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Sample records for hydrothermally altered alkali-borosilicate

  1. SEM and AFM Studies of Two-Phase Magnetic Alkali Borosilicate Glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Andreeva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The morphology and composition of four types of two-phase alkali borosilicate glasses with magnetic atoms prepared by inductive melting have been studied. The results of scanning electron microscopy point to uniform distribution of Na, Si, and O atoms in these samples while magnetic iron atoms form ball-shaped agglomerates. The magnetic properties of these agglomerates have been confirmed by magnetic force microscopy. Atomic force microscopy had shown that in these samples two different morphological structures, drop-like and dendrite net, are formed. The formation of dendrite-like structure is a necessary condition for production of porous magnetic glasses. The obtained results allow us to optimize the melting and heat treatment processes leading to production of porous alkali borosilicate glasses with magnetic properties. The first results for nanocomposite materials on the basis of magnetic glasses containing the embedded ferroelectrics KH2PO4 demonstrate the effect of applied magnetic field on the ferroelectric phase transition.

  2. Mapping hydrothermal altered mineral deposits using Landsat 7 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Earth System Science; Volume 121; Issue 4. Mapping hydrothermal altered mineral ... To evaluate the conventional methods for mapping hydrothermal altered deposits by using Landsat 7 ETM+ image in and around Kuju volcano is the prime target of our study. The Kuju volcano is a mountainous ...

  3. Impact of asteroïdal hydrothermal alteration on organics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Bernard, S.; Le Guillou, C.; Jaber, M.; Remusat, L.

    2017-09-01

    Unravelling the evolution of simple organic molecules trapped in ices after they were accreted into asteroids requires better constraining how they would be modified by hydrothermal alteration, which happened in carbonaceous chondrites (CC) [1]. We have experimentally investigated the chemical evolution of interstellar organic molecule submitted to hydrothermal conditions mimicking asteroidal alteration. In particular, we investigated the role of phyllosilicates in the preservation/degradation of organic matter. We observed that a simple organic molecule (HMT) undergo complex chemical transformation during hydrothermal alteration, with the formation of an insoluble organic matter. Phyllosilicates have influenced the chemical reactions by concentrating a significant fraction of the newly formed organics.

  4. Hydrothermal alteration in oceanic ridge volcanics: A detailed study at the Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, W.I.; Perfit, M.R.; Josnasson, I.R.; Smith, M.F.

    1994-01-01

    The Galapagos Fossil Hydrothermal Field is composed of altered oceanic crust and extinct hydrothermal vents within the eastern Galapagos Rift between 85??49???W and 85??55???W. The discharge zone of the hydrothermal system is revealed along scarps, thus providing an opportunity to examine the uppermost mineralized, and highly altered interior parts of the crust. Altered rocks collected in situ by the submersible ALVIN show complex concentric alteration zones. Microsamples of individual zones have been analysed for major/minor, trace elements, and strontium isotopes in order to describe the complex compositional details of the hydrothermal alteration. Interlayered chlorite-smectite and chlorite with disequilibrium compositions dominate the secondary mineralogy as replacement phases of primary glass and acicular pyroxene. Phenocrysts and matrix grains of plagioclase are unaffected during alteration. Using a modification of the Gresens' equation we demonstrate that the trivalent rare earth elements (REEs) are relatively immobile, and calculate degrees of enrichment and depletion in other elements. Strontium isotopic ratios increase as Sr concentrations decrease from least-altered cores to most-altered rims and cross-cutting veins in individual samples, and can be modeled by open system behaviour under low fluid-rock ratio (< 10) conditions following a period of lower-temperature weathering of volcanics within the rift zone. The complex patterns of element enrichment and depletion and strontium isotope variations indicate mixing between pristine seawater and ascending hot fluids to produce a compositional spectrum of fluids. The precipitation of base-metal sulfides beneath the seafloor is probably a result of fluid mixing and cooling. If, as suggested here, the discharge zone alteration occurred under relatively low fluid-rock ratios, then this shallow region must play an important role in determining the exit composition of vent fluids in marine hydrothermal systems

  5. Mapping hydrothermal altered mineral deposits using Landsat 7 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and low cost (Yetkin 2003). There are many studies around the world related to hydrothermal alteration mapping .... for many years in remote sensing to display spectral variations effectively (e.g., Goetz et al. 1983). It is based on ... affect the viewer's interpretations and may lead to misguided results. Therefore, the band ratio.

  6. Hydrothermal alteration and evolution of the Ohakuri hydrothermal system, Taupo volcanic zone, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henneberger, R. C.; Browne, P. R. L.

    1988-05-01

    Erosion and excavations at Ohakuri in the Taupo Volcanic zone have exposed the upper portion (100-150 m) of a hydrothermal system that was active sometime between 700,000 and 160,000 years ago. Extensive hydrothermal alteration occurred within a host sequence of young, relatively undeformed, chemically and lithologically similar unwelded rhyolitic ignimbrite and air-fall tuffs. Mapping and petrologic work have identified six distinct alteration types. An early event formed a concentrically zoned suite of alteration through the pervasive movement of alkaline chloride type water. In the innermost zone, primary rock components were almost entirely converted to quartz + adularia ± illite ± hematite ± leucoxene. Mineralized veins and breccias of quartz ± pyrite ± adularia ± chlorite formed here in response to episodic hydraulic fracturing. This zone grades outward and upward into a zone of less intense, lower rank alteration with a mordenite + clinoptilolite + smectite + opal ± hematite assemblage, then a zone of weak clay alteration and into fresh rock. Calcite is conspicuously absent from the entire suite. Acid-sulphate type water, formed from steam-condensate, dominated the shallow activity in a second stage of alteration that followed local erosion. Widespread but discontinuous alteration converted the ignimbrite to kaolinite + opal ± hematite, with alunite occurring in the more intense zones. This alteration locally overprints the early alkali-chloride produced suite, but the focus of the second-stage activity was north of the focus of the older event. Scattered opaline sinters and silicified surficial deposits are products of either still later activity or the waning part of the second stage. Chemical analysis shows that the various alteration types have characteristic patterns of major element addition and removal; these reflect the key hydrothermal mineral reactions that formed the new assemblages. Quartz-adularia alteration involved mainly

  7. Hydrothermal Alteration of the Mt Unzen Conduit (Shimabara/Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, T. I.; Mayer, K.; Hess, K. U.; Janots, E.; Gilg, H. A.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2016-12-01

    Investigations were carried out on hydrothermally altered coherent dacitic dykes samples from (USDP-4) drill core at Mt Unzen stratovolcano (Shimabara/Japan). XRF, XRD, EMPA, and C-O-isotope analysis led to insights concerning chemistry, mineralogy, and intensity of alteration as well as the origin of carbonate-precipitating fluids. Additionally a textural characterization of the occurring replacement features in the magma conduit zone was performed. The occurrence of the main secondary phases such as chlorite, pyrite, carbonates, and R1 (Reichweite parameter) illite-smectite indicate a weak to moderate propylitic to phyllic hydrothermal alteration. The dacitic samples of the dykes show different hydrothermal alteration features: (i) carbonate pseudomorphs after hornblende as well as core and zonal textures due to replacement of plagioclase by R1 illite-smectite, (ii) colloform banded fracture fillings and fillings in dissolution vugs, and (iii) chlorite and R1 illite-smectite in the groundmass. Carbonates in fractures comprise iron-rich dolomite solid solutions ("ankerite") and calcite. Isotopic values of d13Cvpdb = -4.59 ± 0.6‰ and d18Ovpdb = -21.73 ± 0.5‰ indicate a hydrothermal-magmatic origin for the carbonate formation. The chlorite-carbonate-pyrite index (CCPI) and the Ishikawa alteration index (AI), applied to the investigated samples show significant differences (CCPI=52.7-57.8; AI=36.1-40.6) indicating their different degree of alteration. According to Nakada et al., 2005, the C13 to C16 dykes represent the feeder dyke from the latest eruption (1991-1995) whereas C8 represents an earlier dyke feeder dyke from an older eruption. Weakest conduit alteration, which was obtained in samples C16-1-5 and C13-2-5, correlates with the alteration degree of the pristine dome rocks. Highest CCPI value was determined for sample C14-1-5 and the highest AI value was determined for sample C15-2-6. The degrees of alteration do not indicate highest alteration of the

  8. Chemistry, mineralogy and alteration intensity of hydrothermal altered Mt Unzen conduit rocks (Shimabara/Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Kai-Uwe; Yilmaz, Tim; Gilg, H. Albert; Janots, Emilie; Mayer, Klaus; Nakada, Setsuya; Dingwell, Donald

    2017-04-01

    Investigations were carried out on hydrothermally altered coherent dacitic dykes samples from (USDP-4) drill core at Mt Unzen stratovolcano (Shimabara/Japan). XRF, XRD, EMPA, C-O-isotope, hot-cathode CL and SEM analysis led to insights concerning chemistry, mineralogy, and intensity and type of alteration as well as the origin of carbonate-precipitating fluids. Additionally a textural characterization of the occurring replacement features in the volcanic conduit rocks was performed. The occurrence of the main secondary phases such as chlorite, pyrite, carbonates, and R1 (Reichweite parameter) illite-smectite and kaolinite group minerals indicate a weak to moderate propylitic to phyllic hydrothermal alteration. The dacitic samples of the dykes show different hydrothermal alteration features: (i) carbonate and chlorite pseudomorphs after hornblende as well as core and zonal textures due to replacement of plagioclase by R1 illite-smectite as well as kaolinite group minerals, (ii) colloform banded fracture fillings and fillings in dissolution vugs, and (iii) chlorite, R1 illite-smectite as well as kaolinite group minerals in the groundmass. Late chlorite veins crosscut precipitates of R1 illite-smectite as well as kaolinite group minerals. Carbonates in fractures and in pseudomorphs after hornblende comprise iron-rich dolomite solid solutions ("ankerite") and calcite. Isotopic values indicate a hydrothermal-magmatic origin for the carbonate formation. The chlorite-carbonate-pyrite index (CCPI) and the Ishikawa alteration index (AI), applied to the investigated samples show significant differences (CCPI=52.7-57.8; AI=36.1-40.6) indicating their different degree of alteration. According to Nakada et al., 2005, the C13 to C16 dykes represent the feeder dyke from the latest eruption (1991-1995) whereas C8 represents an earlier dyke feeder dyke from an older eruption. Weakest alteration, which was obtained in samples C16-1-5 and C13-2-5, correlates with the alteration

  9. Distribution of buried hydrothermal alteration deduced from high-resolution magnetic surveys in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouligand, Claire; Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Blakely, Richard J.

    2014-04-01

    Yellowstone National Park (YNP) displays numerous and extensive hydrothermal features. Although hydrothermal alteration in YNP has been extensively studied, the volume, geometry, and type of rock alteration at depth remain poorly constrained. In this study, we use high-resolution airborne and ground magnetic surveys and measurements of remanent and induced magnetization of field and drill core samples to provide constraints on the geometry of hydrothermal alteration within the subsurface of three thermal areas in YNP (Firehole River, Smoke Jumper Hot Springs, and Norris Geyser Basin). We observe that hydrothermal zones from both liquid- and vapor-dominated systems coincide with magnetic lows observed in aeromagnetic surveys and with a decrease of the amplitude of short-wavelength anomalies seen in ground magnetic surveys. This suggests a strong demagnetization of both the shallow and deep substratum within these areas associated with the removal of magnetic minerals by hydrothermal alteration processes. Such demagnetization is confirmed by measurements of rock samples from hydrothermal areas which display significantly decreased total magnetization. A pronounced negative anomaly is observed over the Lone Star Geyser and suggests a significant demagnetization of the substratum associated with areas displaying large-scale fluid flow. The ground and airborne magnetic surveys are used to evaluate the distribution of magnetization in the subsurface. This study shows that significant demagnetization occurs over a thickness of at least a few hundred meters in hydrothermal areas at YNP and that the maximum degree or maximum thickness of demagnetization correlates closely with the location of hydrothermal activity and mapped alteration.

  10. Effect of Zn- and Ca-oxides on the structure and chemical durability of simulant alkali borosilicate glasses for immobilisation of UK high level wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hua, E-mail: nzhangh@aliyun.com [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); China Institute of Atomic Energy, P.O. Box 275-93, 102413 Beijing (China); Corkhill, Claire L.; Heath, Paul G.; Hand, Russell J.; Stennett, Martin C. [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom); Hyatt, Neil C., E-mail: n.c.hyatt@sheffield.ac.uk [Immobilisation Science Laboratory, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sir Robert Hadfield Building, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Spinel crystallization incorporates ZnO from base glass, displacing Mg and Ni. • Raman spectroscopy demonstrates significant impact on glass structure by addition of ZnO to base glass. • Addition of ZnO reduces glass dissolution rate at early time periods (up to 28 days). - Abstract: Compositional modification of United Kingdom high level nuclear waste (HLW) glasses was investigated with the aim of understanding the impact of adopting a ZnO/CaO modified base glass on the vitrified product phase assemblage, glass structure, processing characteristics and dissolution kinetics. Crystalline spinel phases were identified in the vitrified products derived from the Na{sub 2}O/Li{sub 2}O and the ZnO/CaO modified base glass compositions; the volume fraction of the spinel crystallites increased with increasing waste loading from 15 to 20 wt%. The spinel composition was influenced by the base glass components; in the vitrified product obtained with the ZnO/CaO modified base glass, the spinel phase contained a greater proportion of Zn, with a nominal composition of (Zn{sub 0.60}Ni{sub 0.20}Mg{sub 0.20})(Cr{sub 1.37}Fe{sub 0.63})O{sub 4}. The addition of ZnO and CaO to the base glass was also found to significantly alter the glass structure, with changes identified in both borate and silicate glass networks using Raman spectroscopy. In particular, these glasses were characterised by a significantly higher Q{sup 3} species, which we attribute to Si–O–Zn linkages; addition of ZnO and CaO to the glass composition therefore enhanced glass network polymerisation. The increase in network polymerisation, and the presence of spinel crystallites, were found to increase the glass viscosity of the ZnO/CaO modified base glass; however, the viscosities were within the accepted range for nuclear waste glass processing. The ZnO/CaO modified glass compositions were observed to be significantly more durable than the Na{sub 2}O/Li{sub 2}O base glass up to 28 days, due to

  11. Petrology and Geochemistry of Hydrothermally Altered Volcanic Rocks in the Iheya North Hydrothermal Field, Middle Okinawa Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamasaki, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Iheya North hydrothermal field is located in the middle Okinawa Trough, a young and actively spreading back-arc basin extending behind the Ryukyu arc-trench system in the southeastern margin of the East China Sea. In this hydrothermal field, two scientific drilling expeditions (IODP Exp 331 and SIP CK14-04) were conducted using a deep-sea drilling vessel "Chikyu," and samples from a total of 27 holes were taken. Through these expeditions, Kuroko-type volcanogenic massive sulfide deposits (VMS), hydrothermally altered volcanic rocks, and pumiceous and pelagic sediments were recovered. The recovered core provided important information about the relationship between hydrothermal activity, alteration, and ore mineralization. Whole-rock major element composition and trace element (TE) patterns of pumices were very similar to those of rhyolites in the middle Okinawa Trough (RMO). However, pumices were relatively enriched in chalcophile elements Sr and Nb, which suggest incipient mineralization. Volcanic rock generally demonstrated strong silicification and was greenish pale gray in color. Regardless of severe alteration, some rock displayed major element composition broadly similar to the RMO. Alteration was evidenced by an increase in the content of SiO2 and MgO, and decrease in Al2O3, Na2O, and K2O content. The most striking geochemical feature of altered volcanic rock was the discordance between texture and the degree of modification of TEs. Some samples showed decussate texture occupied by petal-like quartz with severe silicification, but no prominent disturbance of concentration and patterns of TEs were observed. In contrast, samples with well-preserved igneous porphyritic texture showed very low TE content and modification of TE patterns. These results suggest that the modification of texture and composition of TEs, as well as silicification, do not occur by a uniform process, but several processes. This may reflect the differences in temperature and the

  12. Delineation of Hydrothermally Altered Zones that Favour Gold Mineralization in Isanlu Area, Nigeria Using Aeroradiometric Data

    OpenAIRE

    Ohioma, Ohi Jerry; Ezomo, Friday; Akinsunmade, Akinniyi

    2017-01-01

    Aeroradiometric data set of Isanlu sheet 225 (1:100,000) has been acquired with a view to analyze and interpret for the delineation of hydrothermally altered zones that favour gold mineralization. The acquired aero-radiometric data was subjected to filtering algorithm and enhancement techniques such as shaded relief enhancement, elemental ratio enhancement using Geosoft Oasis Montaj Software. Moreover, Golden Software Surfer was used to identify and present the revealed hydrothermally altered...

  13. Constraints on mineralisation and hydrothermal alteration in the Nalunaq gold deposit, South Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bell, Robin-Marie Fairbairn

    Summary: Nalunaq is located in South Greenland and is a small high gold-grade deposit, which for the majority of its operational life was Greenland's only metalliferous mine. Gold is hosted in narrow quartz veins which are cross-cut by late-stage faults. Gold-quartz veins are hosted by fine......-and - medium grained amphibolite of the Nanortalik Nappe. Detailed petrographic and geochronological studies have revealed a multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system, with alteration pre-and post-dating gold mineralisation. The hydrothermal alteration records a transition from upper-amphibolite facies...

  14. A Palaeoproterozoic multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq gold deposit, South Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robin-Marie; Kolb, Jochen; Waight, Tod Earle; Bagas, Leon; Thomsen, Tonny B.

    2017-03-01

    Nalunaq is an orogenic, high gold grade deposit situated on the Nanortalik Peninsula, South Greenland. Mineralisation is hosted in shear zone-controlled quartz veins, located in fine- and medium-grained amphibolite. The deposit was the site of Greenland's only operating metalliferous mine until its closure in 2014, having produced 10.67 t of gold. This study uses a combination of field investigation, petrography and U/Pb zircon and titanite geochronology to define a multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq. A clinopyroxene-plagioclase-garnet(-sulphide) alteration zone (CPGZ) developed in the Nanortalik Peninsula, close to regional peak metamorphism and prior to gold-quartz vein formation. The ca. 1783-1762-Ma gold-quartz veins are hosted in reactivated shear zones with a hydrothermal alteration halo of biotite-arsenopyrite-sericite-actinolite-pyrrhotite(-chlorite-plagioclase-löllingite-tourmaline-titanite), which is best developed in areas of exceptionally high gold grades. Aplite dykes dated to ca. 1762 Ma cross-cut the gold-quartz veins, providing a minimum age for mineralisation. A hydrothermal calcite-titanite alteration assemblage is dated to ca. 1766 Ma; however, this alteration is highly isolated, and as a result, its field relationships are poorly constrained. The hydrothermal alteration and mineralisation is cut by several generations of ca. 1745-Ma biotite granodiorite accompanied by brittle deformation. A ca. 1745-Ma lower greenschist facies hydrothermal epidote-calcite-zoisite alteration assemblage with numerous accessory minerals forms halos surrounding the late-stage fractures. The contrasting hydrothermal alteration styles at Nalunaq indicate a complex history of exhumation from amphibolite facies conditions to lower greenschist facies conditions in an orogenic belt which resembles modern Phanerozoic orogens.

  15. Hydrothermal Alteration at Lonar Crater, India and Elemental Variations in Impact Crater Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newsom, H. E.; Nelson, M. J.; Shearer, C. K.; Misra, S.; Narasimham, V.

    2005-01-01

    The role of hydrothermal alteration and chemical transport involving impact craters could have occurred on Mars, the poles of Mercury and the Moon, and other small bodies. We are studying terrestrial craters of various sizes in different environments to better understand aqueous alteration and chemical transport processes. The Lonar crater in India (1.8 km diameter) is particularly interesting being the only impact crater in basalt. In January of 2004, during fieldwork in the ejecta blanket around the rim of the Lonar crater we discovered alteration zones not previously described at this crater. The alteration of the ejecta blanket could represent evidence of localized hydrothermal activity. Such activity is consistent with the presence of large amounts of impact melt in the ejecta blanket. Map of one area on the north rim of the crater containing highly altered zones at least 3 m deep is shown.

  16. Phreatic activity and hydrothermal alteration in the Valley of Desolation, Dominica, Lesser Antilles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Klaus; Scheu, Bettina; Yilmaz, Tim I.; Montanaro, Cristian; Albert Gilg, H.; Rott, Stefanie; Joseph, Erouscilla P.; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-12-01

    Phreatic eruptions are possibly the most dramatic surface expressions of hydrothermal activity, and they remain poorly understood. The near absence of precursory signals makes phreatic eruptions unpredictable with respect to both time and magnitude. The Valley of Desolation (VoD), Dominica, located close to the Boiling Lake, the second largest high-temperature volcanic crater lake in the world, hosts vigorous hydrothermal activity with hot springs, mud pools, fumaroles, and steaming ground. A phreatic or phreatomagmatic eruption from this site is considered to be the most likely scenario for future volcanic activity on Dominica. Yet there is little information regarding the trigger mechanisms and eruption processes of explosive events at this active hydrothermal center, and only a very small number of studies have investigated hydrothermal activity in the VoD. We therefore conducted two field campaigns in the VoD to map hydrothermal activity and its surficial phenomena. We also investigated alteration processes and their effects on degassing and phreatic eruption processes. We collected in situ petrophysical properties of clay-rich unconsolidated samples, and together with consolidated rock samples, we investigated the range of supergene and hydrothermal alteration in the laboratory. In addition, we performed rapid decompression experiments on unconsolidated soil samples. Our results show that alteration leads to an increasing abundance of clay minerals and a decrease in both strength and permeability of the rocks. In the immediate vicinity of degassing acid-sulfate fluids, advanced argillic alteration yields a mineral zoning which is influenced by meteoric water. The water-saturated basal zone is dominated by kaolinite run 0whereas alunite formation is favored at and above the groundwater table where atmospheric oxidation of H2S to H2SO4 occurs (e.g., steam-heated alteration). Alteration effects may in turn inhibit degassing at the surface, increasing the

  17. Hydrothermal alteration studies of gabbros from Northern Central ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mylonitic gabbro and altered gabbro were recovered from off-axis high and corner high locations at ridge-transform intersection, adjacent to Vityaz transform fault of the slow spreading (32–35mm/yr, full spreading) Northern Central Indian Ridge. Both the varieties show signatures of extensive alteration caused due to ...

  18. Hydrothermal alteration at Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA: DDH 1976-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, N.L.; Parry, W.T.

    1977-09-01

    Hot waters of the Roosevelt Thermal Area, Utah, have altered granitic rocks and detritus of the Mineral Range pluton, Utah. Alteration and mineral deposition recognized in a 200' drill core from DDH 1-76 is most intense in the upper 100 feet which consists of altered alluvium and opal deposits; the lower 100 feet is weakly altered quartz monzonite. Petrographic, x-ray, and chemical methods were used to characterize systematic changes in chemistry and mineralogy. Comparison of the alteration mineral assemblages with known water chemistry and equilibrium activity diagrams suggests that a simple solution equilibrium model cannot account for the alteration. A model is proposed in which upward moving thermal water supersaturated with respect to quartz and a downward moving cool water undersaturated with respect to quartz produces the observed alteration. An estimate of the heat flow contributions from hydrothermal alteration was made by calculating reaction enthalpies for alteration reactions at each depth. The estimated heat flow varied from .02 HFU (for 200' depth, 400,000 yr duration, and no sulfur oxidation) to 67 HFU (for 5,000' depth, 1,000 yr duration, and all sulfur oxidized from sulfide). Heat flow contributions from hydrothermal alteration are comparable with those from a cooling granitic magma.

  19. Hydrothermal alteration in the Baca Geothermal System, Redondo Dome, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Nielson, Dennis L.

    1986-02-01

    Thermal fluids circulating in the active hydrothermal system of the resurgent Redondo dome of the Valles caldera have interacted with their diverse host rocks to produce well-zoned alteration assemblages, which not only help locate permeable fluid channels but also provide insight into the system's thermal history. The alteration shows that fluid flow has been confined principally to steeply dipping normal faults and subsidiary fractures as well as thin stratigraphic aquifers. Permeability along many of these channels has been reduced or locally eliminated by hydrothermal self-sealing. Alteration from the surface through the base of the Miocene Paliza Canyon Formation is of three distinctive types: argillic, propylitic, and phyllic. Argillic alteration forms a blanket above the deep water table in formerly permeable nonwelded tuffs. Beneath the argillic zone, pervasive propylitic alteration is weakly developed in felsic host rocks but locally intense in deep intermediate composition volcanics. Strong phyllic alteration is commonly but not invariably associated with major active thermal fluid channels. Phyllic zones yielding no fluid were clearly once permeable but now are hydrothermally sealed. High-temperature alteration phases at Baca are presently found at much lower temperatures. We suggest either that isotherms have collapsed due to gradual cooling of the system, that they have retreated without overall heat loss due to uplift of the Redondo dome, that the system has shifted laterally, or that it has contracted due to a drop in the water table. The deepest Well (B-12, 3423 m) in the dome may have penetrated through the base of the active hydrothermal system. Below a depth of 2440 m in this well, hydrothermal veining largely disappears, and the rocks resemble those developed by isochemical thermal metamorphism. The transition is reflected by temperature logs, which show a conductive thermal gradient below 2440 m. This depth may mark the dome's neutral plane

  20. Paris vs. Murchison: Impact of hydrothermal alteration on organic matter in CM chondrites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradoff, V.; Le Guillou, C.; Bernard, S.; Binet, L.; Cartigny, P.; Brearley, A. J.; Remusat, L.

    2017-09-01

    Unravelling the origin of organic compounds that were accreted into asteroids requires better constraining the impact of asteroidal hydrothermal alteration on their isotopic signatures, molecular structures, and spatial distribution. Here, we conducted a multi-scale/multi-technique comparative study of the organic matter (OM) from two CM chondrites (that originate from the same parent body or from identical parent bodies that accreted the same mixture of precursors) and underwent a different degree of hydrothermal alteration: Paris (a weakly altered CM chondrite - CM 2.8) and Murchison (a more altered one - CM 2.5). The Paris insoluble organic matter (IOM) shows a higher aliphatic/aromatic carbon ratio, a higher radical abundance and a lower oxygen content than the Murchison IOM. Analysis of the OM in situ shows that two texturally distinct populations of organic compounds are present within the Paris matrix: sub-micrometric individual OM particles and diffuse OM finely distributed within phyllosilicates and amorphous silicates. These results indicate that hydrothermal alteration on the CM parent body induced aromatization and oxidation of the IOM, as well as a decrease in radical and nitrogen contents. Some of these observations were also reported by studies of variably altered fragment of Tagish Lake (C2), although the hydrothermal alteration of the OM in Tagish Lake was apparently much more severe. Finally, comparison with data available in the literature suggests that the parent bodies of other chondrite petrologic groups could have accreted a mixture of organic precursors different from that accreted by the parent body of CMs.

  1. LANDSAT detection of hydrothermal alteration in the Nogal Canyon Cauldron, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R. K.; Rouse, G.

    1977-01-01

    In 1974 a circular-shaped iron oxide anomaly was observed in an image of a LANDSAT frame centered near Truth or Consequences, New Mexico. Field examination of the anomaly has shown that it coincides with a zone of hydrothermal alteration on the northern edge of the Nogal Canyon Cauldron. The altered area contains clay minerals ranging in colors from white to vivid red, the latter presumably resulting from hematite staining. In situ gas measurements showed no evidence of active hydrogen sulfide seepage. Preliminary geochemical analyses of grab samples have detected no significant amounts of mineralization. Whereas this area does not at present appear to be economically important, it provides an example of how LANDSAT can be utilized in reconnaissance mapping for cauldrons, calderas, and other volcanic features which display hydrothermal alteration.

  2. Hydrothermal alteration of sediments associated with surface emissions from the Cerro Prieto geothermal field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valette-Silver, J.N.; Esquer P., I.; Elders, W.A.; Collier, P.C.; Hoagland, J.R.

    1981-01-01

    A study of the mineralogical changes associated with these hydrothermal vents was initiated with the aim of developing possible exploration tools for geothermal resources. The Cerro Prieto reservoir has already been explored by extensive deep drilling so that relationships between surface manifestations and deeper hydrothermal processes could be established directly. Approximately 120 samples of surface sediments were collected both inside and outside of the vents. The mineralogy of the altered sediments studied appears to be controlled by the type of emission. A comparison between the changes in mineralogy due to low temperature hydrothermal activity in the reservoir, seen in samples from boreholes, and mineralogical changes in the surface emission samples shows similar general trends below 180 C: increase of quartz, feldspar and illite, with subsequent disappearance of kaolinite, montmorillonite, calcite and dolomite. These mineral assemblages seem to be characteristic products of the discharge from high intensity geothermal fields.

  3. Pukala intrusion, its age and connection to hydrothermal alteration in Orivesi, southwestern Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Talikka

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The Pukala intrusion is situated in the Paleoproterozoic Svecofennian domain of the Fennoscandian Shield in the contact region between the Central Finland Granitoid Complex and the Tampere Belt. The acid subvolcanic intrusion, which is in contact or close to severalaltered domains, mainly consists of porphyritic granodiorite and trondhjemite. The Pukala intrusion was emplaced into volcanic sequence in an island-arc or fore-arc setting before or during the early stages of the main regional deformation phase of the Svecofennian orogeny. On the basis of the geochemical data, the Pukala intrusion is a peraluminous volcanic-arc granitoid. After crystallisation at 1896±3 Ma, multiphase deformation and metamorphismcaused alteration, recrystallisation, and orientation of the minerals, and tilted the intrusion steeply towards south. The 1851±5 Ma U-Pb age for titanite is connected to the late stages of the Svecofennian tectonometamorphic evolution of the region. Several hydrothermally altered domains are located in the felsic and intermediate metavolcanic rocks of the Tampere Belt within less than one kilometre south of the Pukala intrusion. Alteration is divided into three basic types: partial silica alteration, chlorite-sericite±silica alteration, and sericite alteration in shear zones. The first two types probably formed during the emplacement and crystallisation of the Pukala intrusion, and the third is linked to late shearing. Intense sericitisation and comb quartz bands in the contact of theintrusion and the altered domain at Kutemajärvi suggest that the hydrothermal system was driven by the Pukala intrusion.

  4. Hydrothermal alteration in research drill hole Y-3, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargar, Keith E.; Beeson, Melvin H.

    1985-01-01

    Y-3, a U.S. Geological Survey research diamond-drill hole in Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, reached a depth of 156.7 m. The recovered drill core consists of 42.2 m of surficial (mostly glacial) sediments and two rhyolite flows (Nez Perce Creek flow and an older, unnamed rhyolite flow) of the Central Plateau Member of the Pleistocene Plateau Rhyolite. Hydrothermal alteration is fairly extensive in most of the drill core. The surficial deposits are largely cemented by silica and zeolite minerals; and the two rhyolite flows are, in part, bleached by thermal water that deposited numerous hydrothermal minerals in cavities and fractures. Hydrothermal minerals containing sodium as a dominant cation (analcime, clinoptilolite, mordenite, Na-smectite, and aegirine) are more abundant than calcium-bearing minerals (calcite, fluorite, Ca-smectite, and pectolite) in the sedimentary section of the drill core. In the volcanic section of drill core Y-3, calcium-rich minerals (dachiardite, laumontite, yugawaralite, calcite, fluorite, Ca-smectite, pectolite, and truscottite) are predominant over sodium-bearing minerals (aegirine, mordenite, and Na-smectite). Hydrothermal minerals that contain significant amounts of potassium (alunite and lepidolite in the sediments and illitesmectite in the rhyolite flows) are found in the two drill-core intervals. Drill core y:.3 also contains hydrothermal silica minerals (opal, [3-cristobalite, chalcedony, and quartz), other clay minerals (allophane, halloysite, kaolinite, and chlorite), gypsum, pyrite, and hematite. The dominance of calcium-bearing hydrothermal minerals in the lower rhyolitic section of the y:.3 drill core appears to be due to loss of calcium, along with potassium, during adiabatic cooling of an ascending boiling water.

  5. Hydrothermal alteration of the Ediacaran Doushantuo Formation in the Yangtze Gorges area (South China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derkowski, Arkadiusz; Bristow, Thomas F.; Wampler, J. M.; Środoń, Jan; Marynowski, Leszek; Elliott, W. Crawford; Chamberlain, C. Page

    2013-04-01

    The geochemical and fossil record preserved in the Ediacaran age (635-551 Ma) Doushantuo Formation of South China has been extensively examined to explore the impact of changing climate and the oxidation state of the oceans on the development and distribution of early multicellular life. In the Yangtze Gorges area, this formation shows many of the geochemical trends and features thought to typify global ocean chemistry in the Ediacaran Period, but there are indications that post-sedimentary processes modified these signals. This study of clay minerals and organic matter builds a more detailed picture of the type and degree of post-sedimentary alteration at different stratigraphic levels of the formation and focuses on how this alteration influenced stable carbon and oxygen isotope records. In the cratonward Jiulongwan and Huajipo sections of the Doushantuo Formation, its lower part (Members 1 and 2) consists largely of dolomitic shale, rich in authigenic saponite that crystallized in an alkaline sedimentary basin. Saponite has been altered to chlorite via corrensite across tens of meters of strata in lower Member 2, with increased alteration downward toward the cap dolostone. The greater chloritization is accompanied by lower δ18O and higher δD values of trioctahedral clays. This pattern of alteration of trioctahedral clays is likely due to hydrothermal fluid activity in the underlying, relatively permeable Nantuo Formation and cap dolostone. A concomitant increase of solid bitumen reflectance toward the base of the formation supports this idea. In the uppermost part of the formation in the Yangtze Gorges area (Member 4), a typical open water marine dolomitic shale rich in illite and organic matter, increases in the methylphenanthrenes ratio index and solid bitumen reflectance correlate with decrease of the bulk rock K/Al ratio upward, providing evidence for hot fluid migration above the nearly impermeable shale. Clay from the upper part of the formation is

  6. A Palaeoproterozoic multi-stage hydrothermal alteration system at Nalunaq gold deposit, South Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bell, Robin-Marie; Kolb, Jochen; Waight, Tod Earle

    2017-01-01

    Nalunaq is an orogenic, high gold grade deposit situated on the Nanortalik Peninsula, South Greenland. Mineralisation is hosted in shear zone-controlled quartz veins, located in fine- and medium-grained amphibolite. The deposit was the site of Greenland’s only operating metalliferous mine until its......-tourmaline-titanite), which is best developed in areas of exceptionally high gold grades. Aplite dykes dated to ca. 1762 Ma cross-cut the gold-quartz veins, providing a minimum age for mineralisation. A hydrothermal calcite-titanite alteration assemblage is dated to ca. 1766 Ma; however, this alteration is highly isolated...

  7. Hydrothermal Alteration on Basaltic Mauna Kea Volcano as a Template for Identification of Hydrothermal Alteration on Basaltic Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. V.; Graff, T. G.; Ming, D. W.; Mertzman, S. A.; Bell, J. F., III

    2003-01-01

    Certain samples of palagonitic tephra from Mauna Kea Volcano (Hawaii) are spectral analogues for bright martian surface materials at visible and near-IR wavelengths because both are characterized by a ferric absorption edge extending from about 400 to 750 nm and relatively constant reflectivity extending from about 750 nm to beyond 2000 nm. Palagonite is a yellow or orange isotropic mineraloid formed by hydration and devitrification of basaltic glass. For Mars-analogue palagonite, the pigment is nanometersized ferric oxide particles (np-Ox) dispersed throughout an allophane-like hydrated basaltic glass matrix. Crystalline phyllosilicates are not generally detected, and the hydration state of the is not known. The poorly crystalline nature of glass alteration products implies relatively low temperature formation pathways. We report here x-ray diffraction, major element, Mossbauer, and VNIR data for 9 basaltic tephras. Thermal emission spectra are reported in a separate abstract. Our multidisciplinary approach both tightly constrains mineralogical interpretations and maximizes overlap with datasets available for the martian surface available now and in the future.

  8. Hydrothermal alteration in basalts from Vargeão impact structure, south Brazil, and implications for recognition of impact-induced hydrothermalism on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Elder; Nédélec, Anne; Baratoux, David; Trindade, Ricardo I. F.; Fabre, Sébastien; Berger, Gilles

    2015-05-01

    The 12-km-wide Vargeão impact structure was formed 123 Myr ago in the Paraná basaltic province (southern Brazil). At this time the province region had a dry climate, although a large brackish aquifer had been formed in the underlying sandstones. It is therefore one of the best terrestrial analogs for studying impact-related products on a dry martian surface environment with preserved ice-rich ground. The basalts within the impact structure display cm-sized breccia veins filled with lithic clasts, glassy remnants, newly formed Fe-oxyhydroxides and secondary phases, such as calcite, phyllosilicates and, subordinately quartz and zeolite. The textural and mineralogical study of these phases demonstrate their hydrothermal origin. Although the very center of the structure has experienced the highest pressures and temperatures, the most developed hydrothermal changes are recognized in an inner collar surrounding the central depression. This inner collar is also the location of major modifications of the rock magnetic properties. These magnetic signatures are related to the distribution of impact-related faults and to the formation of new iron oxides. Geochemical modeling indicate that hydrothermal phases formation required low water/rock ratios. Our observations therefore suggest that hydrothermal alteration took place following the perturbation of the aquifer by the impact, but evidence for hydrothermal circulation is limited in comparison with other impact-related hydrothermal systems. This situation may be explained by the presence of the aquifer below the heat source, such a setting being exceptional for the Earth, but common on Mars. However, the spectroscopic signatures in visible/near infrared images suggest that this kind of impact-related hydrothermal alteration may be still indentified in large impact craters on Mars by orbital instruments. These results does not exclude the possibility that more developed alteration took place in breccias that are today

  9. Volcano collapse promoted by hydrothermal alteration and edifice shape, Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, M.E.; Sisson, T.W.; Brien, D.L.

    2001-01-01

    Catastrophic collapses of steep volcano flanks threaten many populated regions, and understanding factors that promote collapse could save lives and property. Large collapses of hydrothermally altered parts of Mount Rainier have generated far-traveled debris flows; future flows would threaten densely populated parts of the Puget Sound region. We evaluate edifice collapse hazards at Mount Rainier using a new three-dimensional slope stability method incorporating detailed geologic mapping and subsurface geophysical imaging to determine distributions of strong (fresh) and weak (altered) rock. Quantitative three-dimensional slope stability calculations reveal that sizeable flank collapse (>0.1 km3) is promoted by voluminous, weak, hydrothermally altered rock situated high on steep slopes. These conditions exist only on Mount Rainier's upper west slope, consistent with the Holocene debris-flow history. Widespread alteration on lower flanks or concealed in regions of gentle slope high on the edifice does not greatly facilitate collapse. Our quantitative stability assessment method can also provide useful hazard predictions using reconnaissance geologic information and is a potentially rapid and inexpensive new tool for aiding volcano hazard assessments.

  10. Hydrothermal alteration at Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA - DDH 1976-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, N.L.; Parry, W.T.

    1977-09-01

    Hot waters of the Roosevelt Thermal Area, Utah, have altered granitic rocks and detritus of the Mineral Range pluton, Utah. Petrographic, x-ray, and chemical methods were used to characterize systematic changes in chemistry and mineralogy. Major alteration zones include: 1) an advanced argillic zone in the upper 30 feet of altered detritus containing alunite, opal, vermiculite, and relic quartz; 2) an argillic zone from 30 feet to 105 feet containing kaolinite, muscovite, and minor alunite; and 3) a propylitic zone from 105 to 200 feet containing muscovite, pyrite, marcasite, montmorillonite, and chlorite in weakly altered quartz monzonite. Comparison of the alternation mineral assemblages with known water chemistry and equilibrium activity diagrams suggests that a simple solution equilibrium model cannot account for the alteration. A model is proposed in which upward moving thermal water supersaturated with respect to quartz and a downward moving cool water undersaturated with respect to quartz produces the observed alteration. An estimate of the heat flow contributions from hydrothermal alteration was made by calculating reaction enthalpies for alteration reactions at each depth.

  11. Boron contents and isotopic compositions of the hydrothermally altered oceanic crust from the Troodos ophiolite, Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsukura, S.; Yamaoka, K.; Ishikawa, T.; Kawahata, H.

    2010-12-01

    The boron contents and isotopic compositions were determined for the hydrothermally altered oceanic crust through the Troodos ophiolite. The samples were represented by the International Crustal Research Drilling Group (ICRDG) drill-Holes CY1 (479m), CY2A (689m), CY4 (2263m), and selected outcrops along the Akaki river. Hole CY1 was composed upper and lower pillow lava, CY4 constituted sheeted dike complex and gabbro section, and the samples along Akaki river formed from pillow lava to sheeted dike complex. Hole CY2A was composed pillow lava and sheeted dike, drilled near Agrokipia ‘B’ deposit a stockwork type which completely enclosed within the lower pillow lava. The goal of this study is to understand the Boron geochemistry during hydrothermal alteration of the oceanic crust including hydrothermal ore deposit as Agrokipia ‘B’. The average boron contents of each sequence from Troodos ophiolite were pillow lava (63.2ppm), sheeted dike complex (4.5ppm), gabbro section (1.6ppm). But then, those of Oman ophiolite were 7.9ppm, 5.3ppm, 1.7ppm (Yamaoka et al., 2010 submitted). Thus, both of these ophiolites, the vertical profile of boron content decreased with depth, also the boron contents were much richer than fresh-MORB (0.5ppm) (Spivack and Edmond, 1987; Chaussidon and Jambon, 1994). This indicates boron rich of the altered oceanic crust were derived from seawater. And sheeted dike complex and gabbro section were similar value relatively, but pillow lava differed widely. These results may represent the difference of length being submarine, because these ophiolites were generated in deep water of the Tethys sea about 90Ma (Late Cretaceous) (Tilton et al., 1981; Mukasa and Ludden, 1987), and Oman ophiolite was obducted about 70Ma (Lanphere, 1981) but Troodos ophiolite uplifted about 10Ma (Middle Miocene) (Robertson and Woodcock, 1979).

  12. Hydrothermal alteration and diagenesis of terrestrial lacustrine pillow basalts: Coordination of hyperspectral imaging with laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberger, Rebecca N.; Mustard, John F.; Cloutis, Edward A.; Mann, Paul; Wilson, Janette H.; Flemming, Roberta L.; Robertson, Kevin M.; Salvatore, Mark R.; Edwards, Christopher S.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate an outcrop of ∼187 Ma lacustrine pillow basalts of the Talcott Formation exposed in Meriden, Connecticut, USA, focusing on coordinated analyses of one pillow lava to characterize the aqueous history of these basalts in the Hartford Basin. This work uses a suite of multidisciplinary measurements, including hyperspectral imaging, other spectroscopic techniques, and chemical and mineralogical analyses, from the microscopic scale up to the scale of an outcrop. The phases identified in the sample are albite, large iron oxides, and titanite throughout; calcite in vesicles; calcic clinopyroxene, aegirine, and Fe/Mg-bearing clay in the rind; and fine-grained hematite and pyroxenes in the interior. Using imaging spectroscopy, the chemistry and mineralogy results extend to the hand sample and larger outcrop. From all of the analyses, we suggest that the pillow basalts were altered initially after emplacement, either by heated lake water or magmatic fluids, at temperatures of at least 400-600 °C, and the calcic clinopyroxenes and aegirine identified in the rind are a preserved record of that alteration. As the hydrothermal system cooled to slightly lower temperatures, clays formed in the rind, and, during this alteration, the sample oxidized to form hematite in the matrix of the interior and Fe3+ in the pyroxenes in the rind. During the waning stages of the hydrothermal system, calcite precipitated in vesicles within the rind. Later, diagenetic processes albitized the sample, with albite replacing plagioclase, lining vesicles, and accreting onto the exterior of the sample. This albitization or Na-metasomatism occurred when the lake within the Hartford Basin evaporated during a drier past climatic era, resulting in Na-rich brines. As Ca-rich plagioclase altered to albite, Ca was released into solution, eventually precipitating as calcite in previously-unfilled vesicles, dominantly in the interior of the pillow. Coordinated analyses of this sample permit

  13. Strontium and oxygen isotopic profiles through 3km of hydrothermally altered oceanic crust in the Reykjanes Geothermal System, Iceland

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, Naomi; Zierenberg, Robert A.; Schiffman, Peter

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 Elsevier B.V. The Iceland Deep Drilling Program well RN-17 was drilled 3km into a section of hydrothermally altered basaltic crust in the Reykjanes geothermal system in Iceland. The system is located on the landward extension of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and the circulating hydrothermal fluid is modified seawater, making Reykjanes a useful analog for mid-oceanic ridge hydrothermal systems. We have determined whole-rock Sr and O isotope compositions, and Sr isotope compositions of epidote...

  14. Targeting Hydrothermal Alterations Utilizing LANDSAT-8 Andaster Data in Shahr-E Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safari, M.; Pour, A. B.; Maghsoudi, A.; Hashim, M.

    2017-10-01

    Shahr-e-Babak tract of the Kerman metalogenic belt is one of the most potential segments of Urumieh-Dokhtar (Sahand-Bazman) magmatic arc. This area encompasses several porphyry copper deposits in exploration, development and exploitation hierarchy. The aim of this study is to map hydrothermal alterations caused by early Cenozoic magmatic intrusions in Shahr-e-Babak area. To this purpose, mineral mapping methods including band combinations, ratios and multiplications as well as PCA and MNF data space transforms in SWIR and VNIR for both ASTER and OLI sensors. Alteration zones according to spectral signatures of each type of alteration mineral assemblages such as argillic, phyllic and propylitic are successfully mapped. For enhancing the target areas false color composites and HSI-RGB color space transform are performed on developed band combinations. Previous studies have proven the robust application of ASTER in geology and mineral exploration; nonetheless, the results of this investigation prove applicability of OLI sensor from landsat-8 for alteration mapping. According to the results, evidently OLI sensor data can accurately map alteration zones. Additionally, the 12-bit quantization of OLI data is its privilege over 8-bit data of ASTER in VNIR and SWIR, thus OLI high quality results, which makes it easy to distinguish targets with enhanced color contrast between the altered and unaltered rocks.

  15. Hydrothermally-altered dacite terrains in the Methana peninsula Greece: Relevance to Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloutis, Edward A.; Jonatanson, Victoria; Bandfield, Joshua L.; Amador, Elena S.; Rivera-Hernández, Frances; Mann, P.; Mertzman, Stanley A.

    2017-04-01

    Dacitic rocks, often indicative of crustal recycling on Earth, have been identified in some regions on Mars, as have possible hydrothermally/aqueously-altered dacites. To enable more robust identification of unaltered and altered dacites on Mars and other planetary bodies, we undertook a spectroscopic-structural-compositional study of altered and unaltered dacites from a dacitic volcanic region in Methana, Greece. Dacites erupted in this region range from fresh to pervasively hydrothermally altered, resulting in friable, Si-enriched products, as well as fumarolic deposition of Si and S-rich precipitates. Spectrally, fresh dacites are unremarkable in the 0.35-2.5 μm region with low, generally flat, reflectance and few, if any, absorption bands. Dacite infrared spectra exhibit Si-O absorption features in the 8-10 μm region (which are characteristic of Si-bearing rocks, in general). With increasing alteration, reflectance over the 0.35-2.5 μm range increases, absorption bands in the 1.4 and 1.9 μm region, associated with H2O/OH, and in the 2.2-2.3 μm region, associated with SiOH, become deeper, Fe3+-associated absorption bands in the 0.43 and 0.9 μm region appear, and the Christiansen feature near 8 μm moves to shorter wavelengths. Silica-rich coatings appear to be spectrally indistinguishable from Si-rich alteration. Alteration-formed sulfates may be detectable by the presence of diagnostic absorption features in the 0.35-2.5 μm region. Spectral similarities between different poorly crystalline high-Si phases make it difficult to uniquely determine the processes that formed high-Si surfaces that have been identified on Mars. However, the samples described here show a variety of spectral features that correspond to variable amounts of alteration. We find a similar range of spectral features, likely due to similar phases, on Mars, perhaps indicating a similar range of alteration environments. Comparison of laboratory spectra to Mars observational data also

  16. Spectral reflectance analysis of hydrothermal alteration in drill chips from two geothermal fields, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, A. K.; Calvin, W. M.

    2010-12-01

    We surveyed drill chips with a lab spectrometer in the visible-near infrared (VNIR) and short-wave infrared (SWIR) regions, 0.35-2.5 μm, to evaluate hydrothermal alteration mineralogy of samples from two known geothermal fields in western Nevada. Rock is fractured into small pieces or “chips” during drilling and stored in trays by depth interval. The drill chips are used to determine subsurface properties such as lithology, structure, and alteration. Accurately determining alteration mineralogy in the geothermal reservoir is important for indicating thermal fluids (usually associated with fluid pathways such as faults) and the highest temperature of alteration. Hydrothermal minerals, including carbonates, iron oxides, hydroxides, sheet silicates, and sulfates, are especially diagnostic in the VNIR-SWIR region.. The strength of reflectance spectroscopy is that it is rapid and accurate for differentiating temperature-sensitive minerals that are not visually unique. We examined drill chips from two western Nevada geothermal fields: Hawthorne (two wells) and Steamboat Springs (three wells) using an ASD lab spectrometer with very high resolution. The Steamboat Hills geothermal field has produced electricity since 1988 and is well studied, and is believed to be a combination of extensional tectonics and magmatic origin. Bedrocks are Cretaceous granodiorite intruding into older metasediments. Hot springs and other surface expressions occur over an area of about 2.6 km2. In contrast, the Hawthorne geothermal reservoir is a ‘blind’ system with no surface expressions such as hot springs or geysers. The geothermal field is situated in a range front fault zone in an extensional area, and is contained in Mesozoic mixed granite and meta-volcanics. We collected spectra at each interval in the chip trays. Interval length varied between 10’ and 30’. - Endmember analysis and mineral identification were performed -using standard analysis approaches used to map mineralogy

  17. Hydrothermal alteration and the formation of aluminous haloes around sulfide deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemiere, B.; Delfour, J.; Moine, B.; Piboule, M.; Ploquin, A.; Isnard, P.; Tegyey, M.

    1986-04-01

    The sulfide deposits of Chizeuil (Saone et Loire) occur in a Late Devonian volcano-sedimentary sequence within an acid volcanic unit and close to a Carboniferous granite batholith. Sulfide bodies, mainly pyrite, are enclosed in andalusite-bearing siliceous rocks lacking primary textures and recrystallized by the granitic thermal metamorphism. Several genetic interpretations were proposed for these siliceous rocks and the associated mineralization, i.e., as either being related to the granite intrusion or of volcanogenic derivation. Detailed studies led to their identification as hydrothermal alterites. A petrographic study of these siliceous alterites reveals that the main mineral phases are only constituted of silica and alumina: quartz, andalusite, kaolinite and minor contents of muscovite, diaspore and corundum. Neither K-feldspar or biotite are present with andalusite. This implies that thermal metamorphism occurred on an already alkali-, calcium- and magnesium-depleted rock. These siliceous alterites show less mobile-element (Al, Ti, V, Zr, Nb) concentration ranges similar to those of acid volcanic host rocks. A metasomatic model is computed from chemical data on surrounding soda dacites, assuming that acid hydrolysis was the only phenomenon involved, and that Al was stable in this process. Although altered rock types grading to soda dacites do not crop out, their existence may be deduced from surficial bedrock multielement geochemical data. The zoned distribution of elements agrees with that deduced from reactions and experimental phase diagrams. The pyrite bodies are surrounded by two distinct concentric alteration zones; the inner one is advanced argillic and the outer one is sericitic. Such a pattern is unusual for volcanogenic sulfide deposits but commonly associated with porphyry deposits. It may be related to the strong acidity (pH≦3) of hydrothermal solutions. These siliceous rocks were produced by an in-situ alteration of brecciated dacitic lavas

  18. Fluid inclusions and hydrothermal alteration on the Dixie Valley Fault, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, W. T.; Hedderly-Smith, D.; Bruhn, R. L.

    1991-11-01

    Footwall rocks of the 1954 rupture segment of the Dixie Valley fault show extensive hydrothermal alteration related to fluids that were present on the fault during tectonic events. Hydrothermal alteration of granitic host rocks consists of temporally and spatially overlapping mineral assemblages. An early, biotite-feldspar assemblage is followed by later Fe-chlorite and epidote. Both chlorite and epidote are replaced by hydrothermal sericite and cross-cut by calcite-hematite and quartz-calcite veins. Biotite is partially replaced by prehnite. The latest hydrothermal minerals are stilbite, laumontite, kaolinite, alunite, smectite, illite, and pervasive replacement of rock units with fine grained quartz, chalcedony, and opal. Secondary fluid inclusions trapped in healed microfractures in igneous quartz include type I inclusions that contain a moderate salinity aqueous liquid and vapor, type II inclusions that contain a moderate salinity aqueous liquid and CO2; type III inclusions that show eutectic melting temperatures below the NaCl-H2O eutectic and contain substantial CaCl2, and type IV inclusions containing halite and other daughter minerals. Microthermometric measurements on these inclusions yield variable compositions and homogenization temperatures. Salinities of type I inclusions vary from 0.1 to 12.9 wt % NaCl with the mode in the interval 0 to 1%. Salinities of type II CO2 bearing inclusions range from 0.62 to 6.81 wt % NaCl relative to H2O, and salinities of type III inclusions with low eutectic melting temperatures are 12.9 to 25.3 NaCl equivalent wt %. Salinities of halite-bearing inclusions are 30.1 to 39.2 wt % NaCl. Homogenization temperatures span the range 120° to 400°C. The processes of isochemical cooling with upward displacement of the footwall, mixing of cool low-salinity water with hotter components, and mixing of cool, evaporite brine with hotter components could be responsible for variable fluid inclusion compositions, homogenization

  19. Impact-Facilitated Hydrothermal Alteration in the Rim of Endeavour Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittlefehldt, D. W.; Schroeder, C.; Farrand, W. H.; Crumpler, L. S.; Yen, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    Endeavour crater, a Noachian-aged, 22 km diameter impact structure on Meridiani Planum, Mars, has been investigated by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunuity for over 2000 sols (Mars days). The rocks of the western rim region (oldest to youngest) are: (i) the pre-impact Matijevic fm.; (ii) rim-forming Shoemaker fm. polymict impact breccias; (iii) Grasberg fm., fine-grained sediments draping the lower slopes; and (iv) Burns fm., sulfate-rich sandstones that onlap the Grasberg fm. The rim is segmented and transected by radial fracture zones. Evidence for fluid-mediated alteration includes m-scale detections of phyllosilicates from orbit, and cm-scale variations in rock/soil composition/mineralogy documented by the Opportunity instrument suite. The m-scale phyllosilicate detections include Fe(3+)-Mg and aluminous smectites that occur in patches in the Matijevic and Shoemaker fms. Rock compositions do not reveal substantial differences for smectite-bearing compared to smectite-free rocks. Interpretation: large-scale hydrothermal alteration powered by impact-deposited heat acting on limited water supplies engendered mineralogic transfomations under low water/rock, near-isochemical conditions. The cm-scale alterations, localized in fracture zones, occurred at higher water/rock as evidenced by enhanced Si and Al contents through leaching of more soluble elements, and deposition of Mg, Ni and Mn sulphates and halogen salts in soils. Visible/near infrared reflectance of narrow curvilinear red zones indicate higher nanophase ferric oxide contents and possibly hydration compared to surrounding outcrops. Broad fracture zones on the rim have reflectance features consistent with development of ferric oxide minerals. Interpretation: water fluxing through the fractures in a hydrothermal system resulting from the impact engendered alteration and leaching under high water/rock conditions. Late, localized alteration is documented by Ca-sulfate-rich veins that are not confined to

  20. Hydrothermal alteration maps of the central and southern Basin and Range province of the United States compiled from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data and Interactive Data Language (IDL) logical operator algorithms were used to map hydrothermally altered rocks in the central and southern parts of the Basin and Range province of the United States. The hydrothermally altered rocks mapped in this study include (1) hydrothermal silica-rich rocks (hydrous quartz, chalcedony, opal, and amorphous silica), (2) propylitic rocks (calcite-dolomite and epidote-chlorite mapped as separate mineral groups), (3) argillic rocks (alunite-pyrophyllite-kaolinite), and (4) phyllic rocks (sericite-muscovite). A series of hydrothermal alteration maps, which identify the potential locations of hydrothermal silica-rich, propylitic, argillic, and phyllic rocks on Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) band 7 orthorectified images, and geographic information systems shape files of hydrothermal alteration units are provided in this study.

  1. Controls on thallium uptake during hydrothermal alteration of the upper ocean crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coggon, Rosalind M.; Rehkämper, Mark; Atteck, Charlotte; Teagle, Damon A. H.; Alt, Jeffrey C.; Cooper, Matthew J.

    2014-11-01

    Hydrothermal circulation is a fundamental component of global biogeochemical cycles. However, the magnitude of the high temperature axial hydrothermal fluid flux remains disputed, and the lower temperature ridge flank fluid flux is difficult to quantify. Thallium (Tl) isotopes behave differently in axial compared to ridge flank systems, with Tl near-quantitatively stripped from the intrusive crust by high temperature hydrothermal reactions, but added to the lavas during low temperature reaction with seawater. This contrasting behavior provides a unique approach to determine the fluid fluxes associated with axial and ridge flank environments. Unfortunately, our understanding of the Tl isotopic mass balance is hindered by poor knowledge of the mineralogical, physical and chemical controls on Tl-uptake by the ocean crust. Here we use analyses of basaltic volcanic upper crust from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Hole U1301B on the Juan de Fuca Ridge flank, combined with published analyses of dredged seafloor basalts and upper crustal basalts from Holes 504B and 896A, to investigate the controls on Tl-uptake by mid-ocean ridge basalts and evaluate when in the evolution of the ridge flank hydrothermal system Tl-uptake occurs. Seafloor basalts indicate an association between basaltic uptake of Tl from cold seawater and uptake of Cs and Rb, which are known to partition into K-rich phases. Although there is no clear relationship between Tl and K contents of seafloor basalts, the data do not rule out the incorporation of at least some Tl into the same minerals as the alkali elements. In contrast, we find no relationship between the Tl content and either the abundance of secondary phyllosilicate minerals, or the K, Cs or Rb contents in upper crustal basalts. We conclude that the uptake of Tl and alkali elements during hydrothermal alteration of the upper crust involves different processes and/or mineral phases compared to those that govern seafloor weathering. Furthermore

  2. Laboratory simulated hydrothermal alteration of sedimentary organic matter from Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leif, Roald N.

    1993-01-01

    High temperature alteration of sedimentary organic matter associated with marine hydrothermal systems involves complex physical and chemical processes that are not easily measured in most natural systems. Many of these processes can be evaluated indirectly by examining the geochemistry of the hydrothermal system in the laboratory. In this investigation, an experimental organic geochemical approach to studying pyrolysis of sedimentary organic matter is applied to the hydrothermal system in the Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California. A general survey of hydrothermal oils and extractable organic matter (bitumen) in hydrothermally altered sediments identified several homologous series of alkanones associated with a high temperature hydrothermal origin. The alkanones range in carbon number from C11 to C30 with no carbon number preference. Alkan-2-ones are in highest concentrations, with lower amounts of 3-, 4-, 5- (and higher) homologs. The alkanones appear to be pyrolysis products synthesized under extreme hydrothermal conditions. Hydrous pyrolysis and confinement pyrolysis experiments were performed to simulate thermally enhanced diagenetic and catagenetic changes in the immature sedimentary organic matter. The extent of alteration was measured by monitoring the n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, steroid and triterpenoid biomarkers, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and alkanones. The results were compared to bitumen extracts from sediments which have been naturally altered by a sill intrusion and accompanied hydrothermal fluid flow. These pyrolysis experiments duplicated many of the organic matter transformations observed in the natural system. Full hopane and sterane maturation occurred after 48 hr in experiments at 330 deg C with low water/rock mass ratios (0.29). A variety of radical and ionic reactions are responsible for the organic compound conversions which occur under extreme hydrothermal conditions. Short duration pyrolysis experiments revealed that a portion of the

  3. 210Pb, 230Th, and 10Be in Central Indian Basin seamount sediments: Signatures of degassing and hydrothermal alteration of recent origin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B; Borole, D.V.; Aldahan, A.; Patil, S.K.; Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B; Possnert, G.; Ericsson, T.; Ramaswamy, V.; Gupta, S.M.

    ) the presence of altered minerals such as smectite and zeolites, and 4) distinctly different magnetic properties in the altered sediments. A predominant influence of neutral chloride type hydrothermal fluids is interpreted. This is the first report of recently...

  4. Sup(210)Pb, sup(230)Th, and sup(10)Be in Central Indian Basin seamount sediments: Signatures of degassing and hydrothermal alteration of recent origin

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Borole, D.V.; Aldahan, A.; Patil, S.K.; Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B.L.; Possnert, G.; Ericsson, T.; Ramaswamy, V.; Gupta, S.M.

    ) the presence of altered minerals such as smectite and zeolites, and 4) distinctly different magnetic properties in the altered sediments. A predominant influence of neutral chloride type hydrothermal fluids is interpreted. This is the first report of recently...

  5. The mass balance calculation of hydrothermal alteration in Sarcheshmeh porphyry copper deposit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Maanijou

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sarcheshmeh porphyry copper deposit is located 65 km southwest of Rafsanjan in Kerman province. The Sarcheshmeh deposit belongs to the southeastern part of Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic assemblage (i.e., Dehaj-Sarduyeh zone. Intrusion of Sarcheshmeh granodiorite stock in faulted and thrusted early-Tertiary volcano-sedimentary deposits, led to mineralization in Miocene. In this research, the mass changes and element mobilities during hydrothermal process of potassic alteration were studied relative to fresh rock from the deeper parts of the plutonic body, phyllic relative to potassic, argillic relative to phyllic and propylitic alteration relative to fresh andesites surrounding the deposit. In the potassic zone, enrichment in Fe2O3 and K2O is so clear, because of increasing Fe coming from biotite alteration and presence of K-feldspar, respectively. Copper and molybdenum enrichments resulted from presence of chalcopyrite, bornite and molybdenite mineralization in this zone. Enrichment of SiO2 and depletion of CaO, MgO, Na2O and K2O in the phyllic zone resulted from leaching of sodium, calcium and magnesium from the aluminosilicate rocks and alteration of K-feldspar to sericite and quartz. In the argillic zone, Al2O3, CaO, MgO, Na2O and MnO have also been enriched in which increasing Al2O3 may be from kaolinite and illite formation. Also, enrichment in SiO2, Al2O3 and CaO in propylitic alteration zone can be attributed to the formation of chlorite, epidote and calcite as indicative minerals of this zone.

  6. Fate of copper complexes in hydrothermally altered deep-sea sediments from the Central Indian Ocean Basin.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chakraborty, P.; Sander, S.G.; Jayachandran, S.; Nath, B.N.; Nagaraju, G.; Chennuri, K.; Vudamala, K.; Lathika, N.; Mascarenhas-Pereira, M.B.L.

    flux from this sediment to the water column in this area. This study suggests that most of the Cu was strongly associated with different binding sites in Fe-oxide phases of the hydrothermally altered sediments with stabilities higher than that of Cu...

  7. Hydrothermal alteration at the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah: Petrographic characterization of the alteration to 2 kilometers depth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballantyne, J.M.; Parry, W.T.

    1978-04-01

    Hydrothermal alteration in drill cuttings from Thermal Power drillhole 14-2, Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal area, has been studied petrographically. The hole is sited in alluvium approximately 1.6 km southeast of the old Resort and was rotary drilled to a depth of 1866.0 m. The exact hole location is 2310 FNL, 350 FWL, Sec. 2, Twp 27S, Rge 9W, elevation 1908.5 m. Core was extracted from 792.5 to 795.5 m. Thin sections were made from samples at 15.2 m intervals of drill cuttings collected at 1.5 or 3.0 m intervals during drilling. Thin sections were made of 1.5 or 3.0 m intervals from 274.3 to 304.8 m, 487.9 to 581.2 m, and 868.7 to 899.2 m. These intervals were chosen for close spaced sampling on the basis of increases in temperature, porosity, conductivity and acoustic velocity shown in geophysical logs. A total of 153 thin sections of cuttings were made, and an additional 9 sections were made from the core. Depths of thin section samples are listed in the appendix. A visual estimate of the percentage of each rock type was made for each thin section.

  8. Hydrothermal alteration at the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, W.T.; Bryant, N.L.; Dedolph, R.E.; Ballantyne, J.M.; Ballantyne, G.H.; Rohrs, D.T.; Mason, J.L.

    1978-11-01

    Hot spring deposits in the Roosevelt thermal area consist of opaline sinter, and siliceous-sinter-cemented alluvium. Alluvium, granite to granodiorite plutonic rocks, and amphibolite facies gneiss have been altered by acid-sulfate water to alunite and opal at the surface, and to kaolinite, alunite, montmorillonite, and muscovite to a depth of 60 m. Marcasite and pyrite occur below the water table at about 30m. Deeper alteration sampled to a depth of 2.26 km consists of muscovite, chlorite, calcite, K-feldspar, albite, and epidote with pyrite and sparse chalcopyrite. Thermal water is dilute (ionic strength 0.1 to 0.2) sodium chloride brine. Surface water contains 10 times as much calcium and 100 times as much magnesium as the deep water. Sulfate varies from 48 to 200 mg/l. Present-day spring temperature is 25/sup 0/C but in 1950 the spring temperature was 85/sup 0/C. Computed Na-K-Ca temperature is 241/sup 0/C for the present-day spring, 274/sup 0/C for a well and 283/sup 0/C for the 1957 spring. Quartz saturation temperatures are 170/sup 0/C for the present-day spring, 283/sup 0/C for the well, and 213/sup 0/C for the 1957 spring. A plausible model for development of the near-surface alteration consists of hydrothermal fluid which convectively rises along major fractures. Water cools by conduction and steam separation, and hydrogen ion is produced by oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. The low pH water percolates from the surface downward and reacts with rocks to produce alunite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, and muscovite as hydrogen is consumed.

  9. Geochemistry and hydrothermal alteration at selected Utah hot springs. Final report: Volume 3 (revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parry, W.T.; Benson, N.L.; Miller, C.D.

    1976-07-01

    Application of Na-K-Ca geothermometry to warm springs in Utah indicates several areas with sufficiently high apparent temperatures to be of interest as geothermal exploration targets. A zone of warm springs in the Bonneville Basin show Na-K-Ca temperatures from 150/sup 0/C to 233/sup 0/C. Examination of Great Salt Lake, Bonneville sediment pore water, and Jordan Valley well-water chemistry indicates that mixing a small percent of these fluids with warm spring water can cause substantial errors in Na-K-Ca temperature estimates. Other saline deposits which may influence Na-K-Ca temperature estimates are the Paradox formation in southeastern Utah, the Muddy Creek formation in southwestern Utah, the Arapien shale in central Utah, the Preuss formation in northeastern Utah, and Playa salts in much of western Utah. The Roosevelt KGRA is the most attractive target identified by Na-K-Ca geothermometry. Hydrothermal alteration, heavy metal distribution, and water chemistry provide additional characterization of the Roosevelt system. Chemistry of a cool water seep (25/sup 0/C) shows Na-K-Ca temperature of 241/sup 0/C and SiO/sub 2/ temperature of 125/sup 0/C. A Phillips well flowing from below 1500' (457m) shows Na-K-Ca temperature of 262/sup 0/C, SiO/sub 2/ temperature of 262/sup 0/C, and K of 1.5 times the surface spring value. The near surface alteration assemblage is best explained in terms of a decrease in pH of near surface fluids as sulfide oxidizes. Increasing potassium and pH with depth indicates that a K-feldspar stable zone may be intersected with deeper drilling. Geology and alteration were mapped in the Monroe KGRA. (JGB)

  10. Field Trip Guide to Serpentinite, Silica-Carbonate Alteration, and Related Hydrothermal Activity in the Clear Lake Region, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser Goff; George Guthrie

    1999-06-01

    This guide is designed to familiarize scientists with the geology, structure, alteration, and fluids typical of California serpentinites for purposes of carbon dioxide sequestration (Lackner et al., 1995). Goff et al. (1997) and Goff and Lackner (1998) describe the geology and geochemistry of some of the serpentinites from this area. Mechanisms of silica-carbonate alteration were outlined by Barnes et al. (1973). Donnelly-Nolan et al. (1993) most recently reviewed relations between regional hydrothermal alteration and Quarternary volcanic activity. Stanley et al. (1998) summarized geophysical characteristics of the region.

  11. Using micro-scale evidence to understand regional-scale hydrothermal alteration of plutonic rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plümper, O.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/37155960X; King, H. E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/411261088; Putnis, A.

    2009-01-01

    Subsolidus re-equilibration of plutonic feldspars induced by hydrothermal fluids provides a valuable record of fluid-rock interactions that affect large volumes of the Earth's continental crust (Taylor, 1977). The effect of hydrothermal fluids has important implications for the interpretation of the

  12. Hydrothermal alteration and permeability changes in granitic intrusions related to Sn-W deposits : case study of Panasqueira (Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launay, Gaetan; Sizaret, Stanislas; Guillou-Frottier, Laurent; Gloaguen, Eric; Melleton, Jérémie; Pichavant, Michel; Champallier, Rémi; Pinto, Filipe

    2017-04-01

    The Panasqueira Sn-W deposit occurs as a dense network of flat wolframite and cassiterite-bearing quartz veins concentrated in the vicinity of a hidden greisen cupola, and to a lesser extent as disseminated cassiterites in the greisen. Previous studies (Thadeu 1951; 1979) have suggested that the Panasqueira deposit is genetically related to magmatic activity for which the most part is unexposed, and being only represented by the greisen cupola. Hydrothermal fluid circulation during the final stages of granite crystallisation has probably led to the greisenisation of the cupola followed by the deposition of the mineralization in the veins system. Mineral replacement reactions that occurred during the greisenisation could affect rock properties (porosity, density and permeability) which control fluid circulation in the granite. This study aims to investigate effects of greisenisation reactions on the dynamic (time varying) permeability that ultimately leads to fluid circulation in the greisen cupola. To do so, petrological study and experimental determinations of hydrodynamic features (porosity and permeability) for different granite alteration levels and petrographic types (unaltered granite to greisen) are combined and then integrated in coupled numerical models of fluid circulation around the granitic intrusion. Greisen occurs in the apical part of the granitic body and results in the pervasive alteration of the granite along the granite-schist contact. This greisen consists mainly of quartz and muscovite formed by the replacement of feldspars and bleaching of biotites of the initial granite. Otherwise, greisen is generally vuggy which suggests a porosity increase of the granite during hydrothermal alteration processes. This porosity increase has a positive effect on the permeability of the granitic system. Indeed, experimental measurements of permeability with the Paterson press indicate that the initial granite is impermeable (10-20 m2) whereas the greisen is

  13. Multifractal magnetic susceptibility distribution models of hydrothermally altered rocks in the Needle Creek Igneous Center of the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Gettings

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic susceptibility was measured for 700 samples of drill core from thirteen drill holes in the porphyry copper-molybdenum deposit of the Stinkingwater mining district in the Absaroka Mountains, Wyoming. The magnetic susceptibility measurements, chemical analyses, and alteration class provided a database for study of magnetic susceptibility in these altered rocks. The distribution of the magnetic susceptibilities for all samples is multi-modal, with overlapping peaked distributions for samples in the propylitic and phyllic alteration class, a tail of higher susceptibilities for potassic alteration, and an approximately uniform distribution over a narrow range at the highest susceptibilities for unaltered rocks. Samples from all alteration and mineralization classes show susceptibilities across a wide range of values. Samples with secondary (supergene alteration due to oxidation or enrichment show lower susceptibilities than primary (hypogene alteration rock. Observed magnetic susceptibility variations and the monolithological character of the host rock suggest that the variations are due to varying degrees of alteration of blocks of rock between fractures that conducted hydrothermal fluids. Alteration of rock from the fractures inward progressively reduces the bulk magnetic susceptibility of the rock. The model introduced in this paper consists of a simulation of the fracture pattern and a simulation of the alteration of the rock between fractures. A multifractal model generated from multiplicative cascades with unequal ratios produces distributions statistically similar to the observed distributions. The reduction in susceptibility in the altered rocks was modelled as a diffusion process operating on the fracture distribution support. The average magnetic susceptibility was then computed for each block. For the purpose of comparing the model results with observation, the simulated magnetic susceptibilities were then averaged over the same

  14. Fractal Dimension Change Point Model for Hydrothermal Alteration Anomalies in Silk Road Economic Belt, the Beishan Area, Gansu, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, H. H.; Wang, Y. L.; Ren, G. L.; LI, J. Q.; Gao, T.; Yang, M.; Yang, J. L.

    2016-11-01

    Remote sensing plays an important role in mineral exploration of “One Belt One Road” plan. One of its applications is extracting and locating hydrothermal alteration zones that are related to mines. At present, the extracting method for alteration anomalies from principal component image mainly relies on the data's normal distribution, without considering the nonlinear characteristics of geological anomaly. In this study, a Fractal Dimension Change Point Model (FDCPM), calculated by the self-similarity and mutability of alteration anomalies, is employed to quantitatively acquire the critical threshold of alteration anomalies. The realization theory and access mechanism of the model are elaborated by an experiment with ASTER data in Beishan mineralization belt, also the results are compared with traditional method (De-Interfered Anomalous Principal Component Thresholding Technique, DIAPCTT). The results show that the findings produced by FDCPM are agree with well with a mounting body of evidence from different perspectives, with the extracting accuracy over 80%, indicating that FDCPM is an effective extracting method for remote sensing alteration anomalies, and could be used as an useful tool for mineral exploration in similar areas in Silk Road Economic Belt.

  15. Mapping hydrothermal alteration using aircraft VNIR scanners at the Rosemont porphyry copper deposit. [Visible-Near Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, R. M.; Abrams, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    Two Visible-Near Infrared (VNIR) scanners, the NS-001 and the M2S, were flown over the Rosemont porphyry copper deposit as part of the NASA/JPL/GEOSAT test site program. This program was established to determine the feasibility and limitations of mapping hydrothermal alteration with multispectral scanners. Data from the NS-001 at 0.83 and 2.2 microns were used to identify Fe(3+) and OH enriched outcrops. These areas were then correlated with three alteration assemblages. The first correlation, hematite-epidote, was the most obvious and appeared as a strong ferric iron signature associated with hematite stained Cretaceous arkoses and andesites. The second correlation, qtz-sericite, showed a combined ferric-hydroxyl signature for a phyllicly altered quartz monzonite. The third correlation, skarn, was identified only after a review of calc-silicate mineral VNIR spectra. Altered limestones that outcrop west of the deposit have a similar ferric iron-hydroxyl signature as the quartz-sericite altered quartz monzonite. This skarn signature has been interpreted to indicate the presence of andradite, hydro-grossularite and idocrase. Data from the second scanner, M2S, was used to search for variation in ferric iron mineral type. Resulting imagery data indicated that hematite was the dominant ferric iron mineral present in the Rosemont area.

  16. Geology of the Riacho do Pontal iron oxide copper-gold (IOCG prospect, Bahia, Brazil: hydrothermal alteration approached via hierarchical cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Roberto Bacelar Huhn

    Full Text Available The Riacho do Pontal prospect is situated on the border between the Borborema Province and the São Francisco Craton, in Bahia state. It comprises rocks polydeformed during the Neoproterozoic. The prospect area includes migmatites and gneissic rocks intruded by several sin- to post-tectonic granites. Structural analysis indicates a strong relationship between the development of ductile to brittle-ductile shear zones and associated hydrothermalism. The main tracts of high-strain rate are represented by the Riacho do Pontal (north and Macururé (south shear zones. Several copper occurrences have been mapped within the Riacho do Pontal prospect along secondary shear zones. In these areas, the gneissic rocks were affected by intense hydrothermal alteration. Hierarchical cluster analysis permitted the identification of the main hydrothermal mineral associations present in these rocks, which resulted from potassic (biotite and sodic-calcic (amphibole-albite alteration, in addition to silicification and iron alteration (hematite. These hydrothermal alteration types are similar to those typically found in iron oxide copper-gold deposits developed at intermediate crustal levels. Hematite-quartz-albite-chalcopyrite-pyrite hydrothermal breccias host the highest-grade copper ore (chalcopyrite-pyrite-chalcocite zones. The spatial relationship between copper deposits and shear zones improves the metallogenic potential for copper of the Borborema Province and has important implications for mineral exploration in the region.

  17. Sm-Nd age of the Fazenda Brasileiro Gabbro, Bahia, Brazil: example of robust behavior of the Sm-Nd isotopic system under extreme hydrothermal alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pimentel, Marcio M. [Brasilia Univ., DF (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias]. E-mail: marcio@unb.br; mmp1103@terra.com.br; Silva, Maria da Gloria [Bahia Univ., Salvador (Brazil). Dept. de Geologia de Geofisica Aplicada]. E-mail: gloria@ufba.br

    2003-09-15

    The Fazenda Brasileiro gold mineralization is hosted by a gabbroic sill, intrusive into metavolcanic-metasedimentary rocks of the Rio Itapicuru Greenstone Belt, Sao Francisco Craton. The 2.05 Ga old mineralization is associated with intense shearing and hydrothermal alteration, and the host gabbro is altered to a series of rocks rich in sericite, chlorite, actinolite, carbonate and quartz. Twelve whole-rock samples of the gold mineralization, representing varied degrees of alteration, from rocks with preserved igneous textures to the ore (quartz-carbonate-sulfide-chlorite), were studied by the Sm-Nd method. All analytical points resulted in an isochron (MSWD = 1.9) indicating the age of 2142 {+-} 47 Ma (1s) and Epsilon Nd (T) of +1.2. Chlorite-sericite-carbonate rich hydrothermal rocks indicate the age of 2148 {+-} 57 Ma and Epsilon Nd (T) of +1.1. The positive Epsilon Nd (T) suggest limited or no contamination with older continental crust, compatible with an oceanic setting for the tholeiites. Combined with REE data, the Sm-Nd isotopic results reveal that the hydrothermal alteration, although intense, was unable to alter significantly the Sm/Nd ratios of the original igneous rocks and did not cause important scatter of the analytical points, providing a rare example of robust behavior of the isotopic system, even under intense hydrothermal alteration. (author)

  18. A directed matched filtering algorithm (DMF) for discriminating hydrothermal alteration zones using the ASTER remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fereydooni, H.; Mojeddifar, S.

    2017-09-01

    This study introduced a different procedure to implement matched filtering algorithm (MF) on the ASTER images to obtain the distribution map of alteration minerals in the northwestern part of the Kerman Cenozoic Magmatic Arc (KCMA). This region contains many areas with porphyry copper mineralization such as Meiduk, Abdar, Kader, Godekolvari, Iju, Serenu, Chahfiroozeh and Parkam. Also argillization, sericitization and propylitization are the most common types of hydrothermal alteration in the area. Matched filtering results were provided for alteration minerals with a matched filtering score, called MF image. To identify the pixels which contain only one material (endmember), an appropriate threshold value should be used to the MF image. The chosen threshold classifies a MF image into background and target pixels. This article argues that the current thresholding process (the choice of a threshold) shows misclassification for MF image. To address the issue, this paper introduced the directed matched filtering (DMF) algorithm in which a spectral signature-based filter (SSF) was used instead of the thresholding process. SSF is a user-defined rule package which contains numeral descriptions about the spectral reflectance of alteration minerals. On the other hand, the spectral bands are defined by an upper and lower limit in SSF filter for each alteration minerals. SSF was developed for chlorite, kaolinite, alunite, and muscovite minerals to map alteration zones. The validation proved that, at first: selecting a contiguous range of MF values could not identify desirable results, second: unexpectedly, considerable frequency of pure pixels was observed in the MF scores less than threshold value. Also, the comparison between DMF results and field studies showed an accuracy of 88.51%.

  19. Impact Lithologies and Post-Impact Hydrothermal Alteration Exposed by the Chicxulub Scientific Drilling Project, Yaxcopoil, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kring, David A.; Zurcher, Lukas; Horz, Friedrich

    2003-01-01

    The Chicxulub Scientific Drilling Project recovered a continuous core from the Yaxcopoil-1 (YAX-1) borehole, which is approx.60-65 km from the center of the Chicxulub structure, approx.15 km beyond the limit of the estimated approx.50 km radius transient crater (excavation cavity), but within the rim of the estimated approx.90 km radius final crater. Approximately approx.100 m of melt-bearing impactites were recoverd from a depth of 794 to 895 m, above approx.600 m of underlying megablocks of Cretaceous target sediments, before bottoming at 1511 m. Compared to lithologies at impact craters like the Ries, the YAX-1 impactite sequence is incredibly rich in impact melts of unusual textural variety and complexity. The impactite sequence has also been altered by hydrothermal activity that may have largely been produced by the impact event.

  20. Hydrothermal alteration studies of gabbros from northern central Indian ridge and their geodynamic implications

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, Dwijesh; Mevel, C.; Banerjee, R.

    assemblages: chlorite, albite, quartz and locally magnesio hornblende. Crystal plastic deformation resulted in mylonite formation and often porphyroclasts of plagioclase and clinopyroxene grains, while altered gabbro locally exhibits cataclastic texture...

  1. Hydrothermal Quartz Oxygen Isotope Ratios in Altered Post-Collapse Rhyolite at Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone National Park, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, A. R.; Larson, P. B.; John, D. A.; Pauley, B. M.

    2008-12-01

    The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, displays regions of pervasively hydrothermally altered rock formed in the shallow, epithermal portions of a hydrothermal system. Hydrothermal fluid circulation causing the alteration is driven by magmatism related to the Yellowstone Caldera thermal anomaly. The protolith, the Tuff of Sulfur Creek, is a 480 ka high silica, low δ18O rhyolitic tuff that erupted after the Yellowstone caldera collapse at 640 ka. Incision of the canyon has exposed 350 vertical meters in the Sevenmile Hole vicinity. Hydrothermal mineralogy determined by standard XRD powder techniques and PIMA on over 90 samples shows both vertical and lateral variation. A vertical transition occurs from kaolinite at depths less than about 100 meters below the present day canyon rim, to illite in deeper exposures. This transition may correspond to a temperature of 150°C, based on a similar transition in the active Yellowstone hydrothermal system. A lateral variation of mineral assemblages in the altered tuff suggests temperatures that may range up to 330°C. Alteration was most likely caused by a liquid due to the presence of pyrite throughout. Local zones of suspected hydrothermal fluid upwelling correspond to the most intense silicification and highest temperature mineral assemblages. This alteration includes quartz + illite ± hyalophane, slawsonite, and buddingtonite. At similar depths outside inferred fluid upwelling zones, lower temperature assemblages are quartz + illite/smectite ± alunite and buddingtonite. At shallow depths, the lowest temperatures are suggested by the presence of quartz + kaolinite ± alunite and opal. Dickite, a kaolinite polymorph, may indicate locally higher temperatures in the shallow kaolinite zones. Oxygen isotope ratios of silica phases were measured for approximately 50 samples using laser fluorination techniques with an error of ±0.2‰. Hydrothermal quartz displays δ18O signatures more

  2. Report on static hydrothermal alteration studies of Topopah Spring tuff waters in J-13 water at 150{sup 0}C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauss, K.G.; Beiriger, W.B.

    1984-08-31

    This report presents the results of preliminary experimental work done to define the package environment in a potential nuclear waste repository in the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff. The work is supported by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project as a part of the Waste Package task to design a package suitable for waste storage within volcanic units at the Nevada Test Site. Static hydrothermal alteration experiments were run for 4 months using polished wafers either fully submerged in an appropriate natural ground water or exposed to water-saturated air with enough excess water to allow refluxing. The aqueous results agreed favorably with similar experiments run using crushed tuff, and the use of solid polished wafers allowed us to directly evaluate the effects of reaction on the tuff. The results are preliminary in the sense that these experiments were run in Teflon-lined, static autoclaves, whereas subsequent experiments have been run in Dickson-type gold-cell rocking autoclaves. The results predict relatively minor changes in water chemistry, very minor alteration of the host rock, and the production of slight amounts of secondary minerals, when liquid water could return to the rock pores following the temperature maximum during the thermal period. 7 references, 16 figures, 10 tables.

  3. A new approach for hydrothermal alteration mapping by selecting and interpreting principal components in Landsat ETM+ images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Kashkoei Jahroomi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In remote sensing studies, especially those in which multi-spectral image data are used, (i.e., Landsat-7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper, various statistical methods are often applied for image enhancement and feature extraction (Reddy, 2008. Principal component analysis is a multivariate statistical technique which is frequently used in multidimensional data analysis. This method attempts to extract and place the spectral information into a smaller set of new components that are more interpretable. However, the results obtained from this method are not so straightforward and require somewhat sophisticated techniques to interpret (Drury, 2001. In this paper we present a new approach for mapping of hydrothermal alteration by analyzing and selecting the principal components extracted through processing of Landsat ETM+ images. The study area is located in a mountainous region of southern Kerman. Geologically, it lies in the volcanic belt of central Iran adjacent to the Gogher-Baft ophiolite zone. The region is highly altered with sericitic, propyliticand argillic alterationwell developed, and argillic alteration is limited (Jafari, 2009; Masumi and Ranjbar, 2011. Multispectral data of Landsat ETM+ was acquired (path 181, row 34 in this study. In these images the color composites of Band 7, Band 4 and Band 1 in RGB indicate the lithology outcropping in the study area. The principal component analysis (PCA ofimage data is often implemented computationally using three steps: (1 Calculation of the variance, covariance matrix or correlation matrix of the satellite sensor data. (2 Computation of the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the variance-covariance matrix or correlation matrix, and (3 Linear transformation of the image data using the coefficients of the eigenvector matrix. Results By applying PCA to the spectral data, according to the eigenvectors obtained, 6 principal components were extracted from the data set. In the PCA matrix, theeigen

  4. Variability of low temperature hydrothermal alteration in upper ocean crust: Juan de Fuca Ridge and North Pond, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutter, J.; Harris, M.; Coggon, R. M.; Alt, J.; Teagle, D. A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Over 2/3 of the global hydrothermal heat flux occurs at low temperatures (sports a thick sediment blanket. Rare basement outcrops are sites of fluid recharge and discharge. The average alteration extent (~10% secondary minerals), oxidation ratio (Fe3+/FeTOT=34%), and alteration character (orange, green, grey halos) of basement is constant with crustal age and depth along a 0.97-3.6 m.yr transect of ODP basement holes. However, vesicle fills record an increasingly complex history of successive alteration with age. In contrast, North Pond, a ~8 m.yr-old sediment-filled basin at 22N on the slow spreading Mid Atlantic Ridge, hosts rapid, relatively cool SE to NW basinal fluid flow. Average alteration extent (~10%) and oxidation ratio (33%) of Hole 395A basalts are similar to JdF. However, 395A cores are dominated by orange alteration halos, lack celadonite, but have abundant zeolite. Vesicle fill combinations are highly variable, but the most common fill progression is from oxidising to less oxidising secondary assemblages. The comparable extent of alteration between these two sites and the absence of an age relationship on the JdF suggests that the alteration extent of the upper crust is uniform and mostly established by 1 Myr. However, the variable alteration character reflects the influence of regional hydrology on hydrothermal alteration.

  5. The age of Au-Cu-Pb-bearing veins in the poly-orogenic Ubendian Belt (Tanzania): U-Th-total Pb dating of hydrothermally altered monazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazimoto, Emmanuel Owden; Schenk, Volker; Appel, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The age of gold-copper-lead mineralization in the Katuma Block of the Ubendian Belt remains controversial because of the lack of radiometric ages that correlate with the age of tectonothermal events of this poly-orogenic belt. Previous studies reported whole rock and mineral Pb-Pb ages ranging between 1,660 and 720 Ma. In this study, we report U-Th-total Pb ages of monazite from hydrothermally altered metapelites that host the Au-Cu-Pb-bearing veins. Three types of chemically and texturally distinct types of monazite grains or zones of grains were identified: monazite cores, which yielded a metamorphic age of 1,938 ± 11 Ma ( n = 40), corresponding to known ages of a regional metamorphic event, deformation and granitic plutonism in the belt; metamorphic overgrowths that date a subsequent metamorphic event at 1,827 ± 10 Ma ( n = 44) that postdates known eclogite metamorphism (at ca. 1,880 Ma) in the belt; hydrothermally altered poikilitic monazite, formed by dissolution-precipitation processes, representing the third type of monazite, constrain the age of a hydrothermal alteration event at 1,171 ± 17 Ma ( n = 19). This Mesoproterozoic age of the hydrothermal alteration coincides with the first amphibolite grade metamorphism of metasediments in the Wakole Block, which adjoins with a tectonic contact the vein-bearing Katuma Block to the southwest. The obtained distinct monazite ages not only constrain the ages of metamorphic events in the Ubendian Belt, but also provide a link between the metamorphism of the Wakole metasediments and the generation of the hydrothermal fluids responsible for the formation of the gold-copper-lead veins in the Katuma Block.

  6. Seismic properties of rocks affected by hydrothermal alteration: a case study from the Lalor Lake VMS mining camp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miah, K.; Bellefleur, G.; Schetselaar, E.

    2013-12-01

    Global demand of base metals, uranium, diamonds, and precious metals has been pushing technological barrier to find and extract minerals at higher depth, which was not feasible in just a few decades ago. Seismic properties of rocks containing and surrounding ore bodies have been useful in characterizing and modeling geologic structures, and mapping high-resolution images of ore bodies. Although seismic surveys and drill hole sonic and density logs are essential for mineral exploration at depth, limited availability of seismic logs to link rock properties of different ore forming geologic structure is a hindrance to seismic interpretations. Volcanogenic Massive Sulphides (VMS) are rich in minerals and of primary interests among geologists and mining industries alike. VMS deposits occur due to focused discharge of metal-enriched fluids associated in the hydrothermal alteration process, and are rich in Zn, Cu, Pb, Ag, Au, etc. Alteration halos surrounding ore deposits can be widespread, and their locations are easier to determine than the deposits within them. Physical rock properties affected by alteration can provide clues on type and potentially size of ore deposits in the surrounding area. In this context, variations in seismic properties of rocks due to hydrothermal alteration near the deposits can help in improving modeling accuracy, and better interpretation of seismic data for economic mineral exploration. While reflection seismic techniques can resolve ore bodies at higher depths than other conventional geophysical techniques, they are relatively expensive both in terms of field data acquisition and post-processing, especially for high-resolution 3D surveys. Acoustic impedance contrasts of ore lenses with their hosting rock environment; geometry, size and spatial location relative to the surface affect their detection with seismic data. Therefore, apriori knowledge of seismic rock properties from drill hole logs and core samples in the potential survey area

  7. Hydrothermal reequilibration of igneous magnetite in altered granitic plutons and its implications for magnetite classification schemes: Insights from the Handan-Xingtai iron district, North China Craton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Guang; Li, Jian-Wei; Hofstra, Albert H.; Koenig, Alan E.; Lowers, Heather A.; Adams, David

    2017-09-01

    Magnetite is a common mineral in igneous rocks and has been used as an important petrogenetic indicator as its compositions and textures reflect changing physiochemical parameters such as temperature, oxygen fugacity and melt compositions. In upper crustal settings, igneous rocks are often altered by hydrothermal fluids such that the original textures and compositions of igneous magnetite may be partly or completely obliterated, posing interpretive problems in petrological and geochemical studies. In this paper, we present textural and compositional data of magnetite from variably albitized granitoid rocks in the Handan-Xingtai district, North China Craton to characterize the hydrothermal reequilibration of igneous magnetite. Four types of magnetite have been identified in the samples studied: pristine igneous magnetite (type 1), reequilibrated porous magnetite (type 2), reequilibrated nonporous magnetite (type 3), and hydrothermal magnetite (type 4). Pristine igneous magnetite contains abundant well-developed ilmenite exsolution lamellae that are largely replaced by titanite during subsequent hydrothermal alteration. The titanite has a larger molar volume than its precursor ilmenite and thus causes micro-fractures in the host magnetite grains, facilitating dissolution and reprecipitation of magnetite. During sodic alteration, the igneous magnetite is extensively replaced by type 2 and type 3 magnetite via fluid-induced dissolution and reprecipitation. Porous type 2 magnetite is the initial replacement product of igneous magnetite and is subsequently replaced by the nonoporous type 3 variety as its surface area is reduced and compositional equilibrium with the altering fluid is achieved. Hydrothermal type 4 magnetite is generally euhedral and lacks exsolution lamellae and porosity, and is interpreted to precipitate directly from the ore-forming fluids. Hydrothermal reequilibration of igneous magnetite has led to progressive chemical purification, during which trace

  8. Hydrothermal alteration products and stable isotope ratios of the Sulfur Creek Tuff; a window into the subsurface environment of the Yellowstone caldera in Yellowstone National Park, WY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonero, A.; Larson, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Yellowstone Caldera in northwest Wyoming is the site of active hydrothermal alteration. Hydrothermal activity relating to the Yellowstone hotspot has resulted in the alteration of rhyolites within the caldera. Specifically, the Seven Mile Hole area of the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone River provides an ideal location and opportunity to investigate the nature of the ongoing hydrothermal alteration. Here, erosion by the river has exposed a sequence of rocks which are host to hydrothermal fluids and are themselves significantly altered. Analyses of clay minerals and other alteration products, such as opal, has been undertaken in order to characterize and distinguish different zones of alteration. Hydrogen isotope ratios have been measured for the altered rock units within the Seven-Mile Hole area, and they range from -84.6 ‰ to -185.1 ‰ (VSMOW). Samples from this area commonly contain minerals such as kaolinite, illite, alunite, or buddingtonite, and the deuterium / hydrogen (D/H) ratios of these mineral phases are shown to vary considerably with respect to their location and elevation in the canyon. Additionally, oxygen isotope ratios have been measured on some samples in order to compare the samples' isotope values to the local meteoric water line. Plotting these samples in δD - δ18O space has shown that some values lie in a region trending away from the meteoric water line and along a "kaolinite line." This area is parallel to the array of Yellowstone hot spring fluids and a broad range of values are possible here depending on temperature of alteration. Furthermore, these data support a model where hydrothermal fluids flow upward through faults related to caldera collapse that are present in the sulfur creek tuff. This research may also show that the unique coloration patterns visible on the slopes of the Grand Canyon of Yellowstone can be, in part, explained as the result of both surface oxidation and hydrothermal alteration processes. Major element XRF

  9. Physico-chemistry and geochemistry of Balengou clay deposit (West Cameroon) with inference to an argillic hydrothermal alteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassongwa, Bernard; Eba, François; Njoya, Dayirou; Tchakounté, Jacqueline Numbem; Jeudong, Narcisse; Nkoumbou, Charles; Njopwouo, Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Field description and sampling along two pits, granulometry, Atterberg limits, mineralogical (XRD, FTIR, DSC & TGA) and geochemical analyses of the Balengou clays help to determine their characteristics and the genesis of the deposit. The mineralogical composition is comprised of halloysite-kaolinite, quartz, montmorillonite, hematite, anatase, feldspar, zircon, chromite, and apatite. Gibbsite and illite occur at the shallow and deep depth, respectively. Dikes of sand-poor clays contain also cristobalite and tridymite. Pairs of elements Rb-Ba, Rb-Sr, Nb-Ta, Ta-Zr, TiO2-Zr display good positive correlations (R2 > 0.85). REE patterns are highly fractionated (LaN up to 3312, LaN/YbN: 19-10) and are marked by deep Ce and Eu negative anomalies. Immobile element canonical ratios indicate that the protoliths were commendite/pantelerite, rhyolite and dacite, or their plutonic equivalents. Mineralogical and geochemical features lead to the suggestion that the clays derived from an advanced argillic hydrothermal alteration.

  10. A Conspicuous Clay Ovoid in Nakhla: Evidence for Subsurface Hydrothermal Alteration on Mars with Implications for Astrobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Sarah; Lyon, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A conspicuous biomorphic ovoid structure has been discovered in the Nakhla martian meteorite, made of nanocrystalline iron-rich saponitic clay and amorphous material. The ovoid is indigenous to Nakhla and occurs within a late-formed amorphous mesostasis region of rhyolitic composition that is interstitial to two clinopyroxene grains with Al-rich rims, and contains acicular apatite crystals, olivine, sulfides, Ti-rich magnetite, and a new mineral of the rhoenite group. To infer the origin of the ovoid, a large set of analytical tools was employed, including scanning electron microscopy and backscattered electron imaging, wavelength-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray mapping, Raman spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis, high-resolution transmission electron microscope imaging, and atomic force microscope topographic mapping. The concentric wall of the ovoid surrounds an originally hollow volume and exhibits internal layering of contrasting nanotextures but uniform chemical composition, and likely inherited its overall shape from a preexisting vesicle in the mesostasis glass. A final fibrous layer of Fe-rich phases blankets the interior surfaces of the ovoid wall structure. There is evidence that the parent rock of Nakhla has undergone a shock event from a nearby bolide impact that melted the rims of pyroxene and the interstitial matter and initiated an igneous hydrothermal system of rapidly cooling fluids, which were progressively mixed with fluids from the melted permafrost. Sharp temperature gradients were responsible for the crystallization of Al-rich clinopyroxene rims, rhoenite, acicular apatites, and the quenching of the mesostasis glass and the vesicle. During the formation of the ovoid structure, episodic fluid infiltration events resulted in the precipitation of saponite rinds around the vesicle walls, altered pyrrhotite to marcasite, and then isolated the ovoid wall structure from the rest of the system by depositing a

  11. Nickeliferous pyrite tracks pervasive hydrothermal alteration in Martian regolith breccia: A study in NWA 7533

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorand, Jean-Pierre; Hewins, Roger H.; Remusat, Laurent; Zanda, Brigitte; Pont, Sylvain; Leroux, Hugues; Marinova, Maya; Jacob, Damien; Humayun, Munir; Nemchin, Alexander; Grange, Marion; Kennedy, Allen; Göpel, Christa

    2015-12-01

    Martian regolith breccia NWA 7533 (and the seven paired samples) is unique among Martian meteorites in showing accessory pyrite (up to 1% by weight). Pyrite is a late mineral, crystallized after the final assembly of the breccia. It is present in all of the lithologies, i.e., the fine-grained matrix (ICM), clast-laden impact melt rocks (CLIMR), melt spherules, microbasalts, lithic clasts, and mineral clasts, all lacking magmatic sulfides due to degassing. Pyrite crystals show combinations of cubes, truncated cubes, and octahedra. Polycrystalline clusters can reach 200 μm in maximum dimensions. Regardless of their shape, pyrite crystals display evidence of very weak shock metamorphism such as planar features, fracture networks, and disruption into subgrains. The late fracture systems acted as preferential pathways for partial replacement of pyrite by iron oxyhydroxides interpreted as resulting from hot desert terrestrial alteration. The distribution and shape of pyrite crystals argue for growth at moderate to low growth rate from just-saturated near neutral (6 FMQ + 2 log units. It is inferred from the maximum Ni contents (4.5 wt%) that pyrite started crystallizing at 400-500 °C, during or shortly after a short-duration, relatively low temperature, thermal event that lithified and sintered the regolith breccias, 1.4 Ga ago as deduced from disturbance in several isotope systematics.

  12. Formation of Hematite fine crystals by hydrothermal alteration of synthetic Martian basalt, static and fluid flow experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, K.; Isobe, H.

    2011-12-01

    Exploration made by Martian rovers and probes provided enormous information on the composition of the Martian surface materials. Origin and formation processes of the Martian surface materials should be various depending on topography and history of the Martian crust. Especially, iron minerals in the Martian soil should have essential role to characterize surface environment of the "red planet". In the present study, experimental reproduction of the Martian soil was carried out by hydrothermal alteration of the synthetic iron-rich basaltic rock. Experimental conditions for temperature and fluid composition followed Isobe and Yoshizawa (2010). Static alteration experiments are carried out at 100 °C and 150 °C, and mass ratio of the starting material to the pH1.0 sulfuric acid solution is 1:50. Run durations are 1, 2, 4 or 8 weeks. Appropriate mass of dry ice was sealed in the experimental vessels to expel atmospheric oxygen with CO2. For the static experiments, powdered starting materials were charged in PFA vial to keep textures of the run products. For the fluid flow experiments, we constructed closed loop with Teflon tube inclined approximately 45°. One of the vertical tube is charged with crushed synthetic basalt and heated approximately 150°C by aluminum block with ribbon heater. Surlfuric acid solution flows through the tube from bottom to top and cooled at the end of the aluminum block. Cooled solution returns to the bottom of the heated tube through another vertical tube without heating block. In the static condition run products, characteristic iron mineral particles are formed for 100°C and 150°C concordant with Isobe and Yoshizawa (2010). These iron minerals distributed not only inside the starting material powder but also on the surface of the reaction vessel and the PFA vial in the reactive solution. The surface of the reaction vessel shows orange and reddish color on 100°C and 150°C run products, respectively. By SEM observation, dissolution of

  13. Temporal evolution of the giant Salobo IOCG deposit, Carajás Province (Brazil): constraints from paragenesis of hydrothermal alteration and U-Pb geochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    deMelo, Gustavo H. C.; Monteiro, Lena V. S.; Xavier, Roberto P.; Moreto, Carolina P. N.; Santiago, Erika S. B.; Dufrane, S. Andrew; Aires, Benevides; Santos, Antonio F. F.

    2017-06-01

    The giant Salobo copper-gold deposit is located in the Carajás Province, Amazon Craton. Detailed drill core description, petrographical studies, and U-Pb SHRIMP IIe and LA-ICP-MS geochronology unravel its evolution regarding the host rocks, hydrothermal alteration and mineralization. Within the Cinzento Shear Zone, the deposit is hosted by orthogneisses of the Mesoarchean Xingu Complex (2950 ± 25 and 2857 ± 6.7 Ma) and of the Neoarchean Igarapé Gelado suite (2763 ± 4.4 Ma), which are crosscut by the Old Salobo granite. Remnants of the Igarapé Salobo metavolcanic-sedimentary sequence are represented by a quartz mylonite with detrital zircon populations (ca. 3.1-3.0, 2.95, 2.86, and 2.74 Ga). High-temperature calcic-sodic hydrothermal alteration (hastingsite-actinolite) was followed by silicification, iron-enrichment (almandine-grunerite-magnetite), tourmaline formation, potassic alteration with biotite, copper-gold ore formation, and later Fe-rich hydrated silicate alteration. Myrmekitic bornite-chalcocite and magnetite comprise the bulk of copper-gold ore. All these alteration assemblages have been overprinted by post-ore hematite-bearing potassic and propylitic alteration, which is also recognized in the Old Salobo granite. In the central zone of the deposit the mylonitized Igarapé Gelado suite rocks yield an age of 2701 ± 30 Ma. Zircon ages of 2547 ± 5.3 and 2535 ± 8.4 Ma were obtained for the Old Salobo granite and for the high-grade copper ore, respectively. A U-Pb LA-ICP-MS monazite age (2452 ± 14 Ma) from the copper-gold ore indicates hydrothermal activity and overprinting in the Siderian. Therefore, a protracted tectono-thermal event due to the reactivation of the Cinzento Shear Zone is proposed for the evolution of the Salobo deposit.

  14. Correlation of wireline log characteristics with hydrothermal alteration and other reservoir properties of the Salton Sea and Westmorland geothermal fields, Imperial Valley, California, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muramoto, F.S.; Elders, W.A.

    1984-05-01

    A detailed study of wireline logs from 11 wells in the Salton Sea and Westmorland geothermal systems was undertaken in order to determine the effects of hydrothermal alteration on the response of electrical and gamma-gamma density well logs. For the Salton Sea geothermal field, definite correspondence between log responses and hydrothermal mineralogy is evident, which in turn is related to the physical properties of the rocks. Three hydrothermal and one unaltered zone can be identified from log data on shales. These are: (1) the unaltered montmorillonite zone (<100/sup 0/ to 190/sup 0/C); (2) the illite zone (100/sup 0/ to 190/sup 0/C to 230/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/C); (3) the chlorite zone (230/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/C to 290/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/C); and (4) the feldspar zone (>290/sup 0/ to 300/sup 0/C). The characteristic responses on well logs by which these zones are identified result primarily from changes in clay mineralogy of the shales and increases in density with progressive hydrothermal metamorphism. In the Westmorland geothermal field, differentiating mineral zones from log responses was only partially successful. However, analyses of both well log and petrologic data for wells Landers 1 and Kalin Farms 1 suggest that the former is heating up and the latter is cooling.

  15. Are the alteration halos of massive sulfide deposits syngenetic Evidence from U-Pb dating of hydrothermal rutile at the Kidd volcanic center, Abitibi subprovince, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schandl, E.S.; Davis, D.W.; Krogh, T.E. (Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

    1990-06-01

    The Kidd volcanic complex is composed of felsic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks of Archean age. Metasomatic events affecting the lithology of the Kidd volcanic complex include silicification, extensive CO{sub 2} metasomatism (carbonate), K-metasomatism (sericite-fuchsite), and chlorite and minor carbonate alterations. Petrographic evidence, supported by stable isotope and fluid inclusion studies, suggests that silicification and early carbonate alteration were synvolcanic, and therefore related to ore deposition. During subsequent extensive K-metasomatism, sericite precipitated in the rhyolite, and fuschsite precipitated in the ultramafic rocks. Although chlorite postdates K-metasomatism, the micas and chlorite are both found in anastomosing microfissures, commonly occupying the same set of fractures. Hydrothermal rutile formed by the breakdown of magnetite-ilmenite during K-metasomatism and chlorite alteration gives an age of 2624 {plus minus} 62 Ma (95% confidence level). It is therefore approximately 100 m.y. younger than syngenetic massive sulfide mineralization (2712 {plus minus} 2 Ma). Sulfide stringers within sericite and chlorite veins suggest some remobilization of the ores during these later events. This alteration assemblage, is identical to that found associated with many lode-gold deposits in the Superior province. Recent dating of micas and rutile associated with gold deposits in the Abitibi subprovince gives comparable ages to the rutile in the Kidd volcanic complex, which must therefore record a widespread, late hydrothermal event affecting mineralized rocks.

  16. Geology, mineralization, and hydrothermal alteration and relationships to acidic and metal-bearing surface waters in the Palmetto Gulch area, southwestern Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, Dana J.; Kurtz, Jeffrey P.; Wright, Winfield G.

    2002-01-01

    The Palmetto Gulch area is affected by low pH and metal-bearing drainage from abandoned mines, and perhaps, from natural weathering around vein zones. To investigate these anthropogenic and potential natural sources of acidity and metals, we mapped the geology, veins, and hydrothermally altered areas; conducted mine dump leachate studies; and collected reconnaissance water quality data. Several small abandoned mines are present in the Palmetto Gulch area that produced small amounts of relatively high-grade silver ore from fault-controlled polymetallic vein deposits. These veins are hosted in lavas, breccias, and related volcaniclastic sediments that ponded within the 28 Ma San Juan-Uncompahgre caldera complex. These rock units generally have conformable contacts and have shallow dips to the northwest. Lava flows of pyroxene andesite, which host the Roy-Pray mine, are massive near their base and typically grade upward into tightly jointed rock with 2-15 cm joint spacing. In general, most hydrothermally altered rock within the Palmetto Gulch area is restricted to envelopes surrounding the mineralized veins and faults. Composite zones of vein-related alteration vary from about 50 to 80 m wide along the high ridgelines and narrow to less than 10 to 15 m beneath an elevation of about 5,462 m. Where unaffected by surficial oxidation, these altered zones contain as much as 7 to 10 volume percent finely-disseminated pyrite. The majority of rocks in the area were affected by regional and vein-related propylitic alteration. These greenish-colored rocks have alteration products consisting of chlorite, illite, and calcite; and feldspars are typically weakly altered. Most of these rocks have detectable amounts of calcite, while as much as 11 percent by weight was detected in samples collected during this study. The Palmetto Gulch area is affected by low pH and metal-bearing drainage from abandoned mines, and perhaps, from natural weathering around vein zones. To investigate

  17. Differing responses of zircon, chevkinite-(Ce), monazite-(Ce) and fergusonite-(Y) to hydrothermal alteration: Evidence from the Keivy alkaline province, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Ray; Bagiński, Bogusław; Zozulya, Dmitry

    2017-09-01

    A quartzolite from the Rova occurrence, Keivy alkali granite province, Kola Peninsula, Russia, is used to examine the differing responses of certain rare-metal minerals during interaction with hydrothermal fluids. The minerals are two silicates [chevkinite-(Ce) and zircon], a phosphate [monazite-(Ce)] and an oxide [fergusonite-(Y)]. Textural evidence is taken to show that the dominant alteration mechanism was interface-coupled dissolution-reprecipitation. Zircon was the most pervasively altered, possibly by broadening of cleavage planes or fractures; the other minerals were altered mainly on their rims and along cracks. The importance of cracks in promoting fluid access is stressed. The compositional effects of the alteration of each phase are documented. The hydrothermal fluids carried few ligands capable of transporting significant amounts of rare-earth elements (REE), high field strength elements (HFSE) and actinides; alteration is inferred to have been promoted by mildly alkaline, Ca-bearing fluids. Expansion cracks emanating from fergusonite-(Y) are filled with unidentified material containing up to 35 wt% UO2 and 25 wt% REE2O3, indicating late-stage, short-distance mobility of these elements. Electron microprobe chemical dating of monazite yielded an age of 1665 ± 22 Ma, much younger than the formation age of the Keivy province (2.65-2.67 Ga) but comparable to that of the Svecofennian metamorphic event which affected the area (1.9-1.7 Ga) or during fluid-thermal activation of the region during rapakivi granite magmatism (1.66-1.56 Ga). Dates for altered monazite range from 2592 ± 244 Ma to 773 ± 88 Ma and reflect disturbance of the U-Th-Pb system during alteration.

  18. Magmatic-vapor expansion and the formation of high-sulfidation gold deposits: Structural controls on hydrothermal alteration and ore mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Byron R.; Henley, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    High-sulfidation copper–gold lode deposits such as Chinkuashih, Taiwan, Lepanto, Philippines, and Goldfield, Nevada, formed within 1500 m of the paleosurface in volcanic terranes. All underwent an early stage of extensive advanced argillic silica–alunite alteration followed by an abrupt change to spatially much more restricted stages of fracture-controlled sulfide–sulfosalt mineral assemblages and gold–silver mineralization. The alteration as well as ore mineralization stages of these deposits were controlled by the dynamics and history of syn-hydrothermal faulting.At the Sulfate Stage, aggressive advanced argillic alteration and silicification were consequent on the in situ formation of acidic condensate from magmatic vapor as it expanded through secondary fracture networks alongside active faults. The reduction of permeability at this stage due to alteration decreased fluid flow to the surface, and progressively developed a barrier between magmatic-vapor expansion constrained by the active faults and peripheral hydrothermal activity dominated by hot-water flow. In conjunction with the increased rock strength resulting from alteration, subsequent fault-slip inversion in response to an increase in compressional stress generated new, highly permeable fractures localized by the embrittled, altered rock. The new fractures focused magmatic-vapor expansion with much lower heat loss so that condensation occurred. Sulfide Stage sulfosalt, sulfide, and gold–silver deposition then resulted from destabilization of vapor phase metal species due to vapor decompression through the new fracture array. The switch from sulfate to sulfide assemblages is, therefore, a logical consequence of changes in structural permeability due to the coupling of alteration and fracture dynamics rather than to changes in the chemistry of the fluid phase at its magmatic source.

  19. A conspicuous clay ovoid in Nakhla: evidence for subsurface hydrothermal alteration on Mars with implications for astrobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatzitheodoridis, Elias; Haigh, Sarah; Lyon, Ian

    2014-08-01

    Abstract A conspicuous biomorphic ovoid structure has been discovered in the Nakhla martian meteorite, made of nanocrystalline iron-rich saponitic clay and amorphous material. The ovoid is indigenous to Nakhla and occurs within a late-formed amorphous mesostasis region of rhyolitic composition that is interstitial to two clinopyroxene grains with Al-rich rims, and contains acicular apatite crystals, olivine, sulfides, Ti-rich magnetite, and a new mineral of the rhoenite group. To infer the origin of the ovoid, a large set of analytical tools was employed, including scanning electron microscopy and backscattered electron imaging, wavelength-dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray mapping, Raman spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry analysis, high-resolution transmission electron microscope imaging, and atomic force microscope topographic mapping. The concentric wall of the ovoid surrounds an originally hollow volume and exhibits internal layering of contrasting nanotextures but uniform chemical composition, and likely inherited its overall shape from a preexisting vesicle in the mesostasis glass. A final fibrous layer of Fe-rich phases blankets the interior surfaces of the ovoid wall structure. There is evidence that the parent rock of Nakhla has undergone a shock event from a nearby bolide impact that melted the rims of pyroxene and the interstitial matter and initiated an igneous hydrothermal system of rapidly cooling fluids, which were progressively mixed with fluids from the melted permafrost. Sharp temperature gradients were responsible for the crystallization of Al-rich clinopyroxene rims, rhoenite, acicular apatites, and the quenching of the mesostasis glass and the vesicle. During the formation of the ovoid structure, episodic fluid infiltration events resulted in the precipitation of saponite rinds around the vesicle walls, altered pyrrhotite to marcasite, and then isolated the ovoid wall structure from the rest of the system by depositing a

  20. Geochemistry, Paragenesis, and Wall-Rock Alteration of the Qatruyeh Iron Deposits, Southwest of Iran: Implications for a Hydrothermal-Metasomatic Genetic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Asadi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Qatruyeh iron deposits, located on the eastern border of the NW-SE trending Sanandaj-Sirjan metamorphic zone, southwest of Iran, are hosted by a late Proterozoic to early Paleozoic sequence dominated by metamorphosed carbonate rocks. The magnetite ores occurred as layered to massive bodies, with lesser amounts of disseminated magnetite and hematite-bearing veins. Textural evidences, along with geochemical analyses of the high field strengths (HFSEs, large ion lithophiles (LILEs, and rare earth elements (REEs, indicate that the main mineralization stage occurred as low-grade layered magnetite ores due to high-temperature hydrothermal fluids accompanied by Na-Ca alteration. Most of the main ore-stage minerals precipitated from an aqueous-carbonic fluid (3.5–15 wt.% NaCl equiv. at temperatures ranging between 300° and 410°C during fluid mixing process, CO2 effervescence, cooling, and increasing of pH. Low-temperature hydrothermal activity subsequently produced hematite ores associated with propylitic alteration. The metacarbonate host rocks are LILE-depleted and HFSE-enriched due to metasomatic alteration.

  1. Integration of remote sensing and aeromagnetic data for mapping structural features and hydrothermal alteration zones in Wadi Allaqi area, South Eastern Desert of Egypt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldosouky, Ahmed M.; Abdelkareem, Mohamed; Elkhateeb, Sayed O.

    2017-06-01

    Remote sensing and aeromagnetic data provided significant information for detecting potential areas of mineralization in Wadi Allaqi in the South Eastern Desert of Egypt. Application of band ratios and Crosta technique of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) using Landsat-8 successfully highlighted the hydrothermal alteration zones and the structural elements represented by lithologic contacts and faults/fracture zones. Structural lineaments were also successfully extracted using remote sensing and aeromagnetic data. Center for Exploration Targeting (CET) Grid analysis and CET Porphyry Analysis techniques were applied for constructing the structural complexity heat map and probable near circular features of porphyry intrusions respectively. Combining data of lineaments, alteration zones and porphyry intrusions after obtaining a consequence of each map allowed predicting and mapping areas of probable high mineral resources. Overlaying the present sites of mineralization on the final map validated the prepared mineral predictive map. Overall results clearly revealed that areas of high structural complexity, fractures/faults density are in agreement with the detected areas of hydrothermal alterations which also matched with the known mineralization mines in the study area.

  2. New insights to the formation of dolomite and magnesite through hydrothermal alteration of Ca-carbonates: An experimental approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kell-Duivestein, Isaac; Dietzel, Martin; Baldermann, Andre; Mavromatis, Vasileios

    2017-04-01

    Advanced knowledge about the physicochemical conditions and reaction paths underlying Ca-Mg carbonate formation, such as dolomite and magnesite, during the advanced stage of diagenesis is a pre-requirement for the accurate interpretation of proxy signals established from carbonate-hosting sedimentary archives. In this study, hydrothermal precipitation experiments were performed in order to trace and quantify the evolution of elemental (Ca, Mg and Sr) and stable isotopic δ18O signatures during the (trans)formation of intermediate aragonite and low-Mg calcite to more stable dolomite and magnesite in the presence of Mg- and Na-chloride-rich brines. Therefore, 330 mg of inorganic CaCO3 seed material (aragonite or calcite) was reacted with 30 mL of an artificial brine solution, originally containing 0.2 M of MgCl2(aq) and 0.1 M or 0.05 M of NaHCO3, in Teflon-lined stainless steel autoclaves at temperatures of 150, 180 and 220˚ C over the course of 365 days. The evolution of reaction products and of the experimental solutions was monitored by ICP-OES, CRDS, FTIR, XRD, EMPA and SEM analyses as well as pH and alkalinity measurements. Based on the apparent solid-phase composition and reactive fluid chemistry the following sequence of mineral growth was established: aragonite and/or low-Mg calcite reacted with aqueous Mg2+ ions to form intermediate huntite, brucite and high-Mg calcite, subsequently altered to Ca-excess dolomite and Ca-rich magnesite and finally converted to nearly stoichiometric endmembers. A progressive evolution in the stoichiometry of dolomite (from 42 to 50 mol% MgCO3) and magnesite (from 80 to 98 mol% MgCO3) as well as the increase in the degree of cation order in dolomite (from 0.26 to 0.74) were observed during this reaction sequence, implying a kinetic drive towards the (thermodynamically stable) end members. The latter processes were also traced, by means of δ18O isotope exchange kinetics between fluid and precipitating solids in bulk (Δ = δ18

  3. The effect of prior hydrothermal alteration on the melting behaviour during rhyolite formation in Yellowstone, and its importance in the generation of low-δ18O magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troch, Juliana; Ellis, Ben S.; Harris, Chris; Ulmer, Peter; Bachmann, Olivier

    2018-01-01

    Constraining the contribution of crustal lithologies to silicic magmas has important implications for understanding the dynamics of these potentially highly explosive systems. Low-δ18O rhyolite lavas erupted after caldera-forming events in Yellowstone have been interpreted as the products of bulk crustal melting of previously deposited and hydrothermally altered rhyolitic material in the down-dropped caldera roof. For lack of compositional data, the "self-cannibalisation bulk melting"-theory relies on the assumption that hydrothermally altered materials are near-cotectic and hydrous (>3 wt% H2O) and will therefore readily melt at temperatures below 850 °C. In this study, we examine the drillcores Y2, Y9 and Y13 from a USGS drilling campaign in Yellowstone in order to characterise the hydrothermally altered material in terms of major and trace elements, oxygen isotopes and water contents. Rhyolite δ18O values can decrease from "normal" (+5.8 to +6.1‰) on the surface to as low as -5‰ at depths of 100-160 m and probably lower as a function of increasing temperature with depth. While material in the drillcores is variably altered and silicified, oxygen isotope exchange in these samples is not accompanied by systematic changes in major and trace element composition and is independent of uptake of water. More than 75% of the drillcore samples have water the most limiting factor during melting. Modelled melting curves using rhyolite-MELTS suggest a maximum of 35% melt can be created at 850 °C, and that bulk melting would require extremely high temperatures >1100 °C. Therefore, large-scale bulk melting is unrealistic and low-δ18O rhyolite magmas more likely result from assimilation of <30% partially melted altered crust with low δ18O into a normal-δ18O rhyolite magma from the main reservoir. This mechanism is supported by isotopic mass-balance models as well as thermal and volumetric constraints, and may be similarly applicable to other low-δ18O settings

  4. Can Low Water/Rock Hydrothermal Alteration of Impact Materials Explain the Rock Component of the Martian Soil?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M. J.; Newsom, H. E.

    2003-01-01

    The martian regolith is a globally homogenized product of chemical and aeolian weathering processes. The soil is thought to consist of a rock component, with lesser amounts of mobile elements (Ca, Na, and K) than a presumed protolith, and a salt or mobile element component enriched in sulfur and chlorine. In this study we consider the contributions of hydrothermal processes to the origin of the rock component of the martian soil.

  5. Textural, mineralogical and stable isotope studies of hydrothermal alteration in the main sulfide zone of the Great Dyke, Zimbabwe and the precious metals zone of the Sonju Lake Intrusion, Minnesota, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C.; Ripley, E.M.; Oberthur, T.; Miller, J.D.; Joslin, G.D.

    2008-01-01

    Stratigraphic offsets in the peak concentrations of platinum-group elements (PGE) and base-metal sulfides in the main sulfide zone of the Great Dyke and the precious metals zone of the Sonju Lake Intrusion have, in part, been attributed to the interaction between magmatic PGE-bearing base-metal sulfide assemblages and hydrothermal fluids. In this paper, we provide mineralogical and textural evidence that indicates alteration of base-metal sulfides and mobilization of metals and S during hydrothermal alteration in both mineralized intrusions. Stable isotopic data suggest that the fluids involved in the alteration were of magmatic origin in the Great Dyke but that a meteoric water component was involved in the alteration of the Sonju Lake Intrusion. The strong spatial association of platinum-group minerals, principally Pt and Pd sulfides, arsenides, and tellurides, with base-metal sulfide assemblages in the main sulfide zone of the Great Dyke is consistent with residual enrichment of Pt and Pd during hydrothermal alteration. However, such an interpretation is more tenuous for the precious metals zone of the Sonju Lake Intrusion where important Pt and Pd arsenides and antimonides occur as inclusions within individual plagioclase crystals and within alteration assemblages that are free of base-metal sulfides. Our observations suggest that Pt and Pd tellurides, antimonides, and arsenides may form during both magmatic crystallization and subsolidus hydrothermal alteration. Experimental studies of magmatic crystallization and hydrothermal transport/deposition in systems involving arsenides, tellurides, antimonides, and base metal sulfides are needed to better understand the relative importance of magmatic and hydrothermal processes in controlling the distribution of PGE in mineralized layered intrusions of this type. ?? Springer-Verlag 2007.

  6. Are the alteration halos of massive sulfide deposits syngenetic? Evidence from U-Pb dating of hydrothermal rutile at the Kidd volcanic center, Abitibi subprovince, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schandl, E. S.; Davis, D. W.; Krogh, T. E.

    1990-06-01

    The Kidd volcanic complex is composed of felsic volcanic and subvolcanic rocks of Archean age. The felsic rocks are intercalated with sedimentary rocks, and are in contact with komatiitic ultramafic rocks. Large diorite plutons were emplaced into the rhyolite, and the complex is overlain by younger basalts. Metasomatic events affecting the lithology of the Kidd volcanic complex include silicification, extensive CO2 metasomatism (carbonate), K-metasomatism (sericite-fuchsite), and chlorite and minor carbonate alterations. Petrographic evidence, supported by stable isotope and fluid inclusion studies, suggests that silicification and early carbonate alteration were synvolcanic, and therefore related to ore deposition. During subsequent extensive K-metasomatism, sericite precipitated in the rhyolite, and fuchsite precipitated in the ultramafic rocks. Although chlorite post-dates K-metasomatism, the micas and chlorite are both found in anastomosing microfissures, commonly occupying the same set of fractures. Hydrothermal rutile formed by the breakdown of magnetiteilmenite during K-metasomatism and chlorite alteration gives an age of 2624 ±62 Ma (95% confidence level) by Pb-Pb isotopic measurements. It is therefore approximately 100 m.y. younger than syngenetic massive sulfide mineralization (2717 ±2 Ma). Sulfide stringers within sericite and chlorite veins suggest some remobilization of the ores during these later events. This alteration assemblage, generally thought to be intimately associated with mineralization, is identical to that found associated with many lode-gold deposits in the Superior province. Recent dating of micas and rutile associated with gold deposits in the Abitibi subprovince gives comparable ages to the rutile in the Kidd volcanic complex, which must therefore record a widespread, late hydrothermal event affecting mineralized rocks.

  7. Description and validation of an automated methodology for mapping mineralogy, vegetation, and hydrothermal alteration type from ASTER satellite imagery with examples from the San Juan Mountains, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Barnaby W.

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of airborne spectroscopic, or "hyperspectral," remote sensing for geoenvironmental watershed evaluations and deposit-scale mapping of exposed mineral deposits has been demonstrated. However, the acquisition, processing, and analysis of such airborne data at regional and national scales can be time and cost prohibitive. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) sensor carried by the NASA Earth Observing System Terra satellite was designed for mineral mapping and the acquired data can be efficiently used to generate uniform mineral maps over very large areas. Multispectral remote sensing data acquired by the ASTER sensor were analyzed to identify and map minerals, mineral groups, hydrothermal alteration types, and vegetation groups in the western San Juan Mountains, Colorado, including the Silverton and Lake City calderas. This mapping was performed in support of multidisciplinary studies involving the predictive modeling of surface water geochemistry at watershed and regional scales. Detailed maps of minerals, vegetation groups, and water were produced from an ASTER scene using spectroscopic, expert system-based analysis techniques which have been previously described. New methodologies are presented for the modeling of hydrothermal alteration type based on the Boolean combination of the detailed mineral maps, and for the entirely automated mapping of alteration types, mineral groups, and green vegetation. Results of these methodologies are compared with the more detailed maps and with previously published mineral mapping results derived from analysis of high-resolution spectroscopic data acquired by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) sensor. Such comparisons are also presented for other mineralized and (or) altered areas including the Goldfield and Cuprite mining districts, Nevada and the central Marysvale volcanic field, Wah Wah Mountains, and San Francisco Mountains, Utah. The automated

  8. Sm-Nd age of the fazenda brasileiro gabbro, Bahia, Brazil: example of robust behavior of the Sm-Nd isotopic system under extreme hydrothermal alteration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio M. Pimentel

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The Fazenda Brasileiro gold mineralization is hosted by a gabbroic sill, intrusive into metavolcanicmetasedimentary rocks of the Rio Itapicuru Greenstone Belt, São Francisco Craton. The 2.05 Ga old mineralization is associated with intense shearing and hydrothermal alteration, and the host gabbro is altered to a series of rocks rich in sericite, chlorite, actinolite, carbonate and quartz. Twelve whole-rock samples of the gold mineralization, representing varied degrees of alteration, from rocks with preserved igneous textures to the ore (quartz-carbonate-sulfide-chlorite, were studied by the Sm-Nd method. All analytical points resulted in an isochron (MSWD = 1.9 indicating the age of 2142 +/- 47 Ma (1s and Epsilon Nd (T of +1.2. Chlorite-sericite-carbonate rich hydrothermal rocks indicate the age of 2148 +/- 57 Ma and Epsilon Nd (T of +1.1. The positive Epsilon Nd (T suggest limited or no contamination with older continental crust, compatible with an oceanic setting for the tholeiites. Combined withREEdata, the Sm-Nd isotopic results reveal that the hydrothermal alteration, although intense, was unable to alter significantly the Sm/Nd ratios of the original igneous rocks and did not cause important scatter of the analytical points, providing a rare example of robust behavior of the isotopic system, even under intense hydrothermal alteration.A mineralização de ouro de Fazenda Brasileiro é hospedada por um sill gabróico intrusivo em rochas metavulcânicas/metassedimentares do Greenstone Belt do Rio Itapicuru, Craton do São Francisco. A mineralização, com idade de ca. 2.05 Ga, está associada com forte cizalhamento e alteração hidrotermal, e o gabro hospedeiro está alterado para rochas ricas em clorita, actinolita, carbonato e quartzo. Doze amostras de rocha total representando graus variados de alteração hidrotermal, desde rochas com texturas ígneas reliquiares até o minério (quartzo-carbonato-sulfeto-clorita, foram estudadas pelo

  9. Identification of Cr-magnetite in Neoproterozoic serpentinites resulting of Cr-Spinel alteration in a past hydrothermal system: Aït Ahmane ultramafic unit (Bou Azzer ophiolite, Anti Atlas, Morocco)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodel, Florent; Macouin, Mélina; Carlut, Julie; Triantafyllou, Antoine; Berger, Julien; Trindade, Ricardo; Ennih, Nasser; Rousse, Sonia

    2017-04-01

    If magnetite is a common serpentinization product, centimetric, massive and almost pure magnetite veins are rarely observed in serpentinites. Unique examples of these, in the Aït Ahmane ultramafic unit (Bou Azzer Neoproterozoic ophiolite, Anti-Atlas, Morocco), offer the opportunity to assess the hydrothermal processes that prevailed at the end of the Precambrian. Pseudomorphic lizardite/chrysotile texture of unaltered serpentinites suggests an oceanic-like first serpentinization stage, under static and low temperature conditions (T CrM/M ratio providing a quantification of the Cr-magnetite contribution to the magnetic susceptibility, relatively to the pure magnetite one. This CrM/M ratio increases drastically with the hydrothermal alteration of serpentinites and Cr-spinels, attesting of a change of the magnetic mineralogy. Combined with petrography, mineral and bulk chemistry, these magnetic data allow us to propose that a Cl-rich acidic hydrothermal event, involving temperatures below 350 °C, appears to have been responsible of an intense magnetite leaching in host serpentinite and an advanced Cr-spinel alteration in ferritchromite and Cr-magnetite. Iron provided by this leaching may have conducted to the unique magnetite veins formation in the Aït Ahmane ultramafic unit. Two different settings are proposed concerning the nature of the hydrothermal event: (1) a continental hydrothermal system as advanced for the Co-Ni-As ores in the Bou Azzer inliers or (2) an oceanic black smoker type hydrothermal vent field on the Neoproterozoic sea-floor.

  10. Use of wireline logs at Cerro Prieto in identification of the distribution of hydrothermally altered zones and dike locations, and their correlation with reservoir temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seamount, D.T. Jr.; Elders, W.A.

    1981-01-01

    Downhole electrical and gamma-gamma density logs from nine wells weere studed and these wireline log parameters with petrologic, temperature, and petrophysical data were correlated. Here, wells M-43, T-366, and M-107 are discussed in detail as typical cases. Log data for shales show good correlation with four zones of hydrothermal alteration previously recognized on the basis of characteristic mineral assemblages and temperatures. These zones are the unaltered montmorillonite zone (< 150/sup 0/C), the illite zone (150/sup 0/C to 230/sup 0/C to 245/sup 0/C), the chlorite zone (235/sup 0/C to 300/sup 0/C, equivalent to the calc-silicate I zone in sands), and the feldspar zone (> 300/sup 0/C, equivalent to the calc-silicate II zone in sands),

  11. Effects of glacial/post-glacial weathering compared with hydrothermal alteration - implications for matrix diffusion. Results from drillcore studies in porphyritic quartz monzodiorite from Aespoe SE Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landstroem, Ove [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden); Tullborg, Eva-Lena [Terralogica AB, Graabo (Sweden); Eriksson, Gunda; Sandell, Yvonne [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2001-08-01

    The effects of hydrothermal + subsequent low temperature alteration and glacial/post-glacial weathering have been studied in two cores of quartz monzodiorite. One core (YA 1192) was drilled into the hydrothermally altered wall rock of a water-conducting fracture exposed at 170 m depth in the access tunnel to the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory. The other one (Bas 1) was drilled from an outcrop with a glacially polished surface, 1 km north of the YA 1192 site. Both drill cores were sectioned into mm-thick slices perpendicular to the core axis. The fracture filling of the YA 1192 core, the weathered surface of the BAS 1 core and the different slices were analysed for major and trace elements and isotopes of U and Th. The altered zone of the YA 1192 core extends to approx. 2.5 cm from the fracture surface. The alteration (mainly plagioclase {yields} albite + sericite + epidote) has resulted in a higher porosity and formation of sorbing secondary minerals (e.g. sericite), favouring matrix diffusion. Increased Br concentrations in the altered zone are indicative of saline water in pores and micro fractures i.e. the presence of a diffusion medium. 234U/238U activity ratios > 1 and increased Cs in the altered zone are then interpreted as diffusion of U and Cs from fracture groundwater and subsequent sorption. The U migration is geologically recent (< 1 Ma). The 2.5 cm altered zone (corresponding to the zone of active matrix diffusion) significantly exceeds the visible red staining zone (0.5 cm) caused by hematite/FeOOH micrograins, emphasizing the need of microscopy to identify zones of alteration. The conspicuous weathering at the BAS 1 site is confined to a narrow rim of the bedrock surface (approx. 0.2-0.5 cm thick). Mass balance calculations for this rim (based on immobility of K) indicate that mechanical erosion has dominated over chemical dissolution processes (is roughly 10 times greater). The chemical weathering has affected mainly plagioclase and chlorite resulting

  12. Evaluating the effect of spatial subsetting on subpixel unmixing methodology applied to ASTER over a hydrothermally altered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayoobi, Iman; Tangestani, Majid H.

    2017-10-01

    This study investigates the effect of spatial subsets of Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection radiometer (ASTER) L1B visible-near infrared and short wave-infrared (VNIR-SWIR) data on matched filtering results at the central part of Kerman magmatic arc, where abundant porphyry copper deposits exist. The matched filtering (MF) procedure was run separately at sites containing hydrothermal minerals such as sericite, kaolinite, chlorite, and jarosite to map the abundances of these minerals on spatial subsets containing 100, 75, 50, and 25 percent of the original scene. Results were evaluated by comparing the matched filtering scores with the mineral abundances obtained by semi-quantitative XRD analysis of corresponding field samples. It was concluded that MF method should be applied to the whole scene prior to any data subsetting.

  13. State of stress and relationship of mechanical properties to hydrothermal alteration at Valles Caldera core hole 1, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Thomas N.; Kranz, Robert L.

    1988-06-01

    We measured the densities, total and microcrack porosities, and ultrasonic velocities of a number of core samples from an 856-m-deep core hole near the Banco Bonito vent at Valles Caldera, New Mexico. Reductions in porosity with depth define a zone from about 600 m down where hydrothermal mineralization and recrystallization have been most active. This zone is also reflected in a large decrease in the anisotropy of acoustic velocities. Stress orientation estimates based on microcrack orientations at the 812-m depth as determined by differential strain curve analysis, as well as anelastic strain recovery measurements on a sample from 472-m depth, show a horizontal E-W minimum compression direction and a maximum compression inclined about 30° from vertical.

  14. A GIS and statistical approach to identify variables that control water quality in hydrothermally altered and mineralized watersheds, Silverton, Colorado, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager, Douglas B.; Johnson, Raymond H.; Rockwell, Barnaby W.; Caine, Jonathan S.; Smith, Kathleen S.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrothermally altered bedrock in the Silverton mining area, southwest Colorado, USA, contains sulfide minerals that weather to produce acidic and metal-rich leachate that is toxic to aquatic life. This study utilized a geographic information system (GIS) and statistical approach to identify watershed-scale geologic variables in the Silverton area that influence water quality. GIS analysis of mineral maps produced using remote sensing datasets including Landsat Thematic Mapper, advanced spaceborne thermal emission and reflection radiometer, and a hybrid airborne visible infrared imaging spectrometer and field-based product enabled areas of alteration to be quantified. Correlations between water quality signatures determined at watershed outlets, and alteration types intersecting both total watershed areas and GIS-buffered areas along streams were tested using linear regression analysis. Despite remote sensing datasets having varying watershed area coverage due to vegetation cover and differing mineral mapping capabilities, each dataset was useful for delineating acid-generating bedrock. Areas of quartz–sericite–pyrite mapped by AVIRIS have the highest correlations with acidic surface water and elevated iron and aluminum concentrations. Alkalinity was only correlated with area of acid neutralizing, propylitically altered bedrock containing calcite and chlorite mapped by AVIRIS. Total watershed area of acid-generating bedrock is more significantly correlated with acidic and metal-rich surface water when compared with acid-generating bedrock intersected by GIS-buffered areas along streams. This methodology could be useful in assessing the possible effects that alteration type area has in either generating or neutralizing acidity in unmined watersheds and in areas where new mining is planned.

  15. (238)U/(235)U isotope ratios of crustal material, rivers and products of hydrothermal alteration: new insights on the oceanic U isotope mass balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordmann, Janine; Weyer, Stefan; Georg, R Bastian; Jöns, Svenja; Sharma, Mukul

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the U isotope composition, n((238)U)/n((235)U), of major components of the upper continental crust, including granitic rocks of different age and post-Archaean shales, as well as that of rivers (the major U source to the oceans) was investigated. Furthermore, U isotope fractionation during the removal of U at mid-ocean ridges, an important sink for U from the oceans, was investigated by the analyses of hydrothermal water samples (including low- and high-temperature fluids), low-temperature altered basalts and calcium carbonate veins. All analysed rock samples from the continental crust fall into a limited range of δ(238)U between -0.45 and -0.21 ‰ (relative to NBL CRM 112-A), with an average of -0.30 ± 0.15 ‰ (2 SD, N = 11). Despite differences in catchment lithologies, all major rivers define a relatively narrow range between -0.31 and -0.13 ‰, with a weighted mean isotope composition of -0.27 ‰, which is indistinguishable from the estimate for the upper continental crust (-0.30 ‰). Only some tributary rivers from the Swiss Alps display a slightly larger range in δ(238)U (-0.29 to +0.01 ‰) and lower U concentrations (0.87-3.08 nmol/kg) compared to the investigated major rivers (5.19-11.69 nmol/kg). These findings indicate that only minor net U isotope fractionation occurs during weathering and transport of material from the continental crust to the oceans. Altered basalts display moderately enriched U concentrations (by a factor of 3-18) compared to those typically observed for normal mid-ocean ridge basalts. These, and carbonate veins within altered basalts, show large U isotope fractionation towards both heavy and light U isotope compositions (ranging from -0.63 to +0.27 ‰). Hydrothermal water samples display low U concentrations (0.3-1 nmol/kg) and only limited variations in their U isotope composition (-0.43 ± 0.25 ‰) around the seawater value. Nevertheless, two of the investigated fluids display

  16. Integrating Data of ASTER and Landsat-8 OLI (AO for Hydrothermal Alteration Mineral Mapping in Duolong Porphyry Cu-Au Deposit, Tibetan Plateau, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingbin Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important characteristics of porphyry copper deposits (PCDs is the type and distribution pattern of alteration zones which can be used for screening and recognizing these deposits. Hydrothermal alteration minerals with diagnostic spectral absorption properties in the visible and near-infrared (VNIR through the shortwave infrared (SWIR regions can be identified by multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing data. Six Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER bands in SWIR have been shown to be effective in the mapping of Al-OH, Fe-OH, Mg-OH group minerals. The five VNIR bands of Landsat-8 (L8 Operational Land Imager (OLI are useful for discriminating ferric iron alteration minerals. In the absence of complete hyperspectral coverage area, an opportunity, however, exists to integrate ASTER and L8-OLI (AO to compensate each other’s shortcomings in covering area for mineral mapping. This study examines the potential of AO data in mineral mapping in an arid area of the Duolong porphyry Cu-Au deposit(Tibetan Plateau in China by using spectral analysis techniques. Results show the following conclusions: (1 Combination of ASTER and L8-OLI data (AO has more mineral information content than either alone; (2 The Duolong PCD alteration zones of phyllic, argillic and propylitic zones are mapped using ASTER SWIR bands and the iron-bearing mineral information is best mapped using AO VNIR bands; (3 The multispectral integration data of AO can provide a compensatory data of ASTER VNIR bands for iron-bearing mineral mapping in the arid and semi-arid areas.

  17. The Hydrothermal System at Home Plate in Gusev Crater, Mars: Formation of High Silica Material by Acid-Sulfate Alteration of Basalt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, R. V.; Ming, D. W.; Gellert, R.; Yen, A.; Clark, B. C.; Gnaff, T. G.; Arvidson, R. E.; Squyres, S. W.

    2008-01-01

    The Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Spirit measured three targets on or adjacent to Home Plate in Gusev Crater that have unusually high SiO2 concentrations (68% to 91%), unusually low FeO concentrations (1% to 7%, with total Fe as FeO), and unusually high TiO2/FeO ratios (0.2 to 1.2 by weight) [1]. Two targets (Kenosha Comets and Lefty Ganote) are located on high albedo soil (Gertrude Weise) that was exposed by the rover wheels, and one target is a float rock called Fuzzy Smith. Kenosha Comets has the highest SiO2 concentration, lowest FeO concentration, and highest TiO2/FeO ratio. Mineralogical evidence from the MER Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES) suggests that the SiO2 is present as amorphous (noncrystalline) SiO2 at Gertrude Weise and nearby targets [2,3]. Mini-TES data were not acquired for Fuzzy Smith. Home Plate is considered to have an explosive volcanic origin, resulting when basaltic magma came into contact with ground water or ice [4]. Within 50 m to 1 km of Home Plate are sulfate rich soil deposits (Paso Robles class soils with 22-35% SO3) which are considered to be probable fumarolic and/or hydrothermal deposits associated with the volcanism [5]. We develop the model here, suggested by [5], that the high-silica materials are another manifestation of acid-sulfate processes associated with fumarolic and hydrothermal activity at Home Plate. This is done by analogy with basaltic materials altered by acid sulfate processes on the Island of Hawaii.

  18. Opaque assemblages in CR2 Graves Nunataks (GRA) 06100 as indicators of shock-driven hydrothermal alteration in the CR chondrite parent body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, Neyda M.; Bullock, Emma S.

    2013-12-01

    We have studied the petrologic characteristics of sulfide-metal lodes, polymineralic Fe-Ni nodules, and opaque assemblages in the CR2 chondrite Graves Nunataks (GRA) 06100, one of the most altered CR chondrites. Unlike low petrologic type CR chondrites, alteration of metal appears to have played a central role in the formation of secondary minerals in GRA 06100. Differences in the mineralogy and chemical compositions of materials in GRA 06100 suggest that it experienced higher temperatures than other CR2 chondrites. Mineralogic features indicative of high temperature include: (1) exsolution of Ni-poor and Ni-rich metal from nebular kamacite; (2) formation of sulfides, oxides, and phosphates; (3) changes in the Co/Ni ratios; and (4) carbidization of Fe-Ni metal. The conspicuous absence of pentlandite may indicate that peak temperatures exceeded 600 °C. Opaques appear to have been affected by the action of aqueous fluids that resulted in the formation of abundant oxides, Fe-rich carbonates, including endmember ankerite, and the sulfide-silicate-phosphate scorzalite. We suggest that these materials formed via impact-driven metamorphism. Mineralogic features indicative of impact metamorphism include (1) the presence of sulfide-metal lodes; (2) the abundance of polymineralic opaque assemblages with mosaic-like textures; and (3) the presence of suessite. Initial shock metamorphism probably resulted in replacement of nebular Fe-Ni metal in chondrules and in matrix by Ni-rich, Co-rich Fe metal, Al-Ti-Cr-rich alloys, and Fe sulfides, while subsequent hydrothermal alteration produced accessory oxides, phosphates, and Fe carbonates. An extensive network of sulfide-metal veins permitted effective exchange of siderophile elements from pre-existing metal nodules with adjacent chondrules and matrix, resulting in unusually high Fe contents in these objects.

  19. Quantification of the boron speciation in alkali borosilicate glasses by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cheng, D.S.; Yang, G.; Zhao, Y.Q.

    2015-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy and related analytical techniques have been widely used to study the microstructure of different materials. However, few research works have been performed in the field of glasses, possibly due to the electron-beam irradiation damage. In this paper, we have...

  20. OSCAR - Oceanographic and Seismic Characterisation of heat dissipation and alteration by hydrothermal fluids at an Axial Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, Richard

    2017-04-01

    of 0.25°C combined with a decrease of 0.01 psu in salinity. Evidence of hydrothermally driven plumes were also detected along the CRR but exact locations of their sources were not found. Our best estimate from the OSCAR data show that the geothermal contribution is over 70% to the abyssal water upwelling. This is the largest contribution yet observed in abyssal basins and is in line with a growing number of studies arguing that geothermal heating plays a significant role in driving the abyssal and global circulation.

  1. Hydrothermal minerals

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.

    , radon etc. to locate active venting site 4. Seabed sampling for rocks and minerals looking for indications of hydrothermal mineralization 5. TV and still Photographic surveys with real- time imaging on board 6. Submersible/ROVs for direct... thriving in this unique environments. However, the study of hydrothermal systems is still relatively young, and there are many fundamental questions that remain to be addressed in the forthcoming years. Suggested reading 1. Seafloor hydrothermal...

  2. Physical, chemical and mineralogical evolution of the Tolhuaca geothermal system, southern Andes, Chile: Insights into the interplay between hydrothermal alteration and brittle deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Alfaro, Pablo; Reich, Martin; Arancibia, Gloria; Pérez-Flores, Pamela; Cembrano, José; Driesner, Thomas; Lizama, Martin; Rowland, Julie; Morata, Diego; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Tardani, Daniele; Campos, Eduardo

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we unravel the physical, chemical and mineralogical evolution of the active Tolhuaca geothermal system in the Andes of southern Chile. We used temperature measurements in the deep wells and geochemical analyses of borehole fluid samples to constrain present-day fluid conditions. In addition, we reconstructed the paleo-fluid temperatures and chemistry from microthermometry and LA-ICP-MS analysis of fluid inclusions taken from well-constrained parageneses in vein samples retrieved from a ~ 1000 m borehole core. Based on core logging, mineralogical observations and fluid inclusions data we identify four stages (S1-S4) of progressive hydrothermal alteration. An early heating event (S1) was followed by the formation of a clay-rich cap in the upper zone (Tolhuaca has produced a mineralogical, hydrological and structural vertical segmentation of the system through the development of a low-permeability, low-cohesion clay-rich cap at shallow depth. The quantitative chemical analyses of fluid inclusions and borehole fluids reveal a significant change in chemical conditions during the evolution of Tolhuaca. Whereas borehole (present-day) fluids are rich in Au, B and As, but Cu-poor (B/Na ~ 100.5, As/Na ~ 10- 1.1, Cu/Na ~ 10- 4.2), the paleofluids trapped in fluid inclusions are Cu-rich but poor in B and As (B/Na ~ 10- 1, As/Na ~ 10- 2.5, Cu/Na ~ 10- 2.5 in average). We interpret the fluctuations in fluid chemistry at Tolhuaca as the result of transient supply of metal-rich, magmatically derived fluids where As, Au and Cu are geochemically decoupled. Since these fluctuating physical and chemical conditions at the reservoir produced a mineralogical vertical segmentation of the system that affects the mechanical and hydrological properties of host rock, we explored the effect of the development of a low-cohesion low-permeability clay cap on the conditions of fault rupture and on the long-term thermal structure of the system. These analyses were performed by using

  3. Hydrothermal alteration and Cu-Ni-PGE mobilization in the charnockitic rocks of the footwall of the South Kawishiwi intrusion, Duluth Complex, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkó, Zsolt; Mogessie, Aberra; Molnár, Ferenc; Krenn, Kurt; Poulson, Simon R; Hauck, Steven; Severson, Mark; Arehart, Greg B

    2015-06-01

    In the Neoarchean (~ 2.7 Ga) contact metamorphosed charnockitic footwall of the Mesoproterosoic (1.1 Ga) South Kawishiwi intrusion of the Duluth Complex, the primary metamorphic mineral assemblage and Cu-Ni-PGE sulfide mineralization is overprinted by an actinolite + chlorite + cummingtonite + prehnite + pumpellyite + quartz + calcite hydrothermal mineral assemblage along 2-3 cm thick veins. In calcite, hosted by the hydrothermal alteration zones and in a single recrystallized quartz porphyroblast, four different fluid inclusion assemblages are documented; the composition of these fluid inclusions provide p-T conditions of the fluid flow, and helps to define the origin of the fluids and evaluate their role in the remobilization and reprecipitation of the primary metamorphic sulfide assemblage. Pure CO2 fluid inclusions were found as early inclusions in recrystallized quartz porphyroblast. These inclusions may have been trapped during the recrystallization of the quartz during the contact metamorphism of the footwall charnockite in the footwall of the SKI. The estimated trapping pressure (1.6-2.0 kbar) and temperature (810-920 °C) conditions correspond to estimates based on felsic veins in the basal zones of the South Kawishiwi intrusion. Fluid inclusion assemblages with CO2-H2O-NaCl and CH4-N2-H2O-NaCl compositions found in this study along healed microfractures in the recrystallized quartz porphyroblast establish the heterogeneous state of the fluids during entrapment. The estimated trapping pressure and temperature conditions (240-650 bar and 120-150 °C for CO2-H2O-NaCl inclusions and 315-360 bar and 145-165 °C for CH4-N2-H2O-NaCl inclusions) are significantly lower than the p-T conditions (> 700 °C and 1.6-2 kbar) during the contact metamorphism, indicating that this fluid flow might not be related to the cooling of the Duluth Complex and its contact aureole. The presence of chalcopyrite inclusions in these fluid inclusions and in

  4. Hydrothermal alteration and Cu–Ni–PGE mobilization in the charnockitic rocks of the footwall of the South Kawishiwi intrusion, Duluth Complex, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benkó, Zsolt; Mogessie, Aberra; Molnár, Ferenc; Krenn, Kurt; Poulson, Simon R.; Hauck, Steven; Severson, Mark; Arehart, Greg B.

    2015-01-01

    In the Neoarchean (~ 2.7 Ga) contact metamorphosed charnockitic footwall of the Mesoproterosoic (1.1 Ga) South Kawishiwi intrusion of the Duluth Complex, the primary metamorphic mineral assemblage and Cu–Ni–PGE sulfide mineralization is overprinted by an actinolite + chlorite + cummingtonite + prehnite + pumpellyite + quartz + calcite hydrothermal mineral assemblage along 2–3 cm thick veins. In calcite, hosted by the hydrothermal alteration zones and in a single recrystallized quartz porphyroblast, four different fluid inclusion assemblages are documented; the composition of these fluid inclusions provide p–T conditions of the fluid flow, and helps to define the origin of the fluids and evaluate their role in the remobilization and reprecipitation of the primary metamorphic sulfide assemblage. Pure CO2 fluid inclusions were found as early inclusions in recrystallized quartz porphyroblast. These inclusions may have been trapped during the recrystallization of the quartz during the contact metamorphism of the footwall charnockite in the footwall of the SKI. The estimated trapping pressure (1.6–2.0 kbar) and temperature (810–920 °C) conditions correspond to estimates based on felsic veins in the basal zones of the South Kawishiwi intrusion. Fluid inclusion assemblages with CO2–H2O–NaCl and CH4–N2–H2O–NaCl compositions found in this study along healed microfractures in the recrystallized quartz porphyroblast establish the heterogeneous state of the fluids during entrapment. The estimated trapping pressure and temperature conditions (240–650 bar and 120–150 °C for CO2–H2O–NaCl inclusions and 315–360 bar and 145–165 °C for CH4–N2–H2O–NaCl inclusions) are significantly lower than the p–T conditions (> 700 °C and 1.6–2 kbar) during the contact metamorphism, indicating that this fluid flow might not be related to the cooling of the Duluth Complex and its contact aureole. The presence of chalcopyrite

  5. Quantification of porosity evolution from unaltered to propylitic-altered granites: the 14C-PMMA method applied on the hydrothermal system of Lavras do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton M. Bongiolo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This work is an application of the 14C-Polymethylmethacrylate method to compare the porosity evolution between unaltered and propylitic-altered granites, using samples from Lavras do Sul region, Brazil. This method, when coupled with optical and electronic petrography has the advantage over other methods to provide the quantification and identification of total and local porosity of rocks. From petrographic observations, different kinds of porous zones were identified and quantified (microfractures, grain boundaries, alteration of minerals, etc. Results show that unaltered granites have 0.5 to 0.6% porosity and propylitic-altered ones have 1.7 to 1.8% porosity, even between samples with different textures. Porosity of altered rocks increases mainly due to higher porosity of neoformed chlorite, calcite, sericite and microfractures. Field observations show that later phyllic alteration halos are wider in equigranular than in porphyritic granites, which could not be explained by different original porosity between those rocks. The observed differences of phyllic halos diffusion were controlled by structural and fluid/rock ratio variations between the equigranular and porphyritic granitic facies during the later hydrothermal stage.Este trabalho é uma aplicação do método 14C-polimetilmetacrilato na comparação da evolução da porosidade entre granitos não alterados e propilitizados, utilizando amostras da região de Lavras do Sul, Brasil. Este método, quando associado a análises por petrografia ótica, eletrônica e processamento digital de imagens tem a vantagem de fornecer, além da porosidade total, a quantificação e identificação da porosidade em locais específicos das rochas. A partir da petrografia foi possível identificar e quantificar os diferentes tipos de poros presentes nas rochas (microfraturas, limites de grãos, alteração de minerais, etc. Os resultados mostram que granitos não alterados têm porosidade de 0,5 a 0,6% e

  6. Hydrothermal processes above the Yellowstone magma chamber: Large hydrothermal systems and large hydrothermal explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, L.A.; Shanks, W.C. Pat; Pierce, K.L.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrothermal explosions are violent and dramatic events resulting in the rapid ejection of boiling water, steam, mud, and rock fragments from source craters that range from a few meters up to more than 2 km in diameter; associated breccia can be emplaced as much as 3 to 4 km from the largest craters. Hydrothermal explosions occur where shallow interconnected reservoirs of steam- and liquid-saturated fluids with temperatures at or near the boiling curve underlie thermal fields. Sudden reduction in confi ning pressure causes fluids to fl ash to steam, resulting in signifi cant expansion, rock fragmentation, and debris ejection. In Yellowstone, hydrothermal explosions are a potentially signifi cant hazard for visitors and facilities and can damage or even destroy thermal features. The breccia deposits and associated craters formed from hydrothermal explosions are mapped as mostly Holocene (the Mary Bay deposit is older) units throughout Yellowstone National Park (YNP) and are spatially related to within the 0.64-Ma Yellowstone caldera and along the active Norris-Mammoth tectonic corridor. In Yellowstone, at least 20 large (>100 m in diameter) hydrothermal explosion craters have been identifi ed; the scale of the individual associated events dwarfs similar features in geothermal areas elsewhere in the world. Large hydrothermal explosions in Yellowstone have occurred over the past 16 ka averaging ??1 every 700 yr; similar events are likely in the future. Our studies of large hydrothermal explosion events indicate: (1) none are directly associated with eruptive volcanic or shallow intrusive events; (2) several historical explosions have been triggered by seismic events; (3) lithic clasts and comingled matrix material that form hydrothermal explosion deposits are extensively altered, indicating that explosions occur in areas subjected to intense hydrothermal processes; (4) many lithic clasts contained in explosion breccia deposits preserve evidence of repeated fracturing

  7. Hydrothermal alterations of the meta volcanic rocks associated to the gold deposits from Pontes e Lacerda region, Mato Grosso State, Brazil; Alteracao hidrotermal das metavulcanicas associadas aos depositos auriferos de Pontes e Lacerda, MT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraldes, M.C.; Figueiredo, B.R. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Geociencias

    1997-01-01

    Geochemical changes due to hydrothermal alterations of volcanic rocks, which are associated with the gold deposits in the Pontes e Lacerda region, state of Mato Grosso, Brazil, are investigated in the present study. These rocks were analyzed for major and trace elements, including REE. Nd and Sr isotopes were used to trace the origin and tectonic environment of the magmatism. The volcanic rocks resemble ocean floor basalts in composition and their isotopic signature indicates a Sr depleted and Nd enriched source in the mantle. The hydrothermal process were responsible for enhanced concentration of K{sub 2} O, Rb, Ba and Fe{sub 2} O{sub 3} and for losses in Ca O, Sr, Mg O, and Fe O. The Zr; Y, Cr; Al{sub 2} O{sub 3} Si O{sub 2} and Ti O{sub 2} contents remained unchanged. Increasing REE contents in the altered volcanics may be due to a probable magmatic contribution to the fluids, which is also indicated by positive Ce anomalies in some altered basalts. The processes which were responsible for these geochemical changes are discussed. (author) 33 refs., 10 figs., 2 tab.

  8. Rhyolite genesis at the Picabo Volcanic Center of the Snake River Plain: Progressive recycling of hydrothermally altered rhyolites revealed by high resolution analysis of individual zircons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, D.; Bindeman, I. N.; Watts, K. E.; Schmitt, A. K.; McCurry, M. O.

    2012-12-01

    The Picabo eruptive center of the Snake River Plain (SRP) produced a series of normal and low δ18O rhyolites from 10.44 Ma to 6.62 Ma, providing the first evidence of progressive recycling of hydrothermally altered rhyolites during the formation of a caldera complex. In this study we present a characterization of ignimbrites and associated lavas based on U-Pb ages and δ18O compositions of individual zircon cores measured by ion microprobe, phenocryst δ18O values measured by laser fluorination, whole rock 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd compositions, and whole rock geochemistry. Our data define rhyolite genesis at the Picabo volcanic center through time and have implications for the transition between volcanic centers. Caldera complex evolution at Picabo began with eruption of the 10.44 ± 0.27 Ma Tuff of Arbon Valley (TAV), a chemically zoned unit with a normal δ18Omelt value (8.15‰), very high 87Sr/86Sr (up to 0.734430) and very low ɛNd (-18). Eruptions continued with the ~9.1 Ma Two-and-a-Half-Mile Rhyolite (Kellogg et al., 1988), a unit significant in that it has an even lower ɛNd than the TAV and a normal δ18Omelt value (8.10‰). This low ɛNd of -23, of the Two-and-a-Half-Mile Rhyolite, reveals that greater than 40% of Archean crust was assimilated. These normal δ18O eruptions were followed by a series of lower δ18O eruptions distinguishable by Sr and Nd isotopes and whole rock chemistry. The 8.25 ± 0.26 Ma Rhyolite of West Pocatello has the lowest δ18Omelt value (3.34‰) of these eruptions, and based on nearly identical age, 87Sr/86Sr, 143Nd/144Nd, and whole rock chemistry, we correlate it to a 1,000 m thick intracaldera tuff (present in the INEL drillcore). Along with a distinct decrease in δ18O, from the TAV to the Rhyolite of West Pocatello, there is a corresponding increase in δ18Ozircon heterogeneity from the TAV (1‰ variation) to the low δ18O units with the greatest δ18Ozircon diversity (up to 5‰). Although morphological evidence for

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis of fine oxide powders

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The authors describe. hydrothermal decomposition,; hydrothermal metal oxidation,; hydrothermal reaction,; hydrothermal precipitation and hydrothermal hydrolysis,; hydrothermal electrochemical,; reactive electrode submerged arc,; hydrothermal microwave,; hydrothermal sonochemical,. etc and also ideal and real powders ...

  10. The boron isotope geochemistry of tourmaline-rich alteration in the IOCG systems of northern Chile: implications for a magmatic-hydrothermal origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornos, Fernando; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Velasco, Francisco

    2012-06-01

    Hydrothermal tourmaline is common in the iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposits of the Coastal Cordillera of Chile where it occurs as large crystals in the groundmass of magmatic-hydrothermal breccias, such as in the Silvita or Tropezón ore bodies, or as small grains in replacive bodies or breccia cement in the ore-bearing andesite, as seen at the Candelaria or Carola deposits. Tourmaline shows strong chemical zoning and has a composition of schorl-dravite with significant povondraite and uvite components. The observed boron isotope composition is fairly variable, between -10.4‰ and +6.0‰ with no major differences among the different deposits, suggesting a common genetic mechanism. The δ11B values are significantly lower than those of seawater or marine evaporites and very similar to those of younger porphyry copper deposits and volcanic rocks in the region, indicating that the boron has a common, likely magmatic, origin. The predominant boron source was ultimately dewatering of the subducting slab with a significant contribution derived from the overlying continental basement. The range of δ11B values is between those of the porphyry copper deposits and the porphyry tin deposits of the Andes, suggesting that the IOCG mineralization might be genetically related to fluids having more crustal contamination than the porphyry copper deposits; such an interpretation is at odds with current models that propose that the Andean IOCG deposits are related to juvenile melts or to the circulation of basinal brines. Furthermore, the obtained δ11B data are markedly different from those of the tourmaline in the Carajás IOCG district (Brazil), suggesting that IOCGs do not form by a unique mechanism involving only one type of fluids.

  11. Hydrothermal alteration and melting of the crust during the Columbia River Basalt-Snake River Plain transition and the origin of low-δ18O rhyolites of the central Snake River Plain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón, Dylan P.; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Ellis, Ben S.; Schmitt, Axel K.; Fisher, Christopher M.

    2015-05-01

    We present compelling isotopic evidence from ~15 Ma rhyolites that erupted coeval with the Columbia River Basalts in southwest Idaho's J-P Desert and the Jarbidge Mountains of northern Nevada at that suggests that the Yellowstone mantle plume caused hydrothermal alteration and remelting of diverse compositions of shallow crust in the area where they erupted. These rhyolites also constitute the earliest known Miocene volcanism in the vicinity of the Bruneau-Jarbidge and Twin Falls (BJTF) volcanic complexes, a major center of voluminous (103-104 km3) low-δ18O rhyolitic volcanism that was previously defined as being active from 13 to 6 Ma. The Jarbidge Rhyolite has above-mantle δ18O (δ18O of +7.9‰ SMOW) and extremely unradiogenic εHf (- 34.7) and εNd (- 24.0). By contrast, the J-P Desert units are lower in δ18O (+4.5 to 5.8‰), and have more moderately unradiogenic whole-rock εHf (- 20.3 to - 8.9) and εNd (- 13.4 to - 7.7). The J-P Desert rhyolites are geochemically and petrologically similar to the younger rhyolites of the BJTF center (the one exception being their high δ18O values), suggesting a common origin for J-P Desert and BJTF rhyolites. The presence of low-δ18O values and unradiogenic Nd and Hf isotopic compositions, both of which differ greatly from the composition of a mantle differentiate, indicate that some of these melts may be 50% or more melted crust by volume. Individual J-P Desert units have isotopically diverse zircons, with one lava containing zircons ranging from - 0.6‰ to + 6.5‰ in δ18O and from - 29.5 to - 2.8 in εHf. Despite this diversity, zircons all have Miocene U/Pb ages. The range of zircon compositions fingerprints the diversity of their source melts, which in turn allow us to determine the compositions of two crustal end-members which melted to form these rhyolites. These end-members are: 1) Archean basement with normal to high-δ18O and unradiogenic εHf and 2) hydrothermally altered, shallow, young crust with low

  12. SHRIMP U–Pb and REE data pertaining to the origins of xenotime in Belt Supergroup rocks: evidence for ages of deposition, hydrothermal alteration, and metamorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinikoff, John N.; Lund, Karen; Fanning, C. Mark

    2015-01-01

    The Belt–Purcell Supergroup, northern Idaho, western Montana, and southern British Columbia, is a thick succession of Mesoproterozoic sedimentary rocks with an age range of about 1470–1400 Ma. Stratigraphic layers within several sedimentary units were sampled to apply the new technique of U–Pb dating of xenotime that sometimes forms as rims on detrital zircon during burial diagenesis; xenotime also can form epitaxial overgrowths on zircon during hydrothermal and metamorphic events. Belt Supergroup units sampled are the Prichard and Revett Formations in the lower Belt, and the McNamara and Garnet Range Formations and Pilcher Quartzite in the upper Belt. Additionally, all samples that yielded xenotime were also processed for detrital zircon to provide maximum age constraints for the time of deposition and information about provenances; the sample of Prichard Formation yielded monazite that was also analyzed. Ten xenotime overgrowths from the Prichard Formation yielded a U–Pb age of 1458 ± 4 Ma. However, because scanning electron microscope – backscattered electrons (SEM–BSE) imagery suggests complications due to possible analysis of multiple age zones, we prefer a slightly older age of 1462 ± 6 Ma derived from the three oldest samples, within error of a previous U–Pb zircon age on the syn-sedimentary Plains sill. We interpret the Prichard xenotime as diagenetic in origin. Monazite from the Prichard Formation, originally thought to be detrital, yielded Cretaceous metamorphic ages. Xenotime from the McNamara and Garnet Range Formations and Pilcher Quartzite formed at about 1160– 1050 Ma, several hundred million years after deposition, and probably also experienced Early Cretaceous growth. These xenotime overgrowths are interpreted as metamorphic–diagenetic in origin (i.e., derived during greenschist facies metamorphism elsewhere in the basin, but deposited in sub-greenschist facies rocks). Several xenotime grains are older detrital grains of igneous

  13. Oxygen isotope exchange kinetics of mineral pairs in closed and open systems: Applications to problems of hydrothermal alteration of igneous rocks and Precambrian iron formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, R.T.; Criss, R.E.; Taylor, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    The systematics of stable-isotope exchange between minerals and fluids are examined in the context of modal mineralogical variations and mass-balance considerations, both in closed and in open systems. On mineral-pair ??18O plots, samples from terranes that have exchanged with large amounts of fluid typically map out steep positively-sloped non-equilibrium arrays. Analytical models are derived to explain these effects; these models allow for different exchange rates between the various minerals and the external fluids, as well as different fluid fluxes. The steep arrays are adequately modelled by calculated isochron lines that involve the whole family of possible exchange trajectories. These isochrons have initially-steep near-vertical positive slopes that rotate toward a 45?? equilibrium slope as the exchange process proceeds to completion. The actual data-point array is thus analogous to the hand of an "isotopic clock" that measures the duration of the hydrothermal episode. The dimensionless ratio of the volumetric fluid flux to the kinetic rate parameter ( u k) determines the shape of each individual exchange trajectory. In a fluid-buffered system ( u k ??? 1), the solutions to the equations: (1) are independent of the mole fractions of the solid phases; (2) correspond to Taylor's open-system water/rock equation; and (3) yield straight-line isochrons that have slopes that approach 1 f, where f is the fraction reacted of the more sluggishly exchanging mineral. The isochrons for this simple exchange model are closely congruent with the isochrons calculated for all of the more complex models, thereby simplifying the application of theory to actual hydrothermal systems in nature. In all of the models an order of magnitude of time (in units of kt) separates steep non-equilibrium arrays (e.g., slope ??? 10) from arrays approaching an equilibrium slope of unity on a ??-?? diagram. Because we know the approximate lifetimes of many hydrothermal systems from geologic and

  14. Application of fractal modeling and PCA method for hydrothermal alteration mapping in the Saveh area (Central Iran based on ASTER multispectral data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Ahmadfaraj

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is determination and separation of alteration zones using Concentration-Area (C-A fractal model based on remote sensing data which has been extracted from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER images. The studied area is on the SW part of Saveh, 1:250,000 geological map, which is located in Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic belt, Central Iran. The pixel values were computed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA method used to determine phyllic, argillic, and propylitic alteration zones. The C-A fractal model is utilized for separation of different parts of alteration zones due to their intensity. The log-log C-A plots reveal multifractal nature for phyllic, argillic, and propylitic alteration zones. The obtained results based on fractal model show that the main trend of the alteration zones is in NW-SE direction. Compared to the geological map of the study area and copper mineralizations, the alteration zones have been detected properly and correlate with the mineral occurrences, intrusive rock, and faults.

  15. Recovery of palladium, cesium, and selenium from heavy metal alkali borosilicate glass by combination of heat treatment and leaching processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhanglian; Okada, Takashi, E-mail: t-okada@u-fukui.ac.jp; Nishimura, Fumihiro; Yonezawa, Susumu

    2017-06-05

    Highlights: • A separation technique of both noble and less noble metal from glass is studied. • Via reductive heat treatment, 80% of palladium is extracted in liquid bismuth. • Sodium–potassium-rich materials with cesium and selenium are phase separated. • From the materials, over 80% of cesium and selenium are extracted in water. - Abstract: Reductive heat-treatment and leaching process were applied to a simulated lead or bismuth soda-potash-borosilicate glass with palladium, cesium, and selenium to separate these elements. In the reductive heat treatment, palladium is extracted in liquid heavy metal phase generated by the reduction of the heavy metal oxides, whereas cesium and selenium are concentrated in phase separated Na–K-rich materials on the glass surface. From the materials, cesium and selenium can be extracted in water, and the selenium extraction was higher in the treatment of the bismuth containing glass. The chemical forms of palladium in the glass affected the extraction efficiencies of cesium and selenium. Among the examined conditions, in the bismuth glass treatment, the cesium and selenium extraction efficiencies in water were over 80%, and that of palladium in liquid bismuth was over 80%.

  16. Hydrothermal Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, E.; Havig, J.; Windman, T.; Meyer-Dombard, D.; Michaud, A.; Hartnett, H.

    2006-12-01

    Life in hot spring ecosystems is confronted with diverse challenges, and the responses to those challenges have dynamic biogeochemical consequences over narrow spatial and temporal scales. Within meters along hot spring outflow channels at Yellowstone, temperatures drop from boiling, and the near-boiling conditions of hot chemolithotrophic communities, to those that permit photosynthesis and on down to conditions where nematodes and insects graze on the edges of photosynthetic mats. Many major and trace element concentrations change only mildly in the water that flows through the entire ecosystem, while concentrations of other dissolved constituents (oxygen, sulfide, ammonia, total organic carbon) increase or decrease dramatically. Concentrations of metals and micronutrients range from toxic to inadequate for enzyme synthesis depending on the choice of hot spring. Precipitation of minerals may provide continuous growth of microbial niches, while dissolution and turbulent flow sweeps them away. Consequently, microbial communities change at the meter scale, and even more abruptly at the photosynthetic fringe. Isotopic compositions of carbon and nitrogen in microbial biomass reflect dramatic and continuous changes in metabolic strategies throughout the system. Chemical energy sources that support chemolithotrophic communities can persist at abundant or useless levels, or change dramatically owing to microbial activity. The rate of temporal change depends on the selection of hot spring systems for study. Some have changed little since our studies began in 1999. Others have shifted by two or more units in pH over several years, with corresponding changes in other chemical constituents. Some go through daily or seasonal desiccation cycles, and still others exhibit pulses of changing temperature (up to 40°C) within minutes. Taken together, hydrothermal ecosystems provide highly manageable opportunities for testing how biogeochemical processes respond to the scale of

  17. Hydrothermal Alteration of Glass from Underground Nuclear Tests: Formation and Transport of Pu-clay Colloids at the Nevada National Security Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zhao, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Joseph, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Begg, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Boggs, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dai, Z. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kersting, A. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-05-27

    across a range of temperatures (25-200 °C) that represent hydrothermal conditions representative of the underground nuclear test cavities (when groundwater has re-saturated the nuclear melt glass and glass dissolution occurs). Colloid loads and Pu concentrations were monitored along with the mineralogy of both the colloids and the secondary mineral phases. The intent was to establish an upper limit for Pu concentrations at the NNSS, provide context regarding the Pu concentrations observed at the NNSS to date and the Pu concentrations that may be observed in the future. The results provide a conceptual model for the risks posed by Pu migration at the NNSS.

  18. Field and geochemical characterisitics of the Mesoarchean (~3075 ma) Ivisaartoq greenstone belt, southern West Greenland: Evidence for seafloor hydrothermal alteration in a supra-subduction oceanic crust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polat, A.; Appel, P.W.U.; Frei, Robert

    2006-01-01

    The Mesoarchean (ca. 3075 Ma) Ivisaartoq greenstone belt in southern West Greenland includes variably deformed and metamorphosed pillow basalts, ultramafic flows (picrites), serpentinized ultramafic rocks, gabbros, sulphide-rich siliceous layers, and minor siliciclastic sedimentary rocks. Primary...... magmatic features such as concentric cooling-cracks and drainage cavities in pillows, volcanic breccia, ocelli interpreted as liquid immiscibility textures in pillows and gabbros, magmatic layering in gabbros, and clinopyroxene cumulates in ultramafic flows are well preserved in low-strain domains....... The belt underwent at least two stages of calc-silicate metasomatic alteration and polyphase deformation between 2963 and 3075 Ma. The stage I metasomatic assemblage is composed predominantly of epidote (now mostly diopside) + quartz + plagioclase ± hornblende ± scapolite, and occurs mainly in pillow cores...

  19. Hydrothermal alteration, fluid inclusions and stable isotope systematics of the Alvo 118 iron oxide-copper-gold deposit, Carajás Mineral Province (Brazil): Implications for ore genesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresi, Ignacio; Xavier, Roberto Perez; Bortholoto, Diego F. A.; Monteiro, Lena V. S.

    2012-03-01

    The Alvo 118 iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) deposit (170 Mt at 1.0 wt.% Cu, 0.3 g/t Au) lies in the southern sector of the Itacaúnas Shear Belt, Carajás Mineral Province, along a WNW-ESE-striking, 60-km-long shear zone, close to the contact of the ~2.76-Ga metavolcano-sedimentary Itacaiúnas Supergroup and the basement (~3.0 Ga Xingu Complex). The Alvo 118 deposit is hosted by mafic and felsic metavolcanic rocks and crosscutting granitoid and gabbro intrusions that have been subjected to the following hydrothermal alteration sequence towards the ore zones: (1) poorly developed sodic alteration (albite and scapolite); (2) potassic alteration (biotite or K-feldspar) accompanied by magnetite formation and silicification; (3) widespread, pervasive chlorite alteration spatially associated with quartz-carbonate-sulphide infill ore breccia and vein stockworks; and (4) local post-ore quartz-sericite alteration. The ore assemblage is dominated by chalcopyrite (~60%), bornite (~10%), hematite (~20%), magnetite (10%) and subordinate chalcocite, native gold, Au-Ag tellurides, galena, cassiterite, F-rich apatite, xenotime, monazite, britholite-(Y) and a gadolinite-group mineral. Fluid inclusion studies in quartz point to a fluid regime composed of two distinct fluid types that may have probably coexisted within the timeframe of the Cu-Au mineralizing episode: a hot (>200°C) saline (32.8‰ to 40.6 wt.% NaCl eq.) solution, represented by salt-bearing aqueous inclusions, and a lower temperature (aqueous fluid defined by two-phase (LH2O + VH2O) fluid inclusions. This trend is very similar to those defined for other IOCG systems of the Carajás Mineral Province. δ 18OH2O values in equilibrium with calcite (-1.0‰ to 7.5‰ at 277°C to 344°C) overlap the lower range for primary magmatic waters, but the more 18O-depleted values also point to the involvement of externally derived fluids, possibly of meteoric origin. Furthermore, sulphide δ 34S values (5.1‰ to 6.3

  20. Characterization and modelling of fluid flows in fissured and fractured media. relation with hydrothermal alterations and paleo-stress quantification; Caracterisation et modelisation des ecoulements fluides en milieu fissure. relation avec les alterations hydrothermales et quantification des paleocontraintes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sausse, J.

    1998-10-15

    In all materials (rocks, concretes, ceramics,...), the presence of fractures at different scales implies high permeability and often oriented fluid flows. These fluid circulations in fractures induce more or less intense fluid-rock interactions with mineral crystallisation and/or dissolution. These phenomena directly depend on the nature of the fluids and the rocks, the physical and chemical properties of the media and the rate of fluid renewal (permeabilities). Usually, the development of such alterations leads to a massive sealing of the fractures (vein alterations) and of the fissures (fluid inclusion planes and microcracks, pervasive alteration). Therefore, their study brings us precious indications for the understanding of the mechanisms of fluid migrations in fossil systems. A geometrical study of the fracture systems at micro or macroscopic scales, based on the spatial distribution of sealing minerals, is applied to two different granites: the Soultz-sous-Foret granite (Bas-Rhin, France) and the Brezouard granite (Vosges, France). At the macroscopic scale, a new graphical method is proposed in order to study drilling data (Soultz granite). It allows to identify the presence of three independent mineral associations (quartz - illite, calcite-chlorite and hematite) in independent fracture systems characterised by a specific 3D geometry and hydraulic properties. These three types of vein alteration correspond to distinct and non contemporaneous fluid percolations. At the microscopic scale, the reconstitution of crack opening - fluid percolation - crack sealing stages is delicate. However, the study of their geometrical characteristics (orientations, radius, volume densities) and thereby the quantification of their porosities, exchange surfaces and permeabilities, allow to identify their respective roles in the fluid propagation. These microstructures, which are very numerous in granites, imply high but variable matrix permeabilities. This has been confirmed by

  1. Chemical environments of submarine hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1992-01-01

    determinations rely on studies of pieces of deep oceanic crust uplifted by tectonic forces such as along the Southwest Indian Ridge, or more complete sections of oceanic crust called ophiolite sequences which are presently exposed on continents owing to tectonic emplacement. Much of what is thought to happen in submarine hydrothermal systems is inferred from studies of ophiolite sequences, and especially from the better-exposed ophiolites in Oman, Cyprus and North America. The focus of much that follows is on a few general features: pressure, temperature, oxidation states, fluid composition and mineral alteration, because these features will control whether organic synthesis can occur in hydrothermal systems.

  2. rights reserved Geophysical Identification of Hydrothermally Altered ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    The Schist Belts comprise low grade, meta-sediment-dominated belts which are best developed in the western half of. Nigeria. These belts are considered to be Upper. Proterozoic supracrustal rocks which have been infolded into the migmatite-gneiss-quartzite complex. Most metallogenetic features of the Schist belts are.

  3. Early Archaean hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, S. T.; Nijman, W.

    2003-04-01

    Although many people have written about hydrothermal systems in the early Earth, little real evidence is available. New data from the Barberton greenstone belt (South Africa) and greenstone belts of the East Pilbara (Western Australia), provide proof of the existence and nature of hydrothermal systems in the Early Archaean (around 3.4 Ga). Detailed field relationships between vein systems, host rock and overlying sediments are combined with data from fluid inclusions studies on quartz fills in the sediments. An intimate relationship between chert veins and the overlying sediments has been established (the veins are syn-sedimentary). The salinity and temperature of the fluids in the inclusions shows that these are of hydrothermal origin. Similar types of hydrothermal systems, of approximately the same age, have been found at different locations; in the Barberton greenstone belt and at various locations in the East Pilbara. The setting of these hydrothermal systems is not always identical however. Although a felsic substratum is more common, in the North Pole area (Pilbara) the hydrothermal systems rise from a basaltic substratum. In the Barberton greenstone belt, the systems are closely related to shallow intrusive (felsic) bodies. The study of these ancient hydrothermal systems forms an important framework for studies of early life on Earth. This study forms part of an international project on Earth's Earliest Sedimentary Basins, supported by the Foundation Dr. Schürmannfonds.

  4. Hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse; Rudolf, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    This article reviews the hydrothermal liquefaction of biomass with the aim of describing the current status of the technology. Hydrothermal liquefaction is a medium-temperature, high-pressure thermochemical process, which produces a liquid product, often called bio-oil or bi-crude. During...... the hydrothermal liquefaction process, the macromolecules of the biomass are first hydrolyzed and/or degraded into smaller molecules. Many of the produced molecules are unstable and reactive and can recombine into larger ones. During this process, a substantial part of the oxygen in the biomass is removed...... by dehydration or decarboxylation. The chemical properties of bio-oil are highly dependent of the biomass substrate composition. Biomass constitutes of various components such as protein; carbohydrates, lignin and fat, and each of them produce distinct spectra of compounds during hydrothermal liquefaction...

  5. Evolution evidence of a basic fluid to an acid based in the analysis of hydrothermal alteration of the geothermic field of the Azufres, Michoacan; Evidencias de evolucion de un fluido basico a acido a partir del analisis de la alteracion hidrotermal del campo geotermico de los Azufres, Michoacan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Partida, Eduardo [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    Hydrothermal alteration at the Los Azufres geothermal field is mostly composed of calc-silicate minerals that define a propylitic alteration zone, which shows progressive dehydration with depth and temperature increase. A generalized zoning of the calc-silicate zone can be observed, with zeolites in the upper part and epidote-clinozoisite at the deepest levels. An argillic alteration zone overlies the calc-silicate zone and is the dominant surface manifestation of the hydrothermal alteration. In some parts, there is a mineral assemblage composed of kaolinite-alunite-native sulfur-quartz (advanced argillic zone) formed by the interaction of vapor and shallow groundwater. The proto-fluid at the Los Azufres geothermal system is related to a neutral sodium chlorine brine, which favors deep propyllitic alteration (productive zone). This zone is characterized by secondary permeability due to fracturing. At depth the geothermal field is dominated by a pressurized liquid, yielding to vapor at more shallow zone. The gradual change from a liquid to a vapor phase occurs through boiling at depths between 1,200 and 1,500 m, and is accompanied by changes in the hydrothermal alteration mineralogy. The type of alteration passes from proylitic to argillic by means of an oxidation-acidification process, which includes the participation of a gas, particularly CO{sub 2}. Considering the physicochemical characteristic of the brine and the evolution of the paragenetic sequence, the Los Azufres geothermal field could de considered a model for hydrothermal behavior at ore deposits which develop by boiling and oxidation of low sulfidation fossil hydrothermal fluids. [Spanish] En el campo geotermico de Los Azufres la zona de alteracion hidrotermal esta formada en su mayor parte por calcosilicatos (que definen una zona paragenetica del tipo propilitico), los cuales muestran una deshidratacion progresiva conforme se va profundizando e incrementandose la temperatura. Se puede generalizar un

  6. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2015-05-31

    The term “hydrothermal” used here refers to the processing of biomass in water slurries at elevated temperature and pressure to facilitate the chemical conversion of the organic structures in biomass into useful fuels. The process is meant to provide a means for treating wet biomass materials without drying and to access ionic reaction conditions by maintaining a liquid water processing medium. Typical hydrothermal processing conditions are 523-647K of temperature and operating pressures from 4-22 MPa of pressure. The temperature is sufficient to initiate pyrolytic mechanisms in the biopolymers while the pressure is sufficient to maintain a liquid water processing phase. Hydrothermal gasification is accomplished at the upper end of the process temperature range. It can be considered an extension of the hydrothermal liquefaction mechanisms that begin at the lowest hydrothermal conditions with subsequent decomposition of biopolymer fragments formed in liquefaction to smaller molecules and eventually to gas. Typically, hydrothermal gasification requires an active catalyst to accomplish reasonable rates of gas formation from biomass.

  7. The Lassen hydrothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, Steven E.; Bergfeld, Deborah; Clor, Laura; Evans, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The active Lassen hydrothermal system includes a central vapor-dominated zone or zones beneath the Lassen highlands underlain by ~240 °C high-chloride waters that discharge at lower elevations. It is the best-exposed and largest hydrothermal system in the Cascade Range, discharging 41 ± 10 kg/s of steam (~115 MW) and 23 ± 2 kg/s of high-chloride waters (~27 MW). The Lassen system accounts for a full 1/3 of the total high-temperature hydrothermal heat discharge in the U.S. Cascades (140/400 MW). Hydrothermal heat discharge of ~140 MW can be supported by crystallization and cooling of silicic magma at a rate of ~2400 km3/Ma, and the ongoing rates of heat and magmatic CO2 discharge are broadly consistent with a petrologic model for basalt-driven magmatic evolution. The clustering of observed seismicity at ~4–5 km depth may define zones of thermal cracking where the hydrothermal system mines heat from near-plastic rock. If so, the combined areal extent of the primary heat-transfer zones is ~5 km2, the average conductive heat flux over that area is >25 W/m2, and the conductive-boundary length summit of Lassen Peak. However, there is a rich record of intermittent hydrothermal measurement over the past several decades and more-frequent measurement 2009–present. These data reveal sensitivity to climate and weather conditions, seasonal variability that owes to interaction with the shallow hydrologic system, and a transient 1.5- to twofold increase in high-chloride discharge in response to an earthquake swarm in mid-November 2014.

  8. Hydrothermal energy development projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibello, E. G.

    The development of hydrothermal energy for direct heat applications is being accelerated by twenty-two demonstration projects that are funded on a cost sharing basis by the US Department of Energy, Division of Geothermal Energy. These projects are designed to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of the direct use of hydrothermal resources in the United States. Engineering and economic data for the projects are summarized. The data and experience being generated by these projects will serve as an important basis for future direct heat development.

  9. Complexing and hydrothermal ore deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Helgeson, Harold C

    1964-01-01

    Complexing and Hydrothermal Ore Deposition provides a synthesis of fact, theory, and interpretative speculation on hydrothermal ore-forming solutions. This book summarizes information and theory of the internal chemistry of aqueous electrolyte solutions accumulated in previous years. The scope of the discussion is limited to those aspects of particular interest to the geologist working on the problem of hydrothermal ore genesis. Wherever feasible, fundamental principles are reviewed. Portions of this text are devoted to calculations of specific hydrothermal equilibriums in multicompone

  10. Impact-generated Hydrothermal Activity at the Chicxulub Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kring, D. A.; Zurcher, L.; Abramov, O.

    2007-05-01

    Borehole samples recovered from PEMEX exploration boreholes and an ICDP scientific borehole indicate the Chicxulub impact event generated hydrothermal alteration throughout a large volume of the Maya Block beneath the crater floor and extending across the bulk of the ~180 km diameter crater. The first indications of hydrothermal alteration were observed in the crater discovery samples from the Yucatan-6 borehole and manifest itself in the form of anhydrite and quartz veins. Continuous core from the Yaxcopoil-1 borehole reveal a more complex and temporally extensive alteration sequence: following a brief period at high temperatures, impact- melt-bearing polymict breccias and a thin, underlying unit of impact melt were subjected to metasomatism, producing alkali feldspar, sphene, apatite, and magnetite. As the system continued to cool, smectite-series phyllosilicates appeared. A saline solution was involved. Stable isotopes suggest the fluid was dominated by a basinal brine created mostly from existing groundwater of the Yucatan Peninsula, although contributions from down-welling water also occurred in some parts of the system. Numerical modeling of the hydrothermal system suggests circulation occurred for 1.5 to 2.3 Myr, depending on the permeability of the system. Our understanding of the hydrothermal system, however, is still crude. Additional core recovery projects, particularly into the central melt sheet, are needed to better evaluate the extent and duration of hydrothermal alteration.

  11. Hydrothermal conversion of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knezevic, D.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents research of hydrothermal conversion of biomass (HTC). In this process, hot compressed water (subcritical water) is used as the reaction medium. Therefore this technique is suitable for conversion of wet biomass/ waste streams. By working at high pressures, the evaporation of

  12. Application of hydrothermal method derived titanate nanotubes as adsorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-Kung; Liu, Shin-Shou; Chen, Huang-Chi

    2009-01-01

    Titanate nanotubes (TNT) derived from alkaline hydrothermal method are characterized by high specific surface area, specific pore volume, and ion-exchange capacity. They may be a promising and important adsorbent in the environmental protection. Although their applications in the fields of lithium ion batteries, dye-sensitized solar cell, photocatalysis, catalysts support, gas and humidity sensors, and ion exchange have been intensely studied during recent years, however, the researches concerning their potential application as an adsorbent are seldom reported. In this mini-review, we first highlight the effects of hydrothermal temperature and sodium content on the microstructures of hydrothermal method derived TNT, because the morphology and microstructure of TNT are highly dependent on the preparation conditions. Effects of the alterations of microstructures induced by the variation of hydrothermal temperature and sodium content on the dyes, heavy metal ions, and organic vapors adsorption characteristics of TNT are then introduced citing recent patents.

  13. The chemistry of hydrothermal magnetite: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadoll, Patrick; Angerer, Thomas; Mauk, Jeffrey L.; French, David; Walshe, John

    2014-01-01

    Magnetite (Fe3O4) is a well-recognized petrogenetic indicator and is a common accessory mineral in many ore deposits and their host rocks. Recent years have seen an increased interest in the use of hydrothermal magnetite for provenance studies and as a pathfinder for mineral exploration. A number of studies have investigated how specific formation conditions are reflected in the composition of the respective magnetite. Two fundamental questions underlie these efforts — (i) How can the composition of igneous and, more importantly, hydrothermal magnetite be used to discriminate mineralized areas from barren host rocks, and (ii) how can this assist exploration geologists to target ore deposits at greater and greater distances from the main mineralization? Similar to igneous magnetite, the most important factors that govern compositional variations in hydrothermal magnetite are (A) temperature, (B) fluid composition — element availability, (C) oxygen and sulfur fugacity, (D) silicate and sulfide activity, (E) host rock buffering, (F) re-equilibration processes, and (G) intrinsic crystallographic controls such as ionic radius and charge balance. We discuss how specific formation conditions are reflected in the composition of magnetite and review studies that investigate the chemistry of hydrothermal and igneous magnetite from various mineral deposits and their host rocks. Furthermore, we discuss the redox-related alteration of magnetite (martitization and mushketovitization) and mineral inclusions in magnetite and their effect on chemical analyses. Our database includes published and previously unpublished magnetite minor and trace element data for magnetite from (1) banded iron formations (BIF) and related high-grade iron ore deposits in Western Australia, India, and Brazil, (2) Ag–Pb–Zn veins of the Coeur d'Alene district, United States, (3) porphyry Cu–(Au)–(Mo) deposits and associated (4) calcic and magnesian skarn deposits in the southwestern United

  14. Regional mapping of hydrothermally altered igneous rocks along the Urumieh-Dokhtar, Chagai, and Alborz Belts of western Asia using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data and Interactive Data Language (IDL) logical operators: a tool for porphyry copper exploration and assessment: Chapter O in Global mineral resource assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, John L.; Zientek, M.L.; Hammarstrom, J.M.; Johnson, K.M.; Pierce, F.W.

    2014-01-01

    Regional maps of phyllic and argillic hydrothermal alteration were compiled using Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data and logical operator algorithms. The area mapped extends from northwestern Iran to southeastern Pakistan and includes volcanic and magmatic arcs that make up the Urumieh-Dokhtar volcanic belt (UDVB), the Chagai volcanic belt (CVB), and the central part of the Alborz magmatic belt (AMB). The volcanic belts span the Zagros-Makran transform zone and the present day Baluchistan (Makran) volcanic arc. ASTER visible near infrared (VNIR) data contain three bands between 0.52 and 0.86 micrometers (μm) and the short-wave infrared (SWIR) data consist of six bands spanning 1.6 to 2.43 μm with 15-meter (m), and 30-m resolution, respectively.

  15. Hydrothermal conversion of biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Knezevic, D.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents research of hydrothermal conversion of biomass (HTC). In this process, hot compressed water (subcritical water) is used as the reaction medium. Therefore this technique is suitable for conversion of wet biomass/ waste streams. By working at high pressures, the evaporation of water and high energy consumption that it requires can be avoided. The main focus of this work was HTC process aiming at production of transportation fuel intermediates. For this study, a new experime...

  16. Why neutron guides may end up breaking down? Some results on the macroscopic behaviour of alkali-borosilicate glass support plates under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffy, R.; Kreuz, M. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Beaucour, J., E-mail: beaucour@ill.fr [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Köster, U. [Institut Laue-Langevin, 71 avenue des Martyrs, CS 20156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Bermejo, F.J. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Serrano 123, E-20886 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we report on a first part of a study on the mechanisms leading to brittle fracture in neutron guides made of glass as structural element. Such devices are widely used to deliver thermal and cold neutron beams to experimental lines in most large neutron research facilities. We present results on macroscopic properties of samples of guide glass substrates which are subjected to neutron irradiation at relatively large fluences. The results show a striking dependence of some of the macroscopic properties such as density, shape or surface curvature upon the specific chemical composition of a given glass. The relevance of the present findings for the installation of either replacement guides at the existing facilities or for the deployment of instruments for ongoing projects such as the European Spallation Source is briefly discussed.

  17. Stable light isotope biogeochemistry of hydrothermal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Des Marais, D J

    1996-01-01

    The stable isotopic composition of the elements O, H, S and C in minerals and other chemical species can indicate the existence, extent, conditions and the processes (including biological activity) of hydrothermal systems. Hydrothermal alteration of the 18O/16O and D/H values of minerals can be used to detect fossil systems and delineate their areal extent. Water-rock interactions create isotopic signatures which indicate fluid composition, temperature, water-rock ratios, etc. The 18O/16O values of silica and carbonate deposits tend to increase with declining temperature and thus help to map thermal gradients. Measurements of D/H values can help to decipher the origin(s) of hydrothermal fluids. The 34S/32S and 13C/12C values of fluids and minerals reflect the origin of the S and C as well as oxygen fugacities and key redox processes. For example, a wide range of 34S/32S values which are consistent with equilibration below 100 degrees C between sulfide and sulfate can be attributed to sulfur metabolizing bacteria. Depending on its magnitude, the difference in the 13C/12C value of CO2 and carbonates versus organic carbon might be attributed either to equilibrium at hydrothermal temperatures or, if the difference exceeds 1% (10/1000), to organic biosynthesis. Along the thermal gradients of thermal spring outflows, the 13C/12C value of carbonates and 13C-depleted microbial organic carbon increases, principally due to the outgassing of relatively 13C-depleted CO2.

  18. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10

    Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international

  19. Geochemistry and strontium isotopic composition of mineralforming solutions of hydrothermal systems of southern Kamchatka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pampura, V.D.; Plyusnin, G.S.; Sandimirova, G.P.

    1980-01-01

    In order to understand the genesis of hydrothermal systems in the regions of recent volcanism, the chemical composition of hydrothermal waters was studied. In addition, the behavior of strontium in the process of hydrothermal alteration of volcanic aquifers was considered. The data on strontium isotopy for thermal waters, effusives and volcanic-sedimentary rocks of the Pauzhetka hydrothermal region are given. For depth-derived sodium-chloride hydrothermal waters /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr values lie within the range of 0.7033 to 0.7056. Significant differences of /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr values in seawater and sodium-chloride hydrothermal waters at all levels of their geochemical metamorphism were noted. This is considered to be evidence of the absence of seawater in the chemical composition of hydrothermal waters of the Pauzhetka type. To determine the cause of low /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr values of depth-derived sodium-chloride hydrothermal waters, the strontium isotopy of country rocks was studied and /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr = 0.702 to 0.705 have been determined. The data indicate the possibility that recent hydrothermal waters inherited a ratio of /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr = 0.703 to 0.704 at the aquifer level.

  20. Controls on the chemistry and temporal variability of seafloor hydrothermal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Damm, K. L.

    Hydrothermal activity at mid-ocean ridge spreading centers has an influence on all aspects of oceanography. The heat input from these systems affects the mid-depth circulation of the oceans, although the magnitude of this effect has not been rigorously quantified [Stommel, 1982]. The rising hydrothermal plumes also entrain deeper, and often saltier water, carrying it up in the water column thereby also affecting the thermohaline circulation of the oceans [Lupton et al., 1985]. The topography of the ridges may also influence deep circulation patterns. It is the inputs of heat and reduced chemical species from the hydrothermal systems that provide the energy for communities of chemosynthetic organisms, unknown prior to the discovery of venting. Hydrothermal activity also affects the chemistry of seawater by the direct addition and removal of various chemical species, and the more indirect scavenging of mid depth chemical constituents onto the Fe- and Mn-particles fanned in hydrothermal plumes. The composition of the oceanic crust is also changed by the addition and removal of chemical constituents as a result of hydrothermal alteration. Recycling of the oceanic crust into the Earth's mantle and the eventual transfer of some gases input by hydrothermal activity from the ocean to the atmosphere, extend the Influence of hydrothermal activity to beyond the oceans themselves. While the magnitude and importance of these linkages are still poorly quantified, we were unaware these linkages even existed prior to the discovery of seafloor hydrothermal systems.

  1. Evidence for Hesperian Impact-Induced Hydrothermalism on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, Giuseppe A.; Davila, Alfonso F.; Tornabene, Livio L.; Dohm, James M.; Fairen, Alberto G.; Gross, Christoph; Kneissl, Thomas; Bishop, Janice L.; Roush, Ted L.; McKay, Chris P.

    2010-01-01

    Several hydrated silicate deposits on Mars are observed within craters and are interpreted as excavated Noachian material. Toro crater (71.8 deg E, 17.0 deg N), located on the northern edge of the Syrtis Major Volcanic Plains, shows spectral and morphologic evidence of impact-induced hydrothermal activity. Spectroscopic observations were used to identify extensive hydrated silicate deposits, including prehnite, chlorites, smectites, and opaline material, a suite of phases that frequently results from hydrothermal alteration in terrestrial craters and also expected on Mars from geochemical modeling of hydrothermal environments. When combined with altimetry and high-resolution imaging data, these deposits appear associated predominantly with the central uplift and with portions of the northern part of the crater floor. Detailed geologic mapping of these deposits reveals geomorphic features that are consistent with hydrothermal activity that followed the impact event, including vent-like and conical mound structures, and a complex network of tectonic structures caused by fluid interactions such as fractures and joints. The crater age has been calculated from the cumulative crater size-frequency distributions and is found to be Early Hesperian. The evidence presented here provides support for impact-induced hydrothermal activity in Toro crater, that extends phyllosilicate formation processes beyond the Noachian era.

  2. Magnetic properties and opaque mineralogy of rocks from selected seafloor hydrothermal sites at oceanic ridges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, A.L. (Univ. of Miami, FL (United States) NOAA, Miami, FL (United States)); Harrison, C.G.A. (Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)); Rona, P.A. (NOAA, Miami, FL (United States)); Haggerty, S.E. (Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst (United States))

    1990-08-10

    Magnetic properties (natural remanent magnetization, susceptibility, Curie point temperature, saturation isothermal remanent magnetization, and Koeenigsberger ratio) and opaque mineralogy were determined for basalts, diabases, gabbros, peridotites, and serpentinites collected by dredging and submersible from the rift valley at five hydrothermal sites (the Snake Pit hydrothermal field, the Tag hydrothermal field on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and the Sea Cliff hydrothermal field on the northern Gorda Ridge). Evidence for unequivocal magnetic mineral modification by hydrothermal action is present only in a small percentage of extrusive basalts but is pervasive in diabases, gabbros, and ultramafic rocks. The studies reveal distinct correlations between magnetization intensity, thermomagnetic behavior, and magnetic mineralogy, grain size, style, and intensity of alteration and rock type. Layer 2A basalts are the source of median valley magnetic anomalies. The magnetic source may shift from the surface to deeper horizons with progressive seafloor aging and enhanced deuteric oxidation in layer 2B dikes and layer 3 gabbros and the formation of magnetite in derpentinized peridotites. This shift is influenced by fluctuations in the Curie isotherm related to the duration of active magma chambers and convective hydrothermal cells. The magnetic and mineralogic properties of oceanic rocks determined show the effects of a wide range of alteration processes that are variously related to depth in oceanic lithosphere, magmatic cooling history, and hydrothermal circulation.

  3. Comparative assessment of five potential sites for hydrothermal magma systems: geochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, A.F.

    1980-08-01

    A brief discussion is given of the geochemical objectives and questions that must be addressed in such an evaluation. A summary of the currently published literature that is pertinent in answering these questions is presented for each of the five areas: The Geysers-Clear Lake region, Long Valley, Rio Grand Rift, Roosevelt Hot Springs, and the Salton Trough. The major geochemical processes associated with proposed hydrothermal sites are categorized into three groups for presentation: geochemistry of magma and associated volcanic rocks, geochemistry of hydrothermal solutions, and geochemistry of hydrothermal alteration. (MHR)

  4. Hydrothermal processes related to some Triassic and Jurassic submarine basaltic complexes in northeastern Hungary, the Dinarides and Hellenides

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gabriella B Kiss; Ferenc Molnár; Ladislav A Palinkas

    2016-01-01

      Comparative studies on hydrothermal alteration of submarine peperitic basalt occurrences related to the Triassic early rifting of the Neotethys were carried out in various parts of the Dinarides and Hellenides...

  5. Hydrothermal pretreatment of coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ross, D.S.

    1989-12-21

    We have examined changes in Argonne Premium samples of Wyodak coal following 30 min treatment in liquid water at autogenous pressures at 150{degrees}, 250{degrees}, and 350{degrees}C. In most runs the coal was initially dried at 60{degrees}C/1 torr/20 hr. The changes were monitored by pyrolysis field ionization mass spectrometry (py-FIMS) operating at 2.5{degrees}C/min from ambient to 500{degrees}C. We recorded the volatility patterns of the coal tars evolved over that temperature range, and in all cases the tar yields were 25%--30% of the starting coal on mass basis. There was essentially no change after the 150{degrees}C treatment. Small increases in volatility were seen following the 250{degrees}C treatment, but major effects were seen in the 350{degrees} work. The tar quantity remained unchanged; however, the volatility increased so the temperature of half volatility for the as-received coal of 400{degrees}C was reduced to 340{degrees}C. Control runs with no water showed some thermal effect, but the net effect from the presence of liquid water was clearly evident. The composition was unchanged after the 150{degrees} and 250{degrees}C treatments, but the 350{degrees} treatment brought about a 30% loss of oxygen. The change corresponded to loss of the elements of water, although loss of OH'' seemed to fit the analysis data somewhat better. The water loss takes place both in the presence and in the absence of added water, but it is noteworthy that the loss in the hydrothermal runs occurs at p(H{sub 2}O) = 160 atm. We conclude that the process must involve the dehydration solely of chemically bound elements of water, the dehydration of catechol is a specific, likely candidate.

  6. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the production of HCl and some metal chlorides in magmatic/hydrothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    In the calculations we have assumed that all apatites are magmatic. The presence of chlorite and altered plagioclase within the granite and quartz-monzodiorite suggests that alteration may play a role in leading to erroneous estimates of initial melt Cl and F for 2 reasons: (1) the apatites may in fact not be magmatic in origin, but are hydrothermal, and (2) the halogen signature of magmatic apatite may be changed due to subsolidus exchange with a hydrothermal fluid. We are currently endeavoring to develop criteria for determining whether apatite composition represents earlier or later stages of magmatic-hydrothermal development.

  7. Surface and subsurface hydrothermal flow pathways at Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham Wall, B. R.

    2005-12-01

    During summer 2003 at Yellowstone's Norris Geyser Basin notable changes were observed in the discharge of heat and steam, creating new thermal features, dying vegetation, and the consequent closure of trails to protect public safety. In order to interpret data collected from GPS, seismic, and temperature instruments deployed in response to the increased hydrothermal activity, a study has been undertaken to provide a more complete knowledge of the spatial distribution of subsurface fluid conduits. Geologic data, including mapped outcrops, aerial imagery, thermal infrared imagery, and subsurface core, indicate that fracture pathways in the Lava Creek Tuff (LCT) channel flow in the hydrothermal system. These data show clear evidence that NE-SW and NW-SE trending structures provide major flow pathways at Norris. By mapping fracture sets in outcrops of LCT with varied degrees of hydrothermal alteration, one can consistently identify fractures that localize hydrothermal fluid flow, alteration, and the geometry of surface thermal features. Alteration is characterized by acid leaching that quickly alters LCT mafic minerals and glassy groundmass, which in outcrop is recognized by corroded and disaggregated LCT with local secondary mineral deposition. Mapping the sequence from unaltered to altered LCT has identified vertical cooling joints as primary conduits for hydrothermal fluids. These vertical joints correlate with the NE-SW trending geomorphic expression of the LCT in this area, and parallel the adjacent caldera boundary. Horizontal fractures parallel depositional stratigraphy, and in core from drill holes Y-9 (248 m) and Y-12 (332 m) appear to initiate at collapsed vapor-phase cavities or regions of altered fiamme. Vertical fractures in the core show sequences of hydrothermal minerals locally derived from water-rock interaction that line fracture walls, characteristic of mineral deposition associated with repeat reactivation. Although the hydrothermal system is

  8. Hydrothermal precipitation of artificial violarite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, W. H.; Toftlund, H.; Warner, T. E.

    2012-01-01

    The nonstoichiometric nickel-ore mineral, violarite, (Ni,Fe)3S4 was prepared as a phase-pure fine powder by a comparatively quick hydrothermal method from an aqueous solution of iron(II) acetate, nickel(II) acetate and DL-penicillamine in an autoclave at 130 °C for 45 h. Powder-XRD showed that th...

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and luminescent ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    methods, hydrothermal synthesis allows excellent control over particle size, shape, distribution and crystallinity of the material. Synthesis is conducted in a ... terns were recorded on Tecnai G2 S-twin transmission elec- tron microscope with field emission gun operating at 200 kV. Samples for TEM measurements were ...

  10. Hydrothermal alteration studies of gabbros from Northern Central ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    clasts even sometimes twins in plagioclase bend with tapering ends and curvy due to ... (c) Deformed twins within plagioclase porphyroclast (shape preferred orientation subparallel to the foliation). Matrix composed of fine grained ..... clast are also enriched in MnO (up to 0.64wt%). Clinopyroxene is comparatively rich in iron ...

  11. Zinc stannate nanostructures: hydrothermal synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunandan Baruah and Joydeep Dutta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured binary semiconducting metal oxides have received much attention in the last decade owing to their unique properties rendering them suitable for a wide range of applications. In the quest to further improve the physical and chemical properties, an interest in ternary complex oxides has become noticeable in recent times. Zinc stannate or zinc tin oxide (ZTO is a class of ternary oxides that are known for their stable properties under extreme conditions, higher electron mobility compared to its binary counterparts and other interesting optical properties. The material is thus ideal for applications from solar cells and sensors to photocatalysts. Among the different methods of synthesizing ZTO nanostructures, the hydrothermal method is an attractive green process that is carried out at low temperatures. In this review, we summarize the conditions leading to the growth of different ZTO nanostructures using the hydrothermal method and delve into a few of its applications reported in the literature.

  12. Hydrothermal stability of zirconia ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, D.Y. [Daelim College of Technology, Anyang (Korea); Gogotsi, G.A. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kiev (Uzbekistan); Kim, D.J. [Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea); Park, N.J. [Kumho National University of Technology, Kumi (Korea)

    2002-02-01

    3 mol% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} partially-Stabilized Zirconia single Crystals (PSZCs) containing a small quantity (<0.5%) of rare-earth oxides (CeO{sub 2}, Tb{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were prepared by using a direct high-frequency skull melting technique to evaluate hydrothermal stability in an autoclave. Pole figure measurements indicate that both CeO{sub 2} and Tb{sub 2}O{sub 3} containing specimens prepared by the skull melting are single crystals. PSZCs exhibited no t{yields}m phase transformation during aging for 5 h at temperatures from 150 to 250 deg. C and 4 MPa water vapor pressure in an autoclave, resulting in excellent hydrothermal stability. (author). 19 refs., 1 tab., 4 figs.

  13. Hydrothermal alteration zones and present reservoir conditions: an approach to define production zones at the eastern portion of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, BC; Zonas de alteracion hidrotermal y condiciones actuales del yacimiento: un enfoque para determinar zonas productoras al oriente del campo geotermico de Cerro Prieto, BC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho Hernandez, Juan Manuel [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Residencia General de Cerro Prieto, Mexicali, Baja California (Mexico)]. E-mail: juan.camacho02@cfe.gob.mx

    2009-07-15

    Geological factors are as essential for locating new wells as they are for defining the production zones of these wells. At the Cerro Prieto geothermal field (CGCP), one of the most important geological factors is identification of the hydrothermal alteration zones (ZAH). These are divided into silica and epidote mineralogical zones (ZMSE), without CaCO{sub 3}, and silica and epidote mineralogical transition zones (ZTMSE), with CaCO{sub 3}. It has been observed that the continuous variation of reservoir thermodynamic conditions (temperature, pressure and enthalpy) is due mainly to the exploitation of geothermal resources. The presence of new thermodynamic conditions recorded at the reservoir has led to the re-location of production wells originally located during the drilling campaign of 2004 to 2006. At the geological sections on the eastern part of the CGCP, adjustments made to the well completions lie on the limits between the ZMSE and ZTMSE zones. In turn, this is related to the current, superior, thermodynamic reservoir conditions. Based on this, a new geologic approach is proposed to define possible production zones for new wells, relating the ZAH zones to current thermodynamic reservoir conditions. [Spanish] Los factores geologicos son determinantes, tanto para establecer nuevos sitios de perforacion como para determinar el intervalo productor de un pozo nuevo. En el campo geotermico de Cerro Prieto (CGCP) una de los factores mas importantes es la determinacion de las zonas de alteracion hidrotermal (ZAH) que se dividen en dos: zona mineralogica de silice y epidota (ZMSE), sin presencia de CaCO{sub 3}, y zona de transicion mineralogica de silice y epidota (ZTMSE), con presencia de CaCO{sub 3}. Por otra parte, tambien se ha constatado que la continua variacion de las condiciones termodinamicas del yacimiento (temperatura, presion y entalpia) es originada en buena medida por la explotacion del recurso geotermico. La ocurrencia de nuevas condiciones

  14. Hydrothermal speleogenesis in carbonates and metasomatic silicites induced by subvolcanic intrusions: a case study from the Štiavnické vrchy Mountains, Slovakia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Bella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several caves of hydrothermal origin in crystalline limestones and metasomatic silicites were investigated in the central zone of the Štiavnica stratovolcano, Štiavnické vrchy Mountains, central Slovakia. Evidence of hydrothermal origin includes irregular spherical cave morphology sculptured by ascending thermal water, occurrence of large calcite crystals and hydrothermal alteration of host rocks, including hydrothermal clays. The early phases of speleogenesis in the crystalline limestone near Sklené Teplice Spa were caused by post-magmatic dissolution linked either to the emplacement of subvolcanic granodiorite intrusions during Late Badenian time or to the spatially associated Late Sarmatian epithermal system. Speleogenesis in metasomatic silicites in the Šobov area is related to hydrothermal processes associated with the pre-caldera stage of the Štiavnica stratovolcano in Late Badenian. Both localities are remarkable examples of hydrothermal speleogenesis associated with Miocene volcanic and magmatic activity in the Western Carpathians.

  15. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the production of HCl and some metal chlorides in magmatic/hydrothermal systems. Annual report, 1991--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-31

    In the calculations we have assumed that all apatites are magmatic. The presence of chlorite and altered plagioclase within the granite and quartz-monzodiorite suggests that alteration may play a role in leading to erroneous estimates of initial melt Cl and F for 2 reasons: (1) the apatites may in fact not be magmatic in origin, but are hydrothermal, and (2) the halogen signature of magmatic apatite may be changed due to subsolidus exchange with a hydrothermal fluid. We are currently endeavoring to develop criteria for determining whether apatite composition represents earlier or later stages of magmatic-hydrothermal development.

  16. Comparison between the chemistry of igneous and hydrothermal biotite in the igneous rocks of Sakhtehesar mountain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farima Ayati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sakhtehesar mountain is located in Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic belt and is composed of volcanic and subvolcanic rocks (Pliocene andesite to dacite which intruded the volcanics and pyroclastics of Paleocene age. Three alteration zones including potassic, phyllic and propylitic are recognized in the area. In this paper, the mineral chemistry of magmatic and primary biotite and the mineral chemistry of biotite in potassic and phyllic alteration zones have been studied. Investigations show that primary and secondary biotites are different from each other and hydrothermal fluids associated with the potassic alteration are distinctively different from the fluids associated with the phyllic alteration zone in the area.

  17. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, M.; Davis, R.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  18. Ongoing hydrothermal activities within Enceladus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Postberg, Frank; Sekine, Yasuhito; Shibuya, Takazo; Kempf, Sascha; Horányi, Mihály; Juhász, Antal; Altobelli, Nicolas; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Masaki, Yuka; Kuwatani, Tatsu; Tachibana, Shogo; Sirono, Sin-iti; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg; Srama, Ralf

    2015-03-12

    Detection of sodium-salt-rich ice grains emitted from the plume of the Saturnian moon Enceladus suggests that the grains formed as frozen droplets from a liquid water reservoir that is, or has been, in contact with rock. Gravitational field measurements suggest a regional south polar subsurface ocean of about 10 kilometres thickness located beneath an ice crust 30 to 40 kilometres thick. These findings imply rock-water interactions in regions surrounding the core of Enceladus. The resulting chemical 'footprints' are expected to be preserved in the liquid and subsequently transported upwards to the near-surface plume sources, where they eventually would be ejected and could be measured by a spacecraft. Here we report an analysis of silicon-rich, nanometre-sized dust particles (so-called stream particles) that stand out from the water-ice-dominated objects characteristic of Saturn. We interpret these grains as nanometre-sized SiO2 (silica) particles, initially embedded in icy grains emitted from Enceladus' subsurface waters and released by sputter erosion in Saturn's E ring. The composition and the limited size range (2 to 8 nanometres in radius) of stream particles indicate ongoing high-temperature (>90 °C) hydrothermal reactions associated with global-scale geothermal activity that quickly transports hydrothermal products from the ocean floor at a depth of at least 40 kilometres up to the plume of Enceladus.

  19. IODP Expedition 331: Strong and Expansive Subseafloor Hydrothermal Activities in the Okinawa Trough

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    the IODP Expedition 331 Scientists

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP Expedition 331 drilled into the Iheya North hydrothermal system in the middle Okinawa Trough in order to investigate active subseafloor microbial ecosystems and their physical and chemical settings. We drilled five sites during Expedition 331 using special guide bases at three holes for reentry, casing, and capping, including installation of a steel mesh platformwith valve controls for postcruise sampling of fluids. At Site C0016, drilling at the base of the North Big Chimney (NBCmound yielded low recovery, but core included the first Kuroko-type black ore ever recovered from the modern subseafloor. The other four sites yielded interbedded hemipelagic and strongly pumiceous volcaniclastic sediment, along with volcanogenic breccias that are variably hydrothermally altered and mineralized. At most sites, analyses of interstitial water and headspace gas yielded complex patterns withdepth and lateral distance of only a few meters. Documented processes included formation of brines and vapor-rich fluids by phase separation and segregation, uptake of Mg and Na by alteration minerals in exchange for Ca, leaching of K at high temperature and uptake at low temperature, anhydrite precipitation, potential microbial oxidation of organic matter and anaerobic oxidation of methane utilizing sulfate, and methanogenesis. Shipboard analyses have found evidence for microbial activity in sediments within the upper 10–30 m below seafloor (mbsf where temperatures were relativelylow, but little evidence in the deeper hydrothermally altered zones and hydrothermal fluid regime.

  20. Weathering of post-impact hydrothermal deposits from the Haughton impact structure: implications for microbial colonization and biosignature preservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izawa, M R M; Banerjee, Neil R; Osinski, G R; Flemming, R L; Parnell, J; Cockell, C S

    2011-01-01

    Meteorite impacts are among the very few processes common to all planetary bodies with solid surfaces. Among the effects of impact on water-bearing targets is the formation of post-impact hydrothermal systems and associated mineral deposits. The Haughton impact structure (Devon Island, Nunavut, Canada, 75.2 °N, 89.5 °W) hosts a variety of hydrothermal mineral deposits that preserve assemblages of primary hydrothermal minerals commonly associated with secondary oxidative/hydrous weathering products. Hydrothermal mineral deposits at Haughton include intra-breccia calcite-marcasite vugs, small intra-breccia calcite or quartz vugs, intra-breccia gypsum megacryst vugs, hydrothermal pipe structures and associated surface "gossans," banded Fe-oxyhydroxide deposits, and calcite and quartz veins and coatings in shattered target rocks. Of particular importance are sulfide-rich deposits and their associated assemblage of weathering products. Hydrothermal mineral assemblages were characterized structurally, texturally, and geochemically with X-ray diffraction, micro X-ray diffraction, optical and electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Primary sulfides (marcasite and pyrite) are commonly associated with alteration minerals, including jarosite (K,Na,H(3)O)Fe(3)(SO(4))(2)(OH)(6), rozenite FeSO(4)·4(H(2)O), copiapite (Fe,Mg)Fe(4)(SO(4))(6)(OH)(2)·20(H(2)O), fibroferrite Fe(SO(4))(OH)·5(H(2)O), melanterite FeSO(4)·7(H(2)O), szomolnokite FeSO(4)·H(2)O, goethite α-FeO(OH), lepidocrocite γ-FeO(OH) and ferrihydrite Fe(2)O(3)·0.5(H(2)O). These alteration assemblages are consistent with geochemical conditions that were locally very different from the predominantly circumneutral, carbonate-buffered environment at Haughton. Mineral assemblages associated with primary hydrothermal activity, and the weathering products of such deposits, provide constraints on possible microbial activity in the post-impact environment. The initial period of

  1. Characteristics of hydrothermal eruptions, with examples from New Zealand and elsewhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, P. R. L.; Lawless, J. V.

    2001-02-01

    Hydrothermal eruptions have occurred in many hot water geothermal fields. This paper concentrates on examples from New Zealand but also mentions others elsewhere, which demonstrate points of particular interest. Numerous small eruptions (maximum focal depths of about 90 m) have occurred in historic times (past 150 years) at Wairakei/Tauhara, Rotorua, Tikitere, Ngatamariki, Mokai and Waimangu. The presence of breccia deposits shows that much larger (with estimated maximum focal depths of about 450 m), prehistoric hydrothermal eruptions have also occurred at Kawerau, Wairakei, Tikitere, Orakeikorako, Te Kopia, Rotokawa and Waiotapu. One of the largest known hydrothermal eruptions in New Zealand took place at Rotokawa 6060±60 years ago; this produced a deposit that extended over an area with a diameter of 4 km, and has a maximum thickness of 11 m. Deposits from hydrothermal eruptions are typically very poorly sorted, matrix-supported, and may contain hydrothermally altered clasts that derive from within the geothermal reservoir. Their lithologies and alteration mineralogies are useful guides to subsurface conditions. Hydrothermal eruptions do not require any direct input of either mass or energy derived directly from a magma and, thus, differ from both phreatic and phreatomagmatic eruptions. Many hydrothermal eruptions in a hot water field start very close to the ground surface and result from the rapid formation of steam due to a sudden pressure reduction. This steam provides the energy necessary to brecciate, lift and eject fragments of the host rocks as a flashing front descends and water nearby in the reservoir boils. A rock brecciation zone accompanies this front, and both precede the descent of the eruption surface. A hydrothermal eruption continues until the steam is produced too slowly to lift the brecciated rocks. There is no genetic difference between the small eruptions induced by exploitation and those which occur as a geothermal system evolves naturally

  2. Hydrothermal temperature effect on crystal structures, optical properties and electrical conductivity of ZnO nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhafina, Wan Almaz; Salleh, Hasiah; Daud, Mohd Zalani; Ghazali, Mohd Sabri Mohd; Ghazali, Salmah Mohd

    2017-09-01

    ZnO is an wide direct band gap semiconductor and possess rich family of nanostructures which turned to be a key role in the nanotechnology field of applications. Hydrothermal method was proven to be simple, robust and low cost among the reported methods to synthesize ZnO nanostructures. In this work, the properties of ZnO nanostructures were altered by varying temperatures of hydrothermal process. The changes in term of morphological, crystal structures, optical properties and electrical conductivity were investigated. A drastic change of ZnO nanostructures morphology and decreases of 002 diffraction peak were observed as the hydrothermal temperature increased. The band gap of samples decreased as the size of ZnO nanostructure increased, whereas the electrical conductivity had no influence on the band gap value but more on the morphology of ZnO nanostructures instead.

  3. Dynamics of the Yellowstone hydrothermal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Lowenstern, Jacob B.

    2014-01-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field is characterized by extensive seismicity, episodes of uplift and subsidence, and a hydrothermal system that comprises more than 10,000 thermal features, including geysers, fumaroles, mud pots, thermal springs, and hydrothermal explosion craters. The diverse chemical and isotopic compositions of waters and gases derive from mantle, crustal, and meteoric sources and extensive water-gas-rock interaction at variable pressures and temperatures. The thermal features are host to all domains of life that utilize diverse inorganic sources of energy for metabolism. The unique and exceptional features of the hydrothermal system have attracted numerous researchers to Yellowstone beginning with the Washburn and Hayden expeditions in the 1870s. Since a seminal review published a quarter of a century ago, research in many fields has greatly advanced our understanding of the many coupled processes operating in and on the hydrothermal system. Specific advances include more refined geophysical images of the magmatic system, better constraints on the time scale of magmatic processes, characterization of fluid sources and water-rock interactions, quantitative estimates of heat and magmatic volatile fluxes, discovering and quantifying the role of thermophile microorganisms in the geochemical cycle, defining the chronology of hydrothermal explosions and their relation to glacial cycles, defining possible links between hydrothermal activity, deformation, and seismicity; quantifying geyser dynamics; and the discovery of extensive hydrothermal activity in Yellowstone Lake. Discussion of these many advances forms the basis of this review.

  4. Powering hydrothermal activity on Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobie, Gabriel; Choblet, Gael; Sotin, Christophe; Behounkova, Marie; Cadek, Ondrej; Postberg, Frank; Soucek, Ondrej

    2017-04-01

    A series of evidence gathered by the Cassini spacecraft indicates that the intense activity at the South Pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus is related to a subsurface salty water reservoir associated with seafloor hydrothermal activity (Hsu et al. 2015, Waite et al. 2017). The observation of an elevated libration implies that this reservoir is global with a thin ice shell (20-25 km in average (Thomas et al. 2016) and power and a mechanism to focus the release of heat in the SPT, unexplained by previous models. Here we investigate heat generation by tidal friction in the porous core and simulate heat transport by water flow for core porosities consistent with Cassini gravity data (Iess et al. 2014). We demonstrate that, for effective viscosity and permeability values typical of water-saturated terrestrial rock analogues, more than 20 GW can be generated in the core, which can maintain a global liquid ocean and power hydrothermal activity at the seafloor. By performing 3D simulations of water flow in a tidally-heated porous rock matrix, we show that heat is extracted from the core in the form of focused outflows of hot water (> 90 °C) mostly in the polar regions, explaining strongly localized ice shell thinning. Owing to strong dissipation in Saturn (Lainey et al. 2017), we show that circulation of hot waters in the core may last at least 20-25 million years and that 10 to 100% of the oceanic volume may be processed in the core at temperature higher than 90°C on this timescale. Whether this has been sufficient for the emergence of life can be explored by future spacecraft missions (Mitri et al., this meeting; Lunine et al. 2017).

  5. Light hydrocarbons in hydrothermal and magmatic fumaroles: hints of catalytic and thermal reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capaccioni, Bruno; Martini, Marino; Mangani, Filippo

    1995-02-01

    Volcanic gaseous mixtures emitted from active volcanoes frequently show variable amounts of saturated (alkanes), unsaturated (alkenes) and aromatic volatile hydrocarbons. Three major patterns of distributions can be recognized, apparently related to the chemical-physical environment of formation of the gas exhalations: alkane-rich, low-temperature gas emissions from recently active volcanic areas; aromatic-rich hydrothermal manifestations; and alkene-rich, ‘magmatic’ fumaroles on active volcanoes. Thermodynamic data, together with theoretical and practical findings from the petroleum industry, point to two main types of reactions occurring in these volcanic environments: cracking and reforming. Cracking processes, mainly caused by thermal effects, occur when hydrocarbon-bearing hydrothermal fluids enter and mix with a hot and dry, rapidly rising magmatic gas phase. The most probable products are light alkenes with carbon numbers decreasing with increasing reaction temperatures. The presence of aromatic species in hydrothermal fluids can be linked to reforming processes, catalysed by several possible agents, such as smectites and zeolites, generally present in the hydrothermally altered volcanic terranes, and facilitated by long residence times in a hydrothermal envelope.

  6. Beyond the vent: New perspectives on hydrothermal plumes and pelagic biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Brennan T.

    2017-03-01

    Submarine hydrothermal vent fields introduce buoyant plumes of chemically altered seawater to the deep-sea water column. Chemoautotrophic microbes exploit this energy source, facilitating seafloor-based primary production that evidence suggests may transfer to pelagic consumers. While most hydrothermal plumes have relatively small volumes, there are recent examples of large-scale plume events associated with periods of eruptive activity, which have had a pronounced effect on water-column biology. This correlation suggests that hydrothermal plumes may have influenced basin-scale ocean chemistry during periods of increased submarine volcanism during the Phanerozoic eon. This paper synthesizes a growing body of scientific evidence supporting the hypothesis that hydrothermal plumes are the energetic basis of unique deep-sea pelagic food webs. While many important questions remain concerning the biology of hydrothermal plumes, this discussion is not present in ongoing management efforts related to seafloor massive sulfide (SMS) mining. Increased research efforts, focused on high-resolution surveys of midwater biology relative to plume structures, are recommended to establish baseline conditions and monitor the impact of future mining-based disturbances to the pelagic biosphere.

  7. Relationship between enhanced dewaterability and structural properties of hydrothermal sludge after hydrothermal treatment of excess sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liping; Li, Aimin; Chang, Yuzhi

    2017-04-01

    Hydrothermal treatment is an effective method to enhance the deep dewaterability of excess sludge with low energy consumption. In this study, an insight into the relationship between enhanced dewaterability and structural properties of the produced hydrothermal sludge was presented, aiming at better understanding the effect of hydrothermal process on excess sludge dewatering performance. The results indicated that hydrothermal effect induced the transformation of surface water to interstitial and free water by lowering the binding strength between adjacent water and solid particles and that free water became the main form for moisture existence in hydrothermal sludge as temperature was higher than 180 °C. Increase in temperature of hydrothermal treatment generated a significant size reduction of sludge flocs but treated sludge with a higher rigidity, which not only strengthened the network of hydrothermal sludge but also destroyed the binding of EPS with water. Hydrothermal process caused crevice and pore structures of excess sludge to disappear gradually, which was a main driving force of water removal as temperature was below 150 °C. With the temperature of hydrothermal treatment exceeding 180 °C, the morphology of hydrothermal sludge became rough which linked closely to the solid precipitation of condensation polymerization, and further became smooth at higher temperature (210 °C) due to the coal-like structures with higher aromaticities, indicating that hydrothermal reaction pathways began to play a main role in enhanced dewaterability. Hydrothermal treatment led to more alkyl and aromatic carbon, but lower O-alkyl, carboxyl and carbonyl carbon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Tidal Evolution and Hydrothermal Activity in IcyWorlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, S.; Hussmann, H.

    2008-09-01

    The tidal heating that sustains a subsurface ocean in Europa likely varied in intensity through the moons history due to the exchange of orbital angular momentum with the innermost Galilean satellite, Io [1]. Tidal interactions elsewhere in the solar system — e.g. in Neptunes moon Triton, and in Kuiper belt systems such as Pluto-Charon and the 2003 EL61 system (Santa-Rudolph-Blitzen) — highlight the potential for vigorously heated subsurface oceans and thus the existence of hydrothermal systems in icy worlds. Understanding the extent and nature of hydrothermal activity in such systems is important for assessing the availability of essential elements and organic compounds necessary sustain and, possibly, originate life [2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7]. During periods of low tidal heating in such systems, hydrothermalism driven by serpentinization (reaction of water with ultramafic rock) may be extensive, with implications for seafloor production of hydrogen, methane and other potential nutrients, and elements necessary to originate and support life in icy world oceans. For Enceladus, an anomalously dense satellite for its size, radiogenic heating and overburden pressure in the mantle are sufficiently low to permit fracturing of the entirety of the moons rocky interior on long time scales [8]. Estimates of methane production from serpentinization of Enceladus interior, based on measured fluxes from the Lost City Hydrothermal Field [9], are an order of magnitude greater than fluxes observed at Enceladuss south polar plume by the Cassini Ion Neutral Mass Spectrometer [10]. For the largest icy worlds in the Solar System — Titan, Ganymede and Callisto—pressures at and below the H2Orock interface are likely too high to permit the formation of microfractures, so an alternative explanation is required if methane is endogenous. Aqueous alteration may be augmented from the above estimates if altered crust is rejuvenated during periods of increased tidal dissipation. Crustal

  9. Hydrothermal system of Long Valley caldera, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorey, M.L.; Lewis, R.E.; Olmsted, F.H.

    1978-01-01

    The geologic and hydrologic setting of the hydrothermal system are described. The geochemical and thermal characteristics of the system are presented. A mathematical model of the Long Valley caldera is analyzed. (MHR)

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterisation of new ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PCH2PO3H)] (A = Rb (1), NH4 (2) and Tl (3)) have been synthesized by hydrothermal method and structurally characterised by X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic techniques. These compounds crystallize in monoclinic space group, 21/ ...

  11. Hydrothermal syntheses and single crystal structural ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ), and Zn(II); OPTA = 1-oxopyridinium-2-thioacetato) was prepared from the appropriate metal acetates, 1-oxopyridinium-2-thioacetic acid (OPTAH), and potassium hydroxide in hydrothermal media and structurally characterized. The structure ...

  12. Effect of hydrothermal processing on ginseng extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jebin Ryu

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Therefore, hydrothermal processing offers significant improvements over the conventional steaming process. In particular, at temperatures over 140°C, high yields of the transformed ginsenosides and increased antioxidant activities were obtained in tens of minutes.

  13. Hydrothermal activity in the Tulancingo-Acoculco Caldera Complex, central Mexico. Exploratory studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Hernandez, Aida [Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos, CFE, Alejandro Volta 655, 58290 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Centro de Geociencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro., 76230 (Mexico); Garcia-Estrada, Gerardo; Palma-Guzman, Hugo; Quijano-Leon, Jose L. [Gerencia de Proyectos Geotermoelectricos, CFE, Alejandro Volta 655, 58290 Morelia, Michoacan (Mexico); Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo; Gonzalez-Partida, Eduardo [Centro de Geociencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Campus Juriquilla, Queretaro, Qro., 76230 (Mexico)

    2009-09-15

    Mineral alteration and fluid inclusion studies of drill cuttings and core samples indicate that the sedimentary basement rocks and the volcanic rocks associated with Tulancingo-Acoculco Caldera Complex have been the site of two distinct and major hydrothermal events. The complex, located in the eastern portion of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt, is formed by the Pliocene Tulancingo Caldera and the younger (Pleistocene) Acoculco Caldera, which developed within the older depression. The volcanic rocks are underlain by Cretaceous sedimentary rocks of the Sierra Madre Oriental. The earliest important hydrothermal event occurred during the emplacement of Mid-Tertiary granitic intrusions that metamorphosed the sedimentary rocks; these intrusives are not exposed at the surface. However, granitic rocks were encountered at the bottom of exploratory borehole EAC-1, drilled within the Caldera Complex. The second main event occurred during the formation of the Tulancingo and Acoculco Calderas. Both episodes lead to secondary mineralization that reduced the permeability of the reservoir rocks. A possible third hydrothermal event may be associated with the recent magmatic activity within the Acoculco Caldera.Thermal logs from well EAC-1 display a conductive thermal gradient with maximum temperatures exceeding 300 C at 2000 m depth. Although there are no active thermal springs in the area, there is extensive fossil surface hydrothermal alteration and cold gas discharges with high He{sup 3}/He{sup 4} ratios. (author)

  14. Hydrothermal industrialization: direct heat development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-05-01

    A description of hydrothermal resources suitable for direct applications, their associated temperatures, geographic distribution and developable capacity are given. An overview of the hydrothermal direct-heat development infrastructure is presented. Development activity is highlighted by examining known and planned geothermal direct-use applications. Underlying assumptions and results for three studies conducted to determine direct-use market penetration of geothermal energy are discussed.

  15. Surficial extent and conceptual model of hydrothermal system at Mount Rainier, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David

    1995-04-01

    A once massive hydrothermal system was disgorged from the summit of Mount Rainier in a highly destructive manner about 5000 years ago. Today, hydrothermal processes are depositing clayey alteration products that have the potential to reset the stage for similar events in the future. Areas of active hydrothermal alteration occur in three representative settings: (1) An extensive area (greater than 12,000 m 2) of heated ground and slightly acidic boiling-point fumaroles at 76-82 °C at East and West Craters on the volcano's summit, where alteration products include smectite, halloysite and disordered kaolinite, cristobalite, tridymite, opal, alunite, gibbsite, and calcite. (2) A small area (less than 500 m 2) of heated ground and sub-boiling-point fumaroles at 55-60 °C on the upper flank at Disappointment Cleaver with smectite alteration and chalcedony, tridymite, and opal-A encrustations. Similar areas probably occur at Willis Wall, Sunset Amphitheater, and the South Tahoma and Kautz headwalls. (3) Sulfate- and carbon dioxide-enriched thermal springs at 9-24 °C on the lower flank of the volcano in valley walls beside the Winthrop and Paradise Glaciers, where calcite, opal-A, and gypsum are being deposited. In addition, chloride- and carbon dioxide-enriched thermal springs issue from thin sediments that overlie Tertiary rocks at, or somewhat beyond, the base of the volcanic edifice in valley bottoms of the Nisqually and Ohanapecosh Rivers. Maximum spring temperatures of 19-25 °C and 38-50 °C, respectively, and extensive travertine deposits have developed in these more distant localities. The heat flow, distribution of thermal activity, and nature of alteration minerals and fluids suggest a conceptual model of a narrow, central hydrothermal system within Mount Rainier, with steam-heated snowmelt at the summit craters and localized leakage of steam-heated fluids within 2 km of the summit. The lateral extent of the hydrothermal system is marked by discharge of

  16. Hydrogen, Oxygen and Silicon Isotope Systematics of Groundwater-Magma Interaction in Icelandic Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, B. I.; Stefansson, A.; Halldorsson, S. A.; Martin, W.; Barnes, J.; Jónasson, K.; Franzson, H.

    2016-12-01

    Magma often encounters groundwater (meteoric or seawater derived) when intruded into the crust. Magma-groundwater interactions result in the formation of hydrothermal fluids which can lead to contact metamorphism and elemental transport in the country rock. In fact, magma-hydrothermal fluid interaction (rather than magma-magmatic fluid interaction) may lead to classic contact metamorphic reactions. In order to explore the importance of hydrothermal fluid during contact metamorphism we use stable isotopes (δD, δ18O, δ30Si) from both active and extinct magma chambers and hydrothermal systems from across Iceland. Quartz grains from various hydrothermal systems, from crustal xenoliths from the Askja central volcano and from the Hafnarfjall pluton, as well as quartz grains associated with low-T zeolites were analysed for δ18O and δ30Si in-situ using SIMS. Whole rock material of these samples was analysed for δD values using a TCEA coupled to an IRMS. Our results indicate that low-T quartz (300°C). Combining the results from the analyses of δ18O and δD allows further division of samples into (i) seawater and/or rock dominated and (ii) meteoric water dominated hydrothermal systems. In order to isolate the effects of fluid-rock interaction, fluid source and formation temperature at the magma-groundwater contact, δD, δ18O and δ30Si values of rocks and fluids were modeled using the PHREEQC software. Comparison of analytical and model results shows that the isotopic compositions are influenced by multiple processes. In some cases, groundwater penetrates the contact zone and causes alteration at >400°C by groundwater-magma heat interaction. Other cases document "baked" contact zones without groundwater. Our analyses and modeling demonstrates that groundwater flow and permeability are crucial in setting the style of contact metamorphism around high T intrusions.

  17. Hydrothermal REE and Zr Ore Forming Processes in Peralkaline Granitic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gysi, A. P.

    2015-12-01

    Anorogenic peralkaline igneous systems display extreme enrichment of REE and Zr with a hydrothermal overprint leading to post-magmatic metal mobilization. Strange Lake in Canada, for example, is a mid-Proterozoic peralkaline granitic intrusion and host to a world-class REE-Zr deposit with >50 Mt ore (>1.5 wt.% REE and >3 wt.% Zr). In contrast to porphyry systems, peralkaline systems are poorly understood and hydrothermal metal mobilization models are only in the early stage of their development. This is partly due to the paucity of thermodynamic data for REE-bearing minerals and aqueous species, and the complexity of the hydrothermal fluids (enrichment of F, P and Cl), which make it difficult to develop thermodynamic models of metal partitioning. This study aims to show the link between alteration stages and metal mobilization using Strange Lake as a natural laboratory and combine these observations with numerical modeling. Four types of alteration were recognized at Strange Lake: i) alkali (i.e. K and Na) metasomatism related to interaction with NaCl-bearing orthomagmatic fluids, ii) acidic alteration by HCl-HF-bearing fluids originating from the pegmatites followed by iii) aegirinization of the border of the pegmatites and surrounding granites and by iv) pervasive Ca-F-metasomatism. The acidic alteration accounts for most of the hydrothermal metal mobilization in and outward from the pegmatites, whereas the Ca-F-metasomatism led to metal deposition and resulted from interaction of an acidic F-rich fluid with a Ca-bearing fluid. Numerical simulations of fluid-rock reactions with saline HCl-HF-bearing fluids at 400 °C to 250 °C indicate that temperature, availability of F/Cl and pH limit the mobility of Zr and REE. Fluids with pH peralkaline granitic systems is the formation of a fluid-buffered subsystem providing the acids and ligands required for REE and Zr mobilization.

  18. Hydrothermal phenomena in Risovaca cave and within Vencac massif Shumadies, Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wrzak-Tomić Janina

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the Risovaca cave are found, for the karst, atypical alteration in the limestones structure. Also, morphogenesis of the object can not be logically interpret. Those differences are result of hydrothermal process in initial phase of karstic cycle. And then activity of hot water and hot emanations brought up to the metasomatism and destruction of rock, enormous excrete of ornaments and later, ceiling collapse and fill up of cave room.

  19. Volcanic and Hydrothermal Activity of the North Su Volcano: New Insights from Repeated Bathymetric Surveys and ROV Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thal, J.; Bach, W.; Tivey, M.; Yoerger, D.

    2013-12-01

    Bathymetric data from cruises in 2002, 2006, and 2011 were combined and compared to determine the evolution of volcanic activity, seafloor structures, erosional features and to identify and document the distribution of hydrothermal vents on North Su volcano, SuSu Knolls, eastern Manus Basin (Papua New Guinea). Geologic mapping based on ROV observations from 2006 (WHOI Jason-2) and 2011 (MARUM Quest-4000) combined with repeated bathymetric surveys from 2002 and 2011 are used to identify morphologic features on the slopes of North Su and to track temporal changes. ROV MARUM Quest-4000 bathymetry was used to develop a 10 m grid of the top of North Su to precisely depict recent changes. In 2006, the south slope of North Su was steeply sloped and featured numerous white smoker vents discharging acid sulfate waters. These vents were covered by several tens of meters of sand- to gravel-sized volcanic material in 2011. The growth of this new cone changed the bathymetry of the south flank of North Su up to ~50 m and emplaced ~0.014 km3 of clastic volcanic material. This material is primarily comprised of fractured altered dacite and massive fresh dacite as well as crystals of opx, cpx, olivine and plagioclase. There is no evidence for pyroclastic fragmentation, so we hypothesize that the fragmentation is likely related to hydrothermal explosions. Hydrothermal activity varies over a short (~50 m) lateral distance from 'flashing' black smokers to acidic white smoker vents. Within 2 weeks of observation time in 2011, the white smoker vents varied markedly in activity suggesting a highly episodic hydrothermal system. Based on ROV video recordings, we identified steeply sloping (up to 30°) slopes exposing pillars and walls of hydrothermal cemented volcaniclastic material representing former fluid upflow zones. These features show that hydrothermal activity has increased slope stability as hydrothermal cementation has prevented slope collapse. Additionally, in some places

  20. Distribution of Hydrothermal Mineral Assemblages in the Sevenmile Hole Area, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, A.; Larson, P.; John, D.; Cosca, M.; Pauley, B.; Manion, J.; Pritchard, C.; Andersen, A.

    2007-12-01

    Incision of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River in Yellowstone National Park has exposed approximately 350 vertical meters of hydrothermally altered rhyolites. This older alteration formed in the shallow portion of a hydrothermal system that was most likely similar to the modern Yellowstone hydrothermal environment. Hydrothermal fluid circulation is related to the ongoing rhyolitic magmatism that produced the Yellowstone caldera at 640 ka. The rhyolitic magmatism and hydrothermal system are shallow expressions of deeper mantle- derived basalts. The older alteration is well exposed in the Sevenmile Hole area, near the northeastern margin of the caldera. Here, the alteration protolith is the high silica, low-18O, rhyolitic Tuff of Sulfur Creek. The tuff erupted at about 480 ka after resurgent doming associated with the third cycle collapse of the Yellowstone caldera. The tuff is a rheomorphically deformed densely welded agglutinate fallout ash that was deposited along the caldera wall. It contains phenocrysts of quartz, sodic plagioclase, and potassium feldspar. The tuff is exposed from the rim of the canyon, which is very close to the pre-alteration paleosurface, to the river bottom where it is covered by detrital sediments and actively forming hot spring deposits. Rocks exposed within the field area are pervasively hydrothermally altered. Mineral phases in approximately 90 samples were determined in the field using a Portable Infrared Mineral Analyser (PIMA). Subsequently, more precise mineral determinations were made using standard petrographic and powder XRD techniques. The alteration mineralogy consists of variable assemblages that include zones of kaolinite + opal; kaolinite + alunite with local dickite and typically high opal and/or quartz concentrations; highly silicified zones containing illite with or without smectite; and weakly silicified zones containing mostly illite. Minor (less than 1 percent) fine-grained disseminated pyrite is ubiquitous. The

  1. Peptide synthesis in early earth hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemke, K.H.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Bird, D.K.

    2009-01-01

    We report here results from experiments and thermodynamic calculations that demonstrate a rapid, temperature-enhanced synthesis of oligopeptides from the condensation of aqueous glycine. Experiments were conducted in custom-made hydrothermal reactors, and organic compounds were characterized with ultraviolet-visible procedures. A comparison of peptide yields at 260??C with those obtained at more moderate temperatures (160??C) gives evidence of a significant (13 kJ ?? mol-1) exergonic shift. In contrast to previous hydrothermal studies, we demonstrate that peptide synthesis is favored in hydrothermal fluids and that rates of peptide hydrolysis are controlled by the stability of the parent amino acid, with a critical dependence on reactor surface composition. From our study, we predict that rapid recycling of product peptides from cool into near-supercritical fluids in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems will enhance peptide chain elongation. It is anticipated that the abundant hydrothermal systems on early Earth could have provided a substantial source of biomolecules required for the origin of life. Astrobiology 9, 141-146. ?? 2009 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc. 2009.

  2. Ultrasonic transducer for the hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bornmann, Peter; Hemsel, Tobias [University of Paderborn, Paderborn (Germany); Littmann, Walter [ATHENA Technologie Beratung GmbH, Paderborn (Germany); Ageba, Ryo; Kadota, Yoishi; Morita, Takeshi [University of Tokyo, Kashiwa (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    Direct ultrasound irradiation is advantageous for increasing the efficiency of the hydrothermal method, which can be used to produce piezoelectric thin films and lead-free piezoelectric ceramics. To apply ultrasound directly to the process, transducer prototypes were developed regarding the boundary conditions of the hydrothermal method. LiNbO{sub 3} and PIC 181 were proven to be feasible materials for high-temperature-resistant transducers ({>=} 200 .deg. C). The resistance of the transducer's horn against a corrosive mineralizer was achieved by using Hastelloy C-22. The efficiency of the ultrasound-assisted hydrothermal method depends on the generated sound field.The impedance and the sound field measurements have shown that the sound field depends on the filling level and on the position and design of the transducer.

  3. The BGU/CERN solar hydrothermal reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolucci, Sergio; Caspers, Fritz; Garb, Yaakov; Gross, Amit; Pauletta, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel solar hydrothermal reactor (SHR) under development by Ben Gurion University (BGU) and the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. We describe in broad terms the several novel aspects of the device and, by extension, of the niche it occupies: in particular, enabling direct off-grid conversion of a range of organic feedstocks to sterile useable (solid, liquid) fuels, nutrients, products using only solar energy and water. We then provide a brief description of the high temperature high efficiency panels that provide process heat to the hydrothermal reactor, and review the basics of hydrothermal processes and conversion taking place in this. We conclude with a description of a simulation of the pilot system that will begin operation later this year.

  4. Characterization of advanced preprocessed materials (Hydrothermal)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rachel Emerson; Garold Gresham

    2012-09-01

    The initial hydrothermal treatment parameters did not achieve the proposed objective of this effort; the reduction of intrinsic ash in the corn stover. However, liquid fractions from the 170°C treatments was indicative that some of the elements routinely found in the ash that negatively impact the biochemical conversion processes had been removed. After reviewing other options for facilitating ash removal, sodium-citrate (chelating agent) was included in the hydrothermal treatment process, resulting in a 69% reduction in the physiological ash. These results indicated that chelation –hydrothermal treatment is one possible approach that can be utilized to reduce the overall ash content of feedstock materials and having a positive impact on conversion performance.

  5. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Nanostructured Vanadium Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Livage

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of vanadium oxides have been obtained via the hydrothermal treatment of aqueous V(V solutions. They exhibit a large variety of nanostructures ranging from molecular clusters to 1D and 2D layered compounds. Nanotubes are obtained via a self-rolling process while amazing morphologies such as nano-spheres, nano-flowers and even nano-urchins are formed via the self-assembling of nano-particles. This paper provides some correlation between the molecular structure of precursors in the solution and the nanostructure of the solid phases obtained by hydrothermal treatment.

  6. Effect of hydrothermally ‘Hass” avocado about antioxidant capacity, total phenolic content and coloration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Augusta Tremocoldi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the antioxidant activity, total phenolic compounds and color in avocado ‘Hass’ hydrothermally treated. The fruits were hydrothermally treated at 45oC for 5, 10, 15 and 20 min. After treatment, fruit were stored at room temperature (21±1ºC and 70±5% relative humidity and cold (10°C±1 and 90±5% relative humidity. The fruits were analyzed for their antioxidant capacity by DPPH method and phenolic compounds at 0, 3, 9 and 12 days. The fruits color was measured at 0, 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 days. The control fruits had higher antioxidant capacity and content of phenolic compounds during the storage period, compared to the fruits hydrothermally treated. The hydrothermally treatment altered the behavior as for the maintenance of the antioxidant activity in relation to the fruits control. In spite of superior values of antioxidant activity for the fruits maintained at 21±1ºC and 70±5% relative humidity, those refrigerated presented better aspect for commercialization. The refrigerated fruits presented better aspect for commercialization in relation to the maintained under room temperature. The brightness, color a * and b * values decreased with the storage days. Values color superiors were observed for the fruits control and those maintained under refrigeration. As it increased the irradiation dose reduced the fruits antioxidant activity and coloration.

  7. Combined hydrothermal liquefaction and catalytic hydrothermal gasification system and process for conversion of biomass feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Hart, Todd R.

    2017-09-12

    A combined hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG) system and process are described that convert various biomass-containing sources into separable bio-oils and aqueous effluents that contain residual organics. Bio-oils may be converted to useful bio-based fuels and other chemical feedstocks. Residual organics in HTL aqueous effluents may be gasified and converted into medium-BTU product gases and directly used for process heating or to provide energy.

  8. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of the Microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigaard Christensen, Per; Peng, Gaël; Vogel, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    The microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum was processed by hydrothermal liquefaction in order to assess the influence of reaction temperature and reaction time on the product and elemental distribution. The experiments were carried out at different reaction times (5 and 15 min) and over a wide range...

  9. Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structure and luminescence property ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structure and luminescence property of a three dimensional Sm(III) coordination polymer with. 2,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid. KRANTHI KUMAR GANGU, ANIMA S DADHICH and. SARATCHANDRA BABU MUKKAMALA. ∗. Department of Chemistry, GITAM University, Visakhapatnam 530 045, ...

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structure and luminescence property ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 127; Issue 12. Hydrothermal synthesis, crystal structure and luminescence property of a three dimensional Sm(III) coordination polymer with 2,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid. Kranthi Kumar Gangu Anima S Dadhich Saratchandra Babu Mukkamala. Volume 127 Issue 12 ...

  11. Hydroprocessing Microalgae Derived Hydrothermal Liquefaction Bio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bio-crude, a biomass derived oil similar to petroleum crude in properties, can be produced from microalgae via hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and upgraded to ... for hydroprocessing the bio-crude; the products obtainable, their compositions & properties; as well as the inputs required for modelling and simulation of the ...

  12. Valorization of Furfural Residue by Hydrothermal Carbonization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Fen; Zhang, Jia; Pedersen, Christian Marcus

    2017-01-01

    Furfural residue (FR) is a low-cost by-product generated in the furfural production from corncobs, which is mainly composed of cellulose and lignin. In this report, hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of deashed FR was conducted at various reaction temperatures (200, 220 and 240 °C) and reaction tim...

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterisation of BIS (4 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... of Infrared and UV- visible spectroscopy. The complexes show broad band absorption in the region 3760 – 3765.71 cm-1 due to the symmetric stretching vibration of the co-ordinated water molecule. Keywords: Hydrothermal reaction, metalloligand, parahydroxybenzaldehyde, para-phenylenediamine, zinc phosphate.

  14. Phase Transformation of Hydrothermally Synthesized Nanoparticle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mild hydrothermal hydrolysis of TiCl4 produces nanorods of the rutile phase of titanium dioxide in high yield, while in the presence of organic acids (citric, acetic, D-tartaric and benzoic acids) anatase is the only product. The effect of these organic acids on the products of the hydrolysis reaction as well as the reaction kinetics ...

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis, structure and characterization of new ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The structure has tunnel-type cavities and are congenial for ion transportation through them. The compound exhibits moderate thermal stability. Keywords. Hydrothermal; crystal structure; solid electrolyte; iron (III) pyrophosphate. 1. Introduction. NASICON and related compounds belong to the well known family of solid ...

  16. HYDROTHERMAL SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    HYDROTHERMAL SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A BINUCLEAR. COMPLEX AND A COORDINATION POLYMER OF COPPER(II). Masoumeh Tabatabaee1*, Reza Mohamadinasab1, Kazem Ghaini1 and Hamid Reza Khavasi2. 1Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University, Yazd Branch, Yazd, Iran.

  17. Direct hydrothermal synthesis of metal intercalated hexagonal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 115; Issue 5-6. Direct hydrothermal synthesis of metal intercalated hexagonal molybdates, M x + Mo 6 − x / 3 O 18 − x (OH) x . y H2O (M = Li, Rb, Cs, NH4). S Upreti A Ramanan. Volume 115 Issue 5-6 October-December 2003 pp 411-417 ...

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis and electrochemical properties of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 128; Issue 5. Hydrothermal synthesis and electrochemical properties of a coordination polymer based on dinuclear (Pyrazinyl tetrazolate) Copper(II) cations and βOctamolybdate Anions. SHAOBIN LI LI ZHANG HUIYUAN MA HAIJUN PANG. Regular Article Volume ...

  19. Hydrothermal ore-forming processes in the light of studies in rock- buffered systems: II. Some general geologic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemley, J.J.; Hunt, J.P.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental metal solubilities for rock-buffered hydrothermal systems provide important insights into the acquisition, transport, and deposition of metals in real hydrothermal systems that produced base metal ore deposits. Water-rock reactions that determine pH, together with total chloride and changes in temperature and fluid pressure, play significant roles in controlling the solubility of metals and determining where metals are fixed to form ore deposits. Deposition of metals in hydrothermal systems occurs where changes such as cooling, pH increase due to rock alteration, boiling, or fluid mixing cause the aqueous metal concentration to exceed saturation. Metal zoning results from deposition occurring at successive saturation surfaces. Zoning is not a reflection simply of relative solubility but of the manner of intersection of transport concentration paths with those surfaces. Saturation surfaces will tend to migrate outward and inward in prograde and retrograde time, respectively, controlled by either temperature or chemical variables. -from Authors

  20. The Origin of Carbon-Bearing Volatiles in a Continental Hydrothermal System in the Great Basin: Water Chemistry and Isotope Characterizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, Richard A.; Niles, Paul B.; Romanek, Christopher; Datta, Saugata; Darnell, Mike

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal systems on Earth are active centers in the crust where organic molecules can be synthesized biotically or abiotically under a wide range of physical and chemical conditions [1-3]. Not only are volatile species (CO, CO2, H2, and hydrocarbons) a reflection of deep-seated hydrothermal alteration processes, but they also form an important component of biological systems. Studying carbon-bearing fluids from hydrothermal systems is of specific importance to understanding (bio-)geochemical processes within these systems. With recent detection of methane in the martian atmosphere [4-7] and the possibility of its hydrothermal origin [8, 9], understanding the formation mechanisms of methane may provide constraints on the history of the martian aqueous environments and climate.

  1. Hydrothermal karst and associated breccias in Neoproterozoic limestone from the Barker-Villa Cacique area (Tandilia belt), Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dristas, Jorge A.; Martínez, Juan C.; van den Kerkhof, Alfons M.; Massonne, Hans-Joachim; Theye, Thomas; Frisicale, María C.; Gregori, Daniel A.

    2017-07-01

    In the Barker-Villa Cacique area (Tandilia belt), remarkable megabreccias, limestone breccias and phosphate-bearing breccias hosted in black limestone and along the contact with the upper section of the sedimentary succession are exposed. These rocks are the result of extensive hydrothermal alteration of the original micritic limestone and other fine-grained clastic sediments. Typical alteration minerals are sericite, chlorite, interstratified chlorite/K-white mica, kaolinite, dickite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, goethite, quartz, calcite, Fe-calcite, dolomite, ankerite, fluor-apatite, barite and aluminium-phosphate-sulfate (APS) minerals. Quartz and calcite cements from hydraulic breccias in the limestone contain low-salinity aqueous fluid inclusions. Corresponding homogenization temperatures display 200-220 °C and 110-140 °C in hydrothermal quartz, and 130-150 °C in late calcite cement. Carbon and oxygen stable isotope analyses of carbonates from the Loma Negra quarry (LNQ) support the major role of hydrothermal activity. A significant difference was found between δ18Ocar values from unaltered micritic limestone (ca. 23.8‰ SMOW) and secondary calcite (ca. 18.5‰ SMOW). The lower δ18Ocar values are interpreted as a result of calcite precipitation from hot hydrothermal fluids. At a late stage, the hydrothermal fluid containing H2S mixed with descending and oxidizing meteoric waters. Circulation of the ensuing acid fluids resulted in the partly dissolution and collapse brecciation of the Loma Negra Formation. The hydrothermal stage can be tentatively dated ca. 590-620 Ma corresponding to the Brasiliano orogeny.

  2. Hydrothermal Detoxization of Slate Containing Asbestos and the Possibility of Application for Fertilizer of its Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myojin, Sachi; Kuroki, Toshihiro; Manabe, Wataru; Yamasaki, Chizuko; Yamasaki, Nakamichi

    2010-11-01

    Hydrothermal decomposition of slate (building materials) containing asbestos has been attempted by using a NH4H2PO4 solution. Firstly, the alteration of chrysotile as a starting material was investigated under hydrothermal conditions of 200° C, 12 hrs of reaction time and with a phosphate solution. It was confirmed that the original fibrous form of chrysotile had been perfectly collapsed by the SEM observation. The chrysotile (asbestos) disappeared to form Mg-Ca-Silicate (Ca7Mg2P6O24) estimated by XRD. The composition and chemical form of reaction products (Mg-Ca-Silicate) was predicted to application as a fertilizer. Fertilizer effect of these resulted product on cultivations of Japanese radish (leaves), soybeans and tomatoes, was examined by using a special medium of mixed soil with a low content of N, P, K and a thermal-treated zeolite one. The fertilizer effects of the product were compared to commercial fertilizers such as N, N-K-P and P types. In order to estimate the fertilizer effect, the size of crops, number of fruits and number of leaves were measured everyday. As a result, these hydrothermal products of slate containing asbestos were as good as commercial fertilizers on the market. Fruits groups especially had a good crop using the hydrothermal slate product. These results show that the main components of hydrothermal treatments slate are calcium silicate and magnesium phosphate. Its decomposition reaction products may have the possibility of application for fertilization of crops which require nucleic acid—phosphorus.

  3. Transmission Electron Microscope Observations of Phyllosilicate Development During Experimental Aqueous Alteration of Allende

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, C. L.; Brearley, A. J.

    2000-01-01

    Samples of Allende have been altered hydrothermally under oxidizing conditions at 200 C. TEM studies show that within 30 days evidence of replacement of matrix olivines by fine-grained serpentine is present and by 90 days complete alteration of many grains has occurred.

  4. Temperature Effects on Phase Relations in Ultramafic-Hosted Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, W. E.; Foustoukos, D. I.; Fu, Q.

    2005-12-01

    The effect of temperature on alteration processes in ultramafic hosted hydrothermal systems is significant and manifest by complex changes in secondary mineralization and the composition of coexisting fluids, as suggested by recent experimental and theoretical data. At relatively high temperatures (400C) olivine recrystallization reactions are sluggish, generally limiting mass transfer. In SiO2 bearing fluids, such as the case for the Rainbow hydrothermal system (36N, MAR), evidence indicates olivine recrystallization to a more fayalite-rich phase and talc, enhancing olivine stability at reaction zone conditions. These phases plus tremolite play a key role in maintaining fluid acidity, accounting for the unusually high levels of dissolved metals that characterize the high temperature Rainbow vent fluids. In contrast, hydrothermal alteration of ultramafic rocks by seawater at temperatures below 300C generally results in high pH fluids, serpentinization of olivine and coexisting pyroxene, and Ca for Mg exchange in the fluid. Data also indicate potentially high dissolved H2 and low dissolved Fe and total dissolved sulfide species. Analogous processes likely characterize subseafloor reaction zones at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF), which lies on the Atlantis Massif at 30N, 15 km west of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. Indeed, geochemical modeling of the Lost City vent fluid chemistry suggests subseafloor temperatures of approximately 200C, which are considerably greater than the measured vent fluid temperatures (40 to 90C), suggesting conductive cooling and seawater mixing effects; processes consistent with the reported mineralization of chimney structures. Available data also suggest moderately high fluid/rock mass ratios, which in combination with reaction zone temperature estimates make it unlikely that hydrothermal circulation can be a direct result of the exothermic nature of the conversion of olivine to serpentine. Accordingly, alternative heat sources need to

  5. Hydrothermal fault zones in the lower oceanic crust: An example from the Samail ophiolite, Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zihlmann, Barbara; Müller, Samuel; Koepke, Juergen; Teagle, Damon

    2017-04-01

    Hydrothermal circulation is a key process for the exchange of chemical elements between the oceans and the solid Earth and particularly for the extraction of heat from newly accreted crust at mid-ocean ridges. However, due to a dearth of samples from intact oceanic crust, or continuous samples from ophiolites, there remain major short comings in our understanding of hydrothermal circulation in the oceanic crust, especially in the deeper part. In particular, it is unknown whether fluid recharge and discharge occurs pervasively or if it is mainly channeled onto discrete zones such as faults. Here, we present a description of a hydrothermal fault zone that crops out in the layered gabbro section, of Wadi Gideah in the Samail ophiolite in Oman, which might be a channel of enhanced fluid flow. Field observations reveal an approximately one meter-thick chlorite - epidote normal fault with heavily altered gabbro clasts in the center. In places there is copper mineralization within the chlorite - epidote zone. In both, the hanging and the footwall the gabbro is heavily altered and veined, mainly with amphibole, epidote, prehnite and zeolite veins. Even though the fault zone is within the layered gabbro section, and perhaps only 1 km above the crust-mantle boundary, the gabbro around the fault zone shows highly variable textures. Preliminary strontium isotope whole rock data yield 87Sr/86Sr ratios of ˜ 0.7046, which are considerably more radiogenic than "fresh" gabbro from the Oman ophiolite (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7026 - 0.7030), and similar to black smoker hydrothermal signatures based on epidote, measured elsewhere in the ophiolite.

  6. Preliminary study of the importance of hydrothermal reactions on the temperature history of a hot, dry rock geothermal reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, J.R.

    1975-07-01

    The conditions under which the heat associated with hydrothermal reactions may be recovered from a dry rock geothermal reservoir were assessed. A theoretical computer model, based upon the finite element method, of a two-dimensional fracture in a hot, dry rock geothermal reservoir was developed and tested. Simulated water circulation through the fracture at constant velocity extracted heat from the wall rock via conduction as well as from chemical processes. Water temperature was assumed equal to the temperature of the wall rock boundary: thus, the combined processes of water circulation and heat transport were simply described by the two-dimensional heat diffusion equation with a time dependent water circulation boundary. The accuracy of the basic finite element approximation was tested by comparing numerical solutions to known analytical solutions for related mathematical models. Hydrothermal reactions occurring between water and a granitic source rock were subdivided into two categories; dissolving reactions and alteration reactions. It was found that the quartz dissolving reaction had little or no direct effect on reservoir temperatures for any combination of flow and fracture parameters. It was shown that hydrothermal alteration reactions could contribute significant chemical energy to a fractured system under conditions of small flow rate and large alteration velocities. Detailed studies of the time dependence of rock and water temperatures with and without alteration were determined.

  7. Characterization and modeling of illite crystal particles and growth mechanisms in a zoned hydrothermal deposit, Lake City, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bove, D.J.; Eberl, D.D.; McCarty, D.K.; Meeker, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    Mean thickness measurements and crystal-thickness distributions (CTDs) of illite particles vary systematically with changes in hydrothermal alteration type, fracture density, and attendant mineralization in a large acid-sulfate/Mo-porphyry hydrothermal system at Red Mountain, near Lake City, Colorado. The hydrothermal illites characterize an extensive zone of quartz-sericite-pyrite alteration beneath two deeply rooted bodies of magmatic-related, quartz-alunite altered rock. Nineteen illites from a 3000 ft vertical drill hole were analyzed by XRD using the PVP-10 intercalation method and the computer program MudMaster (Bertaut-Warren-Averbach technique). Mean crystallite thicknesses, as determined from 001 reflections, range from 5-7 nanometers (nm) at depths from 0-1700 ft, then sharply increase to 10-16 nm at depths between 1800-2100 ft, and decrease again to 4-5 nm below this level. The interval of largest particle thickness correlates strongly with the zone of most intense quartz-sericite-pyrite alteration (QSP) and attendant high-density stockwork fracturing, and with the highest concentrations of Mo within the drill core. CTD shapes for the illite particles fall into two main categories: asymptotic and lognormal. The shapes of the CTDs are dependent on conditions of illite formation. The asymptotic CTDs correspond to a nucleation and growth mechanism, whereas surface-controlled growth was the dominant mechanism for the lognormal CTDs. Lognormal CTDs coincide with major through-going fractures or stockwork zones, whereas asymptotic CTDs are present in wallrock distal to these intense fracture zones. The increase in illite particle size and the associated zone of intense QSP alteration and stockwork veining was related by proximity to the dacitic magma(s), which supplied both reactants and heat to the hydrothermal system. However, no changes in illite polytype, which in other studies reflect temperature transitions, were observed within this interval.

  8. Hydrothermal phase transformation of hematite to magnetite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jie-Feng; Tsai, Cho-Jen

    2014-01-01

    Different phases of iron oxide were obtained by hydrothermal treatment of ferric solution at 200°C with the addition of either KOH, ethylenediamine (EDA), or KOH and EDA into the reaction system. As usually observed, the α-Fe2O3 hexagonal plates and hexagonal bipyramids were obtained for reaction with KOH and EDA, respectively. When both KOH and EDA were added into the reaction system, we observed an interesting phase transformation from α-Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 at low-temperature hydrothermal conditions. The phase transformation involves the formation of α-Fe2O3 hexagonal plates, the dissolution of the α-Fe2O3 hexagonal plates, the reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+), and the nucleation and growth of new Fe3O4 polyhedral particles.

  9. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  10. Resistivity methods in exploration for hydrothermal resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiracek, G.R.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01

    The practical aspects of using dc resistivity in the exploration for hydrothermal resources are discussed. There are several reasons why low electrical resistivity is expected in hydrothermal aquifers but the association is not without pit falls. Besides outlining the reasons why resistivity has proven a successful geothermal exploration tool, a section on how resistivity is practiced is included. Here, the common electrode arrays are considered with their major advantages and disadvantages pointed out. The current status in resistivity interpretation schemes is touched upon with emphasis on computer modeling. Finally, a successful resistivity case history of a low-temperature resource at Las Alturas Estates, New Mexico is included to illustrate a specific resistivity exploration philosophy. The case history concludes with drilling results which are, of course, the ultimate test.

  11. Numerical 3D models support two distinct hydrothermal circulation systems at fast spreading ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenclever, Jörg; Theissen-Krah, Sonja; Rüpke, Lars

    2013-04-01

    half-widths in-between these numbers both systems interact periodically with each other. The potential coexistence of two hydrothermal circulations at fast spreading ridges is of importance for the interpretation of chemical signatures of hydrothermal vents and the quantification of the mass and energy exchange between ocean and solid Earth: (1) An extended off-axis system will expose a much larger volume of the crust to high-temperature hydrothermal alteration. Especially the lower crust (below the level of the melt lens) would also be exposed to hydrothermal fluid flow. (2) The off-axis vents may therefore have a different chemical signature as they sample the lower crust whereas their on-axis counterparts only sample the upper crust. This distinct signature may, however, be lost when both systems merge and mix before discharging. (3) The residence time of the off-axis fluids in the crust is much longer compared to that of the on-axis fluids. (4) The off-axis hydrothermal system may lead to additional ore deposits at some distance (1-2km) to the ridge axis, where one may not expect them to be.

  12. Bioavailability, Bioaccumulation and Biotransformation of arsenic in coral reef organisms surrounding an arsenic-rich marine shallow-water hydrothermal vent system in the coastal waters of Ambitle Island, Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichler, T.; Wallschläger, D.; Price, R. E.

    2009-12-01

    Marine shallow-water hydrothermal systems are often enriched in biologically toxic elements, thus making them ideal natural analogs for coastal anthropogenic pollution. Here, we report our investigation of the bioavailability, bioaccumulation, and biotransformation of hydrothermally-derived arsenic into several coral reef organisms from the arsenic-rich marine shallow-water hydrothermal system of Tutum Bay, Ambitle Island, in northeastern Papua New Guinea. Hydrothermal venting provided bioavailable As by two major pathways throughout Tutum Bay: 1) easily-exchangeable As from hydrothermally influenced sediments to as far away as 200 m from focused venting, and 2) in surface seawaters, which may allow for biological uptake by phytoplankton and transfer up the food web. The soft coral Clavularia sp., the calcareous algae Halimeda sp., and the tunicate Polycarpa sp. collected from the hydrothermal area each displayed distinctly higher (up to 20 times) total arsenic compared to the control site, with increasing trends while approaching focused hydrothermal venting. Organic and inorganic arsenic species were extracted intact from the tissues of each organism, separated by anion exchange chromatography, and analyzed by inductively-coupled plasma-dynamic reaction cell-mass spectrometry. Overall, speciation patterns for Clavularia were similar for the control site versus the hydrothermal site, although the concentrations were much higher. Elevated concentrations of DMA and cationic forms of arsenic, most likely AB, in Clavularia, both from the control site and from the hydrothermal area suggest its metabolic pathway is not altered due to hydrothermal activity, and is similar to other marine organisms. Arsenic speciation patterns in Polycarpa were also similar for both sites, and suggests uptake of arsenic via food chain, containing neither As(III) nor As(V), but abundant excluded As and DMA. It is unclear if methylation is taking place within this organism or prior to

  13. Subaqueous cryptodome eruption, hydrothermal activity and related seafloor morphologies on the andesitic North Su volcano

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thal, Janis; Tivey, Maurice; Yoerger, Dana R.; Bach, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    North Su is a double-peaked active andesite submarine volcano located in the eastern Manus Basin of the Bismarck Sea that reaches a depth of 1154 m. It hosts a vigorous and varied hydrothermal system with black and white smoker vents along with several areas of diffuse venting and deposits of native sulfur. Geologic mapping based on ROV observations from 2006 and 2011 combined with morphologic features identified from repeated bathymetric surveys in 2002 and 2011 documents the emplacement of a volcanic cryptodome between 2006 and 2011. We use our observations and rock analyses to interpret an eruption scenario where highly viscous, crystal-rich andesitic magma erupted slowly into the water-saturated, gravel-dominated slope of North Su. An intense fragmentation process produced abundant blocky clasts of a heterogeneous magma (olivine crystals within a rhyolitic groundmass) that only rarely breached through the clastic cover onto the seafloor. Phreatic and phreatomagmatic explosions beneath the seafloor cause mixing of juvenile and pre-existing lithic clasts and produce a volcaniclastic deposit. This volcaniclastic deposit consists of blocky, non-altered clasts next, variably (1-100%) altered clasts, hydrothermal precipitates and crystal fragments. The usually applied parameters to identify juvenile subaqueous lava fragments, i.e. fluidal shape or chilled margin, were not applicable to distinguish between pre-existing non-altered clasts and juvenile clasts. This deposit is updomed during further injection of magma and mechanical disruption. Gas-propelled turbulent clast-recycling causes clasts to develop variably rounded shapes. An abundance of blocky clasts and the lack of clasts typical for the contact of liquid lava with water is interpreted to be the result of a cooled, high-viscosity, crystal-rich magma that failed as a brittle solid upon stress. The high viscosity allows the lava to form blocky and short lobes. The pervasive volcaniclastic cover on North Su is

  14. Numerical simulation of magmatic hydrothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Geiger, S.; Hurwitz, S.; Driesner, T.

    2010-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of magmatic hydrothermal systems entails coupled and nonlinear multiphase flow, heat and solute transport, and deformation in highly heterogeneous media. Thus, quantitative analysis of these systems depends mainly on numerical solution of coupled partial differential equations and complementary equations of state (EOS). The past 2 decades have seen steady growth of computational power and the development of numerical models that have eliminated or minimized the need for various simplifying assumptions. Considerable heuristic insight has been gained from process-oriented numerical modeling. Recent modeling efforts employing relatively complete EOS and accurate transport calculations have revealed dynamic behavior that was damped by linearized, less accurate models, including fluid property control of hydrothermal plume temperatures and three-dimensional geometries. Other recent modeling results have further elucidated the controlling role of permeability structure and revealed the potential for significant hydrothermally driven deformation. Key areas for future reSearch include incorporation of accurate EOS for the complete H2O-NaCl-CO2 system, more realistic treatment of material heterogeneity in space and time, realistic description of large-scale relative permeability behavior, and intercode benchmarking comparisons. Copyright 2010 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Alteration, slope-classified alteration, and potential lahar inundation maps of volcanoes for the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Volcano Archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, John C.; Hubbard, Bernard E.; Pieri, David; Linick, Justin

    2015-01-01

    This study identifies areas prone to lahars from hydrothermally altered volcanic edifices on a global scale, using visible and near infrared (VNIR) and short wavelength infrared (SWIR) reflectance data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) and digital elevation data from the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) dataset. This is the first study to create a global database of hydrothermally altered volcanoes showing quantitatively compiled alteration maps and potentially affected drainages, as well as drainage-specific maps illustrating modeled lahars and their potential inundation zones. We (1) identified and prioritized 720 volcanoes based on population density surrounding the volcanoes using the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program database (GVP) and LandScan™ digital population dataset; (2) validated ASTER hydrothermal alteration mapping techniques using Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and ASTER data for Mount Shasta, California, and Pico de Orizaba (Citlaltépetl), Mexico; (3) mapped and slope-classified hydrothermal alteration using ASTER VNIR-SWIR reflectance data on 100 of the most densely populated volcanoes; (4) delineated drainages using ASTER GDEM data that show potential flow paths of possible lahars for the 100 mapped volcanoes; (5) produced potential alteration-related lahar inundation maps using the LAHARZ GIS code for Iztaccíhuatl, Mexico, and Mount Hood and Mount Shasta in the United States that illustrate areas likely to be affected based on DEM-derived volume estimates of hydrothermally altered rocks and the ~2x uncertainty factor inherent within a statistically-based lahar model; and (6) saved all image and vector data for 3D and 2D display in Google Earth™, ArcGIS® and other graphics display programs. In addition, these data are available from the ASTER Volcano Archive (AVA) for distribution (available at http://ava.jpl.nasa.gov/recent_alteration_zones.php).

  16. Multifractal spatial organisation in hydrothermal gold systems of the Archaean Yilgarn craton, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munro, Mark; Ord, Alison; Hobbs, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    A range of factors controls the location of hydrothermal alteration and gold mineralisation in the Earth's crust. These include the broad-scale lithospheric architecture, availability of fluid sources, fluid composition and pH, pressure-temperature conditions, microscopic to macroscopic structural development, the distribution of primary lithologies, and the extent of fluid-rock interactions. Consequently, the spatial distribution of alteration and mineralization in hydrothermal systems is complex and often considered highly irregular. However, despite this, do they organize themselves in a configuration that can be documented and quantified? Wavelets, mathematical functions representing wave-like oscillations, are commonly used in digital signals analysis. Wavelet-based multifractal analysis involves incrementally scanning a wavelet across the dataset multiple times (varying its scale) and recording its degree of fit to the signal at each interval. This approach (the wavelet transform modulus maxima method) highlights patterns of self-similarity present in the dataset and addresses the range of scales over which these patterns replicate themselves (expressed by their range in 'fractal dimension'). Focusing on seven gold ore bodies in the Archaean Yilgarn craton of Western Australia, this study investigates whether different aspects of hydrothermal gold systems evolve to organize themselves spatially as multifractals. Four ore bodies were selected from the Sunrise Dam deposit (situated in the Laverton tectonic zone of the Kurnalpi terrane) in addition to the Imperial, Majestic and Salt Creek gold prospects, situated in the Yindarlgooda dome of the Mount Monger goldfield (approximately 40km due east of Kalgoorlie). The Vogue, GQ, Cosmo East and Astro ore bodies at Sunrise Dam were chosen because they exhibit different structural geometries and relationships between gold and associated host-rock alteration styles. Wavelet-based analysis was conducted on 0.5m and 1m

  17. Alteration zone Mapping in the Meiduk and Sar Cheshmeh Porphyry Copper Mining Districts of Iran using Advanced Land Imager (ALI Satellite Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Beiranvand Pour

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the capability of Earth Observing-1 (EO1 Advanced Land Imager (ALI data for hydrothermal alteration mapping in the Meiduk and Sar Cheshmeh porphyry copper mining districts, SE Iran. Feature-oriented principal components selection, 4/2, 8/9, 5/4 band ratioing were applied to ALI data for enhancing the hydrothermally altered rocks associated with porphyry copper mineralization, lithological units and vegetation. Mixture-tuned matched-filtering (MTMF was tested to discriminate the hydrothermal alteration areas of porphyry copper mineralization from surrounding environment using the shortwave infrared bands of ALI. Results indicate that the tested methods are able to yield spectral information for identifying vegetation, iron oxide/hydroxide and clay minerals, lithological units and the discrimination of hydrothermally altered rocks from unaltered rocks using ALI data.

  18. Hyperspectral Alteration Information from Drill Cores and Deep Uranium Exploration in the Baiyanghe Uranium Deposit in the Xuemisitan Area, Xinjiang, China

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Qing-Jun Xu; Fa-Wang Ye; Shao-Feng Liu; Zhi-Xin Zhang; Chuan Zhang

    2017-01-01

    .... In this study, hyperspectral data are collected from drill cores in the Baiyanghe uranium deposit using a FieldSpec4 visible-shortwave infrared spectrometer to study the hydrothermal alteration...

  19. Geophysical imaging of hydrothermal shallow degassing in Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquet, S.; Holbrook, W. S.; Carr, B.; Sims, K. W. W.

    2016-12-01

    The Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field is the world's largest active hydrothermal system, with over 10,000 thermal features. Yet very little is known about the shallow "plumbing" system connecting hydrothermal reservoirs with the surface features. Here we present the results of geophysical investigations of shallow hydrothermal degassing in Yellowstone. In addition to electrical methods, we combined seismic refraction and surface-wave profiling to estimate pressure and shear wave velocities together with the Poisson's ratio. We find that resistivity data helps identifying hydrothermal areas and fluids flowpaths. Poisson's ratio shows a good sensitivity to saturation variations, highlighting gas saturated areas. Porosity and saturation predicted from rock physics modeling provide critical insight to estimate the depth of fluid phase separation and understand the evolution of hydrothermal systems. Finally, the consistency between Poisson's ratio and predicted saturation illustrates its ability to map shallow "plumbing" systems in hydrothermal areas and constrain gas saturation in depth.

  20. Hydrothermal pretreatment of palm oil empty fruit bunch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanungkalit, Sabar Pangihutan; Mansur, Dieni; Nurhakim, Boby; Agustin, Astrid; Rinaldi, Nino; Muryanto, Fitriady, Muhammad Ariffudin

    2017-01-01

    Hydrothermal pretreatment methods in 2nd generation bioethanol production more profitable to be developed, since the conventional pretreatment, by using acids or alkalis, is associated with the serious economic and environmental constraints. The current studies investigate hydrothermal pretreatment of palm oil empty fruit bunch (EFB) in a batch tube reactor system with temperature and time range from 160 to 240 C and 15 to 30 min, respectively. The EFB were grinded and separated into 3 different particles sizes i.e. 10 mesh, 18 mesh and 40 mesh, prior to hydrothermal pretreatment. Solid yield and pH of the treated EFB slurries changed over treatment severities. The chemical composition of EFB was greatly affected by the hydrothermal pretreatment especially hemicellulose which decreased at higher severity factor as determined by HPLC. Both partial removal of hemicellulose and migration of lignin during hydrothermal pretreatment caused negatively affect for enzymatic hydrolysis. This studies provided important factors for maximizing hydrothermal pretreatment of EFB.

  1. Hydrothermal Conditions and the Origin of Cellular Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deamer, David W; Georgiou, Christos D

    2015-12-01

    The conditions and properties of hydrothermal vents and hydrothermal fields are compared in terms of their ability to support processes related to the origin of life. The two sites can be considered as alternative hypotheses, and from this comparison we propose a series of experimental tests to distinguish between them, focusing on those that involve concentration of solutes, self-assembly of membranous compartments, and synthesis of polymers. Key Word: Hydrothermal systems.

  2. Post-impact hydrothermal system geochemistry and mineralogy: Rochechouart impact structure, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Sarah

    2014-05-01

    Hypervelocity impacts generate extreme temperatures and pressures in target rocks and may permanently alter them. The process of cratering is at the forefront of research involving the study of the evolution and origin of life, both on Mars and Earth, as conditions may be favourable for hydrothermal systems to form. Of the 170 known impact structures on Earth, over one-third are known to contain fossil hydrothermal systems [1]. The introduction of water to a system, when coupled with even small amounts of heat, has the potential to completely alter the target or host rock geochemistry. Often, the mineral assemblages produced in these environments are unique, and are useful indicators of post-impact conditions. The Rochechouart impact structure in South-Central France is dated to 201 ± 2 Ma into a primarily granitic target [2]. Much of the original morphological features have been eroded and very little of the allochthonous impactites remain. This has, however, allowed researchers to study the shock effects on the lower and central areas of the structure, as well as any subsequent hydrothermal activity. Previous work has focused on detailed classification of the target and autochthonous and allochthonous impactites [3, 4], identification of the projectile [5], and dating the structure using Ar-isotope techniques [2]. Authors have also noted geochemical evidence of K-metasomatism, which is pronounced throughout all lithologies as enrichment in K2O and depletion in CaO and Na2O [3, 4, 5]. This indicates a pervasive hydrothermal system, whose effects throughout the structure have yet to be studied in detail, particularly in those parts at and below the transient floor. The purpose of this study is to classify the mineralogical and geochemical effects of the hydrothermal system. Samples were collected via permission from the Réserve Naturelle de l'Astroblème de Rochechouart-Chassenon [6]. Sample selection was based on the presence of secondary mineralization in hand

  3. Interactions Between Serpentinization, Hydrothermal Activity and Microbial Community at the Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delacour, A.; Frueh-Green, G. L.; Bernasconi, S. M.; Schaeffer, P.; Frank, M.; Gutjahr, M.; Kelley, D. S.

    2008-12-01

    Seafloor investigations of slow- and ultraslow-spreading ridges have reported many occurrences of exposed mantle peridotites and gabbroic rocks on the ocean floor. Along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, these uplifted portions of oceanic crust host high-temperature black smoker-type hydrothermal systems (e.g., Rainbow, Logatchev, Saldanha), and the more distinct low-temperature Lost City Hydrothermal Field (LCHF). Built on a southern terrace of the Atlantis Massif, the LCHF is composed of carbonate-brucite chimneys that vent alkaline and low-temperature (40-90°C) hydrothermal fluids. These fluids are related to serpentinization of mantle peridotites, which together with minor gabbroic intrusions form the basement of the LCHF. Long-lived hydrothermal activity at Lost City led to extensive seawater-rock interaction in the basement rocks, as indicated by seawater-like Sr- and mantle to unradiogenic Nd-isotope compositions of the serpentinites. These high fluid fluxes in the southern part of the massif influenced the conditions of serpentinization and have obliterated the early chemical signatures in the serpentinites, especially those of carbon and sulfur. Compared to reducing conditions commonly formed during the first stages of serpentinization, serpentinization at Lost City is characterized by relatively oxidizing conditions resulting in a predominance of magnetite, the mobilization/dissolution and oxidation of igneous sulfides to secondary pyrite, and the incorporation of seawater sulfate, all leading to high bulk-rock S-isotope compositions. The Lost City hydrothermal fluids contain high concentrations in methane, hydrogen, and low-molecular weight hydrocarbons considered as being produced abiotically. In contrast, organic compounds in the serpentinites are dominated by the occurrences of isoprenoids (pristane, phytane, and squalane), polycyclic compounds (hopanes and steranes), and higher abundances of C16 to C20 n-alkanes indicative of a marine organic input. We

  4. Hydrothermal metasomatism of a peralkaline granite pegmatite, Khaldzan Buragtag massif, Mongolian Altai; complex evolution of REE-Nb minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagiński, Bogusław; Jokubauskas, Petras; Domańska-Siuda, Justyna; Kartashov, Pavel; Macdonald, Ray

    2016-09-01

    The low-temperature hydrothermal alteration of certain rare-metal minerals is recorded in a quartz-epidote metasomatite from the Tsakhirin Khuduk occurrence in the Khaldzan-Buragtag Nb-REE-Zr deposit, Mongolian Altai. A peralkaline granitic pegmatite was metasomatized by hydrothermal fluids released from associated intrusions, with the formation of, inter alia, chevkinite-(Ce), fergusonite-(Nd) and minerals of the epidote group. The textural pattern indicates recrystallization and coarsening of these phases. Later, low-temperature alteration by fluids resulted in the chevkinite-(Ce) being replaced by complex titanite-TiO2 -cerite-(Ce)-hingganite-hydroxylbastnasite-( Ce) assemblages. Calcite formed late-stage veins and patches. The hydrous fluids were poor in F and CO2 but had high Ca contents.

  5. Cuprous oxide thin films grown by hydrothermal electrochemical deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majumder, M., E-mail: mousumi@cgcri.res.in; Biswas, I.; Pujaru, S.; Chakraborty, A.K.

    2015-08-31

    Semiconducting cuprous oxide films were grown by a hydrothermal electro-deposition technique on metal (Cu) and glass (ITO) substrates between 60 °C and 100 °C. X-ray diffraction studies reveal the formation of cubic cuprous oxide films in different preferred orientations depending upon the deposition technique used. Film growth, uniformity, grain size, optical band gap and photoelectrochemical response were found to improve in the hydrothermal electrochemical deposition technique. - Highlights: • Cu{sub 2}O thin films were grown on Cu and glass substrates. • Conventional and hydrothermal electrochemical deposition techniques were used. • Hydrothermal electrochemical growth showed improved morphology, thickness and optical band gap.

  6. Pt-Os isotopic constraints on the age of hydrothermal overprinting on the Jinchuan Ni-Cu-PGE deposit, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shenghong; Yang, Gang; Qu, Wenjun; Du, Andao; Hanski, Eero; Lahaye, Yann; Chen, Jiangfeng

    2017-12-01

    Platinum group element (PGE) mineralization occurs associated with mafic-ultramafic rocks in different environments. Although the PGE enrichment is primarily caused by magmatic processes, remobilization of Pd and Pt by hydrothermal fluids has likely been an important mechanism in increasing the precious metal grade in many cases. However, the timing of PGE enrichment by hydrothermal fluid processes is commonly difficult to constrain. The Jinchuan ultramafic intrusion in Northwest China is ranked the world's third largest magmatic Ni-Cu sulfide deposit. Besides the main ore body consisting of net-textured and disseminated sulfides, there is hydrothermal mineralization associated with sheared contact zones of the intrusion, which shows elevated Cu and Pt concentrations. The unusually high Pt is hosted mainly in sperrylite within altered silicates. In this study, we applied the Pt-Os geochronometer to a Cu-Pt-rich ore body, yielding an isochron age of 436 ± 23 Ma. This age is significantly younger than the main ore formation age of ca. 825 Ma, but similar to that of the continental collision event between the Qaidam-Qilian Block and Alax Block of North China. This indicates that the intrusion may have been uplifted during the Paleozoic orogenic processes from deeper crust, resulting in the generation of the Cu-Pt-rich hydrothermal ore body. Our new data provide the first strong age constraints on the hydrothermal PGE enrichment, showing that the Pt-Os isotope system is potentially a powerful tool for dating hydrothermal overprinting on Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide deposits.

  7. Hydrothermal system of the Papandayan Volcano from temperature, self-potential (SP) and geochemical measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrdina, Svetlana; Revil, André; Gunawan, Hendra; Saing, Ugan B.; Grandis, Hendra

    2017-07-01

    Papandayan volcano in West Java, Indonesia, is characterized by intense hydrothermal activities manifested by numerous fumaroles at three craters or kawah, i.e. Mas, Manuk and Baru. The latter was created after November 2002 phreatic eruption. Since 2011, numerous volcano-tectonic B events are encountered and the volcano was set on alert status on several occasions. The purpose of the present study is to delineate the structure of the summital hydrothermal system from Self-Potential (SP), soil temperature and gas concentrations in the soil (CO2, SO2 and H2S) data. This combination of geophysical and geochemical methods allows identification of the weak permeable zones serving as preferential pathways for hydrothermal circulation and potential candidates to future landslides or flank collapses. This study is an on-going collaborative research project and we plan to conduct electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and also Induced-Polarization (IP) surveys. Additional data would allow the 3D imaging of the studied area. The IP parameters will be used to characterise and to quantify the degree of alteration of the volcanic rocks as has been shown very recently in the laboratory studies. There are also rocks and soil samples that will undergo laboratory analyses at ISTerre for IP and complex resistivity parameters at the sample scale that will help to interpret the survey results.

  8. Hydrothermal synthesis of bi-functional nanostructured manganese tungstate catalysts for selective oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Lunkenbein, Thomas; Kröhnert, Jutta; Pfeifer, Verena; Girgsdies, Frank; Rosowski, Frank; Schlögl, Robert; Trunschke, Annette

    2016-07-04

    The mechanism of C-H activation in selective oxidation reactions of short-chain alkane molecules over transition metal oxides is critically affected by the balance of acid-base and redox sites at the surface of the catalyst. Using the example of manganese tungstate we discuss how the relative abundance of these sites can be controlled via synthetic techniques. Phase-pure catalysts composed of the thermodynamic stable monoclinic MnWO4 phase have been prepared using hydrothermal synthesis. Variation of the initial pH value resulted in rod-shaped nano-crystalline MnWO4 catalysts composed of particles with varying aspect ratio. The synthesis products have been analysed using transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, infrared, and photoelectron spectroscopy. In situ Raman spectroscopy was used to investigate the dissolution-re-crystallization processes occurring under hydrothermal conditions. Ethanol oxidation was applied to probe the surface functionalities in terms of acid-base and redox properties. Changes in the aspect ratio of the primary catalyst particles are reflected in the product distribution induced by altering the fraction of acid-base and redox sites exposed at the surface of the catalysts in agreement with the proposed mechanism of particle growth by re-crystallization during ageing under hydrothermal conditions.

  9. The nature of hydrothermal fluids in the Kahang porphyry copper deposit (Northeast of Isfahan) based on mineralography, fluid inclusion and stable isotopic data

    OpenAIRE

    Salimeh Sadat Komeili; Mahmoud Khalili; Hooshang Asadi Haroni; Hashem Bagheri; Farimah Ayati

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The Kahang Cu- Mo deposit is situated approximately 73 Km northeast of Isfahan. Asadi (2007) identified a geological reserve of 40 Mt (proven reserve) grading at 0.53 Cu, 0.02 Mo and estimated reserve of 120 Mt. All the rock types in the region have been subjected to hydrothermal solutions which gave rise to three different alteration facies. The dacite and rhyodacite volcanic rocks and granitic- granodioritic stocks have experienced phyllic alteration. Disseminated and stockw...

  10. Zinc and germanium in the sedimentary rocks of Gale Crater on Mars indicate hydrothermal enrichment followed by diagenetic fractionation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Jeff A.; Schmidt, Mariek E.; Gellert, Ralf; Boyd, Nicholas I.; Desouza, Elstan D.; Flemming, Roberta L.; Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Ming, Douglas W.; Perrett, Glynis M.; Rampe, Elizabeth B.; Thompson, Lucy M.; VanBommel, Scott J. V.; Yen, Albert S.

    2017-08-01

    Zinc and germanium enrichments have been discovered in sedimentary rocks in Gale Crater, Mars, by the Alpha Particle X-ray Spectrometer on the rover Curiosity. Concentrations of Zn (910 ± 840 ppm) and Ge (65 ± 58 ppm) are tens to hundreds of times greater than in Martian meteorites and estimates for average silicate Mars. Enrichments occur in diverse rocks including minimally to extensively altered basaltic and alkalic sedimentary rocks. The magnitude of the enrichments indicates hydrothermal fluids, but Curiosity has not discovered unambiguous hydrothermal mineral assemblages. We propose that Zn- and Ge-rich hydrothermal deposits in the source region were dispersed in siliciclastic sediments during transport into the crater. Subsequent diagenetic mobilization and fractionation of Zn and Ge is evident in a Zn-rich sandstone (Windjana; Zn 4000 ppm, Ge 85 ppm) and associated Cl-rich vein (Stephen; Zn 8000 ppm, Ge 60 ppm), in Ge-rich veins (Garden City; Zn 2200 ppm, Ge 650 ppm), and in silica-rich alteration haloes leached of Zn (30-200 ppm). In moderately to highly altered silica-rich rocks, Ge remained immobile relative to leached elements (Fe, Mn, Mg, and Ca), consistent with fluid interaction at pH ≪ 7. In contrast, crosscutting Ge-rich veins at Garden City suggest aqueous mobilization as Ge-F complexes at pH Gale sediments and can aid in unraveling fluid histories as Curiosity's traverse continues.

  11. Mixing from below in hydrothermal ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bons, Paul D.; Gomez-Rivas, Enrique; Markl, Gregor; Walter, Bejamin

    2014-05-01

    Unconformity-related hydrothermal ore deposits typically show indications of mixing of two end-member fluids: (a) hot, deep, rock-buffered basement brines and (b) colder fluids derived from the surface or overlying sediments. The hydromechanics of bringing these fluids together from above and below remain unclear. Classical percolative Darcy-flow models are inconsistent with (1) fluid overpressure indicated by fracturing and brecciation, (2) fast fluid flow indicated by thermal disequilibrium, and (3) strong fluid composition variations on the mm-scale, indicated by fluid inclusion analyses (Bons et al. 2012; Fusswinkel et al. 2013). We propose that fluids first descend, sucked down by desiccation reactions in exhumed basement. Oldest fluids reach greatest depths, where long residence times and elevated temperatures allow them the extensively equilibrate with their host rock, reach high salinity and scavenge metals, if present. Youngest fluids can only penetrate to shallower depths and can (partially) retain signatures from their origin, for example high Cl/Br ratios from the dissolution of evaporitic halite horizons. When fluids are released from all levels of the crustal column, these fluids mix during rapid ascent to form hydrothermal ore deposits. Mixing from below provides a viable hydromechanical mechanism to explain the common phenomenon of mixed shallow and deep fluids in hydrothermal ore deposits. Bons, P.D., Elburg, M.A., Gomez-Rivas, E. 2012. A review of the formation of tectonic veins and their microstructures. J. Struct. Geol. doi:10.1016/j.jsg.2012.07.005 Fusswinkel, T., Wagner, T., Wälle, M., Wenzel, T., Heinrich, C.A., Markl, M. 2013. Fluid mixing forms basement-hosted Pb-Zn deposits: Insight from metal and halogen geochemistry of individual fluid inclusions. Geology. doi:10.1130/G34092.1

  12. U-Pb dating of interspersed gabbroic magmatism and hydrothermal metamorphism during lower crustal accretion, Vema lithospheric section, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux, Matthew; Jöns, Niels; Bowring, Samuel; Lissenberg, C. Johan; Bach, Wolfgang; Kylander-Clark, Andrew; Hacker, Bradley; Dudás, Frank

    2015-04-01

    New U/Pb analyses of zircon and xenotime constrain the timing of magmatism, magmatic assimilation, and hydrothermal metamorphism during formation of the lower crust at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. The studied sample is an altered gabbro from the Vema lithospheric section (11°N). Primary gabbroic minerals have been almost completely replaced by multiple hydrothermal overprints: cummingtonitic amphibole and albite formed during high-temperature hydration reactions and are overgrown first by kerolite and then prehnite and chlorite. In a previous study, clear inclusion-free zircons from the sample yielded Th-corrected 206Pb/238U dates of 13.528 ± 0.101 to 13.353 ± 0.057 Ma. Ti concentrations, reported here, zoning patterns and calculated Th/U of the dated grains are consistent with these zircons having grown during igneous crystallization. To determine the timing of hydrothermal metamorphism, we dated a second population of zircons, with ubiquitous igneous zircon during or following hydrothermal metamorphism. Th-corrected 206Pb/238U dates for the inclusion-rich zircons range from 13.598 ± 0.012 to 13.503 ± 0.018 Ma and predate crystallization of all but one of the inclusion-free zircons, suggesting that the inclusion-rich zircons were assimilated from older hydrothermally altered wall rocks. The xenotime dates are sensitive to the Th correction applied, but even using a maximum correction, 206Pb/238U dates range from 13.341 ± 0.162 to 12.993 ± 0.055 Ma and postdate crystallization of both the inclusion-rich zircons and inclusion-free igneous zircons, reflecting a second hydrothermal event. The data provide evidence for alternating magmatism and hydrothermal metamorphism at or near the ridge axis during accretion of the lower crust at a ridge-transform intersection and suggest that hydrothermally altered crust was assimilated into younger gabbroic magmas. The results of this study show that high-precision U-Pb dating is a powerful method for studying the timing of

  13. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Treatment Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, Peter P.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2015-08-31

    A preliminary hazard assessment was completed during February 2015 to evaluate the conceptual design of the modular hydrothermal liquefaction treatment system. The hazard assessment was performed in 2 stages. An initial assessment utilizing Hazard Identification and Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) techniques identified areas with significant or unique hazards (process safety-related hazards) that fall outside of the normal operating envelope of PNNL and warranted additional analysis. The subsequent assessment was based on a qualitative What-If analysis. This analysis was augmented, as necessary, by additional quantitative analysis for scenarios involving a release of hazardous material or energy with the potential for affecting the public.

  14. Hydrothermal origin of halogens at Home Plate, Gusev Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, M.E.; Ruff, S.W.; McCoy, T.J.; Farrand, W. H.; Johnson, J. R.; Gellert, Ralf; Ming, D. W.; Morris, R.V.; Cabrol, N.; Lewis, K.W.; Schroeder, C.

    2008-01-01

    In the Inner Basin of the Columbia Hills, Gusev Crater is Home Plate, an 80 m platform of layered elastic rocks of the Barnhill class with microscopic and macroscopic textures, including a bomb sag, suggestive of a phreatomagmatic origin. We present data acquired by the Spirit Mars Exploration Rover by Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS), Mo??ssbauer Spectrometer, Miniature Thermal Emission Spectrometer (Mini-TES), and Panoramic Camera (Pancam) for the Barnhill class rocks and nearby vesicular Irvine class basalts. In major element concentrations (e.g., SiO2, Al2O3, MgO, and FeO*), the two rock classes are similar, suggesting that they are derived from a similar magmatic source. The Barnhill class, however, has higher abundances of Cl, Br, Zn, and Ge with comparable SO3 to the Irvine basalts. Nanophase ferric oxide (np ox) and volcanic glass were detected in the Barnhill class rocks by Mo??ssbauer and Mini-TES, respectively, and imply greater alteration and cooling rates in the Barnhill than in the Irvine class rocks. The high volatile elements in the Barnhill class agree with volcanic textures that imply interaction with a briny groundwater during eruption and (or) by later alteration. Differences in composition between the Barnhill and Irvine classes allow the fingerprinting of a Na-Mg-Zn-Ge-Cl-Br (??Fe ?? Ca ?? CO2) brine with low S. Nearby sulfate salt soils of fumarolic origin may reflect fractionation of an acidic S-rich vapor during boiling of a hydrothermal brine at depth. Persistent groundwater was likely present during and after the formation of Home Plate. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Hydrothermal stability of microporous silica and niobia-silica membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boffa, V.; Blank, David H.A.; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrothermal stability of microporous niobia–silica membranes was investigated and compared with silica membranes. The membranes were exposed to hydrothermal conditions at 150 and 200 °C for 70 h. The change of pore structure before and after exposure to steam was probed by single-gas permeation

  16. Hydrothermal systems as environments for the emergence of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, E L

    1996-01-01

    Analysis of the chemical disequilibrium provided by the mixing of hydrothermal fluids and seawater in present-day systems indicates that organic synthesis from CO2 or carbonic acid is thermodynamically favoured in the conditions in which hyperthermophilic microorganisms are known to live. These organisms lower the Gibbs free energy of the chemical mixture by synthesizing many of the components of their cells. Primary productivity is enormous in hydrothermal systems because it depends only on catalysis of thermodynamically favourable, exergonic reactions. It follows that hydrothermal systems may be the most favourable environments for life on Earth. This fact makes hydrothermal systems logical candidates for the location of the emergence of life, a speculation that is supported by genetic evidence that modern hyperthermophilic organisms are closer to a common ancestor than any other forms of life. The presence of hydrothermal systems on the early Earth would correspond to the presence of liquid water. Evidence that hydrothermal systems existed early in the history of Mars raises the possibility that life may have emerged on Mars as well. Redox reactions between water and rock establish the potential for organic synthesis in and around hydrothermal systems. Therefore, the single most important parameter for modelling the geochemical emergence of life on the early Earth or Mars is the composition of the rock which hosts the hydrothermal system.

  17. Levulinic acid from orange peel waste by hydrothermal carbonization (HTC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Puccini, Monica; Licursi, Domenico; Stefanelli, Eleonora; Vitolo, Sandra; Galletti, Anna Maria Raspolli; Heeres, Hero Jan

    2016-01-01

    With the awareness of the need for optimal and sustainable use of natural resources, hydrothermal treatment of biomass and biomass waste for energy and resource recovery has received increasing attention. The hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) of a biomass is achieved using water as the reaction

  18. EFFECTS OF HEAT-FLOW AND HYDROTHERMAL FLUIDS FROM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Volcanic intrusions and hydrothermal activity have modified the diagenetic minerals. In the Ulster Basin, UK, most of the authigenic mineralization in the Permo-Triassic sandstones pre-dated tertiary volcanic intrusions. The hydrothermal fluids and heat-flow from the volcanic intrusions did not affect quartz and feldspar ...

  19. Photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B dye using hydrothermally ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The sunlight mediated photocatalytic degradation of rhodamine B (RB) dye was studied using hydrothermally prepared ZnO ( = 150°C and ∼ 20–30 bars). Zinc chloride was used as the starting material along with sodium hydroxide as a solvent in the hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO. Different durations were tried to ...

  20. A preliminary study of older hot spring alteration in Sevenmile Hole, Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Peter B.; Phillips, Allison; John, David; Cosca, Michael; Pritchard, Chad; Andersen, Allen; Manion, Jennifer

    2009-11-01

    Erosion in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone Caldera (640 ka), Wyoming, has exposed a cross section of older hydrothermal alteration in the canyon walls. The altered outcrops of the post-collapse tuff of Sulphur Creek (480 ka) extend from the canyon rim to more than 300 m beneath it. The hydrothermal minerals are zoned, with an advanced argillic alteration consisting of an association of quartz (opal) + kaolinite ± alunite ± dickite, and an argillic or potassic alteration association with quartz + illite ± adularia. Disseminated fine-grained pyrite or marcasite is ubiquitous in both alteration types. These alteration associations are characteristic products of shallow volcanic epithermal environments. The contact between the two alteration types is about 100 m beneath the rim. By analogy to other active geothermal systems including active hydrothermal springs in the Yellowstone Caldera, the transition from kaolinite to illite occurred at temperatures in the range 150 to 170 °C. An 40Ar/ 39Ar age on alunite of 154,000 ± 16,000 years suggests that hydrothermal activity has been ongoing since at least that time. A northwest-trending linear array of extinct and active hot spring centers in the Sevenmile Hole area implies a deeper structural control for the upflowing hydrothermal fluids. We interpret this deeper structure to be the Yellowstone Caldera ring fault that is covered by the younger tuff of Sulphur Creek. The Sevenmile Hole altered area lies at the eastern end of a band of hydrothermal centers that may mark the buried extension of the Yellowstone Caldera ring fault across the northern part of the Caldera.

  1. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Wastewater Treatment Plant Solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billing, Justin M.

    2016-10-16

    Feedstock cost is the greatest barrier to the commercial production of biofuels. The merits of any thermochemical or biological conversion process are constrained by their applicability to the lowest cost feedstocks. At PNNL, a recent resource assessment of wet waste feedstocks led to the identification of waste water treatment plant (WWTP) solids as a cost-negative source of biomass. WWTP solids disposal is a growing environmental concern [1, 2] and can account for up to half of WWTP operating costs. The high moisture content is well-suited for hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), avoiding the costs and parasitic energy losses associated with drying the feedstock for incineration. The yield and quality of biocrude and upgraded biocrude from WWTP solids is comparable to that obtained from algae feedstocks but the feedstock cost is $500-1200 less per dry ton. A collaborative project was initiated and directed by the Water Environment & Reuse Foundation (WERF) and included feedstock identification, dewatering, shipping to PNNL, conversion to biocrude by HTL, and catalytic hydrothermal gasification of the aqueous byproduct. Additional testing at PNNL included biocrude upgrading by catalytic hydrotreatment, characterization of the hydrotreated product, and a preliminary techno-economic analysis (TEA) based on empirical results. This short article will cover HTL conversion and biocrude upgrading. The WERF project report with complete HTL results is now available through the WERF website [3]. The preliminary TEA is available as a PNNL report [4].

  2. Powering prolonged hydrothermal activity inside Enceladus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choblet, Gaël; Tobie, Gabriel; Sotin, Christophe; Běhounková, Marie; Čadek, Ondřej; Postberg, Frank; Souček, Ondřej

    2017-12-01

    Geophysical data from the Cassini spacecraft imply the presence of a global ocean underneath the ice shell of Enceladus1, only a few kilometres below the surface in the South Polar Terrain2-4. Chemical analyses indicate that the ocean is salty5 and is fed by ongoing hydrothermal activity6-8. In order to explain these observations, an abnormally high heat power (>20 billion watts) is required, as well as a mechanism to focus endogenic activity at the south pole9,10. Here, we show that more than 10 GW of heat can be generated by tidal friction inside the unconsolidated rocky core. Water transport in the tidally heated permeable core results in hot narrow upwellings with temperatures exceeding 363 K, characterized by powerful (1-5 GW) hotspots at the seafloor, particularly at the south pole. The release of heat in narrow regions favours intense interaction between water and rock, and the transport of hydrothermal products from the core to the plume sources. We are thus able to explain the main global characteristics of Enceladus: global ocean, strong dissipation, reduced ice-shell thickness at the south pole and seafloor activity. We predict that this endogenic activity can be sustained for tens of millions to billions of years.

  3. Useful Ingredients Recovery from Sewage Sludge by using Hydrothermal Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Koichi; Moriyama, Mika; Yamasaki, Yuki; Takahashi, Yui; Inoue, Chihiro

    2006-05-01

    Hydrothermal treatment of sludge from a sewage treatment plant was conducted to obtain useful ingredients for culture of specific microbes which can reduce polysulfide ion into sulfide ion and/or hydrogen sulfide. Several additives such as acid, base, and oxidizer were added to the hydrothermal reaction of excess sludge to promote the production of useful materials. After hydrothermal treatment, reaction solution and precipitation were qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed and estimated the availability as nutrition in cultural medium. From the results of product analysis, most of organic solid in sewage was basically decomposed by hydrothermal hydrolysis and transformed into oily or water-soluble compounds. Bacterial culture of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) showed the good results in multiplication with medium which was obtained from hydrothermal treatment of sewage sludge with magnesium or calcium hydroxide and hydrogen peroxide.

  4. Identifying Alteration and Water on MT. Baker, WA with Geophysics: Implications for Volcanic Landslide Hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, C.; Deszcz-Pan, M.; Bedrosian, P.; Minsley, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    Helicopter magnetic and electromagnetic (HEM) data, along with rock property measurements, local ground-based gravity, time domain electromagnetic (TEM) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) data help identify alteration and water-saturated zones on Mount Baker, Washington. Hydrothermally altered rocks, particularly if water-saturated, can weaken volcanic edifices, increasing the potential for catastrophic sector collapses that can lead to far traveled and destructive debris flows. At Mount Baker volcano, collapses of hydrothermally altered rocks from the edifice have generated numerous debris flows that constitute their greatest volcanic hazards. Critical to quantifying this hazard is knowledge of the three-dimensional distribution of pervasively altered rock, shallow groundwater and ice that plays an important role in transforming debris avalanches to far traveled lahars. The helicopter geophysical data, combined with geological mapping and rock property measurements, indicate the presence of localized zones of less than 100 m thickness of water-saturated hydrothermally altered rock beneath Sherman Crater and the Dorr Fumarole Fields at Mt. Baker. New stochastic inversions of the HEM data indicate variations in resistivity in inferred perched aquifers—distinguishing between fresh and saline waters, possibly indicating the influence of nearby alteration and/or hydrothermal systems on water quality. The new stochastic results better resolve ice thickness than previous inversions, and also provide important estimates of uncertainty on ice thickness and other parameters. New gravity data will help constrain the thickness of the ice and alteration. Nuclear magnetic resonance data indicate that the hydrothermal clays contain 50% water with no evidence for water beneath the ice. The HEM data identify water-saturated fresh volcanic rocks from the surface to the detection limit ( 100 m) over the entire summit of Mt. Baker. Localized time domain EM soundings indicate that

  5. The Guaymas Basin hiking guide to hydrothermal mounds, chimneys and microbial mats: complex seafloor expressions of subsurface hydrothermal circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas eTeske

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The hydrothermal mats, mounds and chimneys of the southern Guaymas Basin are the surface expression of complex subsurface hydrothermal circulation patterns. In this overview we document the most frequently visited features of this hydrothermal area with photographs, temperature measurements, and selected geochemical data; many of these distinct habitats await characterization of their microbial communities and activities. Microprofiler deployments on microbial mats and hydrothermal sediments show their steep geochemical and thermal gradients at millimeter-scale vertical resolution. Mapping these hydrothermal features and sampling locations within the southern Guaymas Basin suggest linkages to underlying shallow sills and heatflow gradients. Recognizing the inherent spatial limitations of much current Guaymas Basin sampling calls for a wider survey of the entire spreading region.

  6. Volcano electrical tomography unveils edifice collapse hazard linked to hydrothermal system structure and dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Carbajal, Marina; Komorowski, Jean-Christophe; Nicollin, Florence; Gibert, Dominique

    2016-07-26

    Catastrophic collapses of the flanks of stratovolcanoes constitute a major hazard threatening numerous lives in many countries. Although many such collapses occurred following the ascent of magma to the surface, many are not associated with magmatic reawakening but are triggered by a combination of forcing agents such as pore-fluid pressurization and/or mechanical weakening of the volcanic edifice often located above a low-strength detachment plane. The volume of altered rock available for collapse, the dynamics of the hydrothermal fluid reservoir and the geometry of incipient collapse failure planes are key parameters for edifice stability analysis and modelling that remain essentially hidden to current volcano monitoring techniques. Here we derive a high-resolution, three-dimensional electrical conductivity model of the La Soufrière de Guadeloupe volcano from extensive electrical tomography data. We identify several highly conductive regions in the lava dome that are associated to fluid saturated host-rock and preferential flow of highly acid hot fluids within the dome. We interpret this model together with the existing wealth of geological and geochemical data on the volcano to demonstrate the influence of the hydrothermal system dynamics on the hazards associated to collapse-prone altered volcanic edifices.

  7. Entropy Production in Convective Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boersing, Nele; Wellmann, Florian; Niederau, Jan

    2016-04-01

    Exploring hydrothermal reservoirs requires reliable estimates of subsurface temperatures to delineate favorable locations of boreholes. It is therefore of fundamental and practical importance to understand the thermodynamic behavior of the system in order to predict its performance with numerical studies. To this end, the thermodynamic measure of entropy production is considered as a useful abstraction tool to characterize the convective state of a system since it accounts for dissipative heat processes and gives insight into the system's average behavior in a statistical sense. Solving the underlying conservation principles of a convective hydrothermal system is sensitive to initial conditions and boundary conditions which in turn are prone to uncertain knowledge in subsurface parameters. There exist multiple numerical solutions to the mathematical description of a convective system and the prediction becomes even more challenging as the vigor of convection increases. Thus, the variety of possible modes contained in such highly non-linear problems needs to be quantified. A synthetic study is carried out to simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in a finite porous layer heated from below. Various two-dimensional models are created such that their corresponding Rayleigh numbers lie in a range from the sub-critical linear to the supercritical non-linear regime, that is purely conductive to convection-dominated systems. Entropy production is found to describe the transient evolution of convective processes fairly well and can be used to identify thermodynamic equilibrium. Additionally, varying the aspect ratio for each Rayleigh number shows that the variety of realized convection modes increases with both larger aspect ratio and higher Rayleigh number. This phenomenon is also reflected by an enlarged spread of entropy production for the realized modes. Consequently, the Rayleigh number can be correlated to the magnitude of entropy production. In cases of moderate

  8. Strengths, challenges, and opportunities for hydrothermal pretreatment in lignocellulosic biorefineries: Hydrothermal Pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Bin [Bioproducts, Sciences, and Engineering Laboratory, Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Richland WA USA; Tao, Ling [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO USA; Wyman, Charles E. [Chemical and Environmental Engineering Department and Center for Environmental Research and Technology, Bourns College of Engineering, University of California at Riverside, CA, USA, BioEnergy Science Center (BESC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN USA

    2017-10-11

    Pretreatment prior to or during biological conversion is required to achieve high sugar yields essential to economic production of fuels and chemicals from low cost, abundant lignocellulosic biomass. Aqueous thermochemical pretreatments achieve this performance objective from pretreatment coupled with subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis, but chemical pretreatment can also suffer from additional costs for exotic materials of construction, the need to recover or neutralize the chemicals, introduction of compounds that inhibit downstream operations, and waste disposal, as well as for the chemicals themselves. The simplicity of hydrothermal pretreatment with just hot water offers the potential to greatly improve the cost of the entire conversion process if sugar degradation during pretreatment, production of un-fermentable oligomers, and the amount of expensive enzymes needed to obtain satisfactory yields from hydrothermally pretreated solids can be reduced. Biorefinery economics would also benefit if value could be generated from lignin and other components that are currently fated to be burned for power. However, achieving these goals will no doubt require development of advanced hydrothermal pretreatment configurations. For example, passing water through a stationary bed of lignocellulosic biomass in a flowthrough configuration achieves very high yields of hemicellulose sugars, removes more than 75% of the lignin for potential valorization, and improves sugar release from the pretreated solids with lower enzyme loadings. Unfortunately, the large quantities of water needed to achieve this performance result in very dilute sugars, high energy costs for pretreatment and product recover, and large amounts of oligomers. Thus, improving our understanding of hydrothermal pretreatment fundamentals is needed to gain insights into R&D opportunities to improve performance, and help identify novel configurations that lower capital and operating costs and achieve higher yields.

  9. Detailed paragenesis and Li-mica compositions as recorders of the magmatic-hydrothermal evolution of the Maoping W-Sn deposit (Jiangxi, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legros, Hélène; Marignac, Christian; Mercadier, Julien; Cuney, Michel; Richard, Antonin; Wang, Ru-Cheng; Charles, Nicolas; Lespinasse, Marc-Yves

    2016-11-01

    Li-micas have been used as indicators of the evolution of granites. However, hydrothermal Li-micas are less documented. World-class W-Sn deposits associated with Early Yanshanian granites (South Jiangxi, China) show magmatic and hydrothermal Li-micas which could help unravelling the magmatic-hydrothermal evolution of rare metal deposits. Six types of Li-micas have been identified in the vein system of the Maoping W-Sn deposit through detailed petrography and EPMA and LA-ICP-MS analyses, by chronological order: (i) late-magmatic Li-micas in feldspar veins, associated with late crystallization of a peraluminous melt; (ii) hydrothermal Fe-Li micas (Fe-Li mica veins and selvages); (iii) hydrothermal Fe-Li micas in W-Sn veins; (iv) Fe-Li micas in later banded quartz veins; (v) Li-muscovite in the final stages; and finally (vi) micas associated with alteration at each stage. Based on oscillatory variations and trends in major elements composition, the chemical variations in Li-micas from the successive stages and in hydrothermal micas that crystallized in the veins are interpreted to reflect mixing between at least three fluids of possible magmatic, meteoric and metamorphic origins. The crystallization of zircons and REE minerals, combined with variations of major and trace element concentrations in the Li-micas, notably an enrichment of rare metals (W-Sn-Ta-Nb) in the Li-micas, implies emplacement of a hidden peralkaline REE-rich magma during the crystallization of the banded quartz veins, a source which was different to the pre-existing peraluminous granites. The possible involvement of both peraluminous and peralkaline intrusives suggests the existence of polyphase magmatic-hydrothermal systems in the Maoping deposit, during the Yanshanian event (190-80 Ma).

  10. Post-drilling changes in seabed landscape and megabenthos in a deep-sea hydrothermal system, the Iheya North field, Okinawa Trough.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Nakajima

    Full Text Available There has been an increasing interest in seafloor exploitation such as mineral mining in deep-sea hydrothermal fields, but the environmental impact of anthropogenic disturbance to the seafloor is poorly known. In this study, the effect of such anthropogenic disturbance by scientific drilling operations (IODP Expedition 331 on seabed landscape and megafaunal habitation was surveyed for over 3 years using remotely operated vehicle video observation in a deep-sea hydrothermal field, the Iheya North field, in the Okinawa Trough. We focused on observations from a particular drilling site (Site C0014 where the most dynamic change of landscape and megafaunal habitation was observed among the drilling sites of IODP Exp. 331. No visible hydrothermal fluid discharge had been observed at the sedimentary seafloor at Site C0014, where Calyptogena clam colonies were known for more than 10 years, before the drilling event. After drilling commenced, the original Calyptogena colonies were completely buried by the drilling deposits. Several months after the drilling, diffusing high-temperature hydrothermal fluid began to discharge from the sedimentary subseafloor in the area of over 20 m from the drill holes, 'artificially' creating a new hydrothermal vent habitat. Widespread microbial mats developed on the seafloor with the diffusing hydrothermal fluids and the galatheid crab Shinkaia crosnieri endemic to vents dominated the new vent community. The previously soft, sedimentary seafloor was hardened probably due to barite/gypsum mineralization or silicification, becoming rough and undulated with many fissures after the drilling operation. Although the effects of the drilling operation on seabed landscape and megafaunal composition are probably confined to an area of maximally 30 m from the drill holes, the newly established hydrothermal vent ecosystem has already lasted 2 years and is like to continue to exist until the fluid discharge ceases and thus the

  11. Hydrothermal Gelation of Aqueous Cellulose Nanocrystal Suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Lev; Derakhshandeh, Maziar; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G; Hamad, Wadood Y; MacLachlan, Mark J

    2016-08-08

    We report the facile preparation of gels from the hydrothermal treatment of suspensions of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs). The properties of the hydrogels have been investigated by rheology, electron microscopy, and spectroscopy with respect to variation in the temperature, time, and CNC concentration used in preparation. Desulfation of the CNCs at high temperature appears to be responsible for the gelation of the CNCs, giving highly porous networks. The viscosity and storage modulus of the gels was shown to increase when samples were prepared at higher treatment temperature. Considering the wide natural abundance and biocompatibility of CNCs, this simple, green approach to CNC-based hydrogels is attractive for producing materials that can be used in drug delivery, insulation, and as tissue scaffolds.

  12. Deep-Sea Hydrothermal-Vent Sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, Alberto E.; Venkateswaran, Kasthur; Matthews, Jaret B.

    2008-01-01

    An apparatus is being developed for sampling water for signs of microbial life in an ocean hydrothermal vent at a depth of as much as 6.5 km. Heretofore, evidence of microbial life in deep-sea hydrothermal vents has been elusive and difficult to validate. Because of the extreme conditions in these environments (high pressures and temperatures often in excess of 300 C), deep-sea hydrothermal- vent samplers must be robust. Because of the presumed low density of biomass of these environments, samplers must be capable of collecting water samples of significant volume. It is also essential to prevent contamination of samples by microbes entrained from surrounding waters. Prior to the development of the present apparatus, no sampling device was capable of satisfying these requirements. The apparatus (see figure) includes an intake equipped with a temperature probe, plus several other temperature probes located away from the intake. The readings from the temperature probes are utilized in conjunction with readings from flowmeters to determine the position of the intake relative to the hydrothermal plume and, thereby, to position the intake to sample directly from the plume. Because it is necessary to collect large samples of water in order to obtain sufficient microbial biomass but it is not practical to retain all the water from the samples, four filter arrays are used to concentrate the microbial biomass (which is assumed to consist of particles larger than 0.2 m) into smaller volumes. The apparatus can collect multiple samples per dive and is designed to process a total volume of 10 L of vent fluid, of which most passes through the filters, leaving a total possibly-microbe-containing sample volume of 200 mL remaining in filters. A rigid titanium nose at the intake is used for cooling the sample water before it enters a flexible inlet hose connected to a pump. As the water passes through the titanium nose, it must be cooled to a temperature that is above a mineral

  13. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Dicalcium Silicate Based Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, N.; Chatterjee, A.

    2017-06-01

    It is imperative to develop low energy alternative binders considering the large amounts of energy consumed as well as carbon dioxide emissions involved in the manufacturing of ordinary Portland cement. This study is on the synthesis of a dicalcium silicate based binder using a low temperature hydrothermal route.The process consists of synthesizing an intermediate product consisting of a calcium silicate hydrate phase with a Ca:Si ratio of 2:1 and further thermal treatment to produce the β-Ca2SiO4 (C2S) phase.Effect of various synthesis parameters like water to solid ratio, dwell time and temperature on the formation of the desired calcium silicate hydrate phase is reported along with effect of heating conditions for formation of the β-C2S phase. Around 77.45% of β-C2S phase was synthesized by thermal treatment of the intermediate phase at 820°C.

  14. Fractionation of 238U/235U in rivers and hydrothermal systems: Constraints for the oceanic U isotope cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noordmann, J.; Weyer, S.; Sharma, M.; Georg, R.; Rausch, S.; Bach, W.

    2010-12-01

    Recently, fractionation of 238U/235U has been observed between oxic and anoxic oceanic environments (Weyer et al., 2008). Sedimentary deposits that formed under oxic conditions (containing U+6) are typically enriched in 235U and anoxic or euxinic sediments (containing U+4) typically show enrichment in 238U. These findings are in agreement with theoretical modeling by Schauble (2007) predicting that U isotope fractionation is dominated by volume-dependent effects. To constrain redox evolution of the oceans (Montoya-Pino et al., 2010), we need detailed information on the U isotope mass balance. However, U isotope fractionation during continental weathering and transport to the oceans, as well as during hydrothermal alteration (the second most important sink for U) is yet unknown. To constrain the isotope composition of the dominant U source to the oceans, we investigated water samples from rivers of different climatic conditions. To obtain an estimate on the U isotope composition of the hydrothermal sink, we analyzed five different hydrothermal fluids from the Juan de Fuca Ridge and, additionally, altered oceanic crust from the Bermuda Rise, Reykjanes Ridge and Pigafetta Basin. Furthermore, δ238U has been measured for granites of different localities and ages to expand the very limited data set for samples from the continental crust. Large rivers display an average δ238U of -0.24 ‰ (relative to CRM-112A) which is very similar to the average value of granites (δ238U= -0.30 ‰) and basalts (δ238U= -0.28 ‰), indicating that in average only minor U isotope fractionation occurs during weathering and transport. Only smaller rivers display larger U isotope variations (between 0.01 and -0.28 ‰) likely monitoring U isotope variations of their bed rocks. The hydrothermal waters display a tight range of δ238U (-0.32 and -0.54 ‰) around the seawater value of δ238U= -0.41 ‰ (Weyer et al., 2008), however, at much lower U concentration levels (0.08 to 0.24 ppb

  15. Hydrothermal growth of ZnO nanostructures - revew article

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunandan Baruah and Joydeep Dutta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional nanostructures exhibit interesting electronic and optical properties due to their low dimensionality leading to quantum confinement effects. ZnO has received lot of attention as a nanostructured material because of unique properties rendering it suitable for various applications. Amongst the different methods of synthesis of ZnO nanostructures, the hydrothermal method is attractive for its simplicity and environment friendly conditions. This review summarizes the conditions leading to the growth of different ZnO nanostructures using hydrothermal technique. Doping of ZnO nanostructures through hydrothermal method are also highlighted.

  16. Coupling hydrothermal liquefaction and anaerobic digestion for energy valorization from model biomass feedstocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posmanik, Roy; Labatut, Rodrigo A; Kim, Andrew H; Usack, Joseph G; Tester, Jefferson W; Angenent, Largus T

    2017-06-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction converts food waste into oil and a carbon-rich hydrothermal aqueous phase. The hydrothermal aqueous phase may be converted to biomethane via anaerobic digestion. Here, the feasibility of coupling hydrothermal liquefaction and anaerobic digestion for the conversion of food waste into energy products was examined. A mixture of polysaccharides, proteins, and lipids, representing food waste, underwent hydrothermal processing at temperatures ranging from 200 to 350°C. The anaerobic biodegradability of the hydrothermal aqueous phase was examined through conducting biochemical methane potential assays. The results demonstrate that the anaerobic biodegradability of the hydrothermal aqueous phase was lower when the temperature of hydrothermal processing increased. The chemical composition of the hydrothermal aqueous phase affected the anaerobic biodegradability. However, no inhibition of biodegradation was observed for most samples. Combining hydrothermal and anaerobic digestion may, therefore, yield a higher energetic return by converting the feedstock into oil and biomethane. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A facile hydrothermal route to self-assembled ZnGa2O4 particles and their microwave application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Mingjia; Ouyan, Xin; Wu, Songping; Ge, Rongyun; Xu, Rui

    2016-02-01

    Self-assembled porous ZnGa2O4 particles were synthesized through a facile hydrothermal route in this work. The phase evolution and microstructure of specimens were identified by XRD and SEM. Various morphologies (i.e. porous, nanorods or spherical particles) and size (nano or micro-sized) could be rationally designed through altering the reaction conditions. Hydrothermal ZnGa2O4 particles exhibited an outstanding microwave dielectric performance, i.e. a dielectric constant of 9.93, a Q × f value of 73 000 GHz, and a τf value of -68.7 ppm/ °C. What is more, the ZnGa2O4 ceramics displayed a stable quality factor in the high temperature region (1400-1500 °C) due to the unique frame-structured ZnGa2O4 particles. Therefore, they can be regarded as potential candidate materials for millimeter-wave device.

  18. Imaging hydrothermal roots along the Endeavour segment of the Juan de Fuca ridge using elastic full waveform inversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnulf, A. F.; Harding, A. J.; Kent, G. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Endeavour segment is a 90 km-long, medium-spreading-rate, oceanic spreading center located on the northern Juan de Fuca ridge (JDFR). The central part of this segment forms a 25-km-long volcanic high that hosts five of the most hydrothermally active vent fields on the MOR system, namely (from north to south): Sasquatch, Salty Dawg, High Rise, Main Endeavour and Mothra. Mass, heat and chemical fluxes associated to vigorous hydrothermal venting are large, however the geometry of the fluid circulation system through the oceanic crust remains almost completely undefined. To produce high-resolution velocity/reflectivity structures along the axis of the Endeavour segment, here, we combined a synthetic ocean bottom experiment (SOBE), 2-D traveltime tomography, 2D elastic full waveform and reverse time migration (RTM). We present velocity and reflectivity sections along Endeavour segment at unprecedented spatial resolutions. We clearly image a set of independent, geometrically complex, elongated low-velocity regions linking the top of the magma chamber at depth to the hydrothermal vent fields on the seafloor. We interpret these narrow pipe-like units as focused regions of hydrothermal fluid up-flow, where acidic and corrosive fluids form pipe-like alteration zones as previously observed in Cyprus ophiolites. Furthermore, the amplitude of these low-velocity channels is shown to be highly variable, with the strongest velocity drops observed at Main Endeavour, Mothra and Salty Dawg hydrothermal vent fields, possibly suggesting more mature hydrothermal cells. Interestingly, the near-seafloor structure beneath those three sites is very similar and highlights a sharp lateral transition in velocity (north to south). On the other hand, the High-Rise hydrothermal vent field is characterized by several lower amplitudes up-flow zones and relatively slow near-surface velocities. Last, Sasquatch vent field is located in an area of high near-surface velocities and is not

  19. A multidisciplinary approach to quantify the permeability of the Whakaari/White Island volcanic hydrothermal system (Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Michael J.; Kennedy, Ben M.; Farquharson, Jamie I.; Ashworth, James; Mayer, Klaus; Letham-Brake, Mark; Reuschlé, Thierry; Gilg, H. Albert; Scheu, Bettina; Lavallée, Yan; Siratovich, Paul; Cole, Jim; Jolly, Arthur D.; Baud, Patrick; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-02-01

    Our multidisciplinary study aims to better understand the permeability of active volcanic hydrothermal systems, a vital prerequisite for modelling and understanding their behaviour and evolution. Whakaari/White Island volcano (an active stratovolcano at the north-eastern end of the Taupo Volcanic Zone of New Zealand) hosts a highly reactive hydrothermal system and represents an ideal natural laboratory to undertake such a study. We first gained an appreciation of the different lithologies at Whakaari and (where possible) their lateral and vertical extent through reconnaissance by land, sea, and air. The main crater, filled with tephra deposits, is shielded by a volcanic amphitheatre comprising interbedded lavas, lava breccias, and tuffs. We deployed field techniques to measure the permeability and density/porosity of (1) > 100 hand-sized sample blocks and (2) layered unlithified deposits in eight purpose-dug trenches. Our field measurements were then groundtruthed using traditional laboratory techniques on almost 150 samples. Our measurements highlight that the porosity of the materials at Whakaari varies from ∼ 0.01 to ∼ 0.7 and permeability varies by eight orders of magnitude (from ∼ 10-19 to ∼ 10-11 m2). The wide range in physical and hydraulic properties is the result of the numerous lithologies and their varied microstructures and alteration intensities, as exposed by a combination of macroscopic and microscopic (scanning electron microscopy) observations, quantitative mineralogical studies (X-ray powder diffraction), and mercury porosimetry. An understanding of the spatial distribution of lithology and alteration style/intensity is therefore important to decipher fluid flow within the Whakaari volcanic hydrothermal system. We align our field observations and porosity/permeability measurements to construct a schematic cross section of Whakaari that highlights the salient findings of our study. Taken together, the alteration typical of a volcanic

  20. Hydrothermal carbonization of food waste for nutrient recovery and resuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food waste represents a rather large and currently underutilized source of potentially available and reusable nutrients. Laboratory-scale experiments evaluating the hydrothermal carbonization of food wastes collected from restaurants were conducted to understand how changes in feedstock composition ...

  1. Direct use of hydrothermal energy: a review of environmental aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Banion, K.; Layton, D.

    1981-08-28

    The potential environmental impacts of the exploration, development, and production of hydrothermal geothermal energy for direct use applications are reviewed and evaluated. Mitigation strategies and research and development needs are included. (MHR)

  2. Hydrothermal iron flux variability following rapid sea level changes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Middleton, Jennifer L; Langmuir, Charles H; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; McManus, Jerry F; Mitrovica, Jerry X

    2016-01-01

    .... Mir sediments reveal sixfold to eightfold increases in hydrothermal iron and copper deposition during the Last Glacial Maximum, followed by a rapid decline during the sea level rise associated with deglaciation...

  3. Development of a hydrothermal method to synthesize spherical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vis spectroscopy. Through these techniques, it was found that the pure ZnSe nanoparticles have a zinc blend structure and in a spherical form with average diameter of 30 nm. KEY WORDS: ZnSe, Nanosphere, Hydrothermal, Surfactant. Bull.

  4. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction: 2014 State of Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Anderson, Daniel; Hallen, Richard T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2014-07-30

    This report describes the base case yields and operating conditions for converting whole microalgae via hydrothermal liquefaction and upgrading to liquid fuels. This serves as the basis against which future technical improvements will be measured.

  5. Development of acoustic observation method for seafloor hydrothermal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, M.; Tamura, H.; Asada, A.; Kinoshita, M.; Tamaki, K.

    2012-12-01

    In October 2009, we conducted seafloor reconnaissance using a manned deep-sea submersible Shinkai6500 in Central Indian Ridge 18-20deg.S, where hydrothermal plume signatures were previously perceived. Acoustic video camera "DIDSON" was equipped on the top of Shinkai6500 in order to get acoustic video images of hydrothermal plumes. The acoustic video images of the hydrothermal plumes had been captured in three of seven dives. We could identify shadings inside the acoustic video images of the hydrothermal plumes. Silhouettes of the hydrothermal plumes varied from second to second, and the shadings inside them also varied. These variations corresponded to internal structures and flows of the plumes. DIDSON (Dual-Frequency IDentification SONar) is acoustic lens-based sonar. It has sufficiently high resolution and rapid refresh rate that it can substitute for optical system in turbid or dark water where optical systems fail. Ins. of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo has understood DIDSON's superior performance and tried to develop a new observation method based on DIDSON for hydrothermal discharging from seafloor vent. We expected DIDSON to reveal whole image of hydrothermal plume as well as detail inside the plume. The proposed method to observe and measure hydrothermal flow is the one to utilize a sheet-like acoustic beam. Scanning with concentrated acoustic beam gives distances to the edges of the hydrothermal flows. And then, the shapes of the flows can be identified even in low and zero visibility conditions. Tank experiment was conducted. The purposes of this experiment were to make an attempt at proposed method to delineate underwater hydrothermal flows and to understand relationships among acoustic video image, flow rate and water temperature. Water was heated in the hot tub and pumped to the water tank through the silicon tube. We observed water flows discharging from the tip of the tube with DIDSON. Flow rate had been controlled and temperatures of the

  6. Discovering New Mantle-Hosted Submarine Ecosytems: The Lost City Hydrothermal Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, D. S.; Karson, J. A.; Yoerger, D.; Fruh-Green, G. L.; Butterfield, D. A.; Lilley, M.

    2003-12-01

    In April-May 2003, the Lost City Hydrothermal Field was investigated during 19 Alvin dives and 17 missions with the autonomous vehicle ABE to examine the linkages among geological, chemical and biological processes associated with a submarine hydrothermal system hosted on mantle material. In concert, these two programs resulted in 1) delineation of the geologic features that control hydrothermal flow in this area; 2) an extremely high-resolution bathymetric map (meter scale) of the field and adjacent areas of the Atlantis Massif; 3) interdisciplinary sampling of 10 individual venting sites within the field; and 4) documentation of a nearly continuous zone of deformation at the top of the massif that is very likely the surface expression of a long-lived detachment fault that caps the massif. This hydrothermal system, which is driven by exothermic serpentinization reactions beneath the Atlantis Massif, is unlike any known field examined to date. It is hosted on 1-2 my old variably altered mantle material, it contains more than 30 carbonate chimneys that reach up to 60 m in height, and generation of diffusely venting 40-90C fluids with pH 9-11 that are enriched in methane, hydrogen and other hydrocarbons support dense microbial communities. ABE bathymetry shows that a linear array of the largest structures within the field is controlled by an E-W trending, 200 m long lineament intersected by a N-S trending fault. Mapping of the near vertical cliffs adjacent to the field indicates that much of the subsurface flow within this area is controlled by very gently west-dipping faults that result in a nearly horizontal, sheet-like style of flow. Venting of diffuse fluids directly from the near vertical walls forms perpendicular growths of carbonate flanges, and results in the formation of vertical spires, and massive, shingled deposits that cascade down the cliff faces. The plumbing system within this area is very different from the vertical conduits that typify black smoker

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis of magnetite particles with uncommon crystal facets

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Junki; Kobayashi, Makoto; Kato, Hideki; Miyazaki, Takamichi; Kakihana, Masato

    2014-01-01

    Hydrothermal synthesis of Fe3O4 (magnetite) particles was carried out using organic compounds as morphology control agents to obtain magnetite crystals with uncommon facets. It was established that the morphology of Fe3O4 crystals obtained by hydrothermal treatment of an aqueous solution containing Fe2+ and organic compounds depended on the organic compound used. The shape of the Fe3O4 particles obtained when no additives were used was quasi-octahedral. In contrast, the addition of picolinic ...

  8. Effect of hydrothermal treatment of coal on its associative structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shui Heng-fu; Wang Zhi-cai; Wang Gao-qiang; Niu Min-feng [Anhui University of Technology, Maanshan (China). School of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering

    2006-10-15

    4 bituminous coals with different ranks were thermally and hydrothermally treated under different conditions, and the raw and treated coals were extracted with carbon disulfide/N-2-pyrrolidinone (CS{sub 2}/NMP) mixed solvent (1:1 by volume). It is found that the extraction yields of the thermal or hydrothermal treated coals at proper conditions increase in different extent. The increments of extraction yields for hydrothermal treated coals are higher than those of thermal treated coals. FT-IR shows that the adsorption peaks at 3410 cm{sup -1} attributed to OH group for the hydrothermal treated coals decrease, suggesting the dissociation of the coal aggregation structure due to the breakage of hydrogen bonds, resulting in the increase of extraction yields for the treated coals. For higher rank coal, the removal of minerals and the dissociation of {pi}-cation association after hydrothermal treatment of coal may be responsible for the increase of extraction yield. In addition, the mechanism of hydrothermal treatment of coal was discussed. 15 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Molybdenum isotope behaviour in groundwaters and terrestrial hydrothermal systems, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neely, Rebecca A.; Gislason, Sigurdur R.; Ólafsson, Magnus; McCoy-West, Alex J.; Pearce, Christopher R.; Burton, Kevin W.

    2018-03-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) isotopes have proved useful in the reconstruction of paleoredox conditions. Their application generally relies upon a simplified model of ocean inputs in which rivers dominate Mo fluxes to the oceans and hydrothermal fluids are considered to be a minor contribution. To date, however, little attention has been paid to the extent of Mo isotope variation of hydrothermal waters, or to the potential effect of direct groundwater discharge to the oceans. Here we present Mo isotope data for two Icelandic groundwater systems (Mývatn and Þeistareykir) that are both influenced by hydrothermal processes. Relative to NIST 3134 = +0.25‰, the cold (Icelandic rivers. In contrast, waters that are hydrothermally influenced (>10 °C) possess isotopically heavy δ98/95MoHYDROTHERMAL values of +0.25‰ to +2.06‰ (n = 18) with the possibility that the high temperature endmembers are even heavier. Although the mechanisms driving this fractionation remain unresolved, the incongruent dissolution of the host basalt and both the dissolution and precipitation of sulfides are considered. Regardless of the processes driving these variations, the δ98Mo data presented in this study indicate that groundwater and hydrothermal waters have the potential to modify ocean budget calculations.

  10. Evaluating the Historical Importance of Impact Induced Hydrothermal Systems on Mars Using the Stable Isotopic Composition of Martian Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niles, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    The importance of impact events during the early history of Mars is obvious through a simple examination of the character of the martian surface. This ancient, heavily cratered terrain has been shown to be associated with extensive phyllosilicate deposits. This geologic link could suggest that the extensive phyllosilicate-forming alteration may have occurred during early martian history through impact-induced hydrothermal alteration. However, examination of the oxygen isotopic composition of water on Mars suggests that the extensive phyllosilicate deposits were formed primarily through low temperature (Mars. The average oxygen isotopic composition of water on Earth is dictated by the nature of water-rock interactions. If these interactions occur at higher temperatures then the water will contain a higher proportion of 18O, while lower temperature interactions will result in water with a lower proportion of 18O. Water on Earth today contains a higher proportion of 18O because of plate tectonics and hydrothermal interaction at mid-ocean ridges. The oxygen isotopic composition of water on early earth, however, may have been quite different, containing a smaller proportion of 18O suggesting much less hydrothermal interaction. Because there are not yet any direct measurements of the oxygen isotopic composition of water on Mars, it needs to be inferred through examination of carbonates preserved in martian meteorites and the isotopic composition of atmospheric CO2. This can be done because the oxygen incorporated into carbonates and CO2 is easily exchanged with liquid water if it is present. Independently, both measurements provide an estimate for the (Sigma)18O of water on Mars to be near -16%. This composition is consistent with low temperature weathering of the silicate crust, and indicates that impact hydrothermal systems did not play an important role in the early alteration of the planet. However, our understanding of impact-induced hydrothermal systems remains

  11. Speciation Dynamics of Phosphorus during (Hydro)Thermal Treatments of Sewage Sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rixiang; Tang, Yuanzhi

    2015-12-15

    (Hydro)thermal treatments of sewage sludge from wastewater treatment process can significantly reduce waste volume and transform sludge into valuable products such as pyrochar and hydrochar. Given the global concern with phosphorus (P) resource depletion, P recycling/reclamation from or direct soil application of the derived chars can be potential P recycling practices. In order to evaluate P recyclability as well as the selection and optimization of treatment techniques, it is critical to understand the effects of different treatment techniques and conditions on P speciation and distribution. In the present study, we systematically characterized P speciation in chars derived from thermal (i.e., pyrolysis) and hydrothermal treatments of municipal sewage sludge using complementary chemical extraction and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy methods. P species in the raw activated sludge was dominated by orthophosphate and long-chain polyphosphates, whereas increased amounts of pyrophosphate and short-chain polyphosphates formed after pyrolysis at 250-600 °C. In contrast, hydrothermal treatments resulted in the production of only inorganic orthophosphate in the hydrochar. In addition to the change of molecular speciation, thermal treatments also altered the physical state and extractability of different P species in the pyrochars from pyrolysis, with both total P and polyphosphate being less extractable with increasing pyrolysis temperature. Results from this study suggest that P speciation and availability in sludge-derived chars are tunable by varying treatment techniques and conditions, and provide fundamental knowledge basis for the design and selection of waste management strategies for better nutrient (re)cycling and reclamation.

  12. Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2007-03-30

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

  13. Effects of hydrothermal temperature and time on hydrothermal synthesis of colloidal hydroxyapatite nanorods in the presence of sodium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaoying; Chen, Xiaohu; Cheng, Yute; Wang, Longshen; Hu, Bing; Tan, Junjun

    2015-07-15

    In this paper, colloidal hydrophilic hydroxyapatite nanorods were synthesized in the presence of sodium citrate via thermal-decomplexing method. The influences of hydrothermal temperature and time on the synthesis of HA nanorods were characterized in terms of structure, size, morphology, and colloidal stability through TEM, XRD, zeta potential, DLS and long-term standing test. Results show that increasing hydrothermal temperature and prolonging hydrothermal time would evidently improve crystallinity and enlarge size of HA nanorods but decrease the colloidal stability of nanorods. It is worth noting that the effect of raising the hydrothermal temperature and time on diameter increase is far greater than that on length increase; meanwhile, the colloidal stability would be seriously deteriorated when the hydrothermal temperature is over 180 °C for 24 h or when the hydrothermal temperature is 150 °C for over 48 h, in these cases, dispersion of HA nanorods would apparently settle within 2 months. The origin responding to the results is that although the charge density of HA nanorods is not obviously affected, the dynamic diameters of HA particles increase greatly, which reduces colloidal stability of the dispersion. This work provides new insights into the role of hydrothermal temperature and time on tailoring morphology, crystallinity and colloidal stability of HA nanorods. Moreover, it would be helpful to optimize the experimental procedure both on scientific and industrial applications related to HA. For example, on the premise of satisfying the necessary requirements including crystallinity, size, morphology and colloid stability, it is feasible to compress the consumption of experimental time through raising the hydrothermal temperature, or vice versa. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Catalytic hydrothermal upgradation of wheat husk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rawel; Bhaskar, Thallada; Dora, Sambha; Balagurumurthy, Bhavya

    2013-12-01

    Catalytic hydrothermal upgradation of wheat husk was performed at 280°C for 15 min in the presence of alkaline catalysts (KOH and K2CO3). The effect of alkaline catalysts on the yield of bio-oil products and composition of bio-oils obtained were discussed. Total bio-oil yield (31%) comprising of bio-oil1 (ether fraction) and bio-oil2 (acetone fraction) was maximum with K2CO3 solution. Powder XRD (X-ray diffraction) analysis of wheat husk as well as bio-residue samples show that the peaks due to cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin become weak in bio-residue samples which suggest that these components have undergone hydrolytic cleavage/decomposition. The FTIR spectra of bio-oils indicate that the lignin in the wheat husk samples was decomposed to low molecular weight phenolic compounds. (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrum of bio-oil1 shows more than 50% of the protons resonate in the up field region from 0.5 ppm to 3.0 ppm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The hydrothermal system at Newberry Volcano, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammel, E.A.; Ingebritsen, S.E.; Mariner, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Results of recent geological and geophysical studies at Newberry Volcano have been incorporated into conceptual and numerical models of a magma-based hydrothermal system. Numerical simulations begin with emplacement of a small magma body, the presumed source of silicic eruptions at Newberry that began about 10 000 BP, into a thermal regime representing 100 000 yr of cooling of a large underlying intrusion. Simulated flow patterns and thermal histories for three sets of hypothetical permeability values are compatible with data from four geothermal drill holes on the volcano. Meteoric recharge cools the caldera-fill deposits, but thermal water moving up a central conduit representing a permeable volcanic vent produces temperatures close to those observed in drill holes within the caldera. Meteoric recharge from the caldera moves down the flanks and creates a near-isothermal zone that extends several hundred meters below the water table, producing temperature profiles similar to those obserbed in drill holes on the flanks. The temperatures observed in drillholes on the flanks are not influenced by the postulated Holocene magma body. The elevated temperature gradients measured in the lower portions of these holes may be related to the cumulative effect of older intrusions. The models also indicate that meteoric recharge to the deep hyrothermal system probably originates within or near the caldera. Relatively low fluid velocities at depth suggest that at least a significant fraction of the thermal fluid may be very old. -Authors

  16. Catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of water hyacinth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rawel; Balagurumurthy, Bhavya; Prakash, Aditya; Bhaskar, Thallada

    2015-02-01

    Thermal and catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of water hyacinth was performed at temperatures from 250 to 300 °C under various water hyacinth:H2O ratio of 1:3, 1:6 and 1:12. Reactions were also carried out under various residence times (15-60 min) as well as catalytic conditions (KOH and K2CO3). The use of alkaline catalysts significantly increased the bio-oil yield. Maximum bio-oil yield (23 wt%) comprising of bio-oil1 and bio-oil2 as well as conversion (89%) were observed with 1N KOH solution. (1)H NMR and (13)C NMR data showed that both bio-oil1 and bio-oil2 have high aliphatic carbon content. FTIR of bio-residue indicated that the usage of alkaline catalyst resulted in bio-residue samples with lesser oxygen functionality indicating that catalyst has a marked effect on nature of the bio-residue and helps to decompose biomass to a greater extent compared to thermal case. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Treatment Hazard Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, Peter P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wagner, Katie A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-12

    Hazard analyses were performed to evaluate the modular hydrothermal liquefaction treatment system. The hazard assessment process was performed in 2 stages. An initial assessment utilizing Hazard Identification and Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) techniques identified areas with significant or unique hazards (process safety-related hazards) that fall outside of the normal operating envelope of PNNL and warranted additional analysis. The subsequent assessment was based on a qualitative What-If analysis. The analysis was augmented, as necessary, by additional quantitative analysis for scenarios involving a release of hazardous material or energy with the potential for affecting the public. The following selected hazardous scenarios received increased attention: •Scenarios involving a release of hazardous material or energy, controls were identified in the What-If analysis table that prevent the occurrence or mitigate the effects of the release. •Scenarios with significant consequences that could impact personnel outside the immediate operations area, quantitative analyses were performed to determine the potential magnitude of the scenario. The set of “critical controls” were identified for these scenarios (see Section 4) which prevent the occurrence or mitigate the effects of the release of events with significant consequences.

  18. Hydrothermal Gasification for Waste to Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, Brenden; Laser, Mark; Choo, Yeunun

    2014-11-01

    Hydrothermal gasification is a promising technology for harvesting energy from waste streams. Applications range from straightforward waste-to-energy conversion (e.g. municipal waste processing, industrial waste processing), to water purification (e.g. oil spill cleanup, wastewater treatment), to biofuel energy systems (e.g. using algae as feedstock). Products of the gasification process are electricity, bottled syngas (H2 + CO), sequestered CO2, clean water, and inorganic solids; further chemical reactions can be used to create biofuels such as ethanol and biodiesel. We present a comparison of gasification system architectures, focusing on efficiency and economic performance metrics. Various system architectures are modeled computationally, using a model developed by the coauthors. The physical model tracks the mass of each chemical species, as well as energy conversions and transfers throughout the gasification process. The generic system model includes the feedstock, gasification reactor, heat recovery system, pressure reducing mechanical expanders, and electricity generation system. Sensitivity analysis of system performance to various process parameters is presented. A discussion of the key technological barriers and necessary innovations is also presented.

  19. Reconnaissance of the hydrothermal resources of Utah

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rush, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Geologic factors in the Basin and Range province in Utah are more favorable for the occurrence of geothermal resources than in other areas on the Colorado Plateaus or in the Middle Rocky Mountains. These geologic factors are principally crustal extension and crustal thinning during the last 17 million years. Basalts as young as 10,000 years have been mapped in the area. High-silica volcanic and intrusive rocks of Quaternary age can be used to locate hydrothermal convection systems. Drilling for hot, high-silica, buried rock bodies is most promising in the areas of recent volcanic activity. Southwestern Utah has more geothermal potential than other parts of the Basin and Range province in Utah. The Roosevelt Hot Springs area, the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale area, and the area to the north as far as 60 kilometers from them probably have the best potential for geothermal development for generation of electricity. Other areas with estimated reservoir temperatures greater than 150/sup 0/C are Thermo, Monroe, Red Hill (in the Monroe-Joseph Known Geothermal Resource Area), Joseph Hot Springs, and the Newcastle area. The rates of heat and water discharge are high at Crater, Meadow, and Hatton Hot Springs, but estimated reservoir temperatures there are less than 150/sup 0/C. Additional exploration is needed to define the potential in three additional areas in the Escalante Desert. 28 figs., 18 tabs.

  20. Hydrothermal Vents of Juan de Fuca Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Joyce

    As a member of REVEL (Research and Education: Volcanoes, Exploration and Life), I had an opportunity to participant in a scientific research cruise focused on the active volcanoes along the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the submarine spreading center off the Washington- Oregon-Canada coast. REVEL was sponsored by the National Science Foundation, University of Washington, Pennsylvania State University and the American Museum of Natural History. We studied the geological, chemical and biological processes associated with active hydrothermal systems and my research focused on the biological communities of the sulfide structures. We worked on board the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Vessel, R/V Atlantis and the submersible ALVIN was used to sample the "Black Smokers". As a member of the scientific party, I participated in collection and sorting of biological specimens from the vent communities, attended lectures by scientists, contributed to the cruise log website, maintained a journal and developed my own research project. It was my responsibility to bring this cutting-edge research back to the classroom.

  1. Hydrothermal activity and subsoil complexity: implication for degassing processes at Solfatara crater, Campi Flegrei caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, Cristian; Mayer, Klaus; Isaia, Roberto; Gresse, Marceau; Scheu, Bettina; Yilmaz, Tim I.; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Ricci, Tullio; Dingwell, Donald B.

    2017-12-01

    The Solfatara area and its fumaroles are the main surface expression of the vigorous hydrothermal activity within the active Campi Flegrei caldera system. At depth, a range of volcanic and structural processes dictate the actual state of the hydrothermal system below the crater. The presence of a large variety of volcanic products at shallow depth (including pyroclastic fallout ash beds, pyroclastic density current deposits, breccias, and lavas), and the existence of a maar-related fault system appears to exert major controls on the degassing and alteration behavior. Adding further to the complexity of this environment, variations in permeability and porosity, due to subsoil lithology and alteration effects, may further influence fluid flow towards the surface. Here, we report results from a field campaign conducted in July 2015 that was designed to characterize the in situ physical (temperature, humidity) and mechanical (permeability, strength, stiffness) properties of the Solfatara crater subsoil. The survey also included a mapping of the surficial hydrothermal features and their distributions. Finally, laboratory measurements (porosity, granulometry) of selected samples were performed. Our results enable the discrimination of four main subsoils around the crater: (1) the Fangaia domain located in a topographic low in the southwestern sector, (2) the silica flat domain on the western altered side, (3) the new crust domain in the central area, and (4) the crusted hummocks domain that dominates the north, east, and south parts. These domains are surrounded by encrusted areas, reworked material, and vegetated soil. The distribution of these heterogeneous subsoils suggests that their formation is mostly related to (i) the presence of the Fangaia domain within the crater and (ii) a system of ring faults bordering it. The subsoils show an alternation between very high and very low permeabilities, a fact which seems to affect both the temperature distribution and

  2. Trace elements mobility in soils from the hydrothermal area of Nisyros (Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyriaki Daskalopoulou

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Nisyros Island, Greece, is a stratovolcano known for its intense hydrothermal activity. On June 2013, during a multidisciplinary field campaign, soil samples were collected in the caldera area to determinate the main mineralogical assemblages and to investigate the distribution of trace element concentrations and the possible relationship to the contribution of fluids of deep origin. Soil samples were analysed with XRD and for the chemical composition of their leachable (deionized water and pseudo total (microwave digestion fraction both for major and trace elements. The results allow to divide the samples in 2 groups: Lakki Plain and Stefanos Crater. The latter, where a fumarolic area is located, shows a mineralogical assemblage dominated by phases typical of hydrothermal alteration. Their very low pH values (1.9 – 3.4 show the strong impact of fumarolic gases which are probably also the cause of strong enrichments in these soils of highly volatile elements like S, As, Se, Bi, Sb, Tl and Te. 

  3. Debris flow evolution and the activation of an explosive hydrothermal system; Te Maari, Tongariro, New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procter, J. N.; Cronin, S. J.; Zernack, A. V.; Lube, G.; Stewart, R. B.; Nemeth, K.; Keys, H.

    2014-10-01

    Analysis of the pre- and post-eruption topography, together with observations of the avalanche deposition sequence, yields a triggering mechanism for the 6 August 2012 eruption of Upper Te Maari. The avalanche was composed of a wedge of c. 683 000-774 000 m3 of coarse breccia, spatter and clay-rich tuffs and diamictons which slid from the western flanks of the Upper Te Maari Crater, the failure plane is considered to be a hydrothermally altered clay layer. This landslide led to a pressure drop of up to 0.5 MPa, enough to generate an explosive eruption from the hydrothermal system below, which had been activated over the months earlier by additional heat and gas from a shallow intrusion. The landslide transformed after c. 700 m into a clay-rich cohesive debris flow, eroding soils from steep, narrow stretches of channel, before depositing on intermediate broad flatter reaches. After each erosive reach, the debris flow contained greater clay and mud contents and became more mobile. At c. 2 km flow distance, however, the unsaturated flow stopped, due to a lack of excess pore pressure. This volume controlled flow deposited thick, steep sided lobes behind an outer levee, accreting inward and upward to form a series of curved surface ridges.

  4. Hydrothermally Driven Transformation of Oxygen Functional Groups at Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes for Improved Electrocatalytic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanto, Bryan H R; Chen, Sheng; Duan, Jingjing; Zhao, Chuan

    2016-12-28

    The role of carbon nanotubes in the advancement of energy conversion and storage technologies is undeniable. In particular, carbon nanotubes have attracted significant applications for electrocatalysis. However, one central issue related to the use of carbon nanotubes is the required oxidative pretreatment that often leads to significant damage of graphitic structures which deteriorates their electrochemical properties. Traditionally, the oxidized carbon nanomaterials are treated at high temperature under an inert atmosphere to repair the oxidation-induced defect sites, which simultaneously removes a significant number of oxygen functional groups. Nevertheless, recent studies have shown that oxygen functional groups on the surface of MWCNT are the essential active centers for a number of important electrocatalytic reactions such as hydrogen evolution reaction (HER), oxygen evolution reaction (OER), and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Herein we first show that hydrothermal treatment as a mild method to improve the electrochemical properties and activities of surface-oxidized MWCNT for OER, HER, and ORR without significantly altering the oxygen content. The results indicate that hydrothermal treatment could potentially repair the defects without significantly reducing the pre-existing oxygen content, which has never been achieved before with conventional high-temperature annealing treatment.

  5. Synthesis of non-aggregated nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Attallah, Olivia A., E-mail: olivia.adly@hu.edu.eg [Center of Nanotechnology, Nile University, 12677 Giza (Egypt); Pharmaceutical Chemistry Department, Heliopolis University, 11777 El Salam, Cairo (Egypt); Girgis, E. [Solid State Physics Department, National Research Center, 12622 Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology Lab, CEAS, National Research Center, 12622 Dokki, Giza (Egypt); Abdel-Mottaleb, Mohamed M.S.A. [Center of Nanotechnology, Nile University, 12677 Giza (Egypt)

    2016-02-01

    Non-aggregated magnetite nanorods with average diameters of 20–30 nm and lengths of up to 350 nm were synthesized via in situ, template free hydrothermal technique. These nanorods capped with different concentrations (1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 g) of nicotinic acid (vitamin B3); possessed good magnetic properties and easy dispersion in aqueous solutions. Our new synthesis technique maintained the uniform shape of the nanorods even with increasing the coating material concentration. The effect of nicotinic acid on the shape, particle size, chemical structure and magnetic properties of the prepared nanorods was evaluated using different characterization methods. The length of nanorods increased from 270 nm to 350 nm in nicotinic acid coated nanorods. Goethite and magnetite phases with different ratios were the dominant phases in the coated samples while a pure magnetite phase was observed in the uncoated one. Nicotinic acid coated magnetic nanorods showed a significant decrease in saturation magnetization than uncoated samples (55 emu/g) reaching 4 emu/g in 2.5 g nicotinic acid coated sample. The novel synthesis technique proved its potentiality to prepare coated metal oxides with one dimensional nanostructure which can function effectively in different biological applications. - Highlights: • We synthesize nicotinic acid coated magnetite nanorods via hydrothermal technique • Effect of nicotinic acid concentration on the nanorods properties was significant • Nanorods maintained uniform shape with increased concentration of nicotinic acid • Alterations occurred in particle size, mineral phases and magnetics of coated samples.

  6. In situ ore formation experiment: Amino acids and amino sugars trapped in artificial chimneys on deep-sea hydrothermal systems at Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, Pacific Ocean

    CERN Document Server

    Takano,; Marumo,; K.,; Ebashi,; T.,; Gupta,; P., L; Kawahata,; H.,; Kobayashi,; K.,; Yamagishi,; A.,; Kuwabara,; T,

    2013-01-01

    The present study reports on the bio-organic composition of a deep-sea venting hydrothermal system originating from arc volcanism; the origin of the particulates in hydrothermal fluids from the Suiyo Seamount in the southern Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara) Arc is discussed with regard to amino compounds. Chimney samples on deep-sea hydrothermal systems and core samples at Suiyo Seamount were determined for amino acids, and occasionally amino sugars. Two types of chimney samples were obtained from active hydrothermal systems by submersible vehicles: one was natural chimney (NC) on a hydrothermal natural vent; the other was artificial chimneys (AC), mainly formed by the growth and deposition of sulfide-rich particulate components in a Kuwabara-type in situ incubator (KI incubator). Total hydrolyzed amino acids (THAA) and hydrolyzed hexosamines (HA) in AC ranged from 10.7 nmol/g to 64.0 nmol/g and from 0 nmol/g to 8.1 nmol/g, respectively, while THAA in hydrothermally altered core samples ranged from 26.0 nmol/g to 107.4 ...

  7. Preliminary assessment of modified borosilicate glasses for chromium and ruthenium immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farid, Osama M. [Reactors Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority of Egypt, P.O. 13759, Inshas, Cairo (Egypt); Centre of Nuclear Engineering (CNE), Department of Materials, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Abdel Rahman, R.O., E-mail: alaarehab@yahoo.com [Hot Laboratory Center, Atomic Energy Authority of Egypt, P.O. 13759, Inshas, Cairo (Egypt)

    2017-01-15

    The feasibility of using modified alkali borosilicate glasses for ruthenium and chromium immobilization is preliminary assessed by investigating the immobilization system structure under normal conditions. Within this context, reference alkali borosilicate, and simulated Magnox-modified glasses were prepared and studied. The results indicate that ruthenium is immobilized in the vitreous structure as encapsulated RuO{sub 2} crystallites that act as seeds for heterogeneous nucleation of other crystalline phases. The presence of Zn, as modifier, has contributed to chromium immobilization in zincochromite spinel structure, whereas Ca is accommodated in the vitreous structure. Immobilization performance was evaluated by conducting conservative static leach test and studying the leached glass. Leached glass morphology was altered, where near surface reference glass is leached over 400 nm and simulated Magnox-modified sample is altered over 300 nm. Normalized release rates are within normal range for borosilicate material. For simulated Magnox-modified sample, Ca and alkali structural element, i.e. Na and Li, are leached via ion-exchange reaction. The ion-exchanged fraction equals 1.06 × 10{sup −8} mol/m{sup 2} s and chromium has slightly lower normalized release rate value than ruthenium. - Highlights: • The presence of modifiers and waste oxides led to localized de-vitrification. • Ruthenium is encapsulated within the vitreous glass network as RuO{sub 2} crystals. • Chromium is immobilized within the zincochromite spinel structure. • Pitting and cracks induced by leaching did not affect the immobilization performance.

  8. Carlin-type Au Deposits in Nevada: Unique Hydrothermal Systems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, J. S.

    2006-05-01

    fairly passive as there is minimal evidence for overpressured hydrothermal fluids, complicated multistage vein dilatancy, or significant syn-mineralization slip. Geologic reconstructions and fluid inclusions indicate that deposits formed within a few kilometers of the surface. Ore fluids were moderate temperature (~180-240°C), low salinity (~ 2-3 wt % NaCl equivalent), CO2 bearing (< 4 mole %), and CH4 poor (< 0.4 mole %), with sufficient H2S (10-1 to 10-2 m) to transport Au. Ore fluids decarbonatized, argillized, and locally silicified wall rocks, and deposited disseminated pyrite containing submicron Au as Fe liberated from wallrock reacted with reduced S in the ore fluid. A key question is why, despite extensive exploration, no other district of similar size has been discovered. Deposits similar to CTGD have been found outside of northern Nevada, but they are generally small and not part of large productive trends or districts. It is possible that a unique geologic history in northern Nevada was essential for this major Au district to form. If correct, geologic processes from the Neoproterozoic to the late Eocene, necessary to produce ideal host rocks and structures, converged with optimum processes during the Eocene to deposit Au. Alternatively, other major districts of CTGD may remain to be discovered, unrecognized because of the subtle nature of the mineralization and alteration. Future opportunities for discovery may improve as we identify critical ingredients such as preexisting stratigraphic and structural architecture, earlier Au mineralization, deep metamorphism and/or magmatic activity, coeval upper crustal igneous activity, incipient extensional tectonism, essential to the formation of large CTGD.

  9. Hydrothermal alterations of Bentonites in Almeria (Spain); Alteracion hidrotermal de las bentonitas de Almeria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares Gonzalez, J.; Barahona Fernandez, E.; Huertas Garcia, F.; Caballero Mesa, E.; Cuadros Ojeda, J.

    1996-12-01

    The use of bentonite as backfilling and sealing material in the high level radioactive waste disposals has been treated in previous studies accomplished by different authors. However, the use of this clayey barrier needs the resolution of different problems so that its efficiency will be enhanced. between those could be cited the study of the actual capacity of sealing the space around the canister and the accommodation to the pressure of the rocky environment; the possible variations in plasticity; the diffusion and reaction processes that can be produced through the barrier by groundwater, the capacity of radionuclides adsorption, etc. These studies, show that the bentonites with high content in smectite fulfill satisfactorily with the physical and chemical conditions to be used as sealing material, but it is known that the smectite can be unstable in diagenetic conditions similar to those are given in a deep repository of radioactive wastes, being transformed into illite. A conclusion of immediate interest is deduced from this last study. The bentonites used as sealing material in radioactive waste repositories must no contain Na as interlayer cation since it is very easily exchangeable by K. It is better to select those smectites with Ca and Mg that detain the entry of K in the interlayer and as a consequence the transformation process of smectite into illite is made more difficult. (Author)

  10. Hydrothermal alteration and diagenesis of terrestrial lacustrine pillow basalts: Coordination of hyperspectral imaging with laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberger, Rebecca N; Mustard, John F; Cloutis, Edward A; Mann, Paul; Wilson, Janette H.; Flemming, Roberta L; Robertson, Kevin; Salvatore, Mark R; Edwards, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    We investigate an outcrop of ∼187 Ma lacustrine pillow basalts of the Talcott Formation exposed in Meriden, Connecticut, USA, focusing on coordinated analyses of one pillow lava to characterize the aqueous history of these basalts in the Hartford Basin. This work uses a suite of multidisciplinary measurements, including hyperspectral imaging, other spectroscopic techniques, and chemical and mineralogical analyses, from the microscopic scale up to the scale of an outcrop.

  11. New data on the hydrothermal alterations in the Plavica deposit (Eastern Macedonia)

    OpenAIRE

    Spasovski, Orce; Mircovski, Vojo

    2008-01-01

    The data presented in the paper were obtained based on analyses carried out on samples collected from various depths along the entire length of drill-hole no. 4. The drill-hole was the last one made in the area of the Plavica deposit by the Rio Tinto Company. The samples analyzed point out the presence of subvolcanic to volcanic rocks, presumably dacites and dacite- andesites, that can be distinguished based on the presence of primary quartz. An exception is sample no. 6 which, most p...

  12. Prospecting for Modern and Ancient Hydrothermal Systems on Mars:Implications for Astrobiology and the Exploration for Past or Present Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    Hydrothermal systems are regarded to be prime targets in the search for a fossil record on Mars because they provide 1) Localized environments for sustaining high rates of microbial productivity and 2) Co-existing high rates of mineralization (chemical precipitation) favorable for capturing and preserving microbial biosignatures. Hydrothermal environments may have been widespread on Mars early in the planet's history. Previous authors have described a number of potential hydrothermal sites on Mars which may be grouped into the following geologic associations: 1) Channels and chaos terranes associated with volcanic heat sources (e.g. Dao Vallis - Hadriaca Patera and chaos at the base of Apollonaris), 2) Channel networks and modified central uplifts associated with large impact craters, 3) Channels and alteration zones associated with rift fracture systems and dike swarms (e.g. Cerberus volcanic plains, Elysium), 4) Channel systems in periglacial environments related to potential subglacial volcanic heat sources 5) Mineral signatures (coarse-grained hematite) associated with ancient lacustrine basins and extensional geologic features (e.g. Terra Meridian basin, floor of Candor Chasma, central Aram chaos) and 6) modern seeps and runoff channels found on steep, northward facing slopes at high latitudes. In addition, some attribute a hydrothermal origin to the Fe-rich carbonates of Martian meteorite, ALH 84001. In this talk I will review examples of these and related hydrothermal environments that may have been present on Mars from the perspective of terrestrial analogs and what that implies about preservation potential for fossil biosignatures. I will also discuss possible ways to test hydrothermal hypotheses that could be implemented during the next decade of Mars exploration.

  13. Geochemical features of sulfides from the Deyin-1 hydrothermal field at the southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge near 15°S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shujie; Li, Huaiming; Zhai, Shikui; Yu, Zenghui; Cai, Zongwei

    2017-12-01

    mainly attributed to precipitating directly from the hydrothermal fluid, while those collected from the extinct hydrothermal chimney might have already been altered by the seawater. Generally, ore-forming elements in the sulfides can be divided into three groups: Fe-based element group, Cu-based element group and Zn-based element group. The first group includes Fe, Mn, Cr, Mo, Sn, Rb and bio-enriching elements, such as P and Si, reflecting the similar characteristics to Fe in the study area. And the second group contains Cu, W, Co, Se, Te and Bi, suggesting the similar behavior with Cu. Moreover, the third group includes Zn, Hf, Hg, Cd, Ta, Ga, Pb, As, Ag, Ni and Sb, which indicates the geochemical characteristics of most dispersed trace elements controlled by Zn-bearing minerals to some extent.

  14. The origin of life near deep-sea hydrothermal systems during the Cambrian explosion: data from the Kyzyl Tashtyg sulphide deposit (Central Asia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonov, Vladimir; Terleev, Alexander; Safonova, Inna; Kotlyarov, Alexey; Stupakov, Sergey; Tokarev, Dmitry

    2015-04-01

    On Earth the solar radiation and the hydrothermal circulation both affect life evolution. Recent extensive studies of the World Ocean have shown that the biodiversity of Earth is linked with hydrothermal activity on the oceanic floor. These deep-sea ecosystems use chemical energy, not solar radiation. In the last quarter of the XX century, a new type of hydrothermal systems, so-called black smokers, was discovered in mid-oceanic ridges. As black smokers form sulfide ores and are surrounded by abundant bio-oases or symbioses, identification of their analogues in ancient orogenic belts is necessary for studying life origin and evolution. Of special importance are problems of life associated with deep-sea hydrothermal systems acted at the Precambrian-Cambrian boundary - the time of Cambrian explosion (Maruyama et al., 2013). During that explosion life significantly evolved and diversified due to dramatic changes of Earth's environment. Consequently, the early Cambrian - late Precambrian Kyzyl Tashtyg sulphide deposit of East Tuva in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt is of special interest. This deposit was formed on the bottom of ancient back-arc deep-sea basin as a result of black smoker hydrothermal activity and is hosted by volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks altered by the high temperature solutions. The altered Kyzyl Tashtyg basalts have an amygdules (filled by albite, epidote and carbonates), contain brown-green microfossils, often attached to their walls. The microfossils are thin tubes 5 to 25 microns in diameter and 500 microns long. This tubes are empty and have straight, curved or branching shape. Chemically, the tube material is close to epidote. In consideration of microscopic dimensions, simple morphology and similarity with modern tubular microorganisms, the studied tube-shaped microfossils can be related to cyanobacteria. Almost the same fossils, associated with oceanic basalt complexes, were described earlier (Furnes et al., 2007; Mcloughlin et al., 2007

  15. The interplay of evolved seawater and magmatic-hydrothermal fluids in the 3.24 Ga panorama volcanic-hosted massive sulfide hydrothermal system, North Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drieberg, Susan L.; Hagemann, Steffen G.; Huston, David L.; Landis, Gary; Ryan, Chris G.; Van Achterbergh, Esmé; Vennemann, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    The ~3240 Ma Panorama volcanic-hosted massive sulfide (VHMS) district is unusual for its high degree of exposure and low degree of postdepositional modification. In addition to typical seafloor VHMS deposits, this district contains greisen- and vein-hosted Mo-Cu-Zn-Sn mineral occurrences that are contemporaneous with VHMS orebodies and are hosted by the Strelley granite complex, which also drove VHMS circulation. Hence the Panorama district is a natural laboratory to investigate the role of magmatic-hydrothermal fluids in VHMS hydrothermal systems. Regional and proximal high-temperature alteration zones in volcanic rocks underlying the VHMS deposits are dominated by chlorite-quartz ± albite assemblages, with lesser low-temperature sericite-quartz ± K-feldspar assemblages. These assemblages are typical of VHMS hydrothermal systems. In contrast, the alteration assemblages associated with granite-hosted greisens and veins include quartz-topaz-muscovite-fluorite and quartz-muscovite (sericite)-chlorite-ankerite. These vein systems generally do not extend into the overlying volcanic pile. Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies suggest that the greisens were produced by high-temperature (~590°C), high-salinity (38–56 wt % NaCl equiv) fluids with high densities (>1.3 g/cm3) and high δ18O (9.3 ± 0.6‰). These fluids are compatible with the measured characteristics of magmatic fluids evolved from the Strelley granite complex. In contrast, fluids in the volcanic pile (including the VHMS ore-forming fluids) were of lower temperature (90°–270°C), lower salinity (5.0–11.2 wt % NaCl equiv), with lower densities (0.88–1.01 g/cm3) and lower δ18O (−0.8 ± 2.6‰). These fluids are compatible with evolved Paleoarchean seawater. Fluids that formed the quartz-chalcopyrite-sphalerite-cassiterite veins, which are present within the granite complex near the contact with the volcanic pile, were intermediate in temperature and isotopic composition between the greisen

  16. Fluid inclusion and sulfur isotope studies in probable modern analogue Kuroko-type ores from the JADE hydrothermal field (Central Okinawa Trough, Japan)

    OpenAIRE

    Volker Lüders; B. Pracejus; Halbach, P.

    2001-01-01

    Fluid inclusions and sulfur isotopic compositions were studied in sulfides and barites from the JADE active hydrothermal field in the Central Okinawa Trough. The mineral assemblages in the JADE field strongly resemble ancient Kuroko-type deposits. The formation of massive sulfide mineralization is related to alteration of felsic volcanic rocks by deep penetrating heated seawater. Fluid inclusions in sphalerite from stockwork mineralization show homogenization temperatures that range between 2...

  17. Chemical properties and hydrothermal processes on the first two directly sampled deep-sea eruptions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D. A.; Resing, J. A.; Roe, K. K.; Christensen, M.; Embley, R. W.; Lupton, J. E.; Chadwick, W.

    2009-12-01

    To understand the effects of deep-sea volcanic eruptions on oceanic chemistry, on the ecology of hydrothermal vent communities, on microbial communities in the sub-seafloor biosphere, and on the alteration of oceanic lithosphere requires direct observation and sampling of active eruption sites. Known mid-ocean ridge eruptions have so far been too brief to observe and sample, but a nearly continuous eruption at NW Rota-1 submarine volcano in the Mariana arc (2004-2009) and a potentially long-term eruption at West Mata volcano in the NE Lau Basin (detected Nov. 2008) have provided unprecedented access to magma degassing and rapid water-rock reaction processes that may typify active submarine arc volcanism. How closely this resembles the hydrothermal processes associated with mid-ocean ridge volcanism remains to be seen. NW Rota-1 has a significantly higher output of a free gas phase, but based on initial observations of fluid chemistry and venting types, NW Rota-1 and W Mata have much in common. Active hydrothermal venting was found within a depth horizon encompassing the top 100 meters of the summit peak on both volcanoes (520 m at Rota; 1200 m at Mata). The dominant particulate and chemical plumes originate at active volcanic vents. The hydrothermal chemistry of these volcanic vents is dominated by the condensation of magmatic sulfur dioxide gas, its dissolution into seawater, and subsequent acid attack on volcanic rock. Disproportionation of SO2 to elemental sulfur, H2S, and sulfuric acid occurs. Percolation of hot, acidic fluids through volcaniclastic deposits results in rapid uptake of iron, aluminum, and other metals into solution. Chemical compositions and models indicate that continued water/rock reaction, cooling, and sub-surface mixing with seawater result in rising pH and precipitation of sulfur, alunite, anhydrite, iron sulfides, and iron oxyhydroxides (in order of increasing pH and decreasing temperature). Venting fluids sampled directly out of the

  18. Characterization of cell wall components of wheat bran following hydrothermal pretreatment and fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merali, Zara; Collins, Samuel R A; Elliston, Adam; Wilson, David R; Käsper, Andres; Waldron, Keith W

    2015-01-01

    Pretreatments are a prerequisite for enzymatic hydrolysis of biomass and production of ethanol. They are considered to open up the plant cell wall structure by altering, moving or solubilizing lignin and hydrolyzing a proportion of hemicellulosic moieties. However, there is little information concerning pretreatment-induced changes on wheat bran cell wall polymers and indeed on changes in cell wall phenolic esters in bran or other lignocellulosic biomass. Here, we evaluate polymeric changes (chemical and physical) as a result of selected hydrothermal pretreatment conditions on destarched wheat bran using controlled polymer extraction methods. Quantification of cell wall components together with soluble oligosaccharides, the insoluble residues and ease of extractability and fractionation of biomass residues were conducted. Pretreatment solubilized selected arabinoxylans and associated cross-linking ferulic and diferulic acids with a concomitant increase in lignin and cellulosic glucose. The remaining insoluble arabinoxylans were more readily extractable in alkali and showed considerable depolymerization. The degree of arabinose substitution was less in xylans released by higher concentrations of alkali. The recalcitrant biomass which remained after pretreatment and alkali extraction contained mostly cellulosic glucose and Klason lignin. Pretreatment generated small but insignificant amounts of yeast-inhibiting compounds such as furfural and hydroxymethyl furfural. As such, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of the hydrothermally pretreated bran resulted in increased ethanol yields compared to that of the control (97.5% compared to 63% theoretical). Hydrothermal pretreatment of destarched wheat bran resulted in degradation and depolymerization of the hemicellulosic arabinoxylans together with some breakdown of cellulosic glucose. This was accompanied by a significant reduction in the cross-linking phenolic acids such as ferulic and diferulic acids. The

  19. Resistivity structure of the Furnas hydrothermal system (Azores archipelago, Portugal) from AMT and ERT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrdina, Svetlana; Vandemeulebrouck, Jean; Rath, Volker; Silva, Catarina; Hogg, Colin; Kiyan, Duygu; Viveiros, Fatima; Eleuterio, Joana; Gresse, Marceau

    2016-04-01

    The Furnas volcanic complex is located in the eastern part of the São Miguel Island and comprises a 5 km × 8 km summit depression filled by two nested calderas with several craters and a lake. Present-day volcanic activity of Furnas volcano is mostly located in the northern part of the caldera, within the Furnas village and north to Furnas Lake, where hydrothermal manifestations are mainly fumarolic fields, steam vents, thermal springs, and intense soil diffuse degassing. Considering the Furnas volcano as a whole, the total integrated CO2 efflux is extremely high, with a total amount of CO2 close to 1000 ton per day (Viveiros et al., 2009). We present the first results of an electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), combined with audio-magneto-telluric (AMT) measurements aligned along two profiles inside the caldera. The purpose of this survey is to delimit the extent, the geometry, and the depth of the hydrothermal system and to correlate the deep resistivity structure with high resolution cartography of diffuse CO2 flux (Viveiros et al, 2015). The ERT and AMT methods are complementary in terms of resolution and penetration depth: ERT can image the structural details of shallow hydrothermal system (down to 100 m in our study) while AMT can image at lower resolution deeper structures at the roots of a volcano (down to 4 km in our study). Our first independent 2D inversions of the ERT-AMT data show a good agreement between the surficial and deeper features. Below the main fumarole area we observe a low resistivity body (less than 1 Ohmm) which corresponds well to the high CO2 flux at the surface and is associated with an extended conductive body at larger depth. These results strongly suggest the presence of hydrothermal waters at depth or/and the presence of altered clay-rich material. On a larger scale however, the geometry of the conducting zones differs slightly from what was expected from earlier surface studies, and may not be directly related to fault zones

  20. Community Structure of Lithotrophically-Driven Hydrothermal Microbial Mats from the Mariana Arc and Back-Arc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, Kevin W; Fullerton, Heather; Butterfield, David A; Moyer, Craig L

    2017-01-01

    The Mariana region exhibits a rich array of hydrothermal venting conditions in a complex geological setting, which provides a natural laboratory to study the influence of local environmental conditions on microbial community structure as well as large-scale patterns in microbial biogeography. We used high-throughput amplicon sequencing of the bacterial small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene from 22 microbial mats collected from four hydrothermally active locations along the Mariana Arc and back-arc to explore the structure of lithotrophically-based microbial mat communities. The vent effluent was classified as iron- or sulfur-rich corresponding with two distinct community types, dominated by either Zetaproteobacteria or Epsilonproteobacteria, respectively. The Zetaproteobacterial-based communities had the highest richness and diversity, which supports the hypothesis that Zetaproteobacteria function as ecosystem engineers creating a physical habitat within a chemical environment promoting enhanced microbial diversity. Gammaproteobacteria were also high in abundance within the iron-dominated mats and some likely contribute to primary production. In addition, we also compare sampling scale, showing that bulk sampling of microbial mats yields higher diversity than micro-scale sampling. We present a comprehensive analysis and offer new insights into the community structure and diversity of lithotrophically-driven microbial mats from a hydrothermal region associated with high microbial biodiversity. Our study indicates an important functional role of for the Zetaproteobacteria altering the mat habitat and enhancing community interactions and complexity.

  1. Properties and degradability of hydrothermal carbonization products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eibisch, Nina; Helfrich, Mirjam; Don, Axel; Mikutta, Robert; Kruse, Andrea; Ellerbrock, Ruth; Flessa, Heinz

    2013-09-01

    Biomass carbonized via hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) yields a liquid and a carbon (C)-rich solid called hydrochar. In soil, hydrochars may act as fertilizers and promote C sequestration. We assumed that the chemical composition of the raw material (woodchips, straw, grass cuttings, or digestate) determines the properties of the liquid and solid HTC products, including their degradability. Additionally, we investigated whether easily mineralizable organic components adsorbed on the hydrochar surface influence the degradability of the hydrochars and could be removed by repetitive washing. Carbon mineralization was measured as CO production over 30 d in aerobic incubation experiments with loamy sand. Chemical analysis revealed that most nutrients were preferably enriched in the liquid phase. The C mineralization of hydrochars from woodchips (2% of total C added), straw (3%), grass (6%), and digestate (14%) were dependent on the raw material carbonized and were significantly lower (by 60-92%; digestate-hydrochar (up to 40%) but had no effect on mineralization rates of the other three hydrochars. Variations in C mineralization between different hydrochars could be explained by multiple factors, including differences in the O/C-H/C ratios, C/N ratios, lignin content, amount of oxygen-containing functional groups, and pH. In contrast to the solids, the liquid products were highly degradable, with 61 to 89% of their dissolved organic C being mineralized within 30 d. The liquids may be treated aerobically (e.g., for nutrient recovery). Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  2. Hydrothermal commercialization baseline for state of Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanny, J.A.; Lunis, B.C. [eds.

    1979-06-01

    Wyoming does have numerous hot springs; but there has been little development effort in geothermal energy, since the state's primary interests are in coal, gas and oil. The hot springs of Thermopolis are among the largest in the world. Recent data from the central portion of the state indicate the potential for electric power generation from geothermal energy. Oil and gas wells (about 70,000) have been drilled in the state and some have geothermal waters that can be utilized for direct applications. The Madison Aquifer extends into the northeastern quadrant of the state and offers considerable potential for geothermal energy. Leasing activity is very limited. Geothermal legislation is basically non-existent, but the State Engineer has the responsibility for protecting the thermal springs. This handbook provides a synopsis of various aspects of the geothermal program in Wyoming. The section on Basic State Data (Section 2) lists government personnel (both legislative and executive branches) who are most directly involved with geothermal development. Some basic demographic data are also included. The various hydrothermal resources and the pertinent geology are summarized in Section 3. Activities (ranging from leases to operational systems) that lead to commercialization are described in Section 4. Plans for various developments are summarized in Section 5, while government assistance to Wyoming projects is list4ed in Section 6. The section on energy use patterns (Section 7) summarizes existing energy use and identifies counties and industries likely to be impacted most by geothermal energy. The section on leasing and permitting policies (Section 8) deals with legal and institutional considerations and includes a time table of institutional procedures for a typical resource to show the interrelationships among various organizations involved in development and regulation of the resource.

  3. Concerns of hydrothermal degradation in CAD/CAM zirconia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-W; Covel, N S; Guess, P C; Rekow, E D; Zhang, Y

    2010-01-01

    Zirconia-based restorations are widely used in prosthetic dentistry; however, their susceptibility to hydrothermal degradation remains elusive. We hypothesized that CAD/CAM machining and subsequent surface treatments, i.e., grinding and/or grit-blasting, have marked effects on the hydrothermal degradation behavior of Y-TZP. CAD/CAM-machined Y-TZP plates (0.5 mm thick), both with and without subsequent grinding with various grit sizes or grit-blasting with airborne alumina particles, were subjected to accelerated aging tests in a steam autoclave. Results showed that the CAD/CAM-machined surfaces initially exhibited superior hydrothermal degradation resistance, but deteriorated at a faster rate upon prolonged autoclave treatment compared with ground and grit-blasted surfaces. The accelerated hydrothermal degradation of CAD/CAM surfaces is attributed to the CAD/CAM machining damage and the absence of surface compressive stresses in the fully sintered material. Clinical relevance for surface treatments of zirconia frameworks in terms of hydrothermal and structural stabilities is addressed.

  4. The hydrothermal exploration system on the 'Qianlong2' AUV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, W.; Tao, C.; Jinhui, Z.; Cai, L.; Guoyin, Z.

    2016-12-01

    ABSTRACT: Qianlong2, is a fully Autonomous Underwater Vehicle (AUV) designed for submarine resources research, especially for polymetallic sulphides, and the survey depths of is up to 4500 m. Qianlong2 had successfully explored hydrothermal vent field on the Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR), and collected conductance, temperature and depth (CTD), turbidity, and Oxidation-Reduction Potential (ORP) data. It also had mapped precise topography by high resolution side scan sonar (HRBSSS) during every dive; and obtained photographs of sulfide deposits during some dives. Here, we detailedly described the implementation of investigation, data administration, and fast mapping of hydrothermal exploration system by Qianlong2. Giving a description of how to remove the platform magnetic interference by using magnetic data during Qianlong2 spin. Based on comprehensive hydrochemical anomalies, we get a rapid method for finding the localization of hydrothermal vents. Taking one dive as an example, we systemically showed the process about how to analyse hydrothermal survey data and acquire the location results of hydrothermal vents. Considering that this method is effective and can be used in other deep-submergence assets such as human occupied vehicles (HOVs) and remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) during further studies. Finally, we discussed how to promote and optimize the installation and application of those sensors and how to improve Qianlong2's autonomy of investigation.

  5. Ore-bearing hydrothermal metasomatic processes in the Elbrus volcanic center, the northern Caucasus, Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurbanov, A. G.; Bogatikov, O. A.; Dokuchaev, A. Ya.; Gazeev, V. M.; Abramov, S. S.; Groznova, E. O.; Shevchenko, A. V.

    2008-06-01

    Precaldera, caldera, and postcaldera cycles are recognized in the geological evolution of the Pleistocene-Holocene Elbrus volcanic center (EVC). During the caldera cycle, the magmatic activity was not intense, whereas hydrothermal metasomatic alteration of rocks was vigorous and extensive. The Kyukyurtli and Irik ore-magmatic systems have been revealed in the EVC, with the former being regarded as the more promising one. The ore mineralization in rocks of the caldera cycle comprises occurrences of magnetite, ilmenite, pyrite and pyrrhotite (including Ni-Co varieties), arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite, millerite, galena, and finely dispersed particles of native copper. Pyrite and pyrrhotite from volcanics of the caldera cycle and dacite of the Kyukyurtli extrusion are similar in composition and differ from these minerals of the postcaldera cycle, where pyrite and pyrrhotite are often enriched in Cu, Co, and Ni and millerite is noted as well. The composition of ore minerals indicates that the hydrothermal metasomatic alteration related to the evolution of the Kyukyurtli hydrothermal system was superimposed on rocks of the caldera cycle, whereas the late mineralization in rocks of the postcaldera cycle developed autonomously. The homogenization temperature of fluid inclusions in quartz and carbonate from crosscutting veinlets in the apical portion of the Kyukyurtli extrusion is 140-170°C and in quartz from geyserite, 120-150°C. The temperature of formation of the chalcopyrite-pyrite-pyrrhotite assemblage calculated using mineral geothermometers is 156 and 275°C in dacite from the middle and lower portions of the Malka lava flow and 190°C in dacite of the Kyukyurtli extrusion. The hydrothermal solutions that participated in metasomatic alteration of rocks pertaining to the Kyukyurtli ore-magmatic system (KOMS) and formed both secondary quartzite and geyserite were enriched in fluorine, as evidenced from the occurrence of F-bearing minerals-zharchikhite, ralstonite,

  6. Hydrothermal flake graphite mineralisation in Paleoproterozoic rocks of south-east Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosing-Schow, Nanna; Bagas, Leon; Kolb, Jochen

    2017-01-01

    , transporting carbon as CO2 and CH4, formed the mineralisation commonly hosted by shear zones, which acted as pathways for the mineralising fluids. The hydrothermal alteration assemblage is quartz-biotite-gruneriteedenite-pargasite-K-feldspar-titanite. The δ13C values of graphite, varying from −30 to −18‰ PDB......, indicate that the carbon was derived from organic matter most likely from metasedimentary sources. Devolatilisation of marble may have contributed a minor amount of carbon by fluid mixing. Precipitation of graphite involved retrograde hydration reactions, depleting the fluid in H2O and causing graphite......Flake graphite mineralisation is hosted in the Kuummiut Terrane of the Paleoproterozoic Nagssugtoqidian Orogen, south-east Greenland. Eclogite-facies peak-metamorphic assemblages record temperatures of 640–830 °C and pressures of 22–25 kbar, and are retrogressed in the high-pressure amphibolite...

  7. Field occurrence and lithology of Archean hydrothermal systems in the 3.2Ga Dixon Island Formation, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Y.; Kiyokawa, S.; Ito, T.; Ikehara, M.; Yamaguchi, K. E.; Horie, K.; Sakamoto, R.; Miki, T.

    2013-12-01

    Stratigraphic transition of black chert to iron-rich sedimentary rocks above volcanic sequences with hydrothermal systems is common and characteristic feature of Archean greenstone belts. The 3.2 Ga Dixon Island Formation, exposed along the northern coast of Dixon Island located in the coastal Pilbara terrane, Western Australia, is one of such units and the focus of our study. We introduce field occurrence and lithology of the Dixon Island Formation that preserves features of paleohydrohermal environment in the Mesoarchean ocean. The Dixon Island Formation is composed of the following three members (in ascending order): Komatiite-Rhyolite Tuff, Black Chert, and Varicolored Chert members (Kiyokawa and Taira, 1998). Here we focus on the Komatiite-Rholite Tuff member. It preserves two cycles of highly altered komatiite lavas and well-stratified rhyolite tuff. Komatiite lavas include dendritic crystals of chrome spinel and ghosts of spinifex, euhedral and sheet-like olivines and pyroxenes. These rocks are now composed of granular microcrystalline quartz with chromian muscovite, chrome spinel and chrorite that formed by intense silicification. Its upper part contains hydrothermal veining and alteration (i.e., many vein swarms composed of veins of quartz and organic carbon-rich black chert). Most black chert veins intrude vertically into overlying layers, and contain barite, pyrite, monazite and clay minerals which were least affected by silicificatio. Based on the cross-cutting relationship seen in the outcrops, we recognized two generations of black chert veins (type 1 and type 2 veins; Kiyokawa et al., 2006). Type 1 veins are mainly composed of carbonaceous peloids in a microcrystalline quartz matrix. Euhedral and xenocrystic tourmaline are found only in Type1 veins. Type 2 veins are organic carbon-poor and contain fragments of black chert and siliceous volcanic breccia (Kiyokawa et al., 2006). Intense silicification of komatiitic volcaniclastics and lava, enriched in

  8. Hydrothermal Activity on the Mid-Cayman Rise: ROV Jason sampling and site characterization at the Von Damm and Piccard hydrothermal fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    In January 2012 our multi-national and multi-disciplinary team conducted a series of 10 ROV Jason dives to conduct first detailed and systematic sampling of the Mid Cayman Rise hydrothermal systems at the Von Damm and Piccard hydrothermal fields. At Von Damm, hydrothermal venting is focused at and around a large conical structure that is approximately 120 m in diameter and rises at least 80m from the surrounding, largely sedimented seafloor. Clear fluids emitted from multiple sites around the flanks of the mound fall in the temperature range 110-130°C and fall on a common mixing line with hotter (>200°C) clear fluids emitted from an 8m tall spire at the summit which show clear evidence of ultramafic influence. Outcrop close to the vent-site is rare and the cone itself appear to consist of clay minerals derived from highly altered host rock. The dominant fauna at the summit of Von Damm are a new species of chemosynthetic shrimp but elsewhere the site also hosts two distinct species of chemosynthetic tube worm as well as at least one species of gastropod. The adjacent Piccard site, at ~5000m depth comprises 7 distinct sulfide mounds, 3 of which are currently active: Beebe Vents, Beebe Woods and Beebe Sea. Beebe Vents consists of 5 vigorous black smoker chimneys with maximum temperatures in the range 400-403°C while at Beebe Woods a more highly colonized thicket of up to 8m tall chimneys includes predominantly beehive diffusers with rare black smokers emitting fluids up to 353°C. Beebe Sea a diffuse site emitting fluids at 38°C Tmax, is the largest of the currently active mounds and immediately abuts a tall (8m) rift that strikes NE-SW bisecting the host Axial Volcanic Ridge. The fauna at Piccard are less diverse than at Von Damm and, predominantly, comprise the same species of MCR shrimp, a distinct gastropod species and abundant anemones.

  9. Influence of fluorine substitution on the morphology and structure of hydroxyapatite nanocrystals prepared by hydrothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Nathanael, A., E-mail: ajosephnc@yahoo.com [Department of Nanomaterials Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Thin Film and Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Mangalaraj, D., E-mail: dmraj800@yahoo.com [Department of Nanoscience and Technology, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Hong, S.I., E-mail: sihong@cnu.ac.kr [Thin Film and Nanomaterials Laboratory, Department of Physics, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore 641 046 (India); Masuda, Y. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimoshidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya 463-8560 (Japan); Rhee, Y.H.; Kim, H.W. [Department of Microbiology, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanocrystals with different levels of fluorine substitution (P/F = 0, 6, 4 and 2) on the OH sites were produced via hydrothermal method. The fluorine substitution was found to alter the morphology of crystals appreciably. The aspect ratio and the crystallinity of HAp crystals increased with increasing fluorine substitution. The presence of broad ring and hallow ring patterns in electron diffraction suggests the low-crystalline nature of HAp crystals. With increasing fluorine substitution, the diffraction patterns exhibited discrete rings and numerous diffraction spots, implying the increased crystallinity. Raman spectra from the HAp nanoparticles also support the less-crystalline nature of the pristine HAp and the enhanced crystallization by fluorine substitution. In HAp crystals processed with no fluorine substitution, surface energy and planar Ca{sup 2+} density are less sensitive to the crystallographic orientation because of its low-crystalline nature, favoring equi-axed or slightly elongated particles. The addition of fluorine apparently increased the crystallinity, enhancing the orientation dependent growth and accordingly the aspect ratio. Osteoblast proliferation was observed to be enhanced by fluorine substitution in HAp. In vitro biological data support that the excellent osteoblastic cell viability and functional activity of the fluoridated apatite. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorapatite nanorods were produced hydrothermally with different fluorine content. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fluorine substitution was found to alter the morphology of crystals appreciably. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It enhances the crystallinity, orientation dependent growth and hence aspect ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vitro cellular analysis shows excellent cell viability of the fluorapatite.

  10. Microbial colonization of basaltic glasses in hydrothermal organic-rich sediments at Guaymas Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nolwenn eCallac

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Oceanic basalts host diverse microbial communities with various metabolisms involved in C, N, S and Fe biogeochemical cycles which may contribute to mineral and glass alteration processes at, and below the seafloor. In order to study the microbial colonization on basaltic glasses and their potential biotic/abiotic weathering products, two colonization modules called AISICS (Autonomous In Situ Instrumented Colonization System were deployed in hydrothermal deep-sea sediments at the Guaymas Basin for 8 days and 22 days. Each AISICS module contained 18 colonizers (including sterile controls filled with basaltic glasses of contrasting composition. Chemical analyses of ambient fluids sampled through the colonizers showed a greater contribution of hydrothermal fluids (maximum temperature 57.6°C for the module deployed during the longer time period. For each colonizer, the phylogenetic diversity and metabolic function of bacterial and archaeal communities were explored using a molecular approach by cloning and sequencing. Results showed large microbial diversity in all colonizers. The bacterial distribution is primarily linked to the deployment duration, as well as the depth for the short deployment time module. Some 16s rRNA sequences form a new cluster of Epsilonproteobacteria. Within the Archaea the retrieved diversity could not be linked to either duration, depth or substrata. However, mcrA gene sequences belonging to the ANME-1 mcrA-guaymas cluster were found sometimes associated with their putative sulfate-reducers syntrophs depending on the colonizers. Although no specific glass alteration texture was identified, nano-crystals of barite and pyrite were observed in close association with organic matter, suggesting a possible biological mediation. This study gives new insights into the colonization steps of volcanic rock substrates and the capability of microbial communities to exploit new environmental conditions.

  11. Characterization of geochemical alteration halo associated with gold mineralization at the Buzwagi mine, northern Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manya, Shukrani

    2017-05-01

    Alteration halo geochemical study was carried out along one transect at the Buzwagi mine which is found in the Neoarchaean Nzega greenstone belt of northern Tanzania. The Buzwagi mine Au mineralization is hosted in quartz veins that are cross-cutting strongly sheared and hydrothermally altered K-granites. Mineralogical studies within the shear zone reveal that sericite, silica and sulphides are the most important hydrothermal mineral assemblages responsible for Au mineralization at the Buzwagi mine. The geochemical alteration halo is characterized by the addition of Au, Cu, Fe, K, Rb, Sn, W and U to wall rocks and simultaneous removal of Na, Sr, Ba, LREE and MREE from the host rocks. The concentrations of Cu (130-870 ppm) which show strong positive correlation with Au (R2 = 0.99) are so high in the alteration halo indicating that Cu is a strong Au pathfinder at the Buzwagi mine. Owing to their immobility during the post-emplacement processes, the HFSE (Zr, Hf, Th, Ta) remained unchanged during the hydrothermal alteration process. The addition of Fe and Cu is attributed to the presence of Fe- and Cu-sulphides (pyrite, chalcopyrite and chalcocite) whereas the addition of K, Rb, Sn, W and U is a function of both primary concentrations of these elements in the host rocks as well as the subsequent strong hydrothermal alteration evidenced by sericitization and silicification which involved the destruction of feldspars into sericites). The destruction of albite and its replacement by sericite accounts for the depletion of Na, Sr (and Ba). The Buzwagi mine Au mineralization mineral association do not include the more known pathfinders like Ag, As, Sb, Bi, Te and Tl and they seem not to have played a role in the mineralization process. These elements, therefore, should not be considered as pathfinders for Au exploration purposes at a Buzwagi-like deposit.

  12. Fractionation of Boron Isotopes in Icelandic Hydrothermal Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aggarwal, J.K.; Palmer, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Boron isotope ratios have been determined in a variety of different geothermal waters from hydrothermal systems across Iceland. Isotope ratios from the high temperature meteoric water recharged systems reflect the isotope ratio of the host rocks without any apparent fractionation. Seawater recharged geothermal systems exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B values than the meteoric water recharged geothermal systems. Water/rock ratios can be assessed from boron isotope ratios in the saline hydrothermal systems. Low temperature hydrothermal systems also exhibit more positive {delta}{sup 11}B than the high temperature systems, indicating fractionation of boron due to adsorption of the lighter isotope onto secondary minerals. Fractionation of boron in carbonate deposits may indicate the level of equilibrium attained within the systems.

  13. Composite polymer nanoarchitectures from a one-pot hydrothermal route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shirong; Chang, Ying; Yuan, Conghui; Wang, Shuang; Mao, Jie; Chen, Guorong; Luo, Weiang; Xu, Yiting; Dai, Lizong

    2015-11-13

    Exploitation of facile and versatile synthetic approaches to polymeric nanoarchitectures is of great interest in polymer science and engineering. Herein, we show that a simple hydrothermal route using double-solvents as reaction media has the ability to generate polymer nanospheres with tunable morphologies and components. In this one-pot approach, condensation polymerization of a resol precursor and radical polymerization of styrene are allowed to occur simultaneously under hydrothermal treatment. The synergistic self-organization of phenol-formaldehyde crosslinked networks and polystyrene chains leads to the formation of well-defined hollow nanospheres with adjustable shell thickness or even Janus particles comprising a solid hemisphere and a hollow hemisphere. Furthermore, control over the composition of the hollow polymer nanospheres can be easily achieved by introducing a third monomer into the hydrothermal system.

  14. Energetics of amino acid synthesis in hydrothermal ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amend, J. P.; Shock, E. L.

    1998-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations showed that the autotrophic synthesis of all 20 protein-forming amino acids was energetically favored in hot (100 degrees C), moderately reduced, submarine hydrothermal solutions relative to the synthesis in cold (18 degrees C), oxidized, surface seawater. The net synthesis reactions of 11 amino acids were exergonic in the hydrothermal solution, but all were endergonic in surface seawater. The synthesis of the requisite amino acids of nine thermophilic and hyperthermophilic proteins in a 100 degreesC hydrothermal solution yielded between 600 and 8000 kilojoules per mole of protein, which is energy that is available to drive the intracellular synthesis of enzymes and other biopolymers in hyperthermophiles thriving in these ecosystems.

  15. Study on hydrothermal synthesis dynamics of nanoscale xonotlite fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, F.; Chen, S.; Lin, Q.; Wang, X. D.; Cao, J. X.

    2018-01-01

    The xonotlite crystals were synthesized via the hydrothermal synthesis manner from CaO and SiO2 as the raw materials with their Si/Ca molar ratio of 1.0. Hydrothermal synthesis dynamics of nanoscale xonotlite fibers was explored by masterly measuring the electrical conductivities and the calcium concentrations of product slurries synthesized at various reaction temperature in this paper. The results indicated that the calculated values of the products’ quality at various reaction temperatures were consistent with the measured values. Based on chemical reaction kinetic, using fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, spline interpolation and least-squares fitting method, the dynamic relationship of xonotlite fibers synthesized via hydrothermal synthesis process is of -{dc}A/{dt}={kc}A4/5.

  16. A hydrothermal route for production of dense, nanostructured Y-TZP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boutz, M.M.R.; Boutz, M.M.R.; olde Scholtenhuis, R.J.M.; Winnubst, Aloysius J.A.; Burggraaf, Anthonie; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    Y-TZP powders were prepared either by calcination in air or crystallization under hydrothermal conditions of a hydrous gel, obtained by coprecipitation. Differences in powder properties, green compact structure and sinterability were examined. Crystallization under hydrothermal conditions occurs at

  17. Hydrothermal processing of rice husks: effects of severity on product distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vegas, R.; Kabel, M.A.; Schols, H.A.; Alonso, J.L.; Parajo, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment in aqueous media (hydrothermal or autohydrolysis reactions) is an environmentally friendly technology for fractionating lignocellulosic materials. Rice husks were subjected to hydrothermal processing under a variety of operational conditions to cause the selective breakdown of

  18. Study of the effect of hydrothermal process conditions on pasta quality

    OpenAIRE

    Maache-Rezzoug, Zoulikha; Allaf, Karim

    2005-01-01

    International audience; The effect of hydrothermal treatment on the pasting, hydration properties and colour quality of commercial fresh pasta were studied following an Instantaneous Controlled Pressure Drop treatment. This hydrothermal procedure involves a physical modification at high temperature (

  19. Cu-As Decoupling in Hydrothermal Systems: A Link Between Pyrite Chemistry and Fluid Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, M.; Tardani, D.; Deditius, A.; Chryssoulis, S.; Wrage, J.; Sanchez-Alfaro, P.; Andrea, H.; Cinthia, J.

    2016-12-01

    Chemical zonations in pyrite have been recognized in most hydrothermal ore deposit types, showing in some cases marked oscillatory alternation of metals and metalloids in pyrite growth zones (e.g., of Cu-rich, As-(Au)-depleted zones and As-(Au)-rich, Cu-depleted zones). This decoupled geochemical behavior of Cu and As has been interpreted as a result of chemical changes in ore-forming fluids, although direct evidence connecting fluctuations in hydrothermal fluid composition with metal partitioning into pyrite growth zones is still lacking. Here we report a comprehensive trace element database of pyrite from an active hydrothermal system, the Tolhuaca Geothermal System (TGS) in southern Chile. We combined high-spatial resolution and X-ray mapping capabilities of electron microprobe analysis (EMPA) with low detection limits and depth-profiling capabilities of secondary-ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) in a suite of pyrite samples retrieved from a 1 km drill hole that crosses the argillic and propylitic alteration zones of the geothermal system. We show that the concentrations of precious metals (e.g., Au, Ag), metalloids (e.g., As, Sb, Se, Te), and base and heavy metals (e.g., Cu, Co, Ni, Pb) in pyrite at the TGS are significant. Among the elements analyzed, arsenic, Cu and Co are the most abundant with concentrations that vary from sub-ppm levels to a few wt. %. Pyrites from the deeper propylitic zone do not show significant zonation and high Cu-(Co)-As concentrations correlate with each other. In contrast, well-developed zonations were detected in pyrite from the shallow argillic alteration zone, where Cu(Co)-rich, As-depleted cores alternate with Cu(Co)-depleted, As-rich rims. These microanalytical data were contrasted with chemical data of fluid inclusion in quartz veins (high Cu/Na and low As/Na) and borehole fluids (low Cu/Na and high As/Na) reported at the TGS, showing a clear correspondence between Cu and As concentrations in pyrite-forming fluids and chemical

  20. The coupled geochemistry of Au and As in pyrite from hydrothermal ore deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deditius, Artur P.; Reich, Martin; Kesler, Stephen E.; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Chryssoulis, Stephen L.; Walshe, John; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2014-09-01

    The ubiquity of Au-bearing arsenian pyrite in hydrothermal ore deposits suggests that the coupled geochemical behaviour of Au and As in this sulfide occurs under a wide range of physico-chemical conditions. Despite significant advances in the last 20 years, fundamental factors controlling Au and As ratios in pyrite from ore deposits remain poorly known. Here we explore these constraints using new and previously published EMPA, LA-ICP-MS, SIMS, and μ-PIXE analyses of As and Au in pyrite from Carlin-type Au, epithermal Au, porphyry Cu, Cu-Au, and orogenic Au deposits, volcanogenic massive sulfide (VHMS), Witwatersrand Au, iron oxide copper gold (IOCG), and coal deposits. Pyrite included in the data compilation formed under temperatures from ∼30 to ∼600 °C and in a wide variety of geological environments. The pyrite Au-As data form a wedge-shaped zone in compositional space, and the fact that most data points plot below the solid solubility limit defined by Reich et al. (2005) indicate that Au1+ is the dominant form of Au in arsenian pyrite and that Au-bearing ore fluids that deposit this sulfide are mostly undersaturated with respect to native Au. The analytical data also show that the solid solubility limit of Au in arsenian pyrite defined by an Au/As ratio of 0.02 is independent of the geochemical environment of pyrite formation and rather depends on the crystal-chemical properties of pyrite and post-depositional alteration. Compilation of Au-As concentrations and formation temperatures for pyrite indicates that Au and As solubility in pyrite is retrograde; Au and As contents decrease as a function of increasing temperature from ∼200 to ∼500 °C. Based on these results, two major Au-As trends for Au-bearing arsenian pyrite from ore deposits are defined. One trend is formed by pyrites from Carlin-type and orogenic Au deposits where compositions are largely controlled by fluid-rock interactions and/or can be highly perturbed by changes in temperature and

  1. Results of Physical Property Measurements Obtained during the CHIKYU Cruise CK16-01 to Hydrothermal Fields of the Middle Okinawa Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanikawa, W.; Masaki, Y.; Komori, S.; Torimoto, J.; Makio, M.; Ohta, Y.; Nozaki, T.; Ishibashi, J. I.; Kumagai, H.; Maeda, L.; Hamada, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The middle Okinawa trough, along the Ryukyu-arc on the margin of the western Pacific, fosters several hydrothermal fields. The cruise CK16-01 of D/V CHIKYU targeted the Iheya-North Field and Noho hydrothermal site. More than ten-days extensive coring was carried out with Logging While Drilling (LWD) and deployment of Kuroko cultivation apparatus between February 29th to March 17th2016. Here we present the results of the physical property measurements obtained using Chikyu's on-board laboratory. Cores were sampled among three sites where the seafloor environments were quite different: the Noho site (C9017), a site between the Natsu and Aki sites of the Iheya-North field (C9021), and the Iheya-North Aki site (C9023). Site C9017 was near the center of the hydrothermal activity, and the obtained core was limited 36 m in length and 30 % in the recovery rate. At 70 mbsf (meters below seafloor), the grain density and bulk density of the sediment reached their maxim (3.7 g/m3 and 2.7 g/cm3, respectively), while thermal conductivity reached its lowest value (0.6 W/m·K). Site C9021 yielded a 54 m core, with a core recovery rate of 50 %. Coarse pumiceous layers were found at 68 mbsf, with a hydrothermally altered layer appearing below 68 mbsf. The mean grain density value was 2.4 g/cm3 and was uniform throughout the core. The mean bulk density value of the pumiceous layers was 1.3 g/cm3, and of the hydrothermally altered layer was 2.1 g/cm3. Site C9023 was close to the active hydrothermal chimneys of the Iheya-North Aki site, and yielded 33 m of core with a core recovery rate of 16 %. Massive sulfide layers were found below 48 mbsf with grain density and bulk density values varying between 2.8-4.7 g/cm3 and 1.5-3.9 g/cm3, respectively. Magnetic susceptibility exhibited a high anomaly in a sedimented anhydrite layer found between 95 and 135 mbsf, and a high porosity and low resistivity zone was found below 150 mbsf. Together, these data from drilling cores and onboard

  2. Integrated analysis of hydrothermal flow through pretreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Archambault-Leger Veronique

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of hydrothermal flowthrough (FT pretreatment severity on pretreatment and solubilization performance metrics was evaluated for three milled feedstocks (corn stover, bagasse, and poplar and two conversion systems (simultaneous saccharification and fermentation using yeast and fungal cellulase, and fermentation by Clostridium thermocellum. Results Compared to batch pretreatment, FT pretreatment consistently resulted in higher XMG recovery, higher removal of non-carbohydrate carbon and higher glucan solubilization by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF. XMG recovery was above 90% for FT pretreatment below 4.1 severity but decreased at higher severities, particularly for bagasse. Removal of non-carbohydrate carbon during FT pretreatment increased from 65% at low severity to 80% at high severity for corn stover, and from 40% to 70% for bagasse and poplar. Solids obtained by FT pretreatment were amenable to high conversion for all of the feedstocks and conversion systems examined. The optimal time and temperature for FT pretreatment on poplar were found to be 16 min and 210°C. At these conditions, SSF glucan conversion was about 85%, 94% of the XMG was removed, and 62% of the non carbohydrate mass was solubilized. Solubilization of FT-pretreated poplar was compared for C. thermocellum fermentation (10% inoculum, and for yeast-fungal cellulase SSF (5% inoculum, cellulase loading of 5 and 10 FPU/g glucan supplemented with β-glucosidase at 15 and 30 U/g glucan. Under the conditions tested, which featured low solids concentration, C. thermocellum fermentation achieved faster rates and more complete conversion of FT-pretreated poplar than did SSF. Compared to SSF, solubilization by C. thermocellum was 30% higher after 4 days, and was over twice as fast on ball-milled FT-pretreated poplar. Conclusions XMG removal trends were similar between feedstocks whereas glucan conversion trends were significantly

  3. A ubiquitous thermoacidophilic archaeon from deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reysenbach, Anna-Louise; Liu, Yitai; Banta, Amy B; Beveridge, Terry J; Kirshtein, Julie D; Schouten, Stefan; Tivey, Margaret K; Von Damm, Karen L; Voytek, Mary A

    2006-07-27

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents are important in global biogeochemical cycles, providing biological oases at the sea floor that are supported by the thermal and chemical flux from the Earth's interior. As hot, acidic and reduced hydrothermal fluids mix with cold, alkaline and oxygenated sea water, minerals precipitate to form porous sulphide-sulphate deposits. These structures provide microhabitats for a diversity of prokaryotes that exploit the geochemical and physical gradients in this dynamic ecosystem. It has been proposed that fluid pH in the actively venting sulphide structures is generally low (pH cycling at deep-sea vents.

  4. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Leaf-Shaped Ferric Oxide Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Keqiang Ding

    2009-01-01

    For the first time, leaf-shaped ferric oxide particles were prepared from an aqueous solution of potassium ferricyanide [K3Fe(CN)6] by hydrothermal process. Images obtained from SEM (scanning electron microscope) revealed that leaf-shaped ferric oxides (around 1.5 μm in length) were clearly exhibited when the hydrothermal tempreature was 150 °C, while as the temperature was increased to 200 °C leaf-shaped ferric oxide particles with larger size were observed. XRD (X-ray diffraction) patterns ...

  5. Hydrothermal synthesized bismuth ferrites particles: thermodynamic, structural, and magnetic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yi; Cheng, Zhenxiang; Yu, Zhenwei; Dou, Shi Xue; Wang, Xiaolin; Liu, L Q

    2012-02-01

    A family of bismuth ferrites (BFO), including Bi2Fe4O9, BiFeO3, and Bi25FeO39 with different morphologies, has been prepared by the hydrothermal method assisted by different alkaline mineralizers. X-ray diffraction refinement calculations are carried out to study the crystal structures of bismuth ferrites. A thermodynamic calculation based on the dissolution-precipitation model was carried out to analyze the hydrothermal synthesis of BFO powders. Magnetic measurements of the obtained bismuth ferrites show different magnetic properties from 5 K to 350 K.

  6. Hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae's for bio oil production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toor, Saqib; Reddy, Harvind; Deng, Shuguang

    process water for algae cultivation. GC-MS, elemental analyzer, calorimeter and nutrient analysis were used to analyze bio-crude, lipid-extracted algae and water samples produced in the hydrothermal liquefaction process. The highest bio-oil yield of 46% was obtained on Nannochloropsis salina at 310 °C...... and 107 bar. For Spirulina platensis algae sample, the highest bio-oil yield is 38% at 350 °C and 195 bar. Preliminary data also indicate that a lipid-extracted algae solid residue sample obtained in the hydrothermal liquefaction process contains a high level of proteins...

  7. Hydrothermal brecciation in the Jemez Fault zone, Valles Caldera, New Mexico: Results from CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program) corehole VC-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulen, J.B.; Nielson, D.L.

    1987-06-01

    Paleozoic and Precambrian rocks intersected deep in Continental Scientific Drilling Program corehole VC-1, adjacent to the late Cenozoic Valles caldera complex, have been disrupted to form a spectacular breccia sequence. The breccias are of both tectonic and hydrothermal origin, and probably formed in the Jemez fault zone, a major regional structure with only normal displacement since mid-Miocene. Tectonic breccias are contorted, crushed, sheared, and granulated; slickensides are commmon. Hydrothermal breccias, by contrast, lack these frictional textures, but arej commonly characterized by fluidized matrix foliation and prominent clast rounding. Fluid inclusions in the hydrothermal breccias are dominantly two-phase, liquid-rich at room temperature, principally secondary, and form two distinctly different compositional groups. Older inclusions, unrelated to brecciation, are highly saline and homogenize to the liquid phase in the temperature range 189 to 246/sup 0/C. Younger inclusions, in part of interbreccia origin, are low-salinity and homogenize (also to liquid) in the range 230 to 283/sup 0/C. Vapor-rich inclusions locally trapped along with these dilute liquid-rich inclusions document periodic boiling. These fluid-inclusion data, together with alteration assemblages and textures as well as the local geologic history, have been combined to model hydrothermal brecciation at the VC-1 site.

  8. Lower crustal hydrothermal circulation at slow-spreading ridges: evidence from chlorine in Arctic and South Atlantic basalt glasses and melt inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zwan, Froukje M.; Devey, Colin W.; Hansteen, Thor H.; Almeev, Renat R.; Augustin, Nico; Frische, Matthias; Haase, Karsten M.; Basaham, Ali; Snow, Jonathan E.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrothermal circulation at slow-spreading ridges is important for cooling the newly formed lithosphere, but the depth to which it occurs is uncertain. Magmas which stagnate and partially crystallize during their rise from the mantle provide a means to constrain the depth of circulation because assimilation of hydrothermal fluids or hydrothermally altered country rock will raise their chlorine (Cl) contents. Here we present Cl concentrations in combination with chemical thermobarometry data on glassy basaltic rocks and melt inclusions from the Southern Mid-Atlantic Ridge (SMAR; 3 cm year-1 full spreading rate) and the Gakkel Ridge (max. 1.5 cm year-1 full spreading rate) in order to define the depth and extent of chlorine contamination. Basaltic glasses show Cl-contents ranging from ca. 50-430 ppm and ca. 40-700 ppm for the SMAR and Gakkel Ridge, respectively, whereas SMAR melt inclusions contain between 20 and 460 ppm Cl. Compared to elements of similar mantle incompatibility (e.g. K, Nb), Cl-excess (Cl/Nb or Cl/K higher than normal mantle values) of up to 250 ppm in glasses and melt inclusions are found in 75% of the samples from both ridges. Cl-excess is interpreted to indicate assimilation of hydrothermal brines (as opposed to bulk altered rock or seawater) based on the large range of Cl/K ratios in samples showing a limited spread in H2O contents. Resorption and disequilibrium textures of olivine, plagioclase and clinopyroxene phenocrysts and an abundance of xenocrysts and gabbroic fragments in the SMAR lavas suggest multiple generations of crystallization and assimilation of hydrothermally altered rocks that contain these brines. Calculated pressures of last equilibration based on the major element compositions of melts cannot provide reliable estimates of the depths at which this crystallization/assimilation occurred as the assimilation negates the assumption of crystallization under equilibrium conditions implicit in such calculations. Clinopyroxene

  9. Hydrothermal uranium deposits containing molybdenum and fluorite in the Marysvale volcanic field, west-central Utah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, C.G.; Rasmussen, J.D.; Steven, T.A.; Rye, R.O.; Rowley, P.D.; Romberger, S.B.; Selverstone, J.

    1998-01-01

    Uranium deposits containing molybdenum and fluorite occur in the Central Mining Area, near Marysvale, Utah, and formed in an epithermal vein system that is part of a volcanic/hypabyssal complex. They represent a known, but uncommon, type of deposit; relative to other commonly described volcanic-related uranium deposits, they are young, well-exposed and well-documented. Hydrothermal uranium-bearing quartz and fluorite veins are exposed over a 300 m vertical range in the mines. Molybdenum, as jordisite (amorphous MoS2, together with fluorite and pyrite, increase with depth, and uranium decreases with depth. The veins cut 23-Ma quartz monzonite, 20-Ma granite, and 19-Ma rhyolite ash-flow tuff. The veins formed at 19-18 Ma in a 1 km2 area, above a cupola of a composite, recurrent, magma chamber at least 24 ?? 5 km across that fed a sequence of 21- to 14-Ma hypabyssal granitic stocks, rhyolite lava flows, ash-flow tuffs, and volcanic domes. Formation of the Central Mining Area began when the intrusion of a rhyolite stock, and related molybdenite-bearing, uranium-rich, glassy rhyolite dikes, lifted the fractured roof above the stock. A breccia pipe formed and relieved magmatic pressures, and as blocks of the fractured roof began to settle back in place, flat-lying, concave-downward, 'pull-apart' fractures were formed. Uranium-bearing, quartz and fluorite veins were deposited by a shallow hydrothermal system in the disarticulated carapace. The veins, which filled open spaces along the high-angle fault zones and flat-lying fractures, were deposited within 115 m of the ground surface above the concealed rhyolite stock. Hydrothermal fluids with temperatures near 200??C, ??18OH2O ~ -1.5, ?? -1.5, ??DH2O ~ -130, log fO2 about -47 to -50, and pH about 6 to 7, permeated the fractured rocks; these fluids were rich in fluorine, molybdenum, potassium, and hydrogen sulfide, and contained uranium as fluoride complexes. The hydrothermal fluids reacted with the wallrock resulting in

  10. Geochemistry of hydrothermal vent fluids and its implications for subsurface processes at the active Longqi hydrothermal field, Southwest Indian Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Fuwu; Zhou, Huaiyang; Yang, Qunhui; Gao, Hang; Wang, Hu; Lilley, Marvin D.

    2017-04-01

    The Longqi hydrothermal field at 49.6°E on the Southwest Indian Ridge was the first active hydrothermal field found at a bare-rock ultra-slow spreading mid-ocean ridge. Here we report the chemistry of the hydrothermal fluids, for the first time, that were collected from the S zone and the M zone of the Longqi field by gas-tight isobaric samplers by the HOV "Jiaolong" diving cruise in January 2015. According to H2, CH4 and other chemical data of the vent fluid, we suggest that the basement rock at the Longqi field is dominantly mafic. This is consistent with the observation that the host rock of the active Longqi Hydrothermal field is dominated by extensively distributed basaltic rock. It was very interesting to detect simultaneously discharging brine and vapor caused by phase separation at vents DFF6, DFF20, and DFF5 respectively, in a distance of about 400 m. Based on the end-member fluid chemistry and distance between the vents, we propose that there is a single fluid source at the Longqi field. The fluid branches while rising to the seafloor, and two of the branches reach S zone and M zone and phase separate at similar conditions of about 28-30.2 MPa and 400.6-408.3 °C before they discharge from the vents. The end-member fluid compositions of these vents are comparable with or within the range of variation of known global seafloor hydrothermal fluid chemical data from fast, intermediate and slow spreading ridges, which confirms that the spreading rate is not the key factor that directly controls hydrothermal fluid chemistry. The composition of basement rock, water-rock interaction and phase separation are the major factors that control the composition of the vent fluids in the Longqi field.

  11. Growth and alteration of uranium-rich microlite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giere, R.; Swope, R. J.; Buck, E. C.; Guggenheim, R.; Mathys, D.; Reusser, E.

    2000-02-01

    Uranium-rich microlite, a pyrochlore-group mineral, occurs in 440 Ma old lithium pegmatites of the Mozambique Belt in East Africa. Microlite exhibits a pronounced growth zoning, with a U-free core surrounded by a U-rich rim (UO{sub 2} up to 17 wt.%). The core exhibits conjugate sets of straight cracks (cleavage planes) which provided pathways for a late-stage U-enriched pegmatitic fluid which interacted with the U-free microlite to produce a distinct U enrichment along the cracks and led to the formation of the U-rich rim. Following the stage of U incorporation into microlite, a second generation of hydrothermal fluids deposited mica along the cleavage planes. Subsequent to these two hydrothermal stages, the host rock was uplifted and subjected to intense low-temperature alteration during which Na, Ca and F were leached from the microlite crystals. This alteration also led to a hydration of microlite, but there is no evidence of U loss. These low-temperature alteration effects were only observed in the U-rich rim which is characterized by a large number of irregular cracks which are most probably the result of metamictization, as indicated by electron diffraction images and powder X-ray patterns. The pyrochlore-group minerals provide excellent natural analogues for pyrochlore-based nuclear waste forms, because samples of variable age and with high actinide contents are available.

  12. Geochemical and textural characterization of phosphate accessory phases in the vein assemblage and metasomatically altered Llallagua tin porphyry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betkowski, Wladyslaw B.; Rakovan, John; Harlov, Daniel E.

    2017-09-01

    Petrographic and geochemical characterization of phosphate accessory minerals represents a powerful tool in understanding the mineralization and metasomatic history of one of the world's biggest tin deposits, the Siglo XX mine, Salvadora stock, Llallagua, Bolivia. The Llallagua tin deposit lies in a hydrothermally altered porphyry stock that is part of the subduction-related Bolivian tin belt. Despite numerous studies, there is still a debate over the timing and characteristics of mineralization history of the deposit. Primary igneous fluorapatite and monazite (for the first time) were recognized in the altered porphyry. The igneous monazite is enriched in Th, unlike the hydrothermal monazite that is recognized for its low Th concentration. Fluorapatite, monazite, and xenotime also coexist with cassiterite within the hydrothermal vein assemblage. Fluorapatite and xenotime are essentially pristine. Monazite, however, shows various degrees of alteration in the form of regenerative mineral replacement (RMR). This exemplifies differential reactivity and selective mineral replacement/alteration of three accessory phosphate minerals, that are all important geochemical tracers of magmatic and hydrothermal processes, and which can all be used as geochronometers. Mineral textures and composition in the altered porphyry and vein assemblages have been evaluated. Monazite-xenotime geothermometry indicates monazite crystallization beginning around 550 °C. Monazite continues to grow as temperatures gradually decrease to about 300 °C, when most of cassiterite precipitation occurred in the samples studied. The primary mechanism of phosphate alteration has been identified as a coupled dissolution-reprecipitation process, which led to REE exchange in the igneous fluorapatite and hydrothermal monazite. In Type I local alteration, La and Pr-Nd show continuity across the pre- and post- alteration concentric zones indicating that they were not affected by alteration. This is an

  13. Subcritical hydrothermal conversion of organic wastes and biomass. Reaction pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Amadeus Castro Vega

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal conversion is a procedure which emulates organic matter’s natural conversion into bio-crude having physical and chemical properties analogous to petroleum. The artificial transformation of biomass requi- res previous knowledge of the main reaction routes and product availability. The main component of biomass (depolymerisation by hydrolysis is presented in hydrothermal cellulose conversion, producing oligosaccharides which exhibit dehydration and retro-aldol condensation reactions for transforming into furfurals and carboxylic acids. Other biomass components (such as lignin, proteins, and fat esters present both hydrolysis and pyrolysis reaction routes. As long as biomass mainly contains carbohydrates, subcritical hydrothermal conversion products and their wastes will be fundamentally analogous to those displaying cellulose. These substances have added- value by far surpassing raw material’s acquisition cost. When the main hydrothermal conversion products’ O/C, H/C molar ratios as reported in literature are plotted, an evolutionary tralectory for conversion products appears to be closely or even overlapped with fossil fuels’ geological evolution.

  14. Facile hydrothermal synthesis of CeO2 nanopebbles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Ostwald ripening and oriented attachment process, res- pectively. In the hydrothermal process after the nuclea- tion stage, where the small nanocrystals are dissolved or re-precipitated to grow the larger crystals by the Ostwald ripening process, resulting in the formation of CeO2 nanopebbles.24 Figure 2f shows the ...

  15. hydrothermal synthesis and characterisation of amine-templated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF EKWUEME

    showed that the complexes were insoluble in water, ethanol, DMF and DMSO. KEYWORDS: Hydrothermal synthesis, metal phosphates, p-aminobenzoic acid, ethylacetoacetate, ethylammonium-. 4-aminobenzoate. INTRODUCTION. One of the major areas of materials science is the development of solid state materials with ...

  16. Chaotic thermohaline convection in low-porosity hydrothermal systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoofs, Stan; Spera, Frank J.; Hansen, Ulrich

    1999-01-01

    Fluids circulate through the Earth's crust perhaps down to depths as great as 5^15 km, based on oxygen isotope systematics of exhumed metamorphic terrains, geothermal fields, mesozonal batholithic rocks and analysis of obducted ophiolites. Hydrothermal flows are driven by both thermal and chemical

  17. Hydrothermal processing of biomass from invasive aquatic plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. James Catallo; Todd F. Shupe; Thomas L. Eberhardt

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the hydrothermal (HT) treatment of three invasive aquatic plants (i.e., Lemna sp., Hydrilla sp., and Eichhornia sp.) with respect to the generation of semi-volatile hydrocarbon product mixtures and biomass volume reduction. Identical HT treatments yielded similar semi-...

  18. Hydrothermal plumes over the Carlsberg Ridge, Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ray, D.; KameshRaju, K.A; Baker, E.T.; Rao, A; Mudholkar, A; Lupton, J.E.; SuryaPrakash, L.; Gawas, R.B.; VijayaKumar, T.

    Water column surveys and sampling in 2007 and 2009 was conducted to search for hydrothermal plumes over a segment of the Carlsberg Ridge. An evidence for two separate vent fields, one near 3 degrees 42′N, 63 degrees 40′E and another near 3 degrees...

  19. Hydrothermal decomposition of liquid crystal in subcritical water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Xuning [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, No. 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Shanghai Cooperative Centre for WEEE Recycling, Shanghai Second Polytechnic University, No. 2360 Jinhai Road, Shanghai 201209 (China); He, Wenzhi, E-mail: hithwz@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, No. 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Li, Guangming; Huang, Juwen; Lu, Shangming; Hou, Lianjiao [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, No. 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Highlights: • Hydrothermal technology can effectively decompose the liquid crystal of 4-octoxy-4'-cyanobiphenyl. • The decomposition rate reached 97.6% under the optimized condition. • Octoxy-4'-cyanobiphenyl was mainly decomposed into simple and innocuous products. • The mechanism analysis reveals the decomposition reaction process. - Abstract: Treatment of liquid crystal has important significance for the environment protection and human health. This study proposed a hydrothermal process to decompose the liquid crystal of 4-octoxy-4′-cyanobiphenyl. Experiments were conducted with a 5.7 mL stainless tube reactor and heated by a salt-bath. Factors affecting the decomposition rate of 4-octoxy-4′-cyanobiphenyl were evaluated with HPLC. The decomposed liquid products were characterized by GC-MS. Under optimized conditions i.e., 0.2 mL H{sub 2}O{sub 2} supply, pH value 6, temperature 275 °C and reaction time 5 min, 97.6% of 4-octoxy-4′-cyanobiphenyl was decomposed into simple and environment-friendly products. Based on the mechanism analysis and products characterization, a possible hydrothermal decomposition pathway was proposed. The results indicate that hydrothermal technology is a promising choice for liquid crystal treatment.

  20. A Novel Dual-Stage Hydrothermal Flow Reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellstern, Henrik Christian; Becker, Jacob; Hald, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The dual-stage reactor is a novel continuous flow reactor with two reactors connected in series. It is designed for hydrothermal flow synthesis of nanocomposites, in which a single particle consists of multiple materials. The secondary material may protect the core nanoparticle from oxidation...

  1. Hydrothermal liquefaction of barley straw to bio-crude oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Zhe; Rosendahl, Lasse; Toor, Saqib

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of barley straw with K2CO3 at different temperatures (280–400 C) was conducted and compared to optimize its process conditions; the aqueous phase as a co-product from this process was recycled to explore the feasibility of implementing wastewater reuse for bio...

  2. Thermal and hydrothermal stability of ZrMCM-41 mesoporous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effect of the different initial ZrO2 : SiO2 molar ratio, the different thermal treatment temperature and hydrothermal treatment time on textural property was investigated. The results show that the obtained products possess a typical mesoporous structure of MCM-41 and have specific surface areas in the range of 598.1 ...

  3. Facile hydrothermal synthesis of CeO2 nanopebbles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanopebbles have been synthesized using a facile hydrothermal method. X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy analyses confirm the presence of CeO2 nanopebbles. XRD shows the formation of cubic fluorite CeO2 and the average particle size estimated from the ...

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis and photoluminescent properties of stacked indium sulfide superstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yan; Zhang, Hongjie; Song, Shuyan; Feng, Jing; Lei, Yongqian; Zhao, Lijun; Li, Meiye

    2008-03-28

    Unusual hierarchical stacked superstructures of cubic beta-In2S3 were fabricated via a facile hydrothermal process in the presence of a surfactant cetyltrimethylammonium bromide CTAB; the 3D superstructures were developed by helical propagation of surface steps from microflakes of 10-20 nm thickness.

  5. Borehole plugging by hydrothermal transport. A feasibility report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, D.M.; White, W.B.

    1975-05-30

    The possibility of forming borehole plugs by hydrothermal transport was examined with respect to five systems, utilizing available literature data. In general, it would appear possible to create plugs with hydrothermal cements, with hydrothermally transported quartz, and with carbonates precipitated in-situ using carbon dioxide or carbon dioxide and water as reacting fluids. Hydrothermal cements appear to be most feasible from an engineering and economic point of view using a slurry with a lime-alumina-silica composition carried into the hole in a single pipe at temperatures in the range of 200/sup 0/C and requiring only enough pressure to drive the mixture into the hole. Quartz or chalcedony plugs would be the most impervious, have the lowest chemical reactivity with groundwater, the lowest thermal expansion, and be most compatible with the wall rock. Deposition is likely to be slow, and there are severe engineering problems associated with a single pipe system carrying silica-rich solutions at temperatures in excess of 500/sup 0/C at pressure of 2000 bars (30,000 psi). Calcite plugs could be formed as compatible plug materials in contact with a limestone or dolomite wall rock. It is not known whether non-porous plugs can be readily formed and there is also a problem of chemical reaction with percolating groundwater. The clay-water and sulfur-water systems do not appear to be viable plug systems. In-situ reconstitution of the wall rock does not appear to be an economically feasible possibility.

  6. Antarctic marine biodiversity and deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chown, Steven L

    2012-01-01

    The diversity of many marine benthic groups is unlike that of most other taxa. Rather than declining from the tropics to the poles, much of the benthos shows high diversity in the Southern Ocean. Moreover, many species are unique to the Antarctic region. Recent work has shown that this is also true of the communities of Antarctic deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Vent ecosystems have been documented from many sites across the globe, associated with the thermally and chemically variable habitats found around these, typically high temperature, streams that are rich in reduced compounds and polymetallic sulphides. The animal communities of the East Scotia Ridge vent ecosystems are very different to those elsewhere, though the microbiota, which form the basis of vent food webs, show less differentiation. Much of the biological significance of deep-sea hydrothermal vents lies in their biodiversity, the diverse biochemistry of their bacteria, the remarkable symbioses among many of the marine animals and these bacteria, and the prospects that investigations of these systems hold for understanding the conditions that may have led to the first appearance of life. The discovery of diverse and unusual Antarctic hydrothermal vent ecosystems provides opportunities for new understanding in these fields. Moreover, the Antarctic vents south of 60°S benefit from automatic conservation under the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and the Antarctic Treaty. Other deep-sea hydrothermal vents located in international waters are not protected and may be threatened by growing interests in deep-sea mining.

  7. development of a hydrothermal method to synthesize spherical znse ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    A hydrothermal method to synthesize spherical ZnSe nanoparticles. Bull. Chem. Soc. Ethiop. 2014, 28(1). 39 resulting in the equalization of scattering coefficients of the reference side and sample side. The integrating sphere method involves a barium sulfate-coated sphere that draws the scattered light, allowing all the light ...

  8. Hydrothermal emergence model for ripgut brome (Bromus diandrus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model that describes the emergence of ripgut brome (Bromus diandrus) was developed using a two-season data set from a no-tilled field in northeastern Spain. The relationship between cumulative emergence and hydrothermal time (HTT) was described by a sigmoid growth function (Chapman equation). HTT ...

  9. Effect of pressure on colloidal behavior in hydrothermal water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Swapan K; Tsujii, Kaoru

    2008-06-12

    The pressure dependence of the colloidal phenomena of nanoparticles in hydrothermal water was investigated by both experiment and theory. Dynamic light scattering experiments show that diamond nanoparticles, which are highly stable in ambient water, easily aggregate in high-temperature and high-pressure water. Although the stability of nanoparticles in ambient pure water does not depend on pressure, it is interestingly found that at constant temperature particles aggregate faster in the hydrothermal regime when the pressure is higher. A theoretical interpretation is proposed to predict the stability of colloids in water as a function of temperature and pressure. Numerical analysis shows that the repulsive interparticle potential barrier, which stabilizes particles in the dispersion, decreases dramatically in high-temperature and high-pressure water. The decrease in the potential barrier arises from the temperature and the pressure dependencies of the dielectric constant (epsilon) and the ion product (p K w) of water. Numerical analysis shows that the pressure dependence of epsilon is negligible in the temperature range of 20-300 degrees C, whereas the pressure dependence of p K w is significant at temperatures of T > 150 degrees C. The theory reveals that the pressure dependence of the rate of size increment in the hydrothermal regime results from the pressure dependence of p K w. An increase in pressure in the hydrothermal water enhances the ionization of water molecules which reduces the surface potential of the particles. This effect lowers the interparticle repulsive potential barrier, which accelerates aggregation of the particles.

  10. Next-generation hydrothermal ZnO crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrentraut, Dirk; Maeda, Katsumi; Kano, Masataka; Fujii, Katsushi; Fukuda, Tsuguo

    2011-04-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) crystals were grown by the hydrothermal method under significantly improved conditions. Careful adjustment of critical growth conditions led the way towards ZnO crystals with extremely low (indium and lithium yields high-quality crystals.

  11. thermal power stations' reliability evaluation in a hydrothermal system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    A quantitative tool for the evaluation of thermal power stations reliability in a hydrothermal system is presented. A reliable power station is one which would supply the required power within its installed capacity at any time within the specified voltage and frequency limits. Required for this evaluation are the station's installed ...

  12. Hydrothermal Gold Mineralization and Structural Controls near May ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mickiale

    Ethiopia is endowed with various types of metallic and non-metallic mineral resources such as gold, platinum, copper, lead, ... in detail with reference to petrography, fluid inclusion, isotope geochemistry and age dating by ... Hawzein area and reported presence of hydrothermal gold and base metal mineralization. (Zelalem ...

  13. Origin of Magnetism in Hydrothermally Aged 2-Line Ferrihydrite Suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Liang; Jiang, Zhao-Xia; Du, Yong-Hua; Yin, Xin-Mao; Xi, Shi-Bo; Wen, Wen; Roberts, Andrew P; Wee, Andrew T S; Xiong, Yi-Min; Liu, Qing-Song; Gao, Xing-Yu

    2017-03-07

    As an iron oxyhydroxide, nanosized ferrihydrite (Fh) is important in Earth science, biology, and industrial applications. However, its basic structure and origin of its magnetism have long been debated. We integrate synchrotron-based techniques to explore the chemical structures of 2-line ferrihydrite and to determine the origin of its magnetism during hydrothermal aging in air. Our results demonstrate that both the magnetism and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) signal of 2-line ferrihydrite are enhanced with aging time, and that XMCD spectral patterns resemble that of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) rather than magnetite (Fe3O4). Fe L-edge and K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) further indicate formation of both maghemite and hematite (α-Fe2O3) with increasing concentrations with longer hydrothermal aging time. Thus, magnetic enhancement with longer hydrothermal aging time is attributed to increasing maghemite concentration instead of a magnetically ordered ferrihydrite as previously reported. Moreover, L-edge and K-edge XAS spectra with different probing depths yield different ratios of these Fe oxides, which suggest the formation of a core (ferrihydrite-rich)-shell (with a mixture of both allotropes; α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3) structure during hydrothermal aging. Our results provide insights into the chemical evolution of 2-line ferrihydrite that reveal unambiguously the origin of its magnetism.

  14. Hydrothermal carbonization of tobacco stalk for fuel application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jiaxiao; Li, Bin; Chen, Chaoying; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Min; Zhang, Ke

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco stalks are an abundant biomass resource which are otherwise treated as waste. In this work, the effect of hydrothermal carbonization temperature and time on the structures, chemical compositions and combustion characteristics of hydrochars obtained from tobacco stalks were evaluated. The carbon content, higher heating value, and energy yield increased with accompanying decrease in hydrogen and oxygen contents with the increase of treatment temperature and time. The evolution of the H/C and O/C atomic ratios indicated dehydration and devolatilization processes occurred during hydrothermal carbonization. The weight loss, combustion range and characteristic temperatures of tobacco stalks were significantly modified after hydrothermal carbonization, resulting in higher ignition temperatures and higher energy density. The kinetics model, Coats-Redfern method revealed the activation energy of hydrochars in zone 2 and 3 were among 43.7-74.8kJ/mol and 46.7-85.8kJ/mol, respectively. Our results show that hydrothermal carbonization reaction can facilitate transforming tobacco stalks into energy-rich solid fuel. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. The deep structure of a sea-floor hydrothermal deposit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zierenberg, R.A.; Fouquet, Y.; Miller, D.J.; Bahr, J.M.; Baker, P.A.; Bjerkgard, T.; Brunner, C.A.; Duckworth, R.C.; Gable, R.; Gieskes, J.; Goodfellow, W.D.; Groschel-Becker, H. M.; Guerin, G.; Ishibashi, J.; Iturrino, G.; James, R.H.; Lackschewitz, K.S.; Marquez, L.L.; Nehlig, P.; Peter, J.M.; Rigsby, C.A.; Schultheiss, P.; Shanks, Wayne C.; Simoneit, B.R.T.; Summit, M.; Teagle, D.A.H.; Urbat, M.; Zuffa, G.G.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrothermal circulation at the crests of mid-ocean ridges plays an important role in transferring heat from the interior of the Earth. A consequence of this hydrothermal circulation is the formation of metallic ore bodies known as volcanic-associated massive sulphide deposits. Such deposits, preserved on land, were important sources of copper for ancient civilizations and continue to provide a significant source of base metals (for example, copper and zinc). Here we present results from Ocean Drilling Program Leg 169, which drilled through a massive sulphide deposit on the northern Juan de Fuca spreading centre and penetrated the hydrothermal feeder zone through which the metal-rich fluids reached the sea floor. We found that the style of feeder-zone mineralization changes with depth in response to changes in the pore pressure of the hydrothermal fluids and discovered a stratified zone of high-grade copper-rich replacement mineralization below the massive sulphide deposit. This copper-rich zone represents a type of mineralization not previously observed below sea-floor deposits, and may provide new targets for land-based mineral exploration.

  16. Hydrothermal gold mineralization and structural controls near May ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ezana Mining Development Company has recently reported presence of gold mineralization near May Hibey area, western Tigray, northern Ethiopia. It is in association with hydrothermal quartz veins within the Neoproterozoic low grade basement rocks, metavolcanics and metasedimentary rocks. Structural data suggests ...

  17. Hydrothermal Gold Mineralization and Structural Controls near May ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mickiale

    ABSTRACT. Ezana Mining Development Company has recently reported presence of gold mineralization near. May Hibey area, western Tigray, northern Ethiopia. It is in association with hydrothermal quartz veins within the Neoproterozoic low grade basement rocks, metavolcanics and metasedimentary rocks. Structural ...

  18. Calcium phosphate biomaterials from marine algae. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Felício-Fernandes

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate compounds such as Hydroxyapatite (HAp were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis with phycogenic CaCO3 as starting material. Material obtained was characterised by usual methods (XRD, FTIR, TG, N2-adsorption, SEM and EDX in order to study its physical-chemical characteristics. The prepared HAp showed that it may be suitable for use as a biomaterial.

  19. Influence of bases on hydrothermal synthesis of titanate nanostructures

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Sikhwivhilu, LM

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A hydrothermal treatment of titanium dioxide (TiO2) with various bases (i.e., LiOH, NaOH, KOH, and NH4OH) was used to prepare materials with unique morphologies, relatively small crystallite sizes, and large specific surface areas. The experimental...

  20. Hydrothermal mixing: Fuel for life in the deep-sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hentscher, M.; Bach, W.; Amend, J.; McCollom, T.

    2009-04-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vent systems show a wide range of fluid compositions and temperatures. They reach from highly alkaline and reducing, like the Lost City hydrothermal field, to acidic and reducing conditions, (e. g., the Logatchev hydrothermal field) to acidic and oxidizing conditions (e. g., island arc hosted systems). These apparently hostile vent systems are generally accompanied by high microbial activity forming the base of a food-web that often includes higher organisms like mussels, snails, or shrimp. The primary production is boosted by mixing of chemically reduced hydrothermal vent fluids with ambient seawater, which generates redox disequilibria that serve as energy source for chemolithoautotrophic microbial life. We used geochemical reaction path models to compute the affinities of catabolic (energy-harvesting) and anabolic (biosynthesis) reactions along trajectories of batch mixing between vent fluids and 2 °C seawater. Geochemical data of endmember hydrothermal fluids from 12 different vent fields (Lost City, Rainbow, Logatchev, TAG, EPR 21 °N, Manus Basin, Mariana Arc, etc.) were included in this reconnaissance study of the variability in metabolic energetics in global submarine vent systems. The results show a distinction between ultramafic-hosted and basalt-hosted hydrothermal systems. The highest energy yield for chemolithotrophic catabolism in ultramafic-hosted hydrothermal systems is reached at low temperature and under slightly aerobic to aerobic conditions. The dominant reactions, for example at Rainbow or Lost City, are the oxidation of H2, Fe2+ and methane. At temperatures >60 °C, anaerobic metabolic reactions, e. g., sulphate reduction and methanogenesis, become more profitable. In contrast, basalt-hosted systems, such as TAG and 21 °N EPR uniformly indicate H2S oxidation to be the catabolically dominant reaction over the entire microbial-relevant temperature range. Affinities were calculated for the formation of individual cellular

  1. Imaging Seafloor Massive Sulphides at the TAG hydrothermal fields, from the Blue Mining seismic project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil de la Iglesia, Alba; Vardy, Mark; Bialas, Jörg; Dannowski, Anke; Schröder, Henning; Minshull, Tim; Chidlow, Kasia; Murton, Bramly

    2017-04-01

    The Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse (TAG) hydrothermal field, located at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (26°N), is known for the existence of Seafloor Massive Sulphides (SMS) discovered by the Trans-Atlantic Geotraverse cruise (Rona et al., 1986). The TAG comprises a low-temperature alteration zone, five inactive, high-temperature hydrothermal deposits, and the hydrothermal active TAG mound. TAG is also known for being one of the eight known SMS with a size larger than 2M tones (Hannington et al., 2011). The known SMS deposits do not have the same dimensions as the Massive Sulphides (MS) found on land, covering areas from 10s-100s m2 and their accessibility is more complicated, being located at 800-6000 m water depth. Although they do not seem to be economically exploitable at present, those deep-sea mineral resources could be important targets in the near future. One of the aims of the European-funded Blue Mining project is to identify the SMS deposit dimensions for the future environmentally sustainable and clean deep-sea mining. The Blue Mining project is focused on the extinct Seafloor Massive Sulphides (eSMS) in the TAG hydrothermal field, in particular Shinkai, Southern and Shimmering mounds. In May/June 2016 the German RV METEOR carried out a seismic refraction/reflection wide-angle (WA) experiment acquiring thirty multichannel seismic (MCS) profiles crossing the TAG hydrothermal field. GEOMAR's 2-unit air-gun array with a total volume of 760 cubic-inches was used, triggering seismic pulses every 12 s along the MCS profiles. Reflected and refracted events from the shallow-towed sources were recorded by 20 Ocean Bottom Seismometers (OBS) and 5 Ocean Bottom Hydrophones (OBH). To obtain the internal velocities and gross geometries of these deposits, 10 of 20 OBS were located on top of the eSMS, Shinaki and Southern mounds, while the other 10 instruments were located in extension of the profiles, covering Shimmering mounds and regional targets. In this presentation, we

  2. Reactive Hydrothermal Flow Model for Mid-Oceanic Ridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starger, J. L.; Garven, G.; Tivey, M. K.

    2016-12-01

    A two-dimensional finite-element code known as RST2D [1] is being used to study the geothermal energy, geohydrology, and geochemistry of fluid convection in seafloor hydrothermal systems such as the Juan de Fuca Ridge, East Pacific Rise, and TAG hydrothermal fields. Relative to black smoker vents and other discharge features, submarine recharge zones are understudied. We are attempting to model both the recharge and discharge limbs of these flow fields as a coupled system by mathematically and physically linking the fluid dynamics, heat flow, and geochemical reactions. Numerical simulations have been made to quantify likely flow rates and relevant geochemical water-rock reactions including mineral precipitation and dissolution using a fully-coupled reactive flow modeling approach. In particular, the reactive flow model is being used to predict the formation, likely spatial-temporal distribution, and preservation of anhydrite in the hydrothermal recharge zone and its feedback influence on permeability, fluid flow, and heat transport in the discharge zone. We are focusing on the geochemical effects and controls of on- and off-ridge geology and geometry, permeability-porosity, vent width and geometry, and thermal boundary conditions on the predicted size and extent of the recharge and discharge zones, and whether hydrothermal recharge is focused along extensional faults or diffused across broad areas of the seafloor. Hydrothermal flow systems of this type are known to represent modern analogs for ancient systems such as those being studied for understanding the origin of life on the planet, but also as modern analogs for the formation of volcanogenic massive sulfide ore deposits. Reactive flow modeling provides a useful tool for developing a better understanding of the physiobiochemistry of these episodic flow systems, and could potentially guide exploration for modern and ancient ore deposits. [1] Raffensperger, J.P.,1996, Advances in Porous Media 3, 185 - 305.

  3. Energetics of Amino Acid Synthesis in Alkaline Hydrothermal Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitadai, Norio

    2015-12-01

    Alkaline hydrothermal systems have received considerable attention as candidates for the origin and evolution of life on the primitive Earth. Nevertheless, sufficient information has not yet been obtained for the thermodynamic properties of amino acids, which are necessary components for life, at high temperatures and alkaline pH. These properties were estimated using experimental high-temperature volume and heat capacity data reported in the literature for several amino acids, together with correlation algorithms and the revised Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equations of state. This approach enabled determination of a complete set of the standard molal thermodynamic data and the revised HKF parameters for the 20 protein amino acids in their zwitterionic and ionization states. The obtained dataset was then used to evaluate the energetics of amino acid syntheses from simple inorganic precursors (CO2, H2, NH3 and H2S) in a simulated alkaline hydrothermal system on the Hadean Earth. Results show that mixing between CO2-rich seawater and the H2-rich hydrothermal fluid can produce energetically favorable conditions for amino acid syntheses, particularly in the lower-temperature region of such systems. Together with data related to the pH and temperature dependences of the energetics of amino acid polymerizations presented in earlier reports, these results suggest the following. Hadean alkaline hydrothermal settings, where steep pH and temperature gradients may have existed between cool, slightly acidic Hadean ocean water and hot, alkaline hydrothermal fluids at the vent-ocean interface, may be energetically the most suitable environment for the synthesis and polymerization of amino acids.

  4. Learning about hydrothermal volcanic activity by modeling induced geophysical changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currenti, Gilda M.; Napoli, Rosalba

    2017-05-01

    Motivated by ongoing efforts to understand the nature and the energy potential of geothermal resources, we devise a coupled numerical model (hydrological, thermal, mechanical), which may help in the characterization and monitoring of hydrothermal systems through computational experiments. Hydrothermal areas in volcanic regions arise from a unique combination of geological and hydrological features which regulate the movement of fluids in the vicinity of magmatic sources capable of generating large quantities of steam and hot water. Numerical simulations help in understanding and characterizing rock-fluid interaction processes and the geophysical observations associated with them. Our aim is the quantification of the response of different geophysical observables (i.e. deformation, gravity and magnetic field) to hydrothermal activity on the basis of a sound geological framework (e.g. distribution and pathways of the flows, the presence of fractured zones, caprock). A detailed comprehension and quantification of the evolution and dynamics of the geothermal systems and the definition of their internal state through a geophysical modeling approach are essential to identify the key parameters for which the geothermal system may fulfill the requirements to be exploited as a source of energy. For the sake of illustration only, the numerical computations are focused on a conceptual model of the hydrothermal system of Vulcano Island by simulating a generic 1-year unrest and estimating different geophysical changes. We solved (i) the mass and energy balance equations of flow in porous media for temperature, pressure and density changes, (ii) the elastostatic equation for the deformation field and (iii) the Poisson’s equations for gravity and magnetic potential fields. Under the model assumptions, a generic unrest of 1-year engenders on the ground surface low amplitude changes in the investigated geophysical observables, that are, however, above the accuracies of the modern

  5. Catalytic Diversity in Alkaline Hydrothermal Vent Systems on Ocean Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Ryan D.; Barge, Laura; Chin, Keith B.; Doloboff, Ivria J.; Flores, Erika; Hammer, Arden C.; Sobron, Pablo; Russell, Michael J.; Kanik, Isik

    2016-10-01

    Hydrothermal systems formed by serpentinization can create moderate-temperature, alkaline systems and it is possible that this type of vent could exist on icy worlds such as Europa which have water-rock interfaces. It has been proposed that some prebiotic chemistry responsible for the emergence of life on Earth and possibly other wet and icy worlds could occur as a result ofredox potential and pH gradients in submarine alkaline hydrothermal vents (Russell et al., 2014). Hydrothermal chimneys formed in laboratory simulations of alkaline vents under early Earth conditions have precipitate membranes that contain minerals such as iron sulfides, which are hypothesized to catalyze reduction of CO2 (Yamaguchi et al. 2014, Roldan et al. 2014) leading to further organic synthesis. This CO2 reduction process may be affected by other trace components in the chimney, e.g. nickel or organic molecules. We have conducted experiments to investigate catalytic properties of iron and iron-nickel sulfides containing organic dopants in slightly acidic ocean simulants relevant to early Earth or possibly ocean worlds. We find that the electrochemical properties of the chimney as well as the morphology/chemistry of the precipitate are affected by the concentration and type of organics present. These results imply that synthesis of organics in water-rock systems on ocean worlds may lead to hydrothermal precipitates which can incorporate these organic into the mineral matrix and may affect the role of gradients in alkaline vent systems.Therefore, further understanding on the electroactive roles of various organic species within hydrothermal chimneys will have important implications for habitability as well as prebiotic chemistry. This work is funded by NASA Astrobiology Institute JPL Icy Worlds Team and a NAI Director's Discretionary Fund award.Yamaguchi A. et al. (2014) Electrochimica Acta, 141, 311-318.Russell, M. J. et al. (2014), Astrobiology, 14, 308-43.Roldan, A. (2014) Chem. Comm. 51

  6. Ground Penetrating Radar Investigation of Sinter Deposits at Old Faithful Geyser and Immediately Adjacent Hydrothermal Features, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, D.; Lynne, B. Y.; Jaworowski, C.; Heasler, H.; Smith, G.; Smith, I.

    2015-12-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) was used to evaluate the characteristics of the shallow subsurface siliceous sinter deposits around Old Faithful Geyser. Zones of fractures, areas of subsurface alteration and pre-eruption hydrologic changes at Old Faithful Geyser and surrounding hydrothermal mounds were observed. Despite being viewed directly by about 3,000,000 people a year, shallow subsurface geologic and hydrologic conditions on and near Old Faithful Geyser are poorly characterized. GPR transects of 5754 ft (1754m) show strong horizontal to sub-horizontal reflections, which are interpreted as 2.5 to 4.5 meters of sinter. Some discontinuities in reflections are interpreted as fractures in the sinter, some of which line up with known hydrothermal features and some of which have little to no surface expression. Zones with moderate and weak amplitude reflections are interpreted as sinter that has been hydrothermally altered. Temporal changes from stronger to weaker reflections are correlated with the eruption cycle of Old Faithful Geyser, and are interpreted as post-eruption draining of shallow fractures, followed by pre-eruption fracture filling with liquid or vapor thermal fluids.

  7. The connection between iron ore formations and "mud-shrimp" colonizations around sunken wood debris and hydrothermal sediments in a Lower Cretaceous continental rift basin, Mecsek Mts., Hungary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jáger, Viktor; Molnár, Ferenc; Buchs, David; Koděra, Peter

    2012-09-01

    300 m (above sea level); from these volcanoes further terrestrial plant debris got into the basin. Hydrothermal vents, which periodically occurred around basaltic bodies until the Hauterivian, could have contributed to the creation of favourable temperature or nutritional conditions for some decapoda crustaceans - e.g the recently described new callianassid (Nihonotrypaea thermophila), which is known only from hydrothermally infuenced habitats. Around the intrusive pillow basalts, hydrothermal circulation of oxygenated seawater occured and thick seladonitic and goethitic fills formed along the cracks and cavities of pillowed basalts. When oxidized, sulfate-rich fluids passed into the crustacean coprolite-rich, reductive and anaerobic interpillow sediments, these fluids underwent an intensive sulfate reduction. This was primarily due to termophil sulfate reducers which as proved by the negative sulfur isotope values (- 35.9‰ and - 28.0‰ δ 34S) of sulfidic hydrothermal chimneys which contain framboidal pyrite and which were formed between the pillow basalts. The largest chimney structure reached a height of 1 m, with a mass of about 150 kg. The sulfide phase is characterized by Mo enrichments up to 511 ppm. The fluid inclusion measurements from the calcitic precipitations of the sulfide chimneys indicate low temperature (~ 129 °C) hydrothermal activity, and the salinity of the primary fluid inclusions proves the seawater origin of the hydrothermal fluids. In some thalassinid crustacean coprolite rich interpillow sediments and in the cracks of some hydrothermal calcite, there is the presence of black, lustrous bitumine (gilsonite) which is the distillation product of hydrothermal petroleum formed mainly by the coprolites. Hydrothermal circulations of oxygenated seawater caused subsequent oxidation of the sulfidic, interpillow sediments and chimneys; these were altered to form goethite. Due to the short-period of the hydrothermal activity among the intrusive

  8. Spontaneous and Widespread Electricity Generation in Natural Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Masahiro; Nakamura, Ryuhei; Kasaya, Takafumi; Kumagai, Hidenori; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Takai, Ken

    2017-05-15

    Deep-sea hydrothermal vents discharge abundant reductive energy into oxidative seawater. Herein, we demonstrated that in situ measurements of redox potentials on the surfaces of active hydrothermal mineral deposits were more negative than the surrounding seawater potential, driving electrical current generation. We also demonstrated that negative potentials in the surface of minerals were widespread in the hydrothermal fields, regardless of the proximity to hydrothermal fluid discharges. Lab experiments verified that the negative potential of the mineral surface was induced by a distant electron transfer from the hydrothermal fluid through the metallic and catalytic properties of minerals. These results indicate that electric current is spontaneously and widely generated in natural mineral deposits in deep-sea hydrothermal fields. Our discovery provides important insights into the microbial communities that are supported by extracellular electron transfer and the prebiotic chemical and metabolic evolution of the ocean hydrothermal systems. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The origin and history of alteration and carbonatization of the Yucca Mountain ignimbrites. Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymanski, J.S.

    1992-04-01

    This document contains Volume I of the report entitled The Origin and History of Alteration and Carbonatization of the Yucca Mountain Ignimbrites by Jerry S. Szymanski and a related correspondence with comments by Donald E. Livingston. In the Great Basin, the flow of terrestrial heat through the crust is affected in part by the flow of fluids. At Yucca Mountain, the role of fluids in crustal heat transport is manifested at the surface by youthful calcretes, sinters, bedrock veins, hydrothermal eruption breccias and hydrothermal alteration. This report discusses evidence for recent metasomatism high in the stratigraphic section at Yucca Mountain. Over the last several hundred years, episodes of calcite emplacement contemporaneous with local mafic volcanism have occurred at intervals that are not long in comparison with the isolation time required for a High-Level Radioactive Waste repository.

  10. Geophysical imaging of a vapor dominated hydrothermal system in Yellowstone National Park, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouligand, C.; Byrdina, S.; Kass, A.; Irons, T. P.; Vandemeulebrouck, J.; Ball, J. L.; Ritzinger, B. T.; McConville, E. G.; Hurwitz, S.

    2016-12-01

    Yellowstone National Park (YNP) hosts several vapor-dominated, acid-sulfate thermal areas that are typically located in topographically high areas along the boundary of the Yellowstone caldera. In these systems, steam and heat rise from deep boiling waters and either condense beneath a low permeability cap layer and then descend down fractures (heat pipes), or discharge through fumaroles either to the atmosphere or into pools. To better understand the geometry of the ascending vapor plumes and their relation to geologic structures and hydrothermal alteration, we carried a geophysical study in the Solfatara Plateau thermal area along the northern boundary of the Yellowstone caldera. This ˜600 m × 600 m area has a small mud pool and several small fumaroles with visible native sulfur deposits. Previous studies in the thermal area have mapped the spatial distributions of heat and CO2 flux. In June 2016 we collected detailed electric resistivity, magnetic, TEM and NMR data. Rock samples were collected to measure the electric resistivity and magnetization properties of the altered and unaltered sub-surface in the laboratory. Initial results suggest that there is a strong electric resistivity contrast between the center and periphery of the thermal area, which suggests that fluid pathways are strongly focused. Magnetic anomalies are subdued in the center of the thermal area, indicating low-magnetization of the shallow subsurface.

  11. Application of Hydrothermal and Non-Hydrothermal TiO2 Nanoporous Materials as New Adsorbents for Removal of Heavy Metal Ions from Aqueous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoor Anbia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal and non-hydrothermal spherical TiO2 nanoporous with crystalline framework were prepared by sol-gel method. The Crystalline structures, morphologies and surface texturing of materials were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The Hydrothermal spherical TiO2 nanoporous was found to have a narrow and strong pore size distribution peaks with average of 37.8 Å and pore volume of 0.41 cm3/g and the (Brunauer–Emmett–TellerBET specific surface area of 365 m2/g. Hydrothermal and non-hydrothermal spherical TiO2 nanoporous have been used as adsorbent to study of the adsorption behavior of Pb(II, Co(II and Ni(II ions from aqueous system in a batch system. Effect of equilibrium time on adsorption Pb(II, Co(II and Ni(II ions on these adsorbent was studied The results show that the shaking time 0.5 to 10h has no serious effect on the percentage of ions removal, and the adsorption is fast in all cases. The maximum uptake capacities of Hydrothermal and non-hydrothermal spherical TiO2 nanoporous was calculated. Both hydrothermal and non-hydrothermal TiO2 nanoporous materials were found to have very good potential as new adsorbents in removal of these ions. In batch systems the maximum uptake capacities of Pb(II, Ni(II and Co(II on the hydrothermal and non-hydrothermal TiO2 nanoporous materials was Co(II > Pb(II > Ni(II and Co(II > Ni(II > Pb(II, respectively.

  12. Hydrothermal fluoride and chloride complexation of indium: an EXAFS study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loges, Anselm; Testemale, Denis; Huotari, Simo; Honkanen, Ari-Pekka; Potapkin, Vasily; Wagner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Indium (In) is one of the geochemically lesser studied ore metals, and the factors that control the hydrothermal transport and deposition are largely unknown. It has no ore deposits of its own and is commonly mined as a by-product of Zn ores, and there are very few minerals that contain In as an essential structural component. Recently, industrial application of In in touch screen devices has drastically increased demand, which is projected to exceed supply from the current sources in the near future. Since the most relevant In sources are hydrothermal sphalerite ores and to a lesser extent hydrothermal greisen-type deposits in evolved granitic plutons, the aqueous geochemistry of In is of particular interest for understanding its ore forming processes. As a first step towards a comprehensive model for hydrothermal In solubility and speciation, we have studied In speciation in fluoride and chloride bearing solutions at 30-400˚ C and 500 bar using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. The experiments were conducted in a unique hydrothermal autoclave setup at beamline BM30B-FAME at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble, France. Our results show that the complexation of In changes dramatically between 30 and 400˚ C. Below ca. 200˚ C, fluoride complexes are the most stable ones, but they break down at higher temperatures. Chloride complexes on the other hand become increasingly stable with increasing temperature. This behavior has interesting consequences for natural ore forming systems. In Cl-rich systems (e.g. massive sulfide ores formed in sea floor environments), cooling can be an effective precipitating mechanism. In F-rich systems, fluoride complexation can extend In mobility to low temperatures and In will only precipitate when F is effectively removed from the fluid, e.g. by mixing with a Ca-rich fluid and precipitation of fluorite (CaF2) as is commonly observed in skarn or greisen-type deposits. Due to In complexing with

  13. Hydrothermal treatment for preparation of europium-lanthanum phosphates and exploration of their fluorescence properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroaki Onoda

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Europium-substituted lanthanum phosphates (Eu; 5 mol% were prepared from lanthanum nitrate, europium nitrate, and sodium polyphosphate solutions by a hydrothermal process at 120 and 160 °C up to 8 h. The obtained phosphates were studied using XRD, IR spectroscopy, TG–DTA, and SEM. UV–vis absorbance and reflectance, as well as fluorescence, were estimated as functional properties of these phosphate materials. We found that samples prepared without hydrothermal treatment were amorphous (as indicated by their XRD patterns, whereas those prepared by a hydrothermal treatment contained peaks corresponding to lanthanum orthophosphate, indicating that the hydrothermal process caused the polyphosphate(s to decompose into orthophosphate(s. The TG–DTA curves of the samples prepared by a hydrothermal treatment were different from those of the samples prepared without hydrothermal treatment. All samples reported herein had no specified shape despite using prolonged hydrothermal treatment times. Although the samples prepared without hydrothermal treatment showed only weak fluorescence peaks, those prepared by a hydrothermal treatment showed strong peaks at 556, 590, 615, and 690 nm. These peaks corresponded to transitions from 5D0 to 7F0, 7F1, 7F2, and 7F4, respectively. Collectively, these results indicate that the hydrothermal treatment is a useful method of obtaining europium-substituted lanthanum phosphates with fluorescence properties.

  14. Reduction of nitrate and nitrite salts under hydrothermal conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foy, B.R.; Dell`Orco, P.C.; Wilmanns, E.; McInroy, R.; Ely, J.; Robinson, J.M.; Buelow, S.J.

    1994-10-01

    The feasibility of reducing nitrate/nitrite salts under hydrothermal conditions for the treatment of aqueous mixed wastes stored in the underground tanks at the Department of Energy site at Hanford, Washington was studied. The reduction of nitrate and nitrite salts by reaction with EDTA using a tank waste simulant was examined at temperatures between 623K and 800K and pressures between 0.6 and 1.2 kbar. Continuous flow reactors were used to determine kinetics and products of reactions. All reactions were studied under pressures high enough to produce single phase conditions. The reactions are rapid, go to completion in less than a minute, and produce simple products, such as carbonate, nitrogen, and nitrous oxide gases. The experimental results demonstrate the ability of chemical reactions under hydrothermal conditions to reduce the nitrate and nitrite salts and destroy organic compounds in the waste mixtures.

  15. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Leaf-Shaped Ferric Oxide Particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keqiang Ding

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, leaf-shaped ferric oxide particles were prepared from an aqueous solution of potassium ferricyanide [K3Fe(CN6] by hydrothermal process. Images obtained from SEM (scanning electron microscope revealed that leaf-shaped ferric oxides (around 1.5 μm in length were clearly exhibited when the hydrothermal tempreature was 150 °C, while as the temperature was increased to 200 °C leaf-shaped ferric oxide particles with larger size were observed. XRD (X-ray diffraction patterns testified that the obtained ferric oxides were α-Fe2O3 with well-structured crystal faces. Interestingly, histograms describing the distribution of samples indicated that the distribution of obtained ferric oxide particles did not accord with gaussian distribution

  16. Thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production via hydrothermal gasification of hexadecane

    KAUST Repository

    Alshammari, Yousef M.

    2012-04-01

    This work reports the equilibrium behaviour of the hydrothermal gasification of hexadecane, a heavy saturate model compound, under non-oxidative isothermal and oxidative adiabatic conditions, using the Peng-Robinson equation of state and the direct minimisation of Gibbs free energy employed within the Aspen HYSYS. This modelling enabled establishing both the limits and optimum conditions at which the hydrogen molar yield may be theoretically maximised. The effects of parameters including the reactor isothermal temperature, pressure, water to carbon ratio, and oxygen to carbon ratio on the molar yields of produced gaseous species were analysed. The model has been validated by comparing its results with different reported modelling and experimental data under identical conditions which resulted in a good agreement. The results reported in this work show the potential of achieving economic yields of hydrogen and syngas from liquid hydrocarbons under downhole hydrothermal conditions. © 2011, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights.

  17. Colorado's hydrothermal resource base: an assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearl, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    As part of its effort to more accurately describe the nations geothrmal resource potential, the US Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy contracted with the Colorado Geological survey to appraise the hydrothermal (hot water) geothermal resources of Colorado. Part of this effort required that the amount of energy that could possibly be contained in the various hydrothermal systems in Colorado be estimated. The findings of that assessment are presented. To make these estimates the geothermometer reservoir temperatures estimated by Barrett and Pearl (1978) were used. In addition, the possible reservoir size and extent were estimated and used. This assessment shows that the total energy content of the thermal systems in Colorado could range from 4.872 x 10{sup 15} BTU's to 13.2386 x 10{sup 15} BTU's.

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis and physicochemical properties of ruthenium(0) nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dikhtiarenko, A., E-mail: dikhtiarenkoalla@uniovi.es [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo - CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Khainakov, S.A.; Garcia, J.R.; Gimeno, J. [Departamento de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidad de Oviedo - CINN, 33006 Oviedo (Spain); Pedro, I. de; Fernandez, J. Rodriguez [CITIMAC, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Cantabria, 39005 Santander (Spain); Blanco, J.A. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2012-09-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ruthenium nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The average size of the nanoparticles are depend on the reducing agent used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic response seems to be dominated by a paramagnetic contribution characteristic of the band electronic magnetism of the ruthenium(0) nanoparticles. - Abstract: The synthesis of ruthenium nanoparticles in hydrothermal conditions using mild reducing agents (succinic acid, ascorbic acid and sodium citrate) is reported. The shape of the nanoparticles depends on the type of the reducing agent, while the size is more influenced by the pH of the medium. The magnetic response seems to be dominated by a paramagnetic contribution characteristic of the band electronic magnetism of the nanoparticles.

  19. Piezoelectric Materials Synthesized by the Hydrothermal Method and Their Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Morita

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Synthesis by the hydrothermal method has various advantages, including low reaction temperature, three-dimensional substrate availability, and automatic polarization alignment during the process. In this review, powder synthesis, the fabrication of piezoelectric thin films, and their applications are introduced. A polycrystalline lead zirconate titanate (PZT thin film was applied to a micro ultrasonic motor, and an epitaxial lead titanate (PbTiO3 thin film was estimated as a ferroelectric data storage medium. Ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties were successfully obtained for epitaxial PbTiO3 films. As lead-free piezoelectric powders, KNbO3 and NaNbO3 powders were synthesized by the hydrothermal method and sintered together to form (K,NaNbO3 ceramics, from which reasonable piezoelectric performance was achieved.

  20. Flow and permeability structure of the Beowawe, Nevada hydrothermal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faulder, D.D. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Johnson, S.D.; Benoit, W.R. [Oxbow Power Services, Inc., Reno, NV (United States)

    1997-05-01

    A review of past geologic, geochemical, hydrological, pressure transient, and reservoir engineering studies of Beowawe suggests a different picture of the reservoir than previously presented. The Beowawe hydrothermal contains buoyant thermal fluid dynamically balanced with overlying cold water, as shown by repeated temperature surveys and well test results. Thermal fluid upwells from the west of the currently developed reservoir at the intersection of the Malpais Fault and an older structural feature associated with mid-Miocene rifting. A tongue of thermal fluid rises to the east up the high permeability Malpais Fault, discharges at the Geysers area, and is in intimate contact with overlying cooler water. The permeability structure is closely related to the structural setting, with the permeability of the shallow hydrothermal system ranging from 500 to 1,000 D-ft, while the deeper system ranges from 200 to 400 D-ft.

  1. Facile template-free hydrothermal synthesis and microstrain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. ZnO nanorods were synthesized at low temperature by hydrothermally heating 0⋅1 M solution of. ZnCl2 for 5, 10 and 15 h at a pH of 10. No template, seeded substrate, catalyst and autoclave were employed for the synthesis of ZnO nanorods. The effect of heating durations on the morphology and crystal ...

  2. Hydrothermal Systems of Kamchatka are Models of the Prebiotic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kompanichenko, V. N.; Poturay, V. A.; Shlufman, K. V.

    2015-06-01

    The composition of organic matter and fluctuations of thermodynamic parameters were investigated in the hydrothermal systems of the Kamchatka peninsula in the context of the origin of life. Organics were analyzed by gas-chromatography/mass spectrometry, and 111 organic compounds belonging to 14 homologous series (aromatic hydrocarbons, alkanes and isoalkanes, halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, carboxylic acids, esters, etc.) were found in hot springs inhabited by Archaeal and Bacterial thermophiles. The organics detected in the sterile condensate of water-steam mixture taken from deep boreholes (temperature 108-175 °C) consisted of 69 compounds of 11 homologous series, with aromatic hydrocarbons and alkanes being prevalent. The organic material included important prebiotic components such as nitrogen-containing compounds and lipid precursors. A separate organic phase (oil) was discovered in the Uzon Caldera. A biogenic origin is supported by the presence of sterane and hopane biomarkers and the δ13C value of the bulk oil; its age determined by 14C measurements was 1030 ± 40 years. Multilevel fluctuations of thermodynamic parameters proposed to be required for the origin of life were determined in the Mutnovsky and Pauzhetsky hydrothermal systems. The low-frequency component of the hydrothermal fluid pressure varied by up to 2 bars over periods of hours to days, while mid-frequency variations had regular micro-oscillations with periods of about 20 min; the high-frequency component displayed sharp changes of pressure and microfluctuations with periods less than 5 min. The correlation coefficient between pressure and temperature ranges from 0.89 to 0.99 (average 0.96). The natural regimes of pressure and temperature fluctuations in Kamchatka hydrothermal systems can guide future experiments on prebiotic chemistry under oscillating conditions.

  3. The Benedikt hydrothermal system (north-eastern Slovenia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kralj, Peter; Eichinger, Lorenz; Kralj, Polona

    2009-10-01

    Deep welling in the Benedikt area has proven the existence of recently active hydrothermal system in pre-Tertiary basement composed of banded gneiss, marble and schist originating from a regionally metamorphosed sequence of clastic sediments. Two aquifers with very high fracture porosity were tapped—at depths between 1,485-1,530 and 1,848-1,857 m, where the welling stopped owing to a technical failure. The water temperature exceeds 90°C, while the yield of 100 l/s is limited only by the well performances. The Na-HCO3 dominated water is classified as a CO2-rich healing mineral water suitable for drinking, bottling and balneology. The free degassing gas is almost pure CO2 (99.9 %) and its δ13C composition indicates volcanic origin. The tapped water is relatively old, probably of Pleistocene age at least, and the planned exploitation must consider reinjection in order to protect this valuable natural resource from overexploitation. This recent hydrothermal system is characterised by dominating vertical circulation of waters and is superimposed on older, already inactive hydrothermal system(s), recognised by veins of either metal sulphides and quartz, or calcite. These vein minerals precipitated from hydrothermal fluids migrating from a deeper source towards the ancient surface through a fracture system, which is now self-sealed already. The distribution of metal sulphides indicates that the source might have been a deep-seated Neogene pluton genetically related to the tonalites and quartz diorites that outcrop in the Pohorje Mountains, or a subvolcanic-level volcanic body related to the Neogene volcanic activity in the Graz Basin.

  4. Antarctic marine biodiversity and deep-sea hydrothermal vents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven L Chown

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The diversity of many marine benthic groups is unlike that of most other taxa. Rather than declining from the tropics to the poles, much of the benthos shows high diversity in the Southern Ocean. Moreover, many species are unique to the Antarctic region. Recent work has shown that this is also true of the communities of Antarctic deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Vent ecosystems have been documented from many sites across the globe, associated with the thermally and chemically variable habitats found around these, typically high temperature, streams that are rich in reduced compounds and polymetallic sulphides. The animal communities of the East Scotia Ridge vent ecosystems are very different to those elsewhere, though the microbiota, which form the basis of vent food webs, show less differentiation. Much of the biological significance of deep-sea hydrothermal vents lies in their biodiversity, the diverse biochemistry of their bacteria, the remarkable symbioses among many of the marine animals and these bacteria, and the prospects that investigations of these systems hold for understanding the conditions that may have led to the first appearance of life. The discovery of diverse and unusual Antarctic hydrothermal vent ecosystems provides opportunities for new understanding in these fields. Moreover, the Antarctic vents south of 60°S benefit from automatic conservation under the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources and the Antarctic Treaty. Other deep-sea hydrothermal vents located in international waters are not protected and may be threatened by growing interests in deep-sea mining.

  5. Facile template-free hydrothermal synthesis and microstrain ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ZnO nanorods were synthesized at low temperature by hydrothermally heating 0.1 M solution of ZnCl2 for 5, 10 and 15 h at a pH of 10. No template, seeded substrate, catalyst and autoclave were employed for the synthesis of ZnO nanorods. The effect of heating durations on the morphology and crystal orientation of the ...

  6. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of zirconia based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillot, T., E-mail: Thierry.caillot@ircelyon.univ-lyon1.fr; Salama, Z.; Chanut, N.; Cadete Santos Aires, F.J.; Bennici, S.; Auroux, A.

    2013-07-15

    In this work, three equimolar mixed oxides ZrO{sub 2}/CeO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and a reference ZrO{sub 2} have been synthesized by hydrothermal method. The structural and surface properties of these materials have been fully characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, surface area measurement, chemical analysis, XPS, infrared spectroscopy after adsorption of pyridine and adsorption microcalorimetry of NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} probe molecules. All investigated mixed oxides are amphoteric and possess redox centers on their surface. Moreover, hydrothermal synthesis leads to catalysts with higher surface area and with better acid–base properties than classical coprecipitation method. Both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites are present on the surface of the mixed oxides. Compared to the other samples, the ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} material appears to be the best candidate for further application in acid–base catalysis. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous amorphous phase with a high surface area of titania zirconia mixed oxide obtained by hydrothermal preparation. - Highlights: • Three zirconia based catalysts and a reference were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis. • Mixed oxides present larger surface areas than the reference ZrO{sub 2}. • ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst presents a mesoporous structure with high surface area. • ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst presents simultaneously strong acidic and basic properties.

  7. Continuous-flow hydrothermal and solvothermal synthesis of inorganic nanomaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Starkey, Christopher L.

    2016-01-01

    Nanomaterials and nanotechnology are presently receiving high levels of interest which is aiding significant advancements to industrial and technological applications. New strategies towards nanoparticle synthesis are needed to produce high quality nanomaterials at industrially viable levels. This thesis presents the continuous flow hydrothermal and solvothermal synthesis (CFHSS) of a range of inorganic nanomaterials produced using a continuous-flow reactor designed at the University of Notti...

  8. Effect of hydrothermal treatment on light transmission of translucent zirconias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, Armand; Chung, Kwok-Hung; Flinn, Brian D; Kuykendall, Tuesday; Zheng, Cheng; Harada, Kosuke; Raigrodski, Ariel J

    2017-09-01

    Studies of the light transmission of translucent zirconias after hydrothermal treatment are limited. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of hydrothermal treatment on the light transmission of translucent zirconias for monolithic restorations. Four commercially available zirconia products, BruxZir Anterior Solid Zirconia (BruxAnt, BA), Lava Plus High Translucency (LPHT), Katana Zirconia Super Translucent (KST), and Katana Zirconia Ultra Translucent (KUT) were assessed and 1 type of lithium disilicate, e.max Press LT (LDLT) was used as a control. Plate specimens, 20×20×1 mm (n=80) for the translucency assessment were sectioned from postsintered zirconia bulk materials and ground with a #400-grit diamond wheel and coolant. The specimens were placed under hydrothermal conditions of 134°C at 0.2 MPa (n=5 per group at 0, 5, 50, and 100 hours). Percentage of total transmittance of light (Tt%) of each specimen was measured using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere. X-ray diffraction analyses were used to measure tetragonal-monoclinic phase transformation. Surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometry. Data were analyzed using 2-way ANOVA followed by the Tukey test (α=.05). The Tt% ranged from 6.5% to 28.3%. Group LDLT obtained significantly higher transmittance than other tested groups, whereas groups KST and KUT had significantly higher Tt% than groups BA and LPHT (Ptranslucent zirconia groups (Ptranslucent zirconias (Ptranslucent zirconias and a lithium disilicate glass-ceramic control. Hydrothermal treatment had minimal effects on the translucency of translucent zirconias. The tetragonal-monoclinic phase transformation rate of translucent zirconias was found to be low, except in group LPHT. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Sustainable conversion of waste biomass using hydrothermal carbonization method

    OpenAIRE

    Petrović, Jelena T.; Mihajlović, Marija L.; Mirjana D. Stojanović; Stanojević, Marija R.; Petrović, Marija S.; Milojković, Jelena; Lačnjevac, Časlav M.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrothermal carbonization represents a process for converting a wet organic material at elevated temperature and pressure in hydro char, coal-like product. The resulting hydro char, depending on the nature of biomass, can be used as a substitute for fossil coal, adsorbent of various pollutants, soil fertility supplement and others. This paper provides insight into the reaction mechanisms, as well as the influence of process parameters. It also highlighted the importance and advantage of the ...

  10. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Supercritical Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Hiromichi; Hakuta, Yukiya

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes specific features of supercritical hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxide particles. Supercritical water allows control of the crystal phase, morphology, and particle size since the solvent's properties, such as density of water, can be varied with temperature and pressure, both of which can affect the supersaturation and nucleation. In this review, we describe the advantages of fine particle formation using supercritical water and describe which future tasks need to be solved. PMID:28883312

  11. Rapid hydrothermal route to synthesize cubic-phase gadolinium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    times, first with distilled water and then with ethanol, followed by oven-drying at 80 °C. Finally, the hydroxide powder was annealed at 600 °C, for 3 h so as to facilitate spontaneous decomposition of Gd(OH)3 and consequently, dehydration to yield Gd2O3 nanopowder. The flow chart of hydrothermally synthesized Gd2O3 ...

  12. Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range, northwestern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingebritsen, S.E.; Mariner, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range includes the heat discharged by thermal springs, by "slightly thermal" springs that are only a few degrees warmer than ambient temperature, and by fumaroles. Thermal-spring heat discharge is calculated on the basis of chloride-flux measurements and geothermometer temperatures and totals ~ 240 MW in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, excluding the transient post-1980 discharge at Mount St. Helens (~80 MW as of 2004-5). Heat discharge from "slightly thermal" springs is based on the degree of geothermal warming (after correction for gravitational potential energy effects) and totals ~. 660. MW. Fumarolic heat discharge is calculated by a variety of indirect and direct methods and totals ~160 MW, excluding the transient mid-1970s discharge at Mount Baker (~80 MW) and transient post-1980 discharge at Mount St. Helens (>. 230. MW as of 2005). Other than the pronounced transients at Mount St. Helens and Mount Baker, hydrothermal heat discharge in the Cascade Range appears to be fairly steady over a ~25-year period of measurement. Of the total of ~. 1050. MW of "steady" hydrothermal heat discharge identified in the U.S. part of the Cascade Range, less than 50. MW occurs north of latitude 45??15' N (~0.1 MW per km arc length from 45??15' to 49??N). Much greater rates of hydrothermal heat discharge south of 45??15'N (~1.7 MW per km arc length from 40?? to 45??15'N) may reflect the influence of Basin and Range-style extensional tectonics (faulting) that impinges on the Cascades as far north as Mount Jefferson but is not evident farther north. ?? 2010.

  13. Sulphide mineral evolution and metal mobility during alteration of the oceanic crust: Insights from ODP Hole 1256D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, C. G. C.; Pitcairn, I. K.; Teagle, D. A. H.; Harris, M.

    2016-11-01

    Fluxes of metals during the hydrothermal alteration of the oceanic crust have far reaching effects including buffering of the compositions of the ocean and lithosphere, supporting microbial life and the formation of sulphide ore deposits. The mechanisms responsible for metal mobilisation during the evolution of the oceanic crust are complex and are neither fully constrained nor quantified. Investigations into the mineral reactions that release metals, such as sulphide leaching, would generate better understanding of the controls on metal mobility in the oceanic crust. We investigate the sulphide and oxide mineral paragenesis and the extent to which these minerals control the metal budget in samples from Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Hole 1256D. The ODP Hole 1256D drill core provides a unique sample suite representative of a complete section of a fast-spreading oceanic crust from the volcanic section down to the plutonic complex. The sulphide population at Hole 1256D is divided into five groups based on mineralogical assemblage, lithological location and texture: the magmatic, metasomatised, high temperature hydrothermal, low temperature and patchy sulphides. The initiation of hydrothermal alteration by downward flow of moderate temperature (250-350 °C) hydrothermal fluids under oxidising conditions leads to metasomatism of the magmatic sulphides in the sheeted dyke and plutonic complexes. Subsequent increase in the degree of hydrothermal alteration at temperatures >350 °C under reducing conditions then leads to the leaching of the metasomatised sulphides by rising hydrothermal fluids. Mass balance calculations show that the mobility of Cu, Se and Au occurs through sulphide leaching during high temperature hydrothermal alteration and that the mobility of Zn, As, Sb and Pb is controlled by silicate rather than sulphide alteration. Sulphide leaching is not complete at Hole 1256D and more advanced alteration would mobilise greater masses of metals. Alteration of oxide

  14. Older Hydrothermal Activity along the Northern Yellowstone Caldera Margin at Sulphur Creek, Yellowstone Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manion, J. L.; Larson, P.

    2008-12-01

    The Tuff of Sulphur Creek (480 ka) is well exposed in the Seven Mile Hole area of the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone River, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The rhyolitic tuff erupted after the collapse of the Yellowstone Caldera (640 ka) and hosts more than 350 vertical meters of hydrothermal alteration. Two epithermal alteration assemblages with different mineral associations have been identified in the area: an illite-silica-pyrite phase and a kaolinite-alunite-silica-pyrite phase. Kaolinite and opal occur along the canyon rim, montmorillonite and other smectites are found at intermediate depths, and illite and sulfides (pyrite) are found deepest in the section. Our work on the north side of the Sevenmile Hole altered area has found a complex system of veining. The veins are concentrated in the eastern portion of the canyon and are less frequent to the west. Brecciated cross-cutting veins ranging from 2 to 30cm wide are found at the base of the canyon. Moving vertically up the canyons walls, the veining style becomes less complex. These veins are about 1 to 1.5cm wide and are not brecciated, occurring less frequently than the brecciated veins. The canyon walls and the canyon rim mainly contain millimeter-scale cross-cutting silica veinlets. These stockwork-like veinlets are the most abundant fracture filling that we find throughout the canyon walls. Veins at the base of the system, found in the stream bed, contain abundant sulfides (mainly pyrite). Sulfides are present in three forms: disseminated in a silica matrix, as massive pyrite in healed fractures, and encrusting clays and silica. The latter is the least common. Disseminated and massive sulfides are typically associated with the matrix in the brecciated veins. Breccias include angular clasts of altered tuff with argillized feldspar phenocrysts and fragments of earlier vein-filling opal. Sulfides are most abundant in the bottom of the canyon and in the western part of the field area. Hydrothermal

  15. Hydrothermal treatment and ethanol pulping of sunflower stalks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caparrós, S; Ariza, J; López, F; Nacimiento, J A; Garrote, G; Jiménez, L

    2008-03-01

    The influence of temperature in the hydrothermal treatment of sunflower stalks on the composition of the liquid fraction obtained was examined. The remaining solid fraction was subjected to ethanol pulping in order to obtain pulp that was used to produce paper sheets. The pulp was characterized in terms of yield, kappa index, viscosity, and cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin contents; and the paper sheets in terms of breaking length, stretch, burst index and tear index. Hydrothermal treatment of the raw material at 190 degrees C provided a liquid phase with maximal hemicellulose-derived oligomers and monosaccharide (glucose, xylose and arabinose) contents (26.9 and 4.2 g/L, respectively). Pulping the solid fraction obtained by hydrothermal treatment at 180 degrees C, with 70% ethanol at a liquid/solid ratio of 8:1 at 170 degrees C for 120 min provided pulp with properties on a par with those of soda pulp from the sunflower stalks, namely: 36.3% yield, 69.1% cellulose, 12.6% hemicellulose, 18.2% lignin and 551 ml/g viscosity. Also, paper sheets obtained from the ethanol pulp were similar in breaking length (3.8 km), stretch (1.23%), burst index (1.15 kN/g) and tear index (2.04 m Nm(2)/g) to those provided by soda pulp.

  16. Lithium isotope traces magmatic fluid in a seafloor hydrothermal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dan; Hou, Zengqian; Zhao, Yue; Hou, Kejun; Yang, Zhiming; Tian, Shihong; Fu, Qiang

    2015-09-08

    Lithium isotopic compositions of fluid inclusions and hosted gangue quartz from a giant volcanogenic massive sulfide deposit in China provide robust evidence for inputting of magmatic fluids into a Triassic submarine hydrothermal system. The δ(7)Li results vary from +4.5‰ to +13.8‰ for fluid inclusions and from +6.7‰ to +21.0‰ for the hosted gangue quartz(9 gangue quartz samples containing primary fluid inclusions). These data confirm the temperature-dependent Li isotopic fractionation between hydrothermal quartz and fluid (i.e., Δδ(7)Liquartz-fluid = -8.9382 × (1000/T) + 22.22(R(2) = 0.98; 175 °C-340 °C)), which suggests that the fluid inclusions are in equilibrium with their hosted quartz, thus allowing to determine the composition of the fluids by using δ(7)Liquartz data. Accordingly, we estimate that the ore-forming fluids have a δ(7)Li range from -0.7‰ to +18.4‰ at temperatures of 175-340 °C. This δ(7)Li range, together with Li-O modeling , suggest that magmatic fluid played a significant role in the ore formation. This study demonstrates that Li isotope can be effectively used to trace magmatic fluids in a seafloor hydrothermal system and has the potential to monitor fluid mixing and ore-forming process.

  17. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization, and growth mechanism of hematite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Munawar; Yu, Jianjia; Liu, Ning; Lee, Robert L.

    2014-04-01

    Polyhedron-shaped hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method by mixing FeCl3 and NH4OH at high temperature. In this work, the influences of experimental conditions such as the effects of the concentration of iron's ion, NH4OH concentration, and reaction temperature on the hematite's particle size, dispersity, and growth rate were investigated. Results show that hematite nanoparticles with good crystallinity with the particle size of 100 nm could be obtained when the hydrothermal reaction was carried out with concentration of Fe3+ = 16 mM, NH4OH = 40 mM, reaction temperature = 120 °C, and reaction time = 24 h. In addition, this study investigates the hematite nanoparticle-formation mechanism with reaction time. It is observed that the formation of hematite nanoparticles are initiated by the formation of intermediate phase of goethite nanorods in the early stage of hydrothermal reaction, which further transform into hematite crystal as the reaction is progressed.

  18. Spontaneous Ignition of Hydrothermal Flames in Supercritical Ethanol Water Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Michael C.; Hegde, Uday G.; Kojima, Jun J.

    2017-01-01

    Results are reported from recent tests where hydrothermal flames spontaneously ignited in a Supercritical Water Oxidation (SCWO) Test Cell. Hydrothermal flames are generally categorized as flames that occur when appropriate concentrations of fuel and oxidizer are present in supercritical water (SCW); i.e., water at conditions above its critical point (218 atm and 374 C). A co-flow injector was used to inject fuel, comprising an aqueous solution of 30-vol to 50-vol ethanol, and air into a reactor held at constant pressure and filled with supercritical water at approximately 240 atm and 425 C. Hydrothermal flames auto-ignited and quickly stabilized as either laminar or turbulent diffusion flames, depending on the injection velocities and test cell conditions. Two orthogonal views, one of which provided a backlit shadowgraphic image, provided visual observations. Optical emission measurements of the steady state flame were made over a spectral range spanning the ultraviolet (UV) to the near infrared (NIR) using a high-resolution, high-dynamic-range spectrometer. Depending on the fuel air flow ratios varying degrees of sooting were observed and are qualitatively compared using light absorption comparisons from backlit images.

  19. Agro-industrial waste to solid biofuel through hydrothermal carbonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basso, Daniele; Patuzzi, Francesco; Castello, Daniele; Baratieri, Marco; Rada, Elena Cristina; Weiss-Hortala, Elsa; Fiori, Luca

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the use of grape marc for energy purposes was investigated. Grape marc is a residual lignocellulosic by-product from the winery industry, which is present in every world region where vine-making is addressed. Among the others, hydrothermal carbonization was chosen as a promising alternative thermochemical process, suitable for the treatment of this high moisture substrate. Through a 50 mL experimental apparatus, hydrothermal carbonization tests were performed at several temperatures (namely: 180, 220 and 250 °C) and residence times (1, 3, 8 h). Analyses on both the solid and the gaseous phases obtained downstream of the process were performed. In particular, solid and gas yields versus the process operational conditions were studied and the obtained hydrochar was evaluated in terms of calorific value, elemental analysis, and thermal stability. Data testify that hydrochar form grape marc presents interesting values of HHV (in the range 19.8-24.1 MJ/kg) and physical-chemical characteristics which make hydrochar exploitable as a solid biofuel. In the meanwhile, the amount of gases produced is very small, if compared to other thermochemical processes. This represents an interesting result when considering environmental issues. Statistical analysis of data allows to affirm that, in the chosen range of operational conditions, the process is influenced more by temperature than residence time. These preliminary results support the option of upgrading grape marc toward its energetic valorisation through hydrothermal carbonization. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Hydrothermal synthesis of magnetite particles with uncommon crystal facets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junki Sato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal synthesis of Fe3O4 (magnetite particles was carried out using organic compounds as morphology control agents to obtain magnetite crystals with uncommon facets. It was established that the morphology of Fe3O4 crystals obtained by hydrothermal treatment of an aqueous solution containing Fe2+ and organic compounds depended on the organic compound used. The shape of the Fe3O4 particles obtained when no additives were used was quasi-octahedral. In contrast, the addition of picolinic acid, citric acid or pyridine resulted in the formation of polyhedral crystals, indicating the presence of not only {1 1 1}, {1 0 0} and {1 1 0} facets but also high-index facets including at least {3 1 1} and {3 3 1}. When citric acid was used as an additive, octahedral crystals with {1 1 1} facets also appeared, and their size decreased as the amount of citric acid was increased. Thus, control of Fe3O4 particle morphology was achieved by a simple hydrothermal treatment using additives.

  1. Fungal diversity in deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Calvez, Thomas; Burgaud, Gaëtan; Mahé, Stéphane; Barbier, Georges; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe

    2009-10-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal ecosystems are considered oases of life in oceans. Since the discovery of these ecosystems in the late 1970s, many endemic species of Bacteria, Archaea, and other organisms, such as annelids and crabs, have been described. Considerable knowledge has been acquired about the diversity of (micro)organisms in these ecosystems, but the diversity of fungi has not been studied to date. These organisms are considered key organisms in terrestrial ecosystems because of their ecological functions and especially their ability to degrade organic matter. The lack of knowledge about them in the sea reflects the widely held belief that fungi are terrestrial organisms. The first inventory of such organisms in deep-sea hydrothermal environments was obtained in this study. Fungal diversity was investigated by analyzing the small-subunit rRNA gene sequences amplified by culture-independent PCR using DNA extracts from hydrothermal samples and from a culture collection that was established. Our work revealed an unsuspected diversity of species in three of the five fungal phyla. We found a new branch of Chytridiomycota forming an ancient evolutionary lineage. Many of the species identified are unknown, even at higher taxonomic levels in the Chytridiomycota, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota. This work opens the way to new studies of the diversity, ecology, and physiology of fungi in oceans and might stimulate new prospecting for biomolecules. From an evolutionary point of view, the diversification of fungi in the oceans can no longer be ignored.

  2. Primary Formation Path of Formaldehyde in Hydrothermal Vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Satoshi

    2017-09-01

    Formaldehyde is abundant in the universe and one of the fundamental molecules for life. Hydrothermal vents produce a substantial amount of hydrogen molecules by serpentinization and promote reductive reactions of single carbon compounds. The abundance of formaldehyde is expected to be low due to the high Gibbs free energy in hydrothermal vents. We consider two competing formation pathways of formaldehyde: (1) the reduction of CO by H2 and (2) the reduction of HCOOH by H2 to form a methanediol, followed by the dehydration of the methanediol. We performed a number of quantum chemical simulations to examine the formation of formaldehyde in the gas phase as well as in aqueous solution. The energy barrier is significantly reduced by the catalytic effect of water molecules in aqueous solution and becomes lowest when a water cluster consisted of 5 water molecules catalyzes the reduction. The energy barrier to form a methanediol by the reduction of HCOOH is lower by 17.5 kcal/mol than that to form a formaldehyde by the reduction of CO. Considering the low energy barrier to dehydrate methanediol, the primary pathway to form formaldehyde in hydrothermal vents is concluded to be the reduction of HCOOH by H2, followed by the dehydration of methanediol.

  3. Experimental Investigation of Organic Synthesis in Hydrothermal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shock, Everett L.

    1998-01-01

    The results of the investigation were presented at a Astrobiology Institute General Meeting. Seafloor hydrothermal systems may be the most likely locations on the early Earth for the emergence of life. Because of the disequilibrium inherent in such dynamic, mixing environments, abundant chemical energy would have been available for formation of the building blocks of life. In addition, theoretical studies suggest that organic compounds in these conditions would reach metastable states, due to kinetic barriers to the formation of stable equilibrium products (CO2 and methane). The speciation of organic carbon in metastable states is highly dependent on the oxidation state, pH, temperature, pressure and bulk composition of the system. The goal of our research is to investigate the effects of a number external variables on the formation, transformation, and stability of organic compounds at hydrothermal conditions. We have begun experimental work to attempt to control the oxidation state of simulated hydrothermal systems by using buffers composed of mineral powders and gas mixtures. We are also beginning to test the stability of organic compounds under these conditions.

  4. Hyperspectral Alteration Information from Drill Cores and Deep Uranium Exploration in the Baiyanghe Uranium Deposit in the Xuemisitan Area, Xinjiang, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Jun Xu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The Baiyanghe uranium deposit is a currently important medium-sized deposit in the Xuemisitan area, Xinjiang. The hydrothermal alteration in this deposit is closely related to the uranium mineralization of the deposit. In this study, hyperspectral data are collected from drill cores in the Baiyanghe uranium deposit using a FieldSpec4 visible-shortwave infrared spectrometer to study the hydrothermal alteration. The results reveal that the altered mineral assemblages have obvious zonation characteristics: (1 the upper section comprises long-wavelength illite and minor hematite and montmorillonite; (2 the middle section contains three types of illite (long-, medium- and short-wavelength illite and hematite; and (3 the lower section includes short-wavelength illite, chlorite and carbonate. Additionally, the variety in the characteristic absorption-peak wavelength of illite at 2200 nm gradually shifts to shorter wavelength and ranges between 2195 nm and 2220 nm with increasing depth, while the SWIR-IC (short-wavelength infrared illite crystallinity, a dimensionless quantity of the drill holes gradually increases from 0.2 to 2.1. These patterns reflect the hydrothermal fluid activity in the deposit, which features relatively high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal fluid in the deeper section and low-temperature, low-pressure hydrothermal fluid in the shallower section. Additionally, the uranium mineralization is located near the fracture zone, which represents the center of hydrothermal fluid activity or mineralization. This area has abundant alteration minerals, and the minerals illite (short- and medium-wavelength, hematite and fluorite can be used as uranium-prospecting indicators for uranium exploration in the deeper sections of the Baiyanghe uranium deposit.

  5. Petrography and chemistry of tungsten-rich oxycalciobetafite in hydrothermal veins of the Adamello contact aureole, northern Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumpkin, Gregory R.; Gieré, Reto; Williams, C. Terry; McGlinn, Peter J.; Payne, Timothy E.

    2017-09-01

    Tungsten-rich oxycalciobetafite occurs in complex Ti-rich hydrothermal veins emplaced within dolomite marble in the contact aureole of the Adamello batholith, northern Italy, where it occurs as overgrowths on zirconolite. The betafite is weakly zoned and contains 29-34 wt% UO2. In terms of end-members, the betafite contains approximately 50 mol% CaUTi2O7 and is one of the closest known natural compositions to the pyrochlore phase proposed for use in titanate nuclear waste forms. Amorphization and volume expansion of the betafite caused cracks to form in the enclosing silicate mineral grains. Backscattered electron images reveal that betafite was subsequently altered along crystal rims, particularly near the cracks. Electron probe microanalyses reveal little difference in composition between altered and unaltered areas, except for lower totals, suggesting that alteration is primarily due to hydration. Zirconolite contains up to 18 wt% ThO2 and 24 wt% UO2, and exhibits strong compositional zoning, but no internal cracking due to differential (and anisotropic) volume expansion and no visible alteration. The available evidence demonstrates that both oxycalciobetafite and zirconolite retained actinides for approximately 40 million years after the final stage of vein formation. During this time, oxycalciobetafite and zirconolite accumulated a total alpha-decay dose of 3.0-3.6 × 1016 and 0.2-2.0 × 1016 α/mg, respectively.

  6. Spatial distribution of marine crenarchaeota group I in the vicinity of deep-sea hydrothermal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Ken; Oida, Hanako; Suzuki, Yohey; Hirayama, Hisako; Nakagawa, Satoshi; Nunoura, Takuro; Inagaki, Fumio; Nealson, Kenneth H; Horikoshi, Koki

    2004-04-01

    Distribution profiles of marine crenarchaeota group I in the vicinity of deep-sea hydrothermal systems were mapped with culture-independent molecular techniques. Planktonic samples were obtained from the waters surrounding two geographically and geologically distinct hydrothermal systems, and the abundance of marine crenarchaeota group I was examined by 16S ribosomal DNA clone analysis, quantitative PCR, and whole-cell fluorescence in situ hybridization. A much higher proportion of marine crenarchaeota group I within the microbial community was detected in deep-sea hydrothermal environments than in normal deep and surface seawaters. The highest proportion was always obtained from the ambient seawater adjacent to hydrothermal emissions and chimneys but not from the hydrothermal plumes. These profiles were markedly different from the profiles of epsilon-Proteobacteria, which are abundant in the low temperatures of deep-sea hydrothermal environments.

  7. Modeling of Perturbations in Mid-Ocean Hydrothermal Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S.; Lowell, R. P.

    2013-12-01

    Mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems are complex fluid circulation systems straddling the locations of formation of oceanic crust. Due to the dynamic nature of the crust building process, these systems are episodically subject to magmatic and seismic perturbations. Magma may be emplaced deep or shallow in the oceanic crust thereby changing the thermal structure and permeability of the system. Such events would enhance hydrothermal venting resulting in an increase in vent temperature and heat output along with a decrease in vent salinity in a phase separating system. Event plumes, which may be associated with dike intrusions into the shallow crust, are an important class of such perturbations. In this case, the formation of low salinity vapor may add to the thermal buoyancy flux and allow the plume to rise rapidly to a considerable height above the seafloor. Additionally, seismic or tectonic disturbances may occur both deep and shallow in the crust, changing the fluid-flow structure in the system. Upon knowledge of a major magmatic or seismotectonic event, temporary surveillance at the respective mid ocean ridge site is often increased as a result of rapid response cruises. One of the most common observations made after such events is the temperature of vent fluids, which is then correlated to time of observed activity and used to estimate the residence time of fluids in the system. However, our numerical results indicate that for deep-seated perturbations, surface salinity may show quicker response than temperature. This result serves as our motivation to seek better understanding of propagation mechanism of perturbations through hydrothermal systems. We construct analytical models for fluid flow, heat and salt transfer in both single cracks and through porous media to investigate how perturbations affect both heat and salt transfer to the surface. Our preliminary results for simplified fluid circulation systems tend to support the results from numerical modeling

  8. Hydrothermal conversion of chrysotile asbestos using near supercritical conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasiadou, Kalliopi; Axiotis, Dimosthenis [Laboratory of Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania, P.C. 73100 (Greece); Gidarakos, Evangelos, E-mail: gidarako@mred.tuc.gr [Laboratory of Toxic and Hazardous Waste Management, Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Crete, Chania, P.C. 73100 (Greece)

    2010-07-15

    The present research investigates, develops and evaluates the transformation of chrysotile asbestos into a non-hazardous material, such as forsterite, using an economically viable and safe method. The aim of this study is to convert fibrous chrysotile asbestos into an anhydrous magnesium silicate with a non-hazardous lamellar morphology using supercritical steam. The treatment method is characterized as hydrothermal in a temperature and pressure range of 300-700 deg. C and 1.75-5.80 MPa, respectively. Small amounts of asbestos (2.5 g) were treated in each experiment. Deionised water was used as the treatment solution. The treatment duration varied from approximately 1-5 h. Additional experiments took place using solutions of distilled water and small amounts of acetic acid, with the aim of attaining optimal treatment conditions. Crystal phases of the samples were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The main phases present in the treated samples were forsterite, enstatite, and chrysotile asbestos. Lizardite and periclase were also found. The morphology of the treated chrysotile asbestos fibers was identified by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The fibrous form of chrysotile asbestos was converted into non-fibrous form of forsterite. In fact, none of the fibrous-needle-like morphology, with length equal to or greater than 5 {mu}m and diameter less than 3 {mu}m, which was responsible for the toxicity of the original material, was visible in the solid phase. The dissolution of magnesium from chrysotile asbestos was measured using volumetric determination by titration with EDTA. Leaching of magnesium into the liquid phase was observed. Clearly, the highest concentrations of dissolved magnesium are observed after hydrothermal treatment of chrysotile asbestos using acetic acid 1% (8.4-14.6%). Lowest concentrations of dissolved magnesium are obtained after hydrothermal treatment of chrysotile asbestos without using additives. Observing the results of the hydrothermal

  9. Learning about Hydrothermal Volcanic Activity by Modeling Induced Geophysical Changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilda M. Currenti

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by ongoing efforts to understand the nature and the energy potential of geothermal resources, we devise a coupled numerical model (hydrological, thermal, mechanical, which may help in the characterization and monitoring of hydrothermal systems through computational experiments. Hydrothermal areas in volcanic regions arise from a unique combination of geological and hydrological features which regulate the movement of fluids in the vicinity of magmatic sources capable of generating large quantities of steam and hot water. Numerical simulations help in understanding and characterizing rock-fluid interaction processes and the geophysical observations associated with them. Our aim is the quantification of the response of different geophysical observables (i.e., deformation, gravity, and magnetic fields to hydrothermal activity on the basis of a sound geological framework (e.g., distribution and pathways of the flows, the presence of fractured zones, caprock. A detailed comprehension and quantification of the evolution and dynamics of the geothermal systems and the definition of their internal state through a geophysical modeling approach are essential to identify the key parameters for which the geothermal system may fulfill the requirements to be exploited as a source of energy. For the sake of illustration only, the numerical computations are focused on a conceptual model of the hydrothermal system of Vulcano Island by simulating a generic 1-year unrest and estimating different geophysical changes. We solved (i the mass and energy balance equations of flow in porous media for temperature, pressure and density changes, (ii the elastostatic equation for the deformation field and (iii the Poisson's equations for gravity and magnetic potential fields. Under the model assumptions, a generic unrest of 1-year engenders on the ground surface low amplitude changes in the investigated geophysical observables, that, being above the accuracies of

  10. Comparison of hydrothermal activity between the Adriatic and the Red Sea rift margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Philip; Incerpi, Nicolò; Birkle, Peter; Lacsamana, Elizabeth; Manatschal, Gianreto; Agar, Susan; Zhang, Shuo; Borsato, Ron

    2017-04-01

    Detailed field studies, and access to high-quality seismic reflection and refraction data have led to an improved understanding of the architecture and evolution of magma poor and magma rich margins. Associated with the spatial-temporal evolution of the rift, it is evident that there are evolving, extensive, fluid-rock interactions due to the infiltration of fluids within the sediment, basement and lithospheric mantle. Key questions therefore arise: What are the different fluid-rock reactions that can be typed to different geodynamic stages of the rift evolution? What are their compositions and how do they interact with their environment (basement, sediments, evaporites, hydrosphere, and magmatism)? What are the implications for the evolution of the margin rheology, thermal structure, depositional environments/organic matter maturity, and reservoir quality? The Adriatic paleo-rifted margin is preserved in both SE Switzerland and northern Italy. The field exposures provide a unique opportunity to study the fluid flow history of a hyperextended magma poor extensional margin. Analysis of breccias, cement veins and replacement minerals reveal that the margin records a complex, long-lasting history of dolomitization, calcification and silicification during the Jurassic rifting. The Red Sea by contrast is a young rifted margin. It differs from the paleo-Adriatic margin by several characteristics: volcanism is more evident, and syn-tectonic sediments, including evaporites (halite and anhydrite) are thicker. Several core and fluid samples are available from both onshore and offshore wells, which reveal rift-related hydrothermal alteration. In addition, we find evidence for the presence of an extreme dynamic hydraulic system with infiltration of surface water into sub-salt units during Late Pleistocene. In this study we present results from petrographic and geochemical analysis of basement and sedimentary rocks from Adriatic field-derived samples and core/subsurface fluid

  11. Hydrothermal nontronite formation associated with microbes from low-temperature diffuse hydrothermal vents at the South Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta, Kaiwen; Peng, Xiaotong; Chen, Shun; Xu, Hengchao; Li, Jiwei; Du, Mengran; Hao, Jialong; Lin, Ying

    2017-09-01

    Oceanic nontronite deposits have been identified to be closely related to low-temperature hydrothermal activities. However, their formation mechanisms associated with microbes in diffuse hydrothermal vents still remain largely unknown. The friable deposits, collected from the low-temperature diffuse flow at the Southern Atlantic Ridge, display a layered structure. Scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscope analyses reveal that abundant filamentous, spherical, and rod-shaped mineralized forms are preserved in the yellowish-green layer of the deposits. These mineralized forms primarily consist of Si and Fe. Selected area electron diffraction patterns of the mineralized forms indicate that they are composed of nontronite. High intensities of 12C and 12C14N signals derived from cellular structures determined by nanosecondary ion mass spectrometry suggest the intimate relationship between nontronite and microbes. The results of 454 pyrosequencing analyses provide insights into the microbial communities involved in the biologically induced mineralization in the yellowish-green layer. We propose an evolutionary model for establishing paragenetic sequences among nontronite, Mn oxide, and Fe oxyhydroxide in the deposits. This paragenetic sequence could be widespread in modern and ancient low-temperature hydrothermal fields.

  12. Microbial Sulfur Cycle in Two Hydrothermal Chimneys on the Southwest Indian Ridge

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Huiluo; Wang, Yong; Lee, On On; Zeng, Xiang; Shao, Zongze; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sulfur is an important element in sustaining microbial communities present in hydrothermal vents. Sulfur oxidation has been extensively studied due to its importance in chemosynthetic pathways in hydrothermal fields; however, less is known about sulfate reduction. Here, the metagenomes of hydrothermal chimneys located on the ultraslow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) were pyrosequenced to elucidate the associated microbial sulfur cycle. A taxonomic summary of known genes revea...

  13. Characteristics of hydrothermal activity in the Tarim Basin and its reworking effect on carbonate reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal activity is common in the Tarim Basin. In this paper, petrologic and geochemical features of the hydrothermal products in the carbonate rocks in this basin were analyzed so as to figure out the effect of hydrothermal activity on the Lower Palaeozoic carbonate reservoirs in this area. It is shown that the hydrothermal fluids in the Tarim Basin are generally high in CO2 content, but very low in Mg2+ content. Then, the reworking effect of hydrothermal activity on reservoir was further discussed. It is indicated that the component of hydrothermal fluid is the deciding factor for the reworking of reservoirs. The study provided the following findings. Firstly, hydrothermal fluid is rich in CO2. Dissolution is intense in the vicinity of fracture zones and dissolved pores of different sizes are developed. Therefore, small-scale high-quality reservoirs with good porosity and permeability are formed. Secondly, hydrothermal fluid itself is low in magnesium content and some additional magnesium can be produced from Cambrian dolomites by means of dissolution, but the scale of hydrothermal dolomitization is small. Thirdly, the hydrothermal fluids rich in CO2 form high-quality dissolved vug typed reservoirs by means of dissolving surrounding rocks and their distribution are controlled by faulting. Fourthly, the saddle-like dolomite with hydrothermal origin fills dissolved vugs. Furthermore, the hydrothermal activity in the vicinity of faults results in the recrystallization or excessive growth of dolomite crystal, blocking existed pores, which is a type of destructive diagenesis as a whole. The study results can provide a reference for carbonate reservoir prediction of deep basin.

  14. Characteristics of Biochar Obtained by Hydrothermal Carbonization of Cellulose for Renewable Energy

    OpenAIRE

    Daegi Kim; Kunio Yoshikawa; Ki Young Park

    2015-01-01

    The effect of hydrothermal carbonization on the properties of cellulose present in lignocellulosic biomass was investigated for converting it into a renewable energy resource with high energy recovery efficiency. The biochar obtained from cellulose subjected to hydrothermal carbonization showed a significant increase in its carbon content and a calorific value. 13C NMR spectroscopy showed that when raw cellulose was subjected to hydrothermal carbonization above 220 °C, the resulting biochar h...

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of hybrid Al/ZnO-GO composite for significant photodegrdation of dyes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lellala, Kashinath; Namratha, K.; Byrappa, K., E-mail: kashinathlellala@gmail.com, E-mail: kbyrappa@gmail.com [Centre for Materials Science and Technology, University of Mysore, Vijnana Bhavan, P.B.No.21, Manasagangothri, Mysore - 570006, India. (India); Sudhakar, K. [Lal Bhadur College, S.V.N. Road, Mulugu X-road, Kakatiya University, Warangal-560001, India. (India)

    2016-05-06

    In the present work, undoped and doped Aluminum/Zinc Oxide - graphene oxide (Al/ZnO-GO) nanocomposite have been successfully synthesized by hydrothermal method from zinc acetate and aluminum nitrate solutions without using of any surfactant/stabilizing agents. The results show that the composites of GO nanosheets are decorated densely by Al/ZnO nanoparticles, which displays a good morphology and blend between GO and Al/ZnO. Hybrid composites exhibit an enhanced photocatalytic performance in reduction of dyes under UV-Vis radiation better than bare ZnO-GO and GO for methylene blue dye. The hydrothermal method leads to particles with a higher crystalline due to ambient temperature of the reaction and autogenously pressure conditions, which alters the phases and crystallizations of the nanocomposite. The optical band gap is narrowed to lower energy values due to controlled addition of aluminum and GO in the composite. The improved optical property in Al-doped ZnO flower decorated on GO can be attributed to the decrease in oxygen deficiency after Al doping. XRD, FTIR, UV-Vis spectroscopy, Raman, and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy characterized the effects of Al doping on the structural characteristics and optical properties on the ZnO-GO.

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of hybrid Al/ZnO-GO composite for significant photodegrdation of dyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lellala, Kashinath; Namratha, K.; Sudhakar, K.; Byrappa, K.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, undoped and doped Aluminum/Zinc Oxide - graphene oxide (Al/ZnO-GO) nanocomposite have been successfully synthesized by hydrothermal method from zinc acetate and aluminum nitrate solutions without using of any surfactant/stabilizing agents. The results show that the composites of GO nanosheets are decorated densely by Al/ZnO nanoparticles, which displays a good morphology and blend between GO and Al/ZnO. Hybrid composites exhibit an enhanced photocatalytic performance in reduction of dyes under UV-Vis radiation better than bare ZnO-GO and GO for methylene blue dye. The hydrothermal method leads to particles with a higher crystalline due to ambient temperature of the reaction and autogenously pressure conditions, which alters the phases and crystallizations of the nanocomposite. The optical band gap is narrowed to lower energy values due to controlled addition of aluminum and GO in the composite. The improved optical property in Al-doped ZnO flower decorated on GO can be attributed to the decrease in oxygen deficiency after Al doping. XRD, FTIR, UV-Vis spectroscopy, Raman, and Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy characterized the effects of Al doping on the structural characteristics and optical properties on the ZnO-GO.

  17. Hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies in the Sinian Dengying Fm, central Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqiang Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Upper Sinian Dengying Fm is the focus of natural gas exploration in the central part of the Sichuan Basin (central Sichuan Basin in recent years. Especially, epigenic karstification and its resulted reservoir-seepage spaces have always been the focal points in researches. Based on the petrographic characteristics of drilling cuttings and core samples, and through experimental analysis by using trace elements, isotopes, and cathodoluminescence, the Dengying Fm dolomite was demonstrated to have matrix recrystallized dolomite (MRD, filled saddle dolomite (FSD (the mean homogenization temperature of inclusion: 178.5 °C, high concentrations of Fe & Mn, slightly positive 87Sr/86Sr value and hydrothermal minerals combination (including sphalerite, galena, pyrite, and quartz, etc.. Thus, it was proposed that hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies (HDRF exist in the Dengying Fm dolomite, in other words, the dolomite reservoir is composed of hydrothermal dissolved pores, intercrystalline pores of hydrothermal origin, hydrothermal caverns and expanded fractures, and was formed due to the reworking of hydrothermal fluid on tight matrix dolomite. Identification marks are presented in terms of petrography and geochemistry so that hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies can be effectively recognized and identified. It is concluded that the development of hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies in this area are preliminary controlled by deep and large basement faults and the strength of hydrothermal fluids.

  18. Catalytic Hydrothermal Conversion of Wet Biomass Feedstocks and Upgrading – Process Design and Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Jessica; Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse

    Liquid biofuels will play a major role for a more sustainable energy system of the future. The CatLiq® process is a 2nd generation biomass conversion process that is based on hydrothermal liquefaction. Hydrothermal liquefaction offers a very efficient and feedstock flexible way of converting...... biomass to bio-oil. Bio-oils from hydrothermal liquefaction are characterised by their high feedstock flexibility. Upgrading of complete bio-oils derived from hydrothermal conversion has not yet been extensively studied. Purpose of this work is to reduce the oxygen content of the bio-oil to improve...

  19. Geothermal hydrothermal direct heat use: US market size and market penetration estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Sawy, A.H.; Entingh, D.J.

    1980-09-01

    This study estimates the future regional and national market penetration path of hydrothermal geothermal direct heat applications in the United States. A Technology Substitution Model (MARPEN) is developed and used to estimate the energy market shares captured by low-temperature (50 to 150/sup 0/C) hydrothermal geothermal energy systems over the period 1985 to 2020. The sensitivity of hydrothermal direct heat market shares to various government hydrothermal commercialization policies is examined. Several substantive recommendations to help accelerate commercialization of geothermal direct heat utilization in the United States are indicated and possible additional analyses are discussed.

  20. Spatial Distribution of Viruses Associated with Planktonic and Attached Microbial Communities in Hydrothermal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunoura, Takuro; Kazama, Hiromi; Noguchi, Takuroh; Inoue, Kazuhiro; Akashi, Hironori; Yamanaka, Toshiro; Toki, Tomohiro; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Furushima, Yasuo; Ueno, Yuichiro; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Takai, Ken

    2012-01-01

    Viruses play important roles in marine surface ecosystems, but little is known about viral ecology and virus-mediated processes in deep-sea hydrothermal microbial communities. In this study, we examined virus-like particle (VLP) abundances in planktonic and attached microbial communities, which occur in physical and chemical gradients in both deep and shallow submarine hydrothermal environments (mixing waters between hydrothermal fluids and ambient seawater and dense microbial communities attached to chimney surface areas or macrofaunal bodies and colonies). We found that viruses were widely distributed in a variety of hydrothermal microbial habitats, with the exception of the interior parts of hydrothermal chimney structures. The VLP abundance and VLP-to-prokaryote ratio (VPR) in the planktonic habitats increased as the ratio of hydrothermal fluid to mixing water increased. On the other hand, the VLP abundance in attached microbial communities was significantly and positively correlated with the whole prokaryotic abundance; however, the VPRs were always much lower than those for the surrounding hydrothermal waters. This is the first report to show VLP abundance in the attached microbial communities of submarine hydrothermal environments, which presented VPR values significantly lower than those in planktonic microbial communities reported before. These results suggested that viral lifestyles (e.g., lysogenic prevalence) and virus interactions with prokaryotes are significantly different among the planktonic and attached microbial communities that are developing in the submarine hydrothermal environments. PMID:22210205

  1. Experimental alteration of artificial and natural impact melt rock from the Chesapeake Bay impact structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Declercq, J.; Dypvik, H.; Aagaard, Per; Jahren, J.; Ferrell, R.E.; Horton, J. Wright

    2009-01-01

    The alteration or transformation of impact melt rock to clay minerals, particularly smectite, has been recognized in several impact structures (e.g., Ries, Chicxulub, Mj??lnir). We studied the experimental alteration of two natural impact melt rocks from suevite clasts that were recovered from drill cores into the Chesapeake Bay impact structure and two synthetic glasses. These experiments were conducted at hydrothermal temperature (265 ??C) in order to reproduce conditions found in meltbearing deposits in the first thousand years after deposition. The experimental results were compared to geochemical modeling (PHREEQC) of the same alteration and to original mineral assemblages in the natural melt rock samples. In the alteration experiments, clay minerals formed on the surfaces of the melt particles and as fine-grained suspended material. Authigenic expanding clay minerals (saponite and Ca-smectite) and vermiculite/chlorite (clinochlore) were identified in addition to analcime. Ferripyrophyllite was formed in three of four experiments. Comparable minerals were predicted in the PHREEQC modeling. A comparison between the phases formed in our experiments and those in the cores suggests that the natural alteration occurred under hydrothermal conditions similar to those reproduced in the experiment. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  2. Comparison of Five Hydrothermal Vent Fields at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge: Which Parameters Control the Differences in Fluid Geochemistry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, K.; Koschinsky, A.; Garbe-Schönberg, D.; Seifert, R.

    2006-12-01

    ultramafic rocks closely intergrown clearly controls the fluid geochemistry at these vent sites. Characteristic for both sites are also the smoking craters without any bioogical inhabitation. With respect to the temporal evolution of hydrothermal systems the young post-eruptive and phase-separated systems at 4°49'S are expected to show significant changes in temperature and chemistry within the next years with strong influences in the biological community. The ultramafic-hosted Logatchev field has shown a rather constant fluid composition for about 10 years indicating continuous serpentinization in the sub- seafloor without significant changes in alteration patterns and heat supply.

  3. The Timber Mountain magmato-thermal event: An intense widespread culmination of magmatic and hydrothermal activity at the southwestern Nevada volcanic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, Jr., Mac Roy [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1988-05-01

    Eruption of the Rainier Mesa and Ammonia Tanks Members Timber Mountain Tuff at about 11.5 and 11.3 Ma, respectively, resulted in formation of the timber Mountain (TM) caldera; new K-Ar ages show that volcanism within and around the TM caldera continued for about 1 m.y. after collapse. Some TM age magmatic activity took place west and southeast of the TM caldera in the Beatty -- Bullfrog Hills and Shoshone Mountain areas, suggesting that volcanic activity at the TM caldera was an intense expression of an areally extensive magmatic system active from about 11.5 to 10Ma. Epithermal Au-Ag, Hg and fluorite mineralization and hydrothermal alteration are found in both within and surrounding the Timber Mountain -- Oasis Valley caldera complex. New K-Ar ages date this hydrothermal activity between about 13 and 10 Ma, largely between about 11.5 and 10 Ma, suggesting a genetic relation of hydrothermal activity to the TM magmatic system.

  4. Trace elements in magnetite from massive iron oxide-apatite deposits indicate a combined formation by igneous and magmatic-hydrothermal processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knipping, Jaayke L.; Bilenker, Laura D.; Simon, Adam C.; Reich, Martin; Barra, Fernando; Deditius, Artur P.; Wälle, Markus; Heinrich, Christoph A.; Holtz, François; Munizaga, Rodrigo

    2015-12-01

    Iron oxide-apatite (IOA) deposits are an important source of iron and other elements (e.g., REE, P, U, Ag and Co) vital to modern society. However, their formation, including the namesake Kiruna-type IOA deposit (Sweden), remains controversial. Working hypotheses include a purely magmatic origin involving separation of an Fe-, P-rich, volatile-rich oxide melt from a Si-rich silicate melt, and precipitation of magnetite from an aqueous ore fluid, which is either of magmatic-hydrothermal or non-magmatic surface or metamorphic origin. In this study, we focus on the geochemistry of magnetite from the Cretaceous Kiruna-type Los Colorados IOA deposit (∼350 Mt Fe) located in the northern Chilean Iron Belt. Los Colorados has experienced minimal hydrothermal alteration that commonly obscures primary features in IOA deposits. Laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (LA-ICP-MS) transects and electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectrometry mapping demonstrate distinct chemical zoning in magnetite grains, wherein cores are enriched in Ti, Al, Mn and Mg. The concentrations of these trace elements in magnetite cores are consistent with igneous magnetite crystallized from a silicate melt, whereas magnetite rims show a pronounced depletion in these elements, consistent with magnetite grown from an Fe-rich magmatic-hydrothermal aqueous fluid. Further, magnetite grains contain polycrystalline inclusions that re-homogenize at magmatic temperatures (>850 °C). Smaller inclusions (500 ppm) concentrations.

  5. Hydrothermal and alkaline hydrothermal pretreatments plus anaerobic digestion of sewage sludge for dewatering and biogas production: Bench-scale research and pilot-scale verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunxing; Wang, Xingdong; Zhang, Guangyi; Yu, Guangwei; Lin, Jingjiang; Wang, Yin

    2017-06-15

    To test the feasibility and practicability of the process combing hydrothermal pretreatment for dewatering with biogas production for full utilization of sewage sludge, hydrothermal/alkaline hydrothermal pretreatments and in turn anaerobic digestion of the filtrates obtained after dewatering the pretreated sludge were performed at bench- and pilot-scales. The hydrothermal temperature fell within the range of 140 °C-220 °C and the pretreatment time varied from 30 min to 120 min. For the alkaline hydrothermal pretreatment the pH value of the sludge was adjusted to 9.0-11.0 by adding Ca(OH)2. The results showed that the dewaterability of the sewage sludge was improved with increasing pretreatment temperature but the impact of the pretreatment time was not significant. The addition of Ca(OH)2 gave better performance on the subsequent mechanical dewatering of the pretreated sludge compared to pure hydrothermal pretreatment, and the higher the pH value was, the better the dewaterability of the pretreated sludge was. The conditions of 180 °C/30 min and 160 °C/60 min/pH = 10.0 (for hydrothermal and alkaline hydrothermal pretreatments, respectively) resulted in relatively good results in the theoretical energy balance, which were verified in the pilot-scale tests. Based on the data from the pilot tests, the alkaline hydrothermal process realized self-sufficiency in energy at the cost of a proper amount of CaO. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Did the massive magnetite "lava flows" of El Laco (Chile) form by magmatic or hydrothermal processes? New constraints from magnetite composition by LA-ICP-MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dare, Sarah A. S.; Barnes, Sarah-Jane; Beaudoin, Georges

    2015-06-01

    The El Laco magnetite deposits consist of more than 98 % magnetite but show field textures remarkably similar to mafic lava flows. Therefore, it has long been suggested that they represent a rare example of an effusive Fe oxide liquid. Field and petrographic evidence, however, suggest that the magnetite deposits represent replacement of andesite flows and that the textures are pseudomorphs. We determined the trace element content of magnetite by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) from various settings at El Laco and compared them with magnetite from both igneous and hydrothermal environments. This new technique allows us to place constraints on the conditions under which magnetite in these supposed magnetite "lava flows" formed. The trace element content of magnetite from the massive magnetite samples is different to any known magmatic magnetite, including primary magnetite phenocrysts from the unaltered andesite host rocks at El Laco. Instead, the El Laco magnetite is most similar in composition to hydrothermal magnetite from high-temperature environments (>500 °C), such as iron oxide-copper-gold (IOCG) and porphyry-Cu deposits. The magnetite trace elements from massive magnetite are characterised by (1) depletion in elements considered relatively immobile in hydrothermal fluids (e.g. Ti, Al, Cr, Zr, Hf and Sc); (2) enrichment in elements that are highly incompatible with magmatic magnetite (rare earth elements (REE), Si, Ca, Na and P) and normally present in very low abundance in magmatic magnetite; (3) high Ni/Cr ratios which are typical of magnetite from hydrothermal environments; and (4) oscillatory zoning of Si, Ca, Mg, REE and most high field strength elements, and zoning truncations indicating dissolution, similar to that formed in hydrothermal Fe skarn deposits. In addition, secondary magnetite in altered, brecciated host rock, forming disseminations and veins, has the same composition as magnetite from the massive

  7. Seismic Reflection Imaging of the Heat Source of an Ultramafic-Hosted Hydrothermal System (Rainbow, Mid-Atlantic Ridge 36° 10-17'N)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canales, J. P.; Dunn, R. A.; Sohn, R. A.; Horning, G.; Arai, R.; Paulatto, M.

    2015-12-01

    , lithological contacts, and/or alteration boundaries. Our results are an important step towards understanding the interactions of detachment faulting, magmatic intrusion, and hydrothermal circulation.

  8. Oxygen and U-Th isotopes and the timescales of hydrothermal exchange and melting in granitoid wall rocks at Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankney, Meagan E.; Bacon, Charles R.; Valley, John W.; Beard, Brian L.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2017-01-01

    highest U excess (≥5.8%) also has the most 18O isotope depletion (average δ18Oplag = −4.0‰). The granitoids are a probable assimilant and source of U excess in volcanic rocks from Mt. Mazama. Two granitoids have Th excess and low δ18O values, interpreted to record leaching of U during hydrothermal alteration. A U-Th isochron based on the U excess array of the granitoids and volcanic rocks indicates that hydrothermal circulation initiated ∼40–75 kyrs before the climactic eruption, potentially marking the initiation of a persistent upper-crustal magma chamber. The U-Th ages are consistent with the maximum timescales inferred for hydrothermal alteration based on oxygen isotope zoning in quartz.

  9. Oxygen and U-Th isotopes and the timescales of hydrothermal exchange and melting in granitoid wall rocks at Mount Mazama, Crater Lake, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankney, Meagan E.; Bacon, Charles R.; Valley, John W.; Beard, Brian L.; Johnson, Clark M.

    2017-09-01

    has the most 18O isotope depletion (average δ18Oplag = -4.0‰). The granitoids are a probable assimilant and source of U excess in volcanic rocks from Mt. Mazama. Two granitoids have Th excess and low δ18O values, interpreted to record leaching of U during hydrothermal alteration. A U-Th isochron based on the U excess array of the granitoids and volcanic rocks indicates that hydrothermal circulation initiated ∼40-75 kyrs before the climactic eruption, potentially marking the initiation of a persistent upper-crustal magma chamber. The U-Th ages are consistent with the maximum timescales inferred for hydrothermal alteration based on oxygen isotope zoning in quartz.

  10. Multidisciplinary constraints of hydrothermal explosions based on the 2013 Gengissig lake events, Kverkfjöll volcano, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanaro, Cristian; Scheu, Bettina; Gudmundsson, Magnus Tumi; Vogfjörd, Kristín; Reynolds, Hannah Iona; Dürig, Tobias; Strehlow, Karen; Rott, Stefanie; Reuschlé, Thierry; Dingwell, Donald Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal explosions frequently occur in geothermal areas showing various mechanisms and energies of explosivity. Their deposits, though generally hardly recognised or badly preserved, provide important insights to quantify the dynamics and energy of these poorly understood explosive events. Furthermore the host rock lithology of the geothermal system adds a control on the efficiency in the energy release during an explosion. We present results from a detailed study of recent hydrothermal explosion deposits within an active geothermal area at Kverkfjöll, a central volcano at the northern edge of Vatnajökull. On August 15th 2013, a small jökulhlaup occurred when the Gengissig ice-dammed lake drained at Kverkfjöll. The lake level dropped by approximately 30 m, decreasing pressure on the lake bed and triggering several hydrothermal explosions on the 16th. Here, a multidisciplinary approach combining detailed field work, laboratory studies, and models of the energetics of explosions with information on duration and amplitudes of seismic signals, has been used to analyse the mechanisms and characteristics of these hydrothermal explosions. Field and laboratory studies were also carried out to help constrain the sedimentary sequence involved in the event. The explosions lasted for 40-50 s and involved the surficial part of an unconsolidated and hydrothermally altered glacio-lacustrine deposit composed of pyroclasts, lavas, scoriaceous fragments, and fine-grained welded or loosely consolidated aggregates, interbedded with clay-rich levels. Several small fans of ejecta were formed, reaching a distance of 1 km north of the lake and covering an area of approximately 0.3 km2, with a maximum thickness of 40 cm at the crater walls. The material (volume of approximately 104 m3) has been ejected by the expanding boiling fluid, generated by a pressure failure affecting the surficial geothermal reservoir. The maximum thermal, craterisation and ejection energies, calculated

  11. Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Extremely Well-Preserved 2.45-Billion-Year-Old Hydrothermal Systems in the Vetreny Belt, Baltic Shield: Insights into Paleohydrosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, D. O.; Bindeman, I. N.

    2015-12-01

    The early Paleoproterozoic was an eventful period in the Earth's history. The first portions of free oxygen emerged in the atmosphere, Snowball Earth glaciations happened several times and the first supercontinent broke up due to extensive rifting. These events should have affected the stable isotopic composition of the hydrosphere. In this study, we use rocks that were altered in underwater hydrothermal systems to investigate the stable isotopic composition of the hydrosphere 2.39-2.45 billion years ago (hereinafter, Ga). Extremely low-δ18O (down to -27.5‰ SMOW) rocks from 2.39 Ga metamorphosed subglacial hydrothermal systems of the Belomorian belt, Baltic Shield formed at near-equatorial latitudes suggesting a Snowball (or Slushball) Earth glaciation. These results motivated us to look at temporally and geographically close hydrothermal systems from the unmetamorhposed 2.45 Ga Vetreny Belt rift. The length of the rift is 250 km and it is composed of high-Mg basalts, mafic-ultramafic intrusions and sedimentary successions. We examined several localities of high-Mg basalt flows that include astonishingly fresh pillow lavas, often with preserved volcanic glass, eruptive breccias, and hydrothermal alteration zones. Collected samples serve a great textural evidence of water-rock interaction that occurred in situ while basalts were cooling. The preliminary results from coexisting quartz and epidote (T, D18O=311°C), and from coexisting calcite and quartz (T, D18O=190°C) yield values of δ18O of involved water between -1.6 and -0.9 ‰. The values of δ13C in calcites vary between -4.0 and -2.3 ‰. It is likely that hydrothermal fluids operated in the Vetreny Belt rift were derived from seawater that is no different from modern oceanic water in terms of δ18O. Apparently, the rift was a Paleoproterozoic analog of the modern Red Sea, filled with oceanic water. The result is important because the Vetreny Belt rift predates the onset of Snowball Earth glaciation at 2

  12. Uranium-lead dating of hydrothermal zircon and monazite from the Sin Quyen Fe-Cu-REE-Au-(U) deposit, northwestern Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Chun; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Chen, Wei Terry; Zhao, Xin-Fu; Tran, MyDung

    2017-06-01

    The Sin Quyen deposit in northwestern Vietnam contains economic concentrations of Cu, Au and LREE, and sub-economic concentration of U. In this deposit, massive and banded replacement ores are hosted in Neoproterozoic metapelite. The paragenetic sequence includes sodic alteration (stage I), calcic-potassic alteration and associated Fe-REE-(U) mineralization (stage II), Cu-Au mineralization (stage III), and sulfide-(quartz-carbonate) veins (stage IV). The Sin Quyen deposit experienced an extensive post-ore metamorphic overprint, which makes it difficult to precisely determine the mineralization age. In this study, zircon and monazite U-Pb geochronometers and the Rb-Sr isochron method are used to constrain the timing of mineralization. Zircon grains in the ore are closely intergrown or texturally associated with hydrothermal minerals of stage II (e.g., garnet, allanite, and hedenbergite). They may contain primary fluid inclusions and display irregular zoning in cathodoluminescence (CL) images. Zircon grains are rich in U (688 to 2902 ppm) and poor in Th (0.2 to 2.9 ppm). Their δ18OV-SMOW values range from 11.9 to 14.0‰, higher than those of typical magmatic zircon. These textural and compositional features imply that zircon precipitated from 18O- and U-rich hydrothermal fluids, coeval with the minerals of stage II. Monazite occurs in close association with stage II magnetite and allanite and has low contents of Th (<2700 ppm), indicative of a hydrothermal origin. Hydrothermal zircon and monazite have indistinguishable U-Pb ages of 841 ± 12 and 836 ± 18 Ma, respectively, representing the timing of Fe-REE mineralization. There is no direct isotopic constraint on the timing of the Cu-Au mineralization, but geological observations suggest that the Cu-Au and Fe-REE ores most likely formed within a single evolved hydrothermal process. In the plot of 87Rb/86Sr vs. 87Sr/86Sr, the composition of bulk-ore and biotite separates from ore lie along a reference line for 30 Ma

  13. Hydrothermal contamination of public supply wells in Napa and Sonoma Valleys, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, Matthew J.; Kulongoski, Justin T.; Edwards, Matthew S.; Farrar, Christopher D.; Belitz, Kenneth; Norris, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    Groundwater chemistry and isotope data from 44 public supply wells in the Napa and Sonoma Valleys, California were determined to investigate mixing of relatively shallow groundwater with deeper hydrothermal fluids. Multivariate analyses including Cluster Analyses, Multidimensional Scaling (MDS), Principal Components Analyses (PCA), Analysis of Similarities (ANOSIM), and Similarity Percentage Analyses (SIMPER) were used to elucidate constituent distribution patterns, determine which constituents are significantly associated with these hydrothermal systems, and investigate hydrothermal contamination of local groundwater used for drinking water. Multivariate statistical analyses were essential to this study because traditional methods, such as mixing tests involving single species (e.g. Cl or SiO2) were incapable of quantifying component proportions due to mixing of multiple water types. Based on these analyses, water samples collected from the wells were broadly classified as fresh groundwater, saline waters, hydrothermal fluids, or mixed hydrothermal fluids/meteoric water wells. The Multivariate Mixing and Mass-balance (M3) model was applied in order to determine the proportion of hydrothermal fluids, saline water, and fresh groundwater in each sample. Major ions, isotopes, and physical parameters of the waters were used to characterize the hydrothermal fluids as Na–Cl type, with significant enrichment in the trace elements As, B, F and Li. Five of the wells from this study were classified as hydrothermal, 28 as fresh groundwater, two as saline water, and nine as mixed hydrothermal fluids/meteoric water wells. The M3 mixing-model results indicated that the nine mixed wells contained between 14% and 30% hydrothermal fluids. Further, the chemical analyses show that several of these mixed-water wells have concentrations of As, F and B that exceed drinking-water standards or notification levels due to contamination by hydrothermal fluids.

  14. Genome-resolved metagenomics reveals that sulfur metabolism dominates the microbial ecology of rising hydrothermal plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, K.; Breier, J. A., Jr.; Jain, S.; Reed, D. C.; Dick, G.

    2015-12-01

    Deep-sea hydrothermal plumes occur when hot fluids from hydrothermal vents replete with chemically reduced elements and compounds like sulfide, methane, hydrogen, ammonia, iron and manganese mix with cold, oxic seawater. Chemosynthetic microbes use these reduced chemicals to power primary production and are pervasive throughout the deep sea, even at sites far removed from hydrothermal vents. Although neutrally-buoyant hydrothermal plumes have been well-studied, rising hydrothermal plumes have received little attention even though they represent an important interface in the deep-sea where microbial metabolism and particle formation processes control the transformation of important elements and impact global biogeochemical cycles. In this study, we used genome-resolved metagenomic analyses and thermodynamic-bioenergetic modeling to study the microbial ecology of rising hydrothermal plumes at five different hydrothermal vents spanning a range of geochemical gradients at the Eastern Lau Spreading Center (ELSC) in the Western Pacific Ocean. Our analyses show that differences in the geochemistry of hydrothermal vents do not manifest in microbial diversity and community composition, both of which display only minor variance across ELSC hydrothermal plumes. Microbial metabolism is dominated by oxidation of reduced sulfur species and supports a diversity of bacteria, archaea and viruses that provide intriguing insights into metabolic plasticity and virus-mediated horizontal gene transfer in the microbial community. The manifestation of sulfur oxidation genes in hydrogen and methane oxidizing organisms hints at metabolic opportunism in deep-sea microbes that would enable them to respond to varying redox conditions in hydrothermal plumes. Finally, we infer that the abundance, diversity and metabolic versatility of microbes associated with sulfur oxidation impart functional redundancy that could allow it to persist in the dynamic settings of hydrothermal plumes.

  15. Coupled Iron and Sulfur Transformations in Hydrothermal Springs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, E. S.; Amenabar, M.; Roden, E. E.

    2014-12-01

    Iron (Fe) and sulfur (S) compounds are common constituents of terrestrial hydrothermal systems. The transformation of Fe and S compounds is inferred to be an ancient mechanism of energy conservation that is still represented in extant life inhabiting contemporary hydrothermal environments. While substantial research has been conducted to uncover the ability of microorganisms to couple Fe and S transformations with other biogeochemical cycles (e.g., H, O, C cycles) in hydrothermal environments, few studies have focused on the interplay between the Fe and S cycles. In particular, a paucity of studies has been conducted on this phenomenon in acidic high temperature ecosystems despite the common co-occurrence of Fe and S in these environments. Here, we report the isolation and physiological characterization of a metabolically diverse thermoacidiphilic and autotrophic archaeon from an acidic hot spring environment in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) that is capable of both direct and indirect coupling of the Fe and S cycles. Growth experiments indicate differential attachment requirements depending on the mode of growth and imply the importance of intermediate sulfur species in supporting its metabolism. Genomic analyses confirm the metabolic plasticity of this strain and suggest numerous other mechanisms by which this organism may exploit other geochemical cycles during Fe or S dependent growth. Cultivation and cultivation independent approaches suggest that the distribution of this archaeon is widespread in Fe and S rich hot spring environments in YNP and is likely a keystone population in these environments, responsible for a large proportion of primary productivity. These results underscore the utility of integrating geochemical, cultivation, physiological, and genomic approaches in understanding biogeochemical cycling in volcanic environments.

  16. Temperatures of Mediterranean Volcanic Hydrothermal Systems Reflected by Gas Geothermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiebig, J.; Tassi, F.; D'Alessandro, W.; Vaselli, O.; Woodland, A. B.

    2011-12-01

    We have addressed the genetic relationship between H2, H2O, CO, CO2, n-alkanes and n-alkenes in volcanic-hydrothermal gases emitted from Nisyros (Greece), Vesuvio, Campi Flegrei and Pantelleria (all Italy). Methane attains chemical and isotopic equilibrium with CO2 in the associated hydrothermal systems within the single liquid phase. Calculated aquifer temperatures at depth are ~360°C at Nisyros, 420-460°C at Vesuvio, ~450°C at Campi Flegrei and ~540°C at Pantelleria. CH4-CO2 equilibrium temperatures are in agreement with propane/propene concentration ratios. Temperatures >400°C are additionally confirmed by ethane/ethene ratios. In contrast to CH4-CO2, metastable equilibration of the alkane/alkene pairs takes place in the saturated water vapor phase. Overall agreement of vapor and liquid equilibration temperatures suggests that boiling in the investigated high-enthalpy hydrothermal systems is essentially isothermal. Our results imply that the chemical and isotopic CH4-CO2 geothermometer is least prone to re-equilibration reactions occurring in the vapor phase after vapor separation. Redox conditions during these re-equilibration reactions are homogeneously buffered by H2/H2O ratios of the vapor phase, which, in turn, are controlled by those of the parental liquid phase and by the degree of superimposed vapor separation. Amongst the redox pairs investigated, CO/CO2 is most prone to secondary vapor phase equilibration. Our results imply that the isotopic CH4-CO2 geothermometer has the potential to record temperatures of aquifers associated with dormant volcanoes. Alkene/alkane and H2/H2O concentration ratios should be measured along with CH4 and CO2 to prove independently whether isotopic equilibrium has been attained.

  17. Climate change in a hydrothermal-thermohaline framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldama Campino, Aitor; Döös, Kristofer

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the response of the oceanic thermohaline circulation and the atmospheric hydrothermal circulation to a future climate change scenario are compared to the present climate. We will use stream functions based on purely thermodynamic coordinates to represent the atmospheric and oceanic circulation in one single representation. The oceanic thermohaline stream function makes it possible to analyse and quantify the entire world-ocean conversion rate between cold/warm and fresh/saline waters. The hydrothermal stream function, the analogous circulation in the atmosphere, captures the conversion rate between cold/warm and dry/humid air. The two stream functions have been computed from data from the Earth System Model EC-Earth. For the future climate change scenario the Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 8.5 was selected. The effects of the anthropogenic climate change is analysed in this study comparing the difference between the last 10 years of the historical simulation (1996-2005) to the RCP 8.5 simulation (2090-2100). Both circulations are compared on the same diagram by scaling the axes. The salinity axis of the ocean circulation is scaled by the equivalent latent heat energy required to move an air parcel on the moisture axis in the atmospheric circulation. In the future scenario, the atmospheric and oceanic circulation show a weakening and widening a of the stream function. The circulation expands both in the temperature space and in the humidity space for the atmosphere (salinity for the ocean). These results leads us to propose that the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship guides not only the moist branch of the hydrothermal circulation but also the warming branches of the thermohaline circulation both in the present climate and in a future scenario.

  18. Xenopumice erupted on 15 October 2011 offshore of El Hierro (Canary Islands): a subvolcanic snapshot of magmatic, hydrothermal and pyrometamorphic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Moro, S.; Di Roberto, A.; Meletlidis, S.; Pompilio, M.; Bertagnini, A.; Agostini, S.; Ridolfi, F.; Renzulli, A.

    2015-06-01

    On 15 October 2011, a submarine eruption offshore of El Hierro Island gave rise to floating volcanic products, known as xenopumices, i.e., pumiceous xenoliths partly mingled and coated with the juvenile basanitic magma. Over the last few years, no consensus in the scientific community in explaining the origin of these products has been reached. In order to better understand the formation of xenopumice, we present a textural, mineralogical, and geochemical study of the possible magmatic, hydrothermal, and pyrometamorphic processes, which usually operate in the plumbing systems of active volcanoes. We carried out a comprehensive SEM investigation and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope analyses on some samples representative of three different xenopumice facies. All the data were compared with previous studies, new data for El Hierro extrusives and a literature dataset of Canary Islands igneous and sedimentary rocks. In the investigated xenopumices, we emphasize the presence of restitic magmatic phases as well as crystallization of minerals (mainly olivine + pyroxene + magnetite aggregates) as pseudomorphs after pre-existing mafic phenocrysts, providing evidence of pyrometamorphism induced by the high-T juvenile basanitic magma. In addition, we identify veins consisting of zircon + REE-oxides + mullite associated with Si-rich glass and hydrothermal quartz, which indicate the fundamental role played by hydrothermal fluid circulation in the xenopumice protolith. The petrological data agree with a pre-syneruptive formation of the xenopumice, when El Hierro basanite magma intruded hydrothermally altered trachyandesite to trachyte rocks and triggered local partial melting. Therefore, the El Hierro xenopumice represents a snapshot of the transient processes at the magma-wall rock interface, which normally occurs in the feeding system of active volcanoes.

  19. Hydrothermal spinel, corundum and diaspore in lower oceanic crustal troctolites from the Hess Deep Rift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaka, Toshio; Meyer, Romain; Wintsch, Robert P.; Wathen, Bryan

    2016-06-01

    Aluminous spinel, corundum and diaspore are reported from intensely altered parts of primitive troctolites recovered from IODP Site U1415 at the Hess Deep Rift. The spinel is green-colored, has an irregular shape, has low Cr concentrations, and is so distinct from primary igneous chromite. Corundum and diaspore occur mainly at the rims of green spinel grains with a texture suggesting a sequential replacement of spinel by corundum, and then corundum by diaspore. The green spinel is associated with anorthite and pargasite, which is overgrown by tremolite that forms coronitic aggregates with chlorite around olivine. These petrographic observations are supported by pressure-temperature pseudosections, which predict spinel + pargasite stability field, and tremolite/hornblende + chlorite field at lower temperature conditions. From these pseudosections and simplified system phase diagrams, estimated formation temperature conditions calculated at 2 kbar are 650-750 °C for spinel + pargasite, 410-690 °C for tremolite/hornblende + chlorite, 400-710 °C for corundum, and phases in the lower oceanic crust are presently underestimated, and (2) chemical modification of the lower oceanic crust due to high-temperature hydrothermal metasomatic reactions could be common near spreading axes.

  20. Lipid biomarkers for bacterial ecosystems: studies of cultured organisms, hydrothermal environments and ancient sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summons, R. E.; Jahnke, L. L.; Simoneit, B. R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper forms part of our long-term goal of using molecular structure and carbon isotopic signals preserved as hydrocarbons in ancient sediments to improve understanding of the early evolution of Earth's surface environment. We are particularly concerned with biomarkers which are informative about aerobiosis. Here, we combine bacterial biochemistry with the organic geochemistry of contemporary and ancient hydrothermal ecosystems to construct models for the nature, behaviour and preservation potential of primitive microbial communities. We use a combined molecular and isotopic approach to characterize lipids produced by cultured bacteria and test a variety of culture conditions which affect their biosynthesis. This information is then compared with lipid mixtures isolated from contemporary hot springs and evaluated for the kinds of chemical change that would accompany burial and incorporation into the sedimentary record. In this study we have shown that growth temperature does not appear to alter isotopic fractionation within the lipid classes produced by a methanotropic bacterium. We also found that cultured cyanobacteria biosynthesize diagnostic methylalkanes and dimethylalkanes with the latter only made when growing under low pCO2. In an examination of a microbial mat sample from Octopus Spring, Yellowstone National Park (USA), we could readily identify chemical structures with 13C contents which were diagnostic for the phototrophic organisms such as cyanobacteria and Chloroflexus. We could not, however, find molecular evidence for operation of a methane cycle in the particular mat samples we studied.

  1. Forecasting Electricity Prices in an Optimization Hydrothermal Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matías, J. M.; Bayón, L.; Suárez, P.; Argüelles, A.; Taboada, J.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents an economic dispatch algorithm in a hydrothermal system within the framework of a competitive and deregulated electricity market. The optimization problem of one firm is described, whose objective function can be defined as its profit maximization. Since next-day price forecasting is an aspect crucial, this paper proposes an efficient yet highly accurate next-day price new forecasting method using a functional time series approach trying to exploit the daily seasonal structure of the series of prices. For the optimization problem, an optimal control technique is applied and Pontryagin's theorem is employed.

  2. The origin of life in alkaline hydrothermal vents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojo, V.; Herschy, B.; Whicher, A.; Camprubí, E.; Lane, N.

    2016-12-01

    The origin of life remains one of Science's greatest unresolved questions. The answer will no doubt involve almost all the basic disciplines, including Physics, Chemistry, Astronomy, Geology, and Biology. Chiefly, it is the link between the latter two that must be elucidated: how geochemistry gave rise to biochemistry. Serpentinizing systems such as alkaline hydrothermal vents offer the most robust combination of conditions to have hosted the origin of life on the early Earth, while bearing many parallels to modern living cells. Stark gradients of concentration, pH, oxidation/reduction, and temperature provided the ability to synthesise and concentrate organic products, drive polymerisation reactions, and develop an autotrophic lifestyle independent of foreign sources of organics. In the oxygen-depleted waters of the Hadean, alkaline vents would have acted as electrochemical flow reactors, in which alkaline fluids saturated in H2 mixed with the relatively acidic CO2-rich waters of the ocean, through interconnected micropores made of thin inorganic walls containing catalytic Fe(Ni)S minerals. Perhaps not coincidentally, the unit cells of these Fe(Ni)S minerals closely resemble the active sites of crucial ancestral bioenergetic enzymes. Meanwhile, differences in pH across the thin barriers produced natural proton gradients similar to those used for carbon fixation in modern archaea and bacteria. At the earliest stages, the problem of the origin of life is the problem of the origin of carbon fixation. I will discuss work over the last decade that suggests several possible hypotheses for how simple one-carbon molecules could have given rise to more complex organics, particularly within a serpentinizing alkaline hydrothermal vent. I will discuss the perplexing differences in carbon and energy metabolism in methanogenic archaea and acetogenic bacteria, thought to be the earliest representatives of each domain, to propose a possible ancestral mechanism of CO2 reduction in

  3. Hydrothermal Liquefaction: A Promising Pathway Towards Renewable Jet Fuel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biller, Patrick; Roth, Arne

    2017-01-01

    the natural formation of fossil crude on earth. With reaction times of around 10 to 30 minutes, temperatures of 350 °C and pressures of around 200 bar, HTL converts any biomass feedstock to a liquid bio-crude. This raw product roughly resembles petroleum, but exhibits higher oxygen contents (~10 %) and has......, rendering estimations of minimum fuel selling prices and greenhouse gas (GHG) balances of HTL derived liquid fuels difficult. To advance the technological maturity of hydrothermal liquefaction towards industrial implementation, development efforts should focus on process integration along the entire...

  4. Microwave-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of lead zirconate fine powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apinpus Rujiwatra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A rapid synthesis of lead zirconate fine powders by microwave-assisted hydrothermal technique is reported. The influences of type of lead precursor, concentration of potassium hydroxide mineraliser, applied microwave power and irradiation time are described. The synthesised powders were characterised by powder X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic microanalysis and light scattering technique. The merits of the microwave application in reducing reaction time and improving particle mono-dispersion and size uniformity as well as the drawbacks, viz. low purity of the desired phase and increasing demand of mineraliser, are discussed in relation to conventional heating method.

  5. Hydrothermal analysis in engineering using control volume finite element method

    CERN Document Server

    Sheikholeslami, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Control volume finite element methods (CVFEM) bridge the gap between finite difference and finite element methods, using the advantages of both methods for simulation of multi-physics problems in complex geometries. In Hydrothermal Analysis in Engineering Using Control Volume Finite Element Method, CVFEM is covered in detail and applied to key areas of thermal engineering. Examples, exercises, and extensive references are used to show the use of the technique to model key engineering problems such as heat transfer in nanofluids (to enhance performance and compactness of energy systems),

  6. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Indium Tin Oxide Nanoparticles without Chlorine Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hai Wen; Xu, Guo Dong; Yin, Xin [East China Univ. of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Jian Rong [Ningbo Jinxin Advanced Materials Ltd, Zhejiang (China)

    2014-07-15

    Indium tin oxide (In{sub 2}Sn{sub 1-x}O{sub 5-y}) nanoparticles were synthesized by hydrothermal method from stable indium tin acetylacetone complexes and post annealing at 600 .deg. C. The absence of chlorine ions shortened the synthesis process, decreased the particle agglomeration and improved the particle purity. The introduced complexing ligand acetylacetone decreased the obtained nanoparticle size. The improved powder properties accelerated the sintering of the In{sub 2}Sn{sub 1-x}O{sub 5-y} nanoparticles and reached a relative density of 96.4% when pressureless sintered at 1400 .deg. C.

  7. Feasibility of Hydrothermal Pretreatment on Maize Silage for Bioethanol Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Jian; Thomsen, Mette Hedegaard; Thomsen, Anne Belinda

    2010-01-01

    The potential of maize silage as a feedstock to produce bioethanol was evaluated in the present study. The hydrothermal pretreatment with five different pretreatment severity factors (PSF) was employed to pretreat the maize silage and compared in terms of sugar recovery, toxic test, and ethanol...... the liquors from the five conditions were not toxic to the Baker’s yeast. Pretreatment under 195°C for 7 min had the similar PSF with that of 185°C for 15 min, and both gave the higher ethanol concentration of 19.92 and 19.98 g/L, respectively. The ethanol concentration from untreated maize silage was only 7...

  8. Multiperiod hydrothermal economic dispatch by an interior point method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimball L. M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an interior point algorithm to solve the multiperiod hydrothermal economic dispatch (HTED. The multiperiod HTED is a large scale nonlinear programming problem. Various optimization methods have been applied to the multiperiod HTED, but most neglect important network characteristics or require decomposition into thermal and hydro subproblems. The algorithm described here exploits the special bordered block diagonal structure and sparsity of the Newton system for the first order necessary conditions to result in a fast efficient algorithm that can account for all network aspects. Applying this new algorithm challenges a conventional method for the use of available hydro resources known as the peak shaving heuristic.

  9. Dissolved gases in hydrothermal plumes from Artic vent fields

    OpenAIRE

    Stensland, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries of active vent fields on slow and ultraslow spreading ridges have revealed that hydrothermal activity is more common than previously assumed. In the Norwegian-Greenland Sea, two such vent fields are found; the Jan Mayen vent fields (71°N and 6°E) and Loki`s Castle (73°30′N and 8°E). Both these systems are located on the ultraslow spreading Mohns Ridge, but they differ profoundly in the geochemical fluid and gas composition. This study presen...

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of nanosized transition metal chromite spinels

    OpenAIRE

    DURRANI, Shahid Khan; HUSSAIN, Syed Zahid; Saeed, Khalid

    2014-01-01

    Homogeneous crystalline transition metal chromite spinels (MCr2O4, where M = Co, Mn, and Ni) were prepared by hydrothermal reaction of aqueous solutions containing the respective metal nitrate, chromium(III) nitrate, and sodium hydroxide in stoichiometric amounts at 180-200 °C and pH 10.5-11.5 for 11-13 h. The crystalline structure, microstructure, and thermal stability of the synthesized chromite products were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, thermog...

  11. The nature of hydrothermal fluids in the Kahang porphyry copper deposit (Northeast of Isfahan based on mineralography, fluid inclusion and stable isotopic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salimeh Sadat Komeili

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The Kahang Cu- Mo deposit is situated approximately 73 Km northeast of Isfahan. Asadi (2007 identified a geological reserve of 40 Mt (proven reserve grading at 0.53 Cu, 0.02 Mo and estimated reserve of 120 Mt. All the rock types in the region have been subjected to hydrothermal solutions which gave rise to three different alteration facies. The dacite and rhyodacite volcanic rocks and granitic- granodioritic stocks have experienced phyllic alteration. Disseminated and stockwork siliceous veins are the major styles of mineralization in this zone. Intermediate argillitic alteration developed on a part of dacitic and rhyodacitic rocks whereas andesite and basaltic-andesite plus related pyroclastic rocks have been subjected to propyllitic alteration. This paper presents the results of geological and mineralogical studies carried out in the Kahang area. This preliminary information is integrated with additional data on ore mineralogy, fluid inclusions and stable isotopes in view of understanding the genesis of the Cu- Mo deposit and the nature of the fluids involved in ore formation. Materials and Methods A total of 18 polished thin sections were prepared at the University of Isfahan for optical study. Fluid inclusions study was carried out on 8 double polished quartz thin sections (stockworks containing ore mineralization from phyllic zone. H – O stable isotope analysis was performed on 4 quartz samples from siliceous stockworks (from phyllic altered zone and one vein epidote sample (from propyllitic zone. All isotopic analyses were performed at the University of Oregan, Oregan, USA. Discussion In the investigated mineralization area, the hypogene zone is characterized by the presence of pyrite, chalcopyrite, bornite and magnetite. Hematite, goethite, jarosite, malachite and azurite are the predominant minerals of supergene zone. The major textures of the primary sulfides are disseminated, vein and veinlet. Pyrite is the most common

  12. Relevance of Pitted Material and Impact Melt to Early Martian Hydrothermalism and Habitability; Ries Ejecta Deposits as a Martian Analogue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudill, C. M.; Greenberger, R. N.; Tornabene, L. L.; Osinski, G. R.; Flemming, R. L.; Ehlmann, B. L.

    2017-10-01

    Hydrothermal features are investigated at the Ries impact structure as potentially analogous to crater-related pitted material in Martian ancient terrains, which may reveal shallow sub-surface hydrothermal environments and prime exploration targets.

  13. Numerical modelling of hydrothermal convection within a permeable mineralized zone: application to orogenic gold mineralization in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, A.; Harcouët, V.; Guillou-Frottier, L.; Adler, P.

    2006-12-01

    Fluid convection in faulted zones is recognized as an important mechanism for mineralization as it leads to fluid flow and mass transport. In order to investigate if 3D free convection in faults could be at the origin of a giant ore deposits such as the Palaeoproterozoic ore deposits of the Ashanti belt in Ghana, we have conducted several numerical simulations of heat and fluid flow applied to a realistic geological model. Such deposits are generally late orogenic and most of them are located at the vicinity of or within major structural accidents associated with particular fluid circulations and temperature distributions. In Ghana, deposits are concentrated along the western flank of the Ashanti greenstone belt where fault concentration is the highest and connection between them is maximal. In this region, several factors, identified in the field, are expected to affect hydrothermal fluid flows : (1) a 10 km-wide faulted zone is associated with a lateral permeability gradient ; (2) sedimentary and conglomeratic basins surround the faulted zone;(3) magmatic intrusions are located within the fault and at its vicinity. Our approach is defined by two steps: first, the numerical code solves equations related to heat transfer and fluid-flow in porous media with the above-cited appropriate boundary conditions; second, from the results of the modelling, we calculated the rock alteration index, RAI, which is proportional to the scalar product of the velocity by the temperature gradient. This index illustrates the geochemical alteration potential and depends on parameters such as gold solubility; it is used to identify regions where precipitation or dissolution can occur. Hydrothermal circulations are first investigated by the study of different synthetic cases corresponding to simplified models applicable to situations similar to the ones encountered in Ghana. In the case of a simple geometry, implying a fault zone surrounded by a sedimentary basin, transitions from 2D

  14. Sulfur, carbon, and oxygen isotope variations in submarine hydrothermal deposits of Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, J.M.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    1992-01-01

    Sulfur, carbon, and oxygen isotope values were measured in sulfide, sulfate, and carbonate from hydrothermal chimney, spire, and mound samples in the southern trough of Guaymas Basin, Gulf of California, USA. ??34S values of sulfides range from -3.7 to 4.5%. and indicate that sulfur originated from several sources: 1. (1) dissolution of 0??? sulfide contained within basaltic rocks, 2. (2) thermal reduction of seawater sulfate during sediment alteration reactions in feeder zones to give sulfide with positive ??34S, and 3. (3) entrainment or leaching of isotopically light (negative-??34S) bacteriogenic sulfide from sediments underlying the deposits. ??34S of barite and anhydrite indicate sulfur derivation mainly from unfractionated seawater sulfate, although some samples show evidence of sulfate reduction and sulfide oxidation reactions during mixing within chimneys. Oxygen isotope temperatures calculated for chimney calcites are in reasonable agreement with measured vent fluid temperatures and fluid inclusion trapping temperatures. Hydrothermal fluids that formed calcite-rich chimneys in the southern trough of Guaymas Basin were enriched in 18O with respect to seawater by about 2.4??? due to isotopic exchange with sedimentary and/or basaltic rocks. Carbon isotope values of calcite range from -9.6 to -14.0??? ??34CpDB, indicating that carbon was derived in approximately equal quantities from the dissolution of marine carbonate minerals and the oxidation of organic matter during migration of hydrothermal fluid through the underlying sediment column. Statistically significant positive, linear correlations of ??34S, ??34C, and ??18O of sulfides and calcites with geographic location within the southern trough of Guaymas Basin are best explained by variations in water/rock ( w r) ratios or sediment reactivity within subsurface alteration zones. Low w r ratios and the leaching of detrital carbonates and bacteriogenic sulfides at the southern vent sites result in relatively

  15. Music and Alterity Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep Martí

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The concept of alterity constitutes an important issue in anthropological research and, therefore, in the study of musical practices, as well. Without it, we could hardly understand other kinds of music situated in different spaces and time from the observer. In order to effectively approach these musical practices, we have to develop strategies to help us reduce as much as possible that which distorts the vision of the other. However, beyond the strictly epistemological and methodological issues, the study of music cannot ignore the ethical question related to the manner in which Western thought has understood and treated the other: through a hierarchical and stereotypical type of thinking based on the condition of otherness. Throughout the article, different alterity procedures are presented and discussed, such as synecdochization, exoticization, undervaluation, overvaluation, misunderstanding and exclusion. Taking these different alterity strategies into account may help us to better understand how the musical other is constructed, used and ultimately instrumentalized.

  16. Effect of hydrothermal heat treatment on magnetic properties of copper zinc ferrite rf sputtered films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasmeet; Gadipelly, Thirupathi; Singh, R.

    2016-05-01

    The hydrothermal treatment to the nano-structured films can overcome the destruction of the films. The Cu-Zn Ferrite films were fabricated by RF-sputtering on quartz substrates. Subsequently, the as deposited films were heat treated using hydrothermal process. The X-ray diffraction pattern of the as-deposited and hydrothermal treated films indicate nano-crystalline cubic spinel structure. The amorphous nature of the films is removed after hydrothermal treatment with decreased crystallite size. The field emission scanning electron micrographs showed merged columnar growth for as deposited films, which changes to well define columns after hydrothermal heating. The homogeneous cluster distribution is observed in surface view of the hydrothermal treated films. Hydrothermal treated films show merging of in-plane and out of plane magnetization plots (M(H)) whereas the M(H) plots of as deposited films show angular dependence. The strong angular dependence is observed in the FMR spectra due to the presence of a uniaxial anisotropy in the films. The ferromagnetic interactions decrease in hydrothermal heated films due to the reduced shape anisotropy and crystallite size.

  17. Continuous hydrothermal co-liquefaction of aspen wood and glycerol with water phase recirculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Thomas H.; Grigoras, Ionela F.; Hoffmann, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction is a promising technology for the conversion of a wide range of bio-feedstock into a biocrude; a mixture of chemical compounds that holds the potential for a renewable production of chemicals and fuels. Most research in hydrothermal liquefaction is performed in batch typ...

  18. Hydrothermal synthesis and shape-reactivity correlation study of automotive three-way nanocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-02-01

    In this project, we have shown that the hydrothermal method can be used to tune : the shape/size of CeO2 nanocrystals. CeO2 nanorods and nanocubes have been successfully : prepared at low and high hydrothermal reaction temperature, respectively. The ...

  19. Application of Hydrothermal Treatment to High Concentrated Sewage Sludge for Anaerobic Digestion Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Orikawa

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomato and seaweed were produced by utilizing CO2 and heat discharged from power generation using biogas in Toyogawa biomass park, Japan. The biogas was obtained by anaerobic digestion with hydrothermal treatment. The hydrothermal treatment was applied to the high concentrated sewage sludge (22 % total solids (TS dewatered sludge. The purpose of this study is to clarify the effect of hydrothermal treatment on the qualities of high concentrated sewage sludge, by analyzing particulate organic carbon (POC and dissolved organic carbon (DOC. The hydrothermal treatment was investigated under 10-60 min of treatment time, 180-200 °C of temperature, 10-22 %-TS of sewage sludge concentration. The results showed that the DOC in each conditions increased through hydrothermal treatment. The highest DOC obtained was 67 % of total carbon concentration, when the temperature was 180 °C, treatment time was 60 min and sewage sludge concentration was 10 %-TS. Furthermore, the viscosity of treated sewage sludge was decreased by hydrothermal treatment. In batch anaerobic digestion test, methane gas production was confirmed. In addition, this study evaluated the energy balance of this system. Thus, the results of this study indicated that the possibility of application of hydrothermal treatment to high concentrated sewage sludge for anaerobic digestion process. Keywords: anaerobic reaction, hydrothermal treatment, sewage sludge, solubilization

  20. Ensiling of wheat straw decreases the required temperature in hydrothermal pretreatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambye-Jensen, Morten; Thomsen, Sune Tjalfe; Kádár, Zsófia

    2013-01-01

    .5%. When comparing hydrothermally treated wheat straw (170, 180 and 190°C) with hydrothermally treated ensiled wheat straw (same temperatures), several positive effects of ensiling were revealed. Glucan was up-concentrated in the solid fraction and the solubilisation of hemicellulose was significantly...

  1. The importance of shallow hydrothermal island arc systems in ocean biogeochemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hawkes, J.A.; Connelly, D.P.; Rijkenberg, M.J.A.; Achterberg, E.P.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrothermal venting often occurs at submarine volcanic calderas on island arc chains, typically at shallower depths than mid-ocean ridges. The effect of these systems on ocean biogeochemistry has been under-investigated to date. Here we show that hydrothermal effluent from an island arc caldera was

  2. Hydrothermal stability of silica, hybrid silica and Zr-doped hybrid silica membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Hove, Marcel; Luiten-Olieman, Mieke W.J.; Huiskes, Cindy; Nijmeijer, Arian; Winnubst, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid silica membranes have demonstrated to possess a remarkable hydrothermal stability in pervaporation and gas separation processes allowing them to be used in industrial applications. In several publications the hydrothermal stability of pure silica or that of hybrid silica membranes are

  3. Hydrothermal activity, functional diversity and chemoautotrophy are major drivers of seafloor carbon cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bell, J.B.; Woulds, C.; van Oevelen, D.

    2017-01-01

    Hydrothermal vents are highly dynamic ecosystems and are unusually energy rich in the deep-sea. Insitu hydrothermal-based productivity combined with sinking photosynthetic organic matter in a softsedimentsetting creates geochemically diverse environments, which remain poorly studied. Here,we use

  4. Hydrothermal deposition on the Juan de Fuca Ridge over multiple glacial-interglacial cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Kassandra M.; McManus, Jerry F.; Middleton, Jennifer L.; Langmuir, Charles H.; Huybers, Peter J.; Winckler, Gisela; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy

    2017-12-01

    Hydrothermal systems play an important role in modern marine chemistry, but little is known about how they may have varied on 100,000 year timescales. Here we present high-resolution records of non-lithogenic metal fluxes within sediment cores covering the last 500,000 years of hydrothermal deposition on the flanks of the Juan de Fuca Ridge. Six adjacent, gridded cores were analyzed by x-ray fluorescence for Fe, Mn, and Cu concentrations, corrected for lithogenic inputs with Ti, and normalized to excess initial 230Th to generate non-lithogenic metal flux records that provide the longest orbitally resolved reconstructions of hydrothermal activity currently available. Fe fluxes vary with global sea level over the last two glacial cycles, suggesting higher hydrothermal deposition during interglacial periods. The observed negative relationship between Fe and Mn indicates variable sediment redox conditions and diagenetic remobilization of sedimentary Mn over time. Thus, Mn fluxes may not be a reliable indicator for hydrothermal activity in the Juan de Fuca Ridge sediment cores. Cu fluxes show substantial high-frequency variability that may be linked to changes in vent temperature related to increased magmatic production during glacial periods. Deglacial hydrothermal peaks on the Juan de Fuca Ridge are consistent with previously published records from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and the East Pacific Rise. Moreover, on the Juan de Fuca Ridge, the deglacial peaks in hydrothermal activity are followed by relatively high hydrothermal fluxes throughout the ensuing interglacial periods relative to the previous glacial period.

  5. Geochemical characteristics of hydrothermal sediments from Iheya North Knoll in the Okinawa Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Qiannan; Zhang, Xin; Jiang, Fuqing; Wang, Bing; Luan, Zhendong; Chen, Chang'an; Yan, Jun

    2017-07-01

    Thirty sediment subsamples were recovered from the Iheya North hydrothermal field (with an average of 38 m away from the hydrothermal vent) in the middle Okinawa Trough. Samples were obtained by the ROV (Remote Operated Vehicle) Faxian during the virgin cruise of the R/V Kexue in 2014 with the application of push cores. The chemical compositions of the sediments show that the hydrothermal sediments near the hydrothermal vent are mainly composed of SO3, ZnO and Fe2O3. Moreover, the hydrothermal sediments are also highly enriched in Pb, As, Sb, Hg, Se, Ag, Ba, Mo and Cd comparing with previous analysis results. On the other hand, the concentrations of Sr, Hg and Ag in studied sediments are strongly and positively correlated, these elements can be used as an hydrothermal indicator. In addition, a factor analysis of the sediments suggested that the sediments were mainly influenced by hydrothermal origin, and terrestrial and biogenic input are limited in studied area. It is also suggested that different stages of crystallization were involved in the formation of hydrothermal chimney from factor analysis.

  6. An integrated biohydrogen refinery: Synergy of photofermentation, extractive fermentation and hydrothermal hydrolysis of food wastes

    OpenAIRE

    Redwood, Mark D.; Orozco, Rafael L.; Majewski, Artur J.; Macaskie, Lynne E

    2012-01-01

    An Integrated Biohydrogen Refinery (IBHR) and experimental net energy analysis are reported. The IBHR converts biomass to electricity using hydrothermal hydrolysis, extractive biohydrogen fermentation and photobiological hydrogen fermentation for electricity generation in a fuel cell. An extractive fermentation, developed previously, is applied to waste-derived substrates following hydrothermal pre treatment, achieving 83 99% biowaste destruction. The selective separation of organic acids fro...

  7. Role of triton X-100 and hydrothermal treatment on the morphological features of nanoporous hydroxyapatite nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iyyappan, E.; Wilson, P., E-mail: catwils@gmail.com; Sheela, K.; Ramya, R.

    2016-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) particles were synthesized using Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·4H{sub 2}O and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}HPO{sub 4} as precursors with varying contents of non-ionic surfactant viz., triton X-100 (organic modifier) via co-precipitation method followed by hydrothermal treatment. The prepared HA particles have been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis (EDX), High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM), High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) and Nitrogen adsorption–desorption experiments. The XRD and FTIR studies indicate the formation of HA phase in all the synthesized samples. The specific roles of triton X-100 and hydrothermal treatment in dispersing and in directing the crystal growth respectively have been discussed by comparing the observations from individual experiments using triton X-100 and hydrothermal treatment with that of combined protocol involving both. The plausible mechanism for the individual roles of both triton X-100 and hydrothermal treatment have been proposed. - Highlights: • Nanoporous HA nanorods are synthesized via triton X-100 assisted hydrothermal treatment. • Triton X-100 hinder the agglomeration of HA primary particles • Hydrothermal treatment increase the aspect ratio of the HA particles • Oriented attachment of HA particles occurs under hydrothermal treatment facilitated by triton X-100 stabilized HA collides • The percentage of mesopore volume is higher for hydrothermally treated samples.

  8. Fabrication of Mineralized Collagen from Bovine Waste Materials by Hydrothermal Method as Promised Biomaterials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheikh, Faheem A.; Kanjwal, Muzafar Ahmed; Macossay, Javier

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to produce mineralized-collagen by hydrothermal process. A simple method not depending on additional foreign chemicals has been employed to isolate the mineralized-collagen fibers from bovine waste. The process of extraction involves the use of hydrothermal method f...

  9. Photocatalysis of WO3 Nanoplates Synthesized by Conventional-Hydrothermal and Microwave-Hydrothermal Methods and of Commercial WO3 Nanorods

    OpenAIRE

    Jarupat Sungpanich; Titipun Thongtem; Somchai Thongtem

    2014-01-01

    The degradation of methylene blue (MB) dye by tungsten oxide (WO3) photocatalyst synthesized by the 200°C conventional-hydrothermal (C-H) and 270 W microwave-hydrothermal (M-H) methods and commercial WO3 was studied under UV light irradiation for 360 min. The photocatalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectrophotometry, and UV visible spectroscop...

  10. Off-axis Hydrothermal Activity on the East Pacific Rise near 9 28N, Faulted and Topographic Control of Hydrothermal Discharge?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, K. C.; Haymon, R. M.; Blasius, J.; Benjamin, S.

    2002-12-01

    In May 2002 during two ALVIN dives, we mapped over 100 sediment mounts which appear to be hydrothermal in origin. We also measured diffuse hydrothermal flow characterized by 150-200 millidegree anomalies along the face of a large fault scarp. This hydrothermal area occurs 25-28 km west of the spreading axis. While off-axis hydrothermal activity had been documented at slow- and intermediate-rate spreading centers, it had been oddly undocumented at fast-spreading centers. The hydrothermal field occurs on a large abyssal hill, bounded by the longest (>20 km) and highest (>200 m) fault scarp within a large area (typical scarp heights on the EPR are pattern of hydrothermal circulation on the northern Juan de Fuca Ridge (Johnson et al 93). Our findings are also consistent with the modeling work of Lowell (1980). Most of the mounds lie at the margins of crater-like depressions in the sediments, approximately 1 m across, and appear to contain ejected chunks of sediment. Eleven sediment push cores were collected in the mounds, within the craters, and in ambient surrounding sediments . Chemical and mineralogical analyses of the cores will provide more information about how and why these apparent hydrothermal "blow out" features have formed (see Haymon et al., this meeting). Temperature gradients were measured in the sediments, and these measurements showed that there is a significant flux of heat from the top of the abyssal hill (approximately 1W/m2). Other samples collected during the dives include 3 "slurp" samples of mossy material on the fault scarp, and rock samples with moss-covered surfaces. This ubiquitous material is probably bacterial in origin, its growth perhaps enhanced by diffuse hydrothermal flow along the fault scarp.

  11. Study of Biogas Production Rate from Water Hyacinth by Hydrothermal Pretreatment with Buffalo Dung as a Starter

    OpenAIRE

    Teguh Kurniawan; Yuhelsa Putra; Dewi Murni

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we report the effects of hydrothermal pretreatment on biogas enhancement production rates from water hyacinth mixed with buffalo dung. The focus of the experiment was on the time of hydrothermal pretreatment and the ratio of water hyacinth with buffalo dung. The hydrothermal pretreated substrates were characterized by TDS, BOD and pH. The hydrothermal pretreatment of 60 minutes with the ratio of water hyacinth to buffalo dung 1:2 showed the highest biogas production rate at 7889...

  12. Hydrothermal growth of fine magnetite and ferrite crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrappa, Shayan; Vicas, C. S.; Dhanaraj, Neel; Namratha, K.; Keerthana, S. D.; Dey, Ravi; Byrappa, K.

    2016-10-01

    In the present work, magnetite (Fe3O4, avg. 70 nm) synthesis employing Azadirachta indica (neem) leaf extract is reported originally using hydrothermal conditions and the results obtained were compared with that of D-glucose. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirms the presence of polysaccharides and proteins in the extract which act as both surfactants and reducing agents, aided the formation of magnetite nanostructures. Authors also reported the selective doping of Zn, Cu and Co on nickel ferrite for the enhancement of adsorptive dye removal property, adopting and investigating the use of eloquent one-step green hydrothermal approach (T=180 °C, t=4 h, pH=12) with sodium dodecyl sulfate as surfactant. X-ray diffraction studies reveal that all the materials synthesized are isometric spinel structures and furthermore, morphological evidences using scanning electron microscopy are accounted. Adsorptive dye removal ability of synthesized materials was investigated using trypan blue as a probe. It was evident from the results that magnetite using neem extract showed enhanced adsorption ability (75%) than that of D-glucose (62%). Also, exponential increase in dye removal efficiency from 55% to 81% due to the presence of copper in nickel ferrite was duly noted.

  13. Hydrothermal Processing of Macroalgal Feedstocks in Continuous-Flow Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Roesijadi, Guri; Zacher, Alan H.; Magnuson, Jon K.

    2014-02-03

    Wet macroalgal slurries have been converted into a biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) in a bench-scale continuous-flow reactor system. Carbon conversion to a gravity-separable oil product of 58.8% was accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 °C) in a pressurized (subcritical liquid water) environment (20 MPa) when using feedstock slurries with a 21.7% concentration of dry solids. As opposed to earlier work in batch reactors reported by others, direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent, and biomass trace mineral components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties. In addition, catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG) was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup and fuel gas production from water-soluble organics. Conversion of 99.2% of the carbon left in the aqueous phase was demonstrated. Finally, as a result, high conversion of macroalgae to liquid and gas fuel products was found with low levels of residual organic contamination in byproduct water. Both process steps were accomplished in continuous-flow reactor systems such that design data for process scale-up was generated.

  14. Cool seafloor hydrothermal springs reveal global geochemical fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, C. Geoffrey; Fisher, Andrew T.; McManus, James; Hulme, Samuel M.; Orcutt, Beth N.

    2017-10-01

    We present geochemical data from the first samples of spring fluids from Dorado Outcrop, a basaltic edifice on 23 M.y. old seafloor of the Cocos Plate, eastern Pacific Ocean. These samples were collected from the discharge of a cool hydrothermal system (CHS) on a ridge flank, where typical reaction temperatures in the volcanic crust are low (2-20 °C) and fluid residence times are short. Ridge-flank hydrothermal systems extract 25% of Earth's lithospheric heat, with a global discharge rate equivalent to that of Earth's river discharge to the ocean; CHSs comprise a significant fraction of this global flow. Upper crustal temperatures around Dorado Outcrop are ∼15 °C, the calculated residence time is concentrations in spring fluids are indistinguishable from those of bottom seawater; however, concentrations of Rb, Mo, V, U, Mg, phosphate, Si and Li are different. Applying these observed differences to calculated global CHS fluxes results in chemical fluxes for these ions that are ≥15% of riverine fluxes. Fluxes of K and B also may be significant, but better analytical resolution is required to confirm this result. Spring fluids also have ∼50% less dissolved oxygen (DO) than bottom seawater. Calculations of an analytical model suggest that the loss of DO occurs primarily (>80%) within the upper basaltic crust by biotic and/or abiotic consumption. This calculation demonstrates that permeable pathways within the upper crust can support oxic water-rock interactions for millions of years.

  15. Ethanol Production from Hydrothermally-Treated Biomass from West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bensah, Edem C.; Kádár, Zsófia; Mensah, Moses Y.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the abundance of diverse biomass resources in Africa, they have received little research and development focus. This study presents compositional analysis, sugar, and ethanol yields of hydrothermal pretreated (195 degrees C, 10 min) biomass from West Africa, including bamboo wood, rubber .......26 g/100 g TS). All other local biomass types studied exhibited sugar and ethanol yields below 33% and 35% of the theoretical maximum, respectively. Thus, elephant grass is a highly promising biomass source for ethanol production in Africa.......Despite the abundance of diverse biomass resources in Africa, they have received little research and development focus. This study presents compositional analysis, sugar, and ethanol yields of hydrothermal pretreated (195 degrees C, 10 min) biomass from West Africa, including bamboo wood, rubber...... wood, elephant grass, Siam weed, and coconut husk, benchmarked against those of wheat straw. The elephant grass exhibited the highest glucose and ethanol yields at 57.8% and 65.1% of the theoretical maximums, respectively. The results show that the glucose yield of pretreated elephant grass was 3...

  16. Anaerobic digestion of yard waste with hydrothermal pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wangliang; Zhang, Guangyi; Zhang, Zhikai; Xu, Guangwen

    2014-03-01

    The digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass is limited by its high content of refractory components. The objective of this study is to investigate hydrothermal pretreatment and its effects on anaerobic digestion of sorted organic waste with submerged fermentation. Hydrothermal pretreatment (HT) was performed prior to anaerobic digestion, and three agents were examined for the HT: hot compressed water, alkaline solution, and acidic solution. The concentrations of glucose and xylose were the highest in the sample pretreated in acidic solution. Compared with that of the untreated sample, the biogas yields from digesting the samples pretreated in alkaline solution, acidic solution, and hot water increased by 364, 107, and 79%, respectively. The decrease of chemical oxygen demand (COD) in liquid phase followed the same order as for the biogas yield. The initial ammonia content of the treated samples followed the order sample treated in acidic solution > sample treated in alkaline solution > sample treated in hot water. The concentrations of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were low, indicating that the anaerobic digestion process was running at continuously stable conditions.

  17. Subcritical water as reaction environment: fundamentals of hydrothermal biomass transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Maria; Nilges, Peter; Harnisch, Falk; Schröder, Uwe

    2011-05-23

    Subcritical water, that is, water above the boiling and below critical point, is a unique and sustainable reaction medium. Based on its solvent properties, in combination with the often considerable intrinsic water content of natural biomass, it is often considered as a potential solvent for biomass processing. Current knowledge on biomass transformation in subcritical water is, however, still rather scattered without providing a consistent picture. Concentrating on fundamental physical and chemical aspects, this review summarizes the current state of knowledge of hydrothermal biomass conversion in subcritical water. After briefly introducing subcritical water as a reaction medium, its advantages for biomass processing compared to other thermal processes are highlighted. Subsequently, the physical-chemical properties of subcritical water are discussed in the light of their impact on the occurring chemical reactions. The influence of major operational parameters, including temperature, pressure, and reactant concentration on hydrothermal biomass transformation processes are illustrated for selected carbohydrates. Major emphasis is put on the nature of the carbohydrate monomers, since the conversion of the respective polymers is analogous with the additional prior step of hydrolytic depolymerization. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Indigenous ectosymbiotic bacteria associated with diverse hydrothermal vent invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffredi, Shana K

    2010-08-01

    Symbioses involving bacteria and invertebrates contribute to the biological diversity and high productivity of both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Well-known examples from chemosynthetic deep-sea hydrothermal vent environments involve ectosymbiotic microbes associated with the external surfaces of marine invertebrates. Some of these ectosymbioses confer protection or defence from predators or the environment itself, some are nutritional in nature, and many still are of unknown function. Several recently discovered hydrothermal vent invertebrates, including two populations of yeti crab (Kiwa spp.), a limpet (Symmetromphalus aff. hageni), and the scaly-foot snail (as yet undescribed), support a consortium of diverse bacteria. Comparisons of these ectosymbioses to those previously described revealed similarities among the associated microorganisms, suggesting that certain microbes are indigenous to the surfaces of marine invertebrates. In particular, members of the Thiovulgaceae (epsilonproteobacteria) and Thiotrichaceae (gammaproteobacteria) appear to preferentially form ectosymbioses with vent crustaceans and gastropods. Interactions between specific Proteobacteria and the surfaces of many marine invertebrates likely have ecological and evolutionary significance at these chemically challenging habitats. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Calcium Deficient Hydroxyapatite for Medical Application Prepared by Hydrothermal Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioku, Koji; Kamitakahara, Masanobu; Ikeda, Tohru

    2010-11-01

    Hydrothermal processing plays a key role in the synthesis of biomaterials with excellent biocompatibility in the physiological environment. Especially, calcium phosphates are paid to much attention for the regenerative medicine. Two kinds of porous materials of hydroxyapatite with 70% porosity were prepared. One of them is a newly developed calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite composed of rod-shaped particles of about 20 μm in length synthesized hydrothermally (HHA) and the other one is the stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (SHA) prepared by the conventional sintering method. These materials were used for animal implantation tests to compare these biological responses. In the rabbit femur, implanted HHA was slowly resorbed and then most of the implanted HHA was resorbed after 72 weeks. The implanted SHA was unresorbed throughout the experimental period. The volume of newly formed bone and the number of osteoclasts in the implanted region were significantly larger in HHA than in SHA after 24 weeks. Results in the present research suggested that the activity of osteoclasts correlated to the bone forming activity of osteoblasts. The method to synthesize biodegradable pure calcium-deficient HA is expected to provide adequate biodegradability and bone replaceability.

  20. Reaction kinetics of the hydrothermal treatment of lignin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Huang, Hua-Jiang; Ramaswamy, Shri

    2008-03-01

    Lignins derived from abundant and renewable resources are nontoxic and extremely versatile in performance, qualities that have made them increasingly important in many industrial applications. We have shown recently that liquefaction of lignin extracted from aspen wood resulted in a 90% yield of liquid. In this paper, the hydrothermal treatment of five types of lignin and biomass residues was studied: Kraft pine lignin provided by MeadWestvaco, Kraft pine lignin from Sigma-Aldrich, organosolv lignin extracted from oat hull, the residues of mixed southern hardwoods, and switchgrass after hydrolysis. The yields were found dependent on the composition or structure of the raw materials, which may result from different pretreatment processes. We propose a kinetic model to describe the hydrothermal treatment of Kraft pine lignin and compare it with another model from the literature. The kinetic parameters of the presented model were estimated, including the reaction constants, the pre-exponential factor, and the activation energy of the Arrhenius equations. Results show that the presented model is well in agreement with the experiments.

  1. Hydrothermally grown ZnO nanoparticles for effective photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumaresan, N.; Ramamurthi, K.; Ramesh Babu, R.; Sethuraman, K.; Moorthy Babu, S.

    2017-10-01

    ZnO nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal method from the source materials of zinc chloride and ammonium hydroxide. Precursor solution pH was varied to 7, 9, 11 and 13 by the addition of ammonium solution and the solution was hydrothermally treated at 150 °C for 3 h. Further prepared samples were annealed at 400° C for 3 h. X-ray diffraction technique was employed to study the structure and crystalline nature of synthesized nanoparticles. Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy studies revealed that optical band gap of ZnO is slightly varied due to the effect of size of the particle. Field emission scanning electron microscope images showed that the prepared ZnO nanoparticles acquired spindle like nanorods, hexagonal disk, porous nanorods and nanoflower structures due to the effect of pH of the precursor solution. Photocatlytic activity of the prepared ZnO nanoparticles was evaluated for Rhodamine B (RhB) dye which showed 94% of