WorldWideScience

Sample records for hyperalgesia gastroesophageal reflux

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitz, L; McLeod, E

    2003-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is common in infants and generally resolves spontaneously within the first year of life as the lower esophageal sphincter mechanism matures. The reflux is only considered a "disease" (GERD) when it becomes symptomatic or causes pathological consequences. GERD is commonly associated with esophageal atresia and there is a high incidence in neurologically impaired children; in both groups conservative treatment is notoriously ineffective. The diagnosis of GER is made on upper gastrointestinal contrast studies, endoscopy and pH monitoring. Medical management comprises antacids, reduction of gastric acid production and prokinetic agents. The indications for antireflux surgery include an established esophageal stricture, associated anatomical defect and failure of medical therapy. Apnoeic episodes secondary to documented GER in the infant, constitute an absolute indication for early surgery.

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gastroesophageal reflux disease References Falk GW, Katzka DA. Diseases of the esophagus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman-Cecil Medicine . 25th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2016:chap ... gastroesophageal reflux disease. Am J Gastroenterol . 2013;108(3):308-328. ...

  3. Gastroesophageal Reflux (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with caffeine fatty and fried foods garlic and onions spicy foods tomato-based foods and sauces peppermint ... Heard of GERD? Your Digestive System Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) Contact Us Print Resources Send to a ...

  4. Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Prado P. Moraes-Filho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a condition which develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications. Its pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment have frequently been analyzed but it is interesting to review some aspects of the GERD refractory patients to the proton pump inhibitors treatment. The treatment encompasses behavioral measures and pharmacological therapy. The majority of the patients respond well to proton pump inhibitors treatment but 20%-42% of them may not do so well. Patients who are unresponsible to 4-8 weeks' treatment with proton pump inhibitors (omeprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole, lansoprazole, esomeprazole, pantoprazole-Mg might have so-called refractory GERD. RESULTS: In some cases the patients are not real refractory because either they do not have GERD or the disease was not correctly treated, but the term refractory is still employed. Although debatable, the Brazilian GERD Consensus based upon evidences recommends as first step in the diagnosis, the upper digestive endoscopy to exclude the diagnosis of peptic ulcer and cancer and in some cases identify the presence of esophageal mucosa erosions. CONCLUSIONS: The main causes of the so-called refractory GERD are: (1 functional heartburn; (2 low levels of adherence to proton pump inhibitors treatment; (3 inadequate proton pump inhibitors dosage; (4 wrong diagnosis; (5 co-morbidities and pill-induced esophagitis; (6 genotypic differences; (7 nonacid gastroesophageal reflux; (8 autoimmune skin diseases; (9 eosinophilic esophagitis.

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X L; Wong, Kenneth K Y

    2012-10-01

    Reflux of gastric contents is common in young infants but usually self-limiting and not pathological. Gastroesophageal reflux disease refers to persistent reflux due to pathological factors that results in significant symptoms. Patients may exhibit oesophagitis, bleeding, nutritional failure, or respiratory problems. A high index of suspicion must thus be maintained for all patients. The aim of this article was to provide a concise review of the understanding of this disease, and also to discuss current diagnosis and management strategies for children with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  6. Severe laryngitis associated to gastroesophageal reflux

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Botto, Hugo; Antonioli, Cintia; Nieto, Mary; Cocciaglia, Alejandro; Cuestas, Giselle; Roques Revol, Magdalena; López Marti, Jessica; Rodríguez, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    There is a strong association between gastroesophageal reflux and pharyngolaryngeal reflux as factors leading to respiratory disease, manifested as dysphonia, wheezing, coughing, recurrent laryngitis...

  7. [Update on gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra Pueyo, Jordi

    2014-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a highly frequent disorder classically characterized by the presence of heartburn and/or acid regurgitation that improves with drug therapy that reduces acid content in the stomach. However, especially in patients with non-erosive disease, response to proton pump inhibitors is unsatisfactory in approximately 1 out of 3 patients, and consequently, in these patients, it is important to establish a definitive diagnosis and an alternative therapeutic strategy. In the last few years, advances have been made in knowledge of the physiopathology of reflux, such as identification of the role of the acid pocket in producing reflux, technological advances that allow differentiation among acid reflux, non-acid reflux and slightly acid reflux, and advances in the treatment of reflux with drugs that attempt to act on the barrier function of the esophagogastric junction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux disease - children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peptic esophagitis - children; Reflux esophagitis - children; GERD - children; Heartburn - chronic - children; Dyspepsia - GERD - children ... GERD. Certain factors can lead to GERD in children, including: Birth defects, such as hiatal hernia , a ...

  9. Respiratory involvement in the gastroesophageal reflux disesease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mureşan, Iulia; Picos, Alina; Grad, Simona; Dumitrascu, D L

    2011-01-01

    The pathological gastroesophageal reflux disease may lead to the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), manifested as a spectrum of conditions including erosive esophagitis, Barrett esophagus and has been linked to the development of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus. The gastroesophageal reflux has been incriminated in the occurence of a number of pulmonary symptoms and diseases, otolaryngologic symptoms, and other extraesophageal manifestations. Clinicians must be aware of the possibility of some extraesophageal reflux-related manifestations, even in the absence of heartburn and acid reflux, classic esophageal symptoms of GERD. Although the correlation between gastroesophageal reflux disease and the extraesophageal manifestations has been established, a cause-and-effect relationship has not been proved yet. In this article, we present the respiratory manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease, referring to epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment.

  10. Gastroesophageal reflux in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badriul Hegar

    2011-12-01

    Endoscopically-visible breaks in the distal esophageal mucosa are the most reliable evidence of reflux esophagitis. Esophageal pH monitoring quantitatively measures esophageal acid exposure. Combined multiple intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring (MII-pH measures acidic, weakly acidic, non-acidic and gas reflux episodes. MII-pH is superior to pH monitoring alone for evaluation of the temporal relationship between symptoms and GERER. Barium contrast radiography is not useful for the GERERD diagnosis, but may be used to detect anatomic abnormalities. Parental education, guidance, and support are always required and usually sufficient to manage healthy, thriving infants with symptoms likely due to physiologic GERER. Use of a thickened, commercially available anti-regurgitation formula by preference, may decrease visible regurgitation. Buffering agents, alginate and sucralfate, can be beneficial if used as needed for occasional heartburn. Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs are superior to histamine-2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs.

  11. Discerning differences: gastroesophageal reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Shawna M

    2004-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a frequently encountered problem in infancy; it commonly resolves spontaneously by 12 months of age. Caregivers are challenged to discriminate between physiologic GER and the much less common and more serious condition of pathologic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Pathologic GERD may require more extensive clinical evaluation and necessitate treatment. GERD may be primary or secondary; secondary GERD is associated with a number of genetic syndromes, chromosomal abnormalities, birth defects, or a host of neurologic conditions frequently seen in the newborn intensive care unit. This article reviews the unique anatomic, physiologic, developmental, and nutritional vulnerabilities of infants that make them susceptible to GER and GERD. The North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition have recently developed a comprehensive evidence-based clinical practice guideline that structures the diagnostic approach and treatment option in infants with suspected and confirmed GERD. These guidelines provide clear definitions of GER and GERD to aid the clinician in distinguishing between the 2 conditions. They emphasize the use of history and physical examination and discuss the indications for the use of other diagnostic procedures, such as upper gastrointestinal studies, nuclear medicine scintiscan, esophagogastroduodenoscopy with biopsy, and esophageal pH probe monitoring. Management of GERD begins with a nonpharmacologic approach; the emphasis is on positioning, a trial of a hypoallergenic formula, and thickening of feedings. When these measures fail to control symptoms, a trial of either histamine(2) antagonists or a proton pump inhibitor may be indicated. Finally, surgical treatment may be needed if all other management measures fail. New sleep recommendations for infants with GERD are now consistent with the American Academy of Pediatrics' standard recommendations. Prone sleep positioning is only considered in

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux disease with Thal fundoplication

    OpenAIRE

    Irwan Effendi; Yusri Dianne Jurnalis; Yorva Sayoeti; Yusirwan Yusuf

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common phenomenon among heathy infants, with approximately 50% of infants aged 0 to 3 months and 67% of infants aged 4 months experiencing at least one episode of vomiting per day. GER defined as regurgitation of gastric contents into the esophagus or mouth. GER typically improves through the first postnatal year, with only 5% of healthy 12 month old infants experiencing vomiting.1,2 Complicated GER or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been reported...

  13. Gastroesophageal reflux. Reflujo gastroesofágico.

    OpenAIRE

    Lauro A. Melo Aguilera; Rafael Trinchet Soler; Yanet Hidalgo Marrero

    2005-01-01

    Although many infants has smaller degrees of gastroesophageal reflux, it is recognized that 1:3,000 at 1:10,000 of they have a pathological or symptomatic reflux. Near 90% of children vomits during the first 6 weeks of life, due primarily to the physiologic immaturity of antireflux mechanism. However, in 60% of cases, reflux disappears before 18 months, even without treatment. 30% maintains the symptoms, becoming in pathological, and of them, 10% develops serious problems, around 5% esophagit...

  14. Esophageal Sphincter Device for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ganz, Robert A.; Peters, Jeffrey H.; Horgan, Santiago; Bemelman, Willem A.; Dunst, Christy M.; Edmundowicz, Steven A.; Lipham, John C.; Luketich, James D.; Melvin, W. Scott; Oelschlager, Brant K.; Schlack-Haerer, Steven C.; Smith, C. Daniel; Smith, Christopher C.; Dunn, Dan; Taiganides, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease who have a partial response to proton-pump inhibitors often seek alternative therapy. We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of a new magnetic device to augment the lower esophageal sphincter. METHODS We prospectively assessed 100 patients

  15. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and vocal disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Coelho de Arruda Henry

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic disease in which gastroduodenal contents reflux into the esophagus. The clinical picture of gastroesophageal reflux disease is usually composed by heartburn and regurgitation (typical manifestations. Atypical manifestations (vocal disturbances and asthma may also be complaint. OBJECTIVE: To analyse the clinical, endoscopic, manometric and pHmetric aspects of patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease associated with vocal disturbances. METHODS: Fifty patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease were studied, including 25 with vocal disturbances (group 1 - G1 and 25 without these symptoms (group 2 - G2. All patients were submitted to endoscopy, manometry and esophageal pHmetry (2 probes. The group 1 patients were submitted to videolaryngoscopy. RESULTS: Endoscopic findings: non-erosive reflux disease was observed in 95% of G1 patients and 88% of G2. Videolaryngoscopy: vocal fold congestion, asymmetry, nodules and polyps were observed in G1 patients. Manometric findings: pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (mm Hg: 11.6 ± 5.2 in G1 and 14.0 ± 6.2 in G2 (P = 0.14; pressure in the upper esophageal sphincter (mm Hg: 58.4 ± 15.9 in G1 and 69.5 ± 30.7 in the controls. pHmetric findings: De Meester index: 34.0 ± 20.9 in G1 and 15.4 ± 9.4 in G2 (P<0.001; number of reflux episodes in distal probe: 43.0 ± 20.4 in G1 and 26.4 ± 17.2 in G2 (P = 0.003; percentage of time with esophageal pH value lower than 4 units (distal sensor: 9.0% ± 6.4% in G1 and 3.4% ± 2.1% in G2 (P<0.001; number of reflux episodes in proximal probe: 7.5 ± 10.9 in G1 and 5.3 ± 5.7 in G2 (P = 0.38; percentage of time with esophageal pH values lower than 4 units (Proximal probe: 1.2 ± 2.7 in G1 and 0.5 ± 0.7 in G2 (P = 0.21. CONCLUSIONS: 1 The clinical, endoscopic, and manometric findings observed in patients with vocal disturbance do not differ from those without these symptoms; 2 gastroesophageal

  16. Gastroesophageal Reflux Management with the LINX® System for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Following Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desart, Kenneth; Rossidis, Georgios; Michel, Michael; Lux, Tamara; Ben-David, Kfir

    2015-10-01

    Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) has gained significant popularity in the USA, and consequently resulted in patients experiencing new-onset gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) following this bariatric procedure. Patients with GERD refractory to medical therapy present a more challenging situation limiting the surgical options to further treat the de novo GERD symptoms since the gastric fundus to perform a fundoplication is no longer an option. The aim of this study is to determine if the LINX® magnetic sphincter augmentation system is a safe and effective option for patients with new gastroesophageal reflux disease following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. This study was conducted at the University Medical Center. This is a retrospective review of seven consecutive patients who had a laparoscopic LINX® magnetic sphincter device placement for patients with refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy between July 2014 and April 2015. All patients were noted to have self-reported greatly improved gastroesophageal reflux symptoms 2-4 weeks after their procedure. They were all noted to have statistically significant improved severity and frequency of their reflux, regurgitation, epigastric pain, sensation of fullness, dysphagia, and cough symptoms in their postoperative GERD symptoms compared with their preoperative evaluation. This is the first reported pilot case series, illustrating that the LINX® device is a safe and effective option in patients with de novo refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease after a laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy despite appropriate weight loss.

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, A D

    2001-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a common, self-limited process in infants that usually resolves by six to 12 months of age. Effective, conservative management involves thickened feedings, positional treatment, and parental reassurance. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a less common, more serious pathologic process that usually warrants medical management and diagnostic evaluation. Differential diagnosis includes upper gastrointestinal tract disorders; cow's milk allergy; and metabolic, infectious, renal, and central nervous system diseases. Pharmacologic management of GERD includes a prokinetic agent such as metoclopramide or cisapride and a histamine-receptor type 2 antagonist such as cimetidine or ranitidine when esophagitis is suspected. Although recent studies have supported the cautious use of cisapride in childhood GERD, the drug is currently not routinely available in the United States.

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux disease with Thal fundoplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwan Effendi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux (GER is a common phenomenon among heathy infants, with approximately 50% of infants aged 0 to 3 months and 67% of infants aged 4 months experiencing at least one episode of vomiting per day. GER defined as regurgitation of gastric contents into the esophagus or mouth. GER typically improves through the first postnatal year, with only 5% of healthy 12 month old infants experiencing vomiting.1,2 Complicated GER or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been reported to affect up to 8% of infants and children with GER.l,3 Antireflux procedures (ARPs are increasingly offered to control GERD symptoms. We report a case of a baby with GERD and treated with ThaI fundoplication procedures. Fundoplication procedure is rarely performed in management of GERD, and this is the first fundoplication procedure in children with GERD at M. Djamil Hospital.

  19. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and asthma in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshoo, Vikram; Haydel, Robert; Saturno, Emilio

    2006-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs in about two thirds of children with asthma. It may simply represent a concomitant unrelated finding or it may be responsible for provoking or worsening asthma. GERD could also be a byproduct of asthma itself. In any case, aggressive treatment of GERD seems to improve asthma outcomes. GERD should be suspected in asthma patients who do not have any known risk factors or those who are becoming difficult to treat.

  20. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Sleep Quality in a Chinese Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Jyh Chen

    2009-01-01

    Conclusion: The present study highlights the adverse effect of gastroesophageal reflux on sleep, even in the absence of reflux symptoms. This finding has therapeutic implications in patients with silent erosive disease, and future trials are warranted.

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux diagnosed by occlusal splint tintion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cebrián-Carretero, José Luis; López-Arcas-Calleja, José María

    2006-01-01

    The gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is a very frequent digestive disorder, mainly characterised by the reflux of the gastric acidic content to the esophage in abnormal quantities. There are different situations that favour this situation but almost in all of them rely an incompetence of the esophagic sphincter. The clinical consequences are many, including oral manifestations. Among all of them the most frequent is the esophagitis followed by symptoms at the pharynx or larynx and finally, the oral cavity. At this level fundamentally we will find enamel and oral mucosa erosions. We report the case of a patient who was indirectly diagnosed of her esophague disease by the observation of the alterations in the occlusal splint induced by the gastric reflux. We review the literature concerning the above topic and its possible association with the miofascial syndrome.

  2. Esophageal sphincter device for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Robert A; Peters, Jeffrey H; Horgan, Santiago; Bemelman, Willem A; Dunst, Christy M; Edmundowicz, Steven A; Lipham, John C; Luketich, James D; Melvin, W Scott; Oelschlager, Brant K; Schlack-Haerer, Steven C; Smith, C Daniel; Smith, Christopher C; Dunn, Dan; Taiganides, Paul A

    2013-02-21

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease who have a partial response to proton-pump inhibitors often seek alternative therapy. We evaluated the safety and effectiveness of a new magnetic device to augment the lower esophageal sphincter. We prospectively assessed 100 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease before and after sphincter augmentation. The study did not include a concurrent control group. The primary outcome measure was normalization of esophageal acid exposure or a 50% or greater reduction in exposure at 1 year. Secondary outcomes were 50% or greater improvement in quality of life related to gastroesophageal reflux disease and a 50% or greater reduction in the use of proton-pump inhibitors at 1 year. For each outcome, the prespecified definition of successful treatment was achievement of the outcome in at least 60% of the patients. The 3-year results of a 5-year study are reported. The primary outcome was achieved in 64% of patients (95% confidence interval [CI], 54 to 73). For the secondary outcomes, a reduction of 50% or more in the use of proton-pump inhibitors occurred in 93% of patients, and there was improvement of 50% or more in quality-of-life scores in 92%, as compared with scores for patients assessed at baseline while they were not taking proton-pump inhibitors. The most frequent adverse event was dysphagia (in 68% of patients postoperatively, in 11% at 1 year, and in 4% at 3 years). Serious adverse events occurred in six patients, and in six patients the device was removed. In this single-group evaluation of 100 patients before and after sphincter augmentation with a magnetic device, exposure to esophageal acid decreased, reflux symptoms improved, and use of proton-pump inhibitors decreased. Follow-up studies are needed to assess long-term safety. (Funded by Torax Medical; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00776997.).

  3. Esomeprazole reduces gastroesophageal reflux after beer consumption in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franke, Andreas; Hepp, Caroline; Harder, Hermann; Beglinger, Christoph; Singer, Manfred V

    2008-01-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are advised to avoid alcoholic beverages since alcohol consumption induces gastroesophageal reflux in healthy volunteers and increases it in patients with GERD. Proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are frequently administered for reflux symptoms but their effect on gastroesophageal reflux after alcohol consumption has not yet been fully studied. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate the effect of esomeprazole, an S-enantiomer of omeprazole, on gastroesophageal reflux after beer consumption. In this placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover study, 16 healthy male volunteers received 20 mg esomeprazole daily for one week. On day 7, in an acute experiment, the subjects then consumed 500 ml beer within 5 min. Subsequently, gastroesophageal reflux was monitored by pH-metry over a period of 3 h. In addition, gastric emptying was measured by ultrasonography and blood concentrations of ethanol, cholecystokinin and gastrin were determined. Gastroesophageal reflux was significantly (p=0.001) reduced by 93% after treatment with esomeprazole (0.2%, median percentage of time pHbeer consumption. However, there was no difference in the increase in plasma gastrin after beer consumption between the esomeprazole treatment and placebo. Esomeprazole significantly reduces gastroesophageal reflux after beer consumption in healthy volunteers. Gastric emptying of beer is not prolonged after treatment with esomeprazole, although compared with placebo, this PPI induced significantly higher plasma gastrin concentrations. Moderate alcohol consumption does not worsen gastroesophageal reflux when a PPI is administered.

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux: management guidance for the pediatrician.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightdale, Jenifer R; Gremse, David A

    2013-05-01

    Recent comprehensive guidelines developed by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition define the common entities of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) as the physiologic passage of gastric contents into the esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) as reflux associated with troublesome symptoms or complications. The ability to distinguish between GER and GERD is increasingly important to implement best practices in the management of acid reflux in patients across all pediatric age groups, as children with GERD may benefit from further evaluation and treatment, whereas conservative recommendations are the only indicated therapy in those with uncomplicated physiologic reflux. This clinical report endorses the rigorously developed, well-referenced North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines and likewise emphasizes important concepts for the general pediatrician. A key issue is distinguishing between clinical manifestations of GER and GERD in term infants, children, and adolescents to identify patients who can be managed with conservative treatment by the pediatrician and to refer patients who require consultation with the gastroenterologist. Accordingly, the evidence basis presented by the guidelines for diagnostic approaches as well as treatments is discussed. Lifestyle changes are emphasized as first-line therapy in both GER and GERD, whereas medications are explicitly indicated only for patients with GERD. Surgical therapies are reserved for children with intractable symptoms or who are at risk for life-threatening complications of GERD. Recent black box warnings from the US Food and Drug Administration are discussed, and caution is underlined when using promoters of gastric emptying and motility. Finally, attention is paid to increasing evidence of inappropriate prescriptions for proton pump inhibitors in the pediatric population.

  5. Halitosis and tongue coating in patients with erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease versus nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kislig, Karin; Wilder-Smith, Clive H; Bornstein, Michael M; Lussi, Adrian; Seemann, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether patients with diagnosed erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (ERD) have an increased probability of halitosis and tongue coating compared to patients with nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD). Sixty-six patients (33 males and 33 females) were recruited for the study and received an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. The presence of ERD (n = 31) and NERD (n = 35) was classified based on the Los Angeles classification for erosive changes in the esophagus. Additionally, the patients filled in a questionnaire regarding their subjective assessment of halitosis, and an organoleptic assessment of halitosis, a measurement of oral volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) with the Halimeter, and a tongue coating index were performed. ERD and NERD subjects were compared with regard to Halitosis-related clinical and anamnestic findings. No statistically significant difference could be found between ERD and NERD patients regarding tongue coating index, organoleptic scores, and VSC values as well as self-perceived bad taste, tongue coating, and bad breath. These data suggest that halitosis is not typically associated with erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease and the presence of esophageal mucosal damage (ERD patients). The data of this investigation support the findings of interdisciplinary bad breath clinics that gastroesophageal reflux disease is not a leading cause for halitosis.

  6. Anterior partial fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneist, W; Heintz, A; Trinh, T T; Junginger, T

    2003-07-01

    This study examined the effect of anterior partial fundoplication on reflux symptoms and dysphagia in gastroesophageal reflux disease. Perioperative results in 249 patients were evaluated retrospectively for 93 conventional and prospectively for 156 laparoscopic procedures. The patients were followed up by standardized questionnaire. Median clinical follow-up period was 9 months (range 6-44) after laparoscopic and 88 months (range 15-194) following partial open fundoplication. The median operating time was 58 and 115 min for laparoscopic and open partial fundoplication. Intraoperative complications were rare (1%) for both approaches. After introduction of the laparoscopic procedure the morbidity rate was reduced (mean 3.2% vs. 1.3%) at a shorter postoperative hospital stay (10 vs. 5 days). No reflux symptoms were found in 71.4% patients after conventional and in 69% after laparoscopic partial fundoplication, dysphagia did not develop in 86% and 85%, respectively, and 66% and 82% received no medications. Among the patients with reflux symptoms 6.5% and 0.9% underwent revision surgery. Satisfaction with the surgical outcome was expressed by 78% and 85% of patients, respectively. Anterior partial fundoplication achieves effective medium- and long-term control of reflux symptoms. Technically easy to perform and associated with few complications, the procedure is superior to fundoplication with respect to the development of postoperative dysphagia and therefore represents a viable alternative to fundoplication.

  7. Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease: Current diagnosis and management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Pol, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a disorder difficult to diagnose and to treat. Due to the current definition of GERD, i.e. gastroesophageal reflux (GER) causing bothersome symptoms and/or complications, diagnosis is subject to broad interpretation. This thesis consists of studies

  8. Management of gastroesophageal reflux disease in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramin Niknam

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a very common disease. GERD is defined as the reflux of stomach content which causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications. The management of GERD is step by step. Dietary and lifestyle modifications are the first steps. Twice-daily H2RAs at standard doses for a minimum duration of two weeks can be considered in patients with GERD who fail zo respond to lifestyle and dietary modifications. If symptoms of GERD persist, once-daily Proton Pump Inhibitors (PPIs can be recommended. Patients with an unsatisfactory response to once-daily PPIs dosing can be considered to have refractory GERD. Twice-daily PPI therapy can be recommended in patients who fail to respond to once-daily PPI therapy. The add-on treatment with H2RAs, baclofen, or visceral pain modulators can be considered in selective subjects with GERD who fail to respond to twice-daily PPI. Anti-reflux surgery may be taken into account in selected patients. This review focuses on the initial and maintenance therapy of GERD and also reviews different management of recurrent and refractory GERD

  9. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease and respiratory disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, G; Caffarena, P E; Battistini, E; Fregonese, B; Barabino, A; Jasonni, V

    1995-01-01

    The patients treated for oesophageal atresia present a correlation between the clinical sintomatology after recanalization characterized by disfagia, dispnea, recurrent cough, chronic pneumopaties and oesophageal anomalies. Where morphological alterations accounting for the presence of gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) were not evident, possible functional alterations of the motility were considered. The incidence of GOR was considerably high and, expression of a congenital alteration of the lower oesophageal sphincter and of oesophageal peristalsis, becomes even more severe due to further stretching of the gastro-esophageal junction. The authors underline that the early demonstration of histological changes, even before recanalization, and the motility disorders of the oesophagus have to be well studied, while the LES is normalized, in order to prevent and treat the possible appearance of the well-known complications of GOR.

  10. Sleeve Gastrectomy and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Richdeep S.; Birch, Daniel W.; Karmali, Shahzeer

    2013-01-01

    Bariatric surgery, when combined with lifestyle and medical interventions, is a common and successful treatment modality in the obese patient. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is one such procedure that has increased in popularity as a definitive bariatric operation. Although laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has been shown to be effective in producing weight loss and improving type 2 diabetes mellitus, its effect on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has been inconsistent. This paper aims to summarize the available literature regarding GERD prevalence following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, 8 studies demonstrate increased GERD prevalence, and 5 demonstrate decreased GERD prevalence following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. The relationship between GERD and SG is complex and no clear relationship exists. The anatomic and physiologic changes caused by laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy are discussed in the context of these inconsistent results. PMID:23956846

  11. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and gastroesophageal reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenard, Fabien; Iannelli, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Bariatric surgery is the only effective procedure that provides long-term sustained weight loss. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) has emerged over the last few years to be an ideal bariatric procedure because it has several advantages compared to more complex bariatric procedures, including avoiding an intestinal bypass. However, several published follow-up studies report an increased rate of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) after a SG. GERD is described as either de novo or as being caused by aggravation of preexisting symptoms. However, the literature on this topic is ambivalent despite the potentially increased rate of GERDs that may occur after this common bariatric procedure. This article reviews the mechanisms responsible for GERD in obese subjects as well as the results after a SG with respect to GERD. Future directions for clinical research are discussed along with the current surgical options for morbidly obese patients with GERD and undergoing bariatric surgery. PMID:26420961

  12. Sleeve Gastrectomy and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Laffin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bariatric surgery, when combined with lifestyle and medical interventions, is a common and successful treatment modality in the obese patient. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy is one such procedure that has increased in popularity as a definitive bariatric operation. Although laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy has been shown to be effective in producing weight loss and improving type 2 diabetes mellitus, its effect on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been inconsistent. This paper aims to summarize the available literature regarding GERD prevalence following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy, 8 studies demonstrate increased GERD prevalence, and 5 demonstrate decreased GERD prevalence following laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. The relationship between GERD and SG is complex and no clear relationship exists. The anatomic and physiologic changes caused by laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy are discussed in the context of these inconsistent results.

  13. Omeprazole for Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease during Pregnancy and Lactation

    OpenAIRE

    Marshall, John K; Thomson, Alan BR; Armstrong, David

    1998-01-01

    Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux is a common complication of pregnancy and lactation. However, the safety of many effective medical therapies, including oral proton pump inhibitors, has not been well defined. The administration of oral omeprazole to a 41-year-old female during the third trimester of pregnancy, after ranitidine and cisapride failed to control her refractory gastroesophageal reflux, is reported. No adverse fetal effects were apparent, and the patient elected to continue omep...

  14. Dental approach to erosive tooth wear in gastroesophageal reflux ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The duration of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), the frequency of reflux, the pH and type of acid, and the quality and quantity of saliva affect the severity of dental erosion due to GERD. Objective: To summarize the diagnostic protocol and treatment of dental erosion due to GERD. Methods: A Medline ...

  15. Laparoscopic surgery for gastro-esophageal acid reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schijven, Marlies P.; Gisbertz, Suzanne S.; van Berge Henegouwen, Mark I.

    2014-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a troublesome disease for many patients, severely affecting their quality of life. Choice of treatment depends on a combination of patient characteristics and preferences, esophageal motility and damage of reflux, symptom severity and symptom correlation to acid

  16. Pharmacologic management of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Amarnath; Katz, Philip O

    2002-06-01

    The burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) results from its widespread prevalence and the unfavorable impact of its symptoms on well-being and quality of life. Whereas abnormalities of the antireflux barrier (lower esophageal sphincter) are important in the pathophysiology of GERD, pharmacologic therapy for GERD is based on suppression of acid, which is responsible for the majority of the symptoms and for epithelial damage. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the agents of choice for achieving the goals of medical therapy in GERD, which include symptom relief, improvement in quality of life, and healing and prevention of mucosal injury. As a class, these drugs are extremely safe. The newest PPI, esomeprazole, brings a statistically significant increase in healing of mucosal injury and symptom relief in patients with erosive esophagitis, compared with omeprazole and lansoprazole. This article reviews the role of medical therapy in the short- and long-term management of symptomatic patients with or without erosive esophagitis, including extraesophageal presentations, GERD during pregnancy, and Barrett's esophagus. Management of refractory patients is addressed.

  17. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Medical or Surgical Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Liakakos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common condition with increasing prevalence worldwide. The disease encompasses a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms and disorders from simple heartburn without esophagitis to erosive esophagitis with severe complications, such as esophageal strictures and intestinal metaplasia. Diagnosis is based mainly on ambulatory esophageal pH testing and endoscopy. There has been a long-standing debate about the best treatment approach for this troublesome disease. Methods and Results. Medical treatment with PPIs has an excellent efficacy in reversing the symptoms of GERD, but they should be taken for life, and long-term side effects do exist. However, patients who desire a permanent cure and have severe complications or cannot tolerate long-term treatment with PPIs are candidates for surgical treatment. Laparoscopic antireflux surgery achieves a significant symptom control, increased patient satisfaction, and complete withdrawal of antireflux medications, in the majority of patients. Conclusion. Surgical treatment should be reserved mainly for young patients seeking permanent results. However, the choice of the treatment schedule should be individualized for every patient. It is up to the patient, the physician and the surgeon to decide the best treatment option for individual cases.

  18. Omeprazole for Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease during Pregnancy and Lactation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K Marshall

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux is a common complication of pregnancy and lactation. However, the safety of many effective medical therapies, including oral proton pump inhibitors, has not been well defined. The administration of oral omeprazole to a 41-year-old female during the third trimester of pregnancy, after ranitidine and cisapride failed to control her refractory gastroesophageal reflux, is reported. No adverse fetal effects were apparent, and the patient elected to continue omeprazole therapy (20 mg/day while breastfeeding. Peak omeprazole concentrations in breast milk (58 nM, 3 h after ingestion were less than 7% of the peak serum concentration (950 nM at 4 h, indicating minimal secretion. Although omeprazole is a potentially useful therapy for refractory gastroesophageal reflux during pregnancy and lactation, further data are needed to define better its safety and efficacy.

  19. Omeprazole for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease during pregnancy and lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J K; Thompson, A B; Armstrong, D

    1998-04-01

    Symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux is a common complication of pregnancy and lactation. However, the safety of many effective medical therapies, including oral proton pump inhibitors, has not been well defined. The administration of oral omeprazole to a 41-year-old female during the third trimester of pregnancy, after ranitidine and cisapride failed to control her refractory gastroesophageal reflux, is reported. No adverse fetal effects were apparent, and the patient elected to continue omeprazole therapy (20 mg/day) while breastfeeding. Peak omeprazole concentrations in breast milk (58 nM, 3 h after ingestion) were less than 7% of the peak serum concentration (950 nM at 4 h), indicating minimal secretion. Although omeprazole is a potentially useful therapy for refractory gastroesophageal reflux during pregnancy and lactation, further data are needed to define better its safety and efficacy.

  20. Gastroesophageal pressure gradients in gastroesophageal reflux disease: relations with hiatal hernia, body mass index, and esophageal acid exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, Durk R.; van Herwaarden, Margot A.; Smout, André J. P. M.; Samsom, Melvin

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The roles of intragastric pressure (IGP), intraesophageal pressure (IEP), gastroesophageal pressure gradient (GEPG), and body mass index (BMI) in the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatal hernia (HH) are only partly understood. METHODS: In total, 149 GERD

  1. Dental erosion in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picos, Alina; Chisnoiu, Andrea; Dumitrasc, Dan L

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common condition. In addition to esophageal alterations, there are several extra-esophageal symptoms, such as dental erosion. These areas of dental erosion have a characteristic localization and may sometimes be the first symptom of the GERD syndrome. Late recognition of these effects, or ignoring them, may cause irreversible dental lesions with a negative impact on esthetics, on masticator functions and hence on the digestive system. In this paper the effects of gastroesophageal reflux on hard dental tissues are reviewed.

  2. Systematic review: role of acid, weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    OpenAIRE

    Boeckxstaens, Guy E; Smout, Smout J

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The importance of weakly acidic and weakly alkaline reflux in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is gaining recognition. Aim To quantify the proportions of reflux episodes that are acidic (pH 7) in adult patients with GERD, and to evaluate their correlation with symptoms. Methods Studies were identified by systematic PubMed and Embase searches. Data are presented as sample-size weighted ...

  3. Debut of Gastroesophageal Reflux Concomitant with Administration of Sublingual Immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, J.

    2017-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is an often debilitating condition characterised by retrograde flow of content from stomach into the oesophagus, where the low pH of the stomach acid irritates the mucosa of the oesophagus. The most dominant symptoms in GORD are pyrosis, regurgitation...

  4. Nonpharmacological Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Luigi Corvaglia; Silvia Martini; Arianna Aceti; Santo Arcuri; Roberto Rossini; Giacomo Faldella

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GOR) is very common among preterm infants, due to several physiological mechanisms. Although GOR should not be usually considered a pathological condition, its therapeutic management still represents a controversial issue among neonatologists; pharmacological overtreatment, often unuseful and potentially harmful, is increasingly widespread. Hence, a stepwise approach, firstly promoting conservative strategies such as body positioning, milk thickening, or changes of fe...

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: exaggerations, evidence and clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Targa Ferreira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: there are many questions and little evidence regarding the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in children. The association between GERD and cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA, overuse of abdominal ultrasonography for the diagnosis of GERD, and excessive pharmacological treatment, especially proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs are some aspects that need clarification. This review aimed to establish the current scientific evidence for the diagnosis and treatment of GERD in children. DATA SOURCE: a search was conducted in the MEDLINE, PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, and Cochrane Library electronic databases, using the following keywords: gastroesophageal reflux; gastroesophageal reflux disease; proton-pump inhibitors; and prokinetics; in different age groups of the pediatric age range; up to May of 2013. DATA SYNTHESIS: abdominal ultrasonography should not be recommended to investigate gastroesophageal reflux (GER. Simultaneous treatment of GERD and CMPA often results in unnecessary use of medication or elimination diet. There is insufficient evidence for the prescription of prokinetics to all patients with GER/GERD. There is little evidence to support acid suppression in the first year of life, to treat nonspecific symptoms suggestive of GERD. Conservative treatment has many benefits and with low cost and no side-effects. CONCLUSIONS: there have been few randomized controlled trials that assessed the management of GERD in children and no examination can be considered the gold standard for GERD diagnosis. For these reasons, there are exaggerations in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease, which need to be corrected.

  6. Inducing and Aggravating Factors of Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radhiyatam Mardhiyah

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (subsequently abbreviated as GERD is a disease commonly found in the community. Several factors have been recognized as inducing and aggravating factors of GERD symptoms such as older age, female gender, obesity, smoking habit, alcohol consumption, certain diet and poor eating habit like eating fatty, spicy, and acid food.

  7. [Current diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease: learning experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosato, F; Corsini, F; Marano, S; Palermmo, S; Piraino, A; Vasapollo, L; Scocchera, F; Paolini, A

    2001-02-01

    The authors report their study on gastro-esophageal reflux disease, a pathology that has become increasingly common over the past years reflecting both a real increase and the use of new and more sophisticated and reliable diagnostic methods and tests. It can be included in the group of pathologies absorbing the largest proportion of financial resources, even exceeding biliary lithiasic disease according to American studies. The authors start by analysing the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, drawing a distinction between typical (heartburn, epigastric pain and postprandial regurgitation) and atypical symptoms (laryngotracheal symptoms, bronchopulmonary symptoms and esophageal motor incoordination). They outline the diagnostic iter and tests most widely used today to achieve a correct diagnosis. Lastly, they report their experience of 160 patients attending their esophageal diagnostic unit since January 1999 who underwent a number of different instrumental tests, the results of which are compared. Three different aspects are compared: the presence of symptoms, 24-hour pH-metry and endoscopic tests. All these are necessary for a correct diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease and to evaluate the possibility and efficacy of surgery. They emphasise the diagnostic importance of 24-hour pH-measurement as the only test that can directly reveal gastroesophageal reflux. Positive pH results represent a discriminating element in deciding whether the patient should undergo surgery.

  8. The influence of laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding on gastroesophageal reflux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, [No Value; van Ramshorst, B; Timmer, R; Gooszen, HG; Smout, AJPM

    Background: Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) influences gastroesophageal reflux. Methods: 26 patients undergoing gastric banding were assessed by a questionnaire for symptom analysis, 24-hour pH monitoring, endoscopy and barium swallows, preoperatively, at 6 weeks and at 6 months after

  9. Clinical Management of Infants and Children with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Whitworth, John; Christensen, Michael L.

    2004-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux refers to the passage of gastric contents including food, acid, and digestive enzymes up into the esophagus. Reflux is most commonly recognized in infants when it is associated with regurgitation, known as “spitting up,” and it is usually a self-limited, benign process that has little or no effect on normal weight gain or development. Adults and adolescents may also have reflux, which is usually either asymptomatic or recognized as dyspepsia or “heartburn.” Gastroesoph...

  10. [Application of Lugol solution in the gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Włodarczyk, Janusz

    2007-01-01

    Endoscopy examination followed by Lugol solution staining is used in the diagnostics of early squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus. The aim of the study was to describe usage of this method for the assessment of effectiveness in the gastroesophageal reflux disease. The method uses reaction between glycogen, present in epithelium, and iodine in Lugol solution. The study was conducted in 98 patients. Endoscopic assessment was made before application of Lugol solution, subsequently the gastroesophageal borderline and staining of mucosa membrane after application of Lugol solution was assessed. Biopsies were taken from the stained and unstained areas. The performed study showed that sensitivity of the method is 84%, specificity 79% and effectiveness 85%. The ratio of stained and unstained areas is statistically typical p=0.045. Endoscopic examination followed by Lugol solution staining are sensitive diagnostic methods in the gastroesophageal reflux disease. It is a simple and quick method which should be widely applied.

  11. Clinical management of infants and children with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitworth, John; Christensen, Michael L

    2004-10-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux refers to the passage of gastric contents including food, acid, and digestive enzymes up into the esophagus. Reflux is most commonly recognized in infants when it is associated with regurgitation, known as "spitting up," and it is usually a self-limited, benign process that has little or no effect on normal weight gain or development. Adults and adolescents may also have reflux, which is usually either asymptomatic or recognized as dyspepsia or "heartburn." Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is defined as symptoms or complications that result from reflux. Most evidence suggests the mechanism of reflux is due to transient relaxations of the lower esophageal sphincter at inappropriate times. The diagnosis of suspected GERD in infants and children depends on the age and the presenting symptoms. A thorough history, physical examination, and growth charts are sufficient for the evaluation and diagnosis of GERD in most infants with recurrent vomiting or children with regurgitation and heartburn. Additional evaluation may include an upper gastrointestinal series, esophageal pH monitoring, or endoscopy. The goals of GERD management are eliminating symptoms, healing esophagitis, preventing complications, promoting normal weight gain and growth, and maintaining remission. Therapeutic options include lifestyle changes, pharmacologic therapy, and anti-reflux surgery. Currently available pharmacologic agents for the treatment of GERD include antacids, mucosal protectants, prokinetic agents, and acid suppressants.

  12. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease in mentally retarded persons: prevalence, diagnosis and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhmer, C J; Klinkenberg-Knol, E C; Niezen-de Boer, M C; Meuwissen, S G

    2000-06-10

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease among institutionalised intellectually disabled individuals with an IQ disabled individuals have an increased risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease in case of cerebral palsy, IQ disabled individuals in whom gastroesophageal reflux disease is clinically suspected. For the treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in adults as well as children, proton pump inhibitors are highly effective, independent of the severity of oesophagitis. Marked improvement of symptoms and quality of life can be noticed after treatment.

  13. Obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoda M Malaty, J Kennard Fraley

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Hoda M Malaty1, J Kennard Fraley1,2, Suhaib Abudayyeh1, Kenneth W Fairly1, Ussama S Javed1, et al1Department of Medicine, 2Children’s Nutrition Research Center (CNRC, 4Department of Pediatrics, 5Texas Children’s Hospital, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX, USA; 3Department of Gastroenterology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR, USABackground: The association between body mass index (BMI and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been extensively studied among adults but few studies have examined such association in children. Aims: 1 to determine the relationship between BMI in children and GERD, and 2 to use the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS values for BMI as a valid source for comparison. Methods: We identified two cohorts of children aged between two and 17 years who were seen at Texas Children’s Hospital (TCH. The first cohort consisted of children diagnosed with GERD based on upper gastrointestinal endoscopic and histologic evaluation, which was recorded in the Pediatric Endoscopic Database System-Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative (PEDS-CORI at TCH. A diagnosis of GERD was based on the presence of erosive esophagitis or esophageal ulcers. Endoscopic reports that were incomplete or did not include demographic features, indications for endoscopy, or endoscopic findings were excluded. The second cohort consisted of all children with symptoms due to gastroesophageal reflux (GER who received outpatient gastrointestinal (GI consultation at TCH for any 9th revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases (ICD-9 code suggestive of GER. There was no overlap between the two cohorts as each child was indexed only once. Children with any comorbid illnesses were excluded.Measurements: The records for each child namely, age, gender, height, and weight were obtained on the same date as that of the diagnosis. Using the growth curves published by the NCHS, the gender/age specific weight

  14. [Surgical treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Atsushi; Yamaguchi, Akio

    2007-05-01

    Proton pump inhibitor (PPI) is major treatment for acid reflux. It reduces major symptom of GERD and effective. However, the cause of GERD is the insufficiency of anti-reflux mechanism of cardia. Only surgical treatment can care for hiatal hernia as the main cause of the disruption. Redundant reflux against conservative treatment or obvious hiatal hernia is indication for laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication. Late diagnosis might request radical operation, so we need to know the indication for laparoscopic treatment. For the safer laparoscopic procedure, we perform curtain retraction technique and Floppy Nissen -short cuff method. The former contribute to prevent hemorrhage or pneumothorax, and the latter can reduce the post-operative disphagia.

  15. [Temporal relationship between gastroesophageal reflux and cardiorespiratory events].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya, M J; Cabo, J A; Granero, R; Tuduri, I; Fernández, I; Cabello, R; López-Alonso, M

    2008-07-01

    The acid and non acidic gastroesophageal reflux can trigger apnoea, desaturation and bradicardia events, as well as chronic pulmonary pathology due to microaspirations, whereas the acute or chronic airway closing increase the intrathoracic pressure, triggering the reflux. Our aims were to measurement in preterms newborn the correlations between cardiorespiratory events and gastroesophageal reflux, find out the direction of this relation, identify the patients with association GER->CRE and decide the suitability of antireflux surgery. The study was made in the Motility Unit and in the Intensive Neonatal Care Unit, to preterms newborns without associated pathology except apnoea and/or bradicardia and/or desaturation. 3 hours manometry study in the Motility Unit. 24 hours impedance, pH and cardiorespiratory parameters monitoring (respiratory and cardiac frequent, O2 saturation and CO2) in Intensive Neonatal Care Unit. We characterised the gastroesophageal barrier, all the reflux events and the association between GER and CRE. We made 28 records to 28 patients with CRE. The average of the total number of reflux was 61 (22,25-103,00), 29,2% acid reflux and 70,8% weakly acidic. 12 patients had some GER associated with CRE but in only 2 cases was statistically significant (Sympton index: SI; Sympton Sensitivity Index: SSI) (SI > or = 50%; SSI > or = 10%). The surgical management was successfully in these two babies and nowadays they are asymptomatic. There is not any general association between GER and CRE, nevertheless, in a little percentage of patients, this relationship is fulfilled and it is possible to measurement with impedance, pH and cardiorespiratory parameters. In these cases, the surgical management is the right treatment.

  16. Unmet Needs in the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickman, Ram; Maradey-Romero, Carla; Gingold-Belfer, Rachel; Fass, Ronnie

    2015-07-30

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a highly prevalent gastrointestinal disorder. Proton pump inhibitors have profoundly revolutionized the treatment of GERD. However, several areas of unmet need persist despite marked improvements in the ther-apeutic management of GERD. These include the advanced grades of erosive esophagitis, nonerosive reflux disease, main-tenance treatment of erosive esophagitis, refractory GERD, postprandial heartburn, atypical and extraesophageal manifestations of GERD, Barrett's esophagus, chronic protein pump inhibitor treatment, and post-bariatric surgery GERD. Consequently, any fu-ture development of novel therapeutic modalities for GERD (medical, endoscopic, or surgical), would likely focus on the afore-mentioned areas of unmet need.

  17. Dyspepsia and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): is there any correlation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simadibrata, Marcellus

    2009-10-01

    Dyspepsia is a syndrome characterized by symptoms and signs of upper gastrointestinal tract and the adjacent organs. It is estimated that 25% of the community have symptoms of dyspepsia syndrome. One-third of patients who visit general physician practices are patients with dyspepsia syndrome; and half of patients who visit gastroenterologists are also patients with dyspepsia syndrome. Dyspepsia syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are very prevalent in the community throughout the world.Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is more and more commonly found in daily medical practice. Until now,the natural history of disease on GERD and dyspepsia is hardly understood, even though many scientists studied both conditions and there are frequently overlapping. In an individual, GERD and dyspepsia may occur simultaneously and therefore they are hardly to be discriminated.The management of GERD is performed in keeping with Indonesia and Asia Pacific consensus, life-style modification and administering the acid suppression agents (Proton pump inhibitor (drug of choice), H2-receptor antagonist, etc),prokinetic agents (Cisapride, domperidone, etc). Life-style modification shall be performed as follows, i.e. sleep with 30-45 degree elevated head or upper chest, do not avoid sour beverages, chocolate, coffee or alcohol, avoid fat and various fried foods, sour food, less stress, stop smoking, small but frequent feeding, etc. There is a correlation between dyspepsia syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease(GERD), particularly between the functional dyspepsia and non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux (NERD). More appropriate definition is necessary to differentiate the dyspepsia syndrome and GERD. Further studies are needed to establish distinct definition and criteria between dyspepsia syndrome and GERD.

  18. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: exaggerations, evidence and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Cristina Targa; Carvalho, Elisa de; Sdepanian, Vera Lucia; Morais, Mauro Batista de; Vieira, Mário César; Silva, Luciana Rodrigues

    2014-01-01

    there are many questions and little evidence regarding the diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in children. The association between GERD and cow's milk protein allergy (CMPA), overuse of abdominal ultrasonography for the diagnosis of GERD, and excessive pharmacological treatment, especially proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) are some aspects that need clarification. This review aimed to establish the current scientific evidence for the diagnosis and treatment of GERD in children. a search was conducted in the MEDLINE, PubMed, LILACS, SciELO, and Cochrane Library electronic databases, using the following keywords: gastroesophageal reflux; gastroesophageal reflux disease; proton-pump inhibitors; and prokinetics; in different age groups of the pediatric age range; up to May of 2013. abdominal ultrasonography should not be recommended to investigate gastroesophageal reflux (GER). Simultaneous treatment of GERD and CMPA often results in unnecessary use of medication or elimination diet. There is insufficient evidence for the prescription of prokinetics to all patients with GER/GERD. There is little evidence to support acid suppression in the first year of life, to treat nonspecific symptoms suggestive of GERD. Conservative treatment has many benefits and with low cost and no side-effects. there have been few randomized controlled trials that assessed the management of GERD in children and no examination can be considered the gold standard for GERD diagnosis. For these reasons, there are exaggerations in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease, which need to be corrected. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Pharmacological Therapy of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Luigi Corvaglia; Caterina Monari; Silvia Martini; Arianna Aceti; Giacomo Faldella

    2013-01-01

    Although gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a very common phenomenon among preterm infants, its therapeutic management is still an issue of debate among neonatologists. A step-wise approach should be advisable, firstly promoting nonpharmacological interventions and limiting drugs to selected infants unresponsive to the conservative measures or who are suffering from severe GER with clinical complications. Despite of this, a concerning pharmacological overtreatment has been increasingly reported...

  20. Evaluation and Management of the Pediatric Patients with Suspected Gastroesophageal Reflux Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Hegar, Badriul; Vandenplas, Yvan

    2011-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a normal physiologic process occurring in healthy infants. Symptoms due to gastro-esophageal reflux diseases (GERD) are troublesome when they have adverse effects on the well- being of the patient. A thorough history and physical examination is generally sufficient to establish a clinical diagnosis of uncomplicated infant with gastroesophageal reflux. Poor weight gain is a warning sign. Irritability and regurgitation are associated with a wide range of physiologic a...

  1. Knowledge of pediatrician on gastroesophageal reflux/gastroesophageal reflux disease in children: a preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Surjono

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Gastroesophageal reflux (OER is involuntary movement of gastric content into esophagus due to transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation. This condition usually ignored by physician. Many GER cases have severe complication before properly managed. Ten years after incorporating GER into Indonesia pediatric training curriculum, the knowledge of GER among pediatrician need to be measured. Objectives To measure pediatrician's knowledge of GER/GERD in children. Methods This was a cross sectional study using questionnaire and interview. Result There were 387 respondents who filled the questionnaire and being interviewed. The majority of respondents were between 25-45 years old (33.6%. Respondents who graduated before the year 2000 were 48.3%, and after 2000 were 51.7%. Majority of respondents were general pediatrician (90.2% and 41.3% working in teaching hospitals Among pediatricians graduated after year 2000,6 6%,5 0.5% and 57.5% could gave more than 80% correct answer to questions about general knowledge, diagnosis and management of GERD as compared to 49.2%, 42.2% and 47% subjects graduated before year 2000. More pediatricians graduated before year 2000 answered the questions on general knowledge, diagnosis and management < 60% correctly compared to those graduated after year 2000 (42.2%, 25.2% and 28.3% vs. 14%,11.5% and 12%, respectively. Fifty five of 160 (34.4% respondents who working in teaching hospital gave more than 80% correct answer to questions about GERD. Compared to those working in non-teaching hospitals, only 17.6% were able to correctly answer more than 80% of questions. Conclusions Better knowledge about GER/GERD are found among pediatricians graduated after the topics has been introduced to the curriculum and among those practicing in teaching hospitals.

  2. An Antiregurgitation Milk Formula in the Management of Infants with Mild to Moderate Gastroesophageal Reflux

    OpenAIRE

    Xinias, Ioannis; Spiroglou, Kleomenis; Demertzidou, Vasiliki; Karatza, Eliza; Panteliadis, Christos

    2003-01-01

    Background: Thickened milk formulas are used to treat infants with gastroesophageal reflux (GER), but these substances often increase the duration of reflux episodes and worsen symptoms, and they have been associated with diarrhea, constipation, and cough.

  3. Diagnosis and Treatment of Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selfie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD was a damage in mucosal layer caused by gastric acid reflux. GERD was found about 10-20% in Western Countries and less in Asia, about 2,6-6,7%. Among different type of GERD, refractory GERD was a problem found in daily clinical practice. This terminology was used in patients with regurgitation and heartburn symptoms which is not responsive to 8 weeks proton pump inhibitor (PPI therapy. There were several mechanisms underlying the etiology and pathophysiology of refractory GERD. In general, refractory GERD diagnosis was based on clinical findings, objective endoscopic examination, ambulatory reflux monitoring, and response to antiacid-secretion therapy. Reevaluation of patients compliance should be the first step in refractory GERD management. A further treatment strategies could be started, consist of medical and surgical therapies. A basic clinical knowledge of refractory GERD would help clinician in deciding the best approach for diagnosis and therapy.

  4. An updated review on gastro-esophageal reflux in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenplas, Yvan; Hauser, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Comprehensive guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) and GER disease (GERD) were developed by the European and North American Societies for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. GERD is reflux associated with troublesome symptoms or complications. The recognition of GER and GERD is relevant to implement best management practices. A conservative management is indicated in infants with uncomplicated physiologic reflux. Children with GERD may benefit from further evaluation and treatment. Since the publications of the European and North American Societies for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition guidelines in 2009, no important novelties in drug treatment have been reported. Innovations are mainly restricted to the management of regurgitation in infants. During the last 5 years, pros and cons of multichannel intraluminal impedance have been highlighted. However, overall 'not much has changed' in the diagnosis and management of GER and GERD in infants and children.

  5. Effects of Transcutaneous Electrical Acustimulation on Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-na Meng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To investigate effects and possible mechanisms of transcutaneous electrical acustimulation (TEA performed by a wearable watch-size stimulator for refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (RGERD. Methods. Twenty patients diagnosed as RGERD were enrolled in the study and randomly divided into four groups: esomeprazole group (Group A, esomeprazole combined with TEA group (Group B, esomeprazole combined with sham-TEA group (Group C, and esomeprazole combined with domperidone group (Group D. HRM and 24 h pH-impedance monitoring and GerdQ score were used to measure related indexes before and after treatment. Results. (1 TEA significantly increased LESP, compared with PPI treatment only or PPI plus sham-TEA. After pairwise comparison, LESP of Group B was increased more than Group A (P=0.008 or Group C (P=0.021. (2 PPI plus TEA decreased not only the number of acid reflux episodes but also the number of weak acid reflux episodes (P=0.005. (3 Heartburn and reflux symptoms were improved more with PPI + TEA than with PPI treatment only or PPI plus sham-TEA (GerdQ scores, P=0.001. Conclusion. TEA can improve symptoms in RGERD patients by increasing LESP and decreasing events of weak acid reflux and acid reflux; addition of TEA to esomeprazole significantly enhances the effect of TEA.

  6. Transpyloric feeding in gastroesophageal-reflux-associated apnea in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sudipta; Macwan, Kamlesh; Albert, Viola

    2007-10-01

    The aetiological role of gastroesophageal reflux in apnea of prematurity is controversial. We hypothesized that transpyloric feeds, which decreases reflux and aspiration, will not be associated with decrease in reflux-related apnea. The shows retrospective chart review of 41 premature babies on transpyloric feeds. Fifteen infants meeting the inclusion criteria of apnea of prematurity and clinical evidence of gastroesophageal reflux were included. Primary data points were number of apneas before and after transpyloric feeds. t-statistics was used for analysis. Twelve of the 15 babies showed significant improvement on transpyloric feeds (p management of suspected gastroesophageal-reflux-associated apnea in a selected group of infants.

  7. Knowledge and practice of Brazilian pediatricians on gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Fontenele Soares

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the knowledge and practice of pediatricians about infants with physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease. METHODS: 140 pediatricians were interviewed during two scientific events in 2009 and 2010. The questions referred to two clinical cases of infants. One with symptoms of infant regurgitation (physiological reflux and another with gastroesophageal reflux disease. RESULTS: Among 140 pediatricians, 11.4% (n=16 and 62.1% (n=87 would require investigation tests, respectively for infant regurgitation (physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease. A series of upper gastrointestinal exams would be the first requested with a higher frequency. Medication would be prescribed by 18.6% (n=6 in the case of physiological reflux and 87.1% (n=122 in the case of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Prokinetic drugs would be prescribed more frequently than gastric acid secretion inhibitors. Sleeping position would be recommended by 94.2% (n=132 and 92.9% (n=130 of the respondents, respectively for the case of physiological reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease; however, about half of the respondents would recommend the prone position. Only 10 (7.1% of the pediatricians would exclude the cow's milk protein from the infants' diet. CONCLUSIONS: Approaches different from the international guidelines are often considered appropriate, especially when recommending a different position other than the supine and prescription of medication. In turn, the interviews enable us to infer the right capacity of the pediatricians to distinguish physiologic reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease correctly.

  8. Nasogastric intubation causes gastroesophageal reflux in patients undergoing elective laparotomy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Manning, B J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: The routine use of nasogastric tubes in patients undergoing elective abdominal operation is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative fever, atelectasis, and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that nasogastric tubes have no significant effect on the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux or on lower esophageal sphincter pressure in healthy volunteers. We hypothesized that nasogastric intubation in patients undergoing laparotomy reduces lower esophageal sphincter pressure and promotes gastroesophageal reflux in the perioperative period. METHODS: A prospective randomized case-control study was undertaken in which 15 consenting patients, admitted electively for bowel surgery, were randomized into 2 groups. Group 1 underwent nasogastric intubation after induction of anesthesia, and Group 2 did not. All patients had manometry and pH probes placed with the aid of endoscopic vision at the lower esophageal sphincter and distal esophagus, respectively. Nasogastric tubes, where present, were left on free drainage, and sphincter pressures and pH were recorded continuously during a 24-hour period. Data were analyzed with 1-way analysis of variance. RESULTS: The mean number of reflux episodes (defined as pH < 4) in the nasogastric tube group was 137 compared with a median of 8 episodes in the group managed without nasogastric tubes (P =.006). The median duration of the longest episode of reflux was 132 minutes in Group 1 and 1 minute in Group 2 (P =.001). A mean of 13.3 episodes of reflux lasted longer than 5 minutes in Group 1, with pH less than 4 for 37.4% of the 24 hours. This was in contrast to Group 2 where a mean of 0.13 episodes lasted longer than 5 minutes (P =.001) and pH less than 4 for 0.2% of total time (P =.001). The mean lower esophageal sphincter pressures were lower in Group 1. CONCLUSIONS. These findings demonstrate that patients undergoing elective laparotomy with routine nasogastric tube placement have significant gastroesophageal

  9. Gastroesophageal reflux in infancy and childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwandhi, Eugene; Ton, Mimi N; Schwarz, Steven M

    2006-04-01

    GER is a common reason for pediatric office visits and referrals to a pediatric gastroenterologist. This condition frequently is benign, and it is self-limited in most infants. Although a thorough history and complete physical examination usually are adequate to diagnose GER, a high index of suspicion must be maintained for other diagnoses associated with recurrent emesis, including metabolic disorders, as well as for other gastrointestinal conditions, such as pyloric stenosis and abnormalities of intestinal rotation. Behavioral or lifestyle modification usually can be implemented empirically to diagnose and manage a suspected case of uncomplicated GER. When this fails, medical therapy can be initiated, employing either a step-up or step-down approach with a PPI or H2RA. With the proven efficacy of PPIs and their availability to children, medical treatment has become the mainstay of therapy in severely affected patients; nevertheless, anti-reflux surgery is still widely performed in children with GER. Pediatricians and other primary care providers often manage infants and children who have gastrointestinal complaints, prior to referral to a pediatric gastroenterologist. Hence, they have the responsibility to educate children and families about GER, its natural history, complications, and therapeutic options. A careful history and physical examination, informed use of diagnostic studies, and a consistent approach to medical treatment are important principles that are required to guarantee the success of GER management in infants and children.

  10. Helicobacter pylori infection and gastroesophageal reflux in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupu, V V; Ignat, A; Ciubotariu, G; Ciubară, A; Moscalu, M; Burlea, M

    2016-11-01

    Some studies suggest that Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection would be a protective factor for the gastroesophageal reflux. The aim of this study was to explore this fact. A group of 72 children, admitted in a pediatric gastroenterology regional center in Northeast Romania, diagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux by 24-hour continuous esophageal pH monitoring (results were interpreted using the Boix-Ochoa score), underwent upper endoscopy with gastric biopsy to detect the presence of H. pylori by the rapid urease testing and for bacteriological and histologic examination. 19 children (26.39%) had H. pylori infection, while 53 (73.61%) did not. The grade of esophagitis was classified according to the Los Angeles classification system. Out of 47 children with esophagitis A, 16 (34.04%) had H. pylori infection, while out of the 25 children with esophagitis B, only 3 (12%) had H. pylori infection, with statistic significance (χ(2) = 54.69, P < 0.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]). Regarding the value of the Boix-Ochoa score, it appears that the presence of the H. pylori determines lower pH-metry scores (F = 8.13, P = 0.0015, 95% CI). The presence of the H. pylori was not an important factor in the gastroesophageal reflux. On the other hand its relationship with esophagitis appears to be inverse ratio. The fact that the H. pylori presence is statistically greater in the grade A esophagitis could confirm the hypothesis that the bacteria would slow down the development of the esophagitis. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  11. Effect of hyoscine butylbromide on gastroesophageal reflux in barium studies of the upper gastrointestinal tract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLaughlin, R.F.; Mathieson, J.R.; Chipperfield, P.M.; Grymaloski, M.R.; Wong, A.D.

    1994-12-01

    The presence or absence and severity of gastroesophageal reflux before and after intravenous injection of 120 mg Buscopan were evaluated in 112 consecutive patients undergoing upper gastrointestinal examination. The study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that hyoscine butylbromide (Buscopan) could artificially induce gastroesophageal reflux during barium examination of the upper intestinal tract. Gastroesophageal reflux was seen in 49 (44%) of the patients. There was no significant difference in the overall occurrence or degree of gastroesophageal reflux before and after injection of Buscopan. The routine use of Buscopan was therefore unlikely to spuriously increase the frequency or degree of gastroesophageal reflux observed on upper gastrointestinal barium studies. The study also showed that Buscopan had a satisfactory antispasmodic effect and few side effects. 7 refs., 1 tab.

  12. Can yoga be used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmesh Kaswala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoga methods including Pranayama are the best ways to prevent many diseases and their progression. Even though, Yoga is widely practiced, its effects on certain medical conditions have not been studied or reported. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of them. GERD is extremely common condition requiring frequent consumption of over-the-counter or prescribed proton pump inhibitors (PPI. In severe symptoms of GERD and in the presence of multiple etiologies, PPIs are insufficient to relieve the symptoms of gastric reflux. Regular and proper use of the Yoga along with PPI can control the severe symptoms of GERD and can avoid or delay the necessity of invasive procedures. This evidence-based case report focuses on the effects of Yoga on GERD. Our case report showed that regular practice of Kapalbhati and Agnisar kriya along with PPI, patients with hiatal hernia had improvement in severe symptoms of GERD, which were initially refractory to PPI alone.

  13. [Differentiation therapy for non-acidic gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lishchuk, N B; Simanenkov, V I; Tikhonov, S V

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the clinical and pathogenetic features of the non-acidic types of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and to evaluate the impact of combined therapy versus monotherapy on the course of this disease. The investigation enrolled 62 patients with non-acidic GERD. The follow-up period was 6 weeks. The patients were divided into 2 groups: 1) weakly acidic gastroesophageal refluxes (GER); 2) weakly alkaline GER. Then each group was distributed, thus making up 4 groups: 1) 19 patients with weakly acidic GER who received monotherapy with rabeprazole 20 mg/day; 2) 21 patients with weakly acidic GER had combined therapy with rabeprazole 20 mg and itopride; 3) 8 patients with weakly alkaline GER who received ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) monotherapy; and 4) 14 patients with weakly alkaline GER who had combined therapy with UDCA and itopride, The clinical symptoms of the disease, the endoscopic pattern of the upper gastrointestinal tract (GIT) mucosa, histological changes in the esophageal and gastric mucosa, and the results of 24-hour impedance pH monitoring were assessed over time. During differentiation therapy, the majority of patients reported positive clinical changes and an improved or unchanged endoscopic pattern. Assessment of impedance pH monitoring results revealed decreases in the overall number of GERs, the presence of a bolus in the esophagus, and the number of proximal refluxes. These changes were noted not only in patients taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), but also in those treated with UDCA monotherapy or combined PPI and prokinetic therapy. A differentiated approach to non-acidic GER treatment contributes to its efficiency. Adding the prokinetic itomed (itopride hydrochloride) to PPI therapy in a patient with weakly acidic GER enhances the efficiency of treatment, by positively affecting upper GIT motility. The mainstay of therapy for GERD with a predominance of weakly alkaline refluxes is UDCA, the combination of the latter and the

  14. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Alkaline Reflux: the Mechanisms of the Development and Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Zviahintseva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD — a pathology, which occupies a leading place among all acid-related diseases. The main mechanism of GERD is a violation of the motor-evacuation function of the stomach — slowing gastric emptying and duodenogastric reflux. Slow gastric emptying contributes to more frequent reflux, and the presence of duodenal contents in refluxate — alkaline reflux — is aggressive for the esophageal mucosa (EM. This is due to the presence of bile acids, lysolecithin and pancreatic enzymes in the esophageal refluxate. A long existing contact of aggressive factors in the stomach and the esophagus leads to the development of inflammatory and destructive lesions of the mucous membrane of these organs. According to many researchers, bile acids play a key role in the pathogenesis of the damaging effects on the EM. Drug correction of GERD with alkaline reflux includes, along with the administration of proton pump inhibitors, prokinetics (itopride hydrochloride and ursodeoxycholic acid preparations.

  15. Extraoesophageal symptoms and signs of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Tepeš

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is very common in developed world, with the prevalence of disease is between 6 and 20%. Pathologic reflux can provoke not only typical symptoms (heartburn and regurgitation but also atypical symptoms and diseases of extraoesophageal organs (pulmonary, ENT, mouth. High prevalence of GERD in patients with unexplained chest pain, asthma, chronic cough, chronic laryngitis, hoarsness and dental erosions is not a proof of causality. GERD can cause these diseases with reflux of acid and pepsin into pharynx, larynx, lungs and mouth (reflux theory or through vasovagal mechanisms (reflex theory. Conclusions Good therapeutic success with medical or operative treatment in early methodologically not well conducted studies has not been completely proven in double-blind placebo controlled studies. GERD is an ethyological reason for these extraoesophageal symptoms and diseases in an approximately one third of patients. With diagnostic modalities that we have now, we cannot clearly define in which patient is GERD is an ethyologic factor or a contributer, before we start the treatment. In patients suspected of having GERD, there is therapeutic option of a trial with high dose of proton pump inhibitor for 3 to 6 months. In other patients with low clinical suspicion of GERD, 24-hour pH testing should be done first.

  16. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Children with Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziekiewicz, Marcin A; Banaszkiewicz, Aleksandra; Urzykowska, Agnieszka; Lisowska, Aleksandra; Rachel, Marta; Sands, Dorota; Walkowiak, Jaroslaw; Radzikowski, Andrzej; Albrecht, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Previously published studies have indicated that gastroesophageal reflux (GER) disease is common in pediatric patients with cystic fibrosis. The aim of the present study was to get insight into the incidence of GER and to characterize the nature of reflux episodes in children with cystic fibrosis. This was a multicenter, prospective study of children with cystic fibrosis older than 18 months. Forty four consecutive patients (22 boys, mean age 10.4 ± 3.6, range 3.0-17.8 years) were enrolled into the study. All patients underwent 24 h pH-impedance monitoring. GER were classified according to the widely recognized criteria as an acid, weakly acid, weakly alkaline, or proximal. The pH-impedance trace was considered abnormal when acid exposure was >6 %. GER was diagnosed in 24/44 (54.5 %) children. A total of 1585 (median 35, range 7-128) reflux episodes were detected; 1199 (75.6 %) were acidic, 382 (24.1 %) weakly acidic, and 4 (0.3 %) weakly alkaline. Six hundred and ninety-one (43.6 %) reflux episodes reached the proximal esophagus. In 14/44 patients typical GER symptoms were present. We conclude that the incidence of GER in children with cystic fibrosis is very high. In the majority of patients typical GER symptoms are absent. Therefore, diagnostic procedures should be considered, regardless of lacking symptoms. Although acid reflux episodes predominate in children with cystic fibrosis, classical pH-metry may not constitute a sufficient diagnostic method in this population because of a relatively high number of proximal reflux episodes. Such episodes also indicate an increased risk for aspiration. The pH-impedance diagnostic measurement is advocated when suspecting GER in children with cystic fibrosis.

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux in infants: a primary care perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arguin, Amy Lynn; Swartz, Martha K

    2004-01-01

    This clinical paper discusses the role of the pediatric nurse in the evaluation and management of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in infants. During an infant's first year of life, GER is a common occurrence and concern of families. The infant with uncomplicated GER may be managed conservatively with feeding schedule modifications, thickened feeds, changes in positioning, or a trial of formula change. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a pathological process in infants manifested by poor weight gain, signs of esophagitis, persistent respiratory symptoms or complications, and changes in neurobehavior. Management of the infant with GERD, in addition to non-pharmacological interventions, involves further diagnostic evaluation and pharmacologic therapy, depending upon the child's history and clinical presentation. While most cases of GER are self-limiting, complications include esophagitis, bronchospasm, apnea, aspiration pneumonia and other otolaryngologic disorders. The pediatric health care provider should offer an ongoing, comprehensive clinical approach to the family based on considerations of growth and development, and the quality of interactions between the caregivers and child.

  18. Infant Gastroesophageal Reflux Information on the World Wide Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balgowan, Regina; Greer, Leah C; D'Auria, Jennifer P

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the type and quality of health information about infant gastroesophageal reflux (GER) that a parent may find on the World Wide Web. The data collection tool included evaluation of Web site quality and infant GER-specific content on the 30 sites that met the inclusion criteria. The most commonly found content categories in order of frequency were management strategies, when to call a primary care provider, definition, and clinical features. The most frequently mentioned strategies included feeding changes, infant positioning, and medications. Thirteen of the 30 Web sites included information on both GER and gastroesophageal reflux disease. Mention of the use of medication to lessen infant symptoms was found on 15 of the 30 sites. Only 10 of the 30 sites included information about parent support and coping strategies. Pediatric nurse practitioners (PNPs) should utilize well-child visits to address the normalcy of physiologic infant GER and clarify any misperceptions parents may have about diagnosis and the role of medication from information they may have found on the Internet. It is critical for PNPs to assist in the development of Web sites with accurate content, advise parents on how to identify safe and reliable information, and provide examples of high-quality Web sites about child health topics such as infant GER. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in pregnancy: a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, R S; Jayanthi, N; Alexander, P C; Vijaya, S; Jayanthi, V

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms are common in pregnancy. It often manifests for the first time in pregnancy during the first three months and ceases after delivery. To study the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux in each of the three trimesters by follow-up of pregnant women. To examine the association between dietary factors and GER in pregnancy. This was a prospective hospital-based study. Sixty four pregnant women in their first trimester attending an antenatal clinic were interviewed for symptoms of GER and for dietary details and followed up until term and delivery. Fifty women (83.4%) experienced either heartburn or regurgitation during pregnancy. GER was commoner in primi-gravida (69.3%) and 50% remained symptomatic until term. Regurgitation was more common than heartburn and was often associated with nausea/vomiting. Women with an antenatal history of GERD had 3.79 times the odds of developing symptoms in the third trimester. There was no difference in weight gain in those with and without GER. Spicy food significantly increased the risk of heartburn and green vegetables were protective. The incidence of GERD decreased over three trimesters. Weight gain did not increase the prevalence of GERD. Spicy food aggravated while green vegetables protected against GERD.

  20. [Schatzki ring as a symptom of gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, M D; Mendel'son, G

    2015-01-01

    To determine the importance of a symptom of Schatzki ring. The results of examining 95 patients aged 62-92 years with the symptoms of dyspepsia in the Netanya State Geriatric Center (Israel) in 1994-2004 were analyzed. Standard X-ray study of the upper digestive tract was complemented by provocation tests. The length of an X-ray-negative area (XNA) between barium in the esophagus and stomach and the width in the lower esophagus were measured. Only 2 (2%) of the 95 patients were found to have normal function of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ). Two patients with a drastic esophageal narrowing due to reflux esophagitis were excluded. The remaining (91) patients were divided into 2 groups. The width of the esophagus was less than 2 cm and 2 cm or more in 64 (70%) and 27 (30%) patients, respectively. In weak GEJ, there was esophageal dilatation above the XNA. When in a horizontal position, this portion of the esophagus evacuates its contents into the stomach as a result of ampullary function. It is proximally closed by contracting the functional proximal sphincter (PS). When the ampulla contracts, its pressure increases up to the threshold. This causes the XNA to be closed and the ampulla to inject its contents into the stomach. The wider was the ampulla, the shorter the XNA was. Schatzki ring was detected in 20 (22%) of the 91 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). It was always at the level of the PS. The so-called sliding esophageal hernia is an esophageal ampulla measuring more than 2 cm in wide. The presence of the esophageal ampulla despite its size suggests that the GEJ is incompetent and GERD is present. Schatzki ring occurs at the level of the PS due to reflux esophagitis.

  1. Impact of obesity treatment on gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abraham; Kim, Aram; Sanossian, Cassandra; Francois, Fritz

    2016-01-28

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a frequently encountered disorder. Obesity is an important risk factor for GERD, and there are several pathophysiologic mechanisms linking the two conditions. For obese patients with GERD, much of the treatment effort is focused on weight loss and its consistent benefit to symptoms, while there is a relative lack of evidence regarding outcomes after novel or even standard medical therapy is offered to this population. Physicians are hesitant to recommend operative anti-reflux therapy to obese patients due to the potentially higher risks and decreased efficacy, and these patients instead are often considered for bariatric surgery. Bariatric surgical approaches are broadening, and each technique has emerging evidence regarding its effect on both the risk and outcome of GERD. Furthermore, combined anti-reflux and bariatric options are now being offered to obese patients with GERD. However, currently Roux-en-Y gastric bypass remains the most effective surgical treatment option in this population, due to its consistent benefits in both weight loss and GERD itself. This article aims to review the impact of both conservative and aggressive approaches of obesity treatment on GERD.

  2. Burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Shanghai, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, R; Yan, X; Ma, X-Q; Cao, Y; Wallander, M-A; Johansson, S; He, J

    2009-02-01

    Data on the impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in Asian countries are scarce. This study evaluated the impact of GERD on HRQL in Shanghai, China. One thousand two hundred adult inhabitants of Shanghai, selected using randomized cluster sampling. Participants completed Mandarin versions of the Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ), GERD impact scale, quality of life in reflux and dyspepsia (QOLRAD) questionnaire and short-form-36 (SF-36). GERD was defined as heartburn and/or regurgitation of any frequency during the 1-week recall period of the RDQ. A clinically meaningful impairment of HRQL was defined as a statistically significant decrease of >or=0.5 points in a QOLRAD dimension or >or=5 points in an SF-36 dimension. Overall, 1034 subjects completed the survey (86.2% response rate); 919 responses were suitable for analysis. The prevalence of GERD was 6.2%. GERD was associated with meaningfully impaired HRQL in the QOLRAD dimensions of vitality, eating/drinking and emotional well-being, but not sleep or physical/social functioning, and in all SF-36 dimensions except social functioning. Respondents with GERD experienced eating and drinking problems (47%), sleep impairment (32%) and reduced work productivity (32%). GERD has a clinically meaningful impact on HRQL in Shanghai, China.

  3. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants. Myths and misconceptions, where is the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkhy, Ahmed A

    2012-06-01

    Infantile gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common self-limited, physiological phenomenon. Infantile gastroesophageal reflux becomes pathological (gastroesophageal reflux disease [GERD]) when symptoms become more severe or are associated with complications such as failure to thrive or hematemesis. Though it is a very common condition, there are several misconceptions and myths on GER/GERD diagnosis and management. Inappropriate investigations are frequently requested and unnecessary medications are increasingly prescribed, particularly in infants with symptoms attributed to possible GER/GERD. Several therapeutic interventions are used widely in GERD management, although some evidence is either insufficient or controversial.

  4. Relationship between gastroesophageal reflux symptoms and dietary factors in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ji Hyun; Chung, Su Jin; Lee, Jun Haeng; Kim, Young-Ho; Chang, Dong Kyung; Son, Hee Jung; Kim, Jae J; Rhee, Jong Chul; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is increasing in Korea. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between GERD symptoms and dietary factors in Korea. From January 2007 to April 2008, 162 subjects were enrolled (81 in GERD group and 81 in control group). They were asked to complete the questionnaires about GERD symptoms and dietary habits. The symptom severity score was recorded by visual analogue scale. Subjects with overweight or obesity had an increased risk for GERD (OR, 2.52; 95% CI, 1.18-5.39). Irregular dietary intake was one of the risk factors for GERD (OR, 2.33; 95% CI, 1.11-4.89). Acid regurgitation was the most suffering (2.85 ± 2.95 by visual analogue scale) and frequent reflux-related symptom (57.5%) in GERD. Noodles (OR, 1.22; 95% CI, 1.12-1.34), spicy foods (OR, 1.09; 95% CI, 1.02-1.16), fatty meals (OR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.09-1.33), sweets (OR, 1.42; 95% CI, 1.00-2.02), alcohol (OR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.03-1.31), breads (OR, 1.17; 95% CI, 1.01-1.34), carbonated drinks (OR, 1.69; 95% CI, 1.04-2.74) and caffeinated drinks (OR,1.41; 95% CI, 1.15-1.73) were associated with symptom aggravation in GERD. Among the investigated noodles, ramen (instant noodle) caused reflux-related symptoms most frequently (52.4%). We found that noodles, spicy foods, fatty meals, sweets, alcohol, breads, carbonated drinks and caffeinated drinks were associated with reflux-related symptoms.

  5. Economic evaluations of gastroesophageal reflux disease medical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawron, Andrew J; French, Dustin D; Pandolfino, John E; Howden, Colin W

    2014-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) contributes to substantial medication use and costs worldwide. Economic evaluations provide insight into the value of healthcare, taking into account cost, quality, and benefits of particular treatments. Our objectives were to systematically review the existing literature to identify economic evaluations of GERD management strategies, to assess the scientific quality of these reports, and to summarize the economic outcomes of these evaluations. We identified economic evaluations and cost studies of GERD management strategies by searching PubMed and the UK NHS Economic Evaluation Database via the Cochrane Library. Searching was restricted to articles in English-language journals from July 2003 to July 2013. Cost-identification articles were excluded from the final analysis. Eighteen articles were included in the final analysis; 61 % of these met all criteria for quality reporting. Overall, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy was preferred (most effective and least costly) as empiric therapy for patients with reflux symptoms, except in patient populations with high Helicobacter pylori prevalence (>40 %). Initial empiric PPI therapy (vs. initial endoscopy stratification or H. pylori testing) is likely the most cost-effective initial strategy for patients with typical GERD symptoms. Surgery may be cost effective in patients with chronic GERD symptoms at time horizons of 3-10 years. Endoscopic anti-reflux procedures were not cost effective based on available data. Further economic evaluations should adhere to standard reporting measures of cost estimates and outcomes, and should attempt to account for and compare the large heterogeneity of patient phenotypes and treatment effects seen with anti-reflux therapies.

  6. Update on Gastroesophageal Reflux and Respiratory Disease in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan R Orenstein

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric respiratory diseases have been linked to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, but evidence regarding the association and its potential mechanisms continues to accumulate, and important aspects remain to be determined. Evidence for the association in two common pediatric respiratory disorders - infantile apnea and asthma in older children - and difficult clinical issues associated with the diagnosis and treatment of these two disorders are reviewed. The provocative embryological and physiological connections between the upper gastrointestinal tract and the respiratory tract, and recent understanding of the compensatory anatomy and physiology that protect the normal individual from respiratory manifestations of GERD are also explored. Dysfunctions of these protections likely underlie the pathophysiology of these disorders.

  7. Nonpharmacological management of gastroesophageal reflux in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Martini, Silvia; Aceti, Arianna; Arcuri, Santo; Rossini, Roberto; Faldella, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GOR) is very common among preterm infants, due to several physiological mechanisms. Although GOR should not be usually considered a pathological condition, its therapeutic management still represents a controversial issue among neonatologists; pharmacological overtreatment, often unuseful and potentially harmful, is increasingly widespread. Hence, a stepwise approach, firstly promoting conservative strategies such as body positioning, milk thickening, or changes of feeding modalities, should be considered the most advisable choice in preterm infants with GOR. This review focuses on the conservative management of GOR in the preterm population, aiming to provide a complete overview, based on currently available evidence, on potential benefits and adverse effects of nonpharmacological measures. Nonpharmacological management of GOR might represent a useful tool for neonatologists to reduce the use of antireflux medications, which should be limited to selected cases of symptomatic babies.

  8. Nonpharmacological Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Corvaglia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux (GOR is very common among preterm infants, due to several physiological mechanisms. Although GOR should not be usually considered a pathological condition, its therapeutic management still represents a controversial issue among neonatologists; pharmacological overtreatment, often unuseful and potentially harmful, is increasingly widespread. Hence, a stepwise approach, firstly promoting conservative strategies such as body positioning, milk thickening, or changes of feeding modalities, should be considered the most advisable choice in preterm infants with GOR. This review focuses on the conservative management of GOR in the preterm population, aiming to provide a complete overview, based on currently available evidence, on potential benefits and adverse effects of nonpharmacological measures. Nonpharmacological management of GOR might represent a useful tool for neonatologists to reduce the use of antireflux medications, which should be limited to selected cases of symptomatic babies.

  9. [Diagnostic value of alginate test in gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordin, D S; Masharova, A A; Droxzdov, V N; Firsova, L D; Kozhurina, T S

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of single dose of gaviscon (the alginates test) in detecting gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in patients with heartburn symptoms. 123 patients (male 46, female 77, age 43.6 +/- 15.5 years) with symptoms suggestive of GERD were investigated. Symptom response to the alginates test compared in GERD positive and GERD negative patients according traditional diagnostic criteria of GERD (upper endoscopy, 24-hr pH-monitoring, esophageal manometry, response to treatment with PPIs). Of 91 (78.9%) patients with positive alginates test, 87 were classified as GERD positive and 4 as GERD negative. Of 32 (26%) patients with negative alginates test, 29 were GERD negative and 3 GERD positive. The results providing a sensitivity of alginates test of 96.7% and a specificity of 87.7%. The alginates test is sensitive and specific for diagnosing GERD in patients with typical GERD symptoms.

  10. Different risk factors between reflux symptoms and mucosal injury in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Hsien Li

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is diagnosed based on typical symptoms in clinical practice. It can be divided into two groups using endoscopy: erosive and nonerosive reflux disease (NERD. This study aims to determine the risk factors of reflux symptoms and mucosal injury. This was a two-step case-control study derived from a cohort of 998 individuals having the data of reflux disease questionnaire (RDQ and endoscopic findings. Those with minor reflux symptoms were excluded. The first step compared symptomatic GERD patients with healthy controls. The 2nd step compared patients with erosive esophagitis with healthy controls. In this study, the prevalence of symptomatic GERD and erosive esophagitis were 163 (16.3% and 166 (16.6%, respectively. A total of 507 asymptomatic individuals without mucosal injury of the esophagus on endoscopy were selected as healthy controls. Compared with healthy controls, multivariate analyses showed that symptomatic GERD patients had a higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia [odds ratio (OR, 1.83; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.13–2.96] and obesity (OR, 1.85; 95% CI 1.08–3.02. By contrast, male sex (OR, 2.24; 95% CI 1.42–3.52, positive Campylo-like organism (CLO test (OR, 0.56; 95% CI 0.37–0.84, and hiatus hernia (OR, 14.36; 95% CI 3.05–67.6 were associated with erosive esophagitis. In conclusion, obesity and hypertriglyceridemia were associated with reflux symptoms. By contrast, male sex, negative infection of Helicobacter pylori, and hiatus hernia were associated with mucosal injury. Our results suggested that risk factors of reflux symptoms or mucosal injury might be different in GERD patients. The underlying mechanism awaits further studies to clarify.

  11. Fundoplication in neonates and infants with primary gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Byung Geon; Yang, Hea Kyoung; Lee, Yeoun Joo; Byun, Shin Yun; Kim, Hae Young; Park, Jae Hong

    2014-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux in infant is a physiological process. However, surgery is performed in high risk infants with severe gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) when medical management fails. This study focuses on efficacy and safety of Nissen fundoplication for GERD in infants under age 12 months. This study was a retrospective case analysis of 11 neonates and infants under 12 months of age who underwent Nissen fundoplication following a failure of medical treatment between June 2010 and June 2013 at Pusan National University Children's Hospital. The records were reviewed to determine the effect of fundoplication on symptoms and post-operative complications. A total of 11 infants consist of four males and seven females. Mean birth weight was 2,305.5±558.6 g (1,390-3,130 g). They had some underlying disease, which are not related with GERD such as congenital heart disease (54.5%), prematurity (45.5%), neurologic disease (18.2%), respiratory disease (18.2%), and other gastrointestinal disease. Mean body weight at surgery was 3,803.6±1,864.9 g (1,938.7-5,668.5 g). Mean age at operation was 99.9±107.6 days (17-276 days). Duration from operation to full enteral feeding was 10.9 days. Symptoms related GERD disappeared in all patients including one who got reoperation. One infant died of congenital heart disease unrelated to surgery. There were no complications related to fundoplication. Fundoplication is effective and safe treatment in the neonates and infants with severe GERD.

  12. Persistent reflux symptoms cause anxiety, depression, and mental health and sleep disorders in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yoshihide; Kamiya, Takeshi; Senoo, Kyouji; Tsuchida, Kenji; Hirano, Atsuyuki; Kojima, Hisayo; Yamashita, Hiroaki; Yamakawa, Yoshihiro; Nishigaki, Nobuhiro; Ozeki, Tomonori; Endo, Masatsugu; Nakanishi, Kazuhisa; Sando, Motoki; Inagaki, Yusuke; Shikano, Michiko; Mizoshita, Tsutomu; Kubota, Eiji; Tanida, Satoshi; Kataoka, Hiromi; Katsumi, Kohei; Joh, Takashi

    2016-07-01

    Some patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease experience persistent reflux symptoms despite proton pump inhibitor therapy. These symptoms reduce their health-related quality of life. Our aims were to evaluate the relationship between proton pump inhibitor efficacy and health-related quality of life and to evaluate predictive factors affecting treatment response in Japanese patients. Using the gastroesophageal reflux disease questionnaire, 145 gastroesophageal reflux disease patients undergoing proton pump inhibitor therapy were evaluated and classified as responders or partial-responders. Their health-related quality of life was then evaluated using the 8-item Short Form Health Survey, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale questionnaires. Sixty-nine patients (47.6%) were partial responders. These patients had significantly lower scores than responders in 5/8 subscales and in the mental health component summary of the 8-item Short Form Health Survey. Partial responders had significantly higher Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores, including anxiety and depression scores, than those of responders. Non-erosive reflux disease and double proton pump inhibitor doses were predictive factors of partial responders. Persistent reflux symptoms, despite proton pump inhibitor therapy, caused mental health disorders, sleep disorders, and psychological distress in Japanese gastroesophageal reflux disease patients.

  13. Smaller volume, thickened formulas in the management of gastroesophageal reflux in thriving infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshoo, V; Ross, G; Brown, S; Edell, D

    2000-11-01

    The effect of smaller volume, thickened formulas on gastroesophageal reflux is not clear. The frequency of gastroesophageal reflux and duration of acid pH in the esophagus were determined in six thriving infants using extended esophageal pH monitoring. There was a significant reduction in frequency of emesis and gastroesophageal reflux but not the duration of acid pH in the esophagus with the use of infant formula thickened with rice cereal to provide a nutritionally appropriate intake in a smaller volume. Thickening of formula with rice cereal in a nutritionally balanced form and smaller volume may be an appropriate strategy for reducing frequency of emesis and gastroesophageal reflux in thriving infants.

  14. Managing gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in the very low-birth-weight infant postdischarge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrow, Tammy; Dressler-Mund, Donna; Kowal, Kelly; Dai, Susan; Wilson, Melissa D; Lasby, Karen

    2014-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux and gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms are common challenges for very low-birth-weight infants (Management of symptoms across healthcare disciplines may not be based on current evidence, and inconsistency can result in confusion for families and delayed interventions. The feeding relationship between infant and caregivers may be impaired when symptoms are persistent and poorly managed. An algorithm for managing gastroesophageal reflux-like symptoms in very low-birth-weight infants (from hospital discharge to 12 months corrected age) was developed through the formation of a multidisciplinary community of practice and critical appraisal of the literature. A case study demonstrates how the algorithm results in a consistent approach for identifying symptoms, applying appropriate management strategies, and facilitating appropriate timing of medical consultation. Application to managing gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in the neonatal intensive care unit will be briefly addressed.

  15. Overlap of symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome in the general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Sanne; Jensen, Trine Holm; Henriksen, Susanne Lund

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common functional gastrointestinal conditions with significant impact on the daily lives of individuals. The objective was to investigate the prevalence and overlap...

  16. Esophageal mucosal integrity improves after laparoscopic antireflux surgery in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mauritz, F.A.; Rinsma, N.F.; Heurn, E.L. van; Sloots, C.E.; Siersema, P.D.; Houwen, R.H.; Zee, D.C. van der; Masclee, A.A.M.; Conchillo, J.M.; Herwaarden-Lindeboom, M.Y. van

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Esophageal intraluminal baseline impedance reflects the conductivity of the esophageal mucosa and may be an instrument for in vivo evaluation of mucosal integrity in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS) is a well-established

  17. Colonic fermentation influences lower esophageal sphincter function in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piche, Thierry; des Varannes, Stanislas Bruley; Sacher-Huvelin, Sylvie

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Colonic fermentation of carbohydrates is known to influence gastric and esophageal motility in healthy subjects. This study investigated the effects of colonic fermentation induced by oral administration of fructooligosaccharides (FOS) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux d...

  18. Current status of surgical management of gastroesophageal reflux in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeman, Derek S; Wilson, Nicole A; Warner, Brad W

    2016-06-01

    Surgical therapy for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is controversial with considerable debate ranging from the indications for antireflux surgery to surgical technique. This article will attempt to clarify these issues with the most up-to-date information available on the prevalence, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and surgical treatment of GERD in children. Although laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) has become the most popular operation performed for pathologic reflux, its superiority over both open surgery and other types of fundoplication is not well established. Large retrospective studies suggest LNF has a lower complication rate than open surgery. However, three prospective randomized controlled trials have been published recently which cast doubt on the superiority of LNF and suggest that LNF may have a higher failure rate compared to open fundoplication. Antireflux surgery has higher morbidity and failure rates in infants and in children with neurologic impairment. Based on the best available evidence, LNF may be less morbid, but have a higher rate of failure than open surgery. Pediatric surgeons should be mindful of the risks and benefits of both approaches to best counsel their patients. Larger prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to determine the best treatments for pediatric GERD.

  19. Pharmacological therapy of gastroesophageal reflux in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corvaglia, Luigi; Monari, Caterina; Martini, Silvia; Aceti, Arianna; Faldella, Giacomo

    2013-01-01

    Although gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a very common phenomenon among preterm infants, its therapeutic management is still an issue of debate among neonatologists. A step-wise approach should be advisable, firstly promoting nonpharmacological interventions and limiting drugs to selected infants unresponsive to the conservative measures or who are suffering from severe GER with clinical complications. Despite of this, a concerning pharmacological overtreatment has been increasingly reported. Most of the antireflux drugs, however, have not been specifically assessed in preterm infants; moreover, serious adverse effects have been noticed in association to their administration. This review mainly aims to draw the state of the art regarding the pharmacological management of GER in preterm infants, analyzing the best piecies of evidence currently available on the most prescribed anti-reflux drugs. Although further trials are required, sodium alginate-based formulations might be considered promising; however, data regarding their safety are still limited. Few piecies of evidence on the efficacy of histamine-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors in preterm infants with GER are currently available. Nevertheless, a significantly increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and infections has been largely reported in association with their use, thereby leading to an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. The efficacy of metoclopramide in GER's improvement still needs to be clarified. Other prokinetic agents, such as domperidone and erythromycin, have been reported to be ineffective, whereas cisapride has been withdrawn due to its remarkable cardiac adverse effects.

  20. Factors that influence therapeutic outcomes in symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-02-03

    The term "symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease" (GERD) refers to those patients who present with the typical GERD symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation, yet do not have endoscopic evidence of esophagitis. The primary goals of managing symptomatic GERD are to control symptoms and improve quality of life. A clinical assessment of the GERD patient can identify important clinical features, such as atypical and extraesophageal symptoms for which acid-suppressive agents tend to be less effective. Performing an endoscopy can further identify the patient as having nonerosive reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, or Barrett\\'s esophagus-diagnoses which can help determine treatment but may not prove predictive of therapeutic response. Determining acid exposure through pH testing can predict therapeutic response, with those revealing an abnormal acid exposure time being more responsive to acid-suppressive therapy. However, the performance of an endoscopy and pH testing on each patient is clearly not practical. Whereas the natural history of symptomatic GERD is still largely undefined, acid-suppressive therapy appears to be the best approach available for both the short-term and long-term management of this disease.

  1. Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Type II Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huihui Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims. Patients with type II diabetes mellitus (DM were known to have higher prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in the Western countries, but data on the impact of GERD on DM patients in our country are scarce. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients in Shanghai, China, and to explore its possible risk factors. Methods. 775 type II DM cases were randomly collected. Reflux Disease Questionnaire (RDQ was used to check the presence of GERD. Patients’ characteristics, laboratory data, face-to-face interview, nerve conduction study, and needle electromyogram (EMG test were analyzed. Results. 16% patients were found with typical GERD symptoms. Pathophysiological factors such as peripheral neuropathy, metabolism syndrome, and obesity were found to have no significant differences between GERD and non-GERD type II DM patients in the present study. Conclusion. The prevalence of GERD in type II DM patients is higher than that in adult inhabitants in Shanghai, China. No difference in pathophysiological factors, such as peripheral neuropathy, and metabolism syndrome was found in DM-GERD patients, suggesting that further study and efforts are needed to explore deeper the potential risk factors for the high prevalence rate of GERD in DM patients.

  2. Pharmacological Therapy of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Preterm Infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Corvaglia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although gastroesophageal reflux (GER is a very common phenomenon among preterm infants, its therapeutic management is still an issue of debate among neonatologists. A step-wise approach should be advisable, firstly promoting nonpharmacological interventions and limiting drugs to selected infants unresponsive to the conservative measures or who are suffering from severe GER with clinical complications. Despite of this, a concerning pharmacological overtreatment has been increasingly reported. Most of the antireflux drugs, however, have not been specifically assessed in preterm infants; moreover, serious adverse effects have been noticed in association to their administration. This review mainly aims to draw the state of the art regarding the pharmacological management of GER in preterm infants, analyzing the best piecies of evidence currently available on the most prescribed anti-reflux drugs. Although further trials are required, sodium alginate-based formulations might be considered promising; however, data regarding their safety are still limited. Few piecies of evidence on the efficacy of histamine-2 receptor blockers and proton pump inhibitors in preterm infants with GER are currently available. Nevertheless, a significantly increased risk of necrotizing enterocolitis and infections has been largely reported in association with their use, thereby leading to an unfavorable risk-benefit ratio. The efficacy of metoclopramide in GER’s improvement still needs to be clarified. Other prokinetic agents, such as domperidone and erythromycin, have been reported to be ineffective, whereas cisapride has been withdrawn due to its remarkable cardiac adverse effects.

  3. The effects of gaviscon and metoclopramide in gastroesophageal reflux in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, D; Hodgson, M; Hill, R

    1986-01-01

    Oral metoclopramide (0.5 mg/kg/24 h) and a liquid alginic acid-antacid compound were administered to infants and children with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in a double-blind randomized controlled trial. The effect of medication was measured with 24-h intraesophageal pH monitoring. Neither metoclopramide nor the alginic acid-antacid compound decreased the frequency or duration of gastroesophageal reflux.

  4. Misdiagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease as epileptic seizures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayram, Ayşe Kaçar; Canpolat, Mehmet; Karacabey, Neslihan; Gumus, Hakan; Kumandas, Sefer; Doğanay, Selim; Arslan, Duran; Per, Hüseyin

    2016-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can mimic epileptic seizure, and may be misdiagnosed as epilepsy. On the other hand, GERD can be more commonly seen in children with neurological disorders such as cerebral palsy (CP); this co-incidence may complicate the management of patients by mimicking refractory seizures. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the clinical features, definite diagnoses and treatment approaches of the patients with clinically suspected GERD who were referred to the division of pediatric neurology with a suspected diagnosis of epileptic seizure. We also aimed to investigate the occurrence of GERD in children with epilepsy and/or CP. Fifty-seven children who had a final diagnosis of GERD but were initially suspected of having epileptic seizures were assessed prospectively. All patients were assigned to 3 groups according to definite diagnoses as follows: patients with only GERD who were misdiagnosed as having epileptic seizure (group 1: n=16; 28.1%), those with comorbidity of epilepsy and GERD (group 2: n=21; 36.8%), and those with the coexistence of GERD with epilepsy and CP (group 3: n=20; 35.1%). Five patients (8.8%) did not respond to anti-reflux treatment and laparoscopic reflux surgery was performed. The positive effect of GERD therapy on paroxysmal nonepileptic events was observed in 51/57 (89.5%) patients. GERD is one of the important causes of paroxysmal nonepileptic events. In addition, GERD must be kept in mind at the initial diagnosis and also in the long-term management of patients with neurological disorders such as epilepsy and CP. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Pattern of food intolerance in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caselli, Michele; Lo Cascio, Natalina; Rabitti, Stefano; Eusebi, Leonardo H; Zeni, Elena; Soavi, Cecilia; Cassol, Francesca; Zuliani, Giovanni; Zagari, Rocco M

    2017-12-01

    Many food items have been involved in gastro-esophageal reflux disease pathogenesis and dietary modification has been proposed as first-line treatment. Test-based exclusion diets have shown to significantly reduce reflux symptoms. We aimed to assess the patterns of food intolerance in a series of patients with typical gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms (GERS). We retrospectively evaluated all patients with typical reflux symptoms, attending the Centre Study Association on Food Intolerance and Nutrition of Ferrara from January 2010 to October 2015, who resulted positive to at least one food item at the Leucocytotoxic Test. The presence and severity of typical GERS (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation) were assessed using the Gastro-esophageal Reflux Disease Impact Scale (GIS) questionnaire. Only individuals with a GIS Score of at least 5 points were included. Almost all patients (91.1%) were intolerant to at least 5 food items. The most frequent food intolerance (more than 33% of patients) were found for milk (55.4%), lettuce (46.4%), coffee (43.7%), brewer's yeast (42.9%), pork (42.9%), tuna (37.5%), rice (35.7%), sole (34.8%), asparagus (34.8%) and eggs (33.9%). Nine different clusters of food intolerance were detected. Patients with typical gastro-esophageal reflux symptoms seem to have intolerance to multiple food items, some of which (lettuce, brewer's yeast, tuna, rice, sole and asparagus) have not yet been associated to gastro-esophageal reflux disease.

  6. Symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux in severely mentally retarded people: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veer, A.J.E. de; Bos, J.; Niezen-de Boer, M.C.; Böhmer, C.J.M.; Francke, A.L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs when stomach acid frequently backs up (or refluxes) into the gullet (or esophagus), and it has serious consequences for the quality of life. Usually this is felt as heartburn. Because severely mentally retarded people usually do not utter

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in COPD: links and risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee AL

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Annemarie L Lee,1–3 Roger S Goldstein1,2,4 1West Park Healthcare Centre, 2Department of Physical Therapy, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; 3Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Hospital, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 4Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada Abstract: COPD is a long-term condition associated with considerable disability with a clinical course characterized by episodes of worsening respiratory signs and symptoms associated with exacerbations. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of the most common gastrointestinal conditions in the general population and has emerged as a comorbidity of COPD. GERD may be diagnosed by both symptomatic approaches (including both typical and atypical symptoms and objective measurements. Based on a mix of diagnostic approaches, the prevalence of GERD in COPD ranges from 17% to 78%. Although GERD is usually confined to the lower esophagus in some individuals, it may be associated with pulmonary microaspiration of gastric contents. Possible mechanisms that may contribute to GERD in COPD originate from gastroesophageal dysfunction, including altered pressure in the lower esophageal sphincter (which normally protect against GERD and changes in esophageal motility. Proposed respiratory contributions to the development of GERD include respiratory medications that may alter esophageal sphincter tone and changes in respiratory mechanics, with increased lung hyperinflation compromising the antireflux barrier. Although the specific cause and effect relationship between GERD and COPD has not been fully elucidated, GERD may influence lung disease severity and has been identified as a significant predictor of acute exacerbations of COPD. Further clinical effects could include a poorer health-related quality of life and an increased cost in health care, although these factors require further clarification. There are both medical and surgical options available for the

  8. Work productivity and activity impairment in gastroesophageal reflux disease in Korean full-time employees: a multicentre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Woon Geon; Kim, Heung Up; Kim, Sang Gyun; Kim, Gwang Ha; Shim, Ki-Nam; Kim, Jeong Wook; Kim, Jin Il; Kim, Jae Gyu; Kim, Jae J; Yim, Da-Hae; Park, Sue K; Park, Soo-Heon

    2012-04-01

    The costs of gastroesophageal reflux disease have not been assessed in Asia, even though the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease is gradually increasing. We evaluated work presenteeism and absenteeism as indirect costs of gastroesophageal reflux disease in Korea. This was a cross-sectional and multicentre study using patient-reported outcome instruments. A total of 1009 full-time employees who visited the gastrointestinal department for any reason (281 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and 728 controls) were included. Main outcomes were presenteeism and absenteeism measured as work productivity loss and monetary cost per week. Absenteeism and presenteeism were significantly higher in the gastroesophageal reflux disease than the control group (1.49% vs. 0.46%, P=0.0010; 34.13% vs. 9.23%, Pproductivity was significantly greater in the gastroesophageal reflux disease than the control group (33.09% vs. 9.02%; Pproductivity difference between the two groups represented an additional productivity loss of 11.7h/week in the gastroesophageal reflux disease group compared with the control group. Assuming average hourly wages of $14.12, the weekly burden of gastroesophageal reflux disease reached $165.07 per person. Gastroesophageal reflux disease was associated with substantial work productivity loss, mainly due to presenteeism rather than absenteeism, in Korean full-time employees. Copyright © 2011 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. LINX(™) Reflux Management System: magnetic sphincter augmentation in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavina, Luigi; DeMeester, Tom R; Ganz, Robert A

    2012-12-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), commonly manifested by heartburn or regurgitation, is a chronic, progressive condition in which failed sphincter function allows the contents of the stomach to reflux into the esophagus, the airways and the mouth. Chronic GERD affects 10% of Western society. The majority of patients receive adequate relief from proton pump inhibitors, but up to 40% have incomplete relief of symptoms that cannot be addressed by increasing the dose of medications. The laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication is the surgical gold standard; however, the level of technical difficulty and its side effects have limited its use to less than 1% of the GERD population. These factors have contributed to the propensity of patients to persist with medical therapy, even when inadequate to control symptoms and complications of the disease. Consequently, a significant gap in the treatment continuum for GERD remains evident in current clinical practice. The LINX(™) Reflux Management System (Torax Medical) is designed to provide a permanent solution to GERD by augmenting the physiologic function of the sphincter barrier with a simple and reproducible laparoscopic procedure that does not alter gastric anatomy and can be easily reversed if necessary.

  10. Refractory chronic cough due to gastroesophageal reflux: Definition, mechanism and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Han-Jing; Qiu, Zhong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Refractory chronic cough due to gastroesophageal reflux is a troublesome condition unresponsive to the standard medical anti-reflux therapy. Its underlying mechanisms may include incomplete acid suppression, non-acid reflux, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations and esophageal hypersensitivity. The diagnosis of this disorder depends on both the findings of multi-channel intraluminal impedance-pH monitoring and the subsequent intensified anti-reflux therapy. The strategies of pharmacological treatment for refractory chronic cough due to reflux include the optimization of proton pump inhibitors and add-on therapies with histamine H2 receptor antagonists, baclofen and gabapentin. However, the further study is needed to satisfy its management. PMID:26413488

  11. EMPIRIC THERAPY IN OTOLARYNGOLOGIC MANIFESTATIONS OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mohammadi

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The review of literature shows that a strong relationship exists between the symptoms of otolaryngologic diseases and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. It is commonly observed that an extended physical examination is needed to determine the occurrence of GERD. This non-randomized,prospective quasi-experimental study was performed to clinically verify the relationship between otolaryngologic symptoms and GERD and to show that a search for GERD is necessary under conditions that patients do not respond to initial routine treatment for otolaryngologic symptoms. Extended physical examination of patients who had been referred to an Ear, Nose and throat (ENThospital revealed that GERD-related laryngeal signs were present in 55 patients. Otolaryngologic symptoms detected in decreasing order of occurrence were posterior nasal drip, chronic pharyngitis, chronic cough, hoarseness, ear pain, chronic throat clearing and pruritus in the ear. Furthermore, 66% of the patients had gastrointestinal symptoms that included heartburn, dysphagia, odynophagia, aspiration, globus hystericus, dyspepsia and foreign body sensation. Signs observed during the physical examination were posterior pharyngitis, granular pharyngitis, inflamed arytenoids, contact granuloma, and pachyderma laryngitis. We administered proton pump inhibitor to all patients and recommended to change their life style. The follow up program was a 6-month period. Only 53 patients showed up for the follow up. The overall response rate to the therapeutic regimen was 83%. In treating otolaryngologic patients, especially those who are resistant to routine treatments, a careful extended physical examination including an indirect laryngoscopy for diagnosis of GERD is recommended.

  12. Managing gastroesophageal reflux disease in children: The role of endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldani, Helena As; Nunes, Daltro La; Ferreira, Cristina T

    2012-08-16

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a growing problem in the pediatric population and recent advances in diagnostics and therapeutics have improved their management, particularly the use of esophago-gastroduodenoscopy (EGD). Most of the current knowledge is derived from studies in adults; however there are distinct features between infant onset and adult onset GERD. Children are not just little adults and attention must be given to the stages of growth and development and how these stages impact the disease management. Although there is a lack of a gold standard test to diagnose GERD in children, EGD with biopsy is essential to assess the type and severity of tissue damage. To date, the role of endoscopy in adults and children has been to assess the extent of esophagitis and detect metaplastic changes complicating GERD; however the current knowledge points another role for the EGD with biopsy that is to rule out other potential causes of esophagitis in patients with GERD symptoms such as eosinophilic esophagitis. This review highlights special considerations about the role of EGD in the management of children with GERD.

  13. Respiratory complications of gastroesophageal reflux associated with paraesophageal hiatal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greub, Gilbert; Liaudet, Lucas; Wiesel, Paul; Bettschart, Vincent; Schaller, Marie-Denise

    2003-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may be associated with episodes of bronchoaspiration, sometimes leading to life-threatening respiratory complications. GERD is frequently observed in the setting of type 1 (sliding type) hiatal hernia, but only infrequently complicates the course of type 2 (paraesophageal) hernia. We performed a retrospective analysis of 50 patients operated for type 2 hiatal hernia in our hospital, to determine the prevalence of respiratory complaints related to GERD in this setting. We found 7 cases (14%) of type 2 hiatal hernia complicated by pulmonary manifestations as the only symptoms of GERD. These ranged from dyspnea to severe bronchoconstriction and acute respiratory failure. The series is illustrated by the report of 1 patient who experienced acute bronchospasm and cardiopulmonary arrest as a complication of GERD. In all patients, surgical repair of the hiatal hernia, together with an antireflux procedure, resulted in complete resolution of the respiratory complaints for follow-up periods up to 160 months. Our data emphasize the particular prevalence of respiratory involvement in the case of GERD complicating type 2 hiatal hernia, and also the excellent symptomatic results obtained by surgical therapy for this condition.

  14. Saliva transit in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiani, R A; Mota, G A; Aprile, L R O; Dantas, R O

    2015-10-01

    Saliva is an important factor in the neutralization of the acidity of the refluxed material that comes from the stomach to the esophagus. The impairment of saliva transit from oral cavity to distal esophagus may be one of the causes of esophagitis and symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). With the scintigraphic method, the transit of 2 mL of artificial saliva was measured in 30 patients with GERD and 26 controls. The patients with GERD had symptoms of heartburn and acid regurgitation, a 24-hour pH monitoring with more than 4.2% of the time with pH below four, 26 with erosive esophagitis, and four with non-erosive reflux disease. Fourteen had mild dysphagia for solid foods. Twenty-one patients had normal esophageal manometry, and nine had ineffective esophageal motility. They were 15 men and 15 women, aged 21-61 years, mean 39 years. The control group had 14 men and 12 women, aged 19-61 years, mean 35 years. The subjects swallowed in the sitting and supine position 2 mL of artificial saliva labeled with 18 MBq of (99m) Technetium phytate. The time of saliva transit was measured from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, and the transit through proximal, middle, and distal esophageal body. There was no difference between patients and controls in the time for saliva to go from oral cavity to esophageal-gastric transition, and from proximal esophagus to esophageal-gastric transition, in the sitting and supine positions. In distal esophagus in the sitting position, the saliva transit duration was shorter in patients with GERD (3.0 ± 0.8 seconds) than in controls (7.6 ± 1.7 seconds, P = 0.03). In conclusion, the saliva transit from oral cavity to the esophageal-gastric transition in patients with GERD has the same duration than in controls. Saliva transit through the distal esophageal body is faster in patients with GERD than controls. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the

  15. [Gastroesophageal reflux disease: comparison between patients with and without esophagitis, concerning age, gender and symptoms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasi, A; de Moraes-Filho, J P; Zilberstein, B; Cecconello, I; Gama-Rodrigues, J

    2001-01-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease may or may not have endoscopic esophagitis; there are few studies comparing these groups among themselves. This study was designed in order to evaluate differences between patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease with and without esophagitis. A hundred and twenty-two patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease characterized by esophageal endoscopy and pHmetry were included, 90 with and 32 without esophagitis. Assessment involved an anamnesis, including the following data: age, sex, heartburn, dysphasia, non-cardiac chest pain and respiratory symptoms. Heartburn was analyzed in more detail, its duration, intensity and periodicity being determined. No statistical significant difference was observed between the groups, regarding age, sex or presence of symptoms. However, in the group with esophagitis, heartburn classified as severe or very severe was more frequent. 1. The groups of patients with or without esophagitis analyzed were very similar concerning age, gender and presence of symptoms. However, regarding the heartburn's intensity, it was more intense in the group with esophagitis. 2. Among patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, there is a large number of cases without esophagitis (26.2%) and that prolonged pH-monitoring is fundamental in its identification; 3. A better definition of reflux disease, esophagitis and pathological reflux is needed, in order to allow better diagnostic accuracy and comparisons in different studies on this subject.

  16. Dietary habits and gastroesophageal reflux disease in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, You Jin; Ha, Eun Kyo; Jeong, Su Jin

    2016-07-01

    To identify the relationship between dietary habits and childhood gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in preschool children. We performed a questionnaire study to analyze the relationship between dietary habits and GERD in 85 preschool children with GERD and 117 healthy children of the same age. Irregular and picky eating were more p-revalent in the GERD group than in the control group (odds ratio [OR], 4.14; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37-12.54 and OR, 4.96; 95% CI, 1.88-13.14, respectively). The snack preferences and the late night eating habits were significantly more prevalent in the GERD group than in the control group (OR, 3.83; 95% CI, 1.23-11.87 and OR, 9.51; 95% CI, 2.55-35.49, respectively). A preference for liquid foods was significantly more prevalent in the GERD group (OR, 9.51; 95% CI, 2.548-35.485). The dinner-to-bedtime interval was significantly shorter in the GERD group than in the control group (157.06±48.47 vs. 174.62±55.10, P=0.020). In addition, the time between dinner and bedtime was shorter than 3 hours in 47 children (55.3%) of the GERD group and 44 (37.6%) of the control group. This difference was statistical significance (P=0.015). Dietary habits such as picky and irregular eating, snack preference, a preference of liquid foods, late night eating, and a shorter dinner-to-bedtime interval had a significant correlation with GERD. Further large-scale studies are necessary to confirm our results.

  17. [The Mexican consensus on gastroesophageal reflux disease. Part II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Iga, F; Tamayo-de la Cuesta, J L; Noble-Lugo, A; Hernández-Guerrero, A; Torres-Villalobos, G; Ramos-de la Medina, A; Pantoja-Millán, J P

    2013-01-01

    To update the themes of endoscopic and surgical treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) from the Mexican Consensus published in 2002. Part I of the 2011 Consensus dealt with the general concepts, diagnosis, and medical treatment of this disease. Part II covers the topics of the endoscopic and surgical treatment of GERD. In this second part, an expert in endoscopy and an expert in GERD surgery, along with the three general coordinators of the consensus, carried out an extensive bibliographic review using the Embase, Cochrane, and Medline databases. Statements referring to the main aspects of endoscopic and surgical treatment of this disease were elaborated and submitted to specialists for their consideration and vote, utilizing the modified Delphi method. The statements were accepted into the consensus if the level of agreement was 67% or higher. Twenty-five statements corresponding to the endoscopic and surgical treatment of GERD resulted from the voting process, and they are presented herein as Part II of the consensus. The majority of the statements had an average level of agreement approaching 90%. Currently, endoscopic treatment of GERD should not be regarded as an option, given that the clinical results at 3 and 5 years have not demonstrated durability or sustained symptom remission. The surgical indications for GERD are well established; only those patients meeting the full criteria should be candidates and their surgery should be performed by experts. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  18. Gastroesophageal Reflux is Not Associated with Dental Erosion in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Yvette K.; Heyman, Melvin B.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Dalal, Deepal H.; Wojcicki, Janet M.; Clark, Ann L.; Rechmann, Beate; Rechmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Dental erosion is a complication of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in adults; in children, it is not clear if GER has a role in dental pathologic conditions. Dietary intake, oral hygiene, high bacterial load, and decreased salivary flow might contribute independently to GER development or dental erosion, but their potential involvement in dental erosion from GER is not understood. We investigated the prevalence of dental erosion among children with and without GER symptoms, and whether salivary flow rate or bacterial load contribute to location-specific dental erosion. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 59 children (ages 9–17 y) with symptoms of GER and 20 asymptomatic children (controls); all completed a questionnaire on dietary exposure. Permanent teeth were examined for erosion into dentin, erosion locations, and affected surfaces. The dentist was not aware of GER status, nor was the gastroenterologist aware of dental status. Stimulated salivary flow was measured and salivary bacterial load was calculated for total bacteria, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Results Controlling for age, dietary intake, and oral hygiene, there was no association between GER symptoms and dental erosion, by tooth location or affected surface. Salivary flow did not correlate with GER symptoms or erosion. Erosion location and surface were independent of total bacteria and levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Conclusions Location-specific dental erosion is not associated with GER, salivary flow, or bacterial load. Prospective studies are required to determine the pathogenesis of GER-associated dental erosion and the relationship between dental caries to GER and dental erosion. PMID:21820389

  19. Association between sleep bruxism and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengatto, Cristiane Machado; Dalberto, Charlene da Silveira; Scheeren, Betina; Barros, Sérgio Gabriel Silva de

    2013-11-01

    Rhythmic masticatory muscle activity, including sleep bruxism (SB), can be induced in healthy individuals by experimental esophageal acidification, which plays an important role in the pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, no robust evidence supports the association between SB and GERD. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between SB and GERD. Forty-five individuals were eligible to participate in this observational transversal study at the Gastroenterology Service of the Clinical Hospital of Porto Alegre, Brazil. The participants were classified into 2 groups, those with and without GERD, according to the Montreal Criteria and pH-metry/endoscopy findings. The diagnosis of SB was not assessed in a sleep laboratory but was based on self-report plus clinical inspection, according to the minimal diagnostic criteria of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. The Lipp Stress Symptom Inventory was used to evaluate self-perceived stress. Univariate and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed with SB as dependent variable and GERD, sex, age, body mass index, and stress as predictors (α=.05; 90% power). The study population included individuals with SB without GERD (13.3%) and individuals with SB with GERD (31.1%). In participants with GERD, the prevalence of SB was 73.7%. Only the variable GERD was significantly associated with SB (P=.017; odds ratio 6.58; 95% confidence interval 1.40-30.98), although adjusted for stress and age. Sleep bruxism is prevalent in GERD patients, and GERD is highly associated with SB. Copyright © 2013 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Laparoscopic management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Experience with 100 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Gómez, R; Olivares-Ontiveros, O; García-Vázquez, A; Silva-Sánchez, V; Noyola-Cedillo, S; Quezada-Salcedo, J E; Morales-Trejo, R M

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate the results of laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti funduplication and to compare them with the results obtained in open surgery. Prospective, observational, longitudinal, pre and post-procedure. Beneficencia Española, Hospital Angeles, and Hospital Francisco Galindo Chávez, ISSSTE, in Torreón, Coahuila, Mexico. From December 1992 to February 1999, 100 patients with surgical indications due to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) prospectively underwent a laparoscopic Nissen-Rossetti procedure. A clinical and endoscopic follow up from 3 months to 9 years was performed in 87 cases. Symptomatic control was achieved in 98% (85/87) of the cases and remission of overall endoscopic esophagitis in 79% (69/87); excluding Barrett cases, esophagitis remission was observed in 93% (67/72) of the subjects. The following recurrences took place: two with G-II and two with G-III esophagitis, one requiring pyloroplasty due gastric stasis, and other patient with G-IV esophagitis, who has needed to continue with postoperative dilations. Of 16 cases with Barrett's esophagus, two-showed remission and one did not return control. Perioperative complications included gastric perforations (3), acute pulmonary edema during the immediate postoperative period (1), deep vein thrombosis (1), and late esophageal perforation (1). All were resolved satisfactorily. Surgical mortality was 0 in the 100 cases undergoing the procedure. Eighty-six percent of cases had a 24-h hospital stay. Early morbidity: dysphagia in 60 patients, early satiety in 91 cases, abdominal distention in 25 cases, all this symptomatology disappears during the subsequent 3 months. Persistent morbidity: flatulence in 60% of patients, difficulty for vomiting in 10% of cases. The laparoscopic procedure is as effective as the open method with the advantage of being minimally invasive.

  1. Foods Inducing Typical Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Jung Wan; Joo, Moon Kyung; Kim, Hyo Jung; Lee, Beom Jae; Kim, Ji Hoon; Yeon, Jong Eun; Park, Jong-Jae; Kim, Jae Seon; Byun, Kwan Soo; Bak, Young-Tae

    2017-07-30

    Several specific foods are known to precipitate gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms and GERD patients are usually advised to avoid such foods. However, foods consumed daily are quite variable according to regions, cultures, etc. This study was done to elucidate the food items which induce typical GERD symptoms in Korean patients. One hundred and twenty-six Korean patients with weekly typical GERD symptoms were asked to mark all food items that induced typical GERD symptoms from a list containing 152 typical foods consumed daily in Korea. All patients underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy followed by 24-hour ambulatory esophageal pH monitoring. The definition of "GERD" was if either of the 2 studies revealed evidence of GERD, and "possible GERD" if both studies were negative. One hundred and twenty-six cases (51 GERD and 75 possible GERD) were enrolled. In 19 (37.3%) of 51 GERD cases and in 17 (22.7%) of 75 possible GERD cases, foods inducing typical GERD symptoms were identified. In the GERD group (n = 19), frequent symptom-inducers were hot spicy stews, rice cakes, ramen noodles, fried foods, and topokki. In the possible GERD group (n = 17), frequent symptom-inducers were hot spicy stews, fried foods, doughnuts, breads, ramen noodles, coffee, pizza, topokki, rice cakes, champon noodles, and hotdogs. In one-third of GERD patients, foods inducing typical symptoms were identified. Hot spicy stews, rice cakes, ramen noodles, fried foods, and topokki were the foods frequently inducing typical symptoms in Korea. The list of foods frequently inducing typical GERD symptoms needs to be modified based on their own local experiences.

  2. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease and exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingebrigtsen, Truls S; Marott, Jacob L; Vestbo, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    (31 vs 21%, P = 0.004), more breathlessness (39 vs 22%, P history of respiratory infections (6.8 vs 1.4%, P disease. Among individuals with COPD and gastro-esophageal reflux disease, those who did......BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that gastro-esophageal reflux disease is a risk factor for exacerbations in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS: Among 9622 participants in the Copenhagen City Heart Study, we identified 1259 individuals with COPD...... and information on gastro-esophageal reflux disease and the regular use of acid inhibitory treatment. These individuals were followed for 5 years with regard to medically treated COPD exacerbations, which we defined as a short course treatment with oral corticosteroids alone or in combination with antibiotics. We...

  3. Is the use of esomeprazole in gastroesophageal reflux disease a cost-effective option in Poland?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryszyn, Pawel; Staniak, Aleksandra; Grzegrzolka, Jedrzej

    2016-03-01

    To compare the cost-effectiveness of therapy of gastroesophageal reflux disease with esomeprazole and other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in Poland. Studies comparing esomeprazole with other PPIs in the treatment of erosive esophagitis, non-erosive reflux disease and gastroesophageal reflux disease maintenance therapy were systematically reviewed. 9 randomized clinical trials were selected, meta-analyses were conducted. Cost data derived from Polish Ministry of Health and Pharmacies in Wroclaw. In the treatment of erosive esophagitis esomeprazole was significantly more effective than other PPIs. Both for 4- and 8-week therapy respective incremental cost-effectiveness ratio values were acceptably low. Differences in effectiveness of non-erosive reflux disease therapy were not significant. The replacement of pantoprazole 20 mg with more effective esomeprazole 20 mg in the 6-month maintenance therapy was associated with a substantially high incremental cost-effectiveness ratio.

  4. Gastro-esophageal reflux in children:Symptoms, diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Vandenplas, Yvan; Hauser,Bruno; Devreker,Thierry; Mahler, Tania; Degreef, Elisabeth; Veereman-Wauters, Gigi

    2011-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus and is a normal physiologic process occurring several times per day in healthy individuals. In infants and toddlers, no symptoms allow to diagnose GERD or to predict response to therapy. In older children and adolescents, history and physical examination may be sufficient to diagnose GERD.Endoscopically visible breaks in the distal esophageal mucosa are the most reliable evidence of reflux esophagitis. Esophag...

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms not responding to proton pump inhibitor: GERD, NERD, NARD, esophageal hypersensitivity or dyspepsia?

    OpenAIRE

    Bashashati, Mohammad; Hejazi, Reza A; Andrews, Christopher N; Storr, Martin A

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common gastrointestinal process that can generate symptoms of heartburn and chest pain. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the gold standard for the treatment of GER; however, a substantial group of GER patients fail to respond to PPIs. In the past, it was believed that acid reflux into the esophagus causes all, or at least the majority, of symptoms attributed to GER, with both erosive esophagitis and nonerosive outcomes. However, with modern testing techniqu...

  6. Effect of H. pylori infection on gastrin, ghrelin, motilin, and gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eren, Makbule; Çolak, Ömer; Işıksoy, Serap; Yavuz, Aslı

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux and possible mechanisms in Helicobacter pylori infection. Symptoms of H. pylori-infected children, their total gastroesophageal reflux episodes, acid exposure percentage, gastrin, ghrelin, and motilin levels were evaluated before and after H. pylori eradication. Forty-two H. pylori-infected children were eligible for this study. Acid exposure % and total reflux episodes before and after H. pylori eradication were 10.2%±14.8% vs. 7.71%±5.0% and 94.7%±102.1% vs. 64.6%±55.0%, respectively (p=0.28, p=0.082). There was an insignificant change in the serum gastrin (93.4±153.8 pmol/L vs. 1.28±149.4 pmol/L, p=0.67), ghrelin (7.69±197.5 pg/mL vs. 8.36±299.5 pg/mL, p=0.274), and motilin (75.1±81.2 pg/mL vs. 97.2±80.5 pg/mL, p=0.206) levels after eradication. Gastrin and ghrelin levels were negatively correlated after H. pylori eradication (r=-0.38, p=0.031). There was no association between gastroesophageal reflux episodes and gastrin, ghrelin, and motilin levels (r=0.25 and p=0.11; r= 0.24 and p=0.13; r=-0.23 and p=0.14, respectively). H. pylori infection is neither protective nor harmful in the gastroesophageal reflux. Neither ghrelin nor motilin levels was associated with gastroesophageal reflux. None of gastrin, ghrelin, and motilin levels was affected by H. pylori infection. There is an inverse association between gastrin and ghrelin levels after H. pylori eradication.

  7. [Pathological physiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Hypothesis (Literature review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, M D; Korshun, Z; Mendelson, G

    2013-01-01

    Currently prolonged pH-monitoring is considered as Gold standard for diagnosis of Gastro Esophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). Criteria and norms based on prolonged pH-monitoring were the basic concepts of pathophysiology of GERD. For example, it is accepted that esophageal hernia (EG) can be present without GERD, as well as GERD without EG. X-ray diagnosis compared to the pH- monitoring has a low sensitivity (70%) and specificity (74%). Meanwhile, in recent decades, it has been found that the pH-metry is not effective in a non-erosive reflux disease. We figured that the criteria and norms of pH-monitoring are not accurate. The purpose of this study is to determine the radiological norms of gastroesophageal junction (EGJ) and, to clarify the pathological physiology of GERD according to the new criteria and analysis of the literature. The analysis of the survey of 452 patients was done. Among them were 263 children aged from 1 day to 15 years who have applied to the Belarusian Center of Pediatric Surgery (BCPS) in 1983-1987 and 189 patients aged 15-92 years surveyed in the BCPC, as well as in the Government Geriatric Center (Israel) in 1994-2004. The standard radiography of the upper digestive tract was supplemented by provocative tests. In 21 children and 36 adults survey was carried out to locate space-occupying lesions of the chest or abdomen. Other patients had symptoms of GERD. The 21 children and 17 of 34 adult patients without of GERD symptoms had the same radiographic picture, indicating of the normal LES function: the width of the esophagus was the same all over and no more than 1.5 cm; in a horizontal position a peristaltic wave opens the LES and pushes its contents into the stomach without delay, despite the provocative tests. In 15 out of 34 adults with no symptoms of GERD radiographic findings show signs of LES weakness. In these patients, with a mild GERD, abdominal compression caused contraction of the GEJ with length of (3.60 +/- 0.8 cm) in adults which

  8. Endoscopic grading of the gastroesophageal flap valve is correlated with reflux activity and can predict the size of the esophageal hiatus in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Oliver Owen; Spaun, Georg; Antoniou, Stavros A; Rabl, Charlotte; Köhler, Gernot; Emmanuel, Klaus; Öfner, Dietmar; Pointner, Rudolph

    2013-12-01

    Endoscopic grading of the gastroesophageal flap valve (GEFV) is simple, reproducible, and suggested to be a good predictor of reflux activity. This study aimed to investigate the potential correlation between grading of the GEFV and quality of life (QoL), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, esophageal manometry, multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring (MII) data, and size of the hiatal defect. The study included 43 patients with documented chronic GERD who underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and ambulatory MII monitoring before laparoscopic fundoplication. The GEFV was graded 1-4 using Hill's classification. QoL was evaluated using the Gastrointestinal Quality-of-Life Index (GIQLI), and gastrointestinal symptoms were documented using a standardized questionnaire. The size of the esophageal hiatus was measured during surgery by calculating the hiatal surface area (HSA). Analysis of the correlation between QoL, GERD symptoms, esophageal manometry, MII data, HSA size, and GEFV grading was performed. Statistical significance was set at a p value of 0.05. A significant positive correlation was found between increased GEFV grade and DeMeester score, total number of acid reflux events, number of reflux events in the supine position, and number of reflux events in the upright position. Additionally, a significant positive correlation was found between HSA size and GEFV grading. No significant influence from intensity of GERD symptoms, QoL, and the GEFV grading was found. The mean LES pressures were reduced with increased GEFV grade, but not significantly. The GEFV plays a major role in the pathophysiology of GERD. The results underscore the importance of reconstructing a valve in patients with GERD and an altered geometry of the gastroesophageal junction when they receive a laparoscopic or endoscopic intervention.

  9. Clinical utility of esomeprazole for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in pediatric and adolescent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cardile S

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sabrina Cardile, Claudio RomanoDepartment of Pediatrics, University of Messina, ItalyAbstract: Gastroesophageal reflux is a common condition in the pediatric population, with an increasing incidence in the last few years. It can be defined as an effortless retrograde movement of gastric contents into the esophagus related to complex multifactorial pathogenesis, involving anatomical, hormonal, environmental, and genetic factors. In some cases, it may be associated with esophageal or extraesophageal symptoms (heartburn and regurgitation, and is defined as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. The therapeutic approach to gastroesophageal reflux in infants and children is often conservative, including changes in lifestyle (eg, posture and thickening of meals. If these children remain symptomatic after lifestyle changes (nutrition, feeding, and positional modification, or present with clinical red flags (poor weight gain, recurrent respiratory symptoms, or hematemesis and complications of GERD (esophagitis, bleeding, stricture, Barrett's esophagus, or adenocarcinoma it may be necessary to set up a proper diagnostic protocol. Proton pump inhibitors have been recommended as the most effective acid suppression therapy for adults and pediatric patients. Esomeprazole, the S-isomer of omeprazole, is the only single-isomer proton pump inhibitor available. The paper assesses the safety and tolerability of esomeprazole in pediatric and adolescent patients.Keywords: esomeprazole, gastroesophageal reflux disease, pump proton inhibitors

  10. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and gastroesophageal reflux disease : a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oor, Jelmer E; Roks, David J; Ünlü, Çagdas; Hazebroek, Eric J

    BACKGROUND: The effect of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) on the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) remains unclear. We aimed to outline the currently available literature. DATA SOURCES: All relevant databases were searched for publications examining the effect of laparoscopic SG on GERD.

  11. The diagnosis of gastro-esophageal reflux disease cannot be made with barium esophagograms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saleh, C. M. G.; Smout, A. J. P. M.; Bredenoord, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    For over 50 years, barium studies have been used to diagnose gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD), but the value of this test is controversial. Our study aimed to determine if barium esophagograms can be used to diagnose GERD. Barium esophagograms and pH-impedance measurement were performed in 20

  12. Endoscopic pH Monitoring for Patients with Suspected or Refractory Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian G Turner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wireless pH studies can offer prolonged pH monitoring, which may potentially facilitate the diagnosis and management of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the detection rate of abnormal esophageal acid exposure using prolonged pH monitoring in patients with suspected or refractory GERD symptoms.

  13. Pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of baclofen in pediatric patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiersma, H. E.; van Boxtel, C. J.; Butter, J. J.; van Aalderen, W. M. C.; Omari, T.; Benninga, M. A.

    2003-01-01

    Transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (TLESR) is the predominant mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in adults and children. Baclofen [4-amino-3-(p-chlorophenyl)-butanoic acid], a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-B receptor agonist used for the management of spasticity, has

  14. Limited ability of the proton-pump inhibitor test to identify patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bytzer, Peter; Jones, Roger; Vakil, Nimish

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy often is assessed to determine whether patients' symptoms are acid-related and if patients have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), although the accuracy of this approach is questionable. We evaluated the diagnostic performance of the PPI te...

  15. The effect of a sports drink on gastroesophageal reflux during a run-bike-run test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, H P; Wiersma, J W; Koerselman, J; Akkermans, L M; Bol, E; Mosterd, W L; de Vries, W R

    2000-01-01

    The effects of different modes of prolonged exercise and different drinks on gastroesophageal reflux and reflux-related symptoms were examined. In a cross-over design seven male triathletes performed two tests at one week intervals (50 min periods of alternately running, cycling and running at 70-75% VO2max), with supplementation of either a conventional sports drink (7% carbohydrates) or tap water. Gastroesophageal reflux (percentage time and number of periods esophageal pH < 4) was measured with an ambulant pH system before, during and after exercise. Percentage reflux time (+/- SEM) during running, cycling, running and recovery was 24.0 +/- 4.6, 8.2 +/- 4.8, 17.6 +/- 8.4 and 11.8 +/- 4.0 with carbohydrates and 7.4 +/- 2.9, 0 +/- 0, 2.4 +/- 1.4 and 0.2 +/- 0.2 with water, respectively. Reflux lasted longer during exercise as compared to the rest situation (5.6 + 1.4%), especially with carbohydrates, and lasted longer with carbohydrates than with water (P < 0.05; Wilcoxon signed rank test). In general, reflux lasted longer during running than during cycling (P < 0.05). Data on the number of reflux periods are concordant to these results. Chest pain was reported by one subject during running with carbohydrates. Heartburn during running was reported by two subjects with water and by one with carbohydrates. In conclusion, physical exercise increases gastroesophageal reflux, dependent on the mode of exercise and beverage used.

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux - correlation between diagnostic methods; Refluxo gastroesofagico - correlacao entre metodos diagnosticos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Maria das Gracas de Almeida; Penas, Maria Exposito; Fonseca, Lea Mirian Barbosa [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Radiologia-Medicina Nuclear; Lemme, Eponina Maria O. [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Faculdade de Medicina. Dept. de Clinia Medica-Gastroenterologia; Martinho, Maria Jose Ribeiro [Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Servico de Medicina Nuclear

    1999-02-01

    A group of 97 individuals with typical symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was submitted to gastroesophageal reflux scintigraphy (GES) and compared to the results obtained from endoscopy, histopathology and 24 hours pHmetry. Twenty-four healthy individuals were used as a control group and they have done only the GERS. The results obtained showed that: (a) the difference in the reflux index (RI) for the control group and the sick individuals was statistically significant (p < 0.0001); (b) the correlation between GERS and the other methods showed the following results: sensitivity, 84%; specificity, 95%; positive predictive value, 98%; negative predictive value, 67%; accuracy, 87%. We have concluded that the scintigraphic method should be used to confirm the diagnosis of GERD and also recommended as initial investiative procedure. (author)

  17. Age and sex influence on formation of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with chronic gastroduodenitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chemenkov Yu.V.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The research goal is to investigate age and sex influence on formation of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with chronic gastroduodenitis. Material and Methods. Features of acidity in esophagus and cardial part of stomach was studied in 175 children aged 4 to 17 years with chronic gastroduodenitis by pH-monitoring. pH-monitoring was carried by «Gastroscan-24». Age and sex characteristics have been identified on examination results. Results. Children of preschool age experience the most unfavorable reflux from the stomach to the esophagus. Boys experience the pathological reflux more severely. Conclusions: Effectiveness of esophageal clearance is lower in children of preschool age. Pathological reflux progresses are more favorably in a standing position, especially in children of preschool age. Pathological reflux occurs more often in the supine position and has a longer and more aggressive course in preschool age boys.

  18. Clinical management of infants and children with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whitworth, John; Christensen, Michael L

    2004-01-01

    .... Reflux is most commonly recognized in infants when it is associated with regurgitation, known as "spitting up," and it is usually a self-limited, benign process that has little or no effect on normal...

  19. [Treatment with sodium alginate of gastroesophageal reflux disease in childhood: efficacy and tolerance assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestri, L

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of efficacy of sodium alginate (Gaviscon) in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children 3-12 months old, assessed by 24 hours esophageal continuous pH monitoring. 28 children studied by 24 hours pH esophageal continuous monitoring before starting the treatment with Gaviscon 0.5 ml/Kg/dose four times a day, 20 minutes after meal. After 2 months of treatment, a second pH esophageal monitoring was performed, during therapy. Total number of refluxes, number of refluxes longer than 5 minutes and reflux index before and during treatment were evaluated, by multiple regression method. All pHmetric parameters showed a statistically significative improvement after 60 days of treatment.

  20. Incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease and positive maxillary antral cultures in children with symptoms of chronic rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nation, Javan; Kaufman, Michael; Allen, Meredith; Sheyn, Anthony; Coticchia, James

    2014-02-01

    Studies have shown that gastroesophageal reflux disease occurs more frequently than expected in children with chronic rhinosinusitis. The objective of this study is to further understand the relationship of pediatric chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with symptoms of rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, and chronic cough. A retrospective chart review of 63 children, ages 6 months to 10 years old with rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, and chronic cough. The patients underwent maxillary cultures, adenoidectomy, and distal third esophageal biopsies. Children with esophageal biopsies showing esophagitis were classified as positive for gastroesophageal reflux disease, and maxillary antral swabs growing a high density of bacteria were classified as positive for chronic rhinosinusitis. Six months to 5 years old children (n=43), 6 (14%) had simultaneous positive maxillary antral cultures and positive esophageal biopsies, 11 (26%) had positive esophageal biopsies alone, 23 (53%) had positive maxillary antral cultures alone, and 3 (7%) had neither. Six to 10 years old children (n=20), 9 (45%) had simultaneous positive maxillary antral cultures and positive esophageal biopsies, 1 (5%) patient had positive esophageal biopsies alone, 3 (15%) patients had positive maxillary antral cultures alone, and 7 (35%) patients had neither. Twenty-seven (42%) of the patients from the whole study had gastroesophageal reflux positive biopsies. The younger children were statistically likely to have chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease independently of each other (p=0.0002). A direct group comparison found the younger group to have independent chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease and the older group to have simultaneous chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (p=0.0006). In children with the presenting symptoms of rhinorrhea, nasal congestion, and chronic cough, younger children tend to have either chronic

  1. Two cases of esophageal eosinophilia: eosinophilic esophagitis or gastro-esophageal reflux disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozlem Yilmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE and gastro-esophageal reflux disease are among the major causes of isolated esophageal eosinophilia. Isolated esophageal eosinophilia meeting criteria for EoE may respond to proton pump inhibitor (PPI treatment. This entity is termed proton pumps inhibitor responsive esophageal eosinophilia (PPI-REE. Gastro-esophageal reflux is thought to comprise a subgroup of patients with PPI-REE. According to the latest guidelines, PPI responsiveness distinguishes people with PPI-REE from patients having EoE (non-responders. In this report, two unusual cases with findings belonging to both EoE and PPI-REE are discussed with known and unknown facts.

  2. Is there a changing trend in surgical management of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedon, Mahmud; Gourgiotis, Stavros; Germanos, Stylianos

    2007-09-07

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) is a pathological process in infants manifesting as poor weight gain, signs of esophagitis, persistent respiratory symptoms and changes in neurobehaviour. It is currently estimated that approximately one in every 350 children will experience severe symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux necessitating surgical treatment. Surgery for GORD is currently one of the common major operations performed in infants and children. Most of the studies found favour laparoscopic approach which has surpassed open antireflux surgery as the gold standard of surgical management for GORD. However, it must be interpreted with caution due to the limitation of the studies, especially the small number of subject included in these studies. This review reports the changing trends in the surgical treatment of GORD in children.

  3. Management of gastroesophageal reflux disease in pediatric patients: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Esposito C; Roberti A; Turrà F; Escolino M; Cerulo M; Settimi A; Farina A.; Vecchio P; Di Mezza A

    2015-01-01

    Ciro Esposito, Agnese Roberti, Francesco Turrà, Maria Escolino, Mariapina Cerulo, Alessandro Settimi, Alessandra Farina, Pietro Vecchio, Antonio Di Mezza Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Pediatric Surgery, “Federico II” University of Naples, Naples, Italy Abstract: Gastroesophageal reflux (GER), defined as the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, is a physiologic process that occurs throughout the day in healthy infants and children. Gas...

  4. GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE AMONG CHILDREN AS A RISK FACTOR FOR ESOPHAGUS ADENOCARCINOMA

    OpenAIRE

    N.V. Gerasimova; A.V. Myzin; S.V. Bel'mer; S.A. Polyudov; V.P. Nazhimov

    2006-01-01

    Within recent years, pediatricians have paid special attention to gastroesophageal reflux disease in relation to the risk of the metaplastic changes of mucous coat of esophagus. Intestinal metaplasia is an essential risk factor for the growth of esophagus adenocarcinoma. According to our data, diseases of the lower third of esophagus and Z-line were observed among almost 6% of patients, who underwent endoscopic examination. In the research, where 109 children with protractedly nonhealing defe...

  5. Clinical inquiries. What is the best treatment for gastroesophageal reflux and vomiting in infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Vanessa; Wright, Sarah Towner; Bell, Alfreda D

    2005-04-01

    The literature on pediatric reflux can be divided into studies addressing clinically apparent reflux (vomiting or regurgitation) and reflux as measured by pH probe or other methods. Sodium alginate reduces vomiting and improves parents' assessment of symptoms (strength of recommendation [SOR]: B, small randomized controlled trial [RCT]). Formula thickened with rice cereal decreases the number of postprandial emesis episodes in infants with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) (SOR: B, small RCT). There are conflicting data on the effect of carob bean gum as a formula thickener and its effect on regurgitation frequency (SOR: B, small RCTs). Metoclopramide does not affect vomiting or regurgitation, but is associated with greater weight gain in infants over 3 months with reflux (SOR: B, low-quality RCTs). Carob bean gum used as a formula thickener decreases reflux as measured by intraluminal impedance but not as measured by pH probe (SOR: B, RCT). Omeprazole and metoclopramide each improve the reflux index as measured by esophageal pH probe (SOR: B, RCT). Evidence is conflicting for other commonly used conservative measures (such as positional changes) or other medications for symptomatic relief of infant GERD. There is very limited evidence or expert opinion regarding breastfed infants, particularly with regard to preservation of breastfeeding during therapy.

  6. Management of gastroesophageal reflux disease in pediatric patients: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esposito C

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ciro Esposito, Agnese Roberti, Francesco Turrà, Maria Escolino, Mariapina Cerulo, Alessandro Settimi, Alessandra Farina, Pietro Vecchio, Antonio Di Mezza Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Pediatric Surgery, “Federico II” University of Naples, Naples, Italy Abstract: Gastroesophageal reflux (GER, defined as the passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, is a physiologic process that occurs throughout the day in healthy infants and children. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD occurs when gastric contents flow back into the esophagus and produce symptoms. The most common esophageal symptoms are vomiting and regurgitation. Lifestyle changes are the first-line therapy in both GER and GERD; medications are explicitly indicated only for patients with GERD. Surgical therapies are reserved for children with intractable symptoms or who are at risk for life-threatening complications of GERD. The laparoscopic Nissen antireflux procedure is the gold standard for the treatment of this pathology. A literature search on PubMed and Cochrane Database was conducted with regard to the management of GERD in children to provide a view of state-of-the-art treatment of GERD in pediatrics. Keywords: gastroesophageal reflux, children, medical therapy of GERD, surgical treatment of GERD, laparoscopic Nissen procedure

  7. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease in premature infants using a radionuclide method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishihara, Michiomi [Tokyo Metropolitan Hospital of Ohkubo (Japan)

    2001-12-01

    The cases of 36 very low birthweight infants (premature group) and 52 mature infants with birth weights as low as 1500 g (mature group) with gastro-esephageal reflux disease (GERD) were reviewed. These infants received 24 hour pH monitoring, reflux scintigraphy, gastric emptying, and antrum motility measurement. The results of 24-hour pH monitoring of the premature group are not different from these of the mature group. Time required for reflux scintigraphy of the premature group is higher than that of the mature group. Emptying time of premature group is slower than that of the mature group. Dietary management in premature infants with GERD is important. Using a nasoduodenal feeding tube is quite effective. Radionuclide method, in addition to 24-hour pH monitoring, should be used to evaluate total gastroesophageal function. (author)

  8. [Esophageal diseases: gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett's esophagus, achalasia and eosinophilic esophagitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Xavier; Villoria, Albert

    2013-10-01

    Important new advances were presented in esophageal disease in Digestive Disease Week 2013. A highlight was confirmation of the high efficacy of weight loss to treat symptoms of reflux and an interesting pilot study suggesting that a simple ligature with supra- and infracardial bands could be an effective technique in esophageal reflux. If the excellent results and safety and efficacy of this technique are confirmed in the long term, it could revolutionize the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Also of note this year was the presentation of multiple studies validating a new technique, peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) for the endoscopic treatment of achalasia. This technique seems to have excellent efficacy and safety. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. An alginate-antacid formulation localizes to the acid pocket to reduce acid reflux in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohof, Wout O; Bennink, Roel J; Smout, Andre J P M; Thomas, Edward; Boeckxstaens, Guy E

    2013-12-01

    Alginate rafts (polysaccharide polymers that precipitate into a low-density viscous gel when they contact gastric acid) have been reported to form at the acid pocket, an unbuffered pool of acid that floats on top of ingested food and causes postprandial acid reflux. We studied the location of an alginate formulation in relation to the acid pocket and the corresponding effects on reflux parameters and acid pocket positioning in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We randomly assigned patients with symptomatic GERD and large hiatal hernias to groups who were given either (111)In-labeled alginate-antacid (n = 8, Gaviscon Double Action Liquid) or antacid (n = 8, Antagel) after a standard meal. The relative positions of labeled alginate and acid pocket were analyzed for 2 hours by using scintigraphy; reflux episodes were detected by using high-resolution manometry and pH-impedance monitoring. The alginate-antacid label localized to the acid pocket. The number of acid reflux episodes was significantly reduced in patients receiving alginate-antacid (3.5; range, 0-6.5; P = .03) compared with those receiving antacid (15; range, 5-20), whereas time to acid reflux was significantly increased in patients receiving alginate-antacid (63 minutes; range, 23-92) vs those receiving antacid (14 minutes; range, 9-23; P = .01). The acid pocket was located below the diaphragm in 71% of patients given alginate-antacid vs 21% of those given antacid (P = .08). There was an inverse correlation between a subdiaphragm position of the acid pocket and acid reflux (r = -0.76, P < .001). In a study of 16 patients with GERD, we observed that the alginate-antacid raft localizes to the postprandial acid pocket and displaces it below the diaphragm to reduce postprandial acid reflux. These findings indicate the importance of the acid pocket in GERD pathogenesis and establish alginate-antacid as an appropriate therapy for postprandial acid reflux. Copyright © 2013 AGA Institute

  10. Pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease: new understanding in a new era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herregods, T V K; Bredenoord, A J; Smout, A J P M

    2015-09-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has increased in the last decades and it is now one of the most common chronic diseases. Throughout time our insight in the pathophysiology of GERD has been characterized by remarkable back and forth swings, often prompted by new investigational techniques. Even today, the pathophysiology of GERD is not fully understood but it is now recognized to be a multifactorial disease. Among the factors that have been shown to be involved in the provocation or increase of reflux, are sliding hiatus hernia, low lower esophageal sphincter pressure, transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxation, the acid pocket, obesity, increased distensibility of the esophagogastric junction, prolonged esophageal clearance, and delayed gastric emptying. Moreover, multiple mechanisms influence the perception of GERD symptoms, such as the acidity of the refluxate, its proximal extent, the presence of gas in the refluxate, duodenogastroesophageal reflux, longitudinal muscle contraction, mucosal integrity, and peripheral and central sensitization. Understanding the pathophysiology of GERD is important for future targets for therapy as proton pump inhibitor-refractory GERD symptoms remain a common problem. In this review we provide an overview of the mechanisms leading to reflux and the factors influencing perception, in the light of historical developments. It is clear that further research remains necessary despite the recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiology of GERD. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Current pharmacological management of gastro-esophageal reflux in children: an evidence-based systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tighe, Mark P; Afzal, Nadeem A; Bevan, Amanda; Beattie, R Mark

    2009-01-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) is a common phenomenon, characterized by the regurgitation of the gastric contents into the esophagus. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the term applied when GER is associated with sequelae or faltering growth. The main aims of treatment are to alleviate symptoms, promote normal growth, and prevent complications. Medical treatments for children include (i) altering the viscosity of the feeds with alginates; (ii) altering the gastric pH with antacids, histamine H(2) receptor antagonists, and proton pump inhibitors; and (iii) altering the motility of the gut with prokinetics, such as metoclopramide and domperidone. Our aim was to systematically review the evidence base for the medical treatment of gastro-oesophageal reflux in children. We searched PubMed, AdisOnline, MEDLINE, and EMBASE, and then manually searched reviews from the past 5 years using the key words 'gastro-esophageal' (or 'gastroesophageal'), 'reflux', 'esophagitis', and 'child$' (or 'infant') and 'drug$' or 'therapy'. Articles included were in English and had an abstract. We used the levels of evidence adopted by the Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine in Oxford to assess the studies for all reported outcomes that were meaningful to clinicians making decisions about treatment. This included the impact of clinical symptoms, pH study profile, and esophageal appearance at endoscopy. Five hundred and eight articles were reviewed, of which 56 papers were original, relevant clinical trials. These were assessed further. Many of the studies considered had significant methodological flaws, although based on available evidence the following statements can be made. For infant GERD, ranitidine and omeprazole and probably lansoprazole are safe and effective medications, which promote symptomatic relief, and endoscopic and histological healing of esophagitis. Gaviscon(R) Infant sachets are safe and can improve symptoms of reflux. There is less evidence to support the use of

  12. A prospective study of the effect of gastroesophageal reflux disease treatment on children with otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoul, Edward D; Goldstein, Nira A; Koliskor, Bernard; Weedon, Jeremy; Jackson, Alison; Goldsmith, Ari J

    2011-01-01

    To demonstrate improvements in validated quality-of-life measures for otitis media and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and an objective score for pediatric reflux obtained by fiberoptic laryngoscopy after treatment with antireflux precautions and therapy in children diagnosed as having either recurrent acute otitis media or otitis media with effusion and GERD. Prospective, before-and-after intervention study. Hospital-based pediatric otolaryngology practice. Population-based sample of 47 patients (mean age, 19.5 months). Standard antireflux therapy for 2 consecutive 12-week periods. Otitis Media 6-Item quality-of-life survey, Infant GERD Questionnaire-Revised, GERD Symptom Questionnaire for Young Children, Pediatric Reflux Finding Score, and speech awareness threshold. Follow-up data were available for 37 patients. Mean (SD) change scores for Otitis Media 6-Item quality-of-life survey were 1.6 (1.1) at visit 2 and 1.5 (1.1) at visit 3 (P Infant GERD Questionnaire-Revised and GERD Symptom Questionnaire for Young Children at visit 2 and for Infant GERD Questionnaire-Revised at visit 3. Mean (SD) change scores for the Pediatric Reflux Finding Score were 6.4 (4.9) at visit 2 and 8.0 (7.2) at visit 3 (P reflux on fiberoptic laryngoscopy. Otitis media was considered by the examining physician to be clinically improved in 28 of 37 children (76%; 95% confidence interval, 60%-87%) at visit 2 and in 6 of 10 children (60%; 95% confidence interval, 31%-83%) at visit 3. Nine children (19.1%) required myringotomy tube placement. Children with otitis media with effusion or recurrent acute otitis media and GERD have improved quality of life following treatment with antireflux therapy. Control of gastroesophageal reflux may play a role in the management of otitis media and avoidance of tympanostomy.

  13. The influence of Helicobacter pylori infection on the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with renal insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stolić Radojica

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Aim. Gastric acid is a key factor in the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease. A plausible mechanism by which the Helicobacter pylori infection might protect against reflux disease is by its propensity to produce atrophic gastritis. The aim of the study was to establish the influence of Helicobacter pylori infection on the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux in patients with different stages of renal insufficiency. Methods. The examination was organized as a prospective, clinical study and involved 68 patients − 33 patients with preterminal stage of renal failure and 35 patients with terminal renal insufficiency. Due to dyspeptic difficulties, in all the patients there was preformed upper esophagogastroscopy and Helicobacter pylori infection was found by ureasa test. Results. The patients with preterminal renal insufficiency were significantly younger than patients with terminal renal failure (53.4±11.1 vs. 65.4±12.3 years; p = 0.014. There was found a statistically significant difference between the groups in Helicobacter pylori infection (p = 0.03, hiatal hernia (p = 0.008, gastroesophageal reflux disease (p = 0.007, and duodenal ulcer (p = 0.002. Using the multiple non-parametric correlative analysis there was confirmed a negative correlation between Helicobacter pylori infection and gastro-esophageal reflux disease (Kendal τB = -0.523; p = 0.003 and hiatal hernia (Kendal τB = 0.403; p = 0.021, while there was found a positive correlation between gastro-esophageal reflux disease and hiatal hernia (Kendal τB = 0.350; p = 0.044. Conclusion. Helicobacter pylori infection is a significant protective parameter of the incidence of gastro-esophageal reflux disease in patients with both pre-terminal and terminal renal insufficiency.

  14. Cardiaplication: a novel surgical technique for refractory gastroesophageal reflux in the pediatric population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sarah J; Pandya, Samir; Clifton, Matthew S; Bhatia, Amina; Wulkan, Mark L

    2011-11-01

    We encountered 3 patients with severe gastroesophageal reflux disease and tubular stomachs precluding fundoplication. Here, we report the use of an innovative technique, cardiaplication, as an alternative approach for antireflux surgery. Three infants with medically refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) were referred for fundoplication. In each case, the patient's anatomy prevented a traditional fundoplication from being performed. A cardiaplication was performed by invaginating the cardia of the stomach at the angle of His and securing the invaginated tissue with interrupted silk suture. The plication tubularized the cardia of the stomach, essentially increasing the intra-abdominal portion of the esophagus and altering the angle of His. The imbrication also creates a flapper valve over the distal esophagus, further limiting potential reflux. The charts for the infants who received cardiaplication were reviewed. Radiographic studies and clinical notes for the presence of persistent reflux were evaluated. Cardiaplication was completed in 3 patients with GERD. All cases were initiated laparoscopically and one was converted to an open procedure secondary to dense adhesive disease. Each child was initiated on feeds between postoperative day 2 and 3. Two of the 3 patients were tolerating goal feeds with-in 2 days. The third patient reached goal feeds on day 16. Postoperative imaging (upper gastrointestinal series [UGI]) was obtained in 2 of the 3 patients. At follow-up (13, 7, and 4 months), all 3 patients are clinically free of symptoms of GERD. Delayed radiographic imaging has confirmed that the patients are no longer refluxing. Based on preliminary findings, cardiaplication appears to be a safe and effective surgical technique for the management of severe GERD in infants. We performed cardiaplication out of necessity; however, after further testing this may prove to be an optimal approach, as it can be performed without disruption of the hiatus.

  15. [Preoperative workup to assess indication for laparoscopic treatment in gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Holanda, S; Urdiales, G L; Fernández, J A; España, L; Rodríguez-Rubio, J; Martínez, M D; Fernández, F; Tojo, S; Fernández-Muñiz, P; Calleja, M; Valverde, D

    2008-07-01

    antireflux surgery performed by an experienced surgeon is a maintenance option for patients with well-documented gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Well-documented GERD is difficult to find, as GERD is a multifactorial disease in which the gastroesophageal junction, with its special anatomical and functional components, is important. In order to examine patient preoperative workups, and their indication for surgical treatment in GERD, we retrospectively studied patients who underwent a laparoscopic antireflux procedure. preoperative workups in patients from our health care area who underwent a laparoscopic antireflux procedure from December 1997 to February 2007 were retrospectively analyzed. Data related to epidemiological findings, symptoms, morphologic and functional evaluation, medical therapy, and indication for surgical treatment were recorded and statistically analyzed by means of a bivariate test. Differences were significant when the p value was equal to or less than 0.05. 100 patients (50 % female, 51.31 +/- 13.53 years of age) underwent a laparoscopic antireflux surgery after 56.47 +/- 61.33 months with symptoms. Ninety-five percent of patients had an anatomical abnormality. The pH monitoring test diagnosed three quarters of cases. The most frequent indication for GERD treatment was persistent or recurrent esophagitis despite adequate medical treatment (52 cases). based on our preoperative workup, as described, 100 percent of subjects were well documented and diagnosed with GERD (both non-erosive reflux disease and erosive reflux disease), and their indication for laparoscopic treatment was retrospectively assessed in 94% of cases.

  16. Managing peptic ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux disease in elderly Chinese patients – focus on esomeprazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang RS

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Raymond SY Tang, Justin CY Wu Institute of Digestive Disease, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong Abstract: Peptic ulcer disease (PUD and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD are not uncommon in elderly patients. Clinical presentations of these acid-related disorders may be atypical in the geriatric population. Older individuals are at increased risk for poor outcomes in complicated PUD and for development of GERD complications. Multiple risk factors (eg, Helicobacter pylori [HP], use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], aspirin contribute to the development of PUD. Recent data has shown that HP-negative, NSAID-negative idiopathic peptic ulcers are on the rise and carry a higher risk of recurrent ulcer bleeding and mortality. Effective management of PUD in the geriatric population relies on identification and modification of treatable risk factors. Elderly patients with GERD often require long-term acid suppressive therapy. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI including esomeprazole are effective in the treatment of reflux esophagitis, maintenance of GERD symptomatic control, and management of PUD as well as its complications. Potential safety concerns of long-term PPI use have been reported in the literature. Clinicians should balance the risks and benefits before committing elderly patients to long-term PPI therapy. Keywords: elderly patients, peptic ulcer disease, gastroesophageal reflux disease, proton pump inhibitor, esomeprazole

  17. Gastroesophageal reflux in asymptomatic obese subjects: An esophageal impedance-pH study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyüz, Filiz; Uyanıkoglu, Ahmet; Ermis, Fatih; Arıcı, Serpil; Akyüz, Ümit; Baran, Bülent; Pinarbasi, Binnur; Gul, Nurdan

    2015-03-14

    To investigate the relationship between reflux and body mass index (BMI) in the asymptomatic obese population using the impedance-pH technique. Gastroesophageal reflux is frequent in the obese population. However, the relationship between acid reflux and BMI in asymptomatic obese people is unclear. Forty-six obese (BMI > 25 kg/m(2)) people were enrolled in this prospective study. We evaluated the demographic findings and 24-h impedance pH values of the whole group. Gas, acid (pH 30 kg/m(2)). Demographic and endoscopic findings, and impedance results were similar in these two groups. However, there was a positive correlation between BMI and total and supine pH < 4 episodes (P = 0.002, r = 0.414; P = 0.000, r = 0.542), pH < 4 reflux time (P = 0.015, r = 0.319; P = 0.003, r = 0.403), and DeMeester score (P = 0.012, r = 0.333). Acid reflux is correlated with BMI in asymptomatic obese individuals.

  18. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a Patient with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: 4-Year Followup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Coelho Okida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of the main causes of dental erosion. The aim of this case presented is to describe the prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with GERD after 4 years of followup. A 33-year-old male patient complained about tooth sensitivity. The lingual surface of the maxillary anterior teeth and the cusps of the upper and lower posterior teeth presented wear. It was suspected that the feeling of heartburn reported by the patient associated with the intake of sports supplements (isotonics was causing gastroesophageal changes. The patient was referred to a gastroenterologist and was diagnosed with GERD. Dental treatment was performed with metal-free crowns and porcelain veneers after medical treatment of the disease. With the change in eating habits, the treatment of GERD and lithium disilicate ceramics provided excellent cosmetic results after 4 years and the patient reported satisfaction with the treatment.

  19. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a Patient with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: 4-Year Followup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okida, Ricardo Coelho; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Vechiato Filho, Aljomar José; Andreotti, Agda Marobo; de Medeiros, Rodrigo Antonio; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2014-01-01

    The gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is one of the main causes of dental erosion. The aim of this case presented is to describe the prosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with GERD after 4 years of followup. A 33-year-old male patient complained about tooth sensitivity. The lingual surface of the maxillary anterior teeth and the cusps of the upper and lower posterior teeth presented wear. It was suspected that the feeling of heartburn reported by the patient associated with the intake of sports supplements (isotonics) was causing gastroesophageal changes. The patient was referred to a gastroenterologist and was diagnosed with GERD. Dental treatment was performed with metal-free crowns and porcelain veneers after medical treatment of the disease. With the change in eating habits, the treatment of GERD and lithium disilicate ceramics provided excellent cosmetic results after 4 years and the patient reported satisfaction with the treatment. PMID:24715992

  20. [Research advances in the relationship between cow's milk allergy and gastroesoph-ageal reflux in infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming-Fang; Jiang, Mi-Zu

    2016-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and cow's milk allergy (CMA) are common disorders in infants. In recent years, more and more research has investigated the relationship between these two diseases. Some studies reported that about half of the cases of GER in infants younger than 1 year may be an association with CMA. Therefore, overall understanding the role of CMA on the pathogenesis of GER has a great importance on improving clinical level of diagnosis and therapy. This review article tried to elaborate advances in research on the relationship between CMA and GER in infants, including epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

  1. Dental Erosion in a Partially Edentulous Patient with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    PICOS, ALINA MONICA; PICOS, ANDREI; NICOARA, PETRA; CRAITOIU, MONICA M.

    2014-01-01

    Diseases such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), bulimia, anorexia, and extrinsic alimentary factors may cause dental erosion (DE). The minimally invasive therapeutic attitude preserves the remaining healthy tooth structure. In the earlier stages, the direct restoration of dental lesions is possible, using composite materials. In advanced stages of DE, prosthetic treatments are recommended for stable esthetic and functional results. We present a case of DE in a partially edentulous patient who benefited from a complex therapy. The prosthetic project of the case involves ceramic veneers associated with dental and implant supported fixed prosthesis for the restoration of esthetics, mastication, phonetics and their maintenance. PMID:26528037

  2. Dental Erosion in a Partially Edentulous Patient with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picos, Alina Monica; Picos, Andrei; Nicoara, Petra; Craitoiu, Monica M

    2014-01-01

    Diseases such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), bulimia, anorexia, and extrinsic alimentary factors may cause dental erosion (DE). The minimally invasive therapeutic attitude preserves the remaining healthy tooth structure. In the earlier stages, the direct restoration of dental lesions is possible, using composite materials. In advanced stages of DE, prosthetic treatments are recommended for stable esthetic and functional results. We present a case of DE in a partially edentulous patient who benefited from a complex therapy. The prosthetic project of the case involves ceramic veneers associated with dental and implant supported fixed prosthesis for the restoration of esthetics, mastication, phonetics and their maintenance.

  3. [Evaluating an effectiveness of surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease combined with hiatal hernia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozharovskiy, V V; Tsyganov, A A; Mozharovskiy, K V; Tarasov, A A

    To assess an effectiveness of surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) combined with hiatal hernia (HH). The trial included 96 patients with GERD and HH who were divided into 2 groups. The principal difference between groups was the use of surgery in the main group and therapeutic treatment in the comparison group. The effectiveness of surgical treatment is superior to therapeutic treatment of GERD by more than 2.5 times. HH combined with GERD is an indication for surgical treatment. Fundoplication cuff should not lead to angular and rotational esophageal deformation. Nissen procedure in Donahue modification (Short Floppy Nissen) simulates optimally the geometry of esophago-gastric junction and His angle.

  4. Comorbidities in severe asthma: frequency of rhinitis, nasal polyposis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, vocal cord dysfunction and bronchiectasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Bisaccioni

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Severe asthma is found in approximately 10% of patients with asthma. Some factors associated with worse asthma control include rhinitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, vocal cord dysfunction (VCD, nasal polyposis and bronchiectasis. Therefore, we evaluated the prevalence of these illnesses in patients with severe asthma. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of data obtained from electronic medical records of patients with severe asthma between January 2006 and June 2008. Symptoms of rhinitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease were evaluated as well as intolerance to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. We evaluated the results of esophagogastroduodenoscopy, videolaryngoscopy and CT scans of the chest in order to confirm gastroesophageal reflux disease, nasal polyposis, vocal cord dysfunction and bronchiectasis. RESULTS: We evaluated 245 patients. Rhinitis symptoms were present in 224 patients (91.4%; 18 (7.3% had intolerance to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and 8 (3.3% had nasal polyposis. Symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease were reported for 173 (70.6% patients, although the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease was confirmed based on esophagogastroduodenoscopy or laryngoscopy findings in just 58 (33.6% patients. Vocal cord dysfunction was suspected in 16 (6.5% and confirmed through laryngoscopy in 4 (1.6%. The patient records provided CT scans of the chest for 105 patients, and 26 (24.8% showed bronchiectasis. DISCUSSION: Rhinitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease were the most common comorbidities observed, in addition to bronchiectasis. Therefore, in patients with severe asthma, associated diseases should be investigated as the cause of respiratory symptoms and uncontrolled asthma.

  5. LINX(®) Reflux Management System in chronic gastroesophageal reflux: a novel effective technology for restoring the natural barrier to reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavina, Luigi; Saino, Greta; Lipham, John C; Demeester, Tom R

    2013-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) results from incompetency of the lower esophageal sphincter that allows the contents of the stomach to reflux into the esophagus, the airways, and the mouth. The disease affects about 10% of the western population and has a profound negative impact on quality of life. The majority of patients are successfully treated with proton-pump inhibitors, but up to 40% have incomplete relief of symptoms even after dose adjustment. The laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication represents the surgical gold standard, but is largely underused because of the level of technical difficulty and the prevalence of side effects. These factors have contributed to the propensity of patients to continue with medical therapy despite inadequate symptom control and complications of the disease. As a consequence, a significant 'therapy gap' in the treatment of GERD remains evident in current clinical practice. The LINX(®) Reflux Management System (Torax Medical, St. Paul, MN, USA) is designed to provide a permanent solution to GERD by augmenting the sphincter barrier with a standardized, reproducible laparoscopic procedure that does not alter gastric anatomy and is easily reversible. Two single-group trials confirmed that a magnetic device designed to augment the lower esophageal sphincter can be safely and effectively implanted using a standard laparoscopic approach. The device decreased esophageal acid exposure, improved reflux symptoms and quality of life, and allowed cessation of proton-pump inhibitors in the majority of patients.

  6. Residence of liquids in the infra-junctional portion of the proximal stomach in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbieri C.L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease may have disturbances of gastric motility, which could play a role in the pathophysiology of the disease. Recent studies have suggested that the gastric region just below the gastroesophageal junction may have a distinct physiological behavior. We determined whether patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease have abnormal residence of food in the infra-junctional portion of the stomach after ingesting a liquid nutrient meal. Fasted adult patients with reflux disease (N = 11 and healthy volunteers (N = 10 ingested a liquid meal (320 ml; 437 kcal labeled with 99m technetium-phytate and their total gastric emptying half-time and regional emptying from the stomach infra-junctional region were determined. In 8 patients, episodes of postprandial acidic reflux to the esophagus were measured for 2 h using pH monitoring. There were no differences between reflux patients and controls regarding total gastric emptying time (median: 68 min; range: 39-123 min vs 65 min and 60-99 min, respectively; P > 0.50. Food residence in the infra-junctional area was similar for patients and controls: 23% (range: 20-30 vs 27% (range: 19-30%; P = 0.28 and emptying from this area paralleled total gastric emptying (Rs = 0.79; P = 0.04. There was no correlation between residence of food in the infra-junctional area and episodes of gastroesophageal reflux (Rs = 0.06; P = 0.88. We conclude that it is unlikely that regional motor disturbances involving the infra-junctional region of the stomach play a relevant role in the pathogenesis of acidic gastroesophageal reflux.

  7. Lower pH values of weakly acidic refluxes as determinants of heartburn perception in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with normal esophageal acid exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bortoli, N; Martinucci, I; Savarino, E; Franchi, R; Bertani, L; Russo, S; Ceccarelli, L; Costa, F; Bellini, M; Blandizzi, C; Savarino, V; Marchi, S

    2016-01-01

    Multichannel impedance pH monitoring has shown that weakly acidic refluxes are able to generate heartburn. However, data on the role of different pH values, ranging between 4 and 7, in the generation of them are lacking. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether different pH values of weakly acidic refluxes play a differential role in provoking reflux symptoms in endoscopy-negative patients with physiological esophageal acid exposure time and positive symptom index and symptom association probability for weakly acidic refluxes. One hundred and forty-three consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, nonresponders to proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), were allowed a washout from PPIs before undergoing: upper endoscopy, esophageal manometry, and multichannel impedance pH monitoring. In patients with both symptom index and symptom association probability positive for weakly acidic reflux, each weakly acidic reflux was evaluated considering exact pH value, extension, physical characteristics, and correlation with heartburn. Forty-five patients with normal acid exposure time and positive symptom association probability for weakly acidic reflux were identified. The number of refluxes not heartburn related was higher than those heartburn related. In all distal and proximal liquid refluxes, as well as in distal mixed refluxes, the mean pH value of reflux events associated with heartburn was significantly lower than that not associated. This condition was not confirmed for proximal mixed refluxes. Overall, a low pH of weakly acidic reflux represents a determinant factor in provoking heartburn. This observation contributes to better understand the pathophysiology of symptoms generated by weakly acidic refluxes, paving the way toward the search for different therapeutic approaches to this peculiar condition of esophageal hypersensitivity. © 2014 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  8. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms in the Greek general population: prevalence and risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spantideas N

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nikolaos Spantideas,1 Eirini Drosou,1 Anastasia Bougea,2 Dimitrios Assimakopoulos,3 1Athens Speech Language and Swallowing Institute, Glyfada, Athens, Greece; 2Athens Speech Language and Swallowing Institute, Agios Dimitrios, Athens, Greece; 3Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Medical School of Ioannina University, University Hospital of Ioannina, Ioannina, Greece Background and aims: Population-based data regarding the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in Greece are very poor. This study estimated the prevalence of GERD symptoms and their risk factors in the Greek adult population.Methods: A self-administered questionnaire was answered by a randomly selected population of 340 subjects. The question regarding “heartburn, chest pain, indigestion, or stomach acid coming up” as included in the Reflux Symptom Index was used for prevalence assessment.Results: The monthly prevalence of GERD symptoms was found to be 52.0% in the Greek general population, with no statistically significant difference between the two sexes (P>0.05. The age group of 65–79 years showed a higher prevalence rate of GERD. Symptom severity was found to be mild (59.3% or moderate (27.1%. The number of cigarettes smoked daily (but not smoking duration as well as the number of alcoholic drinks consumed daily (but not the duration of alcohol drinking were found to be related to GERD symptoms. No reported concomitant disease or medication was found to be related with GERD symptoms.Conclusion: The prevalence of GERD symptoms in the Greek general population was found to be 52.0%. Tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking but not concomitant disease or medications were found to be related with GERD symptoms. Keywords: gastroesophageal reflux, reflux, epidemiologic study, risk factors

  9. [Use of omeprazole and esomeprazole in patients suffering from bronchial asthma with associated gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maev, I V; Viuchnova, E S; Balashova, N N; Shchekina, M I

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study is a comparative assessment of the clinical efficiency of Omeprazole and Esomeprazole in patients suffering from bronchial asthma (BA) with associated gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). 101 patients with BA and associated GERD being under study were divided into three groups depending on the way of application of the anti-reflux therapy. Patients from the I group were administered Omeprazole--20 mg per day, patients from the II group received Omeprazole--mg per day, and patients from the III group were administered Esomeprazole--40 mg per day, the treatment courses of each group amounting to eight weeks. The clinical efficiency indices of pulmonary (CEIP) and esophageal (CEIE) symptoms were calculated when the results of the study were summed. The decrease of CEIP and CEIE against the background of the anti-reflux therapy (for example, the CEIP of patients from the III group decreased from 14.9 +/- 1.5 (before the treatment) to 2.9 +/- 0.6 points following eight weeks of treatment (p Omeprazole in the dose equal to 40 mg per day and the impact of Esomeprazole in the same dose on the CEIP. Thus, the CEIP amounted to 10.1 +/- 1.2 points in the II group and 8.5 +/- 1.4 points in the III group (p > 0.05) after the fourth week of treatment. At the same time, we have discovered a reliable advantage of Esomeprazole as compared with Omeprazole for the improvement of the CEIE. The therapy of BA with associated GERD with Omeprazole in the dose equal to 40 mg per day or Esomeprazole in the dose equal to 40 mg per day contributes to the reliable improvement of both pulmonary and esophageal symptoms, and application of Esomeprazole results in a faster reduction of bronchial obstruction and gastroesophageal reflux.

  10. COMPARISON OF SAFETY AND EFFICACY OF LEVOSULPIRIDE AND ITOPRIDE IN TREATMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Ibrahim Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD is a common condition caused by reflux of the liquid acidic contents of the stomach into the oesophagus. Prokinetic medications can be used to treat or control the disease. Such medications can have mild-toserious adverse effects. Levosulpiride and itopride are two such medications, which are used for treating GERD. The aim of the study is to assess the safety and efficacy of levosulpiride and itopride in the management of GERD and to study the side effects and treatment outcome. MATERIALS AND METHODS A total 210 patients aged 18 to 90 years, 99 males and 111 females (male:female ratio of 1:1.1 with reflux oesophagitis were divided into three groups and an endoscopy test was done before starting treatment. The control group received rabeprazole and the two test groups received levosulpiride and itopride. Clinical adverse events were recorded at the end of week 1 and week 2. Following treatment, relief of symptoms was assessed at the end of 2 weeks. RESULTS There were total 210 patients (99 males and 111 females. The male-to-female ratio was 1:1.1. GERD was more common in the 31-50 year age group. Most common symptoms were of dyspepsia, regurgitation, vomiting and heartburn. Improvement of symptoms during the treatment was seen in 53% levosulpiride and 41% itopride patients, respectively. The main adverse effects were abdominal pain and nausea. The percentage of nausea was high with itopride than levosulpiride. CONCLUSION Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common problem frequently seen in both genders and in younger people. Symptomatic relief and endoscopic recovery is early with levosulpiride than itopride. Levosulpiride gives better quality of life earlier in the treatment than itopride and has lesser side effects and better healing outcome.

  11. Epithelial Thickness is a Marker of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieth, Michael; Mastracci, Luca; Vakil, Nimish; Dent, John; Wernersson, Börje; Baldycheva, Irina; Wissmar, Jenny; Ruth, Magnus; Fiocca, Roberto

    2016-11-01

    Histologic criteria have been refined for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We aimed to evaluate these criteria for the assessment of GERD and to measure interassessor agreement. We performed a post hoc analysis of data from the Diamond study (NCT 00291746), conducted in Europe and Canada on adults with frequent upper gastrointestinal symptoms who had not taken a proton pump inhibitor in the previous 2 months. GERD was diagnosed based on the presence of 1 or more of the following: reflux esophagitis, pathologic esophageal acid exposure, and/or positive symptom-acid association probability. Nonerosive reflux disease was defined as the presence of pathologic esophageal acid exposure and/or a positive symptom-acid association probability, but no reflux esophagitis. Biopsies collected from 336 patients from 0.5 cm and 2.0 cm above the Z line were evaluable; they were analyzed independently at pathology centers in Germany and Italy (biopsies from 258 and 195 patients, respectively). The primary outcomes were the accuracy of histologic criteria for the diagnosis of GERD, defined by endoscopy and pH monitoring, and interassessor agreement on histologic criteria. At the assessment site for basal cell layer thickness, total epithelial thickness was the best-performing criterion for diagnosis of investigation-defined GERD; it also identified nonerosive reflux disease, reflux esophagitis, and pathologic esophageal acid exposure at 0.5 cm and 2.0 cm above the Z line. Basal cell layer thickness and presence of dilated intercellular spaces did not identify patients with GERD. Among the criteria tested, the best agreement between assessments carried out at the 2 pathology centers was for total epithelial thickness at 0.5 cm and 2.0 cm above the Z line. Based on an analysis of 336 patients with frequent upper gastrointestinal symptoms, total epithelial thickness is a robust histologic marker for GERD. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier

  12. SLEEVE GASTRECTOMY AND FUNDOPLICATION AS A SINGLE PROCEDURE IN PATIENTS WITH OBESITY AND GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX

    Science.gov (United States)

    LASNIBAT, Juan Pablo; BRAGHETTO, Italo; GUTIERREZ, Luis; SANCHEZ, Felipe

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Bariatric surgery in Chile has seen an exponential increase in recent years, especially in sleeve gastrectomy. Its use is currently discussed in patients suffering from gastroesophageal reflux disease. Different options have been considered for the management of these patients but up to now laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass seems to be the best option. Sleeve gastrectomy plus concomitant fundoplication or hiatal hernia repair also has been suggested in patients having reflux or small hiatal hernia. Aim: To present a cohort of obese patients with gatroesophageal reflux undergoing this procedure, which seeks to provide the benefits of both laparoscopic gastric sleeve (LSG) and antireflux surgery focused on the evaluation of presence of reflux and BMI after surgery, and to compare the result observed in this cohort with a previous group of obese patients without reflux submitted to sleeve gastrectomy alone. Methods: Retrospective case series in 15 patients who underwent this surgery between the years 2003 and 2012. Clinical records were analyzed and values ​​of 24 hr pH monitoring, esophageal manometry and clinical outcome were recorded. Results were compared to a previous series of patients who underwent LSG. No statistical analyses were made. Results: Group A consisted of 15 patients submitted to LSG plus fundoplication. 93% (n=14) were female. Mean age was 46.2 years. Mean preoperative body mass index (BMI) was 33.9. All patients had altered pH monitoring and manometry preoperatively. There was one minor complication corresponding to a seroma. There was no perioperative mortality. Group B consisted of 23 obese patients who underwent LSG. These patients developed de novo reflux, hypotensive LES and esophagitis after the surgery. Group A patients showed improvement in esophageal pH monitoring and manometry at three months. During long-term follow-up, six underwent revision surgery, four for weight regain, one regained weight associated

  13. The association between reflux esophagitis and airway hyper-reactivity in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Karbasi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The association of gastro-esophageal reflux (GER with a wide variety of pulmonary disorders was recognized. We aimed to evaluate the effect of GER-induced esophagitis on airway hyper-reactivity (AHR in patients and the response to treatment. Materials and Methods: In this cohort study, 30 patients attending the gastrointestinal clinic of a university hospital with acid reflux symptoms were included. All patients were evaluated endoscopically and divided into case group with esophagitis and control group without any evidence of esophagitis. Spirometry and methacholine test were done in all patients before and after treatment of GER with pantoprazole 40 mg daily for six months. Results: There was a significant difference in the rate of positive methacholine test between the cases (40% and the controls (6.7% prior to anti-acid therapy (P < 0.0001. After six months of treatment, the frequency of positive methacholine test diminished from 40 to 13.3% in the case group (P < 0.05 but did not change in the controls (P = 0.15. Conclusion: The presence of esophagitis due to GER would increase the AHR and treatment with pantoperazole would decrease AHR in patients with proved esophagitis and no previous history of asthma after six months.

  14. Cardiorespiratory events in infants with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms: Is there any association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresi, F; Martinelli, D; Maggiora, E; Locatelli, E; Liguori, S A; Baldassarre, M E; Cocchi, E; Bertino, E; Coscia, A

    2017-12-21

    Cardiorespiratory (CR) events (apnea, bradycardia, oxygen desaturation) and gastroesophageal reflux (GER) symptoms often coexist in infants admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, leading to over-prescription of drugs and delayed discharge. We aimed to evaluate the relationships between CR and GER events. The temporal associations between CR and GER events were analyzed in symptomatic infants who underwent synchronized CR and pH-impedance monitoring. The symptom association probability (SAP) index was used to identify infants with a significant number of temporal associations. Gastroesophageal reflux characteristics and the chronological sequence of CR and GER events occurring within 30 seconds of each other were evaluated according to SAP index. Of the 66 infants enrolled, aged 29 (18-45) days, 58 had CR events during monitoring. From these 58 patients, a total of 1331 CR events and 5239 GER (24% acidic) were detected. The SAP index was positive in seven (12%) infants. These infants had greater GER frequency, duration, and proximal extent (P events preceded CR events in 83% of these associations. These GER events had a higher proximal extent (P = .004), but showed no differences in pH values. The simultaneous evaluation of CR and GER events could be useful to identify infants with severe GER and significant temporal associations between these events. Treatment of GER could be indicated in these infants, but as the GER events involved are mainly non-acidic, empirical treatment with antacids is, often, inappropriate. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Benefits of massage therapy for infants with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neu, Madalynn; Pan, Zhaoxing; Workman, Rachel; Marcheggiani-Howard, Cassandra; Furuta, Glenn; Laudenslager, Mark L

    2014-10-01

    This randomized controlled pilot trial was conducted to evaluate the clinical efficacy of massage therapy (MT) for relief of symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The hypothesis was that, when compared to infants who received nonmassage therapy, infants who received MT would display fewer GERD symptoms, greater weight gain, greater amount of sleep, lower cortisol levels before and after treatment, and lower daily (area under the curve [AUC]) cortisol secretion. Participants were 36 infants born at term, 4-10 weeks of age at enrollment, healthy except for a diagnosis of GERD by their pediatrician, and with a score of at least 16 on the Infant Gastroesophageal Reflux Questionnaire-Revised (I-GERQ-R). Infants were randomized to receive either MT or a nonmassage sham treatment in their homes for 30 min twice a week for 6 weeks. Data collectors and parents were blind to study condition. GERD symptoms decreased in both groups and weight increased. Pretreatment salivary cortisol levels decreased significantly over time in the massage group while increasing in the nonmassage group. Daily cortisol level also decreased in the massage group and increased in the nonmassage group, but the difference was not significant. MT administered by a professional therapist did not affect symptoms of GERD differently than a sham treatment but did decrease infant stress as measured by cortisol. Research focusing on stress reduction in infants with GERD and multimodal treatments addressing GERD symptoms may yield the most effective treatment. © The Author(s) 2013.

  16. The Study of Oral Liquid Microcrystallization in Children with Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinei, Aurelia; Picos, Alina Monica; Romanciuc, Ina; Berar, Antonela; Mihailescu, Ana Maria

    2014-01-01

    Patients with disabilities have a higher prevalence of caries and dental erosions than general population. This particularity may be assessed by the study of microcrystallization of saliva. We investigated the oral liquid microcrystallization in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a condition associated with dental erosions. 54 children have been clinically examined: 27 children suffering from GERD with ages between 13 and 15, were included in the study group, and 27 healthy children - the control group. The study of crystallographic changes of the oral liquid was performed using the method developed by Shatohina, Razumov SN, Shabalin VN (2006) with the scanning electron microscope VEGA TESCAN TS 5130 MM. The degree of microcrystalization of the oral liquid in children with GERD was considerably reduced, (1.73±0.11 points) and was lower than in children in the control group (3.22±0.16 points) (p<0.01, RR=2). The degree of microcrystallization of oral liquid in children with GERD was 1.86 times lower than in healthy children. This was correlated with the duration of gastroesophageal reflux. The study of structural particularities of dehydrated droplet of oral liquid in children with GERD has elucidated a number of markers of the changes produced in the oral cavity. These can be used in the screening research in prevention of caries and dental erosions.

  17. [Comparative data of prokinetics in treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedorchenko, Iu L

    2013-01-01

    The purpose is to evaluate the effectiveness of itopride (IP) and domperidone (DP) in the treatment of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), in combination with diabetes mellitus (DM) type 1 and 2. 40 patients were examined with GERD and type 1 diabetes and 50 patients with GERD and type 2 diabetes. Each group of patients with GERD, DM 1 and 2 has been divided into: the basic subgroup receiving IG 50 mg 3 tid and control--DP 10 mg tid. Patients were also administered omeprazole. Both subgroups were strictly randomized to key indicators, except for therapy. Baseline and after 2 and 4 weeks, all patients were examined to identify complaints, endoscopy and pH-metric changes, gastric motility was studied by electrogastroenterographic method (PEGEG). In the subgroups of patients with GERD + DM 1 and GERD + DM 2, received treatment with IG complaints on heartburn, regurgitation, odynophagia relieved significantly earlier then in the subgroups treated with DP. After 4 weeks of therapy, decreasing in the number of gastroesophageal refluxes, number of patients with erosive esophagitis B level, and normalization of the motility of the stomach were significantly higher in the groups of GERD + DM 1 and GERD + DM 2 received treatment with IG when compared with the subgroup of PD. There were no side effects of prokinetics. IG was more effective then DP in the treatment of GERD in patients with diabetes, and may be recommended for inclusion in the scheme of treatment of this comorbidity.

  18. [Clinical characteristics of gastroesophageal reflux disease with esophageal injury in korean: focusing on risk factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Jun; Jung, Min Kyu; Kim, Sung Kook; Jang, Byung Ik; Lee, Si Hyung; Kim, Kyeong Ok; Kim, Eun Soo; Cho, Kwang Bum; Park, Kyung Sik; Kim, Eun Young; Jung, Jin Tae; Kwon, Joong Goo; Lee, Joong Hyun; Yang, Chang Hun; Park, Chang Keun; Seo, Hyang Eun; Jeon, Seong Woo

    2011-05-25

    Recent studies suggest that the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is increasing in Korea. However, studies on risk factors for GERD have yielded inconsistent results. The aims of this study were to compare clinical features between symptomatic syndromes without esophageal injury (=non-erosive disease [NED]) and syndromes with esophageal injury (=erosive disease [ED]), and to determine risk factors associated ED. A total of 450 subjects who visited gastroenterology clinics of six training hospitals in Daegu from March 2008 to April 2010 were consecutively enrolled. The subjects were asked to complete a questionnaire which inquired about gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. The questionnaire also included questions about smoking, alcohol drinking, consumption of coffee, use of drugs, exercise, and other medical history. The subjects were subdivided into NED and ED groups. The proportion of subjects in each NED and ED group was 172 (38.2%) and 278 (61.8%). Male gender, smoking, alcohol drinking, consumption of coffee, large waist circumference, infrequent medication of antacids, aspirin and NSAIDs, infrequent and mild GERD symptoms were all significantly associated with ED on univariate analysis. Age, hiatal hernia, diabetes mellitus, body mass index, change in weight during 1 year, and number of typical GERD symptoms were not independent risk factors for ED. However, the association between ED and alcohol drinking, infrequent medication of antacids, mild typical GERD symptoms remained as strong risk factors after adjustments on multivariate logistic analysis. Independent risk factors associated with ED were alcohol drinking, infrequent medication of antacids and mild typical GERD symptoms.

  19. Effects of pectin liquid on gastroesophageal reflux disease in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimizu Nobuzo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of thickeners is a standard therapy for decreasing episodes of regurgitation or vomiting in infants. However, it remains to be investigated whether thickener is effective for vomiting and/or chronic respiratory symptoms in children with cerebral palsy. Methods We enrolled 18 neurologically impaired children caused by cerebral palsy, with gastroesophageal reflux disease. In the first part of this study (pH monitoring, subjects were randomly allocated to two groups: fed with a high-pectin diet [enteral formula: pectin liquid = 2:1 (v/v], or a low-pectin diet [enteral formula: pectin liquid = 3:1 (v/v]. Two-channel esophageal pH monitoring was performed over 48 h. In the second part (clinical trial, subjects were fed a high- or low-pectin diet and non-pectin diet for 4 weeks in a crossover manner. Nurses recorded the feeding volume, number of episodes of vomiting, volume of gastric residue, episodes of cough and wheeze, frequency of using oxygen for dyspnea, and the day when the child could return to school. Cough and wheeze were recorded as a cough-score. Results The median value for the % time pH Conclusion Pectin liquid partially decreased gastroesophageal reflux as measured by eshophageal pH monitoring, and might improve vomiting and respiratory symptoms in children with cerebral palsy. Trial registration ISRCTN19787793

  20. Electrical stimulation for gastroesophageal reflux disease: current state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim SE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sharon E Kim, Edy Soffer Department of Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA Abstract: Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD who are not satisfied with acid suppression therapy can benefit primarily from fundoplication, a surgical intervention. Fundoplication has been the standard surgical procedure for GERD. It is effective but is associated with adverse effects, resulting in a declining number of interventions, creating a need for alternative interventions that are effective, yet have a better adverse effect profile. One such alternative involves the application of electrical stimulation to the lower esophageal sphincter. A number of animal studies showed that such stimulation can increase resting lower esophageal sphincter pressure. An acute human study confirmed this effect, and was followed by two open-label studies, with a follow-up of up to 3 years. Results thus far show that the therapy is associated with a significant improvement in symptoms, a significant reduction in esophageal acid exposure, and a very good safety profile. This review will describe the evolution of electrical stimulation therapy for GERD, as well as the safety and efficacy of this intervention. Keywords: gastroesophageal reflux disease, lower esophageal sphincter, health-related quality of life

  1. Recurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease correlated with a short dinner-to-bedtime interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jae Hoon; Kang, Ho Suk; Lee, Sun-Young; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung; Park, Hyung Seok; Shim, Chan Sup; Jin, Choon Jo

    2014-04-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) can be classified into erosive reflux disease (ERD) and nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD). We aimed to compare the recurrence rates of ERD and NERD and determine the risk factors related to the recurrence. This prospective study comprised 337 consecutive adults who completed questionnaires on their GERD symptoms, height, weight, sleeping position, dinner time, and bedtime. During upper gastrointestinal endoscopy, the presence of a hiatal hernia and mucosal breaks in the low esophagus, esophageal length (the distance between the Z-line and the incisors), and the esophageal length-to-height ratio were recorded. Recurrence was diagnosed when the patient required additional proton pump inhibitor medication after initial recovery with 4-8 weeks of treatment. Recurrence was experienced by 47 (26.0%) of 181 GERD patients. The recurrence rate did not differ between the 48 ERD (27.1%) and 133 NERD (25.6%) patients (P = 0.849). Of the various factors studied, recurrence was found to be correlated with a dinner-to-bedtime interval of less than 3 h (P = 0.002), globus sensation (P = 0.031), and old age (P = 0.047). Logistic regression analysis revealed that a short interval between dinner and bedtime was the only factor significantly related to the recurrence (P = 0.002). Both ERD and NERD patients who sleep within 3 h after eating have a higher risk of GERD recurrence. Our findings highlight the impact of a short dinner-to-bedtime interval on the recurrence of GERD (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: KCT0000134). © 2013 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. The Incidence of Lesions of Different Systems and Organs in Children with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.Z. Gnateyko

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD — a chronic recurrent disease caused by the disturbances of the motor-evacuating function of the gastroesophageal zone and is characterized by spontaneous and/or regular reflux of the gastric or duodenal fluid that leads to the damage of the distal part of the esophagus. GERD is one of the most frequent diseases that affect the esophagus. Taking into the account the huge amount of the causes, which may lead to GERD, its etiology is still not well defined, and the contribution of each factor requires further analysis. The aim of the study was to analyze the peculiarities and the incidence of GERD association with other organ and system pathologies.Materials and methods. Clinical analysis of 73 cases of GERD in school-aged children has been performed. The incidence of GERD combination with other system and organ pathologies has been evaluated using thorough anamnesis and patient’s medical history analysis. Results. In 66 % of children with GERD, the association of this pathology with other digestive tract diseases has been revealed, in 50.7 % — with lesions of musculoskeletal system, in 12.3 % — with urinary tract pathology. Almost one third of children with GERD suffered from congenital defects of different organs and systems, such as dolichosigmoid, mitral valve prolapse, nephroptosis/rotation of the kidneys/pyelectasis/bladder-pelvic reflux, gallbladder deformities. The article presents the analysis of a clinical case of the combination of cardiovascular, digestive and urinary lesions that enables us to assume the presence of possible common etiology factor of the diagnosed diseases. The analyzed data regarding the association of GERD with other organ and system pathologies, as well as the results of other research groups indicate a probable common component in their etiology. The common factor in the described cases of the combination of pathologies may be a violation of the

  3. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding outcomes in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease or hiatal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilone, Vincenzo; Vitiello, Antonio; Hasani, Ariola; Di Micco, Rosa; Monda, Angela; Izzo, Giuliano; Forestieri, Pietro

    2015-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and hiatal hernia (HH) are classically considered contraindications to bariatric restrictive procedures. Despite the high number of studies that have been published, the relationship between laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB) and GERD/HH is still not clear. We have retrospectively analyzed the outcomes of LAGB in patients operated in 2010 with HH and/or GERD. The gastroesophageal reflux was diagnosed if the patients had heartburn and regurgitation more than once a week, and hiatal hernia was assessed by esophagogastroduodenoscopy and/or upper GI radiogram with swallow. Data on heartburn, assumption of antacid medication, weight loss, and rate of complications in both patients with and without GERD or HH were collected. One hundred and twenty patients that underwent LAGB at our department were enrolled in our study; 40 had symptoms of GERD and 25 had hiatal hernia preoperatively. There was no difference of percentage excess weight loss (%EWL) at 12 months (45.4 ± 20.4 vs 4.6 ± 19.5 kg/m(2)) and 36 months follow-up (49.4 ± 16.5 vs 48.6 ± 18.9 kg/m(2)) between asymptomatic patients and patients with HH or GERD symptoms. The number of patients with preoperative heartburn (40 to 10) and/or assumption of antacid drugs (38 to 7) significantly decreased after LAGB CONCLUSIONS: LAGB is an effective and safe surgical treatment for morbidly obesity in patients with GERD or HH, since it induces both a significant weight loss and an improvement of reflux symptoms.

  4. The Potential Impact of Contemporary Developments in the Management of Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Undergoing an Initial Gastroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhail B Salem

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent developments may alter the approach to patients presenting with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD-like symptoms. A newly proposed Montreal consensus definition of Barrett’s esophagus includes all types of esophageal columnar metaplasia, with or without intestinal-type metaplasia. There is also increasing recognition of eosinophilic esophagitis (EE in patients with GERD-like symptoms.

  5. Effect of body position changes on postprandial gastroesophageal reflux and gastric emptying in the healthy premature neonate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wijk, Michiel P.; Benninga, Marc A.; Dent, John; Lontis, Ros; Goodchild, Louise; McCall, Lisa M.; Haslam, Ross; Davidson, Geoffrey P.; Omari, Taher

    2007-01-01

    Objective To identify a body-positioning regimen that promotes gastric emptying (GE) and reduces gastroesophageal reflux (GER) by changing body position 1 hour after feeding. Study design Ten healthy preterm infants (7 male; mean postmenstrual age, 36 weeks [range, 33 to 38 weeks]) were monitored

  6. Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with gastroesophageal reflux in a 2-month-old boy with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Mitsuru; Kato, Tetsushi; Masutani, Satoshi; Matsunaga, Tamotsu; Senzaki, Hideaki

    2009-12-01

    A case of a 2-month-old Down syndrome infant without structural cardiac anomaly is reported in whom management of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) using duodenal-tube feeding successfully treated pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Based on this case, examination for GER is recommended for infants who present with PAH, especially those with Down syndrome who have no cardiac anomalies.

  7. Influence of Concomitant Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease on Clinical Course and Respiratory Function in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Oparin, A.G.; A.A. Oparin; Titkova, A. V.

    2013-01-01

    The main clinical features of clinical course of comorbidity are shown in the article. The value of estimating functional changes of spirogram in these patients is described. The role of concomitant gastroesophageal reflux disease on the clinical course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was proved, the value of estimating atypical clinical signs for the right diagnostics and treatment of these patients is accentuated.

  8. Laparoscopic Surgical Treatment of Severe Obesity Combined with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Pilot Randomized Two-Arm Controlled Clinical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospanov, Oral B.; Orekeshova, Akzhunis M.; Fursov, Roman A.; Yelemesov, Aset A.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are serious medical, social, and economic problems of modern society. A pilot randomized two-arm controlled clinical study was conducted to compare laparoscopic plication of the greater gastric curvature combined with Nissen fundoplication (LFN+LGP) versus only Nissen fundoplication (LFN). The…

  9. Validation of the GSFQ, a Self-Administered Symptom Frequency Questionnaire for Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Paré

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is based primarily on symptoms experienced by a patient, relatively little attention has been paid to the development and validation of self-administered questionnaires specific to GERD symptoms. The present article presents the validation of the short, self-administered GERD Symptom Frequency Questionnaire (GSFQ.

  10. Lipid-Laden Alveolar Macrophages and pH Monitoring in Gastroesophageal Reflux-Related Respiratory Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Kitz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid-laden alveolar macrophages and pH monitoring have been used in the diagnosis of chronic aspiration in children with gastroesophageal reflux (GER. This study was conducted to prove a correlation between the detection of alimentary pulmonary fat phagocytosis and an increasing amount of proximal gastroesophageal reflux. It was assumed that proximal gastroesophageal reflux better correlates with aspiration than distal GER. Patients from 6 months to 16 years with unexplained recurrent wheezy bronchitis and bronchial hyperreactivity, or recurrent pneumonia with chronic cough underwent 24-hour double-channel pH monitoring and bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL. Aspiration of gastric content was determined by counting lipid laden alveolar macrophages from BAL specimens. There were no correlations between any pH-monitoring parameters and counts of lipid-laden macrophages in the whole study population, even when restricting analysis to those with abnormal reflux index expressing clinically significant GER. Quantifying lipid-laden alveolar macrophages from BAL in children with gastroesophageal-related respiratory disorders does not have an acceptable specificity to prove chronic aspiration as an underlying etiology. Therefore, research for other markers of pulmonary aspiration is needed.

  11. Clinical and neurophysiologic characterization of an European family with hereditary sensory neuropathy, paroxysmal cough and gastroesophageal reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Barros

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In 2002, Spring et al reported a family with an autosomal dominant form of hereditary sensory neuropathy; patients also presented adult onset of gastroesophageal reflux and cough. Since then, no further families have been described. Objective: To study a new Portuguese family with these characteristics. Method: To describe the clinical and neurophysiologic characteristics of one family with features of sensory neuropathy associated with cough and gastroesophageal erflux. Results: Three of five siblings presented a similar history of paroxysmal cough (5th decade. About a decade later they experienced numbness and paraesthesia in the feets and in all cases there was evidence of an axonal sensory neuropathy. A history of gastroesophageal reflux of variable severity and age of onset was also present. Discussion: Molecular genetic studies have demonstrated genetic heterogeneity between the hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 subtypes. The identification of these families is of major importance because further work is required to identify the underlying genetic defect.

  12. Managing gastroesophageal reflux disease – comparative efficacy and outcomes of dexlansoprazole MR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frye JW

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Jeanetta W Frye, David A Peura Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of Virginia Health Sciences Center, Charlottesville, VA, USA Abstract: The management of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has been revolutionized with the development of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs. Unfortunately, due to the inherent pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles of conventional PPIs, many patients continue to suffer from symptoms related to GERD despite appropriate use of PPIs. Dexlansoprazole MR is a PPI with a unique dual delayed-release delivery system that has been designed to address the unmet needs in GERD management. Specifically, dexlansoprazole MR addresses limitations with short plasma half-life and need for meal-associated dosing, characteristic of conventional PPIs. In addition, dexlansoprazole MR has been shown to be effective in several specific clinical situations. These include coadministration with clopidogrel, healing of all grades of erosive esophagitis, improvement in reflux-related quality of life, step down to once-per-day dosing, and treatment of Helicobacter pylori infections. Furthermore, dexlansoprazole MR has been found to induce symptom improvement in patients with nonerosive esophageal reflux disease, nocturnal heartburn and GERD-related sleep disturbance, and regurgitation. Overall, dexlansoprazole MR is a unique and useful tool in the management of GERD. Keywords: GERD, PPI, NERD

  13. Correlation between glycemic variability and gastroesophageal reflux in adolescentswith type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I L Alimova

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To estimate an impact of glycemic variability on the development of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM.Materials and methods. We enrolled 33 patients with T1DM aged from 12 to 17 years. 24-h pH-monitoring was performed with “Gas- troskan 24” system (Istok-Sistema, Fryazino; 24-h continuous glucose monitoring utilized CGMS MMT-7310 (Medtronic Minimed, USA with subsequent night-time analysis.Results. As compared to stable night-time glycemia controls (SD <2.0 mmol/L, patients with higher night-time glycemic variability (SD>2.0 mmol/L showed longer period of esophageal acidification (17% [2–58]; p<0.001, higher incidence of acid reflux events with duration above 5 min (2 ev. [1-10]; p<0.001, longer period of most protracted acid reflux event (63 min [5–132]; p<0.001, as well as higher prevalence of pathologic acid GER events (76.4%; χ2=17.11; p<0.001 during night-time. Increase in glycemic in- stability positively correlated with incidence and severity of acid GER events. 6-8 months follow-up supported these findings. Conclusion. Glycemic variability in adolescents with T1DM is a significant risk factor for development of GERD with hypomotor dys- function according to pH-monitoring.

  14. Relation between chronic rhinosinusitis and gastroesophageal reflux in adults: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sella, Guilherme Constante Preis; Tamashiro, Edwin; Anselmo-Lima, Wilma Terezinha; Valera, Fabiana Cardoso Pereira

    The relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is still a controversial issue in literature. A systematic review of the association between these two diseases in adult patients. Systematic review in PubMed and Cochrane Database with articles published between 1951 and 2015. We included all articles that specifically studied the relationship between CRS and GERD. Of the 436 articles found, only 12 met the inclusion criteria. Eight cross-sectional articles suggest a relation between CRS and GERD, especially on CRS that is refractory to clinical or surgical treatment. However, the groups are small and methodologies are different. Four other longitudinal studies have assessed the effect of treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) on the improvement of symptoms of CRS, but the results were conflicting. There seems to be relative prevalence of reflux with intractable CRS. There is still a lack of controlled studies with a significant number of patients to confirm this hypothesis. Few studies specifically assess the impact of treatment of reflux on symptom improvement in patients with CRS. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Oesophageal disease: gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett's oesophagus, achalasia and eosinophilic oesophagitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Xavier

    2016-09-01

    The most interesting conclusions and/or advances presented at Digestive Disease Week 2016 were the following: a) gastroesophageal reflux disease: proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease is frequently associated with poor treatment adherence, psychiatric comorbidities and functional gastrointestinal disorders. These possible entities should be investigated in all cases of proton pump inhibitor-refractory reflux disease; b) Barrett's oesophagus: the efficacy of screening remains unclear; however, new minimally-invasive techniques such as the cytosponge allow more effective detection, both of Barrett's oesophagus and Barrett's oesophagus-associated dysplasia or neoplasia; c) achalasia: evidence indicates that peroral endoscopic myotomy is as effective as surgery and is a safer alternative; d) eosinophilic oesophagitis: high-dose proton pump inhibitors are required to rule out proton pump inhibitor-responsive eosinophilic oesophagitis; montelukast is not clearly effective in the treatment of eosinophilic oesophagitis, although moderate efficacy cannot be ruled out. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. The relationship between the numbers of reflux episodes with anatomic changes of the esophagus in children under one year with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HamidrezaTalari

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux is the most common gastrointestinal disorder in the neonatal period, and the main reason for it is the lack of development in the first months of an infant's digestive system and it gets improved with the aging of baby and development of the digestive system. Some studies have shown that there is a relationship between characteristics of anatomic and esophageal reflux. This study aimed to determine the relationship between the characteristics and frequency of reflux in infants under one year old with gastroesophageal reflux disease. This study is a cross-sectional study that was conducted in 2015 in the hospital of martyr Beheshti. In this study, a group of 120 children with reflux in three age groups less than one month, 1-6 months and 6-12 months were choses and the relationship between reflux episodes with esophagus anatomic characteristics, including distal esophagus distention, Hiss angle, internal angle and length of esophagus were examined. The data were analyzed using the SPSS software and the relationship between the characteristics was compared with the number of reflux in three groups. According to the results, the frequency of reflux and extent of distention of the distal esophageal, Hiss angle, Internal Gastro esophageal angle and length of the esophagus, there was a statistically significant correlation (P <0.001. The correlation between reflux episodes and four parameters, are respectively, 0/95, 0/97, 0/71 and -0/79/. Also there was a direct relation between the frequency of reflux and extent of distention of the distal esophageal, Hiss angle, Internal Gastro esophageal angle and an inverse relation with length of the esophagus. The correlation between the frequency of reflux and esophageal characteristics in separation between all three age groups showed a statistically significant relationship exists between anatomical esophageal characteristics and reflux frequency. Based on the results of this study it

  17. Radionuclide scintigraphy in the evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux in symptomatic and asymptomatic pre-term infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morigeri, C.; Mukhopadhyay, K.; Narang, A. [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Division of Neonatology, Department of Paediatrics, Chandigarh (India); Bhattacharya, A.; Mittal, B.R. [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chandigarh (India)

    2008-09-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is very common in pre-term infants. The diagnosis based on symptoms is always questionable. The incidence of GER in symptomatic babies varies from 22% to 85%, but literature regarding the incidence of reflux in asymptomatic pre-term infants is lacking. We used radionuclide scintigraphy to evaluate the incidence of GER in symptomatic as well as asymptomatic pre-term neonates and to assess whether symptoms have any relation with positive scintigraphy. We studied 106 pre-term infants (52 symptomatic, 54 asymptomatic) of less than 34 weeks of gestation, who fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Babies were considered symptomatic in the presence of vomiting, regurgitation, apnea, de-saturations, unexplained bradycardia and recurrent lung collapses. Radionuclide scintigraphy was conducted at post-conceptional age of 32-34 weeks when they were clinically stable for 72 h. Feeding was avoided for 2 h preceding the study. {sup 99m}Tc sulphur colloid was administered in a dose of 1.85 MBq (0.05 mCi) in 1 ml, followed by milk (full feed) through an orogastric tube, prior to imaging under a gamma camera. Reflux was graded as low or high, and reflux episodes during the study were counted. The incidence of GER in the symptomatic group was 71.2% and in asymptomatic babies 61.1% (p=0.275). High-grade reflux was more common (71.4%) than low-grade (28.6%) in both groups (p=0.449). Mean number of reflux episodes in 20 min was 4.4{+-}2.4 in symptomatic babies and 4.9 {+-}2.2 in asymptomatic babies (p=0.321). Babies with positive scintigraphy were similar in birth weight, gestation, time to achieve full feeds, weight and age at discharge to those with negative scintigraphy. GER is common in pre-term infants of less than 34 weeks gestation. The incidence of positive scintigraphy and grade of reflux is not significantly different in symptomatic vs. asymptomatic babies. Though radionuclide scintigraphy is a simple, quick and non-invasive investigation in

  18. Laparoscopic Nissen (total) versus anterior 180° fundoplication for gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xing; Wu, Ji-Min; Hu, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Feng; Wang, Zhong-Gao; Zhang, Chao; Yan, Chao; Chen, Mei-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) has been the gold standard for the surgical management of Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Laparoscopic anterior 180° fundoplication (180° LAF) is reported to reduce the incidence of postoperative complications while obtaining similar control of reflux. The present meta-analysis was conducted to confirm the value of the 2 techniques. Methods: PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Springerlink, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure Platform databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing LNF and 180° LAF. Data regarding the benefits and adverse results of 2 techniques were extracted and compared using a meta-analysis. Results: Six eligible RCTs comparing LNF (n = 266) and 180° LAF (n = 265) were identified. There were no significant differences between LNF and 180° LAF with regard to operating time, perioperative complications, length of hospital stay, patient satisfaction, willingness to undergo surgery again, quality of life, postoperative heartburn, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use, postoperative DeMeester scores, postoperative lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, postoperative gas-bloating, unable to belch, diarrhea, or overall reoperation. LNF was associated with a higher prevalence of postoperative dysphagia compared with 180° LAF, while 180° LAF was followed by more reoperation for recurrent reflux symptoms. Conclusion: LNF and 180° LAF are equally effective in controlling reflux symptoms and obtain a comparable prevalence of patient satisfaction. 180° LAF can reduce the incidence of postoperative dysphagia while this is offset by a higher risk of reoperation for recurrent symptoms. The risk of recurrent symptoms should need to be balanced against the risk of dysphagia when surgeons choose surgical procedures for each individual with GERD. PMID:28906412

  19. Gastroesophageal reflux after vertical banded gastroplasty is alleviated by conversion to gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekelund, M; Oberg, S; Peterli, R; Frederiksen, S G; Hedenbro, J L

    2012-06-01

    Conversion operations after vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG) are sometimes performed because of vomiting and/or acid regurgitation. Primary operation with gastric bypass (GBP) is known to reduce gastroesophageal reflux (GERD). Previous studies have not been designed to differentiate between the effects of the altered anatomy and of the ensuing weight loss. No series has reported data on acid reflux before and after conversion from VBG to GBP. We invited eight VBG patients with current symptoms of GERD. All had intact staple lines as assessed by barium meal and gastroscopy. Acid reflux was quantified using 48-h Bravo capsule measurements. Conversion operations were performed creating an isolated 15-20-ml pouch; the previously banded part of gastric wall was excised. Gastrojejunostomy was made end to end with a 28-mm circular stapler. The study is based on five patients consenting to early postoperative endoscopy and pH measurement. All patients were women with a mean age of 49.5 years and BMI of 36.3. Time since VBG was 132.1 months. Time from conversion to second measurement was 46.6 days and BMI at that time 32.7. There was no mortality and no serious morbidity. All patients improved clinically and no patient had to go back on proton pump inhibition or antacids. Total time with pH < 4.0 was reduced from 18.4% to 3.3% (p < 0.05). DeMeester score was reduced from 58.1 to 15.9 (p < 0.05). The effect of converting VBG-operated patients to GBP results in a near-normalisation of acid reflux parameters and a discontinuation of proton pump inhibitor medication.

  20. Features of Changes in Biochemical Parameters of Gastric Juice in Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.M. Mosiichuk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available There were studied the features of changes in the factors of aggression and protection in the gastric juice of 91 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD combined with sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. It was determined the pH, concentration of pepsin, glycoproteins, bile acids, sialic acids, fucose, hexosamines, the level of nitric oxide metabolites. It has been found that increased levels of nitric oxide metabolites and bile acids in gastric juice enhances the inflammatory processes in the gastric mucosa irrespective of the functional state of the sphincter of Oddi. Aggressive properties of gastric contents were increased in patients with GERD associated with both hypertonic and hypotonic sphincter of Oddi. The deficit and imbalance of protection factors in most patients in all groups were manifested by reduction in the concentration of carbohydrate terminal residues of glycoproteins as compared to the control group.

  1. The current role of laparoscopic surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobe, T E

    2007-02-01

    The benefits of surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in infants and children have been questioned in the recent literature. The goal of this review was to determine the best current practice for the diagnosis and management of this disease. The literature was reviewed for all recent English language publications on the management of GERD in 8- to 10-year-old patients. In infants and children, GERD has multiple etiologies, and an understanding of these is important for determining which patients are the best surgical candidates. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have become the mainstay of current treatment for primary GERD. Although laparoscopic surgery appears to be better than open surgery, there remains some morbidity and complications that careful patient selection can minimize. Surgery for GERD should be performed only after failure of medical management or for specific problems that mandate it.

  2. Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in a country with a high occurrence of Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bor, Serhat; Kitapcioglu, Gul; Kasap, Elmas

    2017-01-21

    To evaluate the prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with additional symptoms, relationship with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) of this country-wide study. Data from 3214 adults were obtained with validated questionnaire. Eight hundred and forty-one subjects were randomized to be tested for H. pylori via the urea breath test. "Frequent symptoms" were defined heartburn and/or regurgitation occurring at least weekly. The prevalence of GERD was 22.8%, frequent and occasional heartburn were 9.3%-12.7%, regurgitation were 16.6%-18.7%, respectively. Body mass index (BMI) ≤ 18.5 showed a prevalence of 15%, BMI > 30 was 28.5%. The GERD prevalence was higher in women (26.2%) than men (18.9%) (P profile of GERD. Subjects showing classical symptoms occasionally exhibit more additional symptoms compared with those without classical symptoms.

  3. Association between Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Appendicitis: A Population-Based Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Li-Ting; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Lin, Herng-Ching; Lee, Cha-Ze

    2016-01-01

    Appendicitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are both prevalent diseases and might share similar pathological mechanisms. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between GERD and appendicitis using a large population-based dataset. This study used administrative claims data from the Taiwan Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005. We identified 7113 patients with appendicitis as cases, and 28452 matched patients without appendicitis as controls. This study revealed that GERD was found in 359 (5.05%) cases and 728 (2.56%) controls (p appendicitis were 1.96 (95% CI: 1.56~2.47), 2.36 (95% CI: 1.94~2.88), and 1.71 (95% CI: 1.31~2.22) than controls, respectively. We concluded that patients with appendicitis had higher odds of prior GERD than those without appendicitis regardless of age group. PMID:26932391

  4. Experience of antireflux surgery application for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolstokorov A.S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose of the study: post-hoc analysis of mid-term and late results of various types of antireflux surgery performed to treat hiatal hernia. Material and methods. We have studied results of post-surgery examination of 118 patients diagnosed with hiatal hernia, the examination being performed at various time intervals after surgeries. Results. The only benefits of using laparoscopic treatment include cosmetic effect, shorter terms of hospital stay and recovery of person's capacity to work. Conclusion. Analysis of immediate and late results of surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease as well as frequency of postsurgical relapses provided no certain evidence of significant beneficial effect for choosing laparoscopic surgical methods over traditional open surgery.

  5. Quality of life scales for patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Li Guan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common chronic disease of the gastrointestinal tract that occurs in 3.1% of the Chinese population [1]. Heartburn, acid regurgitation and epigastric pain are typical clinical symptoms of GERD. These symptoms can affect patients' work productivity, sleep, diet and daily activities, thus resulting in a reduced quality of life (QOL [2]. Although patient QOL is increasingly being considered as a medical outcome index in the evaluation of the impact of GERD symptoms on patients' health status, measuring patient QOL in clinical trials can be challenging due to the lack of a standard assessment tool. Therefore, we aim to review the commonly used generic, disease-specific and hybrid QOL questionnaires to evaluate patients with GERD to provide a reference for clinical nursing work.

  6. Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease: two new oral formulations dexlansoprazole MR and esomezol (esomeprazole strontium).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Parth J; Oldfield, Edward C; Johnson, David A

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease continues to increase with the aging population and the obesity epidemic. Therapeutic failures can have significant detrimental effects in patients. Recently, dexlansoprazole MR and esomeprazole strontium were introduced to the class of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). This article will review the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics of dexlansoprazole MR and esomeprazole strontium. Using the keywords 'dexlansoprazole MR' and 'esomeprazole strontium' in the search engines of PubMed, Cochrane Reviews and Google, we were able to identify peer-reviewed publications, abstracts and presentations at national society educations meetings and present a balanced view of the available data. Dexlansoprazole MR and esomeprazole strontium offer an innovative delivery mechanism compared to conventional PPIs. Further trials are necessary in order to establish superiority.

  7. Interactions During Feeding with Mothers and Their Infants with Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmiege, Sarah J.; Pan, Zhaoxing; Fehringer, Karen; Workman, Rachel; Marcheggianni-Howard, Cassandra; Furuta, Glenn T.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: To examine whether maternal–child interaction during feedings was suboptimal in dyads in which the infant had gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and to compare massage therapy to a nonmassage therapy sham treatment in improving the mother–child interaction in these dyads. Design: In this randomized, controlled pilot study, infants received massage therapy (n=18) or a nonmassage touch/holding sham treatment (n=18). Mothers, data collectors, and the investigator who scored the feeding observations were blinded to group assignment. Settings/Location: Dyads were recruited from pediatric care providers in the Denver metropolitan area and online advertisements at the University of Colorado. Treatments were given in the home of the dyad. Participants: Healthy infants, born at 38–42 weeks gestational age, were 5–10 weeks of age at enrollment; had a score of at least 16 on the Infant Gastroesophageal Reflux Questionnaire-Revised; and were diagnosed with GERD by their pediatric provider. Mothers were English speaking and at least 18 years of age. Interventions: Treatments were given for 30 minutes twice weekly for 6 weeks. A certified infant massage therapist administered massage, and a registered nurse or physical therapist experienced with infants administered the control treatment. Outcome Measures: Maternal and infant scores on the Nursing Child Assessment of Feeding Scale (NCAFS). Results: NCAFS scores were significantly lower than national norms. Small to moderately sized effects showing improvement in the massage group relative to the nonmassage group were seen for Sensitivity to Cues, Social-Emotional Growth Fostering, Cognitive Growth Fostering, and Clarity of Cues (Cohen d) and ranged from 0.24 to 0.56. Conclusions: Mothers and infants with GERD experience significantly worse interactions than those without GERD. Massage given twice weekly by a professional trended toward improved interaction during feeding. Daily maternal

  8. Atrial fibrillation in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease: a comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Crina; Bruley des Varannes, Stanislas; Muresan, Lucian; Picos, Alina; Dumitrascu, Dan L

    2014-07-28

    To analyze the potential relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the development of atrial fibrillation (AF). Using the key words "atrial fibrillation and gastroesophageal reflux", "atrial fibrillation and esophagitis, peptic", "atrial fibrillation and hernia, hiatal" the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, OVIDSP, WILEY databases were screened for relevant publications on GERD and AF in adults between January 1972-December 2013. Studies written in languages other than English or French, studies not performed in humans, reviews, case reports, abstracts, conference presentations, letters to the editor, editorials, comments and opinions were not taken into consideration. Articles treating the subject of radiofrequency ablation of AF and the consecutive development of GERD were also excluded. Two thousand one hundred sixty-one titles were found of which 8 articles met the inclusion criteria. The presence of AF in patients with GERD was reported to be between 0.62%-14%, higher compared to those without GERD. Epidemiological data provided by these observational studies showed that patients with GERD, especially those with more severe GERD-related symptoms, had an increased risk of developing AF compared with those without GERD, but a causal relationship between GERD and AF could not be established based on these studies. The mechanisms of AF as a consequence of GERD remain largely unknown, with inflammation and vagal stimulation playing a possible role in the development of these disorders. Treatment with proton pomp inhibitors may improve symptoms related to AF and facilitate conversion to sinus rhythm. Although links between AF and GERD exist, large randomized clinical studies are required for a better understanding of the relationship between these two entities.

  9. Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children, adults, and elderly in the same community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okimoto, Eiko; Ishimura, Norihisa; Morito, Yoshiya; Mikami, Hironobu; Shimura, Shino; Uno, Goichi; Tamagawa, Yuji; Aimi, Masahito; Oshima, Naoki; Kawashima, Kousaku; Kazumori, Hideaki; Sato, Shuichi; Ishihara, Shunji; Kinoshita, Yoshikazu

    2015-07-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in adults is increasing in Japan as well as worldwide likely due to increasing obesity and the decreasing rate of Helicobacter pylori infection. However, data regarding the prevalence of GERD in children and adolescents in Japan are lacking. We investigated the prevalence of GERD in children, adults, and elderly living in the same community. We surveyed employees of Shimane University Hospital and a related facility and their families using the Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire (GerdQ) and Izumo Scale instruments with demographic information (age, sex, body height, and body weight) and information regarding concurrent medication being taken for GERD. The presence of GERD was defined as a GerdQ score of ≥ 8. A total of 1859 subjects (771 males, 1088 females; 6-96 years old) were eligible for assessment. The prevalence of GERD in those under 20 years old was 4.4%, which was approximately one third of the rate in adults (11.6%). GERD prevalence was closely associated with obesity in adults, but not in subjects under 20 years old. GERD and other gastrointestinal symptoms frequently overlapped in both adults and younger subjects. We found that the prevalence of GERD in subjects under 20 years of age was lower than that in adults and not associated with obesity. Nevertheless, it is important to be aware of symptoms such as heartburn and/or regurgitation when children and adolescents seek routine clinical care. © 2015 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Influence of capsaicin infusion on secondary peristalsis in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Chih-Hsun; Lei, Wei-Yi; Hung, Jui-Sheng; Liu, Tso-Tsai; Chen, Chien-Lin; Pace, Fabio

    2016-12-07

    To determine whether capsaicin infusion could influence heartburn perception and secondary peristalsis in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Secondary peristalsis was performed with slow and rapid mid-esophageal injections of air in 10 patients with GERD. In a first protocol, saline and capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce infusions were randomly performed, whereas 2 consecutive sessions of capsaicin-containing red pepper sauce infusions were performed in a second protocol. Tested solutions including 5 mL of red pepper sauce diluted with 15 mL of saline and 20 mL of 0.9% saline were infused into the mid-esophagus via the manometric catheter at a rate of 10 mL/min with a randomized and double-blind fashion. During each study protocol, perception of heartburn, threshold volumes and peristaltic parameters for secondary peristalsis were analyzed and compared between different stimuli. Infusion of capsaicin significantly increased heartburn perception in patients with GERD (P < 0.001), whereas repeated capsaicin infusion significantly reduced heartburn perception (P = 0.003). Acute capsaicin infusion decreased threshold volume of secondary peristalsis (P = 0.001) and increased its frequency (P = 0.01) during rapid air injection. The prevalence of GERD patients with successive secondary peristalsis during slow air injection significantly increased after capsaicin infusion (P = 0.001). Repeated capsaicin infusion increased threshold volume of secondary peristalsis (P = 0.002) and reduced the frequency of secondary peristalsis (P = 0.02) during rapid air injection. Acute esophageal exposure to capsaicin enhances heartburn sensation and promotes secondary peristalsis in gastroesophageal reflux disease, but repetitive capsaicin infusion reverses these effects.

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux in morbidly obese patients treated with gastric banding or vertical banded gastroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovrebø, K K; Hatlebakk, J G; Viste, A; Bassøe, H H; Svanes, K

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare gastric banding (GB) and vertical banded gastroplasty (VBG) with respect to postsurgical gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and to investigate the role of preexisting hiatus hernia. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: GB and VBG have for a long time been used in the treatment of morbidly obese patients. The introduction of laparoscopic techniques has renewed the interest in these operations. The long-term results after GB have, however, been poor. VBG was suggested to have antireflux properties because it involves repositioning and retaining the gastroesophageal junction within the abdomen and constructing an elongated intraabdominal tube. METHODS: Forty-three morbidly obese patients accepted for GB or VBG were evaluated for GER before and at regular intervals after surgery. All patients were questioned about adverse symptoms and need for antireflux medication. Both before and after surgery, 24-hour pH measurement and upper gastrointestinal endoscopies were performed. RESULTS: The prevalence of heartburn and acid regurgitation among patients treated with GB increased from 14% and 13% to 63% and 69%, respectively. Heartburn and acid regurgitation were present before surgery in 32% and 23% of patients treated with VBG, percentages unchanged by the procedure. The 24-hour reflux time increased significantly from 6.4% to 30.9% in patients treated with GB but was essentially unchanged in patients treated with VBG. The prevalence of esophagitis after GB and VBG was 75% and 20%. Acid inhibitors were needed in 81% of patients after GB and 29% of patients after VBG. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of GER was unchanged by VBG, but VBG did not demonstrate antireflux properties. The incidence of GER increased markedly after GB. PMID:9671066

  12. Nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease and mild degree of esophagitis: Comparison of symptoms endoscopic, manometric and pH-metric patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grande Michele

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our aim in the present study was to compare patients presenting with gastroesophageal reflux disease in the presence or absence of mild-grade esophagitis (grade I or II according to the Savary-Miller classification. Methods Between 2005 and 2007, 215 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (67 with reflux associated with grade I or II esophagitis and 148 without esophagitis were evaluated at the Department of Surgery, University Hospital Tor Vergata, Rome, and were included in the present study. The evaluations consisted of clinical interviews, endoscopy of the high digestive tract, esophageal manometry and pH monitoring. Results There was no significant difference between the two groups with regard to age, sex or symptoms. The incidence of heartburn associated with noncardiac chest pain was greater in the esophagitis group than in the dysphagia group. The incidence of hiatal hernia was similar in both groups. Although the motor pattern was similar in both groups, the length of the abdominal esophagus was greater in patients without esophagitis (1.6 cm vs 1.1 cm; P  Conclusions Gastroesophageal reflux without esophagitis must be regarded not as a milder form of the disease but as part of a single disease. Furthermore, these patients often demonstrate lower rates of symptom improvement after antireflux treatment in comparison with patients with erosive esophagitis. Therefore, further trials to assess the treatment algorithm for these patients are warranted.

  13. Is there an association between hiatal hernia and ineffective esophageal motility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrado, Leonardo Menegaz; Gurski, Richard Ricachenevsky; da Rosa, André Ricardo Pereira; Simic, Aleksandar Petar; Callegari-Jacques, Sídia Maria

    2011-10-01

    The pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease is multifactorial, where esophageal motility is one of the factors implicated in its genesis. However, there is still no consensus on the existence of an association between esophageal dysmotility and hiatal hernia in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. The objective of this study was to establish the prevalence of esophageal dysmotility in patients with hiatal hernia and to determine if herniation is a factor related to esophageal dysmotility in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. The study included 356 patients with a clinical diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease submitted to upper digestive endoscopy and esophageal functional diagnostics. Hiatal hernia was defined endoscopically by a distance equal to or greater than 2 cm between the diaphragmatic constriction and the squamocolumnar junction and esophageal dysmotility when the esophageal manometry identified the amplitude of the peristaltic waves in the distal esophagus as hiatal hernia. Poisson regression models were used to estimate crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) of esophageal dysmotility according to hiatal hernia. Gastroesophageal reflux disease patients with hiatal hernia had a prevalence of esophageal dysmotility equal to 14.8% and those without hiatal hernia, a prevalence of 7.7% (p = 0.041). Patients with hiatal hernia also showed a higher frequency of erosive esophagitis (47.5% versus 24.2%, p hiatal hernia, was 1.92 (confidence interval (CI), 1.04-3.53; p = 0.037), but this association did not persist when controlled for age, esophagitis, altered pH-metry, and altered low esophageal sphincter (adjusted PR, 1.69; CI, 0.68-4.15; p = 0.257). Despite the prevalence of esophageal dysmotility in the hiatal hernia group being higher than that in the group without hiatal hernia, the association between these variables in individuals with gastroesophageal reflux disease disappeared when controlling for

  14. Weight Loss Can Lead to Resolution of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms: A Prospective Intervention Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mandeep; Lee, Jaehoon; Gupta, Neil; Gaddam, Srinivas; Smith, Bryan K.; Wani, Sachin B.; Sullivan, Debra K.; Rastogi, Amit; Bansal, Ajay; Donnelly, Joseph E.; Sharma, Prateek

    2013-01-01

    Objective Weight gain is an important risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); however, whether weight loss can lead to resolution of GERD symptoms is not clear. Our aim was to measure the impact of weight loss on GERD symptoms. Design and Methods In a prospective cohort study at a tertiary referral center, overweight/obese subjects (BMI 25-39.9 kg/m2) were enrolled in a structured weight loss program. Weight loss strategies included dietary modifications, increased physical activity and behavioral changes. At baseline and at 6 months, BMI and waist circumference were measured and all participants completed a validated reflux disease questionnaire. Results A total of 332 adult subjects, mean age 46 years and 66% women were prospectively enrolled. At baseline, the mean body weight, BMI, and waist circumference were 101 (±18) kg, 35 (±5) kg/m2 and 103 (±13) cm. At 6 months, majority of the subjects (97%) lost weight (average weight loss: 13 ± 7.7 kg) and as compared with baseline, there was a significant decrease in the overall prevalence of GERD (15 vs. 37%; P weight loss and reduction in GERD symptom scores (r = 0.17, P weight loss program can lead to complete resolution of GERD symptoms in the majority of these subjects. PMID:23532991

  15. [Supraventricular tachycardia in newborns and its association with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuertes, Ángeles; Alshweki, Ayham; Pérez-Muñuzuri, Alejandro; Couce, María-Luz

    2017-10-01

    Supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) is the most common arrhythmia in the neonatal period, but its association with other triggering processes is not well established. The aim of the study was to analyse the possible relationship between neonatal SVT and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), a condition which was recently linked to atrial arrhythmias. A retrospective longitudinal descriptive study was conducted over a period of 5years on newborns who were diagnosed with SVT in a level III neonatal unit, assessing morphological aspects, associated symptoms, and treatments received. Its association with GERD and the impact of this on SVT was studied. Eighteen patients (1.2 per 1000 newborns) were diagnosed with SVT. Fifty percent of them were combined with clinically significant GERD (P=.01), and all of them received drug treatment. The average time of control of SVT without GERD since diagnosis was 6 days (95% CI: 2.16-9.84, with a median of 3) and 7.6 days when both pathologies were present (95% CI: 4.14-10.9, with a median of 7) (P=.024). Patients with SVT in the neonatal period frequently have GERD, and this combination leads to more difficulty in controlling the tachycardia. The reflux could act as a trigger or perpetuator of arrhythmia, therefore it is important to find and treat GERD in infants with SVT. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Gastroesophageal reflux disease: review of presenting symptoms, evaluation, management, and outcome in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolia, Vasundhara; Wuerth, Anne; Thomas, Ronald

    2003-09-01

    We conducted a retrospective review of 342 infants presenting with symptoms suggestive of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) to assess their evaluation, management, and outcome. All infants underwent extended pH monitoring (EPM) for one or more of the following symptoms: regurgitation, choking, irritability, failure to thrive, apparent life-threatening event, or wheezing. EPM was considered abnormal if distal reflux index was > or = 5% and/or if the Euler and Byrne score was > or = 50 and these patients were labeled as having GERD. Those with normal EPM parameters were controls. All infants were management before EPM. Of 342 infants studied, EPM was normal in 169 patients, ie, controls, and GERD was present in 173 children. GERD was more prevalent in Caucasians compared to African Americans (P infants with GERD, almost half of infants in the control group also needed pharmacotherapy because of persistent symptoms. Mean time to resolution of symptoms in the control group infants with normal EPM was 3.5 months, and in infants with GERD it was 5.4 months (P infants with symptoms suggestive of GERD resolve their symptoms within 3-6 months of initiating treatment. Day-to-day variability of the spectrum of GERD may contribute towards normal results of EPM in some infants who need pharmacotherapy.

  17. The contribution of hiatal hernia to severe gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with gastroschisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Jacqueline; Blinman, Thane A; Collins, Joy L; Laje, Pablo; Hedrick, Holly L; Adzick, N Scott; Flake, Alan W

    2014-03-01

    A relationship between gastroschisis-associated gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and hiatal hernia (HH) has not been previously reported. In reviewing our experience with gastroschisis-related GER, we noted a surprising incidence of associated HH in patients requiring antireflux procedures. A single center retrospective chart review focused on GER in all gastroschisis patients repaired between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2012 was performed. Of the 141 patients surviving initial gastroschisis repair and hospitalization, 16 (11.3%) were noted to have an associated HH (12 Type I, 3 Type II, 1 Type III) on upper gastrointestinal series for severe reflux. Ten of the 13 (76.9%) patients who required an antireflux procedure had an associated HH. The time to initiation of feeds was similar in all patients, 19 and 23 days. However, time to full feedings and discharge was delayed until a median of 80 and 96 days, respectively, in HH patients. This study describes a high incidence of associated HH in gastroschisis patients. The presence of large associated HH correlated with severe GER, delayed feeding, requirement for antireflux surgery, and a prolonged hospital stay. Patients with gastroschisis and clinically severe GER should undergo early assessment for associated HH. © 2013.

  18. Similar symptom patterns in gastroesophageal reflux patients with and without hiatal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniou, S A; Koch, O O; Antoniou, G A; Asche, K U; Kaindlstorfer, A; Granderath, F A; Pointner, R

    2013-07-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common clinical entity in Western societies. Its association with hiatal hernia has been well documented; however, the comparative clinical profile of patients in the presence or absence of hiatal hernia remains mostly unknown. The aim of the present study was to delineate and compare symptom, impedance, and manometric patterns of patients with and without hiatal hernia. A cumulative number of 120 patients with reflux disease were enrolled in the study. Quality of life score, demographic, symptom, manometric, and impedance data were prospectively collected. Data comparison was undertaken between patients with and without hiatal hernia. A P-value hiatal hernia tended to be older than patients without hernia (52.3 vs. 48.6 years, P hiatal hernia (78.3% vs. 93.9%, P hiatal hernia on manometric and impedance studies. Distinct functional characteristics in patients with and without hiatal hernia may suggest a tailored therapeutic management for these diverse patient groups. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  19. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT OF THE PREVALENCE OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE IN SLOVENIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Pleterski

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. No adequate epidemiological study of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has as yet been conducted in Slovenia. This epidemiological study provided data on the frequency of upper gastrointestinal tract endoscopies in a limited geographic region. The obtained data were used for a projection of the epidemiological situation of GERD in Slovenia. Over a period of 24 working days, the inhabitants of the Gorenjska region underwent 859 endoscopies (50.8% of the patients were males. Esophagitis was diagnosed in 167 patients (19.5% of the total number of the patients examined of whom 102 were of male and 65 of female sex. The most frequently diagnosed condition was gastritis (139 patients. Other very frequently obtained findings included hiatal hernia, duodenitis and a normal finding. Our calculation revealed that approximately 9000 patients consulted a general practitioner due to GERD symptoms in the year 2000. Our calculations were made on the assumption that general practitioners refer 50% of the patients to a specialist and that esophagitis is endoscopically diagnosed in 40% of GERD patients.Conclusions. Considering that, according to literature data, 25% of patients with dyspeptic symptoms visit a physician, the calculated prevalence of GERD among the population between 10 and 89 years comes to 20.5%. Projection of this figure to the entire Slovenia gives the number of people suffering from the reflux disease and which is over 363,000.

  20. Evidence-based appraisal in laparoscopic Nissen and Toupet fundoplications for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Cheng-Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Xiang-Min; Jiang, Dao-Zhen; Liu, Sheng; Qiu, Ming

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To demonstrate the optimal surgical procedure for gastroesophageal reflux disease. METHODS: The electronic databases of Medline, Elsevier, Springerlink and Embase over the last 16 years were searched. All clinical trials involved in the outcomes of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) and laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (LTF) were identified. The data of assessment in benefits and adverse results of LNF and LTF were extracted and compared using meta-analysis. RESULTS: We ultimately identified a total of 32 references reporting nine randomized controlled trials, eight prospective cohort trials and 15 retrospective trials. These studies reported a total of 6236 patients, of whom 4252 (68.18%) underwent LNF and 1984 (31.82%) underwent LTF. There were no differences between LNF and LTF in patients’ satisfaction, perioperative complications, postoperative heartburn, reflux recurrence and re-operation. Both LNF and LTF enhanced the function of lower esophageal sphincter and improved esophagitis. The postoperative dysphagia, gas-bloating syndrome, inability to belch and the need for dilatation after LNF were more common than after LTF. Subgroup analyses showed that dysphagia after LNF and LTF was similar in patients with normal esophageal peristalsis (EP), but occurred more frequently in patients with weak EP after LNF than after LTF. Furthermore, patients with normal EP after LNF still had a higher risk of developing dysphagia than did patients with abnormal EP after LTF. CONCLUSION: Compared with LNF, LTF offers equivalent symptom relief and reduces adverse results. PMID:20572311

  1. Is analysis of lower esophageal sphincter vector volumes of value in diagnosing gastroesophageal reflux disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Robert E; Perdue, Christopher L; Awad, Ziad T; Watson, Patrice; Selima, Mohamed; Davis, Richard E; Filipi, Charles J

    2003-01-01

    With successful surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), there is interest in understanding the anti-reflux barrier and its mechanisms of failure. To date, the potential use of vector volumes to predict the DeMeester score has not been adequately explored. 627 patients in the referral database received esophageal manometry and ambulatory 24-hour pH monitoring. Study data included LES resting pressure (LESP), overall LES length (OL) and abdominal length (AL), total vector volume (TVV) and intrabdominal vector volume (IVV). In cases where LESP, TVV or IVV were all below normal, there was an 81.4 % probability of a positive DeMeester score. In cases where all three were normal, there was an 86.9 % probability that the DeMeester score would be negative. Receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) for LESP, TVV and IVV were nearly identical and indicated no useful cut-off values. Logistic regression demonstrated that LESP and IVV had the strongest association with a positive DeMeester score; however, the regression formula was only 76.1 % accurate. While the indices based on TVV, IVV and LESP are more sensitive and specific, respectively, than any single measurement, the measurement of vector volumes does not add significantly to the diagnosis of GERD.

  2. Managing peptic ulcer and gastroesophageal reflux disease in elderly Chinese patients – focus on esomeprazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Raymond SY; Wu, Justin CY

    2013-01-01

    Peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) are not uncommon in elderly patients. Clinical presentations of these acid-related disorders may be atypical in the geriatric population. Older individuals are at increased risk for poor outcomes in complicated PUD and for development of GERD complications. Multiple risk factors (eg, Helicobacter pylori [HP], use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs [NSAIDs], aspirin) contribute to the development of PUD. Recent data has shown that HP-negative, NSAID-negative idiopathic peptic ulcers are on the rise and carry a higher risk of recurrent ulcer bleeding and mortality. Effective management of PUD in the geriatric population relies on identification and modification of treatable risk factors. Elderly patients with GERD often require long-term acid suppressive therapy. Proton pump inhibitors (PPI) including esomeprazole are effective in the treatment of reflux esophagitis, maintenance of GERD symptomatic control, and management of PUD as well as its complications. Potential safety concerns of long-term PPI use have been reported in the literature. Clinicians should balance the risks and benefits before committing elderly patients to long-term PPI therapy. PMID:24187492

  3. Barrett's metaplasia develops from cellular reprograming of esophageal squamous epithelium due to gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minacapelli, Carlos D; Bajpai, Manisha; Geng, Xin; Cheng, Christina L; Chouthai, Abhishek A; Souza, Rhonda; Spechler, Stuart J; Das, Kiron M

    2017-06-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) clinically predisposes to columnar Barrett's metaplasia (BM) in the distal esophagus. We demonstrate evidence supporting the cellular origin of BM from reprograming or transcommitment of resident normal esophageal squamous (NES) epithelial cells in response to acid and bile (A + B) exposure using an in vitro cell culture model. The hTERT-immortalized NES cell line NES-B10T was exposed 5 min/day to an A + B mixture for 30 wk. Morphological changes, mRNA, and protein expression levels for the inflammatory marker cyclooxygenase-2; the lineage-determining transcription factors TAp63 (squamous), CDX2, and SOX9 (both columnar); and the columnar lineage markers Villin, Muc-2, CK8, and mAb Das-1 (incomplete phenotype of intestinal metaplasia) were assessed every 10 wk. Markers of columnar lineage and inflammation increased progressively, while squamous lineage-determining transcriptional factors were significantly decreased both at the mRNA and/or protein level in the NES-B10T cells at/after A + B treatment for 30 wk. Distinct modifications in morphological features were only observed at/after 30 wk of A + B exposure. These changes acquired by the NES-B10T 30-wk cells were retained even after cessation of A + B exposure for at least 3 wk. This study provides evidence that chronic exposure to the physiological components of gastric refluxate leads to repression of the discernable squamous transcriptional factors and activation of latent columnar transcriptional factors. This reflects the alteration in lineage commitment of the precursor-like biphenotypic, NES-B10T cells in response to A + B exposure as the possible origin of BM from the resident NES cells.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study provides evidence of the origins of Barrett's metaplasia from lineage transcommitment of resident esophageal cells after chronic exposure to gastroesophageal refluxate. The preterminal progenitor-like squamous cells alter their differentiation and develop

  4. Management of gastroesophageal reflux disease: medications, surgery, or endoscopic therapy? (Current status and trends).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Xu-ting; Kavic, Stephen M; Park, Adrian E

    2005-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common chronic disorder in the Western world. The basic cause of GERD has been well characterized--the fundamental defect is a loss of integrity of the gastroesophageal barrier. What is less clear is the most appropriate means of addressing this reflux. GERD has a variety of symptoms, ranging from typical presentations of heartburn and regurgitation (without esophagitis) to atypical presentations, such as severe erosive esophagitis and its associated complications. Because of its symptomatic diversity, physicians may select from a variety of therapeutic approaches. Medical therapy aims at decreasing acidity by suppressing proton secretion and has been well established. Available medications include antacids and alginates, H2-receptor antagonists, motility agents, and proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). Antireflux surgery, commonly performed laparoscopically, aims at reinforcing and repairing the defective barrier through plication of the gastric fundus. The earliest performed successful procedures were the Nissen and Toupet fundoplications, to which several modifications have since been made. It has been demonstrated in preliminary studies and long-term outcomes of such open surgery and preliminary studies of such laparoscopic surgery that antireflux surgery is an effective approach, with overall outcomes superior to those achieved with medications. The precise indications for the surgical treatment of patients with GERD, however, remain controversial. In recent years, endoscopic intraluminal antireflux approaches have attracted the attention of physicians, surgeons, and commercial companies, especially after the approval of two endoscopic intraluminal methods by the United States FDA in 2000. The common element is prevention of acid reflux by construction of a functional or controlled barrier in the lower esophageal sphincter zone. Three main methods are currently employed: endoscopic intraluminal valvuloplasty, endoscopic

  5. Gastroesophageal reflux leads to esophageal cancer in a surgical model with mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaoxin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Esophago-gastroduodenal anastomosis with rats mimics the development of human Barrett's esophagus and esophageal adenocarcinoma by introducing mixed reflux of gastric and duodenal contents into the esophagus. However, use of this rat model for mechanistic and chemopreventive studies is limited due to lack of genetically modified rat strains. Therefore, a mouse model of esophageal adenocarcinoma is needed. Methods We performed reflux surgery on wild-type, p53A135V transgenic, and INK4a/Arf+/- mice of A/J strain. Some mice were also treated with omeprazole (1,400 ppm in diet, iron (50 mg/kg/m, i.p., or gastrectomy plus iron. Mouse esophagi were harvested at 20, 40 or 80 weeks after surgery for histopathological analysis. Results At week 20, we observed metaplasia in wild-type mice (5%, 1/20 and p53A135V mice (5.3%, 1/19. At week 40, metaplasia was found in wild-type mice (16.2%, 6/37, p53A135V mice (4.8%, 2/42, and wild-type mice also receiving gastrectomy and iron (6.7%, 1/15. Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma developed in INK4a/Arf+/- mice (7.1%, 1/14, and wild-type mice receiving gastrectomy and iron (21.4%, 3/14. Among 13 wild-type mice which were given iron from week 40 to 80, twelve (92.3% developed squamous cell carcinoma at week 80. None of these mice developed esophageal adenocarcinoma. Conclusion Surgically induced gastroesophageal reflux produced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, but not esophageal adenocarcinoma, in mice. Dominant negative p53 mutation, heterozygous loss of INK4a/Arf, antacid treatment, iron supplementation, or gastrectomy failed to promote esophageal adenocarcinoma in these mice. Further studies are needed in order to develop a mouse model of esophageal adenocarcinoma.

  6. Recurrent acute otitis media and gastroesophageal reflux disease in children. is there an association?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsis, George P; Nikolopoulos, Thomas P; Yiotakis, Ioannis E; Papacharalampous, George X; Kandiloros, Dimitrios C

    2009-10-01

    To investigate whether there is a relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and recurrent acute otitis media (RAOM) in infants and children. Possible risk factors are also explored. 221 consecutive children who had symptoms and signs associated with GERD and had undergone a prolonged ambulatory 24-h esophageal pH-monitoring. Thirty-four children were excluded from the study due to age, neurological deficits, congenital abnormalities, immunodeficiency syndromes or other chronic systemic disorders. The remaining 187 children (96 boys and 91 girls), aged between 40 days and 33 months (mean age of 18.3 months) were assigned into three groups according to their Reflux Index (RI%). Group A: 49 children (26.2%) without GERD (control group); Group B: 78 children (41.7%) with low to moderate RI; and Group C: 60 children (32.1%) with severe GERD. Parental interviews and personal medical files of the National Health System were used for data collection. However, episodes of acute otitis media were taken into account only if they were diagnosed by a physician. The follow-up period ranged from 6 to 8 years in order to cover the peaks of otitis media incidence in childhood. The results revealed that 6 children from Group A (12.24%), 11 from Group B (14.1%) and 19 from Group C (31.67%) presented episodes of RAOM. The difference was statistically significant (p=0.01). Furthermore, in children who received anti-reflux treatment, the incidence of RAOM substantially decreased and eventually became approximate to that of the control Group A (12.32%). Logistic regression revealed that the strongest risk factor for recurrent otitis media was severe GERD (odds ratio, 4), then attendance at day-care centres (odds ratio, 3), followed by allergies (odds ratio, 2.7). Severe GERD could be implicated in the multifactorial etiology of RAOM in infants and children.

  7. Mucosal integrity and sensitivity to acid in the proximal esophagus in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoeij, Froukje B; Weijenborg, Pim W; van den Bergh Weerman, Marius A; van den Wijngaard, René M J G J; Verheij, J; Smout, André J P M; Bredenoord, Albert J

    2016-07-01

    Acid reflux episodes that extend to the proximal esophagus are more likely to be perceived. This suggests that the proximal esophagus is more sensitive to acid than the distal esophagus, which could be caused by impaired mucosal integrity in the proximal esophagus. Our aim was to explore sensitivity to acid and mucosal integrity in different segments of the esophagus. We used a prospective observational study, including 12 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). After stopping acid secretion-inhibiting medication, two procedures were performed: an acid perfusion test and an upper endoscopy with electrical tissue impedance spectroscopy and esophageal biopsies. Proximal and distal sensitivity to acid and tissue impedance were measured in vivo, and mucosal permeability and epithelial intercellular spaces at different esophageal levels were measured in vitro. Mean lag time to heartburn perception was much shorter after proximal acid perfusion (0.8 min) than after distal acid perfusion (3.9 min) (P = 0.02). Median in vivo tissue impedance was significantly lower in the distal esophagus (4,563 Ω·m) compared with the proximal esophagus (8,170 Ω·m) (P = 0.002). Transepithelial permeability, as measured by the median fluorescein flux was significantly higher in the distal (2,051 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) than in the proximal segment (368 nmol·cm(-2)·h(-1)) (P = 0.033). Intercellular space ratio and maximum heartburn intensity were not significantly different between the proximal and distal esophagus. In GERD patients off acid secretion-inhibiting medication, acid exposure in the proximal segment of the esophagus provokes symptoms earlier than acid exposure in the distal esophagus, whereas mucosal integrity is impaired more in the distal esophagus. These findings indicate that the enhanced sensitivity to proximal reflux episodes is not explained by increased mucosal permeability. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  8. Efficacy of esomeprazole and flupentixol and melitracen in treatment of non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease with depression and anxiety

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟英强

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy of esomeprazole (Esomeprazole) and flupentixol and melitracen (Deanxit) in treatment of non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (NERD) with depression and anxiety. Methods The diagnosis of NERD was based on the results of esomeprazole scale (reflux diagnostic questionnaires, RDQ) and endoscopy, the degree and frequency of symptoms were graded and scored. Hamilton depression scale was used to evaluate depression and anxiety status. Sixty-three patients were randomly divided into group A (esomeprazole 20 mg qd),B (Deanxit 1 tab

  9. Influence of Concomitant Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease on Clinical Course and Respiratory Function in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.G. Oparin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The main clinical features of clinical course of comorbidity are shown in the article. The value of estimating functional changes of spirogram in these patients is described. The role of concomitant gastroesophageal reflux disease on the clinical course of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was proved, the value of estimating atypical clinical signs for the right diagnostics and treatment of these patients is accentuated.

  10. Disease due to gastroesophageal reflux in children Enfermedad por reflujo gastroesofágico en niños

    OpenAIRE

    Leonor Adriana Castiblanco Galvis; Etty Paola Cortés Ramírez; Claudia Paola Acevedo Villafañe; Carlos Alberto Velasco Benítez

    1997-01-01

    In normal infants gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is usually self-limited but GER disease (GERD) is a frequent cause of morbidity in childhood, causing severe respiratory, gastrointestinal and feeding problems. This review describes the pathophysiology, clinical aspects,diagnosis, treatment and complications of GERD in children. En niños normales el reflujo gastroesofágico (RGE) es usualmente autolimitado. La enfermedad por RGE (ERGE) causa severos problemas respiratorios, gastrointestinales y ...

  11. Cardiopexy with Ligamentum Teres in Patients with Hiatal Hernia and Previous Sleeve Gastrectomy: An Alternative Treatment for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez-Valdovinos, Ramiro; Cruz-Vigo, José Luis; Marín-Santillán, Ernesto; Funes-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; López-Ambriz, Gustavo; Domínguez-Carrillo, Luis Gerardo

    2015-08-01

    Fifty percent of patients who have undergone sleeve gastrectomy have gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Surgical reinforcement of the lower esophageal sphincter is necessary to prevent acid reflux. Here, we describe ligamentum teres cardiopexy, a surgical technique that reinforces the lower esophageal sphincter and restores its competence with a new valve, in patients with previous sleeve gastrectomy and hiatal hernia. Included in the study were 15 patients (age, 35.6 ± 15.2 years; 13 females [86.6 %]; mean pre-cardiopexy body mass index, 21.94 kg/m(2)) with sleeve gastrectomy who presented with hiatal hernia and gastroesophageal reflux disease and underwent ligamentum teres cardiopexy. In this procedure, the ligamentum teres is released from its umbilical connection and the hernia reduced by manual traction, freeing the last 3-5 cm of esophagus in the abdomen. The distal ligamentum teres is fixed with one stitch to the apex of the angle of His, one at the gastroesophageal junction, and one joining the gastric fundus to the esophagus. The remainder of the ligamentum teres is fixed over itself with four to six stitches, forming a necktie cardiopexy. The procedure concludes with diaphragmatic crus closure. After 6 months, 13 patients (86.6 %) achieved successful results, defined as resolution of GERD, no proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) use, and manometry measurement over 12 mmHg after surgery. Two patients (13.3 %) required continued proton-pump inhibition. Ligamentum teres cardiopexy combined with closure of the gastric crus is a good alternative treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with previous sleeve gastrectomy and hiatal hernia.

  12. A PROPOSITION FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE IN CHILDREN - A REPORT FROM A WORKING GROUP ON GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENPLAS, Y; ASHKENAZI, A; BELLI, D; BOIGE, N; BOUQUET, J; CADRANEL, S; CEZARD, JP; CUCCHIARA, S; DUPONT, C; GEBOES, K; GOTTRAND, F; HEYMANS, HSA; JASINSKI, C; KNEEPKENS, CMF; KOLETZKO, S; MILLA, P; MOUGENOT, JF; NUSSLE, D; NAVARRO, J; NEWELL, SJ; OLAFSDOTTIR, E; PEETERS, S; RAVELLI, A; POLANCO, [No Value; SANDHU, BK; TOLBOOM, J

    In this paper, a Working Group on Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux discusses recommendations for the first line diagnostic and therapeutic approach of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease in infants and children. All members of the Working Group agreed that infants with uncomplicated gastro-oesophageal reflux

  13. Clinical presentation and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease in a referral center in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalçin, Sule; Yalçin, S; Ciftci, A O; Senocak, M E; Tanyel, F C

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the characteristics of the pathway from the onset of clinical findings related to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) until the surgical therapy to achieve a better organization of the multiple disciplines and create the best management scheme in a referral center in Turkey. All patients who underwent anti-reflux surgery for GERD in our unit between 2000 - 2006 were retrospectively reviewed. Information on their past medical follow-up, the clinical findings, diagnostic evaluation and the therapeutic approach was recorded. There were 24 girls and 40 boys with a median age of 36 months (3 - 192 months). Of the 64 cases, 36 (56.3 %) had a history of past medical follow-up. Of these 36 patients, 20 had received medical and/or surgical therapy for GERD without any standardization. The remaining 16 were treated supportively for neurological, respiratory and metabolic problems without having had a diagnosis of GERD. The median duration of symptoms in 28 patients without a past medical history was shorter than that in the remaining 36 patients (p = 0.03). Of the 64 patients at presentation, 35 had neurological, 4 had metabolic, and 3 had a respiratory pathology; the other 4 had a history of esophageal atresia and tracheoesophageal fistula operation; 5 had been operated in another center for GERD and only 13 cases had isolated GERD. The most commonly used diagnostic methods were contrast study (n = 52) and pH monitoring (n = 36). Forty-one of the 64 had anti-reflux surgery primarily after presentation, in addition to selection of medical therapies and/or other surgical interventions as a first step in the remaining 23. Reevaluation of those 23 patients after a median period of 7 months (1 - 36) finally led to anti-reflux surgery (ARS). Patients presenting with a stricture due to GERD (n = 13) underwent ARS, either as a primary procedure (n = 3) or after a course of dilatations (median period of time: 8.5 months) (n = 10). Extended

  14. Surgical treatment of the non-complicated gastroesophageal reflux: fundoplication without division of the short gastric vessels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELIX Valter Nilton

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Background - There is today a significant greater number of laparoscopic antireflux procedures for the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and there are yet controversies about the necessity of division of the short gastric vessels and full mobilization of the gastric fundus to perform an adequate fundoplication. Aim - To verify the results of the surgical treatment of non-complicated gastroesophageal reflux disease performing Rossetti modification of the Nissen fundoplication. Patients and Methods - Fourteen patients were operated consecutively and prospectively (mean age 44.07 years; all had erosive esophagitis without Barrett's endoscopic signals (grade 3, Savary-Miller and they were submitted to the Rossetti modification of the Nissen fundoplication. Endoscopy, esophageal manometry and pHmetry were performed before the procedure and around 18 months postoperatively. Results - There was no morbidity, transient dysphagia average was 18.42 days; there was no register of dehiscence or displacement of the fundoplication and only one patient revealed a light esophagitis at postoperative endoscopy; the others presented a normal endoscopic view of the distal esophagus. All noticed a marked improvement of preoperative symptoms. Lower esophageal sphincter pressure changed from 5.82 mm Hg (preoperative mean to 12 mm Hg (postoperative mean; lower esophageal sphincter relaxing pressure, from 0.38 mm Hg to 5.24 mm Hg and DeMeester score, from 16.75 to 0.8. Conclusion - Rossetti procedure (fundoplication without division of the short gastric vessels is an effective surgical method to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease.

  15. Swallow-induced esophageal shortening in patients without hiatal hernia is associated with gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, T; Singhal, S; Akimoto, S; Bremner, R M; Mittal, S K

    2017-12-21

    Longitudinal esophageal body shortening with swallow-induced peristalsis has been reported in healthy individuals. Esophageal shortening is immediately followed by esophageal re-elongation, and the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) returns to the baseline position. High-resolution manometry (HRM) allows for objective assessment of extent of shortening and duration of shortening. In patients without hiatal hernia at rest, swallow-induced esophageal shortening can lead to transient hiatal hernia (tHH) which at times may persist after the completion of swallow. This manometric finding has not been investigated in the literature, but a question arises whether this swallow-induced transient herniation can effect on the likelihood of gastroesophageal reflux. This study aims to assess the relationship between gastroesophageal reflux and the subtypes of swallow-induced esophageal shortening, i.e. tHH and non-tHH, in patients without hiatal hernia at rest. After Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval, we queried a prospectively maintained database to identify patients who underwent HRM evaluation and 24-hour pH study between January to December 2015. Patients with type-I esophagogastric junction (EGJ) morphology (i.e. no hiatal hernia) according to the Chicago classification v3.0 were included. The patterns of the esophageal shortening with swallows were divided into two subtypes, i.e. tHH and non-tHH. tHH was defined as an EGJ double high-pressure zones (≥1 cm) at the second inspiration after the termination of swallow-induced esophageal body contraction. The number of episodes of tHH was counted per 10 swallows and tHH size was measured for each patient. In total, 41 patients with EGJ morphology Type-I met the inclusion criteria. The mean age was 47.2 years, 35 patients (85.4%) were women, and the mean body mass index was 33.9 kg/m2. The mean number of tHH episodes was 3 out of 10 swallows; mean maximal tHH size was 1.3 cm. Patients who had tHH in ≥3 out of 10

  16. Hiatal hernia and gastroesophageal reflux: Study of collagen in the phrenoesophageal ligament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Diemen, V; Trindade, E N; Trindade, M R M

    2016-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is defined by the intensity and/or quality of the reflux of gastric or duodenal contents into the esophagus. Surgical treatment of GERD has shown conflicting results and unacceptable recurrence rates, mainly due to herniation of the antireflux valve into the chest. A variety of techniques has been proposed to reduce GERD recurrence, including routine use of prosthesis in cruroplasty. The prevalence of GERD in patients with hiatal hernia (HH) can reach 94 %. It is possible that the phrenoesophageal ligament (POL) engaged in the stabilization of the gastroesophageal junction in the abdomen may be an etiological factor of HH. We conducted a study to evaluate collagen in the constitution of the POL in patients with HH and cadavers without HH. POL samples were collected from 29 patients with HH and GERD (cases) and 32 samples from cadavers without HH (controls). Total collagen was quantified through the Picrosirius red histochemical technique, and type-I and type-III collagens were quantified immunohistochemically using a monoclonal antibody. The stained slides were photographed, and images were quantified by computer software (Image Pro Plus) to count the pixels per field. The mean age was 49.5 (±11.5) years for the cases and 38.5 (±13) years for the controls (p < 0.01). Seventeen cases (58.6 %) and six controls (18.75 %) were female (p < 0.01). The quantity of total (p < 0.01), type-I (p < 0.01), and type-III (p < 0.05) collagens was significantly lower by about 60 % in patients with HH compared with controls. Our data indicate that the composition of POL for patients with GERD and HH includes less total, type-I, and type-III collagens than that of the POL of cadavers without HH. The quality of the POL may be an etiological factor in the development of HH.

  17. Symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease in severely mentally retarded people: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boer Riet

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD occurs when stomach acid frequently backs up (or refluxes into the gullet (or esophagus, and it has serious consequences for the quality of life. Usually this is felt as heartburn. Because severely mentally retarded people usually do not utter complaints of heartburn, it requires a high index of suspicion to discover possible GERD. Therefore it is relevant for care professionals such as nurses to have knowledge of those with a higher risk of GERD and of the possible manifestations of GERD. Methods Using a predefined search method, electronic databases were searched for studies relating the presence of symptoms to the presence of GERD. Relevant data were extracted and the methodological quality of the studies assessed. The results of the included studies were synthesized and conclusions about the level of evidence were drawn. Results Nineteen studies were found relating symptoms to the presence of GERD. Only four were of good methodological quality. The studies were very diverse concerning the studied population, the study method, and the kind of symptoms examined. This makes it difficult to synthesize the results of the studies. There is evidence that patients with cerebral palsy, patients using anticonvulsive drugs, and those with an IQ lower than 35 more frequently have GERD. There is also evidence that vomiting, rumination and hematemesis are associated with a higher risk of the presence of GERD, whereas there is no clear scientific evidence that particular behavior symptoms are indicative for GERD. Conclusion The possible manifestations of GERD are many and varied. A guideline will be made for care professionals to aid systematic observation of possible manifestations of GERD.

  18. Association Between Halitosis Diagnosed by a Questionnaire and Halimeter and Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyo-Jung; Kim, Hee Man; Kim, Nayoung; Oh, Jane C; Jo, Hyun Jin; Lee, Jung-Tae; Chang, Hee-Yung; Chang, Na-Hee; Ahn, Soyeon; Lee, Jeong-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The relationship between halitosis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) remains controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate an association between subjective and objective halitosis and GERD. Methods The subjects were enrolled from participants who visited a health promotion center at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. For diagnosis of halitosis, a questionnaire was requested, and volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs) were measured by Halimeter. Self-conscious halitosis was defined as halitosis perceived by himself or herself. Informed halitosis was defined as halitosis perceived by others. Objective halitosis was defined when mean VSCs values were > 100 parts per billion. GERD was defined based on a questionnaire and endoscopy, including erosive esophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). Results A total of 54 subjects (male:female = 33:21) with mean age of 46.0 ± 11.4 years were analyzed. The mean VSCs values were not significantly different between presence and absence of self-conscious halitosis (P = 0.322), but significantly different between presence and absence of informed halitosis (P = 0.021). Informed halitosis was associated with objective halitosis (P = 0.039). GERD, erosive esophagitis and NERD did not correlate with objective halitosis (P = 0.556, 0.206 and 0.902, respectively). In multivariable analysis, the relationship between objective halitosis and GERD symptoms including chest pain, heart burn, acid regurgitation, epigastric pain, hoarseness, globus sensation and coughing was not significant. Besides, GERD was not associated with self-conscious halitosis, informed halitosis and objective halitosis, respectively. Conclusions GERD might not be associated with self-conscious, informed halitosis and objective halitosis indicated by Halimeter results. Informed halitosis could be correlated with objective halitosis determined by the Halimeter. PMID:25257469

  19. Prevalence and risk factors of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in a Chinese retiree cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Tiantian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data about prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux diseases (GERD from Asian populations are still scarce. To provide additional data on prevalence of GERD and investigate its potential risk factors, we performed this cross-sectional study in the Taizhou Retiree Cohort. Methods After physical examination, the participants were asked whether they suffered with heartburn or acid regurgitation in the last 12 months by trained interviewers, and if yes, the severity and frequency of the symptoms were recorded. Odds ratios (ORs with 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the associations of obesity and other risk factors with GERD were derived from logistic regression models. Results 8831 retirees completed the questionnaire and physical examination. In total 150 (1.7% reported the symptoms occurring at least once per week within the last 12 months before the interview. Compared with subjects without GERD, having a history of diabetes mellitus (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.4-3.5, hypertension (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.0-2.1, gastritis (OR 8.2, 95% CI 5.8-11.5, peptic ulcer (OR 3.3, 95% CI 1.8-6.1 and high triglyceride level (≥1.81mmol/L (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.2-3.4 were associated with a significantly increased risk of GERD. However, there was no significant association between body mass index, waist-to-hip ratio or waist alone, smoking, consumption of alcohol & tea, and the occurrence of reflux symptoms. Conclusions Compared with Western populations, the prevalence of GERD in this Chinese retiree cohort is low. A history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, gastritis, peptic ulcer or hypertriglyceridaemia increases GERD risk in this population.

  20. Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease complicated by Barrett's esophagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stasyshyn, Andriy

    2017-08-31

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for gastroesophageal reflux disease complicated by Barrett's esophagus in 46 patients. A diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm for complicated GERD was developed. To describe the changes in the esophagus with reflux esophagitis, the Los Angeles classification was used. Intestinal metaplasia of the epithelium in the lower third of the esophagus was assessed using videoendoscopy, chromoscopy, and biopsy. Quality of life was assessed with the Gastro-Intestinal Quality of Life Index. The used methods were modeling, clinical, analytical, comparative, standardized, and questionnaire-based. Results and their discussion. Among the complications of GERD, Barrett's esophagus was diagnosed in 9 (19.6 %), peptic ulcer in the esophagus in 10 (21.7 %), peptic stricture of the esophagus in 4 (8.7 %), esophageal-gastric bleeding in 23 (50.0 %), including Malory-Weiss syndrome in 18, and erosive ulcerous bleeding in 5 people. Hiatal hernia was diagnosed in 171 (87.7 %) patients (sliding in 157 (91.8%), paraesophageal hernia in 2 (1.2%), and mixed hernia in 12 (7.0%) cases). One hundred ninety-five patients underwent laparoscopic surgery. Nissen fundoplication was conducted in 176 (90.2%) patients, Toupet fundoplication in 14 (7.2%), and Dor fundoplication in 5 (2.6%). It was established that the use of the diagnostic and treatment algorithm promoted systematization and objectification of changes in complicated GERD, contributed to early diagnosis, helped in choosing treatment, and improved quality of life. Argon coagulation and use of PPIs for 8-12 weeks before surgery led to the regeneration of the mucous membrane in the esophagus. The developed diagnostic and therapeutic algorithm facilitated systematization and objectification of changes in complicated GERD, contributed to early diagnosis, helped in choosing treatment, and improved quality of life.

  1. Gastroesophageal Acid Reflux Control 5 Years After Antireflux Surgery, Compared With Long-term Esomeprazole Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatlebakk, Jan G; Zerbib, Frank; Bruley des Varannes, Stanislas; Attwood, Stephen E; Ell, Christian; Fiocca, Roberto; Galmiche, Jean-Paul; Eklund, Stefan; Långström, Göran; Lind, Tore; Lundell, Lars R

    2016-05-01

    We compared the ability of laparoscopic antireflux surgery (LARS) and esomeprazole to control esophageal acid exposure, over a 5-year period, in patients with chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). We also studied whether intraesophageal and intragastric pH parameters off and on therapy were associated with long-term outcomes. We analyzed data from a prospective, randomized, open-label trial comparing the efficacy and safety of LARS vs esomeprazole (20 or 40 mg/d) over 5 years in patients with chronic GERD. Ambulatory intraesophageal and intragastric 24-hour pH monitoring data were compared between groups before LARS or the start of esomeprazole treatment, and 6 months and 5 years afterward. A secondary aim was to evaluate the association between baseline and 6-month pH parameters and esomeprazole dose escalation, reappearance of GERD symptoms, and treatment failure over 5 years in patients receiving LARS or esomeprazole. In the LARS group (n = 116), the median 24-hour esophageal acid exposure was 8.6% at baseline and 0.7% after 6 months and 5 years (P esomeprazole group (n = 151), the median 24-hour esophageal acid exposure was 8.8% at baseline, 2.1% after 6 months, and 1.9% after 5 years (P esomeprazole). Gastric acidity was stable in both groups. Patients who required a dose increase to 40 mg/d had more severe supine reflux at baseline, and decreased esophageal acid exposure (P esomeprazole therapy. However, patients receiving LARS had significantly greater reductions in 24-hour esophageal acid exposure after 6 months and 5 years. Esophageal and gastric pH, off and on therapy, did not predict long-term outcomes of patients. Abnormal supine acid exposure predicted esomeprazole dose escalation. ClinicalTrials.Gov identifier: NCT00251927 (available: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT00251927). Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The impact of illness in patients with moderate to severe gastro-esophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahlqvist Peter

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common disease. It impairs health related quality of life (HRQL. However, the impact on utility scores and work productivity in patients with moderate to severe GERD is not well known. Methods We analyzed data from 217 patients with moderate to severe GERD (mean age 50, SD 13.7 across 17 Canadian centers. Patients completed three utility instruments – the standard gamble (SG, the feeling thermometer (FT, and the Health Utilities Index 3 (HUI 3 – and several HRQL instruments, including Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD and the Medical Outcomes Short Form-36 (SF-36. All patients received a proton pump inhibitor, esomeprazole 40 mg daily, for four to six weeks. Results The mean scores on a scale from 0 (dead to 1 (full health obtained for the FT, SG, and HUI 3 were 0.67 (95% CI, 0.64 to 0.70, 0.76 (95% CI, 0.75 to 0.80, and 0.80 (95% CI, 0.77 to 0.82 respectively. The mean scores on the SF-36 were lower than the previously reported Canadian and US general population mean scores and work productivity was impaired. Conclusion GERD has significant impact on utility scores, HRQL, and work productivity in patients with moderate to severe disease. Furthermore, the FT and HUI 3 provide more valid measurements of HRQL in GERD than the SG. After treatment with esomeprazole, patients showed improved HRQL.

  3. Effects of esomeprazole on sleep in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease as assessed on actigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramoto, Keiko; Fujiwara, Yasuhiro; Ochi, Masahiro; Okuyama, Masatsugu; Tanigawa, Tetsuya; Yamagami, Hirokazu; Shiba, Masatsugu; Watanabe, Kenji; Watanabe, Toshio; Tominaga, Kazunari; Arakawa, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is strongly associated with sleep disturbances. Although treatment with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) helps to improve GERD symptoms and subjective sleep parameters, the effects of PPI therapy on objective sleep parameters are conflicting. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of esomeprazole treatment on GERD symptoms and sleep parameters assessed using actigraphs and questionnaires. Thirteen patients with GERD received 20 mg of esomeprazole once daily for two weeks. The patients wore actigraphs from three days before the initiation of PPI treatment to the end of therapy. They were also asked to answer the following self-reported questionnaires: Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD (FSSG), Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Objective sleep parameters were evaluated using actigraphy. Treatment with esomeprazole significantly decreased the total FSSG score, including the scores for reflux and dysmotility, as well as the ESS score, although it had no effect on the PSQI score. After the second week of treatment, esomeprazole significantly decreased the wake time (from 47.5±39.6 min to 36.0±27.1 min) and sleep latency period (from 19.5±19.8 min to 9.9±10.2 min) and increased the percentage of sleep time (from 89.1±8.8% to 91.9±6.3%); however, improvements were not noted in all objective parameters. Esomeprazole treatment significantly improves various objective sleep parameters in Japanese patients with GERD. Further placebo-controlled randomized trials are needed to obtain detailed results.

  4. Relationship between esomeprazole dose and timing to heartburn resolution in selected patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy C Orlando

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Roy C Orlando1, Sherry Liu2, Marta Illueca31Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA, 2Department of Statistics and Informatics, 3Department of Clinical Development, AstraZeneca LP, Wilmington, DE, USAObjective: To increase response rates to therapy by increasing the dosage of proton pump inhibitor (PPI therapy in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD whose symptoms are predominantly associated with acid reflux.Methods: In this double-blind, randomized, proof-of-concept study, 369 patients with GERD and moderate heartburn lasting ≥three days/week, a history of response to antacids/acid suppression therapy, and a positive esophageal acid perfusion test result were randomized to esomeprazole 20 or 40 mg once daily, or to 40 mg twice daily for four weeks. Heartburn symptom relief/resolution was subsequently evaluated.Results: In this study population, no relationship was apparent between esomeprazole dosage and efficacy variables for sustained heartburn resolution (seven days without symptoms at week 4 (48.0%, 44.0%, and 41.4% for esomeprazole 20 mg once daily, 40 mg once daily, and 40 mg twice daily, respectively. Nocturnal heartburn resolution with esomeprazole 40 mg twice daily showed a numeric improvement trend versus esomeprazole 20 and 40 mg once daily, but this was not statistically significant.Conclusions: Heartburn resolution rates at four weeks were similar for all esomeprazole dosages and comparable with rates reported previously, suggesting a plateau effect in terms of clinical response to acid suppression with PPI therapy in this population of selected GERD patients.Keywords: acid suppressive therapy, GERD, proton pump inhibitor

  5. Acid gastroesophageal reflux in symptomatic infants is primarily a function of classic 2-phase and pH-only acid reflux event types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodley, Frederick W; Hayes, John; Mousa, Hayat

    2009-05-01

    Combined esophageal pH monitoring (EPM) and multichannel intraluminal impedance (MII) reveal 4 unique acid gastroesophageal reflux (AGER) types in infants: classic 2-phase, single-phase, pH-only events (POEs), and re-reflux episodes. The extent to which different AGER event types contribute to AGER frequency, acid reflux exposure time (ARET), and the number of episodes lasting 5 minutes or longer, has never been reported. In this study, EPM/MII was used to assess AGER in symptomatic infants on the basis of these 4 AGER types. EPM/MII tracings from 12 symptomatic infants (POEs, and re-reflux episodes, respectively. In 20.2 hours of combined ARET, 52.3%, 2.3%, 42.4%, and 3.0% occurred during classic 2-phase, single-phase, POEs, and re-reflux episodes, respectively. Classic 2-phase and POE events were both more frequent than single-phase (P = 0.002 and P POEs (P = 0.0001). Of the 35 total AGER episodes that lasted 5 minutes or longer, 94% were classic 2-phase episodes or POEs (57% and 37%, respectively). In symptomatic infants, total AGER episodes, total ARET, and AGER episodes lasting 5 minutes or longer are largely a function of classic 2-phase and pH-only AGER types.

  6. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in the Asian Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Jin Hong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori infection, a common infection in many countries, is related to the clinical course of upper gastrointestinal diseases. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common esophageal disease in Western countries and its prevalence is increasing in Asian countries. The pathophysiology of GERD is multifactorial. Although no single factor has been isolated as the cause of GERD, a negative association between the prevalence of H. pylori and the severity of GERD, including Barrett’s esophagus, has been demonstrated in epidemiological studies. The high prevalence of H. pylori infection affects the incidence of GERD in Asian countries. In the subjects with East Asian CagA-positive strains, acid injury may be minimized by hypochlorhydria from pangastritis and gastric atrophy. Additionally, host genetic factors may affect the development of GERD. The interactions between genetic factors and the virulence of H. pylori infection may be the reason for the low prevalence of GERD in Asian countries. H. pylori eradication is not considered pivotal in GERD exacerbation based on evidence from Western studies. A recent meta-analysis demonstrated that eradication therapy of H. pylori was related to a higher risk of developing de novo GERD in Asian studies. H. pylori infection remains an inconclusive and important issue in GERD in Asian countries.

  7. Gastroesophageal reflux, dental erosion, and halitosis in epidemiological surveys: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsicano, Juliane A; de Moura-Grec, Patrícia G; Bonato, Rafaela C S; Sales-Peres, Matheus de Carvalho; Sales-Peres, Arsenio; Sales-Peres, Sílvia Helena de Carvalho

    2013-02-01

    In published studies, it has been suggested that dental wear is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This systematic review was carried out to evaluate the association of GERD, dental erosion, and halitosis and to compare the indices adopted in epidemiological surveys. The Medline database (until October, 2011) was searched systematically to identify studies evaluating the prevalence of oral alterations, such as dental erosion and halitosis, in patients with GERD symptoms. Two reviewers analyzed all reports and the selected studies were evaluated according to the quality of evidence, using the validated Newcastle-Ottawa Quality Assessment Scale. Full-text copies of a total of 32 publications were obtained in duplicate. Sixteen publications were identified among the citations in the Bibliographic lists of studies that fulfilled the exclusion/inclusion criteria and quality of evidence. The relationship between dental erosion and GERD patients was significant in only seven studies. According to three studies, halitosis could be one of several extraesophageal symptoms or manifestations in GERD patients. In one study, it was found that the mucosa of GERD patients was significantly more acidic in comparison with that of the control group. This systematic review showed that there is a relationship between GERD and oral diseases (dental erosion and halitosis). The epidemiological surveys used different indices to analyze GERD and dental erosion. Further research could investigate the best method for assessing the two diseases.

  8. Clinical features of Japanese patients with chronic cough induced by gastroesophageal reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuya Fujimori

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux (GER has been reported as a cause of chronic cough (CC in the United States. It has been reported that 5–21% of CC cases are induced by GER. In Japan, however, detailed clinical features of CC induced by GER have not been described. The present study reports on six Japanese patients with GER-induced CC. The subjects were all females, with a mean age of 72 years. The average body mass index was 37 kg/m2, indicating obesity. No abnormalities were found with regard to concentrations of C-reactive protein, peripheral eosinophil counts, serum IgE concentrations, serum titers of cold agglutinins or antibodies to Mycoplasma pneumoniae, chest radiograph findings, respiratory function tests or blood gas analyses. Bronchial biopsy was performed in three patients and showed chronic inflammation characterized by lymphocytic infiltration, squamous metaplasia and mucosal basement membrane thickening. In the study population (Japanese patients, GER-induced CC tended to occur in elderly obese women and may be attributable to airway inflammation.

  9. [Medico-surgical consensus for management of children with gastroesophageal reflux Acapulco, Mexico 2002].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Mayans, Jaime Alfonso; de la Torre Mondragón, Luis; Azuara Fernández, Héctor; Cervantes Bustamante, Roberto; Coran, Arnold G; Berchi, Francisco; Cortés Gallo, Gabriel; Di Lorenzo, Carlo; García Hernández, Carlos; López García, Jacobo; Langer, Jacob C; Larrosa, Alfredo; Maldonado Rays, Jesús; Mason Cordero, Thomas J; Mata Rivera, Norberto; Méndez Nieto, Carlos; Aceves, Reynaldo de Jesús Michel; Michel, Pedro Luis; Monterrey Bermúdez, Guillermo; Mora Tiscareño, María Antonieta; Ordorica Flores, Ricardo; Ortega Salgado, José Arturo; Reynés Manzur, José; Saitúa, Francisco; Urquidi Rivera, Martha; Uscanga Vicarte, Víctor; Vandenplas, Yván; Worona Dibner, Liliana; Zárate Mondragón, Flora

    2003-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is a common disease in children less one year old. It is present around 10% of unselected infant population. 40-50% have abnormal 24 h pH monitoring. An early diagnosis and treatment should be done in order to avoid complications. To establish the consensus for the diagnosis and treatment of children with GER, to rule out similar diseases avoid the use of unnecessary drugs and the secondary side effects as well as unnecessary surgery. The consensus was done with the participation of general pediatricians, pediatrics gastroenterologist, pediatric surgeons, radiologist and endoscopist. An initial paper was done by pediatric surgeon and pediatric gastroenterologist who submitted to the rest of participants. Second stage: the paper was review through E-mail for all participants who send their suggestions and modifications. A new paper was done and discussed by medical and surgery area. During the Congress of Pediatric Surgery, in an open session was discuss again with the participation of the main authors and all the audience present. Finally, a paper was done and review for the main authors.

  10. Antireflux procedures for gastroesophageal reflux disease in children: influence of patient age on surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAteer, Jarod; Larison, Cindy; LaRiviere, Cabrini; Garrison, Michelle M; Goldin, Adam B

    2014-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common diagnosis in infants and children, but no objective criteria exist to guide the diagnosis and treatment of this disease in this population. The extent to which age influences decisions about surgical treatment in childhood GERD is unknown. To identify factors associated with progression to antireflux procedures (ARPs) in children hospitalized with GERD. Retrospective cohort study using inpatient data from 41 US children's hospitals in the Pediatric Health Information System database. We included patients younger than 18 years discharged from January 1, 2002, through December 31, 2010, with primary diagnostic codes for GERD (n = 141 190). We evaluated demographics, comorbidities, and diagnostic procedures descriptively and with a multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression model. Patient age. Proportional hazard of progression to ARP during admission. Of the 141,190 patients meeting study criteria, 11,621 (8.2%) underwent ARPs during the study period. More than half of patients undergoing ARPs (52.7%) were 6 months or younger. Although most patients in the ARP group had preoperative upper gastrointestinal tract fluoroscopy (65.0%), these patients did not undergo a uniform workup. The hazard of progression to an ARP was significantly decreased in children aged 7 months to 4 years (hazard ratio, 0.63 [P infants and young children with GERD and better define "failure of medical management" in this population.

  11. Efficacy and safety of proton pump inhibitors in the management of pediatric gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjon, James A; Pe, Michael; Soscia, Joanna; Mahant, Sanjay

    2013-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly prescribed to infants and children for managing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Recently published literature illustrates conflicting evidence on the efficacy of PPIs in infants and children. Randomized controlled trials and systematic reviews have demonstrated a lack of efficacy of PPIs, specifically in young infants. Furthermore, emerging evidence also suggests that PPIs are not as benign as once thought, with newer data implicating a potential association of PPIs with an increased risk of respiratory tract infections, gastrointestinal infections, bone fractures, hypomagnesemia, and the occurrence of rebound hyperacidity after discontinuation of PPI therapy. To summarize the emerging data in children, we reviewed the literature to assess the efficacy and safety of PPIs in managing pediatric GERD. Despite conflicting evidence on the efficacy of PPIs, most studies in children demonstrated some benefit when compared with placebo. With respect to the safety of PPIs in children, only a few small studies and case reports indicated a potential association of PPIs with an increased risk of respiratory tract or gastrointestinal infections, bone fractures, and hypomagnesemia; however, many of those studies had their own limitations. From the review, it is clear that further well-designed trials and observational studies are needed to shed more light on the efficacy and safety of PPIs in the pediatric population. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  12. Management of supraesophageal complications of gastroesophageal reflux disease in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, S R

    2000-03-06

    Therapy of supraesophageal manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in infants and children nearly always includes "lifestyle modifications" (conservative or nonpharmacologic therapy). Depending on the severity of the GERD manifestation, pharmacotherapy is often added. Although data to support the practice are not abundant, it is rational to begin with prokinetic pharmacotherapy and to add acid suppression if pathologic effects of acid contact with the esophagus or airway are suspected. Pathologic effects of acid produce most forms of supraesophageal GERD; the exception is infantile regurgitation, the most common example of supraesophageal GERD, which is often unaccompanied by either esophagitis or evidence of acid entry into the airway. Currently, fundoplication is rarely required for pediatric GERD, but the supraesophageal complications of GERD are more common indications for this surgery than the esophageal complications in children. Other management options for supraesophageal symptoms in children include delivery of nutrients by tube feeding slowly and continuously into the stomach or, better, small intestine. Short-term or trial tube feeding uses a transnasal tube, for example, for nasojejunal feeding; longer-term tube feeding is simplified by a gastrostomy, which can be placed relatively noninvasively using endoscopy or fluoroscopy.

  13. Comorbidities are frequent in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease in a tertiary health care hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Prado P Moraes-Filho

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Several aspects of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD have been studied, but the frequency of comorbidities is not yet fully understood. OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence of GERD comorbidities in a tertiary care hospital. METHODS: We prospectively studied 670 consecutive adult patients from the outpatient department of our facility. A diagnosis was established using clinical, endoscopic and/or pHmetry-related findings. Each patient's medical file was reviewed with respect to the presence of other medical conditions and diagnoses. RESULTS: Of the 670 patients, 459 (68.6% were female, and the mean age was 55.94 (17-80 years. We registered 316 patients (47.1% with the erosive form of GERD and 354 patients (52.9% with the non-erosive form. A total of 1,664 instances of comorbidities were recorded in 586 patients (87.5%, with the most common being arterial hypertension (21%, hypercholesterolemia (9%, obesity (9%, type II diabetes mellitus (5% and depression (4%. Two or more comorbidities were present in 437 individuals (64.8%. The occurrence of comorbidities increased with age and was higher in patients with the non-erosive form of GERD. CONCLUSIONS: In a tertiary referral population, comorbidities were very common, and these may have worsened the already impaired health-related quality of life of these patients. Clinicians caring for GERD patients in this setting must be aware of the likelihood and nature of comorbid disorders and their impact on disease presentation and patient management.

  14. Preventative effect of massage on gastric volvulus in infants with gastroesophageal reflux-induced pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Suqi; Xiong, Xiaoli; Wan, Qi; Liu, Fan; Tang, Jianqiao; Jiang, Zhixia; Zhou, Lishan; Yuan, Kai; Xie, Dong

    2015-10-01

    To study the preventative effects of massage on gastric volvulus (GV) in infants with gastroesophageal reflux (GER)-induced pneumonia. One-hundred and eighty GV with GER-induced pneumonia inpatients were divided randomly into four groups: basic treatment 1 (n = 60), basic treatment 2 (n = 30), massage treatment 1 (n = 60) and massage treatment 2 (n = 30). Clinical examinations selected between groups 1 and 2 were different. Radiography of the upper gastrointestinal tract using iodine-containing contrast was assessed in group 1 before and after treatment, whereas 24-h pH monitoring of the distal esophagus was assessed in group 2 before and after treatment. Symptom scores and chest radiography were assessed in all groups upon hospital admission and after procedures. Clinical effects were estimated after procedures in all groups. The prevalence of severe pneumonia among the four groups was compared. Massage treatment groups showed a significantly higher percentage of cure and total effect (P 0.05) than basic treatment groups. Furthermore, massage treatment groups had remarkably lower scores for symptoms and signs (P massage treatment groups compared with those in basic treatment groups. Finally, massage treatment groups demonstrated a lower prevalence of severe pneumonia than basic treatment groups (P Massage treatment can prevent GV with GER-induced pneumonia in infants by timely correction of stomach rotation and subsequent attenuation of GER.

  15. Association of problem behavior with sleep problems and gastroesophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Katsuyoshi; Yagi, Takakazu; Maeda, Aya; Nagayama, Kunihiro; Uehara, Sawako; Saito-Sakoguchi, Yoko; Kanematsu, Kyoko; Miyawaki, Shouichi

    2014-02-01

    There are few large-scale epidemiologic studies examining the associations between sleep problems, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, lifestyle and food habits and problem behaviors (PB) in adolescents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations among these factors in Japanese adolescents. A cross-sectional survey of 1840 junior high school students was carried out using questionnaires. The subjects were classified into PB or normal behavior (NB) groups using the Pediatric Symptom Checklist (PSC). The scores of the sleep-related factors, sleep bruxism, lifestyle and food habits, and GERD symptoms were compared. Logistic regression analysis was used to determine the factors related to PB. Mean subject age was 13.3 ± 1.8 years. The PB group had significantly longer sleep latency and higher GERD symptom score (P skip breakfast, and have <30 min of conversation among family at dinner time. The PB group had significantly higher frequencies of sleep bruxism, difficulty falling asleep within 30 min, nightmares, feeling of low sleep quality, daytime somnolence, and daytime lack of motivation. Feelings of low sleep quality had the strongest association with PB, with an adjusted odds ratio of 12.88 (95% confidence interval: 8.99-18.46). PB in adolescents are associated with sleep problems, including sleep bruxism, as well as lifestyle and food habits and GERD symptoms. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatrics International © 2013 Japan Pediatric Society.

  16. Prevalence of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Pediatrics Patients Newly Diagnosed with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Effatpanah

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is associated with a number of comorbidities in pediatrics. However, its association with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD has not been reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of ADHD in pediatric patients newly diagnosed with GERD. Materials and Methods: Sixty newly-diagnosed treatment naive GERD patients and sixty healthy controls aging between 5 to 12 years referring to the Children and Adolescent’s medical center, Tehran, Iran were recruited in a case-control study during the year 2015. Then patients were evaluated for ADHD by a psychiatrist according to the DSM-IV criteria. The revised Conners' Parent Rating Scale (CPRS-R was used for assessment of the symptoms of ADHD. To screen for psychiatry disorders other than ADHD, the Kiddie-Sads-Present and Lifetime Version (K-SADS-PL questionnaire was used. Logistic regression analysis was used for modeling the association between GERD and ADHD in the study sample. Results: The mean age of GERD patients was 5.77±2.27 and for non-GERD controls was 6.03±2.52 (P= 0.543. Thirty-three out of 60 (55% GERD patients and 37 out of 60(61.66% non-GERD controls were male (P: 0.579. Prevalence of ADHD was 33.60 (55% in GERD patients and 10.60 (16.66% in non-GERD (P

  17. Lifestyle Characteristics and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Population-Based Study in Albania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lulzim Çela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. We aimed to assess the prevalence and lifestyle correlates of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in the adult population of Albania, a Mediterranean country in Southeast Europe which has experienced major behavioral changes in the past two decades. Methods. A cross-sectional study, conducted in 2012, included a population-representative sample of 845 individuals (≥18 years residing in Tirana (345 men, mean age: ; 500 women, mean age: ; response rate: 84.5%. Assessment of GERD was based on Montreal definition. Covariates included socioeconomic characteristics, lifestyle factors, and body mass index. Logistic regression was used to assess the association of socioeconomic characteristics and lifestyle factors with GERD. Results. The overall prevalence of GERD was 11.9%. There were no significant sex differences, but a higher prevalence among the older participants. In fully adjusted models, there was a positive relationship of GERD with smoking, physical inactivity, fried food consumption, and obesity, but not so for alcohol intake and meat consumption. Conclusion. We obtained important evidence on the prevalence and lifestyle correlates of GERD in a Western Balkans' country. Smoking, physical inactivity, and obesity were strong “predictors” of GERD in this population. Findings from this study should be replicated in prospective studies in Albania and other transitional settings.

  18. Prosthetic Rehabilitation of a Patient With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: Five-Year Follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, G; Pupo, Y M; Bueno, A L N; Araujo, F O

    2016-01-01

    Tooth wear is a multifactorial process that is a growing concern in dentistry. This phenomenon can be caused by mechanical (attrition, abrasion, or abfraction) or chemical (erosion) processes. Etiologic factors in dental erosion can be due to changes in behavior, an unbalanced diet, or gastrointestinal disorders such as acid regurgitation, which may influence the salivary flow rate and buffering capacity of saliva. This case report describes an esthetic rehabilitation of a patient with gastroesophageal reflux and dental erosion, with a treatment rationale that includes the use of a diagnostic template and five-year follow-up. This technique, presented here in a clinical case with moderate enamel loss, integrates an additive wax-up and a direct intraoral bis-acryl resin mock-up. Lithium disilicate glass-ceramic (IPS e.max Press, Ivoclar Vivadent) laminate veneers were fabricated with the heatpress technique. They were veneered with a layering ceramic (IPS e.max Ceram, Ivoclar Vivadent) to improve the appearance of the incisal edge. The case demonstrated the success of veneers as an effective, conservative, and esthetic treatment for patients with this pathology.

  19. ACIDIC AND NEUTRAL LIQUID INGESTION IN PATIENTS WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafne Calsoni GOMES

    Full Text Available Context Sour acidic liquid has a slower distal esophageal transit than a neutral liquid. Our hypothesis was that an acidic sour bolus has a different ingestion dynamic than a neutral bolus. Method In 50 healthy volunteers and 29 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, we evaluated the ingestion dynamics of 100 mL of acidic sour liquid (concentrated lemon juice, pH: 3.0 and 100 mL of water (pH: 6.8. The time to ingest the total volume, the number of swallows to ingest the volume, the interval between swallows, the flux of ingestion and the volume ingested in each swallow was measured. Results In both groups, healthy volunteers and patients in treatment for GERD, the acidic liquid took longer to be ingested, a higher number of swallows, a slower flux of ingestion and a smaller volume in each swallow than the neutral bolus. There was no difference between healthy volunteers and patients with GERD. The ingestion in women was longer than in men for acidic and neutral liquids. Conclusion Acidic liquid has a different dynamic of ingestion than the neutral liquid, which may be consequence of the slower transit through the distal esophageal body or an anticipation to drink a sour bolus. Patients with GERD have the same prolonged ingestion of the acidic liquid bolus as seen in healthy volunteers.

  20. Taste and Smell Disturbances in Patients with Gastroparesis and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabadi, Alisha; Saadi, Mohammed; Schey, Ron; Parkman, Henry P

    2017-07-30

    Patients with gastroparesis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) often report decreased enjoyment when eating. Some patients remark that food does not smell or taste the same. To determine if taste and/or smell disturbances are present in patients with gastroparesis and/or GERD and relate these to gastrointestinal symptom severity. Patients with gastroparesis and/or GERD completed questionnaires evaluating taste and smell (Taste and Smell Survey [TSS]), Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Symptom Severity Index (PAGI-SYM), and Demographics. TSS questioned the nature of taste/smell changes and the impact on quality of life. PAGI-SYM was used to calculate Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI) and Heartburn and Regurgitation Score (HB/RG). Seventy-six subjects were enrolled: healthy controls (n = 13), gastroparesis alone (n = 30), GERD alone (n = 10), and both gastroparesis and GERD (n = 23). Taste and smell disturbances were higher in patients with gastroparesis, GERD, and both gastroparesis and GERD compared to healthy controls. Taste and smell abnormalities were significantly correlated (r = 0.530, P Smell score was also strongly correlated to HB/RG (r = 0.513, P smell abnormalities are prominent in gastroparesis and GERD patients. Abnormalities in taste and smell are significantly correlated with both gastroparesis and GERD symptom severity. Awareness of this high prevalence of taste and smell dysfunction among patients with gastroparesis and GERD may help to better understand the food intolerances these patients often have.

  1. Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in students of a government medical college at Karachi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Haris; Kamal, Syed Wajahat; Aziz, Sina

    2010-02-01

    To assess the frequency of symptoms suggestive of Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in students of a government medical college at Karachi. This is a cross sectional study conducted at Dow Medical College (from September to December 2008) through a well structured questionnaire meant to assess the typical and atypical manifestations of GERD in terms of frequency, consultation with physician and life style changes adopted to reduce the severity of symptoms. Out of 595 students interviewed, 444 (74.6%) were female. Majority of them were aged between 17-25 years. Abdominal discomfort ever developed in 288/595 (48.4%) students out of which 132/595 (22.18%) students complained of heartburn. Weekly episodes of heartburn were present in 35/444 (7.88%) female students and 10/151 (6.62%) male students. Dysphagia was present in 88/595 (14.8%) students, 9/88 (10.22%) of which also suffered weekly from heart burn. Overall 109/595 (18.3%) students, comprising of 82/444 (18.5%) female and 27/151 (17.9%) male, exhibited breathing problems. Weekly presentation of heartburn was also prevalent in 13/109 (11.92%) students who suffered from breathing problems. The study concludes that the percentage of students having weekly episodes of heart burn is significantly higher than that in general Asian population. The atypical symptoms of GERD are also found to be more prevalent among medical students.

  2. Hiatal hernia repair and gastroesophageal reflux disease in gastric banding patients: analysis of a national database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardestani, Ali; Tavakkoli, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Hiatal hernia (HH) is a risk factor for complications after laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB), with recommendation to repair these at the time of LAGB placement. We reviewed the characteristics and outcomes of bariatric patients undergoing HH repair during LAGB. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HH repair in LAGB patients and its potential effect on outcomes. Using the Bariatric Outcomes Longitudinal Database, we identified patients who had hiatal hernia repair at the time of their LAGB (HHR group) and compared them to other LAGB patients without a HH repair (NonHHR group). Of 41,611 patients who underwent LAGB during 2007-2010, 8120 (19.5%) had HH repair (HHR), adding only 4 minutes to the operating time, without an increase in blood transfusion, length of stay, or band-related complications. Preoperatively, the HHR cohort had a higher incidence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) compared with nonHHR (49% versus 40%, respectively; Phernias with unclear clinical effect. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Endoscopic methods of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) treatment and their complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Jerzy; Błaszak, Antoni; Wojtuń, Stanisław; Wojtkowiak, Marek

    2007-05-01

    Tretament in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is in constant change. It is caused by the fact of change and development of diagnostic and therapeutic methods. Alternative methods of treatment are still searched beacause patients do not accept many years long drug treatment or surgical procedures. New methods are developed. Some of them as endoscopic fundoplication or methods of polimerizing substances injection in the area of lower esophageal sphincer have been abandoned because of low quickly diminishing efficacy Endoscopic sewing that implicate all layers of gaster is still under clinical trials and is considered as interesting. Stertt's procedure that is based on electromagnetic wave application in the area of lower esophageal sphincter is used in clinical practice. Despite effective methods of diagnosing and treatment of GERD there is no evidence of lowering incidence of complications of GERD. It is still common to find esophagus stricture as the first illness manifastation. Chronic character of GERD is associated with intestinal metaplasia and adenocarcinoma of the esophagus in its distal part. The most effective endoscopic methods of the treatment include: endoscopic dilation of the strictures and endoscopic methods of patological epithelium removal in Barrett's esophagus. These are: photodynamic therapy, argon coagulation, laser thermoablation, multipolar ablation and endoscpic mucosectomy. The paper is the review of the methods aimed at GERD and its complication treatment.

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux related to respiratory inhibition after crying and feeding hypoxemia in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minowa, Hideki; Tamura, Reiko; Mima, Aya; Arai, Ikuyo; Yasuhara, Hajime; Ebisu, Reiko; Ohgitani, Ayako

    2016-01-01

    To determine the relationships between gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and both respiratory inhibition after crying (RIAC) and feeding hypoxemia in infants. We screened for RIAC and feeding hypoxemia among infants with a gestational age of 36 weeks or greater using pulse oximetry. We investigated the infants who showed hypoxemia with a decrease in SpO2 to less than 70% and bradycardia with a heart rate of less than 100 beats per minute caused by GER. We then evaluated the relationships between these events and both RIAC and feeding hypoxemia. We examined 250 infants in the present study. RIAC and feeding hypoxemia were observed in 35 (14.0%), and 30 (12.0%) infants, respectively. Ten infants showed hypoxemia and bradycardia caused by GER. These events were correlated with RIAC (p = 0.006) and feeding hypoxemia (p = 0.031). In the infants with RIAC and feeding hypoxemia, some show severe hypoxemia and bradycardia caused by GER. Medical staff caring for infants should note the presence of RIAC and feeding hypoxemia.

  5. Respiratory inhibition after crying or gastroesophageal reflux and feeding hypoxemia in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minowa, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to present information on respiratory inhibition after crying (RIAC), feeding hypoxemia, and respiratory inhibition after gastroesophageal reflux (RIGER) to medical staff caring for infants. The author reviewed investigations of these conditions. These conditions have been observed in full-term healthy infants, and they are accompanied clinically by central cyanosis and a decrease in SpO2 to less than 70%. These conditions are easily diagnosed using pulse oximetry. Among Japanese infants with a gestational age of 36 weeks or older, the incidence of RIAC and feeding hypoxemia is 24% and 32%, respectively. The incidence of RIGER is approximately 4%. Feeding hypoxemia occurs significantly more often during bottle-feeding than during breastfeeding. RIAC, feeding hypoxemia, and RIGER are significantly associated with each other. The risk factors are maternal smoking during pregnancy, threatened premature labor, twin gestation, asymmetric intrauterine growth restriction, and abnormal cranial ultrasound findings. Almost all infants recover from RIAC by day 7 after birth. Some infants with feeding hypoxemia require additional assistance and monitoring by nursing staff until the day of discharge. Medical staff caring for infants should note the presence of RIAC, feeding hypoxemia, and RIGER.

  6. Human leukocyte antigen HLADRB1 determinants susceptibility to gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi, Batool Mutar; Hasan, Riyadh Mohamad; Salih, Wafaa Hazim

    2017-01-01

    - Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is characterized by diverse symptoms. There is an evidence for a genetic component to GERD as supported by familial aggregation of this disease. - To investigate whether certain human leucocyte antigen genes HLA-DRB1 are associated with GERD. - Patients and controls were prospectively recruited from GIT center at Al-Kindy Teaching Hospital (Baghdad-Iraq) between January 2014 and July 2016. Sixty Iraqi Arab Muslims patients with a history of heartburn and dyspepsia compared with 100 Iraqi Arab Muslims controls. All study patients and control groups underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopic examinations and their serums were analyzed for CagA antibodies Immunoglobulin G (IgG) for H. pylori. HLA-DRB1 genotyping were done to both groups. - A total of 60 patients with erosive gastritis; GERD (Grade II and III) were evaluated, together with 100 controls. There is a significant increase of H. pylori infection (P=0.0001) in GERD patients than control group. HLA-DRB1* 15:01 was significantly increased in GERD patients in comparison with control group and an increased frequency of HLADRB1*11:01 in control group compared with patients group. - There is an association between HLA-DRB1 *15:01 in GERD patients with H. pylori positive patients.

  7. Safety and Tolerability of Esomeprazole in Children With Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilger, Mark A; Tolia, Vasundhara; Vandenplas, Yvan; Youssef, Nader N; Traxler, Barry; Illueca, Marta

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate safety, tolerability, and symptom improvement with once-daily esomeprazole in children with endoscopically proven gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In this 8-week, multicenter, randomized, uncontrolled, double-blind study, children ages 1 to 11 years were stratified by weight to receive esomeprazole 5 or 10 mg (children esomeprazole 5 and 10 mg, respectively, and 83.9% and 82.8% of children ≥ 20 kg receiving esomeprazole 10 and 20 mg, respectively, regardless of causality. Overall, only 9.3% of patients reported 13 treatment-related AEs; the most common were diarrhea (2.8% [3/108]), headache (1.9% [2/108]), and somnolence (1.9% [2/108]). Vomiting, a serious AE in 2 patients, was not judged by the investigator to be related to treatment. At the final visit, PGA scores improved significantly from baseline (P esomeprazole (at daily doses of 5, 10, or 20 mg) was generally well tolerated. The frequency and severity of GERD-related symptoms were significantly reduced during the active treatment period.

  8. Pharmacokinetic evaluation of esomeprazole for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goirand, Françoise; Le Ray, Isabelle; Bardou, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are widely used for the treatment of acid-related diseases such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). They are recommended by the American College of Gastroenterology for healing erosive esophagitis (EO) and as long-term treatment in patients with healed EO. The available PPIs differ somewhat in their pharmacokinetics and clinical properties, but whether these differences are of clinical relevance is a matter of debate. Some safety concerns have been raised with the use of PPIs, mostly an increased incidence of infectious diseases such as community-acquired pneumonia or Clostridium difficile diarrhea. This article explores the results of clinical studies on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of esomeprazole , as well as on its clinical efficacy to manage patients with GERD. GERD is a public health concern as its worldwide incidence and associated complications are increasing alongside the exponentially increasing problem of obesity. PPIs are the first pharmacological option because of their efficacy and overall positive risk-to-benefit ratio. Improved efficacy with the use of stereospecific isomers of PPIs, such as esomeprazole, has not yet been convincingly demonstrated. Nevertheless, because of individual experience with former treatment, some patients may report better symptom control when treated with a specific PPI rather than with others.

  9. Magnesium and calcium in exhaled breath condensate of children with asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodig, Slavica; Vlasić, Zeljka; Cepelak, Ivana; Zrinski Topić, Renata; Turkalj, Mirjana; Nogalo, Boro

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium and calcium physiologic functions are closely related. Magnesium is primarily an intracellular cation, the action of which also involves maintenance of cellular ionic balance, while influencing calcium homeostasis by blocking calcium channels. The aim of this study was to compare the concentrations of magnesium and calcium in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) of children with asthma and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). EBC was collected from 66 children aged 7-14 years (23 children with acute asthma, 17 children with GERD, and 26 healthy children). Determination of magnesium and calcium concentrations was preceded by optimization and validation for low concentrations. No difference was recorded for either magnesium or calcium concentration between study groups. However, the magnesium to calcium ratio was statistically significantly lower in both GERD and asthma children as compared with control group. Study results showed the magnesium to calcium ratio to be a statistically significantly better indicator of certain pathologic changes than absolute concentration of either ion. Copyright 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Overlap of symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease, dyspepsia and irritable bowel syndrome in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Sanne; Jensen, Trine Holm; Henriksen, Susanne Lund; Haastrup, Peter Fentz; Larsen, Pia Veldt; Søndergaard, Jens; Jarbøl, Dorte Ejg

    2015-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), functional dyspepsia (FD) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common functional gastrointestinal conditions with significant impact on the daily lives of individuals. The objective was to investigate the prevalence and overlap of the three conditions in a Western general population. A nationwide study of 100,000 individuals 20 years and above, randomly selected in the general population. A web-based questionnaire survey formed the basis of this study. Questions regarding FD and IBS were extracted from the ROME III adult questionnaire. Questions regarding GERD were developed based on the Montreal definition. Prevalence estimates for GERD, FD IBS were calculated in total and for each sex separately and for four age groups. A Venn diagram was constructed, illustrating the overlap between the three conditions. The overall response rate was 52.2%. The prevalence of GERD, FD and IBS was 11.2%, 7.7% and 10.5%, respectively, and overlap between two or three of these conditions was seen among 6.5% of the respondents. Among individuals meeting the criteria of one or more of the conditions GERD, FD and IBS, 30.7% had overlap between two or all three conditions. GERD, FD and IBS are common conditions in the general population and the overlap between these conditions is also quite common. When diagnosing patients with GERD, FD and IBS, physicians should keep in mind that these patients could be suffering from more than one of these conditions.

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux after peroral endoscopic myotomy: a multicenter case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbhari, Vivek; Familiari, Pietro; Bjerregaard, Niels Christian; Pioche, Mathieu; Jones, Edward; Ko, Weon Jin; Hayee, Bu; Cali, Anna; Ngamruengphong, Saowanee; Mion, Francois; Hernaez, Ruben; Roman, Sabine; Tieu, Alan H; El Zein, Mohamad; Ajayi, Tokunbo; Haji, Amyn; Cho, Joo Young; Hazey, Jeffrey; Perry, Kyle A; Ponchon, Thierry; Kunda, Rastislav; Costamagna, Guido; Khashab, Mouen A

    2017-07-01

    Background and study aims The variables associated with gastroesophageal reflux (GER) after peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM) are largely unknown. This study aimed to: 1) identify the prevalence of reflux esophagitis and asymptomatic GER in patients who underwent POEM, and 2) evaluate patient and intraprocedural variables associated with post-POEM GER. Patients and methods All patients who underwent POEM and subsequent objective testing for GER (pH study with or without upper gastrointestinal [GI] endoscopy) at seven tertiary academic centers (one Asian, two US, four European) were included. Patients were divided into two groups: 1) DeMeester score ≥ 14.72 (cases) and 2) DeMeester score of < 14.72 (controls). Asymptomatic GER was defined as a patient with a DeMeester score ≥ 14.72 who was not consuming proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Results A total of 282 patients (female 48.2 %, Caucasian 84.8 %; mean body mass index 24.1 kg/m(2)) were included. Clinical success was achieved in 94.3 % of patients. GER evaluation was completed after a median follow-up of 12 months (interquartile range 10 - 24 months). A DeMeester score of ≥ 14.72 was seen in 57.8 % of patients. Multivariable analysis revealed female sex to be the only independent association (odds ratio 1.69, 95 % confidence interval 1.04 - 2.74) with post-POEM GER. No intraprocedural variables were associated with GER. Upper GI endoscopy was available in 233 patients, 54 (23.2 %) of whom were noted to have reflux esophagitis (majority Los Angeles Grade A or B). GER was asymptomatic in 60.1 %. Conclusion Post-POEM GER was seen in the majority of patients. No intraprocedural variables were identified to allow for potential alteration in procedural technique. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Gastroesophageal reflux disease in neonates and infants : when and how to treat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czinn, Steven J; Blanchard, Samra

    2013-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is defined as the involuntary retrograde passage of gastric contents into the esophagus with or without regurgitation or vomiting. It is a frequently experienced physiologic condition occurring several times a day, mostly postprandial and causes no symptoms. These infants are also called 'happy spitters'. GER disease (GERD) occurs when reflux of the gastric contents causes symptoms that affect the quality of life or pathologic complications, such as failure to thrive, feeding or sleeping problems, chronic respiratory disorders, esophagitis, hematemesis, apnea, and apparent life-threatening events. About 70-85 % of infants have regurgitation within the first 2 months of life, and this resolves without intervention in 95 % of infants by 1 year of age. The predominant mechanism causing GERD is transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxation, which is defined as an abrupt decrease in LES pressure to the level of intragastric pressure, unrelated to swallowing and of relatively longer duration than the relaxation triggered by a swallow. Regurgitation and vomiting are the most common symptoms of infant reflux. A thorough history and physical examination with attention to warning signals suggesting other causes is generally sufficient to establish a clinical diagnosis of uncomplicated infant GER. Choking, gagging, coughing with feedings or significant irritability can be warning signs for GERD or other diagnoses. If there is forceful vomiting, laboratory and radiographic investigation (upper gastrointestinal series) are warranted to exclude other causes of vomiting. Irritability coupled with back arching in infants is thought to be a non-verbal equivalent of heartburn in older children. Other causes of irritability, including cow's milk protein allergy, neurologic disorders, constipation and infection, should be ruled out. The presentation of cow's milk protein allergy overlaps with GERD, and both conditions may co-exist in 42-58 % of

  13. Medicinal Plants for Management of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease: A Review of Animal and Human Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Mehdi; Karegar-Borzi, Hossein; Karimi, Mehrdad; Rahimi, Roja

    2017-02-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a prevalent gastrointestinal disease that causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications. The major therapeutic strategy for GERD focuses mainly on symptom alleviation using proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), which does not produce a perfect response in all patients. An approach with new therapeutic agents for GERD seems to be essential. The aim of this study was to review animal and human studies investigating the effect of medicinal plants in GERD as well as mechanisms underlying their therapeutic effects. Medline, Scopus, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for animal or human studies. The data collected covered January 1966-October 2015. A total of 22 studies were included in this review, of which nine were animal studies and 13 were human studies. Ceratonia siliqua as a medicinal plant and rikkunshito as a multicomponent herbal preparation were the most frequently studied herbal medicines in GERD. Antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities were the main mechanisms demonstrated in animal studies for ameliorating the effects of medicinal plants in GERD. Other mechanisms include downregulation of genes encoding inflammatory proteins, improvement of barrier function and gastric mucus, a decrease in gastric acid, and induction of tonic contractions of the lower esophageal sphincter. All herbal preparations used in human studies have led to the alleviation of symptoms related to GERD. Myrtus communis and Cydonia oblonga showed marked reduction in GERD symptoms comparable to omeprazole. The therapeutic effect of Cydonia oblonga persisted after discontinuation of the drug. Tongjlang and rikkunshito showed therapeutic effects for non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) where PPIs failed to show a promising effect. Studies on Ceratonia siliqua have been solely focused on regurgitation in infants, and a remarkable decrease in the number of regurgitations was demonstrated. The multiple mechanisms of action

  14. Vonoprazan treatment improves gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Shinozaki

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The effects of vonoprazan, a new potassium-competitive acid blocker, on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD symptom are not fully elucidated. The aim of this study is to determine the effect of vonoprazan on GERD and associated gastrointestinal symptoms. We retrospectively reviewed 88 Helicobacter pylori negative patients with GERD treated with vonoprazan 10 mg daily. Symptoms were evaluated using the Izumo scale, which reflects quality of life related to various abdominal symptoms. The rates of improvement and resolution of GERD symptoms were 86% (76/88 and 57% (50/88, respectively. Improvement and resolution in patients with erosive esophagitis was higher than in those with non-erosive reflux disease (91% vs 83%, p = 0.260 and 71% vs 47%, p = 0.025, respectively. We attempted to identify factors which predict the effects of vonoprazan. Multivariate analysis identified advanced age (≥60-year-old (odds ratio [OR] 7.281, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.056–25.776, p = 0.002, obesity (BMI ≥ 24 (OR 3.342, 95%CI 1.124–9.940, p = 0.030 and erosive esophagitis (OR 4.368, 95%CI 1.281–14.895, p = 0.018 as positive predictors of resolution of GERD symptoms. Alcohol use (OR 0.131, 95%CI 0.027–0.632, p = 0.011 and history of H. pylori eradication (OR 0.171, 95%CI 0.041–0.718, p = 0.015 were identified as negative predictors. Vonoprazan also improved epigastric pain (73%, postprandial distress (60%, constipation (58% and diarrhea (52% in patients with GERD. In conclusion, vonoprazan 10 mg daily is effective in improving GERD symptoms. Advanced age, obesity, erosive esophagitis, alcohol use and history of H. pylori eradication influence the resolution of GERD symptoms. Treatment with vonoprazan favorably affects gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with GERD.

  15. Associations of Circulating Gut Hormone and Adipocytokine Levels with the Spectrum of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Huei Tseng

    Full Text Available The pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is complex and poorly understood. We aim to investigate the association of various circulating peptide hormones with heterogenous manifestations of GERD.One hundred and four patients that had experienced typical GERD symptoms (heartburn and/or acid regurgitation for at least 3 episodes per week in the past 3 months were enrolled. All patients received a baseline assessment of symptom severity and frequency with the Reflux Disease Questionnaire and an upper endoscopy to classify GERD into erosive esophagitis (EE, n = 67, non-erosive esophagitis (NE, n = 37, and Barrett's esophagus (BE, n = 8. Fifty asymptomatic subjects with an endoscopically normal esophagus were recruited as the control group. Complete anthropometric measures and blood biochemistry were obtained and fasting serum levels of adipocytokines (adiponectin and leptin and gut hormones (ghrelin and peptide YY (PYY were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in all subjects.All circulating peptide hormone levels were not statistically different between the GERD and control groups. However, GERD patients appeared to have lower PYY levels [median (25th-75th percentile, 80.1 (49.8-108.3 vs. 99.4 (65.8-131.9 pg/ml, p = 0.057] compared with control subjects. Among the GERD patients, ghrelin levels were inversely associated with the frequency and severity of acid regurgitation. In male GERD patients, EE was associated with significantly higher PYY levels [107.0 (55.0-120.8 vs. 32.8 (28.7-84.5 pg/ml, p = 0.026] but lower adiponectin levels [6.7 (5.6-9.3 vs. 9.9 (9.6-10.6 μg/ml, p = 0.034] than NE. Patients with BE had significantly lower adiponectin levels [6.0 (5.1-9.2 vs. 9.2 (7.1-11.2 μg/ml, p = 0.026] than those without BE.Humoral derangement of circulating peptide hormones might participate in inflammation and symptom perception in patients suffering from GERD. Further studies to clarify the exact role of these hormones

  16. [The Montreal definition and classification of gastroesophageal reflux disease: a global, evidence-based consensus paper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakil, N; van Zanten, S V; Kahrilas, P; Dent, J; Jones, R

    2007-11-01

    A world-wide recognised and accepted definition and classification of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) would be highly desirable for research and clinical practice. The purpose of this project was to develop such a generally accepted definition and classification that could be used equally by patients, physicians, and supervisory bodies. In order to ensure a consensus among the participating experts a modified delphi process with a step-wise selection modality was employed. For this the working group of five persons formulated a series of statements on the basis of a systematic search of the literature using three databases (Embase, Cochrane-Study register, Medline). Then these statements were developed further for two years, revised and finally passed as consensus. The consensus group consisted of 44 experts from 18 countries. Each key vote was held on the basis of a six-point scale. A "consensus" was considered to have been reached when two-thirds of the participants voted in favour of the respective statement. The level of agreement between the experts increased in the course of the multistep decision process, in the individual voting steps requiring at least two-thirds of the participants, the results were at first 86%, then 88% through to 94% and finally 100% in favour of the chosen statement. In the final voting, 94% of the final 51 statements were accepted by 90% of the consensus group. 90% of all statements were accepted unanimously or with only minor reservations. GERD was defined as a disease that is associated with troublesome symptoms and/or complications on account of reflux of stomach contents into the esophagus. The complaints are divided into esophageal and extra-esophageal syndromes. Among the novel aspects of this definition are the patient-orientated approach that is independent of endoscopic findings, the classification of the ailment into independent syndromes as well as the consideration of laryngitis, cough, asthma and dental problems

  17. Preliminary study in to the incidence of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in high risk neonates admitted to NICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vivek; Mathai, S S; Kanitkar, M

    2012-09-01

    To find out the incidence of Gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) in neonates at risk for it and compare this with the incidence in the controls. This prospective case control study was conducted on 34 neonates. Twenty-four test high risk neonates comprised of preterms, neonates on mechanical ventilation neonates with ALTE(Acute Life Threatening Episode) and post-operative neonates (Tracheo-esophageal fistula, congenital diaphragmatic hernia). There were ten matched controls. Esophageal pHmetry was done using double sensor antimony pH probe and the two groups were compared. Significant reflux was defined as any reflux on pharyngeal sensor (grade 4 reflux) or a Reflux Index or RI (amount of time the esophageal pH remained 20%.Analysis were done using Fisher Exact t test and Chi square test. Mean gestational age was 34.87(3.86) wk and 33.7(3.29) wk in the test and control groups respectively, while mean BW was 2186.02(814.57) g and 1851.2(592.93) g in each respective group. In the test group 10 were symptomatic, 5 were on mechanical ventilation, 8 were on CPAP and one was post-operation case. Difference in the incidence of significant RI in test and control group was not statistically significant. Incidence between various group of neonates in test group showed no statistical significance either. However, the incidence of grade IV reflux in test group was 8/24 and control 0/10 and this difference was statistically significant. Reflux did increase when period of gestation decreased and the difference was statistically significant. Clinically significant grade IV GER was more in high risk (test) neonates than control.

  18. Sensitivity and specificity of the Gastrointestinal Short Form Questionnaire in diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Teruel-Sánchez-Vegazo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastrointestinal Short Form Questionnaire (GSFQ is a questionnaire for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD diagnosis, with a version in Spanish language, not yet compared to an objective test. Aims: To establish GSFQ diagnostic performance against 24-hour pH monitoring carried out in two tertiary care hospitals. Methods: Consecutive adult patients with typical GERD symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation referred for pH monitoring fulfilled the GSFQ (score range 0-30, proportional to probability of GERD. Diagnosis of GERD was established when acid exposure time in distal esophagus was superior to 4.5% or symptom association probability was greater than 95%. Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC curves were calculated and best cut-off score determined, with corresponding sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios (LR (95% confidence interval for each. Results: One hundred and fifty-two patients were included (59.9% women, age 47.9 ± 13.9; 97.4% heartburn; 71.3% regurgitation. pH monitoring was abnormal in 65.8%. Mean GSFQ score was 11.2 ± 6. Area under ROC was 56.5% (47.0-65.9%. Optimal cut-off score was 13 or greater: sensitivity 40% (30.3-50.3%, specificity 71.2% (56.9-82.9%, positive LR 1.39 (0.85-2.26 and negative LR 0.84 (0.67-1.07. Exclusion of questions 1 and 3 of the original GSFQ, easily interpreted as referred to dyspepsia and not GERD, improved only marginally the diagnostic performance: AUROC 59.1%. Conclusion: The GSFQ does not predict results of pH monitoring in patients with typical symptoms in a tertiary care setting.

  19. Self-reported Halitosis and Gastro-esophageal Reflux Disease in the General Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struch, Franziska; Wallaschofski, Henri; Grabe, Hans J.; Völzke, Henry; Lerch, Markus M.; Meisel, Peter; Kocher, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Background Patients with halitosis contact primary care practitioners, dentists, and gastroenterologists alike. Objectives It is unclear whether gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a risk factor for halitosis. Design and Patients/Participants We studied this possible relationship in the general population using the cross-sectional Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP). Employing structured interviews, self-reported halitosis was assessed among 417 edentulous (toothless) subjects aged 40 to 81 years and among 2,588 dentate subjects aged 20 to 59 years. The presence of heartburn or acid regurgitation (GERD-related symptoms) at 4 levels (absent, mild, moderate, severe) was taken as exposure and used for logistic regression. Analyses were adjusted for relevant confounders, such as age, sex, depressive symptoms, history of chronic gastritis, history of gastric or duodenal ulcer, smoking, school education, and dental status. Measurements and Main Results We found a strong positive association between GERD-related symptoms and halitosis (odds ratio 12.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.66–63.09, P = 0.002 for severe compared to no GERD-related symptoms) in denture-wearing subjects and a moderate, positive association between GERD-related symptoms and halitosis (odds ratio 2.24, 95% CI 1.27–3.92, P = 0.005) in dentate subjects with a clear dose–effect relationship. Conclusions The present study provides clear evidence for an association between GERD and halitosis. As there are effective treatments for GERD, these results suggest treatment options, such as proton pump inhibitors, for halitosis. These should be studied in randomized controlled trials. PMID:18196351

  20. Correlation between the different pH-metry scores in gastroesophageal reflux disease in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupu, Vasile Valeriu; Ignat, Ancuţa; Paduraru, Gabriela; Ciubara, Anamaria; Moscalu, Mihaela; Marginean, Cristina Oana; Burlea, Marin

    2016-06-01

    The 24-hour esophageal pH-metry is the most widely used method to diagnose the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). The study compares the different scores obtained during the 24-hour esophageal pH-metry. A retrospective study over 5 years including 234 children (1 month and 18 years old) admitted in a pediatric gastroenterology regional center in Northeast Romania, with suspicion of GERD. They underwent 24- hour esophageal pH-metry, and the scores obtained (Boix-Ochoa, DeMeester, Johnson-DeMeester) were compared. Out of the 234 children, 172 (73.50%) had positive Boix-Ochoa score and 62 (26.50%) had normal Boix-Ochoa score (<11.99). Based on the DeMeester score, 149 children (63.68%) were positive and 85 (36.32%) were negative. The correlation of the Demeester score with the Boix-Ochoa score was very high (r = 0.978, P <  < 0.01, 95% confidence interval). Considering the Johnson-DeMeester score, 120 cases (51.28%) had GERD and 114 (48.72%) did not. The correlation of the Johnson-DeMeester score with the Boix-Ochoa score was still high (r = 0.94, P <  < 0.01, 95% 95% confidence interval). As considered until now, the Boix-Ochoa score is the most accurate score to be used in pediatrics for the diagnosis of GERD. The use of the different scores-Boix-Ochoa, DeMeester, Johnson-DeMeester-showed a high sensitivity and specificity of the pH-metry measurements applied to the study lot, but the last score has a higher risk of false-negative results.

  1. A Clinicopathologic Study of Oral Changes in Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease, Gastritis, and Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinesh, E; Masthan, Kmk; Kumar, M Sathish; Jeyapriya, S Marytresa; Babu, Aravindha; Thinakaran, Meera

    2016-11-01

    The aim and objectives of this study are to identify oral changes in certain gastrointestinal (GI) diseases, namely gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), ulcerative colitis, gastritis, and to evaluate these oral symptoms as indicators for assessing GI disorders. In this study, the oral manifestations of various GI disorders were assessed in a varying age group of 250 patients in Government Stanley Medical College and Hospital, Chennai. Out of 250 patients, 142 were affected by GERD, 99 were affected by gastritis, and 9 patients were affected by ulcerative colitis. Of these patients, 177 were males and 73 were females. Evaluation of patients with gastritis revealed that 66.7% affected with gingivitis, 19.2% with dental erosion on the palatal and lingual aspects of maxillary and mandibular teeth predominantly in the anterior region, 10.1% with periodontitis, 2% with gingival erythema. Among the patients with GERD, 44% of the cases showed dental erosion, 25.5% periodontitis, 9.9% gingivitis, 5.7% gingival erythema, 2.8% palatal erythema, 2.1% gingival ulcers, glossitis 2%, 1.4% floor of the mouth erythema, and 0.7% erythema of the tongue. Patients with ulcerative colitis showed 44.4% of gingival erythema, 33.3% of dental erosions, and 22.2% of gingival ulcers and periodontitis. In our study of 250 patients, oral manifestations were observed in 88% of the patients. Both soft tissue and hard tissue changes were evident. There was a high correlation between various GI disease and dental erosion, erythema at various sites of the oral cavity, oral ulcers, gingivitis, periodontitis, and glossitis. Careful evaluation of oral cavity may unveil many GI disorders and help the patient by providing early diagnosis, which further facilitates the prognosis.

  2. EFFECTS OF PROTON PUMP INHIBITORS ON DENTAL EROSIONS CAUSED BY GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Vasile OLTEANU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Numerous studies worldwide have assessed the association between dental erosions or other related oral manifestations, and the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Nowadays, one of the main therapeutic resources of GERD is represented by proton pump inhibitors (PPIs. Adequate salivary secretions and flow are considered mandatory for the protection of both teeth and esophageal mucosa. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the possible correlation between GERD treatment options and subsequent control of oral manifestation, taking as premises that either PPIs or dietary and lifestyle changes may control oral patterns of GERD by acting on salivary secretions. Methods: 48 clinically diagnosed GERD adult patients with oral manifestations, mainly erosions, were included in the study, none of which showing alarming symptoms that would require further gastroenterologic examination. Oral examination evaluated the DMF (decayed, missing, filled and OHI-S (Simplified Oral Hygiene indices. Salivary flow was evaluated by the Saxon test. 25 patients were prescribed dietary and lifestyle measures and PPIs (omeprazole – 20 mg, whereas 23 patients were managed only through dietary and lifestyle modifications. General assessment was performed at the time of diagnosis and 4 weeks afterwards. Results: No significant differences as to the DMF index, OHI-S index or Saxon test were found over the 4 weeks management between the groups. Conclusions: Oral manifestation of GERD may be caused by impaired salivary secretions and flow, otherwise no - positive or negative - effect could be secondary to PPI therapy. Accordingly, complex oral rehabilitation of GERD patients and collaboration between gastroenterologists and dentists should be promoted.

  3. Apparent life-threatening event admissions and gastroesophageal reflux disease: the value of hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Ami; Bernard-Stover, Laurie; Kuelbs, Cynthia; Castillo, Edward; Stucky, Erin

    2012-01-01

    No standard management plan for infants with an apparent life-threatening event (ALTE) currently exists. These infants are routinely hospitalized. Benefits of hospitalization of ALTE patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) need definition. The study's objectives were to determine the accuracy of a working diagnosis of GERD in infants admitted with ALTE and to describe the history and hospital course of infants with both working and discharge diagnoses of GERD. Authors retrospectively reviewed records from a large children's hospital of infants aged 1 year old and younger hospitalized from January 1, 2004, to March 1, 2007, with an admission diagnosis of ALTE. Demographics, clinical presentation, testing, hospital course, and 6-month postdischarge visits were abstracted. Intensive care admissions were excluded. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified factors associated with a discharge diagnosis of GERD. Three hundred thirteen infants met inclusion. Mean age was 2.1 months; mean length of stay was 2.5 days. A discharge diagnosis of GERD was most common (n = 154, 49%); 138 (89%) were initially well appearing, 10 (6%) had in-hospital events, and only 20 (13%) had upper gastrointestinal series performed. Concordance of initial working to discharge diagnosis of GERD was 96%. Nonconcordant diagnoses evolved within 24 hours. Rescue breaths and calling 911 were independently associated with a discharge diagnosis of GERD. Within 6 months, 14 patients (9%) with a discharge diagnosis of GERD had recurrent ALTE, and 5 (3%) had significant new diagnoses. Concordance of initial working diagnosis with discharge diagnosis of GERD in ALTE patients is high. However, in hospital events, evolution to new diagnoses and recurrent ALTE suggest that hospitalization of these patients is beneficial. Diagnostic studies should not be routine but should target concerns from the history, examination, and hospital course.

  4. Use of Gastroesophageal Reflux Medications in Premature Infants After NICU Discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Jo Ann; Passarella, Molly; Martin, Ashley E; Lorch, Scott A

    2016-12-01

    To describe the epidemiology and management of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) medications started in the first year of life for premature infants. Retrospective review of a cohort of infants ≤35 weeks' gestation presenting for care by 168 days of age to a 30-site network between 2005 and 2009 (n = 2217) and followed to 3 years of age. Medication frequency, types, and duration of use were assessed. Logistic regression identified factors associated with treatment. Thirty-seven percent (812) were prescribed GER medications with 77% begun after NICU discharge. Ninety percent (727) received histamine-2 receptor antagonists, 33% (269) proton pump inhibitors, 22% (182) prokinetics; 40% (325) received >1 medication. Outpatient medication was initiated at 95 ± 69 days of life for total of 294 ± 249 days (interquartile ratio: 117-359). Feeding issues (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.05, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.24-3.39) were associated with outpatient initiation. Forty-three percent (322) of infants started before 6 months were still on at 1 year of age associated with gestational age <32 weeks (aOR 1.76, 95% CI: 1.16-2.67), chronic lung disease (aOR 2.59, 95% CI: 1.29-5.22), and reactive airways disease (aOR 1.67, 95% CI: 1.05-2.65). Of the 37% of the cohort on GER medications, 77% were started after NICU discharge with prolonged use of medications. Feeding difficulties were associated with starting medication and markers of chronic lung disease with continuation of treatment. With uncertain evidence of efficacy, use of these medications in a high-risk population should be carefully evaluated. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  5. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ouk Ha

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundGastrointestinal symptoms are common in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in Korea appears to be increasing. Some studies have shown that T2DM is a risk factor for symptomatic GERD. However, this possibility is still debated, and the pathogenesis of GERD in T2DM is not yet fully understood. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence and risk factors (including autonomic neuropathy of GERD in patients with T2DM.MethodsThis cross-sectional case-control study enrolled T2DM patients (n=258 and healthy controls (n=184. All participants underwent physical examinations and laboratory tests. We evaluated medical records and long-term diabetes complications, including peripheral and autonomic neuropathy in patients with T2DM. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy was performed in all patients. The Los Angeles (LA classification was used to grade GERD. GERD was defined as LA grade A (or higher or minimal change with GERD symptoms. GERD symptoms were examined using a frequency scale. Data were expressed as mean±standard error. Independent t-tests or chi-square tests were used to make comparisons between groups.ResultsThe prevalence of GERD (32.6% vs. 35.9%, P=0.266 and GERD symptoms (58.8% vs. 59.2%, P=0.503 was not significantly different between T2DM patients and controls. We found no significant differences between T2DM patients with GERD and T2DM patients without GERD with respect to diabetic complications, including autonomic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, duration of DM, and glucose control.ConclusionThe prevalence of GERD in patients with T2DM showed no difference from that of controls. GERD was also not associated with peripheral and cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy, age, or duration of DM in patients with T2DM.

  6. Pharmacokinetics and safety of dexlansoprazole MR in pediatric patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kukulka M

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Michael Kukulka,1 Sai Nudurupati,2 Maria Claudia Perez3 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology, 2Department of Analytical Sciences, 3Department of Clinical Science, Takeda Development Center Americas, Inc., Deerfield, IL, USA Objective: To evaluate the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of dexlansoprazole modified-release (MR capsules in pediatric patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Methods: This Phase I, open-label study enrolled male and female patients (1 to 11 years of age with GERD. Patients received dexlansoprazole MR 15 mg, 30 mg, or 60 mg (according to weight once daily for 7 days. Blood samples for the measurement of plasma dexlansoprazole concentrations were collected for 24 hours after the day 7 dose. Dexlansoprazole plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters were summarized by dose group. Safety assessments included adverse events (AEs, clinical laboratory evaluations, fasting gastrin concentrations, physical examinations, electrocardiograms, and vital signs. Results: Thirty-six patients received study drug (12 per dose group, and 31 had evaluable pharmacokinetic data. There was a significant effect of weight on dose-normalized area under the curve (AUC, P=0.003 and dose-normalized maximum plasma concentration (Cmax (P=0.013, indicating that for a given dose, dexlansoprazole exposure decreases as body weight increases. After adjusting for body weight, both dexlansoprazole Cmax and AUC increased in an approximately dose-proportional manner with increasing dexlansoprazole dose. A total of ten of 36 patients reported at least one treatment-emergent AE, with most events considered mild in intensity. The most common AEs were vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea, and nausea. Conclusion: In 1- to 11-year-old patients with symptomatic GERD, weight-adjusted dexlansoprazole AUC and Cmax increased approximately dose-proportionally. However, for a given dose, dexlansoprazole exposure decreased with increasing

  7. Qualitative evaluation of osteopathic manipulative therapy in a patient with gastroesophageal reflux disease: a brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Leonardo Rios; Nesi, Jacson; Curi, Ana Christina; Martins, Wagner

    2014-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a chronic condition that affects a growing number of people and is currently among the most common disorders seen in clinical practice. To develop a protocol for the management of GERD with osteopathic manipulative therapy (OMTh) applied to the diaphragm and esophagus, and to evaluate the protocol's effectiveness using the quality of life scale (QS-GERD) for the disease. In this single-blinded prospective study, an OMTh protocol focusing on the diaphragm and esophagus was applied to a single patient, who had received a diagnosis of GERD 4 years previously. Outcomes were measured using the QS-GERD, which has a total possible score ranging from 0 to 45 (the lower the score, the better the quality of life) and a level of satisfaction from very satisfied to incapacitated. The OMTh protocol was applied at 3 sessions (initial session, second session 1 week after the first, and third session 2 weeks after the second), and the patient completed the QS-GERD 4 times (before the first session, before the third session, and 2 and 4 weeks after the third session). The OMTh protocol was administered without adverse events, and the patient reported positive outcomes after the third session. The QS-GERD showed a score improvement from 13 of 45 to 4 of 45. The results in the present report show that OMTh applied to the diaphragm and esophagus may improve symptoms of GERD and should be added to the somatovisceral approach to the care of patients with this condition.

  8. Low back pain and gastroesophageal reflux in patients with COPD: the disease in the breath

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordoni B

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bruno Bordoni,1 Fabiola Marelli,2,3 Bruno Morabito,2,3 Beatrice Sacconi,4,5 Philippe Caiazzo,6 Roberto Castagna2 1Foundation Don Carlo Gnocchi IRCCS, Department of Cardiology, Scientific Institute of Hospitalization and Care, Milan, 2Department of Fascial Osteopathic Research, CRESO, School of Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Gorla Minore, 3Department of Fascial Osteopathic Research, CRESO, School of Osteopathic Centre for Research and Studies, Fano, 4Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomopathological Sciences, Sapienza University of Rome, 5Department of Radiological, Oncological and Anatomopathological Sciences, Center for Life Nano Science@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Rome, 6Department of Osteopathic Research, AITOP, Italian Academy of Postural Osteopathic Therapy, Levizzano Rangone – Castelvetro, Italy Abstract: COPD is a worsening condition that leads to a pathologic degeneration of the respiratory system. It represents one of the most important causes of mortality and morbidity in the world, and it is characterized by the presence of associated comorbidity. This article analyzes gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD and low back pain (LBP in patients with COPD and tries to produce anatomo-clinical considerations on the reasons of the presence of these comorbidities. The considerations of the authors are based on the anatomic functions and characteristics of the respiratory diaphragm that are not always considered, from which elements useful to comprehend the symptomatic status of the patient can be deduced, finally improving the therapeutic approach. The information contained in the article can be of help to the clinician and for physiotherapy, and to all health professionals who gravitate around the patient’s care, improving the approach to the diaphragm muscle. Keywords: COPD, diaphragm, low back pain, GERD, fascia

  9. Pharmacokinetics of a single oral dose of baclofen in pediatric patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, H E; van Boxtel, C J; Butter, J J; van Aalderen, W M C; Omari, T; Benninga, M A

    2003-02-01

    Transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (TLESR) is the predominant mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in adults and children. Baclofen [4-amino-3-(p-chlorophenyl)-butanoic acid], a gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-B receptor agonist used for the management of spasticity, has been recently shown to significantly inhibit GER in healthy adults without any relevant side effects. The objective of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetics of baclofen in a pediatric population with GER disease. In an open-label single-dose pharmacokinetic study, eight children with the diagnosis of GER made on clinical grounds received an oral dose of baclofen, 2.5 mg. Blood samples were drawn from an indwelling venous catheter, and urine was collected during a postdose period of 8 hours. The concentration of baclofen in these body fluids was determined using a validated high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with electrochemical detection after OPA-sulfite derivatization. Pharmacokinetic data were analyzed using the nonlinear regression program Scientist. Serum concentration-time curves could be best described using a two-compartment open model with a lag time. Mean plasma clearance (Cl) was 315.9 mL/h/kg; volume of distribution (Vd) was 2.58 L/kg; and half-life (T(1/2)beta) was 5.10 hours. No side effects were noted. As half-lives were comparable with those found in adult studies, the risk for accumulation seems not greater in children than in adults. Body composition can have a strong influence on the Vd of baclofen and, therefore, on the dose needed to obtain therapeutic plasma levels. Dosing according to clearly defined age groups with the help of therapeutic drug monitoring seems preferable. In view of the negative correlation between body weight and Vd, dosing according to body weight using adult pharmacokinetic data does not seem an effective way for using baclofen in children.

  10. Total diet, individual meals, and their association with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehranghiz Ebrahimi-Mameghani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: To identify the association of total diet and individual meals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Methods: This age- and sex-matched case-control study was carried out among 217 subjects (106 cases and 111 controls. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and a GERD checklist and a 3-day food record. Results: Cases consumed more fat (median: 26.3 [3.2-71.5] g vs. 21.8 [4.3-58.1] g; P=0.04and more energy percent form carbohydrates (median: 72.5 [0-100] vs. 69.0 [0-100]; P=0.02at lunch, and less energy (median: 129.5 kcal [0-617.6] vs. 170.5 kcal [0-615.7]; P=0.01 and protein (2.4 [0-19.4] g vs. 3.1 [0-21.8] g; P=0.01 at evening snack, compared to controls.The volume of food was significantly different between the two group only at lunch (median:516 [161-1292] g vs. 468 [198-1060] g; P=0.02. The percentage of energy from total dietary protein showed a significant association with GERD after adjusting for confounders (odds ratio[OR]=0.89; 95% CI: 0.81-0.98. Regarding the individual meals, amount of fat consumed at lunch (OR=1.02; 95% CI: 1.00-1.05, and amount of protein intake at evening snack (OR=0.92;95% CI: 0.85-1.00 were significantly associated with GERD. Meanwhile, caloric density and meal frequency did not differ significantly between the two groups. Conclusion: Amount of fat consumed at lunch is positively associated with GERD, whereas the percentage of energy from total protein and amount of protein intake at evening snack are more likely to be inversely associated with GERD.

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux episodes in asthmatic patients and their temporal relation with sleep architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Mello-Fujita

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux (GER is common in asthma patients and can contribute to sleep disruption. The aim of the present study was to determine the time-related distribution of GER events together with their impact on sleep in asthmatic subjects with GER disease symptoms. The inclusion criteria were: 18-65 years, controlled moderate to severe asthma and GER-compatible clinical evidence. The exclusion criteria were: chronic obstructive lung disease, smoking, infections of the upper airways, use of oral corticosteroids, other co-morbidities, pregnancy, sleep-related disorders, night-time shift work, and the use of substances with impact on sleep. Asthmatic patients with nocturnal symptoms were excluded. All-night polysomnography and esophageal pH monitoring were recorded simultaneously. Of the 147 subjects selected, 31 patients and 31 controls were included. Seventeen patients were classified as DeMeester positive and 14 as DeMeester negative. Both groups displayed similar outcomes when general variables were considered. Sleep stage modification one minute prior to GER was observed in the DeMeester-positive group. Awakening was the most frequent occurrence at GER onset and during the 1-min period preceding 38% of the nocturnal GER. Sleep stage 2 was also prevalent and preceded 36% of GER events. In the DeMeester-negative group, awakening was the most frequent response before and during GER. Modifications in sleep stages, arousals or awakenings were associated with 75% of the total GER events analyzed during the period of one minute before and after the fall of esophageal pH below 4 in the DeMeester-positive group. These data provide evidence that sleep modifications precede the GER events in asthmatic patients.

  12. Enteral feeding in neurologically impaired children with gastroesophageal reflux: Nissen fundoplication and gastrostomy tube placement versus percutaneous gastrojejunostomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenker, Erin

    2008-10-01

    Parents or caregivers of neurologically impaired children with gastroesophageal reflux who require enteral nutrition are often faced with the option of having their child undergo an antireflux surgery and placement of a gastrostomy tube or have a percutaneous gastrojejunostomy tube placed under fluoroscopic guidance. It is important that nurses have an understanding of these procedures and their associated risks and benefits as well as knowledge of the impact each might have on the daily life and care of these children to help support families during this decision-making process.

  13. Enfermedad por reflujo gastroesofágico en niños Disease due to gastroesophageal reflux in children

    OpenAIRE

    Leonor Adriana Castiblanco Galvis; Etty Paola Cortés Ramírez; Claudia Paola Acevedo Villafañe; Carlos Alberto Velasco Benítez

    1997-01-01

    En niños normales el reflujo gastroesofágico (RGE) es usualmente autolimitado. La enfermedad por RGE (ERGE) causa severos problemas respiratorios, gastrointestinales y de alimentación. La ERGE es causa frecuente de morbilidad en niños. El propósito del presente artículo es describir la fisiopatología, las manifestaciones clínicas, el diagnóstico, el manejo y las complicaciones de la ERGE en niños. In normal infants gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is usually self-limited but GER disease (GERD) i...

  14. An Epidemiological Study of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Related Risk Factors in Urban Population of Mashhad, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Vossoughinia, Hassan; Salari, Masoumeh; Mokhtari Amirmajdi, Elham; Saadatnia, Hassan; Abedini, Siavash; Shariati, Alireza; Shariati, Mohammadjavad; Khosravi Khorashad, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is a chronic and common disease, which is characterized by heartburn and regurgitation. In the last couple of decades, GERD has received much attention and studies have shown an increase in its prevalence. Although there have been a few studies on the prevalence of GERD in Iran, no study has yet been done in the northeastern part of the country. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of GERD and its risk factors in a population f...

  15. Laparoscopic modified Thal fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux in a patient with severe scoliosis and sliding esophageal hiatal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatekawa, Yukihiro; Kanehiro, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2006-10-01

    A 14-year-old girl with severe scoliosis and sliding esophageal hiatal hernia underwent laparoscopic fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux. Of various fundoplication procedures, anterior partial fundoplication (Thal fundoplication) was performed because it is effective, with less postoperative gas bloat syndrome. Laparoscopic fundoplication in severely scoliotic children could allow improved operative visibility and easier access to the hiatus in comparison with the open approach. In our "modified anterior partial fundoplication," the sutures between the crura and the esophagus and the sutures on the left of esophageal wall with the fundus of the stomach could be exactly performed by laparoscopic surgical technique. The wrapping of the esophagus in fundoplication was done over the ventral 180 degrees to 270 degrees. Six months postoperatively, the patient did not develop gas bloat syndrome, distal esophageal obstruction from fundoplication, and delayed gastric emptying. Modified anterior partial fundoplication achieves effective control of reflux symptoms.

  16. [Efficacy comparison of laparoscopic Nissen, Toupet and Dor fundoplication in the treatment of hiatal hernia complicated with gastroesophageal reflux disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Fuzeng; Zhang, Cheng; Ke, Limu; Wang, Zhi; Li, Yiliang; Li, Huiling; Du, Zhi

    2016-09-25

    To compare the efficacy and safety among laparoscopic Nissen, Toupet and Dor fundoplication in the treatment of hiatal hernia complicated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Clinical data of 276 patients of hiatal hernia complicated with GERD undergoing operation in our hospital from December 2012 to January 2015 were retrospectively analyzed, including 149 patients of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (Nissen group), 41 of laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (Toupet group), and 86 patients of laparoscopic Dor fundoplication (Dor group). Esophageal reflux status, esophageal manometry, GERD Q rating scale, and postoperative recovery were compare among the three groups. Reflux status was improved significantly in the three groups after operation(all P0.05). There were no significant differences in postoperative reflux time, acid reflux time ratio, reflux longest time ratio, DeMeester score among the three groups (all P>0.05). Pairwise comparison showed that Dor group was significantly better than Toupet group in reducing the number of reflux episode(14.36±10.58 vs. 29.83±19.71) and long-reflux (0.64±0.21 vs. 6.20±3.48)(both P0.05]. The GERD Q scores were significantly decreased after operation in 3 groups(Nissen group:10.94±2.20 vs.7.41±1.43, t=11.667, P=0.001; Toupet group: 10.91±2.02 vs.7.18±1.33, t=5.109, P=0.005; Dor group: 10.69±1.69 vs. 7.10±1.30, t=7.610, P=0.002). There was no significant difference in GERD Q scores among three groups (F=1.465, P=0.207). The operative time, blood loss, hospital stay and complications were not significantly different among 3 groups (all P>0.05). Follow-up period was 12-51 months (median 19 months), and no significant difference in recurrence was found [Nissen group: 2 cases (1.3%), Toupet group: 1 case (2.4%), Dor group: 1 case (1.2%), χ2=0.363, P=0.834]. It is safe and feasible for these three laparoscopic fundoplications to the treatment of hiatal hernia complicated with GERD. But laparoscopic Nissen and

  17. Histological evaluation of esophageal mucosa in children with acid gastroesophageal reflux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Kaczmarski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM
    histological evaluation of esophageal mucosa in children, with regard to the duration of primary acid gastroesophageal reflux (GER and acid GER secondary to cow's milk allergy and/or other food allergy (CMA/FA (prospective study.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS
    264 children of both sexes suspected of GER were enrolled in the study. The age of examined children was 1.5-102 months, mean age 20.78+/-17.23 months. Pathological acid GER was confirmed with pH-monitoring in 138 children (52.3%. Taking into consideration complex differential diagnosis, including oral food challenge test with potentially noxious nutrient (open or blind study, children were assigned into study groups 1 and 2 (primary and secondary GER. Group 1: 76 patients (28.8% aged 4-102 months (x=25.2+/-27.28 months with primary GER. Group 2: 62 patients (23.5% aged 4-74 months (x=21.53+/-17.79 months with GER secondary to CMA/FA. Children with GERD underwent preliminary and control (after 1 year and 2 years of GERD diagnosis endoscopic examination of the upper gastroinestinal tract.

    RESULTS
    Intensity of esophagitis was assessed initially in 25 children from group 1 (32.9%, in 29 children from group 2 (46.8%, and in 9 children from group 3 - reference group (28.1%. Histological evaluation revealed infiltration of inflammatory cells, mainly neutrophils and intraepithelial lymphocytes, and also eosinophils in 10 children (13.2% with primary GER. Infiltration of eosinophils and lymphocytes was found in 5 children (8.1% with secondary GER. In 8 children (25.0% with food allergy there were only lymphocytes. Infiltration of neutrophils and lymphocytes and basal zone hyperplasia or infiltration of eosinophils and lymphocytes with elongation of lamina propria papillae was found in 10 children (13.1% with primary GER and in 20 children (32.2% with secondary GER. Differentiation of particular types of inflammatory

  18. Esophageal Multichannel Intraluminal Impedance and pH Monitoring in the Evaluation of Achalasia and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in a Child with Down Syndrome: a Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoicescu, Mihai-Mirel; Mocanu, Mihai; Galos, Felicia; Munteanu, Mihai; Visan, Simina; Ulmeanu, Coriolan; Balgradean, Mihaela

    2014-12-01

    We report the case of a rare association between achalasia and Down syndrome in a child presenting with symptoms that suggest a gastroesophageal reflux. Evaluation of the patient with 24-hour multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH recording and upper endoscopy lead to the diagnosis of achalasia. However, the persistence of the symptoms after the concurrent surgical myomectomy and fundoplication has led to repeat pH-impedance monitoring testing and endoscopy, which identified the presence of gastroesophageal reflux disease. We emphasize in this paper the importance of multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring in detecting esophageal motility disorders.

  19. Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux during First Year of Life in Infants Admitted in Pediatric Department of Imam Reza Hospital-Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Amirian

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastroesophageal reflux (GER is the most common of esophageal disorder in all ages.  GER defined as passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, and GER disease (GERD, (symptoms or complications of GER, are common pediatric problems. Clinical manifestations of GERD in infants include regurgitation, irritability, choking, gagging vomiting, poor weight gain and respiratory disorder. The purpose of this study is evaluation prevalence of Gastroesophageal reflux and its symptoms in infants during first year of life.   Materials and Method: This study was performed on 75 infants younger than one year old, who were admitted in pediatric department of Imam Reza Hospital in Mashhad during 3 months.   Results: In this study in a three- month period, GER was assessed in 75 infants younger than one year who were admitted in pediatric department of Imam Reza Hospital. Their parents reported GER in 66% of these infants. The most common symptom of reflux was regurgitation. Regurgitation was reported at least once a day to seven times a day. The other reported symptoms were respectively: irritability (16%, choking (10%, and failure to thrive (0.3%. Peak reported regurgitation was 60% at 3.5 months.   Conclusion: Gastroesophageal reflux is a common problem in infancy. Complaints of regurgitation are common during the first year of life. So understanding the symptoms of GER and recognition of GERD should be considred.   Keyword: Infant,Gastroesophageal Reflux, Prevalence. 

  20. Impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms on the quality of life in pregnant women: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fill Malfertheiner, Sara; Seelbach-Göbel, Birgit; Costa, Serban-Dan; Ernst, Wolfgang; Reuschel, Edith; Zeman, Florian; Malfertheiner, Peter; Malfertheiner, Maximilian V

    2017-08-01

    Pregnant women often suffer from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD symptoms are known to influence the quality of life; however, there is a lack of data in pregnant women. The aim of this study was to establish the impact of GERD symptoms on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) during pregnancy. A prospective longitudinal cohort study to investigate the impact of GERD symptoms on the HRQOL was carried out in 510 pregnant women and 330 nonpregnant women as controls. Two validated questionnaires, the Reflux Disease Questionnaire and the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia Questionnaire, were used. The study showed a significant negative impact on HRQOL in pregnant women with GERD symptoms. All five areas, emotional distress, sleep disturbance, vitality, food/drink problems, and physical/social functioning, were significantly reduced, but the most significant impact was on sleep (Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia Questionnaire score -35%). Overall, quality of life in women with GERD worsened throughout pregnancy. GERD is frequently seen in pregnant women and has a negative impact on HRQOL, especially in late pregnancy. Therefore, there is a need for adequate therapy of GERD in pregnant women and HRQOL could be an adequate monitoring tool in this population.

  1. [The binomial symptom index for the evaluation of temporal association between cardiorespiratory symptoms and gastroesophageal reflux in neonates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barriga-Rivera, Alejandro; Moya, María José; Lopez-Alonso, Manuel

    2016-11-01

    The evaluation of symptom association between gastroesophageal reflux and cardiorespiratory events in preterm infants remains unclear. This paper describes a conservative approach to decision-making of anti-reflux surgery through symptom association analysis. Forty-three neonates with potentially reflux-related cardiorespiratory symptoms underwent synchronized esophageal impedance-pH and cardiorespiratory monitoring. Three indices were considered to evaluate symptom association, the symptom index (SI), the symptom sensitivity index (SSI) and the symptom association probability (SAP). A conservative strategy was adopted regarding the decision of anti-reflux surgery, and therefore, patients were scheduled for laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication if the three indices showed a positive assessment of symptom association. Retrospectively, these indices and the binomial symptom index (BSI) were contrasted against the decision of anti-reflux surgery using different windows of association. Thirteen patients showed positive symptom association but only two underwent anti-reflux surgery. The SI and the SSI showed an increasing trend with the width of the window of association. The SAP was affected randomly by slightly altering the windowing parameters. The BSI showed the best performance with the two-minute window (κ =0.78) CONCLUSIONS: The pathology under study is known to improve with maturity. However, the severity of cardiorespiratory symptoms may threaten the neonate's life and therefore, in some occasions, invasive treatments must be considered to protect life. The BSI provides a good prediction of a combination of positive SI, SSI and SAP, which may improve clinical decisions. However, further clinical studies are required to prove the BSI as an optimal predictor of clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. How useful is esophageal high resolution manometry in diagnosing gastroesophageal junction disruption: causes affecting this disruption and its relationship with manometric alterations and gastroesophageal reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanza Ciriza-de-los-Ríos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-resolution manometry (HRM is a breakthrough in the morphological study of the gastroesophageal junction (GEJ and its degrees of disruption. Objectives: a Assessment of risk factors involved in the disruption of the GEJ in patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER symptoms; b the relationship between the type of GEJ and GER demonstrated by 24 hours pH-monitoring; and c identification of the alterations in the manometric parameters related to the morphology of the GEJ. Methods: One hundred and fifteen patients with symptoms of GER studied with HRM and classified by the type of GEJ (type I: Normal; type II: Sliding; type III: Hiatal hernia. Twenty four hour pH-monitoring without proton pump inhibitors was performed in all of them. Epidemiological aspects, manometric parameters (Chicago 2012 classification and the pH-monitoring results were evaluated. Results: Age (OR 1.033 [1.006-1.060]; p = 0.16, BMI (OR 1.097 [1.022-1.176]; p = 0. 01 and abdominal perimeter (OR 1.034 [1.005-1.063]; p = 0.0215 were independent risk factors for the GEJ type III (area under the curve 0.70. Disruption of the GEJ was associated with a lower resting pressure (p = 0.006, greater length (p < 0.001 and greater esophageal shortening (p < 0.001. Abnormal acidic reflux was found in the total period (p = 0.015, standing (p = 0.022 and supine (p = 0.001 in patients with GEJ type II and III with respect to type I. Conclusions: Increased age, overweight and central obesity pose a higher risk of GEJ type III (hiatal hernia. The greater disruption of the GEJ is associated with lower resting pressure, esophageal shortening, and higher acid exposure in the pH-monitoring.

  3. Achalasia Previously Diagnosed as Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease by Relying on Esophageal Impedance-pH Monitoring: Use of High-Resolution Esophageal Manometry in Children

    OpenAIRE

    Pyun, Jung Eun; Choi, Da Min; Lee, Jung Hwa; Yoo, Kee Hwan; Shim, Jung Ok

    2015-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD) is the most common esophageal disorder in children. Achalasia occurs less commonly but has similar symptoms to GERD. A nine-year old boy presented with vomiting, heartburn, and nocturnal cough. The esophageal impedance-pH monitor revealed nonacidic GERD (all-refluxate clearance percent time of 20.9%). His symptoms persisted despite medical treatment for GERD, and he was lost to follow up. Four years later, he presented with heartburn, solid-food dysphag...

  4. Prevalence and management of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children and adolescents: a nationwide cross-sectional observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martigne, Léonie; Delaage, Pierre-Henri; Thomas-Delecourt, Florence; Bonnelye, Geneviève; Barthélémy, Philippe; Gottrand, Frédéric

    2012-12-01

    This cross-sectional observational study aimed to determine the nationwide prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD) in French children and adolescents. Four hundred four general practitioners and 180 paediatricians compiled a register of all children and adolescents (n = 10,394, aged 0 to 17 years, mean 3.8 ± 5.6 years) who presented over two 3-day periods. For all children who, in the physician's opinion, showed symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux (GOR), a 24-item questionnaire covering the history and management of GOR was completed. Children with symptoms that impaired their daily lives were defined as having GORD, the remainder as having physiological GOR. Of the patients, 15.1 % showed GOR symptoms. Extrapolation to the overall French population yielded a prevalence of 10.3 % for GOR and 6.2 % for GORD. There was a significantly (p infants with GORD versus physiological GOR. Significantly (p infants and children with GORD received pharmacological therapy. The use of proton pump inhibitors increased with age but was significantly (p < 0.05) higher among those with GORD. Ten percent of French children and adolescents show GOR symptoms and 6 % have GORD. Clinical presentation and treatment vary in different age groups, but those with GORD are more likely to require pharmacological treatment.

  5. Increase of lower esophageal sphincter pressure after osteopathic intervention on the diaphragm in patients with gastroesophageal reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, R C V; de Sá, C C; Pascual-Vaca, Á O; de Souza Fontes, L H; Herbella Fernandes, F A M; Dib, R A; Blanco, C R; Queiroz, R A; Navarro-Rodriguez, T

    2013-07-01

    The treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease may be clinical or surgical. The clinical consists basically of the use of drugs; however, there are new techniques to complement this treatment, osteopathic intervention in the diaphragmatic muscle is one these. The objective of the study is to compare pressure values in the examination of esophageal manometry of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) before and immediately after osteopathic intervention in the diaphragm muscle. Thirty-eight patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease - 16 submitted to sham technique and 22 submitted osteopathic technique - were randomly selected. The average respiratory pressure (ARP) and the maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) of the LES were measured by manometry before and after osteopathic technique at the point of highest pressure. Statistical analysis was performed using the Student's t-test and Mann-Whitney, and magnitude of the technique proposed was measured using the Cohen's index. Statistically significant difference in the osteopathic technique was found in three out of four in relation to the group of patients who performed the sham technique for the following measures of LES pressure: ARP with P= 0.027. The MEP had no statistical difference (P= 0.146). The values of Cohen d for the same measures were: ARP with d= 0.80 and MEP d= 0.52. Osteopathic manipulative technique produces a positive increment in the LES region soon after its performance. © 2012 Copyright the Authors. Journal compilation © 2012, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  6. Comparison of two tools to assess dyad feeding interaction in infants with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jameson, Meredith; Fehringer, Karen; Neu, Madalynn

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the Mother-Infant/Toddler Feeding Scale (MITFS) and the Nursing Child Assessment Feeding Scale (NCAFS). Specific questions were as follows: (1) Are there differences between the results of the MITFS and the NCAFS tools in terms of rating infant feeding interactions? And (2) does one tool provide a more detailed, nuanced overview of the quality of feeding interactions than the other? This comparative descriptive study is a secondary analysis of a study evaluating a massage intervention for infants with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A feeding observation for each dyad was scored using both the NCAFS and MITFS. Infants were 6-18 weeks of age. There were moderate correlations (r = 0.3-0.8) between 11 of 20 possible NCAFS and MITFS mother-related subscales, and between 3 of 10 possible NCAFS and the MITFS infant-related subscales. A total of 19 dyads (83%) had one or more NCAFS subscale scores that were at least 1 standard deviation (SD) below normative scores, and 21 dyads (91%) had one or more MITFS subscale T-scores that deviated 1 SD from the normative T-scores. Agreement between the two instruments on scores deviating from the norm was 78%. Both instruments discussed in this paper are standardized ways of assessing an infant feeding. Use of a standardized feeding tool is an objective way to evaluate feedings and can potentially identify specific areas of concern to guide an individualized intervention for a mother-infant dyad. Thus, nurses and other health professionals working with mothers and babies, whether in the hospital, pediatrician offices, or clinics would benefit from learning how to use a standardized feeding tool. Use of a feeding tool also provides the opportunity for nurses to understand the basis of important qualities of a feeding interaction, and a way for nurses who regularly feed infants to self-evaluate their feeding methods. This may minimize less than optimal interactions and allow

  7. Meta-analysis of the effectiveness of esomeprazole in gastroesophageal reflux disease and Helicobacter pylori infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, M; Khoo, A L; Zhao, Y J; Lin, L; Lim, B P; Wu, T S; Dan, Y Y

    2015-08-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are one of the most widely used classes of drugs. However, the quantum clinical benefit of newer and more expensive PPIs over the older generation PPIs remains uncertain. This meta-analysis sought to assess the clinical and safety profiles of esomeprazole versus omeprazole at pharmacologically equivalent doses in healing gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), peptic ulcer disease and eradicating Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection. PubMed and the Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials comparing esomeprazole with omeprazole at all doses up to February 2015. Trials were assessed by two reviewers for eligibility according to predefined study inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis was conducted using a random effects model, and heterogeneity in the estimated effects was investigated using meta-regression. Sensitivity analysis was performed to test the robustness of the findings. Fifteen trials were included and none of which compared esomeprazole with omeprazole in peptic ulcer disease. The included studies had not evaluated esomeprazole 20 mg versus omeprazole 40 mg. In GERD, esomeprazole 40 mg (relative risk (RR) = 1·07; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·02 to 1·12) and 20 mg (RR=1·04; 95% CI 1·01 to 1·08) significantly improved esophagitis healing when compared with omeprazole 20 mg at week 8. The corresponding numbers needed to treat were 17 and 30, respectively. No significant difference was observed between esomeprazole 20 mg and omeprazole 20 mg at week 4. In H. pylori eradication, there was no difference in the treatment effects between esomeprazole 20 mg and omeprazole 20 mg (RR = 1·01;95% CI 0·96 to 1·05). Their safety profiles were comparable. Esomeprazole demonstrated better esophagitis healing rate in patients with GERD than omeprazole at week 8. However, this clinical advantage diminished when both drugs were given at the same doses at week 4. Superiority of esomeprazole was not

  8. Experimental model of gastroesophageal reflux in rats Modelo experimental de refluxo gastroesofágico em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmilson Vieira Gaia Filho

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop an experimental model of gastroesophageal reflux in rats. METHODS: Sixty Wistar rats underwent surgery and were assigned to one of the three groups of twenty animals each. The animals in group A underwent total esophageal myectomy and, in group (B, underwent partial myectomy. The third group was the control group (C. A contrast radiographic study of the esophagus was performed to evaluate gastroesophageal reflux. The anatomopathological study of the esophagus was used to evaluate esophagitis. RESULTS: During the 30-day postoperative follow-up, 14 animals in group A presented with reflux of barium in the esophagus. The presence of barium in the esophagus was observed in 7 animals in group B and in 2 animals in the control group. The result of the histopathology examination was controversial. A marked weight loss in the rats undergoing total myectomy was observed, however there was no significant statistical difference. CONCLUSION: Total myectomy in the lower third of the esophagus caused gastroesophageal reflux in the majority of the animals.OBJETIVO: Desenvolver um modelo experimental de refluxo gastroesofágico em ratos. MÉTODOS: Sessenta ratos, Wistar, foram operados e distribuídos em três grupos de vinte animais. Os animais foram submetidos a miectomia total do esôfago em um grupo(A, e em outro grupo foram submetidos a miectomia parcial(B. O terceiro grupo foi o grupo controle(C. Para avaliar o refluxo gastroesofágico realizou-se o estudo radiológico contrastado do esôfago. O estudo anátomo-patológico do esôfago foi utilizado para avaliar esofagite. RESULTADOS: Durante os 30 dias de pós-operatório, 14 animais do grupo A apresentaram refluxo de Bário no esôfago. Em 07 animais do grupo B e em 02 do grupo controle, foram observados a presença de Bário no esôfago. O resultado do histopatológico foi controverso. Observou-se perda ponderal importante nos ratos submetidos a miectomia total, porém não existiu

  9. A Pharmacoeconomic Comparison of the Efficacy and costs of Pantoprazole and Omeprazole for the Treatment of Peptic Ulcer or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hout, BA; Klok, RM; Brouwers, JRBJ; Postma, MJ

    Background: The focus of treatment of patients with peptic ulcer or gastroesophageal reflux disease has changed during the last 15 years, with a shift from histamine(2)-receptor antagonists to proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs). From 1993 to 2000, expenditures for omeprazole (90% of total market share of

  10. Lack of differential pattern in central adiposity and metabolic syndrome in Barrett's esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, L A; Ryan, A M; Pidgeon, G; Ravi, N; Reynolds, J V

    2010-07-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma, although the mechanism is unclear. A pathway from reflux to inflammation through metaplasia is the dominant hypothesis, and an added role relating to visceral adiposity and the metabolic syndrome has been mooted in Barrett's esophagus (BE) patients. Whether BE differs from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in obesity and metabolic syndrome profiles is unclear, and this was the focus of this study. Patients with proven BE or GERD were randomly selected from the unit data registry and invited to attend for metabolic syndrome screening, anthropometry studies including segmental body composition analysis, and laboratory tests including fasting lipids, insulin, and C-reactive protein. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. One hundred and eighteen BE patients and 113 age- and sex-matched GERD controls were studied. The incidence of obesity (body mass index >30 kg/m(2)) was 36% and 38%, respectively, with the pattern of fat deposition predominantly central and an estimated trunk fat mass of 13 and 14 kg, respectively. Using the NCEP criteria, metabolic syndrome was significantly more common in the BE cohort (30% vs 20%, P metabolic syndrome are common in both Barrett's and GERD cohorts, but not significantly different, suggesting that central obesity and the metabolic syndrome does not per se impact on the development of BE in a reflux population. In BE, the importance of obesity and the metabolic syndrome in disease progression merits further study.

  11. Adherence to a predominantly Mediterranean diet decreases the risk of gastroesophageal reflux disease: a cross-sectional study in a South Eastern European population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mone, I; Kraja, B; Bregu, A; Duraj, V; Sadiku, E; Hyska, J; Burazeri, G

    2016-10-01

    Our aim was to assess the association of a Mediterranean diet and gastroesophageal reflux disease among adult men and women in Albania, a former communist country in South Eastern Europe with a predominantly Muslim population. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2012, which included a population-based sample of 817 individuals (≥18 years) residing in Tirana, the Albanian capital (333 men; overall mean age: 50.2 ± 18.7 years; overall response rate: 82%). Assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease was based on Montreal definition. Participants were interviewed about their dietary patterns, which in the analysis was dichotomized into: predominantly Mediterranean (frequent consumption of composite/traditional dishes, fresh fruit and vegetables, olive oil, and fish) versus largely non-Mediterranean (frequent consumption of red meat, fried food, sweets, and junk/fast food). Logistic regression was used to assess the association of gastroesophageal reflux disease with the dietary patterns. Irrespective of demographic and socioeconomic characteristics and lifestyle factors including eating habits (meal regularity, eating rate, and meal-to-sleep interval), employment of a non-Mediterranean diet was positively related to gastroesophageal reflux disease risk (fully adjusted odds ratio = 2.3, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-4.5). Our findings point to a beneficial effect of a Mediterranean diet in the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease in transitional Albania. Findings from this study should be confirmed and expanded further in prospective studies in Albania and in other Mediterranean countries. © 2015 International Society for Diseases of the Esophagus.

  12. CHRONIC COUGH AND DENTAL EROSIONS IN A CHILD WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX EVALUATED BY PH-METRY ASSOCIATED WITH MULTICHANNEL INTRALUMINAL IMPEDANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia GALOŞ

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The clinical manifestations of the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD are multiple and heterogeneous, differing according to age and individual susceptibility. The relationship between respiratory manifestations and the gastroesophageal reflux (GER in children is a contro‑ versial topic on: proving or refuting either cause or effect, with special stress on the most important symptom – cough. Dental erosions can be GERD-related, especially in the case of infants or of neurologically-impaired children. The case of a 4 year and 8 month-old child with gastroeso‑ phageal reflux, with typical (chronic vomiting and atypi‑ cal (chronic cough, dental erosions digestive manifestations, a diagnosis established by pH-metry asso‑ ciated with multichannel intraluminal impedance, will be discussed in the study.

  13. Prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and effects of esomeprazole on the quality of life related to reflux and dyspepsia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikoshi, Tamehachi; Harada, Kazuhiro; Hatta, Hidekazu; Tokura, Takehiko; Oshiro, Yoshiyuki; Nishizaki, Tetsuichi; Obata, Takahiro; Mori, Masahiro; Fueki, Takaaki; Fujimoto, Sohachi; Haruna, Yoshisuke; Kuwabara, Atsunori; Yorimitsu, Daisuke; Ihoriya, Chieko; Kadoya, Hiroyuki; Itano, Seiji; Fujimoto, Yasuo; Komai, Norio; Sasaki, Tamaki; Kashihara, Naoki

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms has not been investigated in patients on maintenance hemodialysis in Japan, and few studies have reported the effect of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in hemodialysis patients with GERD symptoms. Here, we investigated the prevalence of GERD symptoms and the effects of the PPI esomeprazole on the quality of life related to reflux and dyspepsia in patients on maintenance hemodialysis. This was a cross-sectional/cohort study of hemodialysis outpatients implemented in 10 Japanese medical facilities from October 2012 to March 2014. The trial was registered in the UMIN Clinical Trial Registry (UMIN000009124). Forty-one of 385 patients (11%) reported GERD symptoms on the Global Overall Symptom (GOS) questionnaire. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the independent prognostic factors for GERD symptoms as a history of gastric ulcer and use of sevelamer hydrochloride or calcium polystyrene sulfonate. Participants with GERD symptoms completed the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia, Japanese version (QOLRAD-J) questionnaire and were assigned to receive 4-week esomeprazole treatment (20 mg/day). This PPI therapy significantly improved all QOLRAD-J domains in the full analysis set (n = 28) and improved the GERD symptoms listed in the GOS questionnaire. Significantly impaired disease-specific quality of life (QOL) in the QOLRAD-J domains was observed in 44.4-74.1% of patients who had symptoms before treatment. The mean GOS and QOLRAD-J scores correlated significantly. Therapy with 20 mg/day esomeprazole appears to be efficacious for improving disease-specific QOL and GERD symptoms in Japanese patients on maintenance hemodialysis.

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease: recommendations of the Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Iga, F; Bielsa-Fernández, M V; Remes-Troche, J M; Valdovinos-Díaz, M A; Tamayo-de la Cuesta, J L

    Emerging concepts in the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and the constant technologic advances in the diagnosis and treatment of this clinical condition make it necessary to frequently review and update the clinical guidelines, recommendations, and official statements from the leading academic groups worldwide. The Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología (AMG), aware of this responsibility, brought together national experts in this field to analyze the most recent scientific evidence and formulate a series of practical recommendations to guide and facilitate the diagnostic process and efficacious treatment of these patients. The document includes algorithms, figures, and tables for convenient consultation, along with opinions on GERD management in sensitive populations, such as pregnant women and older adults. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  15. Enfermedad por reflujo gastroesofágico en niños Disease due to gastroesophageal reflux in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Adriana Castiblanco Galvis

    1997-03-01

    Full Text Available En niños normales el reflujo gastroesofágico (RGE es usualmente autolimitado. La enfermedad por RGE (ERGE causa severos problemas respiratorios, gastrointestinales y de alimentación. La ERGE es causa frecuente de morbilidad en niños. El propósito del presente artículo es describir la fisiopatología, las manifestaciones clínicas, el diagnóstico, el manejo y las complicaciones de la ERGE en niños. In normal infants gastroesophageal reflux (GER is usually self-limited but GER disease (GERD is a frequent cause of morbidity in childhood, causing severe respiratory, gastrointestinal and feeding problems. This review describes the pathophysiology, clinical aspects,diagnosis, treatment and complications of GERD in children.

  16. A comparison between sodium alginate and magaldrate anhydrous in the treatment of patients with gastroesophageal reflux symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Edoardo G; Zentilin, Patrizia; Dulbecco, Pietro; Iiritano, Elena; Bilardi, Claudio; Savarino, Edoardo; Mansi, Carlo; Savarino, Vincenzo

    2006-11-01

    The aims of the present study were to compare effects of sodium alginate and the antacid magaldrate anhydrous in adults with gastroesophageal reflux (GOR) symptoms. Patients with heartburn and/or acid regurgitation for at least 3 days in the week before the study started (n=203) were randomized to receive a single dose of sodium alginate or magaldrate anhydrous at the onset of symptoms during a 3-day run-in period. Patients with symptoms during the run-in (n=191) were rerandomized to receive a 14-day treatment with either drug given as four daily doses. A speed of action magaldrate group, respectively. We conclude that sodium alginate was faster than magaldrate in relieving GRO symptoms and showed a tendency toward a more prolonged duration of action and a higher level of efficacy.

  17. Diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease: recommendations of the Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Huerta-Iga

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Emerging concepts in the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD and the constant technologic advances in the diagnosis and treatment of this clinical condition make it necessary to frequently review and update the clinical guidelines, recommendations, and official statements from the leading academic groups worldwide. The Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología (AMG, aware of this responsibility, brought together national experts in this field to analyze the most recent scientific evidence and formulate a series of practical recommendations to guide and facilitate the diagnostic process and efficacious treatment of these patients. The document includes algorithms, figures, and tables for convenient consultation, along with opinions on GERD management in sensitive populations, such as pregnant women and older adults.

  18. [Sleep disorders in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease: an open clinical and pH metric prospective study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karoui, Sami; Chtara, Olfa; Bibani, Norsaf; Kallel, Lamia; Zouiten, Lilia; Matri, Samira; Serghini, Meriem; Boubaker, Jalel; Filali, Azza

    2010-03-01

    Sleep disorders are frequent in patients with GERD. Severity of sleep disorders could be related to occurrence of nighttime symptoms, but the relationship between severity of GERD and the severity of sleep disorders is not well established. To identify the frequency of sleep disorders in patients with suspected GERD and the correlation between the severity of sleep disorders and pHmetric parameters in these patients. We studied prospectively 50 patients with esophageal and supra-esophageal symptoms of GERD. 24-hour esophageal pH monitoring examination was performed in all patients. Standard survey was applied to determine the frequency and the severity of sleep disorders in these patients. We included 50 patients (10 men, 40 women), mean age 43.7 years (18-70). Nighttime symptoms were present in 26 patients (52%). Pathological acid gastro-esophageal reflux was diagnosed by 24-hour esophageal pH recording in 18 patients (36%), with nocturnal acid reflux in 19 patients (38%). Sleep disorders were reported by 29 patients (58%). Mean number of hours of sleep was 6.8 hours by night (4-9 hours). Clinical factors associated with higher frequency of sleep disorders were occurrence of nighttime symptoms (p numbers of reflux episodes, number of episodes longest than five minutes, duration of longest reflux episode and DeMeester score (respectively 6.1 +/- 8.8 vs 1.3 +/- 1.5 p = 0.01; 59.2 +/- 52.0 vs 20.7 +/- 21.6 p = 0.001; 3.1 +/- 6.1 vs 0.1 +/- 0.3 p = 0.03; 8.9 +/- 9.3 minutes vs 3.4 +/- 4.0 minutes p = 0.01; 24.0 +/- 33.2 vs 4.8 +/- 4.9 p = 0.01). Number of hours of sleep was significantly lower in patients with pathological acid reflux (5.3 +/- 1.2 hours vs 7.6 +/- 1.7 hours, p hours vs 7.8 +/- 1.5 hours, p Number of hours of sleep was strongly correlated with esophageal pH parameters Sleep disorders are frequent in patients with GERD symptoms. Severity of sleep disorders are strongly correlated with severity of global and nocturnal acid reflux as attested by 24-hour

  19. The Effect of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy with Concomitant Hiatal Hernia Repair on Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in the Morbidly Obese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samakar, Kamran; McKenzie, Travis J; Tavakkoli, Ali; Vernon, Ashley H; Robinson, Malcolm K; Shikora, Scott A

    2016-01-01

    The effect of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) on gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is controversial. Although concomitant hiatal hernia repair (HHR) at the time of LSG is common and advocated by many, there are few data on the outcomes of GERD symptoms in these patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of concomitant HHR on GERD symptoms in morbidly obese patients undergoing LSG. A single institution, multi-surgeon, prospectively maintained database was examined to identify patients who underwent LSG and concomitant HHR from December 2010 to October 2013. Patient characteristics, operative details, and postoperative outcomes were analyzed. Standardized patient questionnaires administered both pre- and postoperatively were utilized. Primary endpoints included subjective reflux symptoms and the need for antisecretory therapy. Weight loss was considered a secondary endpoint. Fifty-eight patients were identified meeting inclusion criteria (LSG + HHR), with a mean follow-up of 97.5 weeks (range 44-172 weeks). The mean age of the cohort was 49.5 ± 11.2 years, with 74.1 % being female. Mean preoperative BMI was 44.2 ± 6.6 kg/m(2). Preoperative upper gastrointestinal contrast series was performed in all patients and demonstrated a hiatal hernia in 34.5 % of patients and reflux in 15.5 % of patients. Preoperatively, 44.8 % (n = 26) of patients reported subjective symptoms of reflux and/or required daily antisecretory therapy [Corrected]. After LSG + HHR, 34.6 % of symptomatic patients had resolution of their symptoms off therapy while the rest remained symptomatic and required daily antisecretory therapy; 84.4 % of patients that were asymptomatic preoperatively remained asymptomatic after surgery. New onset reflux symptoms requiring daily antisecretory therapy was seen in 15.6 % of patients who were previously asymptomatic. Post surgical weight loss did not correlate with the presence or resolution of reflux symptoms. Based

  20. Management of gastroesophageal reflux disease and erosive esophagitis in pediatric patients: Focus on delayed-release esomeprazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabet V Guimarães

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Elizabet V Guimarães, Paula VP Guerra, Francisco J PennaDepartment of Pediatrics, Medical School, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, BrazilObjective: To review the literature on the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD with emphasis on proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, particularly on delayed-release esomeprazole, and to identify properties and adverse effects of PPIs observed in the treatment of GERD in children and adolescents.Sources: Electronic search of PubMed/Medline and Cochrane Collaboration databases, and of abstracts on DDW, NASPGHAN, and ESPGHAN. We focused on controlled and randomized studies published since 2000 and identified reviews that presented a consensual position, and directives published within the last 10 years.Main results: PPIs are considered better antisecretory agents than H2-receptor antagonists. Although all PPIs are similar, they are not identical in their pharmacologic properties. For example, the acid-suppressive effect of esomeprazole, the S-isomer of omeprazole, persists for more than 16 hours after administration of the morning dose. Therefore, it can control acidity after night meals better than a single dose of omeprazole. Moreover, the onset of the suppressive effect of esomeprazole is faster. It achieves acid inhibition faster than other PPIs.Conclusion: Currently, the mainstream treatment for GERD in children is a PPI. Although PPIs are safe drugs, effective in healing erosive esophagitis, and in relieving symptoms, studies with esomeprazole have shown that this drug has as powerful an ability to inhibit acid secretion as omeprazole. It also seems that some pharmacologic properties of esomeprazole are actually better for the treatment of GERD.Keywords: gastroesophageal reflux, therapy, child, adolescent.

  1. [Implementation and evaluation of a blended learning course on gastroesophageal reflux disease for physicians in Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Henry; Margolis, Alvaro; González, Nicolás; Martínez, Elisa; Sanguinetti, Alberto; García, Sofía; López, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Integrating evidence-based clinical practice guidelines on gastroesophageal reflux disease into medical practice is of prime importance in Latin America, given its high prevalence in this region. The aim of this project was to implement and assess an educational intervention on gastroesophageal reflux disease, aimed at primary care physicians in Latin America, with contents based on current clinical guidelines. The course included initial activities, whether face-to-face or through distance learning, and a 2-month period of Internet study and interaction. A pilot test was carried out in Uruguay, which was then repeated in 5 countries (Mexico, Colombia, Venezuela, Argentina and again in Uruguay). A global template was designed, which was then adapted to each of the countries: this was done with the participation of local institutions and leaders. Local credits were given for recertification. Participation was free. Of 3,110 physicians invited to participate, 1,143 (36.8%) started the course. Of these, 587 (51.4%) accessed at least half the contents of the course and 785 (68.7%) took part in the clinical discussions. A total of 338 (29.6%) completed all the requirements of the course and received a certificate. Among physicians who took both the pre- and post-intervention knowledge tests, scores improved from 60 to 80% (Peducation course was successfully imparted in Latin America, with an overall design that was adapted to each country. Determination of specific needs and the participation of national experts were fundamental to the success of the course. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  2. Is there a role for dynamic swallowing MRI in the assessment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and oesophageal motility disorders?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulinna-Cosentini, Christiane; Koelblinger, C.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Weber, M.; Kleinhansl, P. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Radiology, Vienna (Austria); Schima, W. [Abteilung fuer Radiologie und bildgebende Diagnostik, KH Goettlicher Heiland, Vienna (Austria); Lenglinger, J.; Riegler, M.; Cosentini, E.P. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria); Bischof, G. [Hospital St. Josef, Department of Surgery, Vienna (Austria)

    2012-02-15

    To evaluate the diagnostic value of dynamic MRI swallowing in patients with symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). Thirty-seven patients (17 m/20f) with typical signs of GERD underwent MR swallowing in the supine position at 1.5 T with a phased-array body coil. Using dynamic, gradient echo sequences (B-FFE) in the coronal, sagittal and axial planes, the bolus passages of buttermilk spiked with gadolinium chelate were tracked. MRI, pH-metry and manometry were performed within 31 days and results were compared. MRI results were concordant with pH-metry in 82% (23/28) of patients diagnosed with abnormal oesophageal acid exposure by pH-metry. Five patients demonstrated typical symptoms of GERD and had positive findings with pH monitoring, but false negative results with MRI. In four of six patients (67%), there was a correct diagnosis of oesophageal motility disorder, according to manometric criteria, on dynamic MRI. The overall accuracy of MRI diagnoses was 79% (27/34). A statistically significant difference was found between the size of hiatal hernia, grade of reflux in MRI, and abnormal acid exposure on pH-monitoring. MR fluoroscopy may be a promising radiation-free tool in assessing the functionality and morphology of the GE junction. (orig.)

  3. Association between Body Mass Index and Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms in Nepalese Adult Population. A Single Centered Hospital Based Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhilesh Kumar Kasyap

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common disorder, and studies have reported inconsistent association between high BMI and its elevated risk of GERD symptoms. The aim of the present study was to estimate the strength of the association between body mass index and reflux symptoms in Nepalese adults.Materials & Methods: This was a cross-sectional study conducted at National Academy of Medical Science, Bir Hospital, Kathmandu, Nepal. All patients of age 18 years or above who underwent endoscopy and diagnosed to have esophagitis were recruited for the analysis. Symptoms were identified by using a self-administered validated questionnaire regarding GERD that identify the onset for GERD symptoms and grade the frequency and severity of symptoms experienced over a period of one year. BMI data, the cut off points were based on the WHO classification of overweight and obesity. A BMI value ?25–30 represents overweight and BMI >30 indicates obesity. A BMI value <25 is considered as normal. Severity of erosive esophagitis was graded according to the Los Angeles classification.Results: The Among 127 enrolled esophagitis subjects, about 43% were under 20 BMI, 43% overweight and about 24% were obese. Obesity measured by BMI revealed no significant association among age, sex, smoker, alcoholics, hernia and severity grade of esophagitis (p>0.05. Ages with various categories (18-40, >40-60,>60 were significantly associated with the GERD symptoms (P=0.021. We categorize BMI in three categories. A BMI value < 25 (normal, ?25–30 (overweight, and BMI >30 (obesity. Categorical analysis of BMI with GERD symptoms confirmed the absence of any tendency towards an association (p>0.05.Conclusion: The tendency of reflux symptoms towards BMI is null, and weight reduction may not be the adequate justifiable for the symptoms therapy.JCMS Nepal. 2015; 11(2:23-26

  4. Do pediatricians apply the 2009 NASPGHAN-ESPGHAN guidelines for the diagnosis and management of gastroesophageal reflux after being trained?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quitadamo, Paolo; Urbonas, Vaidotas; Papadopoulou, Alexandra; Roman, Enriqueta; Pavkov, Danijela J; Orel, Rok; Dias, Jorge A; Kostovski, Aco; Miele, Erasmo; Villani, Alberto; Staiano, Annamaria

    2014-09-01

    According to a recent survey, the 2009 North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition-European Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition gastroesophageal reflux guidelines are poorly adhered to by European primary care pediatricians. The main issue raised from the survey was the prescription of unnecessary acid suppressive medications, especially in infants. No inquiry into the reasons was made. The primary objective of the present study was to assess the applicability of the guidelines in European primary care pediatricians undergoing specific trainings. One hundred pediatricians involved in the previous survey agreed to participate and were randomly divided into 2 groups: one group was trained in the guidelines through an online podcast and the other group was trained through a synopsis. During the following 3 months, each involved pediatrician was asked to enroll every consecutive infant, child, or adolescent with suggestive reflux symptoms. For every enrolled patient, pediatricians filled in a report concerning their diagnostic and therapeutic choices. A total of 382 patients (boys/girls 186/196, infants/children/adolescents 194/123/65) were enrolled by pediatricians. Infants with unexplained crying and/or distressed behavior who were prescribed proton-pump inhibitors were 3.7% compared with 45.2% of the survey data obtained before the training (P Infants with uncomplicated recurrent regurgitation and vomiting who were prescribed proton-pump inhibitors were 4.5% against 37.1% of the baseline survey data (P managed in full compliance with the guidelines was 46.1% after the training compared with 1.8% before the training (P reflux guidelines have good applicability, despite that they are presently poorly adhered to by European primary care pediatricians. Simple, inexpensive trainings were proven to be effective in increasing adherence by pediatricians. The increase in compliance clearly favors the

  5. Alginate antacid (Gaviscon DA) chewable tablets reduce esophageal acid exposure in Chinese patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease and heartburn symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yao Zong; Fang, Jing Yuan; Zou, Duo Wu; Levinson, Nigel; Jenner, Bartosz; Wilkinson, Joanne

    2016-11-01

    To assess the efficacy of Gaviscon Double Action (DA) alginate antacid chewable tablets for reducing esophageal acid exposure in Chinese patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Altogether 44 patients reporting moderate to severe heartburn symptoms underwent two pH monitoring visits. The treatment sequence was randomized to patients received DA alginate antacid or placebo at one visit and the alternate treatment 7 days later. After a standardized reflux-provoking meal, patients took four tablets of DA alginate antacid or placebo. Esophageal pH was measured for 4 h post-dosing using an electrode positioned 5 cm above the lower esophageal sphincter. The primary end-point was the percentage of 4-h post-dosing period with pH pH pH <4 was 5.1%, significantly less (P = 0.0003) than with placebo (14.8%). DA alginate antacid was statistically significantly superior (P = 0.0290) to placebo (from at least twofold to threefold better) for all other end-points. Two patients reported two mild adverse events (AEs) that resolved within a month of completing the study. No patients had serious and/or severe AEs and none withdrew due to AEs. DA alginate antacid was statistically significantly superior to placebo in reducing post-prandial acid exposure without serious clinically relevant health risks. These findings suggest DA alginate antacid tablets are appropriate for treating acid reflux in Chinese GERD patients with heartburn symptoms. © 2016 Chinese Medical Association Shanghai Branch, Chinese Society of Gastroenterology, Renji Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Lack of differential pattern in central adiposity and metabolic syndrome in Barrett's esophagus and gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, L A

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is an established risk factor for esophageal adenocarcinoma, although the mechanism is unclear. A pathway from reflux to inflammation through metaplasia is the dominant hypothesis, and an added role relating to visceral adiposity and the metabolic syndrome has been mooted in Barrett\\'s esophagus (BE) patients. Whether BE differs from gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in obesity and metabolic syndrome profiles is unclear, and this was the focus of this study. Patients with proven BE or GERD were randomly selected from the unit data registry and invited to attend for metabolic syndrome screening, anthropometry studies including segmental body composition analysis, and laboratory tests including fasting lipids, insulin, and C-reactive protein. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) criteria. One hundred and eighteen BE patients and 113 age- and sex-matched GERD controls were studied. The incidence of obesity (body mass index >30 kg\\/m(2)) was 36% and 38%, respectively, with the pattern of fat deposition predominantly central and an estimated trunk fat mass of 13 and 14 kg, respectively. Using the NCEP criteria, metabolic syndrome was significantly more common in the BE cohort (30% vs 20%, P < 0.05), but there was no significant difference using IDF criteria (42% vs 37%, P= 0.340). Central obesity and the metabolic syndrome are common in both Barrett\\'s and GERD cohorts, but not significantly different, suggesting that central obesity and the metabolic syndrome does not per se impact on the development of BE in a reflux population. In BE, the importance of obesity and the metabolic syndrome in disease progression merits further study.

  7. Efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pantoprazole magnesium in the treatment of reflux symptoms in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD): a prospective, multicenter, post-marketing observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remes-Troche, José María; Sobrino-Cossío, Sergio; Soto-Pérez, Julio César; Teramoto-Matsubara, Oscar; Morales-Arámbula, Miguel; Orozco-Gamiz, Antonio; Tamayo de la Cuesta, José Luis; Mateos, Gualberto

    2014-02-01

    To improve proton pump inhibitor effects, pharmacological modifications have been developed such as the use of enantiomer molecules (e.g., S-omeprazole, S-pantoprazole, or dexlansoprazole), or addition of NaHCO3 (for an immediate release) or magnesium (with a lower absorption for a more sustained effect). The objective of this study was to assess the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of pantoprazole magnesium 40 mg once daily for 4 weeks, on the relief of reflux symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) patients. A phase IV, open-label, prospective, multicenter study was designed. Patients included were prescribed pantoprazole magnesium 40 mg orally once daily for 28±2 days. All patients had a history of persistent or recurrent heartburn and/or acid regurgitation for at least 3 months. Effectiveness and tolerability data obtained from patients who completed a minimum of 4 weeks of pantoprazole magnesium treatment were considered for analysis. The account of baseline characteristics and demographics of GERD symptom intensity was made by analyzing the group of 4,343 patients that fulfilled all inclusion criteria; 54% were females (n=2,345) and 46% (n=1,998) males, with a mean age of 36.2±7.5 years. Severity of symptoms, assessed by the physician using the 4-point Likert scale, reduced by at least 80% from baseline intensity after treatment in the per protocol population. In the case of the intention-to-treat population, the improvement in symptom intensity was 73%. The number of patients that experienced any adverse events was 175/5,027 (3.48%). Pantoprazole magnesium is a safe, effective, and well-tolerated drug that significantly improves GERD symptoms.

  8. Psychometric validation of the Dutch translation of the quality of life in reflux and dyspepsia (QOLRAD questionnaire in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engels Leopold GJB

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD questionnaire is one of the best-characterized disease-specific instruments that captures health-related problems and symptom-patterns in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. This paper reports the psychometric validation of a Dutch translation of the QOLRAD questionnaire in gastroenterology outpatients with GERD. Methods Patients completed the QOLRAD questionnaire at visit 1 (baseline, visit 2 (after 2, 4 or 8 weeks of acute treatment with esomeprazole 40 mg once daily, and visit 4 (after 6 months with on-demand esomeprazole 40 mg once daily or continuous esomeprazole 20 mg once daily. Symptoms were assessed at each visit, and patient satisfaction was assessed at visits 2 and 4. Results Of the 1166 patients entered in the study, 97.3% had moderate or severe heartburn and 55.5% had moderate or severe regurgitation at baseline. At visit 2, symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation were mild or absent in 96.7% and 97.7%, respectively, and 95.3% of patients reported being satisfied with the treatment. The internal consistency and reliability of the QOLRAD questionnaire (range: 0.83-0.92 supported construct validity. Convergent validity was moderate to low. Known-groups validity was confirmed by a negative correlation between the QOLRAD score and clinician-assessed severity of GERD symptoms. Effect sizes (1.15-1.93 and standardized response means (1.17-1.86 showed good responsiveness to change. GERD symptoms had a negative impact on patients' lives. Conclusions The psychometric characteristics of the Dutch translation of the QOLRAD questionnaire were found to be satisfactory, with good reliability and responsiveness to change, although convergent validity was at best moderate.

  9. Efficacy and Safety of a Natural Remedy for the Treatment of Gastroesophageal Reflux: A Double-Blinded Randomized-Controlled Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umberto Alecci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux (GER is a common, chronic, relapsing symptom. Often people self-diagnose and self-treat it even though health-related quality of life is significantly impaired. In the lack of a valid alternative approach, current treatments focus on suppression of gastric acid secretion by the use of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs, but people with GER have a significantly lower response rate to therapy. We designed a randomized double-blinded controlled clinical study to evaluate the efficacy and the safety of a formulation based on sodium alginate/bicarbonate in combination with extracts obtained from Opuntia ficus-indica and Olea europaea associated with polyphenols (Mucosave®; verum, on GER-related symptoms. Male/female 118 (intention to treat subjects with moderate GER and having at least 2 to 6 days of GER episodes/week were treated with verum (6 g/day or placebo for two months. The questionnaires Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease-Health-Related Quality of Life (GERD-HRQoL and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptom Assessment Scale (GSAS were self-administered by participants before the treatment and at the end of the treatment. Verum produced statistically significant reduction of GERD-HRQoL and GSAS scores, −56.5% and −59.1%, respectively, in comparison to placebo. Heartburn and acid regurgitation episodes for week were significantly reduced by verum (p<0.01. Results indicate that Mucosave formulation provides an effective and well-tolerated treatment for reducing the frequency and intensity of symptoms associated with gastroesophageal reflux.

  10. GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH FUNCTIONAL DYSPEPSIA AND CONSTIPATION PREDOMINANT IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: CLINICAL FEATURES AND EFFICACY OF LACTULOSE AND ITOPRIDE HYDROCHLORIDE

    OpenAIRE

    O. V. Krapivnaya; S. A. Alekseenko

    2014-01-01

    Background: The frequent coexistence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with functional dyspepsia (FD) and an irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) has been described in the literature. Aim: To study the specific features of GERD clinical course and diagnosis in patients with GERD in combination with FD and constipation predominant IBS (IBS-C) in comparison to patients with isolated GERD; to assess the efficacy of lactulose and itopride hydrochloride. Materials and methods: A total of 60 pati...

  11. [Feeding disorders, ALTE syndrome, Sandifer syndrome and gastroesophageal reflux disease in the course of food hypersensitivity in 8-month old infant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwańczak, Barbara; Mowszet, Krystyna; Iwańczak, Franciszek

    2010-07-01

    This paper describes the occurrence of feeding disorders, atopic dermatitis, life-threatening symptoms, Sandifer syndrome, and gastroesophageal reflux disease in 8-month old infant in the course of food hypersensitivity. Used in the treatment of cow's milk protein hydrolysates with a considerable degree of hydrolysis, omeprazole, Cisapride. It was not until the introduction of elemental diet based on free amino acids resulted in the withdrawal of life-threatening child's symptoms.

  12. Self-Reported Sleep Bruxism and Nocturnal Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Relationship to Gender and Ethnicity§

    OpenAIRE

    Hesselbacher, Sean; Subramanian, Shyam; Rao, Shweta; Casturi, Lata; Surani, Salim

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives : Nocturnal bruxism is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and GERD is strongly associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Gender and ethnic differences in the prevalence and clinical presentation of these often overlapping sleep disorders have not been well documented. Our aim was to examine the associations between, and the symptoms associated with, nocturnal GERD and sleep bruxism in patients with OSA, and to examine the influence of gender and ethn...

  13. Comparison of the Carlsson-Dent and GERD-Q questionnaires for gastroesophageal reflux disease symptom detection in a general population

    OpenAIRE

    R. Contreras-Omaña; O. Sánchez-Reyes; E. Ángeles-Granados

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is an extremely common pathology in the general population and one of the main reasons for consultation in gastroenterology. There are different instruments for detecting its symptoms, but few studies comparing one tool with another have been conducted in Mexico. Aims: To compare the effectiveness of the Carlsson-Dent questionnaire (CDQ) and the GERD-Q questionnaire (GQQ) in detecting GERD symptoms in a general population. Materials a...

  14. Prevalence and risk factors for gastroesophageal reflux disease in an impoverished minority population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedenberg, Frank K; Rai, Jitha; Vanar, Vishwas; Bongiorno, Charles; Nelson, Deborah B; Parepally, Mayur; Poonia, Arashdeep; Sharma, Amol; Gohel, Shaun; Richter, Joel E

    2010-10-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: An epidemiological link between an increased body mass index and complaints of typical heartburn symptoms has been identified. It appears that increasing waist circumference, rather than overall weight is most important. Studies to date have not included minority, impoverished communities. Our aim was to determine the impact of obesity on the prevalence of reflux disease in an impoverished community while controlling for known confounders. METHODS: DESIGN Cross-sectional survey delivered by in-home interviews, convenience sampling, and targeted mailing. Data queried include demographics, medical history, lifestyle habits, and symptoms of reflux disease. Height, weight, hip and waist circumference measured in participating subjects. PARTICIPANTS: 503 subjects living in the zip code immediately surrounding Temple University Hospital. Included only adults living in the hospital's zip code for at least 3 years. RESULTS: The highest quartile of waist circumference (≥42 in.) demonstrated a strong association with GERD (AOR = 2.15; 95% CI 1.18-3.90). Smoking increased the odds by 1.72 (95% CI 1.13-2.62). There was no relationship between body mass index, waist-hip ratio, or diet and reflux classification. CONCLUSIONS: Increasing waist circumference, but not overall body mass index or waist-hip ratio, and smoking are risk factors for prevalent GERD. No association between reflux disease and lifestyle choices such as coffee drinking and fast food dining were found. LIMITATIONS: Potential for recall bias and disease misclassification. Possible methodological errors in self-measurement of waist and hip circumference.

  15. Combination therapy versus monotherapy for gastroesophageal reflux in children with difficult-to-treat bronchial asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Salah Bediwy

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Combination of domperidone and esomeprazole was more effective in improving the endoscopic reflux score, childhood-asthma control test (C-ACT and FEV1 (% of predicted and significantly reduced the sputum SP than the use of esomeprazole only in children with difficult-to-treat asthma.

  16. A population-based survey to assess troublesome symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Christina; Bytzer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    A simple frequency and severity threshold for categorizing reflux symptoms as troublesome has been suggested, but there is a lack of confirmatory studies for this threshold. The objectives of this study were to examine the characteristics for troublesome symptoms and to compare different ways of categorizing reflux symptoms as troublesome. Members of a web panel responding to an e-mail invitation (1623/3506, median age interval 40-44 years, 51% female) who reported reflux symptoms during the preceding 4 weeks (n=1284) were linked to the full questionnaire. Associations between self-reported troublesome symptoms (10-graded VAS) and troublesome symptoms (mild symptoms >1 day/week or moderate/severe symptoms > or = 1 day/week) and clinical characteristics were analyzed. Out of 1284 subjects, 482 (38%) reported reflux symptoms. Agreement on the classification of troublesome symptoms based on frequency and severity and self-reported troublesome symptoms was poor to fair. Using 4 as the cut-off point on the VAS showed the best agreement (kappa = 0.35). Of the 482 symptomatic respondents, 266 (55%) had troublesome symptoms based on frequency and severity and 274 (57%) had self-reported troublesome symptoms. Subjects (n=80) who had self-reported troublesome symptoms, but were not categorized as having troublesome symptoms based on frequency and severity, reported health concerns, work productivity loss and medical treatment significantly more often (p< or =0.03) than subjects (n=194) with troublesome symptoms according to both categorizations. Classification of troublesome reflux symptoms based on frequency and severity is too simplistic. Health concerns, disrupted work productivity and night-time symptoms add to the perception of symptoms as troublesome.

  17. Association of radiographic morphology with early gastroesophageal reflux disease and satiety control after sleeve gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro, Juan P; Lin, Edward; Patel, Ankit D; Davis, S Scott; Sanni, Aliu; Urrego, Hernan D; Sweeney, John F; Srinivasan, Jahnavi K; Small, William; Mittal, Pardeep; Sekhar, Aarti; Moreno, Courtney C

    2014-09-01

    Variable gastric morphology has been identified on routine upper gastrointestinal series after laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy. This test might give us useful information beyond the presence of leak and obstruction. The aim of this study is to standardize a morphologic classification of gastric sleeve based on water-soluble contrast upper gastrointestinal series, and to determine possible clinical implications. One hundred morbidly obese patients underwent laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy and had routine upper gastrointestinal on postoperative day 1 or 2. Images were reviewed by 4 radiologists who were blinded to outcomes, and sleeve shape was classified as upper pouch, lower pouch, tubular, or dumbbell. Inter-observer agreement was calculated. Clinical outcomes including weight loss, satiety control, and reflux symptoms were recorded. Comparisons were determined by 1-way ANOVA and t-test. Mean age was 46 ± 12 years and mean BMI was 45.1 ± 6 kg/m(2). Overall inter-observer agreement level for the sleeve shape classification was 76.3%. Sleeve shapes were tubular in 37%, dumbbell in 32%, lower pouch in 22%, and upper pouch in 8%. Mean excess body weight loss at 1, 3, and 6 months was 16.8%, 29.9%, and 39.1%, respectively. Excess body weight loss was not associated with sleeve shape. Mean hunger score was 213 ± 97, and patients with dumbbell shape had higher hunger scores (p = 0.003). Mean reflux score was 5.7 ± 8. Upper pouch shape was associated with greater severity of reflux symptoms (p = 0.02). This study suggests a standardized radiographic classification of gastric sleeve morphology. Although sleeve shape is not correlated with weight loss, gastric sleeves with retained fundus result in lower satiety control and higher severity of reflux symptoms. An adequate resection of the gastric fundus might avoid this potential complication. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux in Cats During Anesthesia and Effect of Omeprazole on Gastric pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, R S; Belafsky, P C; Della Maggiore, A; Osborn, J M; Pypendop, B H; Pierce, T; Walker, V J; Fulton, A; Marks, S L

    2017-05-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is poorly characterized in anesthetized cats, but can cause aspiration pneumonia, esophagitis, and esophageal stricture formation. To determine whether pre-anesthetic orally administered omeprazole increases gastric and esophageal pH and increases serum gastrin concentrations in anesthetized cats, and to determine the prevalence of GER using combined multichannel impedance and pH monitoring. Twenty-seven healthy cats undergoing elective dental procedures. Prospective, double-masked, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. Cats were randomized to receive 2 PO doses of omeprazole (1.45-2.20 mg/kg) or an empty gelatin capsule placebo 18-24 hours and 4 hours before anesthetic induction. Blood for measurement of serum gastrin concentration was collected during anesthetic induction. An esophageal pH/impedance catheter was utilized to continuously measure esophageal pH and detect GER throughout anesthesia. Mean gastric pH in the cats that received omeprazole was 7.2 ± 0.4 (range, 6.6-7.8) and was significantly higher than the pH in cats that received the placebo 2.8 ± 1.0 (range, 1.3-4.1; P Omeprazole administration was not associated with a significant increase in serum gastrin concentration (P = .616). Nine of 27 cats (33.3%) had ≥1 episode of GER during anesthesia. Pre-anesthetic administration of 2 PO doses of omeprazole at a dosage of 1.45-2.20 mg/kg in cats was associated with a significant increase in gastric and esophageal pH within 24 hours, but was not associated with a significant increase in serum gastrin concentration. Prevalence of reflux events in cats during anesthesia was similar to that of dogs during anesthesia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  19. Effect of Aloe Vera and Pantoprazole on Gastroesophageal Reflux Symptoms in Mustard Gas Victims: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunes Panahi, Jafar Aslani, Ali Hajihashemi, Mahdieh Kalkhorani, Mostafa Ghanei, Amirhossein Sahebkar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common complaint of sulphur mustard (SM-exposed subjects. Routine treatments such as proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs, H2-blockers and anti-acids cannot control GERD symptoms completely. Aloe vera is a medicinal plant that has been shown to reduce gastric acid secretion. The efficacy of pantoprazole with or without A. Vera juice in alleviating GERD symptoms was investigated in SM-exposed subjects. Methods: Male patients with a history of SM exposure and diagnosed GERD were enrolled and assigned to treatment with pantoprazole (40 mg before breakfast plus A. vera syrup (5 mL bid before breakfast and at bedtime (n=44, or pantoprazole alone (40 mg before breakfast (n=41 for a period of 6 weeks. GERD symptoms were assessed at baseline and weeks 3 and 6 of study using the Reflux Symptom Index (RSI questionnaire. Results: Seventy-five patients (n=38 and 37 in the A. vera + pantoprazloe and pantoprazole group, respectively completed the study. No significant difference was found between the groups regarding demographic characteristics and baseline RSI score (p>0.05. A decreasing trend in RSI score was observed in both groups by the 3rd and 6th week of study (p<0.001. There was a greater reduction of RSI score in the A. vera + pantoprazloe versus pantoprazole group (p<0.001. There was no report of any side effects from A. vera during the course of trial. Conclusion: Findings of the present study suggested a significant improvement in the severity of GERD symptoms in SM-exposed subjects following addition of A. Vera to pantoprazole.

  20. Alginic acid decreases postprandial upright gastroesophageal reflux. Comparison with equal-strength antacid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castell, D O; Dalton, C B; Becker, D; Sinclair, J; Castell, J A

    1992-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that (alginic) acid may have a preferential effect on reflux in the upright position. We evaluated the effect of a compound containing alginic acid plus antacid (extra-strength Gaviscon) versus active control antacid with equal acid-neutralizing capacity on intraesophageal acid exposure following a high-fat meal (61% fat: sausage, egg, and biscuit). In random sequence, each of the 10 volunteers received either alginic acid-antacid or control antacid immediately following and 1, 2, and 3 hr after the meal. The sequence was repeated for both test drugs in the supine and upright positions with constant pH monitoring. Alginic acid-antacid significantly decreased postprandial reflux in the upright position compared to an equal amount of antacid. This effect did not occur in the supine position. These findings support the hypothesis that alginic acid is primarily effective in the upright position and the clinical observations of the effectiveness of alginic acid on daytime reflux symptoms.

  1. De novo deletion of HOXB gene cluster in a patient with failure to thrive, developmental delay, gastroesophageal reflux and bronchiectasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajusalu, Sander; Reimand, Tiia; Uibo, Oivi; Vasar, Maire; Talvik, Inga; Zilina, Olga; Tammur, Pille; Õunap, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    We report a female patient with a complex phenotype consisting of failure to thrive, developmental delay, congenital bronchiectasis, gastroesophageal reflux and bilateral inguinal hernias. Chromosomal microarray analysis revealed a 230 kilobase deletion in chromosomal region 17q21.32 (arr[hg19] 17q21.32(46 550 362-46 784 039)×1) encompassing only 9 genes - HOXB1 to HOXB9. The deletion was not found in her mother or father. This is the first report of a patient with a HOXB gene cluster deletion involving only HOXB1 to HOXB9 genes. By comparing our case to previously reported five patients with larger chromosomal aberrations involving the HOXB gene cluster, we can suppose that HOXB gene cluster deletions are responsible for growth retardation, developmental delay, and specific facial dysmorphic features. Also, we suppose that bilateral inguinal hernias, tracheo-esophageal abnormalities, and lung malformations represent features with incomplete penetrance. Interestingly, previously published knock-out mice with targeted heterozygous deletion comparable to our patient did not show phenotypic alterations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease using radiofrequency ablation (Stretta procedure): An interim analysis of a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalapala, Rakesh; Shah, Harshal; Nabi, Zaheer; Darisetty, Santosh; Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Nageshwar Reddy, D

    2017-09-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is the most common chronic gastrointestinal disorder, affecting one third of the population worldwide. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in Stretta therapy in view of potential long-term side effects of PPIs and the durability of relief with fundoplication. Prospective randomized study comparing the Stretta treatment with controls receiving PPIs. Patient (> 18 years, n = 20) with symptoms of heartburn, regurgitation, abnormal esophageal acid exposure (≥ 4%), and endoscopically confirmed esophagitis were included into the study. The primary measure was improvement in quality of life (QOL) and decrease in the frequency and severity of GERD symptoms. The mean age of the patients was 39 (± 15) years and controls were 34 (± 11) years. Three months after Stretta, 80% reported improvement in QOL compared to 40% in the control group. At the end of 3 months, significant (p < 0.05) improvement in GERD symptom score for heartburn, regurgitation, chest pain, and cough compared with the control group was observed. After Stretta treatment, 60% of the patients were free of PPIs whereas there was no change in the control group. Almost 80% of the patients on Stretta treatment were satisfied with the treatment compared to 30% of the patients in the control group. Stretta was effective in the short-term for the management of GERD.

  3. "The missing LINX" for gastroesophageal reflux disease: Operative techniques video for the Linx magnetic sphincter augmentation procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuckelman, John P; Barron, Morgan R; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-05-01

    In 2012 the FDA approved a magnetic sphincter augmentation (MSA) device (LINX, Torax Medical, Inc) for placement around the lower esophageal sphincter as an alternative approach to fundoplication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). This is a relatively new procedure and there is not widespread familiarization with the standard indications and techniques of device placement. We present two operative videos to highlight the standard surgical technique and technical points needed for successful LINX placement. First will be placement in a standard indications setting of uncomplicated GERD with no hiatal hernia. Second will be placement with complicated anatomy due to alterations from prior gastric surgery and a hiatal hernia. Our experience has revealed that the LINX device can be placed safely in patients with normal or significantly altered anatomy but requires adherence to several key principles and technical points. This procedure offers a new option that is anatomically and physiologically unique compared to standard fundoplication, and that offers highly effective control of GERD with a less invasive approach. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Psychological factors influence the gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and their effect on quality of life among firefighters in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seung-Ho; Ryu, Han-Seung; Choi, Suck-Chei; Lee, Sang-Yeol

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine psychosocial factors related to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and their effects on quality of life (QOL) in firefighters. Data were collected from 1217 firefighters in a Korean province. We measured psychological symptoms using the scale. In order to observe the influence of the high-risk group on occupational stress, we conduct logistic multiple linear regression. The correlation between psychological factors and QOL was also analyzed and performed a hierarchical regression analysis. GERD was observed in 32.2% of subjects. Subjects with GERD showed higher depressive symptom, anxiety and occupational stress scores, and lower self-esteem and QOL scores relative to those observed in GERD - negative subject. GERD risk was higher for the following occupational stress subcategories: job demand, lack of reward, interpersonal conflict, and occupational climate. The stepwise regression analysis showed that depressive symptoms, occupational stress, self-esteem, and anxiety were the best predictors of QOL. The results suggest that psychological and medical approaches should be combined in GERD assessment.

  5. The effect of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy with or without hiatal hernia repair on gastroesophageal reflux disease in obese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santonicola, Antonella; Angrisani, Luigi; Cutolo, Pierpaolo; Formisano, Giampaolo; Iovino, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), which is often associated with the presence of a hiatal hernia (HH). Despite increasing popularity of laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) in bariatric surgery, its effect on GERD is still unclear. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of LSG with or without hiatal hernia repair (HHR) on GERD in obese patients. Seventy-eight patients with HH underwent LSG with concomitant HHR (LSG+HHR group). Their data were compared with that of 102 patients without HH, who underwent only LSG (LSG-group). All patients underwent a standardized questionnaire, a double-contrast barium swallow, and an upper-gastrointestinal endoscopy before the surgical procedure and at least 6 months later. At baseline, the prevalence of GERD symptoms and their frequency-intensity scores did not differ between groups. At follow up, there was a significant decrease in the prevalence of typical GERD symptoms only in the LSG-group (P = .003). LSG+HHR patients showed a significantly higher heartburn frequency-intensity score compared with LSG patients (P = .009). This finding confirms that LSG has a beneficial effect on relieving GERD symptoms, although the underlying mechanisms are still unclear; conversely, the procedure of HHR did not produce any improvement in GERD symptoms. © 2013 American Society for Bariatric Surgery Published by American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery All rights reserved.

  6. An epidemiological study of gastroesophageal reflux disease and related risk factors in urban population of mashhad, iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vossoughinia, Hassan; Salari, Masoumeh; Mokhtari Amirmajdi, Elham; Saadatnia, Hassan; Abedini, Siavash; Shariati, Alireza; Shariati, Mohammadjavad; Khosravi Khorashad, Ahmad

    2014-12-01

    Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is a chronic and common disease, which is characterized by heartburn and regurgitation. In the last couple of decades, GERD has received much attention and studies have shown an increase in its prevalence. Although there have been a few studies on the prevalence of GERD in Iran, no study has yet been done in the northeastern part of the country. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of GERD and its risk factors in a population from Mashhad. To evaluate the epidemiology of GERD based on a population study in Mashhad. This was a cross sectional descriptive study conducted in 2010. In total, 2500 participants were selected based on cluster sampling. Modified and validated Mayo Clinic questionnaire for GERD was used for data collection. Overall, 1685 questionnaires were retrieved. Fifty-one participants were excluded because of pregnancies, history of abdominal surgery and being less than 18 years old. We analyzed data using the SPSS software version 16. Prevalence of GERD and significant risk factors (P value prevalence of GERD among people living in Mashhad was above the average prevalence in other cities of Iran. However, risk factors seemed to be similar to those reported by other studies.

  7. Gastroesophageal Reflux and Body Movement in Infants: Investigations with Combined Impedance-pH and Synchronized Video Recording

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias G. Wenzl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to investigate the temporal association of gastroesophageal reflux (GER and body movement in infants. GER were registered by combined impedance-pH, documentation of body movement was done by video. Videorecording time (Vt was divided into “resting time” and “movement time” and analyzed for occurrence of GER. Association was defined as movement 1 minute before/after the beginning of a GER. Statistical evaluation was by Fisher's exact test. In 15 infants, 341 GER were documented during Vt (86 hours. 336 GER (99% were associated with movement, only 5 episodes (1% occured during resting time. Movement was significantly associated with the occurrence of GER (<.0001. There is a strong temporal association between GER and body movement in infants. However, a clear distinction between cause and effect could not be made with the chosen study design. Combined impedance-pH has proven to be the ideal technique for this approach.

  8. A population-based survey to assess troublesome symptoms in gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reimer, Christina; Bytzer, Peter

    2009-01-01

    . Associations between self-reported troublesome symptoms (10-graded VAS) and troublesome symptoms (mild symptoms >1 day/week or moderate/severe symptoms > or = 1 day/week) and clinical characteristics were analyzed. RESULTS: Out of 1284 subjects, 482 (38%) reported reflux symptoms. Agreement...... on the classification of troublesome symptoms based on frequency and severity and self-reported troublesome symptoms was poor to fair. Using 4 as the cut-off point on the VAS showed the best agreement (kappa = 0.35). Of the 482 symptomatic respondents, 266 (55%) had troublesome symptoms based on frequency and severity...

  9. Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease Doença do refluxo gastroesofágico refratária

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Prado P. Moraes-Filho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a condition which develops when the reflux of stomach contents causes troublesome symptoms and/or complications. Its pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment have frequently been analyzed but it is interesting to review some aspects of the GERD refractory patients to the proton pump inhibitors treatment. The treatment encompasses behavioral measures and pharmacological therapy. The majority of the patients respond well to proton pump inhibitors treatment but 20%-42% of them may not do so well. Patients who are unresponsible to 4-8 weeks' treatment with proton pump inhibitors (omeprazole, pantoprazole, rabeprazole, lansoprazole, esomeprazole, pantoprazole-Mg might have so-called refractory GERD. RESULTS: In some cases the patients are not real refractory because either they do not have GERD or the disease was not correctly treated, but the term refractory is still employed. Although debatable, the Brazilian GERD Consensus based upon evidences recommends as first step in the diagnosis, the upper digestive endoscopy to exclude the diagnosis of peptic ulcer and cancer and in some cases identify the presence of esophageal mucosa erosions. CONCLUSIONS: The main causes of the so-called refractory GERD are: (1 functional heartburn; (2 low levels of adherence to proton pump inhibitors treatment; (3 inadequate proton pump inhibitors dosage; (4 wrong diagnosis; (5 co-morbidities and pill-induced esophagitis; (6 genotypic differences; (7 nonacid gastroesophageal reflux; (8 autoimmune skin diseases; (9 eosinophilic esophagitis.CONTEXTO: A doença do refluxo gastroesofágico (DRGE é a condição que se desenvolve quando o refluxo do conteúdo gástrico provoca sintomas incômodos e/ou complicações. A fisiopatologia, o diagnóstico e o tratamento da enfermidade têm sido convenientemente estudados, mas é interessante revisar alguns aspectos dos pacientes que são aparentemente refratários, ou seja, n

  10. [The association of asthma and gastroesophageal reflux: strategy of paraclinical studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, P; Mallart-Voisin, A; Wallaert, B; Boudoux, L; Marchandise, X; Steinling, M; Ballester, L; Tonnel, A B

    1985-01-01

    This study was carried out on 104 patients of whom 94 were asthmatic and 10 patients presented with a spasmodic intractable cough; all presented with symptoms evocative of an associated gastro-oesophageal reflux (RGO). The clinical symptoms revealed a nocturnal cough (67%), cough preceeding asthma (46%) and heartburn in 60%. The asthma was severe (type III and IV in 89% of cases), or dependent on corticosteroids (37% of cases). pH monitoring of the oesophagus is the most sensitive examination (88% with positive results) slightly ahead of manometry and scintigraphy (both 81%), these examinations were clearly superior to radiographic examination (49%) and oesophageal fibroscopy (36%). The combination of pH monitoring and of scintigraphy enabled 98% of RGO cases to be identified by their clinical data. Medical treatment with Tagamet, Gaviscon and Primperan (alone or in combination) produced an improvement in the respiratory symptoms in 50% of the cases. Of the 14 surgically treated, 7 obtained an improvement in their respiratory symptoms. Seven of the ten patients with spasmodic cough were improved by medical treatment. Our study shows the frequency of oesophageal reflux in patients with severe asthma. In half of them RGO intervened as an aggravating factor and the medical treatment of RGO led to a clear improvement in the respiratory symptoms.

  11. Hill classification is superior to the axial length of a hiatal hernia for assessment of the mechanical anti-reflux barrier at the gastroesophageal junction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansdotter, Ida; Björ, Ove; Andreasson, Anna; Agreus, Lars; Hellström, Per; Forsberg, Anna; Talley, Nicholas J.; Vieth, Michael; Wallner, Bengt

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: The pathogenesis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is multifactorial, including the mechanical anti-reflux barrier of the gastroesophageal junction. This barrier can be evaluated endoscopically in two ways: by measuring the axial length of any hiatal hernia present or by assessing the gastroesophageal flap valve. The endoscopic measurement of axial length is troublesome because of the physiological dynamics in the area. Grading the gastroesophageal flap valve is easier and has proven reproducible. The aim of the present study was to compare the two endoscopic grading methods with regard to associations with GERD. Patients and methods: Population-based subjects underwent endoscopic examination assessing the axial length of hiatus hernia, the gastroesophageal flap valve using the Hill classification, esophagitis using the Los Angeles (LA) classification, and columnar metaplasia using the Z-line appearance (ZAP) classification. Biopsies were taken from the squamocolumnar junction to assess the presence of intestinal metaplasia. Symptoms were recorded with the validated Abdominal Symptom Questionnaire. GERD was defined according to the Montreal definition. Results: In total, 334 subjects were included in the study and underwent endoscopy; 86 subjects suffered from GERD and 211 presented no symptoms or signs of GERD. Based on logistic regression, the estimated area under the curve statistic (AUC) for Hill (0.65 [95 %CI 0.59 – 0.72]) was higher than the corresponding estimate for the axial length of a hiatal hernia (0.61 [95 %CI 0.54 – 0.68]), although the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.225). Conclusion: From our data, and in terms of association with GERD, the Hill classification was slightly stronger compared to the axial length of a hiatal hernia, but we could not verify that the Hill classification was superior as a predictor. The Hill classification may replace the axial length of a hiatal

  12. [Oesophageal diseases: gastroesophageal reflux disease, Barrett's disease, achalasia and eosinophilic oesophagitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Xavier

    2015-09-01

    The most important novel findings presented on oesophageal disease in DDW 2015 were the following: 1) GERD: a) hypervigilance seems to be a key pathogenic factor in reflux symptoms refractory to PPI; b) post-reflux swallowing-induced peristaltic waves could be an excellent diagnostic criterion for GERD; c) laryngeal pH-metry is not useful in the diagnosis of extra-oesophageal symptoms; d) the recommendation of weight loss adequately recorded in the clinical reports of patients with GERD and obesity or overweight is an excellent quality indicator and is associated with better outcomes. 2) Barrett's oesophagus: a) persistent low-grade dysplasia in more than one endoscopy and a diagnosis of "indefinite for dysplasia" are associated with a high risk of neoplastic progression; b) narrow-band imaging allows areas of dysplasia on Barrett's oesophagus to be identified with high sensitivity and specificity; c) initial endoscopy fails to identify a high percentage of advanced neoplasms in Barrett's oesophagus. Early re-endoscopy should be considered; d) endoscopists specialized in Barret's oesophagus obtain a much higher yield in the diagnosis of advanced lesions. Patients at high risk-men, older patients, smokers and those with long-segment Barrett's oesophagus-could benefit from follow-up in a referral center. 3) Achalasia: POEM seems safe and effective, independently from patient characteristics (age, comorbidity) and the technical variations used. 4) Eosinophilic esophagitis: topical budesonide and exclusion diets are reasonably effective in PPI non-responders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Lifestyle factors affecting gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms: a cross-sectional study of healthy 19864 adults using FSSG scores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamamichi Nobutake

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a very common disorder worldwide, comprised of reflux esophagitis (RE and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD. As more than half of GERD patients are classified into the NERD group, precise evaluation of bothersome epigastric symptoms is essential. Nevertheless, compared with many reports targeting endoscopic reflux esophagitis, large-scale studies focusing on GERD symptoms have been very scarce. Methods To elucidate lifestyle factors affecting GERD symptoms, 19,864 healthy adults in Japan were analyzed. Sub-analyses of 371 proton pump inhibitor (PPI users and 539 histamine H2-receptor antagonist (H2RA users were also performed. Using the FSSG (Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD score as a response variable, 25 lifestyle-related factors were univariately evaluated by Student's t-test or Pearson's correlation coefficient, and were further analyzed with multiple linear regression modelling. Results Average FSSG scores were 4.8 ± 5.2 for total subjects, 9.0 ± 7.3 for PPI users, and 8.2 ± 6.6 for H2RA users. Among the total population, positively correlated factors and standardized coefficients (β for FSSG scores are inadequate sleep (β = 0.158, digestive drug users (β = 0.0972 for PPI, β = 0.0903 for H2RA, and β = 0.104 for others, increased body weight in adulthood (β = 0.081, dinner just before bedtime (β = 0.061, the habit of midnight snack (β = 0.055, lower body mass index (β = 0.054, NSAID users (β = 0.051, female gender (β = 0.048, lack of breakfast (β = 0.045, lack of physical exercise (β = 0.035, younger age (β = 0.033, antihyperglycemic agents non-users (β = 0.026, the habit of quick eating (β = 0.025, alcohol drinking (β = 0.025, history of gastrectomy (β = 0.024, history of cardiovascular disease (β = 0.020, and smoking (β = 0.018. Positively correlated factors for PPI users are female gender (β = 0.198, inadequate sleep (β = 0.150, lack of breakfast

  14. The association between gastroesophageal reflux disease with sleep quality, depression, and anxiety in a cohort study of Australian men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    On, Zhi Xiang; Grant, Janet; Shi, Zumin; Taylor, Anne W; Wittert, Gary A; Tully, Phillip J; Hayley, Amie C; Martin, Sean

    2017-06-01

    Previous clinical studies have demonstrated a relationship between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with anxiety and depression; however, few population-based studies have controlled for sleep disorders. The current study aimed to assess the relationship between GERD and anxiety, depression, and sleep disorders in a community-based sample of Australian men. Participants comprised a subset of 1612 men (mean age: 60.7 years, range: 35-80) who participated in the Men Androgen Inflammation Lifestyle Environment and Stress Study during the years 2001-2012, who had complete GERD measures (Gastresophageal Reflux Disease Questionnaire), and were not taking medications known to impact gastrointestinal function (excluding drugs taken for acid-related disorders). Current depression and anxiety were defined by (i) physician diagnosis, (ii) symptoms of depression (Beck Depression Inventory and Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale) or anxiety (Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7), and/or current depressive or anxiolytic medication use. Previous depression was indicated by past depressive diagnoses/medication use. Data on sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and obstructive sleep apnea were collected along with several health, lifestyle, and medical factors, and these were systematically evaluated in both univariate and multivariable analyses. Overall, 13.7% (n = 221) men had clinically significant GERD symptoms. In the adjusted models, an association between GERD and anxiety (odds ratio [OR] 2.7; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-6.8) and poor sleep quality (OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.2-2.9) was observed; however, no effect was observed for current depression (OR 1.5; 95% CI 0.8-2.7). After removing poor sleep quality from the model, an independent association between current depression (OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.7-3.8) and current anxiety (OR 3.2; 95% CI 1.8-6.0) and GERD was observed, but not for previous depression (OR 1.4; 95% CI 0.7-2.8). In this sample of urban-dwelling men

  15. Prospective randomized controlled trial of an injectable esophageal prosthesis versus a sham procedure for endoscopic treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fockens, Paul; Cohen, Lawrence; Edmundowicz, Steven A; Binmoeller, Kenneth; Rothstein, Richard I; Smith, Daniel; Lin, Edward; Nickl, Nicholas; Overholt, Bergein; Kahrilas, Peter J; Vakil, Nimish; Abdel Aziz Hassan, Ayman M; Lehman, Glen A

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to assess whether endoscopic implantation of an injectable esophageal prosthesis, the Gatekeeper Reflux Repair System (GK), is a safe and effective therapy for controlling gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). A prospective, randomized, sham-controlled, single-blinded, international multicenter study planned final enrollment of 204 patients in three groups: up to 60 lead-in, 96 GK, and 48 sham patients. The sham patients were allowed to cross over to the GK treatment arm or exit the study at 6 months. The primary end points were (1) reduction in serious device- and procedure-related adverse device effects compared with a surgical composite complication rate and (2) reduction in heartburn symptoms 6 months after the GK procedure compared with the sham procedure. The secondary end point was improved esophageal pH (total time pH was <4) 6 months after the GK procedure compared with baseline. A planned interim analysis was performed after 143 patients were enrolled (25 lead-in, 75 GK, and 43 sham patients), and the GK study was terminated early due to lack of compelling efficacy data. Four reported serious adverse events had occurred (2 perforations, 1 pulmonary infiltrate related to a perforation, and 1 severe chest pain) at termination of the study with no mortality or long-term sequelae. Heartburn symptoms had improved significantly at 6 months compared with baseline in the GK group (p < 0.0001) and the sham group (p < 0.0001), but no significant between-group difference in improvement was observed (p = 0.146). Esophageal acid exposure had improved significantly at 6 months compared with baseline in the GK group (p = 0.021) and the sham group (p = 0.003), but no significant between-group difference in improvement was observed (p = 0.27). The GK procedure was associated with some serious but infrequent complications. No statistically significant difference in outcomes was observed between the treatment and control groups at 6 months compared with

  16. Classification of adults suffering from typical gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms: contribution of latent class analysis in a European observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruley des Varannes, Stanislas; Cestari, Renzo; Usova, Liudmila; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos; Alvarez Sanchez, Angel; Keim, Sofia; Bergmans, Paul; Marelli, Silvia; Grahl, Esther; Ducrotté, Philippe

    2014-06-26

    As illustrated by the Montreal classification, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is much more than heartburn and patients constitute a heterogeneous group. Understanding if links exist between patients' characteristics and GERD symptoms, and classify subjects based on symptom-profile could help to better understand, diagnose, and treat GERD. The aim of this study was to identify distinct classes of GERD patients according to symptom profiles, using a specific statistical tool: Latent class analysis. An observational single-visit study was conducted in 5 European countries in 7700 adults with typical symptoms. A latent class analysis was performed to identify "latent classes" and was applied to 12 indicator symptoms. On 7434 subjects with non-missing indicators, latent class analysis yielded 5 latent classes. Class 1 grouped the highest severity of typical GERD symptoms during day and night, more digestive and non-digestive GERD symptoms, and bad sleep quality. Class 3 represented less frequent and less severe digestive and non-digestive GERD symptoms, and better sleep quality than in class 1. In class 2, only typical GERD symptoms at night occurred. Classes 4 and 5 represented daytime and nighttime regurgitation. In class 4, heartburn was also identified and more atypical digestive symptoms. Multinomial logistic regression showed that country, age, sex, smoking, alcohol use, low-fat diet, waist circumference, recent weight gain (>5 kg), elevated triglycerides, metabolic syndrome, and medical GERD treatment had a significant effect on latent classes. Latent class analysis classified GERD patients based on symptom profiles which related to patients' characteristics. Although further studies considering these proposed classes have to be conducted to determine the reproducibility of this classification, this new tool might contribute in better management and follow-up of patients with GERD.

  17. Association between dental erosion and possible risk factors: A hospital-based study in gastroesophageal reflux disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamsi Krishna Reddy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a condition, with a prevalence of up to 10–20% in the general population. GERD may involve damage to the oral cavity, and dental erosion may occur with a higher frequency. Aim: To estimate the prevalence of dental erosion in GERD patients and to evaluate the association between dental erosion and possible risk factors. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted in the Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow among patients attending outpatient department between June and August 2014. The study group comprised 91 subjects with GERD and 114 subjects without GERD. Information regarding symptoms of GERD, medicines, any chronic disease, and dietary habits were recorded. Dental examination was done to assess the presence or absence of dental erosions and its severity was measured using O'Sullivan Index (2000. Statistical analysis was done using Mann–Whitney U-test and Kruskal–Wallis test. Results: Of 91 GERD patients, 87 (95.6% patients had dental erosion. In both groups, association between frequent intake of fruit juice, carbonated drinks, milk, yoghurt, fruits, and tea/coffee with occurrence of dental erosion were statistically significant (P < 0.05. In GERD patients, association between intake of milk and occurrence of dental erosion were statistically significant (P < 0.05. Association of medication with dental erosion was found to be statistically significant (P < 0.05. Chronic diseases like diabetes and asthma were also found to be statistically significant with dental erosion (P < 0.05. Conclusion: This study showed that GERD patients were at increased risk of developing dental erosion compared to controls.

  18. Vertical gastric plication versus Nissen fundoplication in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux in children with cerebral palsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Paulo Durante

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Association between neurological lesions and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in children is very common. When surgical treatment is indicated, the consensus favors the fundoplication technique recommended by Nissen, despite its high morbidity and relapse rates. Vertical gastric plication is a procedure that may have advantages over Nissen fundoplication, since it is less aggressive and more adequately meets anatomical principles. The authors proposed to compare the results from the Nissen and vertical gastric plication techniques. DESIGN AND SETTING: Randomized prospective study within the Postgraduate Surgery and Experimentation Program of Unifesp-EPM, at Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual (IAMSPE and Hospital Municipal Infantil Menino Jesus. METHODS: Fourteen consecutive children with cerebral palsy attended between November 2003 and July 2004 were randomized into two groups for surgical treatment of GERD: NF, Nissen fundoplication (n = 7; and VGP, vertical gastric plication (n = 7. These were clinically assessed by scoring for signs and symptoms, evaluation of esophageal pH measurements, duration of the operation, intra and postoperative complications, mortality and length of hospital stay. RESULTS: The mean follow-up was 5.2 months; symptoms were reduced by 42.8% (NF (p = 0.001 and 57.1% (VGP (p = 0.006. The Boix-Ochoa score was favorable for both groups: NF (p < 0.001 and VGP (p < 0.042. The overall mortality was 14.28% in both groups and was due to causes unrelated to the surgical treatment. CONCLUSION: The two operative procedures were shown to be efficient and efficacious for the treatment of GERD in neuropathic patients, over the study period.

  19. Risk of lung cancer in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease: a population-based cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Kuei Hsu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This large-scale, controlled cohort study estimated the risks of lung cancer in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD in Taiwan. We conducted this population-based study using data from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan during the period from 1997 to 2010. Patients with GERD were diagnosed using endoscopy, and controls were matched to patients with GERD at a ratio of 1:4. We identified 15,412 patients with GERD and 60,957 controls. Compared with the controls, the patients with GERD had higher rates of osteoporosis, diabetes mellitus, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, pneumonia, bronchiectasis, depression, anxiety, hypertension, dyslipidemia, chronic liver disease, congestive heart failure, atrial fibrillation, stroke, chronic kidney disease, and coronary artery disease (all P < .05. A total of 85 patients had lung cancer among patients with GERD during the follow-up of 42,555 person-years, and the rate of lung cancer was 0.0020 per person-year. By contrast, 232 patients had lung cancer among patients without GERD during the follow-up of 175,319 person-years, and the rate of lung cancer was 0.0013 per person-year. By using stepwise Cox regression model, the overall incidence of lung cancer remained significantly higher in the patients with GERD than in the controls (hazard ratio, 1.53; 95% CI [1.19–1.98]. The cumulative incidence of lung cancer was higher in the patients with GERD than in the controls (P = .0012. In conclusion, our large population-based cohort study provides evidence that GERD may increase the risk of lung cancer in Asians.

  20. Gastroesophageal reflux in relation to adenocarcinomas of the esophagus: a pooled analysis from the Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael B Cook

    Full Text Available Previous studies have evidenced an association between gastroesophageal reflux and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EA. It is unknown to what extent these associations vary by population, age, sex, body mass index, and cigarette smoking, or whether duration and frequency of symptoms interact in predicting risk. The Barrett's and Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Consortium (BEACON allowed an in-depth assessment of these issues.Detailed information on heartburn and regurgitation symptoms and covariates were available from five BEACON case-control studies of EA and esophagogastric junction adenocarcinoma (EGJA. We conducted single-study multivariable logistic regressions followed by random-effects meta-analysis. Stratified analyses, meta-regressions, and sensitivity analyses were also conducted.Five studies provided 1,128 EA cases, 1,229 EGJA cases, and 4,057 controls for analysis. All summary estimates indicated positive, significant associations between heartburn/regurgitation symptoms and EA. Increasing heartburn duration was associated with increasing EA risk; odds ratios were 2.80, 3.85, and 6.24 for symptom durations of <10 years, 10 to <20 years, and ≥20 years. Associations with EGJA were slighter weaker, but still statistically significant for those with the highest exposure. Both frequency and duration of heartburn/regurgitation symptoms were independently associated with higher risk. We observed similar strengths of associations when stratified by age, sex, cigarette smoking, and body mass index.This analysis indicates that the association between heartburn/regurgitation symptoms and EA is strong, increases with increased duration and/or frequency, and is consistent across major risk factors. Weaker associations for EGJA suggest that this cancer site has a dissimilar pathogenesis or represents a mixed population of patients.

  1. Microscopic esophagitis in gastro-esophageal reflux disease: individual lesions, biopsy sampling, and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastracci, Luca; Spaggiari, Paola; Grillo, Federica; Zentilin, Patrizia; Dulbecco, Pietro; Ceppa, Paola; Baccini, Paola; Mansi, Carlo; Savarino, Vincenzo; Fiocca, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Patients with non-erosive reflux disease may show microscopic damage. This study is aimed to describe distribution, sensitivity, and specificity of histological lesions (i.e., basal cell hyperplasia-BH, papillae elongation-PE, dilatation of intercellular spaces-DIS, intraepithelial eosinophils-IE, neutrophils, and erosions) and sampling criteria. Four groups were identified on the basis of symptoms, endoscopy, and pH monitoring: (1) erosive esophagitis (n = 48), (2) non-erosive esophagitis with abnormal pH (n = 59), (3) non-erosive esophagitis with normal pH (n = 12), and (4) controls (n = 20). Biopsies were taken at the Z-line and 2 and 4 cm above it. BH, PE, DIS, IE, neutrophils, and erosions were assessed. A global severity score was calculated on the basis of the above parameters and allowed the distinction of patients from controls with 80% sensitivity and 85% specificity. Lesions were more severe at Z-line than proximally and more expressed in erosive than in non-erosive disease, although more than 70% of latter patients still showed histological damage. Esophageal biopsy seems very attractive in non-erosive disease where it may contribute to diagnosis and play a role in the comparative evaluation of different therapies.

  2. COMPARISON OF EROSION AND PRIODONTAL INDICES IN PATIENTS WITH AND WITHOUT GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khorsand

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Gastrocsphagcnl reflux disease (CiERD is a systemic disease with intraoral manifestations. The aim ofthis study was (0 compare erosion (Loss Ot'IOOlh structure due In a chemical process without bacterial cause and periodontal indices including: calculus index (Cll. plaque index (PI. gingival index (GI, clinical auachmcnt level (CAL and probing pocket depth (PPD in patients with (iERD and in non CiERD subjects that was done in 2002 in Imam Khomeini Hospital. .IS Patients with CiERI (test group and .IS subjects without GERD (Control group were selected randomly for this study. Statistical analysis for comparing differences between the test and Control groups were Performed using chi square and Fisher exact test. Tile results showed that the prevalence or erosion was significantly higher in test group (I,;LV~'n CiERD. 62.(Y~,'( non CiERD. Then: was also a significant difference in (;1, PI. Cl and PPD between test and control groups. CAL did not show any significant difference between the two groups. Also Hcticobnctcr pylori was significantly higher in test group (~('I,,( test. 54'1,; control group. According to the results. communication between dentist and internist leads to diagnosis and control of GERD. and prevents changes of teeth and periodontal structures.

  3. Estudo da hiper-responsividade brônquica em pacientes portadores de refluxo gastroesofágico Bronchial hyperreactivity in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mônica Silveira Lapa

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O intuito deste trabalho foi evidenciar a existência desse reflexo vagal, através de uma broncoprovocação, em pacientes portadores de refluxo gastroesofágico. MÉTODOS: Onze pacientes com endoscopia sem evidências de refluxo gastroesofágico ou hérnia hiatal (grupo controle e dez pacientes com hérnia hiatal ou refluxo gastroesofágico foram submetidos à broncoprovocação com carbacol. RESULTADOS: O teste foi positivo em 5 dos pacientes com hérnia hiatal ou refluxo gastroesofágico (50%, e em 3 do grupo controle (27% (p = 0,64. CONCLUSÃO: A hipótese de que as vias aéreas de pacientes com refluxo gastroesofágico sem sintomas asmatiformes anteriores possam ser mais responsivas do que as de pacientes sem refluxo gastroesofágico permanece não comprovada.OBJECTIVE: To identify this vagal reflex using bronchial provocation tests in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. METHODS: The study group was composed of 10 patients presenting endoscopic evidence of hiatal hernia or gastroesophageal reflux disease, and the control group consisted of 11 patients presenting no evidence of either condition. All subjects were submitted to bronchial provocation with carbachol. RESULTS: The provocation test was positive in 5 (50% of the study group patients and 3 (27% of the control group patients (p = 0.64. CONCLUSION: The hypothesis that the airways of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (and no history of asthma-like respiratory symptoms might be more responsive than those of individuals without the disease remains unproven.

  4. Manifestações extra-esofágicas da doença do refluxo gastroesofágico Extraesophageal manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Ricachenevski Gurski

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available A doença do refluxo gastroesofágico freqüentemente se apresenta com pirose e regurgitação, os chamados sintomas típicos. Porém, um subgrupo de pacientes apresenta um conjunto de sinais e sintomas que não estão relacionados diretamente ao dano esofágico. A esse conjunto dá-se o nome de manifestações extra-esofágicas da doença do refluxo gastroesofágico. Compreendem, principalmente, broncoespasmo, tosse crônica e alterações inflamatórias na laringe (chamados manifestações atípicas. Apesar de essas manifestações formarem um grupo heterogêneo, algumas considerações gerais englobam todos os subgrupos: embora a associação entre a doença do refluxo gastroesofágico e as manifestações extra-esofágicas esteja bem estabelecida, uma relação entre causa e efeito definitiva ainda não está elucidada; em relação à patogênese das manifestações extra-esofágicas, os principais mecanismos propostos são a injúria direta do tecido extra-esofágico pelo conteúdo ácido gástrico refluído e o reflexo esôfago-brônquico mediado pelo nervo vago; a doença do refluxo gastroesofágico pode não ser incluída no diagnóstico diferencial do grupo de pacientes que apresenta somente os sintomas atípicos. Este artigo revisa as manifestações extra-esofágicas da doença do refluxo gastroesofágico encontradas na literatura, discutindo a epidemiologia, patogênese, diagnóstico e tratamento, com foco nas apresentações mais estudadas e estabelecidas.Gastroesophageal reflux disease often presents as heartburn and acid reflux, the so-called "typical" symptoms. However, a subgroup of patients presents a collection of signs and symptoms that are not directly related to esophageal damage. These are known collectively as the extraesophageal manifestations of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Principal among such manifestations are bronchospasm, chronic cough and laryngitis, which are classified as atypical symptoms. These

  5. Influence on consumer behavior: the impact of direct-to-consumer advertising on medication requests for gastroesophageal reflux disease and social anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanfar, Nile M; Polen, Hyla H; Clauson, Kevin A

    2009-01-01

    A 68-question Internet survey was used to determine the impact of televised direct-to-consumer advertising (DTCA) on consumer-initiated medication changes for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and social anxiety disorder (SAD). Of the 427 respondents, 10% that viewed DTCA for GERD and 6% that viewed DTCA for SAD reported that they subsequently initiated a conversation with their physician. Nearly half of respondents, 47.4% for GERD and 40% for SAD, reported that a change in therapy occurred as a direct result of these discussions. Televised DTCA for these two drug classes can have a significant impact on patient-initiated prescription requests.

  6. Meier–Gorlin syndrome: An additional Egyptian patient with gastroesophageal reflux, hydronephrosis, renal stones and hypoplastic labia majora and minora with clitromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a 4.5 year old female child with the classical triad of Meier–Gorlin syndrome (microtia, absent patella and short stature with normal mentality. She had small triangular face, long peaked nose, high nasal bridge, bilateral low set very small ears (microtia, retromicrognathia, high arched palate, maxillary hypoplasia, decayed teeth, and bilateral partial syndactyly between 2nd and 3rd toes. Our patient had a gastroesophageal reflux, renal stones, hydronephrosis and hypoplastic labia majora and minora with clitromegaly.

  7. Does treatment of gastro-esophageal reflux disease with omeprazole decrease allergic rhinitis symptoms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Shirkani

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Allergic rhinitis is the most common type of allergic disease among population. Its accurate treatment is very important for cutting of allergic march. On the other hand, gasteroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of the most common gastrointestinal problems among allergic patients mainly asthmatic cases. It might conflict treatment. Despite of asthma, a few studies have been conducted on the impact of GERD treatment on allergic rhinitis symptoms. In this study, we assessed GERD treatment and its effects on improving of allergic rhinitis patients with GERD. Materials and Methods: In a prospective cross-sectional study, March - September 2012, 103 consecutive patients with persistent moderate to severe seasonal allergic rhinitis enrolled. For allergic rhinitis patients with GERD 20 mg omeperazole once daily for 6 weeks prescribed, empirically. Conventional allergy treatment continued and finally the allergic rhinitis symptoms were assessed clinically and recorded before, 5th, 10th and 30th days of omeprazole treatment period. Results: Our study included 103 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis who were divided into GERD (n=33, 38% and non-GERD (n=70, 68% groups with the mean age 28 and 25.7 years, respectively. The first group developed significant improvement for GERD symptoms on days 5, 10 and 30 after beginning of therapy (P=0.03. No association was found between GERD treatment and relief of allergic symptoms or TNSS improvement (P>0.05. Data analyzed by Epi info (ver 7 and SPSS software (ver 11.5, and by Chi squeare test and paired T test. P lower than 0.05 was considered as significant. Conclusion: This study showed no significant association between empirical treatment of GERD and improvement of allergic symptoms in patients with allergic rhinitis. However, further studies with a larger sample size might be needed.

  8. Achalasia Previously Diagnosed as Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease by Relying on Esophageal Impedance-pH Monitoring: Use of High-Resolution Esophageal Manometry in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyun, Jung Eun; Choi, Da Min; Lee, Jung Hwa; Yoo, Kee Hwan; Shim, Jung Ok

    2015-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disorder (GERD) is the most common esophageal disorder in children. Achalasia occurs less commonly but has similar symptoms to GERD. A nine-year old boy presented with vomiting, heartburn, and nocturnal cough. The esophageal impedance-pH monitor revealed nonacidic GERD (all-refluxate clearance percent time of 20.9%). His symptoms persisted despite medical treatment for GERD, and he was lost to follow up. Four years later, he presented with heartburn, solid-food dysphagia, daily post-prandial vomiting, and failure to thrive. Endoscopy showed a severely dilated esophagus with candidiasis. High-resolution manometry was performed, and he was diagnosed with classic achalasia (also known as type I). His symptoms resolved after two pneumatic dilatation procedures, and his weight and height began to catch up to his peers. Clinicians might consider using high-resolution manometry in children with atypical GERD even after evaluation with an impedance-pH monitor.

  9. Reproducibility of 24-hour combined multiple intraluminal impedance (MII) and pH measurements in infants and children. Evaluation of a diagnostic procedure for gastroesophageal reflux disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dalby, Kasper; Nielsen, Rasmus G; Markoew, Simone

    2007-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a common disease in infants and children. Prolonged (24-hr) pH monitoring in the esophagus for determination of increased acid exposure has, together with endoscopy, been the only routinely implemented method for GERD diagnosis. The recently introduced...... multiple intraluminal impedance (MII) provides additional information about the number of both acid and nonacid episodes of retrograde bolus movement in the esophagus. The aim of this study was to investigate the day-to-day reproducibility and the interobserver variability of 24-hr combined MII (number...... of nonacid and acidic reflux episodes) and pH in the esophagus in infants and children. Upper endoscopy followed by 2 x 24-hr consecutive combined MII and pH monitoring was performed in 33 infants and children referred to a tertiary center for evaluation of GERD. The study was performed in a hospital setting...

  10. Effect of the duration of food withholding prior to anesthesia on gastroesophageal reflux and regurgitation in healthy dogs undergoing elective orthopedic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viskjer, Sivert; Sjöström, Lennart

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To compare the incidence of and risk factors for gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and regurgitation associated with preanesthetic food withholding for periods of 18 hours (overnight) and 3 hours in healthy dogs undergoing elective orthopedic surgery. ANIMALS 82 healthy (American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status classification I or II) client-owned dogs. PROCEDURES Food was withheld for 18 hours (18-hour group [n = 41]) or each dog was allowed to consume half its daily ration of canned food approximately 3 hours (3-hour group [n = 41]) prior to induction of anesthesia. In each anesthetized dog, a pH catheter was introduced through the oropharynx into the distal portion of the esophagus; the pH was continuously recorded throughout the period of anesthesia. Gastroesophageal reflux was defined as pH food withholding. Regurgitation was significantly associated with duration of GER and duration of preanesthetic food withholding. During anesthesia, 25 (61%) dogs in the 3-hour group had GER and 12 (48%) of those dogs regurgitated gastric content; 18 (43.9%) dogs in the 18-hour group had GER and 2 (11.1%) of those dogs regurgitated gastric content. The mean lowest pH measured in the refluxate in the 3-hour group (2.3) was significantly greater than that in the 18-hour group (1.3). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Among the study dogs undergoing orthopedic surgery, consumption of a light meal 3 hours prior to anesthesia was associated with significantly greater odds of reflux and regurgitation, compared with overnight food withholding.

  11. Endoscopic and symptoms analysis in Mexican patients with irritable Bowel syndrome, dyspepsia, and gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Camacho

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the data of endoscopy and symptoms in 118 Mexican patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, dyspepsia, non-erosive reflux disease (NERD and erosive esophagitis (EE. IBS criteria were fulfilling for dyspepsia patients in 47%, for NERD in 48%, and for EE patients in 48% of cases. Esophagitis was present in 42% of patients with IBS and in 45% of patients with dyspepsia. A higher prevalence of hiatus hernia was found in EE vs. NERD. Heartburn and acid eructation were associated with the presence of esophagitis; acid eructation, regurgitation and nocturnal pain with duodenitis; and heartburn and regurgitation with hiatus hernia. Males more frequently reported: ucus in feces, abdoinal distension, nausea and gastritis; and oen ore frequently reported esophagitis and duodenitis. Patients with NERD (OR 2.54, 95% CI 1.08 to 5.99, p=0.04, tenesmus and early satiety, and men had an increase risk for reporting hard or lumpy stools. In conclusion, nearly half of the Mexican patients with NERD, EE and dyspepsia fulfill criteria for IBS. A large number of symptoms were correlated with endoscopy, which can be used to improve the indication of the endoscopy and its implementation in clinical studies.O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar os dados de endoscopia e sintomas de 118 pacientes mexicanos com síndrome do intestino irritável (IBS, dispepsia, doença do refluxo não-erosiva (NERD e esofagite erosiva (EE. Os pacientes com IBS preencheram os critérios para dispepsia em 47%, para NERD em 48%, e para pacientes EE em 48% dos casos. Esofagite estava presente em 42% dos pacientes com IBS e em 45% dos pacientes com dispepsia. A maior prevalência de hérnia de hiato foi encontrada na EE em comparação com NERD. Azia e eructação ácida foram associadas à presença de esofagite; eructação ácida, regurgitação e dor noturna, com duodenite; e azia e regurgitação com hérnia de hiato. Os homens relataram mais

  12. Comparison of Omeprazole with Ranitidine for Treatment of Symptoms Associated with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Uncomplicated Duodenal Ulcer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre P Archambault

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This randomized, single-blind, parallel group study was conducted to compare omeprazole with ranitidine for the treatment of symptoms associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD, uncomplicated duodenal ulcer (DU or both. After baseline assessments, patients were randomized to receive daily treatment with either 20 mg omeprazole or 300 mg ranitidine for four weeks. In total, 1481 patients (1001 omeprazole, 480 ranitidine with a diagnosis of GERD (n=904 and/or DU (n=577, confirmed by endoscopy or barium meal and reporting moderate to severe symptoms, were included in the analyses. The seventy of overall daytime symptoms reported by the omeprazole group at clinic visits was lower than that reported by the ranitidine group at week 2 for the entire patient group (P=0.0002 and at both weeks 2 and 4 for the subgroup of patients with GERD (P=0.0001 and P=0.001, respectively. The severity of overall night-time symptoms reported by the omeprazole group was lower than that reported by the ranitidine group at week 4 for all patients as a whole (P=0.042 and at both weeks 2 and 4 for the subgroup of patients with GERD (P=0.035 and P=0.010, respectively. There were no significant differences in reports of adverse events. In the omeprazole group, 19% of patients at week 2 and 15% of patients at week 4 reported adverse events, while the corresponding results from the ranitidine group were 21% and 11%. In conclusion, patients with GERD, DU or both treated with omeprazole 20 mg daily for four weeks showed statistically significant reductions in symptoms compared with patients treated with ranitidine 300 mg daily for the same period of time. The percentage of patients with any remaining daytime symptoms was 12% lower in the omeprazole group compared with the ranitidine group at week 2, and 7% lower at week 4. Five per cent fewer patients in the omeprazole group experienced night-time symptoms at either week 2 or week 4.

  13. Impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease on work absenteeism, presenteeism and productivity in daily life: a European observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisbert, Javier P; Cooper, Alun; Karagiannis, Dimitrios; Hatlebakk, Jan; Agréus, Lars; Jablonowski, Helmut; Nuevo, Javier

    2009-10-16

    The RANGE (Retrospective ANalysis of GastroEsophageal reflux disease [GERD]) study assessed differences among patients consulting a primary care physician due to GERD-related reasons in terms of: symptoms, diagnosis and management, response to treatment, and effects on productivity, costs and health-related quality of life. This subanalysis of RANGE determined the impact of GERD on productivity in work and daily life. RANGE was conducted at 134 primary care sites across six European countries (Germany, Greece, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the UK). All subjects (aged >or=18 years) who consulted with their primary care physician over a 4-month identification period were screened retrospectively, and those consulting at least once for GERD-related reasons were identified (index visit). From this population, a random sample was selected to enter the study and attended a follow-up appointment, during which the impact of GERD on productivity while working (absenteeism and presenteeism) and in daily life was evaluated using the self-reported Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire for patients with GERD (WPAI-GERD). Overall, 373,610 subjects consulted with their primary care physician over the 4-month identification period, 12,815 for GERD-related reasons (3.4%); 2678 randomly selected patients attended the follow-up appointment. Average absenteeism due to GERD was highest in Germany (3.2 hours/week) and lowest in the UK (0.4 hours/week), with an average of up to 6.7 additional hours/week lost due to presenteeism in Norway. The average monetary impact of GERD-related work absenteeism and presenteeism were substantial in all countries (from euro55/week per employed patient in the UK to euro273/patient in Sweden). Reductions in productivity in daily life of up to 26% were observed across the European countries. GERD places a significant burden on primary care patients, in terms of work absenteeism and presenteeism and in daily life. The resulting costs to the

  14. Impact of gastroesophageal reflux disease on work absenteeism, presenteeism and productivity in daily life: a European observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatlebakk Jan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The RANGE (Retrospective ANalysis of GastroEsophageal reflux disease [GERD] study assessed differences among patients consulting a primary care physician due to GERD-related reasons in terms of: symptoms, diagnosis and management, response to treatment, and effects on productivity, costs and health-related quality of life. This subanalysis of RANGE determined the impact of GERD on productivity in work and daily life. Methods RANGE was conducted at 134 primary care sites across six European countries (Germany, Greece, Norway, Spain, Sweden and the UK. All subjects (aged ≥18 years who consulted with their primary care physician over a 4-month identification period were screened retrospectively, and those consulting at least once for GERD-related reasons were identified (index visit. From this population, a random sample was selected to enter the study and attended a follow-up appointment, during which the impact of GERD on productivity while working (absenteeism and presenteeism and in daily life was evaluated using the self-reported Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire for patients with GERD (WPAI-GERD. Results Overall, 373,610 subjects consulted with their primary care physician over the 4-month identification period, 12,815 for GERD-related reasons (3.4%; 2678 randomly selected patients attended the follow-up appointment. Average absenteeism due to GERD was highest in Germany (3.2 hours/week and lowest in the UK (0.4 hours/week, with an average of up to 6.7 additional hours/week lost due to presenteeism in Norway. The average monetary impact of GERD-related work absenteeism and presenteeism were substantial in all countries (from €55/week per employed patient in the UK to €273/patient in Sweden. Reductions in productivity in daily life of up to 26% were observed across the European countries. Conclusion GERD places a significant burden on primary care patients, in terms of work absenteeism and

  15. Risk factors associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease relapse in primary care patients successfully treated with a proton pump inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Colombo, A; Pacio-Quiterio, M S; Jesús-Mejenes, L Y; Rodríguez-Aguilar, J E G; López-Guevara, M; Montiel-Jarquín, A J; López-Alvarenga, J C; Morales-Hernández, E R; Ortiz-Juárez, V R; Ávila-Jiménez, L

    There are no studies on the factors associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) relapse in primary care patients. To identify the risk factors associated with GERD relapse in primary care patients that responded adequately to short-term treatment with a proton pump inhibitor. A cohort study was conducted that included GERD incident cases. The patients received treatment with omeprazole for 4 weeks. The ReQuest questionnaire and a risk factor questionnaire were applied. The therapeutic success rate and relapse rate were determined at 4 and 12 weeks after treatment suspension. A logistic regression analysis of the possible risk factors for GERD relapse was carried out. Of the 83 patient total, 74 (89.16%) responded to treatment. Symptoms recurred in 36 patients (48.64%) at 4 weeks and in 13 patients (17.57%) at 12 weeks, with an overall relapse rate of 66.21%. The OR multivariate analysis (95% CI) showed the increases in the possibility of GERD relapse for the following factors at 12 weeks after treatment suspension: basic educational level or lower, 24.95 (1.92-323.79); overweight, 1.76 (0.22-13.64); obesity, 0.25 (0.01-3.46); smoking, 0.51 (0.06-3.88); and the consumption of 4-12 cups of coffee per month, 1.00 (0.12-7.84); citrus fruits, 14.76 (1.90-114.57); NSAIDs, 27.77 (1.12-686.11); chocolate, 0.86 (0.18-4.06); ASA 1.63 (0.12-21.63); carbonated beverages, 4.24 (0.32-55.05); spicy food 7-16 times/month, 1.39 (0.17-11.17); and spicy food ≥ 20 times/month, 4.06 (0.47-34.59). The relapse rate after short-term treatment with omeprazole was high. The consumption of citrus fruits and NSAIDs increased the possibility of GERD relapse. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. REFLUX ESOPHAGITIS IN INFANTS AND CHILDREN - A REPORT FROM THE WORKING GROUP ON GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE OF THE EUROPEAN-SOCIETY-OF-PEDIATRIC-GASTROENTEROLOGY-AND-NUTRITION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDENPLAS, Y; ASHKENAZI, A; BELLI, D; BLECKER, U; BOIGE, N; BOUQUET, J; CADRANEL, S; CEZARD, JP; CUCCHIARA, S; DEVREKER, T; DUPONT, C; GEBOES, K; GOTTRAND, F; HEYMANS, HSA; JASINSKI, C; KNEEPKENS, CMF; KOLETZKO, S; MILLA, P; MOUGENOT, JF; NAVARRO, J; NEWELL, SJ; NUSSLE, D; OLAFSDOTTIR, E; POLANCO, [No Value; RAVELLI, A; SANDHU, BK; TOLBOOM, J

    In this article, the Working Group on Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux of the European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition presents and discusses a definition of reflux esophagitis and recommends a diagnostic approach and therapeutic management for this condition. Histologic criteria for

  17. Omeprazole-Domperidone Fixed Dose Combination vs Omeprazole Monotherapy: A Phase 4, Open-Label, Comparative, Parallel Randomized Controlled Study in Mild to Moderate Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KY Marakhouski

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare the efficacy and safety of omeprazole-domperidone combination vs omeprazole monotherapy in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Methods: In a comparative, randomized controlled, phase 4 study, outpatients with GERD were randomly allocated to either group 1 (omeprazole 20 mg + domperidone 30 mg or group 2 (omeprazole 20 mg in an equal ratio; 2 capsules daily in the morning were administered for 8 weeks. Results: Sixty patients were enrolled. Esophagitis reversal was observed in 92% patients in group 1 vs 65.2% in group 2. Approximately, 83.3% patients in group 1 vs 43.3% patients in group 2 demonstrated full cupping of reflux symptoms at 8 weeks. Combined therapy resulted in significantly longer period of heartburn-free days (23 vs 12 days on omeprazole. There were no safety concerns. Conclusions: Omeprazole-domperidone combination was more effective than omeprazole alone in providing complete cupping of reflux symptoms and healing of esophagitis in patients with GERD. Both the treatments were well tolerated with few reports of adverse events. Trial registration: This trial is registered with http://clinicaltrials.gov , number NCT02140073.

  18. Delayed-release oral suspension of omeprazole for the treatment of erosive esophagitis and gastroesophageal reflux disease in pediatric patients: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Monzani

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Alice Monzani, Giuseppina Oderda1Department of Pediatrics, Università del Piemonte Orientale, Novara, ItalyAbstract: Omeprazole is a proton-pump inhibitor indicated for gastroesophageal reflux disease and erosive esophagitis treatment in children. The aim of this review was to evaluate the efficacy of delayed-release oral suspension of omeprazole in childhood esophagitis, in terms of symptom relief, reduction in reflux index and/or intragastric acidity, and endoscopic and/or histological healing. We systematically searched PubMed, Cochrane and EMBASE (1990 to 2009 and identified 59 potentially relevant articles, but only 12 articles were suitable to be included in our analysis. All the studies evaluated symptom relief and reported a median relief rate of 80.4% (range 35%–100%. Five studies reported a significant reduction of the esophageal reflux index within normal limits (<7% in all children, and 4 studies a significant reduction of intra-gastric acidity. The endoscopic healing rate, reported by 9 studies, was 84% after 8-week treatment and 95% after 12-week treatment, the latter being significantly higher than the histological healing rate (49%. In conclusion, omeprazole given at a dose ranging from 0.3 to 3.5 mg/kg once daily (median 1 mg/kg once daily for at least 12 weeks is highly effective in childhood esophagitis.Keywords: proton pump inhibitors, children, ranitidine, H2-blockers

  19. The University of Chicago contribution to the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and its complications: a tribute to David B. Skinner 1935-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Christina L; Worrell, Stephanie G; Patti, Marco G; DeMeester, Tom R

    2015-03-01

    To highlight the contributions from the University of Chicago under the leadership of Dr David B. Skinner to the understanding of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and its complications. The invention of the esophagoscope confirmed that GERD was a premorbid condition. The medical world was divided between those who believed in a morphological lower esophageal sphincter (LES) and those who did not. Those who did not believe attempted to rearrange the anatomy of the foregut organs to stop reflux with minimal success. The discovery of the LES focused attention on the sphincter as the main deterrent to reflux and the hope that measurement of a low LES pressure would mark the presence of GERD. This turned out not to be so. In July 1973, with this history of confusion, Dr Skinner at the age of 36 assumed the chair of surgery at the University of Chicago. The publications of the University of Chicago's esophageal group were collected from private and public (PubMed) databases, reviewed, and seminal contributions selected. Twenty-four-hour esophageal pH monitoring led to the understanding of the LES, its contribution to GERD, and the complication of Barrett's esophagus. The relationship of Barrett's to adenocarcinoma was clarified. The rising incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma led to contributions in the staging of esophageal cancer and its treatment with an en bloc resection. Ten years after the death of Dr Skinner, we can appreciate the monumental contributions to benign and malignant esophageal disease under his leadership.

  20. Clinical Characteristics of Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Refractory to Proton Pump Inhibitors and the Effects of Switching to 20 mg Esomeprazole on Reflux Symptoms and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima, Fuminao; Hashiguchi, Keiichi; Onitsuka, Yasunori; Tanigawa, Ken; Minami, Hitomi; Matsushima, Kayoko; Akazawa, Yuko; Shiozawa, Ken; Yamaguchi, Naoyuki; Taura, Naota; Ohnita, Ken; Ichikawa, Tatsuki; Isomoto, Hajime; Nakao, Kazuhiko

    2015-12-31

    BACKGROUND Refractory gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may deteriorate patient quality of life (QOL) despite proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS Nineteen Japanese institutions were surveyed to determine the clinical characteristics and QOL of patients with refractory GERD. Those patients treated with a conventional PPI were switched to 20 mg esomeprazole for 4 weeks. Symptoms and QOL were assessed using Global Overall Symptom and Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) questionnaires at baseline and at 2 and/or 4 weeks of esomeprazole treatment. RESULTS Of 120 patients who completed the survey, 58 (48.3%) had refractory GERD. Of these, 69.0% were aged ≥ 65 years, 79.3% were prescribed a PPI at a standard or high dose, and 22.4% were prescribed a PPI together with another drug. After switching to esomeprazole, patients reported significant improvements in heartburn, acid regurgitation, and excessive belching at 2 weeks using a symptom diary, as well as the total score, reflux, abdominal pain, and indigestion, which were assessed using the GSRS at 4 weeks. CONCLUSIONS About half of Japanese patients with GERD may be refractory to conventional PPIs. Their reflux-related symptoms are often severe and may impair QOL. Switching to esomeprazole could be used to improve their symptoms and QOL.

  1. Prevalência de refluxo gastroesofágico patológico em lactentes regurgitadores Prevalence of pathologic gastroesophageal reflux in regurgitant infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo J. F. Costa

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Determinar a prevalência do refluxo gastroesofágico patológico em um grupo de lactentes regurgitadores atendidos no Hospital Helena Moura, Recife, PE, utilizando um critério clínico baseado no Critério de Roma II. MÉTODO: O desenho do estudo foi transversal. A população foi constituída por crianças menores de 1 ano de idade, com história de apresentar regurgitação por um período mínimo de 3 semanas. A amostra estudada, no período de janeiro a agosto de 2002, consistiu de 798 crianças. O critério diagnóstico foi baseado no Critério de Roma II. RESULTADOS: A prevalência do refluxo gastroesofágico patológico foi de 11,15% (89/798; IC 95%: 9,10-13,48, sendo maior nos dois primeiros trimestres de vida: 14,62% (31/212; IC 95%: 10,33-19,86 no primeiro trimestre e 13,76% (38/276; IC 95%: 10,07-18,21 no segundo trimestre. CONCLUSÕES: A prevalência de refluxo gastroesofágico patológico foi semelhante a dados encontrados na literatura, predominando, portanto, os portadores de regurgitação infantil.OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of pathologic gastroesophageal reflux in a group of regurgitant infants attended at Helena Moura Hospital, Recife, State of Pernambuco, Brazil. The clinical criteria employed were based on Rome II criteria. METHOD: The study design was transversal. The patients were all children of less than 1 year of age with a history of episodes of regurgitation for at least 3 weeks. The study group was comprised of 798 children who attended the program between January and August of 2002. The diagnostic criteria were based on Rome II criteria. RESULTS: The prevalence of pathologic gastroesophageal reflux was 11.15% (89/798 (95% CI 9.10-13.48. It was higher during the first two trimesters of life, 14.62% (31/212 (95% CI 10.33-19.86 in the first trimester, and 13.76% (38/276 (95% CI 10.07-18.21 in the second trimester. CONCLUSION: The prevalence of pathologic gastroesophageal reflux within the group

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nih.gov/pubmed/25863867 . Falk GW, Katzka DA. Diseases of the esophagus. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ... LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran’s Gastrointestinal and Liver ... of Barrett's esophagus. Am J Gastroenterol . 2008;103(3):788-797. ...

  3. Acid Reflux (GER and GERD) in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Digestive System & How it Works Zollinger-Ellison Syndrome Acid Reflux (GER & GERD) in Adults View or Print ... up into your esophagus causing heartburn (also called acid reflux). Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a long- ...

  4. Рrediction risk factors of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children and adolescents with chronic gastroduodenal pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. Boiarskа

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. According to the modern literature gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is multifactorial illness. The main risk factors of its development are acid-peptic factor, Н.pylori, the autonomic nervous system dysfunction, rapid growth, heredity, burdened perinatal history, dysplasia of connective tissue structures (DCTS, environmental factors and lifestyle. Among the contradictory questions is intercurrent factors influence on the development and course of the disease. Aim of the work. To determine the risk factors for GERD in children and adolescents with chronic gastroduodenal pathology with the creation of mathematical forecasting model of the disease development and course. Materials and methods. The study involved 138 children with chronic gastroduodenal pathology who were treated inZaporozhyeCityPediatricHospital #5, aged 9 to 17 years. The main group consisted of 97 children with GERD (Group 1 - 46 children with GERD with esophagitis, Group 2 - GERD without esophagitis, comparison group comprised 41 children without clinical and endoscopic manifestations of the esophagus pathology. The following methods were conducted: clinical and medical history, instrumental - fibroesophagogastroduodenoscopy, intragastric pH-metry, ambulatory around-the clock pH monitoring in the esophagus, functional - Holter cardiac monitoring, respiratory HELIK urease test, mathematics and statistics - variational statistics, correlation analysis, binary logistic regression and multivariate regression analysis. Study results. According to the clinical and anamnestic analysis identified risk factors for GERD in children with chronic gastroduodenal pathology: hereditary predisposition (RR=1,79(1,27-2,66, р<0,05, abnormal pregnancy (ВР=1,62(1,31-1,81, р<0,05, early artificial feeding (RR = 1.31 (1,03-1,6, р<0,05, the presence of neurological symptoms during the first year life (RR = 1,32 (1,01-1,51, p <0.05, impaired diet (RR = 1,92 (1,24-2,82, p <0

  5. Laparoscopic Nissen (total) versus anterior 180° fundoplication for gastro-esophageal reflux disease: A meta-analysis and systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xing; Wu, Ji-Min; Hu, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Feng; Wang, Zhong-Gao; Zhang, Chao; Yan, Chao; Chen, Mei-Ping

    2017-09-01

    Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) has been the gold standard for the surgical management of Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Laparoscopic anterior 180° fundoplication (180° LAF) is reported to reduce the incidence of postoperative complications while obtaining similar control of reflux. The present meta-analysis was conducted to confirm the value of the 2 techniques. PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library, Springerlink, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure Platform databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing LNF and 180° LAF. Data regarding the benefits and adverse results of 2 techniques were extracted and compared using a meta-analysis. Six eligible RCTs comparing LNF (n = 266) and 180° LAF (n = 265) were identified. There were no significant differences between LNF and 180° LAF with regard to operating time, perioperative complications, length of hospital stay, patient satisfaction, willingness to undergo surgery again, quality of life, postoperative heartburn, proton pump inhibitor (PPI) use, postoperative DeMeester scores, postoperative lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure, postoperative gas-bloating, unable to belch, diarrhea, or overall reoperation. LNF was associated with a higher prevalence of postoperative dysphagia compared with 180° LAF, while 180° LAF was followed by more reoperation for recurrent reflux symptoms. LNF and 180° LAF are equally effective in controlling reflux symptoms and obtain a comparable prevalence of patient satisfaction. 180° LAF can reduce the incidence of postoperative dysphagia while this is offset by a higher risk of reoperation for recurrent symptoms. The risk of recurrent symptoms should need to be balanced against the risk of dysphagia when surgeons choose surgical procedures for each individual with GERD.

  6. A novel once daily microparticulate dosage form comprising lansoprazole to prevent nocturnal acid breakthrough in the case of gastro-esophageal reflux disease: preparation, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alai, Milind; Lin, Wen Jen

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to formulate and evaluate the lansoprazole (LPZ)-loaded microparticles to prevent nocturnal acid breakthrough in the case of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). The microparticulate delivery system was prepared by solvent evaporation method using Eudragit RS100 as a matrix polymer followed by enteric coated with Eudragit S100 and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose phthalate HP55 using spray drying method. The enteric coated microparticles were stable in gastric pH condition. In vivo pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies in male Wistar rats demonstrated that enteric coated microparticles sustained release of LPZ and promoted ulcer healing activity. In other words, the microparticulate dosage form provided effective drug concentration for a longer period as compared to conventional extended release dosage form, and showed sufficient anti-acid secretion activity to treat acid related disorders including the enrichment of nocturnal acid breakthrough event based on a once daily administration.

  7. Objective measurement of work absence and on-the-job productivity: a case-control study of US employees with and without gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlqvist, Peter; Brook, Richard A; Campbell, Sara M; Wallander, Mari-Ann; Alexander, Anne M; Smeeding, Jim E; Kleinman, Nathan L

    2008-01-01

    To establish an association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and increased work absence, as well as reduced productivity while at work, by using objective productivity measurements. Retrospective case-control analysis of a database containing US employees' administrative health care and payroll data for employees (N = 11,653 with GERD; N = 255,616 without GERD) who were enrolled for at least one year in an employer-sponsored health insurance plan. Employees with GERD had 41% more sick leave days (P productivity per hour worked (P = 0.0481), and 6.0% lower annual objective productivity (P = 0.0391) than the employees without GERD. GERD is associated with a significant impact on employees' work absence and productivity while at work as measured using objective data.

  8. Guidelines for evaluation and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux in infants and children: recommendations of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, C D; Mazur, L J; Liptak, G S; Baker, R D; Boyle, J T; Colletti, R B; Gerson, W T; Werlin, S L

    2001-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER), defined as passage of gastric contents into the esophagus, and GER disease (GERD), defined as symptoms or complications of GER, are common pediatric problems encountered by both primary and specialty medical providers. Clinical manifestations of GERD in children include vomiting, poor weight gain, dysphagia, abdominal or substernal pain, esophagitis and respiratory disorders. The GER Guideline Committee of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition has formulated a clinical practice guideline for the management of pediatric GER. The GER Guideline Committee, consisting of a primary care pediatrician, two clinical epidemiologists (who also practice primary care pediatrics) and five pediatric gastroenterologists, based its recommendations on an integration of a comprehensive and systematic review of the medical literature combined with expert opinion. Consensus was achieved through Nominal Group Technique, a structured quantitative method. The Committee examined the value of diagnostic tests and treatment modalities commonly used for the management of GERD, and how those interventions can be applied to clinical situations in the infant and older child. The guideline provides recommendations for management by the primary care provider, including evaluation, initial treatment, follow-up management and indications for consultation by a specialist. The guideline also provides recommendations for management by the pediatric gastroenterologist. This document represents the official recommendations of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition on the evaluation and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux in infants and children. The American Academy of Pediatrics has also endorsed these recommendations. The recommendations are summarized in a synopsis within the article. This review and recommendations are a general guideline and are not intended as a substitute for clinical judgment or as

  9. Gastroesophageal reflux disease and esophageal motility in morbidly obese patients submitted to laparoscopic adjustable silicone gastric banding or laparoscopic vertical banded gastroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecchi, Fabrizio; Rocchietto, Stefano; Giaccone, Claudio; Talha, Ahmed; Morino, Mario

    2011-03-01

    Laparoscopic adjustable silicone gastric banding (LASGB) and laparoscopic vertical banded gastroplasty (LVBG) are the most frequently performed restrictive operations for morbid obesity. The question of whether bariatric restrictive procedures increase or reduce gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) remains open. This study aimed to compare the long-term results of LASGB with those of LVBG in terms of postoperative GERD and esophageal motility function. From February 1999 to December 2000, 175 patients underwent bariatric surgery. After 75 of these patients were excluded from the study, the remaining 100 patients were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: LASGB or LVBG. The end points of the study were evaluation of clinical and instrumental GERD and esophageal function. The follow-up protocol included clinical assessment using the Gastroesophageal Reflux Health-Related Quality-of-Life (GERD-HRQOL) scale at 3, 12, and 96 months. Esophageal manometry, 24-h pH monitoring, and endoscopy were performed at 12 and 96 months. At 12 months, GERD had developed in 13 (26%) LASGB and 11 (21.6%) LVBG patients. In the majority of cases, GERD resulted from pouch dilation or poor compliance and required either reoperation (ten after LASGB and three after LVBG) or endoscopic dilation of the neopylorus (four after LVBG). In all, 71 patients completed the 96-month follow-up protocol. The findings showed that three (11.5%) of 26 LASGB patients and four (9%) of 45 LVBG patients were receiving proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy for GERD. Postoperative lower esophageal sphincter (LES) pressure and esophageal motility did not differ from preoperative data except for the presence of aperistaltic waves in one LASGB and two LVBG symptomatic GERD patients. No significant association between gastric restrictive procedures and GERD or esophageal function was found during long-term follow-up assessment. The increased occurrence of GERD in the early follow-up period often is due to

  10. Time esophageal pH < 4 overestimates the prevalence of pathologic esophageal reflux in subjects with gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with proton pump inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sloan Sheldon

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A Stanford University study reported that in asymptomatic GERD patients who were being treated with a proton pump inhibitor (PPI, 50% had pathologic esophageal acid exposure. Aim We considered the possibility that the high prevalence of pathologic esophageal reflux might simply have resulted from calculating acidity as time pH Methods We calculated integrated acidity and time pH Results The prevalence of pathologic 24-hour esophageal reflux in both studies was significantly higher when measured as time pH Conclusion In GERD subjects treated with a PPI, measuring time esophageal pH

  11. Maior prevalência de obesidade na doença do refluxo gastroesofagiano erosiva Higher prevalence of obesity in erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz N. Biccas

    2009-03-01

    ão-erosiva (38% masculino, mediana de idade de 50 anos, havia 51 (42% pacientes com peso normal, 55 (46% com sobrepeso e 15 (12% eram obesos. Detectou-se hérnia de hiato em 52 (43% dos 121 pacientes, sendo 21 (41% dos indivíduos com peso normal, 24 (44% dos com sobrepeso e 7 (47% dos obesos. Naqueles 93 pacientes sem esofagite erosiva e com pHmetria normal (39% homens, mediana de idade de 43 anos havia 43 (46% pacientes com peso normal, 38 (41% com sobrepeso e 12 (13% obesos, sendo 26 (28% com hérnia hiatal. A prevalência de hérnia de hiato, assim como o número de pacientes com obesidade e sobrepeso foi significantemente maior no grupo de doença do refluxo erosiva, quando comparado ao grupo sem esofagite erosiva. A intensidade do refluxo, assim como a prevalência de hérnia hiatal foram similares nos pacientes com peso normal, sobrepeso e obesos, em ambos os grupos. CONCLUSÃO:A prevalência de obesidade e sobrepeso é maior em indivíduos com doença do refluxo erosiva do que naqueles sem esofagite erosiva. Não houve diferença na intensidade do refluxo entre as várias categorias de índice de massa corporal, em nenhum dos grupos estudados. Embora a hérnia hiatal seja mais prevalente na doença do refluxo erosiva, esta superioridade não se relacionou ao excesso de peso.CONTEXT: Weight loss is commonly recommended as a treatment for gastroesophageal reflux; however, a relationship between excessive body weight and gastroesophageal reflux disease is not well established. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the prevalence of obesity and over-weight in patients with heartburn, with and without erosive esophagitis; to analyze the prevalence of hiatal hernia and the intensity of abnormal gastroesophageal reflux in both groups of patients, and its relation to body mass index. METHODS: The data of pH monitoring of 362 individuals with heartburn were evaluated retrospectively. All patients had an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and erosive esophagitis was defined by the presence of

  12. Reflux and aerodigestive tract diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coca-Pelaz, A.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Paccagnella, D.; Takes, R.P.; Rinaldo, A.; Silver, C.E.; Woolgar, J.A.; Hinni, M.L.; Ferlito, A.

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease can present with a wide variety of extraesophageal symptoms. In particular, the type of disease characterized predominately by laryngopharyngeal reflux may be difficult to diagnose because of the absence of regurgitation or heartburn. The available battery of

  13. Gastric greater curvature plication combined with Nissen fundoplication in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oral Ospanov

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: LNFGP took significantly longer time to perform, but resulted in significantly higher weight reduction and remission/improvement of comorbidities. Both procedures produced similar anti-reflux effect.

  14. Columnar metaplasia in a surgical mouse model of gastro-esophageal reflux disease is not derived from bone marrow-derived cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikou, Susumu; Aida, Junko; Takubo, Kaiyo; Yamagata, Yukinori; Seto, Yasuyuki; Kaminishi, Michio; Nomura, Sachiyo

    2013-09-01

    The incidence of esophageal adenocarcinoma has increased in the last 25 years. Columnar metaplasia in Barrett's mucosa is assumed to be a precancerous lesion for esophageal adenocarcinoma. However, the induction process of Barrett's mucosa is still unknown. To analyze the induction of esophageal columnar metaplasia, we established a mouse gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) model with associated development of columnar metaplasia in the esophagus. C57BL/6 mice received side-to-side anastomosis of the esophagogastric junction with the jejunum, and mice were killed 10, 20, and 40 weeks after operation. To analyze the contribution of bone marrow-derived cells to columnar metaplasia in this surgical GERD model, some mice were transplanted with GFP-marked bone marrow after the operation. Seventy-three percent of the mice (16/22) showed thickened mucosa in esophagus and 41% of mice (9/22) developed columnar metaplasia 40 weeks after the operation with a mortality rate of 4%. Bone marrow-derived cells were not detected in columnar metaplastic epithelia. However, scattered epithelial cells in the thickened squamous epithelia in regions of esophagitis did show bone marrow derivation. The results demonstrate that reflux induced by esophago-jejunostomy in mice leads to the development of columnar metaplasia in the esophagus. However, bone marrow-derived cells do not contribute directly to columnar metaplasia in this mouse model. © 2013 Japanese Cancer Association.

  15. Effects of esomeprazole treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease on quality of life in 12- to 17-year-old adolescents: an international health outcomes study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Although gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is common in adolescents, the burden of GERD on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adolescents has not been previously evaluated. Therefore, the objective of the study was to examine the effect of GERD on HRQOL in adolescents. Methods This international, 31-site, 8-week safety study randomized adolescents, aged 12 to 17 years inclusive, with GERD to receive esomeprazole 20 or 40 mg once daily. The Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia questionnaire (QOLRAD), previously validated in adults, consists of 25 questions grouped into 5 domains: emotional distress, sleep disturbance, food/drink problems, physical/social functioning, and vitality. The QOLRAD was administered at the baseline and week-8 (final) visits. Results Of the 149 patients randomized, 134 completed the QOLRAD at baseline and final visits and were eligible for analysis of their HRQOL data. Baseline QOLRAD scores indicated GERD had a negative effect on the HRQOL of these adolescents, especially in the domains of vitality and emotional distress, and problems with food/drink. At the final visit, mean scores for all 5 QOLRAD domains improved significantly (P esomeprazole treatment, statistically and clinically significant improvements occurred in all domains of the QOLRAD for these adolescents. Trial Registration D9614C00098; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00241501 PMID:19922626

  16. Effects of esomeprazole treatment for gastroesophageal reflux disease on quality of life in 12- to 17-year-old adolescents: an international health outcomes study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gold Benjamin D

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is common in adolescents, the burden of GERD on health-related quality of life (HRQOL in adolescents has not been previously evaluated. Therefore, the objective of the study was to examine the effect of GERD on HRQOL in adolescents. Methods This international, 31-site, 8-week safety study randomized adolescents, aged 12 to 17 years inclusive, with GERD to receive esomeprazole 20 or 40 mg once daily. The Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia questionnaire (QOLRAD, previously validated in adults, consists of 25 questions grouped into 5 domains: emotional distress, sleep disturbance, food/drink problems, physical/social functioning, and vitality. The QOLRAD was administered at the baseline and week-8 (final visits. Results Of the 149 patients randomized, 134 completed the QOLRAD at baseline and final visits and were eligible for analysis of their HRQOL data. Baseline QOLRAD scores indicated GERD had a negative effect on the HRQOL of these adolescents, especially in the domains of vitality and emotional distress, and problems with food/drink. At the final visit, mean scores for all 5 QOLRAD domains improved significantly (P Conclusion GERD had a negative effect on QOL in adolescents. After esomeprazole treatment, statistically and clinically significant improvements occurred in all domains of the QOLRAD for these adolescents. Trial Registration D9614C00098; ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT00241501

  17. The influence of demographic factors and health-related quality of life on treatment satisfaction in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease treated with esomeprazole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Dika Samer

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The correlation between treatment satisfaction and demographic characteristics, symptoms, or health-related quality of life (HRQL in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is unknown. The objective of this study was to assess correlates of treatment satisfaction in patients with GERD receiving a proton pump inhibitor, esomeprazole. Methods Adult GERD patients (n = 217 completed demography, symptom, HRQL, and treatment satisfaction questionnaires at baseline and/or after treatment with esomeprazole 40 mg once daily for 4 weeks. We used multiple linear regressions with treatment satisfaction as the dependent variable and demographic characteristics, baseline symptoms, baseline HRQL, and change scores in HRQL as independent variables. Results Among the demographic variables only Caucasian ethnicity was positively associated with treatment satisfaction. Greater vitality assessed by the Quality of Life in Reflux and Dyspepsia (QOLRAD and worse heartburn assessed by a four-symptom scale at baseline, were associated with greater treatment satisfaction. The greater the improvement on the QOLRAD vitality (change score, the more likely the patient is to be satisfied with the treatment. Conclusions Ethnicity, baseline vitality, baseline heartburn severity, and change in QOLRAD vitality correlate with treatment satisfaction in patients with GERD.

  18. Combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring assists the diagnosis of sliding hiatal hernia in children with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jia-Feng; Hsu, Wei-Chung; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Wang, Hsiu-Po; Hsu, Hong-Yuan; Chang, Mei-Hwei; Ni, Yen-Hsuan

    2013-11-01

    The role of combined multichannel intraluminal impedance and pH monitoring (MII-pH) in diagnosing sliding hiatal hernia in gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) children remains unclear. We aimed to explore the clinical efficacy of MII-pH as a supplement diagnostic method for sliding hiatal hernia. A total of 104 symptomatic GERD children [mean ± standard deviation (SD) age = 4.5 ± 5.5 years] were recruited. All of them were diagnosed as GERD with and without sliding hiatal hernia by barium and/or esophagogastroduodenoscopy study. All subjects received 24 h MII-pH monitoring to test the efficacy of this new modality. Sixteen children were diagnosed to have sliding hiatal hernia, and nine (56.3%) of them received fundoplication. None of non-hiatal hernia children were indicated for fundoplication [risk difference (RD) 0.56; P hiatal hernia children (mean ± SD = 49.2 ± 78.9 vs. 103.7 ± 60.4 episodes; P = 0.01, paired t test). Ratio of reflux episodes detected by pH-probe to that by impedance probes >1 was more frequently noted in sliding hiatal hernia children than non-sliding hiatal hernia children (Odds ratio 58.33, P hiatal hernia in GERD children are 93.8 and 79.6%, respectively. Ratio of reflux episodes detected by pH-probe to that by impedance probes >1 demonstrated by MII-pH study is a good screening test of sliding hiatal hernia in GERD children.

  19. Tratamento da doença do refluxo gastroesofágico Treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabet Vilar Guimarães

    2006-11-01

    literature on the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD with emphasis on pharmacological aspects. To identify particularities of pharmacological treatment of esophageal and extraesophageal manifestations of the disease. SOURCES: Electronic search of the PubMed/MEDLINE and Cochrane Collaboration databases. Controlled and randomized studies published since 2000 and reviews representing consensus positions and directives published within the last 10 years were identified. SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS: The drugs currently available for the treatment of GERD do not act in the primary mechanism of the disease, i.e., transitory relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter. Pharmacological treatment of GERD with symptoms or with esophageal injury is based on the suppression of acid secretion, particularly with proton pump inhibitors. When the hyperreactivity of the lower airways coexists with esophageal GERD symptoms, suppression of acid secretions should be of benefit in managing the respiratory disease in the presence of a causal relationship; however, this is not usual. When esophageal symptoms are not present, esophageal 24-hour pH study should be carried out prior to starting pharmacological treatment for GERD. Improvement of respiratory symptoms may be delayed with relation to esophageal symptoms. It is common for GERD to recur and pharmacological treatment should be repeated or continued indefinitely, depending on clinical presentation of the disease. CONCLUSIONS: The strategies that have been proposed for the pharmacological treatment of GERD in children are primarily based on studies of case series or on studies with adults. There have been very few controlled and randomized studies in children. Undertaking a greater number of these studies might reinforce existing aspects or establish new aspects of management.

  20. Doença do refluxo gastroesofágico e hiperresponsividade das vias aéreas: coexistência além da chance? Gastroesophageal reflux disease and airway hyperresponsiveness: concomitance beyond the realm of chance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Cavalcanti de Albuquerque Ratier

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A doença do refluxo gastroesofágico e a asma são duas condições mundialmente comuns e podem coexistir. Contudo, a natureza da relação entre essas duas doenças ainda não é bem compreendida. Neste artigo, revisamos alguns aspectos controversos da relação entre asma, hiperresponsividade das vias aéreas e refluxo gastroesofágico, tanto em adultos, quanto em crianças.Gastroesophageal reflux disease and asthma are both quite common the world over, and they can coexist. However, the nature of the relationship between these two diseases remains unclear. In this study, we review controversial aspects of the relationships among asthma, airway hyperresponsiveness, and gastroesophageal reflux disease in adults and in children.

  1. Proton pump inhibitor monotherapy and the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, S; Cui, Z; Zhou, M; Li, R; Li, H; Zhang, S; Ba, Y; Cheng, G

    2017-02-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are commonly used as potent gastric acid secretion antagonists for gastro-esophageal disorders and their overall safety in patients with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is considered to be good and they are well-tolerated. However, recent studies have suggested that PPIs may be a potential independent risk factor for cardiovascular adverse events. The aim of our meta-analysis was to examine the association between PPI monotherapy and cardiovascular events in patients with GERD. A literature search involved examination of relevant databases up to July 2015 including PubMed, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, and ClinicalTrial.gov, as well as selected randomized controlled trials (RCTs) reporting cardiovascular events with PPI exposure in GERD patients. In addition, the pooled risk ratio (RR) and heterogeneity were assessed based on a fixed effects model of the meta-analysis and the I2 statistic, respectively. Seventeen RCTs covering 7540 patients were selected. The pooled data suggested that the use of PPIs was associated with a 70% increased cardiovascular risk (RR=1.70, 95% CI: [1.13-2.56], P=.01, I2 =0%). Furthermore, higher risks of adverse cardiovascular events in the omeprazole subgroup (RR=3.17, 95% CI: [1.43-7.03], P=.004, I2 =25%) and long-term treatment subgroup (RR=2.33, 95% CI: [1.33-4.08], P=.003, I2 =0%) were found. PPI monotherapy can be a risk factor for cardiovascular adverse events. Omeprazole could significantly increase the risk of cardiovascular events and, so, should be used carefully. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms and comorbid asthma and posttraumatic stress disorder following the 9/11 terrorist attacks on World Trade Center in New York City.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiehui; Brackbill, Robert M; Stellman, Steven D; Farfel, Mark R; Miller-Archie, Sara A; Friedman, Stephen; Walker, Deborah J; Thorpe, Lorna E; Cone, James

    2011-11-01

    Excess gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) was reported in several populations exposed to the September 11 2001 (9/11) terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center (WTC). We examined new onset gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS) since 9/11 and persisting up to 5-6 years in relation to 9/11-related exposures among the WTC Health Registry enrollees, and potential associations with comorbid asthma and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This is a retrospective analysis of 37,118 adult enrollees (i.e., rescue/recovery workers, local residents, area workers, and passersby in lower Manhattan on 9/11) who reported no pre-9/11 GERS and who participated in two Registry surveys 2-3 and 5-6 years after 9/11. Post-9/11 GERS (new onset since 9/11) reported at first survey, and persistent GERS (post-9/11 GERS reported at both surveys) were analyzed using log-binomial regression. Cumulative incidence was 20% for post-9/11 GERS and 13% for persistent GERS. Persistent GERS occurred more often among those with comorbid PTSD (24%), asthma (13%), or both (36%) compared with neither of the comorbid conditions (8%). Among enrollees with neither asthma nor PTSD, the adjusted risk ratio (aRR) for persistent GERS was elevated among: workers arriving at the WTC pile on 9/11 (aRR=1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3-2.1) or working at the WTC site > 90 days (aRR=1.6; 1.4-2.0); residents exposed to the intense dust cloud on 9/11 (aRR=1.5; 1.0-2.3), or who did not evacuate their homes (aRR=1.7; 1.2-2.3); and area workers exposed to the intense dust cloud (aRR=1.5; 1.2-1.8). Disaster-related environmental exposures may contribute to the development of GERS. GERS may be accentuated in the presence of asthma or PTSD.

  3. A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials to Compare Long-Term Outcomes of Nissen and Toupet Fundoplication for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-chao Tian

    Full Text Available In recent years, several studies with large sample sizes and recent follow-up data have been published comparing outcomes between laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication and laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication. It is now timely to be re-evaluated and synthesized long-term efficacy and adverse events of both total and partial posterior fundoplication.Electronic searches for RCTs comparing the outcome after laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication and laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication were performed in the databases of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Center Register of Controlled Trials. The data of evaluation in positive and adverse results of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication and laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication were extracted and compared using meta-analysis.13 RCTs were ultimately identified involving 814 (52.05% and 750 (47.95% patients who underwent laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication and laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication, respectively. The operative time, perioperative complications, postoperative satisfaction, recurrence, and the rates of medication adoption or re-operation due to recurrence were not significantly different between two groups. The two types of fundoplication both reinforced the anti-reflux barrier and elevated the lower esophageal sphincter pressure. However, rates of adverse results involving dysphasia, gas-bloat syndrome, inability to belch and re-operation due to severe dysphasia were significantly higher after LNF. In the subgroup analysis of wrap length≤2 cm, laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication was associated with a significantly higher incidence of postoperative dysphagia. However, in the subgroup wrap length>2 cm, the difference was not statistically significant.Laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication might be the better surgery approach for gastroesophageal reflux disease with a lower rate of postoperative adverse results and equal effectiveness as Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication.

  4. Rabeprazole vs esomeprazole in non-erosive gastro-esophageal reflux disease: A randomized, double-blind study in urban Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fock, KM; Teo, EK; Ang, TL; Chua, TS; Ng, TM; Tan, YL

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) is becoming increasingly common in Asia. Data on the efficacy of proton pump inhibitors in patients with non-erosive GERD (NERD) in Asia is lacking. This double-blind study compared the efficacy and safety of rabeprazole with esomeprazole in relief of symptoms in patients with NERD. METHODS: One hundred and thirty-four patients with reflux symptoms of NERD and normal endoscopy were randomized to receive rabeprazole 10 mg or esomeprazole 20 mg once daily for 4 wk. Symptoms were recorded in a diary and changes in severity of symptoms noted. RESULTS: At 4 wk of treatment, rabeprazole 10 mg and esomeprazole 20 mg were comparable with regards to the primary endpoint of time to achieve 24-h symptom-free interval for heartburn 8.5 d vs 9 d and regurgitation 6 d vs 7.5 d. Rabeprazole and esomeprazole were also similarly efficacious in term of patient’s global evaluation with 96% of patients on rabeprazole and 87.9% of patients on esomeprazole, reporting that symptoms improved (P = NS). Satisfactory relief of day- and night-time symptoms was achieved in 98% of patients receiving rabeprazole and 81.4% of patients receiving esomeprazole. Adverse events were comparable in both groups (P = NS). CONCLUSION: Rabeprazole 10 mg has a similar efficacy and safety profile in Asians with NERD as esomeprazole 20 mg. Further study is necessary to investigate whether the small differences between the two drugs seen in this study are related to the improved pharmacodynamic properties of rabeprazole. Both drugs were well tolerated. PMID:15918196

  5. Efficacy and safety of once-daily esomeprazole for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in neonatal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Geoffrey; Wenzl, Tobias G; Thomson, Michael; Omari, Taher; Barker, Peter; Lundborg, Per; Illueca, Marta

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of proton pump inhibitors in infants aged esomeprazole 0.5 mg/kg or placebo once daily for up to 14 days. Change from baseline in the total number of GERD symptoms (from video monitoring) and GERD-related signs (from cardiorespiratory monitoring) was assessed with simultaneous esophageal pH, impedance, cardiorespiratory, and 8-hour video monitoring. There were no significant differences between the esomeprazole and placebo groups in the percentage change from baseline in the total number of GERD-related signs and symptoms (-14.7% vs -14.1%, respectively). Mean change from baseline in total number of reflux episodes was not significantly different between esomeprazole and placebo (-7.43 vs -0.2, respectively); however, the percentage of time pH was 5 minutes in duration was significantly decreased with esomeprazole vs placebo (-10.7 vs 2.2 and -5.5 vs 1.0, respectively; P ≤ .0017). The number of patients with adverse events was similar between treatment groups. Signs and symptoms of GERD traditionally attributed to acidic reflux in neonates were not significantly altered by esomeprazole treatment. Esomeprazole was well tolerated and reduced esophageal acid exposure and the number of acidic reflux events in neonates. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The risk factors and quality of life in patients with overlapping functional dyspepsia or peptic ulcer disease with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shou-Wu; Lee, Teng-Yu; Lien, Han-Chung; Yeh, Hong-Zen; Chang, Chi-Sen; Ko, Chung-Wang

    2014-03-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), functional dyspepsia (FD), and peptic ulcer disease (PUD) impact the daily lives of affected individuals. The aim of this study was to compare the risk factors and impacts on life quality of overlapping FD or PUD in patients with GERD. Data from patients diagnosed with GERD were collected between January and November 2009. FD was defined using the Rome III diagnostic criteria. The overlapping GERD-FD or GERD-PUD groups were classified as concomitant GERD and FD or peptic ulcers. The characteristics of these individuals were analyzed. There were 63, 48, and 60 patients in the GERD only, overlapping GERD-FD, and overlapping GERD-PUD groups, respectively. Significantly younger age, female gender, lower body weight and body mass index, and higher rates of tea consumption were noted in the GERD-FD group. Patients in the GERD-FD group exhibited the lowest quality of life scores, both with respect to physical and mental health, on the Short Form 36 domains. Patients with concomitant GERD and FD were more likely to be younger and female. Overlapping GERD and FD had the worst impact on the quality of life of the affected individuals.

  7. Comparative effectiveness and tolerability of esomeprazole and omeprazole in gastro-esophageal reflux disease: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Qian; Wang, Rugang; Liu, Lin; Zhao, Feng; Wang, Sheng

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of esomeprazole and omeprazole in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Electronic searches on PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, and ClinicalTrials.gov databases were carried out for reports up to February 28, 2015. Ten eligible studies from 8 articles were found that enrolled a total of 10,286 patients for meta-analysis. These results revealed a significant difference between esomeprazole vs. omeprazole (RR=1.06, 95% CI [1.01, 1.10], I2=72%, p=0.01) by subgroup according to dosage by random effects model, and a significant difference between esomeprazole 40 mg vs. omeprazole 20 mg (RR=1.07, 95% CI [1.004, 1.14], I2=78%, p=0.04) based on healing rate as determined by endoscopy, using a random effects model. A significant difference between esomeprazole 20 mg and omeprazole 40 mg (RR=0.68, 95% CI [0.47, 0.97], I2=not applicable, p=0.03) was also found in comparing relief of symptoms by random effects model. There were no significant differences in outcomes between other subgroups, including tolerability. Based on these results, a high dose of esomeprazole is recommended for GERD treatment and control in adults.

  8. Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial assessing the efficacy and safety of proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole in infants with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, Susan R; Hassall, Eric; Furmaga-Jablonska, Wanda; Atkinson, Stuart; Raanan, Marsha

    2009-04-01

    To assess the efficacy and safety of lansoprazole in treating infants with symptoms attributed to gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) that have persisted despite a >or= 1-week course of nonpharmacologic management. This multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group study randomized infants with persisting symptoms attributed to GERD to treatment with lansoprazole or placebo for 4 weeks. Symptoms were tracked through daily diaries and weekly visits. Efficacy was defined primarily by a >or= 50% reduction in measures of feeding-related crying and secondarily by changes in other symptoms and global assessments. Safety was assessed based on the occurrence of adverse events (AEs) and clinical/laboratory data. Of the 216 infants screened, 162 met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were randomized. Of those, 44/81 infants (54%) in each group were responders--identical for lansoprazole and placebo. No significant lansoprazole-placebo differences were detected in any secondary measures or analyses of efficacy. During double-blind treatment, 62% of lansoprazole-treated subjects experienced 1 or more treatment-emergent AEs, versus 46% of placebo recipients (P= .058). Serious AEs (SAEs), particularly lower respiratory tract infections, occurred in 12 infants, significantly more frequently in the lansoprazole group compared with the placebo group (10 vs 2; P= .032). This study detected no difference in efficacy between lansoprazole and placebo for symptoms attributed to GERD in infants age 1 to 12 months. SAEs, particularly lower respiratory tract infections, occurred more frequently with lansoprazole than with placebo.

  9. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and dietary behaviors are significant correlates of short sleep duration in the general population: the Nagahama Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murase, Kimihiko; Tabara, Yasuharu; Takahashi, Yoshimitsu; Muro, Shigeo; Yamada, Ryo; Setoh, Kazuya; Kawaguchi, Takahisa; Kadotani, Hiroshi; Kosugi, Shinji; Sekine, Akihiro; Nakayama, Takeo; Mishima, Michiaki; Chiba, Tsutomu; Chin, Kazuo; Matsuda, Fumihiko

    2014-11-01

    To examine relationships among gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms, dietary behaviors, and sleep duration in the general population. Cross-sectional. Community-based. There were 9,643 participants selected from the general population (54 ± 13 y). None. Sleep duration, sleep habits, and unfavorable dietary behaviors of each participant were assessed with a structured questionnaire. Participants were categorized into five groups according to their sleep duration: less than 5 h, 5 to less than 6 h, 6 to less than 7 h, 7 to less than 8 h, and 8 or more h per day. GERD was evaluated using the Frequency Scale for the Symptoms of GERD (FSSG) and participants having an FSSG score of 8 or more or those under treatment of GERD were defined as having GERD. Trend analysis showed that both the FSSG score and the number of unfavorable dietary habits increased with decreasing sleep duration. Further, multiple logistic regression analysis showed that both the presence of GERD (odds ratio = 1.19, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.07-1.32) and the number of unfavorable dietary behaviors (odds ratio = 1.19, 95% CI = 1.13-1.26) were independent and potent factors to identify participants with short sleep duration even after controlling for other confounding factors. The current study showed that both GERD symptoms and unfavorable dietary behaviors were significant correlates of short sleep duration independently of each other in a large sample from the general population.

  10. Improvement of Asthma and Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease With Oral Pulvis stomachicus cum Belladonna, a Combination of Matricaria recutita, Atropa belladonna, Bismuth, and Antimonite: A Pediatric Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Schoen-Angerer, Tido; Madeleyn, René; Kiene, Helmut; Kienle, Gunver S; Vagedes, Jan

    2016-01-01

    The association between gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) and asthma, although well established in adults, is less strong in the pediatric age group. Benefits of proton pump therapy are limited across age ranges. While there is a growing body of literature on the use of complementary treatments for both asthma and GERD, few studies have focused on treatment benefits for the GERD-asthma association. We present the case of a 2-year-old boy with asthma and GERD who was not responding to inhaled, low-dose corticosteroids, beta-mimetic therapy, and a 6-week course of proton pump inhibitor treatment. We noted a gradual disappearance of symptoms when he was given an oral preparation of Pulvis stomachicus cum Belladonna, an anthroposophic medication containing Matricaria recutita, Atropa belladonna, bismuth, and antimonite. Matricaria recutita and bismuth have known gastric protective properties, and Atropa belladonna contains anticholinergic agents that have a bronchodilatory effect. These complementary medications appear promising in terms of relieving the symptoms of GERD-associated asthma.

  11. [Dynamics of autonomic regulation and daily pH-metry in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease under the influence of low-intensity laser irradiation of blood].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burduli, N M; Balayan, M M

    2014-01-01

    102 patients with GERD were examined: 70 female (68%) and 32 men (32%). Age of respondents ranged from 20 to 65 years (average of 45.8 ±8,2). All patients were randomly divided into 2 groups. In the first (control) group (30 people) traditional drug treatment were used according to the standard therapy of GERD (proton pump inhibitors, antacids, prokinetics), patients in the second (main) group (70 people) along with drug therapy has received a course of intravenous laser therapy according to the methods ILIB-405. For intravenous laser treatment Russian apparatus "Matrix-ILIB" ("Matrix", Russia) was used with wavelength 0,405 μm, output power at the end of the main optical path of 1-1.5 mW. Laser blood irradiation was carried out for 15 minutes in the CW mode, the course of treatment was 10 daily treatments with a break on Saturday and Sunday. Conclusions: 1. Intravenous laser irradiation of blood in the complex therapy of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease improved significantly of HRV due to the alignment of parasympathetic regulation circuit and reducing the activity of sympathetic autonomic regulation, 2. the inclusion of intravenous laser irradiation of blood in the complex therapy of patients with GERD was accompanied by reliable normalization of the indicators of the daily pH-metry of the esophagus in patients with GERD.

  12. Additive Effects of Rebamipide Plus Proton Pump Inhibitors on the Expression of Tight Junction Proteins in a Rat Model of Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gweon, Tae-Geun; Park, Jong-Hyung; Kim, Byung-Wook; Choi, Yang Kyu; Kim, Joon Sung; Park, Sung Min; Kim, Chang Whan; Kim, Hyung-Gil; Chung, Jun-Won

    2017-10-27

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of rebamipide on tight junction proteins in the esophageal mucosa in a rat model of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). GERD was created in rats by tying the proximal stomach. The rats were divided into a control group, a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) group, and a PPI plus rebamipide (PPI+R) group. Pantoprazole (5 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally to the PPI and PPI+R groups. An additional dose of rebamipide (100 mg/kg) was administered orally to the PPI+R group. Mucosal erosions, epithelial thickness, and leukocyte infiltration into the esophageal mucosa were measured in isolated esophagi 14 days after the procedure. A Western blot analysis was conducted to measure the expression of claudin-1, -3, and -4. The mean surface area of mucosal erosions, epithelial thickness, and leukocyte infiltration were lower in the PPI group and the PPI+R group than in the control group. Western blot analysis revealed that the expression of claudin-3 and -4 was significantly higher in the PPI+R group than in the control group. Rebamipide may exert an additive effect in combination with PPI to modify the tight junction proteins of the esophageal mucosa in a rat model of GERD. This treatment might be associated with the relief of GERD symptoms.

  13. A population-based survey of the epidemiology of symptom-defined gastroesophageal reflux disease: the Systematic Investigation of Gastrointestinal Diseases in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Jia

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The epidemiology of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD has yet to be investigated using the symptomatic threshold criteria recommended by the Montreal Definition. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of symptom-defined GERD across five regions of China, and to investigate variables associated with GERD. Methods A representative sample of 18 000 adults (aged 18-80 years were selected equally from rural and urban areas in each region (n = 1800. According to the Montreal Definition, GERD is present when mild symptoms of heartburn and/or regurgitation occur on ≥2 days a week, or moderate-to-severe symptoms of heartburn and/or regurgitation occur on ≥1 day a week. Results In total, 16 091 participants completed the survey (response rate: 89.4% and 16 078 responses were suitable for analysis. Applying the Montreal criteria, the prevalence of symptom-defined GERD was 3.1% and varied significantly (p Conclusions This population-based survey found that the prevalence of symptom-defined GERD in China was 3.1%, which is lower than that found in Western countries.

  14. Comparison of presentation and impact on quality of life of gastroesophageal reflux disease between young and old adults in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shou-Wu; Chang, Chia-Ming; Chang, Chi-Sen; Kao, Ai-Wen; Chou, Ming-Chih

    2011-11-07

    To compare the presentation and impact on quality of life of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in old and young age groups. Data from adult patients with GERD diagnosed by endoscopic and symptomic characteristics were collected between January and November 2009. Exclusion criteria included combined peptic ulcers, malignancy, prior surgery, antacid medication for more than 2 mo, and pregnancy. Enrolled patients were assigned to the elderly group if they were 65 years or older, or the younger group if they were under 65 years. They had completed the GERD impact scale, the Chinese GERD questionnaire, and the SF-36 questionnaire. Data from other cases without endoscopic findings or symptoms were collected and these subjects comprised the control group in our study. There were 111 patients with GERD and 44 normal cases: 78 (70.3%) and 33 patients (29.7%) were in the younger and elderly groups, respectively. There were more female patients (60.3%) in the younger group, and more males (72.7%) in the elderly group. The younger cases had more severe and frequent typical symptoms than the elderly patients. Significantly more impairment of daily activities was noted in the younger patients compared with the elderly group, except for physical functioning. Elderly patients with GERD were predominantly male with rare presentation of typical symptoms, and had less impaired quality of life compared with younger patients in a Chinese population.

  15. Dental erosion, an extraesophageal manifestation of gastroesophageal reflux disease: the experience of a center for digestive physiology in Southeastern Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Roesch-Ramos

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental erosion (DE is the loss of the hard tissues of the tooth produced by the action of gastric juice, pepsin and acid on the dental enamel, its frequency ranges from 5to 53.41%. In Mexico there are no reports on the frequency and possible association. Objective: To establish the prevalence of dental erosion and its relationship to GERD. Patients and methods: Prospective, observational, descriptive and comparative study was conducted in 60patients diagnosed with GERD and 60healthy patients at the Institute of Medical and Biological Research of the Universidad Veracruzana in Veracruz city. Anthropometric characteristics, dietary habits, oral hygiene, alcohol consumption, smoking, ED index and Index of decayed/missing dental pieces/sealed and correlation between severity of ED and GERD were analyzed. Results: 78.67% of patients with GERD had ED, 23.33% corresponded to grade 0, 41.67% to N1, N2and 23.33% to 11.67% to N3. Predominance of females (2.3:1. The mean age was 50.92± 13.52years. The severity of dental erosion was significantly related to the severity of reflux, halitosis, CPO index and poor eating habits. There was no statistically significant difference in the other variables analyzed. Conclusions: Dental erosion has a high frequency in patients with GERD and reflux characteristics are directly related to their severity and therefore should be considered as a manifestation of GERD extraesophageal.

  16. Prevalence of reflux esophagitis among patients undergoing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ahmed Gado

    2013-10-25

    steroidal anti- inflammatory drugs and 8 (2%) were consuming alcohol. The duration of RS ranged from one. Abbreviations: GERD, gastro-esophageal reflux disease; NSAIDs, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs; RS, reflux ...

  17. Relationship between reflux and laryngeal cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coca-Pelaz, A.; Rodrigo, J.P.; Takes, R.P.; Silver, C.E.; Paccagnella, D.; Rinaldo, A.; Hinni, M.L.; Ferlito, A.

    2013-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), or its variation known as laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR), has been recognized as a potential cause of several laryngeal disorders. Patients with laryngeal cancer have lifestyle risk factors, especially tobacco and alcohol consumption, that play an etiological

  18. Long-term benefit of transoral incisionless fundoplication using the esophyx device for the management of gastroesophageal reflux disease responsive to medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanidis, Gerasimos; Viazis, Nikos; Kotsikoros, Nikolaos; Tsoukalas, Nikolaos; Lala, Eythymia; Theocharis, Loukas; Fassaris, Andreas; Manolakopoulos, Spilios

    2017-02-01

    Transoral incisionless fundoplication (TIF) using the EsophyX device has been shown to be effective and safe in patients with Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD); however, the subset of patients that would mostly benefit from this technique remains unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of the TIF procedure in patients with a history of esophagitis or proven chronic GERD who have achieved symptom control with the administration of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) but did not wish to continue receiving medications for life. Forty-five patients with typical GERD symptoms (heartburn, regurgitation, chest pain) and a history of esophagitis grade A and B or proven GERD by esophageal pH monitoring underwent TIF using Esophyx. Patients with eosphagitis C and D or those with large hiatal hernias (>2 cm in length) were excluded. The primary clinical effectiveness measure was GERD symptom elimination at follow up based on normalization of the GERD health related quality of life (GERD-HRQL) questionnaire. After a median follow up period of 59 months (36-75) the median GERD-HRQL scores improved significantly from 27 (2-45) at baseline to 4 (0-26) (P < 0.001) in the 44 patients completing the study. Heartburn was eliminated in 12 out of the 21 patients included (57.1%), regurgitation was eliminated in 15 out of the 17 patients included (88.2%) and finally chest pain was eliminated in 5 patients out of the six patients included (83.3%). Overall, 32 patients out of the 44 patients (72.7%) that completed the study follow up reported elimination of their main symptom, without the need for PPI administration (none PPI usage). Furthermore, six more patients (13.6%), five with heartburn, and one with regurgitation reported half PPI dose taken for <50% of the preceding follow up period (occasional PPI usage), while six more patients (four with heartburn, one with regurgitation, and one with chest pain) reported full or half PPI dose taken

  19. Dynamics of Serum Pepsinogens on the Background of Double Standard Doses of Omeprazole in Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Functional Gastric Dyspepsia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.G. Melashchenko

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In literature it has been reported that concentrations of serum pepsinogens increase during administration of proton pump inhibitors (PPI. However, the magnitude of these changes is still to be assessed. The aim of this study was to evaluate the changes in levels of pepsinogen I (PG-1 and pepsinogen II (PG-2 on the background of therapy with omeprazole which has been administered before breakfast in double standard dose (40 mg. The regimen of PPI administration completely corresponds to conventional PPI-test. There were two groups of patients: 1st one (gastroesophageal reflux desiase — 10 women and 9 men, mean age (52.37 ± 3.25 years; 2nd one (functional dyspepsia — 11 women and 8 men, mean age (48.37 ± 3.56 years. It was found that in 1st group PGI rises from (141.90 ± 7.99 mcg/l to (177.61 ± 7.81 mcg/l, in 2nd group — from (115.02 ± 10.16 mcg/l to (152.37 ± 12.33 mcg/l (p < 0.05. PG-2 level changes in the same. In 1st group PG-2 rises from (21.65 ± 3.13 mcg/l to (32.64 ± 3.42 mcg/l, in 2nd group — from (14.84 ± 1.64 mcg/l to (23.55 ± 2.37 mcg/l (p < 0.05. In 6 cases absolute increase of PGI (ΔPG-2 didn’t reach threshold of 7.0 mcg/l considered by us as level of insufficient acid inhibition. Two of these patients had atrophic gastritis (PG-1 < 50 mcg/l; ratio PG-/PG-2 < 3.0, rest 4 patients didn’t have atrophic gastritis but in half cases they hadn’t adequate answer to PPI administration. There was a significant correlation between increase of PG-1 level and disappearance of reflux complaints evaluated by dynamics in RS-cluster of GSRS-questionnaire.

  20. GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE IN PATIENTS WITH FUNCTIONAL DYSPEPSIA AND CONSTIPATION PREDOMINANT IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: CLINICAL FEATURES AND EFFICACY OF LACTULOSE AND ITOPRIDE HYDROCHLORIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Krapivnaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The frequent coexistence of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD with functional dyspepsia (FD and an irritable bowel syndrome (IBS has been described in the literature. Aim: To study the specific features of GERD clinical course and diagnosis in patients with GERD in combination with FD and constipation predominant IBS (IBS-C in comparison to patients with isolated GERD; to assess the efficacy of lactulose and itopride hydrochloride. Materials and methods: A total of 60 patients with GERD, FD (Rome criteria III, and IBS-C (Rome criteria III and 29 patients with isolated GERD were examined. GERD diagnosis was based on clinical, endoscopic, and pH-metric criteria. For 4 weeks 10 patients with combination of non-erosive reflux disease (NERD, FD and IBS-C received lactulose monotherapy and other 10 patients received combination of lactulose with itopride hydrochloride. Clinical symptoms and pH-metric parameters were assessed before and 4 weeks after treatment. Results: Combination of GERD, FD and IBS-C was noted more frequently in women under 40 with normal body mass index (р<0.05. Classic GERD symptoms were absent in 43.4% of patients with gastrointestinal comorbidity and in 10.3% of patients with isolated GERD (р=0.004. A higher prevalence of belching and nausea was found in patients, suffering from GERD, FD and IBS-C, than in those with isolated GERD (р<0.05. After 4-week lactulose and itopride hydrochloride treatment all the patients with GERD, FD and IBS-C showed a reduction of clinical symptoms (p<0.05 and normalization of pH-metric parameters (р<0.001. Conclusion: GERD course in patients with concomitant FD and IBS-C has the following peculiarities: predominance of women, absence of classic GERD-symptoms in almost half of these patients, and frequent combination with other functional symptoms. Combination therapy with lactulose and itopride hydrochloride enables successful control of GERD and FD symptoms as well as

  1. Menthol suppresses laryngeal C-fiber hypersensitivity to cigarette smoke in a rat model of gastroesophageal reflux disease: the role of TRPM8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bi-Yu; Lin, Yu-Jung; Lee, Hung-Fu; Ho, Ching-Yin; Ruan, Ting; Kou, Yu Ru

    2015-03-01

    Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) display enhanced laryngeal reflex reactivity to stimuli that may be due to sensitization of the laryngeal C-fibers by acid and pepsin. Menthol, a ligand of transient receptor potential melastatin-8 (TRPM8), relieves throat irritation. However, the possibility that GERD induces laryngeal C-fiber hypersensitivity to cigarette smoke (CS) and that menthol suppresses this event has not been investigated. We delivered CS into functionally isolated larynxes of 160 anesthetized rats. Laryngeal pH 5-pepsin treatment, but not pH 5-denatured pepsin, augmented the apneic response to CS, which was blocked by denervation or perineural capsaicin treatment (a procedure that blocks the conduction of C fibers) of the superior laryngeal nerves. This augmented apnea was partially attenuated by capsazepine [an transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonist], SB-366791 (a TRPV1 antagonist), and HC030031 [a transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) antagonist] and was completely prevented by a combination of TRPV1 and TRPA1 antagonists. Local application of menthol significantly suppressed the augmented apnea and this effect was reversed by pretreatment with AMTB (a TRPM8 antagonist). Our electrophysiological studies consistently revealed that laryngeal pH 5-pepsin treatment increased the sensitivity of laryngeal C-fibers to CS. Likewise, menthol suppressed this laryngeal C-fiber hypersensitivity and its effect could be reversed by pretreatment with AMTB. Our results suggest that laryngeal pH 5-pepsin treatment increases sensitivity to CS of both TRPV1 and TRPA1, which are presumably located at the terminals of laryngeal C-fibers. This sensory sensitization leads to enhanced laryngeal reflex reactivity and augmentation of the laryngeal C-fiber responses to CS, which can be suppressed by menthol acting via TRPM8. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Greater loss of productivity among Japanese workers with gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) symptoms that persist vs resolve on medical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, H; Matsuzaki, J; Masaoka, T; Inadomi, J M

    2014-06-01

    Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) impairs quality of life; however, the association between GERD and work productivity has not been well investigated in Japan. This study was designed to compare the impact of GERD on productivity between Japanese workers with GERD symptoms that persisted vs resolved on medical therapy. A cross-sectional Web-based survey was conducted in workers. The impact of GERD on work and daily productivity was evaluated using a Web-reported Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire for patients with GERD and a GERD symptom severity Questionnaire. Demographic information, clinical history, and satisfaction with GERD medication were also ascertained. A total of 20 000 subjects were invited to the survey. After the exclusion of patients with a history of gastrointestinal (GI) malignancy, peptic ulcer, upper GI surgery, and unemployment, 650 participants were included in the analysis. Participants with persistent GERD symptoms reported a significantly greater losses of work productivity (11.4 ± 13.4 h/week), absenteeism (0.7 ± 3.1 h/week), presenteeism (10.7 ± 12.6 h/week), costs (20 100 ± 26 800 JPY/week), and lower daily productivity (71.3% [95% confidence interval, 69.0-73.7]) than those whose symptoms were alleviated with medications. The level of dissatisfaction with GERD medications among participants with persistent GERD symptoms was significantly correlated with loss of work and daily productivity (p productivity despite medical therapy. Ineffective GERD therapy is associated with greater productivity loss. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Explaining the increased health care expenditures associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease among elderly Medicare beneficiaries with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cost-decomposition analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajmera, Mayank; Raval, Amit D; Shen, Chan; Sambamoorthi, Usha

    2014-01-01

    To estimate excess health care expenditures associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) among elderly individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and examine the contribution of predisposing characteristics, enabling resources, need variables, personal health care practices, and external environment factors to the excess expenditures, using the Blinder-Oaxaca linear decomposition technique. This study utilized a cross-sectional, retrospective study design, using data from multiple years (2006-2009) of the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey linked with fee-for-service Medicare claims. Presence of COPD and GERD was identified using diagnoses codes. Health care expenditures consisted of inpatient, outpatient, prescription drugs, dental, medical provider, and other services. For the analysis, t-tests were used to examine unadjusted subgroup differences in average health care expenditures by the presence of GERD. Ordinary least squares regressions on log-transformed health care expenditures were conducted to estimate the excess health care expenditures associated with GERD. The Blinder-Oaxaca linear decomposition technique was used to determine the contribution of predisposing characteristics, enabling resources, need variables, personal health care practices, and external environment factors, to excess health care expenditures associated with GERD. Among elderly Medicare beneficiaries with COPD, 29.3% had co-occurring GERD. Elderly Medicare beneficiaries with COPD/GERD had 1.5 times higher ($36,793 vs $24,722 [Pelderly Medicare beneficiaries with COPD, the presence of GERD was associated with higher expenditures. Need factors primarily contributed to the differences in average health care expenditures, suggesting that the comanagement of chronic conditions may reduce excess health care expenditures associated with GERD.

  4. Self-Reported Sleep Bruxism and Nocturnal Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Relationship to Gender and Ethnicity§

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselbacher, Sean; Subramanian, Shyam; Rao, Shweta; Casturi, Lata; Surani, Salim

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives : Nocturnal bruxism is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and GERD is strongly associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Gender and ethnic differences in the prevalence and clinical presentation of these often overlapping sleep disorders have not been well documented. Our aim was to examine the associations between, and the symptoms associated with, nocturnal GERD and sleep bruxism in patients with OSA, and to examine the influence of gender and ethnicity. Methods : A retrospective chart review was performed of patients diagnosed with OSA at an academic sleep center. The patients completed a sleep questionnaire prior to undergoing polysomnography. Patients with confirmed OSA were evaluated based on gender and ethnicity. Associations were determined between sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, and daytime sleepiness, insomnia, restless legs symptoms, and markers of OSA severity in each group. Results : In these patients with OSA, the prevalence of nocturnal GERD (35%) and sleep bruxism (26%) were higher than the general population. Sleep bruxism was more common in Caucasians than in African Americans or Hispanics; there was no gender difference. Nocturnal GERD was similar among all gender and ethnic groups. Bruxism was associated with nocturnal GERD in females, restless legs symptoms in all subjects and in males, sleepiness in African Americans, and insomnia in Hispanics. Nocturnal GERD was associated with sleepiness in males and African Americans, insomnia in females, and restless legs symptoms in females and in Caucasians. Conclusion : Patients with OSA commonly have comorbid sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, which may require separate treatment. Providers should be aware of differences in clinical presentation among different ethnic and gender groups. PMID:25352924

  5. Self-reported sleep bruxism and nocturnal gastroesophageal reflux disease in patients with obstructive sleep apnea: relationship to gender and ethnicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesselbacher, Sean; Subramanian, Shyam; Rao, Shweta; Casturi, Lata; Surani, Salim

    2014-01-01

    Nocturnal bruxism is associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and GERD is strongly associated with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Gender and ethnic differences in the prevalence and clinical presentation of these often overlapping sleep disorders have not been well documented. Our aim was to examine the associations between, and the symptoms associated with, nocturnal GERD and sleep bruxism in patients with OSA, and to examine the influence of gender and ethnicity. A retrospective chart review was performed of patients diagnosed with OSA at an academic sleep center. The patients completed a sleep questionnaire prior to undergoing polysomnography. Patients with confirmed OSA were evaluated based on gender and ethnicity. Associations were determined between sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, and daytime sleepiness, insomnia, restless legs symptoms, and markers of OSA severity in each group. In these patients with OSA, the prevalence of nocturnal GERD (35%) and sleep bruxism (26%) were higher than the general population. Sleep bruxism was more common in Caucasians than in African Americans or Hispanics; there was no gender difference. Nocturnal GERD was similar among all gender and ethnic groups. Bruxism was associated with nocturnal GERD in females, restless legs symptoms in all subjects and in males, sleepiness in African Americans, and insomnia in Hispanics. Nocturnal GERD was associated with sleepiness in males and African Americans, insomnia in females, and restless legs symptoms in females and in Caucasians. Patients with OSA commonly have comorbid sleep bruxism and nocturnal GERD, which may require separate treatment. Providers should be aware of differences in clinical presentation among different ethnic and gender groups.

  6. Healing of Erosive Esophagitis and Improvement of Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease After Esomeprazole Treatment in Children 12 to 36 Months Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolia, Vasundkara; Gilger, Mark A; Barker, Peter N; Illueca, Marta

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate erosive esophagitis healing and symptom improvement with once-daily esomeprazole in children ages 12 to 36 months with endoscopically or histologically proven gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Data from children ages 12 to 36 months were included in a post-hoc analysis of an 8-week, multicenter, randomized, and double-blind by dose strata study of patients ages 1 to 11 years with endoscopically or histologically confirmed GERD. Children were randomized to receive esomeprazole 5 or 10 mg once daily. Patients underwent endoscopy and, if required, mucosal biopsy at baseline. Patients who had erosive esophagitis (graded using the Los Angeles classification system) at baseline underwent a follow-up endoscopy at final study visit to assess healing of erosive esophagitis. Investigators scored severity of GERD symptoms at baseline and every 2 weeks using the Physician Global Assessment. Thirty-one of 109 primary study patients ages 12 to 36 months were included in the post hoc analysis. At baseline, 15 patients (48.4%) had erosive esophagitis, underwent follow-up endoscopy, and were healed after 8 weeks of esomeprazole treatment. Of the 19 patients with moderate-to-severe baseline Physician Global Assessment symptom scores, 84.2% had lower scores by the final visit. Following esomeprazole treatment, GERD symptoms were significantly improved from baseline to final visit (P ≤ 0.0018). Esomeprazole 5 or 10 mg may be used to successfully treat erosive esophagitis and symptoms of GERD in children as young as 1 year. Moreover, although not yet validated in pediatric patients, the Los Angeles classification system was useful in grading erosive esophagitis in children ages 12 to 36 months.

  7. Evaluation of the effectiveness of esomeprazole treatment strategies in the management of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Jingtian; Yu, Yang; Ma, Jianxia; Yu, Xiaofeng

    2016-05-01

    Here we aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of esomeprazole treatment strategies comparing with other proton pump inhibitors (PPI) in clinical practice for six months in the management of patients with symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). An extensive search of the literature focusing on PPI therapeutic evaluation was performed up to December 2014. Risk ratio (RR) with its corresponding 95% confidence intervals (CIs) in each study was chosen as the effect size. Cochrane's Q statistic and I2 test were both conducted to evaluate heterogeneity across individual studies. Meta-regression was conducted to explore the source of heterogeneity and sensitive analysis was performed to assess the risk bias for the meta-analysis. Totally, eleven trials with high quality enrolled in the meta-analysis. Esomeprazole therapy (20 mg daily) had lower relapse rates than other drugs during six months maintenance treatment (RR = 0.67; 95% CI: 0.55-0.83). Heartburn (RR = 0.72; 95% CI: 0.57-0.92) and epigastric pain (RR = 0.82, 95% Cl: 0.70-0.96) were less likely to happen after esomeprazole treatment, and no significant advantage was found on acid regurgitation and dysphagia. Moreover, lower risk for serious adverse events was observed after esomeprazole therapy (RR = 1.40, 95% CI: 1.04-1.88). Blind method or difference controlled drugs did not influence heterogeneity across studies. Moreover, the conclusion on acid regurgitation, abdominal pain and dysphagia might be unstable. In GERD patients, esomeprazole 20 mg daily is more effective than other PPIs regarding relapse rates, symptoms of epigastric pain and heartburn, and serious adverse events.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and Acid-suppressive Effects of Esomeprazole in Infants 1-24 Months Old With Symptoms of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omari, Taher; Davidson, Geoffrey; Bondarov, Patrik; Nauclér, Emma; Nilsson, Catarina; Lundborg, Per

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the pharmacokinetics and acid-suppressive effects of esomeprazole in infants with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In this single-blind, randomized, parallel-group study, 50 infants 1 to 24 months old with symptoms of GERD, and ≥ 5% of time with intraesophageal pH esomeprazole 0.25 mg/kg (n = 26) or 1 mg/kg (n = 24) once daily for 1 week. Intraesophageal and intragastric pH were recorded at 1 week, and blood samples were taken for pharmacokinetic analysis. At baseline, mean percentages of time with intragastric pH >4 and intraesophageal pH esomeprazole 0.25 mg/kg group and 28.6% and 12.5% in the esomeprazole 1 mg/kg group. After 1 week of treatment, times with intragastric pH >4 were 47.9% and 69.3% in the esomeprazole 0.25 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg groups, respectively (P 5 minutes duration decreased from 6 at baseline to 3 and 2 with esomeprazole 0.25 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg, respectively. The geometric mean AUC0-t of esomeprazole were 0.24 and 1.79 μmol · h/L for the 0.25 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg dosages of esomeprazole, respectively. Both esomeprazole dosages were well tolerated. Oral treatment with esomeprazole 0.25 mg/kg and 1 mg/kg was well tolerated and provided dose-related acid suppression, dose-related exposure to esomeprazole, and decreased esophageal acid exposure in infants 1-24 months old with GERD.

  9. Double-blind controlled study on the efficacy of sodium alginate (Gaviscon) in reducing gastroesophageal reflux assessed by 24 h continuous pH monitoring in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buts, J P; Barudi, C; Otte, J B

    1987-03-01

    We studied the effects of an alginate compound (Gaviscon) on the frequency and the duration of gastroesophageal reflux (GOR) episodes in children. Twenty infants and children with characteristic symptoms of GOR were divided at random into two groups which were given either Gaviscon (ten patients, mean age: 21 months) or a placebo (ten patients, mean age: 35 months). A continuous pH probe monitoring of the lower oesophageal third was performed in all the patients before and after 8 days of treatment. Before the trial, sensitive pH monitoring variables of acid reflux (Euler-Byrne index, percentage of total reflux time per 24 h, mean duration and percentage of reflux time during sleep, total number of reflux episodes per 24 h and number of reflux episodes per 2 h post-cibal periods) were abnormal in all the patients tested. The oesophagram revealed a GOR in 13 of the 20 patients; none of the children who underwent an endoscopy had evidence of oesophagitis. Episodes of regurgitation reported by the parents decreased during Gaviscon therapy while no clinical improvement was noticed in the placebo group. No adverse effects were observed. After 8 days of treatment with Gaviscon, results of all the pH monitoring variables were significantly (P less than 0.05) reduced between -35% and -61% of the initial values recorded. In the placebo treated group, the mean values remained little changes (-9.5 to +8.2% of initial values). These data suggest that Gaviscon may prove useful in the medical management of GOR in infants and children.

  10. Efficacy of low-dose lansoprazole in the treatment of non-erosive gastroesophageal reflux disease: Influence of infection by Helicobacter pylori Eficacia de lansoprazol a dosis bajas en el tratamiento de la enfermedad por reflujo gastroesofágico no erosiva: Influencia de la infección por Helicobacter pylori

    OpenAIRE

    M. Castro Fernández; E. García Díaz; J. L. Larraona; M. C. Rodríguez Hornillo; E. Lamas Rojas; D. Núñez Hospital; M. Pallarés Querol

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are the most effective drugs to cure peptic esophagitis and control the symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). In most patients with GERD esophagitis is not detected by endoscopy, which represents GERD with a negative endoscopy or non-erosive reflux disease (NERD). The influence of infection by H. pylori in the evolution of GERD is controversial since a protective action is identified by some studies, but not all. We conducted a clinica...

  11. Gastroesophageal reflux disease-related symptom recurrence in patients discontinuing proton pump inhibitors for Bravo wireless esophageal pH monitoring study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Schey

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD are treated with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs. Those that do not achieve symptom relief, or non-responders, usually undergo esophageal pH monitoring off PPIs in order to confirm the presence of GERD. Aims: To assess the efficacy of the reverse-PPI trial in evaluating the presence of GERD or its recurrence rates, as well as to identify a correlation between the symptom recurrence rates and GERD severity determined by 48-hour Bravo esophageal pH-monitor testing. Methods: A final total of 205 patients that underwent the 48-hour Bravo esophageal pH-monitoring study were retrospectively included. Patients discontinued PPI usage for at least 7 days prior to testing, and completed symptom questionnaires during the 2-day test. The Bravo test was considered positive if the percentage of time with esophageal pH 4.4%. Results: A total of 363 patients underwent 48-hour Bravo testing and of those patients, 205 were eligible for the study. Ninety-two patients reported symptoms as being «same/better» and 113 as being «worse» after stopping PPIs. Of the 92 patients with improved symptoms, 44 (48% had documented acid reflux during the Bravo study, compared with 65 of 113 (58% patients with worsening symptoms that also complained of acid reflux. Of the 109 patients found to have confirmed GERD upon pH monitoring, 65 (59.6% reported a worsening of symptoms, compared with 48 of 96 (50.0% patients without GERD (p = 0.043. Main symptoms stated to be worse included heartburn, chest pain, regurgitation, nausea, and belching (p  7 days (p = 0.042 Conclusion: Symptom exacerbation following PPI cessation for at least 7 days correlated with acid reflux severity assessed by Bravo testing. Patients off PPIs for 7 days had a higher likelihood of experiencing worsening symptoms, compared with those off PPIs for more than 7 days. These findings suggest that when PPIs are held for 7 days or less prior to

  12. Experience in the Use of Psychocorrection Therapy in the Comprehensive Treatment of Patients with Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Combined with Dysfunction of the Biliary System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Demeshkina

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, due to the rapid increase in the number of stress factors, it is especially important to use psychotherapy and psychopharmacotherapy in the combination treatment of patients with diseases of the gastrointestinal tract. Psychogenic overlaying plays a leading role in the clinical picture of the disease and determines the decreased performance in patients. Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of therapy with psychocorrective agents in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD associated with dysfunction of the biliary system, if they have depressive and anxiety symptoms. Materials and methods. All patients were divided into 2 groups: group I consisted of 27 patients, who received only basic combination treatment, group II — of 25 patients, who in addition to the basic treatment received thioridazine, which is a piperidine derivative of phenothiazine and belongs to the group of neuroleptics. Both groups were representative by the age, duration and course of the disease. All patients demonstrate anxiety and depressive symptoms on the HADS scale. Questionnaire SF‑36 was used to analyze the quality of life. Treatment efficacy was assessed 14 days after. Results. As a result of the treatment, an improvement in overall well-being was observed in both groups against the background of reduction in the pain and dyspeptic syndromes. Additional prescription of psychocorrectives (thioridazine to the basic therapy results in greater positive changes in the intensity of anxiety and depressive symptoms. The distribution of patients by the level of anxiety and depression after treatment showed that these indicators were absent more often in group II (by 2.6 and 1.5 times, respectively. However, cases of clinically significant anxiety and depression were 4.6 and 3.7 times more often in patients, who did not receive thioridazine. The difference in points between the level of anxiety and depression before and after the treatment was 4

  13. Explaining the increased health care expenditures associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease among elderly Medicare beneficiaries with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a cost-decomposition analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajmera M

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Mayank Ajmera,1 Amit D Raval,1 Chan Shen,2 Usha Sambamoorthi1 1Department of Pharmaceutical Systems and Policy, School of Pharmacy, School of Medicine, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, USA; 2Department of Biostatistics and Health Services Research, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, USA Objective: To estimate excess health care expenditures associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD among elderly individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and examine the contribution of predisposing characteristics, enabling resources, need variables, personal health care practices, and external environment factors to the excess expenditures, using the Blinder-Oaxaca linear decomposition technique. Methods: This study utilized a cross-sectional, retrospective study design, using data from multiple years (2006-2009 of the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey linked with fee-for-service Medicare claims. Presence of COPD and GERD was identified using diagnoses codes. Health care expenditures consisted of inpatient, outpatient, prescription drugs, dental, medical provider, and other services. For the analysis, t-tests were used to examine unadjusted subgroup differences in average health care expenditures by the presence of GERD. Ordinary least squares regressions on log-transformed health care expenditures were conducted to estimate the excess health care expenditures associated with GERD. The Blinder-Oaxaca linear decomposition technique was used to determine the contribution of predisposing characteristics, enabling resources, need variables, personal health care practices, and external environment factors, to excess health care expenditures associated with GERD. Results: Among elderly Medicare beneficiaries with COPD, 29.3% had co-occurring GERD. Elderly Medicare beneficiaries with COPD/GERD had 1.5 times higher ($36,793 vs $24,722 [P<0.001] expenditures than did those with COPD/no GERD. Ordinary

  14. The changing patterns of dispensing branded and generic drugs for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease between 2006 and 2011 in Japan: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Kyoko; Hinotsu, Shiro; Hamada, Shota; Ezoe, Yasumasa; Muto, Manabu; Kawakami, Koji

    2015-02-27

    Despite rising healthcare costs, generic drugs are less frequently dispensed in Japan compared with other developed countries. This study aimed to describe changes in dispensing of branded and generic drugs and to explore possible factors that promote the use of generic drugs. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using a Japanese medical and pharmacy claims database. All proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and histamine H2-receptor antagonists (H2RAs) with indications for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) described on Japanese labels were included. Patterns of dispensing branded and generic drugs for the treatment of GERD between 2006 and 2011 were analyzed. Multivariate logistic regression was applied to investigate factors associated with receiving generic drugs. The study cohort included 14,590 patients (male: 50.2%, mean age: 43.1 years). Branded drugs for GERD were still frequently dispensed despite an increase in the share of generic drugs. Only 4.3% of patients who initially received branded drugs switched to generic drugs. The percentage of patients who received only generic drugs increased over time (6.5% to 22.1%). The frequency of generic drug dispensing was the highest in the setting where both prescription and dispensing were implemented in clinics (43.3%), while the lowest in the setting where both prescription and dispensing were implemented in hospitals (11.5%). Factors associated with receiving generic drugs included year of dispensing (adjusted OR 2.22, 95% CI 1.94 to 2.55 for 2009-11 v 2006-8), prescription and dispensing setting (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.44 to 2.26 for prescription in hospitals and dispensing in community pharmacies; OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.80 to 2.72 for prescription in clinics and dispensing in community pharmacies; and OR 4.55, 95% CI 3.68 to 5.62 for prescription and dispensing in clinics v prescription and dispensing in hospitals) and H2RAs (OR 1.64, 95% CI 1.49 to 1.81 compared to PPIs). The share of generic drugs for the

  15. Special features of sleep disorders and depressive disturbances in patients with isolated gastroesophageal reflux disease and in conjunction with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Галина Дмитриевна Фадеенко

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim – to study the special features of sleep disorders and depression intensity in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD and GERD in conjunction with coronary artery disease (CAD by the method of questionnaire and to compare results with clinical and functional manifestations of comorbidity.Methods. There were examined 65 patients with GERD and CAD (group 1 and 29 patients with GERD (group 2. Sleep disorders and depression were studied using questionnaires: subjective sleep characteristics (SSC, (Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS,Beck scale for depression (BSD.Results. Sleep disorders took place in 41 (61,54 % patients from group 1 and 13 (44,83 % patients from group 2. The mean point of SSC was 17,75±1,98 in group 1 opposite to18,59±1,12 in group 2 (p= 0,043. The mean point of ESS was 9,75±1,59 in group 1opposite to 9,24±1,18 in group 2, p=0,103. The mean point of BDS was 11,89±4,38 in group 1opposite to 8,86±1,30 in group 2, p= 0,004. In the group 1 it was established a correlation between SSC and patient’s age (r=- 0320; p=0,0075, BSD and age (r=0,371; p=0,0024, ESS and body mass index(r=0,291; p=0,0188. There were established correlations between duration of CAD and SSC (r=-0,315; p=0,011, CAD and ESS (r=0,273; p=0,0280, CAD and BSD (r=0,379; p=0,0018, GERD heaviness and SSC (p=0,0498, BSD and SSC (r= - 0,676; p=0,000 and between BSD and ESS (r=0,583; p=0,000 in group 1. In group 2 ESS correlated with age (r=0,379; p=0,0426.Conclusions. The conjunction of GERD and CAD can be considered as two mutually potential pathological processes that have a negative effect on such indicators as sleep and psycho-emotional status of patient

  16. Potentiated clinoptilolite: artificially enhanced aluminosilicate reduces symptoms associated with endoscopically negative gastroesophageal reflux disease and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potgieter W

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Wilna Potgieter, Caroline Selma Samuels, Jacques Renè SnymanDepartment of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Pretoria, Gauteng, South AfricaPurpose: The cation exchanger, a potentiated clinoptilolite (Absorbatox™ 2.4D, is a synthetically enhanced aluminosilicate. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible benefits of a potentiated clinoptilolite as a gastroprotective agent in reducing the severity of clinical symptoms and signs associated with 1 endoscopically negative gastroesophageal reflux disease (ENGORD and 2 nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID medication.Methods and patients: Two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot studies, the ENGORD and NSAID studies, were conducted. After initial negative gastroscopy, a total of 25 patients suffering from ENGORD were randomized to receive either placebo capsules or 750 mg Absorbatox twice daily for 14 days. The NSAID study recruited 23 healthy patients who received orally either 1,500 mg Absorbatox or placebo three times daily, plus 500 mg naproxen twice daily. Patients underwent gastroscopic evaluation of their stomach linings prior to and on day 14 of the study. Gastric biopsies were obtained and evaluated via the upgraded Sydney system, whereas visible gastric events and status of the gastric mucosa were evaluated via a 0–3 rating scale. During both studies, patients recorded gastric symptoms in a daily symptom diary.Results: In the ENGORD study, patients who received the potentiated clinoptilolite reported a significant reduction (P≤0.05 in severity of symptoms including reduction in heartburn (44%, discomfort (54%, and pain (56%. Symptom-free days improved by 41% compared to the group who received placebo (not significant. This was over and above the benefits seen with the proton pump inhibitor. In the NSAID study, the reduction in gastric symptom severity was echoed in the group who received the potentiated

  17. Helicobacter pylori infection has no impact on manometric and pH-metric findings in adolescents and young adults with gastroesophageal reflux and antral gastritis: eradication results to no significant clinical improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Xinias

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between Helicobacter pylori (Hp gastritis and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD remains controversial. The aim was to investigate the association between Hp infection and gastroesophageal reflux (GER and the impact of Hp eradication on esophageal acid exposure and motility in adolescents and young adults with Hp gastritis and GERD. Sixty-four patients with symptoms suggestive for GERD, of which 40 Hp-positive (group A and 24 Hp-negative (group B, underwent endoscopy-biopsy, esophageal manometry and 24-hour pH-metry. All group A patients received eradication treatment and were re-evaluated six months later again with 24-hour pH-metry, esophageal manometry, endoscopy-biopsy and clinical assessment. At inclusion, there were no significant differences between the two groups regarding sex, age, grade of endoscopic esophagitis, manometric and pH-metry findings. All Hp-positive patients had an antral predominant gastritis. Eradication of Hp was successful in all patients, and gastritis and esophagitis were healed in all patients. The mean lower esophageal sphincter pressure (LESP increased significantly from 11.25 mmHg before to 11.71 mmHg after eradication (P<0.05. A significant decrease in reflux index was observed (mean RI 6.02% before versus 4.96% after eradication (P<0.05. However clinical symptoms of GER improved not significantly after 6 months follow up. Conclusively, in children and young adults with GER symptoms and GERD, the presence or absence of Hp has no impact on manometric and pH-metric findings. Eradication of Hp infection results in increase in LESP with a consequent decrease in esophageal acid exposure but not significant clinical improvement.

  18. Refluxo gastroesofágico participando da cascata cognitiva do pânico Gastroesophageal reflux participating on panic cognitive cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalil Duailibi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O transtorno do pânico (TP é um transtorno ansioso não-fóbico que acomete de 1,5% a 4% da população mundial. É caracterizado por ataques imotivados de mal-estar psíquico e sintomas somáticos, além de ansiedade antecipatória à crise, com prejuízo funcional ao indivíduo. O objetivo deste relato de caso é descrever a associação entre transtorno do pânico e doença do refluxo gastroesofágico (DRGE. MCL, 25 anos, apresentava crises de pânico frequentes, pouco responsivas ao tratamento durante 6 meses, mesmo com readequação da farmacoterapia. Iniciou-se investigação, sendo fechado o diagnóstico de DRGE, cujo tratamento culminou em remissão das crises de pânico. A dor torácica aguda da DRGE era interpretada como ameaça proximal, ocasionando dúvidas sobre passar mal e hiperventilação, servindo como gatilho da cascata cognitiva do pânico, no mesencéfalo dorsal. A inflamação da mucosa esofágica funciona como ameaça distal, estimulando a amígdala e causando ansiedade antecipatória, mantendo a elevação dos hormônios de estresse. Segundo o modelo de Deakin-Graeff, embora a 5-HT iniba o ataque de pânico e facilite a ansiedade antecipatória, no TP esta última é estimulada por meio do núcleo dorsal da rafe. Portanto, casos que incluem a associação TP e DRGE devem ser mais bem examinados, para que haja diagnóstico e tratamento adequados.Panic disorder (PD is a non phobic anxiety disorder that affects 1,5 to 4% worldwide. It is characterized by unmotivated acute attacks, with mental and somatic symptoms, and by an anxiety which precedes the crises, resulting in functional disturbance. The objective of this case study is to describe the association between PD and gastroesophageal reflux (GR. MCL, 25 years, presented with frequent panic crises, with low response to the therapy for 6 months, even after modification of medication doses. Investigation was carried out and diagnoses defined as GR. The treatment resulted

  19. Estudo de alterações na cavidade oral em pacientes com doença do refluxo gastroesofágico Study in oral cavity alterations in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Canteras Scarillo Falotico Corrêa

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available RACIONAL: A doença do refluxo gastroesofágico, afecção de elevada e crescente incidência, pode se manifestar através de sintomas típicos (pirose e regurgitação e atípicos (pulmonares, otorrinolaringológicos e bucais. OBJETIVO:Analisar as alterações na cavidade oral de pacientes com a doença do refluxo gastroesofágico. MÉTODOS: Foram estudados 100 pacientes, sendo 50 acometidos por doença do refluxo gastroesofágico (grupo 1 e 50 controles (grupo 2. Todos os pacientes foram submetidos a exame clínico oral e questionário específico, e naqueles do grupo 1, foram realizadas endoscopia digestiva alta e manometria e pHmetria esofágicas. RESULTADOS: A endoscopia digestiva alta demonstrou esofagite em todos os pacientes, sendo erosiva em 20, não-erosiva em 30 e hérnia hiatal em 38. A pressão média no esfíncter inferior do esôfago foi de 11 ± 4,8 mm Hg e no superior de 75 ± 26,5 mm Hg. Em 42 pacientes do grupo 1 (84% foi observado refluxo gastroesofágico patológico. O exame clínico oral mostrou: erosões dentárias no grupo 1: 273 faces e no grupo 2: 5; dentes cariados no grupo 1: 23 e 115 no grupo 2; abrasão no grupo 1: 58 e no grupo 2: 95; desgaste por atrito: 408 no grupo 1 e 224 no grupo 2. A face dental mais acometida foi a palatina. No grupo 1, 21 pacientes referiam queixas de aftas freqüentes, 35 sensibilidade dentária, 26 ardência bucal e 42 gosto azedo na boca. Naqueles do grupo 2 estas queixas foram observadas em menor número de pacientes. CONCLUSÕES: Os doentes com doença do refluxo gastroesofágico apresentam maior incidência de erosões dentárias, aftas, ardência bucal, sensibilidade dentária e gosto azedo que os controles e menor incidência de lesões cariosas em relação aos controles.BACKGROUND: The gastroesophageal reflux disease, which has become highly and increasingly incident, may be manifested by typical (pyrosis and regurgitation and atypical (pulmonary, otorhinolaryngological and buccal

  20. Sleeve gastrectomy with anti-reflux procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Sergio; Lacombe, Arnaldo; Aquino, Caio Gustavo Gaspar de; Malzoni, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Sleeve gastrectomy is the fastest growing surgical procedure to treat obesity in the world but it may cause or worsen gastroesophageal reflux disease. This article originally aimed to describe the addition of anti-reflux procedures (removal of periesophageal fats pads, hiatoplasty, a small plication and fixation of the gastric remnant in position) to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and to report early and late results. Eighty-eight obese patients that also presented symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease were submitted to sleeve gastrectomy with anti-reflux procedures. Fifty of them were also submitted to a transit bipartition. The weight loss of these patients was compared to consecutive 360 patients previously submitted to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and to 1,140 submitted to sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition. Gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms were specifically inquired in all anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy patients and compared to the results of the same questionnaire applied to 50 sleeve gastrectomy patients and 60 sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition patients that also presented preoperative symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. In terms of weight loss, excess of body mass index loss percentage after anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy is not inferior to the usual sleeve gastrectomy and anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition is not inferior to sleeve gastrectomy + transit bipartition. Anti-reflux sleeve gastrectomy did not add morbidity but significantly diminished gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms and the use of proton pump inhibitors to treat this condition. The addition of anti-reflux procedures, such as hiatoplasty and cardioplication, to the usual sleeve gastrectomy did not add morbidity neither worsened the weight loss but significantly reduced the occurrence of gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms as well as the use of proton pump inhibitors.

  1. A meta-analysis of long follow-up outcomes of laparoscopic Nissen (total) versus Toupet (270°) fundoplication for gastro-esophageal reflux disease based on randomized controlled trials in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xing; Hu, Zhiwei; Yan, Chao; Zhang, Chao; Wang, Zhonggao; Wu, Jimin

    2016-08-02

    Laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication (LNF) is the most common surgical procedure for the surgical management of gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD). Laparoscopic Toupet fundoplication (LTF) has been reported to have a lower prevalence of postoperative complications yet still obtain a similar level of reflux control. We conducted a meta-analysis to confirm the value of LNF and LTF. PubMed, Medline, Embase, Cochrane Library and Springerlink were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing LNF and LTF. Data regarding the benefits and adverse results of two techniques were extracted and compared using a meta-analysis. Eight eligible RCTs comparing LNF (n = 625) and LTF (n = 567) were identified. There were no significant differences between LNF and LTF with regard to hospitalization duration, perioperative complications, patient satisfaction, postoperative heartburn, regurgitation, postoperative DeMeester scores, or esophagites. A shorter operative time and higher postoperative lower esophageal sphincter pressure were associated with LNF. Prevalence of postoperative dysphagia, gas-bloating, inability to belch, dilatation for dysphagia and reoperation were higher after LNF, but subgroup analyses showed that differences with respect to dysphagia between LNF and LTF disappeared over time. Subgroup analyses did not support "tailored therapy" according to preoperative esophageal motility. LNF and LTF have equivalently good control of GERD and result in a similar prevalence of patient satisfaction. Based on current evidence, it is not rational or advisable to abandon LNF when choosing a surgical procedure for GERD.

  2. Achados audiológicos e linguagem em gêmeas regurgitadoras Audiology and language findings in twins with gastroesophageal reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Henrique Lira de Andrade

    2009-09-01

    findings and the speech development in regurgitating twin sisters. The following steps were accomplished for this study: gathering data in medical registers, patient medical reports and gathering family history. In the data medical registers, beyond the Audiology speech findings, we also found a boarding type of used therapeutic approach and the daily objective planning that guided the sessions. RESULTS: children showed absence of otoacoustic emissions caused by transient stimulation, distortion product, and evoked hearing potential of the brain stem by air and by bone conduction with bilaterally electrophysiological threshold in 30 and 35dBNA, and a light degree hearing loss was suggested in the findings. In this follow-up, they had episodes of secretary otitis media, confirmed by the otolaryngology evaluation and tympanometric curves as for type B and C. Children initiated the speech therapy with ten-months age. Thirty-two therapeutical sessions were accomplished for subject A.B., 28 for subject A.E., in a period of eleven months, in which the children demonstrated improvements as for the language phase of the speech development, however they were not compatible with the age observed in studied literature. CONCLUSION: the two children with gastroesophageal reflux showed conductive loss, floating hearing in the first two years of life and delay in speech development. Although their productions show delay, it was possible to observe significant improvement of the children in relation to the therapeutical speech process.

  3. Laryngopharyngeal reflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Šereg-Bahar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In 4–10 % of patients with gastroesophageal reflux (GER some atypical symptoms are found (cough, hoarseness, globus pharyngeus, dyspnea which are characteristic for laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR. The signs of LPR can be detected in more than 50 % of dysphonic patients. In the diagnostics of LPR, a meticulous history and a videoendoscopy of the larynx and pharynx are the most important procedures. The diagnosis of LPR can be confirmed by the 24-hour double probe pH monitoring and the treatment test with proton pump inhibitors. The best diagnostic results can be obtained with a combination of several diagnostic procedures.Conclusions: An otorhinolaryngologist can start a treatment test with proton pump inhibitors in a patient in whom a laryngopharyngeal reflux is suspected on the basis of history and laryngopharyngeal endoscopy. A successful treatment requires at least 12 weeks regimen with high doses 20 mg twice a day. In the case of alarm signs and unsuccessful treatment a gastroenterologic intervention is necessary.

  4. Gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in a Danish population: a prospective follow-up analysis of symptoms, quality of life, and health-care use

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jane Møller; Wildner-Christensen, Mette; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2009-01-01

    Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS)), and quality of life (the Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey (SF-36)) at inclusion and after 5 years. GERS was defined as a mean score > or =2 in the reflux dimension in the GSRS. Information on use of health-care resources was drawn from the questionnaires and registers...

  5. Dilated intercellular spaces in subtypes of gastroesophagic reflux disease Dilatación de los espacios intercelulares en los subtipos de la enfermedad por reflujo gastroesofágico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Álvaro-Villegas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: dilatation of the intercellular spaces by electron microscopy has been considered as an early morphological marker of tissue injury in gastroesophageal reflux disease. The degree of dilatation in Barrett's esophagus is currently unknown. Objectives: to determine the frequency of dilated intercellular spaces in Barrett's esophagus. Material and methods: cross-sectional and prospective analysis of consecutive patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. We selected symptomatic patients > 18 years and both sexes. Patients with recent PPI use (Introducción: la dilatación de los espacios intercelulares mediante microscopia electrónica se considera un marcador morfológico temprano de daño tisular en la enfermedad por reflujo gastroesofágico. El grado de dilatación en el esófago de Barrett se desconoce actualmente. Objetivos: determinar la frecuencia y grado de la dilatación de los espacios intercelulares en el esófago de Barrett. Material y métodos: series de casos consecutivos con análisis transversal y prospectivo de pacientes con reflujo gastroesofágico. Criterios de selección: > 18 años, sintomáticos, ambos sexos. Se excluyeron aquellos con ingesta de IBP, antagonistas H-2, AINE y cirugía previa. Tomamos datos clínicos, cuestionario de Carlsson-Dent, endoscopia, pH-metría (no erosivos, y biopsias de la mucosa normal a 2 y 5 cm por encima de la unión escamo-columnar. La medición de la dilatación de los espacios intercelulares fue por microscopia electrónica. Estadística: descriptiva. Prueba de Chi-cuadrado con nivel de significancia de 0,05. Se compararon 4 grupos: a enfermedad por reflujo no erosiva (n = 14; b esofagitis erosiva (n = 5; c esófago de Barrett (n = 13; y d controles sanos (n = 5. Resultados: hubo mayor dilatación de los espacios intercelulares en el esófago de Barrett (5 cm, 2,72 ± 1,3 μm vs. 2 cm, 1,7 ± 0,48 μm (p = 0,001. Los otros grupos mostraron menor dilatación y sin diferencias

  6. Dose-Finding Study of Omeprazole on Gastric pH in Neonates with Gastro-Esophageal Acid Reflux Using a Bayesian Sequential Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaguelidou, Florentia; Alberti, Corinne; Biran, Valerie; Bourdon, Olivier; Farnoux, Caroline; Zohar, Sarah; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2016-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors are frequently administered on clinical symptoms in neonates but benefit remains controversial. Clinical trials validating omeprazole dosage in neonates are limited. The objective of this trial was to determine the minimum effective dose (MED) of omeprazole to treat pathological acid reflux in neonates using reflux index as surrogate marker. Double blind dose-finding trial with continual reassessment method of individual dose administration using a Bayesian approach, aiming to select drug dose as close as possible to the predefined target level of efficacy (with a credibility interval of 95%). Neonatal Intensive Care unit of the Robert Debré University Hospital in Paris, France. Neonates with a postmenstrual age ≥ 35 weeks and a pathologic 24-hour intra-esophageal pH monitoring defined by a reflux index ≥ 5% over 24 hours were considered for participation. Recruitment was stratified to 3 groups according to gestational age at birth. Five preselected doses of oral omeprazole from 1 to 3 mg/kg/day. Primary outcome, measured at 35 weeks postmenstrual age or more, was a reflux index omeprazole initiation. Fifty-four neonates with a reflux index ranging from 5.06 to 27.7% were included. Median age was 37.5 days and median postmenstrual age was 36 weeks. In neonates born at less than 32 weeks of GA (n = 30), the MED was 2.5mg/kg/day with an estimated mean posterior probability of success of 97.7% (95% credibility interval: 90.3-99.7%). The MED was 1mg/kg/day for neonates born at more than 32 GA (n = 24). Omeprazole is extensively prescribed on clinical symptoms but efficacy is not demonstrated while safety concerns do exist. When treatment is required, the daily dose needs to be validated in preterm and term neonates. Optimal doses of omeprazole to increase gastric pH and decrease reflux index below 5% over 24 hours, determined using an adaptive Bayesian design differ among neonates. Both gestational and postnatal ages account for these

  7. [EVALUATION OF QUALITY INDICATORS OF LIFE AS A CRITERION OF THE EFFICIENCY OF TREATMENT FOR LIQUIDATORS OF THE ACCIDENT AT CHERNOBYL AEROSPHORUS, PATIENTS WITH HYPERTENSION DISEASE COMORBID WITH GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synelnik, V; Oparin, A

    2017-04-01

    In order to assess the quality of life of liquidators of the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (CHPP) of patients with hypertensive comorbid disease with gastroesophageal reflux disease, 52 patients aged 46 to 71 years (mean age 57.5±0, 8 years old) who were on inpatient treatment in the therapeutic department of the Regional Clinical Specialized Dispensary for Radiation Protection of the Population of Kharkov from January 2016 to December 2016. The men among the examined were 44 (84.6%), women - 8 (15.4 All patients were divided into 2 groups, Group I patients received standard therapy, Group II patients, in addition to standard therapy, respectively nosology, received additionally the drug Actovegin ® Takeda Austria GmbH. All quality of life indicators were evaluated before the treatment and after In group I patients, after the standard treatment of GB comorbid with GERD, statistically significantly reduced the limitations on the scale of body pain (BP), therefore, in points, on the contrary, to 18.8±2.8 points increased, indicating a decrease in pain after treatment In patients. In patients with group II GB comorbid with GERD after standard treatment with additional use of Actovegin ®, the daily activity limitations associated with the disease on the scales of physical functioning (PF), role activity (RP), physical pain (BP), Vitality (VT), emotional state (RE).

  8. Comparison of the effects of esomeprazole 40 mg, rabeprazole 20 mg, lansoprazole 30 mg, and pantoprazole 40 mg on intragastrıc pH in extensive metabolizer patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelebi, Altay; Aydın, Dinçer; Kocaman, Orhan; Konduk, Buğra Tolga; Şentürk, Ömer; Hülagü, Sadetin

    2016-09-01

    Studies on the therapeutic efficacy of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) have been recently published. In most of these studies, comparison of only two PPIs have been made. There are few studies on the comparison of four or more PPIs. We aimed to compare the acid inhibitory effects of esomeprazole 40 mg, rabeprazole 20 mg, lansoprazole 30 mg, and pantoprazole 40 mg on days 1 and 5 of treatment in patients with GERD, who were extensive metabolizers in regard to the CYP2C19 genotype. Helicobacter pylori-negative with typical symptoms of GERD patients were randomly divided into four treatment groups. Efficacy analysis on days 1 and 5 were performed on the four groups which comprised 10 (esomeprazole), 11 (rabeprazole), 10 (lansoprazole), and 10 (pantoprazole) patients. On day 1 of PPI treatment, the mean percentage of time with intragastric Ph>4 were 54%, 58%, 60%, and 35% for the groups, respectively, and on day 5, these values were 67%, 60%, 68%, and 59%, respectively. Esomeprazole, rabeprazole, and lansoprazole were found to be superior to pantoprazole on the first day of treatment. Pantoprazole is a less potent proton pump inhibitor than the other PPIs tested on the first day of treatment. When the time needed to raise the intragatric pH to over 4 was evaluated, esomeprazole was found to have the most rapid action, followed by lansoprazole and rabeprazole.

  9. Prevalence of heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease in the urban Brazilian population Prevalência da pirose e da doença gastroesofágica numa população urbana brasileira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Prado P. Moraes-Filho

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The epidemiological aspects of heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease have been object of growing interest in the last decade because of its increasing prevalence and the complications of the disease. AIMS: To evaluate the prevalence of heartburn and gastroesophageal reflux disease as well as their main characteristics in the Brazilian urban population. METHODS: A national inquire enrolling 13,959 adults was conducted in 22 Brazilian cities. The inclusion criteria were the presence of heartburn at least once a week ("heartburn group" and age greater than 16 years old. Individuals with heartburn with frequency of more than once a week were considered as having gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD group. Factors related to the complaint were asked such as predisposing factors, habits (tobacco, alcohol and coffee intake and body mass index. In this populational study a probabilistic model was used. RESULTS: The results are presented in absolute and relative frequency, which were ponderated estimates of the respective population figures. The global prevalence of heartburn was 11.9% (1,651 persons. Heartburn once a week was present in 4.6% (637 persons and GERD in 7.3% (1,014 persons. The average ages of both groups were similar (men: 36.9 ± 15.0; women: 39.6 ± 15.1 yrs. Females were more affected in both groups. The occurrence of GERD increased with age and was more prevalent after 55 years old. The body mass index was in the normal range and similar in both groups (men: 24.7 ± 4.6; women: 25.3 ± 5.2 kg/m². In both groups the individuals related their symptoms to food intake, fatty and spicy foods (heartburn group: 64.7%, 28.5%, 17.7%; GERD group: 55.0%, 25.9%, 11.7% respectively. In GERD group, stress (24.2%, health problems (22.3% were more related to the symptoms than in heartburn group (20.0% and 15.0% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The global prevalence of heartburn (11.9% is relatively high in the Brazilian urban

  10. Preoperative workup to assess indication for laparoscopic treatment in gastroesophageal reflux disease Aseguramiento preoperatorio en la indicación de tratamiento laparoscópico en la enfermedad por reflujo gastroesofágico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pérez-Holanda

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and objectives: antireflux surgery performed by an experienced surgeon is a maintenance option for patients with well-documented gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD. Well-documented GERD is difficult to find, as GERD is a multifactorial disease in which the gastroesophageal junction, with its special anatomical and functional components, is important. In order to examine patient preoperative workups, and their indication for surgical treatment in GERD, we retrospectively studied patients who underwent a laparoscopic antireflux procedure. Methods: preoperative workups in patients from our health care area who underwent a laparoscopic antireflux procedure from December 1997 to February 2007 were retrospectively analyzed. Data related to epidemiological findings, symptoms, morphologic and functional evaluation, medical therapy, and indication for surgical treatment were recorded and statistically analyzed by means of a bivariate test. Differences were significant when the p value was equal to or less than 0.05. Results: 100 patients (50 % female, 51.31 ± 13.53 years of age underwent a laparoscopic antireflux surgery after 56.47 ± 61.33 months with symptoms. Ninety-five percent of patients had an anatomical abnormality. The pH monitoring test diagnosed three quarters of cases. The most frequent indication for GERD treatment was persistent or recurrent esophagitis despite adequate medical treatment (52 cases. Conclusions: based on our preoperative workup, as described, 100 percent of subjects were well documented and diagnosed with GERD (both non-erosive reflux disease and erosive reflux disease, and their indication for laparoscopic treatment was retrospectively assessed in 94% of cases.Introducción y objetivos: la cirugía antirreflujo realizada por un cirujano experto es una opción para el tratamiento de mantenimiento para el paciente con enfermedad por reflujo gastroesofágico (ERGE bien documentada. La "buena documentaci

  11. Onset and disappearance rates of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms in the Spanish population, and their impact on quality of life Tasas de aparición y desaparición de los síntomas de reflujo gastroesofágico en la población española y su impacto sobre la calidad de vida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rey

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: few studies have reported the onset and disappearance rates of gastroesophageal reflux symptoms (GERS in the population. Aim: to assess the occurrence and disappearance rates of GERS in Spain, and their impact on health-related quality of life (HRQL. Participants and methods: participants were selected at random from the general population of Madrid in age and sex strata. They were interviewed at home twice, 6 months apart. Heartburn, acid regurgitation and consultation were assessed with the gastroesophageal reflux questionnaire, and HRQL with the SF-36. Results: 709 individuals were included, and 451 (63.6% were re-interviewed 6 months later. Among the 325 individuals without GERS, 9 developed weekly symptoms (2.2% [95% CI: 0.8, 3.4%]; 2 (22% consulted because of GERS. Among the 34 subjects reporting weekly GERS initially, 26 did not report them at 6-months. Onset of GERS was associated with worsening scores in the physical summary of SF-36 (delta = -6.6 [95% CI: -11.8, -1.42], while disappearance with an improved score (delta = -3.0 [95% CI: 0.0, 5.9]. Conclusion: despite the lower prevalence of GERS in Spain, the occurrence rate is 2.2% in 6 months; however symptoms disappeared in more than half of subjects six months later. Developing GERS was associated with reduced HRQL, and their disappearance with improvement.

  12. Acid and non-acid reflux patterns in patients with erosive esophagitis and non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) : A study using intraluminal impedance monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conchillo, Jose M.; Schwartz, Matthijs P.; Selimah, Mohamed; Samsom, Melvin; Sifrim, Daniel; Smout, Andre J.

    Background Non-erosive reflux disease (NERD) and erosive esophagitis (EE) are the most common phenotypic presentations of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Aim To assess acid and non-acid reflux patterns in patients with EE and NERD using combined esophageal pH-impedance monitoring. Methods A

  13. The Role of Acid and Bile Reflux in Esophagitis and Barrett’s Metaplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Souza, Rhonda F.

    2010-01-01

    The precise mechanisms whereby gastroesophageal reflux disease causes reflux esophagitis and Barrett’s esophagus are not clear, even though these diseases have been known to be linked for many years. Recent studies indicate a role for the reflux-induced inflammatory response of esophageal squamous epithelial cells and the immune cells in the pathogenesis of reflux esophagitis. Although reflux esophagitis commonly heals with esophageal squamous cell regeneration, in some individuals the esopha...

  14. Protector mechanisms of the association between gastroesophageal reflux disease and asthma: experimental study in rats Mecanismos protetores: doença do refluxo gastroesofágico e asma. Estudo experimental em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Yuri Sugishita Kanikadan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is well known the association between gastroesophageal reflux disease and asthma. The hyperreactivity of the airways is a characteristic of an asthmatic. Many studies associate the increase of the airways reactivity with gastroesophageal reflux disease. AIM: In this study we have evaluated the effect of the intraluminal exposition to gastric juice of trachea on the reactivity to methacholine from rats submitted to a pulmonary allergic inflammation. METHODS: Group of rats were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin. After 24 hours the animals were sacrificed, and their tracheae were removed to be cultured with gastric juice. The gastric juice was obtained from a donor rat. Subsequently the segments were placed into plastic plates with RPMI-1640 for incubation, under suitable atmosphere and time. After the period of incubation the segments were put into chambers for the analysis of the contractile response to methacholine. RESULTS: We observed reduction in the contractile response of trachea cultured with gastric juice from allergic rats. This result was confirmed by the pharmacological treatments with compound 48/80 and dissodium cromoglicate (mast cells blockade, L-NAME (nitric oxide inhibitor, NO, capsaicin (neuropeptides depletion and indomethacin (ciclooxigenase inhibitor. CONCLUSIONS: Our results highlight to the existence of a complex interaction between pulmonary allergy and gastric juice in the airways. The involvement of the non-adrenergic non-cholinergic system, NO, prostanoids and mast cells are directly related to this interaction. We suggest that the reduced contractile response observed in vitro may represent a protector mechanism of the airways. Despite its presence in the human body it can not be observed due to the predominant effects of excitatory the non-adrenergic non-cholinergic system.RACIONAL: É bem estabelecida a relação entre a doença do refluxo gastroesofágico e a asma. A hiperreatividade das vias a

  15. Pediatric GERD (Gastro-Esophageal Reflux Disease)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sore throat, hoarseness, apnea, laryngeal and tracheal stenoses, asthma/wheezing, chronic cough and throat clearing, chronic sinusitis, ear infections/fluid, and dental caries. Effortless regurgitation is very suggestive of GER. However, ...

  16. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with caffeine fatty and fried foods garlic and onions mint flavorings spicy foods tomato-based foods, like ... doctor who treats kids and teens who have diseases of the gastrointestinal system (the esophagus, stomach, intestines, ...

  17. Proton pump inhibitors in gastroesophageal reflux disease: a custom-tailored therapeutic regimen Diseñando un traje a la medida: los inhibidores de la bomba de protones en la enfermedad por reflujo gastroesofágico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Sobrino-Cossío

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Montreal Definition and Classification divides Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD into esophageal symptomatic syndromes (and with mucosal damage and extraesophageal syndromes (with acid established association and proposed association. In typical GERD symptoms, an 8-week treatment with PPIs is satisfactory in most cases (> 90%. Response rates to PPIs in GERD are highly variable, as they also rely on an appropriate clinical diagnosis of the disease; endoscopy differentiates the macroscopic GERD phenotype. The non-erosive variety (50-70% prevalence has a different symptomatic response rate, as gastric acid is not the sole etiology of symptoms. The possible explanations of treatment failure include treatment adherence, PPI metabolism alterations and characteristics, and inadequate diagnosis. Refractory symptoms are related to gastric content neutralization by the chronic use of PPIs. Extraesophageal manifestations are associated with other pathophysiological mechanisms where an autonomic nervous system disturbance gives rise to symptoms. In these clinical entities, the relationship between symptoms and acid needs to be established in order to determine the use of PPIs, or consider other drugs. In other words, so as to "custom-tailor the best-fitting therapy" we need to answer the questions for whom, for what, how and for how long. Finally, PPI safety and tolerability are factors to be considered in elderly patients requiring chronic PPI use, who usually have chronic concomitant illnesses.La Clasificación de Montreal divide la enfermedad por reflujo gastro-esofágico (ERGE en síndromes esofágicos sintomáticos y con daño a la mucosa y en síndromes extraesofágicos con asociación establecida al ácido y asociación propuesta. En síntomas ERGE típicos el tratamiento con inhibidores de la bomba de protones (IBP es satisfactorio (> 90% a 8 semanas en la mayoría de los casos. Las tasas de respuesta a los IBP en la ERGE son muy variables

  18. Surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease: a comparative study between the open and laparoscopic approaches Cirugía de la enfermedad por reflujo gastroesofágico: estudio comparativo entre los abordajes abierto y laparoscópico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Trullenque Juan

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: given the demonstrated effectiveness of medical treatment together with the eminent acceptance of the laparoscopic approach, the indications of surgery in the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD are currently subject to continuous controversy. To participate in this debate, we have the following work hypothesis: "The results of the 360º short and floppy laparoscopic fundoplication are superior to those of open surgery". Clinical design: prospective, clinical, non-randomized study. Patients: our work was developed between November 1991 and December 1998 by means of a prospective, non-randomized clinical rehearsal with two groups of patients: -Group I (n = 75: 360° short and floppy laparoscopic fundoplication in Hospital Dr. Peset, Valencia (Spain. -Group II (n = 28: 360° short and floppy, open fundoplication in Hospital General, Valencia (Spain. We evaluated the preoperative parameters and found no differences, which allows us to know that both groups were comparable. Results: the analysis of peroperative results (morbidity and surgical time and of clinical follow-up (every three months and later annually and instrumental follow-up (TEGD, upper digestive endoscopy, pHmetry and manometry show no differences, while the postoperative analysis shows statistically significant (s.s. differences regarding recovery (pain, oral intake, hospital stay and return to previous activities. Conclusions: the results of the 360° short and floppy laparoscopic fundoplication are similar to those of the open approach, but favor the former approach with a better postoperative tolerance.Objetivo: en la actualidad, dada la efectividad demostrada del tratamiento médico junto con la eminente aceptación del abordaje laparoscópico, las indicaciones de la cirugía en el tratamiento de la enfermedad por reflujo gastroesofágico son causa de continua controversia. Para participar en este debate, nos planteamos la siguiente hipótesis de trabajo

  19. Tratamento cirúrgico da doença de refluxo gastroesofágico na esclerose sistêmica Surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percival D. Sampaio-Barros

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Os autores descrevem sua experiência com o tratamento cirúrgico da doença de refluxo gastroesofágico (DRGE em pacientes com esclerose sistêmica (ES. MÉTODOS: Foram selecionados 10 pacientes com DRGE que apresentavam esofagite grave e estenose esofágica, tratados previamente com doses recomendadas de drogas anti-secretórias (ranitidina e/ou omeprazol e pró-cinéticas (cisapride por mais de seis meses, sem melhora significativa. Todos os pacientes eram do sexo feminino e 8 eram caucasóides, sendo 7 com ES limitada e 3 com ES difusa. RESULTADOS: O tratamento cirúrgico foi realizado através de videolaparoscopia em 9 pacientes e por cirurgia aberta no outro paciente. Sete pacientes foram submetidos à técnica de Nissen modificada e 3 à técnica de Lind. Seis pacientes com estenose esofágica significativa necessitaram de dilatações endoscópicas no período pré-operatório. Avaliação pós-operatória três meses após a cirurgia revelou que 70% dos pacientes apresentaram resultado favorável, com melhora significativa da azia e da disfagia; 1 paciente necessitou de nova intervenção cirúrgica em conseqüência de uma hérnia paraesofágica no período pós-operatório, sendo realizada uma gastrectomia em Y de Roux. Uma boa evolução foi referida por 80% dos pacientes um ano após cirurgia e por 70% dois anos após cirurgia, observando-se dois óbitos. CONCLUSÕES: Os autores concluem que o tratamento cirúrgico da DRGE representa uma eficiente opção terapêutica em pacientes com ES e esofagite grave com estenose.OBJECTIVE: The authors describe the experience with the surgical treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD in 10 patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc. METHODS: Criteria for surgery included GERD with severe chronic esophagitis and stricture, treated previously with recommended doses of antisecretory (ranitidine and/or omeprazole and prokinetic (cisapride drugs for more than six months, without

  20. Prevalence of broncopulmonary and otorhinolaryngologic symptoms in children under investigation for gastroesophageal reflux disease: retrospective analysis Prevalência de achados broncopulmonares e otorrinolaringológicos em crianças sob investigação de doença do refluxo gastroesofágico: análise retrospectiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor José Barbosa Santos

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is a common ailment in children, adding up to the evidence that gastroesophageal reflux is an important cofactor in upper airway disorders, especially in the pediatric population. It is very common for it to impact the upper and lower airways. Our goal was to assess the presence of otorhinolaryngological symptoms in children aged between one and twelve years in whom gastroesophageal reflux is suspected. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We assessed data from the charts of patients up to 12 years of age submitted to 24 hour pH measuring of one of two channels, placed at 2 and 5 cm from the LEE in order to confirm the diagnosis of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. RESULTS: We studied 143 charts from children who underwent 24 hour pH measuring to investigate GERD; however, only 65 were included. The most prevalent symptoms in the children were bronchopulmonary, found in 89.2%, of sinonasal symptoms (72.3%, otologic (46.1% and repetition UAW infections (44.6%. When we compared the presence of each group of symptoms of the results from the pH measuring, no significant differences were found between the symptoms and the pH measuring results. CONCLUSION: GERD can manifest in different ways and otorhinolaryngological symptoms are frequent in children.A Doença do Refluxo Gastroesofágico (DRGE é uma afecção comum na infância, aumentando as evidências de que o refluxo gastroesofágico seja um cofator importante que contribui para as desordens de vias aéreas, principalmente na população pediátrica. É muito comum serem observadas manifestações em vias aéreas superiores e inferiores. Nosso objetivo é avaliar a presença de sintomas otorrinolaringológicos em crianças com idade de um a 12 anos e suspeita de doença do refluxo gastroesofágico. MATERIAIS E MÉTODO: Foram avaliados dados de prontuários de pacientes de até 12 anos submetidos à pHmetria de 24 horas de um ou dois canais, locados a 2 e 5 cm do EEI para