facial feature changes in response to light and pain ...eyelid muscles in response to light. The photic EMG is modulated by the thalamus and central sensory trigeminal pain center of the brainstem, which

  11. Quantitative Tractography and Volumetric MRI in Blast and Blunt Force TBI: Predictors of Neurocognitive and Behavioral Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    JHTR-D-13-00184 May 30, 2014 17:19 J Head Trauma Rehabil Copyright c© 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins The Relationship Between...text of the culture and value systems in which he/she lives and Copyright © 2014 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Unauthorized reproduction of this article...self-report. No Glasgow Coma Scale scores were avail- able for this study, and all information (LOC, PTA, Copyright © 2014 Lippincott Williams

  12. Deficits in Visual System Functional Connectivity after Blast-Related Mild TBI are Associated with Injury Severity and Executive Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-24

    or concussion) increases severity of sleep disturbance among deployed military personnel. Sleep 36:941–946. Bryan, C. J., and T. A. Clemans. 2013...Uddin, B. B. Biswal, et al. 2009. Precuneus shares intrinsic functional architecture in humans and monkeys. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 106:20069–20074

  13. SU-C-BRB-02: Symmetric and Asymmetric MLC Based Lung Shielding and Dose Optimization During Translating Bed TBI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmed, S; Kakakhel, MB [Pakistan Institute of Engineering & Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan); Ahmed, SBS; Hussain, A [Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi (Pakistan)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The primary aim was to introduce a dose optimization method for translating bed total body irradiation technique that ensures lung shielding dynamically. Symmetric and asymmetric dynamic MLC apertures were employed for this purpose. Methods: The MLC aperture sizes were defined based on the radiological depth values along the divergent ray lines passing through the individual CT slices. Based on these RD values, asymmetrically shaped MLC apertures were defined every 9 mm of the phantom in superior-inferior direction. Individual MLC files were created with MATLAB™ and were imported into Eclipse™ treatment planning system for dose calculations. Lungs can be shielded to an optimum level by reducing the MLC aperture width over the lungs. The process was repeated with symmetrically shaped apertures. Results: Dose-volume histogram (DVH) analysis shows that the asymmetric MLC based technique provides better dose coverage to the body and optimum shielding of the lungs compared to symmetrically shaped beam apertures. Midline dose homogeneity is within ±3% with asymmetric MLC apertures whereas it remains within ±4.5% with symmetric ones (except head region where it drops down to −7%). The substantial over and under dosage of ±5% at tissue interfaces has been reduced to ±2% with asymmetric MLC technique. Lungs dose can be reduced to any desired limit. In this experiment lungs dose was reduced to 80% of the prescribed dose, as was desired. Conclusion: The novel asymmetric MLC based technique assures optimum shielding of OARs (e.g. lungs) and better 3-D dose homogeneity and body-dose coverage in comparison with the symmetric MLC aperture optimization. The authors acknowledge the financial and infrastructural support provided by Pakistan Institute of Engineering & Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad and Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH), Karachi during the course of this research project. Authors have no conflict of interest with any national / international body for the presented work.

  14. The base rate of suboptimal effort in a pediatric mild TBI sample: performance on the Medical Symptom Validity Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Michael W; Kirk, John W

    2010-01-01

    Performance on the Medical Symptom Validity Test (MSVT) was examined in 193 consecutively referred patients aged 8 through 17 years who had sustained a mild traumatic brain injury. A total of 33 participants failed to meet actuarial criteria for valid effort on the MSVT. After accounting for possible false positives and false negatives, the base rate of suboptimal effort in this clinical sample was 17%. Only one MSVT failure was thought to be influenced by litigation. The present results suggest that a sizable minority of children is capable of putting forth suboptimal effort during neuropsychological exam, even when external incentives are not readily apparent. The MSVT appears to have good potential value as an objective measure for detecting symptom invalidity in school-age youth.

  15. Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) to Promote Stress Resilience in Those with Co-Occurring Mild TBI and PTSD

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    affects aspects of day-to-day function, such as memory , sleep, mood, psychiatric health and stress resilience. This information will help identify...health, memory and in a laboratory stress task. Veterans have been recruited since regulatory approval was obtained (August 2012) and enrolled in the...1 Award Number: W81XWH-12-1-0037 TITLE: : Using Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) to Promote Stress Resilience in those with Co

  16. Combat Veterans with PTSD after Mild TBI Exhibit Greater ERPs from Posterior-medial Cortical Areas While Appraising Facial Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    within the past 30 days; (2) life- time history of bipolar disorder , attention deficit hyperactivity disorder , or psychotic disorder ; or (3) acute medical...Arbisi, P.A., Thuras, P., 2011. Longitudinal effects of mild traumatic brain injury and posttraumatic stress disorder comorbidity on postdeployment...The effects of temporal unpredictability in anticipation of negative events in combat veterans with PTSD. J. Affect. Disord . 146, 426–432. Simmons, A.N

  17. The Role of PP2A Methylation in Susceptibility and Resistance to TBI and AD-Induced Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Kim, Deqi Yin, Teodoro Bottiglieri, Estelle Sontag, Eric R. Kandel , and Ottavio Arancio Abstract: Elevated levels of homocysteine and impaired...University of Newcastle, Callaghan, NSW 2308, Australia. Eric R. Kandel : Department of Neuroscience, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia...19724.   Mayford,  M.,  Bach,  M.E.,  Huang,  Y.Y.,  Wang,  L.,  Hawkins,  R.D.,  and   Kandel ,  E.R.  (1996).   Control

  18. Characterizing the Relationship Between Blast Exposure and Mild TBI with Dynamic Modeling and Testing in a New Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-31

    been show n to be an indicator of a probability of injury26. By using injuries observed from football players , that work was extended to...Hilti explosiv e cartridge rated at 385, 490, 575 ft/sec velocity ) via a modified Hilti DX E72 into a PVC cylinder (2 in. inside diameter; 1, 2, or 3...icrophone and pressure sensors. It was determined the peak pressure at exhaust was 60 kPa with the 385 velocity charge and 80 kPa with the 575

  19. Applying DTI white matter orientations to finite element head models to examine diffuse TBI under high rotational accelerations.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Colgan, Niall C

    2010-12-01

    The in-vivo mechanical response of neural tissue during impact loading of the head is simulated using geometrically accurate finite element (FE) head models. However, current FE models do not account for the anisotropic elastic material behaviour of brain tissue. In soft biological tissue, there is a correlation between internal microscopic structure and macroscopic mechanical properties. Therefore, constitutive equations are important for the numerical analysis of the soft biological tissues. By exploiting diffusion tensor techniques the anisotropic orientation of neural tissue is incorporated into a non-linear viscoelastic material model for brain tissue and implemented in an explicit FE analysis. The viscoelastic material parameters are derived from published data and the viscoelastic model is used to describe the mechanical response of brain tissue. The model is formulated in terms of a large strain viscoelastic framework and considers non-linear viscous deformations in combination with non-linear elastic behaviour. The constitutive model was applied in the University College Dublin brain trauma model (UCDBTM) (i.e. three-dimensional finite element head model) to predict the mechanical response of the intra-cranial contents due to rotational injury.

  20. Use of the Photo-Electromyogram to Objectively Diagnose and Monitor Treatment of Post-TBI Light Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    layout parameters for each type of data recording session. During the 3rd quarter, we have adapted the tool for use in reviewing and analyzing the video... adaptation period of 15 minutes, while the DSI plate reader below the acrylic mouse holder is used to transfer the EMG signals from the mouse...with CGRP in bright light. This behavior also matches human migraineur behavior in that increased photosensitivity, and any movement and muscular

  1. Quantitative Tractography and Volumetric MRI in Blast and Blunt Force TBI: Predictors of Neurocognitive and Behavioral Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    have shown that the fornix—a limbic white matter (WM) structure connecting the hippocampus and mammillary bodies—is a predilection site for neurotrauma...connecting the hippocampus to the frontal lobe. Since studies have suggested that hippocampal atrophy may precipitate cognitive decline in the context of...be especially productive, and we are currently actively pursuing additional funding to complement the aims and goals of this award. REFERENCES

  2. Correlative analysis of head kinematics and brain's tissue response: a computational approach toward understanding the mechanisms of blast TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvghad-Moghaddam, H.; Rezaei, A.; Ziejewski, M.; Karami, G.

    2017-09-01

    Upon impingement of blast waves on the head, stress waves generated at the interface of the skull are transferred into the cranium and the brain tissue and may cause mild to severe blast traumatic brain injury. The intensity of the shock front, defined by the blast overpressure (BoP), that is, the blast-induced peak static overpressure, significantly affects head kinematics as well as the tissue responses of the brain. While evaluation of global linear and rotational accelerations may be feasible, an experimental determination of dynamic responses of the brain in terms of intracranial pressure (ICP), maximum shear stress (MSS), and maximum principal strain (MPS) is almost impossible. The main objective of this study is to investigate possible correlations between head accelerations and the brain's ICP, MSS, and MPS. To this end, three different blasts were simulated by modeling the detonation of 70, 200, and 500 g of TNT at a fixed distance from the head, corresponding to peak BoPs of 0.52, 1.2, and 2 MPa, respectively. A nonlinear multi-material finite element algorithm was implemented in the LS-DYNA explicit solver. Fluid-solid interaction between the blast waves and head was modeled using a penalty-based method. Strong correlations were found between the brain's dynamic responses and both global linear and rotational accelerations at different blast intensities (R^{2 }≥ 98%), implying that global kinematic parameters of the head might be strong predictors of brain tissue biomechanical parameters.

  3. Prazosin for Prophylaxis of Chronic Post Traumatic Headaches in OEF/OIF/OND Service Members and Veterans with Mild TBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-2-0060 TITLE: Prazosin for Prophylaxis of Chronic Post -Traumatic Headaches in OEF/OIF/OND Service Members and Veterans...TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 30 Sept 2015 – 29 Sept 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Prazosin for Prophylaxis of Chronic Post -Traumatic...5 5. Changes/Problems...................................................................................... 5 6. Products

  4. Diagnosing Contributions of Sensory and Cognitive Deficits to Hearing Dysfunction in Blast Exposed/TBI Service Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT: Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views , opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those...analysis software packages. o Conducted additional EEG data collection and analysis training session focused on EEG experimental design, stimulus...Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory and the Center for Computational Neuroscience and Neural Technologies (CompNet) at Boston University, Boston, MA

  5. A Military Relevant Model of Closed Concussive Head Injury: Longitudinal Studies Characterizing and Validating Single and Repetitive mTBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Because of sports injuries, automobile...head injury will be studied in the WRAIR PCI model using longitudinal and multi-modal designs to fully characterize the neuromotor, cognitive, emotional ...timeframe, the cumulative effects of which can produce long-lasting effects including physical, mental, emotional and cognitive impairments and may place our

  6. Identifying and Understanding the Health Information Experiences and Preferences of Individuals With TBI, SCI, and Burn Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T Coffey MPH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and burn injury can cause lifelong disability and changes in quality of life. In order to meet the challenges of postinjury life, various types of health information are needed. We sought to identify preferred sources of health information and services for persons with these injuries and discover how accessibility could be improved. Methods: Thirty-three persons with injury participated in semistructured interviews. Responses to interview questions were coded using NVivo. Results: Participants’ difficulties accessing health information varied by injury type and individually. The majority of respondents found information via the Internet and advocated its use when asked to describe their ideal health information system. Nearly all participants supported the development of a comprehensive care website. When searching for health information, participants sought doctor and support group networks, long-term health outcomes, and treatments specific to their injury. Conclusion: To optimize the quality of health information resources, Internet-based health-care platforms should add or highlight access points to connect patients to medical professionals and support networks while aggregating specialized, injury-specific research and treatment information.

  7. Quantitative Tractography and Volumetric MRI in Blast and Blunt Force TBI: Predictors of Neurocognitive and Behavioral Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    to properly and accurately image this region (small, densely packed fibers with bony artifact ). In a study published within a special journal series...chures distributed in clinics or within the general hospital areas at the Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System (VASDHS) or at veteran organiza...acquisitions, and all images were corrected for motion artifact using the eddy correct FSL command. Visual inspection of all images was performed for

  8. Parallel Human and Animal Models of Blast- and Concussion-Induced Tinnitus and Related Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    not be feasible without episodic representation to form a spatial environment map ( Eichenbaum , 1999). Moreover, current study is the first study to...and GABA(B) receptors in the regulation of the nucleus accumbens dopamine response to stress. Brain research. 1150, 62-8. Eichenbaum , H., 1999. The...and hyperactivity following cochlear damage. HearRes 147, 261-274. Sanderson, K.L., Raghupathi, R., Saatman, K.E., Martin , D., Miller, G., and

  9. The Role of PP2A Methylation in Susceptibility and Resistance to TBI and AD-Induced Neurodegeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    inside a sound-attenuating box (72cm x 51cm x 48cm). A clear Plexiglas window (2cm thick, 12cm x 20cm) will allow the experimenter to record the...C- terminal anionic construct used a nickel column with His-bind resin . The supernatant was loaded on His-Spin Protein Miniprep columns (Zymo Res...below) Retinal pigment epithelium and Choroid: 6/ 6. Normal pigmentation. Bruch’s membrane is intact. No neovascular membranes were noted. Optic Nerve: 6

  10. Use of the Photo-Electromyogram to Objectively Diagnose and Monitor Treatment of Post-TBI Light Sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    tension between the electrodes and the skin and which can be rendered using a 3D printer . This will replace the standard skin electrodes that are...which we will mount the electrodes. The 3D printer can print the molding on-site using a flexible and soft polymer resin, whose properties we can

  11. Monte Carlo techniques for the study of cancer patients fractionation in head and neck treated with radiotherapy; Tecnicas de Monte Carlo para el estudio del fraccionamiento en pacientes de cancer de cabeza y cuello tratados con radioterapia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrasco Herrera, M. A.; Jimenez Dominguez, M.; Perucha Ortega, M.; Herrador Cordoba, M.

    2011-07-01

    The dose fractionation than the standard head and neck cancer in some situations involve a significant increase of local control and overall survival. There is clinical evidence of these results in case of hyperfractionated treatments, although the choice of optimal fractionation generally is not obtained from the results of any model, in this study has provided the tumor control probability (TCP) for various subdivisions modified (hypo fractionated and hyperfractionated) using Monte Carlo simulation techniques.

  12. A Military-Relevant Model of Closed Concussive Head Injury: Longitudinal Studies Characterizing and Validating Single and Repetitive mTBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    bilateral hit) or (B) either 45° or 90° from the saggital plane (unilateral hits). CatWalk automated gait analysis (Noldus, The Netherlands ) was used to...5 time points; N = 120). Cerebral metabolic activity was maximally preserved using microwave fixation method during euthanasia . Microwave-fixed brain

  13. A Military-Relevant Model of Closed Concussive Head Injury: Longitudinal Studies Characterizing and Validating Single and Repetitive mTBI

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    and its BDPs, UCH-L1, SBDPs, and c-APP) will be evaluated following a single PCI injury in brain tissue, cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and serum by...blocked in 5% milk , probed with rabbit anti-GFAP primary antibodies overnight, washed, probed with donkey anti-rabbit secondary antibodies for 2 hours and...neuroendocrine response, we screened serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) for 29 distinct rat inflammatory cytokines and chemokines at 1h, 24h and 14d

  14. Young child with severe brain volume loss easily passes the word memory test and medical symptom validity test: implications for mild TBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carone, Dominic A

    2014-01-01

    The Word Memory Test (WMT) and Medical Symptom Validity Test (MSVT) are two commonly used free-standing measures of test-taking effort. The use of any test as a measure of effort is enhanced when evidence shows that it can be easily passed by patients with severe neurological conditions. The opportunity arose to administer the WMT and MSVT to a 9-year-old girl (referred to as CJ) with severe congenital bilateral brain tissue loss (shown via a compelling brain MRI image), chronic epilepsy, an extremely low Full Scale IQ, extremely low adaptive functioning, developmental delays, numerous severe cognitive impairments, and treatment with multiple high-dose benzodiazepines. She received extensive early intervention services and numerous academic accommodations. Despite this set of problems, CJ passed the WMT and MSVT at perfect to near perfect levels. Implications for failure on these tests among patients with known or alleged mild traumatic brain injury are discussed.

  15. Application of ERPs neuromarkers for assessment and treatment of a patient with chronic crossed aphasia after severe TBI and long-term coma – Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Chantsoulis

    2017-03-01

    The application of ERP neuromarkers assists in the diagnosis, treatment, and academic success of an ambidextrous patient with chronic posttraumatic aphasia and sporadic ADHD. ERPs can be used to assess the functional brain changes induced by neurotherapeutical programmes

  16. Comparing the Injury Profile, Service Use, Outcomes, and Comorbidities of People With Severe TBI Across Urban, Regional, and Remote Populations in New South Wales: A Multicentre Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Grahame K; Daher, Maysaa; Hodgkinson, Adeline; Strettles, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    To compare the demographic/injury profile, outcomes, service utilization, and unmet service needs of individuals with severe traumatic brain injury across urban, regional, and remote areas of New South Wales. The 11 community-based rehabilitation teams of the New South Wales Brain Injury Rehabilitation Program. Active clients (N = 503) with severe traumatic brain injury. A prospective cross-sectional multicenter study. Overt Behaviour Scale, Health of the Nation Outcome Scale-Acquired Brain Injury, Disability Rating Scale, Sydney Psychosocial Reintegration Scale-2, Care and Needs Scale, data protocol on service utilization, and unmet needs. There were no differences in injury severity or functional outcomes across the 3 locations. However, clients in regional and remote areas had significantly higher levels of premorbid and postinjury comorbidities and lower levels of participation in comparison to urban clients. Although accessing the same number of services as their urban counterparts, clients in regional and remote areas had significantly higher levels of unmet needs suggesting problems with under-servicing. Geographical location had a significant impact on service access and outcomes.

  17. Reintegrating Troops with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI) into Their Communities: Understanding the Scope and Timeline of Post-Deployment Driving Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    more weapons in their personal vehicles and the two most commonly carried are also the most lethal – gun and knife . Family and friends appear to be...highest levels (i.,e making them feel somewhat or very uncomfortable, anxious, or angry) (p=.0003) (Figure 4). Mean anxiety scores across items was...Figure 3 Mean Anxiety Related Driving Scores Figure 4 Driving situations making Service Members Somewhat or Very Anxious 4 Driving

  18. Pilot Study of Neurological Soft Signs and Depressive and Postconcussive Symptoms During Recovery From Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, Mark S; Wood, Nellie E; Spring, Justin D; Gurvits, Tamara V; Nagurney, John T; Zafonte, Ross D; Pitman, Roger K

    2015-01-01

    Neurological soft signs (NSSs) tap into a variety of perceptual, motor, and cognitive functions. The authors administered a battery of NSSs serially to a group of 14 pilot patients recruited from an emergency room after they experienced a mild traumatic brain injury. Patients were seen within 96 hours after injury, and again 30 and 90 days later. Measures of balance, mood, and postconcussive symptoms and impairment were also obtained. NSSs and balance improved across visits. Across visits, NSSs and balance were not significantly associated with any postconcussive outcome measures, although depressive symptoms were. Initial neurological impairment appeared to predict subsequent residual postconcussive symptoms and impairment, but this result requires replication.

  19. Goal-directed outpatient rehabilitation following TBI: a pilot study of programme effectiveness and comparison of outcomes in home and day hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doig, Emmah; Fleming, Jennifer; Kuipers, Pim; Cornwell, Petrea; Khan, Asad

    2011-01-01

    To determine (i) the effectiveness of a goal-directed, environment-focused occupational therapy intervention and (ii) to compare rehabilitation gains across a day hospital (outpatient) setting and home setting. Repeated measures cross-over design with pre-post test measures and a baseline control period, random allocation to a treatment setting sequence and an independent outcome assessor who was blinded to treatment sequence. Descriptive and non-parametric comparative analyses employed. Fourteen participants with severe traumatic brain injury completed a 12 week outpatient occupational therapy programme. The programme was directed by the participant's chosen goals, which were established using a client-centred, structured, goal-planning process. Outcome measures included Goal attainment scaling, the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure, the Sydney Psychosocial Reintegration Scale, the Mayo-Portland Adaptability Index, the Craig Hospital Inventory of Environmental Factors and self-rated satisfaction with therapy. The therapy programme resulted in significant improvements in goal attainment, occupational performance, psychosocial reintegration and ability and adjustment levels, compared with baseline. Differences in gains made in home vs day hospital settings were not statistically significant, with the exception of higher levels of patient satisfaction with therapy at home. To assist further with decision-making about where to conduct therapy, further research is needed to compare the outcomes and determine the cost effectiveness of therapy at home and in day hospital settings.

  20. Retention of the ability to synthesize HIV-1 and HBV antigens in generations of tomato plants transgenic for the TBI-HBS gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    In development of new types of edible vaccines on the basis of transgenic plants, the ability of the latter to retain the synthesis of foreign antibodies in a series of generations is of great importance. For this purpose, the goal of this study was to investigate the ability of transgenic tomato pl...

  1. Tentative Research on 3C-Based TBI Performance Evaluation Index System%基于3C的TBI绩效评价指标体系初探

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李恒光; 齐中英

    2007-01-01

    对TBI绩效评价的研究,应放在对作为TBI母系统的科技中介的绩效评价研究的大框架下来考虑.科技中介绩效评价研究的意义集中体现在对科技中介发展评价指标的研究方面.科技中介绩效评价指标体系的设计依据、设计原则及必含指标,同样适用于TBI的绩效评价.归纳分析我国TBI绩效评价研究的现状可知,存在着研究不深入、绩效指标体系建立不完整等问题.基于"3C"的TBI绩效评价理论体系的提出,能够使现存的问题得以有效的解决.

  2. Radiological protection in a patient during a total body irradiation procedure; Proteccion radiologica en un paciente durante un procedimiento de TBI (irradiacion de cuerpo entero)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez O, J. O.; Hinojosa G, J.; Gomez M, E.; Balam de la Vega, J. A. [The American British Cowdray Medical Center, I. A. P., Sur 128 No. 143, Col. Americas, 01120 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Deheza V, J. C., E-mail: johernandezo@abchospital.co [IPN, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, Av. Luis Enrique Erro s/n, Edificio No. 9, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Col. Lindavista, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-09-15

    A technique used in the Service of Radiotherapy of the Cancer Center of the American British Cowdray Medical Center (ABC) for the bone marrow transplantation, is the total body irradiation. It is known that the dose calculation, for this irradiation type, is old, since the dosimetric calculation is carried out by hand and they exist infinity of techniques for the patients irradiation and different forms of protecting organs of risk, as well as a great uncertainty in the given dose. In the Cancer Center of the ABC Medical Center, was carried out an irradiation procedure to total body with the following methodology: Computerized tomography of the patient total body (two vacuum mattresses in the following positions: dorsal and lateral decubitus), where is combined the two treatment techniques anterior-posterior and bilateral, skin delineate and reference volumes, dose calculation with the planning system Xi O of CMS, dose determination using an ionization chamber and a lung phantom IMRT Thorax Phantom of the mark CIRS and dosimetry in vivo. In this work is presented the used treatment technique, the results, statistics and the actualization of the patient clinical state. (Author)

  3. Potentiating effects of caffeine on teratogenicity of alkylating agents in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, T.; Nakatsuka, T.

    1983-08-01

    Teratogenic to subteratogenic doses of x-ray, mitomycin C, MNNG, thio-TEPA, cyclophosphamide, and chlorambucil were administered to pregnant ICR mice together with caffeine at doses of 12.5, 25, or 50 mg/kg on day 11 of gestation. Fetuses were examined for gross malformations on day 18 of gestation. The teratogenicity of mitomycin C was significantly potentiated by caffeine at a dose as low as 12.5 mg/kg. The teratogenicity of chlorambucil was also significantly potentiated by caffeine at 50 mg/kg, but similar potentiation was not observed for x-ray, MNNG, thio-TEPA, and cyclophosphamide.

  4. 来自澳大利亚的经验:成人急性淋巴细胞白血病用Hyper-CVAD治疗的结果%Outcome of Treatment of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia with Hyperfractionated Cyclophosphamide,Doxorubicin, Vincristine, Dexamethasone/Methotrexate, Cytarabine: Results from An Australian Population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李军民; 陆泽生

    2011-01-01

    1 文献来源Morris K,Weston H,Mollee P,et al.Outcome of treatment of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia with hypeffractionated Cyclophosphamide,Doxorubicin,Vincristine,Dexamethasone/Methotrexate,Cytarabine:Results from an Australian population [J].Leuk Lymphoma,2011,52( 1 ):85-91.2 证据水平2b.%Department of Hematology, Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong Unverisity School of Medicine, Shanghai Institute of Hematology, Shanghai 200025, China

  5. Radiotherapy and high-dose chemotherapy in advanced Ewing's tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pape, H.; Glag, M.; Gripp, S.; Wittkamp, M.; Schmitt, G. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Laws, H.J.; Kaik, B. van; Goebel, U. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Abt. Paediatrische Haematologie und Onkologie; Burdach, S. [Halle Univ. (Germany). Abt. Paediatrie; Juergens, H. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Abt. Paediatrische Hematologie und Onkologie

    1999-10-01

    Background: Ewing's tumors are sensitive to radio- and chemotherapy. Patients with multifocal disease suffer a poor prognosis. Patients presenting primary bone marrow involvement or bone metastases at diagnosis herald a 3-year disease-free survival below 15%. The European Intergroup Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study (EICESS) has established the following indications for high-dose therapy in advanced Ewing's tumors: Patients with primary multifocal bone disease, patients with early (<2 years after diagnosis) or multifocal relapse. Patients and Method: As of 1987, 83 patients have been treated in the EICESS group, 39 of them at the transplant center in Duesseldorf, who have been analyzed here. All individuals received 4 courses of induction chemotherapy with EVAJA and stem cell collection after course 3 and 4. Consolidation radiotherapy of the involved bone compartments was administered in a hyperfractionated regimen 2 times 1.6 Gy per day, up to 22.4 Gy simultaneously to course 5 and 22.4 Gy to course 6 of chemotherapy. The myeloablative chemotherapy consisted of melphalan and etoposide (ME) in combination with 12 Gy TBI (Hyper-ME) oder Double-ME with whole lung irradiation up to 18 Gy (without TBI). Results: The survival probability at 40 months was 31% (44% DOD; 15% DOC). Pelvic infiltration did not reach prognostic relevance in this cohort. Radiotherapy encompassed 75% of the bone marrow at maximum (average 20%). Engraftment was not affected by radiotherapy. Conclusion: High-dose chemotherapy can improve outcome in poor prognostic advanced Ewing's tumors. The disease itself remains the main problem. The expected engraftment problems after intensive radiotherapy in large volumes of bone marrow can be overcome by stem cell reinfusion. (orig.) [German] Hintergrund: Ewing-Tumoren sind radio- und chemosensibel. Im metastasierten Stadium ist die Prognose schlecht. Patienten mit Knochen- oder Knochenmarkinfiltration haben nach drei Jahren eine

  6. Vagal stimulation modulates inflammation through a ghrelin mediated mechanism in traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal, V; Ryu, SY; Lopez, N; Allexan, S; Krzyzaniak, M; Eliceiri, B; Baird, A.; Coimbra, R

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) releases a cascade of inflammatory cytokines. Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) and ghrelin have known anti-inflammatory effects; furthermore, ghrelin release is stimulated by acetylcholine. We hypothesized VNS decreases post-TBI inflammation through a ghrelin-mediated mechanism. TBI was created in five groups of mice: sham, TBI, TBI/ghrelin, TBI/VNS, and TBI/VNS/ghrelin receptor antagonist (GRa). Serum and tissue ghrelin, and serum TNF-αwere measured. Ghrelin increas...

  7. Bladder dysfunction changes from underactive to overactive after experimental traumatic brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Hai-Hong; Kokiko-Cochran, Olga N; Li, Kevin; Balog, Brian; Lin, Ching-Yi; Damaser, Margot S.; Lin, Vernon; Cheng, Julian Yaoan; Lee, Yu-Shang

    2012-01-01

    Although bladder dysfunction is common after traumatic brain injury (TBI), few studies have investigated resultant bladder changes and the detailed relationship between TBI and bladder dysfunction. The goal of this study was to characterize the effects of TBI on bladder function in an animal model. Fluid-percussion injury was used to create an animal model with moderate TBI. Female Sprague-Dawley rats underwent TBI, sham TBI or were not manipulated (naïve). All rats underwent filling cystomet...

  8. Postdeployment Symptom Changes and Traumatic Brain Injury and/or Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    traumatic brain injury ( TBI ) and posttraumatic stress disorder...stress disorder, TBI = traumatic brain injury . *Address all correspondence to Hilary J. Aralis, MS; Naval Health Research Center, Warfighter...both diagnoses. See Figure 1 for sampling details. Figure 1. Flow diagram outlining selection of final blast traumatic brain injury ( TBI ) and no TBI

  9. Late neurotoxicity after nasopharyngeal carcinoma treatment;Toxicite neurologique tardive apres traitement des carcinomes nasopharynges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siala, W.; Mnejja, W.; Daoud, J. [Hopital Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Radiotherapie Carcinologique, Sfax (Tunisia); Khabir, A.; Boudawara, T. [Hopital Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' Anatomopathologie, Sfax (Tunisia); Ben Mahfoudh, K. [Hopital Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Radiologie, Sfax (Tunisia); Ghorbel, A. [Hopital Habib-Bourguiba, Service d' ORL, Sfax (Tunisia); Frikha, M. [Hopital Habib-Bourguiba, Service de Carcinologie Medicale, Sfax (Tunisia)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose A retrospective analysis of risk factors for late neurological toxicity after nasopharyngeal carcinoma radiotherapy. Patients and methods Between 1993 and 2004, 239 patients with non metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma were treated by radiotherapy associated or not to chemotherapy. Radiotherapy was delivered with two modalities: hyperfractionated for 82 patients and conventional fractionation for 157 patients. We evaluated the impact of tumour stage, age, gender, radiotherapy schedule and chemotherapy on neurological toxicity. Results After a mean follow-up of 107 months (35-176 months), 21 patients (8.8%) developed neurological complications, such as temporal necrosis in nine cases, brain stem necrosis in five cases, optics nerve atrophy in two cases and myelitis in one case. Five- and ten-year free of toxicity survival was 95 and 84% respectively. Young patients had greater risk of temporal necrosis, and hyperfractionated radiotherapy was associated with a significantly higher risk of neurological complications (14.6% vs 5.7%, p = 0.02). On multivariate analysis, hyperfractionation and age were insignificant. Conclusion Late neurological toxicity after radiotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma was rare. Younger age and hyperfractionation were considered as risk factors of neurological toxicity in our study

  10. Cellular and Molecular Level Responses After Radiofrequency Radiation Exposure, Alone or in Combination with X-rays or Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-07-27

    fractionated or hyperfractionated radiotherapy ( Eldor , et al., 1989), and which is the range where the expression of allb#3 integrin in melanoma cells...in a soluble extract from isolated mammalian nuclei. Nucleic Acids Res. 11, 1475-1489. Eldor , et al. (1989) A novel spatial transcription pattern

  11. Common genomic signaling among initial DNA damage and radiation-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes from locally advanced breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Pinar, Beatriz; Carmona-Vigo, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    suffering from locally advanced breast cancer and treated with high-dose hyperfractionated radiotherapy were recruited. Initial DNA damage was measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and radiation-induced apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. Gene expression was assessed by DNA microarray. RESULTS...

  12. Preoperative short-term radiation therapy (25 Gy, 2.5 Gy twice daily) for primary resectable rectal cancer (phase II)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widder, J; Herbst, F; Dobrowsky, W; Schmid, R; Pokrajac, B; Jech, B; Chiari, C; Stift, A; Maier, A; Karner-Hanusch, J; Teleky, B; Wrba, F; Jakesz, R; Poetter, R

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility, effectiveness, and long-term bowel function of preoperative hyperfractionated accelerated radiotherapy in primary resectable rectal cancer. A total of 184 consecutive patients ( median age 65 years, male : female = 2 : 1) with clinical T3Nx rectal adenocarcinoma received

  13. 脑外伤大鼠血中CD4+T细胞变化及相关机制探讨%Change of CD4+T Cell in Peripheral Blood after TBI and Relevant Mechanism Exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    屈晓东; 荔志云; 田立桩; 王茂德

    2012-01-01

    Objective To study the changes in CD4 + T cells in the peripheral blood 1, 3 ,5 ,10 days after traumatic brain injuries in the SD rats and try to explore the reasons for CD4 + T cells change from the perspective of apoptosis. Methods Feeney's free - fall method was used to produce the epidural impact resulting in the animal model of traumatic brain injury. Rat's blood from heart were drawn in the corresponding time duration and the number of CD4 + T cells were checked by flow cytometry. Similarly, the the two key enzymes in the classical apoptotic pathway of caspase -8 and caspase -9, i. e. cysteine aspartyl protease - 8 and cysteine aspartyl protease -9 were also examined to explain the reasons for the changes in the number of CD4 + T cells from the perspective of apoptosis. Results The CD4 + T cell numbers in the peripheral blood from 1 day after traumatic brain injury in rats were significantly reduced (P <0.05) compared with the control group. From three days after traumatic brain injury, CD4 + T cell count was significantly restored. However it was still lower than the control group, but not statistically significant. CD4 + T cells within the cysteine aspartyl protease -8 (caspase -8) and cysteine aspartyl protease -9 (caspase -9) were two key proteases of classic apoptotic pathway which started from 1 day after traumatic brain injury and they were decreased significantly compared with the control group (P < 0. 05) . These enzymes remained relatively low until 10 days after traumatic brain injury (P <0. 05). Conclusion There exists immunosupression as depicted by the decrease in the number of CD4 + T cells after traumatic brain injury. However this decrease in the CD4 + T cells in the peripheral blood may not be carried out by the classical apoptotic pathway.%目的 研究SD大鼠在脑外伤后第1、3、5、10天外周血中CD4+T细胞的变化情况,并尝试从凋亡的角度探讨CD4+T细胞变化的原因.方法 参照改进的Feeney氏自由落体硬膜外撞击法制作脑外伤动物模型,在相应的时间点从大鼠心脏取血,通过流式细胞术检查血中CD4+T细胞的数量和代表两条经典凋亡途径上的两个关键酶caspase-8和caspase-9,尝试从凋亡的角度解释CD4+T细胞数量的变化原因.结果 从颅脑外伤后第1天,大鼠外周血中CD4+T细胞数量与对照组相比较明显减少(P<0.05),而颅脑外伤后第3天CD4+T细胞数量明显恢复,尽管仍低于对照组,但无统计学意义.CD4+T细胞内的半胱氨酸天冬氨酰蛋白酶-8(caspase-8)和半胱氨酸天冬氨酰蛋白酶-9(caspase-9)分别是两条经典的细胞凋亡途径上的关键蛋白酶,都从颅脑外伤后第1天开始与对照组相比显著下降且有统计学意义(P<0.05),直至颅脑外伤后第10天caspase-8和caspase-9依然较对照组低(P<0.05).结论 颅脑外伤后存在免疫抑制,与CD4+T细胞的数量减少有关.颅脑外伤后外周血中CD4+T细胞数量减少可能不是通过经典的细胞凋亡途径进行的.

  14. WAIS-IV reliable digit span is no more accurate than age corrected scaled score as an indicator of invalid performance in a veteran sample undergoing evaluation for mTBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Robert J; Axelrod, Bradley N; Drag, Lauren L; Waldron-Perrine, Brigid; Pangilinan, Percival H; Bieliauskas, Linas A

    2013-01-01

    Reliable Digit Span (RDS) is a measure of effort derived from the Digit Span subtest of the Wechsler intelligence scales. Some authors have suggested that the age-corrected scaled score provides a more accurate measure of effort than RDS. This study examined the relative diagnostic accuracy of the traditional RDS, an extended RDS including the new Sequencing task from the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-IV, and the age-corrected scaled score, relative to performance validity as determined by the Test of Memory Malingering. Data were collected from 138 Veterans seen in a traumatic brain injury clinic. The traditional RDS (≤ 7), revised RDS (≤ 11), and Digit Span age-corrected scaled score ( ≤ 6) had respective sensitivities of 39%, 39%, and 33%, and respective specificities of 82%, 89%, and 91%. Of these indices, revised RDS and the Digit Span age-corrected scaled score provide the most accurate measure of performance validity among the three measures.

  15. Head motions while riding roller coasters: Implications for brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Pfister, Bryan J.; Chickola, Larry; Smith, Douglas H.

    2009-01-01

    The risk of traumatic brain injury (TBI) while riding roller coasters has received substantial attention. Case reports of TBI around the time of riding roller coasters have led many medical professionals to assert that the high gravitational forces (G-forces) induced by roller coasters pose a significant TBI risk. Head injury research, however, has shown that G-forces alone cannot predict TBI. Established head injury criterions and procedures were employed to compare the potential of TBI betw...

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury, Microglia, and Beta Amyloid

    OpenAIRE

    Mannix, Rebekah C.; Whalen, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Recently, there has been growing interest in the association between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and Alzheimer's Disease (AD). TBI and AD share many pathologic features including chronic inflammation and the accumulation of beta amyloid (A\\(\\beta\\)). Data from both AD and TBI studies suggest that microglia play a central role in A\\(\\beta\\) accumulation after TBI. This paper focuses on the current research on the role of microglia response to A\\(\\beta\\) after TBI.

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury Screening: Preliminary Findings in a US Army Brigade Combat Team

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    traumatic brain injury TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY ( TBI ) is often dis-cussed as a common injury of the war in... Traumatic Brain Injury Screening 17 TABLE 1 Screening results∗ Injury status Injured with TBI 907 (22.8) Injured without TBI 385 (9.7) Not injured 2681...remember the injury 335 (36.9) Total with TBI 907 (100) ∗Values represent n (%). TBI indicates traumatic brain

  18. Impaired Visual Integration in Children with Traumatic Brain Injury: An Observational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marsh Königs

    Full Text Available Axonal injury after traumatic brain injury (TBI may cause impaired sensory integration. We aim to determine the effects of childhood TBI on visual integration in relation to general neurocognitive functioning.We compared children aged 6-13 diagnosed with TBI (n = 103; M = 1.7 years post-injury to children with traumatic control (TC injury (n = 44. Three TBI severity groups were distinguished: mild TBI without risk factors for complicated TBI (mildRF- TBI, n = 22, mild TBI with ≥1 risk factor (mildRF+ TBI, n = 46 or moderate/severe TBI (n = 35. An experimental paradigm measured speed and accuracy of goal-directed behavior depending on: (1 visual identification; (2 visual localization; or (3 both, measuring visual integration. Group-differences on reaction time (RT or accuracy were tracked down to task strategy, visual processing efficiency and extra-decisional processes (e.g. response execution using diffusion model analysis. General neurocognitive functioning was measured by a Wechsler Intelligence Scale short form.The TBI group had poorer accuracy of visual identification and visual integration than the TC group (Ps ≤ .03; ds ≤ -0.40. Analyses differentiating TBI severity revealed that visual identification accuracy was impaired in the moderate/severe TBI group (P = .05, d = -0.50 and that visual integration accuracy was impaired in the mildRF+ TBI group and moderate/severe TBI group (Ps < .02, ds ≤ -0.56. Diffusion model analyses tracked impaired visual integration accuracy down to lower visual integration efficiency in the mildRF+ TBI group and moderate/severe TBI group (Ps < .001, ds ≤ -0.73. Importantly, intelligence impairments observed in the TBI group (P = .009, d = -0.48 were statistically explained by visual integration efficiency (P = .002.Children with mildRF+ TBI or moderate/severe TBI have impaired visual integration efficiency, which may contribute to poorer general neurocognitive functioning.

  19. Current status and development of traumatic brain injury treatments in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baiyun Liu

    2015-01-01

    Due to its high incidence,high disability rate,and high mortality rate,traumatic brain injury (TBI) poses a serious threat to human health.This manuscript describes the urgent problems currently existing in China's TBI treatment and proposes a scheme of a nationwide collaboration platform for the treatment of TBI so as to improve the overall level of TBI treatment in China,and reduce disability and mortality rates in TBI patients.

  20. Investigations on Alterations of Hippocampal Circuit Function Following Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) afflicts more than 1.7 million people in the United States each year and even mild TBI can lead to persistent neurological impairments 1. Two pervasive and disabling symptoms experienced by TBI survivors, memory deficits and a reduction in seizure threshold, are thought to be mediated by TBI-induced hippocampal dysfunction 2,3. In order to demonstrate how altered hippocampal circuit function adversely affects behavior after TBI in mice, we employ lateral fluid per...

  1. Impact of total body irradiation on successful neutrophil engraftment in unrelated bone marrow or cord blood transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakasone, Hideki; Fuji, Shigeo; Yakushijin, Kimikazu; Onizuka, Makoto; Shinohara, Akihito; Ohashi, Kazuteru; Miyamura, Koichi; Uchida, Naoyuki; Takanashi, Minoko; Ichinohe, Tatsuo; Atsuta, Yoshiko; Fukuda, Takahiro; Ogata, Masao

    2017-02-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) has been thought to promote donor cell engraftment in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) from alternative donors. However, recent progress in HCT strategies may affect the clinical significance of TBI on neutrophil engraftment. With the use of a Japanese transplant registry database, we analyzed 3933 adult recipients (>15 y.o.) who underwent HCT between 2006 and 2013 from an 8/8 HLA-matched unrelated bone marrow donor (MUD, n = 1367), an HLA-mismatched unrelated bone marrow donor (MMUD, n = 1102), or unrelated cord blood (CBT, n = 1464). Conditioning regimens were divided into five groups: High-TBI-(>8Gy), Low-TBI- (≤8Gy), and no-TBI-myeloablative conditioning (MAC), and Low-TBI- and no-TBI-reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC). In both MUD and MMUD, neutrophil engraftment rate was >90% in each of the five conditioning groups, and TBI was not associated with prompt neutrophil engraftment in multivariate analyses. Conversely, in CBT, TBI regimens had a higher rate of day-30 neutrophil engraftment than no-TBI-regimens: 78% in High-TBI-MAC, 83% in Low-TBI-MAC, and 76% in Low-TBI-RIC versus 65% in No-TBI-MAC, and 68% in No-TBI-RIC (P < .001). Multivariate analyses in CBT demonstrated that TBI-regimens were significantly associated with a higher rate of neutrophil engraftment. Subsequently focusing on CBT patients alone, TBI-regimens were significantly associated with a higher rate of neutrophil engraftment in patients who received CBT with a 4/6 or less HLA allele-match, or who had anti-HLA antibodies. In summary, TBI-regimens had no impact on neutrophil engraftment in the current practice of unrelated bone marrow transplantation. However, in CBT, TBI is still necessary to enhance engraftment.

  2. Traumatic Brain Injury Increases the Expression of Nos1, Aβ Clearance, and Epileptogenesis in APP/PS1 Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miszczuk, Diana; Dębski, Konrad J; Tanila, Heikki; Lukasiuk, Katarzyna; Pitkänen, Asla

    2016-12-01

    To test the hypothesis that an amyloidogenic genetic background predisposes to worsening of post-TBI outcome, we investigated whether traumatic brain injury (TBI) in amyloid precursor protein (APP)/PS1 mice aggravates epileptogenesis and/or enhances somatomotor and cognitive impairment. To elaborate the mechanisms of worsening outcomes, we studied changes in the expression of genes involved in APP processing and Tau pathways in the perilesional cortex, ipsilateral thalamus, and ipsilateral hippocampus 16 weeks post-TBI. Mild (mTBI) or severe TBI (sTBI) was triggered using controlled cortical impact in 3-month-old APP/PS1 mice and wild-type (Wt) littermates. Morris water-maze revealed a genotype effect on spatial learning and memory as APP/PS1-sTBI mice performed more poorly than Wt-sTBI mice (p APP/PS1-sTBI mice had epilepsy compared to 11 % in Wt-sTBI (genotype effect p APP/PS1-sham groups (TBI effect p APP/PS1-sTBI mice compared to APP/PS1-sham (p APP/PS1-sTBI mice compared to APP/PS1-sham mice (p < 0.05). The present study provides the first comprehensive evidence of exacerbated epileptogenesis and its molecular mechanisms in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related genetic background after TBI.

  3. Alcohol exposure after mild focal traumatic brain injury impairs neurological recovery and exacerbates localized neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Sophie X; Katz, Paige S; Maxi, John K; Mayeux, Jacques P; Gilpin, Nicholas W; Molina, Patricia E

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) represents a leading cause of morbidity and mortality among young individuals. Alcohol abuse is a risk factor associated with increased TBI incidence. In addition, up to 26% of TBI patients engage in alcohol consumption after TBI. Limited preclinical studies have examined the impact of post-injury alcohol exposure on TBI recovery. The aim of this study was to determine the isolated and combined effects of TBI and alcohol on cognitive, behavioral, and physical recovery, as well as on associated neuroinflammatory changes. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (∼300g) were subjected to a mild focal TBI by lateral fluid percussion (∼30PSI, ∼25ms) under isoflurane anesthesia. On day 4 after TBI, animals were exposed to either sub-chronic intermittent alcohol vapor (95% ethanol 14h on/10h off; BAL∼200mg/dL) or room air for 10days. TBI induced neurological dysfunction reflected by an increased neurological severity score (NSS) showed progressive improvement in injured animals exposed to room air (TBI/air). In contrast, TBI animals exposed to alcohol vapor (TBI/alcohol) showed impaired NSS recovery throughout the 10-day period of alcohol exposure. Open-field exploration test revealed an increased anxiety-like behavior in TBI/alcohol group compared to TBI/air group. Additionally, alcohol-exposed animals showed decreased locomotion and impaired novel object recognition. Immunofluorescence showed enhanced reactive astrocytes, microglial activation, and HMGB1 expression localized to the injured cortex of TBI/alcohol as compared to TBI/air animals. The expression of neuroinflammatory markers showed significant positive correlation with NSS. These findings indicated a close relationship between accentuated neuroinflammation and impaired neurological recovery from post-TBI alcohol exposure. The clinical implications of long-term consequences in TBI patients exposed to alcohol during recovery warrant further investigation.

  4. Polypathology and dementia after brain trauma: Does brain injury trigger distinct neurodegenerative diseases, or should they be classified together as traumatic encephalopathy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Patricia M; Villapol, Sonia; Burns, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    Neuropathological studies of human traumatic brain injury (TBI) cases have described amyloid plaques acutely after a single severe TBI, and tau pathology after repeat mild TBI (mTBI). This has helped drive the hypothesis that a single moderate to severe TBI increases the risk of developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD), while repeat mTBI increases the risk of developing chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). In this review we critically assess this position-examining epidemiological and case control human studies, neuropathological evidence, and preclinical data. Epidemiological studies emphasize that TBI is associated with the increased risk of developing multiple types of dementia, not just AD-type dementia, and that TBI can also trigger other neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease. Further, human post-mortem studies on both single TBI and repeat mTBI can show combinations of amyloid, tau, TDP-43, and Lewy body pathology indicating that the neuropathology of TBI is best described as a 'polypathology'. Preclinical studies confirm that multiple proteins associated with the development of neurodegenerative disease accumulate in the brain after TBI. The chronic sequelae of both single TBI and repeat mTBI share common neuropathological features and clinical symptoms of classically defined neurodegenerative disorders. However, while the spectrum of chronic cognitive and neurobehavioral disorders that occur following repeat mTBI is viewed as the symptoms of CTE, the spectrum of chronic cognitive and neurobehavioral symptoms that occur after a single TBI is considered to represent distinct neurodegenerative diseases such as AD. These data support the suggestion that the multiple manifestations of TBI-induced neurodegenerative disorders be classified together as traumatic encephalopathy or trauma-induced neurodegeneration, regardless of the nature or frequency of the precipitating TBI.

  5. Relationship of Circulating CXCR4+ EPC with Prognosis of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yunpeng; Luo, Lan Lan; Sun, Jian; Gao, Weiwei; Tian, Ye; Park, Eugene; Baker, Andrew; Chen, Jieli; Jiang, Rongcai; Zhang, Jianning

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the changes of circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α)/CXCR4 expression in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) and the correlation between EPC level and the prognosis of mild TBI. 72 TBI patients (57 mild TBI, 15 moderate TBI patients) and 25 healthy subjects (control) were included. The number of circulating EPCs, CD34+, and CD133+ cells and the percentage of CXCR4+ cells in each cell population at 1,4,7,14,21 days after TBI were counted by flow cytometer. SDF-1α levels in serum were detected by ELISA assay. The patients were divided into poor and good prognosis groups based on Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale and Activity of Daily Living Scale at 3 months after TBI. Correlation analysis between each detected index and prognosis of mild TBI was performed. Moderate TBI patients have higher levels of SDF-1α and CXCR4 expression than mild TBI patients (P < 0.05). The percentage of CXCR4+ EPCs at day 7 post-TBI was significantly higher in mild TBI patients with poor prognosis than the ones with good prognosis (P < 0.05). HAMA and HAMD scores in mild TBI patients were significantly lower than moderate TBI patients (P < 0.05) in early term. The percentage of CXCR4+ EPCs at day 7 after TBI was significantly correlated with the prognosis outcome at 3 months. The mobilization of circulating EPCs can be induced in mild TBI. The expression of CXCR4+ in EPCs at 7 days after TBI reflects the short-term prognosis of brain injury, and could be a potential biological marker for prognosis prediction of mild TBI. PMID:28203485

  6. Effect of lacosamide on structural damage and functional recovery after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkänen, A; Immonen, R; Ndode-Ekane, X; Gröhn, O; Stöhr, T; Nissinen, J

    2014-05-01

    In a subgroup of patients, traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in the occurrence of acute epileptic seizures or even status epilepticus, which are treated with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Recent experimental data, however, suggest that administration of AEDs at the early post-injury phase can compromise the recovery process. The present study was designed to assess the profile of a novel anticonvulsant, lacosamide (Vimpat) on post-TBI structural, motor and cognitive outcomes. Moderate TBI was induced by lateral fluid-percussion injury in adult rats. Treatment with 0.9% saline or lacosamide (30 mg/kg, i.p.) was started at 30 min post-injury and continued at 8h intervals for 3d (total daily dose 90 mg/kg/d). Rats were randomly assigned to 4 treatment groups: sham-operated controls treated with vehicle (Sham-Veh) or lacosamide (Sham-LCM) and injured animals treated with vehicle (TBI-Veh) or lacosamide (TBI-LCM). As functional outcomes we tested motor recovery with composite neuroscore and beam-walking at 2, 7, and 15 d post-injury. Cognitive recovery was tested with the Morris water-maze at 12-14 d post-TBI. To assess the structural outcome, animals underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 2 d post-TBI. At 16d post-TBI, rats were perfused for histology to analyze cortical and hippocampal neurodegeneration and axonal damage. Our data show that at 2 d post-TBI, both the TBI-Veh and TBI-LCM groups were equally impaired in neuroscore. Thereafter, motor recovery occurred similarly during the first week. At 2 wk post-TBI, recovery of the TBI-LCM group lagged behind that in the TBI-VEH group (p<0.05). Performance in beam-walking did not differ between the TBI-Veh and TBI-LCM groups. Both TBI groups were similarly impaired in the Morris water-maze at 2 wk post-TBI. MRI and histology did not reveal any differences in the cortical or hippocampal damage between the TBI-Veh and TBI-LCM groups. Taken together, acute treatment with LCM had no protective effects on post-TBI

  7. Head trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gean, Alisa D; Fischbein, Nancy J

    2010-11-01

    Worldwide, an estimated 10 million people are affected annually by traumatic brain injury (TBI). More than 5 million Americans currently live with long-term disability as a result of TBI and more than 1.5 million individuals sustain a new TBI each year. It has been predicted that TBI will become the third leading cause of death and disability in the world by the year 2020. This article outlines the classification of TBI, details the types of lesions encountered, and discusses the various imaging modalities available for the evaluation of TBI.

  8. Expression of Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Nav1.3 Is Associated with Severity of Traumatic Brain Injury in Adult Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Xian-jian; Mao, Qing; Lin, Yong; Feng, Jun-Feng; Jiang, Ji-Yao

    2013-01-01

    During the secondary injury period after traumatic brain injury (TBI), depolarization of neurons mediated by voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) leads to cellular abnormalities and neurological dysfunction. Alterations in expression of different α subunits of VGSCs can affect early brain pathology following TBI. This study detected the expression of Nav1.3 mRNA and protein in the rat cortex post-TBI. Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were randomly assigned to sham-TBI, mild-TBI (mTBI), or seve...

  9. Traumatic brain injury and gene knockout animal models: an up-to-date review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios F; Singh, Ranjodh; Dardiotis, Efthimios; Paterakis, Konstantinos; Hadjigeorgiou, Georgios M; Fountas, Kostas N

    2017-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Identification of endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms after TBI and the development of therapeutic targets to improve TBI outcomes are areas of intense scientific research. In this review, we summarize genetically modified TBI mouse models and highlight the recent scientific findings from using such models, including mediators of inflammation, programmed cell death and metabolism, modulators of vascular tone and membrane channel proteins. A deeper understanding of the complex biochemical processes and genetic pathways in TBI could offer personalized genomic-based therapies for and improve clinical outcomes in TBI patients.

  10. The Effects of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, and Combined Mild Traumatic Brain Injury/Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder on Returning Veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combs, Hannah L; Berry, David T R; Pape, Theresa; Babcock-Parziale, Judith; Smith, Bridget; Schleenbaker, Randal; Shandera-Ochsner, Anne; Harp, Jordan P; High, Walter M

    2015-07-01

    United States veterans of the Iraqi (Operation Iraqi Freedom [OIF]) and Afghanistan (Operation Enduring Freedom [OEF]) conflicts have frequently returned from deployment after sustaining mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and enduring stressful events resulting in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A large number of returning service members have been diagnosed with both a history of mTBI and current PTSD. Substantial literature exists on the neuropsychological factors associated with mTBI and PTSD occurring separately; far less research has explored the combined effects of PTSD and mTBI. The current study employed neuropsychological and psychological measures in a sample of 251 OIF/OEF veterans to determine whether participants with a history of mTBI and current PTSD (mTBI+PTSD) have poorer cognitive and psychological outcomes than participants with mTBI only (mTBI-o), PTSD only (PTSD-o), or veteran controls (VC), when groups are comparable on intelligence quotient, education, and age. The mTBI+PTSD group performed more poorly than VC, mTBI-o, and PTSD-o groups on several neuropsychological measures. Effect size comparisons suggest small deleterious effects for mTBI-o on measures of processing speed and visual attention and small effects for PTSD-o on measures of verbal memory, with moderate effects for mTBI+PTSD on the same variables. Additionally, the mTBI+PTSD group was significantly more psychologically distressed than the PTSD-o group, and PTSD-o group was more distressed than VC and mTBI-o groups. These findings suggest that veterans with mTBI+PTSD perform significantly lower on neuropsychological and psychiatric measures than veterans with mTBI-o or PTSD-o. The results also raise the possibility of mild but persisting cognitive changes following mTBI sustained during deployment.

  11. Prevalence and predictive factors of post-traumatic hypopituitarism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, M; Juul, A; Poulsgaard, L

    2007-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence and predictive factors of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI).......To estimate the prevalence and predictive factors of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI)....

  12. Hypopituitarism in Traumatic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Marianne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    While hypopituitarism after traumatic brain injury (TBI) was previously considered rare, it is now thought to be a major cause of treatable morbidity among TBI survivors. Consequently, recommendations for assessment of pituitary function and replacement in TBI were recently introduced. Given...... the high incidence of TBI with more than 100 pr. 100,000 inhabitants, TBI would be by far the most common cause of hypopituitarism if the recently reported prevalence rates hold true. The disproportion between this proposed incidence and the occasional cases of post-TBI hypopituitarism in clinical practice...... justifies reflection as to whether hypopituitarism has been unrecognized in TBI patients or whether diagnostic testing designed for high risk populations such as patients with obvious pituitary pathology has overestimated the true risk and thereby the disease burden of hypopituitarism in TBI. The findings...

  13. Epidemiology, severity classification, and outcome of moderate and severe traumatic brain injury: a prospective multicenter study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andriessen, T.M.J.C.; Horn, J.; Franschman, G.; Naalt, J. van der; Haitsma, I.; Jacobs, B.; Steyerberg, E.W.; Vos, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the demographics, approach, and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients require regular evaluation of epidemiological profiles, injury severity classification, and outcomes. This prospective multicenter study provides detailed information on TBI-related variables of 508 moderat

  14. Neurogenic fever after traumatic brain injury: an epidemiological study

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, H; Pinto-Martin, J; Bullock, M.

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the incidence of neurogenic fever (NF) in a population of patients in the acute phase following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI); to identify factors associated with the development of NF following severe TBI in adults.

  15. Acute, regional inflammatory response after traumatic brain injury: Implications for cellular therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Harting, Matthew T.; jimenez, fernando; Adams, Sasha D.; Mercer, David W.; Cox, Charles S.

    2008-01-01

    While cellular therapy has shown promise in the management of traumatic brain injury (TBI), microenvironment interactions between the intracerebral milieu and therapeutic stem cells are poorly understood. We sought to characterize the acute, regional inflammatory response after TBI.

  16. Epidemiology, Severity Classification, and Outcome of Moderate and Severe Traumatic Brain Injury: A Prospective Multicenter Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M.J.C. Andriessen; J. Horn; G. Franschman; J. van der Naalt; I. Haitsma; B. Jacobs; E.W. Steyerberg; P.E. Vos

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the demographics, approach, and treatment of traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients require regular evaluation of epidemiological profiles, injury severity classification, and outcomes. This prospective multicenter study provides detailed information on TBI-related variables of 508 moderat

  17. What Can I Do to Help Prevent Traumatic Brain Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TBI in the US: Assessing Outcomes in Children Appendix A Report to Congress: TBI in the US ... Address What's this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Prevention Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Prevention What ...

  18. Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... TBI in the US: Assessing Outcomes in Children Appendix A Report to Congress: TBI in the US ... include data from all 50 states.) Implementing Primary Prevention and Education Strategies CDC has multiple education and ...

  19. Demographic profile of severe traumatic brain injury admissions to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TBI to the Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital (RCWMCH) and who ... intracranial monitoring for severe TBI (defined as a post- resuscitation ... Background. Paediatric traumatic brain injury (PTBI) is a major public health problem.

  20. Attention and driving in traumatic brain injury : A question of coping with time-pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, WH; Withaar, FK; Tant, MLM; van Zomeren, AH

    2002-01-01

    Background: Diffuse and focal traumatic brain injury (TBI) can result in perceptual, cognitive, and motor dysfunction possibly leading to activity limitations in driving. Characteristic dysfunctions for severe diffuse TBI are confronted with function requirements derived from the hierarchical task a