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Sample records for hymenoptera structure organization

  1. Social organization of Platythyrea lamellosa (Roger) (Hymenoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-05-15

    ): II. Division of ... verband. Division of labour in social insects can be studied at a number of complementary levels. ... effects of responses of individual workers. While one approach emphasizes the structure of labour in a.

  2. Brain organization mirrors caste differences, colony founding and nest architecture in paper wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Y; Harris, R M; O'Donnell, S

    2009-09-22

    The cognitive challenges that social animals face depend on species differences in social organization and may affect mosaic brain evolution. We asked whether the relative size of functionally distinct brain regions corresponds to species differences in social behaviour among paper wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae). We measured the volumes of targeted brain regions in eight species of paper wasps. We found species variation in functionally distinct brain regions, which was especially strong in queens. Queens from species with open-comb nests had larger central processing regions dedicated to vision (mushroom body (MB) calyx collars) than those with enclosed nests. Queens from advanced eusocial species (swarm founders), who rely on pheromones in several contexts, had larger antennal lobes than primitively eusocial independent founders. Queens from species with morphologically distinct castes had augmented central processing regions dedicated to antennal input (MB lips) relative to caste monomorphic species. Intraspecific caste differences also varied with mode of colony founding. Independent-founding queens had larger MB collars than their workers. Conversely, workers in swarm-founding species with decentralized colony regulation had larger MB calyx collars and optic lobes than their queens. Our results suggest that brain organization is affected by evolutionary transitions in social interactions and is related to the environmental stimuli group members face.

  3. Functional anatomy of the ovipositor clip in the parasitoid Leptopilina heterotoma (Thompson) (Hymenoptera: Eucoilidae): a structure to grip escaping host larvae.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenteren, van J.C.; Isidoro, N.; Bin, F.

    1998-01-01

    Observations on the host attack behaviour of the parasitoid Leptopilina heterotoma (Hymenoptera : Eucoilidae) led to the supposition that this wasp should possess a structure on its ovipositor by which it can hold a host larvae in a fixed position until the larva is paralyzed. The ovipositor was

  4. Bumble bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) community structure on two sagebrush steppe sites in southern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen P. Cook; Sara M. Birch; Frank W. Merickel; Carrie Caselton Lowe; Deborah Page-Dumroese

    2011-01-01

    Although sagebrush, Artemisia spp., does not require an insect pollinator, there are several native species of bumble bees, Bombus spp. (Hymenoptera: Apidae), that are present in sagebrush steppe ecosystems where they act as pollinators for various forbs and shrubs. These native pollinators contribute to plant productivity and reproduction. We captured 12 species of...

  5. Populational genetic structure and sociogenetic structure of cocoon masses of Digelasinus diversipes (Kirby, 1882 (Hymenoptera: Symphyta: Argidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Boraschi

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene variation and population genetic structure of the Neotropical sawfly Digelasinus diversipes were measured by allozyme analyses using starch gel electrophoresis. Cocoon masses were collected in Eugenia glazioviana (Myrtaceae stems, in two areas of the "Estação Ecológica Jataí" (Luiz Antônio, SP, Brazil - 21°25' S, 47°50' W, in 2000 and 2001. The average heterozygosity observed in this species (Hobs = 0.094 ± 0.025 was not significantly different from other Symphyta groups; it was, however, significantly higher than in other Hymenoptera populations. No significant levels of inbreeding were found (F IS = 0.062; chi2 = 29.9; p > 0.05, but the population was subdivided (F ST = 0.070; chi2 = 458.9; p < 0.05, suggesting the absence of a significant gene flow among the samples studied, due to limited dispersion ability. The low relatedness coefficients found (ranging from 0.23 ± 0.09 to 0.44 ± 0.10 suggest that larvae from different ovipositions associate to construct the cocoon masses.

  6. Influence of the vegetation management of the leeves in irrigated rice organic in diversity of Hymenoptera parasitoids

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    P. R. Simões-Pires

    Full Text Available Abstract Among the natural enemies of insect pests in rice fields, parasitoids are especially notable. To better understand the space-time dynamics of these insects, the objectives of this study were to describe and compare groups of parasitoids in organic irrigated rice fields using two management approaches for levee vegetation, and to relate them to the phenological stages of rice cultivation (the seedling, vegetative, and reproductive stages. The samples were taken in a plantation located in Viamão, RS, Brazil. The total area of 18 ha was divided into two parts: a no-cut (NC subarea in which the wild vegetation of the levees was maintained, and a cut (C subarea in which the levee vegetation was cut monthly. In each subarea, four Malaise traps considered as pseudo-replicas were installed and remained in the field for 24 hours at each sampling location. Collections occurred twice a month from the beginning of cultivation (October 2012 until harvest (March 2013. A total of 3,184 Hymenoptera parasitoids were collected: 2,038 individuals in the NC subarea and 1,146 in the C subarea. We identified 458 morphospecies distributed in 24 families. Mymaridae was the most abundant and Eulophidae was the richest in both subareas. A total of 198 morphospecies was shared between the subareas, including Platygastridae, Eulophidae, and Mymaridae, which were the families with the highest number of shared species. The richness and abundance of parasitoids varied according to their phenological developmental stages, with peak abundance registering during the vegetative period. The Morisita index identified three groupings, indicating a similarity that was related to the three phases of rice growth and development: seedling, vegetative and post-harvest.

  7. Hymenoptera Genome Database: integrating genome annotations in HymenopteraMine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsik, Christine G; Tayal, Aditi; Diesh, Colin M; Unni, Deepak R; Emery, Marianne L; Nguyen, Hung N; Hagen, Darren E

    2016-01-04

    We report an update of the Hymenoptera Genome Database (HGD) (http://HymenopteraGenome.org), a model organism database for insect species of the order Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). HGD maintains genomic data for 9 bee species, 10 ant species and 1 wasp, including the versions of genome and annotation data sets published by the genome sequencing consortiums and those provided by NCBI. A new data-mining warehouse, HymenopteraMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, integrates the genome data with data from external sources and facilitates cross-species analyses based on orthology. New genome browsers and annotation tools based on JBrowse/WebApollo provide easy genome navigation, and viewing of high throughput sequence data sets and can be used for collaborative genome annotation. All of the genomes and annotation data sets are combined into a single BLAST server that allows users to select and combine sequence data sets to search. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Genetic variability and social structure of colonies in Acromyrmex heyeri and A. striatus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. DIEHI

    Full Text Available The breeding structure of both colony and population of social insects can be examined by genetic analysis. Colonies of the leaf-cutting ants Acromyrmex heyeri and A. striatus (Myrmicinae, Attini were thus analyzed for isoenzyme systems MDH, a-GPDH, and AMY to describe genotype variability and social structure. A total of five loci were investigated (three for amylase and one for each other system. Ninety-seven colonies of A. heyeri and 103 of A. striatus were sampled in different localities in Southern Brazil (State of Rio Grande do Sul. The genotypes found show the occurrence of monogyny and polygyny associated or not with polyandry, which indicates that the social organization is colony-specific. The polygyny and polyandry observed are likely to be responsible for the great genotypic diversity of the colonies. The average inbreeding coefficient per colony was higher in A. striatus than in A. heyeri, which may reflect the different patterns of production of sexual individuals and nuptial flight of those two species.

  9. Structural aspects of agent organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossi, D.; Dignum, F.; Dignum, V.

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter we investigate how organizations can be represented as graphs endowed with formal semantics. We distinguish different dimensions of organizations. Each of these dimensions leads to a different structure in the organizational graph. By giving the graphs a formal semantics in

  10. Principles of Virus Structural Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, B.V. Venkataram; Schmid, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    Viruses, the molecular nanomachines infecting hosts ranging from prokaryotes to eukaryotes, come in different sizes, shapes and symmetries. Questions such as what principles govern their structural organization, what factors guide their assembly, how these viruses integrate multifarious functions into one unique structure have enamored researchers for years. In the last five decades, following Caspar and Klug's elegant conceptualization of how viruses are constructed, high resolution structural studies using X-ray crystallography and more recently cryo-EM techniques have provided a wealth of information on structures of variety of viruses. These studies have significantly furthered our understanding of the principles that underlie structural organization in viruses. Such an understanding has practical impact in providing a rational basis for the design and development of antiviral strategies. In this chapter, we review principles underlying capsid formation in a variety of viruses, emphasizing the recent developments along with some historical perspective. PMID:22297509

  11. The scaling and allometry of organ size associated with miniaturization in insects: A case study for Coleoptera and Hymenoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polilov, Alexey A; Makarova, Anastasia A

    2017-02-22

    The study of the influence of body size on structure in animals, as well as scaling of organs, is one of the key areas of functional and evolutionary morphology of organisms. Most studies in this area treated mammals or birds; comparatively few studies are available on other groups of animals. Insects, because of the huge range of their body sizes and because of their colossal diversity, should be included in the discussion of the problem of scaling and allometry in animals, but to date they remain insufficiently studied. In this study, а total of 28 complete (for all organs) and 24 partial 3D computer reconstructions of body and organs have been made for 23 insect species of 11 families and five orders. The relative volume of organs was analyzed based on these models. Most insect organs display a huge potential for scaling and for retaining their organization and constant relative volume. By contrast, the relative volume of the reproductive and nervous systems increases by a considerable factor as body size decreases. These systems can geometrically restrain miniaturization in insects and determine the limits to the smallest possible body size.

  12. Structure elucidation of female-specific volatiles released by the parasitoid wasp Trichogramma turkestanica (Hymenoptera: Trichogrammatidae

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    Armin Tröger

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Females of the parasitoid wasp Trichogramma turkestanica produce the putative polydeoxypropionates (2E,4E,6S,8S,10S-4,6,8,10-tetramethyltrideca-2,4-diene and (2E,4E,6S,8S,10S-4,6,8,10-tetramethyltrideca-2,4-dien-1-ol or their enantiomers as sex specific volatiles. The structures were assigned on the basis of GC–MS investigations using synthetic reference compounds.

  13. Genetic structure of an introduced paper wasp, Polistes chinensis antennalis (Hymenoptera, Vespidae) in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Koji; Kudô, Kazuyuki; Ishiguro, Norio

    2014-08-01

    Several eusocial wasps are prominent invaders to remote islands. The paper wasp Polistes chinensis antennalis is native to East Asia, was introduced to New Zealand in 1979 and has expanded its distribution there. This provides an excellent opportunity to examine the impacts of an initial bottleneck and subsequent expansion on genetic structure. We analysed and compared the genetic population structures of the native (Japan and South Korea) and invasive New Zealand populations. Although 94% of individuals had shared haplotypes detected across both populations, the remaining 6% had private haplotypes identified in only one of the three countries. The genetic variation at microsatellite loci was lower in New Zealand than in native countries, and the genetic structure in New Zealand was clearly distinct from that in its native range. Higher frequencies of diploid-male- and triploid-female-producing colonies were detected in New Zealand than in the native countries, showing the reduction in genetic variation via a genetic bottleneck. At least two independent introductions were suggested, and the putative source regions for New Zealand were assigned as Kanto (central island) and Kyushu (south island) in Japan. Serial founder events following the initial introduction were also indicated. The estimated dispersal distance between mother and daughter in New Zealand was twice that in Japan. Thus, the introduction history of P. chinensis antennalis in New Zealand is probably the result of at least two independent introductions, passing through a bottleneck during introduction, followed by population expansion from the point of introduction. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. (gahan) (hymenoptera : eulophidae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Etude experimentale de quelques parametres biologiques de ceranisus femoratus (gahan) (hymenoptera : eulophidae) un nouvel ennemi naturel Pour le controle de megalurothrips sjostedti (trybom) (thysanoptera : thripidae) ravageur du niebe au benin.

  15. Genetic structure analysis of Eufriesea violacea (Hymenoptera, Apidae populations from southern Brazilian Atlantic rainforest remnants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia H. Sofia

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers were used to analyze the genetic structure of Eufriesea violacea populations in three fragments (85.47, 832.58 and 2800 ha of Atlantic rainforest located in the north of the Brazilian state of Paraná. A total of twelve primers produced 206 loci, of which 129 were polymorphic (95% criterion. The proportions of polymorphic loci in each population ranged from 57.28% to 59.2%, revealing very similar levels of genetic variability in the groups of bees from each fragment. Unbiased genetic distances between groups ranged from 0.0171 to 0.0284, the smallest genetic distance occurring between bees from the two larger fragments. These results suggest that the E. violacea populations from the three fragments have maintained themselves genetically similar to native populations of this species originally present in northern Paraná.

  16. RELATEDNESS AND POPULATION STRUCTURE OF THE PRIMITIVELY EUSOCIAL BEE LASIOGLOSSUM ZEPHYRUM (HYMENOPTERA: HALICTIDAE) IN KANSAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crozier, R H; Smith, B H; Crozier, Y C

    1987-07-01

    Lasioglossum zephyrum is a primitively eusocial bee, which nests in small colonies of up to 20 individuals. The nests occur in patchily distributed aggregations of from a few to over 1,000 nests along periodically disturbed stream and river banks in eastern North America. We used five polymorphic allozyme loci to test for geographic structure and estimate relatedness in eight patches of nests from five aggregations in Douglas Co., Kansas. Autocorrelation analysis of gene frequencies, plus a multilocus G test, revealed a low but significant tendency for differentiation among nests within patches, among patches within aggregations, and among aggregations. Small numbers of nests restricted estimation of relatedness to three patches, of which only one had a sample size large enough to yield confidence limits narrow enough to be informative. The limits from this patch of 20 nests are 0.64 makeup is more complex than this, so that a lower value, say 0.7, is more plausible. This value is sufficiently high to indicate that kin selection is probably important in these populations. © 1987 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  17. Arcus as a tensegrity structure in the arolium of wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantsevich, Leonid; Gorb, Stanislav

    2002-01-01

    The unfolding of the hymenopteran attachment pad (arolium) may be achieved in two ways, hydraulic and mechanical. The first was confirmed in experiments with pressure applied to more proximal leg parts and on immersion in hypotonic solutions. Presumably, this way of unfolding does not play an important role for a living hornet. Mechanical unfolding was studied experimentally with the aid of a micromanipulator pulling the tendon of the musculus retractor unguis. Ablation experiments on different parts of the arolium indicated that the arcus is the most crucial element for mechanical unfolding. The shape of the arcus in closed and open conditions was measured using a 3D measurement microscope and reconstructed by means of 3D computer graphics. The arcus coils up upon being freed from the arolium tissues, and coils up even more after immersion into a 10% aqueous solution of NaOH. Geometrical models of the arcus are proposed, from which the rotational moment of elasticity is derived. Conformations and deformations of the arcus are quantified in order to explain its role in the folding and unfolding processes of the arolium. The diversity of approaches supports the idea that the arcus is a prestressed (tensegrity) structure providing immediate, soft, and graded transmission of forces during folding and unfolding action of the arolium.

  18. Gender Structure and Spatial Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoosh Sadoughianzadeh

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available As a contribution to the widespread debate on the “gender reading” of the “built environment,” this article aims to situate the subject in a new context, the Iranian society. To depict the subject, two distinct traditional architectures of the region, associated with their respective socio-spatial organizations, have been comparatively explored: the “Introvert” and “Extrovert.” These two almost ageless “Introvert” and “Extrovert” architectures, evolved through centuries in different geographical parts of the country, are spatial patterns aptly illustrating how the “gender structure” of each social organization has contributed to the formation of the relevant “physical space” and, further, how the specific “gender relationships” are pertinently structured within each one of the two types of the spaces. Based on a systematic approach and through concentration on the macro-socio-spatial organization, this article is to explore the gender/space associated variations within either of the social systems they belong to. This perspective is particularly instrumental in pinpointing the Introvert and Extrovert architectures in the context of their social organizations and carefully scrutinizing “gender” and “space” categories as systematically integrated variables.

  19. Asociaciones áfido-parasitoide (Hemiptera: Aphididae; Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Aphidiinae en cultivos hortícolas orgánicos en Los Cardales, Buenos Aires, Argentina Aphid-parasitoid associations (Hemiptera: Aphididae; Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Aphidiinae on organic vegetable crops in Los Cardales, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea V. Andorno

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Diez especies de áfidos (Hemiptera: Aphididae se hallaron parasitados por siete especies de parasitoides (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Aphidiinae en cultivos hortícolas orgánicos. Myzus persicae (Sulzer fue el áfido más frecuentemente encontrado sobre una amplia variedad de cultivos, y con mayor diversidad de parasitoides asociados. Aphidius colemani Viereck fue el afidiino más usual, que ataca varias especies de áfidos. Ocho asociaciones tritróficas, involucrando Aphidius matricariae Haliday, han sido registradas por primera vez para la Argentina.Ten aphid species (Hemiptera: Aphididae were found parasitized by seven aphid parasitoid species (Hymenoptera: Braconidae, Aphidiinae on organic vegetable crops. Myzus persicae (Sulzer was the most frequent aphid found on a wide variety of crops, with the largest parasitoid diversity associated. Aphidius colemani Viereck was the most frequent aphidiine attacking several species of aphids. Eight tritrophic associations involving Aphidius matricariae Haliday are reported for the first time for Argentina.

  20. STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION OF BACTERIAL UREASES

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    Lisnyak YuV

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This brief review concerns the basic principles of structural organization of multi-subunit bacterial ureases and formation of their quaternary structure. Urease is a nickel-containing enzyme (urea amidohydrolase, ЕС 3.5.1.5 that catalyses the hydrolysis of urea to get ammonia and carbamate which then decomposes with water to get ammonia and carbon dioxide. Urease is produced by bacteria, fungi, yeast and plants. On the basis of similarities in amino acid sequences, ureases assumed to have a similar structure and conservative catalytic mechanism. Within past two decades bacterial ureases have gained much attention in research field as a virulence factor in human and animal infections. The first crystal structure of urease has been determined for that from Klebsiella aerogenes. The native enzyme consists of three subunits, UreA (α-chain, UreB (β-chain and UreC (γ-chain, and contains four structural domains: two in α-chain (α-domain 1 and α-domain-2, one in β- and one in γ-chain. These three chains form a T-shaped heterotrimer αβγ. Three αβγ heterotrimers form quaternary complex (αβγ3. In case of Helicobacter pilori, the analogous trimers of corresponding dimeric subunits (αβ3 form tetrameric structure ((αβ34 in which four trimers are situated at the vertexes of the regular triangle pyramid. Active center is located in α-domain 1 and contains two atoms of nickel coordinated by residues His134, His136, carboxylated Lys217, His 246, His272 and Asp360, as well as residues involved in binding (His219 and catalysis (His320. Active site is capped by a flap that controls substrate ingress to and product egress from the dinickel center. Urease requires accessory proteins (UreD, UreF, UreG and UreE for the correct assembly of their Ni-containing metallocenters. The accessory proteins UreD, UreF, and UreG sequentially bind to the apoprotein (UreABC3 to finally form (UreABC-UreDFG3 activation complex. UreE metallochaperone delivers

  1. The Influence of Vegetation and Landscape Structural Connectivity on Butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperiidae), Carabids (Coleoptera: Carabidae), Syrphids (Diptera: Syrphidae), and Sawflies (Hymenoptera: Symphyta) in Northern Italy Farmland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Giovanni; Sommaggio, Daniele; Marini, Mario; Puppi, Giovanna; Chiarucci, Alessandro; Landi, Sara; Fabbri, Roberto; Pesarini, Fausto; Genghini, Marco; Ferrari, Roberto; Muzzi, Enrico; van Lenteren, Joop C; Masetti, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Landscape structure as well as local vegetation influence biodiversity in agroecosystems. A study was performed to evaluate the effect of floristic diversity, vegetation patterns, and landscape structural connectivity on butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperiidae), carabids (Coleoptera: Carabidae), syrphids (Diptera: Syrphidae), and sawflies (Hymenoptera: Symphyta). Vegetation analysis and insect samplings were carried out in nine sites within an intensively farmed landscape in northern Italy. Plant species richness and the percentage of tree, shrub, and herb cover were determined by means of the phytosociological method of Braun-Blanquet. Landscape structural connectivity was measured as the total length of hedgerow network (LHN) in a radius of 500 m around the center of each sampling transect. Butterflies species richness and abundance were positively associated both to herb cover and to plant species richness, but responded negatively to tree and shrub cover. Shrub cover was strictly correlated to both species richness and activity density of carabids. The species richness of syrphids was positively influenced by herb cover and plant richness, whereas their abundance was dependent on ligneous vegetation and LHN. Rarefaction analysis revealed that sawfly sampling was not robust and no relationship could be drawn with either vegetation parameters or structural connectivity. The specific responses of each insect group to the environmental factors should be considered in order to refine and optimize landscape management interventions targeting specific conservation endpoints. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Discrimination of Torymus sinensis Kamijo (Hymenoptera

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaori Yara; Yasuhisa Kunimi

    2009-01-01

      Torymus sinensis and Torymus beneficus (Hymenoptera: Torymidae) are, respectively, introduced and indigenous parasitoid wasps that attack the invasive chestnut gall wasp, Dryocosmus kuriphilus (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) in Japan...

  3. Diagnosis of Hymenoptera venom allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biló, B M; Rueff, F; Mosbech, H; Bonifazi, F; Oude-Elberink, J N G

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of diagnostic procedure is to classify a sting reaction by history, identify the underlying pathogenetic mechanism, and identify the offending insect. Diagnosis of Hymenoptera venom allergy thus forms the basis for the treatment. In the central and northern Europe vespid (mainly Vespula spp.) and honeybee stings are the most prevalent, whereas in the Mediterranean area stings from Polistes and Vespula are more frequent than honeybee stings; bumblebee stings are rare throughout Europe and more of an occupational hazard. Several major allergens, usually glycoproteins with a molecular weight of 10-50 kDa, have been identified in venoms of bees, vespids. and ants. The sequences and structures of the majority of venom allergens have been determined and several have been expressed in recombinant form. A particular problem in the field of cross-reactivity are specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies directed against carbohydrate epitopes, which may induce multiple positive test results (skin test, in vitro tests) of still unknown clinical significance. Venom hypersensitivity may be mediated by immunologic mechanisms (IgE-mediated or non-IgE-mediated venom allergy) but also by nonimmunologic mechanisms. Reactions to Hymenoptera stings are classified into normal local reactions, large local reactions, systemic toxic reactions, systemic anaphylactic reactions, and unusual reactions. For most venom-allergic patients an anaphylactic reaction after a sting is very traumatic event, resulting in an altered health-related quality of life. Risk factors influencing the outcome of an anaphylactic reaction include the time interval between stings, the number of stings, the severity of the preceding reaction, age, cardiovascular diseases and drug intake, insect type, elevated serum tryptase, and mastocytosis. Diagnostic tests should be carried out in all patients with a history of a systemic sting reaction to detect sensitization. They are not recommended in subjects with

  4. 16 CFR 0.9 - Organization structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Organization structure. 0.9 Section 0.9 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF PRACTICE ORGANIZATION § 0.9 Organization structure. The Federal Trade Commission comprises the following principal units...

  5. Automatizations processes influence on organizations structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vace¾ Rastislav

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Has been influenced organization structure on processes? If yes, what is the rate? Is approach toward organization structures bordered by aspect of hierarchy? On these and same questions replay that contribution which in detail sight describe uncertainty managing of process in dependence on the type of organization structure.

  6. Hymenoptera Sphecoidea Fabriciana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vecht, van der J.

    1961-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In the early years of systematic entomology Johann Christian Fabricius (1745-1808) described an enormous number of insects, including several hundreds of Hymenoptera, from various parts of the world. His descriptions are generally short and incomplete, the classification of the species

  7. Getting from Organ- to Part- Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Mogens Myrup; Mortensen, Niels Henrik

    1997-01-01

    The paper gives definitions of organ and part and elaborate on the relations between organ, parts and production methods. The importance of the law of superimposed structures on part design is illustrated and a domain- and view concept is developed.The paper is a collective of overhead...

  8. Spatial Analysis of Agricultural Landscape and Hymenoptera Biodiversity at Cianjur Watershed

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    YAHERWANDI

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera is one of the four largest insect order (the other three are Coleoptera, Diptera, and Lepidoptera. There are curerently over 115 000 described Hymenoptera species. It is clear that Hymenoptera is one of the major components of insect biodiversity. However, Hymenoptera biodiversity is affected by ecology, environment, and ecosystem management. In an agricultural areas, the spatial structure, habitat diversity, and habitat composition may vary from cleared landscapes to structurally rich landscape. Thus, it is very likely that such large-scale spatial patterns (landscape effects may influence local biodiversity and ecological functions. Therefore, the objective of this research were to study diversity and configuration elements of agricultural landscapes at Cianjur Watershed with geographical information sytems (GIS and its influence on Hymenoptera biodiversity. The structural differences between agricultural landscapes of Nyalindung, Gasol, and Selajambe were characterized by patch analyst with ArcView 3.2 of digital land use data. Results indicated that class of land uses of Cianjur Watershed landscape were housing, mixed gardens, talun and rice, vegetable, and corn fields. Landscape structure influenced the biodiversity of Hymenoptera. Species richness and the species diversity were higher in Nyalindung landscape compare to Gasol and Selajambe landscape.

  9. Dissipative structures, machines, and organisms: A perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondepudi, Dilip; Kay, Bruce; Dixon, James

    2017-10-01

    Self-organization in nonequilibrium systems resulting in the formation of dissipative structures has been studied in a variety of systems, most prominently in chemical systems. We present a study of a voltage-driven dissipative structure consisting of conducting beads immersed in a viscous medium of oil. In this simple system, we observed remarkably complex organism-like behavior. The dissipative structure consists of a tree structure that spontaneously forms and moves like a worm and exhibits many features characteristic of living organisms. The complex motion of the beads driven by the applied field, the dipole-dipole interaction between the beads, and the hydrodynamic flow of the viscous medium result in a time evolution of the tree structure towards states of lower resistance or higher dissipation and thus higher rates of entropy production. The resulting end-directed evolution manifests as the tree moving to locations seeking higher current, the current that sustains its structure and dynamics. The study of end-directed evolution in the dissipative structure gives us a means to distinguish the fundamental difference between machines and organisms and opens a path for the formulation of physics of organisms.

  10. Dissipative structures, machines, and organisms: A perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondepudi, Dilip; Kay, Bruce; Dixon, James

    2017-10-01

    Self-organization in nonequilibrium systems resulting in the formation of dissipative structures has been studied in a variety of systems, most prominently in chemical systems. We present a study of a voltage-driven dissipative structure consisting of conducting beads immersed in a viscous medium of oil. In this simple system, we observed remarkably complex organism-like behavior. The dissipative structure consists of a tree structure that spontaneously forms and moves like a worm and exhibits many features characteristic of living organisms. The complex motion of the beads driven by the applied field, the dipole-dipole interaction between the beads, and the hydrodynamic flow of the viscous medium result in a time evolution of the tree structure towards states of lower resistance or higher dissipation and thus higher rates of entropy production. The resulting end-directed evolution manifests as the tree moving to locations seeking higher current, the current that sustains its structure and dynamics. The study of end-directed evolution in the dissipative structure gives us a means to distinguish the fundamental difference between machines and organisms and opens a path for the formulation of physics of organisms.

  11. Navigation organs of the oriental hornet : the ocelli and ciliated sensory epithelium of the head

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosenzweig, Eyal

    2000-01-01

    This thesis deals with the structure and the role of the orientation and navigation organs in the Oriental hornet Vespa orientalis L. 1771 (Hymenoptera, Vespinae), with special reference to the ocelli. The role of the cuticle, acting as a voltaic system providing the energy for the hornet to fly and

  12. Navigation organs of the oriental hornet: the ocelli and ciliated sensory epithelium of the head

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenzweig, Eyal

    2000-01-01

    This thesis deals with the structure and the role of the orientation and navigation organs in the Oriental hornet Vespa orientalis L. 1771 (Hymenoptera, Vespinae), with special reference to the ocelli. The role of the cuticle, acting as a voltaic system providing the energy for the hornet to fly and to navigate had been discussed in chapter 2

  13. STRUCTURE AND COOPTATION IN ORGANIZATION NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valéria Riscarolli

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Business executive are rethinking business concept, based on horizontalization principles. As so, most organizational functions are outsourced, leading the enterprise to build business through a network of organizations. Here we study the case of Cia Hering’s network of organizations, a leader in knit apparel segment in Latin America (IEMI, 2004, looking at the network’s structure and levels of cooptation. A theoretical model was used using Quinn et al. (2001 “sun ray” network structure as basis to analyze the case study. Main results indicate higher degree of structural conformity, but incipient degree of coopetation in the network.

  14. Phylogeography of two parthenogenetic sawfly species (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae): relationship of population genetic differentiation to host plant distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, C.; Barker, A.; Boevé, J.L.; Jong, de P.W.; Vos, de H.; Brakefield, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    This study compares the population genetic structure of two obligate parthenogenetic sawfly species, Aneugmenus padi (L.) Zhelochovtsev and Eurhadinoceraea ventralis (Panzer) Enslin (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae). Allozymes were used to detect genetic differences in larvae collected at different

  15. Resensi Buku: Organization Strategy, Structure, and Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayi Ahadiyat

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Book ReviewJudul Buku    : Organization Strategy, Structure, and ProcessPenulis    : Raymond E. Miles and Charles C. SnowPenerbit     : McGraw-Hill Kogakusha, Ltd (International Student Edition, Tokyo,  274 hlm.Tahun    : 1978

  16. Band structure engineering in organic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, Martin; Tress, Wolfgang; Beyer, Beatrice; Gao, Feng; Scholz, Reinhard; Poelking, Carl; Ortstein, Katrin; Günther, Alrun A.; Kasemann, Daniel; Andrienko, Denis; Leo, Karl

    2016-06-01

    A key breakthrough in modern electronics was the introduction of band structure engineering, the design of almost arbitrary electronic potential structures by alloying different semiconductors to continuously tune the band gap and band-edge energies. Implementation of this approach in organic semiconductors has been hindered by strong localization of the electronic states in these materials. We show that the influence of so far largely ignored long-range Coulomb interactions provides a workaround. Photoelectron spectroscopy confirms that the ionization energies of crystalline organic semiconductors can be continuously tuned over a wide range by blending them with their halogenated derivatives. Correspondingly, the photovoltaic gap and open-circuit voltage of organic solar cells can be continuously tuned by the blending ratio of these donors.

  17. Limited phylogeographical structure across Eurasia in two red wood ant species Formica pratensis and F. lugubris (Hymenoptera, Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goropashnaya, A V; Fedorov, V B; Seifert, B; Pamilo, P

    2004-07-01

    The phylogeography and demographic history of two closely related species of the red wood ant (Formica pratensis and F. lugubris) were examined across Eurasia. The phylogeny based on a 1.5-kilobase mitochondrial DNA fragment, including the cytochrome b gene and part of the ND6 gene, showed one phylogeographical division in F. pratensis. This division (0.7% of nucleotide divergence) suggests postglacial colonization of western Europe and of a wide area ranging from Sweden on the west to Lake Baikal on the east from separate forest refugia. In two localities, mitochondrial DNA has been transferred from F. lugubris to F. pratensis and all the individuals of F. pratensis sampled from the Pyrenees had haplotypes clustering in the lugubris clade. No phylogeographical divisions were detected in F. lugubris. Comparison of species-wide phylogeography between the two sympatrically distributed species of ant demonstrates a difference in phylogeographical structure that implies different vicariant histories. However, over most of the species' distribution ranges, similar signs of demographic expansion predating the last glaciation and the lack of phylogeographical structure were found in both the eastern phylogroup of F. pratensis and F. lugubris. This finding is highly consistent with the results reported for all other boreal forest animal species studied to date in Eurasia. Contraction of the distribution range of each species to a single refugial area at different times during the late Pleistocene and a subsequent population expansion seem to be an explanation for the lack of phylogeographical structure across most of Eurasia in species that are ecologically associated with the boreal forest.

  18. Decreasing abundance, increasing diversity and changing structure of the wild bee community (Hymenoptera: Anthophila along an urbanization gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Fortel

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wild bees are important pollinators that have declined in diversity and abundance during the last decades. Habitat destruction and fragmentation associated with urbanization are reported as part of the main causes of this decline. Urbanization involves dramatic changes of the landscape, increasing the proportion of impervious surface while decreasing that of green areas. Few studies have investigated the effects of urbanization on bee communities. We assessed changes in the abundance, species richness, and composition of wild bee community along an urbanization gradient. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Over two years and on a monthly basis, bees were sampled with colored pan traps and insect nets at 24 sites located along an urbanization gradient. Landscape structure within three different radii was measured at each study site. We captured 291 wild bee species. The abundance of wild bees was negatively correlated with the proportion of impervious surface, while species richness reached a maximum at an intermediate (50% proportion of impervious surface. The structure of the community changed along the urbanization gradient with more parasitic species in sites with an intermediate proportion of impervious surface. There were also greater numbers of cavity-nesting species and long-tongued species in sites with intermediate or higher proportion of impervious surface. However, urbanization had no effect on the occurrence of species depending on their social behavior or body size. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found nearly a third of the wild bee fauna known from France in our study sites. Indeed, urban areas supported a diverse bee community, but sites with an intermediate level of urbanization were the most speciose ones, including greater proportion of parasitic species. The presence of a diverse array of bee species even in the most urbanized area makes these pollinators worthy of being a flagship group to raise the awareness of urban

  19. Decreasing Abundance, Increasing Diversity and Changing Structure of the Wild Bee Community (Hymenoptera: Anthophila) along an Urbanization Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortel, Laura; Henry, Mickaël; Guilbaud, Laurent; Guirao, Anne Laure; Kuhlmann, Michael; Mouret, Hugues; Rollin, Orianne; Vaissière, Bernard E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Wild bees are important pollinators that have declined in diversity and abundance during the last decades. Habitat destruction and fragmentation associated with urbanization are reported as part of the main causes of this decline. Urbanization involves dramatic changes of the landscape, increasing the proportion of impervious surface while decreasing that of green areas. Few studies have investigated the effects of urbanization on bee communities. We assessed changes in the abundance, species richness, and composition of wild bee community along an urbanization gradient. Methodology/Principal Findings Over two years and on a monthly basis, bees were sampled with colored pan traps and insect nets at 24 sites located along an urbanization gradient. Landscape structure within three different radii was measured at each study site. We captured 291 wild bee species. The abundance of wild bees was negatively correlated with the proportion of impervious surface, while species richness reached a maximum at an intermediate (50%) proportion of impervious surface. The structure of the community changed along the urbanization gradient with more parasitic species in sites with an intermediate proportion of impervious surface. There were also greater numbers of cavity-nesting species and long-tongued species in sites with intermediate or higher proportion of impervious surface. However, urbanization had no effect on the occurrence of species depending on their social behavior or body size. Conclusions/Significance We found nearly a third of the wild bee fauna known from France in our study sites. Indeed, urban areas supported a diverse bee community, but sites with an intermediate level of urbanization were the most speciose ones, including greater proportion of parasitic species. The presence of a diverse array of bee species even in the most urbanized area makes these pollinators worthy of being a flagship group to raise the awareness of urban citizens about

  20. Advanced Structural Characterization of Organic Thin Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Yun

    In this thesis, the structural characterizations of three organic film systems are described. Several X-ray based techniques have been utilized for the characterizations for different research goals. The structures of N,N',N-trioctyltriazatriangulenium (Oct3-TATA+) salts have been investigated...... of small molecule and polymer layers is indicated by Flory- Huggins theory for the triisopropylsilylethynl pentacene (TIPS-PEN) and polystyrene blend films. In order to investigate the phase separated layers in the ink-jet printed films, we propose a method to measure diraction Bragg peaks by X...

  1. Diaphragm muscle: structural and functional organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieck, G C

    1988-06-01

    The structural and functional organization of the diaphragm muscle is described in terms of the essential units for neuromotor control. These motor units in the diaphragm vary markedly in their metabolic, contractile, and fatigue properties. Thus, the forces generated by the diaphragm during different ventilatory and nonventilatory behaviors will depend on the number and type of motor units recruited. It is therefore important to understand the basic properties of diaphragm motor units and the mechanisms underlying their recruitment.

  2. Organizing for quality: A structural perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dronkers, J.J.

    1987-01-07

    This paper discusses an aspect of QA program implementation that often has been overlooked: existing organizational structures. The paper's premise is that existing organizational structures have a great deal to do with an organization's culture and therefore must be considered when implementing QA programs. The paper reviews major quality assurance programs descriptions as are found in several standards and in the writings of Crosby, Feigenbaum, and Juran. The review shows that quality assurance programs are concerned with both quality achievement and demonstrability of that achievement. Next, a review of organizational structures is considered. Two traditional ones: hierarchical and matrix structures, and an emerging one, parallel structure. Characteristic traits of each and their importance are discussed. The paper concludes with suggesting a method for implementing QA programs to existing structures. The method contemplated places the QA professional in the role of change agent. The method's basis is a critical review of what is needed in a QA program, and what already exists in the structure.

  3. Virtuous organization: A structural equation modeling approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Zamahani

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available For years, the idea of virtue was unfavorable among researchers and virtues were traditionally considered as culture-specific, relativistic and they were supposed to be associated with social conservatism, religious or moral dogmatism, and scientific irrelevance. Virtue and virtuousness have been recently considered seriously among organizational researchers. The proposed study of this paper examines the relationships between leadership, organizational culture, human resource, structure and processes, care for community and virtuous organization. Structural equation modeling is employed to investigate the effects of each variable on other components. The data used in this study consists of questionnaire responses from employees in Payam e Noor University in Yazd province. A total of 250 questionnaires were sent out and a total of 211 valid responses were received. Our results have revealed that all the five variables have positive and significant impacts on virtuous organization. Among the five variables, organizational culture has the most direct impact (0.80 and human resource has the most total impact (0.844 on virtuous organization.

  4. Tolerance and lymphoid organ structure and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryna Elizabeth Burrell

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Frontiers in Immunologic Tolerance explores barriers to tolerance from a variety of views of cells, molecules, and processes of the immune system. Our laboratory has spent over a decade focused on the migration of the cells of the immune system, and dissecting the signals that determine how and where effector and suppressive regulatory T cells traffic from one site to another in order to reject or protect allografts. These studies have led us to a greater appreciation of the anatomic structure of the immune system, and the realization that the path taken by lymphocytes during the course of the immune response to implanted organs determines the final outcome. In particular, the structures, microanatomic domains, and the cells and molecules that lymphocytes encounter during their transit through blood, tissues, lymphatics, and secondary lymphoid organs are powerful determinants for whether tolerance is achieved. Thus, the understanding of complex cellular and molecular processes of tolerance will not come from 96-well plate immunology, but from an integrated understanding of the temporal and spatial changes that occur during the response to the allograft. The study of the precise positioning and movement of cells in lymphoid organs has been difficult since it is hard to visualize cells within their 3-dimensional setting; instead techniques have tended to be dominated by 2-dimensional renderings, although advanced confocal and 2-photon systems are changing this view. It is difficult to precisely modify key molecules and events in lymphoid organs, so that existing knockouts, transgenics, inhibitors, and activators have global and pleiotropic effects, rather than precise anatomically restricted influences. Lastly, there are no well-defined postal codes or tracking systems for leukocytes, so that while we can usually track cells from point A to point B, it is exponentially more difficult or even impossible to track them to point C and

  5. Diagnosis of Hymenoptera venom allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilo, BM; Rueff, F; Mosbech, H; Bonifazi, F; Oude Elberink, JNG

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of diagnostic procedure is to classify a sting reaction by history, identify the underlying pathogenetic mechanism, and identify the offending insect. Diagnosis of Hymenoptera venom allergy thus forms the basis for the treatment. In the central and northern Europe vespid (mainly Vespula

  6. Structural analysis of hierarchically organized zeolites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sharon; Pinar, Ana B.; Kenvin, Jeffrey; Crivelli, Paolo; Kärger, Jörg; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Advances in materials synthesis bring about many opportunities for technological applications, but are often accompanied by unprecedented complexity. This is clearly illustrated by the case of hierarchically organized zeolite catalysts, a class of crystalline microporous solids that has been revolutionized by the engineering of multilevel pore architectures, which combine unique chemical functionality with efficient molecular transport. Three key attributes, the crystal, the pore and the active site structure, can be expected to dominate the design process. This review examines the adequacy of the palette of techniques applied to characterize these distinguishing features and their catalytic impact. PMID:26482337

  7. Organic/Inorganic Epitaxy: Structure & Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenberger, Peter

    1996-03-01

    A fundamental understanding of growth at the organic/inorganic interface impacts many different systems, including self assembly of alkane thiols, quasi epitaxy or Van der Waals epitaxy, and in the templating in biological systems. Using grazing incidence X-ray scattering helium diffraction and STM, both the structure and growth of these systems have been studied. While results have been obtained in three very different prototype systems, self assembly of alkane thiols on Au (111), quasi-epitaxial growth of PTCDA on Au (111), and co-assembly of CTAB and Tetraethoxysilane on various substrates, this talk will focus on the growth and structure of the alkane thiols on gold. These studies reveal that there are two distinct growth mechanisms: one temperature independent with a rate proportional to pressure and the other strongly temperature dependent and with a rate proportional to the square of the pressure (suggesting a bimolecular adsorbtion mechanism.) Our results also reveal a complex coverage temperature phase diagram with varying structures at different coverages. These structural results as well as those on other systems will be interpreted in terms of the competition between the film substrate interactions and the interlayer interactions and the strain that results, highlighting the similarities and differences from inorganic epitaxy.

  8. STRUKTUR KOMUNITAS HYMENOPTERA PARASITOID PADA TUMBUHAN LIAR DI SEKITAR PERTANAMAN PADI DI DAERAH ALIRAN SUNGAI (DAS CIANJUR, JAWA BARAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaherwandi, S. Manuwoto, D. Buchori, P. Hidayat, dan L.B. Prasetyo.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera Parasitoid Community Structure on Non-crops Vegetation Around Rice fields in Cianjur Watershed, West Java. Hymenoptera parasitoids have an important role in agroecosystem because of their ability in suppressing pest population. Their presence in the field is seen as the key to agricultural ecosystem. Their presence can be influenced by the availability of non-crop vegetation. Some adult Hymenoptera parasitoids require food in the form of pollen and nectar of wild flowers to ensure effective reproduction and longevity. The objective of this research was to study Hymenoptera parasitoid communities in non-crop vegetation around rice fields at Cianjur Watershed. Samplings were conducted at three different landscape, i.e. Nyalindung, Gasol and Selajambe West Java. Insects were sampled by two trapping techniques (farmcop and sweep net in two lines of transect for each landscape. A total of 257 species from 25 families of Hymenoptera parasitoids were collected in non-crop vegetation at Cianjur Watershed. Landscape structure, flowering vegetation, and pesticide application affected the species richness, diversity and evenness of Hymenoptera parasitoid in non-crop vegetation.

  9. Management of occupational Hymenoptera allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruëff, Franziska; Chatelain, Rene; Przybilla, Bernhard

    2011-04-01

    Certain outdoor activities show a particularly high risk for being stung by Hymenoptera species. Avoidance of such stings is preferable for preventing unwanted local or systemic sting reactions. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current knowledge on risk factors and management of Hymenoptera venom allergy. We will specifically focus on patients with an intense occupational exposure to Hymenoptera venom. Repeated stings were found to increase the risk for subsequent severe anaphylactic sting reactions. The male preponderance for severe anaphylactic sting reactions probably reflects in part a sex-specific occupational exposure being higher in males. When selecting a specific venom for therapy, current knowledge of cross-reactivity between venoms of various species should be considered. If available, venom immunotherapy should be performed using the venom of the culprit insect. Recently, a pilot study also showed the efficacy of venom immunotherapy when treating large local reactions. If an intensely exposed patient presents with a systemic anaphylactic sting reaction, efficacy of venom immunotherapy should be demonstrated by a tolerated sting challenge before allowing this patient to return to his/her occupation. Patients with bee venom allergy and an intense exposure should be treated with an increased maintenance dose of 200 μg bee venom. Patients with a history of large local reactions should be provided with an emergency kit, which should contain oral antihistamines and corticosteroids. In patients in whom local sting reactions induce symptoms of high clinical significance, an off-label use of venom immunotherapy may be discussed.

  10. Hymenoptera venom allergy in outdoor workers: Occupational exposure, clinical features and effects of allergen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toletone, Alessandra; Voltolini, Susanna; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Dini, Guglielmo; Bignardi, Donatella; Minale, Paola; Massa, Emanuela; Signori, Alessio; Troise, Costantino; Durando, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    To describe (i) the clinical characteristics of workers, exposed to hymenoptera stings, with an ascertained diagnosis of Hymenoptera Venom Allergy (HVA), (ii) the specific role of occupational exposure, (iii) the effect of Venom Immunotherapy (VIT) in reducing the severity of allergic episodes in workers exposed to repeated stings of hymenoptera, and (iv) the management of the occupational consequences caused by allergic reactions due to hymenoptera stings. Between 2000 and 2013 an observational study, including patients referred to the regional reference hospital of Liguria, Italy, with an ascertained diagnosis of HVA and treated with VIT, was performed. A structured questionnaire was administered to all patients to investigate the occupational features of allergic reactions. These were graded according to standard systems in patients at the first episode, and after re-stings, during VIT. One-hundred and 8four out of the 202 patients referred had a complete data set. In 32 (17.4%) patients, the allergic reaction occurred during work activities performed outdoor. Of these, 31.2% previously stung by hymenoptera at work, and receiving VIT, were re-stung during occupational activity. The grades of reaction developed under VIT treatment resulted clinically less severe than of those occurred at the first sting (p-value = 0.031). Our findings confirmed the clinical relevance of HVA, and described its occupational features in outdoor workers with sensitization, stressing the importance of an early identification and proper management of the professional categories recognized at high risk of hymenoptera stings. The Occupational Physician should be supported by other specialists to recommend appropriate diagnostic procedures and the prescription of VIT, which resulted an effective treatment for the prevention of episodes of severe reactions in workers with a proven HVA.

  11. Fauna Europaea: Hymenoptera – Apocrita (excl. Ichneumonoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea-Dan Mitroiu

    2015-03-01

    Hymenoptera is one of the four largest orders of insects, with about 130,000 described species. In the Fauna Europaea database, ‘Hymenoptera - Apocrita (excluding Ichneumonoidea’ comprises 13 superfamilies, 52 families, 91 subfamilies, 38 tribes and 13,211 species. The paper includes a complete list of taxa dealt with, the number of species in each and the name of the specialist responsible for data acquisition. As a general conclusion about the European fauna of Hymenoptera, the best known countries in terms of recorded species are those from northwestern Europe, with the least known fauna probably in the more eastern and southeastern parts of Europe.

  12. Structuring an Efficient Organic Wheat Breeding Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Stephen Baenziger

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Our long-term goal is to develop wheat cultivars that will improve the profitability and competitiveness of organic producers in Nebraska and the Northern Great Plains. Our approach is to select in early generations for highly heritable traits that are needed for both organic and conventional production (another breeding goal, followed by a targeted organic breeding effort with testing at two organic locations (each in a different ecological region beginning with the F6 generation. Yield analyses from replicated trials at two organic breeding sites and 7 conventional breeding sites from F6 through F12 nurseries revealed, using analyses of variance, biplots, and comparisons of selected lines that it is inappropriate to use data from conventional testing for making germplasm selections for organic production. Selecting and testing lines under organic production practices in different ecological regions was also needed and cultivar selections for organic production were different than those for conventional production. Modifications to this breeding protocol may include growing early generation bulks in an organic cropping system. In the future, our selection efforts should also focus on using state-of-the-art, non-transgenic breeding technologies (genomic selection, marker-assisted breeding, and high throughput phenotyping to synergistically improve organic and conventional wheat breeding.

  13. Organic superconductors with an incommensurate anion structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Kawamoto and Kazuo Takimiya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Superconducting incommensurate organic composite crystals based on the methylenedithio-tetraselenafulvalene (MDT-TSF series donors, where the energy band filling deviates from the usual 3/4-filled, are reviewed. The incommensurate anion potential reconstructs the Fermi surface for both (MDT-TSF(AuI20.436 and (MDT-ST(I30.417 neither by the fundamental anion periodicity q nor by 2q, but by 3q, where MDT-ST is 5H-2-(1,3-dithiol-2-ylidene-1,3-diselena-4,6-dithiapentalene, and q is the reciprocal lattice vector of the anion lattice. The selection rule of the reconstructing vectors is associated with the magnitude of the incommensurate potential. The considerably large interlayer transfer integral and three-dimensional superconducting properties are due to the direct donor–donor interactions coming from the characteristic corrugated conducting sheet structure. The materials with high superconducting transition temperature, Tc, have large ratios of the observed cyclotron masses to the bare ones, which indicates that the strength of the many-body effect is the major determinant of Tc. (MDT-TS(AuI20.441 shows a metal–insulator transition at TMI=50 K, where MDT-TS is 5H-2-(1,3-diselenol-2-ylidene-1,3,4,6-tetrathiapentalene, and the insulating phase is an antiferromagnet with a high Néel temperature (TN=50 K and a high spin–flop field (Bsf=6.9 T. There is a possibility that this material is an incommensurate Mott insulator. Hydrostatic pressure suppresses the insulating state and induces superconductivity at Tc=3.2 K above 1.05 GPa, where Tc rises to the maximum, Tcmax=4.9 K at 1.27 GPa. This compound shows a usual temperature–pressure phase diagram, in which the superconducting phase borders on the antiferromagnetic insulating phase, despite the unusual band filling.

  14. Inventário estruturado de formigas (Hymenoptera, Formicidae em floresta ombrófila de encosta na ilha da Marambaia, RJ Structured inventory of ants (Hymenoptera, Formicidae in atlantic slope rain-forest of Marambaia Island, RJ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel de S. Schütte

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available As formigas são componentes funcionais importantes em florestas tropicais devido aos papéis ecológicos que exercem, à grande biomassa e à riqueza de espécies. Embora a Mata Atlântica seja um dos ecossistemas mais bem estudados no Brasil, ainda faltam informações sobre a diversidade de formigas nos fragmentos florestais do Estado do Rio de Janeiro. A riqueza e composição da assembléia de formigas em floresta ombrófila de encosta na ilha da Marambaia (RJ foi estudada através de um inventário estruturado em uma área de 0,6 ha. Armadilhas do tipo "pitfall" e coletas manuais foram empregadas na serapilheira e sobre a vegetação entre os meses de janeiro e julho de 2004. Um total de 29 gêneros e 82 espécies foi encontrado na amostragem. A abundância e a riqueza de espécies foram maiores nas amostras de março do que de julho. Já a eqüitatividade e diversidade de formigas nas amostras não foram influenciadas pela época da coleta. As amostras de formigas em galhos mortos adicionaram seis espécies à lista, acrescentando informações sobre a biologia das espécies. As amostras sobre plantas totalizaram 32 espécies de formigas, das quais 12 foram exclusivas, como as espécies de Pseudomyrmex e algumas de Crematogaster e Pachycondyla. Este estudo pretende contribuir para o desenvolvimento de prioridades conservacionistas em um dos ecossistemas mais ameaçados do mundo.Ants are an important functional component in tropical forest due to their ecological roles, biomass and species diversity. Although the Atlantic Forest is one of the best studied ecosystems in Brazil, there is a lack of information about ant diversity in forest fragments of the state of Rio de Janeiro. The composition and richness of the ant fauna from atlantic slope rain-forest in Marambaia island-RJ were assessed by the structured inventory in an area of 0.6 ha. Pitfalls traps and hand collecting were used for sampling ants in the litter and on vegetation from

  15. Novel Structuring Routines for Organic Photovoltaics

    OpenAIRE

    Meier, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Organic photovoltaic devices are promising candidates for a future energy production at low-costs. In the framework of this thesis, fundamental aspects of organic solar cells based on different blend systems were investigated. X-ray scattering revealed a strong dependency of the inner film morphology of such devices on the layer thickness and the film composition. Applying optical methods, an enhanced photochemical degradation of blend films upon UV-irradiation was observed if ...

  16. Structure and organization of primary care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lember, M.; Cartier, T.; Bourgueil, Y.; Dedeu, T.; Hutchinson, A.; Kringos, D.

    2015-01-01

    The way primary care is structured establishes important conditions for both the process of care and its outcomes. In this chapter, the structure of primary care will be discussed according to three dimensions: governance, economic conditions and workforce development. Governance refers to the

  17. Structural Barriers: Redesigning Schools to Create Learning Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randeree, Ebrahim

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to focus on schools and address the structural dimensions of the organization as well as the hierarchical design of information flows between stakeholders. The paper highlights current structural barriers to creating learning organizations. Design/methodology/approach: This paper utilizes a conceptual model.…

  18. Demand structure and willingness to pay for organic dairy products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smed, Sinne

    2005-01-01

    This paper analyses if the introduction of a new and “low fat” organic variety of fluid milk has any effect on consumers’ valuation of organic milk in general and can rewind the stagnating trend in the demand for organic milk. In order to analyse this, the consumers’ purchasing structure was anal...

  19. Scale and structure of capitated physician organizations in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, M B; Frank, R G; Buchanan, J L; Epstein, A M

    2001-01-01

    Physician organizations in California broke new ground in the 1980s by accepting capitated contracts and taking on utilization management functions. In this paper we present new data that document the scale, structure, and vertical affiliations of physician organizations that accept capitation in California. We provide information on capitated enrollment, the share of revenue derived by physician organizations from capitation contracts, and the scope of risk sharing with health maintenance organizations (HMOs). Capitation contracts and risk sharing dominate payment arrangements with HMOs. Physician organizations appear to have responded to capitation by affiliating with hospitals and management companies, adopting hybrid organizational structures, and consolidating into larger entities.

  20. Hymenoptera “Parasitica” in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Mitio Shimbori

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A checklist composed of 105 species of parasitic Hymenoptera, which includes the non-aculeate Apocrita, recorded in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul (MS, Brazil, is presented. A new list, containing 153 genera obtained in recent surveys is also presented; out of these 131 are new records. The major knowledge gaps for these organisms in the State and the prospects for future studies for these organisms are discussed.

  1. Selection of Organization Structures Within the Naval Facilities Engineering Command.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-01

    develop a methodology of selecting an organization structure modeled after the second approach of Ansoff and Brandenburg. The proposed methodology uses...Galbraith, Robey and Ansoff and Brandenburg [Ref. 2, 3, 4, and 5]. Organization design, a much broader concept, is defined by Galbraith as the search for...advocates using a decision tree to guide the designer to the right organization structure [Ref. 2: p. 72]. Ansoff and Brandenburg developed a process

  2. The Temporal Organization of Syllabic Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Jason A.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation develops analytical tools which enable rigorous evaluation of competing syllabic parses on the basis of temporal patterns in speech production data. The data come from the articulographic tracking of fleshpoints on target speech organs, e.g., tongue, lips, jaw, in experiments with native speakers of American English and Moroccan…

  3. Fauna Europaea: Hymenoptera - Symphyta & Ichneumonoidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Achterberg, Kees; Taeger, Andreas; Blank, Stephan M; Zwakhals, Kees; Viitasaari, Matti; Yu, Dicky Sick Ki; de Jong, Yde

    2017-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant European terrestrial and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (west of the Urals and excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project comprises about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. Fauna Europaea represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. For the Hymenoptera, taxonomic data from one grade (Symphyta) and one Superfamily (Ichneumonoidea), including 15 families and 10,717 species, are included. Ichneumonoidea is the largest superfamily of Hymenoptera and consisting of two extant families, Ichneumonidae and Braconidae. The costal cell of the fore wing is absent, the fore wing has at least two closed cells, the constriction between the mesosoma (thorax + first abdominal segment or propodeum) and the metasoma (remainder of abdomen) is distinct and the parasitoid larvae usually spin a silken cocoon. Also, the metasoma is ventrally partly desclerotized in the vast majority of ichneumonoids.

  4. Silver staining of nucleolar organizer regions (NOR) in some species of Hymenoptera (bees and parasitic wasp) and Coleoptera (lady-beetle).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, E M; Pompolo, S G; Silva-Junior, J C; Caixeiro, A P; Rocha, M P; Dergam, J A

    2001-01-01

    Adaptations of the nucleolar organizer regions (NOR) banding technique using precipitation of silver salts significantly improved the NOR characterization of some species of hymenopterans and one coleopteran. The bee Melipona marginata (2n = 18) showed one metacentric pair of chromosomes with a NOR in the pericentromeric position. The parasitic wasp Mellitobia australica (2n = 12) also showed one metacentric pair with a strongly Ag-positive NOR. The male lady-beetle Cycloneda sanguinea (2n = 18 + Xy(p)) displayed a NOR on a pair of acrocentric autosomes. In the male Euglossa sp. (a haplodiploid species) (n = 21) the NOR were multiple, and occurred in five chromosomes. In the bee Plebeia sp. 1 (2n = 34) the NOR seemed restricted to one of the homologues of a metacentric pair. The systematic advances brought out by using this technique in the context of current theories of karyotypic evolution of these taxa are described and discussed.

  5. PLAN FOR PERFORMANCE ADMINISTRATION IN PYRAMIDAL STRUCTURE ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingo Alarcón Ortiz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Performance administration has become a current strategy in evaluating management within organizations, but its implementation often lacks an action plan, resulting from the valuation of climate and leadership styles embedded in the culture of the organization. This paper proposes a model action plan for performance management, which has been implemented, executed and evaluated in pyramidal organizational structure organizations where a diagnosis of the cultural climate and leadership styles recurring in the organization have been previously made.

  6. Extended structures and physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai-Xue; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2011-07-19

    The ability of uranium to undergo nuclear fission has been exploited primarily to manufacture nuclear weapons and to generate nuclear power. Outside of its nuclear physics, uranium also exhibits rich chemistry, and it forms various compounds with other elements. Among the uranium-bearing compounds, those with a uranium oxidation state of +6 are most common and a particular structural unit, uranyl UO(2)(2+) is usually involved in these hexavalent uranium compounds. Apart from forming solids with inorganic ions, the uranyl unit also bonds to organic molecules to generate uranyl-organic coordination materials. If appropriate reaction conditions are employed, uranyl-organic extended structures (1-D chains, 2-D layers, and 3-D frameworks) can be obtained. Research on uranyl-organic compounds with extended structures allows for the exploration of their rich structural chemistry, and such studies also point to potential applications such as in materials that could facilitate nuclear waste disposal. In this Account, we describe the structural features of uranyl-organic compounds and efforts to synthesize uranyl-organic compounds with desired structures. We address strategies to construct 3-D uranyl-organic frameworks through rational selection of organic ligands and the incorporation of heteroatoms. The UO(2)(2+) species with inactive U═O double bonds usually form bipyramidal polyhedral structures with ligands coordinated at the equatorial positions, and these polyhedra act as primary building units (PBUs) for the construction of uranyl-organic compounds. The geometry of the uranyl ions and the steric arrangements and functionalities of organic ligands can be exploited in the the design of uranyl--organic extended structures, We also focus on the investigation of the promising physicochemical properties of uranyl-organic compounds. Uranyl-organic materials with an extended structure may exhibit attractive properties, such as photoluminescence, photocatalysis

  7. Exposure to a sublethal concentration of imidacloprid and the side effects on target and nontarget organs of Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera, Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catae, Aline Fernanda; Roat, Thaisa Cristina; Pratavieira, Marcel; Silva Menegasso, Anally Ribeiro da; Palma, Mario Sergio; Malaspina, Osmar

    2018-03-01

    The use of insecticides has become increasingly frequent, and studies indicate that these compounds are involved in the intoxication of bees. Imidacloprid is a widely used neonicotinoid; thus, we have highlighted the importance of assessing its oral toxicity to Africanized bees and used transmission electron microscopy to investigate the sublethal effects in the brain, the target organ, and the midgut, responsible for the digestion/absorption of food. In addition, the distribution of proteins involved in important biological processes in the brain were evaluated on the 1st day of exposure by MALDI-imaging analysis. Bioassays were performed to determine the Median Lethal Concentration (LC 50 ) of imidacloprid to bees, and the value obtained was 1.4651 ng imidacloprid/μL diet. Based on this result, the sublethal concentration to be administered at 1, 4 and 8 days was established as a hundredth (1/100) of the LC 50 . The results obtained from the ultrastructural analysis showed alterations in the midgut cells of bees as nuclear and mitochondrial damage and an increase of vacuoles. The insecticide caused spacing among the Kenyon cells in the mushroom bodies, chromatin condensation and loss of mitochondrial cristae. The MALDI-imaging analysis showed an increase in the expression of such proteins as vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, amyloid protein precursor and protein kinase C, which are related to oxygen supply, neuronal degeneration and memory/learning, and a decrease in the expression of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha 1, which is fundamental to the synapses. These alterations demonstrated that imidacloprid could compromise the viability of the midgut epithelium, as well as inhibiting important cognitive processes in individuals, and may be reflected in losses of the colony.

  8. The Application of Classification Structures in Knowledge Organization and Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzu-heng Chiu

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Classification is a way of seeing the world. In a classification scheme, phenomena of interest are represented in a context of relationships that provide description, explanation, prediction, heuristics, and the generation of new knowledge. Knowing that information organization isn’t equal to knowledge organization, the author first defines the scope of classification and knowledge organization, and then describes the relationship between the classification and the representation and organization of knowledge. At the end, four kinds of classification structures are compared to show their abilities in representing knowledge. In order to utilize these classification structures, it is very important to understand their advantages and disadvantages.[Article content in Chinese

  9. Evaluation of spring organic treatments against Varroa destructor (Acari: Varroidae) in honey bee Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae) colonies in eastern Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovenazzo, Pierre; Dubreuil, Pascal

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this study was to measure the efficacy of two organic acid treatments, formic acid (FA) and oxalic acid (OA) for the spring control of Varroa destructor (Anderson and Trueman) in honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) colonies. Forty-eight varroa-infested colonies were randomly distributed amongst six experimental groups (n = 8 colonies per group): one control group (G1); two groups tested applications of different dosages of a 40 g OA/l sugar solution 1:1 trickled on bees (G2 and G3); three groups tested different applications of FA: 35 ml of 65% FA in an absorbent Dri-Loc(®) pad (G4); 35 ml of 65% FA poured directly on the hive bottom board (G5) and MiteAwayII™ (G6). The efficacy of treatments (varroa drop), colony development, honey yield and hive survival were monitored from May until September. Five honey bee queens died during this research, all of which were in the FA treated colonies (G4, G5 and G6). G6 colonies had significantly lower brood build-up during the beekeeping season. Brood populations at the end of summer were significantly higher in G2 colonies. Spring honey yield per colony was significantly lower in G6 and higher in G1. Summer honey flow was significantly lower in G6 and higher in G3 and G5. During the treatment period, there was an increase of mite drop in all the treated colonies. Varroa daily drop at the end of the beekeeping season (September) was significantly higher in G1 and significantly lower in G6. The average number of dead bees found in front of hives during treatment was significantly lower in G1, G2 and G3 versus G4, G5 and G6. Results suggest that varroa control is obtained from all spring treatment options. However, all groups treated with FA showed slower summer hive population build-up resulting in reduced honey flow and weaker hives at the end of summer. FA had an immediate toxic effect on bees that resulted in queen death in five colonies. The OA treatments that were tested have minimal toxic impacts on the

  10. Structural hierarchy in flow-aligned hexagonally self-organized microphases with parallel polyelectrolytic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruotsalainen, T; Torkkeli, M; Serimaa, R; Makela, T; Maki-Ontto, R; Ruokolainen, J; ten Brinke, G; Ikkala, O; Mäkelä, Tapio; Mäki-Ontto, Riikka

    2003-01-01

    We report a novel structural hierarchy where a flow-aligned hexagonal self-organized structure is combined with a polyelectrolytic self-organization on a smaller length scale and where the two structures are mutually parallel. Polystyrene-block-poly(4-vinylpyridine) (PS-block-P4VP) is selected with

  11. International marine organizations: essays on structure and activities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bekiashev, K.A; Serebriakov, V.V

    1981-01-01

    The aim of this directory is to show in detail, on the basis of vast information, the character of international marine organizations and in particular various aspects of their activities, structure...

  12. Porous Organic Materials: Strategic Design and Structure-Function Correlation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Saikat; Heasman, Patrick; Ben, Teng; Qiu, Shilun

    2017-02-08

    Porous organic materials have garnered colossal interest with the scientific fraternity due to their excellent gas sorption performances, catalytic abilities, energy storage capacities, and other intriguing applications. This review encompasses the recent significant breakthroughs and the conventional functions and practices in the field of porous organic materials to find useful applications and imparts a comprehensive understanding of the strategic evolution of the design and synthetic approaches of porous organic materials with tunable characteristics. We present an exhaustive analysis of the design strategies with special emphasis on the topologies of crystalline and amorphous porous organic materials. In addition to elucidating the structure-function correlation and state-of-the-art applications of porous organic materials, we address the challenges and restrictions that prevent us from realizing porous organic materials with tailored structures and properties for useful applications.

  13. Structural diversity in serine derived homochiral metal organic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-09-01

    Sep 1, 2014 ... Abstract. Two new Zn(II) and Cd(II) based homochiral metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) [SerCdOAc and. Zn(Ser)2] have been synthesized using pyridyl functionalized amino acid, viz., serine, as an organic linker. The. SerCdOAc structure is three dimensional, while that of the Zn(Ser)2 is two dimensional.

  14. Re-Ordering Structural Dimensions for Nigerian Organizations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Findings reveal that available researches conducted in organizations, especially in western organizations, so far reflect structural properties of OS in place as well as a variety of determinants, which, in turn, reflects the model adopted. Besides, environmental and cultural factors are found to be major determinants of the ...

  15. cDNA structure, genomic organization and expression patterns of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visfatin was a newly identified adipocytokine, which was involved in various physiologic and pathologic processes of organisms. The cDNA structure, genomic organization and expression patterns of silver Prussian carp visfatin were described in this report. The silver Prussian carp visfatin cDNA cloned from the liver was ...

  16. Structural organization of DNA in chlorella viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Wulfmeyer

    Full Text Available Chlorella viruses have icosahedral capsids with an internal membrane enclosing their large dsDNA genomes and associated proteins. Their genomes are packaged in the particles with a predicted DNA density of ca. 0.2 bp nm(-3. Occasionally infection of an algal cell by an individual particle fails and the viral DNA is dynamically ejected from the capsid. This shows that the release of the DNA generates a force, which can aid in the transfer of the genome into the host in a successful infection. Imaging of ejected viral DNA indicates that it is intimately associated with proteins in a periodic fashion. The bulk of the protein particles detected by atomic force microscopy have a size of ∼60 kDa and two proteins (A278L and A282L of about this size are among 6 basic putative DNA binding proteins found in a proteomic analysis of DNA binding proteins packaged in the virion. A combination of fluorescence images of ejected DNA and a bioinformatics analysis of the DNA reveal periodic patterns in the viral DNA. The periodic distribution of GC rich regions in the genome provides potential binding sites for basic proteins. This DNA/protein aggregation could be responsible for the periodic concentration of fluorescently labeled DNA observed in ejected viral DNA. Collectively the data indicate that the large chlorella viruses have a DNA packaging strategy that differs from bacteriophages; it involves proteins and share similarities to that of chromatin structure in eukaryotes.

  17. The Structural and Functional Organization of Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Peter J.

    2016-01-01

    This article proposes that what have been historically and contemporarily defined as different domains of human cognition are served by one of four functionally- and structurally-distinct areas of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Their contributions to human intelligence are as follows: (a) BA9, enables our emotional intelligence, engaging the psychosocial domain; (b) BA47, enables our practical intelligence, engaging the material domain; (c) BA46 (or BA46-9/46), enables our abstract intelligence, engaging the hypothetical domain; and (d) BA10, enables our temporal intelligence, engaging in planning within any of the other three domains. Given their unique contribution to human cognition, it is proposed that these areas be called the, social (BA9), material (BA47), abstract (BA46-9/46) and temporal (BA10) mind. The evidence that BA47 participates strongly in verbal and gestural communication suggests that language evolved primarily as a consequence of the extreme selective pressure for practicality; an observation supported by the functional connectivity between BA47 and orbital areas that negatively reinforce lying. It is further proposed that the abstract mind (BA46-9/46) is the primary seat of metacognition charged with creating adaptive behavioral strategies by generating higher-order concepts (hypotheses) from lower-order concepts originating from the other three domains of cognition. PMID:27799901

  18. The influence of vegetation and landscape structural connectivity on butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperiidae), Carabids (Coleoptera: Carabidae), Syrphids (Diptera: Syrphidae), and sawflies (Hymenoptera: Symphyta) in Northern Italy farmland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burgio, G.; Sommaggio, D.; Marini, M.; Chiarucci, A.; Landi, S.; Fabbri, R.; Pesarini, F.; Genghini, M.; Ferrari, R.; Muzzi, E.; Lenteren, van J.C.; Masetti, A.

    2015-01-01

    Landscape structure as well as local vegetation influence biodiversity in agroecosystems. A study was performed to evaluate the effect of floristic diversity, vegetation patterns, and landscape structural connectivity on butterflies (Lepidoptera: Papilionoidea and Hesperiidae), carabids (Coleoptera:

  19. Structural Capability of an Organization toward Innovation Capability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Susanne Balslev; Momeni, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    indicated that the advantages relying on the internal capabilities of organizations may determine the competitive position of organizations better than environmental opportunities do. Characteristics of firms shows that one of the most internal capabilities that lead the organizations to the strongest...... competitive advantage in the organizations is the innovation capability. The innovation capability is associated with other organizational capabilities, and many organizations have focused on the need to identify innovation capabilities.This research focuses on recognition of the structural aspect...... of innovation capability and proposes a conceptual framework based on a Qualitative Meta Synthesis of academic literature on organizations innovation capability. This is proposed for the development of the concept of innovation capability in the organizations and this paper includes an expert based validation...

  20. Social organization of Platythyrea lamellosa (Roger) (Hymenoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although colonies of Platythyrea lamellosa were found to be consistently queenless, the division of labour amongst workers resembled the pattern generally characteristic of ants. Mated workers were involved only with reproduction and tending larvae. The behaviour of virgin workers was influenced by their age. Athough ...

  1. Social organization of Platythyrea lamellosa (Roger) (Hymenoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Colonies of Platythyrea lamellosa contained 18-276 workers, but no queens were found. Dissected workers had five to nine ovarioles per ovary, the two ovaries of an individual often differing. In each of the colonies examined, only one worker was inseminated, and it was the only individual that laid diploid reproductive eggs ...

  2. Social organization of Platythyrea lamellosa (Roger) (Hymenoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-05-15

    May 15, 1990 ... Pheromones are probably involved, since no significant interactions between workers (Villet 1990) were seen during the experiments. Oviposition by virgin workers in the presence of a mated worker has been completely suppressed in P. lamellosa. although ovarial activity follows a cycle of development.

  3. Polymeric Thin Films for Organic Electronics: Properties and Adaptive Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Pignataro

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This review deals with the correlation between morphology, structure and performance of organic electronic devices including thin film transistors and solar cells. In particular, we report on solution processed devices going into the role of the 3D supramolecular organization in determining their electronic properties. A selection of case studies from recent literature are reviewed, relying on solution methods for organic thin-film deposition which allow fine control of the supramolecular aggregation of polymers confined at surfaces in nanoscopic layers. A special focus is given to issues exploiting morphological structures stemming from the intrinsic polymeric dynamic adaptation under non-equilibrium conditions.

  4. Structural complexities in the active layers of organic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephanie S; Loo, Yueh-Lin

    2010-01-01

    The field of organic electronics has progressed rapidly in recent years. However, understanding the direct structure-function relationships between the morphology in electrically active layers and the performance of devices composed of these materials has proven difficult. The morphology of active layers in organic electronics is inherently complex, with heterogeneities existing across multiple length scales, from subnanometer to micron and millimeter range. A major challenge still facing the organic electronics community is understanding how the morphology across all of the length scales in active layers collectively determines the device performance of organic electronics. In this review we highlight experiments that have contributed to the elucidation of structure-function relationships in organic electronics and also point to areas in which knowledge of such relationships is still lacking. Such knowledge will lead to the ability to select active materials on the basis of their inherent properties for the fabrication of devices with prespecified characteristics.

  5. Structural Genomics of Minimal Organisms: Pipeline and Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong-Hae; Kim, Rosalind; Adams, Paul; Chandonia, John-Marc

    2007-09-14

    The initial objective of the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center was to obtain a near complete three-dimensional (3D) structural information of all soluble proteins of two minimal organisms, closely related pathogens Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae. The former has fewer than 500 genes and the latter has fewer than 700 genes. A semiautomated structural genomics pipeline was set up from target selection, cloning, expression, purification, and ultimately structural determination. At the time of this writing, structural information of more than 93percent of all soluble proteins of M. genitalium is avail able. This chapter summarizes the approaches taken by the authors' center.

  6. Structural genomics of minimal organisms: pipeline and results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung-Hou; Shin, Dong-Hae; Kim, Rosalind; Adams, Paul; Chandonia, John-Marc

    2008-01-01

    The initial objective of the Berkeley Structural Genomics Center was to obtain a near complete three-dimensional (3D) structural information of all soluble proteins of two minimal organisms, closely related pathogens Mycoplasma genitalium and M. pneumoniae. The former has fewer than 500 genes and the latter has fewer than 700 genes. A semiautomated structural genomics pipeline was set up from target selection, cloning, expression, purification, and ultimately structural determination. At the time of this writing, structural information of more than 93% of all soluble proteins of M. genitalium is avail able. This chapter summarizes the approaches taken by the authors' center.

  7. Functional and structural microbial diversity in organic and conventional viticulture: organic farming benefits natural biocontrol agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Florian; Moser, Gerit; Müller, Henry; Berg, Gabriele

    2011-03-01

    Statistically significant differences in the structure and function of above-ground grapevine-associated microorganisms from organically and conventionally managed vineyards were found. Aureobasidium pullulans, a copper-detoxifying fungus and biocontrol agent, plays a key role in explaining these differences. The black fungus was strongly enriched in the communities of organically managed plants and yielded a higher indigenous antiphytopathogenic potential.

  8. Consumer knowledge structures with regards to organic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bredahl, Lone; Thøgersen, John; Dean, Moira

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents results of an empirical study conducted among European consumers to explore consumer knowledge structures with regard to organic foods and to identify the beliefs and the attribute-to-value chains that discriminate best among different consumer segments. Using means-end chain...... theory as the theoretical basis, the objectives of the study were met through carrying out laddering interviews with consumers in Germany, Great Britain, Denmark and Spain, using a Food-Related Lifestyle (FRL) segment-based approach and interviewing both organic and non-organic consumers. Respondents......; through hierarchical value maps and through perceptual maps derived from correspondence analyses, both across stimuli. Results point to marked differences in knowledge structures concerning organic foods among consumer segments, both at product-knowledge level and at self-knowledge level. The exact values...

  9. Crystalline metal-organic frameworks (MOFs): synthesis, structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Chandan; Kundu, Tanay; Biswal, Bishnu P; Mallick, Arijit; Banerjee, Rahul

    2014-02-01

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are a class of hybrid network supramolecular solid materials comprised of organized organic linkers and metal cations. They can display enormously high surface areas with tunable pore size and functionality, and can be used as hosts for a range of guest molecules. Since their discovery, MOFs have experienced widespread exploration for their applications in gas storage, drug delivery and sensing. This article covers general and modern synthetic strategies to prepare MOFs, and discusses their structural diversity and properties with respect to application perspectives.

  10. Pyridoacridine alkaloids from deep-water marine organisms: Structural elucidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrin R.M. Ibrahim

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Pyridoacridine alkaloids are unique marine nitrogenous compounds that represent a large family of alkaloids. They have been reported from different marine organisms like sponges, ascidians, anemones, prosobranch mollusk, and tunicates. Attention to pyridoacridines has risen because of their significant biological activities. The present review emphasizes mainly on pyridoacridines isolated marine organisms over the last years. Thus, the synthetic ones were not discussed. Herein, 95 pyridoacridine alkaloids isolated from marine organisms have been retrieved, in addition to their classification, isolation, sources, structures, molecular weight, physical, and (UV, IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectral data.

  11. Global self-organization of the cellular metabolic structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildefonso M De La Fuente

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Over many years, it has been assumed that enzymes work either in an isolated way, or organized in small catalytic groups. Several studies performed using "metabolic networks models" are helping to understand the degree of functional complexity that characterizes enzymatic dynamic systems. In a previous work, we used "dissipative metabolic networks" (DMNs to show that enzymes can present a self-organized global functional structure, in which several sets of enzymes are always in an active state, whereas the rest of molecular catalytic sets exhibit dynamics of on-off changing states. We suggested that this kind of global metabolic dynamics might be a genuine and universal functional configuration of the cellular metabolic structure, common to all living cells. Later, a different group has shown experimentally that this kind of functional structure does, indeed, exist in several microorganisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we have analyzed around 2.500.000 different DMNs in order to investigate the underlying mechanism of this dynamic global configuration. The numerical analyses that we have performed show that this global configuration is an emergent property inherent to the cellular metabolic dynamics. Concretely, we have found that the existence of a high number of enzymatic subsystems belonging to the DMNs is the fundamental element for the spontaneous emergence of a functional reactive structure characterized by a metabolic core formed by several sets of enzymes always in an active state. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This self-organized dynamic structure seems to be an intrinsic characteristic of metabolism, common to all living cellular organisms. To better understand cellular functionality, it will be crucial to structurally characterize these enzymatic self-organized global structures.

  12. Naamlijst van de Nederlandse bronswespen (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijswijt, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Checklist of the chalcid wasps of the Netherlands (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea) A first list of Dutch Chalcidoidea was published by Snellen van Vollenhoven in Herklots (Snellen van Vollenhoven, 1858). This list contained 24 species of chalcids, partly synonyms of each other. In a new list (Snellen van

  13. Basophil-activation tests in hymenoptera allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, Anthony E. J.; van der Heide, Sicco

    The measurement of basophil-activation markers may be useful in detecting IgIE-mediated sensitization but the relevance for application of the basophil-activation test in prediction of clinical reactivity in Hymenoptera allergy is very limited. For this reason, this test currently has no established

  14. (Apidae: Hymenoptera) pollination on yields of Cucumeropsis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The honeybees play an important role in the pollinations of many field crops. Here, we assessed the effect of the presence of honeybee colonies, A. mellifera adansonii, L. 1758 (Apidae: Hymenoptera) in the production of African melon crop, C. mannii (Naudin) (Cucurbitaceae) in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of. Congo.

  15. Structure-Function Relationships in Semiconducting Polymers for Organic Photovoltaics

    OpenAIRE

    Kavulak, David Fredric Joel

    2010-01-01

    The major body of this work investigates how the chemical structure of conjugated polymers relates to the fundamental operating mechanism of organic photovoltaic devices. New conjugated polymers were characterized and their optical and electronic properties tested and correlated with their power conversion efficiencies as the active layer in polymer solar cells. From these experiments general structure/function relationships are drawn with an eye toward developing universal guidelines for con...

  16. Development of Multiple Polymorphic Microsatellite Markers for Ceratina calcarata (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Using Genome-Wide Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Wyatt A; Rehan, Sandra M

    2016-01-01

    The small carpenter bee, Ceratina calcarata (Robertson), is a widespread native pollinator across eastern North America. The behavioral ecology and nesting biology of C. calcarata has been relatively well-studied and the species is emerging as a model organism for both native pollinator and social evolution research. C. calcarata is subsocial: reproductively mature females provide extended maternal care to their brood. As such, studies of C. calcarata may also reveal patterns of relatedness and demography unique to primitively social Hymenoptera. Here, we present 21 microsatellite loci, isolated from the recently completed C. calcarata genome. Screening in 39 individuals across their distribution revealed that no loci were in linkage disequilibrium, nor did any deviate significantly from Hardy-Weinberg following sequential Bonferroni correction. Allele count ranged from 2 to 14, and observed and expected heterozygosities ranged from 0.08 to 0.82 (mean 0.47) and 0.26 to 0.88 (mean 0.56), respectively. These markers will enable studies of population-wide genetic structuring across C. calcarata's distribution. Such tools will also allow for exploration of between and within-colony relatedness in this subsocial native pollinator. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  17. Clinical Characteristics of Allergy to Hymenoptera Stings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visitsunthorn, Nualanong; Kijmassuwan, Teera; Visitsunthorn, Kittipos; Pacharn, Panchama; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai

    2017-06-13

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of allergy to stings from the Hymenoptera order of insects in a hospital in Thailand. A descriptive retrospective analytical study was carried out in inpatients and outpatients suffering from Hymenoptera stings from 2009 to 2013 in Siriraj Hospital. Medical records of 386 patients with an allergy to Hymenoptera stings were evaluated. Anaphylaxis was more common in patients younger than 15 years, who comprised 22.3% of patients in this study. The most common sting type was from wasps (58.3%). Eighty-five percent of patients sought medical treatment less than 24 hours after being stung. A systemic reaction and anaphylaxis were found in 9.9% and 4.4% of subjects, respectively. In 17 patients with anaphylaxis, only 11 patients (64.7%) received an epinephrine (adrenaline) injection as treatment, and only 8 (47.1%) received epinephrine autoinjectors or epinephrine-prefilled syringes to prevent a possible subsequent severe reaction. Significantly more patients younger than 15 years received epinephrine for prevention of an allergic reaction than did those older than 15 years (87.5% vs 11.7%, P < 0.001). Antibiotics were given to 43.0% of patients. Anaphylaxis from Hymenoptera stings was more common in children than in adults. Only half of the patients visited the emergency room within 1 hour of being stung. Overuse of antibiotics and underuse of epinephrine were found. More information about Hymenoptera stings should be provided to the public, and the use of epinephrine should be encouraged in the case of severe reactions and anaphylaxis.

  18. Revision of Khoikhoiinae (Hymenoptera, Braconidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sharkey

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The species of the two genera of Khoikhoiinae (Hymenoptera, Braconidae are revised. Thirteen species are recognized, of which five are new and eight were previously described: Khoikhoia anthelion Sharkey, sp. n., K. lission Mason, 1984, K. oligospilos Sharkey, sp. n., K. semiadusta Mason, 1983, K. solata Mason, 1983, K. townesi Mason, 1983, K. turneri Mason, 1984, Sania browni Sharkey, sp. n., S. capensis Mason, 1983, S. henryi Mason, 1983, S. marjoriae Mason, 1983, S. masneri Sharkey, sp. n., and S. masoni Sharkey, sp. n.. All are from the Cape Region of South Africa, and all but one species are confined to the western Cape. A dichotomous key to species is presented; links to electronic interactive keys and to distribution maps are also included. Based on phylogenetic position and morphological characters, speculations on life history are made, and it is suggested that some species may be parasitoids of wood- or stem-boring Lepidoptera. The DELTA data matrix and images for the key are available at 10.3897/zookeys.20.108.app.1.ik; Intkey files are available at 10.3897/zookeys.20.108.app.2.ik; Lucid files in LIF and SDD format are available at doi:10.3897/zookeys.20.108.app.3.ik and doi:10.3897/zookeys.20.108.app.4.ik. Publishing of DELTA raw data will facilitate future workers to edit keys and to add newly discovered taxa.

  19. Theoretical study on the structural effect of some organic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) analysis of some organic compounds (imines or Schiff bases) is studied. The corrosion inhibition efficiencies of these imines have been studied by using AM1 (Austin model 1) Hamiltonian SCF-MO method and QSPR analysis. One of the most promising semiempirical ...

  20. Self-organized structures in soft confined thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These very small scale, highly confined systems are inherently unstable and thus self-organize into ordered structures which can be exploited for MEMS, sensors, opto-electronic devices and a host of other nanotechnology applications. In particular, mesomechanics requires incorporation of intermolecular interactions and ...

  1. Colony Structure and Nest Location of Two Species of Dacetine Ants: Pyramica ohioensis (Kennedy & Schramm and Pyramica rostrata (Emery in Maryland (Hymenoptera: Formicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard M. Duffield

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of numerous Pyramica ohioensis and P. rostrata colonies living in acorns, as well as the efficient recovery of colonies from artificial nests placed in suitable habitats, opens a new stage in the study of North American dacetine ants. Here we present detailed information, based on 42 nest collections, on the colony structure of these two species. P. ohioensis colonies are smaller than those of P. rostrata. Both species are polygynous, but nests of P. ohioensis contain fewer dealate queens than those of P. rostrata. This is the first report of multiple collections of Pyramica colonies nesting in fallen acorns, and of the use of artificial nesting cavities to sample for dacetines in the soil and leaf litter. We describe an artificial cavity nest design that may prove useful in future investigations.

  2. ORGANIC VS CONVENTIONAL: SOIL NEMATODE COMMUNITY STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, C; Storey, S G; Malan, A P

    2014-01-01

    Global increases in human population are creating an ever-greater need for food production. Poor soil management practices have degraded soil to such an extent that rapidly improved management practices is the only way to ensure future food demands. In South Africa, deciduous fruit producers are realising the need for soil health, and for an increased understanding of the benefits of soil ecology, to ensure sustainable fruit production. This depends heavily on improved orchard management. Conventional farming relies on the addition of artificial fertilizers, and the application of chemicals, to prevent or minimise, the effects of the soil stages of pest insects, and of plant-parasitic nematodes. Currently, there is resistance toward conventional farming practices, which, it is believed, diminishes biodiversity within the soil. The study aimed to establish the soil nematode community structure and function in organically, and conventionally, managed deciduous fruit orchards. This was done by determining the abundance, the diversity, and the functionality of the naturally occurring free-living, and plant-parasitic, nematodes in deciduous fruit orchards in the Western Cape province of South Africa. The objective of the study was to form the basis for the use of nematodes as future indicators of soil health in deciduous fruit orchards. Orchards from neighbouring organic, and conventional, apricot farms, and from an organic apple orchard, were studied. All the nematodes were quantified, and identified, to family level. The five nematode-classified trophic groups were found at each site, while 14 families were identified in each orchard, respectively. Herbivores were dominant in all the orchards surveyed. Organic apples had the fewest herbivores and fungivores, with the highest number of carnivores. When comparing organic with conventional apricot orchards, higher numbers of plant-parasitic nematodes were found in the organic apricot orchards. The Maturity Index (MI

  3. [Analysis of ooplasmic flows and their structural bases during cleavage inPimpla turionellae L. (Hymenoptera) : II. Strain of egg architecture by different acceleration gradients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, Elke

    1974-12-01

    In the egg ofPimpla turionellae L., three density gradients are produced by different methods of centrifugation. In spinning, the egg is rotated about its own long axis, so that the lightest egg material is collected in a central column (radial stratification). Flinging parallel to the long axis has been carried out at a short distance from the rotational axis (rotation axis situated immediately adjacent to a long edge of the egg) as well as further from the rotational axis (at a distance of 4.5 cm). A transversal stratification is thereby produced, in which the lightest and the heaviest material are collected at opposite long edges of the egg. The same stratification results from all three methods. From centripetal outward toward centrifugal, a lipid zone, a light yolk zone, a cytoplasm zone poor in yolk granules (basophilic cytoplasmic network), a dense yolk zone and a glycogen zone are formed. The sharpness of separation between the zones in eggs centrifuged during maturation divisions is better than that in eggs spun or flung during cleavage or pre-blastoderm formation. Either development ceases soon after the experiment has taken place or the centrifuged eggs develop into larvae. Half of the eggs flung at short distance or spun about the rotational axis with 10000-12000g are able to develop into embryos. Eggs handled by both of these methods show identical development at increasing accelerations. Eggs flung at greater distance already cease their development after a treatment at 10000g. Malformations or incomplete embryos do not occur in any group of experiments. These findings allow postulation of a system of factors sensitive to accelerations higher than 10000g, which is arranged cylindrically within the egg and which is not connected in any way to the shiftable, light microscopic fractions. This postulated system of factors could have a dynamic function and thereby be an essential component of the primary organization pattern in the egg ofPimpla.Only eggs

  4. Structural organization of the regulatory domain of human 5-lipoxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, John B; Brock, Thomas G

    2005-04-01

    The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) initiates the synthesis of leukotrienes. For this reason, 5-LO activity is important for immune defense, whereas improper regulation contributes to pathogenesis, including chronic inflammation, asthma and atherosclerosis. Like all lipoxygenases, the 5-LO protein consists of two domains, a regulatory domain and a catalytic domain. Naturally, the regulatory domain determines catalytic activity and controls leukotriene synthesis. This domain shares features with classical C2 domains in that it has a beta-sandwich structure and binds calcium, nucleotides and phospholipids. However, important structural features place this domain in a distinct family, the PLATs (for Polycystin-1, Lipoxygenase, alpha-Toxin). In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the three dimensional organization of this important component of the 5-LO molecule. In addition, we point to findings from structural analyses of related proteins to suggest further details relating 5-LO structure to function.

  5. Morphology and function of the ovipositor mechanism in Ceraphronoidea (Hymenoptera, Apocrita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Ernst

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The ovipositor of apocritan Hymenoptera is an invaluable source of phylogenetically relevant characters, and our understanding of its functional morphology stands to enlighten us about parasitoid life history strategies. Although Ceraphronoidea is one of the most commonly collected Hymenoptera taxa with considerable economic importance, our knowledge about their natural history and phylogenetic relationships, both to other apocritan lineages and within the superfamily itself, is limited. As a first step towards revealing ceraphronoid natural diversity we describe the skeletomuscular system of the ceraphronoid ovipositor for the first time. Dissections and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy 3D media files were used to visualize the ovipositor complex and to develop character concepts. Morphological structures were described in natural language and then translated into a character-character state format, whose terminology was linked to phenotype-relevant ontologies. Four unique anatomical phenotypes were revealed: 1. The first valvifer (gonangulum of the genus Trassedia is composed of two articulating sclerites, a condition present only in a few basal insect taxa. The bipartition of the first valvifer in Trassedia is most likely secondary and might allow more rapid oviposition. 2. Ceraphronoids, unlike other Hymenoptera, lack the retractor muscle of the terebra; instead the egg laying device is retracted by the seventh sternite. 3. Also unlike other Hymenoptera, the cordate apodeme and the anterior flange of the second valvifer are fused and compose one ridge that serves as the site of attachment for the dorsal and ventral T9-second valvifer muscles. Overall, the ceraphronoid ovipositor system is highly variable and can be described by discrete, distinguishable character states. However, these differences, despite their discrete nature, do not reflect the present classification of the superfamily and might represent parallelisms driven by host

  6. CONCEPTUAL GENERALIZATION OF STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION OF COMPUTER NETWORKS MEDICAL SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. P. Mintser

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic principles of the structural organization of computer networks in schools are presented. The questions of universities integration’s in the modern infrastructure of the information society are justified. Details the structural organizations of computer networks are presented. The effectiveness of implementing automated library information systems is shown. The big dynamical growths of technical and personal readiness of students to use virtual educational space are presented. In this regard, universities are required to provide advance information on filling the educational environment of modern virtual university, including multimedia resources for industry professional education programs. Based on information and educational environments virtual representations of universities should be formed distributed resource centers that will avoid duplication of effort on the development of innovative educational technologies, will provide a mutual exchange of results and further development of an open continuous professional education, providing accessibility, modularity and mobility training and retraining specialists.

  7. Carotenoids Database: structures, chemical fingerprints and distribution among organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuzaki, Junko

    2017-01-01

    To promote understanding of how organisms are related via carotenoids, either evolutionarily or symbiotically, or in food chains through natural histories, we built the Carotenoids Database. This provides chemical information on 1117 natural carotenoids with 683 source organisms. For extracting organisms closely related through the biosynthesis of carotenoids, we offer a new similarity search system 'Search similar carotenoids' using our original chemical fingerprint 'Carotenoid DB Chemical Fingerprints'. These Carotenoid DB Chemical Fingerprints describe the chemical substructure and the modification details based upon International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) semi-systematic names of the carotenoids. The fingerprints also allow (i) easier prediction of six biological functions of carotenoids: provitamin A, membrane stabilizers, odorous substances, allelochemicals, antiproliferative activity and reverse MDR activity against cancer cells, (ii) easier classification of carotenoid structures, (iii) partial and exact structure searching and (iv) easier extraction of structural isomers and stereoisomers. We believe this to be the first attempt to establish fingerprints using the IUPAC semi-systematic names. For extracting close profiled organisms, we provide a new tool 'Search similar profiled organisms'. Our current statistics show some insights into natural history: carotenoids seem to have been spread largely by bacteria, as they produce C30, C40, C45 and C50 carotenoids, with the widest range of end groups, and they share a small portion of C40 carotenoids with eukaryotes. Archaea share an even smaller portion with eukaryotes. Eukaryotes then have evolved a considerable variety of C40 carotenoids. Considering carotenoids, eukaryotes seem more closely related to bacteria than to archaea aside from 16S rRNA lineage analysis. : http://carotenoiddb.jp.

  8. Additive Manufacturing of Biomedical Constructs with Biomimetic Structural Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; He, Jiankang; Zhang, Weijie; Jiang, Nan; Li, Dichen

    2016-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM), sometimes called three-dimensional (3D) printing, has attracted a lot of research interest and is presenting unprecedented opportunities in biomedical fields, because this technology enables the fabrication of biomedical constructs with great freedom and in high precision. An important strategy in AM of biomedical constructs is to mimic the structural organizations of natural biological organisms. This can be done by directly depositing cells and biomaterials, depositing biomaterial structures before seeding cells, or fabricating molds before casting biomaterials and cells. This review organizes the research advances of AM-based biomimetic biomedical constructs into three major directions: 3D constructs that mimic tubular and branched networks of vasculatures; 3D constructs that contains gradient interfaces between different tissues; and 3D constructs that have different cells positioned to create multicellular systems. Other recent advances are also highlighted, regarding the applications of AM for organs-on-chips, AM-based micro/nanostructures, and functional nanomaterials. Under this theme, multiple aspects of AM including imaging/characterization, material selection, design, and printing techniques are discussed. The outlook at the end of this review points out several possible research directions for the future. PMID:28774030

  9. Prediction of structure and density for organic nitramines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzyabchenko, A. V.; Pivina, T. S.; Arnautova, E. A.

    1996-05-01

    An approach to ab initio crystal structure prediction by packing optimization is developed for organic nitramines, an important class of energetic materials. The principal features of the search method are: use of statistical data on the organic crystal structural classes to select typical space groups and site symmetries for further search; accounting for the energy-hypersurface symmetry to determine the unique search region; and use of an automated similarity-search procedure to recognize non-unique minima and determine the symmetry of optimized packings. The wide convergence properties of the local search procedure permit one to start optimization from an arbitrary point, so that no preliminary screening of the starting models is necessary. The numerical calculations were first carried out on the known crystal structures of three polymorphs of HMX (1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane). In this step, the force-field parameters for the nitramine fragment have been improved to obtain the best correspondence between the predicted and observed molecular geometries. The predicted packings were found to be in reasonably good agreement with the X-ray structural data, while the computed lattice energies were not accurate enough to predict the observed heats of sublimation and the trend of polymorph stabilities. Secondly, the method was employed to predict the possible crystal structures of eight isomeric azanitroadamantanes and wurtzitanes, whose molecular structures were proposed earlier on the basis of a computational study (T.S. Pivina et al., Propellants, Explosives, Pyrotechnics, 20 (1995) 91). As a result, the energy-minimized structures with densities up to 2.08 and 2.04 g cm -3 have been predicted for the adamantane and wurtzitane series, respectively, as the possible crystal polymorphs. Due to the interaction between the conformational and packing forces giving rise to some gain in the total energy at the expense of at least partial loss in molecular

  10. Organic and inorganic–organic thin film structures by molecular layer deposition: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Sundberg

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The possibility to deposit purely organic and hybrid inorganic–organic materials in a way parallel to the state-of-the-art gas-phase deposition method of inorganic thin films, i.e., atomic layer deposition (ALD, is currently experiencing a strongly growing interest. Like ALD in case of the inorganics, the emerging molecular layer deposition (MLD technique for organic constituents can be employed to fabricate high-quality thin films and coatings with thickness and composition control on the molecular scale, even on complex three-dimensional structures. Moreover, by combining the two techniques, ALD and MLD, fundamentally new types of inorganic–organic hybrid materials can be produced. In this review article, we first describe the basic concepts regarding the MLD and ALD/MLD processes, followed by a comprehensive review of the various precursors and precursor pairs so far employed in these processes. Finally, we discuss the first proof-of-concept experiments in which the newly developed MLD and ALD/MLD processes are exploited to fabricate novel multilayer and nanostructure architectures by combining different inorganic, organic and hybrid material layers into on-demand designed mixtures, superlattices and nanolaminates, and employing new innovative nanotemplates or post-deposition treatments to, e.g., selectively decompose parts of the structure. Such layer-engineered and/or nanostructured hybrid materials with exciting combinations of functional properties hold great promise for high-end technological applications.

  11. Differently Structured Advance Organizers Lead to Different Initial Schemata and Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurlitt, Johannes; Dummel, Sebastian; Schuster, Silvia; Nuckles, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Does the specific structure of advance organizers influence learning outcomes? In the first experiment, 48 psychology students were randomly assigned to three differently structured advance organizers: a well-structured, a well-structured and key-concept emphasizing, and a less structured advance organizer. These were followed by a sorting task, a…

  12. Organic/metal interfaces. Electronic and structural properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhm, Steffen

    2008-07-17

    This work addresses several important topics of the field of organic electronics. The focus lies on organic/metal interfaces, which exist in all organic electronic devices. Physical properties of such interfaces are crucial for device performance. Four main topics have been covered: (i) the impact of molecular orientation on the energy levels, (ii) energy level tuning with strong electron acceptors, (iii) the role of thermodynamic equilibrium at organic/ organic homo-interfaces and (iv) the correlation of interfacial electronic structure and bonding distance. To address these issues a broad experimental approach was necessary: mainly ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy was used, supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, metastable atom electron spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray standing waves, to examine vacuum sublimed thin films of conjugated organic molecules (COMs) in ultrahigh vacuum. (i) A novel approach is presented to explain the phenomenon that the ionization energy in molecular assemblies is orientation dependent. It is demonstrated that this is due to a macroscopic impact of intramolecular dipoles on the ionization energy in molecular assemblies. Furthermore, the correlation of molecular orientation and conformation has been studied in detail for COMs on various substrates. (ii) A new approach was developed to tune hole injection barriers ({delta}{sub h}) at organic/metal interfaces by adsorbing a (sub-) monolayer of an organic electron acceptor on the metal electrode. Charge transfer from the metal to the acceptor leads to a chemisorbed layer, which reduces {delta}{sub h} to the COM overlayer. This concept was tested with three acceptors and a lowering of {delta}{sub h} of up to 1.2 eV could be observed. (iii) A transition from vacuum-level alignment to molecular level pinning at the homo-interface between a lying monolayer and standing multilayers of a COM was observed, which depended on the amount of a pre-deposited acceptor. The

  13. Fauna Europaea: Hymenoptera - Apocrita (excl. Ichneumonoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitroiu, Mircea-Dan; Noyes, John; Cetkovic, Aleksandar; Nonveiller, Guido; Radchenko, Alexander; Polaszek, Andrew; Ronquist, Fredrick; Forshage, Mattias; Pagliano, Guido; Gusenleitner, Josef; Bartalucci, Mario Boni; Olmi, Massimo; Fusu, Lucian; Madl, Michael; Johnson, Norman F; Jansta, Petr; Wahis, Raymond; Soon, Villu; Rosa, Paolo; Osten, Till; Barbier, Yvan; de Jong, Yde

    2015-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Hymenoptera is one of the four largest orders of insects, with about 130,000 described species. In the Fauna Europaea database, 'Hymenoptera - Apocrita (excluding Ichneumonoidea)' comprises 13 superfamilies, 52 families, 91 subfamilies, 38 tribes and 13,211 species. The paper includes a complete list of taxa dealt with, the number of species in each and the name of the specialist responsible for data acquisition. As a general conclusion about the European fauna of Hymenoptera, the best known countries in terms of recorded species are those from northwestern Europe, with the least known fauna probably in the more eastern and southeastern parts of Europe.

  14. Fauna Europaea: Hymenoptera – Apocrita (excl. Ichneumonoidea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, John; Cetkovic, Aleksandar; Nonveiller, Guido; Radchenko, Alexander; Polaszek, Andrew; Ronquist, Fredrick; Forshage, Mattias; Pagliano, Guido; Gusenleitner, Josef; Bartalucci, Mario Boni; Olmi, Massimo; Fusu, Lucian; Madl, Michael; Johnson, Norman F; Jansta, Petr; Wahis, Raymond; Soon, Villu; Rosa, Paolo; Osten, Till; Barbier, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Hymenoptera is one of the four largest orders of insects, with about 130,000 described species. In the Fauna Europaea database, ‘Hymenoptera - Apocrita (excluding Ichneumonoidea)’ comprises 13 superfamilies, 52 families, 91 subfamilies, 38 tribes and 13,211 species. The paper includes a complete list of taxa dealt with, the number of species in each and the name of the specialist responsible for data acquisition. As a general conclusion about the European fauna of Hymenoptera, the best known countries in terms of recorded species are those from northwestern Europe, with the least known fauna probably in the more eastern and southeastern parts of Europe. PMID:25859127

  15. Component Resolved Diagnosis in Hymenoptera Anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsitz, D; Brockow, K

    2017-06-01

    Hymenoptera anaphylaxis is one of the leading causes of severe allergic reactions and can be fatal. Venom-specific immunotherapy (VIT) can prevent a life-threatening reaction; however, confirmation of an allergy to a Hymenoptera venom is a prerequisite before starting such a treatment. Component resolved diagnostics (CRD) have helped to better identify the responsible allergen. Many new insect venom allergens have been identified within the last few years. Commercially available recombinant allergens offer new diagnostic tools for detecting sensitivity to insect venoms. Additional added sensitivity to nearly 95% was introduced by spiking yellow jacket venom (YJV) extract with Ves v 5. The further value of CRD for sensitivity in YJV and honey bee venom (HBV) allergy is more controversially discussed. Recombinant allergens devoid of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants often help to identify the culprit venom in patients with double sensitivity to YJV and HBV. CRD identified a group of patients with predominant Api m 10 sensitization, which may be less well protected by VIT, as some treatment extracts are lacking this allergen. The diagnostic gap of previously undetected Hymenoptera allergy has been decreased via production of recombinant allergens. Knowledge of analogies in interspecies proteins and cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants is necessary to distinguish relevant from irrelevant sensitizations.

  16. Structural Organization of Enzymes of the Phenylacetate Catabolic Hybrid Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrey M. Grishin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic compounds are the second most abundant class of molecules on the earth and frequent environmental pollutants. They are difficult to metabolize due to an inert chemical structure, and of all living organisms, only microbes have evolved biochemical pathways that can open an aromatic ring and catabolize thus formed organic molecules. In bacterial genomes, the phenylacetate (PA utilization pathway is abundant and represents the central route for degradation of a variety of organic compounds, whose degradation reactions converge at this pathway. The PA pathway is a hybrid pathway and combines the dual features of aerobic metabolism, i.e., usage of both oxygen to open the aromatic ring and of anaerobic metabolism—coenzyme A derivatization of PA. This allows the degradation process to be adapted to fluctuating oxygen conditions. In this review we focus on the structural and functional aspects of enzymes and their complexes involved in the PA degradation by the catabolic hybrid pathway. We discuss the ability of the central PaaABCE monooxygenase to reversibly oxygenate PA, the controlling mechanisms of epoxide concentration by the pathway enzymes, and the similarity of the PA utilization pathway to the benzoate utilization Box pathway and β-oxidation of fatty acids.

  17. Structural Organization of Enzymes of the Phenylacetate Catabolic Hybrid Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishin, Andrey M; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2015-06-12

    Aromatic compounds are the second most abundant class of molecules on the earth and frequent environmental pollutants. They are difficult to metabolize due to an inert chemical structure, and of all living organisms, only microbes have evolved biochemical pathways that can open an aromatic ring and catabolize thus formed organic molecules. In bacterial genomes, the phenylacetate (PA) utilization pathway is abundant and represents the central route for degradation of a variety of organic compounds, whose degradation reactions converge at this pathway. The PA pathway is a hybrid pathway and combines the dual features of aerobic metabolism, i.e., usage of both oxygen to open the aromatic ring and of anaerobic metabolism-coenzyme A derivatization of PA. This allows the degradation process to be adapted to fluctuating oxygen conditions. In this review we focus on the structural and functional aspects of enzymes and their complexes involved in the PA degradation by the catabolic hybrid pathway. We discuss the ability of the central PaaABCE monooxygenase to reversibly oxygenate PA, the controlling mechanisms of epoxide concentration by the pathway enzymes, and the similarity of the PA utilization pathway to the benzoate utilization Box pathway and β-oxidation of fatty acids.

  18. Organic matter and soil structure in the Everglades Agricultural Area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Alan L. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Hanlon, Edward A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This publication pertains to management of organic soils (Histosols) in the Everglades Agricultural Area (EAA). These former wetland soils are a major resource for efficient agricultural production and are important globally for their high organic matter content. Recognition of global warming has led to considerable interest in soils as a repository for carbon. Soils rich in organic matter essentially sequester or retain carbon in the profile and can contribute directly to keeping that sequestered carbon from entering the atmosphere. Identification and utilization of management practices that minimize the loss of carbon from organic soils to the atmosphere can minimize effects on global warming and increase the longevity of subsiding Histosols for agricultural use. Understanding and predicting how these muck soils will respond to current and changing land uses will help to manage soil carbon. The objectives of this document are to: a. Discuss organic soil oxidation relative to storing or releasing carbon and nitrogen b. Evaluate effects of cultivation (compare structure for sugarcane vs. uncultivated soil) Based upon the findings from the land-use comparison (sugarcane or uncultivated), organic carbon was higher with cultivation in the lower depths. There is considerable potential for minimum tillage and residue management to further enhance carbon sequestration in the sugarcane system. Carbon sequestration is improved and soil subsidence is slowed with sugarcane production, and both of these are positive outcomes. Taking action to increase or maintain carbon sequestration appears to be appropriate but may introduce some risk to farming operations. Additional management methods are needed to reduce this risk. For both the longevity of these organic soils and from a global perspective, slowing subsidence through BMP implementation makes sense. Since these BMPs also have considerable societal benefit, it remains to be seen if society will help to offset a part or all

  19. Organization, Structure and Activity of Proteins in Monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boucher,J.; Trudel, E.; Methot, M.; Desmeules, P.; Salesse, C.

    2007-01-01

    Many different processes take place at the cell membrane interface. Indeed, for instance, ligands bind membrane proteins which in turn activate peripheral membrane proteins, some of which are enzymes whose action is also located at the membrane interface. Native cell membranes are difficult to use to gain information on the activity of individual proteins at the membrane interface because of the large number of different proteins involved in membranous processes. Model membrane systems, such as monolayers at the air-water interface, have thus been extensively used during the last 50 years to reconstitute proteins and to gain information on their organization, structure and activity in membranes. In the present paper, we review the recent work we have performed with membrane and peripheral proteins as well as enzymes in monolayers at the air-water interface. We show that the structure and orientation of gramicidin has been determined by combining different methods. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the secondary structure of rhodopsin and bacteriorhodopsin is indistinguishable from that in native membranes when appropriate conditions are used. We also show that the kinetics and extent of monolayer binding of myristoylated recoverin is much faster than that of the nonmyristoylated form and that this binding is highly favored by the presence polyunsaturated phospholipids. Moreover, we show that the use of fragments of RPE65 allow determine which region of this protein is most likely involved in membrane binding. Monomolecular films were also used to further understand the hydrolysis of organized phospholipids by phospholipases A2 and C.

  20. Single-Walled Carbon-Nanotubes-Based Organic Memory Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundes Fakher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electrical behaviour of organic memory structures, based on single-walled carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs, metal–insulator–semiconductor (MIS and thin film transistor (TFT structures, using poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA as the gate dielectric, are reported. The drain and source electrodes were fabricated by evaporating 50 nm gold, and the gate electrode was made from 50 nm-evaporated aluminium on a clean glass substrate. Thin films of SWCNTs, embedded within the insulating layer, were used as the floating gate. SWCNTs-based memory devices exhibited clear hysteresis in their electrical characteristics (capacitance–voltage (C–V for MIS structures, as well as output and transfer characteristics for transistors. Both structures were shown to produce reliable and large memory windows by virtue of high capacity and reduced charge leakage. The hysteresis in the output and transfer characteristics, the shifts in the threshold voltage of the transfer characteristics, and the flat-band voltage shift in the MIS structures were attributed to the charging and discharging of the SWCNTs floating gate. Under an appropriate gate bias (1 s pulses, the floating gate is charged and discharged, resulting in significant threshold voltage shifts. Pulses as low as 1 V resulted in clear write and erase states.

  1. Modern electronic structure theory and applications in organic chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Davidson, ER

    1997-01-01

    This volume focuses on the use of quantum theory to understand and explain experiments in organic chemistry. High level ab initio calculations, when properly performed, are useful in making quantitative distinctions between various possible interpretations of structures, reactions and spectra. Chemical reasoning based on simpler quantum models is, however, essential to enumerating the likely possibilities. The simpler models also often suggest the type of wave function likely to be involved in ground and excited states at various points along reaction paths. This preliminary understanding is n

  2. CONVERSION PRODUCT STRUCTURE AS TOOL TO INCREASE YIELD PROCESSING ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Khorev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors' analysis of the performance of organizations, processing raw materials of agricultural origin, in particular, dealing with meat processing, identified the need to develop tools to increase their profitability. Unlike common approaches to assessing the profitability of the processing organizations, taking into account only the interests of the organization's leadership and buyers of products, the authors proposed and implemented a concept based on the interests of participants in the triune balance business activities: owners of capital, management organizations and consumers. As one of the tools for improving the yield of processing organizations are invited to transform their product mix of economic evaluations of profitability of each product line positions. Russian researchers income from product sales are traditionally measured by indicators such as net income, income from sales, profit margins and profitability level - in terms of return on sales. The disadvantage of using these indicators, according to the authors, is their lack of objectivity in the evaluation of the effectiveness of investment business owners. In this work was used unconventional and non-proliferation in the Russian practice, the rate of economic value added (EVA, a built - in system of profitability assortment positions. As indicators, the production of a particular product line units proposed and used two quantitative indicators - EVA level per unit of production and profitability of production (for EVA, as well as a quality parameter - the level of demand. Developed by the evaluation program transformation product structure represented as a matrix management capabilities, allowing to achieve a balance of interests of the triune main participants in business activity.

  3. Molecular structure and exciton dynamics in organic conjugated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alan K.

    Intermolecular electronic interactions, dipole coupling and orbital overlap, caused by pi-pi stacking in organic conjugated polymers lead to unique structures and properties that can be harnessed for optoelectronic applications. These interactions define structure-function relationships in amorphous and aggregated forms of polymers in the solid state and determine their efficiencies and functionality in electronic devices, from transistors to solar cells. Organic polymer electronic device performance depends critically upon electronic coupling between monomer units -mediated by conformation and packing characteristics - that dictates electronic properties like conductivity and capacitance as well as electronic processes, such as charge carrier generation and transport. This dissertation demonstrates how electronic processes in conjugated polymers are mediated by subtle inter- and intra-chain electronic interactions imparted by the conformational degrees of freedom within their solid state structure and how this effects device performance. To initiate this investigation into structure-function relationships, an examination of nanoparticles representing two limiting aggregation states of the conjugated polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) was conducted. These aggregates are defined by their predominate form of electronic coupling, inter- or intrachain, called H- and J-aggregates respectively. H- or J-aggregates of P3HT were embedded in an insulating matrix and time-resolved fluorescence intensity modulation spectroscopy was utilized to uncover the existence of efficient singlet-triplet quenching in J aggregates not present in H-aggregates. These studies were extended by examining P3HT H-and J-aggregates under applied electric fields in capacitor type devices using multiple time-resolved and steady-state spectroscopic techniques. These experiments reveal electronic couplings in J aggregates that shift excited state population towards a majority composed of long lived

  4. Modeling, structural, and spectroscopic studies of lanthanide-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Marcelo O; Paz, Filipe A Almeida; Freire, Ricardo O; de Sá, Gilberto F; Galembeck, André; Montenegro, Maria C B S M; Araújo, Alberto N; Alves, S

    2009-09-10

    In this paper, we report the hydrothermal synthesis of three lanthanide-organic framework materials using as primary building blocks the metallic centers Eu(3+), Tb(3+), and Gd(3+) and residues of mellitic acid: [Ln(2)(MELL)(H(2)O)(6)] (where Ln(3+) = Eu(3+), Tb(3+), and Gd(3); hereafter designated as (1), (2) and (3)). Structural characterization encompasses single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies, thermal analysis, and vibrational spectroscopy, plus detailed investigations on the experimental and predicted (using the Sparkle/AM1 model) photophysical luminescent properties. Crystallographic investigations showed that the compounds are all isostructural, crystallizing in the orthorhombic space group Pnnm and structurally identical to the lanthanum 3D material reported by the group of Williams. (2) is highly photoluminescent, as confirmed by the measured quantum yield and lifetime (37% and 0.74 ms, respectively). The intensity parameters (Omega(2), Omega(4), and Omega(6)) of (1) were first calculated using the Sparkle/AM1 structures and then employed in the calculation of the rates of energy transfer (W(ET)) and back-transfer (W(BT)). Intensity parameters were used to predict the radiative decay rate. The calculated quantum yield derived from the Sparkle/AM1 structures was approximately 16%, and the experimental value was 8%. We attribute the registered differences to the fact that the theoretical model does not consider the vibronic coupling with O-H oscillators from coordinated water molecules. These results clearly attest for the efficacy of the theoretical models employed in all calculations and open a new window of interesting possibilities for the design in silico of novel and highly efficient lanthanide-organic frameworks.

  5. Resolving Anatomical and Functional Structure in Human Brain Organization: Identifying Mesoscale Organization in Weighted Network Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Christian; Bassett, Danielle S.; Lim, Kelvin O.; Carlson, Jean M.

    2014-01-01

    Human brain anatomy and function display a combination of modular and hierarchical organization, suggesting the importance of both cohesive structures and variable resolutions in the facilitation of healthy cognitive processes. However, tools to simultaneously probe these features of brain architecture require further development. We propose and apply a set of methods to extract cohesive structures in network representations of brain connectivity using multi-resolution techniques. We employ a combination of soft thresholding, windowed thresholding, and resolution in community detection, that enable us to identify and isolate structures associated with different weights. One such mesoscale structure is bipartivity, which quantifies the extent to which the brain is divided into two partitions with high connectivity between partitions and low connectivity within partitions. A second, complementary mesoscale structure is modularity, which quantifies the extent to which the brain is divided into multiple communities with strong connectivity within each community and weak connectivity between communities. Our methods lead to multi-resolution curves of these network diagnostics over a range of spatial, geometric, and structural scales. For statistical comparison, we contrast our results with those obtained for several benchmark null models. Our work demonstrates that multi-resolution diagnostic curves capture complex organizational profiles in weighted graphs. We apply these methods to the identification of resolution-specific characteristics of healthy weighted graph architecture and altered connectivity profiles in psychiatric disease. PMID:25275860

  6. Resolving anatomical and functional structure in human brain organization: identifying mesoscale organization in weighted network representations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Lohse

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Human brain anatomy and function display a combination of modular and hierarchical organization, suggesting the importance of both cohesive structures and variable resolutions in the facilitation of healthy cognitive processes. However, tools to simultaneously probe these features of brain architecture require further development. We propose and apply a set of methods to extract cohesive structures in network representations of brain connectivity using multi-resolution techniques. We employ a combination of soft thresholding, windowed thresholding, and resolution in community detection, that enable us to identify and isolate structures associated with different weights. One such mesoscale structure is bipartivity, which quantifies the extent to which the brain is divided into two partitions with high connectivity between partitions and low connectivity within partitions. A second, complementary mesoscale structure is modularity, which quantifies the extent to which the brain is divided into multiple communities with strong connectivity within each community and weak connectivity between communities. Our methods lead to multi-resolution curves of these network diagnostics over a range of spatial, geometric, and structural scales. For statistical comparison, we contrast our results with those obtained for several benchmark null models. Our work demonstrates that multi-resolution diagnostic curves capture complex organizational profiles in weighted graphs. We apply these methods to the identification of resolution-specific characteristics of healthy weighted graph architecture and altered connectivity profiles in psychiatric disease.

  7. Resolving anatomical and functional structure in human brain organization: identifying mesoscale organization in weighted network representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohse, Christian; Bassett, Danielle S; Lim, Kelvin O; Carlson, Jean M

    2014-10-01

    Human brain anatomy and function display a combination of modular and hierarchical organization, suggesting the importance of both cohesive structures and variable resolutions in the facilitation of healthy cognitive processes. However, tools to simultaneously probe these features of brain architecture require further development. We propose and apply a set of methods to extract cohesive structures in network representations of brain connectivity using multi-resolution techniques. We employ a combination of soft thresholding, windowed thresholding, and resolution in community detection, that enable us to identify and isolate structures associated with different weights. One such mesoscale structure is bipartivity, which quantifies the extent to which the brain is divided into two partitions with high connectivity between partitions and low connectivity within partitions. A second, complementary mesoscale structure is modularity, which quantifies the extent to which the brain is divided into multiple communities with strong connectivity within each community and weak connectivity between communities. Our methods lead to multi-resolution curves of these network diagnostics over a range of spatial, geometric, and structural scales. For statistical comparison, we contrast our results with those obtained for several benchmark null models. Our work demonstrates that multi-resolution diagnostic curves capture complex organizational profiles in weighted graphs. We apply these methods to the identification of resolution-specific characteristics of healthy weighted graph architecture and altered connectivity profiles in psychiatric disease.

  8. Structural organization of G-protein-coupled receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomize, Andrei L.; Pogozheva, Irina D.; Mosberg, Henry I.

    1999-07-01

    Atomic-resolution structures of the transmembrane 7-α-helical domains of 26 G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) (including opsins, cationic amine, melatonin, purine, chemokine, opioid, and glycoprotein hormone receptors and two related proteins, retinochrome and Duffy erythrocyte antigen) were calculated by distance geometry using interhelical hydrogen bonds formed by various proteins from the family and collectively applied as distance constraints, as described previously [Pogozheva et al., Biophys. J., 70 (1997) 1963]. The main structural features of the calculated GPCR models are described and illustrated by examples. Some of the features reflect physical interactions that are responsible for the structural stability of the transmembrane α-bundle: the formation of extensive networks of interhelical H-bonds and sulfur-aromatic clusters that are spatially organized as 'polarity gradients' the close packing of side-chains throughout the transmembrane domain; and the formation of interhelical disulfide bonds in some receptors and a plausible Zn2+ binding center in retinochrome. Other features of the models are related to biological function and evolution of GPCRs: the formation of a common 'minicore' of 43 evolutionarily conserved residues; a multitude of correlated replacements throughout the transmembrane domain; an Na+-binding site in some receptors, and excellent complementarity of receptor binding pockets to many structurally dissimilar, conformationally constrained ligands, such as retinal, cyclic opioid peptides, and cationic amine ligands. The calculated models are in good agreement with numerous experimental data.

  9. Inorganic Biominerals in Crustaceans are Structurally Independent of Organic Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mergelsberg, S. T.; Michel, F. M.; Mukhopadhyay, B.; Dove, P. M.

    2015-12-01

    Biomineralization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) as crystalline calcite or amorphous CaCO3 (ACC) occurs in the exoskeletons of all crustaceans. These cuticles are complex composites of inorganic mineral and organic macromolecules with highly divergent morphologies that are adapted to the extreme variations in environmental pressures within their diverse ecological niches. The remarkable variations and adaptations that form, infer a highly efficient and regulated mechanism for biomineralization that is most likely orchestrated by a myriad of biomacromolecules (Ziegler A 2012). The roles of these peptides and organic metabolites during CaCO3 biomineralization are not well understood. In part, this is due to a lack of knowledge of crustacean homeostasis. In a step toward understanding cuticle mineralization in crustaceans, this study asks: Which molecules affect biomineralization? Do the biomineral-active molecules vary greatly between species and body parts? Recent studies of polysaccharide controls on mineralization also raise the question of whether small heterogeneities in chitin, the most abundant biopolymer of the composite, could be primarily responsible for differences in CaCO3 crystallinity. This study used a novel spectroscopic approach to characterize the mineral and organic components of exoskeletons from three Malacostraca organisms — American Lobster (Homarus americanus), Dungeness Crab (Metacarcinus magister), and Red Rock Crab (Cancer productus). Using high-energy x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, the cuticles of three major body parts from these organisms were analyzed for the structure and bulk chemistry of its chitin and CaCO3 components. The findings indicate that Raman spectroscopy provides adequate resolution to show that crystallinity of chitin and the CaCO3 mineral component are chemically independent of each other, although their crystallinities co-vary for Brachyura species (Dungeness and Red Rock Crabs). Insights from this study

  10. Evolution and structural organization of the C proteins of paramyxovirinae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael K Lo

    Full Text Available The phosphoprotein (P gene of most Paramyxovirinae encodes several proteins in overlapping frames: P and V, which share a common N-terminus (PNT, and C, which overlaps PNT. Overlapping genes are of particular interest because they encode proteins originated de novo, some of which have unknown structural folds, challenging the notion that nature utilizes only a limited, well-mapped area of fold space. The C proteins cluster in three groups, comprising measles, Nipah, and Sendai virus. We predicted that all C proteins have a similar organization: a variable, disordered N-terminus and a conserved, α-helical C-terminus. We confirmed this predicted organization by biophysically characterizing recombinant C proteins from Tupaia paramyxovirus (measles group and human parainfluenza virus 1 (Sendai group. We also found that the C of the measles and Nipah groups have statistically significant sequence similarity, indicating a common origin. Although the C of the Sendai group lack sequence similarity with them, we speculate that they also have a common origin, given their similar genomic location and structural organization. Since C is dispensable for viral replication, unlike PNT, we hypothesize that C may have originated de novo by overprinting PNT in the ancestor of Paramyxovirinae. Intriguingly, in measles virus and Nipah virus, PNT encodes STAT1-binding sites that overlap different regions of the C-terminus of C, indicating they have probably originated independently. This arrangement, in which the same genetic region encodes simultaneously a crucial functional motif (a STAT1-binding site and a highly constrained region (the C-terminus of C, seems paradoxical, since it should severely reduce the ability of the virus to adapt. The fact that it originated twice suggests that it must be balanced by an evolutionary advantage, perhaps from reducing the size of the genetic region vulnerable to mutations.

  11. Resolving detailed molecular structures in complex organic mixtures and modeling their secondary organic aerosol formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman-Rendall, Kevin A. S.; Zhuang, Yang R.; Amirav, Aviv; Chan, Arthur W. H.

    2016-03-01

    Characterization of unresolved complex mixtures (UCMs) remains an ongoing challenge towards developing detailed and accurate inputs for modeling secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Traditional techniques based on gas chromatography/electron impact-mass spectrometry induce excessive fragmentation, making it difficult to speciate and quantify isomers precisely. The goal of this study is to identify individual organic isomers by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry with supersonic molecular beam (SMB-GC/MS, also known as GC/MS with Cold EI) and to incorporate speciated isomers into an SOA model that accounts for the specific structures elucidated. Two samples containing atmospherically relevant UCMs are analyzed. The relative isomer distributions exhibit remarkably consistent trends across a wide range of carbon numbers. Constitutional isomers of different alkanes are speciated and individually quantified as linear, branched - for the first time by position of branching - multiply branched, or unsaturated - by degree of ring substitution and number of rings. Relative amounts of exact molecular structures are used as input parameters in an SOA box model to study the effects of molecular structures on SOA yields and volatility evolution. Highly substituted cyclic, mono-substituted cyclic, and linear species have the highest SOA yields while branched alkanes formed the least SOA. The rate of functionalization of a representative UCM is found to be in agreement with current volatility basis set (VBS) parameterizations based on detailed knowledge of composition and known oxidation mechanisms, confirming the validity of VBS parameters currently used in air quality models.

  12. Isotopic and structural signature of experimentally irradiated organic matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Boris; Roskosz, Mathieu; Remusat, Laurent; Leroux, Hugues; Vezin, Hervé; Depecker, Christophe

    2014-10-01

    The effects of electron irradiation on the structure and the D/H signature of a synthetic analogue of extraterrestrial insoluble organic matter (IOM) were studied. Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) was chosen because it contains both aliphatic and aromatic functional groups. A 900 nm-thick film was irradiated with electrons within the energy range 4-300 keV, for different run durations. Temperature influence was also tested. Irradiated residues were structurally and isotopically characterized by infrared spectroscopy (IR), electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR), and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS). With increasing energy deposition, spectroscopic results indicate (i) a gradual amorphization with chain scissions, (ii) an increase of CH2/CH3 and (iii) the formation of quinones. The EPR study shows that mono- and biradicals (organic species with one or several unpaired valence electrons) are also formed during irradiation. As these structural modifications occur, the δD (initially at -33‰ relative to SMOW) decreases first during a transient step and then stabilizes at ∼+300‰. There is a strong correlation between the changes recorded by the different methods and the electron dose. Deposited energy appears to be the key parameter to induce these modifications. In this respect a low-energy electron irradiation causes more damages than high energy ones. Based on our data and considering the current solar electron flux, the irradiation at moderate energy (1-10 keV) can produce significant D-enrichments of the IOM in a timescale compatible with the evolution of a typical protoplanetary disk.

  13. Mieren in Veluwebermen: soortenrijkdom en aanbevelingen voor beheer (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordijk, J.; Boer, P.

    2007-01-01

    Ants in roadside verges on the Veluwe: species richness and recommendations for management (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) Highway verges in the Veluwe region contain some well developed nutrient poor plant communities, like grasslands, grey hair grass vegetation and heather vegetation. These places

  14. Bibliography of the family Braconidae (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonoidea) (1964-2003)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghahari, H.; Yu, D.S.; Achterberg, van C.

    2006-01-01

    A bibliography of the family Braconidae/Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae is given for the period 1964-2003. It is an addition to Shenefelt's bibliography (1965), which covers the period 1785-1963. In total 10,436 references are listed.

  15. A checklist of Ropalidiini wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Polistinae in Indochina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Phong Huy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a basis for intensive study of the taxonomy and biogeography of Ropalidiini wasps in Indochina (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Polistinae, a checklist of Ropalidiini wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae is presented. A total of 57 Ropalidiini species and subspecies belonging to three genera from Indochina are listed, together with information of the type material deposited in the Natural History Collection, Ibaraki University, Japan (IUNH and the Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources (IEBR. References of their distribution in Indochina are also provided.

  16. Ichneumonidae (Hymenoptera) new for the fauna of Norway, Part 5

    OpenAIRE

    RIEDEL, Matthias; Hansen, Lars Ove

    2012-01-01

    The family Ichneumonidae represents a very species-rich family of parasitoid Hymenoptera. In Norway, 1583 different Ichneumonid species have been reported so far. The present survey gives distributional records for 98 additional species of the family Ichneumonidae (Hymenoptera) previously not known from Norway. 21 of them have hitherto not been reported from Scandinavia, including the first Palaearctic record of Syrphophilus tricinctus (Ashmead, 1902). Posted here with permission from the...

  17. Rilascio e insediamento di Torymus sinensis (Hymenoptera Torymidae) in Sardegna

    OpenAIRE

    Loru, Laura; Fois, Xenia; Fadda, Maria Leonarda; Peddes, Angelo; Pantaleoni, Roberto Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The classical biological control based on the release of the parasitoid Torymus sinensis Kamijo (Hymenoptera, Torymidae) is considered to be the only effective method of controlling Dryocosmus kuriphilus ((Hymenoptera, Cynipidae), a major pest of Castanea species worldwide. In our multi-year study, performed between 2009 and 2015, we confirm the establishment of T. sinensis in Sardinia (Italy) and its effectiveness in controlling gall wasp infestation.

  18. Nanoscale Structure of Organic Matter Could Explain Litter Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, G.; Adani, F.

    2014-12-01

    According to the literature biochemical catalyses are limited in their actions because of the complex macroscopic and, above all, microscopic structures of cell wall that limit mass transportation (i.e. 3D structure). Our study on energy crop showed that plant digestibility increased by modifying the 3D cell wall microstructure. Results obtained were ascribed to the enlargement, such as effectively measured, of the pore spaces between cellulose fibrils. Therefore we postulated that 3 D structure of plant residues drives degradability in soil determining its recalcitrance in short time. Here we focused on the drivers of short-term decomposition of organic matter (plant residues) in soils evaluating the architecture of plant tissues, captured via measurements of the microporosiy of the cell walls. Decomposition rates of a wide variety of biomass types were studied conducting experiments in both aerobic and anaerobic environments. Different analytical approaches were applied in order to characterize biomass at both chemical and physical level. Combined statistical approaches were used to examine the relationships between carbon mineralization and chemical/physical characteristics. The results revealed that degradation was significantly and negatively correlated with the micro-porosity surface (MiS) (surface of pores of 0.3-1.5 nm of diameter). The multiple regressions performed by using partial least square model enabled describing biomass biodegradability under either aerobic and anaerobic condition by using micro-porosity and aromatic-C content (assumed to be representative of lignin) as independent variables (R2 =0.97, R2cv =0.95 for aerobic condition; R2 =0.99, R2cv =0.98 for anaerobic condition, respectively). These results corroborate the hypothesis that plant tissues are physically protected from enzymatic attack by a microporous "sheath" that limit penetration into cell wall, and demonstrate the key role played by aromatic carbon, because of its chemical

  19. Social Capital in Organizations - Beyond Structure and Metaphor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waldstrøm, Christian

    2003-01-01

    in future research before social capital can move definitively beyond being merely a metaphor for advantage. First, the unresolved issue of causality is a barrier in the study of social structure and social capital alike, and hampers both measuring scales and implications drawn from empirical research......The importance and usefulness of social capital as a concept in the study of organizations have been established by a large body of research. The aim of this paper is to review the concept of social capital in an organizational context, and it identifies five main issues that need to be addressed....... Secondly, it is necessary to determine whether social capital can or should be measured. Thirdly, the negative aspects of social capital should be explored and integrated into the existing research. Fourthly, the field between social capital of the individual and organizational social capital lacks...

  20. Structuring of bacterioplankton communities by specific dissolved organic carbon compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Consarnau, Laura; Lindh, Markus V; Gasol, Josep M; Pinhassi, Jarone

    2012-09-01

    The main role of microorganisms in the cycling of the bulk dissolved organic carbon pool in the ocean is well established. Nevertheless, it remains unclear if particular bacteria preferentially utilize specific carbon compounds and whether such compounds have the potential to shape bacterial community composition. Enrichment experiments in the Mediterranean Sea, Baltic Sea and the North Sea (Skagerrak) showed that different low-molecular-weight organic compounds, with a proven importance for the growth of marine bacteria (e.g. amino acids, glucose, dimethylsulphoniopropionate, acetate or pyruvate), in most cases differentially stimulated bacterial growth. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis 'fingerprints' and 16S rRNA gene sequencing revealed that some bacterial phylotypes that became abundant were highly specific to enrichment with specific carbon compounds (e.g. Acinetobacter sp. B1-A3 with acetate or Psychromonas sp. B3-U1 with glucose). In contrast, other phylotypes increased in relative abundance in response to enrichment with several, or all, of the investigated carbon compounds (e.g. Neptuniibacter sp. M2-A4 with acetate, pyruvate and dimethylsulphoniopropionate, and Thalassobacter sp. M3-A3 with pyruvate and amino acids). Furthermore, different carbon compounds triggered the development of unique combinations of dominant phylotypes in several of the experiments. These results suggest that bacteria differ substantially in their abilities to utilize specific carbon compounds, with some bacteria being specialists and others having a more generalist strategy. Thus, changes in the supply or composition of the dissolved organic carbon pool can act as selective forces structuring bacterioplankton communities. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Structural versatility of Metal-organic frameworks: Synthesis and Characterization

    KAUST Repository

    Alsadun, Norah S.

    2017-05-01

    Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs), an emerging class of porous crystalline materials, have shown promising properties for diverse applications such as catalysis, gas storage and separation. The high degree of tunability of MOFs vs other solid materials enable the assembly of advanced materials with fascinating properties for specific applications. Nevertheless, the precise control in the construction of MOFs at the molecular level remains challenging. Particularly, the formation of pre-targeted multi-nuclear Molecular Building Block (MBB) precursors to unveil materials with targeted structural characteristics is captivating. The aim of my master project in the continuous quest of the group of Prof. Eddaoudi in exploring different synthetic pathways to control the assembly of Rare Earth (RE) based MOF. After giving a general overview about MOFs, I will discuss in this thesis the results of my work on the use of tri-topic oriented organic carboxylate building units with the aim to explore the assembly/construction of new porous RE based MOFs. In chapter 2 will discuss the assembly of 3-c linkers with RE metals was then evaluated based on symmetry and angularity of the three connected linkers. The focus of chapter 3 is cerium based MOFs and heterometallic system, based on 3-c ligands with different length and symmetry. Overall, the incompatibility of 3-c ligands with the 12-c cuo MBB did not allow to any formation of higher neuclearity (˃6), but it has resulted in affecting the connectivity of the cluster.

  2. Organic Matter Biogeochemistry In The Almeria-oran Frontal Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutx, M.; Guigue, C.; Striby, L.; Bianchi, M.; van Wambeke, F.; Leblond, N.; Prieur, L.

    In the western Mediterranean, the Almeria-Oran front extends at the boundary of the Alboran-Sea. At different location through the frontal structure, drifting sediment traps (PPS5) were deployed at 100 m and 300m during a 1-1.5 d sampling period in the December 1997 and January 1998. Simultaneously, samples of dissolved and suspended matter were collected by using CTD/rosette casts from surface down to 200m. Iatroscan-analyzed lipid tracers were used to obtain a synoptic scheme of organic matter biogeochemistry in the frontal zone and to assess the role of physical- biological couplings on the quality and quantity of organic matter fluxes. The study of lipids reflected the meso-scale spatial variability of pelagic ecosystems and the effect of hydrodynamic on the carbon exportation to the deep ocean. In the frontal area, the particle flux (3.9 mg m-2 j-1 at 100 m and 1.9 mg m-2 j-1at 300 m) was low compared to the flux recorded during a previous cruise in spring (May 1991) (7.7 mg m-2 j-1 at 100 m and 3.0 mg m-2 j-1at 300 m). On the contrary, diatoms and freshly released lipid material signatures were observed at the front site as in spring. The distribution of hydrolysis lipid signature points out that heterotrophic processes actively degraded biogenic particles transported through cross-frontal sopycnals i during winter 1997-1998.

  3. Modeling adsorption properties of structurally deformed metal-organic frameworks using structure-property map.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, WooSeok; Lim, Dae-Woon; Kim, Sungjune; Harale, Aadesh; Yoon, Minyoung; Suh, Myunghyun Paik; Kim, Jihan

    2017-07-25

    Structural deformation and collapse in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) can lead to loss of long-range order, making it a challenge to model these amorphous materials using conventional computational methods. In this work, we show that a structure-property map consisting of simulated data for crystalline MOFs can be used to indirectly obtain adsorption properties of structurally deformed MOFs. The structure-property map (with dimensions such as Henry coefficient, heat of adsorption, and pore volume) was constructed using a large data set of over 12000 crystalline MOFs from molecular simulations. By mapping the experimental data points of deformed SNU-200, MOF-5, and Ni-MOF-74 onto this structure-property map, we show that the experimentally deformed MOFs share similar adsorption properties with their nearest neighbor crystalline structures. Once the nearest neighbor crystalline MOFs for a deformed MOF are selected from a structure-property map at a specific condition, then the adsorption properties of these MOFs can be successfully transformed onto the degraded MOFs, leading to a new way to obtain properties of materials whose structural information is lost.

  4. The occurrence and evolution of nectar extraction apparatus among Hymenoptera ‘Symphyta'. Jervis, M. & Vilhelmsen, L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilhelmsen, Lars

    2000-01-01

    We review feeding biology and mouthpart structure generally among adults of the basal hymenopteran, or ‘symphytan', lineages (sawflies, woodwasps, horntails and their relatives). These insects feed on a wide range of materials: floral and extrafloral nectar, pollen, plant (floral and leaf ) tissues......, plant (angiosperm) sap, the juice of ripe fruit, the spermatial fluid of rust fungi, sternorrhynchan bug honeydew, and insect tissues. Adults show feeding-related mouthpart specialization either for consuming pollen (the Xyelidae only) or for consuming ‘concealed' floral nectar (several families). Seven...... functional types of elongated proboscis or ‘concealed-nectar extraction apparatus (CNEA)' have previously been recognized among Hymenoptera. We identify an additional type, which appears to be unique among Hymenoptera and has probably evolved directly from unspecialized mouthparts (labiomaxillary complex...

  5. Adaptive symbiotic organisms search (SOS algorithm for structural design optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanshyam G. Tejani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The symbiotic organisms search (SOS algorithm is an effective metaheuristic developed in 2014, which mimics the symbiotic relationship among the living beings, such as mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism, to survive in the ecosystem. In this study, three modified versions of the SOS algorithm are proposed by introducing adaptive benefit factors in the basic SOS algorithm to improve its efficiency. The basic SOS algorithm only considers benefit factors, whereas the proposed variants of the SOS algorithm, consider effective combinations of adaptive benefit factors and benefit factors to study their competence to lay down a good balance between exploration and exploitation of the search space. The proposed algorithms are tested to suit its applications to the engineering structures subjected to dynamic excitation, which may lead to undesirable vibrations. Structure optimization problems become more challenging if the shape and size variables are taken into account along with the frequency. To check the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms, six different planar and space trusses are subjected to experimental analysis. The results obtained using the proposed methods are compared with those obtained using other optimization methods well established in the literature. The results reveal that the adaptive SOS algorithm is more reliable and efficient than the basic SOS algorithm and other state-of-the-art algorithms.

  6. Structure and organization of nanosized-inclusion-containing bilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chun-lai; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2009-07-01

    Based on a considerable amount of experimental evidence for lateral organization of lipid membranes which share astonishingly similar features in the presence of different inclusions, we use a hybrid self-consistent field theory (SCFT)/density-functional theory (DFT) approach to deal with bilayer membranes embedded by nanosized inclusions and explain experimental findings. Here, the hydrophobic inclusions are simple models of hydrophobic drugs or other nanoparticles for biomedical applications. It is found that lipid/inclusion-rich domains are formed at moderate inclusion concentrations and disappear with the increase in the concentration of inclusions. At high inclusion content, chaining of inclusions occurs due to the effective depletion attraction between inclusions mediated by lipids. Meanwhile, the increase in the concentration of inclusions can also cause thickening of the membrane and the distribution of inclusions undergoes a layering transition from one-layer structure located in the bilayer midplane to two-layer structure arranged into the two leaflets of a bilayer. Our theoretical predictions address the complex interactions between membranes and inclusions suggesting a unifying mechanism which reflects the competition between the conformational entropy of lipids favoring the formation of lipid- and inclusion-rich domains in lipids and the steric repulsion of inclusions leading to the uniform dispersion.

  7. Fauna Europaea: Hymenoptera – Symphyta & Ichneumonoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees van Achterberg

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms of all extant European terrestrial and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (west of the Urals and excluding the Caucasus region, and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project comprises about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. Fauna Europaea represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. For the Hymenoptera, taxonomic data from one grade (Symphyta and one Superfamily (Ichneumonoidea, including 15 families and 10,717 species, are included. Ichneumonoidea is the largest superfamily of Hymenoptera and consisting of two extant families, Ichneumonidae and Braconidae. The costal cell of the fore wing is absent, the fore wing has at least two closed cells, the constriction between the mesosoma (thorax + first abdominal segment or propodeum and the metasoma (remainder of abdomen is distinct and the parasitoid larvae usually spin a silken cocoon. Also, the metasoma is ventrally partly desclerotized in the vast majority of ichneumonoids.

  8. Fauna Europaea: Hymenoptera – Symphyta & Ichneumonoidea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taeger, Andreas; Blank, Stephan M.; Zwakhals, Kees; Viitasaari, Matti; Yu, Dicky Sick Ki

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant European terrestrial and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (west of the Urals and excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project comprises about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. Fauna Europaea represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. For the Hymenoptera, taxonomic data from one grade (Symphyta) and one Superfamily (Ichneumonoidea), including 15 families and 10,717 species, are included. Ichneumonoidea is the largest superfamily of Hymenoptera and consisting of two extant families, Ichneumonidae and Braconidae. The costal cell of the fore wing is absent, the fore wing has at least two closed cells, the constriction between the mesosoma (thorax + first abdominal segment or propodeum) and the metasoma (remainder of abdomen) is distinct and the parasitoid larvae usually spin a silken cocoon. Also, the metasoma is ventrally partly desclerotized in the vast majority of ichneumonoids. PMID:28894397

  9. Self-medication of anaphylactic reactions due to Hymenoptera stings-an EAACI Task Force Consensus Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilò, M B; Cichocka-Jarosz, E; Pumphrey, R; Oude-Elberink, J N; Lange, J; Jakob, T; Bonadonna, P; Fernandez, J; Kosnik, M; Helbling, A; Mosbech, H; Gawlik, R; Niedoszytko, M; Patella, V; Pravettoni, V; Rodrigues-Alves, R; Sturm, G J; Rueff, F

    2016-07-01

    An anaphylactic reaction due to a Hymenoptera sting is a clinical emergency, and patients, their caregivers as well as all healthcare professionals should be familiar with its recognition and acute management. This consensus report has been prepared by a European expert panel of the EAACI Interest Group of Insect Venom Hypersensitivity. It is targeted at allergists, clinical immunologists, internal medicine specialists, pediatricians, general practitioners, emergency department doctors, and any other healthcare professional involved. The aim was to report the scientific evidence on self-medication of anaphylactic reactions due to Hymenoptera stings, to inform healthcare staff about appropriate patient self-management of sting reactions, to propose indications for the prescription of an adrenaline auto-injector (AAI), and to discuss other forms of medication. First-line treatment for Hymenoptera sting anaphylaxis is intramuscular adrenaline. Prescription of AAIs is mandatory in the case of venom-allergic patients who suffer from mast cell diseases or with an elevated baseline serum tryptase level and in untreated patients with a history of a systemic reaction involving at least two different organ systems. AAI prescription should also be considered in other specific situations before, during, and after stopping venom immunotherapy. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Discrimination of Torymus sinensis Kamijo (Hymenoptera: Torymidae) and T. beneficus Yasumatsu et Kamijo and their hybrids by allele-specific PCR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yara, Kaori; Kunimi, Yasuhisa

    2009-01-01

    Torymus sinensis and Torymus beneficus (Hymenoptera: Torymidae) are, respectively, introduced and indigenous parasitoid wasps that attack the invasive chestnut gall wasp, Dryocosmus kuriphilus (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) in Japan...

  11. Wolbachia in two populations of Melittobia digitata Dahms (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Claudia S.; Sivinski, John [United States Dept. of Agriculture, Gainesville, FL (United States). Center for Medical, Agriculture and Veterinary Entomology]. E-mails: cclaudia@bioinf.uni-leipzig.de; john.sivinski@ars.usda.gov; Matthews, Robert W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Entomology]. E-mail: rmatthew@uga.edu; Gonzalez, Jorge M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Entomology]. E-mail: jmgonzalez@neo.tamu.edu; Aluja, Martin [Instituto de Ecologia A.C., Veracruz (Mexico)]. E-mail: martin.aluja@inecol.edu.mx

    2008-11-15

    We investigated two populations of Melittobia digitata Dahms, a gregarious parasitoid (primarily upon a wide range of solitary bees, wasps, and flies), in search of Wolbachia infection. The first population, from Xalapa, Mexico, was originally collected from and reared on Mexican fruit fly pupae, Anastrepha ludens Loew (Diptera: Tephritidae); the other, from Athens, Georgia, was collected from and reared on prepupae of mud dauber wasps, Trypoxylon politum Say (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae). PCR studies of the ITS2 region corroborated that both parasitoid populations were the same species; this potentially provides a useful molecular taxonomic profile since females of Melittobia species are superficially similar. Amplification of the Wolbachia surface protein gene (wsp) confirmed the presence of this endosymbiont in both populations. Sequencing revealed that the Wolbachia harbored in both populations exhibited a wsp belonging to a unique subgroup (denoted here as Dig) within the B-supergroup of known wsp genes. This new subgroup of wsp may either belong to a different strain of Wolbachia from those previously found to infect Melittobia or may be the result of a recombination event. In either case, known hosts of Wolbachia with a wsp of this subgroup are only distantly related taxonomically. Reasons are advanced as to why Melittobia - an easily reared and managed parasitoid - holds promise as an instructive model organism of Wolbachia infection amenable to the investigation of Wolbachia strains among its diverse hosts. (author)

  12. STM and AFM of bio/organic molecules and structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikai, Atsushi

    Applications of scanning tunneling and atomic force microscopes in bio/organic researches are reviewed with a special emphasis on the types of researches that are expected to contribute to the creation of a new field of "single molecule biochemistry" in the near future. The reviewed articles within the scope as stated above actually include a fairly broad spectrum of researches. It is, therefore, a hope of the author that this review will be useful to those who are considering biological applications of the probe microscopy techniques but are not quite familiar with the types of experiments that have been done in the past. In the section on scanning tunneling microscopy, identification of chemically distinct functional groups by the difference in their tunneling properties will be discussed as a main focus because it is fundamental for biochemists to identify molecules by their shapes and properties. In the section on atomic force microscopy, recent progresses in the imaging techniques of proteins and DNAs are closely reviewed, and rapidly advancing technologies of single molecule measurements and manipulation of nanometer sized structures are given extensive coverage because the author considers that such new applications are extremely promising to open an entirely new field in biological sciences.

  13. Marsh Soil Responses to Nutrients: Belowground Structural and Organic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coastal marsh responses to nutrient enrichment apparently depend upon soil matrix and whether the system is primarily biogenic or minerogenic. Deteriorating organic rich marshes (Jamaica Bay, NY) receiving wastewater effluent had lower belowground biomass, organic matter, and soi...

  14. Emission Characteristics of Organic Light-Emitting Diodes and Organic Thin-Films with Planar and Corrugated Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mao-Kuo Wei

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we review the emission characteristics from organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs and organic molecular thin films with planar and corrugated structures. In a planar thin film structure, light emission from OLEDs was strongly influenced by the interference effect. With suitable design of microcavity structure and layer thicknesses adjustment, optical characteristics can be engineered to achieve high optical intensity, suitable emission wavelength, and broad viewing angles. To increase the extraction efficiency from OLEDs and organic thin-films, corrugated structure with micro- and nano-scale were applied. Microstructures can effectively redirects the waveguiding light in the substrate outside the device. For nanostructures, it is also possible to couple out the organic and plasmonic modes, not only the substrate mode.

  15. Catalogue of the Iranian Microgastrinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadallah, Neveen S; Ghahari, Hassan; Peris-Felipo, Francisco Javier

    2015-11-16

    In the present study, the Iranian Microgastrinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) fauna is summarized. It is based on a detailed study of all available published data and new material collected. In total 99 species belonging to 8 genera are from Iran: Apanteles Förster, 1862 (36 species), Cotesia Cameron, 1891 (34 species), Deuterixys Mason, 1981 (1 species), Diolcogaster Ashmead, 1900 (4 species), Microgaster Latreille, 1804 (4 species), Microplitis Förster, 1862 (11 species), Pholesetor Mason, 1981 (4 species) and Protapanteles Ashmead, 1898 (5 species) in 4 tribes (Apantilini, Cotesiini, Microgastrini and Microplitini). A faunistic list with distribution data, and host records are given. Four species are new records for the fauna of Iran: Apanteles brunnistigma Abdinbekova, 1969, A. ingenuoides Papp, 1971, Microplitis decipiens Prell, 1925 and M. marshallii Kokujev, 1898.

  16. THE EXTENT OF CLONAL STRUCTURE IN DIFFERENT LYMPHOID ORGANS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HERMANS, MHA; WUBBENA, A; KROESE, FGM; HUNT, SV; COWAN, R; OPSTELTEN, D

    1992-01-01

    To gain insight into the clonal organization of lymphoid organs, we studied the distribution in situ of donor-derived cells in near-physiological chimeras. We introduced RT7b fetal liver cells into nonirradiated congenic RT7a neonatal rats. The chimerism 6-20 wk after injection ranged from 0.3 to

  17. Structural model of leadership influence in a hospital organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, J E; Vredenburgh, D J

    1979-03-01

    Path analysis was used to develop a structural model of the head nurse's leadership influence in a large metropolitan hospital. The study indicates that the head nurse's consideration behavior had an inverse effect on her staff member's job related tension but also had an inverse effect on the employee's job performance. Her initiating structure behavior had a positive effect on employee terminations particularly in the structured task situations. The role of structural models in leadership research is discussed.

  18. Ovarian egg morphology in chalcidoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea parasitizing gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vårdal, H.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We provide morphological egg data of 26 species of 5 chalcidoid families associated with cynipid galls (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae from western Palaearctic, including the first egg data for the family Ormyridae. Adult chalcidoid species were reared from galls, and eggs obtained from dissected female ovaries were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The shape of the eggs varies from oval to elongate and tapered at both ends. Eggs of Eurytomidae as well as some Eulophidae, Eupelmidae and Pteromalidae are equipped with a peduncle at the anterior end. We found a positive correlation between long eggs and long ovipositors and confirmed the expectation that eggs of endoparasitoids are generally shorter and narrower than eggs of ectoparasitoids. We were able to locate the sperm entrance or micropyle at the anterior pole of eggs of several species. It is situated at the anterior end of the egg and at the end of the peduncle when present. In addition, the eggshells of the endoparasitoid Sycophila biguttata (Swederus, 1795 (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae and the ectoparasitoid Cecidostiba fungosa (Geoffroy, 1785 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, are for the first time described.En el presente trabajo se aportan datos morfol.gicos del huevo de 26 especies del Paleártico occidental pertenecientes a 5 familias de Chalcidoidea asociadas con agallas de cinípidos (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae, incluyendo los primeros datos del huevo de especies de Ormyridae. Los ejemplares adultos de las especies estudiadas fueron obtenidos por emergencia de agallas en laboratorio, los ovarios de las hembras diseccionados para obtener los huevos, que fueron finalmente estudiados utilizando técnicas de microscopía electronica de barrido. La forma de los huevos estudiados varía de ovalada a alargada y ahusada en ambos extremos. Los huevos de Eurytomidae, así como algunos de Eulophidae, Eupelmidae y Pteromalidae están provistos de un pedúnculo en el extremo anterior. Se encontr

  19. Gender Structure and Spatial Organization: Iranian Traditional Spaces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sadoughianzadeh, Minoosh

    2013-01-01

    .... To depict the subject, two distinct traditional architectures of the region, associated with their respective socio-spatial organizations, have been comparatively explored: the “Introvert” and “Extrovert...

  20. Lexical and constructional organization of argument structure: a contrastive analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract. In this chapter I outline some principles for a contrastive analysis of basic clausal expressions in English and Spanish. They are formulated within a general framework of Cognitive Linguistics. The proposed principles for cross-linguistic variation are a challenge to the principles...... exclusive focus on lexicalization patterns. Contrastive analysis may provide insight into differing ways of organizing grammatical information. Construction grammar (CXG) suggests that clausal core information is organized by integrating at least two construction types: A) schematic constructions, B...

  1. Organic Farm Structure by Category of Agricultural Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Dora Orboi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Organic production systems are based on specific and precise standards of production, pursuing the achievement of optimal agro-systems, easy to sustain in terms of social, environmental and economic. Organic production systems plays a dual social role, because, on the one hand provides for a specific market that is responding to consumer demand for organic products, and on the other hand delivers public goods, contributing to environmental protection, animal welfare and rural development. The main goal of organic agriculture is to optimize the health and productivity of interdependent communities of soil, plants, animals and humans, providing new guidance of agricultural diversification in a general context of protecting the environment and promoting the development of sustainable agriculture. In 2013, the continent with the largest organic cultivated surface was Australia / Oceania, over 17.3 million, up to 5 million hectares compared to 2011, followed by Europe with 11.4 mil. Ha, Latin America - 6.6 million ha, Asia - 3.4 million ha North America - 3.0 million ha and Africa - 1.2 million ha of the 43.1 million total hectares grown in organic management system, almost two thirds are permanent pastures (27 million hectares, followed by agricultural land area totaling 10.9 million ha (arable land - 7.7 million ha permanent crops - 3.2 million ha.

  2. Ozone-induced changes in natural organic matter (NOM) structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhoff, P.; Debroux, J.; Aiken, G.; Amy, G.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrophobic organic acids (combined humic and fulvic acids), obtained from an Antarctic Lake with predominantly microbially derived organic carbon sources and two US fiver systems with terrestrial organic carbon sources, were ozonated. Several analyses, including 13C-NMR, UV absorbance, fluorescence, hydrophobic/transphilic classification, and potentiometric titrations, were performed before and after ozonation. Ozonation reduced aromatic carbon content, selectively reducing phenolic carbon content. Ozonation of the samples resulted in increased aliphatic, carboxyl, plus acetal and ketal anomeric carbon content and shifted towards less hydrophobic compounds.Hydrophobic organic acids (combined humic and fulvic acids), obtained from an Antarctic Lake with predominantly microbially derived organic carbon sources and two US river systems with terrestrial organic carbon sources, were ozonated. Several analyses, including 13C-NMR, UV absorbance, fluorescence, hydrophobic/transphilic classification, and potentiometric titrations, were performed before and after ozonation. Ozonation reduced aromatic carbon content, selectively reducing phenolic carbon content. Ozonation of the samples resulted in increased aliphatic, carboxyl, plus acetal and ketal anomeric carbon content and shifted towards less hydrophobic compounds.

  3. Comparative mitogenomics of Braconidae (Insecta: Hymenoptera) and the phylogenetic utility of mitochondrial genomes with special reference to Holometabolous insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Animal mitochondrial genomes are potential models for molecular evolution and markers for phylogenetic and population studies. Previous research has shown interesting features in hymenopteran mitochondrial genomes. Here, we conducted a comparative study of mitochondrial genomes of the family Braconidae, one of the largest families of Hymenoptera, and assessed the utility of mitochondrial genomic data for phylogenetic inference at three different hierarchical levels, i.e., Braconidae, Hymenoptera, and Holometabola. Results Seven mitochondrial genomes from seven subfamilies of Braconidae were sequenced. Three of the four sequenced A+T-rich regions are shown to be inverted. Furthermore, all species showed reversal of strand asymmetry, suggesting that inversion of the A+T-rich region might be a synapomorphy of the Braconidae. Gene rearrangement events occurred in all braconid species, but gene rearrangement rates were not taxonomically correlated. Most rearranged genes were tRNAs, except those of Cotesia vestalis, in which 13 protein-coding genes and 14 tRNA genes changed positions or/and directions through three kinds of gene rearrangement events. Remote inversion is posited to be the result of two independent recombination events. Evolutionary rates were lower in species of the cyclostome group than those of noncyclostomes. Phylogenetic analyses based on complete mitochondrial genomes and secondary structure of rrnS supported a sister-group relationship between Aphidiinae and cyclostomes. Many well accepted relationships within Hymenoptera, such as paraphyly of Symphyta and Evaniomorpha, a sister-group relationship between Orussoidea and Apocrita, and monophyly of Proctotrupomorpha, Ichneumonoidea and Aculeata were robustly confirmed. New hypotheses, such as a sister-group relationship between Evanioidea and Aculeata, were generated. Among holometabolous insects, Hymenoptera was shown to be the sister to all other orders. Mecoptera was recovered as the

  4. Comparative mitogenomics of Braconidae (Insecta: Hymenoptera and the phylogenetic utility of mitochondrial genomes with special reference to Holometabolous insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi Min

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal mitochondrial genomes are potential models for molecular evolution and markers for phylogenetic and population studies. Previous research has shown interesting features in hymenopteran mitochondrial genomes. Here, we conducted a comparative study of mitochondrial genomes of the family Braconidae, one of the largest families of Hymenoptera, and assessed the utility of mitochondrial genomic data for phylogenetic inference at three different hierarchical levels, i.e., Braconidae, Hymenoptera, and Holometabola. Results Seven mitochondrial genomes from seven subfamilies of Braconidae were sequenced. Three of the four sequenced A+T-rich regions are shown to be inverted. Furthermore, all species showed reversal of strand asymmetry, suggesting that inversion of the A+T-rich region might be a synapomorphy of the Braconidae. Gene rearrangement events occurred in all braconid species, but gene rearrangement rates were not taxonomically correlated. Most rearranged genes were tRNAs, except those of Cotesia vestalis, in which 13 protein-coding genes and 14 tRNA genes changed positions or/and directions through three kinds of gene rearrangement events. Remote inversion is posited to be the result of two independent recombination events. Evolutionary rates were lower in species of the cyclostome group than those of noncyclostomes. Phylogenetic analyses based on complete mitochondrial genomes and secondary structure of rrnS supported a sister-group relationship between Aphidiinae and cyclostomes. Many well accepted relationships within Hymenoptera, such as paraphyly of Symphyta and Evaniomorpha, a sister-group relationship between Orussoidea and Apocrita, and monophyly of Proctotrupomorpha, Ichneumonoidea and Aculeata were robustly confirmed. New hypotheses, such as a sister-group relationship between Evanioidea and Aculeata, were generated. Among holometabolous insects, Hymenoptera was shown to be the sister to all other orders

  5. Teachers' Organization of Participation Structures for Teaching Science with Computer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a qualitative study that investigated the nature of the participation structures and how the participation structures were organized by four science teachers when they constructed and communicated science content in their classrooms with computer technology. Participation structures focus on the activity structures and…

  6. Self-organization of muscle cell structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosberg, Anna; Kuo, Po-Ling; Guo, Chin-Lin; Geisse, Nicholas A; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Adams, William J; Sheehy, Sean P; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2011-02-01

    The organization of muscle is the product of functional adaptation over several length scales spanning from the sarcomere to the muscle bundle. One possible strategy for solving this multiscale coupling problem is to physically constrain the muscle cells in microenvironments that potentiate the organization of their intracellular space. We hypothesized that boundary conditions in the extracellular space potentiate the organization of cytoskeletal scaffolds for directed sarcomeregenesis. We developed a quantitative model of how the cytoskeleton of neonatal rat ventricular myocytes organizes with respect to geometric cues in the extracellular matrix. Numerical results and in vitro assays to control myocyte shape indicated that distinct cytoskeletal architectures arise from two temporally-ordered, organizational processes: the interaction between actin fibers, premyofibrils and focal adhesions, as well as cooperative alignment and parallel bundling of nascent myofibrils. Our results suggest that a hierarchy of mechanisms regulate the self-organization of the contractile cytoskeleton and that a positive feedback loop is responsible for initiating the break in symmetry, potentiated by extracellular boundary conditions, is required to polarize the contractile cytoskeleton.

  7. The essence and content of investigative activities to undermine the economic foundations of organized criminal structures

    OpenAIRE

    Igor Vyacheslavovich Ilyin; Aleksey Evgeniyevich Ilyin

    2015-01-01

    Objective to determine the essential characteristics of investigative activities IA aimed at undermining the economic foundations of organized criminal structures OCS to define the activities to improve the legislation regulating the investigative activity aimed at undermining the economic foundations of organized criminal structures. Methods dialectical formal logic formallegal and comparative. Results basing on the evaluation of opinions of various scholars foreign and d...

  8. Evolution of Organic Agriculture within Theoretical Frameworks of Structural Change and Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Ole Horn

    Summary   This dissertation, "Evolution of Organic Agriculture within Frameworks of Structural Change and Transformation", represents a search for an understanding of the phenomenon of "Organic Agriculture". It is structured in six parts. In the first part, we investigate the agricultural economic...

  9. Primera cita de la Argentina de Ophelimus maskelli (Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae y su parasitoide, Closterocerus chamaeleon (Girault (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A AQUINO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Se cita por primera vez de la Argentina la presencia de la avispa galí - cola exótica Ophelimus maskelli (Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae y su para - sitoide natural, Closterocerus chamaeleon (Girault (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae en Eucalyptus camaldulensis de la provincia de Buenos Aires. Ophelimus maskelli es una especie invasora de origen Australiano que ha sido reportada como plaga de los eucaliptos en numerosos países de Asia, Europa y América. Closterocerus chamaleon es un parasitoide exótico cuyo potencial como biocontrolador de O. maskelli está siendo evaluado en algunos países.

  10. Chiral Organic Cages with a Triple-Stranded Helical Structure Derived from Helicene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Abaid Ullah; Gan, Fuwei; Shen, Chengshuo; Yu, Na; Wang, Ruibin; Crassous, Jeanne; Shu, Mouhai; Qiu, Huibin

    2018-02-28

    We report the use of helicene with an intrinsic helical molecular structure to prepare covalent organic cages via imine condensation. The organic cages revealed a [3+2]-type architecture containing a triple-stranded helical structure with three helicene units arranged in a propeller-like fashion with the framework integrally twisted. Such structural chirality was retained upon dissolution in organic solvents, as indicated by a strong diastereotopy effect in proton NMR and unique Cotton effects in circular dichroism spectra. Further study on chiral adsorption showed that the chiral organic cages possess considerable enantioselectivity toward a series of aromatic racemates.

  11. The Influence of Content Organization on Student's Cognitive Structure in Thermodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Marco A.; Santos, Carlos A.

    1981-01-01

    Two approaches to the content of thermodynamics were used in an introductory college physics course: traditional organization and organization based on Ausubel's learning theory. The influence of these organizations on engineering student's (N=58) cognitive structure was investigated using a word association test analyzed through hierarchical…

  12. Interracial Friendship and Structural Diversity: Trends for Greek, Religious, and Ethnic Student Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Julie J.; Kim, Young K.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how peer interactions in college organizations (Greek, ethnic, and religious) affect interracial friendships, including whether peer interaction in student organizations mediates the relationship between structural diversity and interracial friendship. Involvement in ethnic student organizations was non-significant;…

  13. Organic structures design applications in optical and electronic devices

    CERN Document Server

    Chow, Tahsin J

    2014-01-01

    ""Presenting an overview of the syntheses and properties of organic molecules and their applications in optical and electronic devices, this book covers aspects concerning theoretical modeling for electron transfer, solution-processed micro- and nanomaterials, donor-acceptor cyclophanes, molecular motors, organogels, polyazaacenes, fluorogenic sensors based on calix[4]arenes, and organic light-emitting diodes. The publication of this book is timely because these topics have become very popular nowadays. The book is definitely an excellent reference for scientists working in these a

  14. Genomic and karyotypic variation in Drosophila parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Cynipoidea, Figitidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Gokhman

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, 1830 has served as a model insect for over a century. Sequencing of the 11 additional Drosophila Fallen, 1823 species marks substantial progress in comparative genomics of this genus. By comparison, practically nothing is known about the genome size or genome sequences of parasitic wasps of Drosophila. Here, we present the first comparative analysis of genome size and karyotype structures of Drosophila parasitoids of the Leptopilina Förster, 1869 and Ganaspis Förster, 1869 species. The gametic genome size of Ganaspis xanthopoda (Ashmead, 1896 is larger than those of the three Leptopilina species studied. The genome sizes of all parasitic wasps studied here are also larger than those known for all Drosophila species. Surprisingly, genome sizes of these Drosophila parasitoids exceed the average value known for all previously studied Hymenoptera. The haploid chromosome number of both Leptopilina heterotoma (Thomson, 1862 and L. victoriae Nordlander, 1980 is ten. A chromosomal fusion appears to have produced a distinct karyotype for L. boulardi (Barbotin, Carton et Keiner-Pillault, 1979 (n = 9, whose genome size is smaller than that of wasps of the L. heterotoma clade. Like L. boulardi, the haploid chromosome number for G. xanthopoda is also nine. Our studies reveal a positive, but non linear, correlation between the genome size and total chromosome length in Drosophila parasitoids. These Drosophila parasitoids differ widely in their host range, and utilize different infection strategies to overcome host defense. Their comparative genomics, in relation to their exceptionally well-characterized hosts, will prove to be valuable for understanding the molecular basis of the host-parasite arms race and how such mechanisms shape the genetic structures of insect communities.

  15. Design of control adaptability system model for TV media organization structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dong-dong; WANG Ya-lin; MA Tao

    2008-01-01

    To resolve the control adaptability problem of TV media in complex competitive environment, a con-trol system model of TV media organization structure was designed. Based on the designed system model for TV media organization structure, the relations among the main factors of the system constitution, missions, organi-zing decision entity, and carrying bodies were analyzed. By means of applying multi-objective decision method and complex control system theory, and combining the integration model of TV media organization structure, the basic model was concluded and the corresponding parameters were designed. The current organization process of TV media is analyzed by this model, which comes to the adaptability appearance with different parameters. The results indicate that the model can estimate current TV media organization structure for the chain appearance of communications and the correlation between platforms and policy-making agencies.

  16. Studies on the Structure Evolvement of Organic Agricultural Industry in Taiwan and its Influential Factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin; XU; Zheng; ZHANG; Li; KONG

    2014-01-01

    In order to study the development of organic agriculture in Taiwan in recent years,and based on relevant agriculture,economic and social statistics,the general scale of organic agriculture and industrial structure were treated with statistic analysis. Results suggest that the general scale of organic agriculture in Taiwan grew rapidly from 2004 to 2011. The certified organic farmers grew by 140. 59%,and the area with organic plantation grew by 302. 40%. The industrial structure has changed significantly as vegetables have become the No. 1 organic crop instead of rice. Besides of the four major crops,organic plantation has played an increasingly important role. Essential factors influencing the great-leap-forward development include the general trend of agricultural industrial structure adjustment,proliferation of management system and strategic opportunities brought by economic cycles.

  17. Aggregation enhanced emission (AEE) in organic salt: A structure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    media wherein the highly hydrophobic luminescent moieties are expected to aggregate, leading to ACQ ... It was observed that photoluminescence of the salts were enhanced manifolds compared to that .... making supramolecular polymer via hydrogen bonding. Organic salt formation is one such easy way towards.

  18. Organizational Structures and Data Use in Volunteer Monitoring Organizations (VMOs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Shelby Gull; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Stubbs, Harriett S.; James, April L.; Menius, Erika

    2012-01-01

    Complex environmental problems call for unique solutions to monitoring efforts alongside developing a more environmentally literate citizenry. Community-based monitoring (CBM) through the use of volunteer monitoring organizations helps to provide a part of the solution, particularly when CBM groups work with research scientists or government…

  19. Organizing Innovation within Incumbent Firms: Structure Enabling Strategic Autonomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Looy, Bart; van Looy, Bart; Visscher, Klaasjan

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we will discuss how large established firms can be effective in organizing innovation alongside their current business. We examine the trajectory of an incumbent firm in the telecommunication industry – Alcatel – which has been successful in exploring and exploiting the promises of

  20. The potential of parasitoid Hymenoptera as bioindicators of arthropod diversity in agricultural grasslands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Annette Anderson; Stephen McCormack; Alvin Helden; Helen Sheridan; Anne Kinsella; Gordon Purvis

    2011-01-01

    .... This study tested the hypothesis that parasitoid Hymenoptera are potential bioindicators that provide a useful means to assess the wider biodiversity of arthropod populations in agro-ecosystem...

  1. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as safer, structurally reinforced energetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushuyev, Oleksandr S; Peterson, Geneva R; Brown, Preston; Maiti, Amitesh; Gee, Richard H; Weeks, Brandon L; Hope-Weeks, Louisa J

    2013-01-28

    Second-generation cobalt and zinc coordination architectures were obtained through efforts to stabilize extremely sensitive and energetic transition-metal hydrazine perchlorate ionic polymers. Partial ligand substitution by the tridentate hydrazinecarboxylate anion afforded polymeric 2D-sheet structures never before observed for energetic materials. Carefully balanced reaction conditions allowed the retention of the noncoordinating perchlorate anion in the presence of a strongly chelating hydrazinecarboxylate ligand. High-quality X-ray single-crystal structure determination revealed that the metal coordination preferences lead to different structural motifs and energetic properties, despite the nearly isoformulaic nature of the two compounds. Energetic tests indicate highly decreased sensitivity and DFT calculations suggest a high explosive performance for these remarkable structures. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Structure and Organization of Computing (Draft v1)

    OpenAIRE

    Denning, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Overview of the CS field's structure including historical evolution, body of knowledge, great principles, and relationships with other fields.An article for CRC Handbook of Computer Science and Engineering DRAFT v1– 5/24/12

  3. Making News by Structuring Time: A Temporal Analysis on Infographic Production in News Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Pai-Lin Cheng

    2016-01-01

    How can organization be able to accomplish its mission of gathering information just in time? As a temporal organization, news media employ temporal structuring strategies to integrate institutional and individual efforts to have the work done before the deadline. This researcher conducted a field research on infographic designers of daily newspapers to observe: (1) how temporal structures of regulate the infographic designers; (2) how designers interact the temporal structures and develo...

  4. Evaluating the impact of investments in information technology on structural inertia in health organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, Lee W

    2010-01-01

    Structural inertia is the overall capacity of an organization to adapt within a market environment. This paper reviews the impact of healthcare investments in information management/information technology (IM/IT) on the strategic management concept of structural inertia. Research indicates that healthcare executives should consider the relative state of structural inertia for their firms and match them with potential IM/IT solutions. Additionally, organizations should favorably consider IM/IT solutions that are comparatively less complex.

  5. Flexible organic solar cells including efficiency enhancing grating structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oliveira Hansen, Roana Melina de; Liu, Yinghui; Madsen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    In this work, a new method for the fabrication of organic solar cells containing functional light-trapping nanostructures on flexible substrates is presented. Polyimide is spin-coated on silicon support substrates, enabling standard micro- and nanotechnology fabrication techniques......, such as photolithography and electron-beam lithography, besides the steps required for the bulk-heterojunction organic solar cell fabrication. After the production steps, the solar cells on polyimide are peeled off the silicon support substrates, resulting in flexible devices containing nanostructures for light absorption...... enhancement. Since the solar cells avoid using brittle electrodes, the performance of the flexible devices is not affected by the peeling process. We have investigated three different nanostructured grating designs and conclude that gratings with a 500 nm pitch distance have the highest light...

  6. Determination of organic crystal structures by X ray powder diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    McBride, L

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structure of Ibuprofen has been solved from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data using a genetic algorithm (GA). The performance of the GA is improved by incorporating prior chemical information in the form of hard limits on the values that can be taken by the flexible torsion angles within the molecule. Powder X-ray diffraction data were collected for the anti-convulsant compounds remacemide, remacemide nitrate and remacemide acetate at 130 K on BM 16 at the X-ray European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) at Grenoble. High quality crystal structures were obtained using data collected to a resolution of typically 1.5 A. The structure determinations were performed using a simulated annealing (SA) method and constrained Rietveld refinements for the structures converged to chi sup 2 values of 1.64, 1.84 and 1.76 for the free base, nitrate and acetate respectively. The previously unknown crystal structure of the drug famotidine Form B has been solved using X-ray powder diffraction data colle...

  7. Convergent evolution of insect hearing organs from a preadaptive structure

    OpenAIRE

    Lakes-Harlan, R.; lting, H. St; Stumpner, A.

    1999-01-01

    Flies of the taxon Emblemasomatini (Sarcophagidae: Diptera) independently evolved an ear with the same anatomy and location as the Ormiini (Tachinidae: Diptera). Both ears represent a first case of convergent evolution of homologous insect ears, which raises the question for a preadaptation. Physiological and anatomical data indicate a preadaptive-sound-insensitive, but vibration-sensitive scolopidial chordotonal organ in non-hearing flies. As selective pressure for the evolutionary transform...

  8. STRUCTURE OF NITROGEN FRACTIONS ORGANIC AND CONVENTIONAL COW'S MILK

    OpenAIRE

    Zhukova, Yaroslava; Petov, Pylyp; Mudrak, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    Raw organic and conventional cow’s milk samples were analyzed for total nitrogen, non-protein nitrogen and milk urea content with the aim of evaluation of the different diets effect. Conventional milk contained higher level of total milk urea nitrogen as well as higher proportion in total nitrogen and non-protein nitrogen fraction. We detected that ratio of milk urea nitrogen to non-protein nitrogen is the most significant criterion for assessment of diet differences.

  9. In-vitro diagnostics of Hymenoptera venom allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueff, F.; Vos, B.; Przybilla, B.

    In-vitro diagnostics of Hymenoptera venom allergy Patients with a history of anaphylactic sting reactions require an allergological work-up (history, in-vitro tests, and skin tests) to clarify indications on venom immunotherapy and on the type of venom to be used. To demonstrate a venom

  10. Faunistic study on Pompilidae (Inseta: Hymenoptera) family in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study that comprises Ankara, Kýrýkkale and Çankýrý provinces, 30 specimens in total were collected, and 6 species belonging to Turkey Pompilidae (Hymenoptera) family were identified as new records in Turkey fauna. The locality and members of these specimens are shown in this material. Their distribution is also ...

  11. Distributional record of oak gall wasp (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) that occur on oak trees (Quercus spp.) and produce galls on a certain part of the host. In this survey, oak gall wasp species were collected from the oak forests of Pardanan, Mirabad, Nalas, Sardasht, Hamran and Dar-ghabr in ...

  12. Faunistic study on Pompilidae (Inseta: Hymenoptera) family in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-19

    Jan 19, 2009 ... In this study that comprises Ankara, Kırıkkale and Çankırı provinces, 30 specimens in total were collected, and 6 species belonging to Turkey Pompilidae (Hymenoptera) family were identified as new records in Turkey fauna. The locality and members of these specimens are shown in this material. Their.

  13. A preliminary checklist of the ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A preliminary species checklist of the ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of. Kakamega Forest, Western Kenya, is presented. The species list is based on specimens sampled from 1999 until 2009, which are deposited in the ant collection of the Zoological Research Museum Koenig, Bonn, Germany, and the Natural History ...

  14. Taxonomy of ant species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) collected by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taxonomy of ant species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) collected by pitfall traps from Sinai and Delta region, Egypt. Salwa Mohamed', Samy Zalatz, Hassan Fadll, Sohair Gadallal & Moustafa Sharaf“ l. Entomology Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. 2. Zoology Department, Faculty of Science, ...

  15. Revision of the world species of Xeris Costa (Hymenoptera: Siricidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henri Goulet; Caroline Boudreault; Nathan M. Schiff

    2015-01-01

    Xeris is one of ten extant genera of Siricidae known as as woodwasps or horntails. They are important wood-boring Hymenoptera from the Northern Hemisphere. Adults and larvae of Xeris are often intercepted at ports and are consequently of concern as potential alien invasive species. The genus consists of 16 species with eight in...

  16. Thermoperiodism synchronizes emergence in the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfalfa seed production in the northwestern United States and western Canada is heavily dependent upon the pollinating services of M. rotundata (F.) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae). Megachile rotundata females nest in cavities either naturally occurring or in artificial nesting blocks. Because of the ph...

  17. EAACI Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy: Hymenoptera venom allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, Gunter J.; Varga, Eva-Maria; Roberts, Graham; Mosbech, Holger; Bilò, M. Beatrice; Akdis, Cezmi A.; Antolín-Amérigo, Darío; Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Gawlik, Radoslaw; Jakob, Thilo; Kosnik, Mitja; Lange, Joanna; Mingomataj, Ervin; Mitsias, Dimitris I.; Ollert, Markus; Oude Elberink, Joanna N. G.; Pfaar, Oliver; Pitsios, Constantinos; Pravettoni, Valerio; Ruëff, Franziska; Sin, Betül Ayşe; Agache, Ioana; Angier, Elizabeth; Arasi, Stefania; Calderón, Moises A.; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Halken, Susanne; Jutel, Marek; Lau, Susanne; Pajno, Giovanni B.; van Ree, Ronald; Ryan, Dermot; Spranger, Otto; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; Dhami, Sangeeta; Zaman, Hadar; Sheikh, Aziz; Muraro, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Hymenoptera venom allergy is a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction following a honeybee, vespid or ant sting. Systemic allergic sting reactions have been reported in up to 7.5% of adults and up to 3.4% of children. They can be mild and restricted to the skin or moderate-to-severe with a

  18. Effects of Apis mellifera adansonii, L. 1758 (Apidae: Hymenoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The honeybees play an important role in the pollinations of many field crops. Here, we assessed the effect of the presence of honeybee colonies, A. mellifera adansonii, L. 1758 (Apidae: Hymenoptera) in the production of African melon crop, C. mannii (Naudin) (Cucurbitaceae) in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of Congo.

  19. A new species of Zamischus (Hymenoptera, Cynipoidea, Figitidae from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Díaz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Zamischus (Hymenoptera, Cynipoidea, Figitidae from Brazil. A new species of Zamischus from Brazil is described and diagnosed. The species is closely related to Z. brasiliensis but differs in the morphology of antennae and scutellum. Z. aquilesi sp. nov. was collected via Malaise trapping in a tobacco field in Santa Cruz do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul.

  20. De schermbloemzandbij Andrena nitidiuscula terug in Nederland (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raemakers, I.

    2005-01-01

    New records of Andrena nitidiuscula in the Netherlands (Hymenoptera: Apidae) In 2005 Andrena nitidiuscula was observed from late June till mid August in a garden and a few other sites near Maastricht (Limburg). These observations are the first since 1950 and refute the classification as extinct in

  1. Michanthidium almeidai, a new species from northeastern Brazil (Hymenoptera, Megachilinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Danúncia; Parizotto, Daniele Regina

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Michanthidium Urban (Hymenoptera, Megachilinae)is described and figured from Sergipe and Bahia States, northeastern Brazil. An identification key, illustrations, and a distribution map for the three species of the genus are presented. The male genitalia of Michanthidium almeidai sp. n. and Michanthidium albitarse are illustrated and compared for the first time. PMID:22140334

  2. Self-organizing Knotted Magnetic Structures in Plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Smiet, C B; Thompson, A; Swearngin, J; Dalhuizen, J W; Bouwmeester, D

    2015-01-01

    We perform full-MHD simulations on various initially helical configurations and show that they reconfigure into a state where the magnetic field lines span nested toroidal surfaces. This relaxed configuration is not a Taylor state, as is often assumed for relaxing plasma, but a state where the Lorentz force is balanced by the hydrostatic pressure, which is lowest on the central ring of the nested tori. Furthermore, the structure is characterized by a spatially slowly varying rotational transform, which leads to the formation of a few magnetic islands at rational surfaces. We then obtain analytic expressions that approximate the global structure of the quasi-stable linked and knotted plasma configurations that emerge, using maps from $S^3$ to $S^2$ of which the Hopf fibration is a special case. The knotted plasma configurations have a highly localized magnetic energy density and retain their structure on time scales much longer than the Alfvenic time scale.

  3. Self-organization in neural networks - Applications in structural optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajela, Prabhat; Fu, B.; Berke, Laszlo

    1993-01-01

    The present paper discusses the applicability of ART (Adaptive Resonance Theory) networks, and the Hopfield and Elastic networks, in problems of structural analysis and design. A characteristic of these network architectures is the ability to classify patterns presented as inputs into specific categories. The categories may themselves represent distinct procedural solution strategies. The paper shows how this property can be adapted in the structural analysis and design problem. A second application is the use of Hopfield and Elastic networks in optimization problems. Of particular interest are problems characterized by the presence of discrete and integer design variables. The parallel computing architecture that is typical of neural networks is shown to be effective in such problems. Results of preliminary implementations in structural design problems are also included in the paper.

  4. The filamins: organizers of cell structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Fumihiko; Stossel, Thomas P; Hartwig, John H

    2011-01-01

    Filamin A (FLNa), the first non-muscle actin filament cross-linking protein, was identified in 1975. Thirty five years of FLNa research has revealed its structure in great detail, discovered its isoforms (FLNb and c), and identified over 90 binding partners including channels, receptors, intracellular signaling molecules, and even transcription factors. Due to this diversity, mutations in human FLN genes result in a wide range of anomalies with moderate to lethal consequences. This review focuses on the structure and functions of FLNa in cell migration and adhesion.

  5. Structure, context, complexity, organization: physical aspects of information and value

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Eriksson, Karl-Erik; Lindgren, Kristian; Månsson, Bengt Å

    1987-01-01

    ... and of information theory are general enough to play such a role. The authors have been involved in studies of the handling of natural resources in human societies. There we met problems and ideas which led us to the theme of this book: a perspective and a set of concepts, useful for describing and understanding processes in which structure emerges. T...

  6. Structure and membrane organization of photosystem II in green plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hankamer, B; Barber, J; Boekema, EJ

    1997-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is the pigment protein complex embedded in the thylakoid membrane of higher plants, algae, and cyanobacteria that uses solar energy to drive the photosynthetic water-splitting reaction. This chapter reviews the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary structures of PSII as

  7. Hybrid organic-inorganic materials based on hydroxyapatite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moussa, Sana Ben; Bachouâ, Hassen [U.R. Matériaux et synthèse organique UR17ES31, Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d’Ingénieur de Monastir, Université de Monastir, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia); Gruselle, Michel, E-mail: michel.gruselle@upmc.fr [Sorbonne Université, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 8232, Institut Parisien de Chimie Moléculaire, F-75005 Paris (France); Beaunier, Patricia [Sorbonne Université, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 7197, Laboratoire de Réactivité de Surface, F-75005 Paris (France); Flambard, Alexandrine [Sorbonne Université, UPMC Univ Paris 06, CNRS, UMR 8232, Institut Parisien de Chimie Moléculaire, F-75005 Paris (France); Badraoui, Béchir [U.R. Matériaux et synthèse organique UR17ES31, Institut Préparatoire aux Etudes d’Ingénieur de Monastir, Université de Monastir, 5019 Monastir (Tunisia)

    2017-04-15

    The present article details the formation of calcium hydroxyapatite synthesized by the hydrothermal way, in presence of glycine or sarcosine. The presence of these amino-acids during the synthetic processes reduces the crystalline growthing through the formation of hybrid organic-inorganic species The crystallite sizes are decreasing and the morphology is modified with the increase of the amino-acid concentration. - Graphical abstract: Formation of Ca carboxylate salt leading to the grafting of glycine and sarcosine on the Ca=Hap surface (R= H, CH3).

  8. Organic light emission structures — XXI century technologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorokin V. M.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available The given review allows to believe, that the decision of a complex technological, materialstechnological, technical problems at creation modern OLED- and PLED-devices in nearest 5—10 years will result in creation of devices with power efficiency more than 100 lm/W and service life till 100 000 hours. The realization of such parameters will allow to expand area of application of the considered systems and to create in the future unique flat powereffective organic lighting systems of new generation — light sources XXI of century.

  9. Supervised self-organizing maps in crystal property and structure prediction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willighagen, E.L.; Wehrens, R.; Melssen, W.J.; Gelder, R. de; Buydens, L.M.C.

    2007-01-01

    This article shows, the use of supervised self-organizing maps (SOMs) to explore large numbers of experimental or simulated crystal structures and to visualize structure-property relationships. The examples show how powder diffraction patterns together with one or more structural properties, such as

  10. Structure Determination of Unknown Organic Liquids Using NMR and IR Spectroscopy: A General Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavel, John T.; Hyde, Erin C.; Bruch, Martha D.

    2012-01-01

    This experiment introduced general chemistry students to the basic concepts of organic structures and to the power of spectroscopic methods for structure determination. Students employed a combination of IR and NMR spectroscopy to perform de novo structure determination of unknown alcohols, without being provided with a list of possible…

  11. A genome-wide identification and classification of basic helix-loop-helix genes in the jewel wasp, Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Ting; Wang, Yong; Wang, Xu-Hua; Tao, Xia-Fang; Yao, Qin; Chen, Ke-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are highly conserved DNA-binding transcription factors of a large superfamily. Animal bHLH proteins play important regulatory roles in various developmental processes such as neurogenesis, myogenesis, heart development, and hematopoiesis. The jewel wasp (Nasonia vitripennis) is a good model organism of hymenoptera insects for studies of developmental and evolutionary genetics. In this study, we identified 48 bHLH genes in the genome of N. vitripennis. According to phylogenetic analysis, based on N. vitripennis bHLH (NvbHLH) motif sequences and structural domain distribution in their full-length protein sequences, the identified NvbHLH genes were classified into 36 bHLH families with 19, 12, 9, 1, 6, and 1 member(s) in groups A, B, C, D, E, and F, respectively. Our classification to the identified NvbHLH family members confirms GenBank annotations for 21 of the 48 NvbHLH proteins and provides useful information for further characterization and annotation of the remaining 27 NvbHLH proteins. Compared to other insect species, N. vitripennis has the lowest number of bHLH family members. No NvbHLH members have been found in the families Net, MyoRa, and PTFa, while all other insect species have at least one member in each of the families. These data constitute a solid basis for further investigations into the functions of bHLH proteins in developmental regulation of N. vitripennis.

  12. Perceptual organization in computer vision - A review and a proposal for a classificatory structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sudeep; Boyer, Kim L.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of perceptual organization in biological vision, and its necessity in advanced computer vision systems, arises from the characteristic that perception, the extraction of meaning from sensory input, is an intelligent process. This is particularly so for high order organisms and, analogically, for more sophisticated computational models. The role of perceptual organization in computer vision systems is explored. This is done from four vantage points. First, a brief history of perceptual organization research in both humans and computer vision is offered. Next, a classificatory structure in which to cast perceptual organization research to clarify both the nomenclature and the relationships among the many contributions is proposed. Thirdly, the perceptual organization work in computer vision in the context of this classificatory structure is reviewed. Finally, the array of computational techniques applied to perceptual organization problems in computer vision is surveyed.

  13. Abundance and Diversity of Wild Bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) Found in Lowbush Blueberry Growing Regions of Downeast Maine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushmann, Sara L; Drummond, Francis A

    2015-08-01

    Insect-mediated pollination is critical for lowbush blueberry (Ericaceae: Vaccinium angustifolium Aiton) fruit development. Past research shows a persistent presence of wild bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) providing pollination services even when commercial pollinators are present. We undertook the study to 1) provide a description of bee communities found in lowbush blueberry-growing regions, 2) identify field characteristics or farm management practices that influence those communities, 3) identify key wild bee pollinators that provide pollination services for the blueberry crop, and 4) identify non-crop plants found within the cropping system that provide forage for wild bees. During a 4-year period, we collected solitary and eusocial bees in over 40 fields during and after blueberry bloom, determining a management description for each field. We collected 4,474 solitary bees representing 124 species and 1,315 summer bumble bees representing nine species. No bumble bee species were previously unknown in Maine, yet we document seven solitary bee species new for the state. These include species of the genera Nomada, Lasioglossum, Calliopsis, and Augochloropsis. No field characteristic or farm management practice related to bee community structure, except bumble bee species richness was higher in certified organic fields. Pollen analysis determined scopal loads of 67-99% ericaceous pollen carried by five species of Andrena. Our data suggest two native ericaceous plants, Kalmia angustifolia L. and Gaylussacia baccata (Wangenheim), provide important alternative floral resources. We conclude that Maine blueberry croplands are populated with a species-rich bee community that fluctuates in time and space. We suggest growers develop and maintain wild bee forage and nest sites. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Structure of Solvent-Free Nanoparticle−Organic Hybrid Materials

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Hsiu-Yu

    2010-11-16

    We derive the radial distribution function and the static structure factor for the particles in model nanoparticleorganic hybrid materials composed of nanoparticles and attached oligomeric chains in the absence of an intervening solvent. The assumption that the oligomers form an incompressible fluid of bead-chains attached to the particles that is at equilibrium for a given particle configuration allows us to apply a density functional theory for determining the equilibrium configuration of oligomers as well as the distribution function of the particles. A quasi-analytic solution is facilitated by a regular perturbation analysis valid when the oligomer radius of gyration R g is much greater than the particle radius a. The results show that the constraint that each particle carries its own share of the fluid attached to itself yields a static structure factor that approaches zero as the wavenumber approaches zero. This result indicates that each particle excludes exactly one other particle from its neighborhood. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  15. Structural Origins of Scintillation: Metal Organic Frameworks as a Nanolaboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    transportation and safety hazards—impose severe practical constraints and raise challenges for fast- neutron detection applications requiring their...environmental sensing III. Fast neutron and gamma particle discrimination in MOFs infiltrated with triplet-harvesting complexes Part I: Structural and...distances range from 4-5 Å, which is consistent with the lowest energy values calculated for this dimer configuration . The observed PL and RL spectra for

  16. Porous organic polymers with different pore structures for sensitive solid-phase microextraction of environmental organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhoubing; Liu, Shuqin; Xu, Jianqiao; Yin, Li; Zheng, Juan; Zhou, Ningbo; Ouyang, Gangfeng

    2017-10-09

    Adsorption capacity is the major sensitivity-limited factor in solid-phase microextraction. Due to its light-weight properties, large specific surface area and high porosity, especially tunable pore structures, the utilization of porous organic polymers as solid-phase microextraction adsorbents has attracting researchers' attentions. However, these works mostly concentrated on the utilization of specific porous organic polymers for preparing high-performance solid-phase microextraction coatings. The relationship between pore structures and adsorption performance of the porous organic polymers still remain unclear. Herein, three porous organic polymers with similar properties but different pore distributions were prepared by condensation polymerization reaction of phloroglucinol and terephthalaldehyde, which were fabricated as solid-phase microextraction coatings subsequently. The adsorption capacity of the porous organic polymers-coated fibers were evaluated by using benzene and its derivatives (i.e.,benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and m-xylene) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as the target analytes. The results showed that the different adsorption performance of these porous organic polymers was mainly caused by their different pore volumes instead of their surface areas or pore sizes. Finally, the proposed method by using the mesoporous organic polymer coating was successfully applied to the determination of benzene and its derivatives in environmental water samples. As for analytical performance, high pre-concentration factors (74-2984), satisfactory relative recoveries (94.5 ± 18.5-116.9 ± 12.5%), intraday precision (2.44-5.34%), inter-day precision (4.62-7.02%), low limit of detections (LODs, 0.10-0.29 ng L(-1)) and limit of quantifications (LOQs, 0.33-0.96 ng L(-1)) were achieved under the optimal conditions. This study provides an important idea in the rational design of porous organic polymers for solid-phase microextraction or other

  17. The relationship between family orientation, organization context, organization structure and firm performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijaard, J.; Uhlaner, L.M.

    2004-01-01

    This study focuses on the prediction of three firm performance indicators, sales growth, innovation performance and profitability, on a sample of small and medium-sized firms in the Netherlands. Predictions from agency theory and the resource based view of organizations lead to alternate hypotheses

  18. Structure of the Buried Metal-Molecule Interface in Organic Thin Film Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Rein; Sørensen, Thomas Just; Glyvradal, Magni

    2009-01-01

    By use of specular X-ray reflectivity (XR) the structure of a metal-covered organic thin film device is measured with angstrom resolution. The model system is a Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) film, sandwiched between a silicon substrate and a top electrode consisting of 25 Å titanium and 100 Å aluminum....... By comparison of XR data for the five-layer Pb2+ arachidate LB film before and after vapor deposition of the Ti/Al top electrode, a detailed account of the structural damage to the organic film at the buried metal-molecule interface is obtained. We find that the organized structure of the two topmost LB layers...

  19. [Structural organization of 5S ribosomal DNA of Rosa rugosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tynkevych, Iu O; Volkov, R A

    2014-01-01

    In order to clarify molecular organization of the genomic region encoding 5S rRNA in diploid species Rosa rugosa several 5S rDNA repeated units were cloned and sequenced. Analysis of the obtained sequences revealed that only one length variant of 5S rDNA repeated units, which contains intact promoter elements in the intergenic spacer region (IGS) and appears to be transcriptionally active is present in the genome. Additionally, a limited number of 5S rDNA pseudogenes lacking a portion of coding sequence and the complete IGS was detected. A high level of sequence similarity (from 93.7 to 97.5%) between the IGS of major 5S rDNA variants of East Asian R. rugosa and North American R. nitida was found indicating comparatively recent divergence of these species.

  20. The essence and content of investigative activities to undermine the economic foundations of organized criminal structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Vyacheslavovich Ilyin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective to determine the essential characteristics of investigative activities IA aimed at undermining the economic foundations of organized criminal structures OCS to define the activities to improve the legislation regulating the investigative activity aimed at undermining the economic foundations of organized criminal structures. Methods dialectical formal logic formallegal and comparative. Results basing on the evaluation of opinions of various scholars foreign and domestic experience as well as the generally accepted rules of formation of the conceptual apparatus the authors investigated essential features of investigative activities aimed at undermining the economic foundations of organized criminal structures the correlation between the studied activities with other areas of combating organized crime are examined. Scientific novelty for the first time at a scientific level the definition is given of the investigative activities aimed at undermining the economic foundations of organized criminal structures its place in the system of law enforcement activities is defined amendments are proposed to the Law quotOn investigative activityquot which allow to legitimise the investigative activities aimed at undermining the economic foundations of organized criminal structures. Practical value addressing gaps in legislation which might regulate the investigative activity aimed at undermining the economic foundations of organized criminal structures. nbsp

  1. A novel organic-inorganic hybrid tandem solar cell with inverted structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, A.; Faez, R.

    2017-04-01

    A novel organic-inorganic hybrid tandem solar cell with inverted structure is proposed. This efficient double-junction hybrid tandem solar cell consists of a single-junction hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) subcell with n-i-p structure as front cell and a P3HT:PCBM organic subcell with inverted structure as back cell. In order to optimize the hybrid tandem cell, we have performed a simulation based on transfer matrix method. We have compared the characteristics of this novel structure with a conventional structure. As a result, a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 6.1 and 24% improvement compared to the conventional hybrid tandem cell was achieved. We also discuss the high potential of this novel structure for realizing high-stability organic-inorganic hybrid photovoltaic devices.

  2. The mechanical beauty of hierarchically organized living structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimiliano Fraldi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available By traveling through the inner structure of biological tissues, for instance by means of a scanning or a transmission electron microscope, unexpectedly exact geometries and symmetries in the form of perfect lattices, honeycomb networks, helical macromolecules and polyhedral shapes resulting from minimal surfaces can be observed. Furthermore, by exploring cells and tissues at meso-, micro- and nano-scale levels, one discovers that self-similarity and hierarchy replicate that geometrical order and surprisingly characterize all the biological architectures, in this way de facto governing the key biomechanical functions and biochemical signaling at the basis of the life.

  3. Structural organization of precursors of thermolysin-like proteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidyuk, Ilya V; Gasanov, Eugene V; Safina, Dina R; Kostrov, Sergey V

    2008-09-01

    The primary structures of the full-length precursors of thermolysin-like proteinases (TLPs) were systemically analyzed. Structural comparison of the precursor amino-terminal regions (ATRs) removed during maturation allowed us to divide the family into two groups: peptidases with short (about 50 amino acids) and long (about 200 amino acids) ATRs. The accumulation of mutations in the ATRs of both types proved to correlate with that in the catalytic domains. No classical signal peptides were identified in the short ATRs, but they contained a conserved PPL-motif near the initiation methionine. The functional role of the short ATRs and PPL-motif is currently unclear. The C-terminal regions (CTRs) of TLP precursors, which are often removed during maturation, too, are found in about a half of precursors with long ATRs, but occur more rarely in precursors with short ATRs. CTRs in TLP precursors contain previously identified conserved domains typical for many other proteins and likely underlie the interaction with high molecular weight substrates.

  4. Organization of the ectodermal nervous structures in medusae: cubomedusae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichinger, Justin M; Satterlie, Richard A

    2014-02-01

    At least two conducting systems are well documented in cubomedusae. A variably diffuse network of large neurons innervates the swim musculature and can be visualized immunohistochemically using antibodies against α- or β-tubulin. Despite the non-specificity of these antibodies, multiple lines of evidence suggest that staining highlights the primary motor networks. These networks exhibit unique neurite distributions among the muscle sheets in that network density is greatest in the perradial frenula, where neurites are oriented in parallel with radial muscle fibers. This highly innervated, buttress-like muscle sheet may serve a critical role in the cubomedusan mechanism of turning. In scyphomedusae, a second subumbrellar network immunoreactive to antibodies against the neuropeptide FMRFamide innervates the swim musculature, but it is absent in cubomedusae. Immunoreactivity to FMRFamide in cubomedusae is mostly limited to a small network of neurons in the pacemaker region of the rhopalia, the pedalial apex at the nerve ring junction, and a few neuron tracts in the nerve ring. However, FMRFamide-immunoreactive networks, as well as tubulin-immunoreactive networks, are nearly ubiquitous outside of the swim muscle sheets in the perradial smooth muscle bands, manubrium, pedalia, and tentacles. Here we describe in detail the peripheral nerve nets of box jellyfish on the basis of immunoreactivity to the antibodies above. Our results offer insight into how the peripheral nerve nets are organized to produce the complex swimming, feeding, and defensive behaviors observed in cubomedusae.

  5. Modeling the Structure and Effectiveness of Intelligence Organizations: Dynamic Information Flow Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Behrman, Robert; Carley, Kathleen

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the Dynamic Information Flow Simulation (DIFS), an abstract model for analyzing the structure and function of intelligence support organizations and the activities of entities within them...

  6. Studies on structure and organization of calcium carbonate deposits in algae

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kerkar, V.; Untawale, A.G.

    The structure and organization of calcium carbonate deposits is studied in species of Halimeda, Udotea, Neomeris (Chlorophyta) and Padina (Phaeophyta). It was found that in Halimeda aragonite deposition takes place outside the cell wall...

  7. Occurrence, formation and function of organic sheets in the mineral tube structures of Serpulidae (polychaeta, Annelida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olev Vinn

    Full Text Available A scanning electron microscopy study of organic sheets in serpulid tube mineral structures was carried out to discern their function, formation and evolution. The organic sheets may have some taxonomic value in distinguishing the two major clades of serpulids previously identified. The organic sheets in the mineral tube structure occur only in certain taxa belonging to clade A, but not all species in clade A have them. Organic sheets are best developed in genus Spirobranchus. One could speculate that organic sheets have evolved as an adaption to further strengthen the mechanical properties of the tubes in clade A, which contains serpulids with the most advanced mineral tube microstructures. The organic sheets are presumably secreted with at least some mineral phase.

  8. Brachymeria pandora (Crawford (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae: a new parasitoid of Historis odius (Fabricius (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélcio R. Gil-Santana

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The first record of parasitism of Brachymeria pandora (Crawford, 1914 (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae on Historis odius (Fabricius, 1775 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil is presented.Apresenta-se o primeiro registro de parasitismo de Brachymeria pandora (Crawford, 1914 (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae em Historis odius (Fabricius, 1775 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, no estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil.

  9. KEANEKARAGAMAN HYMENOPTERA PARASITIKA PADA TIPE EKOSISTEM BERBEDA DI BANGKA TENGAH, KEPULAUAN BANGKA BELITUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Marta Saputra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of parasitic Hymenoptera in different ecosystem types in Central Bangka, Bangka-Belitung Islands. Hymenoptera richness is dominated by parasitic species. More than 80% of Hymenoptera play a role as parasitoid on arthropods that are mostly insects. Diversity of parasitic Hymenoptera is widely studied in various types of terrestrial ecosystems including agro-ecosystem and non-agro-ecosystem. This study aimed to invent and compare the diversity of parasitic Hymenoptera in three different ecosystems, i.e., forest, oil palm plantation, and ex-tin mining. The location was located in Central Bangka Regency, Bangka Island. The study was conducted in Juli 2014 until October 2015. Parasitic Hymenoptera was collected with insect sweep net and yellow pan trap on one transect line with 1000 m length. Parasitic Hymenoptera were found on forest as much as 732 morphospecies, 326 morphospecies on oil palm plantations, and 293 morphospecies on ex-tin mining. Diversity and abundance of parasitic Hymenoptera on forest was higher than oil palm plantation and ex-tin mining area. Braconidae family was found dominant on forest, however on oil palm plantation and extin mining area the dominant family was Scelionidae.

  10. Confirmation of the Dimensional Adjustment Model of Organizational Structure in Municipal Sports Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    Sofia Nikolaidou; Vasilis Gialamas; Georgia Yfantidou; George Costa; George Mavrommatis

    2015-01-01

    The presence of municipal sport organizations indicates the priority, which is given from the local authority in the well-being of citizens. On the other hand, it constitutes the basis upon which sports are built in national level. The whole body of the organizations has an organizational structure. The organizational structure is a system of registration of employment and the relations that govern them. The basic dimensions are: concentration, complexity and formalization. The purpose of thi...

  11. The control structure of team-based organizations : A diagnostic model for empowerment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuipers, Benjamin; de Witte, M.C.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a diagnostic model for empowerment in team-based organizations that portrays four dimensions of the organization's control structure: the level of routine, the nature of expertise, the level of dependence and the line of command. The combined positions of the set of job

  12. Fine structure of the subradular organ of Lepidochitona cinereus (L), (Mollusca, Polyplacophora).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, P R

    1975-10-13

    Electron microscopy of the subradular organ of the chiton Lepidochitona cinereus (L) reveals at least three cell types, microvillous, ciliated and mucus-secreting, situated in a single epithelium. The base of the epithelium is abundantly innervated and supplied with muscle cells. The fine structure is consistent with a chemosensory function for the subradular organ.

  13. Using Structure-Based Organic Chemistry Online Tutorials with Automated Correction for Student Practice and Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Timothy P.; Hargaden, Gra´inne C.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the development and implementation of an open-access organic chemistry question bank for online tutorials and assessments at University College Cork and Dublin Institute of Technology. SOCOT (structure-based organic chemistry online tutorials) may be used to supplement traditional small-group tutorials, thereby allowing…

  14. Automated torso organ segmentation from 3D CT images using structured perceptron and dual decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimura, Yukitaka; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a method for torso organ segmentation from abdominal CT images using structured perceptron and dual decomposition. A lot of methods have been proposed to enable automated extraction of organ regions from volumetric medical images. However, it is necessary to adjust empirical parameters of them to obtain precise organ regions. This paper proposes an organ segmentation method using structured output learning. Our method utilizes a graphical model and binary features which represent the relationship between voxel intensities and organ labels. Also we optimize the weights of the graphical model by structured perceptron and estimate the best organ label for a given image by dynamic programming and dual decomposition. The experimental result revealed that the proposed method can extract organ regions automatically using structured output learning. The error of organ label estimation was 4.4%. The DICE coefficients of left lung, right lung, heart, liver, spleen, pancreas, left kidney, right kidney, and gallbladder were 0.91, 0.95, 0.77, 0.81, 0.74, 0.08, 0.83, 0.84, and 0.03, respectively.

  15. Conductance Switching and Organization of Two Structurally Related Molecular Wires on Gold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stan, Razvan C.; Kros, Alexander; Akkilic, Namik; Appel, Jeroen; Sanghamitra, Nusrat J.M.

    2015-01-01

    The self-assembly and electron transfer properties of adsorbed organic molecules are of interest for the construction of miniaturized molecular circuitries. We have investigated with scanning probe microscopy the self-organization of two structurally related molecular wires embedded within a

  16. NMR Study of Organic Counterion Binding to Perfluorinated Micellar Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossev, Dobrin; Matsumoto, Mustuo; Nakahara, Masaru

    2008-03-01

    In this study we have applied our previously developed NMR method to study the adsorption of tetramethylammonium (TMA^+) and tetraethylammonium (TEA^+) counterions to micelles formed by perfluorooctylsulfonate (FOS^-) surfactant in water at 30 C. These two counterions induce formation of threadlike surfactant structures that result in well pronounced viscoelastic properties of the solution. To selectively probe the degree of counterion binding we have used ^1H and ^19F NMR chemical shifts and self-diffusion coefficients that are sensitive to the Stern and diffuse double layers, respectively. The competitive adsorption of TMA^+ and TEA^+ was examined as a function of the TMA^+/TEA^+ ratio at a constant FOS^- concentration of 100 mM. The two counterions were found to form Stern layer around the FOS^- micelles with comparable packing; about one counterion per two micellized FOS molecules. When mixed at intermediate proportions, however, the TEA^+ counterion shows preferential binding; the concentration of TEA^+ in the Stern layer is found to be twice higher than that of TMA^+ at equal total respective concentrations in the solution. These results are discussed in terms of counterion size and hydrophobicity and presented in parallel with those that involved the smaller and more hydrophilic lithium counterion.

  17. Soil structure and characteristics of organic matter in two orchards differing in eartworm activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongmans, A.G.; Pulleman, M.M.; Balabane, M.; Oort, van F.; Marinissen, J.C.Y.

    2003-01-01

    By consuming plant remains and soil, earthworms incorporate organic matter (OM) into the soil and form biogenic soil structures, which can affect OM dynamics. We carried out a (micro)morphological study of soil structure development and OM distribution in two orchards (45 year) in a Dutch calcareous

  18. TiO2 and SiC nanostructured films, organized CNT structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    some nanomaterials (TiO2 and SiC nanostructured films, organized CNT structures, ZnO ... to remove micro and nanoscale contaminants from water and heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum. ZnO has been ... The possible mechanism for photocatalytic degradation of phenol using nano- structured TiO2 as a photocatalyst is ...

  19. Structural proteomics of minimal organisms: conservation ofprotein fold usage and evolutionary implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandonia, John-Marc; Kim, Sung-Hou

    2006-03-15

    Background: Determining the complete repertoire of proteinstructures for all soluble, globular proteins in a single organism hasbeen one of the major goals of several structural genomics projects inrecent years. Results: We report that this goal has nearly been reachedfor several "minimal organisms"--parasites or symbionts with reducedgenomes--for which over 95 percent of the soluble, globular proteins maynow be assigned folds, overall 3-D backbone structures. We analyze thestructures of these proteins as they relate to cellular functions, andcompare conservation off old usage between functional categories. We alsocompare patterns in the conservation off olds among minimal organisms andthose observed between minimal organisms and other bacteria. Conclusion:We find that proteins performing essential cellular functions closelyrelated to transcription and translation exhibit a higher degree ofconservation in fold usage than proteins in other functional categories.Folds related to transcription and translation functional categories werealso over represented in minimal organisms compared to otherbacteria.

  20. Rational synthesis of organic thin films with exceptional long-range structural integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiki, Noriya; Shoji, Yoshiaki; Kajitani, Takashi; Ishiwari, Fumitaka; Kosaka, Atsuko; Hikima, Takaaki; Takata, Masaki; Someya, Takao; Fukushima, Takanori

    2015-06-01

    Highly oriented, domain-boundary-free organic thin films could find use in various high-performance organic materials and devices. However, even with state-of-the-art supramolecular chemistry, it is difficult to construct organic thin films with structural integrity in a size regime beyond the micrometer length scale. We show that a space-filling design, relying on the two-dimensional (2D) nested hexagonal packing of a particular type of triptycene, enables the formation of large-area molecular films with long-range 2D structural integrity up to the centimeter length scale by vacuum evaporation, spin-coating, and cooling from the isotropic liquid of the triptycene. X-ray diffraction analysis and microscopic observations reveal that triptycene molecules form a completely oriented 2D (hexagonal triptycene array) + 1D (layer stacking) structure, which is key for the long-range propagation of structural order.

  1. An investigation on a production company via the scope of Mintzberg’s adhocratic organization structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerem Toker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, the importance of innovation for enterprises, increase each passing day. As a result of globalization, enterprises are under intense competitive pressure. They have to make innovation for increasing to market share or for protecting to it at least. Non-innovative firms lose their customers and their existence is face to threat from other innovative actors in the market. Therefore firms have to design their organization structure that encourage to innovation. Mintzberg’s adhocratic organization structure was investigated in this article.  Thus, its aim of this study leads to resemblance and diversity between theory and practice via of the theoretical knowledge.  As a result of study; high degree of similarity between the application and Mintzberg’s theory, which is related to adhocratic organization structure, has been identified.Keywords: Innovation, Organizational Structure, Mintzberg, Adhocracy, Media Sector

  2. Keeping patients safe in healthcare organizations: a structuration theory of safety culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groves, Patricia S; Meisenbach, Rebecca J; Scott-Cawiezell, Jill

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a discussion of the use of structuration theory to facilitate understanding and improvement of safety culture in healthcare organizations. Patient safety in healthcare organizations is an important problem worldwide. Safety culture has been proposed as a means to keep patients safe. However, lack of appropriate theory limits understanding and improvement of safety culture. The proposed structuration theory of safety culture was based on a critique of available English-language literature, resulting in literature published from 1983 to mid-2009. CINAHL, Communication and Mass Media Complete, ABI/Inform and Google Scholar databases were searched using the following terms: nursing, safety, organizational culture and safety culture. When viewed through the lens of structuration theory, safety culture is a system involving both individual actions and organizational structures. Healthcare organization members, particularly nurses, share these values through communication and enact them in practice, (re)producing an organizational safety culture system that reciprocally constrains and enables the actions of the members in terms of patient safety. This structurational viewpoint illuminates multiple opportunities for safety culture improvement. Nurse leaders should be cognizant of competing value-based culture systems in the organization and attend to nursing agency and all forms of communication when attempting to create or strengthen a safety culture. Applying structuration theory to the concept of safety culture reveals a dynamic system of individual action and organizational structure constraining and enabling safety practice. Nurses are central to the (re)production of this safety culture system. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  3. Spermatogenesis in the parasitoid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Carabajal Paladino, Leonela Z.; Lo Nostro, F.; Papeschi, A.; Cladera, J.; Bressa, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 1 (2017), s. 38-43 ISSN 0001-7272 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Hymenoptera * modified meiosis * abortive division Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 1.211, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/azo.12148/pdf

  4. Allergen-specific immunotherapy of Hymenoptera venom allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiener, Maximilian; Graessel, Anke; Ollert, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Stings of hymenoptera can induce IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in venom-allergic patients, ranging from local up to severe systemic reactions and even fatal anaphylaxis. Allergic patients' quality of life can be mainly improved by altering their immune response to tolerate the venoms...... on state of the art diagnostic and therapeutic options as well as on novel directions trying to improve therapy....

  5. Molecular phylogenetics of ponerine ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Ponerinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Recent molecular phylogenetic studies of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) have revolutionized our understanding of how these ecologically dominant organisms diversified, but detailed phylogenies are lacking for most major ant subfamilies. I report the results of the first detailed phylogenetic study of the ant subfamily Ponerinae, a diverse cosmopolitan lineage whose properties make it an attractive model system for investigating social and ecological evolution in ants. Molecular sequence data were obtained from four nuclear genes (wingless, long-wavelength rhodopsin, rudimentary [CAD], 28S rDNA; total of ~3.3 kb) for 86 ponerine taxa, representing all three ponerine tribes, 22 of the 28 currently recognized genera, and 14 of the 18 informal subgenera of Pachycondyla, a heterogeneous grouping whose monophyly is doubtful on morphological grounds. Phylogenetic reconstructions using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference support the monophyly of Ponerinae and tribe Platythyreini, but fail to support the monophyly of the large tribe Ponerini due to its inclusion of the unusual genus Thaumatomyrmex. Pachycondyla is inferred to be broadly non-monophyletic. Numerous novel generic and suprageneric relationships are inferred within Ponerini, which was found to consist of four major multi-generic clades (the Ponera, Pachycondyla, Plectroctena and Odontomachus genus groups) plus the single genera Hypoponera and Harpegnathos. Uncertainty remains in some regions of the phylogeny, including at the base of Ponerini, possibly reflecting rapid radiation. Divergence dating using a Bayesian relaxed clock method estimates an origin for stem Ponerinae in the upper Cretaceous, a major burst of diversification near the K/T boundary, and a rich and continual history of diversification during the Cenozoic. These results fail to support the predictions of the "dynastic-succession hypothesis" previously developed to explain the high species diversity of Ponerinae. Though model

  6. Phylogenetic insights into the evolution of parasitism in hymenoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, James B

    2003-01-01

    The Hymenoptera are one of the four megadiverse orders of insects, with over 100000 described species and several times this number still waiting to be described. A major part of this diverse group is formed of large lineages of parasitoid wasps. Some of these lineages have in turn given rise to subgroups that have gone on to diversify into other lifestyles, such as gall-forming on, and pollination of, plants, as well as a broad array of food-collecting behaviors associated with social living in colonies. Thus, the Hymenoptera demonstrate the large evolutionary potential of parasitism as a lifestyle, in contrast to early assertions that parasitism tends to lead to evolutionary 'dead ends' driven by overspecialization. Phylogenetic approaches have already led to a number of important insights into the evolution of parasitism in Hymenoptera. A series of examples are discussed in this review, including the origin of parasitism in the order, the development of koinobiosis in some groups, coevolution with symbiotic viruses, and the evolution in some groups away from parasitism and into such habits as gall formation, pollination of figs, nest building and sociality. The potential for comparative analysis of hymenopteran habits is large, but progress is still in its early stages due to the paucity of available well-supported phylogenies, and the still limited accumulation of basic biological data for many taxa.

  7. A case of anaphylaxis: horse-fly or hymenoptera sting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quercia, O; Emiliani, F; Foschi, F G; Stefanini, G F

    2009-10-01

    In literature it has been described a high risk of systemic reaction after blood-sucking Dyptera bites, like mosquitoes and horsefly, in people sensitive to hymenoptera. A 51 year old man, allergic to hymenoptera venom and with a history of i.v. reaction after Mueller, who has been treated with Vespula sp. ITS for the last 3 years, was stung by a yellow, black and green insect on the neck. Five minutes after the bite, he suffered generalized hitching and urticaria, oral cavity and lower limbs paresthesia, followed by lost of consciousness. At the Emergency Room he was successfully treated with adrenaline, intravenous antihistamines and corticosteroid. The description of the insect as well as the lack of the sting on the site suggested a wasp as the culprit. By studying one of these insect that has been captured by the patient, it turned out it wasn't a Vespula, but a horsefly, the Tabanus bovinus, which resembles Hymenoptera. Skin prick test and RAST for Tabanus confirmed the allergology diagnosis. In conclusion, also Tabanus bovines can cause systemic reaction up to anaphylactic shock.

  8. Structural features based genome-wide characterization and prediction of nucleosome organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Yanglan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nucleosome distribution along chromatin dictates genomic DNA accessibility and thus profoundly influences gene expression. However, the underlying mechanism of nucleosome formation remains elusive. Here, taking a structural perspective, we systematically explored nucleosome formation potential of genomic sequences and the effect on chromatin organization and gene expression in S. cerevisiae. Results We analyzed twelve structural features related to flexibility, curvature and energy of DNA sequences. The results showed that some structural features such as DNA denaturation, DNA-bending stiffness, Stacking energy, Z-DNA, Propeller twist and free energy, were highly correlated with in vitro and in vivo nucleosome occupancy. Specifically, they can be classified into two classes, one positively and the other negatively correlated with nucleosome occupancy. These two kinds of structural features facilitated nucleosome binding in centromere regions and repressed nucleosome formation in the promoter regions of protein-coding genes to mediate transcriptional regulation. Based on these analyses, we integrated all twelve structural features in a model to predict more accurately nucleosome occupancy in vivo than the existing methods that mainly depend on sequence compositional features. Furthermore, we developed a novel approach, named DLaNe, that located nucleosomes by detecting peaks of structural profiles, and built a meta predictor to integrate information from different structural features. As a comparison, we also constructed a hidden Markov model (HMM to locate nucleosomes based on the profiles of these structural features. The result showed that the meta DLaNe and HMM-based method performed better than the existing methods, demonstrating the power of these structural features in predicting nucleosome positions. Conclusions Our analysis revealed that DNA structures significantly contribute to nucleosome organization and influence

  9. The Impact of the Demand for Integration in the Large Multi-Business Unit Firm on the IT Organization Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Eric Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Large, multi-business unit firms are decentralizing their overall corporate structures. At the same time, the structures of their IT organizations are becoming more centralized. This is contrary to current wisdom that the IT organization structure will mimic the structure of the corporation, all else being equal. Because the general business…

  10. Las avispas bandera (Hymenoptera: Evaniidae de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zambrano González Giselle

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available La familia Evaniidae está representada por un número relativamente pequeño de géneros y especies dentro del orden Hymenoptera. Son avispas de tamaño medio, sin aguijón y solitarias que parasitan ootecas de cucarachas. Se realizó un estudio de reconocimiento genérico de la familia Evaniidae para Colombia y su distribución a partir de colecciones  entomológicas. El primer capítulo, “Sistemática y taxonomía de  Evaniidae”, pretende ser el reflejo de un trabajo realizado por más de un año, de curadoría y determinación de especímenes presentes en colecciones entomológicas, donde se propone una clave taxonómica para la identificación de los seis géneros de evánidos encontrados en Colombia y un análisis de los caracteres utilizados para la misma. El segundo capítulo, “Biología de Evaniidae”, es una recopilación de todos los estudios existentes sobre la biología de la familia, en donde se hace evidente la falta de trabajo sobre el tema y el desconocimiento básico de algunos aspectos que podrían ser muy útiles para la implementación de nuevas estrategias de control biológico. El tercer capítulo, “Distribución geográfica de los géneros de la f amilia Evaniidae”, muestra como los diferentes géneros de la familia se encuentran distribuidos dentro del territorio colombiano y presenta el estado actual del muestreo de la familia dando información para poder definir áreas de concentración de muestras o áreas posteriores de muestreo. Por último, se presentan las conclusiones y recomendaciones finales que permiten dar una idea del trabajo que queda por hacer y los pasos a seguir.

  11. Toxicological and histopathological effects of boric acid on Atta sexdens rubropilosa (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Simone; Silva-Zacarin, Elaine C M; Decio, Pâmela; Malaspina, Osmar; Bueno, Fabiana C; Bueno, Odair C

    2010-06-01

    The current study compared the toxicity of different concentrations of boric acid in adult workers of Atta sexdens rubropilosa Forel (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), with toxicological bioassays, and examining the dose-dependent and time-dependent histopathological changes, of the midgut, Malpighian tubules, and postpharyngeal glands. Our results revealed the importance of conducting toxicological bioassays combined with morphological analyses of the organs of ants chronically exposed to insecticides used in commercial ant baits. In vitro bioassays showed that boric acid significantly decreases the survivorship of workers regardless of concentration, whereas the morphological data suggested progressive dose-dependent and time-dependent changes in the organs examined, which were evident in the midgut. The midgut is the first organ to be affected, followed by the postpharyngeal gland and Malpighian tubules. This sequence is in agreement with the absorption pathway of this chemical compound in the midgut, its transference to the hemolymph, possibly reaching the postpharyngeal glands, and excretion by the Malpighian tubules. These progressive changes might be due to the cumulative and delayed effect of boric acid. Our findings provide important information for the understanding of the action of boric acid in ant baits in direct and indirect target organs.

  12. Organic chemistry as a language and the implications of chemical linguistics for structural and retrosynthetic analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadeddu, Andrea; Wylie, Elizabeth K; Jurczak, Janusz; Wampler-Doty, Matthew; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2014-07-28

    Methods of computational linguistics are used to demonstrate that a natural language such as English and organic chemistry have the same structure in terms of the frequency of, respectively, text fragments and molecular fragments. This quantitative correspondence suggests that it is possible to extend the methods of computational corpus linguistics to the analysis of organic molecules. It is shown that within organic molecules bonds that have highest information content are the ones that 1) define repeat/symmetry subunits and 2) in asymmetric molecules, define the loci of potential retrosynthetic disconnections. Linguistics-based analysis appears well-suited to the analysis of complex structural and reactivity patterns within organic molecules. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Highly conductive transparent organic electrodes with multilayer structures for rigid and flexible optoelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoyang; Liu, Xingyuan; Lin, Fengyuan; Li, Hailing; Fan, Yi; Zhang, Nan

    2015-05-27

    Transparent electrodes are essential components for optoelectronic devices, such as touch panels, organic light-emitting diodes, and solar cells. Indium tin oxide (ITO) is widely used as transparent electrode in optoelectronic devices. ITO has high transparency and low resistance but contains expensive rare elements, and ITO-based devices have poor mechanical flexibility. Therefore, alternative transparent electrodes with excellent opto-electrical performance and mechanical flexibility will be greatly demanded. Here, organics are introduced into dielectric-metal-dielectric structures to construct the transparent electrodes on rigid and flexible substrates. We show that organic-metal-organic (OMO) electrodes have excellent opto-electrical properties (sheet resistance of below 10 Ω sq(-1) at 85% transmission), mechanical flexibility, thermal and environmental stabilities. The OMO-based polymer photovoltaic cells show performance comparable to that of devices based on ITO electrodes. This OMO multilayer structure can therefore be used to produce transparent electrodes suitable for use in a wide range of optoelectronic devices.

  14. The role of the organization structure in the diffusion of innovations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Sáenz-Royo

    Full Text Available Diffusion and adoption of innovations is a topic of increasing interest in economics, market research, and sociology. In this paper we investigate, through an agent based model, the dynamics of adoption of innovative proposals in different kinds of structures. We show that community structure plays an important role on the innovation diffusion, so that proposals are more likely to be accepted in homogeneous organizations. In addition, we show that the learning process of innovative technologies enhances their diffusion, thus resulting in an important ingredient when heterogeneous networks are considered. We also show that social pressure blocks the adoption process whatever the structure of the organization. These results may help to understand how different factors influence the diffusion and acceptance of innovative proposals in different communities and organizations.

  15. Metal-organic extended 2D structures: Fe-PTCDA on Au(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Lucia; Caillard, Renaud; MartIn-Gago, Jose A; Mendez, Javier [Grupo ESISNA, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), c/ Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Pelaez, Samuel; Serena, Pedro A, E-mail: jmendez@icmm.csic.es [Grupo de Teoria y Simulacion de Materiales, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), c/ Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, Campus de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-07-30

    In this work we combine organic molecules of 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA) with iron atoms on an Au (111) substrate in ultra-high vacuum conditions at different temperatures. By means of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) we study the formation of stable 2D metal-organic structures. We show that at certain growth conditions (temperature, time and coverage) stable 'ladder-like' nanostructures are obtained. These are the result of connecting together two metal-organic chains through PTCDA molecules placed perpendicularly, as rungs of a ladder. These structures, stable up to 450 K, can be extended in a 2D layer covering the entire surface and presenting different rotation domains. STM images at both polarities show a contrast reversal between the two molecules at the unit cell. By means of density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we confirm the stability of these structures and that their molecular orbitals are placed separately at the different molecules.

  16. Metal-organic frameworks: structure, properties, methods of synthesis and characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butova, V. V.; Soldatov, M. A.; Guda, A. A.; Lomachenko, K. A.; Lamberti, C.

    2016-03-01

    This review deals with key methods of synthesis and characterization of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The modular structure affords a wide variety of MOFs with different active metal sites and organic linkers. These compounds represent a new stage of development of porous materials in which the pore size and the active site structure can be modified within wide limits. The set of experimental methods considered in this review is sufficient for studying the short-range and long-range order of the MOF crystal structure, determining the morphology of samples and elucidating the processes that occur at the active metal site in the course of chemical reactions. The interest in metal-organic frameworks results, first of all, from their numerous possible applications, ranging from gas separation and storage to chemical reactions within the pores. The bibliography includes 362 references.

  17. Family Structure as a Correlate of Organized Sport Participation among Youth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel McMillan

    Full Text Available Organized sport is one way that youth participate in physical activity. There are disparities in organized sport participation by family-related factors. The purpose of this study was to determine whether non-traditional family structure and physical custody arrangements are associated with organized sport participation in youth, and if so whether this relationship is mediated by socioeconomic status. Data were from the 2009-10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey, a nationally representative cross-section of Canadian youth in grades 6-10 (N = 21,201. Information on family structure was derived from three survey items that asked participants the number of adults they lived with, their relationship to these adults, and if applicable, how often they visited another parent outside their home. Participants were asked whether or not they were currently involved in an organized sport. Logistic regression was used to compare the odds of organized sport participation according to family structure. Bootstrap-based mediation analysis was used to assess mediation by perceived family wealth. The results indicated that by comparison to traditional families, boys and girls from reconstituted families with irregular visitation of a second parent, reconstituted families with regular visitation of a second parent, single-parent families with irregular visitation of a second parent, and single-parent families with regular visitation of a second parent were less likely to participate in organized sport than those from traditional families, with odds ratios ranging from 0.48 (95% confidence interval: 0.38-0.61 to 0.78 (95% confidence interval: 0.56-1.08. The relationship between family structure and organized sport was significantly mediated by perceived family wealth, although the magnitude of the mediation was modest (ie, <20% change in effect estimate. In conclusion, youth living in both single-parent and reconstituted families experienced significant

  18. Effect of immerse an organic layer in isopropyl alcohol on characteristics of hybrid photovoltaic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares Vargas, A. J.; Cosme, I.; Mansurova, S.; Kosarev, A.; Itzmoyotl, A.

    2017-08-01

    Organic materials have become very important in recent years due to their potential use for photovoltaic applications. Among the main advantages of organic semiconductors are their functional and mechanical flexibility, as well as fabrication simplicity. However, these materials usually afford moderate efficiency in organic photovoltaic devices. On the other hand, hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is a widely known inorganic semiconductor that compared to their organic counterparts has excellent photogeneration and transport properties and it is suitable for large area fabrication of flexible devices. The idea of combining organic semiconductors and amorphous silicon films in hybrid photovoltaic devices is very attractive due to the possibility to complement the useful properties of both material systems. The photovoltaic devices that we study in this work consist of a p-i-n structure, which is also commonly used in inorganic solar cells. In such kind of structures, the light is mainly absorbed in the intrinsic silicon film and the p- and ntype films are used to create an electric field that separates electrons and holes to produce a photocurrent. In this work, we use an organic material (PEDOT:PSS) to replace the p-type inorganic film in amorphous silicon p-i-n structure. It is widely known, that PEDOT:PSS based organic film is highly transparent and its conductivity can be modified e.g. immerse in a solvent type. Here we present the results of experimental investigation of the effect of isopropanol (IPA) treatments in p-type (PEDOT:PSS) organic layer on characteristics of hybrid solar cell structure.

  19. Structural and dynamic studies of substrate binding in porous metal-organic frameworks

    OpenAIRE

    Easun, Timothy; Moreau, Florian; Yan, Yong; Yang, Sihai; Schröder, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Porous metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are the subject of considerable research interest because of\\ud their high porosity and capability of specific binding to small molecules, thus underpinning a wide range\\ud of materials functions such as gas adsorption, separation, drug delivery, catalysis, and sensing. MOFs,\\ud constructed by the designed assembly of metal ions and functional organic linkers, are an emerging class\\ud of porous materials with extended porous structures containing periodi...

  20. An Investigation on a Production Company via the Scope of Mintzberg’s Adhocratic Organization Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Yasin Cakirel

    2016-01-01

    Today, the importance of innovation for enterprises, increase each passing day. As a result of globalization, enterprises are under intense competitive pressure. They have to make innovation for increasing to market share or for protecting to it at least. Noninnovative firms lose their customers and their existence is face to threat from other innovative actors in the market. Therefore firms have to design their organization structure that encourage to innovation. Mintzberg’s adhocratic organ...

  1. The draft genome of a termite illuminates alternative social organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termites have substantial economic and ecological impact worldwide. They are also the oldest organisms living in complex societies, having evolved a caste system independent of that of eusocial Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). Here we provide the first genome sequence for a termite, Zootermopsis ...

  2. Forest products research and development organizations in a worldwide setting: A review of structure, governance, and measures of performance of organizations outside the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul V. Ellefson; Michael A. Kilgore; Kenneth E. Skog; Christopher D. Risbrudt

    2007-01-01

    Located in 23 countries, 40 forest-products research and development organizations outside the United States were reviewed in 2004 and 2005. The intent was to obtain a better understanding of how such organizations are structured and administered and their performance judged. Investing over $600 million annually, the 40 organizations employed 7,000 to 7,500 scientists...

  3. Structure and function of an inorganic-organic separator for electrochemical cells: Preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozek, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    The structure of a new separator material for electrochemical cells has been investigated. Investigation into details of the separator structure showed it to be multilayered and to consist mainly of a quasi-impervious organic skin, a porous region of mixed organic and inorganic material, and an area of nonuniformly treated substrate. The essential feature of the coating (slurry) is believed to be interconnected pores which allow ionic conductivity. The interconnected pores are believed to be formed by the interaction of the plasticizer and inorganic fibers. The major failure mode of silver zinc cells using such a separator (zinc nodules shorting adjacent plates) was investigated.

  4. Preparation and applications of monolithic structures containing metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yongqin; Tan, Xinyi; Svec, Frantisek

    2017-01-01

    Metal-organic frameworks are a new category of advanced porous materials with large surface areas and porosities, uniform pore sizes, tunable surface chemistry, and structural diversity. In combination with monoliths, they allow the fine tuning of desired interactions required in a variety of applications. This review article summarizes results of recent studies focused on synthetic strategies enabling incorporation of metal-organic frameworks in monolithic structures. A diverse array of applications including chromatographic separation, solid-phase microextraction, sample enrichment, heterogeneous catalysis, and enzymatic catalysis are also described. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Integrating Organic Matter Structure with Ecosystem Function using Advanced Analytical Chemistry Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Microorganisms are the primary transformers of organic matter in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The structure of organic matter controls its bioavailability and researchers have long sought to link the chemical characteristics of the organic matter pool to its lability. To date this effort has been primarily attempted using low resolution descriptive characteristics (e.g. organic matter content, carbon to nitrogen ratio, aromaticity, etc .). However, recent progress in linking these two important ecosystem components has been advanced using advanced high resolution tools (e.g. nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy (MS)-based techniques). A series of experiments will be presented that highlight the application of high resolution techniques in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems with the focus on how these data explicitly provide the foundation for integrating organic matter structure into our concept of ecosystem function. The talk will highlight results from a series of experiments including: an MS-based metabolomics and fluorescence excitation emission matrix approach evaluating seasonal and vegetation based changes in dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition from arctic soils; Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS and MS metabolomics analysis of DOM from three lakes in an alpine watershed; and the transformation of 13C labeled glucose track with NMR during a rewetting experiment from Colorado grassland soils. These data will be synthesized to illustrate how the application of advanced analytical techniques provides novel insight into our understanding of organic matter processing in a wide range of ecosystems.

  6. Liquid crystal-based Mueller matrix spectral imaging polarimetry for parameterizing mineral structural organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladish, James C; Duncan, Donald D

    2017-01-20

    Herein, we discuss the remote assessment of the subwavelength organizational structure of a medium. Specifically, we use spectral imaging polarimetry, as the vector nature of polarized light enables it to interact with optical anisotropies within a medium, while the spectral aspect of polarization is sensitive to small-scale structure. The ability to image these effects allows for inference of spatial structural organization parameters. This work describes a methodology for revealing structural organization by exploiting the Stokes/Mueller formalism and by utilizing measurements from a spectral imaging polarimeter constructed from liquid crystal variable retarders and a liquid crystal tunable filter. We provide results to validate the system and then show results from measurements on a mineral sample.

  7. Autonomy and structure can enhance motivation of volunteers in sport organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wei Ting; Wu, Kou Hsien; Wang, Yi Ching; Hsiao, Chia Huei; Wu, Hui Chin

    2013-12-01

    The goal was better understanding of the motivational factors of volunteers in non-profit sport organizations. The roles of two factors provided by supervisors to their subordinates were examined: autonomy support, i.e., the encouragement of self-initiation and emphasis on choice rather than control, and structure, i.e., the introduction of order, definite procedures, and rules. 489 sport volunteers (289 men, 200 women; M age = 31.2 yr., SD = 7.4) were administered questionnaires assessing their perceived autonomy support, structure, and motivation. Regression analysis indicated that perceived autonomy support predicted motivation. Structure also mediated the effect of perceived autonomy support on motivation. Supervisors of sport organizations should provide adequate structure for their volunteers.

  8. Controlling the dynamics of a self-organized structure using a rf-field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talasman, S.J.; Ignat, M

    2004-03-15

    We investigate the influence of an external rf-field upon a plasma self-organized structure. We show that depending on the intensity of this field, though it is at very low values, the dynamics of the structure can be easily controlled over a wide range of the state parameters values. This could be considered as a non-feedback method of dynamics control.

  9. Structure in 5's: A Synthesis of the Research on Organization Design

    OpenAIRE

    Henry Mintzberg

    1980-01-01

    The elements of organizational structuring---which show a curious tendency to appear in five's---suggest a typology of five basic configurations: Simple Structure, Machine Bureaucracy, Professional Bureaucracy, Divisionalized Form, and Adhocracy. The elements include (1) five basic parts of the organization---the operating core, strategic apex, middle line, technostructure, and support staff; (2) five basic mechanisms of coordination---mutual adjustment, direct supervision, and the standardiz...

  10. Family Structure as a Correlate of Organized Sport Participation among Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Rachel; McIsaac, Michael; Janssen, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Organized sport is one way that youth participate in physical activity. There are disparities in organized sport participation by family-related factors. The purpose of this study was to determine whether non-traditional family structure and physical custody arrangements are associated with organized sport participation in youth, and if so whether this relationship is mediated by socioeconomic status. Data were from the 2009-10 Health Behaviour in School-aged Children survey, a nationally representative cross-section of Canadian youth in grades 6-10 (N = 21,201). Information on family structure was derived from three survey items that asked participants the number of adults they lived with, their relationship to these adults, and if applicable, how often they visited another parent outside their home. Participants were asked whether or not they were currently involved in an organized sport. Logistic regression was used to compare the odds of organized sport participation according to family structure. Bootstrap-based mediation analysis was used to assess mediation by perceived family wealth. The results indicated that by comparison to traditional families, boys and girls from reconstituted families with irregular visitation of a second parent, reconstituted families with regular visitation of a second parent, single-parent families with irregular visitation of a second parent, and single-parent families with regular visitation of a second parent were less likely to participate in organized sport than those from traditional families, with odds ratios ranging from 0.48 (95% confidence interval: 0.38-0.61) to 0.78 (95% confidence interval: 0.56-1.08). The relationship between family structure and organized sport was significantly mediated by perceived family wealth, although the magnitude of the mediation was modest (ie, sport participation that was partially mediated by perceived family wealth.

  11. Algorithms for changing the structure of geospace self-organizing question-answering sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochalov, Vladimir; Mochalova, Anastasia

    2017-10-01

    Optimization problems of construction, development and changing the structure of geospace self-organizing question-answering sensor networks (GSQASN) are considered. The task specifies the coordinates of various network nodes. It is required with the specified functional, structural, cost and spatial constraints to change the structure of the GSQASN by adding new nodes, moving to new positions or removing some existing nodes. After the formation of the GSQASN structure we solve the task of question-answer agents placement into GSQASN structure in order to be able to answer the given types of questions under the established limitations. The functional scheme of a given category nodes placement into GSQASN structure and approximate bio-inspired algorithms for solving the tasks are proposed. The results of the work can be used in the construction of specific GSQASN and in the GSQASN design support systems.

  12. Algorithms for changing the structure of geospace self-organizing question-answering sensor networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mochalov Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Optimization problems of construction, development and changing the structure of geospace self-organizing question-answering sensor networks (GSQASN are considered. The task specifies the coordinates of various network nodes. It is required with the specified functional, structural, cost and spatial constraints to change the structure of the GSQASN by adding new nodes, moving to new positions or removing some existing nodes. After the formation of the GSQASN structure we solve the task of question-answer agents placement into GSQASN structure in order to be able to answer the given types of questions under the established limitations. The functional scheme of a given category nodes placement into GSQASN structure and approximate bio-inspired algorithms for solving the tasks are proposed. The results of the work can be used in the construction of specific GSQASN and in the GSQASN design support systems.

  13. Teachers' Organization of Participation Structures for Teaching Science with Computer Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Karthigeyan

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes a qualitative study that investigated the nature of the participation structures and how the participation structures were organized by four science teachers when they constructed and communicated science content in their classrooms with computer technology. Participation structures focus on the activity structures and processes in social settings like classrooms thereby providing glimpses into the complex dynamics of teacher-students interactions, configurations, and conventions during collective meaning making and knowledge creation. Data included observations, interviews, and focus group interviews. Analysis revealed that the dominant participation structure evident within participants' instruction with computer technology was ( Teacher) initiation-( Student and Teacher) response sequences-( Teacher) evaluate participation structure. Three key events characterized the how participants organized this participation structure in their classrooms: setting the stage for interactive instruction, the joint activity, and maintaining accountability. Implications include the following: (1) teacher educators need to tap into the knowledge base that underscores science teachers' learning to teach philosophies when computer technology is used in instruction. (2) Teacher educators need to emphasize the essential idea that learning and cognition is not situated within the computer technology but within the pedagogical practices, specifically the participation structures. (3) The pedagogical practices developed with the integration or with the use of computer technology underscored by the teachers' own knowledge of classroom contexts and curriculum needs to be the focus for how students learn science content with computer technology instead of just focusing on how computer technology solely supports students learning of science content.

  14. Study of structural, optical properties and electronic structure of PTCDI-C5 organic nanostructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurban, Mustafa; Gündüz, Bayram

    2018-01-01

    This work reports the change in the structural, electronic, spectroscopic and optical properties of N,N‧-Dipentyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (PTCDI-C5) small molecule via experimental and theoretical techniques. Experimental and simple models were taken into consideration to calculate the refractive index (n) of PTCDI-C5 from its energy gap (Eg) data. Electrical conductance was recorded. UV, FT-IR and FT-Raman spectra characteristics and the electronic properties of PTCDI-C5 were also recorded time-dependent (TD) DFT approach based on optimized structure with different solvent environments. The results herein obtained reveal that PTCDI-C5 material is suitable for UV and chemical sensors due to its good optoelectronic paramaters.

  15. Internal organization of large protein families: relationship between the sequence, structure and function based clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiao-hui; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Wooley, John; Godzik, Adam

    2011-01-01

    The protein universe can be organized in families that group proteins sharing common ancestry. Such families display variable levels of structural and functional divergence, from homogenous families, where all members have the same function and very similar structure, to very divergent families, where large variations in function and structure are observed. For practical purposes of structure and function prediction, it would be beneficial to identify sub-groups of proteins with highly similar structures (iso-structural) and/or functions (iso-functional) within divergent protein families. We compared three algorithms in their ability to cluster large protein families and discuss whether any of these methods could reliably identify such iso-structural or iso-functional groups. We show that clustering using profile-sequence and profile-profile comparison methods closely reproduces clusters based on similarities between 3D structures or clusters of proteins with similar biological functions. In contrast, the still commonly used sequence-based methods with fixed thresholds result in vast overestimates of structural and functional diversity in protein families. As a result, these methods also overestimate the number of protein structures that have to be determined to fully characterize structural space of such families. The fact that one can build reliable models based on apparently distantly related templates is crucial for extracting maximal amount of information from new sequencing projects. PMID:21671455

  16. Effect of Different Organic Material Turnover on Soil Structure and Maize Photosynthetic Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Jiu-ming

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different organic material turnover on soil structure and maize photosynthetic rate was researched in this paper. The results showed that comparing the control treatment, the soil bulk density of two treatments of shallow reversing and chiseling plow with straw returning and organic fertilizer were decreased by 0.13 g·cm-3and 0.09 g·cm-3, respectively. The application of shallow reversing and chiseling plow with straw turnover,organic fertilizer, green organic fertilizer and bio-fertilizer could reduce soil hardness, change the soil three phase state, improve the soil physics structure. Organic fertilizer and green organic fertilizer and bio-fertilizer increased the maize photosynthetic rate at trumpet period by 2.1~7.6 μmol·m-2·s-1. The transpiration rate of straw turnover and bio-fertilizer treatments was decreased by57% and 56% separately. Conductances of all treatments were lower than that of the control treatment at trumpet period. Meanwhile stomatal conductance was increased at filling stage which may lead to the decreasing CO2concentration with the reason that reducing of stomatal booster caused the lower CO2concentration. Returning of organic materials could reduce soil bulk density and com paction, make the soil three phase state having a reasonable range, improve crop photosynthetic rate, decrease the transpiration rate, especially the treatments of straw returning and organic fertilize. In short, protection tillage and organic materials returning to field play a positive role for improving soil fertility, soil physical characteristics, crop photosynthetic rate and crop yields.

  17. The Isochores as a Fundamental Level of Genome Structure and Organization: A General Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Maria; Musto, Héctor

    2017-03-01

    The recent availability of a number of fully sequenced genomes (including marine organisms) allowed to map very precisely the isochores, based on DNA sequences, confirming the results obtained before genome sequencing by the ultracentrifugation in CsCl. In fact, the analytical profile of human DNA showed that the vertebrate genome is a mosaic of isochores, typically megabase-size DNA segments that belong to a small number of families characterized by different GC levels. In this review, we will concentrate on some general genome features regarding the compositional organization from different organisms and their evolution, ranging from vertebrates to invertebrates until unicellular organisms. Since isochores are tightly linked to biological properties such as gene density, replication timing, and recombination, the new level of detail provided by the isochore map helped the understanding of genome structure, function, and evolution. All the findings reported here confirm the idea that the isochores can be considered as a "fundamental level of genome structure and organization." We stress that we do not discuss in this review the origin of isochores, which is still a matter of controversy, but we focus on well established structural and physiological aspects.

  18. Chemical evaluation of soil organic matter structure in diverse cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil organic matter (SOM) improves soil structure, nutrient and water retention, and biodiversity while reducing susceptibility to soil erosion. SOM also represents an important pool of C that can be increased to help mitigate global climate change. Our understanding of how agricultural management ...

  19. Ethnically Diverse Students' Knowledge Structures in First-Semester Organic Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Enrique J.; Shavelson, Richard J.; Nandagopal, Kiruthiga; Szu, Evan; Penn, John

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry courses remain a challenge for many undergraduate students. In particular, first-semester organic chemistry has been labeled as a gatekeeper with high attrition rates, especially among students of color. Our study examines a key factor related to conceptual understanding in science and predictive of course outcomes-knowledge structures.…

  20. Atomic structure of self-organizing iridium induced nanowires on Ge(001)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kabanov, Nikolai; Heimbuch, Rene; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Saletsky, A.M.; Klavsyuk, A.L.

    2017-01-01

    The atomic structure of self-organizing iridium (Ir) induced nanowires on Ge(001) is studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The Ir induced nanowires are aligned in a direction perpendicular to the Ge(001) substrate dimer rows,

  1. [The physiological and pathological role of some organic dentine and enamel structures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    István, Bocskay; Viktor, Waldhofer

    2005-08-01

    The enamel is the toughest human tissue. The major component of the inorganic part is hydroxyl apatite (90-92%). The organic part of enamel is formed by proteins, proteoglycans and lipoids, and represents only 1-2% of the entire weight. The organic components are organized, forming histological structures like enamel lamellae, enamel rods sheaths, enamel spindles and tufts. The authors, with the aid of the scanning electron microscope and histochemical staining, have demonstrated that enamel lamellae presented a true histological structure, contrary to some opinions that consider this entities developmental failures or simple cracks. In the opinion of the authors, these lamellae confer elasticity to the enamel when exposed to lateral or tangential forces, or even torque. The lamellae are also considered pathways for the progression of dental caries. The dentine-enamel junction is another non-mineralized tooth-structure which functions like an elastic support for the tough enamel, opposing unfortunately a very low resistance in the face of dental caries progression. In such cases we talk about secondary enamel caries. The dentinal tubules with the organic structures inside are essential in maintaining the vitality of the dentine and enamel; but in pathological circumstances they represent pathways for pathological stimuli heading toward the pulp, and they are the weakest points in front of caries progression.

  2. Imaging structural and functional connectivity: towards a unified definition of human brain organization?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guye, Maxime; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Ranjeva, Jean-Philippe

    2008-08-01

    Diffusion tractography and functional/effective connectivity MRI provide a better understanding of the structural and functional human brain connectivity. This review will underline the major recent methodological developments and their exceptional respective contributions to physiological and pathophysiological studies in vivo. We will also emphasize the benefits provided by computational models of complex networks such as graph theory. Imaging structural and functional brain connectivity has revealed the complex brain organization into large-scale networks. Such an organization not only permits the complex information segregation and integration during high cognitive processes but also determines the clinical consequences of alterations encountered in development, ageing, or neurological diseases. Recently, it has also been demonstrated that human brain networks shared topological properties with the so-called 'small-world' mathematical model, allowing a maximal efficiency with a minimal energy and wiring cost. Separately, magnetic resonance tractography and functional MRI connectivity have both brought new insights into brain organization and the impact of injuries. The small-world topology of structural and functional human brain networks offers a common framework to merge structural and functional imaging as well as dynamical data from electrophysiology that might allow a comprehensive definition of the brain organization and plasticity.

  3. Structure-directing effects of ionic liquids in the ionothermal synthesis of metal–organic frameworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas P. Vaid

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Traditional synthesis of metal–organic frameworks (MOFs involves the reaction of a metal-containing precursor with an organic linker in an organic solvent at an elevated temperature, in what is termed a `solvothermal' reaction. More recently, many examples have been reported of MOF synthesis in ionic liquids (ILs, rather than an organic solvent, in `ionothermal' reactions. The high concentration of both cations and anions in an ionic liquid allows for the formation of new MOF structures in which the IL cation or anion or both are incorporated into the MOF. Most commonly, the IL cation is included in the open cavities of the MOF, countering the anionic charge of the MOF framework itself and acting as a template around which the MOF structure forms. Ionic liquids can also serve other structure-directing roles, for example, when an IL containing a single enantiomer of a chiral anion leads to a homochiral MOF, even though the IL anion is not itself incorporated into the MOF. A comprehensive review of ionothermal syntheses of MOFs, and the structure-directing effects of the ILs, is given.

  4. Anthraquinone with Tailored Structure for Nonaqueous Metal-Organic Redox Flow Battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei; Xu, Wu; Cosimbescu, Lelia; Choi, Daiwon; Li, Liyu; Yang, Zhenguo

    2012-06-08

    A nonaqueous, hybrid metal-organic redox flow battery based on tailored anthraquinone structure is demonstrated to have an energy efficiency of {approx}82% and a specific discharge energy density similar to aqueous redox flow batteries, which is due to the significantly improved solubility of anthraquinone in supporting electrolytes.

  5. Schools of fish and flocks of birds : their shape and internal structure by self-organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemelrijk, Charlotte K.; Hildenbrandt, Hanno

    2012-01-01

    Models of self-organization have proved useful in revealing what processes may underlie characteristics of swarms. In this study, we review model-based explanations for aspects of the shape and internal structure of groups of fish and of birds travelling undisturbed (without predator threat). Our

  6. A Conceptual Framework of Corporate and Business Ethics across Organizations: Structures, Processes and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Goran; Wood, Greg

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this paper is to introduce and describe a conceptual framework of corporate and business ethics across organizations in terms of ethical structures, ethical processes and ethical performance. Design/methodology/approach: A framework is outlined and positioned incorporating an ethical frame of reference in the field of…

  7. Method for analyzing structural changes of flexible metal-organic frameworks induced by adsorbates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubbeldam, D.; Krishna, R.; Snurr, R.Q.

    2009-01-01

    Metal−organic frameworks (MOFs) have crystal structures that exhibit unusual flexibility. An extreme example is that of the "breathing MOF" MIL-53 that expands or shrinks to admit guest molecules like CO2 and water. We present a powerful simulation tool to quickly calculate unit cell shape and size

  8. Metal-Organic Frameworks with d-f Cyanide Bridges: Structural Diversity, Bonding Regime, and Magnetism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferbinteanu, M.; Cimpoesu, F.; Tanase, S.; Cheng, P.

    2015-01-01

    We present a selection of metal-organic frameworks based on d-f and f-f linkages, discussing their structural features and properties from experimental and theoretical viewpoints. We give an overview of our own synthetic and modeling methodologies, highlighting the complexity of the

  9. [Surgical accesses to retroperitoneal organs and anatomic structures in case of abdominal trauma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolyar, A N; Abakumov, M M

    2015-01-01

    It is presented the detailed description with illustrations of 3 surgical accesses which are used by authors to dissect retroperitoneal organs and anatomic structures in victims with closed trauma and abdominal injury. We reported clinical observations of successful use of developed accesses.

  10. Molecular design chemical structure generation from the properties of pure organic compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, AL

    1992-01-01

    This book is a systematic presentation of the methods that have been developed for the interpretation of molecular modeling to the design of new chemicals. The main feature of the compilation is the co-ordination of the various scientific disciplines required for the generation of new compounds. The five chapters deal with such areas as structure and properties of organic compounds, relationships between structure and properties, and models for structure generation. The subject is covered in sufficient depth to provide readers with the necessary background to understand the modeling

  11. Molecular manipulation of solid state structure: influences of organic components on vanadium oxide architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagrman, Pamela J.; Finn, Robert C.; Zubieta, Jon

    2001-11-01

    Among the inorganic materials enjoying widespread contemporary interest, the metal oxide based solid phases occupy a prominent position by virtue of their applications to catalysis, sorption, molecular electronics, energy storage, optical materials and ceramics. The diversity of properties associated with these materials reflects the chemical composition, which allows variations in covalency, geometry and oxidation states, and the crystalline architecture, which may provide different pore structures, coordination sites, or juxtapositions of functional groups. Despite such fundamental and practical significance, the design of the structure of such materials remains a challenge in solid state chemistry. While organic materials have been synthesized which self-assemble into ordered arrays at low temperature and which exhibit molecular recognition and biomimetic activity, the ability to synthesize inorganic materials by rational design remains elusive. Small, soluble molecular building blocks with well-defined reaction chemistries which allow their low-temperature assembly into crystalline solid state inorganic materials are not well known. However, the existence of naturally occurring, structurally complex minerals establishes that hydrothermal synthesis can provide a low temperature pathway to produce open-framework and layered metastable structures utilizing inorganic starting materials. Thus, hydrothermal conditions have been used to prepare microporous tetrahedral framework solids that are capable of shape-selective absorption, like zeolites and aluminophosphates, and more recently in the preparation of complex solid arrays of the M/O/PO 3-4 and M/O/RPO 2-3 systems (M=V and Mo). The hydrothermal technique may be combined with the introduction of organic components which may act as charge compensating groups, space-filling units, structure directing agents, templates, tethers between functional groups, or conventional ligands in the preparation of inorganic/organic

  12. Organic-acid effect on the structures of a series of lead(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jin; Ma, Jian-Fang; Liu, Ying-Ying; Ma, Ji-Cheng; Batten, Stuart R

    2007-08-06

    An investigation into the dependence of coordination polymer architectures on organic-acid ligands is reported on the basis of the reaction of Pb(NO3)2 and eight structurally related organic-acid ligands in the presence or absence of N-donor chelating ligands. Eight novel lead(II)-organic architectures, [Pb(adip)(dpdp)]2 1, [Pb(glu)(dpdp)] 2, [Pb(suc)(dpdp)] 3, [Pb(fum)(dpdp)] . H2O 4, [Pb2(oba)(dpdp)2] . 2(dpdp).2(NO3).2H2O 5, [Pb2(1,4-bdc)2(dpdp)2] . H2O 6, [Pb(dpdc)(dpdp)] 7, and [Pb(1,3-bdc)(dpdp)] . H2O 8, where dpdp = dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]-phenazine, H2adip = adipic acid, H2glu = glutaric acid, H2suc = succinic acid, H2fum = fumaric acid, H2oba = 4,4'-oxybis(benzoic acid), 1,4-H2bdc = benzene-1,4-dicarboxylic acid, H2dpdc = 2,2'-diphenyldicarboxylic acid, and 1,3-H2bdc = benzene-1,3-dicarboxylic acid, were successfully synthesized under hydrothermal conditions through varying the organic-acid linkers and structurally characterized by X-ray crystallography. Compounds 1-8 crystallize in the presence of organic-acid linkers as well as secondary N-donor chelating ligands. Diverse structures were observed for these complexes. 1 and 5 have dinuclear structures, which are further stacked via strong pi-pi interactions to form 2D layers. 2-3 and 6-8 feature chain structures, which are connected by strong pi-pi interactions to result in 2D and 3D supramolecular architectures. Compound 4 contains 2D layers, which are further extended to a 3D structure by pi-pi interactions. A systematic structural comparison of these 8 complexes indicates that the organic-acid structures have essential roles in the framework formation of the Pb(II) complexes.

  13. Brachymeria pandora (Crawford) (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae) as a new parasitoid of Thyrinteina leucocerae (Rindge) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zache, B; Zaché, R R C; Tavares, M T; Wilcken, C F

    2012-08-01

    This is the first report of Brachymeria pandora (Crawford) (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae)-parasitizing pupae of the eucalyptus defoliator Thyrinteina leucocerae (Rindge) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) in Brazil.

  14. A NEW SPECIES OF INVASIVE GALL WASP (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE: TETRASTICHINAE) ON BLUE GUM (EUCALYPTUS GLOBULUS) IN CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The blue gum gall wasp, Selitrichodes globulus La Salle & Gates (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae), is described as an invasive gall inducer on blue gum, Eucalyptus globulus (Myrtaceae), in California....

  15. Towards solution and refinement of organic crystal structures by fitting to the atomic pair distribution function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prill, Dragica; Juhás, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J L; Schmidt, Martin U

    2016-01-01

    A method towards the solution and refinement of organic crystal structures by fitting to the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) is developed. Approximate lattice parameters and molecular geometry must be given as input. The molecule is generally treated as a rigid body. The positions and orientations of the molecules inside the unit cell are optimized starting from random values. The PDF is obtained from carefully measured X-ray powder diffraction data. The method resembles `real-space' methods for structure solution from powder data, but works with PDF data instead of the diffraction pattern itself. As such it may be used in situations where the organic compounds are not long-range-ordered, are poorly crystalline, or nanocrystalline. The procedure was applied to solve and refine the crystal structures of quinacridone (β phase), naphthalene and allopurinol. In the case of allopurinol it was even possible to successfully solve and refine the structure in P1 with four independent molecules. As an example of a flexible molecule, the crystal structure of paracetamol was refined using restraints for bond lengths, bond angles and selected torsion angles. In all cases, the resulting structures are in excellent agreement with structures from single-crystal data.

  16. Laser Control of Self-Organization Process in Microscopic Region and Fabrication of Fine Microporous Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukimasa Matsumura

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a controlling technique of microporous structure by laser irradiation during self-organization process. Self-organization process is fabrication method of microstructure. Polymer solution was dropped on the substrate at high humid condition. Water in air appears dropping air temperature below the dew point. The honeycomb structure with regularly aligned pores on the film was fabricated by attaching water droplets onto the solution surface. We demonstrate that it was possible to prevent forming pores at the region of laser irradiation and flat surface was fabricated. We also demonstrated that a combination structure with two pore sizes and flat surface was produced by a single laser-pulse irradiation. Our method is a unique microfabrication processing technique that combines the advantages of bottom-up and top-down techniques. This method is a promising technique that can be applied to produce for photonic crystals, biological cell culturing, surface science and electronics fields, and so forth.

  17. Developing organization structure of retail enterprises (on the example of the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr L. Bobkov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the research is to prove repetitiveness of changes in the organization structure of commercial enterprises. With regard to the goals of the research, such scientifically well-known paired notions as vertical and horizontal; high and flat; mechanical and organic can be considered as two basic types of organizational structures. The authors’ hypothesis is that these two types of structures – consequent and parallel – replace each other dialectically, and change qualitatively in the process of enterprises growth, but, at the same time, they maintain their constitutive properties at each level of organizations development.The retail sector was chosen as the object of analysis, since the generalized organizational structure in it is characterized by separate sales outlets, which makes it possible to conduct statistical processing of data. In this context, enterprises of similar size (in terms of number of employees and sales volume and having similar (consequent or parallel organizational structures can make groups that form the aggregate of commercial organizations. Cluster analysis is a generally accepted method of defining groups joining objects that are homogeneous with respect to certain criteria. Cluster analysis is the means of exploratory analysis, meant for natural clustering of the initial data set into groups. The IBM SPSS Statistics software was used for defining clusters.The analysis was conducted according to the data of the Czech Republic retail enterprises. The economy of this Central-European country was chosen, because, on the one hand, it is a part of the common market of the United Europe, and, on the other hand, it preserves its national currency. The research data were obtained from the database of Albertina Gold Edition of Bisnode Česká republika, a.s., including enterprises of all the sectors. 1695 retail organizations of all sizes were chosen from the total trade organizations for the research.As a result

  18. Characterizing the Structure and Porosity of Organic Molecules of Intrinsic Microporosity by Molecular Simulations and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Lauren J.; McDermott, Amanda G.; Del Regno, Annalaura; Msayib, Kadhum J.; Carta, Mariolino; Taylor, Rupert; McKeown, Neil B.; Siperstein, Flor R.; Runt, James; Colina, Coray M.

    2011-03-01

    Organic molecules of intrinsic microporosity (OMIMs) are amorphous, glassy solids that contain interconnected pores of sizes smaller than 2 nm. The philosophy behind OMIMs is similar to that of polymers of intrinsic microporosity (PIMs); rigid, awkwardly shaped molecules frustrate packing and form low density materials with intrinsically porous structures. Atomistic simulations were performed on OMIMs using our recently developed packing and compression procedure to study the effect of structure on packing behavior. The structure and porosity of the simulated samples were characterized, such as by surface areas and structure factors, and compared to experimental results. The presented computational procedure will further understanding of structure-property relationships and aid in the design of novel materials with high surface areas. Supported by NSF/Materials World Network/EPSRC.

  19. Palatability of Baits Containing (S)-Methoprene to Wasmannia auropunctata (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michelle P. Montgomery; Cas Vanderwoude; A. Jasmyn J. Lynch

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Wasmannia auropunctata Roger (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), little fire ant, is recognized as a serious pest ant species that affects agriculture, homes, gardens, and natural ecosystems in Hawaii, USA, and elsewhere...

  20. A new species of the genus Homolobus Foerster from Ecuador (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Homolobinae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.; Shaw, S.R.

    2009-01-01

    A new high elevation altitude species of the genus Homolobus Foerster (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Homolobinae), H. fuscinervis spec. nov. from Ecuador (Napo province, 2163 m elevation) is described and illustrated.

  1. The first known fossil Masoninae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) from Miocene Dominican amber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.

    2001-01-01

    The first fossil species of the genus Masona van Achterberg, 1995, of the subfamily Masoninae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is described and illustrated. It originates from approximately 15-20 millions years old (= Miocene) Dominican amber.

  2. Two new species of the genus Peristenus Foerster (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Euphorinae) from the Canary Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.; Guerrero, E.R.

    2003-01-01

    Two new species of the genus Peristenus Foerster (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Euphorinae) from the Canary Islands are described and illustrated: Peristenus angifemoralis spec. nov. from Tenerife, and P. gloriae spec. nov. from Gran Canaria and Tenerife.

  3. Macrocentrus sylvestrellae spec. nov. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Macrocentrinae), a parasitoid of Dioryctria sylvestrella (Ratzeburg) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.

    2001-01-01

    A new species of the genus Macrocentrus Curtis, 1833 (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Macrocentrinae) described and illustrated: M. sylvestrellae spec. nov. from France and Italy. It is a gregarious koinobiont endoparasitoid of the pine stem borer Dioryctria sylvestrella (Ratzeburg, 1840) (Lepidoptera;

  4. The Changing Needs for Higher Education Organizations Structure in Vietnam: Evidence from Japanese, Taiwanese, and Thai Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minh-Quang Duong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Organizational change is the process of changing the structure of the organization and the attitudes of members in the organization. During the last decade, both Vietnamese social and educational organizations have slowly changed in their organizational structure as a barrier to the development in the era of globalization and internationalization in Vietnam. This paper is an attempt to discuss the factors which affect Vietnamese higher educational organization. Discussions on the viewpoint of higher educational organization structure of Japan, Taiwan, and Thailand. Furthermore, this paper will contribute to improve educational management, and serve as a useful reference for future higher education’s school mergers.

  5. Structural and functional rich club organization of the brain in children and adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Grayson

    Full Text Available Recent studies using Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI have proposed that the brain's white matter is organized as a rich club, whereby the most highly connected regions of the brain are also highly connected to each other. Here we use both functional and diffusion-weighted MRI in the human brain to investigate whether the rich club phenomena is present with functional connectivity, and how this organization relates to the structural phenomena. We also examine whether rich club regions serve to integrate information between distinct brain systems, and conclude with a brief investigation of the developmental trajectory of rich-club phenomena. In agreement with prior work, both adults and children showed robust structural rich club organization, comprising regions of the superior medial frontal/dACC, medial parietal/PCC, insula, and inferior temporal cortex. We also show that these regions were highly integrated across the brain's major networks. Functional brain networks were found to have rich club phenomena in a similar spatial layout, but a high level of segregation between systems. While no significant differences between adults and children were found structurally, adults showed significantly greater functional rich club organization. This difference appeared to be driven by a specific set of connections between superior parietal, insula, and supramarginal cortex. In sum, this work highlights the existence of both a structural and functional rich club in adult and child populations with some functional changes over development. It also offers a potential target in examining atypical network organization in common developmental brain disorders, such as ADHD and Autism.

  6. Catchment structure that supports organic matter providing a natural control on rising river nutrient concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutter, Marc; Ibiyemi, Adekunle; Wang, Chen

    2017-04-01

    The connectivity of sources of pollution in catchments has been well studied and brings concepts such as pollution hotspots and critical source areas. However, consideration of the placement of other structures combating rising pollution impacts has been less considered. One such area that is receiving developing focus is the layout of riparian management and buffer strips. However, there are wider aspects of connectivity and landscape structure that can bring benefits to delivery and in-stream processing of pollution. These include wetlands, forests and the distribution of soils of differing connectivity of organic matter varying in bioavailability. Organic matter is a great modulator of catchment processes from controlling the potential of land use (e.g. constraints of soil organic matter and wetness on agricultural use), to the amount and form of nutrients leached from soils, to controls of dissolved organic matter on in-stream biology that responds to nutrient concentrations. As the fundamental control of ecosystem energy available for many heterotrophic processes it mediates uptake, recycling and speciation of N, P at many stages of the catchment from soils to waters; as such DOM can be considered as a nature-based solution exerting a background level of control on inorganic nutrients. This poster explores the role of different structural aspects of catchments that provide beneficial organic matter inputs to rivers. At the fine scale the lability of riparian soil and leaf litter DOC are considered. At a riparian management scale the local changes in buffer strip soil C and DOC relative to field soils are considered. At the largest scale spatial data are explored for riparian structure, forests, wetlands and soils differing in delivery and forms of C across major Scottish rivers and used as co-variates to explain differences in in-stream processing of nutrients.

  7. Coffee farm diversity and landscape features influence density of colonies of Atta cephalotes (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varón, Edgar; Eigenbrode, Sanford D; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A; Hilje, Luko; Jones, Jeffrey

    2011-02-01

    The density of colonies of leaf-cutting ants, Atta cephalotes L. (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), was measured and compared among coffee (Coffea arabica L.) plantations in five management categories: monoculture conventional, diversified conventional, diversified organic, highly diversified conventional, and highly diversified organic. Twenty-four small farms (farm and off-farm (landscape) variables were measured and tested for their relationship with A. cephalotes colony density. Total ant colony density (colonies per ha) and density of new colonies shortly after a nuptial flight were significantly greater in the coffee monoculture conventional system, compared with all other systems. Total ant colony density and density of new colonies were inversely related to percentage of shade within the farms. Within farms, colony density was greater near edges adjacent to riparian forest than those adjacent to nonforested land. Regardless of edge type, plots closer to the edge (0-30 m) had greater colony density than those furthest from the edge. At the landscape scale, density of new colonies was positively related to fallow land use coverage within a 2,000-m buffer radius and to forest coverage within a 500-m radius. Results indicate that coffee farm management practices and landscape level factors can affect A. cephalotes colony densities. Understanding such practices and factors could assist in the development of better management methods of these injurious insects in coffee farms. Increased diversification in coffee farms, possibly due to the greater shade associated with it, may reduce colonization by the ants, which are considered forest gap specialists.

  8. Study on morphological characteristics and microscopic structure of medicinal organs of Pulsatilla chinensis (Bunge) Regel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Hao; Yang, Jun; Peng, Hua-Sheng; Qian, Jiang-Ping

    2017-08-01

    Modern clinical studies have found that Pulsatilla radix contains a variety of active ingredients; however, its medicinal parts and microstructure have been controversial. Based on morphological observation and microscopic identification of different structures, we chose Anhui, Henan, Jilin, and Shanxi Province to study Pulsatilla chinensis (Bunge) Regel populations. We specifically addressed different diameters and anatomical structures of different parts of underground organs. We also found that P. chinensis (Bunge) Regel had a "joint point" structure in its underground organ. Above the "joint point" is the rhizome, below the "joint point" is the root. The main medicinal organ is the rhizome. The protective tissues of the endothelial layer of P. chinensis (Bunge) Regel changed in the process of its development. The protective tissues were replaced by epidermis, cortex, endodermis, and phloem. With the secondary growth, the endothelial cells have been radial division. This study showed that morphology and microscopic identification was an important mean of medicinal material identifications, and it had the characteristics of a convenient, fast, and intuitive method to identify the composition and structural characteristics of P. chinensis (Bunge) Regel medicinal parts. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Impact of organic and inorganic nanomaterials in the soil microbial community structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogueira, Veronica; Lopes, Isabel [Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, P-3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM (Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies), University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Rocha-Santos, Teresa [ISEIT/Viseu, Instituto Piaget, Estrada do Alto do Gaio, Galifonge, 3515-776 Lordosa, Viseu (Portugal); Santos, Ana L. [Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, P-3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM (Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies), University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Rasteiro, Graca M.; Antunes, Filipe [CIEPQPF, Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Polo II, University of Coimbra, 3030-290 Coimbra (Portugal); Goncalves, Fernando; Soares, Amadeu M.V.M.; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide [Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, P-3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM (Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies), University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Gomes, Newton N.C.M., E-mail: gomesncm@ua.pt [Department of Biology, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitario de Santiago, P-3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CESAM (Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies), University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Pereira, Ruth [Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); CESAM (Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies), University of Aveiro, Campus de Santiago 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2012-05-01

    In this study the effect of organic and inorganic nanomaterials (NMs) on the structural diversity of the soil microbial community was investigated by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis, after amplification with universal primers for the bacterial region V6-V8 of 16S rDNA. The polymers of carboxylmethyl-cellulose (CMC), of hydrophobically modified CMC (HM-CMC), and hydrophobically modified polyethylglycol (HM-PEG); the vesicles of sodium dodecyl sulphate/didodecyl dimethylammonium bromide (SDS/DDAB) and of monoolein/sodium oleate (Mo/NaO); titanium oxide (TiO{sub 2}), titanium silicon oxide (TiSiO{sub 4}), CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, gold nanorods, and Fe/Co magnetic fluid were the NMs tested. Soil samples were incubated, for a period of 30 days, after being spiked with NM suspensions previously characterized by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) or by an ultrahigh-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM). The analysis of similarities (ANOSIM) of DGGE profiles showed that gold nanorods, TiO{sub 2}, CMC, HM-CMC, HM-PEG, and SDS/DDAB have significantly affected the structural diversity of the soil bacterial community. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Organic and inorganic nanomaterials on soil microbial community. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural diversity was investigated by Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer All the organic nanomaterials, TiO{sub 2} and gold nanorods significantly affected the structural diversity.

  10. [Structure and cellular organization of the osphradium of Limnea stagnalis L].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamardin, N N

    1976-08-01

    Light microscopy was used to study the structure and cellular organization of the osphradial organ of the pulmonary mollusque L. stagnalis. The osphradium unites the epithelial canal and the ganglion consisting of two cell populations. On the internal surface of the V-shaped osphradial canal there are three zones of cells: secretory, villous and epithelial. The villous zone of the canal is related with sensory bipolar and multipolar neurons of the ganglion. The irritation percepted by these cells seems to be transferred through numerous zones of neuropile to large unipolar neurons of the ganglion cortical layer.

  11. Revision of Zelodia (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Agathidinae from Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sharkey

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The species of Thai Zelodia (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Agathidinae are revised. Twenty-one species are treated, 19 new species are described, i.e. Zelodia charoeni, Zelodia chongkraii, Zelodia cholathorni, Zelodia idrisi, Zelodia nikomi, Zelodia nopadoli, Zelodia pahangensis, Zelodia panyaii, Zelodia poonsathii, Zelodia ratanae, Zelodia saksiti, Zelodia surachaii, Zelodia suyaneeae, Zelodia toyae, Zelodia uthaii, Zelodia wangi, Zelodia wichaii, Zelodia wirati, Zelodia wirotei. A dichotomous key to species is presented; links to electronic interactive keys and to distribution maps are also included.

  12. Register of a gynandromorph of Euglossa pleosticta Dressler (Hymenoptera, Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariele P. Camargo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Register of a gynandromorph of Euglossa pleosticta (Hymenoptera, Apidae. Here we provide a description of a gynandromorph of Euglossa pleosticta with partial bilateral phenotypic asymmetry. The specimen was collected by cineol baittrap at Parque Estadual São Camilo, a conservation unit in western Paraná. The bee has mostly a female phenotype, except by the right half of its head, including the presence of 11 flagellomeres, ivory markings on scape and parocular area, by the pilosity of the right galea, and by deformed male characteristics on mid and hind tibiae of right legs.

  13. Conformational flexibility in DNA structure and its implications in understanding the organization of DNA in chromatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobell, H.M.; Tsai, C.C.; Jain, S.C.; Sakore, T.D.

    1978-01-01

    X-ray crystallographic studies of drug-nucleic acid crystalline complexes have suggested that DNA first bends or kinks before accepting an intercalative drug or dye. This flexibility in DNA structure is made possible by altering the normal C2' endo deoxyribose sugar puckering in B DNA to a mixed sugar puckering pattern of the type C3' endo (3'-5') C2' endo and partially unstacking base pairs. A kinking scheme such as this would require minimal stereochemical rearrangement and would also involve small energies. This has prompted us to ask more generally if a conformational change such as this could be used by proteins in their interactions with DNA. Here we describe an interesting superhelical DNA structure formed by kinking DNA every ten base pairs. This structure may be used in the organization of DNA within the nucleosome structure in chromatin.

  14. Hierarchical pictorial structures for simultaneously localizing multiple organs in volumetric pre-scan CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montillo, Albert; Song, Qi; Das, Bipul; Yin, Zhye

    2015-03-01

    Parsing volumetric computed tomography (CT) into 10 or more salient organs simultaneously is a challenging task with many applications such as personalized scan planning and dose reporting. In the clinic, pre-scan data can come in the form of very low dose volumes acquired just prior to the primary scan or from an existing primary scan. To localize organs in such diverse data, we propose a new learning based framework that we call hierarchical pictorial structures (HPS) which builds multiple levels of models in a tree-like hierarchy that mirrors the natural decomposition of human anatomy from gross structures to finer structures. Each node of our hierarchical model learns (1) the local appearance and shape of structures, and (2) a generative global model that learns probabilistic, structural arrangement. Our main contribution is twofold. First we embed the pictorial structures approach in a hierarchical framework which reduces test time image interpretation and allows for the incorporation of additional geometric constraints that robustly guide model fitting in the presence of noise. Second we guide our HPS framework with the probabilistic cost maps extracted using random decision forests using volumetric 3D HOG features which makes our model fast to train and fast to apply to novel test data and posses a high degree of invariance to shape distortion and imaging artifacts. All steps require approximate 3 mins to compute and all organs are located with suitably high accuracy for our clinical applications such as personalized scan planning for radiation dose reduction. We assess our method using a database of volumetric CT scans from 81 subjects with widely varying age and pathology and with simulated ultra-low dose cadaver pre-scan data.

  15. Syllabic organization and deafness: orthographic structure or letter frequency in reading?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, A C; Nickerson, J F

    2001-05-01

    For hearing people, structure given to orthographic information may be influenced by phonological structures that develop with experience of spoken language. In this study we examine whether profoundly deaf individuals structure orthographic representation differently. We ask "Would deaf students who are advanced readers show effects of syllable structure despite their altered experience of spoken language, or would they, because of reduced influence from speech, organize their orthographic knowledge according to groupings defined by letter frequency?" We used a task introduced by Prinzmetal (Prinzmetal, Treiman, & Rho, 1986) in which participants were asked to judge the colour of letters in briefly presented words. As with hearing participants, the number of errors made by deaf participants was influenced by syllable structure (Prinzmetal et al., 1986; Rapp, 1992). This effect could not be accounted for by letter frequency. Furthermore, there was no correlation between the strength of syllable effects and residual speech or hearing. Our results support the view that the syllable is a unit of linguistic organization that is abstract enough to apply to both spoken and written language.

  16. Doing the Organizational Tango: Symbiotic Relationship between Formal and Informal Organizational Structures for an Agile Organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Malgorzata Ali

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on research with a broad objective to examine the relationship between two organizational entities, the formally structured organization and informal organizational structures, in a changing operational environment, more specifically during military deployments. The paper draws on organizational and complexity paradigms; based on empirical evidence obtained through qualitative techniques, it describes mechanisms that enable a symbiotic relationship between these two organizational structures in a complex operational landscape. Substantive findings provide insights into the dynamics of the interactions between these structures and illuminate the relationship between three enabling factors – accountability, responsible autonomy, and command and control arrangements – that need to be considered to fully exploit the strengths inherent in both formal and informal structures. Based on these findings, a model for enhancement of organizational agility in response to changes in a complex operational environment is described. The model is predicated on feedback and mutual adjustment of the organization, institution and individual through sensemaking; it illustrates the dynamic nature of interactions that are required for such a response.

  17. Gold Nanoparticle Self-Similar Chain Structure Organized by DNA Origami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Baoquan; Deng, Zhengtao; Yan, Hao; Cabrini, Stefano; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2010-03-17

    Here we demonstrate Au nanoparticle self-similar chain structure organized by triangle DNA origami with well-controlled orientation and <10 nm spacing. We show for the first time that a large DNA complex (origami) and multiple AuNP conjugates can be well-assembled and purified with reliable yields. The assembled structure could be used to generate high local-field enhancement. The same method can be used to precisely localize multiple components on a DNA template for potential applications in nanophotonic, nanomagnetic, and nanoelectronic devices.

  18. To Assess the Rate for Affecting the Structural Dimensions of Governmental Organizations on their Agility (Case Study: Isfahan Province Jihad Agriculture Organization)

    OpenAIRE

    Rashidi Fatemeh; Rashidpoor Ali; Alinaghiyan Mahdi

    2014-01-01

    This research has been performed in the direction of making agile the governmental organizations at Isfahan Province Jihad Agriculture Organization. In this research the structural dimensions were eight dimensions (formalization, specialization, standardization, hierarchy of authorities, complexity, centralization, professionalism, personnel rations). In order to assess the variables for testing the research hypotheses, a standard questionnaire was built in the dimension of the organizational...

  19. Effects of organic versus conventional arable farming on soil structure and organic matter dynamics in a marine loam in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pulleman, M.M.; Jongmans, A.G.; Marinissen, J.C.Y.; Bouma, J.

    2003-01-01

    We compared the effects of conventional and organic arable farming on soil organic matter (SOM) content, soil structure, aggregate stability and C and N mineralization, which are considered important factors in defining sustainable land management. Within one soil series, three different farming

  20. REMOTE WORK AS A PROMISING FORM OF LABOUR ORGANIZATION FOR RUSSIAN ENTREPRENEURIAL STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Gurova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Remote work (telecommuting is one of the modern technologies of the organization of the labor process, which is not yet widely used in domestic practice. However, in times of crisis, when entrepreneurial structures seek for the maximum reduction of expenses, it can be a tool to address many of the pressing issues related to the most effective use of production and labor resources.The article discusses the features of the remote work on a world level and in our country, detected its strengths and weaknesses for the participants of labour relations, as well as revealed the potential of this form of labor organization for achievement of optimum balance between expenses and efficiency of entrepreneurial structures.

  1. Structure of the subgenual organ in the green lacewing, Chrysoperla carnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devetak, D; Pabst, M A

    1994-04-01

    REM and TEM studies of the subgenual organ in Chrysoperla carnea (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) show that it is composed of three scolopidia, each with one sensory, one scolopale and one cap cell. The distal part of the dendrite shows a cilium with a '9 + 0' structure. The cross-handing pattern of the ciliary root has a periodicity of bands of about 61 nm. The scolopale material in a certain part of the scolopale cell is organized into five rods. The cell bodies of all three cap cells form a lens-like structure. the velum, which is fixed to the leg wall and the trachea with an extracellular material. The importance of the velum is discussed. Four types of intercellular junction are found; spot desmosomes. belt desmosomes, septate junctions and gap junctions.

  2. MARKET ECONOMY AS A PRECONDITION ESTABLISHMENT OWNERSHIP STRUCTURE IN SPORTS ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milica Radović

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The first step in forming a market economy with privatization is necessary and radical changes in the institutional system. In the sport as well as any activities, privatization is a process of transformation of state ownership to private ownership in order to increase economic efficiency, utilization of available resources with the aim of encouraging economic development. The authors emphasize adoption as key institutional preconditions for the transformation of ownership in sports organizations, gives overview of various models of privatization in the surrounding countries. The aim of this paper is the analysis of potential problems, depending on the ownership structure, which is the result of the privatization process. Sports organizations should know in advance the advantages and disadvantages of different ownership structures, so that in the process of restructuring the chosen one that will ensure the realization of the priority goals.

  3. Electronic Structure Modulation of Metal–Organic Frameworks for Hybrid Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The study of metal–organic frameworks has largely been motivated by their structural and chemical diversity; however, these materials also possess rich physics, including optical, electronic, and magnetic activity. If these materials are to be employed in devices, it is necessary to develop an understanding of their solid-state behavior. We report an approach to calculate the effect of strain on the band structure of porous frameworks. The origin of the bidirectional absolute deformation potentials can be described from perturbations of the organic and inorganic building blocks. The unified approach allows us to propose several uses for hybrid materials, beyond their traditionally posited applications, including gas sensing, photoelectrochemistry, and as hybrid transistors. PMID:25436990

  4. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Control of Structure Transformations in a Family of Cobalt(II)-Organic Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Feng, Rui; Xu, Jian; Jia, Yan-Yuan; Wang, Ting-Ting; Chang, Ze; Bu, Xian-He

    2017-10-11

    Dynamic metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) that respond to external stimuli have recently attracted great attention. However, the subtle control of dynamic processes as well as the illustration of the underlying mechanism, which is crucial for the targeted construction and modulation purpose, is extremely challenging. Herein, we report the achievement of simultaneous kinetic and thermodynamic modulation of the structure transformation processes of a family of cobalt(II)-organic frameworks, through the rational combination of coligand replacement, solvent molecule substitution, and ligand-based solid solution strategies. On the basis of the systematic investigation of the structural transformation behaviors, the underlying response mechanism and principles for modulation were illustrated. It is expected that this work can provide valuable hints for the study and further development of dynamic materials.

  5. Error-reducing Structure of the Genetic Code Indicates Code Origin in Non-thermophile Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutfraind, Alexander; Kempf, Achim

    2008-02-01

    During the RNA World, organisms experienced high rates of genetic errors, which implies that there was strong evolutionary pressure to reduce the errors’ phenotypical impact by suitably structuring the still-evolving genetic code. Therefore, the relative rates of the various types of genetic errors should have left characteristic imprints in the structure of the genetic code. Here, we show that, therefore, it is possible to some extent to reconstruct those error rates, as well as the nucleotide frequencies, for the time when the code was fixed. We find evidence indicating that the frequencies of G and C in the genome were not elevated. Since, for thermodynamic reasons, RNA in thermophiles tends to possess elevated G+C content, this result indicates that the fixation of the genetic code occurred in organisms which were either not thermophiles or that the code’s fixation occurred after the rise of DNA.

  6. Quantitative structure-retention relationships for organic pollutants in biopartitioning micellar chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Binbin; Ma, Weiping; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Fan, Botao

    2007-08-13

    Quantitative structure-retention relationship (QSRR) models have been successfully developed for the prediction of the retention factor (log k) in the biopartitioning micellar chromatography (BMC) of 66 organic pollutants. Heuristic method (HM) and radial basis function neural networks (RBFNN) were utilized to construct the linear and non-linear QSRR models, respectively. The optimal QSRR model was developed based on a 6-17-1 radial basis function neural network architecture using molecular descriptors calculated from molecular structure alone. The RBFNN model gave a correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.8464 and root-mean-square error (RMSE) of 0.1925 for the test set. This paper provided a useful model for the predicting the log k of other organic compounds when experiment data are unknown.

  7. Theoretical description of structural and electronic properties of organic photovoltaic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhugayevych, Andriy; Tretiak, Sergei

    2015-04-01

    We review recent progress in the modeling of organic solar cells and photovoltaic materials, as well as discuss the underlying theoretical methods with an emphasis on dynamical electronic processes occurring in organic semiconductors. The key feature of the latter is a strong electron-phonon interaction, making the evolution of electronic and structural degrees of freedom inseparable. We discuss commonly used approaches for first-principles modeling of this evolution, focusing on a multiscale framework based on the Holstein-Peierls Hamiltonian solved via polaron transformation. A challenge for both theoretical and experimental investigations of organic solar cells is the complex multiscale morphology of these devices. Nevertheless, predictive modeling of photovoltaic materials and devices is attainable and is rapidly developing, as reviewed here.

  8. Effects of organic enrichment on macrofauna community structure: an experimental approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Riera

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The determination of the resilience of benthic assemblages is a capital issue for the off-shore aquaculture industry in its attempts to minimize environmental disturbances. Experimental studies are an important tool for the establishment of thresholds for macrofaunal assemblages inhabiting sandy seabeds. An experiment was conducted with three treatments (Control, 1x and 3x,in which organic load (fish pellets was added (1x (10 g of fish pellets and 3x (30 g. A reduction in abundance of individuals and species richness was found as between the control and organic-enriched treatments. Significant changes in assemblage structure were also found, mainly due to the decrease of the sensitive tanaid Apseudes talpa in organically-enriched treatments. AMBI and M-AMBI indices were calculated and a decrease of ecological status was observed in treatment 3x.

  9. EU Structuring Effects on Civic Organizations: Learning from Experience, Learning from Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Sancez Salgado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes an analytical framework designed to permit a comparison of EU impact on voluntary organizations based in different national and regional settings, including the European Union. The empirical part of this paper applies the proposed framework of analysis to civil society organizations based in France, the UK and Spain. According to the data collected, the EU has significant structuring effects on its western member states. The EU has not only contributed to the transformation of the voluntary sector's landscape in some member states, it has also supported significant organizational and normative changes among voluntary organizations. This article argues that many of the dynamics at work in Europe may be of some relevance for current developments in candidate and third countries (and formulates some hypotheses in this direction. Comparative studies in this field including third countries would also contribute significantly to a refinement of the proposed analytical framework.

  10. Discovery of a novel accessory structure of the pitviper infrared receptor organ (serpentes: viperidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilmar Bolívar-G

    Full Text Available The facial pits of rattlesnakes, copperheads, lanceheads, bushmasters and other American and Asian pitvipers (Crotalinae are highly innervated and densely vascularized infrared (IR receptor organs. For over a century, studies have focused on a small sample of model species from North America and Asia. Based on an expanded survey of Central and South American crotalines, we report a conspicuous accessory structure composed of well-defined papillae that project from the anterior orbital adnexa. The papillae are continuous with the inner chamber of the IR receptor organ and our histological and ultrastructural data suggest that they possess a well-developed nervous network and extensive vascularization; however, they lack the characteristic IR-sensitive terminal nerve masses found in the IR-receptive pit membrane. The function of the IR receptor organ papillae is unknown.

  11. Discovery of a novel accessory structure of the pitviper infrared receptor organ (serpentes: viperidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolívar-G, Wilmar; Antoniazzi, Marta M; Grant, Taran; Jared, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The facial pits of rattlesnakes, copperheads, lanceheads, bushmasters and other American and Asian pitvipers (Crotalinae) are highly innervated and densely vascularized infrared (IR) receptor organs. For over a century, studies have focused on a small sample of model species from North America and Asia. Based on an expanded survey of Central and South American crotalines, we report a conspicuous accessory structure composed of well-defined papillae that project from the anterior orbital adnexa. The papillae are continuous with the inner chamber of the IR receptor organ and our histological and ultrastructural data suggest that they possess a well-developed nervous network and extensive vascularization; however, they lack the characteristic IR-sensitive terminal nerve masses found in the IR-receptive pit membrane. The function of the IR receptor organ papillae is unknown.

  12. Crystal structures of seven molecular salts derived from benzylamine and organic acidic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xianhong; Jin, Xiunan; Lv, Chengcai; Jin, Shouwen; Zheng, Xiuqing; Liu, Bin; Wang, Daqi; Guo, Ming; Xu, Weiqiang

    2017-07-01

    Cocrystallization of the commonly available organic amine, benzylamine, with a series of organic acids gave a total of seven molecular salts with the compositions: (benzylamine): (p-toluenesulfonic acid) (1) [(HL)+ · (tsa-)], (benzylamine): (o-nitrobenzoic acid) (2) [(HL+) · (onba)-], (benzylamine): (3,4-methylenedioxybenzoic acid) (3) [(HL+) · (mdba-)], (benzylamine): (mandelic acid) (4) [(HL+) · (mda-)], (benzylamine): (5-bromosalicylic acid)2(5) [(HL+) · (bsac-) · (Hbsac)], (benzylamine): (m-phthalic acid) (6) [(HL+) · (Hmpta-)], and (benzylamine)2: (trimesic acid) (7) [(HL+)2 · (Htma2-)]. The seven salts have been characterised by X-ray diffraction technique, IR, and elemental analysis, and the melting points of all the salts were also reported. And their structural and supramolecular aspects are fully analyzed. The result reveals that among the seven investigated crystals the NH2 groups in the benzylamine moieties are protonated when the organic acids are deprotonated, and the crystal packing is interpreted in terms of the strong charge-assisted Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond formation between the ammonium and the deprotonated acidic groups. Except the Nsbnd H⋯O hydrogen bond, the Osbnd H⋯O hydrogen bonds (charge assisted or neutral) were also found at the salts 4-7. Further analysis of the crystal packing of the salts indicated that a different family of additional CHsbnd O/CH2sbnd O, CHsbnd π/CH2sbnd π, Osbnd O, and Osbnd Cπ associations contribute to the stabilization and expansion of the total high-dimensional (2D-3D) framework structures. For the coexistence of the various weak nonbonding interactions these structures adopted homo or hetero supramolecular synthons or both. Some classical supramolecular synthons, such as R42(8), R43(10) and R44(12), usually observed in organic solids of organic acids with amine, were again shown to be involved in constructing most of these hydrogen bonding networks.

  13. Organizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callison, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on "organizers," tools or techniques that provide identification and classification along with possible relationships or connections among ideas, concepts, and issues. Discusses David Ausubel's research and ideas concerning advance organizers; the implications of Ausubel's theory to curriculum and teaching; "webbing," a…

  14. Synthesis, structure, and transformation studies in a family of inorganic-organic hybrid framework structures based on indium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Padmini; Hegde, Nayana N; Prabhu, Ramanath; Vidya, V M; Datta, Ayan; Natarajan, Srinivasan

    2009-12-21

    Eight new open-framework inorganic-organic hybrid compounds based on indium have been synthesized employing hydrothermal methods. All of the compounds have InO(6), C(2)O(4), and HPO(3)/HPO(4)/SO(4) units connected to form structures of different dimensionality. Thus, the compounds have zero- (I), two- (II, III, IV, V, VII, and VIII), and three-dimensionally (VI) extended networks. The formation of the first zero-dimensional hybrid compound is noteworthy. In addition, concomitant polymorphic structures have been observed in the present study. The molecular compound, I, was found to be reactive, and the transformation studies in the presence of a base (pyridine) give rise to the polymorphic structures of II and III, while the addition of an acid (H(3)PO(3)) gives rise to a new indium phosphite with a pillared layer structure (T1). Preliminary density functional theory calculations suggest that the stabilities of the polymorphs are different, with one of the forms (II) being preferred over the other, which is consistent with the observed experimental behavior. The oxalate units perform more than one role in the present structures. Thus, the oxalate units connect two In centers to satisfy the coordination requirements as well as to achieve charge balance in compounds II, IV, and VI. The terminal oxalate units observed in compounds I, IV, and V suggest the possibility of intermediate structures. Both in-plane and out-of-plane connectivity of the oxalate units were observed in compound VI. The compounds have been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, and (31)P NMR studies.

  15. Electronic structure of the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor TTF-TCNQ

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sing, M.; Schwingenschlögl, U.; Claessen, R.

    2003-01-01

    We study the electronic structure of the quasi-one-dimensional organic conductor TTF-TCNQ by means of density-functional band theory, Hubbard model calculations, and angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES). The experimental spectra reveal significant quantitative and qualitative......-dimensional Hubbard model for the low-energy spectral behavior is attributed to interchain coupling and the additional effect of electron-phonon interaction....

  16. Structural organization of the transfer RNA operon I of Vibrio cholerae

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    restriction enzyme EcoRI at 37°C according to the in- structions of the manufacturer (New .... (b) Schematic representation of the EcoRI restriction map and the structural organization of tRNA operon I in V. cholerae El Tor/O139 and clas- ... MED/09/154/97 from the Department of Biotechnology,. New Delhi. Both AG and AM ...

  17. Supporting Structural and Functional Collaborative Networked Organizations Modeling with Service Entities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rubén Darío; Bas, Ángel Ortiz; Prats, Guillermo; Varela, Rosa Navarro

    This work focuses on the Service Entities definition as an approach that may help to support structural and functional Collaborative Networked Organizations (CNO) modeling, when VOs are engineered inside Virtual Breeding Environments Management Systems (VMS). Manbree is an undergoing development which is intended to provide an integrated framework for CNO modeling and execution based on that approach and it is briefly described at the final section.

  18. STRUCTURE AND ORGANIZATION OF SHAPES IN THE DESIGN OF INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS, USING GEOMETRICAL TRANSFORMATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIN Dumitru

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the major contribution of geometrical transformations in the structure and organization of the shapes which compose industrial products. Geometrical transformations, such as symmetry, translation, rotation, homology etc. are frequently used in the design activity for filling the plane and the space (plane and spatial equipartitions, in ornaments and also in creating shapes, which are functional and aesthetical at the same time.

  19. Work function tuning for high-performance solution-processed organic photodetectors with inverted structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saracco, Emeline; Bouthinon, Benjamin; Verilhac, Jean-Marie; Celle, Caroline; Chevalier, Nicolas; Mariolle, Denis; Dhez, Olivier; Simonato, Jean-Pierre

    2013-12-03

    Organic photodetectors with inverted structure are fabricated by solution process techniques. A very thin interfacing layer of polyethyleneimine leads to a homogenous interface with low work function. The devices exhibit excellent performances, in particular in terms of low dark current density, wide range linearity, high detectivity, and remarkable stability in ambient air without encapsulation. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. The levels of fruit organization in Celastraceae and structural diversity of pirenariums in Cassinoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan A. Savinov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The levels of fruit organization are determined for the Celastraceae family on the basis of fruit morphology and anatomical study of pericarp (114 species from 45 genera. Analysis of their correlation with basal and derivative lineages according to the last molecular data is conducted and reconstruction of initial stages of the family phylogeny is presented. Special focus to structural diversity of pirenarium in Cassinoideae subfamily is spared.

  1. Organic geochemistry of impactites from the Haughton impact structure, Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnell, John; Bowden, Stephen A.; Osinski, Gordon R.; Lee, Pascal; Green, Paul; Taylor, Colin; Baron, Martin

    2007-04-01

    Organic matter in impactites from the 24 km wide and 39 Ma old Haughton impact structure, Canadian High Arctic, is a mixture of fossil and modern biological components. The fossil component represents a conventional oil that was generated from Lower Palaeozoic marine source material before impact and permeates bedrock dolomites. Biomarker maturity parameters record the thermal effect of the mid-Tertiary impact. Maturity-influenced sterane, rearranged hopanoid, and triaromatic steroid ratios all increase towards the centre of the impact structure, where thermal alteration was greatest. The heating was probably dominated by an impact-related hydrothermal system, as such systems last long enough for kinetically-based thermal alteration to occur. Kinetically-related biomarker data suggest that the hydrothermal heating lasted for c. 5000 years. Biomarkers are also preserved in dolomite clasts within impact melt breccia, and indicate strong thermal alteration. Modern biological contamination of the rocks is responsible for the superposition of two geochemical signatures (which could be cyanobacteria, non-marine algae, or higher plant matter) onto the fossil component, but they can be recognized and distinguished. The data show that the impact structure system holds a record of both the pre-impact organic signature and the thermal signature of the impact, and thereby indicates that organic geochemistry is a valuable tool in documenting the response of rocks to impacts.

  2. Unraveling the multiscale structural organization and connectivity of the human brain: the role of diffusion MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo eBastiani

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The structural architecture and the anatomical connectivity of the human brain show different organizational principles at distinct spatial scales. Histological staining and light microscopy techniques have been widely used in classical neuroanatomical studies to unravel brain organization. Using such techniques is a laborious task performed on 2-dimensional histological sections by skilled anatomists possibly aided by semi-automated algorithms. With the recent advent of modern magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast mechanisms, cortical layers and columns can now be reliably identified and their structural properties quantified post mortem. These developments are allowing the investigation of neuroanatomical features of the brain at a spatial resolution that could be interfaced with that of histology. Diffusion MRI and tractography techniques, in particular, have been used to probe the architecture of both white and gray matter in three dimensions. Combined with mathematical network analysis, these techniques are increasingly influential in the investigation of the macro-, meso- and microscopic organization of brain connectivity and anatomy, both in vivo and ex vivo. Diffusion MRI-based techniques in combination with histology approaches can therefore support the endeavor of creating multimodal atlases that take into account the different spatial scales or levels on which the brain is organized. The aim of this review is to illustrate and discuss the structural architecture and the anatomical connectivity of the human brain at different spatial scales and how recently developed diffusion MRI techniques can help investigate these.

  3. Redescripción de Mastrus ridibundus (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae, parasitoide introducido en la Argentina para el control de Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae Redescription of Mastrus ridibundus (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae, parasitoid introduced for the control of Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Torréns

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se redescribe el agente de biocontrol introducido en la Argentina, Mastrus ridibundus (Gravenhorst (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae, para el control de Cydia pomonella (L. y se aportan nuevos caracteres para su identificación.The bio-control agent introduced in Argentina Mastrus ridibundus (Gravenhorst (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae for the control of Cydia pomonella (L. is redescribed, providing new characters for the species.

  4. Seeking structure in social organization: compensatory control and the psychological advantages of hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friesen, Justin P; Kay, Aaron C; Eibach, Richard P; Galinsky, Adam D

    2014-04-01

    Hierarchies are a ubiquitous form of human social organization. We hypothesized that 1 reason for the prevalence of hierarchies is that they offer structure and therefore satisfy the core motivational needs for order and control relative to less structured forms of social organization. This hypothesis is rooted in compensatory control theory, which posits that (a) individuals have a basic need to perceive the world as orderly and structured, and (b) personal and external sources of control are capable of satisfying this need because both serve the comforting belief that the world operates in an orderly fashion. Our first 2 studies confirmed that hierarchies were perceived as more structured and orderly relative to egalitarian arrangements (Study 1) and that working in a hierarchical workplace promotes a feeling of self-efficacy (Study 2). We threatened participants' sense of personal control and measured perceptions of and preferences for hierarchy in 5 subsequent experiments. Participants who lacked control perceived more hierarchy occurring in ambiguous social situations (Study 3) and preferred hierarchy more strongly in workplace contexts (Studies 4-5). We also provide evidence that hierarchies are indeed appealing because of their structure: Preference for hierarchy was higher among individuals high in Personal Need for Structure and a control threat increased preference for hierarchy even among participants low in Personal Need for Structure (Study 5). Framing a hierarchy as unstructured reversed the effect of control threat on hierarchy (Study 6). Finally, hierarchy-enhancing jobs were more appealing after control threat, even when they were low in power and status (Study 7). (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Estudios etológicos en Hymenoptera (insecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge F. Genise

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available Esta revisión sobre los estudios etológicos en Hymenoptera plP.- tende destacar la forma tan particular en que la etología es encarada en este grupo de insectos, resaltando ciertas modalidades y conceptos, algunos de ellos de posible aplicación en otros grupos, cspecialmente de invertebrados. Los puntos sobresalientes pueden resumirse así; 1 El estudio de los grupos de Hymenoptera solitarios cercanamente emparentados con los sociales, para rastrear evolutivamente los patrones de comportamiento que ya presentes en las especies no sociales se habrían combinado para dar una conducta social. 2 La división en fases de esta evolución como esquema básico para encarar las investigaciones y la búsqueda de modelos de transición entre fases que permitan ejemplificar sin discontinuidades importantes el proceso evolutivo. 3 El estudio de la filogenia de otros patrones de comportamiento no directamente relacionados con la conducta social, que alcanzan su máxima expresión en grupos no sociales. 4 El estudio del comportamiento de los organismos que posiblemente hayan actuado como agentes selectivos en la evolución. 5 La contribución que los estudios etológicos hacen a la ecología, al esclarecer ciertos aspectos relacionados con la inserción de las especies en los ecosistemas

  6. Comparative morphology of the mandibles of female polistine social wasps (Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Polistinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Tobias Silveira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparative morphology of the mandibles of female polistine social wasps (Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Polistinae. Diversity of mandibular forms in female polistines is explored and compared among 116 species of all polistine genera. Inferences about function are made and discussed based on observed form differences. Mandible length and width measurements are analyzed for a subset of polistine species plus two vespines and two eumenines. A variable expressing the ratio between these variables is also considered in morphometric analyses. The following mechanical interactions among mandible structural elements are highlighted: opposition and crossing of mandibles' apical teeth at the middle of the closing trajectory; shearing action of the apical teeth against mesial denticles of the opposite mandible; shearing action of the mandible anterior margin against the ventral margin of the clypeus. In the genera Agelaia and Angiopolybia, exceptionally developed mesial mandibular structures may be related to necrophagy. In some epiponine genera, poorly developed mesial denticles and strong torsion of mandibles may be partially related to use of short wood fibers in nest construction as advanced by Sarmiento (2004. The considerable morphological variation found across the subfamily Polistinae is certain to be important in taxonomic and phylogenetic studies at the genus and species levels.

  7. Structure and sensory physiology of the leg scolopidial organs in Mantophasmatodea and their role in vibrational communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhard, M J B; Lang, D; Metscher, B; Pass, G; Picker, M D; Wolf, H

    2010-07-01

    Individuals of the insect order Mantophasmatodea use species-specific substrate vibration signals for mate recognition and location. In insects, substrate vibration is detected by mechanoreceptors in the legs, the scolopidial organs. In this study we give a first detailed overview of the structure, sensory sensitivity, and function of the leg scolopidial organs in two species of Mantophasmatodea and discuss their significance for vibrational communication. The structure and number of the organs are documented using light microscopy, SEM, and x-ray microtomography. Five scolopidial organs were found in each leg of male and female Mantophasmatodea: a femoral chordotonal organ, subgenual organ, tibial distal organ, tibio-tarsal scolopidial organ, and tarso-pretarsal scolopidial organ. The femoral chordotonal organ, consisting of two separate scoloparia, corresponds anatomically to the organ of a stonefly (Nemoura variegata) while the subgenual organ complex resembles the very sensitive organs of the cockroach Periplatena americana (Blattodea). Extracellular recordings from the leg nerve revealed that the leg scolopidial organs of Mantophasmatodea are very sensitive vibration receptors, especially for low-frequency vibrations. The dominant frequencies of the vibratory communication signals of Mantophasmatodea, acquired from an individual drumming on eight different substrates, fall in the frequency range where the scolopidial organs are most sensitive. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The Structure of Neurexin 1[alpha] Reveals Features Promoting a Role as Synaptic Organizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fang; Venugopal, Vandavasi; Murray, Beverly; Rudenko, Gabby (Michigan)

    2014-10-02

    {alpha}-Neurexins are essential synaptic adhesion molecules implicated in autism spectrum disorder and schizophrenia. The {alpha}-neurexin extracellular domain consists of six LNS domains interspersed by three EGF-like repeats and interacts with many different proteins in the synaptic cleft. To understand how {alpha}-neurexins might function as synaptic organizers, we solved the structure of the neurexin 1{alpha} extracellular domain (n1{alpha}) to 2.65 {angstrom}. The L-shaped molecule can be divided into a flexible repeat I (LNS1-EGF-A-LNS2), a rigid horseshoe-shaped repeat II (LNS3-EGF-B-LNS4) with structural similarity to so-called reelin repeats, and an extended repeat III (LNS5-EGF-B-LNS6) with controlled flexibility. A 2.95 {angstrom} structure of n1{alpha} carrying splice insert SS3 in LNS4 reveals that SS3 protrudes as a loop and does not alter the rigid arrangement of repeat II. The global architecture imposed by conserved structural features enables {alpha}-neurexins to recruit and organize proteins in distinct and variable ways, influenced by splicing, thereby promoting synaptic function.

  9. In situ KPFM imaging of local photovoltaic characteristics of structured organic photovoltaic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoshi; Fukuchi, Yasumasa; Fukasawa, Masako; Sassa, Takafumi; Kimoto, Atsushi; Tajima, Yusuke; Uchiyama, Masanobu; Yamashita, Takashi; Matsumoto, Mutsuyoshi; Aoyama, Tetsuya

    2014-02-12

    Here, we discuss the local photovoltaic characteristics of a structured bulk heterojunction, organic photovoltaic devices fabricated with a liquid carbazole, and a fullerene derivative based on analysis by scanning kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). Periodic photopolymerization induced by an interference pattern from two laser beams formed surface relief gratings (SRG) in the structured films. The surface potential distribution in the SRGs indicates the formation of donor and acceptor spatial distribution. Under illumination, the surface potential reversibly changed because of the generation of fullerene anions and hole transport from the films to substrates, which indicates that we successfully imaged the local photovoltaic characteristics of the structured photovoltaic devices. Using atomic force microscopy, we confirmed the formation of the SRG because of the material migration to the photopolymerized region of the films, which was induced by light exposure through photomasks. The structuring technique allows for the direct fabrication and the control of donor and acceptor spatial distribution in organic photonic and electronic devices with minimized material consumption. This in situ KPFM technique is indispensable to the fabrication of nanoscale electron donor and electron acceptor spatial distribution in the devices.

  10. Hybrid Organic-Inorganic Perovskites: Structural Diversity and Opportunities for Semiconductor Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzi, David

    Photovoltaic (PV) devices based on three-dimensional perovskites, (Cs, MA, FA)Pb(I, Br)3 (MA =methylammonium, FA =formamidinium), have attracted substantial recent interest, because of the unprecedented rise in power conversion efficiency to values above 20%, which in turn is made possible by the near ideal band gap, strong optical absorption, high carrier mobilities, long minority carrier lifetimes, and relatively benign defects and grain boundaries for the absorbers. Some of the same properties that render these materials near-ideal for PV, also make them attractive for LED and other optoelectronic applications. Despite the high levels of device performance, the incorporation of the heavy metal lead, coupled with issues of device stability and electrical hysteresis pose challenges for commercializing these exciting technologies. This talk will provide a perspective on and discuss recent advances related to the broader perovskite family, focusing on the extraordinary structural/chemical diversity, including ability to control structural/electronic dimensionality, substitute on the organic cation, metal or halogen sites, and prospects of multi-functionality arising from separately engineered organic/inorganic structural components (e.g., see). Further exploration within this perovskite structural and chemical space offers exciting opportunities for future energy and electronic materials design. This work has been financially supported by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), U.S. Dept. of Energy, under Award Number DE-EE0006712.

  11. Enhanced organic photovoltaic properties via structural modifications in PEDOT:PSS due to graphene oxide doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goutham, Raj P.; Sandhya, Rani V.; Kanwat, Anil; Jang, Jin, E-mail: jjang@khu.ac.kr

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Graphene oxide(GO) blended with PEDOT:PSS is used as HTL for PTB7:PCBM BHJ solar cells. • Increase in conductivity due to structural alterations in PEDOT:PSS by GO addition. • The structural alterations are reaveled under Raman spectroscopy, XPS and AFM. • PEDOT:PSS changed to extended coil due to addition of GO to PEDOT:PSS. • Enhanced conductivity after GO addition to PEDOT:PSS resulted in enhanced PCE. - Abstract: Poly(3,4-thylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate), PEDOT:PSS is a well-known conductive polymer for hole transport in organic devices, the properties of which can be enhanced by doping. Common dopants are metal oxides and nanoparticles. In this study, addition of graphene oxide (GO) to PEDOT:PSS as a dopant is addressed in organic photovoltaics (OPVs). With GO doping, electrical conductivity and transport properties of PEDOT:PSS increases due to structural alterations in the presence of −COOH and −OH functional groups in GO. These structural alterations have been revealed under detailed study of Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, Topographical and conductive Atom force microscopy (AFM/C-AFM) mapping. OPVs fabricated using PEDOT:PSS: GO (5:1) as a hole transport layer (HTL) exhibited a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 7.68%, which was higher than the 7.01% that was obtained for the OPVs using pristine PEDOT:PSS.

  12. Crystal structure of Mdm12 reveals the architecture and dynamic organization of the ERMES complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hanbin; Park, Jumi; Lee, Changwook

    2016-12-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum-mitochondria encounter structure (ERMES) is a protein complex that plays a tethering role in physically connecting ER and mitochondria membranes. The ERMES complex is composed of Mdm12, Mmm1, and Mdm34, which have a SMP domain in common, and Mdm10. Here, we report the crystal structure of S. cerevisiae Mdm12. The Mdm12 forms a dimeric SMP structure through domain swapping of the β1-strand comprising residues 1-7. Biochemical experiments reveal a phospholipid-binding site located along a hydrophobic channel of the Mdm12 structure and that Mdm12 might have a binding preference for glycerophospholipids harboring a positively charged head group. Strikingly, both full-length Mdm12 and Mdm12 truncated to exclude the disordered region (residues 74-114) display the same organization in the asymmetric unit, although they crystallize as a tetramer and hexamer, respectively. Taken together, these studies provide a novel understanding of the overall organization of SMP domains in the ERMES complex, indicating that Mdm12 interacts with Mdm34 through head-to-head contact, and with Mmm1 through tail-to-tail contact of SMP domains. © 2016 The Authors.

  13. A study on effects of organizational structure on performance of research organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mahdi Mousavi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Organizational structure plays an important role on survival of any business units and it is important to understand different factors influencing it. In this paper, we present an empirical study to learn the effects of three parameters including formality, concentration and complexity on organizational performance. The proposed study of this paper is implemented for one of research-based organization located in city of Qom, Iran. There were 120 employees working for this organization and the proposed study of this paper has selected a sample of 100 people, designed, and distributed a questionnaire among them. The proposed study uses two methods of regression analysis as well as structural equation modeling to study the impacts of three variables on organizational performance. The results show that there are some positive and meaningful relationship between formality and concentration from one side and organizational performance from the other side. In addition, there is a meaningful and negative relationship between complexity and organizational performance. The results of structural equation modeling are also consistent with the results of structural equation modeling.

  14. Novel Threadlike Structures May Be Present on the Large Animal Organ Surface: Evidence in Swine Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung-Hee Bae

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The types of embryonic development probably provoke different paths of novel threadlike structure (NTS development. The authors hypothesized that NTS may be easily observed on the surface of swine intestines by using trypan blue staining method and visualization under an optical microscope. Methods. General anesthesia was administered to 2 Yorkshire pigs. The abdominal walls of the pigs were carefully dissected along the medial alba. NTSs were identified on organ surfaces under a stereoscopic microscope after trypan blue staining. Isolated NTS specimens obtained from the large intestine were subjected to 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI staining and observed using the polarized light microscopy to confirm whether the obtained structure fits the definition of NTS. Results. We found elastic, semitransparent threadlike structures (forming a network structure that had a milky-white color in situ and in vivo in swine large intestines. The samples showed distinct extinction of polarized light at every 90 degrees, and nucleus was shown to be rod shaped by DAPI staining, indicating that they meet the criteria of NTS. Conclusion. We used a swine model to demonstrate that NTS may be present on large animal organ surfaces. Our results may permit similar studies by using human specimens.

  15. Organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hatch, Mary Jo

    Most of us recognize that organizations are everywhere. You meet them on every street corner in the form of families and shops, study in them, work for them, buy from them, pay taxes to them. But have you given much thought to where they came from, what they are today, and what they might become...... and considers many more. Mary Jo Hatch introduces the concept of organizations by presenting definitions and ideas drawn from the a variety of subject areas including the physical sciences, economics, sociology, psychology, anthropology, literature, and the visual and performing arts. Drawing on examples from...... prehistory and everyday life, from the animal kingdom as well as from business, government, and other formal organizations, Hatch provides a lively and thought provoking introduction to the process of organization....

  16. A New Species of Vespula, and First Record of Vespa crabro L. (Hymenoptera:Vespidae) from Guatemala, Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespula akrei Landolt sp. nov. (Hymenoptera:Vespidae; Vespinae) is described from Guatemala. The first record of Vespa crabro L. (Hymenoptera:Vespidae:Vespinae) in Guatemala is given, and Vespula Inexspectata Eck (1994) from Mexico is re-described. We place Vespula akrei sp. nov. in the Vespula vulg...

  17. The strength of a calcified tissue depends in part on the molecular structure and organization of its constituent mineral crystals in their organic matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    High-voltage electron-microscopic tomographic (3D) studies of the ultrastructural interaction between mineral and organic matrix in a variety of calcified tissues reveal different crystal structural and organizational features in association with their respective organic matrices. In brittle or weak pathologic or ectopic calcifications, including examples of osteogenesis imperfecta, calciphylaxis, calcergy, and dermatomyositis, hydroxyapatite crystals occur in various sizes and shapes and are oriented and aligned with respect to collagen in a manner which is distinct from that found in normal calcified tissues. A model of collagen-mineral interaction is proposed which may account for the observed crystal structures and organization. The results indicate that the ultimate strength, support, and other mechanical properties provided by a calcified tissue are dependent in part upon the molecular structure and arrangement of its constituent mineral crystals within their organic matrix.

  18. A novel series of isoreticular metal organic frameworks: Realizing metastable structures by liquid phase epitaxy

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Jinxuan

    2012-12-04

    A novel class of metal organic frameworks (MOFs) has been synthesized from Cu-acetate and dicarboxylic acids using liquid phase epitaxy. The SURMOF-2 isoreticular series exhibits P4 symmetry, for the longest linker a channel-size of 3 3 nm2 is obtained, one of the largest values reported for any MOF so far. High quality, ab-initio electronic structure calculations confirm the stability of a regular packing of (Cu++) 2-carboxylate paddle-wheel planes with P4 symmetry and reveal, that the SURMOF-2 structures are in fact metastable, with a fairly large activation barrier for the transition to the bulk MOF-2 structures exhibiting a lower, twofold (P2 or C2) symmetry. The theoretical calculations also allow identifying the mechanism for the low-temperature epitaxial growth process and to explain, why a synthesis of this highly interesting, new class of high-symmetry, metastable MOFs is not possible using the conventional solvothermal process.

  19. Atypical depression in the structure of organic mental disorders (literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonov S.F.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The review of literature presents current data on cli¬nical picture and diagnostics of atypical depression. Rubric “atypical depression” includes a variety of depressive states characterized by reactively caused changes of mood, sensitivity to interpersonal contacts, inverted vegetative and somatic symptoms such as increased appetite and hypersomnia. The article considers the place of atypical depression in the structure of organic mental disorders. Positions of foreign authors that produce atypical depression as a clinical entity in the structure of Bipolar affective disorder II type are represented, the views of other authors on the structure of atypical depression are considered. The analysis of national concept of non-circular depression is carried out. Questions of atypical affective conditions acquire special significance due to preparation of International Classification of Diseases of the 11th revision, because inclusion in it of Bipolar affective disorder II type, a manifestation of which is considered to be atypical depressions, is under discussion.

  20. Structural basis for heteromeric assembly and perinuclear organization of keratin filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chang-Hun; Kim, Min-Sung; Chung, Byung Min; Leahy, Daniel J; Coulombe, Pierre A

    2013-01-01

    There is as yet no high-resolution data regarding the structure and organization of keratin intermediate filaments, which are obligate heteropolymers providing vital mechanical support in epithelia. We report the crystal structure of interacting 2B regions from the central coiled-coil domains of keratins 5 and 14 (K5 and K14), expressed in progenitor keratinocytes of epidermis. The interface of the K5–K14 coiled-coil heterodimer has asymmetric salt bridges, hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic contacts, and its surface exhibits a notable charge polarization. A trans-dimer homotypic disulfide bond involving Cys367 in K14's stutter region occurs in the crystal and in skin keratinocytes, where it is concentrated in a keratin filament cage enveloping the nucleus. We show that K14-Cys367 impacts nuclear shape in cultured keratinocytes and that mouse epidermal keratinocytes lacking K14 show aberrations in nuclear structure, highlighting a new function for keratin filaments. PMID:22705788

  1. Structure of bacterial communities in soil following cover crop and organic fertilizer incorporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Adria L; Sheaffer, Craig C; Wyse, Donald L; Staley, Christopher; Gould, Trevor J; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2016-11-01

    Incorporation of organic material into soils is an important element of organic farming practices that can affect the composition of the soil bacterial communities that carry out nutrient cycling and other functions crucial to crop health and growth. We conducted a field experiment to determine the effects of cover crops and fertilizers on bacterial community structure in agricultural soils under long-term organic management. Illumina sequencing of 16S rDNA revealed diverse communities comprising 45 bacterial phyla in corn rhizosphere and bulk field soil. Community structure was most affected by location and by the rhizosphere effect, followed by sampling time and amendment treatment. These effects were associated with soil physicochemical properties, including pH, moisture, organic matter, and nutrient levels. Treatment differences were apparent in bulk and rhizosphere soils at the time of peak corn growth in the season following cover crop and fertilizer application. Cover crop and fertilizer treatments tended to lower alpha diversity in early season samples. However, winter rye, oilseed radish, and buckwheat cover crop treatments increased alpha diversity in some later season samples compared to a no-amendment control. Fertilizer treatments and some cover crops decreased relative abundance of members of the ammonia-oxidizing family Nitrosomonadaceae. Pelleted poultry manure and Sustane® (a commercial fertilizer) decreased the relative abundance of Rhizobiales. Our data point to a need for future research exploring how (1) cover crops influence bacterial community structure and functions, (2) these effects differ with biomass composition and quantity, and (3) existing soil conditions and microbial community composition influence how soil microbial populations respond to agricultural management practices.

  2. "Just as the Structural Formula Does": Names, Diagrams, and the Structure of Organic Chemistry at the 1892 Geneva Nomenclature Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler-Smith, Evan

    2015-02-01

    At the Geneva Nomenclature Congress of 1892, some of the foremost organic chemists of the late nineteenth century crafted a novel relationship between chemical substances, chemical diagrams, and chemical names that has shaped practices of chemical representation ever since. During the 1880s, the French chemist Charles Friedel organised the nomenclature reform effort that culminated in the Geneva Congress; in the disorderly nomenclature of German synthetic chemistry, Friedel saw an opportunity to advance French national interests and his own pedagogical goals. Friedel and a group of close colleagues reconceived nomenclature as a unified field, in which all chemical names ought to relate clearly to one another and to the structure of the compounds they represented. The German chemist Adolf von Baeyer went a step farther, arguing for names that precisely and uniquely corresponded to the structural formula of each compound, tailored for use in chemical dictionaries and handbooks. Baeyer's vision prevailed at the Geneva Congress, which consequently codified rules for rigorously mapping structural formulas into names, resulting in names that faithfully represented the features of these diagrams but not always the chemical behaviour of the compounds themselves. This approach ultimately limited both the number of chemical compounds that the Geneva rules were able to encompass and the breadth of their application. However, the relationship between diagram and name established at the Geneva Congress became the foundation not only of subsequent systems of chemical nomenclature but of methods of organising information that have supported the modern chemical sciences.

  3. "Structuration" by intellectual organization: the configuration of knowledge in relations among structural components in networks of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leydesdorff, Loet

    2011-08-01

    Using aggregated journal-journal citation networks, the measurement of the knowledge base in empirical systems is factor-analyzed in two cases of interdisciplinary developments during the period 1995-2005: (i) the development of nanotechnology in the natural sciences and (ii) the development of communication studies as an interdiscipline between social psychology and political science. The results are compared with a case of stable development: the citation networks of core journals in chemistry. These citation networks are intellectually organized by networks of expectations in the knowledge base at the specialty (that is, above-journal) level. The "structuration" of structural components (over time) can be measured as configurational information. The latter is compared with the Shannon-type information generated in the interactions among structural components: the difference between these two measures provides us with a measure for the redundancy generated by the specification of a model in the knowledge base of the system. This knowledge base incurs (against the entropy law) to variable extents on the knowledge infrastructures provided by the observable networks of relations.

  4. Structure of Manila Clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) Microbiota at the Organ Scale in Contrasting Sets of Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisterhans, Guillaume; Raymond, Natalie; Girault, Emilie; Lambert, Christophe; Bourrasseau, Line; de Montaudouin, Xavier; Garabetian, Frédéric; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Marine invertebrate microbiota has a key function in host physiology and health. To date, knowledge about bivalve microbiota is poorly documented except public health concerns. This study used a molecular approach to characterize the microbiota associated with the bivalve Manila clam (Ruditapes philippinarum) by determining (1) the difference among organs either or not under the influence of host habitat, (2) small-scale variability of microbiota, and (3) the experimental response of the Manila clam microbiota submitted to different lateral transmissions. These questions were investigated by sampling two groups of individuals living in contrasting habitats and carrying out a transplant experiment. Manila clam microbiota (i.e., bacterial community structure) was determined at organ-scale (gills, gut, and a pool of remaining tissues) by capillary electrophoresis DNA fingerprinting (CE fingerprinting). The Manila clam microbiota structure differed among organs indicating a selection of Manila clam microbiota at organ scale. Habitat strongly influenced gill and gut microbiota. In contrast, microbiota associated with remaining tissues was similar between group individuals suggesting that these communities are mostly autochthonous, i.e., Manila clam specific. Transplant experiment showed that improving living condition did not induce any change in microbiota associated with remaining tissues. In contrast, the reduction in individual habitat quality led to individuals in declining health as strongly suggested by the increase in phagocytosis activity and decrease in condition index together with the change in internal organ microbiota. This study provides a first description of the Manila clam holobiont which can withstand disturbance and respond opportunistically to improved environmental conditions.

  5. Evolution of self-organization in nano-structured PVD coatings under extreme tribological conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox-Rabinovich, G., E-mail: gfox@mcmaster.ca [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Kovalev, A. [Surface Phenomena Researches Group, CNIICHERMET, 9/23, 2-nd Baumanskaya Street, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Aguirre, M.H. [Laboratory of Advanced Microscopy, Institute of Nanoscience of Aragón, University of Zaragoza, 50018 Zaragoza (Spain); Yamamoto, K. [Materials Research Laboratory, Kobe Steel Ltd, 1-5-5 Takatsuda-dai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271, Hyogo (Japan); Veldhuis, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Gershman, I. [All-Russian Railway Research Institute, 10 Third Mytishchinskaya Street, Moscow 29851 (Russian Federation); Rashkovskiy, A. [Surface Phenomena Researches Group, CNIICHERMET, 9/23, 2-nd Baumanskaya Street, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Endrino, J.L. [Albengoa Research, Energia Solar 1, Palmas Altas, Seville 41014 (Spain); Beake, B. [Micro Materials Limited, Willow House, Yale Business Village, Ellice Way, Wrexham LL13 7YL (United Kingdom); Dosbaeva, G. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada); Wainstein, D. [Surface Phenomena Researches Group, CNIICHERMET, 9/23, 2-nd Baumanskaya Street, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation); Yuan, Junifeng; Bunting, J.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, McMaster University, 1280 Main St. W., Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4L7 (Canada)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • The evolution of self-organization under extreme frictional conditions has been studied. • Comprehensive characterization of the tribo-films was made using various surface analytical techniques. • During the running-in stage, mullite tribo-ceramics predominate on the surface of the nano-multilayer coating, establishing a functional hierarchy within the layer of tribo-films. • It is possible to control tribo-film evolution during self-organization by means of an increase in structural complexity and the non-equilibrium state of the surface engineered layer. - Abstract: The evolution of the self-organization process where dissipative structures are formed under the extreme frictional conditions associated with high performance dry machining of hardened steels has been studied in detail. The emphasis was on the progressive studies of surface transformations within multilayer and monolayer TiAlCrSiYN-based PVD coatings during the running-in stage of wear when self-organization process occurs. The coating layer was characterized by high resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (HREELS). It is shown that the nano-multilayer coating possesses higher non-equilibrium structure in comparison to the monolayer. Comprehensive studies of the tribo-films (dissipative structures) formed on the friction surface were made using a number of advanced surface characterization techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). The data obtained for the tribo-films was combined with the detailed TEM studies of the structural and phase transformations within the underlying coating layer. This data was related to the micro-mechanical characteristics of the coating layer and its wear resistance. It was demonstrated that the evolution of the self-organization process is strongly controlled by the characteristics of the tribo-films formed at different stages of the wear process. Within running-in stage (after

  6. Ultrastructure of antennal sensilla of an autoparasitoid Encarsia sophia (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoman; Zhang, Fan; Luo, Chen; Wang, Su

    2014-12-01

    Encarsia sophia (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) is a parasitoid utilized for biological control of Bemisia tabaci, with selection of prey aided by chemoreceptor organs. The morphology and distribution of the antennal sensilla (chemoreceptors) of E. sophia were examined using Transmission electron micrographs. The total antennal length for E. sophia was 429.28±0.95 μm for females and 437.19±8.21 for males, and each antennae was found to consist of seven sensilla of different types. Both sexes possessed sensilla chaetica, sensilla trichodea, basiconic capitate peg sensilla, multiporous grooved-surface placoid sensilla (MG-PS), uniporous rod-like sensilla, nonporous finger-like sensilla, and sensilla coeloconica. Transmission electron micrographs of longitudinal sections of female antennae showed that they were composed of fat body, cuticle, mesoscutello-metanotal muscles, neurons, and glandular tissue, and cross-sections of the basal MG-PS showed sensillar lymph cavities and dendrites. The MG-PSs were imbedded in an electron-dense mass with cuticular invaginations which acted as pores that connected to a central lumen. The possible function of each type of sensilla is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Précis of Neural organization: structure, function, and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbib, M A; Erdi, P

    2000-08-01

    NEURAL ORGANIZATION: Structure, function, and dynamics shows how theory and experiment can supplement each other in an integrated, evolving account of the brain's structure, function, and dynamics. (1) STRUCTURE: Studies of brain function and dynamics build on and contribute to an understanding of many brain regions, the neural circuits that constitute them, and their spatial relations. We emphasize Szentágothai's modular architectonics principle, but also stress the importance of the microcomplexes of cerebellar circuitry and the lamellae of hippocampus. (2) FUNCTION: Control of eye movements, reaching and grasping, cognitive maps, and the roles of vision receive a functional decomposition in terms of schemas. Hypotheses as to how each schema is implemented through the interaction of specific brain regions provide the basis for modeling the overall function by neural networks constrained by neural data. Synthetic PET integrates modeling of primate circuitry with data from human brain imaging. (3) DYNAMICS: Dynamic system theory analyzes spatiotemporal neural phenomena, such as oscillatory and chaotic activity in both single neurons and (often synchronized) neural networks, the self-organizing development and plasticity of ordered neural structures, and learning and memory phenomena associated with synaptic modification. Rhythm generation involves multiple levels of analysis, from intrinsic cellular processes to loops involving multiple brain regions. A variety of rhythms are related to memory functions. The Précis presents a multifaceted case study of the hippocampus. We conclude with the claim that language and other cognitive processes can be fruitfully studied within the framework of neural organization that the authors have charted with John Szentágothai.

  8. Overview of the Structure of All-AT Oligonucleotides: Organization in Helices and Packing Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Lourdes; Valls, Núria; Urpí, Lourdes; Gouyette, Catherine; Sanmartín, Trinidad; Richter, Michael; Alechaga, Elida; Santaolalla, Alicia; Baldini, Roberto; Creixell, Marc; Ciurans, Ruth; Skokan, Petr; Pous, Joan; Subirana, Juan A.

    2006-01-01

    We present the crystalline organization of 33 all-AT deoxyoligonucleotide duplexes, studied by x-ray diffraction. Most of them have very similar structures, with Watson-Crick basepairs and a standard average twist close to 36°. The molecules are organized as parallel columns of stacked duplexes in a helical arrangement. Such organization of duplexes is very regular and repetitive: all sequences show the same pattern. It is mainly determined by the stacking of the terminal basepairs, so that the twist in the virtual TA base step between neighbor duplexes is always negative, ∼−22°. The distance between the axes of parallel columns is practically identical in all cases, ∼26 Å. Interestingly, it coincides with that found in DNA viruses and fibers in their hexagonal phase. It appears to be a characteristic distance for ordered parallel DNA molecules. This feature is due to the absence of short range intermolecular forces, which are usually due to the presence of CG basepairs at the end of the oligonucleotide sequence. The duplexes apparently interact only through their diffuse ionic atmospheres. The results obtained can thus be considered as intermediate between liquid crystals, fibers, and standard crystal structures. They provide new information on medium range DNA-DNA interactions. PMID:16698788

  9. Unraveling the structure and chemical mechanisms of highly oxygenated intermediates in oxidation of organic compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhandong

    2017-11-28

    Decades of research on the autooxidation of organic compounds have provided fundamental and practical insights into these processes; however, the structure of many key autooxidation intermediates and the reactions leading to their formation still remain unclear. This work provides additional experimental evidence that highly oxygenated intermediates with one or more hydroperoxy groups are prevalent in the autooxidation of various oxygenated (e.g., alcohol, aldehyde, keto compounds, ether, and ester) and nonoxygenated (e.g., normal alkane, branched alkane, and cycloalkane) organic compounds. These findings improve our understanding of autooxidation reaction mechanisms that are routinely used to predict fuel ignition and oxidative stability of liquid hydrocarbons, while also providing insights relevant to the formation mechanisms of tropospheric aerosol building blocks. The direct observation of highly oxygenated intermediates for the autooxidation of alkanes at 500–600 K builds upon prior observations made in atmospheric conditions for the autooxidation of terpenes and other unsaturated hydrocarbons; it shows that highly oxygenated intermediates are stable at conditions above room temperature. These results further reveal that highly oxygenated intermediates are not only accessible by chemical activation but also by thermal activation. Theoretical calculations on H-atom migration reactions are presented to rationalize the relationship between the organic compound’s molecular structure (n-alkane, branched alkane, and cycloalkane) and its propensity to produce highly oxygenated intermediates via extensive autooxidation of hydroperoxyalkylperoxy radicals. Finally, detailed chemical kinetic simulations demonstrate the influence of these additional reaction pathways on the ignition of practical fuels.

  10. Low-Dimensional Organic-Inorganic Halide Perovskite: Structure, Properties, and Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ravi K; Cohen, Bat-El; Iagher, Lior; Etgar, Lioz

    2017-10-09

    Three-dimensional (3 D) perovskite has attracted a lot of attention owing to its success in photovoltaic (PV) solar cells. However, one of its major crucial issues lies in its stability, which has limited its commercialization. An important property of organic-inorganic perovskite is the possibility of forming a layered material by using long organic cations that do not fit into the octahedral cage. These long organic cations act as a "barrier" that "caps" 3 D perovskite to form the layered material. Controlling the number of perovskite layers could provide a confined structure with chemical and physical properties that are different from those of 3 D perovskite. This opens up a whole new batch of interesting materials with huge potential for optoelectronic applications. This Minireview presents the synthesis, properties, and structural orientation of low-dimensional perovskite. It also discusses the progress of low-dimensional perovskite in PV solar cells, which, to date, have performance comparable to that of 3 D perovskite but with enhanced stability. Finally, the use of low-dimensional perovskite in light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and photodetectors is discussed. The low-dimensional perovskites are promising candidates for LED devices, mainly because of their high radiative recombination as a result of the confined low-dimensional quantum well. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Structural investigations of self-assembled monolayers for organic electronics: results from X-ray reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khassanov, Artoem; Steinrück, Hans-Georg; Schmaltz, Thomas; Magerl, Andreas; Halik, Marcus

    2015-07-21

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) have been established as crucial interlayers and electronically active layers in organic electronic devices, such as organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), organic photovoltaics (OPVs), organic thin film transistors (OTFTs), and nonvolatile memories (NVMs). The use of self-assembling functionalized organic molecules is beneficial due to mainly three advantages compared with common thin film deposition approaches. (1) Molecular self-assembly occurs with surface selectivity, determined by the interaction between the functional anchor group of the organic molecules and the target surface. (2) The film thickness of the resulting layers is perfectly controllable on the angstrom scale, due to the self-terminating film formation to only a single molecular layer. And finally, (3) the wide variability in the chemical structure of such molecules enables different SAM functionalities for devices, ranging from electrical insulation to charge storage to charge transport. The SAM approach can be further expanded by employing several functionalized molecules to create mixed SAMs with consequently mixed properties. The function of SAMs in devices depends not only on the chemical structure of the molecules but also on their final arrangement and orientation on the surface. A reliable and nondestructive in-depth characterization of SAMs on nonconductive oxide surfaces is still challenging because of the very small thickness and the impracticality of methods such as scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In this Account, we illustrate how X-ray reflectivity (XRR) provides analytical access to major questions of SAM composition, morphology, and even formation by means of investigations of pure and mixed SAMs based on phosphonic acids (PAs) of various chain structures on flat alumina (AlOx) surfaces. XRR is an analytical method that provides access to spatially averaged structural depth profiles over a relatively

  12. Effects of commercial organic fertilizers on the yield and yield structure of potato cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filipović Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The research work has dealt with investigations of two type commercial organic fertilizers (DCM ECO-MIX 4 NPK 7:7:10 i GUANITO NPK 6:15:3 effects on the yield and yield structure of three potato cultivars (Cleopatra, Carrera and Sylvana. The control variant was used in plots without the use of organic fertilizers. The field experiment was performed in 2012. in a populated area Dobrica (N 45° 13’, E 20° 51’, 78 m.s.l. at the experimental farm plot Belča on which is certified organic production, on anthropogenic soil subtype chernozem on carbonate terrace. The results of research showed that the lowest tuber yield was determined in the control treatment (20,87 t ha-1, while the highest yield was achieved with a commercial organic fertilizer DCM ECO-MIX 4 (23,96 t ha-1. Number of tubers per plant corresponded to the characteristics of the studied cultivars. The largest number of tubers per plant was correlated with yield. Specifically, individual variants of the two greatest yields had the highest average number of tubers per plant. Cultivar Cleopatra of variant with GUANITO achieved 17,51 tubers per plant, while cultivar Sylvana of variant with DCM ECO-MIX 4 achieved 17,38 tubers per plant.

  13. Factors Influencing Implementation of OHSAS 18001 in Indian Construction Organizations: Interpretive Structural Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaprasad, Sunku Venkata Siva; Chalapathi, Pasupulati Venkata

    2015-09-01

    Construction activity has made considerable breakthroughs in the past two decades on the back of increases in development activities, government policies, and public demand. At the same time, occupational health and safety issues have become a major concern to construction organizations. The unsatisfactory safety performance of the construction industry has always been highlighted since the safety management system is neglected area and not implemented systematically in Indian construction organizations. Due to a lack of enforcement of the applicable legislation, most of the construction organizations are forced to opt for the implementation of Occupational Health Safety Assessment Series (OHSAS) 18001 to improve safety performance. In order to better understand factors influencing the implementation of OHSAS 18001, an interpretive structural modeling approach has been applied and the factors have been classified using matrice d'impacts croises-multiplication appliqué a un classement (MICMAC) analysis. The study proposes the underlying theoretical framework to identify factors and to help management of Indian construction organizations to understand the interaction among factors influencing in implementation of OHSAS 18001. Safety culture, continual improvement, morale of employees, and safety training have been identified as dependent variables. Safety performance, sustainable construction, and conducive working environment have been identified as linkage variables. Management commitment and safety policy have been identified as the driver variables. Management commitment has the maximum driving power and the most influential factor is safety policy, which states clearly the commitment of top management towards occupational safety and health.

  14. Device applications and structural and optical properties of Indigo - A biodegradable, low-cost organic semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhengjun; Pisane, Kelly L.; Sierros, Konstantinos; Seehra, Mohindar S.; Korakakis, Dimitris

    2015-03-01

    Currently, memory devices based on organic materials are attracting great attention due to their simplicity in device structure, mechanical flexibility, potential for scalability, low-cost potential, low-power operation, and large capacity for data storage. In a recent paper from our group, Indigo-based nonvolatile organic write-once-read-many-times (WORM) memory device, consisting of a 100nm layer of indigo sandwiched between an indium tin oxide (ITO) cathode and an Al anode, has been reported. This device is found to be at its low resistance state (ON state) and can be switched to high resistance state (OFF state) by applying a positive bias with ON/OFF current ratio of the device being up to 1.02 × e6. A summary of these results along with the structural and optical properties of indigo powder will be reported. Analysis of x-ray diffraction shows a monoclinic structure with lattice parameters a(b)[c] = 0.924(0.577)[0.1222]nm and β =117° . Optical absorption shows a band edge at 1.70 eV with peak of absorption occurring at 1.90 eV. These results will be interpreted in terms of the HOMO-LUMO bands of Indigo.

  15. Unravelling surface and interfacial structures of a metal–organic framework by transmission electron microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Zhu, Yihan

    2017-02-21

    Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) are crystalline porous materials with designable topology, porosity and functionality, having promising applications in gas storage and separation, ion conduction and catalysis1, 2, 3. It is challenging to observe MOFs with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) due to the extreme instability of MOFs upon electron beam irradiation4, 5, 6, 7. Here, we use a direct-detection electron-counting camera to acquire TEM images of the MOF ZIF-8 with an ultralow dose of 4.1 electrons per square ångström to retain the structural integrity. The obtained image involves structural information transferred up to 2.1 Å, allowing the resolution of individual atomic columns of Zn and organic linkers in the framework. Furthermore, TEM reveals important local structural features of ZIF-8 crystals that cannot be identified by diffraction techniques, including armchair-type surface terminations and coherent interfaces between assembled crystals. These observations allow us to understand how ZIF-8 crystals self-assemble and the subsequent influence of interfacial cavities on mass transport of guest molecules.

  16. Organic-Inorganic Hydrophobic Nanocomposite Film with a Core-Shell Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Peng; Chen, Ying; Yu, Zhiwu

    2016-12-17

    A method to prepare novel organic-inorganic hydrophobic nanocomposite films was proposed by a site-specific polymerization process. The inorganic part, the core of the nanocomposite, is a ternary SiO₂-Al₂O₃-TiO₂ nanoparticles, which is grafted with methacryloxy propyl trimethoxyl silane (KH570), and wrapped by fluoride and siloxane polymers. The synthesized samples are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), contact angle meter (CA), and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicate that the novel organic-inorganic hydrophobic nanocomposite with a core-shell structure was synthesized successfully. XRD analysis reveals the nanocomposite film has an amorphous structure, and FTIR analysis indicates the nanoparticles react with a silane coupling agent (methacryloxy propyl trimethoxyl silane KH570). Interestingly, the morphology of the nanoparticle film is influenced by the composition of the core. Further, comparing with the film synthesized by silica nanoparticles, the film formed from SiO₂-Al₂O₃-TiO₂ nanoparticles has higher hydrophobic performance, i.e., the contact angle is greater than 101.7°. In addition, the TEM analysis reveals that the crystal structure of the particles can be changed at high temperatures.

  17. Organic-Inorganic Hydrophobic Nanocomposite Film with a Core-Shell Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Liu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A method to prepare novel organic-inorganic hydrophobic nanocomposite films was proposed by a site-specific polymerization process. The inorganic part, the core of the nanocomposite, is a ternary SiO2–Al2O3–TiO2 nanoparticles, which is grafted with methacryloxy propyl trimethoxyl silane (KH570, and wrapped by fluoride and siloxane polymers. The synthesized samples are characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectrscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD, contact angle meter (CA, and scanning electron microscope (SEM. The results indicate that the novel organic-inorganic hydrophobic nanocomposite with a core-shell structure was synthesized successfully. XRD analysis reveals the nanocomposite film has an amorphous structure, and FTIR analysis indicates the nanoparticles react with a silane coupling agent (methacryloxy propyl trimethoxyl silane KH570. Interestingly, the morphology of the nanoparticle film is influenced by the composition of the core. Further, comparing with the film synthesized by silica nanoparticles, the film formed from SiO2–Al2O3–TiO2 nanoparticles has higher hydrophobic performance, i.e., the contact angle is greater than 101.7°. In addition, the TEM analysis reveals that the crystal structure of the particles can be changed at high temperatures.

  18. Primary and secondary parasitoids (Hymenoptera) of aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) on blueberry and other Vaccinium in the Pacific Northwest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raworth, D A; Pike, K S; Tanigoshi, L K; Mathur, S; Graf, G

    2008-04-01

    Blueberry scorch virus, a commercially important Carlavirus in highbush blueberry, Vaccinium corymbosum L., is vectored by aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae). We surveyed the aphids, primary parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae, Braconidae), and associated secondary parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Charipidae, Megaspilidae, Pteromalidae) on highbush blueberry and other Vaccinium in the Pacific Northwest from 1995 to 2006, with samples concentrated in 2005 and 2006, to lay the groundwork for augmentative biological control. Ericaphis fimbriata (Richards) was the principal aphid. The dominant parasitoid species were Praon unicum Smith, Aphidius n. sp., A. sp., and Aphidius ervi Haliday. Their frequency in relation to the other primary parasitoids varied significantly with geographical area; P. unicum dominated the frequency distribution in southwestern British Columbia, A. n. sp., west of the Cascades, and A. sp. and A. ervi east of the Cascades. Among the secondary parasitoids, pteromalids dominated, and their frequency in relation to the other secondary parasitoids was lowest in southwestern British Columbia. The parasitization rate for P. unicum and A. n. sp. in southwestern British Columbia increased from May or June to a maximum of 0.080 +/- 0.024 and 0.090 +/- 0.084 (SD), respectively, in late July or early August. P. unicum emerged in the spring 4 wk before A. n. sp. The parasitization rate for P. unicum was lower in conventional than organic fields. Whereas aphid density increased monotonically, P. unicum had two spring peaks. A simulation model showed that these peaks could reflect discrete generations. Releases of insectary-reared P. unicum at 150 or 450 DD above 5.6 degrees C, summing from 1 January, may effectively augment the natural spring populations by creating overlapping generations.

  19. Effects of Sulfide Concentration and Dissolved Organic Matter Characteristics on the Structure of Nanocolloidal Metacinnabar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Brett A; Gerbig, Chase A; Kim, Christopher; Stegemeier, John P; Ryan, Joseph N; Aiken, George R

    2017-10-16

    Understanding the speciation of divalent mercury (Hg(II)) in aquatic systems containing dissolved organic matter (DOM) and sulfide is necessary to predict the conversion of Hg(II) to bioavailable methylmercury. We used X-ray absorption spectroscopy to characterize the structural order of mercury in Hg(II)-DOM-sulfide systems for a range of sulfide concentration (1-100 µM), DOM aromaticity (specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA254)), and Hg(II)-DOM and Hg(II)-DOM-sulfide equilibration times (4-142 h). In all systems, Hg(II) was present as structurally-disordered nanocolloidal metacinnabar (β-HgS). β-HgS nanocolloids were significantly smaller or less ordered at lower sulfide concentration, as indicated by under-coordination of Hg(II) in β-HgS. The size or structural order of β-HgS nanocolloids increased with increasing sulfide abundance and decreased with increasing SUVA254 of the DOM. The Hg(II)-DOM or Hg(II)-DOM-sulfide equilibration times did not significantly influence the extent of structural order in nanocolloidal β-HgS. Geochemical factors that control the structural order of nanocolloidal β-HgS, which are expected to influence nanocolloid surface reactivity and solubility, should be considered in the context of mercury bioavailability.

  20. Materials for organic photovoltaics: insights from detailed structural models and molecular simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casalegno, Mosè; Baggioli, Alberto; Famulari, Antonino; Meille, Stefano V.; Nicolini, Tommaso; Po, Riccardo; Raos, Guido

    2012-10-01

    This paper contains a brief discussion of the role of detailed structural and computational studies, within the general field of organic photovoltaics. We review some of our recent work on poly(3-butylthiophene) (P3BT) and on [6,6]phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). The first is a prototypical hole-transporting material, whose crystal forms I.' and II were solved by us through the combined use of powder Xray diffraction, electron diffraction and molecular modelling. PCBM is a widely used fullerene derivative with electron-transporting properties. It has a rich polymorphism, which to date remains largely unexplored. Our molecular dynamics simulations have revealed interesting features of its solid-state organization, including that in the amorphous phase.

  1. The brain imaging data structure, a format for organizing and describing outputs of neuroimaging experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.; Auer, Tibor; Calhoun, Vince D.; Craddock, R. Cameron; Das, Samir; Duff, Eugene P.; Flandin, Guillaume; Ghosh, Satrajit S.; Glatard, Tristan; Halchenko, Yaroslav O.; Handwerker, Daniel A.; Hanke, Michael; Keator, David; Li, Xiangrui; Michael, Zachary; Maumet, Camille; Nichols, B. Nolan; Nichols, Thomas E.; Pellman, John; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Rokem, Ariel; Schaefer, Gunnar; Sochat, Vanessa; Triplett, William; Turner, Jessica A.; Varoquaux, Gaël; Poldrack, Russell A.

    2016-01-01

    The development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques has defined modern neuroimaging. Since its inception, tens of thousands of studies using techniques such as functional MRI and diffusion weighted imaging have allowed for the non-invasive study of the brain. Despite the fact that MRI is routinely used to obtain data for neuroscience research, there has been no widely adopted standard for organizing and describing the data collected in an imaging experiment. This renders sharing and reusing data (within or between labs) difficult if not impossible and unnecessarily complicates the application of automatic pipelines and quality assurance protocols. To solve this problem, we have developed the Brain Imaging Data Structure (BIDS), a standard for organizing and describing MRI datasets. The BIDS standard uses file formats compatible with existing software, unifies the majority of practices already common in the field, and captures the metadata necessary for most common data processing operations. PMID:27326542

  2. Structure, photoluminescent properties and photocatalytic activities of a new Cd(II) metal-organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng Yan; Ma, Wei Xing; Wang, Ming Yan; Yang, Xu Jie; Xu, Xing You

    2014-01-24

    A new metal-organic framework, [Cd(TDC)(bix)(H2O)]n (H2TDC = thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid; bix = 1,4-bis(imidazol-1-ylmethyl)benzene), has been synthesized under hydrothermal conditions and structurally characterized by elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, UV-vis and single X-ray diffraction. Cd-MOF is a 2D infinite layer framework, which is further interconnected by hydrogen-bond interactions leading to a 3D supramolecular architecture. The photoluminescent properties of the Cd-MOF were investigated and this compound shows intense fluorescent emissions in the solid state. In addition, it exhibits good photocatalytic activities for the degradation of methyl organic under UV light irradiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The genomes of two key bumblebee species with primitive eusocial organization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadd, Ben M.; Barribeau, Seth M.; Bloch, Guy

    2015-01-01

    , two ecologically dominant bumblebees and widely utilized study species. Comparing these new genomes to those of the highly eusocial honeybee Apis mellifera and other Hymenoptera, we identify deeply conserved similarities, as well as novelties key to the biology of these organisms. Some honeybee genome...

  4. Design of ferrocene-dipeptide bioorganometallic conjugates to induce chirality-organized structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriuchi, Toshiyuki; Hirao, Toshikazu

    2010-07-20

    The highly ordered molecular assemblies in proteins can have a variety of functions, as observed in enzymes, receptors, and the like. Synthetic scientists are constructing bioinspired systems by harnessing the self-assembling properties of short peptides. Secondary structures such as alpha-helices, beta-sheets, and beta-turns are important in protein folding, which is mostly directed and stabilized by hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic interactions of side chains. The design of secondary structure mimics that are composed of short peptides has attracted much attention, both for gaining fundamental insight into the factors affecting protein folding and for developing pharmacologically useful compounds, artificial receptors, asymmetric catalysts, and new materials. Ferrocenes are an organometallic scaffold with a central reverse-turn unit based on the inter-ring spacing of about 3.3 A, which is a suitable distance for hydrogen bonding between attached peptide strands. The conjugation of organometallic compounds with biomolecules such as amino acids, peptides, and DNA should provide novel systems that reflect properties of both the ferrocene and the biologically derived moieties. In this Account, we focus on recent advances in the design of ferrocene-peptide bioconjugates, which help illustrate the peptidomimetic basis for protein folding and the means of constructing highly ordered molecular assemblies. Ferrocene-peptide bioconjugates are constructed to form chirality-organized structures in both solid and solution states. The ferrocene serves as a reliable organometallic scaffold for the construction of protein secondary structures via intramolecular hydrogen bonding: the attached dipeptide strands are constrained within the appropriate dimensions. The introduction of the chiral dipeptide chains into the ferrocene scaffold induces the conformational enantiomerization of the ferrocenyl moiety; the chirality-organized structure results from intramolecular hydrogen

  5. Lead and zinc in the structure of organic and mineral soil components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Kummer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the more reactive forms, metals can occur in the structure of minerals, and the sum of all these forms defines their total contents in different soil fractions. The isomorphic substitution of heavy metals for example alters the dimensions of the unit cell and mineral size. This study proposed a method of chemical fractionation of heavy metals, using more powerful extraction methods, to remove the organic and different mineral phases completely. Soil samples were taken from eight soil profiles (0-10, 10-20 and 20-40 cm in a Pb mining and metallurgy area in Adrianópolis, Paraná, Brazil. The Pb and Zn concentrations were determined in the following fractions (complete phase removal in each sequential extraction: exchangeable; carbonates; organic matter; amorphous and crystalline Fe oxides; Al oxide, amorphous aluminosilicates and kaolinite; and residual fractions. The complete removal of organic matter and mineral phases in sequential extractions resulted in low participation of residual forms of Pb and Zn in the total concentrations of these metals in the soils: there was lower association of metals with primary and 2:1 minerals and refractory oxides. The powerful methods used here allow an identification of the complete metal-mineral associations, such as the occurrence of Pb and Zn in the structure of the minerals. The higher incidence of Zn than Pb in the structure of Fe oxides, due to isomorphic substitution, was attributed to a smaller difference between the ionic radius of Zn2+ and Fe3+.

  6. Indigenous Knowledge Organization: A Study of Concepts, Terminology, Structure and (Mostly Indigenous Voices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Lee

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the lack of published information (especially in Canada on modified classification systems and thesauri for describing and organizing Aboriginal materials, I set out to conduct a survey on this topic. The surveys were distributed at five Indigenous-related conferences and gatherings in Canada and the United States between the Fall, 2009, and the Fall, 2010, and more than 50 completed surveys were collected. Research findings included preferred changes in terminology from Library of Congress subject headings (which were seen to be outdated and inappropriate but there was no resounding consensus on a “one-size fits all” terminology for thesauri terminology. However, this was not seen to be problematic given the diverse range of participants who took part in the survey. Respondents also commented on a survey question inquiring about the use of the “Medicine Wheel” concept as a way to organize Aboriginal-related materials, as well as other possible structures that might prove more culturally relevant for organizing these materials. There was both support for and strong opposition to the use of the Medicine Wheel for this purpose, for a variety of reasons. Participants indicated a preference for non-hierarchical and less linear structures than what current mainstream classification systems provide. There also seemed to be support for “landscape-based” structures. Although research findings were not conclusive, some valuable insights were gained from this study. The exploratory nature of this research project suggests more research (and more in-depth research in this area is required.

  7. A Landscape Analysis to Understand Orientation of Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Drones in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galindo-Cardona, A; Monmany, A C; Diaz, G; Giray, T

    2015-08-01

    Honey bees [Apis mellifera L. (Apidae, Hymenoptera)] show spatial learning behavior or orientation, in which animals make use of structured home ranges for their daily activities. Worker (female) orientation has been studied more extensively than drone (male) orientation. Given the extensive and large flight range of drones as part of their reproductive biology, the study of drone orientation may provide new insight on landscape features important for orientation. We report the return rate and orientation of drones released at three distances (1, 2, and 4 km) and at the four cardinal points from an apiary located in Gurabo, Puerto Rico. We used high-resolution aerial photographs to describe landscape characteristics at the releasing sites and at the apiary. Analyses of variance were used to test significance among returning times from different distances and directions. A principal components analysis was used to describe the landscape at the releasing sites and generalized linear models were used to identify landscape characteristics that influenced the returning times of drones. Our results showed for the first time that drones are able to return from as far as 4 km from the colony. Distance to drone congregation area, orientation, and tree lines were the most important landscape characteristics influencing drone return rate. We discuss the role of landscape in drone orientation. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Function of the Dufour’s gland in solitary and social Hymenoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aniruddha Mitra

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The poison gland and Dufour’s gland are the two glands associated with the sting apparatus in female Apocrita (Hymenoptera. While the poison gland usually functions as an integral part of the venom delivery system, the Dufour’s gland has been found to differ in its function in various hymenopteran groups. Like all exocrine glands, the function of the Dufour’s gland is to secrete chemicals, but the nature and function of the secretions varies in different taxa. Functions of the Dufour’s gland secretions range from serving as a component of material used in nest building, larval food, and pheromones involved in communicative functions that are important for both solitary and social species. This review summarizes the different functions reported for the Dufour’s gland in hymenopterans, illustrating how the Dufour’s gland secretions can be adapted to give rise to various functions in response to different challenges posed by the ways of life followed by different taxa. Aspects of development, structure, chemistry and the evolution of different functions are also touched upon briefly.

  9. Exploring the structure and organization of information within nursing clinical handovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Maree; Jefferies, Diana; Nicholls, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Clinical handover is the primary source of patient information for nurses; however, inadequate information transfer compromises patient safety. We investigated the content and organization of information conveyed at 81 handovers. A structure that captures and presents the information transferred at handover emerged: identification of the patient and clinical risks, clinical history/presentation, clinical status, care plan and outcomes/goals of care (ICCCO). This approach covers essential information while allowing for prioritization of information when required. Further research into the impact of ICCCO on patient safety is in progress. © 2012 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Structural and electrical properties of organic stilbazolium single crystal of DSCHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaram, S. John; Ramaclus, Jerald V.; Sagayaraj, P., E-mail: psagayaraj@hotmail.com [Department of Physics, Loyola College, Chennai - 600034 (India); Raj, A. Antony [Department of Physics, AMET University, Kanathur, Chennai - 603112 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Organic nonlinear optical crystal 4-N, N-Dimethyl Amino-4’N’-Methyl-Stilbazolium 3-Carboxy-4-Hydroxy benzenesulfonate (DSCHS) has been successfully grown from aqueous methanol solution by adopting slow solvent evaporation technique. Chemical composition of the sample was confirmed by CHN analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction analysis was carried out and it shows that DSCHS crystal belongs to triclinic structure with Pl space group. It is found that this material exhibits positive photoconductivity. Dielectric studies were also carried out for different temperature by varying the frequency.

  11. A porous Cu(II) metal-organic framework: Synthesis, crystal structure and gas adsorption properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wu-Wu; Guo, Ying; Zhang, Wei-Hong

    2017-09-01

    Presented here is a new porous Cu(II) metal-organic framework, namely [Cu(tdc)(H2O)]n·n(DMA) (1 H2tdc = thiophene-2,5-dicarboxylic acid, DMA = N,N‧-dimethylacetamide), which was obtained by the self-assembly reaction of CuCl2 and H2tdc under solvothermal conditions. Single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that compound 1 features a 3D porous framework based on 1D chain structure subunits, and the 1D rhombohedral channels are occupied by the lattice DMA molecules. Gas adsorption studies reveal that this desolvated sample exhibit high uptake capacity for light hydrocarbons.

  12. Formation of organic layer on femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasumaru, Naoki; Sentoku, Eisuke; Kiuchi, Junsuke

    2017-05-01

    Two types of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) formed on titanium by femtosecond (fs) laser pulses (λ = 800 nm, τ = 180 fs, ν = 1 kHz) in air were investigated experimentally. At a laser fluence F above the ablation threshold, LIPSS with a minimum mean spacing of D organic thin film similar to a cellulose derivative that cannot be easily formed by conventional chemical synthesis. The results of these surface analyses indicate that these two types of LIPSS are formed through different mechanisms. This fs-laser processing technique may become a new technology for the artificial synthesis of cellulose derivatives.

  13. Response of Organ Structure and Physiology to Autotetraploidization in Early Development of Energy Willow Salix viminalis

    OpenAIRE

    Dudits, D.; Torok, K.; Cseri, A.; Paul, K; Nagy, A.V.; Nagy, B.; Sass, L.; Ferenc, G.; Vaňková, R.; Dobrev, P.; Vass, I.; Ayaydin, F.

    2016-01-01

    The biomass productivity of the energy willow Salix viminalis as a short-rotation woody crop depends on organ structure and functions that are under the control of genome size. Colchicine treatment of axillary buds resulted in a set of autotetraploid S. viminalis var. Energo genotypes (polyploid Energo [PP-E]; 2n = 4x = 76) with variation in the green pixel-based shoot surface area. In cases where increased shoot biomass was observed, it was primarily derived from larger leaf size and wider s...

  14. Thelytokous parthenogenesis in the fungus-gardening ant Mycocepurus smithii (Hymenoptera: Formicidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rabeling

    Full Text Available The general prevalence of sexual reproduction over asexual reproduction among organisms testifies to the evolutionary benefits of recombination, such as accelerated adaptation to changing environments and elimination of deleterious mutations. Documented instances of asexual reproduction in groups otherwise dominated by sexual reproduction challenge evolutionary biologists to understand the special circumstances that might confer an advantage to asexual reproductive strategies. Here we report one such instance of asexual reproduction in the ants. We present evidence for obligate thelytoky in the asexual fungus-gardening ant, Mycocepurus smithii, in which queens produce female offspring from unfertilized eggs, workers are sterile, and males appear to be completely absent. Obligate thelytoky is implicated by reproductive physiology of queens, lack of males, absence of mating behavior, and natural history observations. An obligate thelytoky hypothesis is further supported by the absence of evidence indicating sexual reproduction or genetic recombination across the species' extensive distribution range (Mexico-Argentina. Potential conflicting evidence for sexual reproduction in this species derives from three Mycocepurus males reported in the literature, previously regarded as possible males of M. smithii. However, we show here that these specimens represent males of the congeneric species M. obsoletus, and not males of M. smithii. Mycocepurus smithii is unique among ants and among eusocial Hymenoptera, in that males seem to be completely absent and only queens (and not workers produce diploid offspring via thelytoky. Because colonies consisting only of females can be propagated consecutively in the laboratory, M. smithii could be an adequate study organism a to test hypotheses of the population-genetic advantages and disadvantages of asexual reproduction in a social organism and b inform kin conflict theory.For a Portuguese translation of the

  15. Thelytokous parthenogenesis in the fungus-gardening ant Mycocepurus smithii (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabeling, Christian; Lino-Neto, José; Cappellari, Simone C; Dos-Santos, Iracenir A; Mueller, Ulrich G; Bacci, Maurício

    2009-08-26

    The general prevalence of sexual reproduction over asexual reproduction among organisms testifies to the evolutionary benefits of recombination, such as accelerated adaptation to changing environments and elimination of deleterious mutations. Documented instances of asexual reproduction in groups otherwise dominated by sexual reproduction challenge evolutionary biologists to understand the special circumstances that might confer an advantage to asexual reproductive strategies. Here we report one such instance of asexual reproduction in the ants. We present evidence for obligate thelytoky in the asexual fungus-gardening ant, Mycocepurus smithii, in which queens produce female offspring from unfertilized eggs, workers are sterile, and males appear to be completely absent. Obligate thelytoky is implicated by reproductive physiology of queens, lack of males, absence of mating behavior, and natural history observations. An obligate thelytoky hypothesis is further supported by the absence of evidence indicating sexual reproduction or genetic recombination across the species' extensive distribution range (Mexico-Argentina). Potential conflicting evidence for sexual reproduction in this species derives from three Mycocepurus males reported in the literature, previously regarded as possible males of M. smithii. However, we show here that these specimens represent males of the congeneric species M. obsoletus, and not males of M. smithii. Mycocepurus smithii is unique among ants and among eusocial Hymenoptera, in that males seem to be completely absent and only queens (and not workers) produce diploid offspring via thelytoky. Because colonies consisting only of females can be propagated consecutively in the laboratory, M. smithii could be an adequate study organism a) to test hypotheses of the population-genetic advantages and disadvantages of asexual reproduction in a social organism and b) inform kin conflict theory.For a Portuguese translation of the abstract, please see

  16. The structure optimization design of the organic solar cells using the FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Jian [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Wang Chengwei, E-mail: cwwang@nwnu.edu.c [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Li Yan [College of Physics and Electronic Engineering, Northwest Normal University, Lanzhou 730070 (China); Zhou Feng; Liu Weimin [State Key Laboratory of Solid Lubrication, Lanzhou Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2010-04-15

    The finite-different time-domain method (FDTD) was used to optimize structure of organic solar cells based on the heterojunction of the substituted polythiophene polymer (PEOPT) and the C{sub 60} molecule. The absorption of the device in visible light range was determined, and the maximized average absorption is about 88% at the wavelength of 469 nm. The effects of the glass substrate thickness on the absorption and the distribution of the optical energy inside the device were investigated. Based on the important roles of the optical energy at PEOPT/C{sub 60} interface in the photocurrent efficiency, the device structure was optimized for the maximized photocurrent efficiency. The optimal C{sub 60} thickness 29 nm was obtained for the wavelength of 469 nm. Meantime, when the PEOPT thickness is the range of 80-130 nm, there are few effects on optical energy at PEOPT/C{sub 60} interface.

  17. Schools of fish and flocks of birds: their shape and internal structure by self-organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemelrijk, Charlotte K; Hildenbrandt, Hanno

    2012-12-06

    Models of self-organization have proved useful in revealing what processes may underlie characteristics of swarms. In this study, we review model-based explanations for aspects of the shape and internal structure of groups of fish and of birds travelling undisturbed (without predator threat). Our models attribute specific collective traits to locomotory properties. Fish slow down to avoid collisions and swim at a constant depth, whereas birds fly at low variability of speed and lose altitude during turning. In both the models of fish and birds, the 'bearing angle' to the nearest neighbour emerges as a side-effect of the 'blind angle' behind individuals and when group size becomes larger, temporary subgroups may increase the complexity of group shape and internal structure. We discuss evidence for model-based predictions and provide a list of new predictions to be tested empirically.

  18. Synthesis of a specified, silica molecular sieve by using computationally predicted organic structure-directing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Joel E; Deem, Michael W; Davis, Mark E

    2014-08-04

    Crystalline molecular sieves are used in numerous applications, where the properties exploited for each technology are the direct consequence of structural features. New materials are typically discovered by trial and error, and in many cases, organic structure-directing agents (OSDAs) are used to direct their formation. Here, we report the first successful synthesis of a specified molecular sieve through the use of an OSDA that was predicted from a recently developed computational method that constructs chemically synthesizable OSDAs. Pentamethylimidazolium is computationally predicted to have the largest stabilization energy in the STW framework, and is experimentally shown to strongly direct the synthesis of pure-silica STW. Other OSDAs with lower stabilization energies did not form STW. The general method demonstrated here to create STW may lead to new, simpler OSDAs for existing frameworks and provide a way to predict OSDAs for desired, theoretical frameworks. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. The structure and organization of the human follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gromoll, J; Pekel, E.; Nieschlag, E. [Institute of Reproductive Medicine of the Univ., Muenster (Germany)

    1996-07-15

    The structure and organization of the human follicle-stimulating hormone receptor (FSHR) gene were determined by either screening a phage library of human genomic DNA or applying the long PCR technique to amplify different exon pairs with their corresponding introns. The FSHR gene spans a region of 54 kb and consists of 10 exons and 9 introns. Most of the extracellular domain is encoded by 9 exons, ranging in length between 69 and 251 bp; the C-terminal part of the extracellular domain, the transmembrane domain, and the intracellular domain are encoded by the large exon 10 (1234 bp). Overall the gene encodes 695 amino acids. The structure of the human FSHR displays a striking similarity to that of the previously characterized rat FSHR gene, with a high degree of conservation in exon sizes and exon/intron junctions. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. KEANEKARAGAMAN HYMENOPTERA PARASITOID PADA PERKEBUNAN KELAPA SAWIT PTPN VIII CINDALI, BOGOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichsan Luqmana Indra Putra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of parasitic Hymenoptera in PTPN VIII oil palm plantation Cindali, Bogor. One group of important natural enemies in oil palm plantation is parasitic Hymenoptera. The purpose of this research is to know the diversity and fluctuation of parasitic Hymenoptera PTPN VIII Cindali oil palm plantation. This research was conducted in 6 blocks of oil palm in September 2014 – June 2015. There were 5 plots in every observation blocks 39.2 x 39.2 m in size, and used direct and indirect method. Direct method done by 5 plants in every plots was taken randomized to observed and taken the herbivore insects to reared until the parasitic Hymenoptera came out. Observation of cover crops conducted by 3 subplots determined diagonally in every plots 9.8 x 9.8 m in size and herbivore insects was observed and collected. Indirect methods used sweep net and yellow pan trap. The result of this research, 26 parasitic Hymenoptera families was found, with the Braconidae was the most morphospecies found and the most individual amount was Scelionidae. The abundance of parasitoid in every month fluctuated.

  1. Hymenoptera venom allergy: work disability and occupational impact of venom immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolocci, Giulia; Folletti, Ilenia; Torén, Kjell; Muzi, Giacomo; Murgia, Nicola

    2014-08-06

    Little is known about the Hymenoptera venom allergy impact on work ability and the effect of venom immunotherapy (VIT) on work. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and predictors of work disability in patients treated with VIT and the effects of VIT on occupational functioning. 181 patients, aged 18-71 years, treated with VIT while working, were investigated by questionnaire. Participants were classified into employed and self-employed and, based on work exposure to Hymenoptera, into three risk categories: high risk, occasionally high risk and low risk. Work disability was defined as having to have changed jobs/tasks and/or suffered economic loss because of Hymenoptera venom allergy. Predictors of work disability were assessed in logistic regression models. 31 (17%) patients reported work disability. Being self-employed and having the severe reaction at work were associated with work disability (pallergy could determine work disability. Patients with Hymenoptera venom allergy having a high-risk job for exposure to Hymenoptera seem to have higher risk of work disability and refer more frequently a positive effect of VIT on work. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  2. Interactions of the Calcite {10.4} Surface with Organic Compounds: Structure and Behaviour at Mineral – Organic Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakim, S. S.; Olsson, M. H. M.; Sørensen, H. O.

    2017-01-01

    that control crystal growth with organic macromolecules. Carbonate rocks, composed almost exclusively of calcite, host drinking water aquifers and oil reservoirs. In this study, we examined the ordering behaviour of several organic compounds and the thickness of the adsorbed layers formed on calcite {10...

  3. Organized turbulent motions in a hedgerow vineyard: effect of evolving canopy structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendrame, Nadia; Tezza, Luca; Tha Paw U, Kyaw; Pitacco, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Vegetation-atmosphere exchanges are determined by functional and structural properties of the plants together with environmental forcing. However, a fundamental aspect is the interaction of the canopy with the lower atmosphere. The vegetation deeply alters the composition and physical properties of the air flow, exchanging energy, matter and momentum with it. These processes take place in the bottom part of the atmospheric boundary layer where turbulence is the main mechanism transporting within-canopy air towards the mid- and upper atmospheric boundary layer and vice versa. Canopy turbulence is highly influenced by vegetation drag elements, determining the vertical profile of turbulent moments within the canopy. Canopies organized in rows, like vineyards, show peculiar turbulent transport dynamics. In addition, the morphological structure (phenology) of the vineyard is greatly variable seasonally, shifting from an empty canopy during vine dormancy to dense foliage in summer. The understanding of the canopy ventilation regime is related to several practical applications in vineyard management. For example, within-canopy turbulent motion is very important to predict small particles dispersion, like fungal spores, and minimize infection studying the effect on leaf wetness duration. Our study aims to follow the continuous evolution of turbulence characteristics and canopy structure during the growing season of a hedgerow vineyard, from bud break to fully developed canopy. The field experiment was conducted in a flat extensive vineyard in North-Eastern Italy, using a vertical array of five synchronous sonic anemometers within and above the canopy. Turbulent flow organization was greatly influenced by canopy structure. Turbulent coherent structures involved in momentum transport have been investigated using the classical quadrant analysis and a novel approach to identify dominant temporal scales. Momentum transport in the canopy was dominated by downward gusts showing

  4. Self-organizing biochemical cycle in dynamic feedback with soil structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyeva, Nadezda; Vladimirov, Artem; Smirnov, Alexander; Matveev, Sergey; Tyrtyshnikov, Evgeniy; Yudina, Anna; Milanovskiy, Evgeniy; Shein, Evgeniy

    2016-04-01

    In the present study we perform bifurcation analysis of a physically-based mathematical model of self-organized structures in soil (Vasilyeva et al., 2015). The state variables in this model included microbial biomass, two organic matter types, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water content and capillary pore size. According to our previous experimental studies, organic matter affinity to water is an important property affecting soil structure. Therefore, organic matter wettability was taken as principle distinction between organic matter types in this model. It considers general known biological feedbacks with soil physical properties formulated as a system of parabolic type non-linear partial differential equations with elements of discrete modeling for water and pore formation. The model shows complex behavior, involving emergence of temporal and spatial irregular auto-oscillations from initially homogeneous distributions. The energy of external impact on a system was defined by a constant oxygen level on the boundary. Non-linear as opposed to linear oxygen diffusion gives possibility of modeling anaerobic micro-zones formation (organic matter conservation mechanism). For the current study we also introduced population competition of three different types of microorganisms according to their mobility/feeding (diffusive, moving and fungal growth). The strongly non-linear system was solved and parameterized by time-optimized algorithm combining explicit and implicit (matrix form of Thomas algorithm) methods considering the time for execution of the evaluated time-step according to accuracy control. The integral flux of the CO2 state variable was used as a macroscopic parameter to describe system as a whole and validation was carried out on temperature series of moisture dependence for soil heterotrophic respiration data. Thus, soil heterotrophic respiration can be naturally modeled as an integral result of complex dynamics on microscale, arising from biological processes

  5. Using operational and defined fractions to assess soil organic matter stabilization and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horwath, W. R.

    2015-12-01

    Studies on soil organic matter (SOM) began with alkaline solvents revealing a dark colored substance that could be isolated under low pH. Further studies revealed fulvic and humic acids and humin fractions leading to theories on functional groups and metal-clay bridging mechanisms. The fate of isotopes in these fractions revealed soil carbon pools with varying turnover rates with half the soil carbon (C) in humin and acid hydrolyzed fractions over 1000 years old. These results are the basis of the three pool conceptual framework used in many biogeochemical models. Theories on the role of functional groups and compound classes further elaborated concepts on physical (aggregates) and chemical mechanisms of C stabilization. With the advance of analytical instrumentation, the operational fractions were further defined to the compound and molecular levels. These studies confirmed the majority of soil C is microbially derived. Our observation that all microbial groups contributed nonselectively to soil C maintenance independent of mineralogy suggests that compound characteristics within integrated structures are more important than the source of individual compounds for stabilizing soil C. In dissolved organic C floccing studies using Near Edge X-ray Fine Structure analysis, we found that aromatic compounds interacted first with Fe, however, the majority of direct bonds to Fe were polysaccharides, reinforcing that an integrative chemical structure rather than direct bonds imparted stability in organo-metal interactions. Using a novel differential scanning calorimeter coupled to an isotope ratio mass spectrometer setup, we confirmed that the presence of clays (independent of clay type) increased the microbial utilization of calcium stabilized high versus low temperature compounds, asserting that higher temperature compounds (i.e., phenolics) are likely less tightly bound by clay minerals. The integration of operational and defined fractions of SOM remains a legitimate

  6. Morphology dependent two photon absorption in plasmonic structures and plasmonic-organic hybrids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambhir, Kaweri; Ray, Bhumika; Mehrotra, Ranjana; Sharma, Parag

    2017-05-01

    Two photon absorption coefficients of two distinct plasmonic structures, namely, gold nanoflowers (GNF) and gold nanopebbles (GNP) have been investigated and compared with conventional gold nanospheres (GNS). All three different nanoshapes were synthesized by changing the reaction solvent under the same experimental procedure. Further, hybrids of these plasmonic structures were prepared with an organic dye Eosin yellow (EY), to investigate the morphology effect of plasmonic structures on plasmonic-organic hybrids in terms of their linear extinction spectra and two photon absorption coefficients. The NLO investigations were conducted using 20 ps laser pulses of wavelength 532 nm as an excitation source in single beam Z-scan setup. UV/visible spectroscopy was employed for monitoring plasmon resonances and changes in linear extinction spectra. The experimental outcomes revealed two photon absorption coefficients of EY increased 120%, 32% and 39%, while 69%, 60% and 53% enhancement in the peaks of linear extinction maxima of EY has been observed, when hybridized with GNF, GNS and GNP, respectively. This boost in the optical coefficients may be attributed to dimerization of EY molecules on the surface of nanoparticles. Keeping the toxicity of EY in view, we propose that the two photon absorption coefficients of this dye and control thereof, by the addition of plasmonic structures would be helpful not only in understanding the interactions between plasmons and fluorophore, but also pave an efficient way, to reduce the operative concentration of this hazardous dye in a wide range of applications and thereby, mitigating the environmental degradation caused by its highly concentrated effluents.

  7. Electronic, structural and chemical effects of charge-transfer at organic/inorganic interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, R.; Vázquez de Parga, A. L.; Gallego, J. M.

    2017-07-01

    During the last decade, interest on the growth and self-assembly of organic molecular species on solid surfaces spread over the scientific community, largely motivated by the promise of cheap, flexible and tunable organic electronic and optoelectronic devices. These efforts lead to important advances in our understanding of the nature and strength of the non-bonding intermolecular interactions that control the assembly of the organic building blocks on solid surfaces, which have been recently reviewed in a number of excellent papers. To a large extent, such studies were possible because of a smart choice of model substrate-adsorbate systems where the molecule-substrate interactions were purposefully kept low, so that most of the observed supramolecular structures could be understood simply by considering intermolecular interactions, keeping the role of the surface always relatively small (although not completely negligible). On the other hand, the systems which are more relevant for the development of organic electronic devices include molecular species which are electron donors, acceptors or blends of donors and acceptors. Adsorption of such organic species on solid surfaces is bound to be accompanied by charge-transfer processes between the substrate and the adsorbates, and the physical and chemical properties of the molecules cannot be expected any longer to be the same as in solution phase. In recent years, a number of groups around the world have started tackling the problem of the adsorption, self- assembly and electronic and chemical properties of organic species which interact rather strongly with the surface, and for which charge-transfer must be considered. The picture that is emerging shows that charge transfer can lead to a plethora of new phenomena, from the development of delocalized band-like electron states at molecular overlayers, to the existence of new substrate-mediated intermolecular interactions or the strong modification of the chemical

  8. Segmentation features and structural organization of the intrapulmonary artery of the yak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jinxing; Yu, Sijiu; He, Junfeng; Cui, Yan

    2013-11-01

    This study aims to systematically investigate intrapulmonary artery segmentation, blood vessel wall characteristics and structure organization, and the interrelation between intrapulmonary artery structure and plateau hypoxia adaptation in yak. The normal intrapulmonary artery structure of the yak had been studied using histological methods and transmission electron microscopy. The intrapulmonary artery of the yak was also examined using morphometric analysis and angiography. Results showed that the elastic intrapulmonary artery is divided into two types, namely, classical and transitional elastic segments. The muscular intrapulmonary artery is divided into three types, namely, transitional, classical muscular, and muscular arteriole segments. In the transitional elastic artery, elastic fibers and smooth muscles are linked through three models of ends, lateral branches, and branch tops. Two phenomena are possible for the transition from the elastic intrapulmonary artery to the muscular artery. One phenomenon postulates that a less elastic membrane is first increased and then suddenly decreased, and another supposes that the elastic membrane is gradually reduced and assembled in one to two layers before entering the transitional muscular artery. The smooth muscle of the intrapulmonary artery tunica media had more apophysis; it was physically connected with elastic membrane or fiber and composed of functionally resilient unit of the intrapulmonary arterial wall. Glycogenosomes increased in the muscular intrapulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. It exist one to two layers intact smooth muscle in intrapulmonary arteriole, the presence of intact smooth muscle in the intrapulmonary arteriole of the yak is a kind of structure adaptation to low-oxygen environment. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Self-organizing fuzzy graphs for structure-based comparison of protein pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisen, Felix; Weisel, Martin; Kriegl, Jan M; Schneider, Gisbert

    2010-12-03

    Patterns of receptor-ligand interaction can be conserved in functionally equivalent proteins even in the absence of sequence homology. Therefore, structural comparison of ligand-binding pockets and their pharmacophoric features allow for the characterization of so-called "orphan" proteins with known three-dimensional structure but unknown function, and predict ligand promiscuity of binding pockets. We present an algorithm for rapid pocket comparison (PoLiMorph), in which protein pockets are represented by self-organizing graphs that fill the volume of the cavity. Vertices in these three-dimensional frameworks contain information about the local ligand-receptor interaction potential coded by fuzzy property labels. For framework matching, we developed a fast heuristic based on the maximum dispersion problem, as an alternative to techniques utilizing clique detection or geometric hashing algorithms. A sophisticated scoring function was applied that incorporates knowledge about property distributions and ligand-receptor interaction patterns. In an all-against-all virtual screening experiment with 207 pocket frameworks extracted from a subset of PDBbind, PoLiMorph correctly assigned 81% of 69 distinct structural classes and demonstrated sustained ability to group pockets accommodating the same ligand chemotype. We determined a score threshold that indicates "true" pocket similarity with high reliability, which not only supports structure-based drug design but also allows for sequence-independent studies of the proteome.

  10. Novel dense organic-lanthanide hybrid architectures: syntheses, structures and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Zheng-Shuai; Xu, Jing; Okamura, Taka-aki; Chen, Man-Sheng; Sun, Wei-Yin; Ueyama, Norikazu

    2009-04-14

    Six novel three-dimensional (3D) dense organic-lanthanide(III) frameworks with formula {[Ln(HBPTCA)(H2O)].3H2O}n [Ln = La (1), Ce (2), Sm (3)] and [Ln4(BPTCA)3(H2O)4]n [Ln = Tb (4), Dy (5), Ho (6)] were obtained by reactions of the corresponding lanthanide nitrate salt with 4,4'-bipyridine-2,2',6,6'-tetracarboxylic acid (H4BPTCA) under different conditions. Complexes 1-3 have the same structure with (4, 6(2))(2)(4(2), 6(10), 8(3)) topology, which is rare binodal (3, 6)-connecting rutile structure, while the complexes 4-6 also with the same structure have different topology of (4(2), 6)(4)(6, 8(2))(4)(4(3), 6(3))(4)(4(2), 6(4))(6)(4(4), 6(5), 8(5), 10). The results indicate that the reaction conditions have great influence on the structure of the resulted complexes in this system. In addition, the H4BPTCA was found to be an effective bridging ligand for construction of novel lanthanide-based dense hybrids, and two new coordination modes of the BPTCA4- were found in the complexes. The photoluminescent property of 4 and magnetic properties of 2, 5 and 6 were also investigated.

  11. Changes in the structural organization of the cytoskeleton of Tritrichomonas foetus during trophozoite-pseudocyst transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Andrade Rosa, Ivone; de Souza, Wanderley; Benchimol, Marlene

    2015-06-01

    Tritrichomonas foetus is a parasite that causes bovine trichomonosis, a major sexually transmitted disease in cattle. It grows in axenic media as a trophozoite with a pear-shaped body, three anterior flagella, and one recurrent flagellum. However, under some well-controlled experimental conditions in vitro, as well as in vivo in infected bulls, the parasite acquires a spherical or elliptical shape, and the flagella are internalized but the cells do not display a cyst wall. This form, known as the endoflagellar or pseudocystic form, is viable, and can be transformed back to trophozoites with pear-shaped body. We used confocal laser scanning microscopy, and high resolution scanning electron microscopy to examine the changes that take place in the protozoan cytoskeleton during trophozoite-pseudocyst transformation. Results confirmed previous studies and added new structural information to the organization of cytoskeletal structures during the transformation process. We observed that changes take place in the pseudocysts' axostyle and costa, which acquired a curved shape. In addition, the costa of multinucleated/polymastigont pseudocysts took variable conformations while curved. The costa accessory structure, as well as a network of filaments connecting this structure to the region where the recurrent flagellum associates to the protozoan body, was not seen in pseudocysts. In addition, the axostyle was fragmented during trophozoite-pseudocyst transformation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Investigation of charge injection and transport behavior in multilayer structure consisted of ferromagnetic metal and organic polymer under external fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hua; Meng, Wei-Feng

    2017-10-01

    In this paper a five layer organic electronic device with alternately placed ferromagnetic metals and organic polymers: ferromagnetic metal/organic layer/ferromagnetic metal/organic layer/ferromagnetic metal, which is injected a spin-polarized electron from outsides, is studied theoretically using one-dimensional tight binding model Hamiltonian. We calculated equilibrium state behavior after an electron with spin is injected into the organic layer of this structure, charge density distribution and spin polarization density distribution of this injected spin-polarized electron, and mainly studied possible transport behavior of the injected spin polarized electron in this multilayer structure under different external electric fields. We analyze the physical process of the injected electron in this multilayer system. It is found by our calculation that the injected spin polarized electron exists as an electron-polaron state with spin polarization in the organic layer and it can pass through the middle ferromagnetic layer from the right-hand organic layer to the left-hand organic layer by the action of increasing external electric fields, which indicates that this structure may be used as a possible spin-polarized charge electronic device and also may provide a theoretical base for the organic electronic devices and it is also found that in the boundaries between the ferromagnetic layer and the organic layer there exist induced interface local dipoles due to the external electric fields.

  13. Structure and composition of organic reefs and carbonate mud mounds: concepts and categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riding, Robert

    2002-07-01

    Defined here as 'essentially in place calcareous deposits created by sessile organisms', Organic Reefs are diverse and complex structures with a long geological history. Their classification has been the subject of fierce debate, often characterized by reliance on subjective features such as wave-resistance and qualitative attempts to discriminate between 'first' and 'second class' reefs. In contrast, emphasis is here placed on the objective characteristic of the type of sedimentary support, which largely determines the sedimentary composition of the deposit. Constructional and depositional processes result in three principal sedimentary components: matrix (M), essentially in place skeletons (S) and cavity/ cement (C), whose proportions can be represented on MSC triangular plots. Separately or together, these components also provide the structural support for the reef. On these compositional and structural bases, three main categories of Organic Reef are recognized: Matrix-supported reefs (Agglutinated Microbial Reefs, Cluster Reefs, Segment Reefs), Skeleton-supported reefs (Frame Reefs), Cement-supported reefs (Cement Reefs). Agglutinated Microbial Reefs: possess laminated, clotted, or aphanitic fabrics created by microbial trapping of particulate sediment; in place skeletons and large primary cavities are rare; early cementation may provide added support; topographic relief is limited by the need for currents to provide sediment to accreting surfaces. Cluster Reefs: skeletal reefs in which essentially in place skeletons are adjacent, but not in contact, resulting in matrix support; characterized by relatively high matrix/skeleton ratios and low volumes of extra-skeletal early cement. Sediment trapping is an important corollary of skeletal growth and Cluster Reef organisms are tolerant of loose sediment. Absence of framework limits the topographic relief that Cluster Reefs can attain relative to spatial extent, and may permit bedding to develop within the reef

  14. Predator deterrence by mandibular gland secretions of bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cane, J H

    1986-06-01

    Volatile lipids from the mandibular gland secretions of bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) are potent olfactory repellents of foraging ants (Formica, Crematogaster) in biologically relevant contexts and quantities. In contrast, differential success in capture of bee and fly prey by predatory asilid flies (Efferia), reduviid bugs (Apiomerus), and arachnids (Agelenopsis, Argiope) is better explained by prey size than by chemical repellence, aposematism, or possession of a sting. Supernormal doses of some allomones, applied to worker honeybees (Apis mellifera) that were fed toArgiope aurantia spiders, elicted more frequent preenvenomation pauses following ensnarement but did not significantly increase other prey-handling times. These pauses merely delayed the bee's demise. Mandibular gland secretions of solitary bees augment their other secondary defenses in at least two contexts: (1) during intranest encounters when repelling intruding ants, and (2) retaliation delivered to their arthropodan predators which, if the bee is nearly too large for the predator to handle, may allow the bee to escape.

  15. New records of spider wasps (Hymenoptera, Pompilidae from Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Castro Huertas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available New records of genera and species of spider wasps (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae from Colombia are provided. Agenioideus, Cryptocheilus, Evagetes, Mystacagenia, and Xerochares are newly recorded genera from Colombia. Nineteen species are first recorded from Colombia: Aimatocare vitrea (Fox; Ageniella azteca (Cameron; Ageniella curtipinus (Cameron; Ageniella fallax (Arlé; Ageniella hirsuta Banks; Ageniella pilifrons (Cameron; Ageniella pretiosa Banks; Ageniella sanguinolenta (Smith; Ageniella zeteki (Banks; Agenioideus birkmanni (Banks; Aporus (Aporus cuzco Evans; Aporus (Cosmiaporus diverticulus (Fox; Aporus (Notoplaniceps canescens Smith; Euplaniceps exilis (Banks; Euplaniceps herbertii (Fox; Irenangelus clarus Evans; Mystacagenia bellula Evans; Phanochilus nobilitatus (Smith and Xerochares expulsus Schulz. The following species and genera have their occurence ranges expanded for South America: Ageniella azteca (Cameron; Ageniella zeteki (Banks; Agenioideus birkmanni (Banks; and Xerochares expulsus Schulz; Cryptocheilus Panzer; and Xerochares Evans.

  16. On the identity of Melipona torrida Friese (Hymenoptera, Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel A. R. Melo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available On the identity of Melipona torrida Friese (Hymenoptera, Apidae. Melipona marginata var. torrida Friese, 1916, described from three workers putatively collected in Costa Rica, never had its identity properly recognized. Since its original description, no additional specimens have ever been collected in Costa Rica. It is argued here that Melipona torrida was based on mislabeled specimens and corresponds to Melipona marginata obscurior Moure, 1971, a form known only from southern Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay. A lectotype is designated for Melipona torrida and notes on the type material of Melipona marginata obscurior are provided. Other known examples of species described from mislabeled specimens in Friese's Zur Bienenfauna von Costa Rica are discussed. It is pointed out that additional names proposed in this work, based on material from Costa Rica, might turn out to correspond to South American taxa. Also, the date of publication of this Friese's paper is discussed.

  17. An annotated catalogue of the Iranian Alysiinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadallah, Neveen S; Ghahari, Hassan; Peris-Felipo, Francisco Javier; Fischer, Maximilian

    2015-06-19

    In the present study, a catalogue of the Iranian Alysiinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is given. It is based on a detailed study of all available published data. In total 78 species from 15 genera including Alloea Haliday, 1833 (1 species), Angelovia Zaykov, 1980 (1 species), Aphaereta Foerster, 1862 (2 species), Aspilota Foerster, 1862 (2 species), Chorebus Haliday, 1833 (42 species), Coelinidea Viereck, 1913 (2 species), Coloneura Foerster, 1862 (1 species), Dacnusa Haliday, 1833 (10 species), Dinotrema Foerster, 1862 (5 species), Idiasta Foerster, 1862 (1 species), Orthostigma Ratzeburg, 1844 (3 species), Phaenocarpa Foerster, 1862 (1 species), Protodacnusa Griffiths, 1964 (2 species), Pseudopezomachus Mantero, 1905 (2 species), and Synaldis Foerster, 1862 (3 species) are reported in this catalogue. Two species are new records for Iran: Coelinidea elegans (Curtis, 1829) and Dacnusa (Pachysema) aterrima Thomson, 1895. Also, a faunistic list with distribution data and host records is provided.

  18. Cytogenetic characterization of Partamona cupira (Hymenoptera, Apidae by fluorochromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson de Brito Marthe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Four colonies of the stingless bee Partamona cupira (Hymenoptera: Apidae were cytogenetically analyzed using conventional staining and the fluorochromes CMA3 e DAPI. The females have 2n = 34 chromosomes (2K=32+2. Some females, however, presented an additional large B acrocentric chromosome, to a total of 2n = 35. Chromosome B and the chromosomal pairs 2, 9 and 10 showed CMA3+ bands, indicating an excess of CG base-pairs. A clear association was verified between the P. helleri B chromosome SCAR marker and the presence of a B chromosome in P. cupira. The data obtained suggests that B chromosomes in P. helleri and P. cupira share a common origin.

  19. Revision of the Paridris nephta species group (Hymenoptera, Platygastroidea, Platygastridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elijah Talamas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Paridris nephta group is revised (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae. Fifteen species are described, 14 of which are new: Paridris atrox Talamas, sp. n. (Yunnan Province, China, P. bunun Talamas, sp. n. (Taiwan, P. ferus Talamas, sp. n. (Thailand, P. kagemono Talamas, sp. n. (Japan, P. minator Talamas, sp. n. (Laos, Thailand, P. mystax Talamas, sp. n. (Laos, Thailand, P. nephta (Kozlov (Japan, North Korea, South Korea, Far Eastern Russia, P. nilaka Talamas, sp. n. (Thailand, P. reptilis Talamas, sp. n. (Taiwan, P. rugulosus Talamas, sp. n. (Laos, Vietnam, P. solaris Talamas, sp. n. (Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, P. teres Talamas, sp. n. (Vietnam, P. toketoki Talamas, sp. n. (Taiwan, P. verrucosus Talamas, sp. n. (Guangdong Province, China, P. yak Talamas, sp. n. (Thailand.

  20. Role of α-Helical Structure in Organic Solvent-Activated Homodimer of Elastase Strain K

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Fah Wong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recombinant elastase strain K overexpressed from E. coli KRX/pCon2(3 was purified to homogeneity by a combination of hydrophobic interaction chromatography and ion exchange chromatography, with a final yield of 48% and a 25-fold increase in specific activity. The purified protein had exhibited a first ever reported homodimer size of 65 kDa by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF, a size which is totally distinct from that of typically reported 33 kDa monomer from P. aeruginosa. The organic solvent stability experiment had demonstrated a stability pattern which completely opposed the rules laid out in previous reports in which activity stability and enhancement were observed in hydrophilic organic solvents such as DMSO, methanol, ethanol and 1-propanol. The high stability and enhancement of the enzyme in hydrophilic solvents were explained from the view of alteration in secondary structures. Elastinolytic activation and stability were observed in 25 and 50% of methanol, respectively, despite slight reduction in α-helical structure caused upon the addition of the solvent. Further characterization experiments had postulated great stability and enhancement of elastase strain K in broad range of temperatures, pHs, metal ions, surfactants, denaturing agents and substrate specificity, indicating its potential application in detergent formulation.

  1. Recent Advances in Organic Photovoltaics: Device Structure and Optical Engineering Optimization on the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Guoping; Ren, Xingang; Zhang, Su; Wu, Hongbin; Choy, Wallace C H; He, Zhicai; Cao, Yong

    2016-03-23

    Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices, which can directly convert absorbed sunlight to electricity, are stacked thin films of tens to hundreds of nanometers. They have emerged as a promising candidate for affordable, clean, and renewable energy. In the past few years, a rapid increase has been seen in the power conversion efficiency of OPV devices toward 10% and above, through comprehensive optimizations via novel photoactive donor and acceptor materials, control of thin-film morphology on the nanoscale, device structure developments, and interfacial and optical engineering. The intrinsic problems of short exciton diffusion length and low carrier mobility in organic semiconductors creates a challenge for OPV designs for achieving optically thick and electrically thin device structures to achieve sufficient light absorption and efficient electron/hole extraction. Recent advances in the field of OPV devices are reviewed, with a focus on the progress in device architecture and optical engineering approaches that lead to improved electrical and optical characteristics in OPV devices. Successful strategies are highlighted for light wave distribution, modulation, and absorption promotion inside the active layer of OPV devices by incorporating periodic nanopatterns/nanostructures or incorporating metallic nanomaterials and nanostructures. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Neutron reflectrometry reveals the internal structure of natural organic matter deposited onto an aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Jagadamma, Sindhu [ORNL; Ambaye, Haile Arena [ORNL; Petridis, Loukas [ORNL; Lauter, Valeria [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Organic carbon (OC) stabilization in soils plays a significant role in the global C cycle, therefore understanding the structure and function of the OC soil mineral interface is of high importance. To study the interface, films of simple OC compounds and natural organic matter (NOM) were deposited onto a soil mineral analogue (Al2O3) using spin coating and were exposed to humidity. The thickness, density and structure of the films were studied using a depth-sensitive, nano-scale technique of neutron reflectometry. A single homogenous layer was observed when NOM and glucose (GL) were adsorbed onto Al2O3. However, when stearic acid (SA) was added to either NOM or GL, separate layers attributed to SA and either NOM or GL were detected. The formation of distinct, immiscible layers is due to insolubility of SA with NOM and GL. In contrast, GL and NOM are both water-soluble, and therefore soluble with each other, forming a homogenous layer on the mineral surface. Our results suggest that the extent of complex layering formed on the OC mineral interface may depend on the relative solubility of the compounds.

  3. Structural insights into two inorganic-organic hybrids based on chiral amino acids and polyoxomolybdates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arefian, Mina; Mirzaei, Masoud; Eshtiagh-Hosseini, Hossein

    2018-03-01

    A new chiral inorganic-organic hybrid with the formula (L-His)2(H7CoMo6O24)·6H2O (1), based on natural amino acid and Anderson type polyoxomolybdate was synthesized through mild condition. The chiral L-histidine molecules induced chirality to the whole structure through various types of strong and unconventional hydrogen bond (HB) interactions (CH⋯O, NH⋯O and CH···π interactions), as well as bifurcated hydrogen bonds (BHBs) between L-histidine amino acid, hexamer water cluster molecules, and H7CoMo6O24·xH2O. Following, important non-covalent CH⋯O interactions is investigated in another chiral inorganic-organic hybrid structure, (L-Pro)3(PMo12O40).4.5H2O (2), in detail. The CH⋯O hydrogen bonds lead to a chiral network similar to the DNA strands affording a promising candidate to bio-inorganic studies.

  4. Report on the sixth blind test of organic crystal structure prediction methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Anthony M.; Cooper, Richard I.; Adjiman, Claire S.; Bhattacharya, Saswata; Boese, A. Daniel; Brandenburg, Jan Gerit; Bygrave, Peter J.; Bylsma, Rita; Campbell, Josh E.; Car, Roberto; Case, David H.; Chadha, Renu; Cole, Jason C.; Cosburn, Katherine; Cuppen, Herma M.; Curtis, Farren; Day, Graeme M.; DiStasio Jr, Robert A.; Dzyabchenko, Alexander; van Eijck, Bouke P.; Elking, Dennis M.; van den Ende, Joost A.; Facelli, Julio C.; Ferraro, Marta B.; Fusti-Molnar, Laszlo; Gatsiou, Christina-Anna; Gee, Thomas S.; de Gelder, René; Ghiringhelli, Luca M.; Goto, Hitoshi; Grimme, Stefan; Guo, Rui; Hofmann, Detlef W. M.; Hoja, Johannes; Hylton, Rebecca K.; Iuzzolino, Luca; Jankiewicz, Wojciech; de Jong, Daniël T.; Kendrick, John; de Klerk, Niek J. J.; Ko, Hsin-Yu; Kuleshova, Liudmila N.; Li, Xiayue; Lohani, Sanjaya; Leusen, Frank J. J.; Lund, Albert M.; Lv, Jian; Ma, Yanming; Marom, Noa; Masunov, Artëm E.; McCabe, Patrick; McMahon, David P.; Meekes, Hugo; Metz, Michael P.; Misquitta, Alston J.; Mohamed, Sharmarke; Monserrat, Bartomeu; Needs, Richard J.; Neumann, Marcus A.; Nyman, Jonas; Obata, Shigeaki; Oberhofer, Harald; Oganov, Artem R.; Orendt, Anita M.; Pagola, Gabriel I.; Pantelides, Constantinos C.; Pickard, Chris J.; Podeszwa, Rafal; Price, Louise S.; Price, Sarah L.; Pulido, Angeles; Read, Murray G.; Reuter, Karsten; Schneider, Elia; Schober, Christoph; Shields, Gregory P.; Singh, Pawanpreet; Sugden, Isaac J.; Szalewicz, Krzysztof; Taylor, Christopher R.; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Tuckerman, Mark E.; Vacarro, Francesca; Vasileiadis, Manolis; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Vogt, Leslie; Wang, Yanchao; Watson, Rona E.; de Wijs, Gilles A.; Yang, Jack; Zhu, Qiang; Groom, Colin R.

    2016-01-01

    The sixth blind test of organic crystal structure prediction (CSP) methods has been held, with five target systems: a small nearly rigid molecule, a polymorphic former drug candidate, a chloride salt hydrate, a co-crystal and a bulky flexible molecule. This blind test has seen substantial growth in the number of participants, with the broad range of prediction methods giving a unique insight into the state of the art in the field. Significant progress has been seen in treating flexible molecules, usage of hierarchical approaches to ranking structures, the application of density-functional approximations, and the establishment of new workflows and ‘best practices’ for performing CSP calculations. All of the targets, apart from a single potentially disordered Z′ = 2 polymorph of the drug candidate, were predicted by at least one submission. Despite many remaining challenges, it is clear that CSP methods are becoming more applicable to a wider range of real systems, including salts, hydrates and larger flexible molecules. The results also highlight the potential for CSP calculations to complement and augment experimental studies of organic solid forms. PMID:27484368

  5. Synthesis, fine structural characterization, and CO2 adsorption capacity of metal organic frameworks-74.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Abhijit Krishna; Lin, Kuen-Song

    2014-04-01

    Two metal organic frameworks of MOF-74 group (zinc and copper-based) were successfully synthesized, characterized, and evaluated for CO2 adsorption. The both samples such as MOF-74(Zn) and MOF-74(Cu) were characterized with FE-SEM for morphology and particle size, XRD patterns for phase structure, FTIR for organic functional groups, nitrogen adsorption for pore textural properties, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy for fine structural parameters and oxidation states of central metal atoms. CO2 adsorption isotherms of MOF-74 samples were measured in a volumetric adsorption unit at 273 K and pressure up to 1.1 bar. The MOF-74(Zn) and MOF-74(Cu) adsorbents have the pore widths of 8.58 and 8.04 angstroms with the BET specific surface areas of 1,474 and 1,345 m2 g(-1), respectively. CO2 adsorption capacities of MOF-74(Zn) and MOF-74(Cu) were 4.10 and 3.38 mmol x g(-1), respectively measured at 273 K and 1.1 bar. The oxidation state of central atoms in MOF-74(Zn) was Zn(II) confirmed by XANES spectra while MOF-74(Cu) was composed of Cu(I) and Cu(II) central atoms. The bond distances of Zn--O and Cu--O were 1.98 and 1.94 angstroms, respectively.

  6. Effects of the benzoxazolinone BOA, selected degradation products and structure related pesticides on soil organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coja, Tamara; Idinger, Jacqueline; Blümel, Sylvia

    2006-02-01

    The benzoxazolinone BOA and the degradation products APO, AAPO and HPAA, as well as four structure related compounds to BOA, were tested for their lethal and sublethal effects on the collembola Folsomia candida and on the carabid beetle Poecilus cupreus applying validated standard laboratory methods. According to the results of the recommended risk assessment for plant protection products (EPPO, 2003), BOA and its structure related compounds carbendazim, benoxacor and benazolin (and additionally the formulated product Cresopur) were classified as low risk compounds for both test organisms. Phosalone was of high risk for F. candida. APO, AAPO and HPAA were of medium risk for F. candida, but were rated as low risk compounds for P. cupreus at the tested rates of about 2 mg/kg substrate. However, as the BOA degradation products have been found to occur at field rates below 0.2 mg/kg substrate or are often even not detectable, it is assumed that their potential risk for both non-target soil organisms in the field will be acceptable.

  7. Organic-inorganic semiconductor hybrid systems. Structure, morphology, and electronic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Helou, Mira

    2012-08-22

    This dissertation addresses the preparation and characterization of hybrid semiconducting systems combining organic with inorganic materials. Characterization methods used included to determine the structure, morphology, and thermal stability comprised X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). One organic-inorganic semiconducting system was pentacene (C{sub 22}H{sub 14}) and zinc oxide. This interface was investigated in detail for pentacene on an oxygen-terminated zinc oxide surface, i.e. ZnO(000 anti 1). An extended study on the promising p-n junction was carried out for pentacene on ZnO with different orientations which exhibit different chemical and structural characteristics: ZnO(000 anti 1), ZnO(0001), and ZnO(10 anti 10). Moreover, the organic crystal structure of pentacene was selectively tuned by carefully choosing the substrate temperature. This defined interface with a physisorbed pentacene layer on ZnO was characterized by optical absorption which depends on the temperature of the measured system, the pentacene film thickness, and the molecular orientation and packing. The high quality of the pentacene films allowed in one case to characterize the Davydov splitting by linear polarized light focused on a single crystallite. Another subject in the field of organic-inorganic hybrid materials comprised conjugated dithiols used as self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) for immobilizing semiconducting CdS nanoparticles (NPs) on Au substrates. It was demonstrated that an appropriate selection and preparation of the conjugated SAMs is crucial for building up a light-addressable potentiometric sensor with a sufficient efficiency. An optimized electron transfer was achieved with SAMs of long range ordering, high stability, and adequate conductivity. This was examined for different linkers and was best for stilbenedithiol immobilized in solution at higher temperatures. Due

  8. Structure-activity relationships to estimate the effective Henry's law constants of organics of atmospheric interest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Raventos-Duran

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The Henry's law constant is a key property needed to address the multiphase behaviour of organics in the atmosphere. Methods that can reliably predict the values for the vast number of organic compounds of atmospheric interest are therefore required. The effective Henry's law constant H* in air-water systems at 298 K was compiled from literature for 488 organic compounds bearing functional groups of atmospheric relevance. This data set was used to assess the reliability of the HENRYWIN bond contribution method and the SPARC approach for the determination of H*. Moreover, this data set was used to develop GROMHE, a new Structure Activity Relationship (SAR based on a group contribution approach. These methods estimate logH* with a Root Mean Square Error (RMSE of 0.38, 0.61, and 0.73 log units for GROMHE, SPARC and HENRYWIN respectively. The results show that for all these methods the reliability of the estimates decreases with increasing solubility. The main differences among these methods lie in H* prediction for compounds with H* greater than 103 M atm−1. For these compounds, the predicted values of logH* using GROMHE are more accurate (RMSE = 0.53 than the estimates from SPARC or HENRYWIN.

  9. Charge separation energetics at organic heterojunctions: on the role of structural and electrostatic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castet, Frédéric; D'Avino, Gabriele; Muccioli, Luca; Cornil, Jérôme; Beljonne, David

    2014-10-14

    Improving the performance of organic photovoltaic cells requires the individuation of the specific factors limiting their efficiency, by rationalizing the relationship between the chemical nature of the materials, their morphology, and the electronic processes taking place at their interface. In this contribution, we present recent theoretical advances regarding the determination of the energetics and dynamics of charge carriers at organic-organic interfaces, highlighting the role of structural and electrostatic disorder in the separation of electron-hole pairs. The influence of interfacial electrostatic interactions on charge carrier energetics is first illustrated in model aggregates. Then, we review some of our recent theoretical studies in which we combined molecular dynamics, quantum-chemical and classical micro-electrostatic methods to evaluate the energy landscape explored by the mobile charges in the vicinity of donor-acceptor interfaces with realistic morphologies. Finally, we describe the theoretical challenges that still need to be overcome in order to gain a complete overview of the charge separation processes at the molecular level.

  10. On the Effect of Confinement on the Structure and Properties of Small-Molecular Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martín, Jaime [Centre for Plastic Electronics and Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road London SW7 2AZ UK; POLYMAT, University of the Basque Country UPV/EHU Avenida de Tolosa 72, 20018 Donostia-San Sebastián Spain; Dyson, Matthew [Centre for Plastic Electronics and Department of Physics, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road London SW7 2AZ UK; Reid, Obadiah G. [Chemical and Materials Science Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder CO 80309 USA; Li, Ruipeng [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Wilson Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853 USA; Nogales, Aurora [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia IEM-CSIC, C/Serrano 121 Madrid 28006 Spain; Smilgies, Detlef-M. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Wilson Laboratory, Cornell University, Ithaca NY 14853 USA; Silva, Carlos [School of Chemistry and Biochemistry, School of Physics, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta GA 30332 USA; Rumbles, Garry [Chemical and Materials Science Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Renewable and Sustainable Energy Institute, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder CO 80309 USA; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder CL 80309 USA; Amassian, Aram [KAUST Solar Center (KSC), King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal 23955-6900 Saudi Arabia; Stingelin, Natalie [Centre for Plastic Electronics and Department of Materials, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road London SW7 2AZ UK; School of Materials Science and Engineering and School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, 311 Ferst Drive Atlanta GA 30332 USA

    2017-12-11

    Many typical organic optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, and photovoltaic cells, use an ultrathin active layer where the organic semiconductor is confined within nanoscale dimensions. However, the question of how this spatial constraint impacts the active material is rarely addressed, although it may have a drastic influence on the phase behavior and microstructure of the active layer and hence the final performance. Here, the small-molecule semiconductor p-DTS(FBTTh2)2 is used as a model system to illustrate how sensitive this class of material can be to spatial confinement on device-relevant length scales. It is also shown that this effect can be exploited; it is demonstrated, for instance, that spatial confinement is an efficient tool to direct the crystal orientation and overall texture of p-DTS(FBTTh2)2 structures in a controlled manner, allowing for the manipulation of properties including photoluminescence and charge transport characteristics. This insight should be widely applicable as the temperature/confinement phase diagrams established via differential scanning calorimetry and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction are used to identify specific processing routes that can be directly extrapolated to other functional organic materials, such as polymeric semiconductors, ferroelectrics or high-refractive-index polymers, to induce desired crystal textures or specific (potentially new) polymorphs.

  11. Tuning the structure and function of metal-organic frameworks via linker design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Weigang; Wei, Zhangwen; Gu, Zhi-Yuan; Liu, Tian-Fu; Park, Jinhee; Park, Jihye; Tian, Jian; Zhang, Muwei; Zhang, Qiang; Gentle, Thomas; Bosch, Mathieu; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2014-08-21

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) are constructed from metal ions/clusters coordinated by organic linkers (or bridging-ligands). The hallmark of MOFs is their permanent porosity, which is frequently found in MOFs constructed from metal-clusters. These clusters are often formed in situ, whereas the linkers are generally pre-formed. The geometry and connectivity of a linker dictate the structure of the resulting MOF. Adjustments of linker geometry, length, ratio, and functional-group can tune the size, shape, and internal surface property of a MOF for a targeted application. In this critical review, we highlight advances in MOF synthesis focusing on linker design. Examples of building MOFs to reach unique properties, such as unprecedented surface area, pore aperture, molecular recognition, stability, and catalysis, through linker design are described. Further search for application-oriented MOFs through judicious selection of metal clusters and organic linkers is desirable. In this review, linkers are categorized as ditopic (Section 1), tritopic (Section 2), tetratopic (Section 3), hexatopic (Section 4), octatopic (Section 5), mixed (Section 6), desymmetrized (Section 7), metallo (Section 8), and N-heterocyclic linkers (Section 9).

  12. Influence of organic modification on the structure and properties of polyurethane/sepiolite nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Hongxiang, E-mail: chenhx_916@hotmail.com [Hubei Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion and New Carbon Material, College of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, 947 Heping Road, 430081 Wuhan, Hubei (China); Zeng Danlin [Hubei Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion and New Carbon Material, College of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, 947 Heping Road, 430081 Wuhan, Hubei (China); Xiao Xiaoqin [College of Machinery and Automation, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, 430081 Wuhan (China); Zheng Maosheng [Institute of Condensed Physics and Materials, Northwest University, 710069 Xi' an (China); Ke Changmei; Li Yanjun [Hubei Key Laboratory of Coal Conversion and New Carbon Material, College of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, 947 Heping Road, 430081 Wuhan, Hubei (China)

    2011-01-25

    Research highlights: {yields} KH550 was the best among the three organic modifiers by comparing tensile properties, water resistance and swelling rate. {yields} FTIR revealed the strong interaction between KH550-Sp and the PU matrix. {yields} TEM revealed the compatibility of KH550-Sp and PU was improved. {yields} SEM confirmed the good dispersion of KH550-Sp in PU matrix. - Abstract: The polyurethane (PU) nanocomposites were prepared using organomodified sepiolite (organo-Sp) by in situ polymerization method. The clay was modified with three different organic modifiers such as {gamma}-aminopropyltriethoxylsilane (KH550), hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and lauric acid (LA). The morphology and the dispersion of organo-Sp in polyurethane were characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The influence of organo-Sp on the tensile properties, water resistance and swelling rate of polyurethane composites was studied. The results showed the properties and structure of polyurethane nanocomposites were related to the kind of organic modifier.

  13. On the Effect of Confinement on the Structure and Properties of Small-Molecular Organic Semiconductors

    KAUST Repository

    Martín, Jaime

    2017-12-11

    Many typical organic optoelectronic devices, such as light-emitting diodes, field-effect transistors, and photovoltaic cells, use an ultrathin active layer where the organic semiconductor is confined within nanoscale dimensions. However, the question of how this spatial constraint impacts the active material is rarely addressed, although it may have a drastic influence on the phase behavior and microstructure of the active layer and hence the final performance. Here, the small-molecule semiconductor p-DTS(FBTTh) is used as a model system to illustrate how sensitive this class of material can be to spatial confinement on device-relevant length scales. It is also shown that this effect can be exploited; it is demonstrated, for instance, that spatial confinement is an efficient tool to direct the crystal orientation and overall texture of p-DTS(FBTTh) structures in a controlled manner, allowing for the manipulation of properties including photoluminescence and charge transport characteristics. This insight should be widely applicable as the temperature/confinement phase diagrams established via differential scanning calorimetry and grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction are used to identify specific processing routes that can be directly extrapolated to other functional organic materials, such as polymeric semiconductors, ferroelectrics or high-refractive-index polymers, to induce desired crystal textures or specific (potentially new) polymorphs.

  14. Small Scale Genetic Population Structure of Coral Reef Organisms in Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne Timm

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Small island archipelagos with fringing and dispersed reef systems represent special marine ecosystems, providing a patchy habitat for many coral reef organisms. Although geographic distances may be short, it is still unclear if such environments are inhabited evenly with panmictic conditions or if limited connectivity between marine populations, even on small geographic scales, leads to genetic differentiation between areas within the archipelago or even single reef structures. To study diversity patterns and connectivity between reefs of the Spermonde Archipelago, Indonesia, population genetic analyses of two reef organisms were performed by using the mitochondrial control region and microsatellite markers. A vertebrate (clown anemonefish and an invertebrate species (sea squirt were studied in parallel to investigate if there are general patterns of connectivity in Spermonde for sessile or site attached marine species, which can be extrapolated to a larger group. The genetic population structures revealed restrictions in gene flow in the clown anemone fish (Amphiprion ocellaris, especially between near-shore reefs in the South of the archipelago. This indicates very localized genetic exchange and may also reflect the high self-recruitment typical for these fish. The northern reefs show higher connectivity despite geographic distances being larger. The filter-feeding sessile sea squirt, Polycarpa aurata, features similar population patterns, especially in the southern area. However, connectivity is generally higher in the middle and shelf edge areas of Spermonde for this species. The results underline that there are restrictions to gene flow even on very small geographic scales in the studied organisms, with many barriers to gene flow in the southern shallower shelf area. Weaker currents in this area may lead to more influence of biological factors for dispersal, such as larval behavior, motility and competition for suitable habitat. The

  15. Investigating Bedrock through Canopy Structure, Organization and Connectivity of an Arctic Watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafflon, B.; Leger, E.; Peterson, J.; Ulrich, C.; Soom, F.; Biraud, S.; Tran, A. P.; Wainwright, H. M.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Hubbard, S. S.

    2016-12-01

    Improving understanding of Arctic ecosystem functioning and parameterization of process-rich models that simulate feedbacks to a changing climate require advances in quantifying ecosystem properties, from within the bedrock to the top of the canopy. In Arctic regions having significant elevation gradients and subsurface heterogeneity (bedrock, permafrost, ground ice), quantifying surface and subsurface structure, organization and connectivity of watershed elements is particularly challenging yet is critical for predicting the storage and flux of carbon in a changing climate. In this study, we evaluate linkages between physical properties (incl. fraction of soil constituents, bedrock depth, permafrost characteristics), hydrological conditions and geomorphic characteristics. This study takes place in a Seward Peninsula Watershed near Nome AK, which is characterized by an elevation gradient, extensive bedrock, and discontinuous permafrost. We use a multi-method acquisition strategy to characterize below and above ground properties and their linkages, including point-scale measurements, electrical resistivity tomography, seismic refraction and UAS-based low-altitude aerial imaging. Data integration and analysis is supported by numerical approaches that simulate dynamic hydrological and thermal processes. Overall, this study enables the identification of watershed structure and the links between various soil (incl., water content, temperature, electrical conductivity), landscape properties (incl. wetness conditions, vegetation, topographic metrics) and the bedrock/permafrost distribution and characteristics in a representative Arctic watershed. Low-altitude aerial imaging shows promise to extend the landscape organization analysis approach to larger regions in the Arctic. The obtained information about organization and connectivity of the landscape is expected to be useful for improving predictions of Arctic ecosystem feedbacks to climate.

  16. Factor Structure of the Primary Scales of the Inventory of Personality Organization in a Nonclinical Sample Using Exploratory Structural Equation Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, William D.; Levy, Kenneth N.

    2012-01-01

    Using exploratory structural equation modeling and multiple regression, we examined the factor structure and criterion relations of the primary scales of the Inventory of Personality Organization (IPO; Kernberg & Clarkin, 1995) in a nonclinical sample. Participants (N = 1,260) completed the IPO and measures of self-concept clarity, defenses,…

  17. Adsorption and structural fractionation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) by soil mineral surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avneri, Shani; Polubesova, Tamara; Chefetz, Benny

    2015-04-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) represents a small but highly reactive fraction of the soil organic matter (SOM). One of the important processes affecting the fate of DOM in soils is its interactions with mineral phases. Adsorptive fractionation of DOM by soils and minerals has been observed previously, however detailed changes in composition of DOM due to its interactions with mineral soils were not yet elucidated. In this research the adsorption and physico-chemical fractionation of DOM by soil poor with organic matter and rich with iron oxides and clay fraction was investigated. The changes in DOM structural composition were studied using separation with polymeric resins. The following fractions were obtained: hydrophobic acid (HoA), hydrophobic neutral (HoN), hydrophilic acid (HiA), hydrophilic base (HiB), and hydrophilic neutral (HiN). Two types of DOM were studied: DOM extracted from composted biosolids (compost DOM) and DOM from Suwanee River (SRNOM). Sorption affinity of DOM to soil mineral surfaces was source and chemistry dependent. SRNOM, which was characterized by higher content of aromatic and carboxylic groups demonstrated higher affinity to the studied soil than compost DOM. For both DOM samples preferential adsorption of HoA by soil (50-85% from adsorbed carbon) was observed. Desorption of both DOM types demonstrated significant hysteresis (up to 90-100% of dissolved organic carbon was retained by the soil after 3 cycles of desorption stages). This suggests that DOM desorption behavior was affected by HoA dominant adsorption to the soil mineral fraction, and not by DOM source. Results of this study indicate that interactions of different types of DOM with mineral soil may result in similar changes in composition and properties of DOM both in the supernatant as well as in the adsorbed phase. The change in DOM composition due to its interaction with soil minerals may influence the interactions of pollutants with DOM and soil particle surfaces.

  18. Spatially-resolved in-situ structural study of organic electronic devices with nanoscale resolution: the plasmonic photovoltaic case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paci, B; Bailo, D; Albertini, V Rossi; Wright, J; Ferrero, C; Spyropoulos, G D; Stratakis, E; Kymakis, E

    2013-09-14

    A novel high spatial resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction stratigraphy technique has been applied in-situ to an integrated plasmonic nanoparticle-based organic photovoltaic device. This original approach allows for the disclosure of structure-property relations linking large scale organic devices to length scales of local nano/hetero structures and interfaces between the different components. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Chemical thermodynamics of systemic self-organization towards life by nano-structured cosmic dust particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, F. R.; Kissel, J.

    2001-08-01

    Self-organization of chemicals to living systems demands for several necessary conditions as derived from far-from-equilibrium thermodynamics. Autopoesis is not just self-replication of systems, but is orbital stability of growth, variability, and self-replication. Physically, this means a reaction-diffusion space-time boundary (in/out) problem. The solutions of such a system of related partial non-linear differential coupled equations exhibit orbital stability as needed only if some other conditions are at hand. Of course, template oriented synthesis is needed, however, onset of the cycle demands for high excess reaction energy. The type of non-linearity demands for chirality. The diffusion behaviour needs a nano-grained structure for onset of self-replication, together with critical spatial dimensions in the μm-regime. To meet all chemical and physical requirements the proticity and polarity of a mobile phase (such as liquid water), together with the right heterocatalytic backbone structure and organic precursors are prerequisites, too. To our knowledge only cosmic (esp. cometary or micrometeoritic) dust particles together with liquid water may cause that onset, as we calculated numerically for RNA and peptide life precursors as well. In order to test the dynamics of such a system model grains will be taylored which meet the requirements mentioned. Simple systems are to be prepared on the basis of nano-structured silica spheres. Loading of catalysts and precursors for autocatalytic (peptide or RNA) templates, and furtheron the onset of reaction by changing the liquid phase parameters, will be studied.

  20. Analysis, structure and geochemical significance of organically-bound sulphur in the geosphere : State of the art and future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Leeuw, J.W. de

    1990-01-01

    This paper reviews the developments of the 1980s in the characterisation of organically-bound sulphur in the geosphere and summarises the geochemical significance of the results obtained by these studies. The identification of more than 1500 novel OSC (organic sulphur compounds) with structures

  1. The Effects of the Position of Organizers to Facilitate Learning of Structured Anthropology Materials in the Sixth Grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Buckley Richard

    The purpose of the study, part of the research and curriculum development of the Anthropology Curriculum Project, was to compare the facilitative effects of pre- and post-organizers on the learning of structured anthropology materials at the sixth-grade level. Organizers were defined, in this thesis, as written material that serves the function of…

  2. The roles of tertiary amine structure, background organic matter and chloramine species on NDMA formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selbes, Meric; Kim, Daekyun; Ates, Nuray; Karanfil, Tanju

    2013-02-01

    N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), a probable human carcinogen, is a disinfection by-product that has been detected in chloraminated and chlorinated drinking waters and wastewaters. Formation mechanisms and precursors of NDMA are still not well understood. The main objectives of this study were to systematically investigate (i) the effect of tertiary amine structure, (ii) the effect of background natural organic matter (NOM), and (iii) the roles of mono vs. dichloramine species on the NDMA formation. Dimethylamine (DMA) and 20 different tertiary aliphatic and aromatic amines were carefully examined based on their functional groups attached to the basic DMA structure. The wide range (0.02-83.9%) of observed NDMA yields indicated the importance of the structure of tertiary amines, and both stability and electron distribution of the leaving group of tertiary amines on NDMA formation. DMA associated with branched alkyl groups or benzyl like structures having only one carbon between the ring and DMA structure consistently gave higher NDMA yields. Compounds with electron withdrawing groups (EWG) reacted preferentially with monochloramine, whereas compounds with electron donating group (EDG) showed tendency to react with dichloramine to form NDMA. When the selected amines were present in NOM solutions, NDMA formation increased for compounds with EWG while decreased for compounds with EDG. This impact was attributed to the competitions between NOM and amines for chloramine species. The results provided additional information to the commonly accepted mechanism for NDMA formation including chloramine species reacting with tertiary amines and the role of the leaving group on overall NDMA conversion. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Relating microbial community structure to functioning in forest soil organic carbon transformation and turnover

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yeming; Wang, Juan; Huang, Xueman; Tang, Zuoxin; Liu, Shirong; Sun, Osbert J

    2014-01-01

    Forest soils store vast amounts of terrestrial carbon, but we are still limited in mechanistic understanding on how soil organic carbon (SOC) stabilization or turnover is controlled by biotic and abiotic factors in forest ecosystems. We used phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) as biomarker to study soil microbial community structure and measured activities of five extracellular enzymes involved in the degradation of cellulose (i.e., β-1,4-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase), chitin (i.e., β-1,4-N-acetylglucosaminidase), and lignin (i.e., phenol oxidase and peroxidase) as indicators of soil microbial functioning in carbon transformation or turnover across varying biotic and abiotic conditions in a typical temperate forest ecosystem in central China. Redundancy analysis (RDA) was performed to determine the interrelationship between individual PFLAs and biotic and abiotic site factors as well as the linkage between soil microbial structure and function. Path analysis was further conducted to examine the controls of site factors on soil microbial community structure and the regulatory pathway of changes in SOC relating to microbial community structure and function. We found that soil microbial community structure is strongly influenced by water, temperature, SOC, fine root mass, clay content, and C/N ratio in soils and that the relative abundance of Gram-negative bacteria, saprophytic fungi, and actinomycetes explained most of the variations in the specific activities of soil enzymes involved in SOC transformation or turnover. The abundance of soil bacterial communities is strongly linked with the extracellular enzymes involved in carbon transformation, whereas the abundance of saprophytic fungi is associated with activities of extracellular enzymes driving carbon oxidation. Findings in this study demonstrate the complex interactions and linkage among plant traits, microenvironment, and soil physiochemical properties in affecting SOC via microbial regulations. PMID

  4. A theory of self-organized zonal flow with fine radial structure in tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y. Z.; Liu, Z. Y.; Xie, T.; Mahajan, S. M.; Liu, J.

    2017-12-01

    The (low frequency) zonal flow-ion temperature gradient (ITG) wave system, constructed on Braginskii's fluid model in tokamak, is shown to be a reaction-diffusion-advection system; it is derived by making use of a multiple spatiotemporal scale technique and two-dimensional (2D) ballooning theory. For real regular group velocities of ITG waves, two distinct temporal processes, sharing a very similar meso-scale radial structure, are identified in the nonlinear self-organized stage. The stationary and quasi-stationary structures reflect a particular feature of the poloidal group velocity. The equation set posed to be an initial value problem is numerically solved for JET low mode parameters; the results are presented in several figures and two movies that show the spatiotemporal evolutions as well as the spectrum analysis—frequency-wave number spectrum, auto power spectrum, and Lissajous diagram. This approach reveals that the zonal flow in tokamak is a local traveling wave. For the quasi-stationary process, the cycle of ITG wave energy is composed of two consecutive phases in distinct spatiotemporal structures: a pair of Cavitons growing and breathing slowly without long range propagation, followed by a sudden decay into many Instantons that carry negative wave energy rapidly into infinity. A spotlight onto the motion of Instantons for a given radial position reproduces a Blob-Hole temporal structure; the occurrence as well as the rapid decay of Caviton into Instantons is triggered by zero-crossing of radial group velocity. A sample of the radial profile of zonal flow contributed from 31 nonlinearly coupled rational surfaces near plasma edge is found to be very similar to that observed in the JET Ohmic phase [J. C. Hillesheim et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 165002 (2016)]. The theory predicts an interior asymmetric dipole structure associated with the zonal flow that is driven by the gradients of ITG turbulence intensity.

  5. A new scenario of bioprospecting of Hymenoptera venoms through proteomic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LD Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Venoms represent a huge and essentially unexplored reservoir of bioactive components that may cure diseases that do not respond to currently available therapies. This review select advances reported in the literature from 2000 to the present about the new scenario of Hymenoptera venom composition. On account of new technologies in the proteomic approach, which presents high resolution and sensitivity, the combination of developments in new instruments, fragmentation methods, strategic analysis, and mass spectrometry have become indispensable tools for interrogation of protein expression, molecule interaction, and post- translational modifications. Thus, the biochemical characterization of Hymenoptera venom has become a major subject of research in the area of allergy and immunology, in which proteomics has been an excellent alternative to assist the development of more specific extracts for diagnosis and treatment of hypersensitive patients to Hymenoptera venoms.

  6. Vertical stratification of selected Hymenoptera in a remnant forest of the Po Plain (Italy, Lombardy (Hymenoptera: Ampulicidae, Crabronidae, Sphecidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Di Giovanni

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Communities of the canopy of temperate forests are still relatively unexplored. Furthermore, very little is known on how vertical stratification for some insect groups is related to biological strategies. In this study, we investigated the community composition of both canopy and understory of the families Ampulicidae, Crabronidae and Sphecidae (Hymenoptera of the Natural Reserve of “Bosco della Fontana”, a remnant lowland forest in northeastern Italy. Observed patterns in vertical stratification have been related to species foraging habits. Our study reveals that the bulk of the community of Spheciformes of the understory consists of species predating dipterans and spiders, while species associated with the canopy are mainly predators of sap-sucking honeydew producers and epiphyte grazers, like aphids, thrips, and barkflies. Comparing the communities of canopy and understory may lead to a better understanding of species ecology and provides useful information to forest managers.

  7. Ternary System with Controlled Structure: A New Strategy toward Efficient Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pei; Wang, Rui; Zhu, Jingshuai; Huang, Wenchao; Chang, Sheng-Yung; Meng, Lei; Sun, Pengyu; Cheng, Hao-Wen; Qin, Meng; Zhu, Chenhui; Zhan, Xiaowei; Yang, Yang

    2018-02-01

    Recently, a new type of active layer with a ternary system has been developed to further enhance the performance of binary system organic photovoltaics (OPV). In the ternary OPV, almost all active layers are formed by simple ternary blend in solution, which eventually leads to the disordered bulk heterojunction (BHJ) structure after a spin-coating process. There are two main restrictions in this disordered BHJ structure to obtain higher performance OPV. One is the isolated second donor or acceptor domains. The other is the invalid metal-semiconductor contact. Herein, the concept and design of donor/acceptor/acceptor ternary OPV with more controlled structure (C-ternary) is reported. The C-ternary OPV is fabricated by a sequential solution process, in which the second acceptor and donor/acceptor binary blend are sequentially spin-coated. After the device optimization, the power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of all OPV with C-ternary are enhanced by 14-21% relative to those with the simple ternary blend; the best PCEs are 10.7 and 11.0% for fullerene-based and fullerene-free solar cells, respectively. Moreover, the averaged PCE value of 10.4% for fullerene-free solar cell measured in this study is in great agreement with the certified one of 10.32% obtained from Newport Corporation. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Metal-organic fireworks: MOFs as integrated structural scaffolds for pyrotechnic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, L H; Colakel, A; Vrcelj, R M; Sinclair, I; Coles, S J

    2015-08-07

    A new approach to formulating pyrotechnic materials is presented whereby constituent ingredients are bound together in a solid-state lattice. This reduces the batch inconsistencies arising from the traditional approach of combining powders by ensuring the key ingredients are 'mixed' in appropriate quantities and are in intimate contact. Further benefits of these types of material are increased safety levels as well as simpler logistics, storage and manufacture. A systematic series of new frameworks comprising fuel and oxidiser agents (group 1 and 2 metal nodes & terephthalic acid derivatives as linkers) has been synthesised and structurally characterised. These new materials have been assessed for pyrotechnic effect by calorimetry and burn tests. Results indicate that these materials exhibit the desired pyrotechnic material properties and the effect can be correlated to the dimensionality of the structure. A new approach to formulating pyrotechnic materials is proposed whereby constituent ingredients are bound together in a solid-state lattice. A series of Metal-organic framework frameworks comprising fuel and oxidiser agents exhibits the desired properties of a pyrotechnic material and this effect is correlated to the dimensionality of the structure.

  9. Altered topological organization of white matter structural networks in patients with neuromyelitis optica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaou Liu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To investigate the topological alterations of the whole-brain white-matter (WM structural networks in patients with neuromyelitis optica (NMO. METHODS: The present study involved 26 NMO patients and 26 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. WM structural connectivity in each participant was imaged with diffusion-weighted MRI and represented in terms of a connectivity matrix using deterministic tractography method. Graph theory-based analyses were then performed for the characterization of brain network properties. A multiple linear regression analysis was performed on each network metric between the NMO and control groups. RESULTS: The NMO patients exhibited abnormal small-world network properties, as indicated by increased normalized characteristic path length, increased normalized clustering and increased small-worldness. Furthermore, largely similar hub distributions of the WM structural networks were observed between NMO patients and healthy controls. However, regional efficiency in several brain areas of NMO patients was significantly reduced, which were mainly distributed in the default-mode, sensorimotor and visual systems. Furthermore, we have observed increased regional efficiency in a few brain regions such as the orbital parts of the superior and middle frontal and fusiform gyri. CONCLUSION: Although the NMO patients in this study had no discernible white matter T2 lesions in the brain, we hypothesize that the disrupted topological organization of WM networks provides additional evidence for subtle, widespread cerebral WM pathology in NMO.

  10. A novel series of isoreticular metal organic frameworks: realizing metastable structures by liquid phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jinxuan; Lukose, Binit; Shekhah, Osama; Arslan, Hasan Kemal; Weidler, Peter; Gliemann, Hartmut; Bräse, Stefan; Grosjean, Sylvain; Godt, Adelheid; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Magdau, Ioan-Bogdan; Heine, Thomas; Wöll, Christof

    2012-01-01

    A novel class of metal organic frameworks (MOFs) has been synthesized from Cu-acetate and dicarboxylic acids using liquid phase epitaxy. The SURMOF-2 isoreticular series exhibits P4 symmetry, for the longest linker a channel-size of 3 × 3 nm2 is obtained, one of the largest values reported for any MOF so far. High quality, ab-initio electronic structure calculations confirm the stability of a regular packing of (Cu++)2- carboxylate paddle-wheel planes with P4 symmetry and reveal, that the SURMOF-2 structures are in fact metastable, with a fairly large activation barrier for the transition to the bulk MOF-2 structures exhibiting a lower, twofold (P2 or C2) symmetry. The theoretical calculations also allow identifying the mechanism for the low-temperature epitaxial growth process and to explain, why a synthesis of this highly interesting, new class of high-symmetry, metastable MOFs is not possible using the conventional solvothermal process. PMID:23213357

  11. Panoscopic organization of anisotropic colloidal structures from photofunctional inorganic nanosheet liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakato, Teruyuki; Nono, Yoshihiro; Mouri, Emiko; Nakata, Munetaka

    2014-01-21

    Colloidal liquid crystals of inorganic nanosheets with thickness of around 1 nm and lateral dimensions of several micrometers prepared by exfoliation of a layered niobate are converted to hierarchically organized arrays whose structures are controlled from the nano to macroscopic length scale through the growth of liquid crystalline domains called tactoids as the secondary building blocks followed by controlled application of external fields. Growth of the tactoids is attained by incubation of the liquid crystals at room temperature. The tactoids are then assembled into higher-order structures with characteristic lengths of sub-mm to mm under the simultaneous application of an ac electric field and gravity, whose directions determine the final textural motif of the arrays. Whereas a net-like texture is observed when applying the electric and gravitational forces in the same direction, a striped texture where the nanosheets are unidirectionally aligned is observed when the electric field is applied in the direction perpendicular to gravity. The use of well-grown tactoids is key to the macroscopic structural control. Since the niobate nanosheets have wide band-gap semiconducting nature, the nanosheet stripe arrays exhibit photocatalysis that reflected the alignment of the nanosheets with respect to the polarized direction of impinging light.

  12. Synthesis, structure and characterization of five new organically templated metal sulfates with 2-aminopyridinium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarchuk, Tamara J; Kinzhybalo, Vasyl; Pietraszko, Adam

    2016-05-01

    The chemistry of organically templated metal sulfates has attracted interest from the materials science community and the development of synthetic strategies for the preparation of organic-inorganic hybrid materials with novel structures and special properties is of current interest. Sulfur-oxygen-metal linkages provide the possibility of using sulfate tetrahedra as building units to form new solid-state materials. A series of novel organically templated metal sulfates of 2-aminopyridinium (2ap) with aluminium(III), cobalt(II), magnesium(II), nickel(II) and zinc(II) were obtained from the respective aqueous solutions and studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The compounds crystallize in centrosymmetric triclinic unit cells in three structure types: type 1 for 2-aminopyridinium hexaaquaaluminium(III) bis(sulfate) tetrahydrate, (C5H7N2)[Al(H2O)6](SO4)2·4H2O, (I); type 2 for bis(2-aminopyridinium) tris[hexaaquacobalt(II)] tetrakis(sulfate) dihydrate, (C5H7N2)2[Co(H2O)6]3(SO4)4·2H2O, (II), and bis(2-aminopyridinium) tris[hexaaquamagnesium(II)] tetrakis(sulfate) dihydrate, (C5H7N2)2[Mg(H2O)6]3(SO4)4·2H2O, (III); and type 3 for bis(2-aminopyridinium) hexaaquanickel(II) bis(sulfate), (C5H7N2)2[Ni(H2O)6](SO4)2, (IV), and bis(2-aminopyridinium) hexaaquazinc(II) bis(sulfate), (C5H7N2)2[Zn(H2O)6](SO4)2, (V). The templating role of the 2ap cation in all of the reported crystalline substances is governed by the formation of characteristic charge-assisted hydrogen-bonded pairs with sulfate anions and the presence of π-π interactions between the cations. Additionally, both coordinated and uncoordinated water molecules are involved in hydrogen-bond formation. As a consequence, extensive three-dimensional hydrogen-bonding patterns are formed in the reported crystal structures.

  13. Serum tryptase concentrations in beekeepers with and without Hymenoptera venom allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballada, F; Alonso, M; Vizcaino, L; Coutinho, V; Núñez, R; Vidal, C; Boquete, M; González-Quintela, A

    2013-01-01

    Increased tryptase concentrations are a risk marker for the severity of reactions to Hymenoptera stings or venom immunotherapy To investigate serum tryptase concentrations in beekeepers with and without Hymenoptera venom allergy (HVA). Serum tryptase concentrations were measured in adult patients with HVA (n = 91, 37 of whom were beekeepers), beekeepers without HVA (n = 152), and control individuals from the general adult population (n = 246). Multivariate analyses revealed that serum tryptase levels were positively associated with beekeeping activities (P Beekeeping and HVA are independently associated with increased concentrations of serum tryptase.

  14. New host association: Polybia scutellaris (Hymenoptera, Vespidae parasitized by Melaloncha (Diptera, Phoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ayelen Lutz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available New host association: Polybia scutellaris (Hymenoptera, Vespidae parasitized by Melaloncha (Diptera, Phoridae. The genus Melaloncha Brues is a large assemblage of New World, parasitoid phorid flies. They are parasitoids of Apoidea bees. However, here we present the first record of a wasp parasitized by Melaloncha sp. The new host is Polybia scutellaris (White, a neotropical eusocial wasp. The parasitized wasp was found in an urban park near the city of La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina. It appears that the genus Melaloncha parasitizes a wider range of social Hymenoptera than currently known.

  15. Bimolecular crystals with an intercalated structure improve poly(p-phenylenevinylene)-based organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kyung-Geun; Park, Jun-Mo; Mangold, Hannah; Laquai, Frédéric; Choi, Tae-Lim; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2015-01-01

    The exciton dissociation, recombination, and charge transport of bulk heterojunction organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) is influenced strongly by the nanomorphology of the blend, such as the grain size and the molecular packing. Although it is well known that polymers based on amorphous poly(p-phenylenevinylene) (PPV) have a fundamental limit to their efficiency because of low carrier mobility, which leads to increased recombination and unbalanced charge extraction, herein, we demonstrate that the issue can be overcome by forming bimolecular crystals of an amorphous PPV-based polymer:phenyl-C61 -butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) intercalated structure. We used amorphous poly(2,5-dioctyloxy-p-phenylene vinylene-alt-2',5'-thienylene vinylene) (PPVTV), which has a simple chemical structure. A reasonably high power conversion efficiency (∼3.5 %) was obtained, although the material has an intrinsically amorphous structure and a relatively large band gap (2.0 eV). We demonstrate a correlation between a well-ordered bimolecular crystal of PPVTV:PCBM and an improved hole mobility of a PPVTV:PCBM film compared to a pristine PPVTV film by using 2 D grazing incidence XRD and space-charge-limited current measurements. Furthermore, we show that the bimolecular crystal structure in high-performance OPVs is related to an optimum molecular packing, which is influenced by the PPVTV:PCBM blending ratio, side-chain length, and molecular weight of the PPVTV polymer. Improved charge transport in PPVTV:PCBM bimolecular crystals leads to a fast sweep out of charges and thus suppression of nongeminate recombination under the operating conditions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Structural organization of FtsB, a transmembrane protein of the bacterial divisome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPointe, Loren M; Taylor, Keenan C; Subramaniam, Sabareesh; Khadria, Ambalika; Rayment, Ivan; Senes, Alessandro

    2013-04-16

    We report the first structural analysis of an integral membrane protein of the bacterial divisome. FtsB is a single-pass membrane protein with a periplasmic coiled coil. Its heterologous association with its partner FtsL represents an essential event for the recruitment of the late components to the division site. Using a combination of mutagenesis, computational modeling, and X-ray crystallography, we determined that FtsB self-associates, and we investigated its structural organization. We found that the transmembrane domain of FtsB homo-oligomerizes through an evolutionarily conserved interaction interface where a polar residue (Gln 16) plays a critical role through the formation of an interhelical hydrogen bond. The crystal structure of the periplasmic domain, solved as a fusion with Gp7, shows that 30 juxta-membrane amino acids of FtsB form a canonical coiled coil. The presence of conserved Gly residue in the linker region suggests that flexibility between the transmembrane and coiled coil domains is functionally important. We hypothesize that the transmembrane helices of FtsB form a stable dimeric core for its association with FtsL into a higher-order oligomer and that FtsL is required to stabilize the periplasmic domain of FtsB, leading to the formation of a complex that is competent for binding to FtsQ, and to their consequent recruitment to the divisome. The study provides an experimentally validated structural model and identifies point mutations that disrupt association, thereby establishing important groundwork for the functional characterization of FtsB in vivo.

  17. Visualization of the 3D structures of small organisms via LED-SIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Yongying; Dan, Dan; Zhang, Mengna; Bai, Ming; Lei, Ming; Yao, Baoli; Yang, Xingke

    2016-01-01

    Innovative new techniques that aid in the visualization of microscopic anatomical structures have improved our understanding of organismal biology significantly. It is often challenging to observe internal 3D structures, despite the use of techniques such as confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), focused ion beam scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM) and others. In the current paper, we assess LED-SIM (DMD-based LED-illumination structured illumination microscopy), which facilitates the acquisition of nano- and micro-3D structures of small organisms in a high-resolution format (500 nm in the XY-plane and 930 nm along the Z-axis). We compare other microstructural imaging techniques (involving conventional optical microscopy, CLSM and Micro-CT) with LED-SIM to assess the quality (e.g. resolution, penetration depth, etc.) of LED-SIM images, as well as to document the potential short-comings of LED-SIM. Based on these results we present an optimized set of protocols to ensure that LED-SIM arthropod and nematode samples with different cuticles or textures are prepared for analysis in an optimal manner. Six arthropod and nematode specimens were tested and shown to be suitable for LED-SIM imaging, which was found to yield high resolution 3D images. Although LED-SIM still must be thoroughly tested before it is widely accepted and the Z-axis resolution still requires improvement, this technique offers distinct high quality 3D images. LED-SIM can be highly effective and may provide high quality 3D images for zoological studies following the guidelines of sample preparation presented in the current paper.

  18. Chapter 5: Organizational structures suited to ISPRM's evolving role as an international non-governmental organization in official relation with the world health organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Groote, Per M; Reinhardt, Jan D; Gutenbrunner, Christoph; DeLisa, Joel A; Melvin, John L; Bickenbach, Jerome E; Stucki, Gerold

    2009-09-01

    International non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in official relation with the World Health Organization (WHO) face organizational challenges against the background of legitimate representation of their membership and accountable procedures within the organization. Moreover, challenges arise in the light of such an international NGO's civil societal mandate to help reach the "health-for-all" goals as defined by WHO and to facilitate the implementation of the United Nations (UN) Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The objective of this paper is to examine how such an international NGO using the International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ISPRM) as a case in point can address these challenges. The specific aims are to analyse ISPRM's structures and procedures of internal organs and external relations and to develop solutions. These possible solutions will be presented as internal organizational scenarios and a yearly schedule of meetings closely aligned to that of WHO to facilitate an efficient internal and external interaction.

  19. Pentagonal helices in a periodic metal-organic framework. Crystals as computers for discovering structures of minimal transitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mian; Li, Dan; O'Keeffe, Michael; Su, Zhong-Min

    2015-08-07

    The structure of a recently-published metal-organic framework is deconstructed into its underlying net which is found to be of exceptional complexity. It is shown that this is because of local pentagonal symmetry and the structure is in fact the simplest possible (minimal transitivity) given that local symmetry.

  20. The Most Appropriate National Level Organization Structure and Command and Control System for U.S. Customs and Border Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-08

    Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2010. Weber, Max. The Theory of Social and Economic Organization. Translated by A. M. Henderson and Talcott Parsons ...material and websites pertaining to organizational structure and organizational theory . By reorganizing its national level headquarters using a...material and websites pertaining to organizational structure and organizational theory . By reorganizing its national level headquarters using a

  1. Organization of the rabbit vitreous body : Lamellae, Cloquet's channel and a novel structure, the 'alae canalis Cloqueti'

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Los, LI; van Luyn, MJA; Nieuwenhuis, P

    Even though the rabbit is a frequently used animal model for studies on Vitreous function and pathobiology, data on the structural organization of the rabbit Vitreous are scarce. The aim of the present study is to give a detailed description of rabbit vitreous structure in order to provide a basis

  2. Structural study, spectroscopic analysis and dielectric proprieties of new hybrid organic-inorganic compound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihaoui, Nejla; Hamdi, Besma; Zouari, Ridha

    2017-11-01

    The present research work presented the growth, the crystal structure and the spectroscopic study of a new organic inorganic hybrid compound [C12H12N]2ZnCl4. In fact, the single crystals of bis (4-benzylpyridinium) tetrachlorozincate (II), [4-BP]2ZnCl4 were obtained by slow evaporation of an aqueous solution at room temperature and crystallized in the centrosymmetric space group -P2yn of Monoclinic system. The infrared (FT-IR), Raman and RMN spectra of the title compound were recorded at room temperature and then analyzed. The thermal study and the evolution of the complex permittivity of the single crystal sample have been reported to explain the availability of the phase transition at 368 K.

  3. Electronic structure of planar-quasicycled organic molecules with intramolecular hydrogen bond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALEXEI N. PANKRATOV

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available By means of the HF/6-311G(d,p method, the electronic structure of the series of organic molecules, among which are malonaldehyde, acetylacetone, thiomalonaldehyde,’the derivatives of aniline 2-XC6H4NH2, phenol 2-XC6H4OH, benzenethiol 2-XC6H4SH (X = CHO, COOH, COO-, NO, NO2, OH, OCH3, SH, SCH3, F, Cl, Br, 8-hydroxyquinoline, 8-mercaptoquinoline, tropolone, has been studied. The intramolecular hydrogen bond (IHB has been established to lead to a local electron redistribution in quasicycle, and primarily to the electron density transfer between the direct IHB participants – from the hydrogen atom toward the proton-aceptor atom. On forming the IHB of the S–H···O type, the electron density in general decreases on the sulphohydryl hydrogen atom and increases on the sulphur atom.

  4. Structural Characterization and Infrared and Electrical Properties of the New Inorganic-Organic Hybrid Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Oueslati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available New inorganic-organic hybrid [(C3H74N]2Hg2Cl6 compound was obtained and characterised by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, infrared, and impedance spectroscopy. The latter crystallizes in the monoclinic system (space group C 2/c, with the following unit cell dimensions: (1 Å, (6 Å, (2 Å, and (2. Besides, its structure was solved using 84860 independent reflections leading to . Electrical properties of the material were studied using impedance spectroscopic technique at different temperatures in the frequency range of 209 Hz to 5 MHz. Detailed analysis of the impedance spectrum suggested that the electrical properties of the material are strongly temperature-dependent. The Nyquist plots clearly showed the presence of bulk and grain boundary effect in the compound.

  5. Nonprofit environmental organizations in world politics: Domestic structure and transnational relations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Payne, R.A. [Univ. of Louisville, KY (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Nonprofit environmental organizations often have global policy goals. Consequently, they pursue transnational objectives by pressuring influential governments and international institutions. The effectiveness of this strategy as applied to nation-states varies by domestic political structure. First, transnational actors are more likely to achieve their goals in society-dominated rather than they are in state-dominated countries because the former are more open to external inputs to the policy process and provide a greater number of access points. Second, ironically, transnational actors are more likely to achieve success in relatively centralized states if political access is attained. Decentralization invites a cacophony of voices in what may turn into a maelstrom of domestic politics. Relatively centralized corporatist states may prove accessible without the disadvantage of domestic turbulence.

  6. Thienoacene-fused pentalenes: Syntheses, structures, physical properties and applications for organic field-effect transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Dai, Gaole

    2014-11-27

    Three soluble and stable thienoacene-fused pentalene derivatives (1-3) with different π-conjugation lengths were synthesized. X-ray crystallographic analysis and density functional theory (DFT) calculations revealed their unique geometric and electronic structures due to the interaction between the aromatic thienoacene units and antiaromatic pentalene moiety. As a result, they all possess a small energy gap and show amphoteric redox behaviour. Time dependent (TD) DFT calculations were used to explain their unique electronic absorption spectra. These new compounds exhibited good thermal stability and ordered packing in solid state and thus their applications in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) were also investigated. The highest field-effect hole mobility of 0.016, 0.036 and 0.001 cm2 V-1 s-1 was achieved for solution-processed thin films of 1-3, respectively.

  7. Synthesis and structure of new carbohydrate metal-organic frameworks and inclusion complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Jing-Quan; Wu, Lian-He; Li, Shu-Xian; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Qian-Nan; Zhu, Pei-Pei

    2015-12-01

    Two new metal-organic framework compounds based on natural β-cyclodextrin molecules (β-CD) and alkali metals (Na+/K+) were synthesized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR, XPRD and 1HNMR. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals that compounds 1 and 2 possess the bowl-like pore and the "8" type double channels configuration. Due to the [blow + channel] double configuration, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) and Quercetin inclusion complexes of compound 1 are studied, and the results show that the two kinds of drug with different structure and size can be included into the compound at the same time, which is expected to become a new type of multi-functional green crystalline solid material.

  8. Hybrid Organic/Inorganic Perovskite–Polymer Nanocomposites: Toward the Enhancement of Structural and Electrical Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Privitera, Alberto

    2017-11-30

    Hybrid organic/inorganic perovskite nanoparticles (NPs) have garnered remarkable research attention because of their promising photophysical properties. New and interesting properties emerge after combining perovskite NPs with semiconducting materials. Here, we report the synthesis and investigation of a composite material obtained by mixing CH3NH3PbBr3 nanocrystals with the semiconducting polymer poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT). By the combination of structural techniques and optical and magnetic spectroscopies we observed multiple effects of the perovskite NPs on the P3HT: (i) an enlargement of P3HT crystalline domains, (ii) a strong p-doping of the P3HT, and (iii) an enhancement of interchain order typical of H-aggregates. These observations open a new avenue toward innovative perovskite NP-based applications.

  9. Experimental and modelling study of organization phenomena in dielectric barrier discharges with structurally inhomogeneous wood substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levasseur, O.; Profili, J.; Gangwar, R. K.; Naudé, N.; Clergereaux, R.; Gherardi, N.; Stafford, L.

    2014-10-01

    The spatial organization of dielectric barrier discharges operating at atmospheric pressure in the presence of complex wood substrates was analysed using optical imaging, current-voltage (I-V) characteristics, and optical emission spectroscopy combined with a collisional-radiative model to extract the average electron energy. The structural inhomogeneities of selected wood species produced non-uniform light emission patterns while maintaining homogeneous-like I-V characteristics and spatially uniform average electron energy. Based on a simple electrical model of the discharge, this localization was ascribed, at least partially, to a spatial modulation of the relative dielectric permittivity on ‘early’ versus ‘late’ wood affecting the local voltage applied to the gas, and thus the local discharge current.

  10. Crystal structure of new organically templated copper sulfate with 2-aminopyridinium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara J. Lukianova

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, (C5H7N22[Cu(H2O6](SO42·4H2O [systematic name: bis(2-aminopyridinium hexaaquacopper(II bis(sulfate tetrahydrate], comprises axially elongated hexaaqua-coordinated octahedral CuII ions located on an inversion centre, non-coordinating sulfate anions, 2-aminopyridinium cations and lattice water molecules. The crystal structure is built of successive inorganic and organic layers extending parallel to (001 that are connected by an extensive three-dimensional hydrogen-bonded network of the type O—H...O and N—H...O, as well as π–π interactions [centroid–centroid distance 3.4140 (14 Å, offset 0.277 Å].

  11. MORPHOLOGICAL FEATURES OF STRUCTURAL ORGANIZATION OF THE LIVER VOLGA FISH 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. N. Fedorova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of this study was the morphological analysis of liver of fish of the families percidae, spike and zherekh Delta R. Volga. Location. The Caspian sea. Methods. Used the conventional method of preparation of histological preparations Results. In the liver of the Volga fish were observed for different values of the granularity of the cytoplasm of hepatocytes, necrosis of small areas of the parenchyma of the organ, proliferation of connective tissue around the triad, slow blood flow, were found numerous small hemorrhages. Main conclusions. The study found that all the fish was broken beam structure of the liver revealed cirrhosis. 

  12. Heritable yeast prions have a highly organized three-dimensional architecture with interfiber structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saibil, Helen R; Seybert, Anja; Habermann, Anja; Winkler, Juliane; Eltsov, Mikhail; Perkovic, Mario; Castaño-Diez, Daniel; Scheffer, Margot P; Haselmann, Uta; Chlanda, Petr; Lindquist, Susan; Tyedmers, Jens; Frangakis, Achilleas S

    2012-09-11

    Yeast prions constitute a "protein-only" mechanism of inheritance that is widely deployed by wild yeast to create diverse phenotypes. One of the best-characterized prions, [PSI(+)], is governed by a conformational change in the prion domain of Sup35, a translation-termination factor. When this domain switches from its normal soluble form to an insoluble amyloid, the ensuing change in protein synthesis creates new traits. Two factors make these traits heritable: (i) the amyloid conformation is self-templating; and (ii) the protein-remodeling factor heat-shock protein (Hsp)104 (acting together with Hsp70 chaperones) partitions the template to daughter cells with high fidelity. Prions formed by several other yeast proteins create their own phenotypes but share the same mechanistic basis of inheritance. Except for the amyloid fibril itself, the cellular architecture underlying these protein-based elements of inheritance is unknown. To study the 3D arrangement of prion assemblies in their cellular context, we examined yeast [PSI(+)] prions in the native, hydrated state in situ, taking advantage of recently developed methods for cryosectioning of vitrified cells. Cryo-electron tomography of the vitrified sections revealed the prion assemblies as aligned bundles of regularly spaced fibrils in the cytoplasm with no bounding structures. Although the fibers were widely spaced, other cellular complexes, such as ribosomes, were excluded from the fibril arrays. Subtomogram image averaging, made possible by the organized nature of the assemblies, uncovered the presence of an additional array of densities between the fibers. We suggest these structures constitute a self-organizing mechanism that coordinates fiber deposition and the regulation of prion inheritance.

  13. Formation of organic layer on femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumaru, Naoki, E-mail: yasuma@fukui-nct.ac.jp [National Institute of Technology, Fukui College, Sabae, Fukui 916-8507 (Japan); Sentoku, Eisuke [National Institute of Technology, Fukui College, Sabae, Fukui 916-8507 (Japan); Kiuchi, Junsuke [Eyetec Co., Ltd., Sabae, Fukui 916-0016 (Japan)

    2017-05-31

    Highlights: • Surface analyses of two types of femtosecond laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on titanium were conducted. • The parallel-oriented ultrafine LIPSS showed the almost same roughness and chemical states as the non-irradiated Ti surface. • The well-known perpendicular-oriented LIPSS were typically covered with an organic layer similar to a cellulose derivative. - Abstract: Two types of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) formed on titanium by femtosecond (fs) laser pulses (λ = 800 nm, τ = 180 fs, ν = 1 kHz) in air were investigated experimentally. At a laser fluence F above the ablation threshold, LIPSS with a minimum mean spacing of D < λ⁄2 were observed perpendicular to the laser polarization direction. In contrast, for F slightly below than the ablation threshold, ultrafine LIPSS with a minimum value of D < λ/10 were formed parallel to the polarization direction. The surface roughness of the parallel-oriented LIPSS was almost the same as that of the non-irradiated surface, unlike the high roughness of the perpendicular-oriented LIPSS. In addition, although the surface state of the parallel-oriented LIPSS was the same as that of the non-irradiated surface, the perpendicular-oriented LIPSS were covered with an organic thin film similar to a cellulose derivative that cannot be easily formed by conventional chemical synthesis. The results of these surface analyses indicate that these two types of LIPSS are formed through different mechanisms. This fs-laser processing technique may become a new technology for the artificial synthesis of cellulose derivatives.

  14. Seeking and Sharing Knowledge Using Social Media in an Organization: The Impact of Social Influence, Organization Structure and Social Capital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schutz, Douglas M.

    2013-01-01

    The prolific use of social media tools such as blogs and wikis is leading several organizations to adopt these tools. However, success of social media depends on its use by employees to share and seek knowledge. Based on a unique data set obtained from a large multi-national corporation, I examined three different aspects of knowledge seeking and…

  15. Reliability and validity of the German version of the Structured Interview of Personality Organization (STIPO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doering, Stephan; Burgmer, Markus; Heuft, Gereon; Menke, Dina; Bäumer, Brigitta; Lübking, Margit; Feldmann, Marcus; Hörz, Susanne; Schneider, Gudrun

    2013-08-13

    The assessment of personality organization and its observable behavioral manifestations, i.e. personality functioning, has a long tradition in psychodynamic psychiatry. Recently, the DSM-5 Levels of Personality Functioning Scale has moved it into the focus of psychiatric diagnostics. Based on Kernberg's concept of personality organization the Structured Interview of Personality Organization (STIPO) was developed for diagnosing personality functioning. The STIPO covers seven dimensions: (1) identity, (2) object relations, (3) primitive defenses, (4) coping/rigidity, (5) aggression, (6) moral values, and (7) reality testing and perceptual distortions. The English version of the STIPO has previously revealed satisfying psychometric properties. Validity and reliability of the German version of the 100-item instrument have been evaluated in 122 psychiatric patients. All patients were diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) and were assessed by means of the STIPO. Moreover, all patients completed eight questionnaires that served as criteria for external validity of the STIPO. Interrater reliability varied between intraclass correlations of .89 and 1.0, Crohnbach's α for the seven dimensions was .69 to .93. All a priori selected questionnaire scales correlated significantly with the corresponding STIPO dimensions. Patients with personality disorder (PD) revealed significantly higher STIPO scores (i.e. worse personality functioning) than patients without PD; patients cluster B PD showed significantly higher STIPO scores than patients with cluster C PD. Interrater reliability, Crohnbach's α, concurrent validity, and differential validity of the STIPO are satisfying. The STIPO represents an appropriate instrument for the assessment of personality functioning in clinical and research settings.

  16. Reliability and validity of the German version of the Structured Interview of Personality Organization (STIPO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The assessment of personality organization and its observable behavioral manifestations, i.e. personality functioning, has a long tradition in psychodynamic psychiatry. Recently, the DSM-5 Levels of Personality Functioning Scale has moved it into the focus of psychiatric diagnostics. Based on Kernberg’s concept of personality organization the Structured Interview of Personality Organization (STIPO) was developed for diagnosing personality functioning. The STIPO covers seven dimensions: (1) identity, (2) object relations, (3) primitive defenses, (4) coping/rigidity, (5) aggression, (6) moral values, and (7) reality testing and perceptual distortions. The English version of the STIPO has previously revealed satisfying psychometric properties. Methods Validity and reliability of the German version of the 100-item instrument have been evaluated in 122 psychiatric patients. All patients were diagnosed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) and were assessed by means of the STIPO. Moreover, all patients completed eight questionnaires that served as criteria for external validity of the STIPO. Results Interrater reliability varied between intraclass correlations of .89 and 1.0, Crohnbach’s α for the seven dimensions was .69 to .93. All a priori selected questionnaire scales correlated significantly with the corresponding STIPO dimensions. Patients with personality disorder (PD) revealed significantly higher STIPO scores (i.e. worse personality functioning) than patients without PD; patients cluster B PD showed significantly higher STIPO scores than patients with cluster C PD. Conclusions Interrater reliability, Crohnbach’s α, concurrent validity, and differential validity of the STIPO are satisfying. The STIPO represents an appropriate instrument for the assessment of personality functioning in clinical and research settings. PMID:23941404

  17. Exploring how organic matter controls structural transformations in natural aquatic nanocolloidal dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Stephen M; Jarvie, Helen P

    2012-07-03

    The response of the dispersion nanostructure of surface river bed sediment to the controlled removal and readdition of natural organic matter (NOM), in the absence and presence of background electrolyte, was examined using the technique of small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). Partial NOM removal induced aggregation of the mineral particles, but more extensive NOM removal restored colloidal stability. When peat humic acid (PHA) was added to a NOM-deficient sediment concentration-related structural transformations were observed: at 255 mg/L PHA aggregation of the nanocolloid was actually enhanced, but at 380 mg/L PHA disaggregation and colloidal stability were promoted. The addition of 2 mM CaCl(2) induced mild aggregation in the native sediment but not in sediments with added PHA, suggesting that the native NOM and the PHA respond differently to changes in ionic strength. A first attempt at using SANS to directly characterize the thickness and coverage of an adsorbed PHA layer in a natural nanocolloid is also presented. The results are discussed in the context of a hierarchical aquatic colloidal nanostructure, and the implications for contemporary studies of the role of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in sustaining the transport of colloidal iron in upland catchments.

  18. Morphological structure of Gluconacetobacter xylinus cellulose and cellulose-based organic-inorganic composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyslov, R. Yu; Ezdakova, K. V.; Kopitsa, G. P.; Khripunov, A. K.; Bugrov, A. N.; Tkachenko, A. A.; Angelov, B.; Pipich, V.; Szekely, N. K.; Baranchikov, A. E.; Latysheva, E.; Chetverikov, Yu O.; Haramus, V.

    2017-05-01

    Scanning electron microscopy, ultra-small-angle neutron scattering (USANS), small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering (SANS and SAXS), as well as low-temperature nitrogen adsorption, were used in the studies of micro- and mesostructure of polymer matrix prepared from air-dry preliminarily disintegrated cellulose nano-gel film (synthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus) and the composites based on this bacterial cellulose. The composites included ZrO2 nanoparticles, Tb3+ in the form of low molecular weight salt and of metal-polymer complex with poly(vinylpyrrolydone)-poly(methacryloyl-o-aminobenzoic acid) copolymer. The combined analysis of the data obtained allowed revealing three levels of fractal organization in mesostructure of G. xylinus cellulose and its composites. It was shown that both the composition and an aggregation state of dopants have a significant impact on the structural characteristics of the organic-inorganic composites. The composites containing Tb3+ ions demonstrate efficient luminescence; its intensity is an order of magnitude higher in the case of the composites with the metal-polymer complex. It was found that there is the optimal content of ZrO2 nanoparticles in composites resulting in increased Tb3+ luminescence.

  19. Beyond static structures: Putting forth REMD as a tool to solve problems in computational organic chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraglia, Riccardo; Nicolaï, Adrien; Wodrich, Matthew D; Ceriotti, Michele; Corminboeuf, Clemence

    2016-01-05

    Computational studies of organic systems are frequently limited to static pictures that closely align with textbook style presentations of reaction mechanisms and isomerization processes. Of course, in reality chemical systems are dynamic entities where a multitude of molecular conformations exists on incredibly complex potential energy surfaces (PES). Here, we borrow a computational technique originally conceived to be used in the context of biological simulations, together with empirical force fields, and apply it to organic chemical problems. Replica-exchange molecular dynamics (REMD) permits thorough exploration of the PES. We combined REMD with density functional tight binding (DFTB), thereby establishing the level of accuracy necessary to analyze small molecular systems. Through the study of four prototypical problems: isomer identification, reaction mechanisms, temperature-dependent rotational processes, and catalysis, we reveal new insights and chemistry that likely would be missed using static electronic structure computations. The REMD-DFTB methodology at the heart of this study is powered by i-PI, which efficiently handles the interface between the DFTB and REMD codes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. A self-organizing maps classifier structure for brain computer interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Bueno

    Full Text Available AbstractIntroductionBrain Computer Interfaces provide an alternative communication path to severe paralyzed people and uses electrical signals related to brain activity in order to identify the user’s intention. In this paper a classifier based on a Self-Organizing Map is introduced.MethodsElectroencephalography signal is used on this work as a source for the user’s intention. This signal represents the brain activity and is processed in order to extract the frequency features presented to the classifier, which uses a Self-Organizing Map and a series of probability masks in order to identify the correct class.ResultsThe proposed structure was evaluated using a dataset of Electroencephalography with three mental tasks. The system was able to identify the different states of the users intention with an accuracy of 71.21% for a three-class problem using only 25 neurons for one of the users.ConclusionThe classifier proposed in this paper has an accuracy that is around the value of similar works in the literature, using the same data, but using a small time window for the classification, meaning the system can have a better time response for the user.

  1. Deciphering the Social Organization and Structure of Wild Yunnan Snub-Nosed Monkeys (Rhinopithecus bieti).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grueter, Cyril C; Li, Dayong; Ren, Baoping; Wei, Fuwen; Li, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The social organization of natural groups of Rhinopithecus bieti (Yunnan snub-nosed monkey) is virtually unknown. We studied the demography and social structure of a free-ranging group at Samage Forest, China, for nearly 2 years. This study confirmed that R. bieti exhibits a multilevel social organization of core 1-male units (OMUs) that congregate in a band of >400 members. Even though the band appeared to be unified for the most part, we also witnessed occasional fission-fusion. OMUs were cohesive entities, and their members were spatially and socially isolated from members of other OMUs. Large all-male units associated with the band, and when they closely followed OMUs there was a tendency for elevated male aggression. Within OMUs, females associated preferentially with males and vice versa, resulting in a bisexually bonded society. Contrary to other Asian colobines, R. bieti were comparatively social, with grooming occupying 7.3% of the time. Social grooming was primarily a female affair, but males also participated in grooming networks. The integration of males into the social network of the OMU is thought to help to maintain OMU integrity and cohesion with other social units being in close proximity. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Cop-like operon: Structure and organization in species of the Lactobacillale order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANGÉLICA REYES

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Copper is an essential and toxic trace metal for bacteria and, therefore, must be tightly regulated in the cell. Enterococcus hirae is a broadly studied model for copper homeostasis. The intracellular copper levels in E. hirae are regulated by the cop operon, which is formed by four genes: copA and copB that encode ATPases for influx and efflux of copper, respectively; copZ that encodes a copper chaperone; and copY, a copper responsive repressor. Since the complete genome sequence for E. hirae is not available, it is possible that other genes may encode proteins involved in copper homeostasis. Here, we identified a cop-like operon in nine species of Lactobacillale order with a known genome sequence. All of them always encoded a CopY-like repressor and a copper ATPase. The alignment of the cop-like operon promoter region revealed two CopY binding sites, one of which was conserved in all strains, and the second was only present in species of Streptococcus genus and L. johnsonii. Additional proteins associated to copper metabolism, CutC and Cupredoxin, also were detected. This study allowed for the description of the structure and organization of the cop operon and discussion of a phylogenetic hypothesis based on the differences observed in this operon's organization and its regulation in Lactobacillale order.

  3. Network Catastrophe: Self-Organized Patterns Reveal both the Instability and the Structure of Complex Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hankyu; Lu, Tsai-Ching

    2015-03-01

    Critical events in society or biological systems can be understood as large-scale self-emergent phenomena due to deteriorating stability. We often observe peculiar patterns preceding these events, posing a question of--how to interpret the self-organized patterns to know more about the imminent crisis. We start with a very general description -- of interacting population giving rise to large-scale emergent behaviors that constitute critical events. Then we pose a key question: is there a quantifiable relation between the network of interactions and the emergent patterns? Our investigation leads to a fundamental understanding to: 1. Detect the system's transition based on the principal mode of the pattern dynamics; 2. Identify its evolving structure based on the observed patterns. The main finding of this study is that while the pattern is distorted by the network of interactions, its principal mode is invariant to the distortion even when the network constantly evolves. Our analysis on real-world markets show common self-organized behavior near the critical transitions, such as housing market collapse and stock market crashes, thus detection of critical events before they are in full effect is possible.

  4. Structures and Gas Storage Performance of Metal-organic Framework Materials at High Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Hu, Yue; Huang, Yining

    2013-06-01

    Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs), are crystalline nanoporous materials comprised of small metal clusters connected three-dimensionally by polyfunctional organic ligands. MOFs have been widely studied due to their high porosity, surface area and thermal stability, which make them promising candidates for gas capture and storage. In the MOF family, Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks (ZIFs) have attracted much attention because of their promising applications for CO2 storage. In contrast to the extensive studies under ambient conditions, most ZIFs have only been studied under pressure in a very limited range. It is known that pressure can provide an effective driving force to achieve structural modification which includes changes in pore size, opening and geometry, channel shape and internal surface area. Subsequently, these pressure-induced changes will affect the sorption selectivity, capacity and access to the binding sites of the porous materials. Here, we report the first in situ high-pressure investigation of several ZIFs by FTIR spectroscopy. We observed rich pressure-induced transformations upon compression in different pressure ranges. Furthermore, the reversibilities of these transformations upon decompression were also examined. Finally, the performance of CO2 storage of selected ZIFs at high pressures will be addressed. Our observation and analyses contribute to the understanding of chemical and mechanical properties of ZIFs under high-pressure conditions and provide new insight into their storage applications.

  5. Effects of the benzoxazoid DIMBOA, selected degradation products, and structure-related pesticides on soil organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idinger, Jacqueline; Coja, Tamara; Blümel, Sylvia

    2006-09-01

    Both lethal and sublethal effects of the benzoxazoid 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-(2H)-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H)-one (DIMBOA), the degradation products 6-methoxy-benzoxazolin-2(3H)-one (MBOA), 2-amino-7-methoxy-(3H)-phenoxazin-3-one (AMPO), and 2-acetylamino-7-methoxy-3(H)-phenoxazin-3-one (AAMPO) and the structure-related compounds 2-methoxy-N-(2-oxo-1,3-oxazolidin-3yl)acet-2'=6'-xylidide (oxadixyl), and O,O-diethyl S-[6-chloro-2-oxobenzoxazolin-3-yl)methyl]phosphorodithioate (phosalone) on the collembola Folsomia candida and on the carabid beetle Poecilus cupreus (except phosalone) were determined. Validated laboratory standard methods including reference and control treatments were applied in compliance with prescribed validity criteria. A risk assessment according to the EPPO risk assessment scheme for plant protection products (2003) was carried out. DIMBOA, MBOA, AMPO, AAMPO, and oxadixyl were classified as low-risk compounds for both test organisms. The reference compounds methyl-m-hydroxy-carbanilate-methyl-carbanilate (phenmedipham) and O,O-dimethyl S-[2-(methylamino)-2-oxoethyl]phosphoro-dithioate (dimethoate) were of low and medium risk respectively, to F. candida, but final assessment of the risk to P. cupreus requires further testing. Phosalone was of high risk to F. candida. The results obtained suggest that neither DIMBOA nor the tested degradation products pose a risk to either nontarget soil organism in the field.

  6. Crosslinked copolyazoles with a zwitterionic structure for organic solvent resistant membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Chisca, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of crosslinked membranes with a zwitterionic structure based on a facile reaction between a newly synthesized copolyazole with free OH groups and (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane (GPTMS) is reported. The new OH-functionalized copolyazole is soluble in common organic solvents, such as tetrahydrofuran (THF), dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO), N,N′-dimethylformamide (DMF) and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and can be easily processed by phase inversion. After crosslinking with GPTMS, the membranes acquire high solvent resistance. We show the membrane performance and the influence of the crosslinking reaction conditions on the thermal stability, surface polarity, pore morphology, and solvent resistance. By using UV-spectroscopy we monitored the solvent resistance of the membranes in four aggressive solvents (THF, DMSO, DMF and NMP) for 30 days. After this time, only minor changes (less than 2%) were detected for membranes subjected to a crosslinking reaction for 6 hours or longer. Our data suggest that the novel crosslinked membranes can be used for industrial applications in wide harsh environments in the presence of organic solvents.

  7. Spatial organization and correlation properties quantify structural changes on mesoscale of parenchymatous plant tissue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valous, N. A.; Delgado, A.; Sun, D.-W., E-mail: dawen.sun@ucd.ie [School of Biosystems Engineering, University College Dublin, National University of Ireland, Belfield, Dublin 4, Dublin (Ireland); Drakakis, K. [Complex and Adaptive Systems Laboratory, University College Dublin, National University of Ireland, Belfield, Dublin 4, Dublin (Ireland)

    2014-02-14

    The study of plant tissue parenchyma's intercellular air spaces contributes to the understanding of anatomy and physiology. This is challenging due to difficulty in making direct measurements of the pore space and the complex mosaic of parenchymatous tissue. The architectural complexity of pore space has shown that single geometrical measurements are not sufficient for characterization. The inhomogeneity of distribution depends not only on the percentage content of phase, but also on how the phase fills the space. The lacunarity morphometric, as multiscale measure, provides information about the distribution of gaps that correspond to degree of spatial organization in parenchyma. Additionally, modern theories have suggested strategies, where the focus has shifted from the study of averages and histograms to the study of patterns in data fluctuations. Detrended fluctuation analysis provides information on the correlation properties of the parenchyma at different spatial scales. The aim is to quantify (with the aid of the aforementioned metrics), the mesostructural changes—that occur from one cycle of freezing and thawing—in the void phase of pome fruit parenchymatous tissue, acquired with X-ray microcomputed tomography. Complex systems methods provide numerical indices and detailed insights regarding the freezing-induced modifications upon the arrangement of cells and voids. These structural changes have the potential to lead to physiological disorders. The work can further stimulate interest for the analysis of internal plant tissue structures coupled with other physico-chemical processes or phenomena.

  8. Structural Organization of a Full-Length Gp130/LIF-R Cytokine Receptor Transmembrane Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skiniotis, G.; Lupardus, P.J.; Martick, M.; Walz, T.; Garcia, K.C.

    2009-05-26

    gp130 is a shared receptor for at least nine cytokines, and can signal either as a homodimer, or as a heterodimer with Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Receptor (LIF-R). Here we biophysically and structurally characterize the full-length, transmembrane form of a quaternary cytokine receptor complex consisting of gp130, LIF-R, the cytokine Ciliary Neurotrophic Factor (CNTF), and its alpha receptor (CNTF-R{alpha}). Thermodynamic analysis indicates that, unlike the cooperative assembly of the symmetric gp130/Interleukin-6/IL-6R{alpha} hexameric complex, CNTF/CNTF-R{alpha} heterodimerizes gp130 and LIF-R via non-cooperative energetics to form an asymmetric 1:1:1:1 complex. Single particle electron microscopic (EM) analysis of the full-length gp130/LIF-R/CNTF-R{alpha}/CNTF quaternary complex elucidates an asymmetric structural arrangement, in which the receptor extracellular and transmembrane segments join as a continuous, rigid unit, poised to sensitively transduce ligand engagement to the membrane-proximal intracellular signaling regions. These studies also enumerate the organizing principles for assembly of the 'tall' class of gp130-family cytokine receptor complexes including LIF, IL-27, IL-12, and others.

  9. Quantum interference measurement of spin interactions in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deo, Vincent; Zhang, Yao; Soghomonian, Victoria; Heremans, Jean J

    2015-03-30

    Quantum interference is used to measure the spin interactions between an InAs surface electron system and the iron center in the biomolecule hemin in nanometer proximity in a bio-organic/semiconductor device structure. The interference quantifies the influence of hemin on the spin decoherence properties of the surface electrons. The decoherence times of the electrons serve to characterize the biomolecule, in an electronic complement to the use of spin decoherence times in magnetic resonance. Hemin, prototypical for the heme group in hemoglobin, is used to demonstrate the method, as a representative biomolecule where the spin state of a metal ion affects biological functions. The electronic determination of spin decoherence properties relies on the quantum correction of antilocalization, a result of quantum interference in the electron system. Spin-flip scattering is found to increase with temperature due to hemin, signifying a spin exchange between the iron center and the electrons, thus implying interactions between a biomolecule and a solid-state system in the hemin/InAs hybrid structure. The results also indicate the feasibility of artificial bioinspired materials using tunable carrier systems to mediate interactions between biological entities.

  10. Atomic structure of self-organizing iridium induced nanowires on Ge(001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabanov, N.S., E-mail: n.kabanov@utwente.nl [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 (Russian Federation); Physics of Interfaces and Nanomaterials, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P. O. Box 217, Enschede 7500 AE (Netherlands); Heimbuch, R.; Zandvliet, H.J.W. [Physics of Interfaces and Nanomaterials, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P. O. Box 217, Enschede 7500 AE (Netherlands); Saletsky, A.M.; Klavsyuk, A.L. [Faculty of Physics, Moscow State University, 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2017-05-15

    Highlights: • Ir/Ge(001) structure has been studied with DFT calculations and scanning tunneling microscopy. • Ir/Ge(001) nanowires are composed of Ge atoms and Ir atoms are located in subsurface positions. • The regions in the vicinity of the nanowires are very dynamic, even at temperatures as low as 77 K. - Abstract: The atomic structure of self-organizing iridium (Ir) induced nanowires on Ge(001) is studied by density functional theory (DFT) calculations and variable-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy. The Ir induced nanowires are aligned in a direction perpendicular to the Ge(001) substrate dimer rows, have a width of two atoms and are completely kink-less. Density functional theory calculations show that the Ir atoms prefer to dive into the Ge(001) substrate and push up the neighboring Ge substrate atoms. The nanowires are composed of Ge atoms and not Ir atoms as previously assumed. The regions in the vicinity of the nanowires are very dynamic, even at temperatures as low as 77 K. Time-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy measurements reveal that this dynamics is caused by buckled Ge substrate dimers that flip back and forth between their two buckled configurations.

  11. Hypertrophic phenotype in cardiac cell assemblies solely by structural cues and ensuing self-organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chiung-yin; Bien, Harold; Sobie, Eric A; Dasari, Vikram; McKinnon, David; Rosati, Barbara; Entcheva, Emilia

    2011-03-01

    In vitro models of cardiac hypertrophy focus exclusively on applying "external" dynamic signals (electrical, mechanical, and chemical) to achieve a hypertrophic state. In contrast, here we set out to demonstrate the role of "self-organized" cellular architecture and activity in reprogramming cardiac cell/tissue function toward a hypertrophic phenotype. We report that in neonatal rat cardiomyocyte culture, subtle out-of-plane microtopographic cues alter cell attachment, increase biomechanical stresses, and induce not only structural remodeling, but also yield essential molecular and electrophysiological signatures of hypertrophy. Increased cell size and cell binucleation, molecular up-regulation of released atrial natriuretic peptide, altered expression of classic hypertrophy markers, ion channel remodeling, and corresponding changes in electrophysiological function indicate a state of hypertrophy on par with other in vitro and in vivo models. Clinically used antihypertrophic pharmacological treatments partially reversed hypertrophic behavior in this in vitro model. Partial least-squares regression analysis, combining gene expression and functional data, yielded clear separation of phenotypes (control: cells grown on flat surfaces; hypertrophic: cells grown on quasi-3-dimensional surfaces and treated). In summary, structural surface features can guide cardiac cell attachment, and the subsequent syncytial behavior can facilitate trophic signals, unexpectedly on par with externally applied mechanical, electrical, and chemical stimulation.

  12. Local Electronic Structure of a Single-Layer Porphyrin-Containing Covalent Organic Framework

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Chen

    2017-12-20

    We have characterized the local electronic structure of a porphyrin-containing single-layer covalent organic framework (COF) exhibiting a square lattice. The COF monolayer was obtained by the deposition of 2,5-dimethoxybenzene-1,4-dicarboxaldehyde (DMA) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-aminophenyl) porphyrin (TAPP) onto a Au(111) surface in ultrahigh vacuum followed by annealing to facilitate Schiff-base condensations between monomers. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) experiments conducted on isolated TAPP precursor molecules and the covalently linked COF networks yield similar transport (HOMO-LUMO) gaps of 1.85 ± 0.05 eV and 1.98 ± 0.04 eV, respectively. The COF orbital energy alignment, however, undergoes a significant downward shift compared to isolated TAPP molecules due to the electron-withdrawing nature of the imine bond formed during COF synthesis. Direct imaging of the COF local density of states (LDOS) via dI/dV mapping reveals that the COF HOMO and LUMO states are localized mainly on the porphyrin cores and that the HOMO displays reduced symmetry. DFT calculations reproduce the imine-induced negative shift in orbital energies and reveal that the origin of the reduced COF wave function symmetry is a saddle-like structure adopted by the porphyrin macrocycle due to its interactions with the Au(111) substrate.

  13. On the solid, liquid and solution structural organization of imidazolium ionic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dupont Jairton

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available 1,3-dialkyl imidazolium salts are one of the most popular and investigated classes of room temperature ionic liquids. Although in various cases the physical-chemical properties and/or the outcome of the processes in these liquids significantly differ from those performed in "classical" dipolar organic solvents, they are still regarded as merely homogeneous solvents. In this brief overview it is developed the concept that pure 1,3-dialkylimidazolium ionic liquids are better described as hydrogen-bonded polymeric supramolecules of the type {[(DAIx(Xx-n] n+ [(DAIx-n(Xx] n-}n where DAI is the 1,3-dialkylimidazolium cation and X the anion. This structural pattern is a general trend for the solid phase and is maintained to a great extent in the liquid phase and even in the gas phase. The introduction of other molecules and macromolecules occurs with a disruption of the hydrogen bond network and in some cases can generate nano-structures with polar and non-polar regions where inclusion-type compounds can be formed.

  14. Studies on growth, crystal structure and characterization of novel organic nicotinium trifluoroacetate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanaraj, P.V. [Centre for Crystal Growth, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603 110 (India); Rajesh, N.P., E-mail: rajeshnp@hotmail.com [Centre for Crystal Growth, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603 110 (India); Sundar, J. Kalyana; Natarajan, S. [Department of Physics, Madurai Kamaraj University, Madurai 625 021 (India); Vinitha, G. [Department of Physics, Crescent Engineering College, Chennai 600 048 (India)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Good quality crystals of nicotinium trifluoroacetate in monoclinic system were grown for first time. {yields} Nicotinium trifluoroacetate crystal exhibits third order nonlinear optical properties. {yields} The optical spectrum of nicotinium trifluoroacetate crystal reveals the wide transmission in the entire range with cutoff wavelength at 286 nm. {yields} Nicotinium trifluoroacetate is a low dielectric constant material. - Abstract: An organic material, nicotinium trifluoroacetate (NTF) was synthesized and single crystals in monoclinic system were grown from aqueous solution for the first time. Its solubility and metastable zone width were estimated. The crystal structure of NTF was analyzed to reveal the molecular arrangements and the formation of hydrogen bonds in the crystal. High-resolution X-ray diffraction rocking curve measurements were performed to analyze the structural perfection of the grown crystals. Functional groups in NTF were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. Thermal behaviour and stability of NTF were studied by thermogravimetric and differential thermal analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. Mechanical and dielectric properties of NTF crystals were analyzed. Optical studies reveal that NTF crystals are transparent in the wavelength range 286-1100 nm. The third order nonlinear optical parameters of NTF were derived by the Z-scan technique.

  15. Quantitative Structure--Activity Relationship (QSAR) for the Oxidation of Trace Organic Contaminants by Sulfate Radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ruiyang; Ye, Tiantian; Wei, Zongsu; Luo, Shuang; Yang, Zhihui; Spinney, Richard

    2015-11-17

    The sulfate radical anion (SO4•–) based oxidation of trace organic contaminants (TrOCs) has recently received great attention due to its high reactivity and low selectivity. In this study, a meta-analysis was conducted to better understand the role of functional groups on the reactivity between SO4•– and TrOCs. The results indicate that compounds in which electron transfer and addition channels dominate tend to exhibit a faster second-order rate constants (kSO4•–) than that of H–atom abstraction, corroborating the SO4•– reactivity and mechanisms observed in the individual studies. Then, a quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model was developed using a sequential approach with constitutional, geometrical, electrostatic, and quantum chemical descriptors. Two descriptors, ELUMO and EHOMO energy gap (ELUMO–EHOMO) and the ratio of oxygen atoms to carbon atoms (#O:C), were found to mechanistically and statistically affect kSO4•– to a great extent with the standardized QSAR model: ln kSO4•– = 26.8–3.97 × #O:C – 0.746 × (ELUMO–EHOMO). In addition, the correlation analysis indicates that there is no dominant reaction channel for SO4•– reactions with various structurally diverse compounds. Our QSAR model provides a robust predictive tool for estimating emerging micropollutants removal using SO4•– during wastewater treatment processes.

  16. Effects of Didymosphenia geminata massive growth on stream communities: Smaller organisms and simplified food web structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladrera, Rubén; Gomà, Joan; Prat, Narcís

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to contribute to the understanding of the impact of Didymosphenia geminata massive growths upon river ecosystem communities' composition and functioning. This is the first study to jointly consider the taxonomic composition and functional structure of diatom and macroinvertebrate assemblages in order to determine changes in community structure, and the food web alterations associated with this invasive alga. This study was carried out in the Lumbreras River (Ebro Basin, La Rioja, Northern Spain), which has been affected by a considerable massive growth of D. geminata since 2011. The study shows a profound alteration in both the river community composition and in the food web structure at the sites affected by the massive growth, which is primarily due to the alteration of the environmental conditions, thus demonstrating that D. geminata has an important role as an ecosystem engineer in the river. Thick filamentous mats impede the movement of large invertebrates-especially those that move and feed up on it-and favor small, opportunistic, herbivorous organisms, mainly chironomids, that are capable of moving between filaments and are aided by the absence of large trophic competitors and predators -prey release effect-. Only small predators, such as hydra, are capable of surviving in the new environment, as they are favored by the increase in chironomids, a source of food, and by the reduction in both their own predators and other midge predators -mesopredator release-. This change in the top-down control affects the diatom community, since chironomids may feed on large diatoms, increasing the proportion of small diatoms in the substrate. The survival of small and fast-growing pioneer diatoms is also favored by the mesh of filaments, which offers them a new habitat for colonization. Simultaneously, D. geminata causes a significant reduction in the number of diatoms with similar ecological requirements (those attached to the substrate). Overall, D

  17. Information flow and organization of stingless bee foraging

    OpenAIRE

    Biesmeijer, Jacobus; Judith Slaa, E.

    2004-01-01

    International audience; Stingless bees (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Meliponini) live in populous permanent colonies and face the same problem as other foraging social insects: how to coordinate the worker's actions and respond to the spatio-temporal uncertainties of food availability in their habitat. Here we review the (social) information used by individual foragers and how organized collective foraging emerges from the individual actions. We also address intra- and interspecific competition for f...

  18. Do differences in food web structure between organic and conventional farms affect the ecosystem service of pest control?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfadyen, Sarina; Gibson, Rachel; Polaszek, Andrew; Morris, Rebecca J; Craze, Paul G; Planqué, Robert; Symondson, William O C; Memmott, Jane

    2009-03-01

    While many studies have demonstrated that organic farms support greater levels of biodiversity, it is not known whether this translates into better provision of ecosystem services. Here we use a food-web approach to analyse the community structure and function at the whole-farm scale. Quantitative food webs from 10 replicate pairs of organic and conventional farms showed that organic farms have significantly more species at three trophic levels (plant, herbivore and parasitoid) and significantly different network structure. Herbivores on organic farms were attacked by more parasitoid species on organic farms than on conventional farms. However, differences in network structure did not translate into differences in robustness to simulated species loss and we found no difference in percentage parasitism (natural pest control) across a variety of host species. Furthermore, a manipulative field experiment demonstrated that the higher species richness of parasitoids on the organic farms did not increase mortality of a novel herbivore used to bioassay ecosystem service. The explanation for these differences is likely to include inherent differences in management strategies and landscape structure between the two farming systems.

  19. Perspectives of experimental and theoretical studies of self-organized dust structures in complex plasmas under microgravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsytovich, V. N.

    2015-02-01

    We review research aimed at understanding the phenomena occurring in a complex plasma under microgravity conditions. Some aspects of the work already performed are considered that have not previously been given sufficient attention but which are potentially crucial for future work. These aspects, in particular, include the observation of compact dust structures that are estimated to be capable of confining all components of a dust plasma in a bounded spatial volume; experimental evidence of the nonlinear screening of dust particles; and experimental evidence of the excitation of collective electric fields. In theoretical terms, novel collective attraction processes between likely charged dust particles are discussed and all schemes of the shadowy attraction between dust particles used earlier, including in attempts to interpret observations, are reviewed and evaluated. Dust structures are considered from the standpoint of the current self-organization theory. It is emphasized that phase transitions between states of self-organized systems differ significantly from those in homogeneous states and that the phase diagrams should be constructed in terms of the parameters of a self-organized structure and cannot be constructed in terms of the temperature and density or similar parameters of homogeneous structures. Using the existing theoretical approaches to modeling self-organized structures in dust plasmas, the parameter distribution of a structure is recalculated for a simpler model that includes the quasineutrality condition and neglects diffusion. These calculations indicate that under microgravity conditions, any self-organized structure can contain a limited number of dust particles and is finite in size. The maximum possible number of particles in a structure determines the characteristic inter-grain distance in dust crystals that can be created under microgravity conditions. Crystallization criteria for the structures are examined and the quasispherical

  20. Side-Effects of Glyphosate to the Parasitoid Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stecca, C S; Bueno, A F; Pasini, A; Silva, D M; Andrade, K; Filho, D M Z

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the side-effects of glyphosate to the parasitoid Telenomus remus Nixon (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae) when parasitoids were exposed to this chemical at the pupal (inside host eggs) and adult stages. Bioassays were conducted under laboratory conditions according to the International Organization for Biological Control (IOBC) standard methods for testing side-effects of pesticides to egg parasitoids. Different glyphosate-based pesticides (Roundup Original®, Roundup Ready®, Roundup Transorb®, Roundup WG®, and Zapp Qi®) were tested at the same acid equivalent concentration. Treatments were classified following the IOBC toxicity categories as (1) harmless, (2) slightly harmful, (3) moderately harmful, and (4) harmful. When tested against T. remus adults, Roundup Original®, Roundup Ready®, Roundup Transorb®, and Roundup WG® reduced parasitism 2 days after parasitoid emergence, being classified as slightly harmful. Differently, when tested against T. remus pupae, all tested glyphosate-based products did not differ in their lethal effect and therefore did not reduce T. remus adult emergence or parasitism capacity, being classified as harmless. However, differences on sublethal toxicity were found. Parasitism of individuals emerging from parasitized eggs sprayed at the pupal stage of T. remus with Zapp Qi® was lower compared to control, but parasitism was still higher than 66%, and therefore, Zapp Qi® was still classified as harmless. In conclusion, all tested glyphosate-based products can be used in agriculture without negative impact to T. remus as none was classified as harmful or moderately harmful to this parasitoid when exposure occurred at the pupal or adult stages.