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Sample records for hydrophobic surfactant protein

  1. Expression profiles of hydrophobic surfactant proteins in children with diffuse chronic lung disease

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    Guttentag Susan

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormalities of the intracellular metabolism of the hydrophobic surfactant proteins SP-B and SP-C and their precursors may be causally linked to chronic childhood diffuse lung diseases. The profile of these proteins in the alveolar space is unknown in such subjects. Methods We analyzed bronchoalveolar lavage fluid by Western blotting for SP-B, SP-C and their proforms in children with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP, n = 15, children with no SP-B (n = 6, children with chronic respiratory distress of unknown cause (cRD, n = 7, in comparison to children without lung disease (n = 15 or chronic obstructive bronchitis (n = 19. Results Pro-SP-B of 25–26 kD was commonly abundant in all groups of subjects, suggesting that their presence is not of diagnostic value for processing defects. In contrast, pro-SP-B peptides cleaved off during intracellular processing of SP-B and smaller than 19–21 kD, were exclusively found in PAP and cRD. In 4 of 6 children with no SP-B, mutations of SFTPB or SPTPC genes were found. Pro-SP-C forms were identified at very low frequency. Their presence was clearly, but not exclusively associated with mutations of the SFTPB and SPTPC genes, impeding their usage as candidates for diagnostic screening. Conclusion Immuno-analysis of the hydrophobic surfactant proteins and their precursor forms in bronchoalveolar lavage is minimally invasive and can give valuable clues for the involvement of processing abnormalities in pediatric pulmonary disorders.

  2. Protein-surfactant interactions at hydrophobic interfaces studied with total internal reflection fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR-FCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonesson, Andreas W; Blom, Hans; Hassler, Kai; Elofsson, Ulla M; Callisen, Thomas H; Widengren, Jerker; Brismar, Hjalmar

    2008-01-15

    The aim of this work was to study the dynamics of proteins near solid surfaces in the presence or absence of competing surfactants by means of total internal reflection fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR-FCS). Two different proteins were studied, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (TLL). A nonionic/anionic (C12E6/LAS) surfactant composition was used to mimic a detergent formulation and the surfaces used were C18 terminated glass. It was found that with increasing surfactant concentrations the term in the autocorrelation function (ACF) representing surface binding decreased. This suggested that the proteins were competed off the hydrophobic surface by the surfactant. When fitting the measured ACF to a model for surface kinetics, it was seen that with raised C12E6/LAS concentration, the surface interaction rate increased for both proteins. Under these experimental conditions this meant that the time the protein was bound to the surface decreased. At 10 microM C12E6/LAS the surface interaction was not visible for BSA, whereas it was still distinguishable in the ACF for TLL. This indicated that TLL had a higher affinity than BSA for the C18 surface. The study showed that TIR-FCS provides a useful tool to quantify the surfactant effect on proteins adsorption.

  3. Solubilization of Hydrophobic Dyes in Surfactant Solutions

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    Ali Reza Tehrani-Bagha

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the use of surfactants for solubilization of hydrophobic organic dyes (mainly solvent and disperse dyes has been reviewed. The effect of parameters such as the chemical structures of the surfactant and the dye, addition of salt and of polyelectrolytes, pH, and temperature on dye solubilization has been discussed. Surfactant self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution and below the concentration where this occurs—the critical micelle concentration (CMC—there is no solubilization. Above the CMC, the amount of solubilized dye increases linearly with the increase in surfactant concentration. It is demonstrated that different surfactants work best for different dyes. In general, nonionic surfactants have higher solubilization power than anionic and cationic surfactants. It is likely that the reason for the good performance of nonionic surfactants is that they allow dyes to be accommodated not only in the inner, hydrocarbon part of the micelle but also in the headgroup shell. It is demonstrated that the location of a dye in a surfactant micelle can be assessed from the absorption spectrum of the dye-containing micellar solution.

  4. BINDING ISOTHERMS SURFACTANT-PROTEINS

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    Elena Irina Moater

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The interactions between surfactants and proteins shows some similarities with interactions between surfactants and polymers, but the hydrophobic amphoteric nature of proteins and their secondary and tertiary structure components make them different from conventional polymer systems. Many studies from the past about surfactant - proteins bonding used the dialysis techniques. Other techniques used to determine the binding isotherm, included ultrafiltration, ultracentrifugation, potentiometry, ion-selective electrode method and surface tension. High affinity isotherms which are typical of an anionic surfactant - protein bonding, exhibit an initial increase steep followed by a slow growth region and then a vertical growth above a certain concentration. This isotherm is typical of ionic surfactant to protein binding. Often the high affinity initial bond appears at very low concentrations of surfactant and therefore in some protein-surfactant systems, the exact shape of the isotherm in this region may be missing. The surfactant - protein binding is influenced by a number of variables such as the nature and chain length of surfactant, pH, ionic strength, temperature, nature of this protein and additives.

  5. Biomimicry of surfactant protein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nathan J; Johansson, Jan; Barron, Annelise E

    2008-10-01

    Since the widespread use of exogenous lung surfactant to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, premature infant survival and respiratory morbidity have dramatically improved. Despite the effectiveness of the animal-derived surfactant preparations, there still remain some concerns and difficulties associated with their use. This has prompted investigation into the creation of synthetic surfactant preparations. However, to date, no clinically used synthetic formulation is as effective as the natural material. This is largely because the previous synthetic formulations lacked analogues of the hydrophobic proteins of the lung surfactant system, SP-B and SP-C, which are critical functional constituents. As a result, recent investigation has turned toward the development of a new generation of synthetic, biomimetic surfactants that contain synthetic phospholipids along with a mimic of the hydrophobic protein portion of lung surfactant. In this Account, we detail our efforts in creating accurate mimics of SP-C for use in a synthetic surfactant replacement therapy. Despite SP-C's seemingly simple structure, the predominantly helical protein is extraordinarily challenging to work with given its extreme hydrophobicity and structural instability, which greatly complicates the creation of an effective SP-C analogue. Drawing inspiration from Nature, two promising biomimetic approaches have led to the creation of rationally designed biopolymers that recapitulate many of SP-C's molecular features. The first approach utilizes detailed SP-C structure-activity relationships and amino acid folding propensities to create a peptide-based analogue, SP-C33. In SP-C33, the problematic and metastable polyvaline helix is replaced with a structurally stable polyleucine helix and includes a well-placed positive charge to prevent aggregation. SP-C33 is structurally stable and eliminates the association propensity of the native protein. The second approach follows the same design

  6. Interaction of Fluorocarbon Containing Hydrophobically Modified Polyelectrolyte with Nonionic Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO,Jin-Feng(郭金峰); ZHUANG,Dong-Qing(庄东青); ZHOU,Hui(周晖); ZHANG,Yun-Xiang(章云祥)

    2002-01-01

    The interaction of fluorocarbon containing hydrophobically modified polyelectrolyte (FMPAANa) with two kinds of nonionic surfactants (hydrogenated and fluorinated) in a semidilute (0.5 wt% ) aqueous solution had been studied by rheological measurements. Association behavior was found in both systems. The hydrophobic interaction of FMPAANa with fluorinated surfactant (FC171) is much stronger than that with hydrogenated surfactant (NP7.5) at low surfactant concentrations. The interaction is strengthened by surfactants being added for the density of active junctions increased. Whereas distinct phenomena for FC171 and NP7. 5 start to be found as the surfactants added over their respective certain concentration. The interaction of polyelectrolyte with fluorinated surfactant increases dramatical ly while that with hydrogenated surfactant decreases.

  7. Structural study of surfactant-dependent interaction with protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K., E-mail: vkaswal@barc.gov.in [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, Joachim [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-06-24

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the complex structure of anionic BSA protein with three different (cationic DTAB, anionic SDS and non-ionic C12E10) surfactants. These systems form very different surfactant-dependent complexes. We show that the structure of protein-surfactant complex is initiated by the site-specific electrostatic interaction between the components, followed by the hydrophobic interaction at high surfactant concentrations. It is also found that hydrophobic interaction is preferred over the electrostatic interaction in deciding the resultant structure of protein-surfactant complexes.

  8. Modification of Deeply Buried Hydrophobic Interfaces by Ionic Surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L Tamam; D Pontoni Z Sapir; S Yefet; S Sloutskin; B Ocko; H Reichert; M Deutsch

    2011-12-31

    Hydrophobicity, the spontaneous segregation of oil and water, can be modified by surfactants. The way this modification occurs is studied at the oil-water interface for a range of alkanes and two ionic surfactants. A liquid interfacial monolayer, consisting of a mixture of alkane molecules and surfactant tails, is found. Upon cooling, it freezes at T{sub s}, well above the alkane's bulk freezing temperature, T{sub b}. The monolayer's phase diagram, derived by surface tensiometry, is accounted for by a mixtures-based theory. The monolayer's structure is measured by high-energy X-ray reflectivity above and below T{sub s}. A solid-solid transition in the frozen monolayer, occurring approximately 3 C below T{sub s}, is discovered and tentatively suggested to be a rotator-to-crystal transition.

  9. Hydrophobic patches on protein surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijnzaad, P.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrophobicity is a prime determinant of the structure and function of proteins. It is the driving force behind the folding of soluble proteins, and when exposed on the surface, it is frequently involved in recognition and binding of ligands and other proteins. The energetic cost of exposing hydroph

  10. Surfactant Facilitated Spreading of Aqueous Drops on Hydrophobic Surfaces

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    Kumar, Nitin; Couzis, Alex; Maldareili, Charles; Singh, Bhim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Microgravity technologies often require aqueous phases to spread over nonwetting hydrophobic solid surfaces. Surfactants facilitate the wetting of water on hydrophobic surfaces by adsorbing on the water/air and hydrophobic solid/water interfaces and lowering the surface tensions of these interfaces. The tension reductions decrease the contact angle, which increases the equilibrium wetted area. Hydrocarbon surfactants; (i.e., amphiphiles with a hydrophobic moiety consisting of an extended chain of (aliphatic) methylene -CH2- groups attached to a large polar group to give aqueous solubility) are capable of reducing the contact angles on surfaces which are not very hydrophobic, but do not reduce significantly the contact angles of the very hydrophobic surfaces such as parafilm, polyethylene or self assembled monolayers. Trisiloxane surfactants (amphiphiles with a hydrophobe consisting of methyl groups linked to a trisiloxane backbone in the form of a disk ((CH3)3-Si-O-Si-O-Si(CH3)3) and an extended ethoxylate (-(OCH2CH2)a-) polar group in the form of a chain with four or eight units) can significantly reduce the contact angle of water on a very hydrophobic surface and cause rapid and complete (or nearly complete) spreading (termed superspreading). The overall goal of the research described in this proposal is to establish and verify a theory for how trisiloxanes cause superspreading, and then use this knowledge as a guide to developing more general hydrocarbon based surfactant systems which superspread. We propose that the trisiloxane surfactants superspread because their structure allows them to strongly lower the high hydrophobic solid/aqueous tension when they adsorb to the solid surface. When the siloxane adsorbs, the hydrophobic disk parts of the molecule adsorb onto the surface removing the surface water. Since the cross-sectional area of the disk is larger than that of the extended ethoxylate chain, the disks can form a space-filling mat on the surface which

  11. Surfactant-soil interactions during surfactant-amended remediation of contaminated soils by hydrophobic organic compounds: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laha, Shonali; Tansel, Berrin; Ussawarujikulchai, Achara

    2009-01-01

    Surfactants are amphiphilic molecules that reduce aqueous surface tension and increase the solubility of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs). Surfactant-amended remediation of HOC-contaminated soils and aquifers has received significant attention as an effective treatment strategy - similar in concept to using soaps and detergents as washing agents to remove grease from soiled fabrics. The proposed mechanisms involved in surfactant-amended remediation include: lowering of interfacial tension, surfactant solubilization of HOCs, and the phase transfer of HOC from soil-sorbed to pseudo-aqueous phase. However, as with any proposed chemical countermeasures, there is a concern regarding the fate of the added surfactant. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding nonionic micelle-forming surfactant sorption onto soil, and serves as an introduction to research on that topic. Surfactant sorption onto soil appears to increase with increasing surfactant concentration until the onset of micellization. Sorbed-phase surfactant may account for the majority of added surfactant in surfactant-amended remediation applications, and this may result in increased HOC partitioning onto soil until HOC solubilization by micellar phase surfactant successfully competes with increased HOC sorption on surfactant-modified soil. This review provides discussion of equilibrium partitioning theory to account for the distribution of HOCs between soil, aqueous phase, sorbed surfactant, and micellar surfactant phases, as well as recently developed models for surfactant sorption onto soil. HOC partitioning is characterized by apparent soil-water distribution coefficients in the presence of surfactant.

  12. Hydrophobically Modified Polyelectrolytes: V. Interaction of Fluorocarbon Modified Poly (acrylic acid) with Various Added Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU,Hui(周晖); SONG,Guo-Qaiang(宋国强); GUO,Jin-Feng(郭金峰); ZHANG,Yun-xiang (章云祥); DIEING,Reinhold; MA,Lian(马莲); HAEUSSLING,Lukas

    2001-01-01

    The interactions between fiuorocarbon-medified pol(sodium acrylate) and various kinds of added surfactant have been studied by means of viscometric measurement. Association behavior was found in both hydrogenated and fluorinated anionic, nonionic and cationic surfactants. Among them, the interactions between fluorocarbon-modified poly ( sodium acrylate) and cationic surfactants are the strongest, owing to the cooperation of both electrostatic attractions and hydrophobic associations. The anionic surfactants have the weakest effects on the solution properties because of the existence of unfavorable electrostatic repulsion. The hydrophobic interactions between copolymers and fluorinated surfactants are much stronger than those between copolymers and hydrogenated surfactants.

  13. Interaction of bovine serum albumin with N-acyl amino acid based anionic surfactants: Effect of head-group hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Subhajit; Dey, Joykrishna

    2015-11-15

    The function of a protein depends upon its structure and surfactant molecules are known to alter protein structure. For this reason protein-surfactant interaction is important in biological, pharmaceutical, and cosmetic industries. In the present work, interactions of a series of anionic surfactants having the same hydrocarbon chain length, but different amino acid head group, such as l-alanine, l-valine, l-leucine, and l-phenylalanine with the transport protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA), were studied at low surfactant concentrations using fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The results of fluorescence measurements suggest that the surfactant molecules bind simultaneously to the drug binding site I and II of the protein subdomain IIA and IIIA, respectively. The fluorescence as well as CD spectra suggest that the conformation of BSA goes to a more structured state upon surfactant binding at low concentrations. The binding constants of the surfactants were determined by the use of fluorescence as well as ITC measurements and were compared with that of the corresponding glycine-derived surfactant. The binding constant values clearly indicate a significant head-group effect on the BSA-surfactant interaction and the interaction is mainly hydrophobic in nature.

  14. Surface hydrophobization by electrostatic deposition of hydrophobically modified poly(acrylates) and their complexes with surfactants

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    Gîfu, Ioana Cătălina; Maxim, Monica Elisabeta; Iovescu, Alina; Simion, Elena Livia; Aricov, Ludmila; Anastasescu, Mihai; Munteanu, Cornel; Anghel, Dan-Florin

    2016-05-01

    The present study demonstrates the hydrophobic effect of poly(electrolyte) multilayer films when they are alkyl-grafted and complexed or not with surfactants. For this purpose, sodium hydrophobically modified poly(acrylates) (PACnNa, n = 10, 18) or their anionic complexes with alkyltrimethylammonium bromides (CxTAB, x = 10, 12, 14, 18), and the cationic poly(diallyldimethyldiammonium chloride) (PDDAMAC) are assembled by layer-by-layer deposition on a glass substrate. Contact angle (CA) measurements reveal that films constructed with PACnNa-CxTAB/PDADMAC are superior water repellants than those of PACnNa/PDADMAC. For example, the highest CA is obtained for the PAC18Na-C18TAB/PDADMAC. Moreover, it has been observed that the CA increases with the alkyl chain length of PACnNa and of surfactant. The film roughness and thickness have the same trend as wettability. Thinner and less coarse films are obtained by NaCl addition, as witnessed by SEM and AFM.

  15. Surfactant phospholipids and proteins in lung defence%肺防御系统中的表面磷脂酶和蛋白

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haagsman HP; Herias V; van Eijk M

    2003-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant comprises two hydrophobic proteins SP-B and SP-C, which are important forthe adsorption and spreading of the surfactant film at the air-liquid interface. Besides the hydrophobic proteins two other surfactant proteins have been described: SP-A and SP-D. These proteins are members of a family

  16. Understanding the mutual impact of interaction between hydrophobic nanoparticles and pulmonary surfactant monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachan, Amit K; Galla, Hans-Joachim

    2014-03-26

    Interaction between hydrophobic nanoparticles (NPs) and a pulmonary surfactant (PS) film leads to a shift in molecular packing of surfactant molecules in the PS film around the interacting NPs. The resultant structural arrangement of surfactants around the NPs may be a potential structural factor responsible for their high retention ability within the film. Moreover, during this interaction, surfactant molecules coat the NPs and change their surface properties.

  17. Spontaneous surface self-assembly in protein-surfactant mixtures: interactions between hydrophobin and ethoxylated polysorbate surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Ian M; Petkov, Jordan T; Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun; Cox, Andrew R; Hedges, Nick; Webster, John R P

    2014-05-01

    The synergistic interactions between certain ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactants and the protein hydrophobin result in spontaneous self-assembly at the air-water interface to form layered surface structures. The surface structures are characterized using neutron reflectivity. The formation of the layered surface structures is promoted by the hydrophobic interaction between the polysorbate alkyl chain and the hydrophobic patch on the surface of the globular hydrophobin and the interaction between the ethoxylated sorbitan headgroup and hydrophilic regions of the protein. The range of the ethoxylated polysorbate concentrations over which the surface ordering occurs is a maximum for the more hydrophobic surfactant polyoxyethylene(8) sorbitan monostearate. The structures at the air-water interface are accompanied by a profound change in the wetting properties of the solution on hydrophobic substrates. In the absence of the polysorbate surfactant, hydrophobin wets a hydrophobic surface, whereas the hydrophobin/ethoxylated polysorbate mixtures where multilayer formation occurs result in a significant dewetting of hydrophobic surfaces. The spontaneous surface self-assembly for hydrophobin/ethoxylated polysorbate surfactant mixtures and the changes in surface wetting properties provide a different insight into protein-surfactant interactions and potential for manipulating surface and interfacial properties and protein surface behavior.

  18. Switchable Pickering emulsions stabilized by silica nanoparticles hydrophobized in situ with a conventional cationic surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yue; Jiang, Jianzhong; Liu, Kaihong; Cui, Zhenggang; Binks, Bernard P

    2015-03-24

    A stable oil-in-water Pickering emulsion stabilized by negatively charged silica nanoparticles hydrophobized in situ with a trace amount of a conventional cationic surfactant can be rendered unstable on addition of an equimolar amount of an anionic surfactant. The emulsion can be subsequently restabilized by adding a similar trace amount of cationic surfactant along with rehomogenization. This destabilization-stabilization behavior can be cycled many times, demonstrating that the Pickering emulsion is switchable. The trigger is the stronger electrostatic interaction between the oppositely charged ionic surfactants compared with that between the cationic surfactant and the (initially) negatively charged particle surfaces. The cationic surfactant prefers to form ion pairs with the added anionic surfactant and thus desorbs from particle surfaces rendering them surface-inactive. This access to switchable Pickering emulsions is easier than those employing switchable surfactants, polymers, or surface-active particles, avoiding both the complicated synthesis and the stringent switching conditions.

  19. Surfactant-cobalt(III) complexes: The impact of hydrophobicity on interaction with HSA and DNA - insights from experimental and theoretical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeralakshmi, Selvakumar; Sabapathi, Gopal; Nehru, Selvan; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam

    2017-05-01

    To develop surfactant-based metallodrugs, it is very important to know about their hydrophobicity, micelle forming capacity, their interaction with biomacromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids, and biological activities. Here, diethylenetriamine (dien) and tetradecylamine ligand (TA) based surfactant-cobalt(III) complexes with single chain domain, [Co(dien)(TA)Cl2]ClO4 (1) and double chain domain [Co(dien)(TA)2Cl](ClO4)2 (2) were chosen to study the effect of hydrophobicity on the interaction with human serum albumin and calf thymus DNA. The obtained results showed that (i) single chain surfactant-cobalt(III) complex (1) interact with HSA and DNA via electrostatic interaction and groove binding, respectively; (ii) double chain surfactant-cobalt(III) complex (2) interact with HSA and DNA via hydrophobic interaction and partial intercalation, respectively, due to the play of hydrophobicity by single and double chain domains. Further it is noted that, double chain surfactant-cobalt(III) complex interact strongly with HSA and DNA, compared single chain surfactant-cobalt(III) complex due to their more hydrophobicity nature. DFT and molecular docking studies offer insights into the mechanism and mode of binding towards the molecular target CT-DNA and HSA. Hence, the present findings will create new avenue towards the use of hydrophobic metallodrugs for various therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. How fast is protein hydrophobic collapse?

    OpenAIRE

    Sadqi, Mourad; Lapidus, Lisa J.; Muñoz, Victor

    2003-01-01

    One of the most recurring questions in protein folding refers to the interplay between formation of secondary structure and hydrophobic collapse. In contrast with secondary structure, it is hard to isolate hydrophobic collapse from other folding events. We have directly measured the dynamics of protein hydrophobic collapse in the absence of competing processes. Collapse was triggered with laser-induced temperature jumps in the acid-denatured form of a simple protein and monitored by fluoresce...

  1. Hydrophobic, electrostatic, and dynamic polymer forces at silicone surfaces modified with long-chain bolaform surfactants.

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    Rapp, Michael V; Donaldson, Stephen H; Gebbie, Matthew A; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Gizaw, Yonas; Koenig, Peter; Roiter, Yuri; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2015-05-06

    Surfactant self-assembly on surfaces is an effective way to tailor the complex forces at and between hydrophobic-water interfaces. Here, the range of structures and forces that are possible at surfactant-adsorbed hydrophobic surfaces are demonstrated: certain long-chain bolaform surfactants-containing a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) mid-block domain and two cationic α, ω-quarternary ammonium end-groups-readily adsorb onto thin PDMS films and form dynamically fluctuating nanostructures. Through measurements with the surface forces apparatus (SFA), it is found that these soft protruding nanostructures display polymer-like exploration behavior at the PDMS surface and give rise to a long-ranged, temperature- and rate-dependent attractive bridging force (not due to viscous forces) on approach to a hydrophilic bare mica surface. Coulombic interactions between the cationic surfactant end-groups and negatively-charged mica result in a rate-dependent polymer bridging force during separation as the hydrophobic surfactant mid-blocks are pulled out from the PDMS interface, yielding strong adhesion energies. Thus, (i) the versatile array of surfactant structures that may form at hydrophobic surfaces is highlighted, (ii) the need to consider the interaction dynamics of such self-assembled polymer layers is emphasized, and (iii) it is shown that long-chain surfactants can promote robust adhesion in aqueous solutions.

  2. USE OF CATIONIC SURFACTANTS TO MODIFY SOIL SURFACES TO PROMOTE SORPTION AND RETARD MIGRATION OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cationic surfactants can be used to modify surfaces of soils and subsurface materials to promote adsorption of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOC). Batch and column experiments were performed to investigate this phenomenon with the cationic surfactant dodecylpyridinium (DP), a se...

  3. Hydrophobically modified polyelectrolytes : synthesis, properties and interactions with surfactants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwkerk, A.C.

    1998-01-01

    Hydrophobically modified polyelectrolytes can form micelle-like aggregates, so-called microdomains, in aqueous solution. The hydrophobic side chains constitute the apolar inner part of these microdomains and the hydrophilic groups on the polyelectrolyte backbone are at the surface of the

  4. Understanding the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface from molecular level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Liu, Zhipei; Ren, Tao; Wu, Pan; Shen, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xinping

    2014-11-25

    Understanding the behavior of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is crucial for many applications, such as lubricants, paints, cosmetics, and fire-fighting foams. In this study, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were employed to investigate the microscopic properties of non-ionic fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface. Several properties, including the distribution of head groups, the distribution probability of the tilt angle between hydrophobic tails with respect to the xy plane, and the order parameter of surfactants, were computed to probe the structure of hydrophobic surfactants at the air/water interface. The effects of the monomer structure on interfacial phenomena of non-ionic surfactants were investigated as well. It is observed that the structure of fluorocarbon surfactants at the air/water interface is more ordered than that of hydrocarbons, which is dominated by the van der Waals interaction between surfactants and water molecules. However, replacing one or two CF2 with one or two CH2 group does not significantly influence the interfacial structure, suggesting that hydrocarbons may be promising alternatives to perfluorinated surfactants.

  5. Responsive Aqueous Foams Stabilized by Silica Nanoparticles Hydrophobized in Situ with a Conventional Surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yue; Pei, Xiaomei; Jiang, Jianzhong; Cui, Zhenggang; Binks, Bernard P

    2015-12-01

    In the recent past, switchable surfactants and switchable/stimulus-responsive surface-active particles have been of great interest. Both can be transformed between surface-active and surface-inactive states via several triggers, making them recoverable and reusable afterward. However, the synthesis of these materials is complicated. In this paper we report a facile protocol to obtain responsive surface-active nanoparticles and their use in preparing responsive particle-stabilized foams. Hydrophilic silica nanoparticles are initially hydrophobized in situ with a trace amount of a conventional cationic surfactant in water, rendering them surface-active such that they stabilize aqueous foams. The latter can then be destabilized by adding equal moles of an anionic surfactant, and restabilized by adding another trace amount of the cationic surfactant followed by shaking. The stabilization-destabilization of the foams can be cycled many times at room temperature. The trigger is the stronger electrostatic interaction between the oppositely charged surfactants than that between the cationic surfactant and the negatively charged particles. The added anionic surfactant tends to form ion pairs with the cationic surfactant, leading to desorption of the latter from particle surfaces and dehydrophobization of the particles. Upon addition of another trace amount of cationic surfactant, the particles are rehydrophobized in situ and can then stabilize foams again. This principle makes it possible to obtain responsive surface-active particles using commercially available inorganic nanoparticles and conventional surfactants.

  6. Rheological Properties of the Aqueous Solution for Fluorocarbon-containing Hydrophobically Modified Sodium PolyacrylicAcid with Various Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO,Jin-Feng(郭金峰); ZHUANG,Dong-Qing(庄东青); ZHOU,Hui(周晖); ZHANG,Yun-Xiang(章云祥)

    2001-01-01

    The interaction of fluorocarbon-containing hydrophobicallymodified sodiun polyacryiic acid (FMPAANa) (0.5 wt% )with various surfactants (anionic,nonionic and cationic) hasbeen investigated by theological measurements.Different rhe-ological behaviors are displayed for ionic surfactants and non-ionic surfactants.Fluorinated surfactants have stronger affini-ty with polyelectrolyte hydrophobes comparing with hydro-genated surfactants.The hydrophobic association of FM-PAANa with a cationic surfactant (CTAB) and a fluorinatednonionic surfactant (FC171) is much stronger than with anonionic surfactant (NP7.5 ) and an anionic surfactant(FC143).Further investigation of the effects of temperatureon solution properties shows that the dissociation energy Em iscorrelated to the strength of the aggregated junctions.``

  7. Tuning of protein-surfactant interaction to modify the resultant structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering and dynamic light scattering studies have been carried out to examine the interaction of bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein with different surfactants under varying solution conditions. We show that the interaction of anionic BSA protein (pH7) with surfactant and the resultant structure are strongly modified by the charge head group of the surfactant, ionic strength of the solution, and mixed surfactants. The protein-surfactant interaction is maximum when two components are oppositely charged, followed by components being similarly charged through the site-specific binding, and no interaction in the case of a nonionic surfactant. This interaction of protein with ionic surfactants is characterized by the fractal structure representing a bead-necklace structure of micellelike clusters adsorbed along the unfolded protein chain. The interaction is enhanced with ionic strength only in the case of site-specific binding of an anionic surfactant with an anionic protein, whereas it is almost unchanged for other complexes of cationic and nonionic surfactants with anionic proteins. Interestingly, the interaction of BSA protein with ionic surfactants is significantly suppressed in the presence of nonionic surfactant. These results with mixed surfactants thus can be used to fold back the unfolded protein as well as to prevent surfactant-induced protein unfolding. For different solution conditions, the results are interpreted in terms of a change in fractal dimension, the overall size of the protein-surfactant complex, and the number of micelles attached to the protein. The interplay of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions is found to govern the resultant structure of complexes.

  8. Amphiphilic biopolymers (amphibiopols) as new surfactants for membrane protein solubilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval-Terrié, Caroline; Cosette, Pascal; Molle, Gérard; Muller, Guy; Dé, Emmanuelle

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop new surfactants for membrane protein solubilization, from a natural, biodegradable polymer: the polysaccharide pullulan. A set of amphiphilic pullulans (HMCMPs), differing in hydrophobic modification ratio, charge ratio, and the nature of the hydrophobic chains introduced, were synthesized and tested in solubilization experiments with outer membranes of Pseudomonas fluorescens. The membrane proteins were precipitated, and then resolubilized with various HMCMPs. The decyl alkyl chain (C10) was the hydrophobic graft that gave the highest level of solubilization. Decyl alkyl chain-bearing HMCMPs were also able to extract integral membrane proteins from their lipid environment. The best results were obtained with an amphiphilic pullulan bearing 18% decyl groups (18C10). Circular dichroism spectroscopy and membrane reconstitution experiments were used to test the structural and functional integrity of 18C10-solubilized proteins (OmpF from Escherichia coli and bacteriorhodopsin from Halobacterium halobium). Whatever their structure type (α or β), 18C10 did not alter either the structure or the function of the proteins analyzed. Thus, HMCMPs appear to constitute a promising new class of polymeric surfactants for membrane protein studies. PMID:12649425

  9. Surfactant-Enhanced Phytoremediation of Soils Contaminated with Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants: Potential and Assessment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Yan-Zheng; LING Wan-Ting; ZHU Li-Zhong; ZHAO Bao-Wei; ZHENG Qing-Song

    2007-01-01

    Phytoremediation is becoming a cost-effective technology for the in-situ clean up of sites polluted with hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs). The major factors limiting phytoremediation are the mass transfer, rate of plant uptake, and microbial biodegradation of HOCs. This article discusses the potential of surfactants to enhance desorption, plant uptake, and biodegradation of HOCs in the contaminated sites. Positive effects of surfactants on phytoremediation have been recently observed in greenhouse studies. The presence of some nonionic surfactants including polyoxyethylene sorbitan monooleate (Tween 80) and polyoxyethylene(23)dodecanol (Brij35) at relatively low concentrations resulted in significant positive effects on phytoremediation for pyrene-contaminated soil. However, the anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate, SDS) and the cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTMAB) were not useful because of their phytotoxicity or low efficiency for surfactant-enhanced phytoremediation (SEPR). The mechanisms of SEPR for HOC-contaminated sites were evaluated by considering experimental observations. In view of concerns about the cost effectiveness and toxicity of surfactants to plants, more research is needed to enhance the use of SEPR technology.

  10. The hydrophobicity of silicone-based oils and surfactants and their use in reactive microemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellino, Victor; Cheng, Yu-Ling; Acosta, Edgar

    2011-01-01

    In this work, for the first time, the Hydrophilic-Lipophilic Difference (HLD) framework for microemulsion formulation has been applied to silicone oils and silicone alkyl polyether surfactants. Based on the HLD equations and recently introduced mixing rules, we have quantified the hydrophobicity of the oils according to the equivalent alkane carbon number (EACN). We have found that, in a reference system containing sodium dihexyl sulfosuccinate (SDHS) as the surfactant, 0.65 centistoke (cSt) and 3.0 cSt silicone oils behave like n-dodecane and n-pentadecane, respectively. Silicone alkyl polyether surfactants were found to have characteristic curvatures ranging 3.4-18.9, exceeding that of most non-ionic surfactants. The introduction of methacrylic acid (MAA) and hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) to the aqueous phase caused a significant negative shift in HLD, indicative of an aqueous phase that is less hydrophilic than pure water. The more hydrophobic surfactants (largest positive curvatures) were used in order to compensate for this effect. These findings have led to the formulation of bicontinuous microemulsions (μEs) containing silicone oil, silicone alkyl polyether and reactive monomers in aqueous solution. Ternary phase diagrams of these systems revealed the potential for silicone-containing polymer composites with bicontinuous morphologies. These findings have also helped to explain the phase behavior of formulations previously reported in literature, and could help in providing a systematic, consistent approach to future silicone oil based microemulsion formulation.

  11. A method for detecting hydrophobic patches protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijnzaad, P.; Berendsen, H.J.C.; Argos, P.

    1996-01-01

    A method for the detection of hydrophobic patches on the surfaces of protein tertiary structures is presented, it delineates explicit contiguous pieces of surface of arbitrary size and shape that consist solely of carbon and sulphur atoms using a dot representation of the solvent-accessible surface,

  12. A method for detecting hydrophobic patches protein

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijnzaad, P.; Berendsen, H.J.C.; Argos, P.

    1996-01-01

    A method for the detection of hydrophobic patches on the surfaces of protein tertiary structures is presented, it delineates explicit contiguous pieces of surface of arbitrary size and shape that consist solely of carbon and sulphur atoms using a dot representation of the solvent-accessible surface,

  13. Synthesis of Hydrophobically Modified Poly(acrylic acid) Gels and Interaction of the Gels with Cationic/Anionic Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN,Qin(田琴); TANG,Xiao-Zhen(唐小真); ZHUANG,Dong-Qing(庄东青); ZHANG,Yun-Xiang(章云祥)

    2002-01-01

    Poly( acrylic acid) (PAA) gel network with only chemical crosslinking and hydrophobically modified PAA (HM-PAA)gels with both chemical and physical crosslinking were synthesized by radical polymerization in tert-butanol, using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as crosslinker, and 2-(Nethylperfiuorooctanesulfoamido) ethyl methacrylate ( FMA ),stearyl acrylate (SA) or lauryl acrylate (LA) as hydrophobic comonomer respectively. The effect of the fractions and the species of the hydrophobes on swelling properties of HM-PAA gels and the interaction of gels and surfactants were studied.The results showed that the swelling ratio of HM-PAA gels exhibited a sharp decrease with increasing hydrophobic comonomer concentration, which could be ascribed to the formation of strong hydrophobic association among hydrophobic groups. It was proved that two kinds of binding mechanisms of surfactant/gel and different kinds of hydrophobic dusters existed in gels containing both physical and chemical networks.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH BRIEF: USE OF CATIONIC SURFACTANTS TO MODIFY AQUIFER MATERIALS TO REDUCE THE MOBILITY OF HYDROPHOBIC ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cationic surfactants can be used to modify surfaces of soils and subsurface materials to promote sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOC) and retard their migration. For example, cationic surfactants could be injected into an aquifer downgradient from a source of HOC conta...

  15. Production and characterisation of recombinant forms of human pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukovic, Dunja; Plasencia, Inés; Taberner, Francisco J

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is an essential component for the surface tension-lowering activity of the pulmonary surfactant system. It contains a valine-rich alpha helix that spans the lipid bilayer, and is one of the most hydrophobic proteins known so far. SP-C is also an essential component...... of various surfactant preparations of animal origin currently used to treat neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS) in preterm infants. The limited supply of this material and the risk of transmission of infectious agents and immunological reactions have prompted the development of synthetic SP...

  16. Cationic versus anionic surfactant in tuning the structure and interaction of nanoparticle, protein, and surfactant complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehan, Sumit; Aswal, Vinod K; Kohlbrecher, Joachim

    2014-08-26

    The structure and interaction in complexes of anionic Ludox HS40 silica nanoparticle, anionic bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein, and cationic dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) surfactant have been studied using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The results are compared with similar complexes having anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant (Mehan, S; Chinchalikar, A. J.; Kumar, S.; Aswal, V. K.; Schweins, R. Langmuir 2013, 29, 11290). In both cases (DTAB and SDS), the structure in nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes is predominantly determined by the interactions of the individual two-component systems. The nanoparticle-surfactant (mediated through protein-surfactant complex) and protein-surfactant interactions for DTAB, but nanoparticle-protein (mediated through protein-surfactant complex) and protein-surfactant interactions for SDS, are found to be responsible for the resultant structure of nanoparticle-protein-surfactant complexes. Irrespective of the charge on the surfactant, the cooperative binding of surfactant with protein leads to micellelike clusters of surfactant formed along the unfolded protein chain. The adsorption of these protein-surfactant complexes for DTAB on oppositely charged nanoparticles gives rise to the protein-surfactant complex-mediated aggregation of nanoparticles (similar to that of DTAB surfactant). It is unlike that of depletion-induced aggregation of nanoparticles with nonadsorption of protein-surfactant complexes for SDS in similarly charged nanoparticle systems (similar to that of protein alone). The modifications in nanoparticle aggregation as well as unfolding of protein in these systems as compared to the corresponding two-component systems have also been examined by selectively contrast matching the constituents.

  17. Molecular dynamics of surfactant protein C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramírez, Eunice; Santana, Alberto; Cruz, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a membrane-associated protein essential for normal respiration. It has been found that the alpha-helix form of SP-C can undergo, under certain conditions, a transformation from an alpha-helix to a beta-strand conformation that closely resembles amyloid fibrils, which...

  18. Structure of DNA-Cationic Surfactant Complexes at Hydrophobically Modified and Hydrophilic Silica Surfaces as Revealed by Neutron Reflectometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardenas Gomez, Marite; Wacklin, Hanna; Campbell, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the structure and composition of mixed DNA-cationic surfactant adsorption layers on both hydrophobic and hydrophilic solid surfaces. We have focused on the effects of the bulk concentrations, the surfactant chain length, and the type solid surface on the interfacial...... layer structure (the location, coverage, and conformation the e DNA and surfactant molecules). Neutron reflectometry is the technique of choice for revealing the surface layer structure by means of selective deuteration. We start by studying the interfacial complexation of DNA...... with dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) and hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on hydrophobic surfaces, where we show that DNA molecules are located on top of a self-assembled surfactant monolayer, with the thickness of the DNA layer and the surfactant DNA ratio determined by the surface coverage of the underlying...

  19. On relationships between surfactant type and globular proteins interactions in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Elena; Ruso, Juan M; Prieto, Gerardo; Sarmiento, Félix

    2007-12-01

    The binding of sodium perfluorooctanoate (C8FONa), sodium octanoate (C8HONa), lithium perfluorooctanoate (C8FOLi), and sodium dodecanoate (C12HONa) onto myoglobin, ovalbumin, and catalase in water has been characterized using electrophoretic mobility. The tendency of the protein-surfactant complexes to change their charge in the order catalase < ovalbumin < myoglobin was observed which was related to the contents of alpha-helices in the proteins. alpha-Helices are more hydrophobic than beta-sheets. The effect of surfactant on the zeta potentials follows C8HONa < C8FONa < C8FOLi < C12HONa for catalase and ovalbumin; and C8HONa < C8FOLi < C8FONa < C12HONa for myoglobin. The numbers of binding sites on the proteins were determined from the observed increases of the zeta-potential as a function of surfactant concentration in the regions where the binding was a consequence of the hydrophobic effect. The Gibbs energies of binding of the surfactants onto the proteins were evaluated. For all systems, Gibbs energies are negative and large at low concentrations (where binding to the high energy sites takes place) and become less negative at higher ones. This fact suggests a saturation process. Changes in Gibbs energies with the different proteins and surfactants under study have been found to follow same sequence than that found for the charge. The role of hydrophobic interactions in these systems has been demonstrated to be the predominant.

  20. A Trimeric Surfactant: Surface Micelles, Hydration-Lubrication, and Formation of a Stable, Charged Hydrophobic Monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampf, Nir; Wu, Chunxian; Wang, Yilin; Klein, Jacob

    2016-11-15

    The surface structure of the trimeric surfactant tri(dodecyldimethylammonioacetoxy)diethyltriamine trichloride (DTAD) on mica and the interactions between two such DTAD-coated surfaces were determined using atomic force microscopy and a surface force balance. In an aqueous solution of 3 mM, 5 times the critical aggregation concentration (CAC), the surfaces are coated with wormlike micelles or hemimicelles and larger (∼80 nm) bilayer vesicles. Repulsive normal interactions between the surfaces indicate a net surface charge and a solution concentration of ions close to that expected from the CAC. Moreover, this surface coating is strongly lubricating up to some tens of atmospheres, attributed to the hydration-lubrication mechanism acting at the exposed, highly hydrated surfactant headgroups. Upon replacement of the DTAD solution with surfactant-free water, the surface structures have changed on the DTAD monolayers, which then jump into adhesive contact on approach, both in water and following addition of 0.1 M NaNO3. This trimeric surfactant monolayer, which is highly hydrophobic, is found to be positively charged, which is evident from the attraction between the DTAD monolayer and negatively charged bare mica across water. These monolayers are stable over days even under a salt solution. The stability is attributed to the several stabilization pathways available to DTAD on the mica surface.

  1. Adsorption of non-ionic surfactants on hydrophobic and hydrophilic carbon surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Sánchez, M; Maroto-Valiente, A; Guerrero-Ruiz, A; Nevskaia, D M

    2010-03-01

    The adsorption from aqueous solutions of a series of non-ionic surfactants (TX-114, TX-100, TX-165 and TX-305, where the ethoxylation degree is increasing in the series) on a non-microporous carbon surface, that is a high surface area graphite (GT), and on a mainly microporous activated carbon (NT) has been comparatively studied. Also the initially hydrophobic GT and NT surfaces have been modified by oxidation treatments in order to achieve partially hydrophilic carbon materials (GTox and NTox samples). The adsorption results reveal that for GT sample below the critical micellar concentrations (cmc) of surfactants practically the whole surface is covered by monomers. For NT there are steric hindrance limitations, so the surfactant molecules are adsorbed only on micropores of sizes larger than 8A. When oxygen surface groups are introduced on the carbonaceous surfaces, the adsorption behaviour is again different for both materials. Thus, for GTox the adsorbed amounts below the cmc decrease probably due to withdrawal effect of the oxygen surface groups. On the contrary, the adsorbed amounts above the cmc slightly increase with regard to bare graphite, possibly due to an improved formation of micelles. In the case of NTox the adsorbed uptakes below and above cmc increase remarkably in comparison with NT sample, which can be explained by some specific interactions of the surfactants molecules with oxygen surface groups inside the micropores.

  2. Study of the interactions between lysozyme and a fully-fluorinated surfactant in aqueous solution at different surfactant-protein ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruso, Juan M; González-Pérez, Alfredo; Prieto, Gerardo; Sarmiento, Félix

    2003-11-01

    The interactions of a fluorinated surfactant, sodium perfluorooctanoate, with lysozyme, have been investigated by a combination of UV absorbance, electrical conductivity and dynamic light scattering to detect and to characterize the conformational transitions of lysozyme. By using difference spectroscopy, the transition was followed as a function of surfactant concentration, and the data were analyzed to obtain the Gibbs energy of the transition in water (DeltaGw(o)) and in a hydrophobic environment (DeltaGh(o)) for saturated protein-surfactant complexes. Electrical conductivity was used to determine the critical micelle concentration of the surfactant in the presence of different lysozyme concentration. From these results, the average number of surfactant monomer per protein molecule was calculated. Finally, dynamic light scattering show that only changes in the secondary structure of the protein can be observed.

  3. Self-assembly of cationic surfactants that contain thioether groups in the hydrophobic tails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Dan; Shi, Lei; Menger, Fredric M

    2008-05-06

    Self-assembly in aqueous solutions of cationic surfactants that carry thioether groups in their hydrophobic tails has been investigated. Of particular interest was the identification of possible changes in the aggregate structure due to the presence of sulfur atoms. Solutions of four different compounds [CH(3)CH(2)S(CH(2))(10)N(CH(3))(3)(+)Br(-) (2-10), CH(3)(CH(2))(5)S(CH(2))(6)N(CH(3))(3)(+)Br(-) (6-6), CH(3)(CH(2))(7)S(CH(2))(6)N(CH(3))(3)(+)Br(-) (8-6), and CH(3)(CH(2))(7)S(CH(2))(8)N(CH(3))(3)(+)Br(-) (8-8)] were characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, NMR diffusometry, and conductivity measurements. In addition to investigating aqueous solutions containing each of the thioethers present as the sole solute, mixtures of 2-10 or 6-6 with dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB) were studied. The addition of a sulfide group to the hydrophobic tail causes an increase in the critical micelle concentration but has a limited effect on the aggregate structure. Micelles are formed at a well-defined concentration for all of the investigated surfactants and surfactant mixtures. However, a comparison of the behavior of concentrated solutions of 8-8 to that of solutions of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) of similar concentrations suggests that the presence of a sulfur atom decreases the tendency for micellar growth. This may be a consequence of a slightly higher preference for the micellar surface of a sulfur atom as compared to that of a methylene group in a similar position, an idea that is also supported by results for the surfactant mixtures.

  4. Porcine lung surfactant protein B gene (SFTPB)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirera Salicio, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete

    2008-01-01

    The porcine surfactant protein B (SFTPB) is a single copy gene on chromosome 3. Three different cDNAs for the SFTPB have been isolated and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence comparison revealed six nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), four synonymous SNPs and an in-frame deletion of 69...

  5. Surfactant protein D is proatherogenic in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Madsen, Jens; Kejling, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important innate immune defense molecule that mediates clearance of pathogens and modulates the inflammatory response. Moreover, SP-D is involved in lipid homeostasis, and pulmonary accumulation of phospholipids has previously been observed in SP-D-deficient (Spd...

  6. Interactions between Surfactants in Solution and Electrospun Protein Fibers: Effects on Release Behavior and Fiber Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming; Chronakis, Ioannis S; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2016-03-07

    Intermolecular interaction phenomena occurring between endogenous compounds, such as proteins and bile salts, and electrospun compounds are so far unreported, despite the exposure of fibers to such biorelevant compounds when applied for biomedical purposes, e.g., tissue engineering, wound healing, and drug delivery. In the present study, we present a systematic investigation of how surfactants and proteins, as physiologically relevant components, interact with insulin-loaded fish sarcoplasmic protein (FSP) electrospun fibers (FSP-Ins fibers) in solution and thereby affect fiber properties such as accessible surface hydrophilicity, physical stability, and release characteristics of an encapsulated drug. Interactions between insulin-loaded protein fibers and five anionic surfactants (sodium taurocholate, sodium taurodeoxycholate, sodium glycocholate, sodium glycodeoxycholate, and sodium dodecyl sulfate), a cationic surfactant (benzalkonium chloride), and a neutral surfactant (Triton X-100) were studied. The anionic surfactants increased the insulin release in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the neutral surfactant had no significant effect on the release. Interestingly, only minute amounts of insulin were released from the fibers when benzalkonium chloride was present. The FSP-Ins fibers appeared dense after incubation with this cationic surfactant, whereas high fiber porosity was observed after incubation with anionic or neutral surfactants. Contact angle measurements and staining with the hydrophobic dye 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid indicated that the FSP-Ins fibers were hydrophobic, and showed that the fiber surface properties were affected differently by the surfactants. Bovine serum albumin also affected insulin release in vitro, indicating that also proteins may affect the fiber performance in an in vivo setting.

  7. Bending of the Flexible Spacer Chain of Gemini Surfactant Induced by Hydrophobic Interaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU,Yi; JIANG,Rong; LING,Tingting; ZHAO,Jianxi

    2009-01-01

    In order to understand the special role of the flexible alkylene spacer of gemini surfactant in the self-assembly,three gemini surfactants,alkylene-α,ω-bis(didodecylmethylammonium bromide)that is designated as 2C12-s-2C12·2Br (s=3,6,8),were synthesized.When the spread films of 2C12-s-2C12·2Br on the surface of water were con-structed,they form the dense layer of the alkyl tails owing to four dodecyl chains per molecule.This induced the bending of the spacer chain toward the air-side at the s smaller than that of C12-s-C12·2Br adsorbed on the air/water interface owing to the enhanced hydrophobic interaction between the alkyl tails and the spacer chain, where C12-s-C12·2Br has only two alkyl tails per molecule. Conclusively.,the enhanced hydrophobic interaction between the alkyl tails and the spacer chain can effectively induce the bending of the latter toward the air-side.

  8. Interaction of the N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C with interfacial phospholipid films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, Inés; Keough, Kevin M W; Perez-Gil, Jesus

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C is a 35-residue polypeptide composed of a hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helix and a polycationic, palmitoylated-cysteine containing N-terminal segment. This segment is likely the only structural motif the protein projects out of the bilayer in which SP-C is ins......Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C is a 35-residue polypeptide composed of a hydrophobic transmembrane alpha-helix and a polycationic, palmitoylated-cysteine containing N-terminal segment. This segment is likely the only structural motif the protein projects out of the bilayer in which SP...

  9. Biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant function by polymeric nanoparticles: role of surfactant protein B and C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck-Broichsitter, Moritz; Ruppert, Clemens; Schmehl, Thomas; Günther, Andreas; Seeger, Werner

    2014-11-01

    The current study investigated the mechanisms involved in the process of biophysical inhibition of pulmonary surfactant by polymeric nanoparticles (NP). The minimal surface tension of diverse synthetic surfactants was monitored in the presence of bare and surface-decorated (i.e. poloxamer 407) sub-100 nm poly(lactide) NP. Moreover, the influence of NP on surfactant composition (i.e. surfactant protein (SP) content) was studied. Dose-elevations of SP advanced the biophysical activity of the tested surfactant preparation. Surfactant-associated protein C supplemented phospholipid mixtures (PLM-C) were shown to be more susceptible to biophysical inactivation by bare NP than phospholipid mixture supplemented with surfactant protein B (PLM-B) and PLM-B/C. Surfactant function was hindered owing to a drastic depletion of the SP content upon contact with bare NP. By contrast, surface-modified NP were capable of circumventing unwanted surfactant inhibition. Surfactant constitution influences the extent of biophysical inhibition by polymeric NP. Steric shielding of the NP surface minimizes unwanted NP-surfactant interactions, which represents an option for the development of surfactant-compatible nanomedicines.

  10. Biotoxicity and bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds solubilized in nonionic surfactant micelle phase and cloud point system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Tao; Liu, Chunyan; Zeng, Xinying; Xin, Qiao; Xu, Meiying; Deng, Yangwu; Dong, Wei

    2017-06-01

    A recent work has shown that hydrophobic organic compounds solubilized in the micelle phase of some nonionic surfactants present substrate toxicity to microorganisms with increasing bioavailability. However, in cloud point systems, biotoxicity is prevented, because the compounds are solubilized into a coacervate phase, thereby leaving a fraction of compounds with cells in a dilute phase. This study extends the understanding of the relationship between substrate toxicity and bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds solubilized in nonionic surfactant micelle phase and cloud point system. Biotoxicity experiments were conducted with naphthalene and phenanthrene in the presence of mixed nonionic surfactants Brij30 and TMN-3, which formed a micelle phase or cloud point system at different concentrations. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, unable to degrade these compounds, was used for the biotoxicity experiments. Glucose in the cloud point system was consumed faster than in the nonionic surfactant micelle phase, indicating that the solubilized compounds had increased toxicity to cells in the nonionic surfactant micelle phase. The results were verified by subsequent biodegradation experiments. The compounds were degraded faster by PAH-degrading bacterium in the cloud point system than in the micelle phase. All these results showed that biotoxicity of the hydrophobic organic compounds increases with bioavailability in the surfactant micelle phase but remains at a low level in the cloud point system. These results provide a guideline for the application of cloud point systems as novel media for microbial transformation or biodegradation.

  11. Influence of the hydrophilic head size and hydrophobic tail length of surfactants on the ability of micelles to stabilize citral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chi Rac; Park, Sung Joon; Choi, Seung Jun

    2016-07-01

    Surfactant-made micelles can control the rate of chemical degradation of poorly water-soluble food flavors. To evaluate how the molecular structure of surfactant has an influence on the chemical decomposition rate of citral, micelles were prepared with polyoxyethylene alkyl ether-type surfactants that had similar molecular structures but various hydrophilic head sizes and hydrophobic tail lengths. At a critical 20× micelle concentration of surfactant, there was no significant difference in the chemical degradation rate of citral in micelles in neutral pH, regardless of the hydrophilic head size or hydrophobic tail length. In an acidic environment, the degradation rate constant of citral generally increased proportionally with increasing hydrophilic head size of surfactant (0.1563 and 0.2217 for surfactants with 23 and 100 oxyethylene units, respectively) but the length of hydrophobic tail did not affect the citral stability. Also, little difference (0.2217 and 0.2265 for surfactant having 100 oxyethylene units with and without Fe(3+) ) in degradation rate constant of citral between simple micellar solution and micellar solution containing iron suggested that iron ions could not accelerate citral degradation in micelles, regardless of the form of iron (Fe(2+) and Fe(3+) ). This work concludes that although the concentration of surfactant could be relevant, if its concentration could be controlled in the same manner as the critical micelle concentration, then a polyethylene alkyl ether-type surfactant with a small hydrophilic head could more efficiently stabilize citral at an acidic pH. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Synthesis of Hydrophobically Modified Poly(acrylic acid) gels and Interaction of the gels with Cationic/Anionic Surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田琴; 唐小真; 庄东青; 章云祥

    2002-01-01

    Poly(acrylic acid)(PAA) gel network with only chemical crosslinking and hydorophobically modified PAA(HM-PAA)gels with both chemical and physical crosslinking were synthesized by radical polymerization in tert-butanol,using ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as crossliker,and 2-(N-ethylperfluorooctanesulfoamido)ethyl methacrylate (FMA),stearyl acrylate (SA) or lauryl acrylate (LA) as Hydrophobic comonomer respectively.The effcet of the fractions and the species of the hydrophobes on swelling properties of HM-PAA gels and the interaction of gels and surfactants were studied.The results showed that the swelling ratio of HM-PAA gels exhibited a sharp decrease with increasing hydrophobic comomomer comcentration,Which Could be sacribed to the formation of strong hydrophobic association among hydrophobic groups.It was proved that two kinds of binding mechanisms of surfactan/gel and different kinds of hydrophobic clusters existed in gels containing both physical and chemical networks.

  13. Electrophoretic and spectroscopic characterization of the protein patterns formed in different surfactant solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Elena; Ruso, Juan M; Prieto, Gerardo; Sarmiento, Félix

    2008-01-01

    The complexations between catalase and the sodium perfluorooctanoate/sodium octanoate and sodium perfluorooctanoate/sodium dodecanoate systems have been studied by a combination of electrophoresis and spectroscopy measurements. The numbers of adsorption sites on the protein were determined from the observed increases of the zeta-potential as a function of surfactant concentration in the regions where the adsorption was a consequence of the hydrophobic effect. The Gibbs energies of adsorption of the surfactants onto the protein were evaluated and the results show that for all systems, Gibbs energies are negative and larger, in absolute values, at low values of surfactant concentration where binding to the high energy sites takes place, and become less negative as more surfactant molecules bind, suggesting a saturation process. The role of hydrophobic interactions in these systems has been demonstrated to be the predominant. Spectroscopy measurements suggest conformational changes on catalase depending on the surfactant mixture as well as the mixed ratio. No isosbestic point or shifts have been found showing that catalase has spectrophotometrically one kind of binding site for these surfactant mixtures.

  14. The interplay of lung surfactant proteins and lipids assimilates the macrophage clearance of nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A Ruge

    Full Text Available The peripheral lungs are a potential entrance portal for nanoparticles into the human body due to their large surface area. The fact that nanoparticles can be deposited in the alveolar region of the lungs is of interest for pulmonary drug delivery strategies and is of equal importance for toxicological considerations. Therefore, a detailed understanding of nanoparticle interaction with the structures of this largest and most sensitive part of the lungs is important for both nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. Astonishingly, there is still little known about the bio-nano interactions that occur after nanoparticle deposition in the alveoli. In this study, we compared the effects of surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A and D (SP-D on the clearance of magnetite nanoparticles (mNP with either more hydrophilic (starch or hydrophobic (phosphatidylcholine surface modification by an alveolar macrophage (AM cell line (MH-S using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Both proteins enhanced the AM uptake of mNP compared with pristine nanoparticles; for the hydrophilic ST-mNP, this effect was strongest with SP-D, whereas for the hydrophobic PL-mNP it was most pronounced with SP-A. Using gel electrophoretic and dynamic light scattering methods, we were able to demonstrate that the observed cellular effects were related to protein adsorption and to protein-mediated interference with the colloidal stability. Next, we investigated the influence of various surfactant lipids on nanoparticle uptake by AM because lipids are the major surfactant component. Synthetic surfactant lipid and isolated native surfactant preparations significantly modulated the effects exerted by SP-A and SP-D, respectively, resulting in comparable levels of macrophage interaction for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanoparticles. Our findings suggest that because of the interplay of both surfactant lipids and proteins, the AM clearance of nanoparticles is essentially the same, regardless

  15. The interplay of lung surfactant proteins and lipids assimilates the macrophage clearance of nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruge, Christian A; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Herrmann, Jennifer; Kirch, Julian; Cañadas, Olga; Echaide, Mercedes; Pérez-Gil, Jesús; Casals, Cristina; Müller, Rolf; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2012-01-01

    The peripheral lungs are a potential entrance portal for nanoparticles into the human body due to their large surface area. The fact that nanoparticles can be deposited in the alveolar region of the lungs is of interest for pulmonary drug delivery strategies and is of equal importance for toxicological considerations. Therefore, a detailed understanding of nanoparticle interaction with the structures of this largest and most sensitive part of the lungs is important for both nanomedicine and nanotoxicology. Astonishingly, there is still little known about the bio-nano interactions that occur after nanoparticle deposition in the alveoli. In this study, we compared the effects of surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) on the clearance of magnetite nanoparticles (mNP) with either more hydrophilic (starch) or hydrophobic (phosphatidylcholine) surface modification by an alveolar macrophage (AM) cell line (MH-S) using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Both proteins enhanced the AM uptake of mNP compared with pristine nanoparticles; for the hydrophilic ST-mNP, this effect was strongest with SP-D, whereas for the hydrophobic PL-mNP it was most pronounced with SP-A. Using gel electrophoretic and dynamic light scattering methods, we were able to demonstrate that the observed cellular effects were related to protein adsorption and to protein-mediated interference with the colloidal stability. Next, we investigated the influence of various surfactant lipids on nanoparticle uptake by AM because lipids are the major surfactant component. Synthetic surfactant lipid and isolated native surfactant preparations significantly modulated the effects exerted by SP-A and SP-D, respectively, resulting in comparable levels of macrophage interaction for both hydrophilic and hydrophobic nanoparticles. Our findings suggest that because of the interplay of both surfactant lipids and proteins, the AM clearance of nanoparticles is essentially the same, regardless of different

  16. Different effects of surfactant proteins B and C - implications for development of synthetic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curstedt, Tore; Johansson, Jan

    2010-06-01

    Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with synthetic surfactants containing a surfactant protein C analogue in a simple phospholipid mixture gives similar tidal volumes as treatment with poractant alfa (Curosurf(R)) but ventilation with a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) is needed for this synthetic surfactant to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. The effect on lung gas volumes seems to depend on the structure of the peptide since treatment with a synthetic surfactant containing the 21-residue peptide (LysLeu(4))(4)Lys (KL(4)) gives low lung gas volumes in experiments also performed with PEEP. Surfactant preparations containing both surfactant proteins B and C or their analogues prevent alveolar collapse at end-expiration even if ventilated without PEEP. Treatment of premature newborn rabbits with different natural surfactants indicates that both the lipid composition and the proteins are important in order to stabilize the alveoli at end-expiration. Synthetic surfactants containing two peptides may be able to replace natural surfactants within the near future but more trials need to be performed before any conclusion can be drawn about the ideal composition of this new generation of synthetic surfactants.

  17. Distance-dependent hydrophobic-hydrophobic contacts in protein folding simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Angelo; Parisi, Giovanni; Punzi, Giuseppe; Todisco, Simona; Di Noia, Maria Antonietta; Bossis, Fabrizio; Turi, Antonio; De Grassi, Anna; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo

    2014-09-21

    Successful prediction of protein folding from an amino acid sequence is a challenge in computational biology. In order to reveal the geometric constraints that drive protein folding, highlight those constraints kept or missed by distinct lattices and for establishing which class of intra- and inter-secondary structure element interactions is the most relevant for the correct folding of proteins, we have calculated inter-alpha carbon distances in a set of 42 crystal structures consisting of mainly helix, sheet or mixed conformations. The inter-alpha carbon distances were also calculated in several lattice "hydrophobic-polar" models built from the same protein set. We found that helix structures are more prone to form "hydrophobic-hydrophobic" contacts than beta-sheet structures. At a distance lower than or equal to 3.8 Å (very short-range interactions), "hydrophobic-hydrophobic" contacts are almost absent in the native structures, while they are frequent in all the analyzed lattice models. At distances in-between 3.8 and 9.5 Å (short-/medium-range interactions), the best performing lattice for reproducing mainly helix structures is the body-centered-cubic lattice. If protein structures contain sheet portions, lattice performances get worse, with few exceptions observed for double-tetrahedral and body-centered-cubic lattices. Finally, we can observe that ab initio protein folding algorithms, i.e. those based on the employment of lattices and Monte Carlo simulated annealings, can be improved simply and effectively by preventing the generation of "hydrophobic-hydrophobic" contacts shorter than 3.8 Å, by monitoring the "hydrophobic-hydrophobic/polar-polar" contact ratio in short-/medium distance ranges and by using preferentially a body-centered-cubic lattice.

  18. Lung surfactant levels are regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by monitoring surfactant protein D.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taku Fukuzawa

    Full Text Available Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta(+/+ and Ig-Hepta(-/- mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii surfactant secretion, and (iii a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space.

  19. Lung surfactant levels are regulated by Ig-Hepta/GPR116 by monitoring surfactant protein D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzawa, Taku; Ishida, Junji; Kato, Akira; Ichinose, Taro; Ariestanti, Donna Maretta; Takahashi, Tomoya; Ito, Kunitoshi; Abe, Jumpei; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Wakana, Shigeharu; Fukamizu, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Nobuhiro; Hirose, Shigehisa

    2013-01-01

    Lung surfactant is a complex mixture of lipids and proteins, which is secreted from the alveolar type II epithelial cell and coats the surface of alveoli as a thin layer. It plays a crucial role in the prevention of alveolar collapse through its ability to reduce surface tension. Under normal conditions, surfactant homeostasis is maintained by balancing its release and the uptake by the type II cell for recycling and the internalization by alveolar macrophages for degradation. Little is known about how the surfactant pool is monitored and regulated. Here we show, by an analysis of gene-targeted mice exhibiting massive accumulation of surfactant, that Ig-Hepta/GPR116, an orphan receptor, is expressed on the type II cell and sensing the amount of surfactant by monitoring one of its protein components, surfactant protein D, and its deletion results in a pulmonary alveolar proteinosis and emphysema-like pathology. By a coexpression experiment with Sp-D and the extracellular region of Ig-Hepta/GPR116 followed by immunoprecipitation, we identified Sp-D as the ligand of Ig-Hepta/GPR116. Analyses of surfactant metabolism in Ig-Hepta(+/+) and Ig-Hepta(-/-) mice by using radioactive tracers indicated that the Ig-Hepta/GPR116 signaling system exerts attenuating effects on (i) balanced synthesis of surfactant lipids and proteins and (ii) surfactant secretion, and (iii) a stimulating effect on recycling (uptake) in response to elevated levels of Sp-D in alveolar space.

  20. Hydrophobic mismatch sorts SNARE proteins into distinct membrane domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milovanovic, Dragomir; Honigmann, Alf; Koike, Seiichi; Göttfert, Fabian; Pähler, Gesa; Junius, Meike; Müllar, Stefan; Diederichsen, Ulf; Janshoff, Andreas; Grubmüller, Helmut; Risselada, Herre J.; Eggeling, Christian; Hell, Stefan W.; van den Bogaart, Geert; Jahn, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The clustering of proteins and lipids in distinct microdomains is emerging as an important principle for the spatial patterning of biological membranes. Such domain formation can be the result of hydrophobic and ionic interactions with membrane lipids as well as of specific protein-protein interactions. Here using plasma membrane-resident SNARE proteins as model, we show that hydrophobic mismatch between the length of transmembrane domains (TMDs) and the thickness of the lipid membrane suffices to induce clustering of proteins. Even when the TMDs differ in length by only a single residue, hydrophobic mismatch can segregate structurally closely homologous membrane proteins in distinct membrane domains. Domain formation is further fine-tuned by interactions with polyanionic phosphoinositides and homo and heterotypic protein interactions. Our findings demonstrate that hydrophobic mismatch contributes to the structural organization of membranes.

  1. Proteins and protein/surfactant mixtures at interfaces in motion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerboom, F.J.G.

    2000-01-01

    The research described in this thesis covers a number of aspects of the relation between surface properties and foaming properties of proteins, low molecular surfactants and mixtures thereof. This work is the result of a question of the industrial partners if it is possible to understand

  2. Surfactant-Free Solid Dispersions of Hydrophobic Drugs in an Amorphous Sugar Matrix Dried from an Organic Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Koji; Gotoda, Yuto; Hirota, Daichi; Hidaka, Fumihiro; Sato, Tomo; Matsuura, Tsutashi; Imanaka, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Naoyuki; Imamura, Koreyoshi

    2017-03-06

    The technique for homogeneously dispersing hydrophobic drugs in a water-soluble solid matrix (solid dispersion) is a subject that has been extensively investigated in the pharmaceutical industry. Herein, a novel technique for dispersing a solid, without the need to use a surfactant, is reported. A freeze-dried amorphous sugar sample was dissolved in an organic solvent, which contained a soluble model hydrophobic component. The suspension of the sugar and the model hydrophobic component was vacuum foam dried to give a solid powder. Four types of sugars and methanol were used as representative sugars and the organic medium. Four model drugs (indomethacin, ibuprofen, gliclazide, and nifedipine) were employed. Differential scanning calorimetry analyses indicated that the sugar and model drug (100:1) did not undergo segregation during the drying process. The dissolution of the hydrophobic drugs in water from the solid dispersion was then evaluated, and the results indicated that the Cmax and AUC0-60 min of the hydrophobic drug in water were increased when the surfactant-free solid dispersion was used. Palatinose and/or α-maltose were superior to the other tested carbohydrates in increasing Cmax and AUC0-60 min for all tested model drugs, and the model drug with a lower water solubility tended to exhibit a greater extent of over-dissolution.

  3. Protein-induced bilayer Perturbations: Lipid ordering and hydrophobic coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Frederic Nicolas Rønne; Laursen, Ib; Bohr, Henrik;

    2009-01-01

    The host lipid bilayer is increasingly being recognized as an important non-specific regulator of membrane protein function. Despite considerable progress the interplay between hydrophobic coupling and lipid ordering is still elusive. We use electron spin resonance (ESR) to study the interaction...... and hydrophobic mismatch. Our findings also show that at high protein:lipid ratios the lipids are motionally restricted but not completely immobilized. Both exchange on and off rate values for the lipid ↔ gramicidin interaction are lowest at optimal hydrophobic matching. Hydrophobic mismatch of few Å results...... in up to 10-fold increased exchange rates as compared to the ‘optimal’ match situation pointing to the regulatory role of hydrophobic coupling in lipid–protein interactions....

  4. A molecular dynamics study of CaCO3 nanoparticles in a hydrophobic solvent with a stearate co-surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarchuk, Michael S; Heyes, David M; Breakspear, Angela; Chahine, Samir; Dini, Daniele

    2015-05-28

    Stearates containing overbased detergent nanoparticles (NPs) are used as acid neutralising additives in automotive and marine engine oils. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the self-assembly of calcium carbonate, calcium stearate as a co-surfactant and stabilising surfactants of such NPs in a model explicit molecular hydrophobic solvent have been carried out using a methodology described first by Bodnarchuk et al. [J. Phys. Chem. C, 2014, 118, 21092]. The cores and particles as a whole become more elongated with stearate, and the surfactant molecules are more spaced out in this geometry than in their stearate-free counterparts. The rod dimensions are found to be largely independent of the surfactant type for a given amount of CaCO3. The corresponding particles without stearate were more spherical, the precise shape depending to a greater extent on the chemical architecture of the surfactant molecule. The rod-shaped stearate containing nanoparticles penetrated a model water droplet to a greater depth than the corresponding near-spherical particle, which is possibly facilitated by the dissociation of nanoparticle surfactant molecules onto the surface of the water in this process. These simulations are the first to corroborate the nanoparticle-water penetration mechanism proposed previously by experimental groups investigating the NP acid neutralisation characteristics.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of high molecular weight hydrophobically modified polyacrylamide nanolatexes using novel nonionic polymerizable surfactants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Al-Sabagh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, nine hydrophobically modified polyacrylamides (HM-PAM nanolatexes, were synthesized by copolymerizing the acrylamide monomer and novel polymerizable surfactants (surfmers. The reaction was carried out by inverse microemulsion copolymerization technique. The copolymerization was initiated by redox initiators composed of potassium peroxodisulphate and sodium bisulfite. The emulsion was stabilized using mixed tween 85 and span 80 as nonionic emulsifiers. The prepared HM-PAMs were classified into three groups according to the surfmers used in the copolymerization. The chemical structures of the prepared HM-PAMs were confirmed by FT-IR, 1H NMR and 13C NMR. The thermal properties were estimated with the thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. The size and morphology of the prepared latexes were investigated by the dynamic light scattering (DLS and the High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscope (HRTEM. Finally, the molecular weights of the prepared copolymers were determined by the GPC and the viscosity average molecular weight method. They were situated between 1.58 × 106 and 0.89 × 106.

  6. Factors affecting protein transfer into surfactant-isooctane solution: a case study of extraction behavior of chemically modified cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, T; Goto, M

    1998-01-01

    The extraction mechanism of proteins by surfactant molecules in an organic solvent has been investigated using a chemically modified protein. We conducted guanidylation on lysine residues of cytochrome c by replacing their amino groups with homoarginine to enhance the protein-surfactant interaction. Results have shown that guanidylated cytochrome c readily forms a hydrophobic complex with dioleyl phosphoric acid (DOLPA) through hydrogen bonding between the phosphate moiety and the guanidinium groups. Although improved protein-surfactant interaction activated the formation of a hydrophobic complex at the interface, it could not improve the protein transfer in isooctane. It has been established that the protein extraction mechanism using surfactant molecules is mainly governed by two processes: formation of an interfacial complex at the oil-water interface and the subsequent solubilization of the complex into the organic phase. In addition, a kinetic study demonstrated that guanidylation of lysine accelerated the initial extraction rate of cytochrome c. This fact implies that the protein transferability from aqueous phase into organic phase depends on the protein-surfactant interaction which can be modified by protein surface engineering.

  7. Optimization of compatible non-ionic surfactant for formulation development of hydrophobic conidia of entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana (Hypocreales:Cordycipitaceae) and Metarhizium anisopliae Hypocreales:Clavicipita

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aerial conidia, especially dried conidia of entomopathogenic fungi, Beauveria bassiana and Metarhizium anisopliae are hydrophobic, and therefore surfactants are needed for developing water-based formulations in laboratory studies, greenhouse bioassays, and field trials as well as commercial product ...

  8. Surfactant protein D is proatherogenic in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith L; Madsen, Jens; Kejling, Karin

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important innate immune defense molecule that mediates clearance of pathogens and modulates the inflammatory response. Moreover, SP-D is involved in lipid homeostasis, and pulmonary accumulation of phospholipids has previously been observed in SP-D-deficient (Spd......-/-) mice. Atherogenesis involves both inflammation and lipid deposition, and we investigated the role of SP-D in the development of atherosclerosis. SP-D synthesis was localized to vascular endothelial cells. Atherosclerotic lesion areas were 5.6-fold smaller in the aortic roots in Spd-/- mice compared...... with wild-type C57BL/6N mice on an atherogenic diet. HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly elevated in Spd-/- mice. Treatment of Spd-/- mice with a recombinant fragment of human SP-D resulted in decreases of HDL-C (21%) as well as total cholesterol (26%), and LDL cholesterol (28%). Plasma TNF...

  9. Biochemical characterization of the small hydrophobic protein of avian metapneumovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian metapneumovirus (aMPV) is a paramyxovirus that has three membrane-associate proteins: glycoprotein (G), fusion (F), and small hydrophobic (SH) proteins. Among them, the SH protein is a small type II integral membrane protein that is incorporated into virions and is only present in certain para...

  10. C-reactive protein increases membrane fluidity and distorts lipid lateral organization of pulmonary surfactant. Protective role of surfactant protein A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saenz, Alejandra; Lopez-Sanchez, Almudena; Mojica-Lazaro, Jonas

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how surfactant membranes can be perturbed by C-reactive protein (CRP) and whether surfactant protein A (SP-A) might overcome CRP-induced surfactant membrane alterations. The effect of CRP on surfactant surface adsorption was evaluated in vivo after int...

  11. Hydrophobic patches on the surfaces of protein structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijnzaad, P.; Berendsen, H.J.C.; Argos, P.

    1996-01-01

    A survey of hydrophobic patches on the surface of 112 soluble, monomeric proteins is presented, The largest patch on each individual protein averages around 400 Angstrom(2) but can range from 200 to 1,200 Angstrom(2). These areas are not correlated to the sizes of the proteins and only weakly to the

  12. Key interactions of surfactants in therapeutic protein formulations: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Tarik A; Mahler, Hanns-Christian; Kishore, Ravuri S K

    2015-11-01

    Proteins as amphiphilic, surface-active macromolecules, demonstrate substantial interfacial activity, which causes considerable impact on their multifarious applications. A commonly adapted measure to prevent interfacial damage to proteins is the use of nonionic surfactants. Particularly in biotherapeutic formulations, the use of nonionic surfactants is ubiquitous in order to prevent the impact of interfacial stress on drug product stability. The scope of this review is to convey the current understanding of interactions of nonionic surfactants with proteins both at the interface and in solution, with specific focus to their effects on biotherapeutic formulations.

  13. Evidence for Non-Random Hydrophobicity Structures in Protein Chains

    CERN Document Server

    Irbäck, A; Potthast, F; Irb\\"ack, Anders; Peterson, Carsten; Potthast, Frank

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether proteins originate from random sequences of amino acids is addressed. A statistical analysis is performed in terms of blocked and random walk values formed by binary hydrophobic assignments of the amino acids along the protein chains. Theoretical expectations of these variables from random distributions of hydrophobicities are compared with those obtained from functional proteins. The results, which are based upon proteins in the SWISS-PROT data base, convincingly show that the amino acid sequences in proteins differ from what is expected from random sequences in a statistical significant way. By performing Fourier transforms on the random walks one obtains additional evidence for non-randomness of the distributions. We have also analyzed results from a synthetic model containing only two amino-acid types, hydrophobic and hydrophilic. With reasonable criteria on good folding properties in terms of thermodynamical and kinetic behavior, sequences that fold well are isolated. Performing t...

  14. The structure of latherin, a surfactant allergen protein from horse sweat and saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Steven J; McDonald, Rhona E; Cooper, Alan; Smith, Brian O; Kennedy, Malcolm W

    2013-08-06

    Latherin is a highly surface-active allergen protein found in the sweat and saliva of horses and other equids. Its surfactant activity is intrinsic to the protein in its native form, and is manifest without associated lipids or glycosylation. Latherin probably functions as a wetting agent in evaporative cooling in horses, but it may also assist in mastication of fibrous food as well as inhibition of microbial biofilms. It is a member of the PLUNC family of proteins abundant in the oral cavity and saliva of mammals, one of which has also been shown to be a surfactant and capable of disrupting microbial biofilms. How these proteins work as surfactants while remaining soluble and cell membrane-compatible is not known. Nor have their structures previously been reported. We have used protein nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to determine the conformation and dynamics of latherin in aqueous solution. The protein is a monomer in solution with a slightly curved cylindrical structure exhibiting a 'super-roll' motif comprising a four-stranded anti-parallel β-sheet and two opposing α-helices which twist along the long axis of the cylinder. One end of the molecule has prominent, flexible loops that contain a number of apolar amino acid side chains. This, together with previous biophysical observations, leads us to a plausible mechanism for surfactant activity in which the molecule is first localized to the non-polar interface via these loops, and then unfolds and flattens to expose its hydrophobic interior to the air or non-polar surface. Intrinsically surface-active proteins are relatively rare in nature, and this is the first structure of such a protein from mammals to be reported. Both its conformation and proposed method of action are different from other, non-mammalian surfactant proteins investigated so far.

  15. Fragment-based approach to calculate hydrophobicity of anionic and nonionic surfactants derived from chromatographic retention on a C18 stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammer, Jort; Haftka, Joris J-H; Scherpenisse, Peter; Hermens, Joop L M; de Voogt, Pim W P

    2017-02-01

    To predict the fate and potential effects of organic contaminants, information about their hydrophobicity is required. However, common parameters to describe the hydrophobicity of organic compounds (e.g., octanol-water partition constant [KOW ]) proved to be inadequate for ionic and nonionic surfactants because of their surface-active properties. As an alternative approach to determine their hydrophobicity, the aim of the present study was therefore to measure the retention of a wide range of surfactants on a C18 stationary phase. Capacity factors in pure water (k'0 ) increased linearly with increasing number of carbon atoms in the surfactant structure. Fragment contribution values were determined for each structural unit with multilinear regression, and the results were consistent with the expected influence of these fragments on the hydrophobicity of surfactants. Capacity factors of reference compounds and log KOW values from the literature were used to estimate log KOW values for surfactants (log KOWHPLC). These log KOWHPLC values were also compared to log KOW values calculated with 4 computational programs: KOWWIN, Marvin calculator, SPARC, and COSMOThermX. In conclusion, capacity factors from a C18 stationary phase are found to better reflect hydrophobicity of surfactants than their KOW values. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:329-336. © 2016 The Authors. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of SETAC.

  16. Use and application of hydrophobic interaction chromatography for protein purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Justin T

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this section is to provide the reader with guidelines and background on the use and experimental application of Hydrophobic Interaction chromatography (HIC) for the purification of proteins. The section will give step by step instructions on how to use HIC in the laboratory to purify proteins. General guidelines and relevant background information is also provided.

  17. PLUNC is a novel airway surfactant protein with anti-biofilm activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lokesh Gakhar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The PLUNC ("Palate, lung, nasal epithelium clone" protein is an abundant secretory product of epithelia present throughout the conducting airways of humans and other mammals, which is evolutionarily related to the lipid transfer/lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LT/LBP family. Two members of this family--the bactericidal/permeability increasing protein (BPI and the lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP--are innate immune molecules with recognized roles in sensing and responding to Gram negative bacteria, leading many to propose that PLUNC may play a host defense role in the human airways. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Based on its marked hydrophobicity, we hypothesized that PLUNC may be an airway surfactant. We found that purified recombinant human PLUNC greatly enhanced the ability of aqueous solutions to spread on a hydrophobic surface. Furthermore, we discovered that PLUNC significantly reduced surface tension at the air-liquid interface in aqueous solutions, indicating novel and biologically relevant surfactant properties. Of note, surface tensions achieved by adding PLUNC to solutions are very similar to measurements of the surface tension in tracheobronchial secretions from humans and animal models. Because surfactants of microbial origin can disperse matrix-encased bacterial clusters known as biofilms [1], we hypothesized that PLUNC may also have anti-biofilm activity. We found that, at a physiologically relevant concentration, PLUNC inhibited biofilm formation by the airway pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an in vitro model. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data suggest that the PLUNC protein contributes to the surfactant properties of airway secretions, and that this activity may interfere with biofilm formation by an airway pathogen.

  18. Surfactant protein A and surfactant protein D variation in pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Husby, Steffen; Holmskov, Uffe

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant proteins A (SP-A) and D (SP-D) have been implicated in pulmonary innate immunity. The proteins are host defense lectins, belonging to the collectin family which also includes mannan-binding lectin (MBL). SP-A and SP-D are pattern-recognition molecules with the lectin domains binding...... molecules present on immune cells leading to enhanced microbial clearance and modulation of inflammation. SP-A and SP-D also modulate the functions of cells of the adaptive immune system including dendritic cells and T cells. Studies on SP-A and SP-D polymorphisms and protein levels in bronchoalveolar...... preferentially to sugars on a broad spectrum of pathogen surfaces and thereby facilitating immune functions including viral neutralization, clearance of bacteria, fungi and apoptotic and necrotic cells, modulation of allergic reactions, and resolution of inflammation. SP-A and SP-D can interact with receptor...

  19. Biosurfactants and surfactants interacting with membranes and proteins: Same but different?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otzen, Daniel E

    2017-04-01

    Biosurfactants (BS) are surface-active molecules produced by microorganisms. For several decades they have attracted interest as promising alternatives to current petroleum-based surfactants. Aside from their green profile, they have remarkably low critical micelle concentrations, reduce the air/water surface tension to very low levels and are excellent emulsifiers, all of which make them comparable or superior to their synthetic counterparts. These remarkable physical properties derive from their more complex chemical structures in which hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are not as clearly separated as chemical surfactants but have a more mosaic distribution of polarity as well as branched or circular structures. This allows the lipopeptide surfactin to adopt spherical structures to facilitate dense packing at interfaces. They are also more complex. Glycolipid BS, e.g. rhamnolipids (RL) and sophorolipids, are produced biologically as mixtures which vary in the size and saturation of the hydrophobic region as well as modifications in the hydrophilic headgroup, such as the number of sugar groups and different levels of acetylation, leading to variable surface-active properties. Their amphiphilicity allows RL to insert easily into membranes at sub-cmc concentrations to modulate membrane structure and extract lipopolysaccharides, leading to extensive biofilm remodeling in vivo, sometimes in collaboration with hydrophobic RL precursors. Thanks to their mosaicity, even anionic BS like RL only bind weakly to proteins and show much lower denaturing potency, even supporting membrane protein refolding. Nevertheless, they can promote protein degradation by proteases e.g. by neutralizing positive charges, which together with their biofilm-combating properties makes them very promising detergent surfactants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipid order/lipid defects and lipid-control of protein activity edited by Dirk Schneider.

  20. Vector description of electric and hydrophobic interactions in protein homodimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozo-Villarías, Angel; Cedano, Juan; Querol, Enrique

    2016-05-01

    This article describes the formation of homodimers from their constituting monomers, based on the rules set by a simple model of electric and hydrophobic interactions. These interactions are described in terms of the electric dipole moment (D) and hydrophobic moment vectors (H) of proteins. The distribution of angles formed by the two dipole moments of monomers constituting dimers were analysed, as well as the distribution of angles formed by the two hydrophobic moments. When these distributions were fitted to Gaussian curves, it was found that for biological dimers, the D vectors tend mostly to adopt a perpendicular arrangement with respect to each other, in which the constituting dipoles have the least interaction. A minor population tends towards an antiparallel arrangement implying maximum electric attraction. Also in biological dimers, the H vectors of most monomers tend to interact in such a way that the total hydrophobic moment of the dimer increases with respect to those of the monomers. This shows that hydrophobic moments have a tendency to align. In dimers originating in the crystallisation process, the distribution of angles formed by both hydrophobic and electric dipole moments appeared rather featureless, probably because of unspecific interactions in the crystallisation processes. The model does not describe direct interactions between H and D vectors although the distribution of angles formed by both vectors in dimers was analysed. It was found that in most cases these angles tended to be either small (both moments aligned parallel to each other) or large (antiparallel disposition).

  1. A computational solution to analyze hydrophobic characteristics in protein chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marilia Amável Gomes; Azevedo, Alexandre; Missailidis, Sotiris; Silva, Dilson

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents a program developed to facilitate calculations of the total or partial hidrophobicity value of polypeptides and proteins chains. It was built using the Fortran 77 language and performs additional functions, determining the total free energy and the electromotive force of an amino acid in a protein. These values were then used to estimate the average hydrophobicity of the protein or fragment sequence.

  2. Effect of presence of benzene ring in surfactant hydrophobic chain on the transformation towards one dimensional aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabah A. Khalil

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The formation of wormlike micelle and the following significant changes in rheological properties suffer misunderstanding from both theoretical and fundamental aspects. Recently, we have introduced a theory for interpreting such important phenomenon which is referred to as critical intermolecular forces (CIF. The theory has stated that the hydrophobic effect is the main factor for the formation of worm-like aggregates. Therefore, it seems interesting to check out the validity of this new physical insight through investigating the presence of benzene ring as less hydrophobic group in contrast to that of alkyl in surfactant tail. The mixture of anionic sodium dodecylbenzenesulphonate (SDBS and cationic cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB shows a high dynamic viscosity peak at the ratio of 80/20 of 3 wt.% CTAB/SDBS indicating the formation of wormlike micelles. The thermodynamic properties have been evaluated for this mixture exhibiting good agreement with the rheological changes. Interestingly, the results show the presence of benzene ring (in SDBS causing a negative effect towards the formation of one dimensional aggregate in contrast to previous results which support the proposed CIF theory. The presence of nonionic surfactant TritonX-100 in binary and ternary systems of SDBS and CTAB prohibits the formation of wormlike micelles.

  3. Structures of multidomain proteins adsorbed on hydrophobic interaction chromatography surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gospodarek, Adrian M; Sun, Weitong; O'Connell, John P; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-12-05

    In hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), interactions between buried hydrophobic residues and HIC surfaces can cause conformational changes that interfere with separations and cause yield losses. This paper extends our previous investigations of protein unfolding in HIC chromatography by identifying protein structures on HIC surfaces under denaturing conditions and relating them to solution behavior. The thermal unfolding of three model multidomain proteins on three HIC surfaces of differing hydrophobicities was investigated with hydrogen exchange mass spectrometry (HXMS). The data were analyzed to obtain unfolding rates and Gibbs free energies for unfolding of adsorbed proteins. The melting temperatures of the proteins were lowered, but by different amounts, on the different surfaces. In addition, the structures of the proteins on the chromatographic surfaces were similar to the partially unfolded structures produced in the absence of a surface by temperature as well as by chemical denaturants. Finally, it was found that patterns of residue exposure to solvent on different surfaces at different temperatures can be largely superimposed. These findings suggest that protein unfolding on various HIC surfaces might be quantitatively related to protein unfolding in solution and that details of surface unfolding behavior might be generalized.

  4. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifart, Carola; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf; Müller, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus; von Wichert, Peter; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  5. A comprehensive study to protein retention in hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baca, Martyna; De Vos, Jelle; Bruylants, Gilles; Bartik, Kristin; Liu, Xiaodong; Cook, Ken; Eeltink, Sebastiaan

    2016-10-01

    The effect of different kosmotropic/chaotropic salt systems on retention characteristics of intact proteins has been examined in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The performance was assessed using different column chemistries, i.e., polyalkylamide, alkylamine incorporating hydrophobic moieties, and a butyl chemistry. Selectivity in HIC is mainly governed by the salt concentration and by the molal surface tension increment of the salt. Typically, a linear relationship between the natural logarithm of the retention factor and the salt concentration is obtained. Using a 250mm long column packed with 5μm polyalkylamide functionalized silica particles and applying a 30min linear salt gradient, a peak capacity of 78 was achieved, allowing the baseline separation of seven intact proteins. The hydrophobicity index appeared to be a good indicator to predict the elution order of intact proteins in HIC mode. Furthermore, the effect of adding additives in the mobile phase, such as calcium chloride (stabilizing the 3D conformation of α-lactalbumin) and isopropanol, on retention properties has been assessed. Results indicate that HIC retention is also governed by conformational in the proteins which affect the number of accessible hydrophobic moieties.

  6. Nanocarriers from GRAS Zein Proteins to Encapsulate Hydrophobic Actives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissmueller, Nikolas T; Lu, Hoang D; Hurley, Amanda; Prud'homme, Robert K

    2016-11-14

    One factor limiting the expansion of nanomedicines has been the high cost of the materials and processes required for their production. We present a continuous, scalable, low cost nanoencapsulation process, Flash Nanoprecipitation (FNP) that enables the production of nanocarriers (NCs) with a narrow size distribution using zein corn proteins. Zein is a low cost, GRAS protein (having the FDA status of "Generally Regarded as Safe") currently used in food applications, which acts as an effective encapsulant for hydrophobic compounds using FNP. The four-stream FNP configuration allows the encapsulation of very hydrophobic compounds in a way that is not possible with previous precipitation processes. We present the encapsulation of several model active compounds with as high as 45 wt % drug loading with respect to zein concentration into ∼100 nm nanocarriers. Three examples are presented: (1) the pro-drug antioxidant, vitamin E-acetate, (2) an anticholera quorum-sensing modulator CAI-1 ((S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one; CAI-1 that reduces Vibrio cholerae virulence by modulating cellular communication), and (3) hydrophobic fluorescent dyes with a range of hydrophobicities. The specific interaction between zein and the milk protein, sodium caseinate, provides stabilization of the NCs in PBS, LB medium, and in pH 2 solutions. The stability and size changes in the three media provide information on the mechanism of assembly of the zein/active/casein NC.

  7. Protein interactions in hydrophobic charge induction chromatography (HCIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Sanchayita; Hubbard, Brian; Cramer, Steven M

    2005-01-01

    A quantitative understanding of how proteins interact with hydrophobic charge induction chromatographic resins is provided. Selectivity on this mode of chromatography for monoclonal antibodies as compared to other model proteins is probed by means of a linear retention vs pH plot. The pH-dependent adsorption behavior on this mode of chromatography for a hydrophobic, charged solute is described by taking into account the equilibrium between a hydrophobic, charged solute and an ionizable, heterocyclic ligand. By analogy, an equation that is seen to adequately describe macromolecular retention under linear conditions over a range of pH is developed. A preparative, nonlinear isotherm that can capture both pH and salt concentration dependency for proteins is proposed by using an exponentially modified Langmuir isotherm model. This model is seen to successfully simulate adsorption isotherms for a variety of proteins over a range of pHs and mobile phase salt concentrations. Finally, the widely differing retention characteristics of two monoclonal antibodies are used to derive two different strategies for improving separations on this mode of chromatography. A better understanding of protein binding to this class of resins is seen as an important step to future exploitation of this mode of chromatography for industrial scale purification of proteins.

  8. Structural characterisation of human proteinosis surfactant protein A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Holmskov, U; Højrup, P

    2000-01-01

    Human surfactant protein-A (SP-A) has been purified from a proteinosis patient and characterised by a combination of automated Edman degradation and mass spectrometry. The complete protein sequence was characterised. The major part of SP-A was shown to consist of SP-A2 gene product, and only...

  9. Application of polyhydroxyalkanoate binding protein PhaP as a bio-surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dai-Xu; Chen, Chong-Bo; Fang, Guo; Li, Shi-Yan; Chen, Guo-Qiang

    2011-08-01

    PhaP or phasin is an amphiphilic protein located on surfaces of microbial storage polyhydroxyalkanoates granules. This study aimed to explore amphiphilic properties of PhaP for possible application as a protein surfactant. Following agents were used to conduct this study as controls including bovine serum albumin, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), Tween 20, sodium oleate, a commercial liquefied detergent together with the same amount of PhaP. Among all these tested control surfactants, PhaP showed the strongest effect to form emulsions with lubricating oil, diesel, and soybean oil, respectively. PhaP emulsion stability study compared with SDS revealed that PhaP had a stronger capability to maintain a very stable emulsion layer after 30 days while SDS lost half and two-thirds of its capacity after 2 and 30 days, respectively. When PhaP was more than 200 μg/ml in the water, all liquids started to exhibit stable emulsion layers. Similar to SDS, PhaP significantly reduced the water contact angles of water on a hydrophobic film of biaxially oriented polypropylene. PhaP was thermally very stable, it showed ability to form emulsion and to bind to the surface of polyhydroxybutyrate nanoparticles after a 60- min heating process at 95 °C. It is therefore concluded that PhaP is a protein with thermally stable property for application as natural and environmentally friendly surfactant for food, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical usages.

  10. Self-assembling surfactant-like peptide A6K as potential delivery system for hydrophobic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Y

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Yongzhu Chen,1 Chengkang Tang,2 Jie Zhang,2 Meng Gong,3 Bo Su,2 Feng Qiu4 1Periodical Press, 2Core Facility of West China Hospital, 3Laboratory of Endocrinology and Metabolism, West China Hospital, 4Laboratory of Anaesthesia and Critical Care Medicine, Translational Neuroscience Centre, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, People’s Republic of China Background: Finding a suitable delivery system to improve the water solubility of hydrophobic drugs is a critical challenge in the development of effective formulations. In this study, we used A6K, a self-assembling surfactant-like peptide, as a carrier to encapsulate and deliver hydrophobic pyrene.Methods: Pyrene was mixed with A6K by magnetic stirring to form a suspension. Confocal laser scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, fluorescence, and cell uptake measurements were carried out to study the features and stability of the nanostructures, the state and content of pyrene, as well as the pyrene release profile.Results: The suspension formed contained pyrene monomers trapped in the hydrophobic cores of the micellar nanofibers formed by A6K, as well as nanosized pyrene crystals wrapped up and stabilized by the nanofibers. The two different encapsulation methods greatly increased the concentration of pyrene in the suspension, and formation of pyrene crystals wrapped up by A6K nanofibers might be the major contributor to this effect. Furthermore, the suspension system could readily release and transfer pyrene into living cells.Conclusion: A6K could be further exploited as a promising delivery system for hydrophobic drugs. Keywords: pyrene, self-assembling peptide, micelles, nanofibers, drug delivery  

  11. The importance of surfactant proteins-New aspects on macrophage phagocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschernig, Thomas; Veith, Nils T; Diler, Ebru; Bischoff, Markus; Meier, Carola; Schicht, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Surfactant and its components have multiple functions. The so called collectins are surfactant proteins which opsonize bacteria and improve pulmonary host defense via the phagocytosis and clearance of microorganisms and particles. In this special issue of the Annals of Anatomy a new surfactant protein, Surfactant Associated 3, is highlighted. As outlined in this mini review Surfactant Associated 3 is regarded as an enhancer of phagocytosis. In addition, the role played by SP-A is updated and open research questions raised.

  12. Competitive adsorption of monoclonal antibodies and nonionic surfactants at solid hydrophobic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapp, Sebastian J; Larsson, Iben; van de Weert, Marco

    2015-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies from the IgG subclasses one and two were compared in their adsorption behavior with hydrophobic surfaces upon dilution to 10 mg/mL with 0.9% NaCl. These conditions simulate handling of the compounds at hospital pharmacies and surfaces encountered after preparation, such ...

  13. Review: Milk Proteins as Nanocarrier Systems for Hydrophobic Nutraceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimpel, Florian; Schmitt, Joachim J

    2015-11-01

    Milk proteins and milk protein aggregates are among the most important nanovehicles in food technology. Milk proteins have various functional properties that facilitate their ability to carry hydrophobic nutraceutical substances. The main functional transport properties that were examined in the reviewed studies are binding of molecules or ions, surface activity, aggregation, gelation, and interaction with other polymers. Hydrophobic binding has been investigated using caseins and isolated β-casein as well as whey proteins. Surface activity of caseins has been used to create emulsion-based carrier systems. Furthermore, caseins are able to self-assemble into micelles, which can incorporate molecules. Gelation and interaction with other polymers can be used to encapsulate molecules into protein networks. The release of transported substances mainly depends on pH and swelling behavior of the proteins. The targeted use of nanocarrier systems requires specific knowledge about the binding mechanisms between the proteins and the carried substances in a certain food matrix. © 2015 Institute of Food Technologists®

  14. Genetic and environmental influences of surfactant protein D serum levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, G.L.; Hjelmborg, J.V.; Kyvik, K.O.

    2006-01-01

    The collectin surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an important component of the pulmonary innate immune system, but SP-D is also present on extrapulmonary epithelial surfaces and in serum, where it has been used as a biomarker for pulmonary disease states. In this study, we investigate the mechanisms ...

  15. Circulating surfactant protein D is decreased in systemic lupus erythematosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh, Silje Vermedal; Voss, Anne; Sorensen, Grith Lykke

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Deficiencies of innate immune molecules like mannan binding lectin (MBL) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Surfactant protein D (SP-D) and MBL belong to the same family of innate immune molecules - the collectins, which share important...

  16. Water Dispersible and Biocompatible Porphyrin-Based Nanospheres for Biophotonics Applications: A Novel Surfactant and Polyelectrolyte-Based Fabrication Strategy for Modifying Hydrophobic Porphyrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Ning; Zong, Shenfei; Cao, Wei; Jiang, Jianzhuang; Wang, Zhuyuan; Cui, Yiping

    2015-09-01

    The hydrophobility of most porphyrin and porphyrin derivatives has limited their applications in medicine and biology. Herein, we developed a novel and general strategy for the design of porphyrin nanospheres with good biocompatibility and water dispersibility for biological applications using hydrophobic porphyrins. In order to display the generality of the method, we used two hydrophobic porphyrin isomers as starting material which have different structures confirmed by an X-ray technique. The porphyrin nanospheres were fabricated through two main steps. First, the uniform porphyrin nanospheres stabilized by surfactant were prepared by an interfacially driven microemulsion method, and then the layer-by-layer method was used for the synthesis of polyelectrolyte-coated porphyrin nanospheres to reduce the toxicity of the surfactant as well as improve the biocompatibility of the nanospheres. The newly fabricated porphyrin nanospheres were characterized by TEM techniques, the electronic absorption spectra, photoluminescence emission spectra, dynamic light scattering, and cytotoxicity examination. The resulting nanospheres demonstrated good biocompatibility, excellent water dispersibility and low toxicity. In order to show their application in biophotonics, these porphyrin nanospheres were successfully applied in targeted living cancer cell imaging. The results showed an effective method had been explored to prepare water dispersible and highly stable porphyrin nanomaterial for biophotonics applications using hydrophobic porphyrin. The approach we reported shows obvious flexibility because the surfactants and polyelectrolytes can be optionally selected in accordance with the characteristics of the hydrophobic material. This strategy will expand the applications of hydrophobic porphyrins owning excellent properties in medicine and biology.

  17. Iterative assembly of helical proteins by optimal hydrophobic packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, G Albert; Coutsias, Evangelos A; Dill, Ken A

    2008-08-06

    We present a method for the computer-based iterative assembly of native-like tertiary structures of helical proteins from alpha-helical fragments. For any pair of helices, our method, called MATCHSTIX, first generates an ensemble of possible relative orientations of the helices with various ways to form hydrophobic contacts between them. Those conformations having steric clashes, or a large radius of gyration of hydrophobic residues, or with helices too far separated to be connected by the intervening linking region, are discarded. Then, we attempt to connect the two helical fragments by using a robotics-based loop-closure algorithm. When loop closure is feasible, the algorithm generates an ensemble of viable interconnecting loops. After energy minimization and clustering, we use a representative set of conformations for further assembly with the remaining helices, adding one helix at a time. To efficiently sample the conformational space, the order of assembly generally proceeds from the pair of helices connected by the shortest loop, followed by joining one of its adjacent helices, always proceeding with the shorter connecting loop. We tested MATCHSTIX on 28 helical proteins each containing up to 5 helices and found it to heavily sample native-like conformations. The average rmsd of the best conformations for the 17 helix-bundle proteins that have 2 or 3 helices is less than 2 A; errors increase somewhat for proteins containing more helices. Native-like states are even more densely sampled when disulfide bonds are known and imposed as restraints. We conclude that, at least for helical proteins, if the secondary structures are known, this rapid rigid-body maximization of hydrophobic interactions can lead to small ensembles of highly native-like structures. It may be useful for protein structure prediction.

  18. Amphiphilic drugs as surfactants to fabricate excipient-free stable nanodispersions of hydrophobic drugs for cancer chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shiqi; Lee, Eunhye; Wang, Chi; Wang, Jinqiang; Zhou, Zhuxian; Li, Yixian; Li, Xiaoyi; Tang, Jianbin; Lee, Don Haeng; Liu, Xiangrui; Shen, Youqing

    2015-12-28

    Nanoformulations have been extensively explored to deliver water-insoluble drugs, but they generally use exotic new materials, for instance, amphiphilic block copolymers, which must first go through extensively clinical trials and be approved as drug excipients before any clinical uses. We hypothesize that using clinical amphiphilic drugs as surfactants to self-assemble with and thus solubilize hydrophobic drugs will lead to readily translational nanoformulations as they contain no new excipients. Herein, we show the first example of such excipient-free nanodispersions using an amphiphilic anti-tumor drug, irinotecan hydrochloride (CPT11). CPT11 self-assembles with its insoluble active parent drug, 7-ethyl-10-hydroxy camptothecin (SN38), into stable and water-dispersible nanoparticles, increasing SN38's water solubility by thousands of times up to 25 mg/mL with a loading efficiency close to 100%. The versatility of this approach is also demonstrated by fabricating nanodispersions of CPT11 with other water-insoluble drugs including paclitaxel (PTX) and camptothecin (CPT). These nanodispersions have much increased bioavailability and thereby improved anti-cancer activities. Thus, this strategy, using clinically proven amphiphilic drugs as excipients to fabricate nanodispersions, avoids new materials and makes readily translational nanoformulations of hydrophobic drugs.

  19. Protein-spanning water networks and implications for prediction of protein-protein interactions mediated through hydrophobic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Di; Ou, Shuching; Patel, Sandeep

    2014-12-01

    Hydrophobic effects, often conflated with hydrophobic forces, are implicated as major determinants in biological association and self-assembly processes. Protein-protein interactions involved in signaling pathways in living systems are a prime example where hydrophobic effects have profound implications. In the context of protein-protein interactions, a priori knowledge of relevant binding interfaces (i.e., clusters of residues involved directly with binding interactions) is difficult. In the case of hydrophobically mediated interactions, use of hydropathy-based methods relying on single residue hydrophobicity properties are routinely and widely used to predict propensities for such residues to be present in hydrophobic interfaces. However, recent studies suggest that consideration of hydrophobicity for single residues on a protein surface require accounting of the local environment dictated by neighboring residues and local water. In this study, we use a method derived from percolation theory to evaluate spanning water networks in the first hydration shells of a series of small proteins. We use residue-based water density and single-linkage clustering methods to predict hydrophobic regions of proteins; these regions are putatively involved in binding interactions. We find that this simple method is able to predict with sufficient accuracy and coverage the binding interface residues of a series of proteins. The approach is competitive with automated servers. The results of this study highlight the importance of accounting of local environment in determining the hydrophobic nature of individual residues on protein surfaces.

  20. Preservation of protein in marine systems: Hydrophobic and other noncovalent associations as major stabilizing forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Reno T.; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2001-05-01

    - The fate of proteins during early diagenesis was investigated in environments with low mineral content to assess preservation mechanisms other than mineral sorption. Preservation was examined in anoxic, organic-rich sediments of Mangrove Lake, a marine environment located in Bermuda, and for particulate material generated during oxic decay of diatoms. N-phenacylthiazolium bromide (PTB) treatment tested the hypothesis that proteins may undergo modification reactions with glucose to form advanced-glycation end products (AGEs). A small but significant release (additional 14%) of proteins was observed after PTB treatment in surficial sediments, indicating that some aggregations can proceed through an α-dicarbonyl intermediate of the AGE pathway. Size-exclusion high-pressure liquid chromatography with protein fluorescence, absorbance, and evaporative light-scattering detector measurements under native (phosphate or bicarbonate buffers) and denaturing (guanidine · HCl, urea, or acetonitrile) conditions point to the importance of hydrophobic and other noncovalent interactions in the stabilization of proteinaceous material in the environment. Soluble aggregates of substantial, relative molecular mass ( Mr ≳ 10 6) appear to be formed early in the diagenetic sequence. The preferential preservation of very high Mr, multisubunit phytoplankton proteins in sediments suggests that such aggregations confer resistance to degradation. Alternatively, some of the proteinaceous material may represent that fraction of organic matter that is highly prone to aggregations. Extended incubations (18 h; 37°C) with trypsin and proteinase-K showed that much of the aggregates that could be extracted are receptive to proteolytic cleavage. Buffer-, surfactant-, and NaOH-extractable aggregates comprised most of the acid-hydrolyzable proteinaceous material in detritus and surficial sediments but <35% in 9.7-m-deep sediments, suggesting additional mechanisms for preservation might be in

  1. Extraction of detergents from hydrophobic proteins with isopentanol: application to electrophoretic analysis of photosynthetic bacterial hydrophobic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo, J R; Hernández, R S; Célis, H

    1983-07-15

    The method for extracting Triton X-100 used by I. H. Mather and C. B. Tampling [Anal. Biochem. 93, 139-142 (1979)], has been extended to other detergents of different charge and chemical nature. All the detergents tested can be extracted with isopentanol in conditions in which not more than 8% of hydrophobic or hydrophilic protein is lost from the water phase. The removal of detergent from reaction centers and light harvesting protein-pigment complexes of photosynthetic bacteria, eliminates the artifacts of oligomers when analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-gel electrophoresis.

  2. Interaction of cationic hydrophobic surfactants at negatively charged surfaces investigated by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamee, Cathy E; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Higashitani, Ko; Vakarelski, Ivan U; Kappl, Michael

    2009-10-06

    Atomic force microscopy was used to study the adsorption of the surfactant octadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (C18TAC) at a low concentration (0.03 mM) to negatively charged surfaces in water. Atomic force microscopy tips were functionalized with dimethyloctadecyl(3-tripropyl)ammonium chloride (C18TAC-si) or N-trimethoxysilylpropyl-N,N,N-trimethylammomium chloride (hydrophilpos-si) to facilitate imaging of the adsorbed surfactant without artifacts. Tapping mode images and force measurements revealed C18TAC patches, identified as partial surfactant bilayers or hemimicelles. The forces controlling the adsorption process of the C18TAC to a negatively charged surface were investigated by measuring the forces between a C18TAC-si or a hydrophilpos-si tip and a silica surface in the presence of varying concentrations of either NaCl or NaNO3. Screening of forces with an increasing NaCl concentration was observed for the C18TAC-si and hydrophilpos-si tips, proving an electrostatic contribution. Screening was also observed for the hydrophilpos-si tip in NaNO3, whereas a long-range attraction was observed for the C18TAC-si tip for all NaNO3 concentrations. These results indicate that screening of the forces for the C18TAC-si tip depended on the type and/or size of the anion, possibly due to a different probability of the anions to enter the silane layers. The interaction of C18TAC patches with C18TAC-si tips in the presence of NaCl and the interaction of the patches with hydrophilpos-si tips in either NaCl or NaNO3 were repulsive and independent of the number of force curves measured, indicating a stable, positively charged C18TAC patch. However, the forces measured between the patches and a C18TAC-si tip in NaNO3 depended on the number of force curves measured, indicating a change in patch structure induced by the first interaction.

  3. Impact of a surfactant on the electroactivity of proteins at an aqueous-organogel microinterface array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Shane; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2013-02-05

    The impact of surfactant addition to the organic phase on the electroactivity of proteins at the aqueous-organogel interface was examined by voltammetry. The presence of bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) in the organogel phase, as the sodium salt, caused marked changes in the peak currents for myoglobin detection. The protein desorption voltammetric peak exhibited a 6-fold increase in the current compared to the corresponding experiment without surfactant. Interfacial coverage showed a 17-fold increase in the adsorbed protein at the interface, from 50 pmol cm(-2), in the absence of surfactant, to 850 pmol cm(-2), in the presence of 10 mM surfactant. Additionally, the presence of the surfactant resulted in a second pair of adsorption/desorption peaks at lower potentials and in a change in the capacitance of the system. The formation of surfactant-protein and surfactant-protein-organic anion deposits is proposed on the basis of these features, leading to increased voltammetric signals for myoglobin, hemoglobin, and cytochrome c. The mechanism of protein-surfactant interaction was probed by using the surfactant as the anion in the organic phase electrolyte salt. Repetitive cyclic voltammetry of cytochrome c showed that in the presence of surfactant there was an enhancement of the signal, caused by a buildup of the protein-surfactant-electrolyte anion assembly at the interface. These findings provide the basis for surfactant-modified interfaces to enhance the electroanalytical performance for protein detection.

  4. Surfactant Protein-B 121ins2 Heterozygosity, Reduced Pulmonary Function and COPD in Smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækvad-Hansen, Marie; Dahl, Morten; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE: Hereditary surfactant protein-B deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes fatal respiratory distress syndrome in newborns. Seventy percent of the cases of hereditary surfactant protein-B deficiency are caused by homozygosity for the 121ins2 mutation in the surfactant...

  5. Production Technology and Physicochemical Properties of Composition Containing Surfactant Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery V. Novochadov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a production method of substance containing great amount of phospolipids (up to 36 % and surfactant proteins (up to 2 % in terms of lyophilisate composition. Basic physical and chemical characteristics of the substance (density, viscosity, surface tension and the coefficient of sliding friction indicate a high lubricant capacity of the derived product. These properties are kept when mixed with native human synovial fluid in the ratio of 1 to 9 inclusive. The obtained data allows to consider the derived composition, containing surfactant proteins and phospholipids, a variety of bionic lubricant suitable for testing as a potential equivalent of synovial fluid which can be used in traumatology and orthopedics, a cosmetic component or agent which increases the stability of the cell suspension during culturing in bioreactors.

  6. Complexation between dodecyl sulfate surfactant and zein protein in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruso, Juan M; Deo, Namita; Somasundaran, P

    2004-10-12

    Interactions between sodium dodecyl sulfate and zein protein, a model system for the understanding of the effect of surfactants on skin, were investigated using a range of techniques involving UV-vis spectroscopy, TOC (total organic carbon analysis), electrophoresis, and static and dynamic light scattering. Zein protein was solubilized by SDS. The adsorption of SDS onto insoluble protein fraction caused the zeta potential of the complex to become more negative. From these values, we calculated the Gibbs energy of absorption, which decreases when the SDS concentration is raised. Finally the structure of the complex, based on the analysis by static and dynamic light scattering, is proposed to be rod like.

  7. Exploring the affinity binding of alkylmaltoside surfactants to bovine serum albumin and their effect on the protein stability: A spectroscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hierrezuelo, J M; Carnero Ruiz, C

    2015-08-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence together with circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopic studies was performed to examine the interactions between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and two alkylmaltoside surfactants, i.e. n-decyl-β-D-maltoside (β-C10G2) and n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (β-C12G2), having identical structures but different tail lengths. Changes in the intrinsic fluorescence of BSA from static as well as dynamic measurements revealed a weak protein-surfactant interaction and gave the corresponding binding curves, suggesting that the binding mechanism of surfactants to protein is essentially cooperative in nature. The behavior of both surfactants is similar, so that the differences detected were attributed to the more hydrophobic nature of β-C12G2, which favors the adsorption of micelle-like aggregates onto the protein surface. These observations were substantially demonstrated by data derived from synchronous, three-dimensional and anisotropy fluorescence experiments. Changes in the secondary structure of the protein induced by the interaction with surfactants were analyzed by CD to determine the contents of α-helix and β-strand. It was noted that whereas the addition of β-C10G2 appears to stabilize the secondary structure of the protein, β-C12G2 causes a marginal denaturation of BSA for a protein:surfactant molar ratio as high as 1 to 100.

  8. Silver Nanoparticles-Based Nano-drop Spectrophotometric Determination of Cationic Surfactants Coupled with Hydrophobic Interaction; An Application to Pharmaceuticals and Environmental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashima Sharma

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The proposed work describes the nanodrop spectrophotometric determination of cationic surfactants using citrate-modified silver nanoparticles based on the aggregation of silver nanoparticles induced by cationic surfactants due to the hydrophobic effect. The visible color change in the solution of silver nanoparticle includes a red shift with the quenching of the absorption spectra. The maximum absorbance was measured at wavelength,λmax400 nm. The concentrations of cationic surfactants were determined using a nanodrop spectrophotometer with limits of detection of 15.0, 8.0, 6.0, 5.8, and 13.0 µM for dodecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide, myristiltrimethyl ammonium bromide, cetrimoniumtrimethyl ammonium bromide, cetylpyridinium chloride and benzalkonium chloride, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied for the determination of cetylpyridinium chloride in commercial mouthwasher, gum astringent and nasal spray pharmaceuticals and environmental samples.

  9. Experimental and computational surface hydrophobicity analysis of a non-enveloped virus and proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldt, Caryn L; Zahid, Amna; Vijayaragavan, K Saagar; Mi, Xue

    2017-05-01

    The physical characteristics of viruses needs to be understood in order to manipulate the interaction of viruses with host cells, as well as to create specific molecular recognition techniques to detect, purify, and remove viruses. Viruses are generally believed to be positively charged at physiological pH, but there are few other defining characteristics. Here, we have experimentally and computationally demonstrated that a non-enveloped virus is more hydrophobic than a panel of model proteins. Reverse-phase and hydrophobic interaction chromatography and ANS fluorescence determined the experimental hydrophobic strength of each entity. Computational surface hydrophobicity was calculated by the solvent exposed surface area of the protein weighted by the hydrophobicity of each amino acid. The results obtained indicate a strong correlation between the computational surface hydrophobicity and experimentally determined hydrophobicity using reverse-phase chromatography and ANS fluorescence. The surface hydrophobicity did not compare strongly to the weighted average of the amino acid sequence hydrophobicity. This demonstrates that our simple method of calculating the surface hydrophobicity gives general hydrophobicity information about proteins and viruses with crystal structures. In the process, this method demonstrated that porcine parvovirus (PPV) is more hydrophobic than the model proteins used in this study. This adds an additional dimension to currently known virus characteristics and can improve our manipulation of viruses for gene therapy targeting, surface adsorption and general understanding of virus interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lung surfactant protein A (SP-A) interactions with model lung surfactant lipids and an SP-B fragment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Muzaddid; Jackman, Donna; Booth, Valerie

    2011-06-07

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A) is the most abundant protein component of lung surfactant, a complex mixture of proteins and lipids. SP-A performs host defense activities and modulates the biophysical properties of surfactant in concerted action with surfactant protein B (SP-B). Current models of lung surfactant mechanism generally assume SP-A functions in its octadecameric form. However, one of the findings of this study is that when SP-A is bound to detergent and lipid micelles that mimic lung surfactant phospholipids, it exists predominantly as smaller oligomers, in sharp contrast to the much larger forms observed when alone in water. These investigations were carried out in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), dodecylphosphocholine (DPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylcholine (LMPC), lysomyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (LMPG), and mixed LMPC + LMPG micelles, using solution and diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. We have also probed SP-A's interaction with Mini-B, a biologically active synthetic fragment of SP-B, in the presence of micelles. Despite variations in Mini-B's own interactions with micelles of different compositions, SP-A is found to interact with Mini-B in all micelle systems and perhaps to undergo a further structural rearrangement upon interacting with Mini-B. The degree of SP-A-Mini-B interaction appears to be dependent on the type of lipid headgroup and is likely mediated through the micelles, rather than direct binding.

  11. Surfactant protein D in the female genital tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Floridon, C; Nielsen, O;

    2004-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays a role in innate immunity against various pathogens and in vivo studies have demonstrated that SP-D also has anti-inflammatory properties. SP-D was originally demonstrated in alveolar type II cells, but recent studies have shown extrapulmonary expression of SP......-D indicating a systemic role for the protein. This study describes the presence of SP-D in the female genital tract, the placenta and in amniotic fluid using immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. SP-D was observed in cells lining surface epithelium and secretory glands in the vagina...

  12. A conserved patch of hydrophobic amino acids modulates Myb activity by mediating protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dukare, Sandeep; Klempnauer, Karl-Heinz

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor c-Myb plays a key role in the control of proliferation and differentiation in hematopoietic progenitor cells and has been implicated in the development of leukemia and certain non-hematopoietic tumors. c-Myb activity is highly dependent on the interaction with the coactivator p300 which is mediated by the transactivation domain of c-Myb and the KIX domain of p300. We have previously observed that conservative valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions in a conserved stretch of hydrophobic amino acids have a profound effect on Myb activity. Here, we have explored the function of the hydrophobic region as a mediator of protein-protein interactions. We show that the hydrophobic region facilitates Myb self-interaction and binding of the histone acetyl transferase Tip60, a previously identified Myb interacting protein. We show that these interactions are affected by the valine-to-isoleucine amino acid substitutions and suppress Myb activity by interfering with the interaction of Myb and the KIX domain of p300. Taken together, our work identifies the hydrophobic region in the Myb transactivation domain as a binding site for homo- and heteromeric protein interactions and leads to a picture of the c-Myb transactivation domain as a composite protein binding region that facilitates interdependent protein-protein interactions of Myb with regulatory proteins.

  13. Lung remodeling in aging surfactant protein D deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Jan Philipp; Arkenau, Martina; Knudsen, Lars; Wedekind, Dirk; Ochs, Matthias

    2017-02-07

    Pulmonary surfactant, a mixture of lipids and proteins at the air-liquid interface of alveoli, prevents the lungs from collapsing due to surface tension. One constituent is surfactant-associated protein-D (SP-D), a protein involved in surfactant homeostasis and innate immunity. Mice deficient in SP-D (SP-D (-/-)) has been described as developing a characteristic phenotype which affects the surfactant system (including changes in the intra-cellular and intra-alveolar surfactant pool, alveolar epithelial type II cells and alveolar macrophages), lung architecture and its inflammatory state (development of an emphysema-like pathology, inflammatory cell infiltration). Furthermore, it has been described that these mice develop sub-pleural fibrosis and a thickening of alveolar septal walls. The aim of the present study was to systematically investigate the long term progression of this phenotype with special focus on parenchymal remodeling, whether there are progressive emphysematous changes and whether there is progressive septal wall thickening which might indicate the development of pulmonary fibrosis. By means of design-based stereology and light microscopy, lungs of wild type (wt) and SP-D (-/-) mice of four age groups (3, 6, 12 and ∼18 months) were investigated. The data do not suggest a relevant spontaneous pro-fibrotic remodeling or a destructive process in the aging SP-D (-/-) mice. We demonstrated neither a significant destructive emphysema nor significant thickening of alveolar septal walls, but the data suggest an increase in the number weighted mean alveolar volume in aging SP-D (-/-) mice without loss of alveoli or alveolar epithelial surface area per lung. This increase may reflect over-distension due to altered mechanical properties of alveoli. In the light of our findings and data from the literature, the question arises as to whether a lack of SP-D promotes structural changes in the lung which have been described as being associated with aging lungs

  14. Effect of surfactants on Ra-sHSPI - A small heat shock protein from the cattle tick Rhipicephalus annulatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Shahein, Yasser E.; Hussein, Nahla; Khan, Rizwan H.

    2016-09-01

    Electrostatic interaction plays an important role in protein aggregation phenomenon. In this study, we have checked the effect of anionic - Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate (SDS) and cationic-Cetyltrimethyl Ammonium Bromide (CTAB) surfactant on aggregation behavior of Ra-sHSPI, a small heat shock protein purified from Rhipicephalus annulatus tick. To monitor the effect of these surfactants, we have employed several spectroscopic methods such as Rayleigh light scattering measurements, ANS (8-Anilinonaphthalene-1-sulfonic acid) fluorescence measurements, ThT (Thioflavin T) binding assays, Far-UV CD (Circular Dichroism) and dynamic light scattering measurements. In the presence of anionic surfactant-SDS, Ra-sHSPI forms amyloid fibrils, in contrast, no amyloid formation was observed in presence of cationic surfactant at low pH. Enhancement of ANS fluorescence intensity confirms the exposition of more hydrophobic patches during aggregation. ThT binding assay confirms the amyloid fibrillar nature of the SDS induced Ra-sHSPI aggregates and supported by PASTA 2.0 (prediction of amyloid structural aggregation) software. This study demonstrates the crucial role of charge during amyloid fibril formation at low pH in Ra-sHSPI.

  15. Hydrophobic environment is a key factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gromiha, M Michael; Pathak, Manish C; Saraboji, Kadhirvel; Ortlund, Eric A; Gaucher, Eric A

    2013-04-01

    The stability of thermophilic proteins has been viewed from different perspectives and there is yet no unified principle to understand this stability. It would be valuable to reveal the most important interactions for designing thermostable proteins for such applications as industrial protein engineering. In this work, we have systematically analyzed the importance of various interactions by computing different parameters such as surrounding hydrophobicity, inter-residue interactions, ion-pairs and hydrogen bonds. The importance of each interaction has been determined by its predicted relative contribution in thermophiles versus the same contribution in mesophilic homologues based on a dataset of 373 protein families. We predict that hydrophobic environment is the major factor for the stability of thermophilic proteins and found that 80% of thermophilic proteins analyzed showed higher hydrophobicity than their mesophilic counterparts. Ion pairs, hydrogen bonds, and interaction energy are also important and favored in 68%, 50%, and 62% of thermophilic proteins, respectively. Interestingly, thermophilic proteins with decreased hydrophobic environments display a greater number of hydrogen bonds and/or ion pairs. The systematic elimination of mesophilic proteins based on surrounding hydrophobicity, interaction energy, and ion pairs/hydrogen bonds, led to correctly identifying 95% of the thermophilic proteins in our analyses. Our analysis was also applied to another, more refined set of 102 thermophilic-mesophilic pairs, which again identified hydrophobicity as a dominant property in 71% of the thermophilic proteins. Further, the notion of surrounding hydrophobicity, which characterizes the hydrophobic behavior of residues in a protein environment, has been applied to the three-dimensional structures of elongation factor-Tu proteins and we found that the thermophilic proteins are enriched with a hydrophobic environment. The results obtained in this work highlight the

  16. Essential Regulation of Lung Surfactant Homeostasis by the Orphan G Protein-Coupled Receptor GPR116

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Young Yang

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available GPR116 is an orphan seven-pass transmembrane receptor whose function has been unclear. Global disruption of the Gpr116 gene in mice revealed an unexpected, critical role for this receptor in lung surfactant homeostasis, resulting in progressive accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins in the alveolar space, labored breathing, and a reduced lifespan. GPR116 expression analysis, bone marrow transplantation studies, and characterization of conditional knockout mice revealed that GPR116 expression in ATII cells is required for maintaining normal surfactant levels. Aberrant packaging of surfactant proteins with lipids in the Gpr116 mutant mice resulted in compromised surfactant structure, function, uptake, and processing. Thus, GPR116 plays an indispensable role in lung surfactant homeostasis with important ramifications for the understanding and treatment of lung surfactant disorders.

  17. Essential Regulation of Lung Surfactant Homeostasis by the Orphan G-protein Coupled Receptor GPR116

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mi Young; Hilton, Mary Beth; Seaman, Steven; Haines, Diana C.; Nagashima, Kunio; Burks, Christina M.; Tessarollo, Lino; Ivanova, Pavlina T.; Brown, H. Alex; Umstead, Todd M.; Floros, Joanna; Chroneos, Zissis C.; St. Croix, Brad

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY GPR116 is an orphan seven-pass transmembrane receptor of previously unknown function. Global disruption of the Gpr116 gene in mice revealed an unexpected, critical role for this receptor in lung surfactant homeostasis, resulting in progressive accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins in the alveolar space, labored breathing, and a reduced lifespan. GPR116 expression analysis, bone marrow transplantation studies and characterization of conditional knockout mice revealed that GPR116 expression in ATII cells is required for maintaining normal surfactant levels. Aberrant packaging of surfactant proteins with lipids in the Gpr116 mutant mice resulted in compromised surfactant structure, function, uptake, and processing. Thus, GPR116 plays an indispensable role in lung surfactant homeostasis with important ramifications for the understanding and treatment of lung surfactant disorders. PMID:23684610

  18. Essential regulation of lung surfactant homeostasis by the orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR116.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mi Young; Hilton, Mary Beth; Seaman, Steven; Haines, Diana C; Nagashima, Kunio; Burks, Christina M; Tessarollo, Lino; Ivanova, Pavlina T; Brown, H Alex; Umstead, Todd M; Floros, Joanna; Chroneos, Zissis C; St Croix, Brad

    2013-05-30

    GPR116 is an orphan seven-pass transmembrane receptor whose function has been unclear. Global disruption of the Gpr116 gene in mice revealed an unexpected, critical role for this receptor in lung surfactant homeostasis, resulting in progressive accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins in the alveolar space, labored breathing, and a reduced lifespan. GPR116 expression analysis, bone marrow transplantation studies, and characterization of conditional knockout mice revealed that GPR116 expression in ATII cells is required for maintaining normal surfactant levels. Aberrant packaging of surfactant proteins with lipids in the Gpr116 mutant mice resulted in compromised surfactant structure, function, uptake, and processing. Thus, GPR116 plays an indispensable role in lung surfactant homeostasis with important ramifications for the understanding and treatment of lung surfactant disorders. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of the protein denaturant guanidinium chloride on aqueous hydrophobic contact-pair interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, Ryan D; Khajehpour, Mazdak

    2015-01-01

    Guanidinium chloride (GdmCl) is one of the most common protein denaturants. Although GdmCl is well known in the field of protein folding, the mechanism by which it denatures proteins is not well understood. In fact, there are few studies looking at its effects on hydrophobic interactions. In this work the effect of GdmCl on hydrophobic interactions has been studied by observing how the denaturant influences model systems of phenyl and alkyl hydrophobic contact pairs. Contact pair formation is monitored through the use of fluorescence spectroscopy, i.e., measuring the intrinsic phenol fluorescence being quenched by carboxylate ions. Hydrophobic interactions are isolated from other interactions through a previously developed methodology. The results show that GdmCl does not significantly affect hydrophobic interactions between small moieties such as methyl groups and phenol; while on the other hand, the interaction of larger hydrophobes such as hexyl and heptyl groups with phenol is significantly destabilized.

  20. Signal peptide hydrophobicity is critical for early stages in protein export by Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zanen, G; Meima, R; Tjalsma, H; Jongbloed, JDH; Westers, H; Oudega, B; Luirink, J; van Dijl, JM; Quax, WJ; Houben, E.N.G.

    2005-01-01

    Signal peptides that direct protein export in Bacillus subtilis are overall more hydrophobic than signal peptides in Escherichia coli. To study the importance of signal peptide hydrophobicity for protein export in both organisms, the alpha-amylase AmyQ was provided with leucine-rich (high hydrophobi

  1. Measurement of human surfactant protein-B turnover in vivo from tracheal aspirates using targeted proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomazela, Daniela M; Patterson, Bruce W; Hanson, Elizabeth; Spence, Kimberly L; Kanion, Tiffany B; Salinger, David H; Vicini, Paolo; Barret, Hugh; Heins, Hillary B; Cole, F Sessions; Hamvas, Aaron; MacCoss, Michael J

    2010-03-15

    We describe a method to measure protein synthesis and catabolism in humans without prior purification and use the method to measure the turnover of surfactant protein-B (SP-B). SP-B, a lung-specific, hydrophobic protein essential for fetal-neonatal respiratory transition, is present in only picomolar quantities in tracheal aspirate samples and difficult to isolate for dynamic turnover studies using traditional in vivo tracer techniques. Using infusion of [5,5,5-(2)H(3)] leucine and a targeted proteomics method, we measured both the quantity and kinetics of SP-B tryptic peptides in tracheal aspirate samples of symptomatic newborn infants. The fractional synthetic rate (FSR) of SP-B measured using the most abundant proteolytic fragment, a 10 amino acid peptide from the carboxy-terminus of proSP-B (SPTGEWLPR), from the circulating leucine pool was 0.035 +/- 0.005 h(-1), and the fractional catabolic rate was 0.044 +/- 0.003 h(-1). This technique permits high-throughput and sensitive measurement of turnover of low abundance proteins with minimal sample preparation.

  2. Role of surfactant derived intermediates in the efficacy and mechanism for radiation chemical degradation of a hydrophobic azo dye, 1-phenylazo-2-naphthol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Laboni [Radiation & Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Chatterjee, Suchandra [Food Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Naik, Devidas B. [Radiation & Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India); Adhikari, Soumyakanti, E-mail: asoumya@barc.gov.in [Radiation & Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400085 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Demonstration of the role of surfactant in the degradation of the hydrophobic dye. • First direct observation of the formation of “hydrazyl radical-parent” adduct. • Similar products obtained in the reaction of e{sup −}{sub aq} and ·OH radical in TX-100 medium. • Significant reduction in cytotoxicity of irradiated dye in aqueous–organic medium. • New mechanistic pathway could be delineated. - Abstract: A combined methodology involving gamma and pulse radiolysis, product analysis and toxicity studies has been adopted to comprehend the degradation process of a model hydrophobic azo dye, 1-phenylazo-2-naphthol, emphasizing the role of the surfactant, which is an integral part of textile waste. Two new and important findings are underlined in this article. The first is the direct attestation of the hydrazyl radical-parent adduct, formed in the reaction of the dye with e{sup −}{sub aq} followed by protonation and subsequent addition to the unreacted dye molecule. This has been confirmed from concentration dependent studies. Secondly, we have clearly shown that in the reaction of hydroxyl radical with the dye in Triton X-100 media, the initially produced TX radicals cause reductive degradation of the dye. Identification and detailed analysis of HPLC and GCMS data reveals that similar products are formed in both the reactions of e{sup −}{sub aq} and ·OH radicals. Moreover, the cytotoxicity of 10{sup −4} mol dm{sup −3} dye was found to be reduced significantly after irradiation. Thus, the present study not only depicts new pathways for the degradation of hydrophobic azo dye, but also demonstrates the role of a surfactant in the entire process.

  3. Hydrophobic protein in colorectal cancer in relation to tumor stages and grades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lay-Chin; Yeoh; Chee-Keat; Loh; Boon-Hui; Gooi; Manjit; Singh; Lay-Harn; Gam

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To identify differentially expressed hydrophobic proteins in colorectal cancer. METHODS: Eighteen pairs of colorectal cancerous tissues in addition to tissues from normal mucosa were analysed. Hydrophobic proteins were extracted from the tissues, separated using 2-D gel electrophoresis and analysed using Liquid Chromatography Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Statistical analysis of the proteins was carried out in order to determine the significance of each protein to colorectal cancer (CRC) and als...

  4. Surfactant Protein-D-Encoding Gene Variant Polymorphisms Are Linked to Respiratory Outcome in Premature Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Dahl, Marianne; Tan, Qihua

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Associations between the genetic variation within or downstream of the surfactant protein-D-encoding gene (SFTPD), which encodes the collectin surfactant protein-D (SP-D) and may lead to respiratory distress syndrome or bronchopulmonary dysplasia, recently were reported. Our aim was to...

  5. Environmental Pollutant Ozone Causes Damage to Lung Surfactant Protein B (SP-B)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Lung surfactant protein B (SP-B) is an essential protein found in the surfactant fluid at the air–water interface of the lung. Exposure to the air pollutant ozone could potentially damage SP-B and lead to respiratory distress. We have studied two peptides, one consisting of the N-terminus of SP-B [SP-B(1–25)] and the other a construct of the N- and C-termini of SP-B [SP-B(1–25,63–78)], called SMB. Exposure to dilute levels of ozone (∼2 ppm) of monolayers of each peptide at the air–water interface leads to a rapid reaction, which is evident from an increase in the surface tension. Fluorescence experiments revealed that this increase in surface tension is accompanied by a loss of fluorescence from the tryptophan residue at the interface. Neutron and X-ray reflectivity experiments show that, in contrast to suggestions in the literature, the peptides are not solubilized upon oxidation but rather remain at the interface with little change in their hydration. Analysis of the product material reveals that no cleavage of the peptides occurs, but a more hydrophobic product is slowly formed together with an increased level of oligomerization. We attributed this to partial unfolding of the peptides. Experiments conducted in the presence of phospholipids reveal that the presence of the lipids does not prevent oxidation of the peptides. Our results strongly suggest that exposure to low levels of ozone gas will damage SP-B, leading to a change in its structure. The implication is that the oxidized protein will be impaired in its ability to interact at the air–water interface with negatively charged phosphoglycerol lipids, thus compromising what is thought to be its main biological function. PMID:26270023

  6. Applying flexible molecular docking to simulate protein retention behavior in hydrophobic interaction chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU; Peng; TIAN; FeiFei; LI; ZhiLiang

    2007-01-01

    Interaction between proteins and stationary phase in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) is differentiated into two thermodynamic processes involving direct nonbonding/conformation interaction and surface hydrophobic effect of proteins, hence quantitatively giving rise to a binary linear relation between HIC retention time (RT) at concentrated salting liquid and ligand-protein binding free energy. Then, possible binding manners for 27 proteins of known crystal structures with hydrophobic ligands are simulated and analyzed via ICM flexible molecular docking and genetic algorithm, with results greatly consistent with experimental values. By investigation, it is confirmed local hydrophobic effects of proteins and nonbinding/conformation interaction between ligand and protein both notably influence HIC chromatogram retention behaviors, mainly focusing on exposed portions on the protein surface.

  7. Biophysical insights into the intercalative interaction of surfactant cobalt(III) complexes of certain diimine ligands bound to yeast tRNA: Effects of hydrophobicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Sakthinathan, Subramanian; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam

    2015-08-01

    The interaction of two surfactant cobalt(III) complexes, cis-[Co(ip)2(DA)2](ClO4)3 1 and cis-[Co(dpq)2(DA)2](ClO4)3 2 where ip = imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline and dpq = dipyrido[3,2-d:2‧-3‧-f]quinoxaline with yeast tRNA have been explored by using electronic absorption, competitive binding, electrochemical studies and viscosity measurements. The results suggest that these complexes can bind to tRNA by intercalation. The presence of hydrophobic diimine ligand and the long aliphatic double chains of these complexes facilitate its intercalative interaction with the hydrophobic interior of the tRNA. The extent of tRNA binding of complex 2 has greater affinity than that of complex containing imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline ligands.

  8. Biophysical insights into the intercalative interaction of surfactant cobalt(III) complexes of certain diimine ligands bound to yeast tRNA: Effects of hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Karuppiah; Sakthinathan, Subramanian; Arunachalam, Sankaralingam

    2015-08-01

    The interaction of two surfactant cobalt(III) complexes, cis-[Co(ip)₂(DA)₂](ClO₄)₃ 1 and cis-[Co(dpq)₂(DA)₂](ClO₄)₃ 2 where ip=imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline and dpq=dipyrido[3,2-d:2'-3'-f]quinoxaline with yeast tRNA have been explored by using electronic absorption, competitive binding, electrochemical studies and viscosity measurements. The results suggest that these complexes can bind to tRNA by intercalation. The presence of hydrophobic diimine ligand and the long aliphatic double chains of these complexes facilitate its intercalative interaction with the hydrophobic interior of the tRNA. The extent of tRNA binding of complex 2 has greater affinity than that of complex containing imidazo[4,5-f][1,10]phenanthroline ligands.

  9. Molecular biological characterization of equine surfactant protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospes, R; Hospes, B I L; Reiss, I; Bostedt, H; Gortner, L

    2002-12-01

    In the following, we describe the isolation and sequencing of the equine surfactant protein A (Sp-A) as found in both the cDNA and the genomic DNA. We found a length of the cDNA sequence of 747 bp (base pairs), in translation into amino acids of 248. Compared with the known molecular biological facts about Sp-A in other species, the cDNA sequence obtained showed highest homology with that of sheep (85.01%). The genomic DNA of equine Sp-A, as in other species, includes three introns. There were no hints for the existence of two different Sp-A genes. These results should form the basis for a better understanding of respiratory failure in foals and adult horses, and also lead to further studies on this item.

  10. Surfactant protein-B 121ins2 heterozygosity, reduced pulmonary function, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækvad-Hansen, Marie; Dahl, Morten; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Hereditary surfactant protein-B deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder that causes fatal respiratory distress syndrome in newborns. Seventy percent of the cases of hereditary surfactant protein-B deficiency are caused by homozygosity for the 121ins2 mutation in the surfactant protein-B gene...

  11. Cell surface hydrophobicity is conveyed by S-layer proteins - A study in recombinant lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, H.C. van der; Belt-Gritter, B. van de; Pouwels, P.H.; Martinez, B.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity is one of the most important factors controlling adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces. In this paper, cell surface properties of lactobacilli and recombinant lactobacilli with and without a surface layer protein (SLP) associated with cell surface hydrophobicity were det

  12. Cell surface hydrophobicity is conveyed by S-layer proteins - A study in recombinant lactobacilli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mei, H.C. van der; Belt-Gritter, B. van de; Pouwels, P.H.; Martinez, B.; Busscher, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity is one of the most important factors controlling adhesion of microorganisms to surfaces. In this paper, cell surface properties of lactobacilli and recombinant lactobacilli with and without a surface layer protein (SLP) associated with cell surface hydrophobicity were det

  13. Hydrogel based drug carriers for controlled release of hydrophobic drugs and proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ke Peng,

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study is to prepare in situ forming hydrogels based on biocompatible polymers for the controlled release of hydrophobic drug and proteins. In order to load hydrophobic drug to the hydrophilic hydrogel matrix, beta-cyclodextrin and human serum albumin was introduced to the hydrogel ne

  14. Nonlinear surface dilatational rheology and foaming behavior of protein and protein fibrillar aggregates in the presence of natural surfactant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan, Zhili; Yang, Xiaoquan; Sagis, L.M.C.

    2016-01-01

    The surface and foaming properties of native soy glycinin (11S) and its heat-induced fibrillar aggregates, in the presence of natural surfactant steviol glycoside (STE), were investigated and compared at pH 7.0 to determine the impact of protein structure modification on protein?surfactant interfaci

  15. A simple atomic-level hydrophobicity scale reveals protein interfacial structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapcha, Lauren H; Rossky, Peter J

    2014-01-23

    Many amino acid residue hydrophobicity scales have been created in an effort to better understand and rapidly characterize water-protein interactions based only on protein structure and sequence. There is surprisingly low consistency in the ranking of residue hydrophobicity between scales, and their ability to provide insightful characterization varies substantially across subject proteins. All current scales characterize hydrophobicity based on entire amino acid residue units. We introduce a simple binary but atomic-level hydrophobicity scale that allows for the classification of polar and non-polar moieties within single residues, including backbone atoms. This simple scale is first shown to capture the anticipated hydrophobic character for those whole residues that align in classification among most scales. Examination of a set of protein binding interfaces establishes good agreement between residue-based and atomic-level descriptions of hydrophobicity for five residues, while the remaining residues produce discrepancies. We then show that the atomistic scale properly classifies the hydrophobicity of functionally important regions where residue-based scales fail. To illustrate the utility of the new approach, we show that the atomic-level scale rationalizes the hydration of two hydrophobic pockets and the presence of a void in a third pocket within a single protein and that it appropriately classifies all of the functionally important hydrophilic sites within two otherwise hydrophobic pores. We suggest that an atomic level of detail is, in general, necessary for the reliable depiction of hydrophobicity for all protein surfaces. The present formulation can be implemented simply in a manner no more complex than current residue-based approaches.

  16. Cis-acting sequences from a human surfactant protein gene confer pulmonary-specific gene expression in transgenic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korfhagen, T.R.; Glasser, S.W.; Wert, S.E.; Bruno, M.D.; Daugherty, C.C.; McNeish, J.D.; Stock, J.L.; Potter, S.S.; Whitsett, J.A. (Cincinnati College of Medicine, OH (USA))

    1990-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is produced in late gestation by developing type II epithelial cells lining the alveolar epithelium of the lung. Lack of surfactant at birth is associated with respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants. Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a highly hydrophobic peptide isolated from pulmonary tissue that enhances the biophysical activity of surfactant phospholipids. Like surfactant phospholipid, SP-C is produced by epithelial cells in the distal respiratory epithelium, and its expression increases during the latter part of gestation. A chimeric gene containing 3.6 kilobases of the promoter and 5{prime}-flanking sequences of the human SP-C gene was used to express diphtheria toxin A. The SP-C-diphtheria toxin A fusion gene was injected into fertilized mouse eggs to produce transgenic mice. Affected mice developed respiratory failure in the immediate postnatal period. Morphologic analysis of lungs from affected pups showed variable but severe cellular injury confined to pulmonary tissues. Ultrastructural changes consistent with cell death and injury were prominent in the distal respiratory epithelium. Proximal components of the tracheobronchial tree were not severely affected. Transgenic animals were of normal size at birth, and structural abnormalities were not detected in nonpulmonary tissues. Lung-specific diphtheria toxin A expression controlled by the human SP-C gene injured type II epithelial cells and caused extensive necrosis of the distal respiratory epithelium. The absence of type I epithelial cells in the most severely affected transgenic animals supports the concept that developing type II cells serve as precursors to type I epithelial cells.

  17. Solute partitioning in aqueous surfactant assemblies: comparison of hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions in micelles, alcohol-swollen micelles, microemulsions, and synthetic vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, J.C.; Whitten, D.G.

    1982-11-03

    The structures of anionic assemblies including sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) micelles, alcohol-swollen SLS micelles, microemulsions, and vesicles of a mixture of dipalmitoyllecithin and dicetyl phosphate are investigated by using the ground-state complexation of a hydrophilic quencher (methyl viologen) with several hydrophobic fluorescent probes, including surfactant stilbenes and 1,4-diphenylbutadiene. In SLS micelles this complexation can be decreased nearly an order of magnitude by addition of 1-heptanol, indicating that the structure of the micelle can be adjusted from the highly open structure of the pure micelle to a much more closed structure in which hydrophobic solubilizates can be sequestered from hydrophilic reagents bound to the surface. The fluorescence quenching process in anionic vesicles is strongly dependent on temperature; at low temperatures quenching occurs, while at higher temperatures addition of methyl viologen appears to increase the stilbene fluorescence, indicating that the dicationic quencher binds to the vesicle surface, increasing the order of the system. These results indicate that the degree of organization of surfactant systems can be adjusted by simple changes in composition. 33 references.

  18. Production of hydrophobic amino acids from biobased resources: wheat gluten and rubber seed proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widyarani; Sari, Yessie W; Ratnaningsih, Enny; Sanders, Johan P M; Bruins, Marieke E

    2016-09-01

    Protein hydrolysis enables production of peptides and free amino acids that are suitable for usage in food and feed or can be used as precursors for bulk chemicals. Several essential amino acids for food and feed have hydrophobic side chains; this property may also be exploited for subsequent separation. Here, we present methods for selective production of hydrophobic amino acids from proteins. Selectivity can be achieved by selection of starting material, selection of hydrolysis conditions, and separation of achieved hydrolysate. Several protease combinations were applied for hydrolysis of rubber seed protein concentrate, wheat gluten, and bovine serum albumin (BSA). High degree of hydrolysis (>50 %) could be achieved. Hydrophobic selectivity was influenced by the combination of proteases and by the extent of hydrolysis. Combination of Pronase and Peptidase R showed the highest selectivity towards hydrophobic amino acids, roughly doubling the content of hydrophobic amino acids in the products compared to the original substrates. Hydrophobic selectivity of 0.6 mol-hydrophobic/mol-total free amino acids was observed after 6 h hydrolysis of wheat gluten and 24 h hydrolysis of rubber seed proteins and BSA. The results of experiments with rubber seed proteins and wheat gluten suggest that this process can be applied to agro-industrial residues.

  19. Heating and reduction affect the reaction with tannins of wine protein fractions differing in hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon, Matteo; Vincenzi, Simone; Lucchetta, Marco; Curioni, Andrea

    2010-02-15

    During the storage, bottled white wines can manifest haziness due to the insolubilisation of the grape proteins that may 'survive' in the fermentation process. Although the exact mechanism of this occurrence is not fully understood, proteins and tannins are considered two of the key factors involved in wine hazing, since their aggregation leads to the formation of insoluble particles. To better understand this complex interaction, proteins and tannins from the same unfined Pinot grigio wine were separated. Wine proteins were then fractionated by hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). A significant correlation between hydrophobicity of the wine protein fractions and the haze formed after reacting with wine tannins was found, with the most reactive fractions revealing (by SDS-PAGE and RP-HPLC analyses) the predominant presence of thaumatin-like proteins. Moreover, the effects of both protein heating and disulfide bonds reduction (with dithiotreithol) on haze formation in the presence of tannins were assessed. These treatments generally resulted in an improved reactivity with tannins, and this phenomenon was related to both the surface hydrophobicity and composition of the protein fractions. Therefore, haze formation in wines seems to be related to hydrophobic interactions occurring among proteins and tannins. These interactions should occur on hydrophobic tannin-binding sites, whose exposition on the proteins can depend on both protein heating and reduction.

  20. "SP-G", a putative new surfactant protein--tissue localization and 3D structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Rausch

    Full Text Available Surfactant proteins (SP are well known from human lung. These proteins assist the formation of a monolayer of surface-active phospholipids at the liquid-air interface of the alveolar lining, play a major role in lowering the surface tension of interfaces, and have functions in innate and adaptive immune defense. During recent years it became obvious that SPs are also part of other tissues and fluids such as tear fluid, gingiva, saliva, the nasolacrimal system, and kidney. Recently, a putative new surfactant protein (SFTA2 or SP-G was identified, which has no sequence or structural identity to the already know surfactant proteins. In this work, computational chemistry and molecular-biological methods were combined to localize and characterize SP-G. With the help of a protein structure model, specific antibodies were obtained which allowed the detection of SP-G not only on mRNA but also on protein level. The localization of this protein in different human tissues, sequence based prediction tools for posttranslational modifications and molecular dynamic simulations reveal that SP-G has physicochemical properties similar to the already known surfactant proteins B and C. This includes also the possibility of interactions with lipid systems and with that, a potential surface-regulatory feature of SP-G. In conclusion, the results indicate SP-G as a new surfactant protein which represents an until now unknown surfactant protein class.

  1. Improvement of pulmonary surfactant activity by introducing D-amino acids into highly hydrophobic amphiphilic α-peptide Hel 13-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Yukitake, Ko; Nakahara, Hiromichi; Lee, Sooyoung; Shibata, Osamu; Lee, Sannamu

    2014-08-01

    The high costs of artificial pulmonary surfactants, ranging in hundreds per kilogram of body weight, used for treating the respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) premature babies have limited their applications. We have extensively studied soy lecithins and higher alcohols as lipid alternatives to expensive phospholipids such as DPPC and PG. As a substitute for the proteins, we have synthesized the peptide Hel 13-5D3 by introducing D-amino acids into a highly lipid-soluble, basic amphiphilic peptide, Hel 13-5, composed of 18 amino acid residues. Analysis of the surfactant activities of lipid-amphiphilic artificial peptide mixtures using lung-irrigated rat models revealed that a mixture (Murosurf SLPD3) of dehydrogenated soy lecithin, fractionated soy lecithin, palmitic acid (PA), and peptide Hel 13-5D3 (40:40:17.5:2.5, by weight) superior pulmonary surfactant activity than a commercially available pulmonary surfactant (beractant, Surfacten®). Experiments using ovalbumin-sensitized model animals revealed that the lipid-amphiphilic artificial peptide mixtures provided significant control over an increase in the pulmonary resistance induced by premature allergy reaction and reduced the number of acidocytes and neutrophils in lung-irrigated solution. The newly developed low-cost pulmonary surfactant system may be used for treatment of a wide variety of respiratory diseases.

  2. Untapped therapeutic potential of surfactant proteins: is there a case for recombinant SP-D supplementation in neonatal lung disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Howard W

    2010-06-01

    Whilst pulmonary surfactant therapy has been highly successful in reducing mortality from respiratory distress syndrome of the newborn, a significant proportion of infants born at less than 28 weeks' gestation develop neonatal chronic lung disease. This has a complex pathogenesis but infection, inflammation, oxygen toxicity and ventilator-induced lung injury in the premature infant are all recognised risk factors for its development. Current surfactant therapies in clinical use do not contain all surfactant components and lack the hydrophilic surfactant proteins A and D. These proteins are known to have important roles in surfactant homeostasis and in protecting the lung against inflammation. This review examines the evidence from animal models supporting a role for surfactant protein-D in particular in reducing inflammation in the lung and speculates that supplementation of current surfactant therapies with recombinant forms of surfactant protein-D may help offset the risk of development of chronic lung disease.

  3. Inversion of the balance between hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions in protein folding and aggregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony W Fitzpatrick

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Identifying the forces that drive proteins to misfold and aggregate, rather than to fold into their functional states, is fundamental to our understanding of living systems and to our ability to combat protein deposition disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and the spongiform encephalopathies. We report here the finding that the balance between hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions is different for proteins in the processes of folding to their native states and misfolding to the alternative amyloid structures. We find that the minima of the protein free energy landscape for folding and misfolding tend to be respectively dominated by hydrophobic and by hydrogen bonding interactions. These results characterise the nature of the interactions that determine the competition between folding and misfolding of proteins by revealing that the stability of native proteins is primarily determined by hydrophobic interactions between side-chains, while the stability of amyloid fibrils depends more on backbone intermolecular hydrogen bonding interactions.

  4. pH-dependent phase behavior of carbohydrate-based gemini surfactants. Effect of the length of the hydrophobic spacer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, Jaap E.; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Scarzello, Marco; Wagenaar, Anno; Engberts, Jan B. F. N.

    2006-01-01

    The phase behavior of a series of carbohydrate-based gemini surfactants with varying spacer lengths was studied using static and dynamic light scattering between pH 2 and 12. Cryo-electron microscopy pictures provide evidence for the different morphologies present in solution. The spacer length of

  5. Topology and cellular localization of the small hydrophobic protein of avian metapneumovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The small hydrophobic protein (SH) is a type II integral membrane protein that is packaged into virions and is only present in certain paramyxoviruses including metapneumovirus. In addition to a highly divergent primary sequence, SH proteins vary significantly in size among the different viruses. Hu...

  6. Simulation of dynamic behavior of surfactants on a hydrophobic surface using periodic-shell boundary molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Daiki; Horikoshi, Satoshi; Sakai, Kenichi; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption and aggregation behaviors of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on a hydrophobic graphite surface were examined using a novel molecular dynamics (MD) simulation with the periodic-shell boundary condition (PSBC). Differences in the adsorption behavior of SDS and CTAB molecules were clearly shown on the hydrophobic surface. Unexpectedly, the SDS molecules approached the graphite surface with their hydrophilic head groups. This unexpected approach mode was thought to be due to the aqueous layer on the graphite surface. The hydrophobic moiety of SDS molecules repeatedly adsorbed and desorbed on the graphite surface. In addition, SDS molecules kept moving on the graphite surface; thus, they did not form a stable adsorption layer. In contrast to SDS, the hydrophobic moiety of CTAB molecules approached the graphite surface at the primary step of adsorption. The hydrophobic moieties of CTAB molecules came close to each other, whereas the hydrophilic groups separated from one another. This result suggests that the CTAB molecules form molecular assemblies with a curved structure. The simulation results were consistent with the experimental observations. A clear difference between the adsorption behavior of SDS and CTAB molecules was revealed by MD simulations with PSBC.

  7. Interactions Between Biopolymers and Surfactants with Focus on Fluorosurfactants and Proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Macáková, Lubica

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to obtain a better understanding of the association between surfactants and biopolymers in bulk solutions and at solid/aqueous liquid interface. In order to do this, the interactions between surfactants and biopolymers were investigated with a variety of experimental techniques. The main focus has been on the interactions between fluorosurfactants and proteins, which are important during electrophoresis of proteins in silica capillaries. Electrophoretic separation o...

  8. Mapping Hydrophobicity on the Protein Molecular Surface at Atom-Level Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolau Jr., Dan V.; Paszek, Ewa; Fulga, Florin; Nicolau, Dan V.

    2014-01-01

    A precise representation of the spatial distribution of hydrophobicity, hydrophilicity and charges on the molecular surface of proteins is critical for the understanding of the interaction with small molecules and larger systems. The representation of hydrophobicity is rarely done at atom-level, as this property is generally assigned to residues. A new methodology for the derivation of atomic hydrophobicity from any amino acid-based hydrophobicity scale was used to derive 8 sets of atomic hydrophobicities, one of which was used to generate the molecular surfaces for 35 proteins with convex structures, 5 of which, i.e., lysozyme, ribonuclease, hemoglobin, albumin and IgG, have been analyzed in more detail. Sets of the molecular surfaces of the model proteins have been constructed using spherical probes with increasingly large radii, from 1.4 to 20 Å, followed by the quantification of (i) the surface hydrophobicity; (ii) their respective molecular surface areas, i.e., total, hydrophilic and hydrophobic area; and (iii) their relative densities, i.e., divided by the total molecular area; or specific densities, i.e., divided by property-specific area. Compared with the amino acid-based formalism, the atom-level description reveals molecular surfaces which (i) present an approximately two times more hydrophilic areas; with (ii) less extended, but between 2 to 5 times more intense hydrophilic patches; and (iii) 3 to 20 times more extended hydrophobic areas. The hydrophobic areas are also approximately 2 times more hydrophobicity-intense. This, more pronounced “leopard skin”-like, design of the protein molecular surface has been confirmed by comparing the results for a restricted set of homologous proteins, i.e., hemoglobins diverging by only one residue (Trp37). These results suggest that the representation of hydrophobicity on the protein molecular surfaces at atom-level resolution, coupled with the probing of the molecular surface at different geometric resolutions

  9. Hydrophobic Binding Hot Spots of Bcl-xL Protein-Protein Interfaces by Cosolvent Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yang, Chao-Yie; Wang, Shaomeng

    2011-01-01

    .... Molecular dynamics simulation in the isopropanol/water cosolvent environment and in water was employed to investigate Bcl-xL protein, which has a highly flexible, large, and primarily hydrophobic binding site...

  10. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography of proteins. IV. Protein adsorption capacity and transport in preparative mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Brian C S; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2011-01-21

    The adsorption isotherms of four model proteins (lysozyme, α-lactalbumin, ovalbumin, and BSA) on eight commercial phenyl hydrophobic interaction chromatography media were measured. The isotherms were softer than those usually seen in ion-exchange chromatography of proteins, and the static capacities of the media were lower, ranging from 30 to 110 mg/mL, depending on the ammonium sulfate concentration and the protein and adsorbent types. The protein-accessible surface area appears to be the main factor determining the binding capacity, and little correlation was seen with the protein affinities of the adsorbents. Breakthrough experiments showed that the dynamic capacities of the adsorbents at 10% breakthrough were 20-80% of the static capacities, depending on adsorbent type. Protein diffusivities in the adsorbents were estimated from batch uptake experiments using the pore diffusion and homogeneous diffusion models. Protein transport was affected by the adsorbent pore structures. Apparent diffusivities were higher at lower salt concentrations and column loadings, suggesting that adsorbed proteins may retard intraparticle protein transport. The diffusivities estimated from the batch uptake experiments were used to predict column breakthrough behavior. Analytical solutions developed for ion-exchange systems were able to provide accurate predictions for lysozyme breakthrough but not for ovalbumin. Impurities in the ovalbumin solutions used for the breakthrough experiments may have affected the ovalbumin uptake and led to the discrepancies between the predictions and the experimental results.

  11. The SARS coronavirus spike glycoprotein is selectively recognized by lung surfactant protein D and activates macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Zhong, Fei; Chow, Vincent T K;

    2007-01-01

    Da glycosylated protein. It was not secreted in the presence of tunicamycin and was detected as a 130 kDa protein in the cell lysate. The purified S-protein bound to Vero but not 293T cells and was itself recognized by lung surfactant protein D (SP-D), a collectin found in the lung alveoli. The binding required...

  12. Raman spectra and molecular conformation of 2,4,4-trimethyl-2-pentanethiol as a model compound of a hydrophobic group of triton X-100 surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Hiroatsu; Fukuhara, Koichi

    1986-05-01

    Raman spectra of 2,4,4-trimethyl-2-pentanethiol were measured. The spectral analysis with the normal coordinate treatment indicated that this molecule takes the gauche conformation about the CCCS bond in the solid state and the trans and gauche conformations in the liquid state. The Raman bands due to the totally symmetric C&.zdbnd;C streching vibration of the t-butyl part of the 1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl group were found to be important to distinguish the two conformations. These key bands were applied to the interpretation of the Raman spectra of Triton X-100 surfactant which contains the p-(1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenoxyl group as a hydrophobic moiety. The 1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl group of Triton X-100 molecules is shown to be predominantly in the gauche conformation in the liquid state and in aquaeous solution.

  13. How Chain Length and Charge Affect Surfactant Denaturation of Acyl Coenzyme A Binding Protein (ACBP)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kell Kleiner; Otzen, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Using intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence, equilibria and kinetics of unfolding of acyl coenzyme A binding protein (ACBP) have been investigated in sodium alkyl sulfate surfactants of different chain length (8-16 carbon atoms) and with different proportions of the nonionic surfactant dodecyl...... maltoside (DDM). The aim has been to determine how surfactant chain length and micellar charge affect the denaturation mechanism. ACBP denatures in two steps irrespective of surfactant chain length, but with increasing chain length, the potency of the denaturant rises more rapidly than the critical micelle...... constants increases linearly with denaturant concentration below the cmc but declines at higher concentrations. Both shortening chain length and decreasing micellar charge reduce the overall kinetics of unfolding and makes the dependence of unfolding rate constants on surfactant concentration more complex...

  14. Signatures of hydrophobic collapse in extended proteins captured with force spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    We unfold and extend single proteins at a high force and then linearly relax the force to probe their collapse mechanisms. We observe a large variability in the extent of their recoil. Although chain entropy makes a small contribution, we show that the observed variability results from hydrophobic interactions with randomly varying magnitude from protein to protein. This collapse mechanism is common to highly extended proteins, including nonfolding elastomeric proteins like PEVK from titin. O...

  15. Natural history of five children with surfactant protein C mutations and interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avital, Avraham; Hevroni, Avigdor; Godfrey, Simon; Cohen, Shlomo; Maayan, Channa; Nusair, Samir; Nogee, Lawrence M; Springer, Chaim

    2014-11-01

    Interstitial lung diseases in infants and children are uncommon and may be caused by specific inborn errors of surfactant metabolism. Five children with open lung biopsy diagnosed interstitial lung disease were followed (mean of 27.2 years) and evaluated for surfactant protein gene mutations. Four of the children were originally diagnosed as desquamative interstitial pneumonitis and one as chronic interstitial pneumonitis. All had good response to chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine treatment for periods of 7-38 months. Lung function tests, incremental exercise tests, and rentgenological studies were performed in the children. Surfactant protein gene mutations were searched in all the patients and in part of their families. Three of the patients, aged now 32, 29, and 37 years, feel well and have normal lung function, while two of the patients, both females, aged 28 and 37 years, conduct normal activities of daily living, have healthy children but have clinical, physiological and rentgenological evidence of restrictive lung disease. All five patients were found to have surfactant protein C gene (SFTPC) mutations, three of them with the most common mutation (p.I73T) and the other two with new mutations of surfactant protein C gene (p.I38F and p.V39L). We conclude that detection of surfactant protein mutations should be attempted in all children presenting with interstitial lung disease. Furthermore, treatment with hydroxychloroquine should be considered in children with SFTPC mutations. Prospective evaluation of hydroxychloroquine therapy in a greater number of patients is needed.

  16. Characteristics of sugar surfactants in stabilizing proteins during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Koreyoshi; Murai, Katsuyuki; Korehisa, Tamayo; Shimizu, Noriyuki; Yamahira, Ryo; Matsuura, Tsutashi; Tada, Hiroko; Imanaka, Hiroyuki; Ishida, Naoyuki; Nakanishi, Kazuhiro

    2014-06-01

    Sugar surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths and sugar head groups were compared for their protein-stabilizing effect during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying. Six enzymes, different in terms of tolerance against inactivation because of freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, were used as model proteins. The enzyme activities that remained after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying in the presence of a sugar surfactant were measured for different types and concentrations of sugar surfactants. Sugar surfactants stabilized all of the tested enzymes both during freeze-thawing and freeze-drying, and a one or two order higher amount of added sugar surfactant was required for achieving protein stabilization during freeze-drying than for the cryoprotection. The comprehensive comparison showed that the C10-C12 esters of sucrose or trehalose were the most effective through the freeze-drying process: the remaining enzyme activities after freeze-thawing and freeze-drying increased at the sugar ester concentrations of 1-10 and 10-100 μM, respectively, and increased to a greater extent than for the other surfactants at higher concentrations. Results also indicate that, when a decent amount of sugar was also added, the protein-stabilizing effect of a small amount of sugar ester through the freeze-drying process could be enhanced. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  17. Plasma surfactant protein D levels and the relation to body mass index in a chinese population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, X M; Wu, Y P; Wei, R

    2007-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a member of the collectin family and is an important component of the pulmonary innate host defence. The protein has a widespread distribution in the human body and is present in multiple epithelia, in endothelium and in blood. Various studies have looked at the rel......Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a member of the collectin family and is an important component of the pulmonary innate host defence. The protein has a widespread distribution in the human body and is present in multiple epithelia, in endothelium and in blood. Various studies have looked...

  18. Essential Regulation of Lung Surfactant Homeostasis by the Orphan G-protein Coupled Receptor GPR116

    OpenAIRE

    Mi Young Yang; Mary Beth Hilton; Steven Seaman; Diana C. Haines; Kunio Nagashima; Christina M. Burks; Lino Tessarollo; Pavlina T. Ivanova; H. Alex Brown; Todd M. Umstead; Joanna Floros; Zissis C. Chroneos; Brad St. Croix

    2013-01-01

    GPR116 is an orphan seven-pass transmembrane receptor whose function has been unclear. Global disruption of the Gpr116 gene in mice revealed an unexpected, critical role for this receptor in lung surfactant homeostasis, resulting in progressive accumulation of surfactant lipids and proteins in the alveolar space, labored breathing, and a reduced lifespan. GPR116 expression analysis, bone marrow transplantation studies, and characterization of conditional knockout mice revealed that GPR116 exp...

  19. S-nitrosylation of surfactant protein-D controls inflammatory function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Jiang Guo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The pulmonary collectins, surfactant proteins A and D (SP-A and SP-D have been implicated in the regulation of the innate immune system within the lung. In particular, SP-D appears to have both pro- and anti-inflammatory signaling functions. At present, the molecular mechanisms involved in switching between these functions remain unclear. SP-D differs in its quaternary structure from SP-A and the other members of the collectin family, such as C1q, in that it forms large multimers held together by the N-terminal domain, rather than aligning the triple helix domains in the traditional "bunch of flowers" arrangement. There are two cysteine residues within the hydrophobic N terminus of SP-D that are critical for multimer assembly and have been proposed to be involved in stabilizing disulfide bonds. Here we show that these cysteines exist within the reduced state in dodecameric SP-D and form a specific target for S-nitrosylation both in vitro and by endogenous, pulmonary derived nitric oxide (NO within a rodent acute lung injury model. S-nitrosylation is becoming increasingly recognized as an important post-translational modification with signaling consequences. The formation of S-nitrosothiol (SNO-SP-D both in vivo and in vitro results in a disruption of SP-D multimers such that trimers become evident. SNO-SP-D but not SP-D, either dodecameric or trimeric, is chemoattractive for macrophages and induces p38 MAPK phosphorylation. The signaling capacity of SNO-SP-D appears to be mediated by binding to calreticulin/CD91. We propose that NO controls the dichotomous nature of this pulmonary collectin and that posttranslational modification by S-nitrosylation causes quaternary structural alterations in SP-D, causing it to switch its inflammatory signaling role. This represents new insight into both the regulation of protein function by S-nitrosylation and NO's role in innate immunity.

  20. Use of carbonate extraction in analyzing moderately hydrophobic transmembrane proteins in the mitochondrial inner membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hayoung; Botelho, Salomé Calado; Park, Kwangjin; Kim, Hyun

    2015-12-01

    Resistance to sodium carbonate extraction is regarded as a canonical way to distinguish integral membrane proteins (MPs) from other membrane-associated proteins. However, it has been observed that carbonate extraction releases some mitochondrial integral MPs. Here, by analyzing both artificially designed and native mitochondrial inner MPs containing transmembrane domains (TMDs) of different hydrophobicities, we show that carbonate treatment can release moderately hydrophobic TMDs from the mitochondrial inner membrane. These results suggest that resistance and sensitivity to carbonate extraction may be interpreted with caution when analyzing the nature of mitochondrial inner MPs.

  1. Use of Viscosity to Probe the Interaction of Anionic Surfactants with a Coagulant Protein from Moringa oleifera Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raymond Maikokera

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The intrinsic viscosity of the coagulant protein was evaluated from the flow times of the protein solutions through a capillary viscometer, and the results suggested the coagulant protein to be globular. The interactions of the coagulant protein with anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS were also investigated by capillary viscometry. We conclude that there is strong protein-surfactant interaction at very low surfactant concentrations, and the behavior of the anionic surfactants in solutions containing coagulant protein is very similar. The viscometry results of protein-SDS system are compared with surface tension, fluorescence, and circular dichroism reported earlier. Combining the results of the four studies, the four approaches seem to confirm the same picture of the coagulant protein-SDS interaction. All the physical quantities when studied as function of surfactant concentration for 0.05% (w/v protein solution either exhibited a maximum or minimum at a critical SDS concentration.

  2. Isoentropic and Isoenthalpic Temperatures of Protein Unfolding in Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan YAN; Rui Xian LIU; Yin Mao WEI; Ye Hua SHEN; Xin Du GENG

    2006-01-01

    The thermal behaviors of five proteins in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) were investigated in the temperature range from 0 to 50℃. The thermodynamic parameters (△H°,△S°, △Cp°and △G°) of these proteins in the process of retention and unfolding were determined.The existence of enthalpy and entropy convergence with temperature was confirmed. The differences of the isoentropic and isoenthalpic temperatures for protein unfolding in HIC system from the traditional solution were elucidated.

  3. Separation of proteins from human plasma by sample displacement chromatography in hydrophobic interaction mode

    OpenAIRE

    Josic, Djuro; Breen, Lucas; Clifton, James; Gajdosik, Martina Srajer; Gaso-Sokac, Dajana; Rucevic, Marijana; Müller, Egbert

    2012-01-01

    Sample displacement chromatography (SDC) in reversed-phase and ion-exchange modes was introduced approximately twenty years ago. This method was first used for the preparative purification of peptides and proteins. Recently, SDC in ion-exchange mode was also successfully used for enrichment of low abundance proteins from human plasma. In this paper, the use of SDC for the separation of plasma proteins in hydrophobic interaction mode is demonstrated. By use of two or more columns coupled in se...

  4. Stable intermediates determine proteins' primary unfolding sites in the presence of surfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steen Vang; Andersen, Kell kleiner; Enghild, Jan J.

    2009-01-01

    Despite detailed knowledge of the overall structural changes and stoichiometries of surfactant binding, little is known about which protein regions constitute the preferred sites of attack for initial unfolding. Here we have exposed three proteins to limited proteolysis at anionic (SDS) and catio......Despite detailed knowledge of the overall structural changes and stoichiometries of surfactant binding, little is known about which protein regions constitute the preferred sites of attack for initial unfolding. Here we have exposed three proteins to limited proteolysis at anionic (SDS......) and cationic (DTAC) surfactant concentrations corresponding to specific conformational transitions, using the surfactant-robust broad-specificity proteases Savinase and Alcalase. Cleavage sites are identified by SDS-PAGE and N-terminal sequencing. We observe well-defined cleavage fragments, which suggest......, cleavage sites can be rationalized from the structure of the protein's folding transition state and the position of loops in the native state. Nevertheless, they are more sensitive to choice of surfactant and protease, probably reflecting a heterogeneous and fluctuating ensemble of partially unfolded...

  5. Orphan G protein-coupled receptor GPR116 regulates pulmonary surfactant pool size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, James P; Ludwig, Marie-Gabrielle; Mueller, Matthias; Kinzel, Bernd; Sato, Atsuyasu; Xu, Yan; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Ikegami, Machiko

    2013-09-01

    Pulmonary surfactant levels within the alveoli are tightly regulated to maintain lung volumes and promote efficient gas exchange across the air/blood barrier. Quantitative and qualitative abnormalities in surfactant are associated with severe lung diseases in children and adults. Although the cellular and molecular mechanisms that control surfactant metabolism have been studied intensively, the critical molecular pathways that sense and regulate endogenous surfactant levels within the alveolus have not been identified and constitute a fundamental knowledge gap in the field. In this study, we demonstrate that expression of an orphan G protein-coupled receptor, GPR116, in the murine lung is developmentally regulated, reaching maximal levels 1 day after birth, and is highly expressed on the apical surface of alveolar type I and type II epithelial cells. To define the physiological role of GPR116 in vivo, mice with a targeted mutation of the Gpr116 locus, Gpr116(Δexon17), were generated. Gpr116(Δexon17) mice developed a profound accumulation of alveolar surfactant phospholipids at 4 weeks of age (12-fold) that was further increased at 20 weeks of age (30-fold). Surfactant accumulation in Gpr116(Δexon17) mice was associated with increased saturated phosphatidylcholine synthesis at 4 weeks and the presence of enlarged, lipid-laden macrophages, neutrophilia, and alveolar destruction at 20 weeks. mRNA microarray analyses indicated that P2RY2, a purinergic receptor known to mediate surfactant secretion, was induced in Gpr116(Δexon17) type II cells. Collectively, these data support the concept that GPR116 functions as a molecular sensor of alveolar surfactant lipid pool sizes by regulating surfactant secretion.

  6. Mechanism of simultaneously refolding and purification of proteins by hydrophobic interaction chromatographic unit and applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG; Xindu(耿信笃); BAI; Quan(白泉)

    2002-01-01

    The hydrophobic amino acid residues of a denatured protein molecule tend to react with the particles of the stationary phase of hydrophobic interaction chromatography (STHIC). These hydrophobic interactions prevent the denatured protein molecules from aggregating with each other. The STHIC can provide high enough energy to a denatured protein molecule to make it dehydration and to refold it into its native or various intermediate states. The outcome not only depends on the specific interactions between amino acids, the structure of STHIC, but also depends on the association between the STHIC and mobile phase. The mechanism of protein refolding and the principle of its quality control by HPHIC were also presented. By appropriate selection of the chromatographic condition, several denatured proteins can be refolded and separated simultaneously in a single chromatographic run. A specially designed unit, with diameter much larger than its length, was designed and employed for both laboratory and preparative scales. That unit for the simultaneous renaturation and purification of proteins (USRPP) had the following four functions: to completely remove denaturant, to renature proteins, to separate renatured proteins from impurities, and to easily recycle waste denaturant. The efficiencies of refolding and purification of proteins by the USRPP are almost comparable to a usual long chromatographic column in laboratory. In preparative scale, USRPP can be easily, rapidly, and economically applied requiring a low pressure gradient. As an example, recombinant human interferon-? is employed to elucidate the application of the preparative USRPP.

  7. Estimation of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors protein binding degree using chromatographic hydrophobicity data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trbojević-Stanković Jasna

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors represent a significant group of drugs primarily used in the treatment of hypertension and congestive heart failure. Objective. Selected ACE inhibitors (enalapril, quinapril, fosinopril, lisinopril, cilazapril were studied in order to establish a fast and easy estimation method of their plasma protein binding degree based on their lipophilicity data. Methods. Chromatographic hydrophobicity data (parameter C0 were obtained on cellulose layers under conditions of normal-phase thin-layer chromatography (NPTLC, using different binary solvent systems. The ACE inhibitors lipophilicity descriptors (logP values were calculated using the software package Virtual Computational Chemistry Laboratory. The ACE inhibitors plasma protein binding data were collected from relevant literature. Results. ACE inhibitors protein binding data varied from negligible (lisinopril to 99% (fosinopril. The calculated lipophilicity descriptors, logPKOWWIN values ranged from -0.94 (lisinopril to 6.61 (fosinopril. Good correlations were established between plasma protein binding values and calculated logPKOWWIN values (R2=0.8026 as well as chromatographic hydrophobicity data, C0 parameters (R2=0.7662. Even though good correlation coefficients (R2 were obtained in both relations, unacceptable probability value with p>0.05 was found in relation between protein binding data and calculated logPKOWWIN values. Subsequently, taking into consideration the request for probability value lower than 0.05, a better relationship was observed between protein binding data and chromatographically obtained hydrophobicity parameters C0 values. Conclusion. Cellulose layers are easily available and cost effective sorbent to assess hydrophobicity. Experimentally obtained data on ACE inhibitors hydrophobicity and plasma protein binding estimation are important parameters in evaluating bioavailability of these drugs. [Projekat Ministarstva

  8. Two Mutations in Surfactant Protein C Gene Associated with Neonatal Respiratory Distress

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    Anna Tarocco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple mutations of surfactant genes causing surfactant dysfunction have been described. Surfactant protein C (SP-C deficiency is associated with variable clinical manifestations ranging from neonatal respiratory distress syndrome to lethal lung disease. We present an extremely low birth weight male infant with an unusual course of respiratory distress syndrome associated with two mutations in the SFTPC gene: C43-7G>A and 12T>A. He required mechanical ventilation for 26 days and was treated with 5 subsequent doses of surfactant with temporary and short-term efficacy. He was discharged at 37 weeks of postconceptional age without any respiratory support. During the first 16 months of life he developed five respiratory infections that did not require hospitalization. Conclusion. This mild course in our patient with two mutations is peculiar because the outcome in patients with a single SFTPC mutation is usually poor.

  9. Species Differences in the Carbohydrate Binding Preferences of Surfactant Protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crouch, Erika C.; Smith, Kelly; McDonald, Barbara

    2006-01-01

    Interactions of surfactant protein D (SP-D) with micro-organisms and organic antigens involve binding to the trimeric neck plus carbohydrate recognition domain (neck+CRD). In these studies, we compared the ligand binding of homologous human, rat, and mouse trimeric neck+CRD fusion proteins, each ...

  10. Fabrication and functionalization of single asymmetric nanochannels for electrostatic/hydrophobic association of protein molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mubarak; Bayer, Veronika; Schiedt, Birgitta; Neumann, Reinhard; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2008-12-01

    We have developed a facile and reproducible method for surfactant-controlled track-etching and chemical functionalization of single asymmetric nanochannels in PET (polyethylene terephthalate) membranes. Carboxyl groups present on the channel surface were converted into pentafluorophenyl esters using EDC/PFP (N-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride/pentafluorophenol) coupling chemistry. The resulting amine-reactive esters were further covalently coupled with ethylenediamine or propylamine in order to manipulate the charge polarity and hydrophilicity of the nanochannels, respectively. Characterization of the modified channels was done by measuring their current-voltage (I-V) curves as well as their permselectivity before and after the chemical modification. The electrostatic/hydrophobic association of bovine serum albumin on the channel surface was observed through the change in rectification behaviour upon the variation of pH values.

  11. Lateral Diffusion of Membrane Proteins : Consequences of Hydrophobic Mismatch and Lipid Composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramadurai, Sivaramakrishnan; Duurkens, Hinderika; Krasnikov, Victor V.; Poolman, Bert

    2010-01-01

    Biological membranes are composed of a large number lipid species differing in hydrophobic length, degree of saturation, and charge and size of the headgroup. We now present data on the effect of hydrocarbon chain length of the lipids and headgroup composition on the lateral mobility of the proteins

  12. Effects of the Biomolecules: Vitamins, Proteins, Amino Acids, and Surfactants: DTAB, MTOAC, TMSOI, Orcinol on Upper Critical Solution Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kumar

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Upper critical solution temperatures (UCSTS ± 0.05 K and mutual solubilities of phenol + water systems are reported separately with 0.5 millimol kg-1 (mm kg-1 proteins (casein, pepsin, egg-albumin, vitamins (B1-thiamine, B2-riboflavin, B6-pyridoxine, amino acids (glycine, β-alanine, L-leucine and surfactants (dodecyl trimethylammonium bromide- DTAB, trimethylsulphoxonium iodide-TMSOI, methyltrioctylammonium chloride- MTOAC, orcinol. The additives decrease the UCSTs by about 0.50-2 0C with slight enhancement in mutual solubilities but the leucine with two –CH3 (methyl and two - CH2- (methylene groups produce negligible increase in the solubilities. The –CH3 and - CH2- groups develop stronger hydrophobic interactions but the glycine develops stronger hydrophilic interactions due to –N+H3 (amino and –COO- (carboxylic groups and weaker hydrophobic due to single –CH2- group. The leucine increases the solubility by 0.009 mole fractions with a 0.7 0C decrease in USCT as compared to phenol-water. The mole fractions of additives restricted to 0.002 to 0.005 range, the conjugations of casein and vitamins in place of –CH3 groups of amino acids enhance the solubility with lower UCST values.

  13. Natural aging of multilayer films containing hydrophobically modified poly(acrylate)s or their complexes with surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gîfu, Ioana Cătălina; Maxim, Monica Elisabeta; Iovescu, Alina; Aricov, Ludmila; Simion, Elena Livia; Leontieş, Anca Ruxandra; Anastasescu, Mihai; Munteanu, Cornel; Anghel, Dan-Florin

    2017-08-01

    The paper reports the natural aging of polyelectrolyte multilayers containing sodium hydrophobically modified poly(acrylates) (PACnNa, n = 10 and 18) or complexes of PACnNa with alkyltrimethylammonium bromides (CxTAB, x = 10, 12, 14, 18) and poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDADMAC). Wettability, thickness and surface morphology of aged multilayers are compared with those of freshly made. Contact angle (CA) increases with the alkyl chain length of the PACnNa and of the CxTAB in the complex with PACnNa. Wettability measurements unveil that only five bilayers of alternatively deposited PAC18Na-C18TAB and PDADMAC reach in 12 months the same CA as sixty freshly prepared bilayers. The PDADMAC outer layer gives higher CA and root mean square roughness than the negatively terminated multilayers. The results are significant for gaining new insight into the underlying mechanism of multilayers aging, saving materials, and improving the surface coatings for long term preservation.

  14. Hydrophobic Fractionation Enhances Novel Protein Detection by Mass Spectrometry in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ming; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Whelan, Stephen A.; He, Jianbo; Saxton, Romaine E.; Faull, Kym F.; Chang, Helena R.

    2010-01-01

    It is widely believed that discovery of specific, sensitive and reliable tumor biomarkers can improve the treatment of cancer. The goal of this study was to develop a novel fractionation protocol targeting hydrophobic proteins as possible cancer cell membrane biomarkers. Hydrophobic proteins of breast cancer tissues and cell lines were enriched by polymeric reverse phase columns. The retained proteins were eluted and digested for peptide identification by nano-liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry using a hybrid linear ion-trap Orbitrap. Hundreds of proteins were identified from each of these three specimens: tumors, normal breast tissue, and breast cancer cell lines. Many of the identified proteins defined key cellular functions. Protein profiles of cancer and normal tissues from the same patient were systematically examined and compared. Stem cell markers were overexpressed in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) compared with non-TNBC samples. Because breast cancer stem cells are known to be resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and can be the source of metastasis frequently seen in patients with TNBC, our study may provide evidence of molecules promoting the aggressiveness of TNBC. The initial results obtained using a combination of hydrophobic fractionation and nano-LC mass spectrometry analysis of these proteins appear promising in the discovery of potential cancer biomarkers. When sufficiently refined, this approach may prove useful for early detection and better treatment of breast cancer. PMID:20596302

  15. Mutation of exposed hydrophobic amino acids to arginine to increase protein stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Czaplicki Jerzy

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One strategy to increase the stability of proteins is to reduce the area of water-accessible hydrophobic surface. Results In order to test it, we replaced 14 solvent-exposed hydrophobic residues of acetylcholinesterase by arginine. The stabilities of the resulting proteins were tested using denaturation by high temperature, organic solvents, urea and by proteolytic digestion. Conclusion Altough the mutational effects were rather small, this strategy proved to be successful since half of the mutants showed an increased stability. This stability may originate from the suppression of unfavorable interactions of nonpolar residues with water or from addition of new hydrogen bonds with the solvent. Other mechanisms may also contribute to the increased stability observed with some mutants. For example, introduction of a charge at the surface of the protein may provide a new coulombic interaction on the protein surface.

  16. INTERFACIAL SELF-ASSEMBLY OF A HYDROPHOBIN INTO AN AMPHIPATHIC PROTEIN MEMBRANE MEDIATES FUNGAL ATTACHMENT TO HYDROPHOBIC SURFACES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOSTEN, HAB; SCHUREN, FHJ; WESSELS, JGH

    1994-01-01

    The SC3p hydrophobin of Schizophyllum commune is a small hydrophobic protein (100-101 amino acids with eight cysteine residues) that self-assembles at a water/air interface and coats aerial hyphae with an SDS-insoluble protein membrane, at the outer side highly hydrophobic and with a typical rodlet

  17. Anionic surfactants enhance click reaction-mediated protein conjugation with ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Daniel; Schneider, Tatjana; Aschenbrenner, Joos; Mortensen, Franziska; Scheffner, Martin; Marx, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The Cu(I)-catalyzed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) has become increasingly important in the conjugation chemistry of biomolecules. For example, it is an efficient and convenient method to generate defined ubiquitin-protein conjugates. Here, we investigate the effect of surfactants on the efficiency of CuAAC for chemical protein ubiquitylation. We found that anionic surfactants enhance conjugate formation by up to 10-fold resulting in high yields even at low (i.e., micromolar) concentrations of the reactants. Notably, the herein investigated conjugates are functional and thus properly folded. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Lateral diffusion of membrane proteins: consequences of hydrophobic mismatch and lipid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadurai, Sivaramakrishnan; Duurkens, Ria; Krasnikov, Victor V; Poolman, Bert

    2010-09-08

    Biological membranes are composed of a large number lipid species differing in hydrophobic length, degree of saturation, and charge and size of the headgroup. We now present data on the effect of hydrocarbon chain length of the lipids and headgroup composition on the lateral mobility of the proteins in model membranes. The trimeric glutamate transporter (GltT) and the monomeric lactose transporter (LacY) were reconstituted in giant unilamellar vesicles composed of unsaturated phosphocholine lipids of varying acyl chain length (14-22 carbon atoms) and various ratios of DOPE/DOPG/DOPC lipids. The lateral mobility of the proteins and of a fluorescent lipid analog was determined as a function of the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer (h) and lipid composition, using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. The diffusion coefficient of LacY decreased with increasing thickness of the bilayer, in accordance with the continuum hydrodynamic model of Saffman-Delbrück. For GltT, the mobility had its maximum at diC18:1 PC, which is close to the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer in vivo. The lateral mobility decreased linearly with the concentration of DOPE but was not affected by the fraction of anionic lipids from DOPG. The addition of DOPG and DOPE did not affect the activity of GltT. We conclude that the hydrophobic thickness of the bilayer is a major determinant of molecule diffusion in membranes, but protein-specific properties may lead to deviations from the Saffman-Delbrück model.

  19. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhanon, James R.; Simmons, Blake A.; Zifer, Thomas; Jamison, Gregory M.; Loy, Douglas A.; Rahimian, Kamyar; Long, Timothy M.; Wheeler, David R.; Staiger, Chad L.

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  20. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  1. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  2. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and Surfactant protein-B turnover in human acute lung injury and in control patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizzi Sabina

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS and Acute Lung Injury (ALI have low concentrations of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. No information is available on their turnover. Objectives To analyze disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B turnover in patients with ARDS/ALI and in human adults with normal lungs (controls. Methods 2H2O as precursor of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine-palmitate and 113C-Leucine as precursor of surfactant protein-B were administered intravenously to 12 patients with ARDS/ALI and to 8 controls. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B were isolated from serial tracheal aspirates, and their fractional synthetic rate was derived from the 2H and 13C enrichment curves, obtained by gas chromatography mass spectrometry. Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine, surfactant protein-B, and protein concentrations in tracheal aspirates were also measured. Results 1 Surfactant protein-B turned over at faster rate than disaturated-phosphatidylcholine both in ARDS/ALI patients and in controls. 2 In patients with ARDS/ALI the fractional synthesis rate of disaturated-phosphatidylcholine was 3.1 times higher than in controls (p Conclusions 1 Disaturated-phosphatidylcholine and surfactant protein-B have a different turnover both in healthy and diseased lungs. 2 In ARDS/ALI the synthesis of these two surfactant components may be differently regulated.

  3. Stable intermediates determine proteins' primary unfolding sites in the presence of surfactants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Steen Vang; Andersen, Kell kleiner; Enghild, Jan J.

    2009-01-01

    Despite detailed knowledge of the overall structural changes and stoichiometries of surfactant binding, little is known about which protein regions constitute the preferred sites of attack for initial unfolding. Here we have exposed three proteins to limited proteolysis at anionic (SDS) and catio......Despite detailed knowledge of the overall structural changes and stoichiometries of surfactant binding, little is known about which protein regions constitute the preferred sites of attack for initial unfolding. Here we have exposed three proteins to limited proteolysis at anionic (SDS......) and cationic (DTAC) surfactant concentrations corresponding to specific conformational transitions, using the surfactant-robust broad-specificity proteases Savinase and Alcalase. Cleavage sites are identified by SDS-PAGE and N-terminal sequencing. We observe well-defined cleavage fragments, which suggest...... that flexibility is limited to certain regions of the protein. Cleavage sites for α-lactalbumin and myoglobin correspond to regions identified in other studies as partially unfolded at low pH or in the presence of organic solvents. For Tnfn3, which does not form partially folded structures under other conditions...

  4. A model of protein association based on their hydrophobic and electric interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Mozo-Villarías

    Full Text Available The propensity of many proteins to oligomerize and associate to form complex structures from their constituent monomers, is analyzed in terms of their hydrophobic (H, and electric pseudo-dipole (D moment vectors. In both cases these vectors are defined as the product of the distance between their positive and negative centroids, times the total hydrophobicity or total positive charge of the protein. Changes in the magnitudes and directions of H and D are studied as monomers associate to form larger complexes. We use these descriptors to study similarities and differences in two groups of associations: a open associations such as polymers with an undefined number of monomers (i.e. actin polymerization, amyloid and HIV capsid assemblies; b closed symmetrical associations of finite size, like spherical virus capsids and protein cages. The tendency of the hydrophobic moments of the monomers in an association is to align in parallel arrangements following a pattern similar to those of phospholipids in a membrane. Conversely, electric dipole moments of monomers tend to align in antiparallel associations. The final conformation of a given assembly is a fine-tuned combination of these forces, limited by steric constraints. This determines whether the association will be open (indetermined number of monomers or closed (fixed number of monomers. Any kinetic, binding or molecular peculiarities that characterize a protein assembly, comply with the vector rules laid down in this paper. These findings are also independent of protein size and shape.

  5. A polymer surfactant corona dynamically replaces water in solvent-free protein liquids and ensures macromolecular flexibility and activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallat, François-Xavier; Brogan, Alex P S; Fichou, Yann; McGrath, Nina; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Combet, Jérôme; Wuttke, Joachim; Mann, Stephen; Zaccai, Giuseppe; Jackson, Colin J; Perriman, Adam W; Weik, Martin

    2012-08-15

    The observation of biological activity in solvent-free protein-polymer surfactant hybrids challenges the view of aqueous and nonaqueous solvents being unique promoters of protein dynamics linked to function. Here, we combine elastic incoherent neutron scattering and specific deuterium labeling to separately study protein and polymer motions in solvent-free hybrids. Myoglobin motions within the hybrid are found to closely resemble those of a hydrated protein, and motions of the polymer surfactant coating are similar to those of the hydration water, leading to the conclusion that the polymer surfactant coating plasticizes protein structures in a way similar to hydration water.

  6. Automated Hydrophobic Interaction Chromatography Column Selection for Use in Protein Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick J. M.; Stone, Orrin J.; Anderson, Michelle E.

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to other chromatographic methods for purifying proteins (e.g. gel filtration, affinity, and ion exchange), hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) commonly requires experimental determination (referred to as screening or "scouting") in order to select the most suitable chromatographic medium for purifying a given protein 1. The method presented here describes an automated approach to scouting for an optimal HIC media to be used in protein purification. HIC separates proteins and other biomolecules from a crude lysate based on differences in hydrophobicity. Similar to affinity chromatography (AC) and ion exchange chromatography (IEX), HIC is capable of concentrating the protein of interest as it progresses through the chromatographic process. Proteins best suited for purification by HIC include those with hydrophobic surface regions and able to withstand exposure to salt concentrations in excess of 2 M ammonium sulfate ((NH4)2SO4). HIC is often chosen as a purification method for proteins lacking an affinity tag, and thus unsuitable for AC, and when IEX fails to provide adequate purification. Hydrophobic moieties on the protein surface temporarily bind to a nonpolar ligand coupled to an inert, immobile matrix. The interaction between protein and ligand are highly dependent on the salt concentration of the buffer flowing through the chromatography column, with high ionic concentrations strengthening the protein-ligand interaction and making the protein immobile (i.e. bound inside the column) 2. As salt concentrations decrease, the protein-ligand interaction dissipates, the protein again becomes mobile and elutes from the column. Several HIC media are commercially available in pre-packed columns, each containing one of several hydrophobic ligands (e.g. S-butyl, butyl, octyl, and phenyl) cross-linked at varying densities to agarose beads of a specific diameter 3. Automated column scouting allows for an efficient approach for determining which HIC media

  7. Automated hydrophobic interaction chromatography column selection for use in protein purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Patrick J M; Stone, Orrin J; Anderson, Michelle E

    2011-09-21

    In contrast to other chromatographic methods for purifying proteins (e.g. gel filtration, affinity, and ion exchange), hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) commonly requires experimental determination (referred to as screening or "scouting") in order to select the most suitable chromatographic medium for purifying a given protein (1). The method presented here describes an automated approach to scouting for an optimal HIC media to be used in protein purification. HIC separates proteins and other biomolecules from a crude lysate based on differences in hydrophobicity. Similar to affinity chromatography (AC) and ion exchange chromatography (IEX), HIC is capable of concentrating the protein of interest as it progresses through the chromatographic process. Proteins best suited for purification by HIC include those with hydrophobic surface regions and able to withstand exposure to salt concentrations in excess of 2 M ammonium sulfate ((NH(4;))(2;)SO(4;)). HIC is often chosen as a purification method for proteins lacking an affinity tag, and thus unsuitable for AC, and when IEX fails to provide adequate purification. Hydrophobic moieties on the protein surface temporarily bind to a nonpolar ligand coupled to an inert, immobile matrix. The interaction between protein and ligand are highly dependent on the salt concentration of the buffer flowing through the chromatography column, with high ionic concentrations strengthening the protein-ligand interaction and making the protein immobile (i.e. bound inside the column) (2). As salt concentrations decrease, the protein-ligand interaction dissipates, the protein again becomes mobile and elutes from the column. Several HIC media are commercially available in pre-packed columns, each containing one of several hydrophobic ligands (e.g. S-butyl, butyl, octyl, and phenyl) cross-linked at varying densities to agarose beads of a specific diameter (3). Automated column scouting allows for an efficient approach for determining

  8. Signatures of hydrophobic collapse in extended proteins captured with force spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Kirstin A.; Gräter, Frauke; Dougan, Lorna; Badilla, Carmen L.; Berne, Bruce J.; Fernandez, Julio M.

    2007-01-01

    We unfold and extend single proteins at a high force and then linearly relax the force to probe their collapse mechanisms. We observe a large variability in the extent of their recoil. Although chain entropy makes a small contribution, we show that the observed variability results from hydrophobic interactions with randomly varying magnitude from protein to protein. This collapse mechanism is common to highly extended proteins, including nonfolding elastomeric proteins like PEVK from titin. Our observations explain the puzzling differences between the folding behavior of highly extended proteins, from those folding after chemical or thermal denaturation. Probing the collapse of highly extended proteins with force spectroscopy allows separation of the different driving forces in protein folding. PMID:17470816

  9. Ligand binding induces a sharp decrease in hydrophobicity of folate binding protein assessed by 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate which suppresses self-association of the hydrophobic apo-protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jan; Lawaetz, Anders J; Hansen, Steen I

    2012-08-17

    High affinity folate binding protein (FBP) regulates as a soluble protein and as a cellular receptor intracellular trafficking of folic acid, a vitamin of great importance to cell growth and division. We addressed two issues of potential importance to the biological function of FBP, a possible decrease of the surface hydrophobicity associated with the ligand-induced conformation change of FBP, and protein-inter-protein interactions involved in self-association of hydrophobic apo-FBP. The extrinsic fluorescent apolar dye 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate (ANS) exhibited enhanced fluorescence intensity and a blueshift of emission maximum from 510-520 nm to 460-470 nm upon addition of apo-FBP indicating binding to a strongly hydrophobic environment. Neither enhancement of fluorescence nor blueshift of ANS emission maximum occurred when folate-ligated holo-FBP replaced apo-FBP. The drastic decrease in surface hydrophobicity of holo-FBP could have bearings on the biological function of FBP since changes in surface hydrophobicity have critical effects on the biological function of receptors and transport proteins. ANS interacts with exposed hydrophobic surfaces on proteins and may thereby block and prevent aggregation of proteins (chaperone-like effect). Hence, hydrophobic interactions seemed to participate in the concentration-dependent self-association of apo-FBP which was suppressed by high ANS concentrations in light scatter measurements.

  10. Protein denaturation due to the action of surfactants: a study by SAXS and ITC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oseliero Filho, Pedro Leonidas; Oliveira, Cristiano Luis Pinto de [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Pedersen, Jan Skov; Otzen, Daniel Erik [University of Aarhus (Denmark)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Proteins are the major constituent of biological systems along with carbohydrates, lipids and nucleic acids (DNA and RNA). According to their structure and composition, proteins perform several functions in the organism, starting from the macroscopic level, with participation on the olfaction of animals, down to the cellular level, allocated in the membrane and making the connection between extra and intracellular environment. The function of a protein (which may be enzymatic, hormonal, structural, energetic, transport etc) is related to several factors including its structure (primary, secondary, tertiary or quaternary). Denaturation occurs when the secondary structure and/or tertiary is lost, which is almost always followed by the loss of the associated biological function. Temperature, pH and the action of surfactants influence the process of the denaturation. The influence of surfactants to the protein structure and function is the aim of this work. Therefore we are using an isolated protein, {alpha}-lactalbumin, that is found in the milk and whose function is related to the synthesis of galactose. The purpose is to characterize, in a thermodynamic-structural point of view, the denaturation of alpha-lactalbumin in the presence of surfactants anionic (sodium dodecyl sulfate - SDS), cationic (tetradecyltrimethylammonium bromide - TTAB), zwitterionic (2-diheptanoyl-sn-glycero-3- phosphocholine - DHPC) and nonionic (decyl-{beta}-D-Maltopyranoside - DM). The isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) technique, which provides information of structural changes from changes in energy, represents the starting point for the study, while the technique of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) provides information about the structural characteristics of surfactant-protein complexes formed at each step of the denaturation process. The data analysis is in the initial stage, but it was possible to obtain general parameters related to the complex formed from the

  11. Correlation of average hydrophobicity, water/air interface surface rheological properties and foaming properties of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, A; Abirached, C; Araujo, A C; Panizzolo, L A; Moyna, P; Añón, M C

    2012-04-01

    A comparative study on the behavior in the air-water interface of β-lactoglobulin, α-lactoalbumin, glycinin and β-conglycinin was performed. The behavior at the interface was evaluated by equilibrium surface tension and surface rheological properties of adsorbed films. There were significant differences (α ≤ 0.05) in the values of the constants of adsorption to the interface of the four proteins. The glycinin had the slowest rate of adsorption, due to its low average hydrophobicity, low molecular flexibility and large molecular size. Smaller proteins like β-lactoglobulin and α-lactoalbumin tended to greater equilibrium pressure values than the larger proteins because of its higher rate of adsorption to the interface. The foam capacity of proteins showed a positive correlation with the average hydrophobicity; the maximal retained liquid volume or the initial rate of passage of liquid to foam were significantly lower (α ≤ 0.05) when protein was glycinin. The dilatational modulus of glycinin was the lowest, which implies lowest resistance to disruption of the film. Glycinin protein has lower proportion of gravitational drainage and higher disproportionation having perhaps a less resistant film. In conclusion, β-conglycinin and whey proteins showed a similar behavior, so β-conglycinin might be the best soybean protein to replace milk proteins in food formulations.

  12. Circulating surfactant protein D is decreased in early rheumatoid arthritis: a 1-year prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh, S V; Lindegaard, H M; Sorensen, G L;

    2008-01-01

    Innate immune system abnormalities, e.g., mannan-binding lectin (MBL) genotype variants, have been demonstrated to modify the disease course of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Surfactant protein D (SP-D) shares important structural and functional properties with MBL suggesting that SP-D may...... with traditional disease activity measures indicate that SP-D reflects a distinctive aspect in the RA pathogenesis....

  13. Surfactant protein D, a clinical biomarker for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with excellent discriminant values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akiki, Zeina; Fakih, Dalia; Jounblat, Rania

    2016-01-01

    Biological markers can help to better identify a disease or refine its diagnosis. In the present study, the association between surfactant protein D (SP-D) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was studied among subjects consulting for respiratory diseases or symptoms and was compared...

  14. No effect of ablation of surfactant protein-D on acute cerebral infarction in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lambertsen, Kate Lykke; Østergaard, Kamilla; Clausen, Bettina Hjelm

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Crosstalk between the immune system in the brain and the periphery may contribute to the long-term outcome both in experimental and clinical stroke. Although, the immune defense collectin surfactant protein-D (SP-D) is best known for its role in pulmonary innate immunity, SP-D is also...

  15. Long-term stability and circadian variation in circulating levels of surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoegh, Silje Vermedal; Sorensen, Grith Lykke; Tornoe, Ida;

    2010-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an oligomeric calcium-dependent lectin with important roles in innate host defence against infectious microorganisms. Several studies have shown that patients with inflammatory lung disease have elevated levels of circulating SP-D, and serum SP-D has been suggested ...

  16. Serum surfactant protein D is correlated to development of dementia and augmented mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Mads; Andersen, Kjeld; Sørensen, Grith Lykke;

    2007-01-01

    Development of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), is associated with lipid dysregulation and inflammation. As the host defense lectin surfactant protein D (SP-D) has multiple effects in lipid homeostasis and inflammation, the correlation between SP-D concentrations and development of d...

  17. Dynamic strength of the interaction between lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) and saccharide ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thormann, Esben; Dreyer, Jakob K; Simonsen, Adam C

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the dynamic strength of the interaction between lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) and different sugars, maltose, mannose, glucose, and galactose, we have used an atomic force microscope to monitor the interaction on a single molecule scale. The experiment is performed by me...

  18. Hydrophobic enhancement of Dopa-mediated adhesion in a mussel foot protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Wei; Yu, Jing; Broomell, Christopher; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2013-01-09

    Dopa (3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine) is recognized as a key chemical signature of mussel adhesion and has been adopted into diverse synthetic polymer systems. Dopa's notorious susceptibility to oxidation, however, poses significant challenges to the practical translation of mussel adhesion. Using a surface forces apparatus to investigate the adhesion of mussel foot protein 3 (Mfp3) "slow", a hydrophobic protein variant of the Mfp3 family in the plaque, we have discovered a subtle molecular strategy correlated with hydrophobicity that appears to compensate for Dopa instability. At pH 3, where Dopa is stable, Mfp3 slow, like Mfp3 "fast" adhesion to mica, is directly proportional to the mol % of Dopa present in the protein. At pH of 5.5 and 7.5, however, loss of adhesion in Mfp3 slow was less than half that occurring in Mfp3 fast, purportedly because Dopa in Mfp3 slow is less prone to oxidation. Indeed, cyclic voltammetry showed that the oxidation potential of Dopa in Mfp3 slow is significantly higher than in Mfp3 fast at pH of 7.5. A much greater difference between the two variants was revealed in the interaction energy of two symmetric Mfp3 slow films (E(ad) = -3 mJ/m(2)). This energy corresponds to the energy of protein cohesion which is notable for its reversibility and pH independence. Exploitation of aromatic hydrophobic sequences to protect Dopa against oxidation as well as to mediate hydrophobic and H-bonding interactions between proteins provides new insights for developing effective artificial underwater adhesives.

  19. The Effect of Membrane Environment on Surfactant Protein C Stability Studied by Constant-pH Molecular Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalheda, Catarina A; Campos, Sara R R; Baptista, António M

    2015-10-26

    Pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a small peptide with two covalently linked fatty acyl chains that plays a crucial role in the formation and stabilization of the pulmonary surfactant reservoirs during the compression and expansion steps of the respiratory cycle. Although its function is known to be tightly related to its highly hydrophobic character and key interactions maintained with specific lipid components, much is left to understand about its molecular mechanism of action. Also, although it adopts a mainly helical structure while associated with the membrane, factors as pH variation and deacylation have been shown to affect its stability and function. In this work, the conformational behavior of both the acylated and deacylated SP-C isoforms was studied in a DPPC bilayer under different pH conditions using constant-pH molecular dynamics simulations. Our findings show that both protein isoforms are remarkably stable over the studied pH range, even though the acylated isoform exhibits a labile helix-turn-helix motif rarely observed in the other isoform. We estimate similar tilt angles for the two isoforms over the studied pH range, with a generally higher degree of internalization of the basic N-terminal residues in the deacylated case, and observe and discuss some protonation-conformation coupling effects. Both isoforms establish contacts with the surrounding lipid molecules (preferentially with the sn-2 ester bonds) and have a local effect on the conformational behavior of the surrounding lipid molecules, the latter being more pronounced for acylated SP-C.

  20. A pH-sensitive red fluorescent protein compatible with hydrophobic resin embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wenyan; Gang, Yadong; Liu, Xiuli; Zhou, Hongfu; Zeng, Shaoqun

    2017-02-01

    pH sensitive fluorescent proteins enabling chemical reactivation in resin are useful tools for fluorescence microimaging. EYFP or EGFP improved from GFP in jellyfish are good for such applications. For simultaneous two-color imaging, a suitable red fluorescent protein is of urgent need. Here a pH sensitive red fluorescent protein, pHuji, is selected and verified to be compatible with hydrophobic resin embedding and thus may be promising for dual-colour chemical reactivation imaging in conjunction with EGFP or EYFP.

  1. The principal eigenvector of contact matrices and hydrophobicity profiles in proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Bastolla, U; Román, H E; Vendruscolo, M; Bastolla, Ugo; Porto, Markus; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2005-01-01

    With the aim to study the relationship between protein sequences and their native structures, we adopt vectorial representations for both sequence and structure. The structural representation is based on the Principal Eigenvector of the fold's contact matrix (PE). As recently shown, the latter encodes sufficient information for reconstructing the whole contact matrix. The sequence is represented through a Hydrophobicity Profile (HP), using a generalized hydrophobicity scale that we obtain from the principal eigenvector of a residue-residue interaction matrix and denote it as interactivity scale. Using this novel scale, we define the optimal HP of a protein fold, and predict, by means of stability arguments, that it is strongly correlated with the PE of the fold's contact matrix. This prediction is confirmed through an evolutionary analysis, which shows that the PE correlates with the HP of each individual sequence adopting the same fold and, even more strongly, with the average HP of this set of sequences. Th...

  2. Preparation of a hydrophobic polythiophene film to improve protein adsorption and proliferation of PC 12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Da-Feng; Wang, Hua-Jie; Fu, Jian-Xi; Wang, Wei; Jia, Xue-Shun; Wang, Jin-Ye

    2008-12-25

    High quality films of polythiophene with different alkyl side chains were successfully synthesized by a novel method in the presence of sodium dodecylbenzenesulonate (SDBS) under N2 atmosphere on the PTFE (polytetrafluorethylene) substrate. The as-prepared films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), conductivity measurement, and water contact angle measurement. The morphologies of the films were homogeneous with micro-/nanostructures, and their conductivities were high enough for biomedical applications. Hydrophobicity of the films could be adjusted easily by inducing alkyl side chains with different length, which could control protein adsorption in succession. Hydrophobic polythiophene film with a long alkyl side chain had a higher ability of protein adsorption and PC 12 cell proliferation. The biocompatibility study of the synthesized films in vitro proved that the synthesized films were not cytotoxic to two cell lines used and could support cell attachment and proliferation well. Polythiophenes films prepared by in-situ deposition will be good candidates for biomedical applications.

  3. Interaction of Moringa oleifera seed protein with a mineral surface and the influence of surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaambwa, Habauka M; Hellsing, Maja S; Rennie, Adrian R; Barker, Robert

    2015-06-15

    The paper describes the adsorption of purified protein from seeds of Moringa oleifera to a sapphire interface and the effects of addition of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) and the cationic surfactant hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Neutron reflection was used to determine the structure and composition of interfacial layers adsorbed at the solid/solution interface. The maximum surface excess of protein was found to be about 5.3 mg m(-2). The protein does not desorb from the solid/liquid interface when rinsed with water. Addition of SDS increases the reflectivity indicating co-adsorption. It was observed that CTAB is able to remove the protein from the interface. The distinct differences to the behavior observed previously for the protein at the silica/water interface are identified. The adsorption of the protein to alumina in addition to other surfaces has shown why it is an effective flocculating agent for the range of impurities found in water supplies. The ability to tailor different surface layers in combination with various surfactants also offers the potential for adsorbed protein to be used in separation technologies.

  4. Protein-nanoparticle interactions evaluation by immunomethods: Surfactants can disturb quantitative determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaguera, Cristina; Calderó, Gabriela; Solans, Conxita; Vauthier, Christine

    2015-08-01

    The adsorption of proteins on nanoparticle surface is one of the first events that occur when nanoparticles enter in the blood stream, which influences nanoparticles lifetime and further biodistribution. Albumin, which is the most abundant protein in serum and which has been deeply characterized, is an interesting model protein to investigate nanoparticle-protein interactions. Therefore, the interaction of nanoparticles with serum albumin has been widely studied. Immunomethods were suggested for the investigation of adsorption isotherms because of their ease to quantify the non-adsorbed bovine serum albumin without the need of applying separation methods that could modify the balance between the adsorbed and non-adsorbed proteins. The present work revealed that this method should be applied with caution. Artifacts in the determination of free protein can be generated by the presence of surfactants such as polysorbate 80, widely used in the pharmaceutical and biomedical field, that are needed to preserve the stability of nanoparticle dispersions. It was shown that the presence of traces of polysorbate 80 in the dispersion leads to an overestimation of the amount of bovine serum albumin remaining free in the dispersion medium when determined by both radial immunodiffusion and rocket immunoelectrophoresis. However, traces of poloxamer 188 did not result in clear perturbed migrations. These methods are not appropriate to perform adsorption isotherms of proteins on nanoparticle dispersions containing traces of remaining free surfactant. They should only be applied on dispersions that are free of surfactant that is not associated with nanoparticles.

  5. Boc SPPS of two hydrophobic peptides using a ''solubilising tail'' strategy : Dodecaalanine and chemotactic protein 10(42-55)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Englebretsen, DR; Alewood, PF

    1996-01-01

    The solid phase syntheses of the hydrophobic peptides dodecaalanine and chemotactic protein-10(42-55) were achieved using a ''solubilising tail'' strategy. Peptide constructs of the form H-hydrophobic peptide-glycolamide ester-(Gly-Arg)(4)-Gly-OH were synthesised by Boc SPPS. The peptide-constructs

  6. Boc SPPS of two hydrophobic peptides using a ''solubilising tail'' strategy : Dodecaalanine and chemotactic protein 10(42-55)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Englebretsen, DR; Alewood, PF

    1996-01-01

    The solid phase syntheses of the hydrophobic peptides dodecaalanine and chemotactic protein-10(42-55) were achieved using a ''solubilising tail'' strategy. Peptide constructs of the form H-hydrophobic peptide-glycolamide ester-(Gly-Arg)(4)-Gly-OH were synthesised by Boc SPPS. The peptide-constructs

  7. INTERFACIAL SELF-ASSEMBLY OF A SCHIZOPHYLLUM-COMMUNE HYDROPHOBIN INTO AN INSOLUBLE AMPHIPATHIC PROTEIN MEMBRANE DEPENDS ON SURFACE HYDROPHOBICITY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOSTEN, HAB; RUARDY, TG; VANDERMEI, HC; BUSSCHER, HJ; WESSELS, JGH

    1995-01-01

    Hydrophobins are small secreted fungal proteins rich in hydrophobic amino acids with a characteristic hydropathy pattern and conserved location of eight cysteine residues. It was previously shown that purified SC3p hydrophobin of Schizophyllum commune self-assembles at hydrophilic/hydrophobic interf

  8. Assay of protein and peptide adducts of cholesterol ozonolysis products by hydrophobic and click enrichment methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Katherine; Genaro-Mattos, Thiago C; Miyamoto, Sayuri; Stec, Donald F; Kim, Hye-Young H; Tallman, Keri A; Porter, Ned A

    2014-10-20

    Cholesterol undergoes ozonolysis to afford a variety of oxysterol products, including cholesterol-5,6-epoxide (CholEp) and the isomeric aldehydes secosterol A (seco A) and secosterol B (seco B). These oxysterols display numerous important biological activities, including protein adduction; however, much remains to be learned about the identity of the reactive species and the range of proteins modified by these oxysterols. Here, we synthesized alkynyl derivatives of cholesterol-derived oxysterols and employed a straightforward detection method to establish secosterols A and B as the most protein-reactive of the oxysterols tested. Model adduction studies with an amino acid, peptides, and proteins provide evidence for the potential role of secosterol dehydration products in protein adduction. Hydrophobic separation methods-Folch extraction and solid phase extraction (SPE)-were successfully applied to enrich oxysterol-adducted peptide species, and LC-MS/MS analysis of a model peptide-seco adduct revealed a unique fragmentation pattern (neutral loss of 390 Da) for that species. Coupling a hydrophobic enrichment method with proteomic analysis utilizing characteristic fragmentation patterns facilitates the identification of secosterol-modified peptides and proteins in an adducted protein. More broadly, these improved enrichment methods may give insight into the role of oxysterols and ozone exposure in the pathogenesis of a variety of diseases, including atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and asthma.

  9. Hsp90 protein interacts with phosphorothioate oligonucleotides containing hydrophobic 2'-modifications and enhances antisense activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xue-Hai; Shen, Wen; Sun, Hong; Kinberger, Garth A; Prakash, Thazha P; Nichols, Joshua G; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-05-05

    RNase H1-dependent antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) are chemically modified to enhance pharmacological properties. Major modifications include phosphorothioate (PS) backbone and different 2'-modifications in 2-5 nucleotides at each end (wing) of an ASO. Chemical modifications can affect protein binding and understanding ASO-protein interactions is important for better drug design. Recently we identified many intracellular ASO-binding proteins and found that protein binding could affect ASO potency. Here, we analyzed the structure-activity-relationships of ASO-protein interactions and found 2'-modifications significantly affected protein binding, including La, P54nrb and NPM. PS-ASOs containing more hydrophobic 2'-modifications exhibit higher affinity for proteins in general, although certain proteins, e.g. Ku70/Ku80 and TCP1, are less affected by 2'-modifications. We found that Hsp90 protein binds PS-ASOs containing locked-nucleic-acid (LNA) or constrained-ethyl-bicyclic-nucleic-acid ((S)-cEt) modifications much more avidly than 2'-O-methoxyethyl (MOE). ASOs bind the mid-domain of Hsp90 protein. Hsp90 interacts with more hydrophobic 2' modifications, e.g. (S)-cEt or LNA, in the 5'-wing of the ASO. Reduction of Hsp90 protein decreased activity of PS-ASOs with 5'-LNA or 5'-cEt wings, but not with 5'-MOE wing. Together, our results indicate Hsp90 protein enhances the activity of PS/LNA or PS/(S)-cEt ASOs, and imply that altering protein binding of ASOs using different chemical modifications can improve therapeutic performance of PS-ASOs. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  10. The role of hydrophobic interactions in positioning of peripheral proteins in membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomize Mikhail A

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three-dimensional (3D structures of numerous peripheral membrane proteins have been determined. Biological activity, stability, and conformations of these proteins depend on their spatial positions with respect to the lipid bilayer. However, these positions are usually undetermined. Results We report the first large-scale computational study of monotopic/peripheral proteins with known 3D structures. The optimal translational and rotational positions of 476 proteins are determined by minimizing energy of protein transfer from water to the lipid bilayer, which is approximated by a hydrocarbon slab with a decadiene-like polarity and interfacial regions characterized by water-permeation profiles. Predicted membrane-binding sites, protein tilt angles and membrane penetration depths are consistent with spin-labeling, chemical modification, fluorescence, NMR, mutagenesis, and other experimental studies of 53 peripheral proteins and peptides. Experimental membrane binding affinities of peripheral proteins were reproduced in cases that did not involve a helix-coil transition, specific binding of lipids, or a predominantly electrostatic association. Coordinates of all examined peripheral proteins and peptides with the calculated hydrophobic membrane boundaries, subcellular localization, topology, structural classification, and experimental references are available through the Orientations of Proteins in Membranes (OPM database. Conclusion Positions of diverse peripheral proteins and peptides in the lipid bilayer can be accurately predicted using their 3D structures that represent a proper membrane-bound conformation and oligomeric state, and have membrane binding elements present. The success of the implicit solvation model suggests that hydrophobic interactions are usually sufficient to determine the spatial position of a protein in the membrane, even when electrostatic interactions or specific binding of lipids are substantial. Our

  11. Interplay between hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule in determining membrane-protein topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elazar, Assaf; Weinstein, Jonathan Jacob; Prilusky, Jaime; Fleishman, Sarel Jacob

    2016-09-13

    The energetics of membrane-protein interactions determine protein topology and structure: hydrophobicity drives the insertion of helical segments into the membrane, and positive charges orient the protein with respect to the membrane plane according to the positive-inside rule. Until recently, however, quantifying these contributions met with difficulty, precluding systematic analysis of the energetic basis for membrane-protein topology. We recently developed the dsTβL method, which uses deep sequencing and in vitro selection of segments inserted into the bacterial plasma membrane to infer insertion-energy profiles for each amino acid residue across the membrane, and quantified the insertion contribution from hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule. Here, we present a topology-prediction algorithm called TopGraph, which is based on a sequence search for minimum dsTβL insertion energy. Whereas the average insertion energy assigned by previous experimental scales was positive (unfavorable), the average assigned by TopGraph in a nonredundant set is -6.9 kcal/mol. By quantifying contributions from both hydrophobicity and the positive-inside rule we further find that in about half of large membrane proteins polar segments are inserted into the membrane to position more positive charges in the cytoplasm, suggesting an interplay between these two energy contributions. Because membrane-embedded polar residues are crucial for substrate binding and conformational change, the results implicate the positive-inside rule in determining the architectures of membrane-protein functional sites. This insight may aid structure prediction, engineering, and design of membrane proteins. TopGraph is available online (topgraph.weizmann.ac.il).

  12. Segregated phases in pulmonary surfactant membranes do not show coexistence of lipid populations with differentiated dynamic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Orädd, Greger; Bagatolli, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The composition of pulmonary surfactant membranes and films has evolved to support a complex lateral structure, including segregation of ordered/disordered phases maintained up to physiological temperatures. In this study, we have analyzed the temperature-dependent dynamic properties of native...... surfactant membranes and membranes reconstituted from two surfactant hydrophobic fractions (i.e., all the lipids plus the hydrophobic proteins SP-B and SP-C, or only the total lipid fraction). These preparations show micrometer-sized fluid ordered/disordered phase coexistence, associated with a broad...... from the two types of surfactant hydrophobic extract. These latter results suggest that lipid dynamics are similar in the coexisting fluid phases observed by fluorescence microscopy. Additionally, it is found that surfactant proteins significantly reduce the average intramolecular lipid mobility...

  13. Hydrophobic blocks facilitate lipid compatibility and translocon recognition of transmembrane protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Tracy A; Schiller, Nina; von Heijne, Gunnar; Deber, Charles M

    2015-02-24

    Biophysical hydrophobicity scales suggest that partitioning of a protein segment from an aqueous phase into a membrane is governed by its perceived segmental hydrophobicity but do not establish specifically (i) how the segment is identified in vivo for translocon-mediated insertion or (ii) whether the destination lipid bilayer is biochemically receptive to the inserted sequence. To examine the congruence between these dual requirements, we designed and synthesized a library of Lys-tagged peptides of a core length sufficient to span a bilayer but with varying patterns of sequence, each composed of nine Leu residues, nine Ser residues, and one (central) Trp residue. We found that peptides containing contiguous Leu residues (Leu-block peptides, e.g., LLLLLLLLLWSSSSSSSSS), in comparison to those containing discontinuous stretches of Leu residues (non-Leu-block peptides, e.g., SLSLLSLSSWSLLSLSLLS), displayed greater helicity (circular dichroism spectroscopy), traveled slower during sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, had longer reverse phase high-performance liquid chromatography retention times on a C-18 column, and were helical when reconstituted into 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylglycero-3-phosphocholine liposomes, each observation indicating superior lipid compatibility when a Leu-block is present. These parameters were largely paralleled in a biological membrane insertion assay using microsomal membranes from dog pancreas endoplasmic reticulum, where we found only the Leu-block sequences successfully inserted; intriguingly, an amphipathic peptide (SLLSSLLSSWLLSSLLSSL; Leu face, Ser face) with biophysical properties similar to those of Leu-block peptides failed to insert. Our overall results identify local sequence lipid compatibility rather than average hydrophobicity as a principal determinant of transmembrane segment potential, while demonstrating that further subtleties of hydrophobic and helical patterning, such as circumferential hydrophobicity in

  14. Charges in Hydrophobic Environments: A Strategy for Identifying Alternative States in Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Aaron C; Majumdar, Ananya; Schlessman, Jamie L; García-Moreno E, Bertrand

    2017-01-10

    In the V23E variant of staphylococcal nuclease, Glu-23 has a pKa of 7.5. At low pH, Glu-23 is neutral and buried in the hydrophobic interior of the protein. Crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy experiments show that when Glu-23 becomes charged, the protein switches into an open state in which strands β1 and β2 separate from the β-barrel; the remaining structure is unaffected. In the open state the hydrophobic interior of the protein is exposed to bulk water, allowing Glu-23 to become hydrated. This illustrates several key aspects of protein electrostatics: (1) The apparent pKa of an internal ionizable group can reflect the average of the very different pKa values (open ≈4.5, closed ≫7.5) sampled in the different conformational states. (2) The high apparent dielectric constant reported by the pKa value of internal ionizable group reflects conformational reorganization. (3) The apparent pKa of internal groups can be governed by large conformational changes. (4) A single charge buried in the hydrophobic interior of a protein is sufficient to convert what might have been a transient, partially unfolded state into the dominant state in solution. This suggests a general strategy for examining inaccessible regions of the folding landscape and for engineering conformational switches driven by small changes in pH. These data also constitute a benchmark for stringent testing of the ability of computational algorithms to predict pKa values of internal residues and to reproduce pH-driven conformational transitions of proteins.

  15. 2-DE using hemi-fluorinated surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starita-Geribaldi, Mireille; Thebault, Pascal; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Guittard, Frederic; Geribaldi, Serge

    2007-07-01

    The synthesis of hemi-fluorinated zwitterionic surfactants was realized and assessed for 2-DE, a powerful separation method for proteomic analysis. These new fluorinated amidosulfobetaine (FASB-p,m) were compared to their hydrocarbon counterparts amidosulfobetaine (ASB-n) characterized by a hydrophilic polar head, a hydrophobic and lipophilic tail, and an amido group as connector. The tail of these FASB surfactants was in part fluorinated resulting in the modulation of its lipophilicity (or oleophobicity). Their effect on the red blood cell (RBC) membrane showed a specific solubilization depending on the length of the hydrophobic part. A large number of polypeptide spots appeared in the 2-DE patterns by using FASB-p,m. The oleophobic character of these surfactants was confirmed by the fact that Band 3, a highly hydrophobic transmembrane protein, was not solubilized by these fluorinated structures. The corresponding pellet was very rich in Band 3 and could then be solubilized by using a strong detergent such as amidosulfobetaine with an alkyl tail containing 14 carbon atoms (ASB-14). Thus, these hemi-fluorinated surfactants appeared as powerful tools when used at the first step of a two-step solubilization strategy using a hydrocarbon homologous surfactant in the second step.

  16. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Quistgaard, Esben M. [Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Nordlund, Par [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Department of Medical Biochemistry and Biophysics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm (Sweden); Thanabalu, Thirumaran [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore); Torres, Jaume, E-mail: jtorres@ntu.edu.sg [School of Biological Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 (Singapore)

    2015-08-15

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target. - Highlights: • A yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) detected BAP31 as a binder of RSV SH protein. • Transfected SH and BAP31 co-localize in lung epithelial cells. • Endogenous BAP31 is pulled down by RSV SH protein. • BAP31 endodomain interacts with the N-terminal α-helix of SH protein in micelles. • This interaction is proposed to be a potential drug target.

  17. Fluorescent Ensemble Based on Bispyrene Fluorophore and Surfactant Assemblies: Sensing and Discriminating Proteins in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Junmei; Ding, Liping; Bo, Yu; Fang, Yu

    2015-10-14

    A particular bispyrene fluorophore (1) with two pyrene moieties covalently linked via a hydrophilic spacer was synthesized. Fluorescence measurements reveal that the fluorescence emission of 1 could be well modulated by a cationic surfactant, dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB). Protein sensing studies illustrate that the selected ensemble based on 1/DTAB assemblies exhibits ratiometric responses to nonmetalloproteins and turn-off responses to metalloproteins, which can be used to differentiate the two types of proteins. Moreover, negatively charged nonmetalloproteins can be discriminated from the positively charged ones according to the difference in ratiometric responses. Fluorescence sensing studies with control bispyrenes indicate that the polarity of the spacer connecting two pyrene moieties plays an important role in locating bispyrene fluorophore in DTAB assemblies, which further influences its sensing behaviors to noncovalent interacting proteins. This study sheds light on the influence of the probe structure on the sensing performance of a fluorescent ensemble based on probe and surfactant assemblies.

  18. Soybean Hydrophobic Protein Response to External Electric Field: A Molecular Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijaya Raghavan

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The molecular dynamic (MD modeling approach was applied to evaluate the effect of an external electric field on soybean hydrophobic protein and surface properties. Nominal electric field strengths of 0.002 V/nm and 0.004 V/nm had no major effect on the structure and surface properties of the protein isolate but the higher electric field strength of 3 V/nm significantly affected the protein conformation and solvent accessible surface area. The response of protein isolate to various external field stresses demonstrated that it is necessary to gain insight into protein dynamics under electromagnetic fields in order to be able to develop the techniques utilizing them for food processing and other biological applications.

  19. New cationic vesicles prepared with double chain surfactants from arginine: Role of the hydrophobic group on the antimicrobial activity and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinazo, A; Petrizelli, V; Bustelo, M; Pons, R; Vinardell, M P; Mitjans, M; Manresa, A; Perez, L

    2016-05-01

    Cationic double chain surfactants have attracted much interest because they can give rise to cationic vesicles that can be used in biomedical applications. Using a simple and economical synthetic approach, we have synthesized four double-chain surfactants with different alkyl chain lengths (LANHCx). The critical aggregation concentration of the double chain surfactants is at least one order of magnitude lower than the CMC of their corresponding single-chain LAM and the solutions prepared with the LANHCx contain stable cationic vesicles. Encouragingly, these new arginine derivatives show very low haemolytic activity and weaker cytotoxic effects than conventional dialkyl dimethyl ammonium surfactants. In addition, the surfactant with the shortest alkyl chain exhibits good antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. The results show that a rational design applied to cationic double chain surfactants might serve as a promising strategy for the development of safe cationic vesicular systems.

  20. Adaptive hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions of mussel foot proteins with organic thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jing; Kan, Yajing; Rapp, Michael; Danner, Eric; Wei, Wei; Das, Saurabh; Miller, Dusty R; Chen, Yunfei; Waite, J Herbert; Israelachvili, Jacob N

    2013-09-24

    The adhesion of mussel foot proteins (Mfps) to a variety of specially engineered mineral and metal oxide surfaces has previously been investigated extensively, but the relevance of these studies to adhesion in biological environments remains unknown. Most solid surfaces exposed to seawater or physiological fluids become fouled by organic conditioning films and biofilms within minutes. Understanding the binding mechanisms of Mfps to organic films with known chemical and physical properties therefore is of considerable theoretical and practical interest. Using self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on atomically smooth gold substrates and the surface forces apparatus, we explored the force-distance profiles and adhesion energies of three different Mfps, Mfp-1, Mfp-3, and Mfp-5, on (i) hydrophobic methyl (CH3)- and (ii) hydrophilic alcohol (OH)-terminated SAM surfaces between pH 3 and pH 7.5. At acidic pH, all three Mfps adhered strongly to the CH3-terminated SAM surfaces via hydrophobic interactions (range of adhesive interaction energy = -4 to -9 mJ/m(2)) but only weakly to the OH-terminated SAM surfaces through H- bonding (adhesive interaction energy ≤ -0.5 mJ/m(2)). 3, 4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (Dopa) residues in Mfps mediate binding to both SAM surface types but do so through different interactions: typical bidentate H-bonding by Dopa is frustrated by the longer spacing of OH-SAMs; in contrast, on CH3-SAMs, Dopa in synergy with other nonpolar residues partitions to the hydrophobic surface. Asymmetry in the distribution of hydrophobic residues in intrinsically unstructured proteins, the distortion of bond geometry between H-bonding surfaces, and the manipulation of physisorbed binding lifetimes represent important concepts for the design of adhesive and nonfouling surfaces.

  1. Importance of hydrophobic cluster formation through long-range contacts in the folding transition state of two-state proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvaraj, S; Gromiha, M Michael

    2004-06-01

    Understanding the folding pathways of proteins is a challenging task. The Phi value approach provides a detailed understanding of transition-state structures of folded proteins. In this work, we have computed the hydrophobicity associated with each residue in the folded state of 16 two-state proteins and compared the Phi values of each mutant residue. We found that most of the residues with high Phi value coincide with local maximum in surrounding hydrophobicity, or have nearby residues that show such maximum in hydrophobicity, indicating the importance of hydrophobic interactions in the transition state. We have tested our approach to different structural classes of proteins, such as alpha-helical, SH3 domains of all-beta proteins, beta-sandwich, and alpha/beta proteins, and we observed a good agreement with experimental results. Further, we have proposed a hydrophobic contact network pattern to relate the Phi values with long-range contacts, which will be helpful to understand the transition-state structures of folded proteins. The present approach could be used to identify potential hydrophobic clusters that may form through long-range contacts during the transition state.

  2. Lateral Protein-Protein Interactions at Hydrophobic and Charged Surfaces as a Function of pH and Salt Concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hladílková, Jana; Callisen, Thomas H; Lund, Mikael

    2016-04-07

    Surface adsorption of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase (TLL)-a widely used industrial biocatalyst-is studied experimentally and theoretically at different pH and salt concentrations. The maximum achievable surface coverage on a hydrophobic surface occurs around the protein isoelectric point and adsorption is reduced when either increasing or decreasing pH, indicating that electrostatic protein-protein interactions in the adsorbed layer play an important role. Using Metropolis Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, where proteins are coarse grained to the amino acid level, we estimate the protein isoelectric point in the vicinity of charged surfaces as well as the lateral osmotic pressure in the adsorbed monolayer. Good agreement with available experimental data is achieved and we further make predictions of the protein orientation at hydrophobic and charged surfaces. Finally, we present a perturbation theory for predicting shifts in the protein isoelectric point due to close proximity to charged surfaces. Although this approximate model requires only single protein properties (mean charge and its variance), excellent agreement is found with MC simulations.

  3. Structure and dynamics of a protein-surfactant assembly studied by ion-mobility mass spectrometry and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borysik, Antoni J

    2015-09-01

    The structure and dynamics of a protein-surfactant assembly studied by ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IMS) and vacuum molecular dynamics (MD) simulations is reported. Direct evidence is provided for the ability of the surfactant dodecyl-β-D-maltoside (DDM) to prevent charge-induced unfolding of the membrane protein (PagP) in the gas-phase. Restraints obtained by IMS are used to map the surfactant positions onto the protein surface. Surfactants occupying more exposed positions at the apexes of the β-barrel structure are most in-line with the experimental observations. MD simulations provide additional evidence for this assembly organization through surfactant inversion and migration on the protein structure in the absence of solvent. Surfactant migration entails a net shift from apolar membrane spanning regions to more polar regions of the protein structure with the DDM molecule remaining attached to the protein via headgroup interactions. These data provide evidence for the role of protein-DDM headgroup interactions in stabilizing membrane protein structure from gas-phase unfolding.

  4. Structural adaptation of extreme halophilic proteins through decrease of conserved hydrophobic contact surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siglioccolo Alessandro

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Halophiles are extremophilic microorganisms growing optimally at high salt concentrations. There are two strategies used by halophiles to maintain proper osmotic pressure in their cytoplasm: accumulation of molar concentrations of potassium and chloride with extensive adaptation of the intracellular macromolecules ("salt-in" strategy or biosynthesis and/or accumulation of organic osmotic solutes ("osmolyte" strategy. Our work was aimed at contributing to the understanding of the shared molecular mechanisms of protein haloadaptation through a detailed and systematic comparison of a sample of several three-dimensional structures of halophilic and non-halophilic proteins. Structural differences observed between the "salt-in" and the mesophilic homologous proteins were contrasted to those observed between the "osmolyte" and mesophilic pairs. Results The results suggest that haloadaptation strategy in the presence of molar salt concentration, but not of osmolytes, necessitates a weakening of the hydrophobic interactions, in particular at the level of conserved hydrophobic contacts. Weakening of these interactions counterbalances their strengthening by the presence of salts in solution and may help the structure preventing aggregation and/or loss of function in hypersaline environments. Conclusions Considering the significant increase of biotechnology applications of halophiles, the understanding of halophilicity can provide the theoretical basis for the engineering of proteins of great interest because stable at concentrations of salts that cause the denaturation or aggregation of the majority of macromolecules.

  5. Interaction between human BAP31 and respiratory syncytial virus small hydrophobic (SH) protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Jain, Neeraj; Limpanawat, Suweeraya; To, Janet; Quistgaard, Esben M; Nordlund, Par; Thanabalu, Thirumaran; Torres, Jaume

    2015-08-01

    The small hydrophobic (SH) protein is a short channel-forming polypeptide encoded by the human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV). Deletion of SH protein leads to the viral attenuation in mice and primates, and delayed apoptosis in infected cells. We have used a membrane-based yeast two-hybrid system (MbY2H) and a library from human lung cDNA to detect proteins that bind SH protein. This led to the identification of a membrane protein, B-cell associated protein 31 (BAP31). Transfected SH protein co-localizes with transfected BAP31 in cells, and pulls down endogenous BAP31. Titration of purified C-terminal endodomain of BAP31 against isotopically labeled SH protein in detergent micelles suggests direct interaction between the two proteins. Given the key role of BAP31 in protein trafficking and its critical involvement in pro- and anti-apoptotic pathways, this novel interaction may constitute a potential drug target.

  6. Differential Effects of Hydrophobic Core Packing Residues for Thermodynamic and Mechanical Stability of a Hyperthermophilic Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tych, Katarzyna M; Batchelor, Matthew; Hoffmann, Toni; Wilson, Michael C; Hughes, Megan L; Paci, Emanuele; Brockwell, David J; Dougan, Lorna

    2016-07-26

    Proteins from organisms that have adapted to environmental extremes provide attractive systems to explore and determine the origins of protein stability. Improved hydrophobic core packing and decreased loop-length flexibility can increase the thermodynamic stability of proteins from hyperthermophilic organisms. However, their impact on protein mechanical stability is not known. Here, we use protein engineering, biophysical characterization, single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS), and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to measure the effect of altering hydrophobic core packing on the stability of the cold shock protein TmCSP from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. We make two variants of TmCSP in which a mutation is made to reduce the size of aliphatic groups from buried hydrophobic side chains. In the first, a mutation is introduced in a long loop (TmCSP L40A); in the other, the mutation is introduced on the C-terminal β-strand (TmCSP V62A). We use MD simulations to confirm that the mutant TmCSP L40A shows the most significant increase in loop flexibility, and mutant TmCSP V62A shows greater disruption to the core packing. We measure the thermodynamic stability (ΔGD-N) of the mutated proteins and show that there is a more significant reduction for TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG = 63%) than TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG = 47%), as might be expected on the basis of the relative reduction in the size of the side chain. By contrast, SMFS measures the mechanical stability (ΔG*) and shows a greater reduction for TmCSP V62A (ΔΔG* = 8.4%) than TmCSP L40A (ΔΔG* = 2.5%). While the impact on the mechanical stability is subtle, the results demonstrate the power of tuning noncovalent interactions to modulate both the thermodynamic and mechanical stability of a protein. Such understanding and control provide the opportunity to design proteins with optimized thermodynamic and mechanical properties.

  7. Native Contact Density and Nonnative Hydrophobic Effects in the Folding of Bacterial Immunity Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial colicin-immunity proteins Im7 and Im9 fold by different mechanisms. Experimentally, at pH 7.0 and 10°C, Im7 folds in a three-state manner via an intermediate but Im9 folding is two-state-like. Accordingly, Im7 exhibits a chevron rollover, whereas the chevron arm for Im9 folding is linear. Here we address the biophysical basis of their different behaviors by using native-centric models with and without additional transferrable, sequence-dependent energies. The Im7 chevron rollover is not captured by either a pure native-centric model or a model augmented by nonnative hydrophobic interactions with a uniform strength irrespective of residue type. By contrast, a more realistic nonnative interaction scheme that accounts for the difference in hydrophobicity among residues leads simultaneously to a chevron rollover for Im7 and an essentially linear folding chevron arm for Im9. Hydrophobic residues identified by published experiments to be involved in nonnative interactions during Im7 folding are found to participate in the strongest nonnative contacts in this model. Thus our observations support the experimental perspective that the Im7 folding intermediate is largely underpinned by nonnative interactions involving large hydrophobics. Our simulation suggests further that nonnative effects in Im7 are facilitated by a lower local native contact density relative to that of Im9. In a one-dimensional diffusion picture of Im7 folding with a coordinate- and stability-dependent diffusion coefficient, a significant chevron rollover is consistent with a diffusion coefficient that depends strongly on native stability at the conformational position of the folding intermediate. PMID:26016652

  8. Native contact density and nonnative hydrophobic effects in the folding of bacterial immunity proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tao; Chan, Hue Sun

    2015-05-01

    The bacterial colicin-immunity proteins Im7 and Im9 fold by different mechanisms. Experimentally, at pH 7.0 and 10°C, Im7 folds in a three-state manner via an intermediate but Im9 folding is two-state-like. Accordingly, Im7 exhibits a chevron rollover, whereas the chevron arm for Im9 folding is linear. Here we address the biophysical basis of their different behaviors by using native-centric models with and without additional transferrable, sequence-dependent energies. The Im7 chevron rollover is not captured by either a pure native-centric model or a model augmented by nonnative hydrophobic interactions with a uniform strength irrespective of residue type. By contrast, a more realistic nonnative interaction scheme that accounts for the difference in hydrophobicity among residues leads simultaneously to a chevron rollover for Im7 and an essentially linear folding chevron arm for Im9. Hydrophobic residues identified by published experiments to be involved in nonnative interactions during Im7 folding are found to participate in the strongest nonnative contacts in this model. Thus our observations support the experimental perspective that the Im7 folding intermediate is largely underpinned by nonnative interactions involving large hydrophobics. Our simulation suggests further that nonnative effects in Im7 are facilitated by a lower local native contact density relative to that of Im9. In a one-dimensional diffusion picture of Im7 folding with a coordinate- and stability-dependent diffusion coefficient, a significant chevron rollover is consistent with a diffusion coefficient that depends strongly on native stability at the conformational position of the folding intermediate.

  9. Latherin: a surfactant protein of horse sweat and saliva.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhona E McDonald

    Full Text Available Horses are unusual in producing protein-rich sweat for thermoregulation, a major component of which is latherin, a highly surface-active, non-glycosylated protein. The amino acid sequence of latherin, determined from cDNA analysis, is highly conserved across four geographically dispersed equid species (horse, zebra, onager, ass, and is similar to a family of proteins only found previously in the oral cavity and associated tissues of mammals. Latherin produces a significant reduction in water surface tension at low concentrations (< or = 1 mg ml(-1, and therefore probably acts as a wetting agent to facilitate evaporative cooling through a waterproofed pelt. Neutron reflection experiments indicate that this detergent-like activity is associated with the formation of a dense protein layer, about 10 A thick, at the air-water interface. However, biophysical characterization (circular dichroism, differential scanning calorimetry in solution shows that latherin behaves like a typical globular protein, although with unusual intrinsic fluorescence characteristics, suggesting that significant conformational change or unfolding of the protein is required for assembly of the air-water interfacial layer. RT-PCR screening revealed latherin transcripts in horse skin and salivary gland but in no other tissues. Recombinant latherin produced in bacteria was also found to be the target of IgE antibody from horse-allergic subjects. Equids therefore may have adapted an oral/salivary mucosal protein for two purposes peculiar to their lifestyle, namely their need for rapid and efficient heat dissipation and their specialisation for masticating and processing large quantities of dry food material.

  10. Impact of organic modifier and temperature on protein denaturation in hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobaly, Balázs; Beck, Alain; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy; Fekete, Szabolcs

    2016-11-30

    The goal of this study was to better understand the chromatographic conditions in which monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) of broad hydrophobicity scale and a cysteine conjugated antibody-drug conjugate (ADCs), namely brentuximab-vedotin, could denaturate. For this purpose, some experiments were carried out in HIC conditions using various organic modifier in natures and proportions, different mobile phase temperatures and also different pHs. Indeed, improper analytical conditions in hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) may create reversed-phase (RP) like harsh conditions and therefore protein denaturation. In terms of organic solvents, acetonitrile (ACN) and isopropanol (IPA) were tested with proportions ranging from 0 to 40%. It appeared that IPA was a less denaturating solvent than ACN, but should be used in a reasonable range (10-15%). Temperature should also be kept reasonable (below 40°C), to limit denaturation under HIC conditions. However, the combined increase of temperature and organic content induced denaturation of protein biopharmaceuticals in all cases. Indeed, above 30-40°C and 10-15% organic modifier in mobile phase B, heavy chain (HC) and light chain (LC) fragments dissociated. Mobile phase pH was also particularly critical and denaturation was significant even under moderately acidic conditions (pH of 5.4). Today, HIC is widely used for measuring drug-to-antibody ratio (DAR) of ADCs, which is a critical quality attribute of such samples. Here, we demonstrated that the estimation of average DAR can be dependent on the amount of organic modifier in the mobile phase under HIC conditions, due to the better recovery of the most hydrophobic proteins in presence of organic solvent (IPA). So, special care should be taken when measuring the average DAR of ADCs in HIC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Surfactant protein (SP)-A and SP-D as antimicrobial and immunotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awasthi, Shanjana

    2010-06-01

    Surfactant protein (SP)-A and SP-D belong to the "Soluble C-type Lectin" family of proteins and are collectively known as "Collectins". Based on their ability to recognize pathogens and to regulate the host defense, SP-A and SP-D have been recently categorized as "Secretory Pathogen Recognition Receptors". SP-A and SP-D were first identified in the lung; the expression of SP-A and SP-D has also been observed at other mucosal surfaces, such as lacrimal glands, gastrointestinal mucosa, genitourinary epithelium and periodontal surfaces. Since the role of these proteins is not fully elucidated at other mucosal surfaces, the focus of this article is on lung-SP-A and SP-D. It has become clear from research studies performed over a number of years that SP-A and SP-D are critical for the maintenance of lung homeostasis and the regulation of host defense and inflammation. However, none of the surfactant preparations available for clinical use have SP-A or SP-D. A review is presented here on SP-A- and SP-D-deficiencies in lung diseases, the importance of the administration of SP-A and SP-D, and recent patents and research directions that may lead to the design of novel SP-A- or SP-D-based therapeutics and surfactants.

  12. A Novel Mode of Protein Kinase Inhibition Exploiting Hydrophobic Motifs of Autoinhibited Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S Eathiraj; R Palma; M Hirschi; E Volckova; E Nakuci; J Castro; C Chen; T Chan; D France; M Ashwell

    2011-12-31

    Protein kinase inhibitors with enhanced selectivity can be designed by optimizing binding interactions with less conserved inactive conformations because such inhibitors will be less likely to compete with ATP for binding and therefore may be less impacted by high intracellular concentrations of ATP. Analysis of the ATP-binding cleft in a number of inactive protein kinases, particularly in the autoinhibited conformation, led to the identification of a previously undisclosed non-polar region in this cleft. This ATP-incompatible hydrophobic region is distinct from the previously characterized hydrophobic allosteric back pocket, as well as the main pocket. Generalized hypothetical models of inactive kinases were constructed and, for the work described here, we selected the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase family as a case study. Initial optimization of a FGFR2 inhibitor identified from a library of commercial compounds was guided using structural information from the model. We describe the inhibitory characteristics of this compound in biophysical, biochemical, and cell-based assays, and have characterized the binding mode using x-ray crystallographic studies. The results demonstrate, as expected, that these inhibitors prevent activation of the autoinhibited conformation, retain full inhibitory potency in the presence of physiological concentrations of ATP, and have favorable inhibitory activity in cancer cells. Given the widespread regulation of kinases by autoinhibitory mechanisms, the approach described herein provides a new paradigm for the discovery of inhibitors by targeting inactive conformations of protein kinases.

  13. Entropic formulation for the protein folding process: hydrophobic stability correlates with folding rates

    CERN Document Server

    Molin, J P Dal

    2016-01-01

    We assume that the protein folding process follows two autonomous steps: the conformational search for the native, mainly ruled by the hydrophobic effect; and, the final adjustment stage, which eventually gives stability to the native. Our main tool of investigation is a 3D lattice model provided with a ten-letter alphabet, the stereochemical model. This model was conceived for Monte Carlo (MC) simulations when one keeps in mind the kinetic behavior of protein-like chains in solution. In order to characterize the folding characteristic time ({\\tau}) by two distinct sampling methods, first we present two sets of 10^{3} MC simulations for a fast protein-like sequence. For these sets of folding times, {\\tau} and {\\tau}_{q} were obtained with the application of the standard Metropolis algorithm (MA), and a modified algorithm (M_{q}A). The results for {\\tau}_{q}reveal two things: i) the hydrophobic chain-solvent interactions plus a set of inter-residues steric constraints are enough to emulate the first stage of t...

  14. Comparative insight into surfactants mediated amyloidogenesis of lysozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Sumit K; Khan, Javed M; Siddiqi, Mohammad K; Alam, Parvez; Khan, Rizwan H

    2016-02-01

    Electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions have an important role in the protein aggregation. In this study, we have investigated the effect of charge and hydrophobicity of oppositely charged surfactants i.e., anionic (AOT and SDS) and cationic (CTAB and DTAB) on hen egg white lysozyme at pH 9.0 and 13.0, respectively. We have employed various methods such as turbidity measurements, Rayleigh light scattering, ThT, Congo red and ANS dye binding assays, far-UV CD, atomic force microscopy, transmission electron and fluorescence microscopy. At lower molar ratio, both anionic and cationic surfactants promote amyloid fibril formation in lysozyme at pH 9.0 and 13.0, respectively. The aggregation was proportionally increased with respect to protein concentration and hydrophobicity of surfactant. The morphology of aggregates at both the pH was fibrillar in structure, as visualized by dye binding and microscopic imaging techniques. Initially, the interaction between surfactants and lysozyme was electrostatic and then hydrophobic as investigated by ITC. This study demonstrates the crucial role of charge and hydrophobicity during amyloid fibril formation.

  15. Dynamical transition, hydrophobic interface, and the temperature dependence of electrostatic fluctuations in proteins

    CERN Document Server

    LeBard, David N

    2008-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have revealed a dramatic increase, with increasing temperature, of the amplitude of electrostatic fluctuations caused by water at the active site of metalloprotein plastocyanin. The increased breadth of electrostatic fluctuations, expressed in terms of the reorganization energy of changing the redox state of the protein, is related to the formation of the hydrophobic protein/water interface allowing large-amplitude collective fluctuations of the water density in the protein's first solvation shell. On the top of the monotonic increase of the reorganization energy with increasing temperature, we have observed a spike at 220 K also accompanied by a significant slowing of the exponential collective Stokes shift dynamics. In contrast to the local density fluctuations of the hydration-shell waters, these spikes might be related to the global property of the water solvent crossing the Widom line.

  16. Purification, characterization and immunolocalization of porcine surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, C.M.; Nielsen, Ove Lilholm; Willis, A.

    2005-01-01

    chromatography. The purified protein appeared on sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as a band of similar to53 000 MW in the reduced state and similar to138 000 MW in the unreduced state. Porcine SP-D was sensitive to collagenase digestion and N-deglycosylation, which reduced the molecular...

  17. Genetic and environmental influences of surfactant protein D serum levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Grith Lykke; Hjelmborg, Jacob v. B.; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm

    2006-01-01

    in the NH(2)-terminal region (Met11Thr) of the mature protein is significantly associated with the serum SP-D levels. A classic twin study was performed on a twin population including 1,476 self-reported healthy adults. The serum SP-D levels increased with male sex, age, and smoking status. The intraclass...

  18. Optimal Hydrophobicity in Ring-Opening Metathesis Polymerization-Based Protein Mimics Required for siRNA Internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deRonde, Brittany M; Posey, Nicholas D; Otter, Ronja; Caffrey, Leah M; Minter, Lisa M; Tew, Gregory N

    2016-06-13

    Exploring the role of polymer structure for the internalization of biologically relevant cargo, specifically siRNA, is of critical importance to the development of improved delivery reagents. Herein, we report guanidinium-rich protein transduction domain mimics (PTDMs) based on a ring-opening metathesis polymerization scaffold containing tunable hydrophobic moieties that promote siRNA internalization. Structure-activity relationships using Jurkat T cells and HeLa cells were explored to determine how the length of the hydrophobic block and the hydrophobic side chain compositions of these PTDMs impacted siRNA internalization. To explore the hydrophobic block length, two different series of diblock copolymers were synthesized: one series with symmetric block lengths and one with asymmetric block lengths. At similar cationic block lengths, asymmetric and symmetric PTDMs promoted siRNA internalization in the same percentages of the cell population regardless of the hydrophobic block length; however, with 20 repeat units of cationic charge, the asymmetric block length had greater siRNA internalization, highlighting the nontrivial relationships between hydrophobicity and overall cationic charge. To further probe how the hydrophobic side chains impacted siRNA internalization, an additional series of asymmetric PTDMs was synthesized that featured a fixed hydrophobic block length of five repeat units that contained either dimethyl (dMe), methyl phenyl (MePh), or diphenyl (dPh) side chains and varied cationic block lengths. This series was further expanded to incorporate hydrophobic blocks consisting of diethyl (dEt), diisobutyl (diBu), and dicyclohexyl (dCy) based repeat units to better define the hydrophobic window for which our PTDMs had optimal activity. High-performance liquid chromatography retention times quantified the relative hydrophobicities of the noncationic building blocks. PTDMs containing the MePh, diBu, and dPh hydrophobic blocks were shown to have superior

  19. Biophysical mimicry of lung surfactant protein B by random nylon-3 copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohm, Michelle T; Mowery, Brendan P; Czyzewski, Ann M; Stahl, Shannon S; Gellman, Samuel H; Barron, Annelise E

    2010-06-16

    Non-natural oligomers have recently shown promise as functional analogues of lung surfactant proteins B and C (SP-B and SP-C), two helical and amphiphilic proteins that are critical for normal respiration. The generation of non-natural mimics of SP-B and SP-C has previously been restricted to step-by-step, sequence-specific synthesis, which results in discrete oligomers that are intended to manifest specific structural attributes. Here we present an alternative approach to SP-B mimicry that is based on sequence-random copolymers containing cationic and lipophilic subunits. These materials, members of the nylon-3 family, are prepared by ring-opening polymerization of beta-lactams. The best of the nylon-3 polymers display promising in vitro surfactant activities in a mixed lipid film. Pulsating bubble surfactometry data indicate that films containing the most surface-active polymers attain adsorptive and dynamic-cycling properties that surpass those of discrete peptides intended to mimic SP-B. Attachment of an N-terminal octadecanoyl unit to the nylon-3 copolymers, inspired by the post-translational modifications found in SP-C, affords further improvements by reducing the percent surface area compression to reach low minimum surface tension. Cytotoxic effects of the copolymers are diminished relative to that of an SP-B-derived peptide and a peptoid-based mimic. The current study provides evidence that sequence-random copolymers can mimic the in vitro surface-active behavior of lung surfactant proteins in a mixed lipid film. These findings raise the possibility that random copolymers might be useful for developing a lung surfactant replacement, which is an attractive prospect given that such polymers are easier to prepare than are sequence-specific oligomers.

  20. Ancestral mutations as a tool for solubilizing proteins: The case of a hydrophobic phosphate-binding protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gonzalez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Stable and soluble proteins are ideal candidates for functional and structural studies. Unfortunately, some proteins or enzymes can be difficult to isolate, being sometimes poorly expressed in heterologous systems, insoluble and/or unstable. Numerous methods have been developed to address these issues, from the screening of various expression systems to the modification of the target protein itself. Here we use a hydrophobic, aggregation-prone, phosphate-binding protein (HPBP as a case study. We describe a simple and fast method that selectively uses ancestral mutations to generate a soluble, stable and functional variant of the target protein, here named sHPBP. This variant is highly expressed in Escherichia coli, is easily purified and its structure was solved at much higher resolution than its wild-type progenitor (1.3 versus 1.9 Å, respectively.

  1. Deconvoluting the Effect of the Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Domains of an Amphiphilic Integral Membrane Protein in Lipid Bicontinuous Cubic Mesophases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van 't Hag, Leonie; Shen, Hsin-Hui; Lu, Jingxiong; Hawley, Adrian M; Gras, Sally L; Drummond, Calum J; Conn, Charlotte E

    2015-11-10

    Lipidic bicontinuous cubic mesophases with encapsulated amphiphilic proteins are widely used in a range of biological and biomedical applications, including in meso crystallization, as drug delivery vehicles for therapeutic proteins, and as biosensors and biofuel cells. However, the effect of amphiphilic protein encapsulation on the cubic phase nanostructure is not well-understood. In this study, we illustrate the effect of incorporating the bacterial amphiphilic membrane protein Ag43, and its individual hydrophobic β(43) and hydrophilic α(43) domains, in bicontinuous cubic mesophases. For the monoolein, monoalmitolein, and phytantriol cubic phases with and without 8% w/w cholesterol, the effect of the full length amphiphilic protein Ag43 on the cubic phase nanostructure was more significant than the sum of the individual hydrophobic β(43) and hydrophilic α(43) domains. Several factors were found to potentially influence the impact of the hydrophobic β(43) domain on the cubic phase internal nanostructure. These include the size of the hydrophobic β(43) domain relative to the thickness of the lipid bilayer, as well as its charge and diameter. The size of the hydrophilic α(43) domain relative to the water channel radius of the cubic mesophase was also found to be important. The secondary structure of the Ag43 proteins was affected by the hydrophobic thickness and physicochemical properties of the lipid bilayer and the water channel diameter of the cubic phase. Such structural changes may be small but could potentially affect membrane protein function.

  2. Selective labeling of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C in organic solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, I; Cruz, A; López-Lacomba, J L

    2001-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C has been isolated from porcine lungs and treated with dansyl isothiocyanate in chloroform:methanol 2:1 (v/v) solutions,under conditions optimized to introduce a single dansyl group covalently attached to the N-terminalamine group of the protein without loss of its...... native thioesther-linked palmitic chains. The resulting derivative Dans-SP-C conserves the secondary structure of native SP-C as well as the ability to promote interfacial adsorption of DPPC suspensions and to affect the thermotropic behavior of DPPC bilayers. This derivative can be used to characterize...... lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions of a native-like SP-C in lipid/protein complexes. Udgivelsesdato: 2001-Sep-1...

  3. Role of the N-terminal seven residues of surfactant protein B (SP-B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahzad Sharifahmadian

    Full Text Available Breathing is enabled by lung surfactant, a mixture of proteins and lipids that forms a surface-active layer and reduces surface tension at the air-water interface in lungs. Surfactant protein B (SP-B is an essential component of lung surfactant. In this study we probe the mechanism underlying the important functional contributions made by the N-terminal 7 residues of SP-B, a region sometimes called the "insertion sequence". These studies employed a construct of SP-B, SP-B (1-25,63-78, also called Super Mini-B, which is a 41-residue peptide with internal disulfide bonds comprising the N-terminal 7-residue insertion sequence and the N- and C-terminal helices of SP-B. Circular dichroism, solution NMR, and solid state (2H NMR were used to study the structure of SP-B (1-25,63-78 and its interactions with phospholipid bilayers. Comparison of results for SP-B (8-25,63-78 and SP-B (1-25,63-78 demonstrates that the presence of the 7-residue insertion sequence induces substantial disorder near the centre of the lipid bilayer, but without a major disruption of the overall mechanical orientation of the bilayers. This observation suggests the insertion sequence is unlikely to penetrate deeply into the bilayer. The 7-residue insertion sequence substantially increases the solution NMR linewidths, most likely due to an increase in global dynamics.

  4. Effective protein separation by coupling hydrophobic interaction and reverse phase chromatography for top-down proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiu, Lichen; Valeja, Santosh G; Alpert, Andrew J; Jin, Song; Ge, Ying

    2014-08-05

    One of the challenges in proteomics is the proteome's complexity, which necessitates the fractionation of proteins prior to the mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Despite recent advances in top-down proteomics, separation of intact proteins remains challenging. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) appears to be a promising method that provides high-resolution separation of intact proteins, but unfortunately the salts conventionally used for HIC are incompatible with MS. In this study, we have identified ammonium tartrate as a MS-compatible salt for HIC with comparable separation performance as the conventionally used ammonium sulfate. Furthermore, we found that the selectivity obtained with ammonium tartrate in the HIC mobile phases is orthogonal to that of reverse phase chromatography (RPC). By coupling HIC and RPC as a novel two-dimensional chromatographic method, we have achieved effective high-resolution intact protein separation as demonstrated with standard protein mixtures and a complex cell lysate. Subsequently, the separated intact proteins were identified by high-resolution top-down MS. For the first time, these results have shown the high potential of HIC as a high-resolution protein separation method for top-down proteomics.

  5. Human salivary agglutinin binds to lung surfactant protein-D and is identical with scavenger receptor protein gp-340

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ligtenberg, T J; Bikker, F J; Groenink, J

    2001-01-01

    bound in a similar way to Streptococcus mutans and surfactant protein-D. Histochemically, the distribution of gp-340 in the submandibular salivary glands was identical with the agglutinin distribution, as shown in a previous paper [Takano, Bogert, Malamud, Lally and Hand (1991) Anat. Rec. 230, 307......Salivary agglutinin is a 300-400 kDa salivary glycoprotein that binds to antigen B polypeptides of oral streptococci, thereby playing a role in their colonization and the development of caries. A mass spectrum was recorded of a trypsin digest of agglutinin. A dominant peak of 1460 Da was sequenced...... of gp-340. gp-340 is a 340 kDa glycoprotein isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid that binds specifically to lung surfactant protein-D. DMBT1 is a candidate tumour suppressor gene. A search in the human genome revealed only one copy of this gene. The molecular mass, as judged from SDS...

  6. Disordered water within a hydrophobic protein cavity visualized by x-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, B; Blaber, M; Gronenborn, A M; Clore, G M; Caspar, D L

    1999-01-05

    Water in the hydrophobic cavity of human interleukin 1beta, which was detected by NMR spectroscopy but was invisible by high resolution x-ray crystallography, has been mapped quantitatively by measurement and phasing of all of the low resolution x-ray diffraction data from a single crystal. Phases for the low resolution data were refined by iterative density modification of an initial flat solvent model outside the envelope of the atomic model. The refinement was restrained by the condition that the map of the difference between the electron density distribution in the full unit cell and that of the atomic model be flat within the envelope of the well ordered protein structure. Care was taken to avoid overfitting the diffraction data by maintaining phases for the high resolution data from the atomic model and by a resolution-dependent damping of the structure factor differences between data and model. The cavity region in the protein could accommodate up to four water molecules. The refined solvent difference map indicates that there are about two water molecules in the cavity region. This map is compatible with an atomic model of the water distribution refined by using XPLOR. About 70% of the time, there appears to be a water dimer in the central hydrophobic cavity, which is connected to the outside by two constricted channels occupied by single water molecules approximately 40% of the time on one side and approximately 10% on the other.

  7. Generic folding and transition hierarchies for surface adsorption of hydrophobic-polar lattice model proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying Wai; Wüst, Thomas; Landau, David P.

    2013-01-01

    The thermodynamic behavior and structural properties of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins interacting with attractive surfaces are studied by means of Wang-Landau sampling. Three benchmark HP sequences (48mer, 67mer, and 103mer) are considered with different types of surfaces, each of which attract either all monomers, only hydrophobic (H) monomers, or only polar (P) monomers, respectively. The diversity of folding behavior in dependence of surface strength is discussed. Analyzing the combined patterns of various structural observables, such as, e.g., the derivatives of the numbers of surface contacts, together with the specific heat, we are able to identify generic categories of folding and transition hierarchies. We also infer a connection between these transition categories and the relative surface strengths, i.e., the ratio of the surface attractive strength to the interchain attraction among H monomers. The validity of our proposed classification scheme is reinforced by the analysis of additional benchmark sequences. We thus believe that the folding hierarchies and identification scheme are generic for HP proteins interacting with attractive surfaces, regardless of chain length, sequence, or surface attraction.

  8. Effect of silk protein surfactant on silk degumming and its properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Cao, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Yu-Qing

    2015-10-01

    The silk protein surfactant (SPS) first used as a silk degumming agent in this study is an amino acid-type anionic surfactant that was synthesized using silk fibroin amino acids and lauroyl chloride. We studied it systematically in comparison with the traditional degumming methods such as sodium carbonate (Na2CO3) and neutral soap (NS). The experimental results showed that the sericin can be completely removed from the silk fibroin fiber after boiling the fibers three times for 30 min and using a bath ratio of 1:80 (g/mL) and a concentration of 0.2% SPS in an aqueous solution. The results of the tensile properties, thermal analysis, and SEM all show that SPS is similar to the NS, far superior to Na2CO3. In short, SPS may be used as an environmentally friendly silk degumming/refining agent in the silk textile industry and in the manufacture of silk floss quilts.

  9. Reduced influenza viral neutralizing activity of natural human trimers of surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L; White, Mitchell R; Tecle, Tesfaldet

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV) infection. Common human polymorphisms of SP-D have been found in many human populations and associated with increased risk of certain infections. We recently reported that the Thr...... human SP-D multimers as well as reduced hemagglutination inhibiting activity against several strains of IAV. Natural SP-D trimers also had different interactions with human neutrophil peptide defensins (HNPs) in viral neutralization assays as compared to multimeric SP-D. CONCLUSION: These studies......-D can be useful for dissecting out different functional properties of the protein....

  10. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B: a Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Protein at the host-parasite interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Álvarez, Valeria; Folle, Ana Maite; Ramos, Ana Lía; Zamarreño, Fernando; Costabel, Marcelo D; García-Zepeda, Eduardo; Salinas, Gustavo; Córsico, Betina; Ferreira, Ana María

    2015-02-01

    Lipids are mainly solubilized by various families of lipid binding proteins which participate in their transport between tissues as well as cell compartments. Among these families, Hydrophobic Ligand Binding Proteins (HLBPs) deserve special consideration since they comprise intracellular and extracellular members, are able to bind a variety of fatty acids, retinoids and some sterols, and are present exclusively in cestodes. Since these parasites have lost catabolic and biosynthetic pathways for fatty acids and cholesterol, HLBPs are likely relevant for lipid uptake and transportation between parasite and host cells. Echinococcus granulosus antigen B (EgAgB) is a lipoprotein belonging to the HLBP family, which is very abundant in the larval stage of this parasite. Herein, we review the literature on EgAgB composition, structural organization and biological properties, and propose an integrated scenario in which this parasite HLBP contributes to adaptation to mammalian hosts by meeting both metabolic and immunomodulatory parasite demands.

  11. Dynamical transition, hydrophobic interface, and the temperature dependence of electrostatic fluctuations in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebard, David N.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2008-12-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have revealed a dramatic increase, with increasing temperature, of the amplitude of electrostatic fluctuations caused by water at the active site of metalloprotein plastocyanin. The increased breadth of electrostatic fluctuations, expressed in terms of the reorganization energy of changing the redox state of the protein, is related to the formation of the hydrophobic protein-water interface, allowing large-amplitude collective fluctuations of the water density in the protein’s first solvation shell. On top of the monotonic increase of the reorganization energy with increasing temperature, we have observed a spike at ≃220K also accompanied by a significant slowing of the exponential collective Stokes shift dynamics. In contrast to the local density fluctuations of the hydration-shell waters, these spikes might be related to the global property of the water solvent crossing the Widom line or undergoing a weak first-order transition.

  12. Effect of single-site mutations on hydrophobic-polar lattice proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Guangjie; Vogel, Thomas; Wüst, Thomas; Li, Ying Wai; Landau, David P.

    2014-09-01

    We developed a heuristic method for determining the ground-state degeneracy of hydrophobic-polar (HP) lattice proteins, based on Wang-Landau and multicanonical sampling. It is applied during comprehensive studies of single-site mutations in specific HP proteins with different sequences. The effects in which we are interested include structural changes in ground states, changes of ground-state energy, degeneracy, and thermodynamic properties of the system. With respect to mutations, both extremely sensitive and insensitive positions in the HP sequence have been found. That is, ground-state energies and degeneracies, as well as other thermodynamic and structural quantities, may be either largely unaffected or may change significantly due to mutation.

  13. Genetic and environmental influences of surfactant protein D serum levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, G.L.; Hjelmborg, J.V.; Kyvik, K.O.

    2006-01-01

    defining the constitutional serum level of SP-D and determine the magnitude of the genetic contribution to serum SP-D in the adult population. Recent studies have demonstrated that serum SP-D concentrations in children are genetically determined and that a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located...... in the NH(2)-terminal region (Met11Thr) of the mature protein is significantly associated with the serum SP-D levels. A classic twin study was performed on a twin population including 1,476 self-reported healthy adults. The serum SP-D levels increased with male sex, age, and smoking status. The intraclass...... correlation was significantly higher for monozygotic (MZ) twin pairs than for dizygotic (DZ) twin pairs. Serum SP-D variance was influenced by nonshared environmental effects and additive genetic effects. Multivariate analysis of MZ and DZ covariance matrixes showed significant genetic correlation among serum...

  14. Urea denatured state ensembles contain extensive secondary structure that is increased in hydrophobic proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nick Pace, C; Huyghues-Despointes, Beatrice M P; Fu, Hailong; Takano, Kazufumi; Scholtz, J Martin; Grimsley, Gerald R

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this article is to gain a better understanding of the denatured state ensemble (DSE) of proteins through an experimental and computational study of their denaturation by urea. Proteins unfold to different extents in urea and the most hydrophobic proteins have the most compact DSE and contain almost as much secondary structure as folded proteins. Proteins that unfold to the greatest extent near pH 7 still contain substantial amounts of secondary structure. At low pH, the DSE expands due to charge–charge interactions and when the net charge per residue is high, most of the secondary structure is disrupted. The proteins in the DSE appear to contain substantial amounts of polyproline II conformation at high urea concentrations. In all cases considered, including staph nuclease, the extent of unfolding by urea can be accounted for using the data and approach developed in the laboratory of Wayne Bolen (Auton et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci 2007; 104:15317–15323). PMID:20198681

  15. Synthesis of carbohydrate-based surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pemberton, Jeanne E.; Polt, Robin L.; Maier, Raina M.

    2016-11-22

    The present invention provides carbohydrate-based surfactants and methods for producing the same. Methods for producing carbohydrate-based surfactants include using a glycosylation promoter to link a carbohydrate or its derivative to a hydrophobic compound.

  16. Are the interactions between recombinant prion proteins and polymeric surfaces related to the hydrophilic/hydrophobic balance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrlinic, Tjasa; Debarnot, Dominique; Legeay, Gilbert; Coudreuse, Arnaud; El Moualij, Benaissa; Zorzi, Willy; Perret-Liaudet, Armand; Quadrio, Isabelle; Mozetic, Miran; Poncin-Epaillard, Fabienne

    2012-06-01

    New non-fouling tubes are developed and their influence on the adhesion of neuroproteins is studied. Recombinant prion proteins are considered as a single component representative of hydrophobic proteins. Samples are stored for 24 h at 4 °C in tubes coated with two different coatings: poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) as a hydrophilic surface and a plasma-fluorinated coating as a hydrophobic one. The protein adhesion is monitored by ELISA tests, XPS and confocal microscopy. It appears that the highest recovery of recombinant prion protein in the liquid phase is obtained with the hydrophilic surface while the hydrophobic character of the storage tube induces an important amount of biological loss. However, the recovery is not complete even for tubes coated with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide).

  17. Thermal compaction of the intrinsically disordered protein tau: entropic, structural, and hydrophobic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battisti, Anna; Ciasca, Gabriele; Grottesi, Alessandro; Tenenbaum, Alexander

    2017-03-28

    Globular denatured proteins have structural properties similar to those of random coils. Experiments on denatured proteins have shown that when the temperature is increased thermal compaction may take place, resulting in a reduction of their radius of gyration Rg to range between 5% and 35% of its initial value. This phenomenon has been attributed to various causes, namely entropic, hydrophobic, and structural factors. The intrinsically disordered protein tau, which helps in nucleating and stabilizing microtubules in the axons of the neurons, also undergoes a relevant compaction process: when its temperature is increased from 293 K to 333 K its gyration radius decreases by 18%. We have performed an atomistic simulation of this molecule, at the lowest and highest temperatures of the mentioned interval, using both standard molecular dynamics and metadynamics, in parallel with small-angle X-ray scattering experiments. Using the fit of the experimental data and a genetic algorithm to select the most probable configurations among those produced in both atomistic simulations (standard MD and metadynamics), we were able to compute relevant changes, related to the temperature increase, in the average angles between residues, in the transient secondary structures, in the solvent accessible surface area, and in the number of intramolecular H-bonds. The analysis of the data showed how to decompose the compaction phenomenon into three contributions. An estimate of the entropic contribution to the compaction was obtained using the changes in the mean values of the angles between contiguous residues. The computation of the solvent accessible surface at the two temperatures allowed an estimation of the second factor contributing to the compaction, namely the increase in the hydrophobic interaction. We also measured the change in the average number of residues temporarily being in α-helices, 3-helices, PP II helices, β-sheets and β-turns. Those changes in the secondary

  18. Protein Exposed Hydrophobicity Reduces the Kinetic Barrier for Adsorption of Ovalbumin to the Air-Water Interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, P.A.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Egmond, M.R.; Voragen, F.A.G.J.; Jongh, H.H.J. de

    2003-01-01

    Using native and caprylated ovalbumin, the role of exposed hydrophobicity on the kinetics of protein adsorption to the air - water interface is studied. First, changes in the chemical properties of the protein upon caprylation were characterized followed by measurement of the changes in adsorption k

  19. Protein exposed hydrophobicity reduces the kinetic barrier for adsoption of ovalbumin to the air-water interface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, P.A.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Egmond, M.R.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    Using native and caprylated ovalbumin, the role of exposed hydrophobicity on the kinetics of protein adsorption to the air-water interface is studied. First, changes in the chemical properties of the protein upon caprylation were characterized followed by measurement of the changes in adsorption kin

  20. Protein exposed hydrophobicity reduces the kinetic barrier for adsoption of ovalbumin to the air-water interface.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wierenga, P.A.; Meinders, M.B.J.; Egmond, M.R.; Voragen, A.G.J.

    2003-01-01

    Using native and caprylated ovalbumin, the role of exposed hydrophobicity on the kinetics of protein adsorption to the air-water interface is studied. First, changes in the chemical properties of the protein upon caprylation were characterized followed by measurement of the changes in adsorption

  1. Expression of recombinant small hydrophobic protein for serospecific detection of avian pneumovirus subgroup C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lizhong; Sabara, Marta I; Li, Yan

    2005-01-01

    The small hydrophobic (SH) gene of the avian pneumovirus (APV) Colorado isolate (CO), which belongs to subgroup C (APV/C), was expressed with a baculovirus vector. The recombinant SH protein was evaluated as a potential subgroup-specific diagnostic reagent in order to differentiate infections resulting from APV/C from those induced by APV/A, APV/B, and human metapneumovirus (hMPV). When the recombinant baculovirus was used to infect insect cells, a 31- to 38-kDa glycosylated form of the SH protein was produced and subsequently tested for reactivity with antibodies specific for APV/A, APV/B, APV/C, and hMPV. Western blot analysis showed that the expressed recombinant SH protein could only be recognized by APV/C-specific antibodies. This result was consistent with sequence analysis of the APV/C SH protein, which had very low (24%) amino acid identity with the corresponding protein of hMPV and no discernible identity with the SH protein of APV/A or APV/B. A recombinant SH protein-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed, and it further confirmed the lack of reactivity of this protein with antisera raised to APV/A, APV/B, and hMPV and supported its designation as a subgroup-specific antigen. This finding indicated that the recombinant SH protein was a suitable antigen for ELISA-based detection of subgroup-specific antibodies in turkeys and could be used for serologically based differential diagnosis of APV and hMPV infections.

  2. A survey and a molecular dynamics study on the (central) hydrophobic region of prion proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jiapu

    2014-01-01

    Prion diseases are invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases that affect humans and animals. Unlike most other amyloid forming neurodegenerative diseases, these can be highly infectious. Prion diseases occur in a variety of species. They include the fatal human neurodegenerative diseases Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease (CJD), Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI), Gerstmann-Straussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS), Kuru, the bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE or 'mad-cow' disease) in cattle, the chronic wasting disease (CWD) in deer and elk, and scrapie in sheep and goats, etc. Transmission across the species barrier to humans, especially in the case of BSE in Europe, CWD in North America, and variant CJDs (vCJDs) in young people of UK, is a major public health concern. Fortunately, scientists reported that the (central) hydrophobic region of prion proteins (PrP) controls the formation of diseased prions. This article gives a detailed survey on PrP hydrophobic region and does molecular dynamics studies of human PrP(110-136...

  3. Interplay of Electrostatics and Hydrophobic Effects in the Metamorphic Protein Human Lymphotactin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Elif Nihal; Volkman, Brian F; Cui, Qiang

    2015-07-30

    The human lymphotactin (hLtn) is a protein that features two native states both of which are physiologically relevant: it is a monomer (hLtn10) at 10 °C with 200 mM salt and a dimer (hLtn40) at 40 °C and without salt. Here we focus on the networks of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions that display substantial changes upon the conversion from hLtn10 to hLtn40 since they are expected to modulate the relative stability of the two folds. In addition to the Arg 23-Arg 43 interaction discussed in previous work, we find several other like-charge pairs that are likely important to the stability of hLtn10. Free energy perturbation calculations are carried out to explicitly evaluate the contribution of the Arg 23-Arg 43 interaction to the hLtn10 stability. hLtn40 features a larger number of salt bridges, and a set of hydrophobic residues undergo major changes in the solvent accessible surface area between hLtn10 and hLtn40, pointing to their importance to the relative stability of the two folds. We also discuss the use of explicit and implicit solvent simulations for characterizing the conformational ensembles under different solution conditions.

  4. Development of Cy5.5-Labeled Hydrophobically Modified Glycol Chitosan Nanoparticles for Protein Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Amanda

    Therapeutic proteins are often highly susceptible to enzymatic degradation, thus restricting their in vivo stability. To overcome this limitation, delivery systems designed to promote uptake and reduce degradation kinetics have undergone a rapid shift from macro-scale systems to nanomaterial based carriers. Many of these nanomaterials, however, elicit immune responses and may have cytotoxic effects both in vitro and in vivo. The naturally derived polysaccharide chitosan has emerged as a promising biodegradable material and has been utilized for many biomedical applications; nevertheless, its function is often constrained by poor solubility. Glycol chitosan, a derivative of chitosan, can be hydrophobically modified to impart amphiphilic properties that enable the self-assembly into nanoparticles in aqueous media at neutral pH. This nanoparticle system has shown initial success as a therapeutic agent in several model cell culture systems, but little is known about its stability against enzymatic degradation. Therefore, the goal of this research was to investigate the resistance of hydrophobically modified glycol chitosan against enzyme-catalyzed degradation using an in vivo simulated system containing lysozyme. To synthesize the nanoparticles, hydrophobic cholanic acid was first covalently conjugated to glycol chitosan using of N-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-N'-ethylcarbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) and N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS). Conjugates were purified by dialysis, lyophilized, and ultra-sonicated to form nanoparticles. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy confirmed the binding of 5beta-cholanic acid to the glycol chitosan. Particle size and stability over time were determined with dynamic light scattering (DLS), and particle morphology was evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The average diameter of the nanoparticles was approximately 200 nm, which remained stable at 4°C for up to 10 days. Additionally, a near infrared fluorescent (NIRF) dye

  5. How hydrophobicity and the glycosylation site of glycans affect protein folding and stability: a molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Diannan; Yang, Cheng; Liu, Zheng

    2012-01-12

    Glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications in the biosynthesis of protein, but its effect on the protein conformational transitions underpinning folding and stabilization is poorly understood. In this study, we present a coarse-grained off-lattice 46-β barrel model protein glycosylated by glycans with different hydrophobicity and glycosylation sites to examine the effect of glycans on protein folding and stabilization using a Langevin dynamics simulation, in which an H term was proposed as the index of the hydrophobicity of glycan. Compared with its native counterpart, introducing glycans of suitable hydrophobicity (0.1 enthalpy effect. The simulations have shown both the stabilization and the destabilization effects of glycosylation, as experimentally reported in the literature, and provided molecular insight into glycosylated proteins. The understanding of the effects of glycans with different hydrophobicities on the folding and stability of protein, as attempted by the present work, is helpful not only to explain the stabilization and destabilization effect of real glycoproteins but also to design protein-polymer conjugates for biotechnological purposes.

  6. Method for making nanoporous hydrophobic coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou; Sun, Zaicheng

    2013-04-23

    A simple coating method is used to form nanoporous hydrophobic films that can be used as optical coatings. The method uses evaporation-induced self-assembly of materials. The coating method starts with a homogeneous solution comprising a hydrophobic polymer and a surfactant polymer in a selective solvent. The solution is coated onto a substrate. The surfactant polymer forms micelles with the hydrophobic polymer residing in the particle core when the coating is dried. The surfactant polymer can be dissolved and selectively removed from the separated phases by washing with a polar solvent to form the nanoporous hydrophobic film.

  7. Fluorescence turn-on responses of anionic and cationic conjugated polymers toward proteins: effect of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Kan-Yi; Liu, Bin

    2010-03-11

    Cationic and anionic poly(fluorenyleneethynylene-alt-benzothiadiazole)s (PFEBTs) are designed and synthesized via Sonagashira coupling reaction to show light-up signatures toward proteins. Due to the charge transfer character of the excited states, the fluorescence of PFEBTs is very weak in aqueous solution, while their yellow fluorescence can be enhanced by polymer aggregation. PFEBTs show fluorescence turn-on rather than fluorescence quenching upon complexation with proteins. Both electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions between PFEBTs and proteins are found to improve the polymer fluorescence, the extent of which is dependent on the nature of the polymer and the protein. Changes in solution pH adjust the net charges of proteins, providing an effective way to manipulate electrostatic interactions and in turn the increment in the polymer fluorescence. In addition, the effect of protein digestion on the fluorescence of polymer/protein complexes is probed. The results indicate that electrostatic interaction induced polymer fluorescence increase cannot be substantially reduced through cleaving protein into peptide fragments. In contrast, hydrophobic interactions, mainly determined by the hydrophobicity of proteins, can be minimized by digestion, imparting a light-off signature for the polymer/protein complexes. This study thus not only highlights the opportunities of exerting nonspecific interactions for protein sensing but also reveals significant implications for biosensor design.

  8. Nonlinear Surface Dilatational Rheology and Foaming Behavior of Protein and Protein Fibrillar Aggregates in the Presence of Natural Surfactant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zhili; Yang, Xiaoquan; Sagis, Leonard M C

    2016-04-19

    The surface and foaming properties of native soy glycinin (11S) and its heat-induced fibrillar aggregates, in the presence of natural surfactant steviol glycoside (STE), were investigated and compared at pH 7.0 to determine the impact of protein structure modification on protein-surfactant interfacial interactions. The adsorption at, and nonlinear dilatational rheological behavior of, the air-water interface were studied by combining drop shape analysis tensiometry, ellipsometry, and large-amplitude oscillatory dilatational rheology. Lissajous plots of surface pressure versus deformation were used to analyze the surface rheological response in terms of interfacial microstructure. The heat treatment generates a mixture of long fibrils and unconverted peptides. The presence of small peptides in 11S fibril samples resulted in a faster adsorption kinetics than that of native 11S. The addition of STE affected the adsorption of 11S significantly, whereas no apparent effect on the adsorption of the 11S fibril-peptide system was observed. The rheological response of interfaces stabilized by 11S-STE mixtures also differed significantly from the response for 11S fibril-peptide-STE mixtures. For 11S, the STE reduces the degree of strain hardening in extension and increases strain hardening in compression, suggesting the interfacial structure may change from a surface gel to a mixed phase of protein patches and STE domains. The foams generated from the mixtures displayed comparable foam stability to that of pure 11S. For 11S fibril-peptide mixtures STE only significantly affects the response in extension, where the degree of strain softening is decreased compared to the pure fibril-peptide system. The foam stability of the fibril-peptide system was significantly reduced by STE. These findings indicate that fibrillization of globular proteins could be a potential strategy to modify the complex surface and foaming behaviors of protein-surfactant mixtures.

  9. Engineering of the E. coli Outer Membrane Protein FhuA to overcome the Hydrophobic Mismatch in Thick Polymeric Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fioroni Marco

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Channel proteins like the engineered FhuA Δ1-159 often cannot insert into thick polymeric membranes due to a mismatch between the hydrophobic surface of the protein and the hydrophobic surface of the polymer membrane. To address this problem usually specific block copolymers are synthesized to facilitate protein insertion. Within this study in a reverse approach we match the protein to the polymer instead of matching the polymer to the protein. Results To increase the FhuA Δ1-159 hydrophobic surface by 1 nm, the last 5 amino acids of each of the 22 β-sheets, prior to the more regular periplasmatic β-turns, were doubled leading to an extended FhuA Δ1-159 (FhuA Δ1-159 Ext. The secondary structure prediction and CD spectroscopy indicate the β-barrel folding of FhuA Δ1-159 Ext. The FhuA Δ1-159 Ext insertion and functionality within a nanocontainer polymeric membrane based on the triblock copolymer PIB1000-PEG6000-PIB1000 (PIB = polyisobutylene, PEG = polyethyleneglycol has been proven by kinetic analysis using the HRP-TMB assay (HRP = Horse Radish Peroxidase, TMB = 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine. Identical experiments with the unmodified FhuA Δ1-159 report no kinetics and presumably no insertion into the PIB1000-PEG6000-PIB1000 membrane. Furthermore labeling of the Lys-NH2 groups present in the FhuA Δ1-159 Ext channel, leads to controllability of in/out flux of substrates and products from the nanocontainer. Conclusion Using a simple "semi rational" approach the protein's hydrophobic transmembrane region was increased by 1 nm, leading to a predicted lower hydrophobic mismatch between the protein and polymer membrane, minimizing the insertion energy penalty. The strategy of adding amino acids to the FhuA Δ1-159 Ext hydrophobic part can be further expanded to increase the protein's hydrophobicity, promoting the efficient embedding into thicker/more hydrophobic block copolymer membranes.

  10. Hydrophobic aggregation of ultrafine kaolinite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xiao-ping; HU Yue-hua; LIU Run-Qing

    2008-01-01

    The hydrophobic aggregation of ultrafine kaolinite in cationic surfactant suspension was investigated by sedimentation test, zeta potential measurement and SEM observation. SEM images reveal that kaolinite particles show the self-aggregation of edge-face in acidic media, the aggregation of edge-face and edge-edge in neutral media, and the dispersion in alkaline media due to electrostatic repulsion. In the presence of the dodecylammonium acetate cationic surfactant and in neutral and alkaline suspension, the hydrophobic aggregation of face-face is demonstrated. The zeta potential of kaolinite increases with increasing the concentration of cationic surfactant. The small and loose aggregation at a low concentration but big and tight aggregation at a high concentration is presented At pH=7 alkyl quarterly amine salt CTAB has the best hydrophobic aggregation among three cationic surfactants, namely, dodecylammonium acetate, alkyl quarterly amine salts 1227 and CTAB.

  11. Collagen mimetic peptide discs promote assembly of a broad range of natural protein fibers through hydrophobic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuinness, Kenneth; Nanda, Vikas

    2017-07-19

    Collagen mimetic peptides that alone formed two-dimensional nanoscale discs driven by hydrophobic interactions were shown in electron microscopy studies to also co-assemble with natural fibrous proteins to produce discs-on-a-string (DoS) nanostructures. In most cases, peptide discs also facilitated bundling of the protein fibers. This provides insight into how synthetic and natural proteins may be combined to develop multicomponent, multi-dimensional architectures at the nanoscale.

  12. Simulations of HIV capsid protein dimerization reveal the effect of chemistry and topography on the mechanism of hydrophobic protein association

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Naiyin

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has shown that the hydrophobic protein surfaces in aqueous solution sit near a drying transition. The tendency for these surfaces to expel water from their vicinity leads to self assembly of macromolecular complexes. In this article we show with a realistic model for a biologically pertinent system how this phenomenon appears at the molecular level. We focus on the association of the C-terminal domain (CA-C) of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) capsid protein. By combining all-atom simulations with specialized sampling techniques we measure the water density distribution during the approach of two CA-C proteins as a function of separation and amino acid sequence in the interfacial region. The simulations demonstrate that CA-C protein-protein interactions sit at the edge of a dewetting transition and that this mesoscopic manifestation of the underlying liquid-vapor phase transition can be readily manipulated by biology or protein engineering to significantly affect association behavior. While ...

  13. Protein adsorption on a hydrophobic surface: a molecular dynamics study of lysozyme on graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffaini, Giuseppina; Ganazzoli, Fabio

    2010-04-20

    Adsorption of human lysozyme on hydrophobic graphite is investigated through atomistic computer simulations with molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) techniques. The chosen strategy follows a simulation protocol proposed by the authors to model the initial and the final adsorption stage on a bare surface. Adopting an implicit solvent and considering 10 starting molecular orientations so that all the main sides of the protein can face the surface, we first carry out an energy minimization to investigate the initial adsorption stage, and then long MD runs of selected arrangements to follow the surface spreading of the protein maximizing its adsorption strength. The results are discussed in terms of the kinetics of surface spreading, the interaction energy, and the molecular size, considering both the footprint and the final thickness of the adsorbed protein. The structural implications of the final adsorption geometry for surface aggregation and nanoscale structural organization are also pointed out. Further MD runs are carried out in explicit water for the native structure and the most stable adsorption state to assess the local stability of the geometry obtained in implicit solvent, and to calculate the statistical distribution of the water molecules around the whole lysozyme and its backbone.

  14. Isolation of soybean protein P34 from oil bodies using hydrophobic interaction chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidel-Morgenstern Andreas

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soybeans play a prominent role in allergologic research due to the high incidence of allergic reactions. For detailed studies on specific proteins it is necessary to have access to a large amount of pure substance. Results In this contribution, a method for purifying soybean (Glycine max protein P34 (also called Gly m Bd 30 K or Gly m 1 using hydrophobic interaction chromatography is presented. After screening experiments using 1 mL HiTrap columns, Butyl Sepharose 4 FF was selected for further systematic investigations. With this stationary phase, suitable operation conditions for two-step gradient elution using ammonium sulphate were determined experimentally. The separation conditions obtained in a small column could be scaled up successfully to column volumes of 7.5 and 75 mL, allowing for high product purities of almost 100% with a yield of 27% for the chromatographic separation step. Conditions could be simplified further using a onestep gradient, which gave comparable purification in a shorter process time. The identity of the purified protein was verified using in-gel digestion and mass spectrometry as well as immunological techniques. Conclusion With the technique presented it is possible to produce, within a short timeframe, pure P34, suitable for further studies where an example antigen is needed.

  15. Surfactant protein A2 mutations associated with pulmonary fibrosis lead to protein instability and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Meenakshi; Wang, Yongyu; Gerard, Robert D; Mendelson, Carole R; Garcia, Christine Kim

    2010-07-16

    Rare heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2, SFTPA2) are associated with adult-onset pulmonary fibrosis and adenocarcinoma of the lung. We have previously shown that two recombinant SP-A2 mutant proteins (G231V and F198S) remain within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of A549 cells and are not secreted into the culture medium. The pathogenic mechanism of the mutant proteins is unknown. Here we analyze all common and rare variants of the surfactant protein A2, SP-A2, in both A549 cells and in primary type II alveolar epithelial cells. We show that, in contrast with all other SP-A2 variants, the mutant proteins are not secreted into the medium with wild-type SP-A isoforms, form fewer intracellular dimer and trimer oligomers, are partially insoluble in 0.5% Nonidet P-40 lysates of transfected A549 cells, and demonstrate greater protein instability in chymotrypsin proteolytic digestions. Both the G231V and F198S mutant SP-A2 proteins are destroyed via the ER-association degradation pathway. Expression of the mutant proteins increases the transcription of a BiP-reporter construct, expression of BiP protein, and production of an ER stress-induced XBP-1 spliced product. Human bronchoalveolar wash samples from individuals who are heterozygous for the G231V mutation have similar levels of total SP-A as normal family members, which suggests that the mechanism of disease does not involve an overt lack of secreted SP-A but instead involves an increase in ER stress of resident type II alveolar epithelial cells.

  16. Protective Effect of Surfactant Protein D in Pulmonary Vaccinia Virus Infection: Implication of A27 Viral Protein

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    Julien Perino

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV was used as a surrogate of variola virus (VARV (genus Orthopoxvirus, the causative agent of smallpox, to study Orthopoxvirus infection. VARV is principally transmitted between humans by aerosol droplets. Once inhaled, VARV first infects the respiratory tract where it could encounter surfactant components, such as soluble pattern recognition receptors. Surfactant protein D (SP-D, constitutively present in the lining fluids of the respiratory tract, plays important roles in innate host defense against virus infection. We investigated the role of SP-D in VACV infection and studied the A27 viral protein involvement in the interaction with SP-D. Interaction between SP-D and VACV caused viral inhibition in a lung cell model. Interaction of SP-D with VACV was mediated by the A27 viral protein. Binding required Ca2+ and interactions were blocked in the presence of excess of SP-D saccharide ligands. A27, which lacks glycosylation, directly interacted with SP-D. The interaction between SP-D and the viral particle was also observed using electron microscopy. Infection of mice lacking SP-D (SP-D-/- resulted in increased mortality compared to SP-D+/+ mice. Altogether, our data show that SP-D participates in host defense against the vaccinia virus infection and that the interaction occurs with the viral surface protein A27.

  17. Interactions between Surfactants in Solution and Electrospun Protein Fibers: Effects on Release Behavior and Fiber Properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boutrup Stephansen, Karen; García-Díaz, María; Jessen, Flemming

    2016-01-01

    ), a cationic surfactant (benzalkonium chloride), and a neutral surfactant (Triton X-100) were studied. The anionic surfactants increased the insulin release in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas the neutral surfactant had no significant effect on the release. Interestingly, only minute amounts...... of insulin were released from the fibers when benzalkonium chloride was present. The FSP-Ins fibers appeared dense after incubation with this cationic surfactant, whereas high fiber porosity was observed after incubation with anionic or neutral surfactants. Contact angle measurements and staining...

  18. Wang-Landau sampling in face-centered-cubic hydrophobic-hydrophilic lattice model proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingfa; Song, Beibei; Yao, Yonglei; Xue, Yu; Liu, Wenjie; Liu, Zhaoxia

    2014-10-01

    Finding the global minimum-energy structure is one of the main problems of protein structure prediction. The face-centered-cubic (fcc) hydrophobic-hydrophilic (HP) lattice model can reach high approximation ratios of real protein structures, so the fcc lattice model is a good choice to predict the protein structures. The lacking of an effective global optimization method is the key obstacle in solving this problem. The Wang-Landau sampling method is especially useful for complex systems with a rough energy landscape and has been successfully applied to solving many optimization problems. We apply the improved Wang-Landau (IWL) sampling method, which incorporates the generation of an initial conformation based on the greedy strategy and the neighborhood strategy based on pull moves into the Wang-Landau sampling method to predict the protein structures on the fcc HP lattice model. Unlike conventional Monte Carlo simulations that generate a probability distribution at a given temperature, the Wang-Landau sampling method can estimate the density of states accurately via a random walk, which produces a flat histogram in energy space. We test 12 general benchmark instances on both two-dimensional and three-dimensional (3D) fcc HP lattice models. The lowest energies by the IWL sampling method are as good as or better than those of other methods in the literature for all instances. We then test five sets of larger-scale instances, denoted by the S, R, F90, F180, and CASP target instances on the 3D fcc HP lattice model. The numerical results show that our algorithm performs better than the other five methods in the literature on both the lowest energies and the average lowest energies in all runs. The IWL sampling method turns out to be a powerful tool to study the structure prediction of the fcc HP lattice model proteins.

  19. Surfactant protein D is a candidate biomarker for subclinical tobacco smoke-induced lung damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sofie L.; Tan, Qihua; Holst, René;

    2014-01-01

    Variation in Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) is associated with lung function in tobacco smoke-induced chronic respiratory disease. We hypothesized that the same association exists in the general population and could be used to identify individuals sensitive to smoke-induced lung damage. The associat......Variation in Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) is associated with lung function in tobacco smoke-induced chronic respiratory disease. We hypothesized that the same association exists in the general population and could be used to identify individuals sensitive to smoke-induced lung damage...... or haplotypes, and expiratory lung function were assessed using twin study methodology and mixed-effects models. Significant inverse associations were evident between sSP-D and the forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity in the presence of current tobacco smoking but not in non...... with lung function measures in interaction with tobacco smoking. The obtained data suggest sSP-D as a candidate biomarker in risk assessments for subclinical tobacco smoke-induced lung damage. The data and derived conclusion warrant confirmation in a longitudinal population following chronic obstructive...

  20. Signal amplification in electrochemical detection of buckwheat allergenic protein using field effect transistor biosensor by introduction of anionic surfactant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho Hideshima

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Food allergens, especially buckwheat proteins, sometimes induce anaphylactic shock in patients after ingestion. Development of a simple and rapid screening method based on a field effect transistor (FET biosensor for food allergens in food facilities or products is in demand. In this study, we achieved the FET detection of a buckwheat allergenic protein (BWp16, which is not charged enough to be electrically detected by FET biosensors, by introducing additional negative charges from anionic surfactants to the target proteins. A change in the FET characteristics reflecting surface potential caused by the adsorption of target charged proteins was observed when the target sample was coupled with the anionic surfactant (sodium dodecyl sulfate; SDS, while no significant response was detected without any surfactant treatment. It was suggested that the surfactant conjugated with the protein could be useful for the charge amplification of the target proteins. The surface plasmon resonance analysis revealed that the SDS-coupled proteins were successfully captured by the receptors immobilized on the sensing surface. Additionally, we obtained the FET responses at various concentrations of BWp16 ranging from 1 ng/mL to 10 μg/mL. These results suggest that a signal amplification method for FET biosensing is useful for allergen detection in the food industry.

  1. Proteomic and Lipidomic Analysis of Nanoparticle Corona upon Contact with Lung Surfactant Reveals Differences in Protein, but Not Lipid Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raesch, Simon Sebastian; Tenzer, Stefan; Storck, Wiebke; Rurainski, Alexander; Selzer, Dominik; Ruge, Christian Arnold; Perez-Gil, Jesus; Schaefer, Ulrich Friedrich; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2015-12-22

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) constitutes the first line of host defense in the deep lung. Because of its high content of phospholipids and surfactant specific proteins, the interaction of inhaled nanoparticles (NPs) with the pulmonary surfactant layer is likely to form a corona that is different to the one formed in plasma. Here we present a detailed lipidomic and proteomic analysis of NP corona formation using native porcine surfactant as a model. We analyzed the adsorbed biomolecules in the corona of three NP with different surface properties (PEG-, PLGA-, and Lipid-NP) after incubation with native porcine surfactant. Using label-free shotgun analysis for protein and LC-MS for lipid analysis, we quantitatively determined the corona composition. Our results show a conserved lipid composition in the coronas of all investigated NPs regardless of their surface properties, with only hydrophilic PEG-NPs adsorbing fewer lipids in total. In contrast, the analyzed NP displayed a marked difference in the protein corona, consisting of up to 417 different proteins. Among the proteins showing significant differences between the NP coronas, there was a striking prevalence of molecules with a notoriously high lipid and surface binding, such as, e.g., SP-A, SP-D, DMBT1. Our data indicate that the selective adsorption of proteins mediates the relatively similar lipid pattern in the coronas of different NPs. On the basis of our lipidomic and proteomic analysis, we provide a detailed set of quantitative data on the composition of the surfactant corona formed upon NP inhalation, which is unique and markedly different to the plasma corona.

  2. Signal recognition particle and SecA cooperate during export of secretory proteins with highly hydrophobic signal sequences.

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    Yufan Zhou

    Full Text Available The Sec translocon of bacterial plasma membranes mediates the linear translocation of secretory proteins as well as the lateral integration of membrane proteins. Integration of many membrane proteins occurs co-translationally via the signal recognition particle (SRP-dependent targeting of ribosome-associated nascent chains to the Sec translocon. In contrast, translocation of classical secretory proteins across the Sec translocon is a post-translational event requiring no SRP but the motor protein SecA. Secretory proteins were, however, reported to utilize SRP in addition to SecA, if the hydrophobicity of their signal sequences exceeds a certain threshold value. Here we have analyzed transport of this subgroup of secretory proteins across the Sec translocon employing an entirely defined in vitro system. We thus found SecA to be both necessary and sufficient for translocation of secretory proteins with hydrophobic signal sequences, whereas SRP and its receptor improved translocation efficiency. This SRP-mediated boost of translocation is likely due to the early capture of the hydrophobic signal sequence by SRP as revealed by site-specific photo cross-linking of ribosome nascent chain complexes.

  3. The effects of GH and hormone replacement therapy on serum concentrations of mannan-binding lectin, surfactant protein D and vitamin D binding protein in Turner syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg; Leth-Larsen, Rikke; Lauridsen, Anna Lis

    2004-01-01

    function. In the present study we examined whether GH or hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in Turner syndrome (TS) influence the serum concentrations of MBL and two other proteins partaking in the innate immune defence, surfactant protein D (SP-D) and vitamin D binding protein (DBP). DESIGN: Study 1...

  4. Modeling protein density of states: additive hydrophobic effects are insufficient for calorimetric two-state cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H S

    2000-09-01

    A well-established experimental criterion for two-state thermodynamic cooperativity in protein folding is that the van't Hoff enthalpy DeltaH(vH) around the transition midpoint is equal, or very nearly so, to the calorimetric enthalpy DeltaH(cal) of the entire transition. This condition is satisfied by many small proteins. We use simple lattice models to provide a statistical mechanical framework to elucidate how this calorimetric two-state picture may be reconciled with the hierarchical multistate scenario emerging from recent hydrogen exchange experiments. We investigate the feasibility of using inverse Laplace transforms to recover the underlying density of states (i.e., enthalpy distribution) from calorimetric data. We find that the constraint imposed by DeltaH(vH)/DeltaH(cal) approximately 1 on densities of states of proteins is often more stringent than other "two-state" criteria proposed in recent theoretical studies. In conjunction with reasonable assumptions, the calorimetric two-state condition implies a narrow distribution of denatured-state enthalpies relative to the overall enthalpy difference between the native and the denatured conformations. This requirement does not always correlate with simple definitions of "sharpness" of a transition and has important ramifications for theoretical modeling. We find that protein models that assume capillarity cooperativity can exhibit overall calorimetric two-state-like behaviors. However, common heteropolymer models based on additive hydrophobic-like interactions, including highly specific two-dimensional Gō models, fail to produce proteinlike DeltaH(vH)/DeltaH(cal) approximately 1. A simple model is constructed to illustrate a proposed scenario in which physically plausible local and nonlocal cooperative terms, which mimic helical cooperativity and environment-dependent hydrogen bonding strength, can lead to thermodynamic behaviors closer to experiment. Our results suggest that proteinlike thermodynamic

  5. Human surfactant protein A2 gene mutations impair dimmer/trimer assembly leading to deficiency in protein sialylation and secretion.

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    Yi Song

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein A2 (SP-A2 plays an essential role in surfactant metabolism and lung host defense. SP-A2 mutations in the carbohydrate recognition domain have been related to familial pulmonary fibrosis and can lead to a recombinant protein secretion deficiency in vitro. In this study, we explored the molecular mechanism of protein secretion deficiency and the subsequent biological effects in CHO-K1 cells expressing both wild-type and several different mutant forms of SP-A2. We demonstrate that the SP-A2 G231V and F198S mutants impair the formation of dimmer/trimer SP-A2 which contributes to the protein secretion defect. A deficiency in sialylation, but not N-linked glycosylation, is critical to the observed dimmer/trimer impairment-induced secretion defect. Furthermore, both mutant forms accumulate in the ER and form NP-40-insoluble aggregates. In addition, the soluble mutant SP-A2 could be partially degraded through the proteasome pathway but not the lysosome or autophagy pathway. Intriguingly, 4-phenylbutyrate acid (4-PBA, a chemical chaperone, alleviates aggregate formation and partially rescued the protein secretion of SP-A2 mutants. In conclusion, SP-A2 G231V and F198S mutants impair the dimmer/trimer assembly, which contributes to the protein sialylation and secretion deficiency. The intracellular protein mutants could be partially degraded through the proteasome pathway and also formed aggregates. The treatment of the cells with 4-PBA resulted in reduced aggregation and rescued the secretion of mutant SP-A2.

  6. Cloning of gp-340, a putative opsonin receptor for lung surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmskov, U; Mollenhauer, J; Madsen, J

    1999-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is an oligomeric C type lectin that promotes phagocytosis by binding to microbial surface carbohydrates. A 340-kDa glycoprotein (gp-340) has been shown to bind SP-D in the presence of calcium but does so independently of carbohydrate recognition. This protein exists both...... transcription-PCR analysis showed that the main sites of synthesis of gp-340 are lung, trachea, salivary gland, small intestine, and stomach. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong staining for gp-340 in alveolar and other tissue macrophages. Immunostaining of the macrophage membrane was either uniform or focal...... intestine and in the ducts of salivary glands. The distribution of gp-340 in macrophages is compatible with a role as an opsonin receptor for SP-D....

  7. Equilibrium and dynamic interfacial properties of protein/ionic-liquid-type surfactant solutions at the decane/water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chong; Lei, Jinmei; Zhang, Lu; Du, Feng-Pei

    2014-11-25

    The interfacial behavior of β-casein and lysozyme solutions has been investigated in the presence of an ionic liquid-type imidazolium surfactant ([C16mim]Br) at the decane/water interface. The dynamic dilational properties of the protein/surfactant solutions are investigated by the oscillating drop method and interfacial tension relaxation method. The interfacial tension isotherms for the mixed adsorption layers indicate that the increased addition of [C16mim]Br to a pure protein changes the properties of the complex formed at the decane/water interface. Whereas the interfacial tension data of the protein/surfactant mixed layers do not clearly show differences with changing bulk composition, the dilational rheology provides undoubted evidence that the structure and, in particular, the dynamics of the adsorbed layers depend on the bulk surfactant concentration. The experiment data for β-casein/[C16mim]Br solutions indicate that at higher bulk [C16mim]Br concentrations, β-casein in the interfacial layer is subject to conformational changes, where it gives space to [C16mim]Br molecules in the form of coadsorb rather than replacement; in contrast, in lysozyme/[C16mim]Br solutions some lysozyme molecules desorb from the interface due to the competitive adsorption of free [C16mim]Br molecules. Experimental results related to the interfacial dilational properties of the protein/surfactant solutions show that the dilational modulus turns out to be more sensitive to the conformation of protein/surfactant mixture at the liquid interface than the interfacial tension.

  8. Molecular aggregation in water : the interplay of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buwalda, Rixt Tietje

    2001-01-01

    Hydrophobic interactions belong to the most important noncovalent interactions and play an important role in many (bio)chemical processes. A number of processes in aqueous solution like protein folding, surfactant aggregation or molecular recognition processes strongly rely on the interactions betwe

  9. The elevation of serum napsin A in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, compared with KL-6, surfactant protein-A and surfactant protein-D

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    Samukawa Takuya

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Napsin A, an aspartic protease, is mainly expressed in alveolar type-II cells and renal proximal tubules and is a putative immunohistochemical marker for pulmonary adenocarcinomas. This study sought to determine whether napsin A could be measured in the serum to evaluate its relationship to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF and determine whether renal dysfunction might affect serum napsin A levels. Methods Serum levels of napsin A were measured in 20 patients with IPF, 34 patients with lung primary adenocarcinoma, 12 patients with kidney diseases, and 20 healthy volunteers. Surfactant protein (SP-A, SP-D, and Krebs von den Lungen-6 (KL-6 levels in serum and pulmonary function tests were also evaluated in IPF patients. Results Circulating levels of napsin A were increased in patients with IPF, as compared with healthy controls, and they correlated with the severity of disease. Moreover, the serum napsin A levels were not elevated in patients with pulmonary adenocarcinoma or renal dysfunction. The distinguishing point between IPF and the controls was that the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC of napsin A was larger than that of KL-6, SP-A, or SP-D. Conclusion These findings suggest that serum napsin A may be a candidate biomarker for IPF.

  10. Surfactant protein D binds to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope protein gp120 and inhibits HIV replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meschi, Joseph; Crouch, Erika C; Skolnik, Paul;

    2005-01-01

    The envelope protein (gp120) of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) contains highly conserved mannosylated oligosaccharides. These glycoconjugates contribute to resistance to antibody neutralization, and binding to cell surface lectins on macrophages and dendritic cells. Mannose-binding lectin (MBL......) binds to gp120 and plays a role in defence against the virus. In this study it is demonstrated that surfactant protein D (SP-D) binds to gp120 and inhibits HIV infectivity at significantly lower concentrations than MBL. The binding of SP-D was mediated by its calcium-dependent carbohydrate...... defence against HIV. A chimeric protein containing the N-terminal and collagen domains of SP-D linked to the neck and carbohydrate-recognition domains of MBL (called SP-D/MBL(neck+CRD)) had greater ability to bind to gp120 and inhibit virus replication than either SP-D or MBL. The enhanced binding of SP...

  11. Distribution of endotracheally instilled surfactant protein SP-C in lung-lavaged rabbits.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bambang Oetomo, Sidarto; de Leij, Louis; Curstedt, T; ter Haar, J G; Schoots, Coenraad; Wildevuur, Charles; Okken, Albert

    1991-01-01

    In lung-lavaged surfactant-deficient rabbits (n = 6) requiring artificial ventilation, porcine surfactant was instilled endotracheally. This resulted in improvement of lung function so that the animals could be weaned off artificial ventilation. The animals were killed 4 1/2 h after surfactant admin

  12. Primary alveolar capillary dysplasia (acinar dysplasia) and surfactant protein B deficiency: a clinical, radiological and pathological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugosson, Claes O.; Khoumais, Nuha [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Department of Radiology MBC 28, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Salama, Husam M.; Kattan, Abdul H. [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Department of Paediatrics, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia); Al-Dayel, Fouad [King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Department of Pathology, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia)

    2005-03-01

    Full-term infants with severe and prolonged respiratory distress represent a diagnostic challenge. Plain radiographic findings may be nonspecific or similar to classic surfactant deficiency disease for infants with surfactant protein B deficiency and acinar dysplasia. Objectives: To describe the similar clinical-radiolgical patterns of two rare neonatal conditions. Six newborn babies with severe respiratory distress at birth demonstrated clinical and radiographically prolonged and progressive diffuse pulmonary opacification. All infants demonstrated hyperinflation of the lungs. The diffuse hazy opacification, which varied from mild (n=3) to moderate (n=3), progressed to severe diffuse opacification preceding death, which occurred at 12-36 days of life. Open lung biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of primary alveolar acinar dysplasia (AD) in four infants and surfactant protein B deficiency (SPBD) in two infants. In full-term babies with unexplained progressive respiratory distress from birth and progress of radiological changes, both AD and SPBD should be considered. (orig.)

  13. Small surfactant-like peptides can drive soluble proteins into active aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Bihong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inactive protein inclusion bodies occur commonly in Escherichia coli (E. coli cells expressing heterologous proteins. Previously several independent groups have found that active protein aggregates or pseudo inclusion bodies can be induced by a fusion partner such as a cellulose binding domain from Clostridium cellulovorans (CBDclos when expressed in E. coli. More recently we further showed that a short amphipathic helical octadecapeptide 18A (EWLKAFYEKVLEKLKELF and a short beta structure peptide ELK16 (LELELKLKLELELKLK have a similar property. Results In this work, we explored a third type of peptides, surfactant-like peptides, for performing such a "pulling-down" function. One or more of three such peptides (L6KD, L6K2, DKL6 were fused to the carboxyl termini of model proteins including Aspergillus fumigatus amadoriase II (AMA, all three peptides were used, Bacillus subtilis lipase A (LipA, only L6KD was used, hereinafter the same, Bacillus pumilus xylosidase (XynB, and green fluorescent protein (GFP, and expressed in E. coli. All fusions were found to predominantly accumulate in the insoluble fractions, with specific activities ranging from 25% to 92% of the native counterparts. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM and confocal fluorescence microscopic analyses confirmed the formation of protein aggregates in the cell. Furthermore, binding assays with amyloid-specific dyes (thioflavin T and Cong red to the AMA-L6KD aggregate and the TEM analysis of the aggregate following digestion with protease K suggested that the AMA-L6KD aggregate may contain structures reminiscent of amyloids, including a fibril-like structure core. Conclusions This study shows that the surfactant-like peptides L6KD and it derivatives can act as a pull-down handler for converting soluble proteins into active aggregates, much like 18A and ELK16. These peptide-mediated protein aggregations might have important implications for protein aggregation in

  14. Reversible Interactions of Proteins with Mixed Shell Polymeric Micelles: Tuning the Surface Hydrophobic/Hydrophilic Balance toward Efficient Artificial Chaperones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianzu; Song, Yiqing; Sun, Pingchuan; An, Yingli; Zhang, Zhenkun; Shi, Linqi

    2016-03-22

    Molecular chaperones can elegantly fine-tune its hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance to assist a broad spectrum of nascent polypeptide chains to fold properly. Such precious property is difficult to be achieved by chaperone mimicking materials due to limited control of their surface characteristics that dictate interactions with unfolded protein intermediates. Mixed shell polymeric micelles (MSPMs), which consist of two kinds of dissimilar polymeric chains in the micellar shell, offer a convenient way to fine-tune surface properties of polymeric nanoparticles. In the current work, we have fabricated ca. 30 kinds of MSPMs with finely tunable hydrophilic/hydrophobic surface properties. We investigated the respective roles of thermosensitive and hydrophilic polymeric chains in the thermodenaturation protection of proteins down to the molecular structure. Although the three kinds of thermosensitive polymers investigated herein can form collapsed hydrophobic domains on the micellar surface, we found distinct capability to capture and release unfolded protein intermediates, due to their respective affinity for proteins. Meanwhile, in terms of the hydrophilic polymeric chains in the micellar shell, poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) excels in assisting unfolded protein intermediates to refold properly via interacting with the refolding intermediates, resulting in enhanced chaperone efficiency. However, another hydrophilic polymer-poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) severely deteriorates the chaperone efficiency of MSPMs, due to its protein-resistant properties. Judicious combination of thermosensitive and hydrophilic chains in the micellar shell lead to MSPM-based artificial chaperones with optimal efficacy.

  15. The fungal cerato-platanin protein EPL1 forms highly ordered layers at hydrophobic/hydrophilic interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonazza, K; Gaderer, R; Neudl, S; Przylucka, A; Allmaier, G; Druzhinina, I S; Grothe, H; Friedbacher, G; Seidl-Seiboth, V

    2015-03-07

    Cerato-platanin proteins (CPPs) and hydrophobins are two classes of small, secreted proteins that are exclusively found in fungi. CPPs are known as chitin-binding proteins, and were recently also shown to form protein layers at air/water interfaces, but the features of these layers were not investigated on the molecular level yet. In this study, by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM), EPL1, a member of the CPP family was shown to form highly ordered monolayers at a hydrophobic surface/liquid-interface. Furthermore, two new hydrophobins were analysed, and the influence of EPL1 on hydrophobin layers was studied in situ. Hydrophobins are amphiphilic proteins that are able to self-assemble at hydrophobic/hydrophilic interfaces, thereby inverting the polarity of the surface. This renders fungal growth structures such as spores water repellent. The combination of AFM data and wettability experiments led to the conclusion that in presence of both, hydrophobins and EPL1, a previously unknown hybrid layer is formed. This mixed protein layer is on one hand not inverting but enhancing the hydrophobicity of HOPG (highly oriented pyrolytic graphite), typical for EPL1, and on the other hand, it is stable and water insoluble, which is reminiscent of hydrophobin layers.

  16. The N-terminal repeat and the ligand binding domain A of SdrI protein is involved in hydrophobicity of S. saprophyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleine, Britta; Ali, Liaqat; Wobser, Dominique; Sakιnç, Türkân

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcus saprophyticus is an important cause of urinary tract infection, and its cell surface hydrophobicity may contribute to virulence by facilitating adherence of the organism to uroepithelia. S. saprophyticus expresses the surface protein SdrI, a member of the serine-aspartate repeat (SD) protein family, which has multifunctional properties. The SdrI knock out mutant has a reduced hydrophobicity index (HPI) of 25%, and expressed in the non-hydrophobic Staphylococcus carnosus strain TM300 causes hydrophobicity. Using hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC), we confined the hydrophobic site of SdrI to the N-terminal repeat region. S. saprophyticus strains carrying different plasmid constructs lacking either the N-terminal repeats, both B or SD-repeats were less hydrophobic than wild type and fully complemented SdrI mutant (HPI: 51%). The surface hydrophobicity and HPI of both wild type and the complemented strain were also influenced by calcium (Ca(2+)) and were reduced from 81.3% and 82.4% to 10.9% and 12.3%, respectively. This study confirms that the SdrI protein of S. saprophyticus is a crucial factor for surface hydrophobicity and also gives a first significant functional description of the N-terminal repeats, which in conjunction with the B-repeats form an optimal hydrophobic conformation.

  17. Epitope mapping of imidazolium cations in ionic liquid-protein interactions unveils the balance between hydrophobicity and electrostatics towards protein destabilisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Micael; Figueiredo, Angelo Miguel; Cabrita, Eurico J

    2014-11-14

    We investigated imidazolium-based ionic liquid (IL) interactions with human serum albumin (HSA) to discern the level of cation interactions towards protein stability. STD-NMR spectroscopy was used to observe the imidazolium IL protons involved in direct binding and to identify the interactions responsible for changes in Tm as accessed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Cations influence protein stability less than anions but still significantly. It was found that longer alkyl side chains of imidazolium-based ILs (more hydrophobic) are associated with a higher destabilisation effect on HSA than short-alkyl groups (less hydrophobic). The reason for such destabilisation lies on the increased surface contact area of the cation with the protein, particularly on the hydrophobic contacts promoted by the terminus of the alkyl chain. The relevance of the hydrophobic contacts is clearly demonstrated by the introduction of a polar moiety in the alkyl chain: a methoxy or alcohol group. Such structural modification reduces the degree of hydrophobic contacts with HSA explaining the lesser extent of protein destabilisation when compared to longer alkyl side chain groups: above [C2mim](+). Competition STD-NMR experiments using [C2mim](+), [C4mim](+) and [C2OHmim](+) also validate the importance of the hydrophobic interactions. The combined effect of cation and anion interactions was explored using (35)Cl NMR. Such experiments show that the nature of the cation has no influence on the anion-protein contacts, still the nature of the anion modulates the cation-protein interaction. Herein we propose that more destabilising anions are likely to be a result of a partial contribution from the cation as a direct consequence of the different levels of interaction (cation-anion pair and cation-protein).

  18. The Role of Surfactant in Lung Disease and Host Defense against Pulmonary Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, SeungHye; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life as it lines the alveoli to lower surface tension, thereby preventing atelectasis during breathing. Surfactant is enriched with a relatively unique phospholipid, termed dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, and four surfactant-associated proteins, SP-A, SP-B, SP-C, and SP-D. The hydrophobic proteins, SP-B and SP-C, together with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, confer surface tension-lowering properties to the material. The more hydrophilic surfactant components, SP-A and SP-D, participate in pulmonary host defense and modify immune responses. Specifically, SP-A and SP-D bind and partake in the clearance of a variety of bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens and can dampen antigen-induced immune function of effector cells. Emerging data also show immunosuppressive actions of some surfactant-associated lipids, such as phosphatidylglycerol. Conversely, microbial pathogens in preclinical models impair surfactant synthesis and secretion, and microbial proteinases degrade surfactant-associated proteins. Deficiencies of surfactant components are classically observed in the neonatal respiratory distress syndrome, where surfactant replacement therapies have been the mainstay of treatment. However, functional or compositional deficiencies of surfactant are also observed in a variety of acute and chronic lung disorders. Increased surfactant is seen in pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, a disorder characterized by a functional deficiency of the granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor receptor or development of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor antibodies. Genetic polymorphisms of some surfactant proteins such as SP-C are linked to interstitial pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we briefly review the composition, antimicrobial properties, and relevance of pulmonary surfactant to lung disorders and present its therapeutic implications.

  19. Rescuing Those Left Behind: Recovering and Characterizing Underdigested Membrane and Hydrophobic Proteins To Enhance Proteome Measurement Depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannone, Richard J; Wurch, Louie L; Podar, Mircea; Hettich, Robert L

    2015-08-04

    The marine archaeon Nanoarchaeum equitans is dependent on direct physical contact with its host, the hyperthermophile Ignicoccus hospitalis. As this interaction is thought to be membrane-associated, involving a myriad of membrane-anchored proteins, proteomic efforts to better characterize this difficult to analyze interface are paramount to uncovering the mechanism of their association. By extending multienzyme digestion strategies that use sample filtration to recover underdigested proteins for reprocessing/consecutive proteolytic digestion, we applied chymotrypsin to redigest the proteinaceous material left over after initial proteolysis with trypsin of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extracted I. hospitalis-N. equitans proteins. Using this method, we show that proteins with increased hydrophobic character, including membrane proteins with multiple transmembrane helices, are enriched and recovered in the underdigested fraction. Chymotryptic reprocessing provided significant sequence coverage gains in both soluble and hydrophobic proteins alike, with the latter benefiting more so in terms of membrane protein representation. These gains were despite a large proportion of high-quality peptide spectra remaining unassigned in the underdigested fraction suggesting high levels of protein modification on these often surface-exposed proteins. Importantly, these gains were achieved without applying extensive fractionation strategies usually required for thorough characterization of membrane-associated proteins and were facilitated by the generation of a distinct, complementary set of peptides that aid in both the identification and quantitation of this important, under-represented class of proteins.

  20. Pulmonary surfactant and lung transplantation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erasmus, Michiel Elardus

    1997-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant lowers the surface tension at the air-water interface inside the alveolus. This is achieved by adsorption of surfactant phospholipids at the air-water interface, a process controlled by surfactant-associated proteins, such as SP-A. In this way, surfactant prevents collapse of th

  1. Hydrophobicity, thermal and micro-structural properties of whey protein concentrate-pullulan-beeswax films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Seid Mahdi; Khanzadi, Mehrdad; Mirzaei, Habibollah; Dehnad, Danial; Chegini, Faramarz Khodaian; Maghsoudlou, Yayha

    2015-09-01

    In this research, effects of beeswax (BW) on functional properties of whey protein concentrates (WPC):pullulan (PUL) films were investigated. For this purpose, 0, 10, 20 and 30w/w(glycerol)% BW rates and 30:70, 50:50 and 70:30w/w% WPC:PUL ratios were applied. Films containing 70% WPC:30% PUL (WPC70) and 30% BW (BW30) justified the highest contact angle (92.4°) among all films; SEM micrographs indicated that BW could come toward the surface of films during drying stage and resulted in a higher hydrophobic behavior of bilayer films compared with blend films. WPC70 supplied the lowest T(g) values (36-48 °C) among different proportions of WPC-PUL; the highest melting points were just assured in the absence of BW regardless of combination ratio for WPI:PUL. BW30 films deserved lower roughness rates than BW20 (and even BW10) films, indicating more advantageous microstructure and higher hydrogen connections in BW30 films and justifying similar melting points attained for BW30 films to BW20 or 10 ones. Overall, application of WPC70 and BW30 was recommended to obtain optimum combination of final properties for WPC-PUL-BW bilayer films as SEM exhibited flexible and elastic structures of such films.

  2. Designed armadillo repeat proteins as general peptide-binding scaffolds: consensus design and computational optimization of the hydrophobic core

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parmeggiani, Fabio; Pellarin, Riccardo; Larsen, Anders Peter

    2007-01-01

    interactions with peptides or parts of proteins in extended conformation. The conserved binding mode of the peptide in extended form, observed for different targets, makes armadillo repeat proteins attractive candidates for the generation of modular peptide-binding scaffolds. Taking advantage of the large...... number of repeat sequences available, a consensus-based approach combined with a force field-based optimization of the hydrophobic core was used to derive soluble, highly expressed, stable, monomeric designed proteins with improved characteristics compared to natural armadillo proteins. These sequences...

  3. A study of the hydration of ribonuclease A using densitometry: Effect of the protein hydrophobicity and polarity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkin, Vladimir A.; Khadiullina, Aigul V.

    2014-05-01

    The excess volumes of the binary system of ribonuclease A (RNase A) with water were obtained as a function of composition at 25 °C. The excess quantities for RNase A were compared with the published data for several unrelated proteins (lysozyme, serum albumin, lactoglobulin, and chymotrypsinogen A). The hydrophobicity of these proteins is gradually changed over a wide range. It was found that the more hydrophilic a protein is, the more significant the hydrophilic hydration contribution is. RNase A is the most hydrophilic protein in the present study, and it has the most significant hydrophilic hydration contribution.

  4. Role of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic sites in the dynamic crossover of the protein-hydration water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Mateus Henrique; Barbosa, Rafael C.; da Silva, Leandro B.; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2017-02-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to study the water structure and dynamics in the hydration shell of the globular TS-Kappa protein. The results show that for a wide range of temperatures the diffusion coefficient of water near the protein surface is lower than in bulk. A crossover in the diffusion behavior of hydration water is observed at different temperatures for hydrophilic and hydrophobic vicinities. We have found a correlation between the crossover in the hydrophilic case and the protein dynamical transition. An explanation in terms of the competition between water-water water-protein H-bond formation is provided based on H-bond network analysis.

  5. A short C-terminal tail prevents mis-targeting of hydrophobic mitochondrial membrane proteins to the ER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reithinger, Johannes H; Yim, Chewon; Park, Kwangjin; Björkholm, Patrik; von Heijne, Gunnar; Kim, Hyun

    2013-11-01

    Sdh3/Shh3, a subunit of mitochondrial succinate dehydrogenase, contains transmembrane domains with a hydrophobicity comparable to that of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteins. Here, we show that a C-terminal reporter fusion to Sdh3/Shh3 results in partial mis-targeting of the protein to the ER. This mis-targeting is mediated by the signal recognition particle (SRP) and depends on the length of the C-terminal tail. These results imply that if nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins contain strongly hydrophobic transmembrane domains and a long C-terminal tail, they have the potential to be recognized by SRP and mis-targeted to the ER. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural effects of pH and deacylation on surfactant protein C in an organic solvent mixture: a constant-pH MD study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalheda, Catarina A; Campos, Sara R R; Machuqueiro, Miguel; Baptista, António M

    2013-11-25

    The pulmonary surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a small highly hydrophobic protein that adopts a mainly helical structure while associated with the membrane but misfolds into a β-rich metastable structure upon deacylation, membrane dissociation, and exposure to the neutral pH of the aqueous alveolar subphase, eventually leading to the formation of amyloid aggregates associated with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The present constant-pH MD study of the acylated and deacylated isoforms of SP-C in a chloroform/methanol/water mixture, often used to mimic the membrane environment, shows that the loss of the acyl groups has a structural destabilizing effect and that the increase of pH promotes intraprotein contacts which contribute to the loss of helical structure in solution. These contacts result from the poor solvation of charged groups by the solvent mixture, which exhibits a limited membrane-mimetic character. Although a single SP-C molecule was used in the simulations, we propose that analogous intermolecular interactions may play a role in the early stages of the protein misfolding and aggregation in this mixture.

  7. Study on the influence of puerarin injection for the pulmonary surfactant protein and inflammatory mediators of children with severe pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lv-Wei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study and observe the influence situation of puerarin injection for the pulmonary surfactant protein and inflammatory mediators of children with severe pneumonia. Methods: 60 children with severe pneumonia in our hospital from February 2013 to January 2015 were selected as study object,and they were randomly divided into control group (routine treatment group) 30 cases and observation group (routine treatment and puerarin injection group) 30 cases, then the serum pulmonary surfactant protein and inflammatory mediators of two groups before the treatment and at different time after the treatment were respectively detected and compared. Results: The serum ulmonary surfactant protein and inflammatory mediators of observation group at third,fifth and tenth day after the treatment were all obviously lower than those of control group, all P<0.05, the comparison indexes after the treatment all had significant differences. Conclusions: The influence of puerarin injection for the pulmonary surfactant protein and inflammatory mediators of children with severe pneumonia are great, and it can effectively improve the disease state of children with severe pneumonia.

  8. Influence of ulinastatin on pulmonary surfactant protein, anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory mediator in patients with severe pneumonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Wang; Rui Kang; Jia-Li Xie; Ya-Ni Xue

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To observe the influence of ulinastatin on pulmonary surfactant protein and anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory mediator in patients with severe pneumonia. Methods:A total of 54 patients with severe pneumonia treated in our hospital from April 2014 to May 2015 were selected as the study object, and they were randomly divided into control group (conventional treatment of severe pneumonia group) and observation group (conventional treatment and ulinastatin group), with 27 cases in each group. Then the serum levels of pulmonary surfactant protein,anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory mediators in two groups before and after treatment at 1 day, 3 day and 5 day were compared. Results:The serum level of pulmonary surfactant protein, anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory mediators in two groups before treatment had no significant differences, all P>0.05, and those serum indexes in observation group after treatment at 1 day, 3 day and 5 day were all significantly better than those of the control group, all P<0.05. Conclusions:The ulinastatin can effectively improve the pulmonary surfactant protein, anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory mediators in patients with severe pneumonia, and its improvement role for various of severe pneumonia are obvious.

  9. The effect of geometrical presentation of multimodal cation-exchange ligands on selective recognition of hydrophobic regions on protein surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, James; Parimal, Siddharth; Brown, Matthew R; Heden, Ryan; Cramer, Steven M

    2015-09-18

    The effects of spatial organization of hydrophobic and charged moieties on multimodal (MM) cation-exchange ligands were examined by studying protein retention behavior on two commercial chromatographic media, Capto™ MMC and Nuvia™ cPrime™. Proteins with extended regions of surface-exposed aliphatic residues were found to have enhanced retention on the Capto MMC system as compared to the Nuvia cPrime resin. The results further indicated that while the Nuvia cPrime ligand had a strong preference for interactions with aromatic groups, the Capto MMC ligand appeared to interact with both aliphatic and aromatic clusters on the protein surfaces. These observations were formalized into a new set of protein surface property descriptors, which quantified the local distribution of electrostatic and hydrophobic potentials as well as distinguishing between aromatic and aliphatic properties. Using these descriptors, high-performing quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models (R(2)>0.88) were generated for both the Capto MMC and Nuvia cPrime datasets at pH 5 and pH 6. Descriptors of electrostatic properties were generally common across the four models; however both Capto MMC models included descriptors that quantified regions of aliphatic-based hydrophobicity in addition to aromatic descriptors. Retention was generally reduced by lowering the ligand densities on both MM resins. Notably, elution order was largely unaffected by the change in surface density, but smaller and more aliphatic proteins tended to be more affected by this drop in ligand density. This suggests that modulating the exposure, shape and density of the hydrophobic moieties in multimodal chromatographic systems can alter the preference for surface exposed aliphatic or aromatic residues, thus providing an additional dimension for modulating the selectivity of MM protein separation systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Conserved Hydrophobic Core in Gαi1 Regulates G Protein Activation and Release from Activated Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Ali I; Lokits, Alyssa D; Gilbert, James A; Iverson, T M; Meiler, Jens; Hamm, Heidi E

    2016-09-09

    G protein-coupled receptor-mediated heterotrimeric G protein activation is a major mode of signal transduction in the cell. Previously, we and other groups reported that the α5 helix of Gαi1, especially the hydrophobic interactions in this region, plays a key role during nucleotide release and G protein activation. To further investigate the effect of this hydrophobic core, we disrupted it in Gαi1 by inserting 4 alanine amino acids into the α5 helix between residues Gln(333) and Phe(334) (Ins4A). This extends the length of the α5 helix without disturbing the β6-α5 loop interactions. This mutant has high basal nucleotide exchange activity yet no receptor-mediated activation of nucleotide exchange. By using structural approaches, we show that this mutant loses critical hydrophobic interactions, leading to significant rearrangements of side chain residues His(57), Phe(189), Phe(191), and Phe(336); it also disturbs the rotation of the α5 helix and the π-π interaction between His(57) and Phe(189) In addition, the insertion mutant abolishes G protein release from the activated receptor after nucleotide binding. Our biochemical and computational data indicate that the interactions between α5, α1, and β2-β3 are not only vital for GDP release during G protein activation, but they are also necessary for proper GTP binding (or GDP rebinding). Thus, our studies suggest that this hydrophobic interface is critical for accurate rearrangement of the α5 helix for G protein release from the receptor after GTP binding.

  11. Two novel mutations in surfactant protein-C, lung function and obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baekvad-Hansen, Marie; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Dominant mutations in the surfactant protein-C(SFTPC) gene have been linked with interstitial lung disease. The frequency of lung disease due to SFTPC mutations in the general population is unknown. The aim of this study was to identify novel SFTPC mutations that are associated with lung function...... pulmonary disease or interstitial lung disease. No Y106X heterozygotes suffered from asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or interstitial lung disease. We identified two novel mutations in highly conserved areas of the SFTPC gene, and show that heterozygotes for the mutations have normal...... lung function and are unaffected by COPD and interstitial lung disease. A53T heterozygotes had increased asthma risk, but further research is required to conclusively determine whether this mutation is associated with asthma....

  12. Association between the surfactant protein D (SFTPD) gene and subclinical carotid artery atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Grith L; Bladbjerg, Else Marie; Steffensen, Rudi;

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a defense collectin with inflammation-modulating properties. SP-D deficiency inhibits atherosclerosis in vivo, and the circulatory SP-D levels have been previously associated with cardiovascular disease mortality. We hypothesized that plasma SP-D (p......SP-D) and SP-D gene (SFTPD) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are risk factors for atherosclerosis. METHODS: We evaluated individuals who were all 60 years old and participated in The Glostrup Population Study. Subclinical atherosclerosis was diagnosed based on the ultrasonographic measurement of intima......: The results do not support that pSP-D levels influence the development of subclinical atherosclerosis. However, the SFTPD SNP data support previous observations from animal studies that SP-D plays a role in the etiology of atherosclerotic disease development. The nominal significant effects are likely...

  13. Immunohistochemical investigation of pulmonary surfactant-associated protein A in fire victims.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, B L; Ishida, K; Oritani, S; Quan, L; Taniguchi, M; Li, D R; Fujita, M Q; Maeda, H

    2001-03-01

    To evaluate the forensic pathological significance of the immunohistochemical distribution of pulmonary surfactant-associated protein A (SP-A) in determining the cause of death in fires, 57 fire victims were examined by scoring the staining intensity. The highest SP-A score with dense granular deposits (aggregates) in the intra-alveolar space was frequently observed in cases with a lower blood carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) level (fires. High SP-A scores showed a relation to the serum level and in part related to the bloody exudate in the lower airway. These observations suggested that the increase in SP-A in fire victims may be mainly related to pulmonary alveolar injury due to the inhalation of hot air and/or irritant gases rather than hypoxia.

  14. Surfactant protein B polymorphisms, pulmonary function and COPD in 10,231 individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækvad-Hansen, M; Nordestgaard, B G; Dahl, Morten

    2011-01-01

    The surfactant protein (SP)-B gene may influence chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and, thus, personalised medicine. We tested whether functional polymorphisms in SP-B (rs1130866 (1580T>C), rs2077079 (-18A>C) and rs3024791 (-384G>A)) associate with reduced lung function and risk of COPD...... in the general population. We genotyped 10,231 individuals from the general adult Danish population, and recorded spirometry and hospital admissions due to COPD. Because we previously found an association between the rare SP-B 121ins2 mutation and COPD among smokers, we stratified the analyses for smoking status....... None of the individual SP-B genotypes or genotype combinations were associated with reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) % predicted, forced vital capacity (FVC) % pred and FEV1/FVC overall or among smokers (p = 0.25-0.99). The odds ratio for spirometrically defined COPD did not differ from 1...

  15. Involvement of eicosanoids and surfactant protein D in extrinsic allergic alveolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higashi, A; Higashi, N; Tsuburai, T; Takeuchi, Y; Taniguchi, M; Mita, H; Saito, A; Takatori, K; Arimura, K; Akiyama, K

    2005-12-01

    The pathophysiology of extrinsic allergic alveolitis (EAA) involves oxidative lung damage as well as interstitial and alveolar inflammation. Macrophages and mast cells are inflammatory components of EAA that produce both leukotrienes (LTs) and prostaglandin D2 (PGD2). In addition, PGD2 is also produced by the free-radical-catalysed peroxidation of arachidonic acid during oxidative stress. Urinary 8-iso prostaglandin F2alpha (8-isoPGF2alpha) and serum surfactant protein D (SP-D) are considered appropriate biomarkers of oxidative stress and interstitial lung disease activity, respectively. The present study aimed to assess the association of these biomarkers with the pathophysiology of EAA. Two cases of acute EAA caused by the inhalation of fungi spores were reported. Eight asthmatic patients and six healthy control subjects were also enrolled in the current study. The serum SP-D and urinary eicosanoid (LTE4, PGD2 metabolite (9alpha,11betaPGF2), 8-isoPGF2alpha) concentrations markedly increased during the acute exacerbation phase. These concentrations decreased following corticosteroid therapy in the EAA patients. There was a significant correlation between serum SP-D and urinary 9alpha,11betaPGF2 concentrations in the EAA patients. In conclusion, although the present study proposes that serum surfactant protein-D and urinary eicosanoids are new biomarkers involved in the various immunological responses in extrinsic allergic alveolitis, further large-scale studies are needed to investigate the role of these compounds, not just as biomarkers, but also as biological potentiators of extrinsic allergic alveolitis.

  16. Single molecule force spectroscopy reveals critical roles of hydrophobic core packing in determining the mechanical stability of protein GB1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Tianjia; Wang, Hui-Chuan Eileen; Li, Hongbin

    2012-08-21

    Understanding molecular determinants of protein mechanical stability is important not only for elucidating how elastomeric proteins are designed and functioning in biological systems but also for designing protein building blocks with defined nanomechanical properties for constructing novel biomaterials. GB1 is a small α/β protein and exhibits significant mechanical stability. It is thought that the shear topology of GB1 plays an important role in determining its mechanical stability. Here, we combine single molecule atomic force microscopy and protein engineering techniques to investigate the effect of side chain reduction and hydrophobic core packing on the mechanical stability of GB1. We engineered seven point mutants and carried out mechanical φ-value analysis of the mechanical unfolding of GB1. We found that three mutations, which are across the surfaces of two subdomains that are to be sheared by the applied stretching force, in the hydrophobic core (F30L, Y45L, and F52L) result in significant decrease in mechanical unfolding force of GB1. The mechanical unfolding force of these mutants drop by 50-90 pN compared with wild-type GB1, which unfolds at around 180 pN at a pulling speed of 400 nm/s. These results indicate that hydrophobic core packing plays an important role in determining the mechanical stability of GB1 and suggest that optimizing hydrophobic interactions across the surfaces that are to be sheared will likely be an efficient method to enhance the mechanical stability of GB1 and GB1 homologues.

  17. Perplexing cooperative folding and stability of a low-sequence complexity, polyproline 2 protein lacking a hydrophobic core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Zachary P; Baxa, Michael C; Yu, Wookyung; Riback, Joshua A; Li, Hui; Roux, Benoît; Kent, Stephen B H; Sosnick, Tobin R

    2017-02-28

    The burial of hydrophobic side chains in a protein core generally is thought to be the major ingredient for stable, cooperative folding. Here, we show that, for the snow flea antifreeze protein (sfAFP), stability and cooperativity can occur without a hydrophobic core, and without α-helices or β-sheets. sfAFP has low sequence complexity with 46% glycine and an interior filled only with backbone H-bonds between six polyproline 2 (PP2) helices. However, the protein folds in a kinetically two-state manner and is moderately stable at room temperature. We believe that a major part of the stability arises from the unusual match between residue-level PP2 dihedral angle bias in the unfolded state and PP2 helical structure in the native state. Additional stabilizing factors that compensate for the dearth of hydrophobic burial include shorter and stronger H-bonds, and increased entropy in the folded state. These results extend our understanding of the origins of cooperativity and stability in protein folding, including the balance between solvent and polypeptide chain entropies.

  18. Using in situ X-ray reflectivity to study protein adsorption on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces: benefits and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Andrew G; Kuzmenko, Ivan

    2013-04-30

    We have employed in situ X-ray reflectivity (IXRR) to study the adsorption of a variety of proteins (lysozyme, cytochrome c, myoglobin, hemoglobin, serum albumin, and immunoglobulin G) on model hydrophilic (silicon oxide) and hydrophobic surfaces (octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayers), evaluating this recently developed technique for its applicability in the area of biomolecular studies. We report herein the highest resolution depiction of adsorbed protein films, greatly improving on the precision of previous neutron reflectivity (NR) results and previous IXRR studies. We were able to perform complete scans in 5 min or less with the maximum momentum transfer of at least 0.52 Å(-1), allowing for some time-resolved information about the evolution of the protein film structure. The three smallest proteins (lysozyme, cytochrome c, and myoglobin) were seen to deposit as fully hydrated, nondenatured molecules onto hydrophilic surfaces, with indications of particular preferential orientations. Time evolution was observed for both lysozyme and myoglobin films. The larger proteins were not observed to deposit on the hydrophilic substrates, perhaps because of contrast limitations. On hydrophobic surfaces, all proteins were seen to denature extensively in a qualitatively similar way but with a rough trend that the larger proteins resulted in lower coverage. We have generated high-resolution electron density profiles of these denatured films, including capturing the growth of a lysozyme film. Because the solution interface of these denatured films is diffuse, IXRR cannot unambiguously determine the film extent and coverage, a drawback compared to NR. X-ray radiation damage was systematically evaluated, including the controlled exposure of protein films to high-intensity X-rays and exposure of the hydrophobic surface to X-rays before adsorption. Our analysis showed that standard measuring procedures used for XRR studies may lead to altered protein films

  19. Depth profiles of pulmonary surfactant protein B in phosphatidylcholine bilayers, studied by fluorescence and electron spin resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruz, A; Casals, C; Plasencia, I

    1998-01-01

    . These differences in the extent of insertion lead to qualitative and quantitative differences in the effect of the protein on the mobility of the phospholipid acyl chains, as studied by spin-label electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy, and could represent different functional stages in the surfactant cycle......Pulmonary surfactant-associated protein B (SP-B) has been isolated from porcine lungs and reconstituted in bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) or egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (PC) to characterize the extent of insertion of the protein into phospholipid bilayers. The parameters...... for the interaction of SP-B with DPPC or PC using different reconstitution protocols have been estimated from the changes induced in the fluorescence emission spectrum of the single protein tryptophan. All the different reconstituted SP-B-phospholipid preparations studied had similar Kd values for the binding...

  20. Thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C: CutA1 mutant proteins substituted with hydrophobic and charged residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Yoshinori; Takehira, Michiyo; Joti, Yasumasa; Ogasahara, Kyoko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Ono, Naoko; Kunishima, Naoki; Yutani, Katsuhide

    2015-10-26

    Although the thermodynamics of protein denaturation at temperatures over 100 °C is essential for the rational design of highly stable proteins, it is not understood well because of the associated technical difficulties. We designed certain hydrophobic mutant proteins of CutA1 from Escherichia coli, which have denaturation temperatures (Td) ranging from 101 to 113 °C and show a reversible heat denaturation. Using a hydrophobic mutant as a template, we successfully designed a hyperthermostable mutant protein (Td = 137 °C) by substituting six residues with charged ones. Thermodynamic analyses of these mutant proteins indicated that the hydrophobic mutants were stabilized by the accumulation of denaturation enthalpy (ΔH) with no entropic gain from hydrophobic solvation around 100 °C, and that the stabilization due to salt bridges resulted from both the increase in ΔH from ion-ion interactions and the entropic effect of the electrostatic solvation over 113 °C. This is the first experimental evidence that has successfully overcome the typical technical difficulties.

  1. Analysis of Amphiphilic Lipids and Hydrophobic Proteins Using Nonresonant Femtosecond Laser Vaporization with Electrospray Post-Ionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, John J.; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Levis, Robert J.

    2011-04-01

    Amphiphilic lipids and hydrophobic proteins are vaporized at atmospheric pressure using nonresonant 70 femtosecond (fs) laser pulses followed by electrospray post-ionization prior to being transferred into a time-of-flight mass spectrometer for mass analysis. Measurements of molecules on metal and transparent dielectric surfaces indicate that vaporization occurs through a nonthermal mechanism. The molecules analyzed include the lipids 1-monooleoyl-rac-glycerol, 1,2-dihexanoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1,2-dimyristoyl- sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and the hydrophobic proteins gramicidin A, B, and C. Vaporization of lipids from blood and milk are also presented to demonstrate that lipids in complex systems can be transferred intact into the gas phase for mass analysis.

  2. Theoretical model to investigate the alkyl chain and anion dependent interactions of gemini surfactant with bovine serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishvakarma, Vijay K; Kumari, Kamlesh; Patel, Rajan; Dixit, V S; Singh, Prashant; Mehrotra, Gopal K; Chandra, Ramesh; Chakrawarty, Anand Kumar

    2015-05-15

    Surfactants are used to prevent the irreversible aggregation of partially refolded proteins and they also assist in protein refolding. We have reported the design and screening of gemini surfactant to stabilize bovine serum albumin (BSA) with the help of computational tool (iGEMDOCK). A series of gemini surfactant has been designed based on bis-N-alkyl nicotinate dianion via varying the alkyl group and anion. On changing the alkyl group and anion of the surfactant, the value of Log P changes means polarity of surfactant can be tuned. Further, the virtual screening of the gemini surfactant has been carried out based on generic evolutionary method. Herein, thermodynamic data was studied to determine the potential of gemini surfactant as BSA stabilizer. Computational tools help to find out the efficient gemini surfactant to stabilize the BSA rather than to use the surfactant randomly and directionless for the stabilization. It can be confirmed through the experimental techniques. Previously, researcher synthesized one of the designed and used gemini surfactant to stabilize the BSA and their interactions were confirmed through various techniques and computational docking. But herein, the authors find the most competent gemini surfactant to stabilize BSA using computational tools on the basis of energy score. Different from the single chain surfactant, the gemini surfactants exhibit much stronger electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions with the protein and are thus effective at much lower concentrations. Based on the present study, it is expected that gemini surfactants may prove useful in the protein stabilization operations and may thus be effectively employed to circumvent the problem of misfolding and aggregation.

  3. Design-based stereological analysis of the lung parenchymal architecture and alveolar type II cells in surfactant protein A and D double deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, A; Allen, L; Nyengaard, Jens Randel

    2005-01-01

    overlapping as well as distinct functions. The present study provides a design-based stereological analysis of adult mice deficient in both SP-A and SP-D (A(-)D(-)) with special emphasis on parameters characterizing alveolar architecture and surfactant-producing type II cells. Compared to wild-type, A......, but the mean volume of a single lamellar body remains constant. These results demonstrate that chronic deficiency of SP-A and SP-D in mice leads to parenchymal remodeling, type II cell hyperplasia and hypertrophy, and disturbed intracellular surfactant metabolism. The design-based stereological approach......Alveolar epithelial type II cells synthesize and secrete surfactant. The surfactant-associated proteins A and D (SP-A and SP-D), members of the collectin protein family, participate in pulmonary immune defense, modulation of inflammation, and surfactant metabolism. Both proteins are known to have...

  4. Quantitation of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-B in the absence or presence of phospholipids by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oviedo, J M; Valiño, F; Plasencia, I

    2001-01-01

    We have developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that uses polyclonal or monoclonal anti-surfactant protein SP-B antibodies to quantitate purified SP-B in chloroform/methanol and in chloroform/methanol extracts of whole pulmonary surfactant at nanogram levels. This method has been...

  5. Structural and thermodynamic consequences of burial of an artificial ion pair in the hydrophobic interior of a protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Aaron C; Castañeda, Carlos A; Schlessman, Jamie L; García-Moreno, E Bertrand

    2014-08-12

    An artificial charge pair buried in the hydrophobic core of staphylococcal nuclease was engineered by making the V23E and L36K substitutions. Buried individually, Glu-23 and Lys-36 both titrate with pKa values near 7. When buried together their pKa values appear to be normal. The ionizable moieties of the buried Glu-Lys pair are 2.6 Å apart. The interaction between them at pH 7 is worth 5 kcal/mol. Despite this strong interaction, the buried Glu-Lys pair destabilizes the protein significantly because the apparent Coulomb interaction is sufficient to offset the dehydration of only one of the two buried charges. Save for minor reorganization of dipoles and water penetration consistent with the relatively high dielectric constant reported by the buried ion pair, there is no evidence that the presence of two charges in the hydrophobic interior of the protein induces any significant structural reorganization. The successful engineering of an artificial ion pair in a highly hydrophobic environment suggests that buried Glu-Lys pairs in dehydrated environments can be charged and that it is possible to engineer charge clusters that loosely resemble catalytic sites in a scaffold protein with high thermodynamic stability, without the need for specialized structural adaptations.

  6. Improved techniques for CE-MALDI-MS off-line coupling and MALDI-MS analysis of primarily hydrophobic proteins and peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Jacksén, Johan

    2007-01-01

    Due to the hydrophobic nature of integral membrane proteins (IMP) they give rise to several difficulties concerning handling and analysis, which is not the case for the most water soluble proteins. New analysis methods are needed, where the insolubility problems of the hydrophobic proteins due to aggregation and adhesion are tackled. Those problems also affect digestion performance and equipment compatibility for the analysis. Protocols for analysis and separation specified for IMP are presen...

  7. ON-COLUMN ENRICHMENT OF HYDROPHOBIC CYP450 PROTEINS IN HPLC FRACTIONATION OF MOUSE MICROSOMES PRIOR TO PROTEIN DIGESTION AND NANOSPRAY-LC/MSMS ANALYSIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    IntroductionMembrane proteins play crucial role in many cellular processes and are promising candidates for biomarker discovery but are under-represented in the field of proteomics due to their hydrophobic nature. Although standard reversed-phase LC methods often exhibit ...

  8. Preparation of a weak anion exchange/hydrophobic interaction dual-function mixed-mode chromatography stationary phase for protein separation using click chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Kailou; Yang, Fan; Xia, Hongjun; Wang, Fei; Song, Qingguo; Bai, Quan

    2015-03-01

    In this study, 3-diethylamino-1-propyne was covalently bonded to the azide-silica by a click reaction to obtain a novel dual-function mixed-mode chromatography stationary phase for protein separation with a ligand containing tertiary amine and two ethyl groups capable of electrostatic and hydrophobic interaction functionalities, which can display hydrophobic interaction chromatography character in a high-salt-concentration mobile phase and weak anion exchange character in a low-salt-concentration mobile phase employed for protein separation. As a result, it can be employed to separate proteins with weak anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction modes, respectively. The resolution and selectivity of the stationary phase were evaluated in both hydrophobic interaction and ion exchange modes with standard proteins, respectively, which can be comparable to that of conventional weak anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography columns. Therefore, the synthesized weak anion exchange/hydrophobic interaction dual-function mixed-mode chromatography column can be used to replace two corresponding conventional weak anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography columns to separate proteins. Based on this mixed-mode chromatography stationary phase, a new off-line two-dimensional liquid chromatography technology using only a single dual-function mixed-mode chromatography column was developed. Nine kinds of tested proteins can be separated completely using the developed method within 2.0 h.

  9. Interaction of surfactant protein A with the intermediate filaments desmin and vimentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Verdugo, Ignacio; Synguelakis, Monique; Degrouard, Jeril; Franco, Claudio-Areias; Valot, Benoit; Zivy, Michel; Chaby, Richard; Tanfin, Zahra

    2008-05-06

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A), a member of the collectin family that modulates innate immunity, has recently been involved in the physiology of reproduction. Consistent with the activation of ERK-1/2 and COX-2 induced by SP-A in myometrial cells, we reported previously the presence of two major proteins recognized by SP-A in these cells. Here we identify by mass spectrometry one of these SP-A targets as the intermediate filament (IF) desmin. In myometrial preparations derived from desmin-deficient mice, the absence of binding of SP-A to any 50 kDa protein confirmed the identity of this SP-A-binding site as desmin. Our data based on partial chymotrypsin digestion of pure desmin suggested that SP-A recognizes especially its rod domain, which is known to play an important role during the assembly of desmin into filaments. In line with that, electron microscopy experiments showed that SP-A inhibits in vitro the polymerization of desmin filaments. SP-A also recognized in vitro polymerized filaments in a calcium-dependent manner at a physiological ionic strength but not the C1q receptor gC1qR. Furthermore, Texas Red-labeled SP-A colocalized with desmin filaments in myometrial cells. Interestingly, vimentin, the IF characteristic of leukocytes, is one of the major proteins recognized by SP-A in protein extracts of U937 cells after PMA-induced differentiation of this monocytic cell line. Interaction of SP-A with vimentin was further confirmed using recombinant vimentin in solid-phase binding assays. The ability of SP-A to interact with desmin and vimentin, and to prevent polymerization of desmin monomers, shed light on unexpected and wider biological roles of this collectin.

  10. High-performance liquid chromatography as a technique to determine protein adsorption onto hydrophilic/hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tongtong; Anselme, Karine; Sarrailh, Segolene; Ponche, Arnaud

    2016-01-30

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of simple high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) setup for quantification of adsorbed proteins on various type of plane substrates with limited area (hydrophobic (polydimethylsiloxane: PDMS) surfaces, kinetics of adsorption were determined and amounts of adsorbed bovine serum albumin, myoglobin and lysozyme were obtained: as expected for each protein, the amount adsorbed at the plateau on glass (between 0.15 μg/cm(2) and 0.4 μg/cm(2)) is lower than for hydrophobic PDMS surfaces (between 0.45 μg/cm(2) and 0.8 μg/cm(2)). These results were consistent with bicinchoninic acid protein determination. According to ICH guidelines, both Reversed Phase and Size Exclusion HPLC can be validated for quantification of adsorbed protein. However, we consider the size exclusion approach more interesting in this field because additional informations can be obtained for aggregative proteins. Indeed, monomer, dimer and oligomer of bovine serum albumin (BSA) were observed in the chromatogram. On increasing the temperature, we found a decrease of peak intensity of bovine serum albumin as well as the fraction of dimer and oligomer after contact with PDMS and glass surface. As the surface can act as a denaturation parameter, these informations can have a huge impact on the elucidation of the interfacial behavior of protein and in particular for aggregation processes in pharmaceutical applications.

  11. Donor surfactant protein D (SP-D) polymorphisms are associated with lung transplant outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramini, B; Kim, C; Diangelo, S; Petersen, E; Lederer, D J; Shah, L; Robbins, H; Floros, J; Arcasoy, S M; Sonett, J R; D'Ovidio, F

    2013-08-01

    Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) is the major factor limiting long-term success of lung transplantation. Polymorphisms of surfactant protein D (SP-D), an important molecule within lung innate immunity, have been associated with various lung diseases. We investigated the association between donor lung SP-D polymorphisms and posttransplant CLAD and survival in 191 lung transplant recipients consecutively transplanted. Recipients were prospectively followed with routine pulmonary function tests. Donor DNA was assayed by pyrosequencing for SP-D polymorphisms of two single-nucleotide variations altering amino acids in the mature protein N-terminal domain codon 11 (Met(11) Thr), and in codon 160 (Ala(160) Thr) of the C-terminal domain. CLAD was diagnosed in 88/191 patients, and 60/191 patients have died. Recipients of allografts that expressed the homozygous Met(11) Met variant of aa11 had significantly greater freedom from CLAD development and better survival compared to those with the homozygous Thr(11) Th variant of aa11. No significant association was noted for SP-D variants of aa160. Lung allografts with the SP-D polymorphic variant Thr(11) Th of aa11 are associated with development of CLAD and reduced survival. The observed genetic differences of the donor lung, potentially with their effects on innate immunity, may influence the clinical outcomes after lung transplantation.

  12. AMOTL2 interaction with TAZ causes the inhibition of surfactant proteins expression in lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucci, Valeria; Di Palma, Tina; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Scaloni, Andrea; Zannini, Mariastella

    2013-10-25

    TAZ (Transcriptional co-Activator with PDZ-binding motif), is a biologically potent transcriptional coactivator and functions by binding to the PPXY motif present in several transcription factors. Notably, TAZ behaves as a transducer linking cytoplasmic signaling events to transcriptional regulation in the nucleus. Several different factors regulate TAZ expression and/or function. In particular, a major regulation of TAZ activity occurs through the Hippo pathway by a phosphorylation-mediated mechanism that causes its cytoplasmic sequestration or degradation. Here we demonstrate that AMOTL2 robustly co-immunoprecipitates with TAZ, and their interaction is dependent on the WW domain of TAZ and the PPXY motif in the N-terminus of AMOTL2. Furthermore, we show that AMOTL2 colocalizes with TAZ in the cytoplasm of H441 human lung cells and regulates TAZ cytoplasm-to-nucleus translocation through direct protein-protein interaction. Interestingly, the overexpression of AMOTL2 inhibits the functional cooperation between the transcription factor TTF-1 and TAZ on the Surfactant C gene promoter, as well as the expression of other known target genes of these regulatory factors. Taken together, our results suggest an inhibitory role of AMOTL2 on TAZ ability to co-activate transcription and describe a different mechanism, Hippo pathway-independent, that modulates the activity of TAZ in lung cells through the interaction with Angiomotin-like 2 (AMOTL2). © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Surfactant protein A regulates IgG-mediated phagocytosis in inflammatory neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wofford, Jessica A; Wright, Jo Rae

    2007-12-01

    Surfactant proteins (SP)-A and SP-D have been shown to affect the functions of a variety of innate immune cells and to interact with various immune proteins such as complement and immunoglobulins. The goal of the current study is to test the hypothesis that SP-A regulates IgG-mediated phagocytosis by neutrophils, which are major effector cells of the innate immune response that remove invading pathogens by phagocytosis and by extracellular killing mediated by reactive oxygen and nitrogen. We have previously shown that SP-A stimulates chemotaxis by inflammatory, but not peripheral, neutrophils. To evaluate the ability of SP-A to modulate IgG-mediated phagocytosis, polystyrene beads were coated with BSA and treated with anti-BSA IgG. SP-A significantly and specifically enhanced IgG-mediated phagocytosis by inflammatory neutrophils, but it had no effect on beads not treated with IgG. SP-A bound to IgG-coated beads and enhanced their uptake via direct interactions with the beads as well as direct interactions with the neutrophils. SP-A did not affect reactive oxygen production or binding of IgG to neutrophils and had modest effects on polymerization of actin. These data suggest that SP-A plays an important role in mediating the phagocytic response of neutrophils to IgG-opsonized particles.

  14. An insight into the immune roles of surfactant proteins, SP-A and SP-D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annapurna eNayak

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary surfactant proteins, SP-A and SP-D, are hydrophilic collagen-containing calcium-dependent lectins, which appear to have a range of innate immune functions at pulmonary as well as extrapulmonary sites. These proteins bind to target ligands on pathogens, allergens and apoptotic cells via C-terminal carbohydrate recognition domains while the collagen region brings about the effector functions. SP-A and SP-D deals with various pathogens triggering a range of innate immune mechanisms such as agglutination/aggregation, enhancement of phagocytosis and killing reactions, and growth inhibition. SP-A and SP-D have also been involved in the control of pulmonary inflammation including allergy and asthma, and hence, they are likely to central issues in a range of pathological situations. There is also emerging evidence to suggest that SP-A and SP-D are capable of linking innate immunity with adaptive immunity that includes modulation of dendritic cell function and helper T cell polarisation. It is clear now that SP-A and SP-D are potent innate immune molecules in the lungs. This review is a summary of their immunological properties in general and their importance in human health and disease.

  15. Preparation of Mesoporous Nano-Hydroxyapatite Using a Surfactant Template Method for Protein Delivery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaodong Wu; Xiaofeng Song; Dongsong Li; Jianguo Liu; Peibiao Zhang; Xuesi Chen

    2012-01-01

    Mesoporous nano-hydroxyapatite (n-HA) has gained more and more attention as drug storage and release hosts.The aim of this study is to observe the effect of the ratio of surfactant to the theoretical yield of HA on the mesoporous n-HA,then to reveal the effect of the mesoporous nanostrueture on protein delivery.The mesoporous n-HA was synthesized using the wet precipitation in the presence of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) at ambient temperature and normal atmospheric pressure.The morphology,size,crystalline phase,chemical composition and textural characteristics of the product were well characterized by X-ray Powder Diffraction (XRD),Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR),Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM),Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM),Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) and N2 adsorption/desorption,respectively.The protein adsorption/release studies were also carried out by using Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) as a model protein.The results reveal that the mesoporous n-HA synthesized with CTAB exhibits high pure phase,low crystallinity and the typical characteristics of the mesostructure.The BSA loading increases with the specific surface area and the pore volume of n-HA,and the release rates of BSA are different due to their different pore sizes and pore structures,n-HA synthesized with 0.5% CTAB has the highest BSA loading and the slowest release rate because of its highest surface area and smaller pore size.These mesoporous n-HA materials demonstrate a potential application in the field of protein delivery due to their bioaetive,biocompatible and mesoporous properties.

  16. Application of a pH responsive multimodal hydrophobic interaction chromatography medium for the analysis of glycosylated proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallberg, K; Becker, K; Bülow, L

    2011-02-04

    Protein glycosylation has significant effects on the structure and function of proteins. The efficient separation and enrichment of glycoproteins from complex biological samples is one key aspect and represents a major bottleneck of glycoproteome research. In this paper, we have explored pH multimodal hydrophobic interaction chromatography to separate glycosylated from non-glycosylated forms of proteins. Three different proteins, ribonuclease, invertase and IgG, have been examined and different glycoforms have been identified. The media itself shows strong responsiveness to small variations in pH, which makes it possible to fine-tune the chromatographic conditions according to the properties of the protein isolated. Optimal glycoprotein separation has been obtained at pH 4. The pH responsive multimodal HIC medium in contrast to conventional HIC media is able to resolve contaminating DNA. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Biomimetic oligosaccharide and peptide surfactant polymers designed for cardiovascular biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruegsegger, Mark Andrew

    A common problem associated with cardiovascular devices is surface induced thrombosis initiated by the rapid, non-specific adsorption of plasma proteins onto the biomaterial surface. Control of the initial protein adsorption is crucial to achieve the desired longevity of the implanted biomaterial. The cell membrane glycocalyx acts as a non-thrombogenic interface through passive (dense oligosaccharide structures) and active (ligand/receptor interactions) mechanisms. This thesis is designed to investigate biomimicry of the cell glycocalyx to minimize non-specific protein adsorption and promote specific ligand/receptor interactions. Biomimetic macromolecules were designed through the molecular-scale engineering of polymer surfactants, utilizing a poly(vinyl amine) (PVAm) backbone to which hydrophilic (dextran, maltose, peptide) and hydrophobic alkyl (hexanoyl or hexanal) chains are simultaneously attached. The structure was controlled through the molar feed ratio of hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic groups, which also provided control of the solution and surface-active properties. To mimic passive properties, a series of oligomaltose surfactants were synthesized with increasing saccharide length (n = 2, 7, 15 where n is number of glucose units) to investigate the effect of coating height on protein adsorption. The surfactants were characterized by infra red (IR) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies for structural properties and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle goniometry for surface activity. Protein adsorption under dynamic flow (5 dyn/cm2) was reduced by 85%--95% over the bare hydrophobic substrate; platelet adhesion dropped by ˜80% compared to glass. Peptide ligands were incorporated into the oligosaccharide surfactant to promote functional activity of the passive coating. The surfactants were synthesized to contain 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% peptide ligand density and were stable on hydrophobic surfaces. The peptide surface density was

  18. Protein aggregation with poly(vinyl) alcohol surfactant reduces double emulsion-encapsulated mammalian cell-free expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Jin Woo; Durand, Grégory; Majumder, Sagardip

    2017-01-01

    Development of artificial cell models requires encapsulation of biomolecules within membrane-bound compartments. There have been limited studies of using mammalian cell-free expression (CFE) system as the ‘cytosol’ of artificial cells. We exploit glass capillary droplet microfluidics for the encapsulation of mammalian CFE within double emulsion templated vesicles. The complexity of the physicochemical properties of HeLa cell-free lysate poses a challenge compared with encapsulating simple buffer solutions. In particular, we discovered the formation of aggregates in double emulsion templated vesicles encapsulating mammalian HeLa CFE, but not with bacterial CFE. The aggregates did not arise from insolubility of the proteins made from CFE nor due to the interaction of mammalian CFE with the organic solvents in the middle phase of the double emulsions. We found that aggregation is dependent on the concentration of poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) surfactant, a critical double emulsion-stabilizing surfactant, and the lysate concentration in mammalian CFE. Despite vesicle instability and reduced protein expression, we demonstrate protein expression by encapsulating mammalian CFE system. Using mass spectrometry and Western blot, we identified and verified that actin is one of the proteins inside the mammalian CFE that aggregated with PVA surfactant. Our work establishes a baseline description of mammalian CFE system encapsulated in double emulsion templated vesicles as a platform for building artificial cells. PMID:28358875

  19. Protein aggregation with poly(vinyl) alcohol surfactant reduces double emulsion-encapsulated mammalian cell-free expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kenneth K Y; Lee, Jin Woo; Durand, Grégory; Majumder, Sagardip; Liu, Allen P

    2017-01-01

    Development of artificial cell models requires encapsulation of biomolecules within membrane-bound compartments. There have been limited studies of using mammalian cell-free expression (CFE) system as the 'cytosol' of artificial cells. We exploit glass capillary droplet microfluidics for the encapsulation of mammalian CFE within double emulsion templated vesicles. The complexity of the physicochemical properties of HeLa cell-free lysate poses a challenge compared with encapsulating simple buffer solutions. In particular, we discovered the formation of aggregates in double emulsion templated vesicles encapsulating mammalian HeLa CFE, but not with bacterial CFE. The aggregates did not arise from insolubility of the proteins made from CFE nor due to the interaction of mammalian CFE with the organic solvents in the middle phase of the double emulsions. We found that aggregation is dependent on the concentration of poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) surfactant, a critical double emulsion-stabilizing surfactant, and the lysate concentration in mammalian CFE. Despite vesicle instability and reduced protein expression, we demonstrate protein expression by encapsulating mammalian CFE system. Using mass spectrometry and Western blot, we identified and verified that actin is one of the proteins inside the mammalian CFE that aggregated with PVA surfactant. Our work establishes a baseline description of mammalian CFE system encapsulated in double emulsion templated vesicles as a platform for building artificial cells.

  20. Innate Defense against Influenza A Virus: Activity of Human Neutrophil Defensins and Interactions of Defensins with Surfactant Protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L.; White, Mitchell R.; Tecle, Tesfaldet

    2006-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV) infection, in part by modifying interactions with neutrophils. Human neutrophil defensins (HNPs) inhibit infectivity of enveloped viruses, including IAV. Our goal in this study was to characte......Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV) infection, in part by modifying interactions with neutrophils. Human neutrophil defensins (HNPs) inhibit infectivity of enveloped viruses, including IAV. Our goal in this study...... with the hemagglutination-inhibiting activity of SP-D. HNPs had significant viral neutralizing activity against divergent IAV strains. However, the HNPs generally had competitive effects when combined with SP-D in assays using an SP-D-sensitive IAV strain. In contrast, cooperative antiviral effects were noted in some...

  1. Surfactant Protein-A inhibits Aspergillus fumigatus-induced allergic T-cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russo Scott J

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pulmonary surfactant protein (SP-A has potent immunomodulatory activities but its role and regulation during allergic airway inflammation is unknown. Methods We studied changes in SP-A expression in the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL using a murine model of single Aspergillus fumigatus (Af challenge of sensitized animals. Results SP-A protein levels in the BAL fluid showed a rapid, transient decline that reached the lowest values (25% of controls 12 h after intranasal Af provocation of sensitized mice. Decrease of SP-A was associated with influx of inflammatory cells and increase of IL-4 and IL-5 mRNA and protein levels. Since levels of SP-A showed a significant negative correlation with these BAL cytokines (but not with IFN-γ, we hypothesized that SP-A exerts an inhibitory effect on Th2-type immune responses. To study this hypothesis, we used an in vitro Af-rechallenge model. Af-induced lymphocyte proliferation of cells isolated from sensitized mice was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by addition of purified human SP-A (0.1–10 μg/ml. Flow cytometric studies on Af-stimulated lymphocytes indicated that the numbers of CD4+ (but not CD8+ T cells were significantly increased in the parental population and decreased in the third and fourth generation in the presence of SP-A. Further, addition of SP-A to the tissue culture inhibited Af-induced IL-4 and IL-5 production suggesting that SP-A directly suppressed allergen-stimulated CD4+ T cell function. Conclusion We speculate that a transient lack of this lung collectin following allergen exposure of the airways may significantly contribute to the development of a T-cell dependent allergic immune response.

  2. Immobilizing PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers on hydrophobic surfaces and its effect on protein and platelet: a combined study using QCM-D and DPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing; Huang, Fujian; Hu, Yu; Jiang, Wei; Ji, Xiangling; Liang, Haojun; Yin, Jinghua

    2014-11-01

    Dual polarization interferometry was used to monitor the immobilization dynamics of four Pluronics on hydrophobic surfaces and to elucidate the effect of Pluronic conformation on protein adsorption. The proportion of hydrophobic chain segments and not the length of the hydrophobic chain can influence the chain densities of the Pluronics. The immobilized densities of the Pluronics resulted from competition between the hydration of polyethylene oxide (PEO) in the aqueous solution and the hydrophobic interaction of polypropylene oxide on the substrate. P-123 obtained the largest graft mass (2.89±0.25 ng/mm2) because of the dominant effect of hydrophobic interactions. Hydrophobic segments of P-123 were anchored slowly and step-wise on the C18 substrate. P-123 exhibited the largest hydrophobic chain segment proportion (propylene oxide/ethylene oxide=3.63) and formed a brush chain conformation, indicating excellent protein and platelet resistance. The result of quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation further confirmed that the PEO conformation in P-123 on the substrate exhibited a relatively extended brush chain, and that L-35 showed relatively loose and pancake-like structures. The PEO in P-123 regulated the conformation to maintain the native conformation and resist the adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA). Thus, the hemocompatibilities of the immobilized Pluronics were influenced by the proportion of hydrophobic chain segments and their PEO conformations.

  3. An ensemble classifier for eukaryotic protein subcellular location prediction using gene ontology categories and amino acid hydrophobicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liqi Li

    Full Text Available With the rapid increase of protein sequences in the post-genomic age, it is challenging to develop accurate and automated methods for reliably and quickly predicting their subcellular localizations. Till now, many efforts have been tried, but most of which used only a single algorithm. In this paper, we proposed an ensemble classifier of KNN (k-nearest neighbor and SVM (support vector machine algorithms to predict the subcellular localization of eukaryotic proteins based on a voting system. The overall prediction accuracies by the one-versus-one strategy are 78.17%, 89.94% and 75.55% for three benchmark datasets of eukaryotic proteins. The improved prediction accuracies reveal that GO annotations and hydrophobicity of amino acids help to predict subcellular locations of eukaryotic proteins.

  4. Retention model of protein for mixed-mode interaction mechanism in ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI, Yin-Mao; LUO, Quan-Zhou; LIU,Tong; GENG, Xin-Du

    2000-01-01

    A unified retention equation of proteins was proved to be valid for a mixed-mode interaction mechanism in ion exchange chromatography (IEC) and hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC). The reason to form a “U” shape retention curve of proteins in both HIC and IEC was explained and the concentration range of the strongest elution ability for the mobile phase was determined with this equation. The parameters in this equation could be used to characterize the difference for either HIC or IEC adsorbents and the changes in the molecular conformation of proteins. With the parameters in this equation, the contributions of salt and water in the mobile phase to the protein retention in HIC and IEC were discussed,respectively. In addition, the comparison between the unified equation and Melander's three-parameter equation for mixedmode interaction chromatography was also investigated and better results were obtained in former equation.

  5. Association of surfactant protein A polymorphisms with otitis media in infants at risk for asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bracken Michael B

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Otitis media is one of the most common infections of early childhood. Surfactant protein A functions as part of the innate immune response, which plays an important role in preventing infections early in life. This prospective study utilized a candidate gene approach to evaluate the association between polymorphisms in loci encoding SP-A and risk of otitis media during the first year of life among a cohort of infants at risk for developing asthma. Methods Between September 1996 and December 1998, women were invited to participate if they had at least one other child with physician-diagnosed asthma. Each mother was given a standardized questionnaire within 4 months of her infant's birth. Infant respiratory symptoms were collected during quarterly telephone interviews at 6, 9 and 12 months of age. Genotyping was done on 355 infants for whom whole blood and complete otitis media data were available. Results Polymorphisms at codons 19, 62, and 133 in SP-A1, and 223 in SP-A2 were associated with race/ethnicity. In logistic regression models incorporating estimates of uncertainty in haplotype assignment, the 6A4/1A5haplotype was protective for otitis media among white infants in our study population (OR 0.23; 95% CI 0.07,0.73. Conclusion These results indicate that polymorphisms within SP-A loci may be associated with otitis media in white infants. Larger confirmatory studies in all ethnic groups are warranted.

  6. Surfactant protein A expression in human normal and neoplastic breast epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidotti, P; Cigala, C; Graziani, D; Del Curto, B; Dessy, E; Coggi, G; Bosari, S; Pietra, G G

    2001-11-01

    We studied the presence of surfactant protein A (Sp-A) immunoreactivity and messenger RNA in 62 normal and abnormal breast samples. Sections were immunostained with polyclonal anti-Sp-A antibody. The association between Sp-A immunoreactivity and histologic grade of 32 invasive ductal carcinomas was assessed by 3 pathologists who scored the intensity of Sp-A immunoreactivity times the percentage of tumor immunostained; individual scores were averaged, and the final scores were correlated with tumor grade, proliferative index, and expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors. Strong Sp-A immunoreactivity was present at the luminal surface of ductal epithelial cells in normal breast samples and in benign lesions; carcinomas displayed variable immunoreactivity, inversely proportional to the degree of differentiation. Sp-A messenger RNA was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in 3 of 3 normal breast samples and 9 of 9 carcinomas. The significance of Sp-A expression in breast epithelium requires further study; possibly it has a role in native host defense or epithelial differentiation.

  7. [Surfactant protein and thyroid transcription factor 1 in pleuro-pulmonary neoplasia. Immunohistochemical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessy, E; Falleni, M; Del Curto, B; Braidotti, P; Pietra, G G

    2000-12-01

    Aim of this work was to investigate the ability of the antibodies against Surfactant proteins (SP) and Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) to distinguish primary neoplasms of the lung from metastatic carcinomas to the lung and pleural mesotheliomas. We evaluated the immunohistochemical expression of the antibodies anti SP-A, SP-B, pro SP-C, SP-D, and TTF-1 in a series of 56 primary lung carcinomas, 9 metastatic carcinomas to the lung, 5 pleural mesotheliomas and 8 non-pulmonary carcinomas. Among primary lung neoplasms, only adenocarcinomas immunostained for all SP (specificity = 1; total sensitivity = 0.52). TTF-1 had an excellent specificity (= 1), but a weak sensitivity (= 0.34) in recognizing primary lung carcinomas. TTF-1 was present in lung adenocarcinomas which were negative for SPs; however it failed to distinguish the subtypes. Pleural mesotheliomas, pulmonary metastases and non-pulmonary carcinomas were not immunoreactive for SP-A, SP-B, SP-D, and TTF-1. Pro SP-C was positive also in the adenocarcinomas of the large bowel and in their pulmonary and nodal metastases. These results demonstrate that the combined use of antibodies anti SP-A, SP-B and TTF-1 is the best association in distinguishing primary lung carcinomas from metastatic carcinomas to the lung and pleural mesotheliomas.

  8. Comprehensive characterisation of pulmonary and serum surfactant protein D in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erpenbeck Veit J

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D is considered as a candidate biomarker for the functional integrity of the lung and for disease progression, which can be detected in serum. The origin of SP-D in serum and how serum concentrations are related to pulmonary concentrations under inflammatory conditions is still unclear. Methods In a cross-sectional study comprising non-smokers (n = 10, young - (n = 10, elderly smokers (n = 20, and smokers with COPD (n = 20 we simultaneously analysed pulmonary and serum SP-D levels with regard to pulmonary function, exercise, repeatability and its quaternary structure by native gel electrophoresis. Statistical comparisons were conducted by ANOVA and post-hoc testing for multiple comparisons; repeatability was assessed by Bland-Altman analysis. Results In COPD, median (IQR pulmonary SP-D levels were lower (129(68 ng/ml compared to smokers (young: 299(190, elderly: 296(158 ng/ml; p Conclusions Pulmonary and serum SP-D levels are stable markers influenced by smoking and related to airflow obstruction and disease state. Smaller subunits of pulmonary SP-D and the rapid increase of serum SP-D levels in COPD due to exercise support the translocation hypothesis and its use as a COPD biomarker. Trial registration no interventional trial

  9. Early expression of surfactant proteins D in Fusarium solani infected rat cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Cheng-Ye; Li, Xiao-Jing; Jia, Wen-Yan; Li, Na; Xu, Qiang; Lin, Jing; Wang, Qing; Jiang, Nan; Hu, Li-Ting; Zhao, Gui-Qiu

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the early expression of surfactant proteins D(SP-D) in Fusarium solani infected rat cornea. Wistar rats were divided into group A, B and C randomly. The right eyes were chosen as the experiment one. Group A was control group. Group B was not inoculated with Fusarium solani. Group C was taken as fusarium solani keratitis model. Five rats in group B and C were executed randomly at 6, 12, 24, 48 and 96 hours respectively after the experimental model being established. The expression of SP-D was assessed through immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction(RT-PCR). RT-PCR detected that the SP-D mRNA expression was low in the corneal of normal rats and group B. The expression of fungal infected cornea increased gradually and reached the peak at 24 hours in group C. The synchronous expression of group B and C were in significant difference (Pfusarium solani infected cornea. SP-D may play a role in the early innate immunity response of the corneal resistance to Fusarium solani infection.

  10. Surfactant Protein B Intron 4 Variation in German Patients with COPD and Acute Respiratory Failure

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    Carola Seifart

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a major health problem. Genetic factors that contribute to the disease have been postulated. The pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B, which is essential for normal lung function, is considered as a candidate gene for COPD in this case-control study. We studied the SP-B intron 4 size variants in 346 individuals. This group consisted of 118 patients with chronic bronchitis or COPD, including 24 patients with acute respiratory failure (ARF in COPD, 118 matched controls without pulmonary disease and 110 healthy individuals (population control. The frequency of intron 4 variants was similar in either control group (10.9%, 14.4% respectively, with a small increase in the COPD group (18.6%. This increase was due to a high increase of intron 4 variants in the ARF subgroup (37.5%, p = 0.003, OR 4.9, 95% CI: 1.76–13.6. The data indicate that SP-B intron 4 variants may associate with increased risk of ARF in COPD and may be used as a marker of susceptibility in this disease subgroup.

  11. A dock and coalesce mechanism driven by hydrophobic interactions governs Cdc42 binding with its effector protein ACK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetley, George J N; Mott, Helen R; Cooley, R Neil; Owen, Darerca

    2017-07-07

    Cdc42 is a Rho-family small G protein that has been widely studied for its role in controlling the actin cytoskeleton and plays a part in several potentially oncogenic signaling networks. Similar to most other small G proteins, Cdc42 binds to many downstream effector proteins to elicit its cellular effects. These effector proteins all engage the same face of Cdc42, the conformation of which is governed by the activation state of the G protein. Previously, the importance of individual residues in conferring binding affinity has been explored for residues within Cdc42 for three of its Cdc42/Rac interactive binding (CRIB) effectors, activated Cdc42 kinase (ACK), p21-activated kinase (PAK), and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP). Here, in a complementary study, we have used our structure of Cdc42 bound to ACK via an intrinsically disordered ACK region to guide an analysis of the Cdc42 interface on ACK, creating a panel of mutant proteins with which we can now describe the complete energetic landscape of the Cdc42-binding site on ACK. Our data suggest that the binding affinity of ACK relies on several conserved residues that are critical for stabilizing the quaternary structure. These residues are centered on the CRIB region, with the complete binding region anchored at each end by hydrophobic interactions. These findings suggest that ACK adopts a dock and coalesce binding mechanism with Cdc42. In contrast to other CRIB-family effectors and indeed other intrinsically disordered proteins, hydrophobic residues likely drive Cdc42-ACK binding. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Alcohol--Induced Polyelectrolyte-Surfactant Complex Coacervate Systems: Characterization and Applications in Enzyme and Protein Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati Moshtaghin, Mahboubeh

    The focus of this thesis is to achieve a better understanding of the newly discovered surfactant-polyelectrolyte complex coacervate (SPCC) systems induced by fluoroalcohol/acid as well as short chain aliphatic alcohol; and to elucidate their applications in extraction and enrichment of proteins and enzyme. We have discovered that fluoroalcohols and --acids induce complex coacervation and phase separation in the aqueous mixtures of oppositely charged anionic polyelectrolytes; specifically, sodium salts of polyacrylic acid and polymethacrylic acid and cationic surfactant (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CTAB) over a broad range of concentrations of mole fractions of the oppositely charged amphiphiles. Accordingly, these new classes of coacervators will significantly broaden the scope and facilitate engineering of new coacervate phases. Toward these goals, we have inspected the formation of surfactant-polyelectrolyte complex coacervates in the presence of fluoroalcohols namely hexafluoroisopropanol (HFIP) and Trifluoroethanol (TFE). Furthermore, the extent of coacervation as a function of concentrations the system components, and charge ratios of the oppositely charged amphiphiles has been investigated. Polyelectrolytes are considered to be milder reagents, as compared to surfactants, regarding proteins denaturation. This highlights the importance of a detailed investigation of the efficiency of our coacervate systems for extraction and preconcentration of proteins and enzymes, especially, when the biological activity of the extracted proteins needs to be maintained based on the objectives mentioned above, the results of the investigations have been organized in four chapters. In Chapter II, the phase behavior of the FA-SPCC will be investigated. The objective is to examine the phase behavior and phase properties with respect to the extent of coacervation in different solution conditions. In particular, the effects of different solution variables such as concentration

  13. Two hydrophobic residues can determine the specificity of mitogen-activated protein kinase docking interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardwell, A Jane; Bardwell, Lee

    2015-10-30

    MAPKs bind to many of their upstream regulators and downstream substrates via a short docking motif (the D-site) on their binding partner. MAPKs that are in different families (e.g. ERK, JNK, and p38) can bind selectively to D-sites in their authentic substrates and regulators while discriminating against D-sites in other pathways. Here we demonstrate that the short hydrophobic region at the distal end of the D-site plays a critical role in determining the high selectivity of JNK MAPKs for docking sites in their cognate MAPK kinases. Changing just 1 or 2 key hydrophobic residues in this submotif is sufficient to turn a weak JNK-binding D-site into a strong one, or vice versa. These specificity-determining differences are also found in the D-sites of the ETS family transcription factors Elk-1 and Net. Moreover, swapping two hydrophobic residues between these D-sites switches the relative efficiency of Elk-1 and Net as substrates for ERK versus JNK, as predicted. These results provide new insights into docking specificity and suggest that this specificity can evolve rapidly by changes to just 1 or 2 amino acids.

  14. Reduced influenza viral neutralizing activity of natural human trimers of surfactant protein D

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    Sorensen Grith L

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant protein D (SP-D plays important roles in innate host defense against influenza A virus (IAV infection. Common human polymorphisms of SP-D have been found in many human populations and associated with increased risk of certain infections. We recently reported that the Thr/Thr 11 form of SP-D is associated with low serum levels and assembles predominantly as trimers as opposed to the more common multimeric forms of SP-D. Methods Preliminary experiments were done to establish the effects of different monoclonal antibodies against SP-D on ability of SP-D to bind to or neutralize the virus. We then purified natural human trimeric and multimeric forms of SP-D from amniotic fluid and tested ability of these preparations to bind to IAV, to inhibit infectivity and hemagglutination activity of IAV in vitro. Results In initial experiments mAbs directed against different areas on the CRD of SP-D were found to have differing effects on antiviral activity. Using an mAb that did not interfere with antiviral activity of SP-D, we confirm that natural SP-D trimers had reduced ability to bind to IAV. In addition, the trimers had reduced ability to neutralize IAV as compared to natural human SP-D multimers as well as reduced hemagglutination inhibiting activity against several strains of IAV. Natural SP-D trimers also had different interactions with human neutrophil peptide defensins (HNPs in viral neutralization assays as compared to multimeric SP-D. Conclusion These studies indicate that a common human polymorphic form of SP-D may modulate host defense against IAV and give impetus to clinical studies correlating this genotype with risk for IAV infection in susceptible groups. We also show that mAbs directed against different areas on the carbohydrate recognition domain of SP-D can be useful for dissecting out different functional properties of the protein.

  15. Surfactants at the Design Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czajka, Adam; Hazell, Gavin; Eastoe, Julian

    2015-08-04

    This article analyzes how the individual structural elements of surfactant molecules affect surface properties, in particular, the point of reference defined by the limiting surface tension at the aqueous cmc, γcmc. Particular emphasis is given to how the chemical nature and structure of the hydrophobic tails influence γcmc. By comparing the three different classes of surfactants, fluorocarbon, silicone, and hydrocarbon, a generalized surface packing index is introduced which is independent of the chemical nature of the surfactants. This parameter ϕcmc represents the volume fraction of surfactant chain fragments in a surface film at the aqueous cmc. It is shown that ϕcmc is a useful index for understanding the limiting surface tension of surfactants and can be useful for designing new superefficient surfactants.

  16. Hydrophobic cluster analysis: procedures to derive structural and functional information from 2-D-representation of protein sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemesle-Varloot, L; Henrissat, B; Gaboriaud, C; Bissery, V; Morgat, A; Mornon, J P

    1990-08-01

    Hydrophobic cluster analysis (HCA) [15] is a very efficient method to analyse and compare protein sequences. Despite its effectiveness, this method is not widely used because it relies in part on the experience and training of the user. In this article, detailed guidelines as to the use of HCA are presented and include discussions on: the definition of the hydrophobic clusters and their relationships with secondary and tertiary structures; the length of the clusters; the amino acid classification used for HCA; the HCA plot programs; and the working strategies. Various procedures for the analysis of a single sequence are presented: structural segmentation, structural domains and secondary structure evaluation. Like most sequence analysis methods, HCA is more efficient when several homologous sequences are compared. Procedures for the detection and alignment of distantly related proteins by HCA are described through several published examples along with 2 previously unreported cases: the beta-glucosidase from Ruminococcus albus is clearly related to the beta-glucosidases from Clostridum thermocellum and Hansenula anomala although they display a reverse organization of their constitutive domains; the alignment of the sequence of human GTPase activating protein with that of the Crk oncogene is presented. Finally, the pertinence of HCA in the identification of important residues for structure/function as well as in the preparation of homology modelling is discussed.

  17. POLYMERIC SURFACTANT STRUCTURE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.M. Saville; J.W. White

    2001-01-01

    Polymeric surfactants are amongst the most widespread of all polymers. In nature, proteins and polysaccharides cause self organization as a result of this surfactancy; in industry, polymeric surfactants play key roles in the food, explosives and surface coatings sectors. The generation of useful nano- and micro-structures in films and emulsions as a result of polymer amphiphilicity and the application of mechanical stress is discussed. The use of X-ray and neutron small angle scattering and reflectivity to measure these structures and their dynamic properties will be described. New results on linear and dendritic polymer surfactants are presented.

  18. Altered surfactant protein A gene expression and protein homeostasis in rats with emphysematous changes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Qiong-jie; XIONG Sheng-dao; ZHANG Hui-lan; SHI Xue-mei; XU Yong-jian; ZHANG Zhen-xiang; ZHEN Guo-hua; ZHAO Jian-ping

    2008-01-01

    Background The decrease of suffactant protein(SP)secreted by the alveolar type Ⅱ cell is one of the important causes of limiting air of pulmonary emphysema.However,the SP-A gene and protein changes in this disease are rarely studied.This study was undertaken to investigate alterations in SP-A gene activity and protein,and to explore their roles in the pathogenesis of emphysematous changes.Methods Twenty Wistar rats were divided randomly into a normal control group(n=10)and a cigarette smoking(CS)+lipopolysaccharide(LPS)group(n=10).Ultra-structural changes were obsewed under an electron microscope.The number of cells positive for SP-A was measured by immunohistochemistry.The mRNA expression and protein Ievel of SP-A in the lung tissues were determined by quantitative polymerase chain reaction(qPCR)and Western blot separately.The protein level of SP-A in lavage fluid was determined by Western blot.Results The number of cells positive for SP-A of the CS+LPS group(0.35±0.03)was lower than that of the blank control group(0.72±0.06,P<0.05).The level of SP-A in the lung tissues of rats in the CS+LPS group(0.2765±0.0890)was lower than that in the blank controI group(0.6875±0.1578,P<0.05).The level of SP-A in the lavage fluid of rats in the CS+LPS group(0.8567±0.1458)was lower than that in the blank controI group(1.3541±0.2475,P<0.05).The lung tissues of rats in the CS+LPS group showed an approximate increase(0.4-fold)in SP-A mRNA levels relative to β-actin mRNA (P<0.05).Conclusions The changes of SP-A may be related to emphysematous changes in the lung.And cigarette smoke and LPS alter lung SP-A gene activity and protein homeostasis.

  19. Physical origin of hydrophobicity studied in terms of cold denaturation of proteins: comparison between water and simple fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshidome, Takashi; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2012-11-14

    A clue to the physical origin of the hydrophobicity is in the experimental observations, which show that it is weakened at low temperatures. By considering a solvophobic model protein immersed in water and three species of simple solvents, we analyze the temperature dependence of the changes in free energy, energy, and entropy of the solvent upon protein unfolding. The angle-dependent and radial-symmetric integral equation theories and the morphometric approach are employed in the analysis. Each of the changes is decomposed into two terms, which depend on the excluded volume and on the area and curvature of the solvent-accessible surface, respectively. The excluded-volume term of the entropy change is further decomposed into two components representing the protein-solvent pair correlation and the protein-solvent-solvent triplet and higher-order correlation, respectively. We show that water crowding in the system becomes more serious upon protein unfolding but this effect becomes weaker as the temperature is lowered. If the hydrophobicity originated from the water structuring near a nonpolar solute, it would be strengthened upon lowering of the temperature. Among the three species of simple solvents, considerable weakening of the solvophobicity at low temperatures is observed only for the solvent where the particles interact through a strong attractive potential and the particle size is as small as that of water. Even in the case of this solvent, however, cold denaturation of a protein cannot be reproduced. It would be reproducible if the attractive potential was substantially enhanced, but such enhancement causes the appearance of the metastability limit for a single liquid phase.

  20. Rosin Surfactant QRMAE Can Be Utilized as an Amorphous Aggregate Inducer: A Case Study of Mammalian Serum Albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishtikhar, Mohd; Chandel, Tajjali Ilm; Ahmad, Aamir; Ali, Mohd Sajid; Al-Lohadan, Hamad A; Atta, Ayman M; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Quaternary amine of diethylaminoethyl rosin ester (QRMAE), chemically synthesized biocompatible rosin based cationic surfactant, has various biological applications including its use as a food product additive. In this study, we examined the amorphous aggregation behavior of mammalian serum albumins at pH 7.5, i.e., two units above their isoelectric points (pI ~5.5), and the roles played by positive charge and hydrophobicity of exogenously added rosin surfactant QRMAE. The study was carried out on five mammalian serum albumins, using various spectroscopic methods, dye binding assay, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The thermodynamics of the binding of mammalian serum albumins to cationic rosin modified surfactant were established using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). It was observed that a suitable molar ratio of protein to QRMAE surfactant enthusiastically induces amorphous aggregate formation at a pH above two units of pI. Rosin surfactant QRMAE-albumins interactions revealed a unique interplay between the initial electrostatic and the subsequent hydrophobic interactions that play an important role towards the formation of hydrophobic interactions-driven amorphous aggregate. Amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with varying diseases, from the formation of protein wine haze to the expansion of the eye lenses in cataract, during the expression and purification of recombinant proteins. This study can be used for the design of novel biomolecules or drugs with the ability to neutralize factor(s) responsible for the aggregate formation, in addition to various other industrial applications.

  1. Rosin Surfactant QRMAE Can Be Utilized as an Amorphous Aggregate Inducer: A Case Study of Mammalian Serum Albumin.

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    Mohd Ishtikhar

    Full Text Available Quaternary amine of diethylaminoethyl rosin ester (QRMAE, chemically synthesized biocompatible rosin based cationic surfactant, has various biological applications including its use as a food product additive. In this study, we examined the amorphous aggregation behavior of mammalian serum albumins at pH 7.5, i.e., two units above their isoelectric points (pI ~5.5, and the roles played by positive charge and hydrophobicity of exogenously added rosin surfactant QRMAE. The study was carried out on five mammalian serum albumins, using various spectroscopic methods, dye binding assay, circular dichroism and electron microscopy. The thermodynamics of the binding of mammalian serum albumins to cationic rosin modified surfactant were established using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC. It was observed that a suitable molar ratio of protein to QRMAE surfactant enthusiastically induces amorphous aggregate formation at a pH above two units of pI. Rosin surfactant QRMAE-albumins interactions revealed a unique interplay between the initial electrostatic and the subsequent hydrophobic interactions that play an important role towards the formation of hydrophobic interactions-driven amorphous aggregate. Amorphous aggregation of proteins is associated with varying diseases, from the formation of protein wine haze to the expansion of the eye lenses in cataract, during the expression and purification of recombinant proteins. This study can be used for the design of novel biomolecules or drugs with the ability to neutralize factor(s responsible for the aggregate formation, in addition to various other industrial applications.

  2. Weak and saturable protein-surfactant interactions in the denaturation of apo-alpha-lactalbumin by acidic and lactonic sophorolipid

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    Kell K Andersen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Biosurfactants are of growing interest as sustainable alternatives to fossil-fuel-derived chemical surfactants, particularly for the detergent industry. To realize this potential, it is necessary to understand how they affect proteins which they may encounter in their applications. However knowledge of such interactions is limited. Here we present a study of the interactions between the model protein apo-alpha-lactalbumin and the biosurfactant sophorolipid (SL produced by the yeast Starmerella bombicola. SL occurs both as an acidic and a lactonic form; the lactonic form (lactSL is sparingly soluble and has a lower critical micelle concentration than the acidic form (acidSL. We show that acidSL affects apo-aLA in a similar way to the related glycolipid biosurfactant rhamnolipid (RL, with the important difference that RL is also active below the cmc in contrast to acidSL. Using isothermal titration calorimetry data, we show that acidSL has weak and saturable interactions with apo-aLA at low concentrations; due to the relatively low cmc of acidSL (which means that the monomer concentration is limited to ca. 0-1 mM SL, it is only possible to observe interactions with monomeric acidSL at high apo-aLA concentrations. However, the denaturation kinetics of apo-aLA in the presence of acidSL are consistent with a collaboration between monomeric and micellar surfactant species, similar to RL and nonionic or zwitterionic surfactants. Inclusion of lactSL as mixed micelles with acidSL lowers the cmc and this effectively reduces the rate of unfolding, emphasizing that SL like other biosurfactants is a gentle anionic surfactant. Our data highlight the potential of these biosurfactants for future use in the detergent industry.

  3. Impact of the degree of ethoxylation of the ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactant on the surface self-assembly of hydrophobin-ethoxylated polysorbate surfactant mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penfold, Jeffrey; Thomas, Robert K; Li, Peixun; Petkov, Jordan T; Tucker, Ian; Cox, Andrew R; Hedges, Nick; Webster, John R P; Skoda, Maximilian W A

    2014-08-19

    Neutron reflectivity measurements have been used to study the surface adsorption of the polyethylene sorbitan monostearate surfactant, with degrees of ethoxylation varying from 3 to 20 ethylene oxide groups, with the globular protein hydrophobin. The surface interaction between the ethoxylated polysorbate nonionic surfactants and the hydrophobin results in self-assembly at the air-solution interface in the form of a well-defined layered surface structure. The surface interaction arises from a combination of the hydrophobic interaction between the surfactant alkyl chain and the hydrophobic patch on the surface of the hydrophobin, and the hydrophilic interaction between the ethoxylated sorbitan headgroup and the hydrophilic regions on the surface of the hydrophobin. The results presented show that varying the degree of ethoxylation of the polysorbate surfactant changes the interaction between the surfactant and the hydrophobin and the packing, and hence the evolution in the resulting surface structure. The optimal degree of ethoxylation for multilayer formation is over a broad range, from of order 6 to 17 ethylene oxide groups, and for degrees of ethoxylation of 3 and 20 only monolayer adsorption of either the surfactant or the hydrophobin is observed.

  4. Meckel-Gruber syndrome protein MKS3 is required for endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation of surfactant protein C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Bridges, James P; Na, Cheng-Lun; Xu, Yan; Weaver, Timothy E

    2009-11-27

    Autosomal dominant mutations in the SFTPC gene are associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a progressive lethal interstitial lung disease. Mutations that cause misfolding of the encoded proprotein surfactant protein C (SP-C) trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation, a pathway that segregates terminally misfolded substrate for retrotranslocation to the cytosol and degradation by proteasome. Microarray screens for genes involved in SP-C ER-associated degradation identified MKS3/TMEM67, a locus previously linked to the ciliopathy Meckel-Gruber syndrome. In this study, MKS3 was identified as a membrane glycoprotein predominantly localized to the ER. Expression of MKS3 was up-regulated by genetic or pharmacological inducers of ER stress. The ER lumenal domain of MKS3 interacted with a complex that included mutant SP-C and associated chaperones, whereas the region predicted to encode the transmembrane domains of MKS3 interacted with cytosolic p97. Deletion of the transmembrane and cytosolic domains abrogated interaction of MKS3 with p97 and resulted in accumulation of mutant SP-C proprotein; knockdown of MKS3 also inhibited degradation of mutant SP-C. These results support a model in which MKS3 links the ER lumenal quality control machinery with the cytosolic degradation apparatus.

  5. Meckel-Gruber Syndrome Protein MKS3 Is Required for Endoplasmic Reticulum-associated Degradation of Surfactant Protein C*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Bridges, James P.; Na, Cheng-Lun; Xu, Yan; Weaver, Timothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Autosomal dominant mutations in the SFTPC gene are associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, a progressive lethal interstitial lung disease. Mutations that cause misfolding of the encoded proprotein surfactant protein C (SP-C) trigger endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation, a pathway that segregates terminally misfolded substrate for retrotranslocation to the cytosol and degradation by proteasome. Microarray screens for genes involved in SP-C ER-associated degradation identified MKS3/TMEM67, a locus previously linked to the ciliopathy Meckel-Gruber syndrome. In this study, MKS3 was identified as a membrane glycoprotein predominantly localized to the ER. Expression of MKS3 was up-regulated by genetic or pharmacological inducers of ER stress. The ER lumenal domain of MKS3 interacted with a complex that included mutant SP-C and associated chaperones, whereas the region predicted to encode the transmembrane domains of MKS3 interacted with cytosolic p97. Deletion of the transmembrane and cytosolic domains abrogated interaction of MKS3 with p97 and resulted in accumulation of mutant SP-C proprotein; knockdown of MKS3 also inhibited degradation of mutant SP-C. These results support a model in which MKS3 links the ER lumenal quality control machinery with the cytosolic degradation apparatus. PMID:19815549

  6. Surfactant protein B gene polymorphism in preterm babies with respiratory distress syndrome

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    P.P.R. Lyra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS is multifactorial and multigenic. Studies have suggested that polymorphisms and mutations in the surfactant protein B (SP-B gene are associated with the pathogenesis of RDS. The objectives of this study were to determine and compare the frequencies of SP-B gene polymorphisms in preterm babies with and without RDS. We studied 151 neonates: 79 preterm babies without RDS and 72 preterm newborns with RDS. The following four SP-B gene polymorphisms were analyzed: A/C at -18, C/T at 1580, A/G at 9306, and G/C at nucleotide 8714. The polymorphisms were detected by PCR amplification of genomic DNA and genotyping. The genotypes were determined using PCR-based converted restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The control group consisted of 42 (53% girls and 37 (47% boys. Weight ranged from 1170 to 3260 g and mean gestational age (GA was 33.9 weeks (range: 29 to 35 weeks and 6 days. The RDS group consisted of 31 (43% girls and 41 (57% boys. Weight ranged from 614 to 2410 g and mean GA was 32 weeks (range: 26 to 35 weeks. The logistic regression model showed that GA was the variable that most contributed to the occurrence of RDS. The AG genotype of the A/G polymorphism at position 9306 of the SP-B gene was a protective factor in this population (OR = 0.1681; 95%CI = 0.0426-0.6629. We did not detect differences in the frequencies of the other polymorphisms between the two groups of newborns.

  7. Protective Role of Surfactant Protein D in Ocular Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

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    Zhiyong Zhang

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common pathogens causing keratitis. Surfactant protein D (SP-D plays a critical role in host defense and innate immunity. In order to investigate the role of SP-D in ocular S. aureus infection, the eyes of wild-type (WT and SP-D knockout (SP-D KO C57BL/6 mice were infected with S. aureus (10(7 CFU/eye in the presence and absence of cysteine protease inhibitor(E64.Bacterial counts in the ocular surface were examined 3, 6, 12, 24 hrs after infection. Bacterial phagocytosis by neutrophils and bacterial invasion in ocular epithelial cells were evaluated quantitatively. S. aureus-induced ocular injury was determined with corneal fluorescein staining. The results demonstrated that SP-D is expressed in ocular surface epithelium and the lacrimal gland; WT mice had increased clearance of S. aureus from the ocular surface (p<0.05 and reduced ocular injury compared with SP-D KO mice. The protective effects of SP-D include increased bacterial phagocytosis by neutrophils (p<0.05 and decreased bacterial invasion into epithelial cells (p<0.05 in WT mice compared to in SP-D KO mice. In the presence of inhibitor (E64, WT mice showed enhanced bacterial clearance (p<0.05 and reduced ocular injury compared to absent E64 while SP-D KO mice did not. Collectively, we concluded that SP-D protects the ocular surface from S. aureus infection but cysteine protease impairs SP-D function in this murine model, and that cysteine protease inhibitor may be a potential therapeutic agent in S. aureus keratitis.

  8. Alterations in pulmonary surfactant protein a metabolism and its diagnostic value in onset of radiation pneumonitis

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    Imai, Yoshinari; Takahashi, Hiroki [Sapporo Medical Univ. (Japan)

    1999-12-01

    Radiation pneumonitis (RP) is a serious disorder caused by radiation therapy, for the detection of which there exists no simple and sensitive clinical examination. In this study, we examined whether the measurement of serum pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) levels could be effective for detecting the onset of RP. Of the 18 patients included in the study, 9 suffered RP complication after radiation therapy. Serum SP-A levels in patients with RP (64.1{+-}6.5 ng/ml) were 1.82 times as high as those of pre-radiation (36.2{+-}4.0 ng/ml). The difference between them was significant (p=0.0003), while the SP-A value in patients without RP after radiation therapy was almost the same as the pre-radiation level. To study the mechanisms of these elevations, we developed a model of whole lung irradiation (20 Gy) in adult rats. Prior to alveolitis, which was a histological change seen at day 28, levels of SP-A in lung tissue homogenates and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid had become elevated by day 21. Serum SP-A levels in the irradiated rats were significantly elevated by day 21, peaking at day 35, and then declined. Hydroxyproline contents in lung tissues were elevated by day 42 and remained so through day 56. Therefore, the increase in serum SP-A level may be reflected by alveolitis but not fibrosis. In conclusion, determination of serum SP-A could be helpful in detecting the onset of RP. (author)

  9. Lung surfactant protein D (SP-D) response and regulation during acute and chronic lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaunsbaek, Maria Quisgaard; Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Beers, Michael F; Atochina-Vasserman, Elena N; Hansen, Soren

    2013-06-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a collection that plays important roles in modulating host defense functions and maintaining phospholipid homeostasis in the lung. The aim of current study was to characterize comparatively the SP-D response in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and serum in three murine models of lung injury, using a validated ELISA technology for estimation of SP-D levels. Mice were exposed to lipopolysaccharide, bleomycin, or Pneumocystis carinii (Pc) and sacrificed at different time points. In lipopolysaccharide-challenged mice, the level of SP-D in BAL increased within 6 h, peaked at 51 h (4,518 ng/ml), and returned to base level at 99 h (612 ng/ml). Serum levels of SP-D increased immediately (8.6 ng/ml), peaked at 51 h (16 ng/ml), and returned to base levels at 99 h (3.8 ng/ml). In a subacute bleomycin inflammation model, SP-D levels were 4,625 and 367 ng/ml in BAL and serum, respectively, 8 days after exposure. In a chronic Pc inflammation model, the highest level of SP-D was observed 6 weeks after inoculation, with BAL and serum levels of 1,868 and 335 ng/ml, respectively. We conclude that serum levels of SP-D increase during lung injury, with a sustained increment during chronic inflammation compared with acute inflammation. A quick upregulation of SP-D in serum in response to acute airway inflammation supports the notion that SP-D translocates from the airways into the vascular system, in favor of being synthesized systemically. The study also confirms the concept of using increased SP-D serum levels as a biomarker of especially chronic airway inflammation.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa elastase provides an escape from phagocytosis by degrading the pulmonary surfactant protein-A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhizhou Kuang

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen that causes both acute pneumonitis in immunocompromised patients and chronic lung infections in individuals with cystic fibrosis and other bronchiectasis. Over 75% of clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa secrete elastase B (LasB, an elastolytic metalloproteinase that is encoded by the lasB gene. Previously, in vitro studies have demonstrated that LasB degrades a number of components in both the innate and adaptive immune systems. These include surfactant proteins, antibacterial peptides, cytokines, chemokines and immunoglobulins. However, the contribution of LasB to lung infection by P. aeruginosa and to inactivation of pulmonary innate immunity in vivo needs more clarification. In this study, we examined the mechanisms underlying enhanced clearance of the ΔlasB mutant in mouse lungs. The ΔlasB mutant was attenuated in virulence when compared to the wild-type strain PAO1 during lung infection in SP-A+/+ mice. However, the ΔlasB mutant was as virulent as PAO1 in the lungs of SP-A⁻/⁻ mice. Detailed analysis showed that the ΔlasB mutant was more susceptible to SP-A-mediated opsonization but not membrane permeabilization. In vitro and in vivo phagocytosis experiments revealed that SP-A augmented the phagocytosis of ΔlasB mutant bacteria more efficiently than the isogenic wild-type PAO1. The ΔlasB mutant was found to have a severely reduced ability to degrade SP-A, consequently making it unable to evade opsonization by the collectin during phagocytosis. These results suggest that P. aeruginosa LasB protects against SP-A-mediated opsonization by degrading the collectin.

  11. Serum Levels of Surfactant Proteins in Patients with Combined Pulmonary Fibrosis and Emphysema (CPFE.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andriana I Papaioannou

    Full Text Available Emphysema and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF present either per se or coexist in combined pulmonary fibrosis and emphysema (CPFE. Serum surfactant proteins (SPs A, B, C and D levels may reflect lung damage. We evaluated serum SP levels in healthy controls, emphysema, IPF, and CPFE patients and their associations to disease severity and survival.122 consecutive patients (31 emphysema, 62 IPF, and 29 CPFE and 25 healthy controls underwent PFTs, ABG-measurements, 6MWT and chest HRCT. Serum levels of SPs were measured. Patients were followed-up for 1-year.SP-A and SP-D levels differed between groups (p = 0.006 and p<0.001 respectively. In post-hoc analysis, SP-A levels differed only between controls and CPFE (p<0.05 and CPFE and emphysema (p<0.05. SP-D differed between controls and IPF or CPFE (p<0.001 for both comparisons. In IPF SP-B correlated to pulmonary function while SP-A, correlated to the Composite Physiological Index (CPI. Controls current smokers had higher SP-A and SP-D levels compared to non-smokers (p = 0.026 and p = 0.023 respectively. SP-D levels were higher in CPFE patients with extended emphysema (p = 0.042. In patients with IPF, SP-B levels at the upper quartile of its range (≥26 ng/mL presented a weak association with reduced survival (p = 0.05.In conclusion, serum SP-A and SP-D levels were higher where fibrosis exists or coexists and related to disease severity, suggesting that serum SPs relate to alveolar damage in fibrotic lungs and may reflect either local overproduction or overleakage. The weak association between high levels of SP-B and survival needs further validation in clinical trials.

  12. Cryptococcus neoformans is resistant to surfactant protein A mediated host defense mechanisms.

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    Steven S Giles

    Full Text Available Initiation of a protective immune response to infection by the pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans is mediated in part by host factors that promote interactions between immune cells and C. neoformans yeast. Surfactant protein A (SP-A contributes positively to pulmonary host defenses against a variety of bacteria, viruses, and fungi in part by promoting the recognition and phagocytosis of these pathogens by alveolar macrophages. In the present study we investigated the role of SP-A as a mediator of host defense against the pulmonary pathogen, C. neoformans. Previous studies have shown that SP-A binds to acapsular and minimally encapsulated strains of C. neoformans. Using in vitro binding assays we confirmed that SP-A does not directly bind to a fully encapsulated strain of C. neoformans (H99. However, we observed that when C. neoformans was incubated in bronchoalveolar fluid, SP-A binding was detected, suggesting that another alveolar host factor may enable SP-A binding. Indeed, we discovered that SP-A binds encapsulated C. neoformans via a previously unknown IgG dependent mechanism. The consequence of this interaction was the inhibition of IgG-mediated phagocytosis of C. neoformans by alveolar macrophages. Therefore, to assess the contribution of SP-A to the pulmonary host defenses we compared in vivo infections using SP-A null mice (SP-A-/- and wild-type mice in an intranasal infection model. We found that the immune response assessed by cellular counts, TNFalpha cytokine production, and fungal burden in lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids during early stages of infection were equivalent. Furthermore, the survival outcome of C. neoformans infection was equivalent in SP-A-/- and wild-type mice. Our results suggest that unlike a variety of bacteria, viruses, and other fungi, progression of disease with an inhalational challenge of C. neoformans does not appear to be negatively or positively affected by SP-A mediated mechanisms of

  13. Barrier or carrier? Pulmonary surfactant and drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Alberto; Cruz, Antonio; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    2015-09-01

    To consider the lung as a target for drug delivery and to optimise strategies directed at the pulmonary route, it is essential to consider the role of pulmonary surfactant, a thin lipid-protein film lining the respiratory surface of mammalian lungs. Membrane-based surfactant multilayers are essential for reducing the surface tension at the respiratory air-liquid interface to minimise the work of breathing. Different components of surfactant are also responsible for facilitating the removal of potentially pathological entities such as microorganisms, allergens or environmental pollutants and particles. Upon inhalation, drugs or nanoparticles first contact the surfactant layer, and these interactions critically affect their lifetime and fate in the airways. This review summarises the current knowledge on the possible role and effects of the pulmonary surfactant system in drug delivery strategies. It also summarises the evidence that suggests that pulmonary surfactant is far from being an insuperable barrier and could be used as an efficient shuttle for delivering hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds deep into the lung and the organism.

  14. Characterization of hydrophobic-ligand-binding proteins of Taenia solium that are expressed specifically in the adult stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M; Lee, E-G; Kim, S-H; Bae, Y-A; Wang, H; Yang, Y; Kong, Y

    2012-09-01

    Taenia solium, a causative agent of taeniasis and cysticercosis, has evolved a repertoire of lipid uptake mechanisms. Proteome analysis of T. solium excretory-secretory products (TsESP) identified 10 kDa proteins displaying significant sequence identity with cestode hydrophobic-ligand-binding-proteins (HLBPs). Two distinct 362- and 352-bp-long cDNAs encoding 264- and 258-bp-long open reading frames (87 and 85 amino acid polypeptides) were isolated by mining the T. solium expressed sequence tags and a cDNA library screening (TsHLBP1 and TsHLBP2; 94% sequence identity). They clustered into the same clade with those found in Moniezia expansa and Hymenolepis diminuta. Genomic structure analysis revealed that these genes might have originated from a common ancestor. Both the crude TsESP and bacterially expressed recombinant proteins exhibited binding activity toward 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonic acid (1,8-ANS), which was competitively inhibited by oleic acid. The proteins also bound to cis-parinaric acid (cPnA) and 16-(9-anthroyloxy) palmitic acid (16-AP), but showed no binding activity against 11-[(5-dimethylaminonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl) amino] undecanoic acid (DAUDA) and dansyl-DL-α-aminocaprylic acid (DACA). Unsaturated fatty acids (FAs) showed greater affinity than saturated FAs. The proteins were specifically expressed in adult worms throughout the strobila. The TsHLBPs might be involved in uptake and/or sequestration of hydrophobic molecules provided by their hosts, thus contributing to host-parasite interface interrelationships.

  15. Inherited surfactant deficiency due to uniparental disomy of rare mutations in the surfactant protein-B and ATP binding cassette, subfamily A, member 3 genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamvas, Aaron; Nogee, Lawrence M.; Wegner, Daniel J.; DePass, Kelcey; Christodoulou, John; Bennetts, Bruce; McQuade, Leon R.; Gray, Peter H.; Deterding, Robin R.; Carroll, Travis R.; Kammesheidt, Anja; Kasch, Laura M.; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Cole, F. Sessions

    2009-01-01

    Objective To characterize inheritance of homozygous, rare, recessive loss-of-function mutations in the surfactant protein-B (SFTPB) or ATP binding cassette, subfamily A, member 3 (ABCA3) genes in newborns with lethal respiratory failure. Study design We resequenced parents whose infants were homozygous for mutations in SFTPB or ABCA3. For infants with only one heterozygous parent, we performed microsatellite analysis for chromosomes 2 (SFTPB) and 16 (ABCA3). Results We identified one infant homozygous for the c.1549C>GAA mutation (121ins2) in SFTPB for whom only the mother was heterozygous and 3 infants homozygous for mutations in ABCA3 (p.K914R, p.P147L, and c.806_7insGCT) for whom only the fathers were heterozygous. For the SP-B deficient infant, microsatellite markers confirmed maternal heterodisomy with segmental isodisomy. Microsatellite analysis confirmed paternal isodisomy for the three ABCA3 deficient infants. Two ABCA3 deficient infants underwent lung transplantation at 3 and 5 months of age, respectively, and two infants died. None exhibited any non-pulmonary phenotype. Conclusions Uniparental disomy should be suspected in infants with rare homozygous mutations in SFTPB or ABCA3. Confirmation of parental carrier status is important to provide recurrence risk and to monitor expression of other phenotypes that may emerge through reduction to homozygosity of recessive alleles. PMID:19647838

  16. Surfactant protein-A suppresses eosinophil-mediated killing of Mycoplasma pneumoniae in allergic lungs.

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    Julie G Ledford

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein-A (SP-A has well-established functions in reducing bacterial and viral infections but its role in chronic lung diseases such as asthma is unclear. Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp frequently colonizes the airways of chronic asthmatics and is thought to contribute to exacerbations of asthma. Our lab has previously reported that during Mp infection of non-allergic airways, SP-A aides in maintaining airway homeostasis by inhibiting an overzealous TNF-alpha mediated response and, in allergic mice, SP-A regulates eosinophilic infiltration and inflammation of the airway. In the current study, we used an in vivo model with wild type (WT and SP-A(-/- allergic mice challenged with the model antigen ovalbumin (Ova that were concurrently infected with Mp (Ova+Mp to test the hypothesis that SP-A ameliorates Mp-induced stimulation of eosinophils. Thus, SP-A could protect allergic airways from injury due to release of eosinophil inflammatory products. SP-A deficient mice exhibit significant increases in inflammatory cells, mucus production and lung damage during concurrent allergic airway disease and infection (Ova+Mp as compared to the WT mice of the same treatment group. In contrast, SP-A deficient mice have significantly decreased Mp burden compared to WT mice. The eosinophil specific factor, eosinophil peroxidase (EPO, which has been implicated in pathogen killing and also in epithelial dysfunction due to oxidative damage of resident lung proteins, is enhanced in samples from allergic/infected SP-A(-/- mice as compared to WT mice. In vitro experiments using purified eosinophils and human SP-A suggest that SP-A limits the release of EPO from Mp-stimulated eosinophils thereby reducing their killing capacity. These findings are the first to demonstrate that although SP-A interferes with eosinophil-mediated biologic clearance of Mp by mediating the interaction of Mp with eosinophils, SP-A simultaneously benefits the airway by limiting inflammation

  17. Proteomic analysis reveals down-regulation of surfactant protein B in murine type II pneumocytes infected with influenza A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebaabetswe, Lemme P; Haick, Anoria K; Gritsenko, Marina A; Fillmore, Thomas L; Chu, Rosalie K; Purvine, Samuel O; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo; Matzke, Melissa M; Smith, Richard D; Waters, Katrina M; Metz, Thomas O; Miura, Tanya A

    2015-09-01

    Infection of type II alveolar epithelial (ATII) cells by influenza A viruses (IAV) correlates with severe respiratory disease in humans and mice. To understand pathogenic mechanisms during IAV infection of ATII cells, murine ATII cells were cultured to maintain a differentiated phenotype, infected with IAV-PR8, which causes severe lung pathology in mice, and proteomics analyses were performed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. PR8 infection increased levels of proteins involved in interferon signaling, antigen presentation, and cytoskeleton regulation. Proteins involved in mitochondrial membrane permeability, energy metabolism, and chromatin formation had reduced levels in PR8-infected cells. Phenotypic markers of ATII cells in vivo were identified, confirming the differentiation status of the cultures. Surfactant protein B had decreased levels in PR8-infected cells, which was confirmed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence assays. Analysis of ATII cell protein profiles will elucidate cellular processes in IAV pathogenesis, which may provide insight into potential therapies to modulate disease severity.

  18. Expression, stabilization and purification of membrane proteins via diverse protein synthesis systems and detergents involving cell-free associated with self-assembly peptide surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xuan; Dong, Shuangshuang; Zheng, Jie; Li, Duanhua; Li, Feng; Luo, Zhongli

    2014-01-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are involved in regulating most of physiological actions and metabolism in the bodies, which have become most frequently addressed therapeutic targets for various disorders and diseases. Purified GPCR-based drug discoveries have become routine that approaches to structural study, novel biophysical and biochemical function analyses. However, several bottlenecks that GPCR-directed drugs need to conquer the problems including overexpression, solubilization, and purification as well as stabilization. The breakthroughs are to obtain efficient protein yield and stabilize their functional conformation which are both urgently requiring of effective protein synthesis system methods and optimal surfactants. Cell-free protein synthesis system is superior to the high yields and post-translation modifications, and early signs of self-assembly peptide detergents also emerged to superiority in purification of membrane proteins. We herein focus several predominant protein synthesis systems and surfactants involving the novel peptide detergents, and uncover the advantages of cell-free protein synthesis system with self-assembling peptide detergents in purification of functional GPCRs. This review is useful to further study in membrane proteins as well as the new drug exploration.

  19. Influence of binding pH and protein solubility on the dynamic binding capacity in hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Pascal; Baumgartner, Kai; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2015-05-29

    Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) is one of the most frequently used purification methods in biopharmaceutical industry. A major drawback of HIC, however, is the rather low dynamic binding capacity (DBC) obtained when compared to e.g. ion exchange chromatography (IEX). The typical purification procedure for HIC includes binding at neutral pH, independently of the proteins nature and isoelectric point. Most approaches to process intensification are based on resin and salt screenings. In this paper a combination of protein solubility data and varying binding pH leads to a clear enhancement of dynamic binding capacity. This is shown for three proteins of acidic, neutral, and alkaline isoelectric points. High-throughput solubility screenings as well as miniaturized and parallelized breakthrough curves on Media Scout RoboColumns (Atoll, Germany) were conducted at pH 3-10 on a fully automated robotic workstation. The screening results show a correlation between the DBC and the operational pH, the protein's isoelectric point and the overall solubility. Also, an inverse relationship of DBC in HIC and the binding kinetics was observed. By changing the operational pH, the DBC could be increased up to 30% compared to the standard purification procedure performed at neutral pH. As structural changes of the protein are reported during HIC processes, the applied samples and the elution fractions were proven not to be irreversibly unfolded. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Similarities in Self-Assembly of Proteins and Surfactants: an Attempt to Bridge the Gap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linden, van der E.; Venema, P.

    2007-01-01

    The area of surfactant self assembly has already received attention for more than half a century. Considerable progress has been made in regards to connecting the molecular properties to the assembly morphology and the phase behaviour, where a multitude of different (rather exotic) types of

  1. Sum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopy of Adsorbed Amino Acids, Peptides and Proteins of Hydrophilic and Hydrophobic Solid-Water Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holinga IV, George Joseph [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy was used to investigate the interfacial properties of several amino acids, peptides, and proteins adsorbed at the hydrophilic polystyrene solid-liquid and the hydrophobic silica solid-liquid interfaces. The influence of experimental geometry on the sensitivity and resolution of the SFG vibrational spectroscopy technique was investigated both theoretically and experimentally. SFG was implemented to investigate the adsorption and organization of eight individual amino acids at model hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces under physiological conditions. Biointerface studies were conducted using a combination of SFG and quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) comparing the interfacial structure and concentration of two amino acids and their corresponding homopeptides at two model liquid-solid interfaces as a function of their concentration in aqueous solutions. The influence of temperature, concentration, equilibration time, and electrical bias on the extent of adsorption and interfacial structure of biomolecules were explored at the liquid-solid interface via QCM and SFG. QCM was utilized to quantify the biological activity of heparin functionalized surfaces. A novel optical parametric amplifier was developed and utilized in SFG experiments to investigate the secondary structure of an adsorbed model peptide at the solid-liquid interface.

  2. Weak and Saturable Protein-Surfactant Interactions in the Denaturation of Apo-α-Lactalbumin by Acidic and Lactonic Sophorolipid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kell K; Vad, Brian S; Roelants, Sophie;

    2016-01-01

    Biosurfactants are of growing interest as sustainable alternatives to fossil-fuel-derived chemical surfactants, particularly for the detergent industry. To realize this potential, it is necessary to understand how they affect proteins which they may encounter in their applications. However...... the cmc in contrast to acidSL. Using isothermal titration calorimetry data, we show that acidSL has weak and saturable interactions with apo-aLA at low concentrations; due to the relatively low cmc of acidSL (which means that the monomer concentration is limited to ca. 0-1 mM SL), it is only possible...

  3. Smoking and polymorphisms of genes encoding mannose-binding lectin and surfactant protein-D in patients with rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Malthe; Frisch, Morten; Madsen, Hans Ole;

    2014-01-01

    To investigate whether polymorphisms in genes coding for mannose-binding lectin (MBL) and surfactant protein-D (SP-D) are associated directly or by interaction with smoking with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), anti-citrullinated peptide antibody (ACPA) positive RA, and erosive RA. MBL2 genotypes, SFTPD...... genotype at codon 11, and HLA-shared epitope were determined in 456 patients with rheumatoid arthritis and 533 sex- and age-matched controls. Patients were grouped according to the presence of ACPA antibodies and RA-associated bone erosions and sub-stratified according to smoking status as never or ever...

  4. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantification of mouse surfactant protein D (SP-D)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Soren; Schmidt, Vivi; Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard;

    2008-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a pattern recognition molecule of the collectin family of C-type lectins. It is found in the airways and at mucosal surfaces. SP-D is part of the innate immune system where it neutralizes and leads to elimination of microorganisms. It regulates the functions of other...... innate immune cells, such as macrophages and neutrophils. It also modulates the adaptive immune response by interacting with antigen-presenting cells and T cells. Monoclonal anti-mouse-SP-D antibodies were raised from SP-D deficient mice using recombinant SP-D as antigen. Ten monoclonal antibodies were...

  5. Surfactant protein d deficiency in mice is associated with hyperphagia, altered fat deposition, insulin resistance, and increased Basal endotoxemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stidsen, Jacob V; Khorooshi, Reza; Rahbek, Martin K U

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a host defence lectin of the innate immune system that enhances clearance of pathogens and modulates inflammatory responses. Recently it has been found that systemic SP-D is associated with metabolic disturbances and that SP-D deficient mice are mildly obese...... with elevated levels of systemic bacterial lipopolysaccharide.In conclusion, our findings suggest that lack of SP-D mediates modulation of food intake not directly involving hypothalamic regulatory pathways. The resulting accumulation of adipose tissue was associated with insulin resistance. The data suggest SP...

  6. Correlations of Ventricular Enlargement with Rheologically Active Surfactant Proteins in Cerebrospinal Fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schob, Stefan; Weiß, Alexander; Dieckow, Julia; Richter, Cindy; Pirlich, Mandy; Voigt, Peter; Surov, Alexey; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Quaeschling, Ulf; Preuß, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Surfactant proteins (SPs) are involved in the regulation of rheological properties of body fluids. Concentrations of SPs are altered in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of hydrocephalus patients. The common hallmark of hydrocephalus is enlargement of the brain ventricles. The relationship of both phenomena has not yet been investigated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between SP concentrations in the CSF and enlargement of the brain ventricles. Procedures: Ninty-six individuals (41 healthy subjects and 55 hydrocephalus patients) were included in this retrospective analysis. CSF specimens were analyzed for SP-A, SP-B, SP-C and SP-D concentrations by use of enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). Ventricular enlargement was quantified in T2 weighted (T2w) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sections using an uni-dimensional (Evans’ Index) and a two-dimensional approach (lateral ventricles area index, LVAI). Results: CSF-SP concentrations (mean ± standard deviation in ng/ml) were as follows: SP-A 0.71 ± 0.58, SP-B 0.18 ± 0.43, SP-C 0.89 ± 0.77 and SP-D 7.4 ± 5.4. Calculated values of Evans’ Index were 0.37 ± 0.11, a calculation of LVAI resulted in 0.18 ± 0.15 (each mean ± standard deviation). Significant correlations were identified for Evans’ Index with SP-A (r = 0.388, p < 0.001) and SP-C (r = 0.392, p < 0.001), LVAI with SP-A (r = 0.352, p = 0.001), SP-C (r = 0.471, p < 0.001) and SP-D (r = 0.233, p = 0.025). Furthermore, SP-C showed a clear inverse correlation with age (r = −0.357, p = 0.011). Conclusion: The present study confirmed significant correlations between SPs A, C and D in the CSF with enlargement of the inner CSF spaces. In conclusion, SPs clearly play an important role for CSF rheology. CSF rheology is profoundly altered in hydrocephalic diseases, however, diagnosis and therapy of hydrocephalic conditions are still almost exclusively based on ventricular enlargement. Until now it was unclear, whether the

  7. Interactions of surfactants with a water treatment protein from Moringa oleifera seeds in solution studied by zeta-potential and light scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwaambwa, Habauka M; Rennie, Adrian R

    2012-04-01

    Protein extracted from Moringa oleifera (MO) seeds has been advocated as a cheap and environmental friendly alternative to ionic flocculants for water purification. However, the nature and mechanism of its interaction with particles in water, as well as with dissolved surface-active molecules, are not well understood. In this article, we report studies of the protein and its interaction with four surfactants using dynamic light scattering (DLS), zeta-potential and turbidity measurements. Zeta-potential measurements identified points of charge reversal and the turbidity and DLS measurements were used to characterize the microstructure and size of protein-surfactant complexes. From the points of charge reversal, it was estimated that 7 anions are required to neutralize the positive charges of each protein molecule at pH 7. For protein mixtures with sodium dodecyl sulfate and dodecyl di-acid sodium salt, the peak in turbidity corresponds to concentrations with a large change in zeta-potential. No turbidity was observed for protein mixtures with either the nonionic surfactant Triton X-100 or the zwitterionic surfactant N-dodecyl-N,N-dimethyl-3-ammonio-1-propanesulfonate. Changes of pH in the range 4-10 have little effect on the zeta-potential, turbidity, and the hydrodynamic radius reflecting the high isoelectric point of the protein. Addition of small amounts of salt has little effect on the size of protein in solution. These results are discussed in the context of the use of the MO protein in water treatment.

  8. Semi-automated hydrophobic interaction chromatography column scouting used in the two-step purification of recombinant green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Orrin J; Biette, Kelly M; Murphy, Patrick J M

    2014-01-01

    Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) most commonly requires experimental determination (i.e., scouting) in order to select an optimal chromatographic medium for purifying a given target protein. Neither a two-step purification of untagged green fluorescent protein (GFP) from crude bacterial lysate using sequential HIC and size exclusion chromatography (SEC), nor HIC column scouting elution profiles of GFP, have been previously reported. Bacterial lysate expressing recombinant GFP was sequentially adsorbed to commercially available HIC columns containing butyl, octyl, and phenyl-based HIC ligands coupled to matrices of varying bead size. The lysate was fractionated using a linear ammonium phosphate salt gradient at constant pH. Collected HIC eluate fractions containing retained GFP were then pooled and further purified using high-resolution preparative SEC. Significant differences in presumptive GFP elution profiles were observed using in-line absorption spectrophotometry (A395) and post-run fluorimetry. SDS-PAGE and western blot demonstrated that fluorometric detection was the more accurate indicator of GFP elution in both HIC and SEC purification steps. Comparison of composite HIC column scouting data indicated that a phenyl ligand coupled to a 34 µm matrix produced the highest degree of target protein capture and separation. Conducting two-step protein purification using the preferred HIC medium followed by SEC resulted in a final, concentrated product with >98% protein purity. In-line absorbance spectrophotometry was not as precise of an indicator of GFP elution as post-run fluorimetry. These findings demonstrate the importance of utilizing a combination of detection methods when evaluating purification strategies. GFP is a well-characterized model protein, used heavily in educational settings and by researchers with limited protein purification experience, and the data and strategies presented here may aid in development other of HIC-compatible protein

  9. Semi-automated hydrophobic interaction chromatography column scouting used in the two-step purification of recombinant green fluorescent protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orrin J Stone

    Full Text Available Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC most commonly requires experimental determination (i.e., scouting in order to select an optimal chromatographic medium for purifying a given target protein. Neither a two-step purification of untagged green fluorescent protein (GFP from crude bacterial lysate using sequential HIC and size exclusion chromatography (SEC, nor HIC column scouting elution profiles of GFP, have been previously reported.Bacterial lysate expressing recombinant GFP was sequentially adsorbed to commercially available HIC columns containing butyl, octyl, and phenyl-based HIC ligands coupled to matrices of varying bead size. The lysate was fractionated using a linear ammonium phosphate salt gradient at constant pH. Collected HIC eluate fractions containing retained GFP were then pooled and further purified using high-resolution preparative SEC. Significant differences in presumptive GFP elution profiles were observed using in-line absorption spectrophotometry (A395 and post-run fluorimetry. SDS-PAGE and western blot demonstrated that fluorometric detection was the more accurate indicator of GFP elution in both HIC and SEC purification steps. Comparison of composite HIC column scouting data indicated that a phenyl ligand coupled to a 34 µm matrix produced the highest degree of target protein capture and separation.Conducting two-step protein purification using the preferred HIC medium followed by SEC resulted in a final, concentrated product with >98% protein purity. In-line absorbance spectrophotometry was not as precise of an indicator of GFP elution as post-run fluorimetry. These findings demonstrate the importance of utilizing a combination of detection methods when evaluating purification strategies. GFP is a well-characterized model protein, used heavily in educational settings and by researchers with limited protein purification experience, and the data and strategies presented here may aid in development other of HIC

  10. Surfactant-enhanced cellulose nanocrystal Pickering emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhen; Ballinger, Sarah; Pelton, Robert; Cranston, Emily D

    2015-02-01

    The effect of surfactants on the properties of Pickering emulsions stabilized by cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) was investigated. Electrophoretic mobility, interfacial tension, confocal microscopy and three-phase contact angle measurements were used to elucidate the interactions between anionic CNCs and cationic alkyl ammonium surfactants didecyldimethylammonium bromide (DMAB) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB). Both surfactants were found to adsorb onto CNCs with concentration-dependent morphology. At low concentrations, individual surfactant molecules adsorbed with alkyl tails pointing outward leading to hydrophobic CNCs. At higher concentrations, above the surfactant's apparent critical micelle concentration, surfactant aggregate morphologies on CNCs were inferred and the hydrophobicity of CNCs decreased. DMAB, which has two alkyl tails, rendered the CNCs more hydrophobic than CTAB which has only a single alkyl tail, at all surfactant concentrations. The change in CNC wettability from surfactant adsorption was directly linked to emulsion properties; adding surfactant increased the emulsion stability, decreased the droplet size, and controlled the internal phase of CNC Pickering emulsions. More specifically, a double transitional phase inversion, from oil-in-water to water-in-oil and back to oil-in-water, was observed for emulsions with CNCs and increasing amounts of DMAB (the more hydrophobic surfactant). With CNCs and CTAB, no phase inversion was induced. This work represents the first report of CNC Pickering emulsions with surfactants as well as the first CNC Pickering emulsions that can be phase inverted. The ability to surface modify CNCs in situ and tailor emulsions by adding surfactants may extend the potential of CNCs to new liquid formulations and extruded/spray-dried materials.

  11. Fibrinogen stability under surfactant interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Natalia; Barbosa, Leandro R S; Itri, Rosangela; Ruso, Juan M

    2011-10-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), circular dichroism (CD), difference spectroscopy (UV-vis), Raman spectroscopy, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements have been performed in the present work to provide a quantitatively comprehensive physicochemical description of the complexation between bovine fibrinogen and the sodium perfluorooctanoate, sodium octanoate, and sodium dodecanoate in glycine buffer (pH 8.5). It has been found that sodium octanoate and dodecanoate act as fibrinogen destabilizer. Meanwhile, sodium perfluorooctanoate acts as a structure stabilizer at low molar concentration and as a destabilizer at high molar concentration. Fibrinogen's secondary structure is affected by all three studied surfactants (decrease in α-helix and an increase in β-sheet content) to a different extent. DSC and UV-vis revealed the existence of intermediate states in the thermal unfolding process of fibrinogen. In addition, SAXS data analysis showed that pure fibrinogen adopts a paired-dimer structure in solution. Such a structure is unaltered by sodium octanoate and perfluoroctanoate. However, interaction of sodium dodecanoate with the fibrinogen affects the protein conformation leading to a complex formation. Taken together, all results evidence that both surfactant hydrophobicity and tail length mediate the fibrinogen stability upon interaction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Adsorption of a small protein to a methyl-terminated hydrophobic surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otzen, Daniel; Oliveberg, M.; Höök, F.

    2003-01-01

    We have studied the adsorption kinetics of a small monomeric protein S6 using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) technique. Competitive adsorption from various proportions of native (Nat) and denatured (Den) protein in the bulk phase was carried out using a range ...

  13. A New Class of Amphiphiles Bearing Rigid Hydrophobic Groups for Solubilization and Stabilization of Membrane Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chae, Pil Seok; Rasmussen, Søren G F; Rana, Rohini R;

    2012-01-01

    Non-traditional amphiphiles: Conferring aqueous solubility on membrane proteins generally requires the use of a detergent or other amphiphilic agent. A new class of amphiphiles was synthesized, based on steroidal lipophilic groups, and evaluated with several membrane proteins. The results show th...

  14. Amino acid-based surfactants – do they deserve more attention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordes, Romain; Holmberg, Krister

    2015-08-01

    The 20 standard amino acids (together with a few more that are not used in the biosynthesis of proteins) constitute a versatile tool box for synthesis of surfactants. Anionic, cationic and zwitterionic amphiphiles can be prepared and surfactants with several functional groups can be obtained by the proper choice of starting amino acid. This review gives examples of procedures used for preparation and discusses important physicochemical properties of the amphiphiles and how these can be taken advantage of for various applications. Micelles with a chiral surface can be obtained by self-assembly of enantiomerically pure surfactants and such supramolecular chirality can be utilized for asymmetric organic synthesis and for preparation of mesoporous materials with chiral pores. Surfactants based on amino acids with two carboxyl groups are effective chelating agents and can be used as collectors in mineral ore flotation. A surfactant based on cysteine readily oxidizes into the corresponding cystine compound, which can be regarded as a gemini surfactant. The facile and reversible cysteine-cystine transformation has been taken advantage of in the design of a switchable surfactant. A very attractive aspect of surfactants based on amino acids is that the polar head-group is entirely natural and that the linkage to the hydrophobic tail, which is often an ester or an amide bond, is easily cleaved. The rate of degradation can be tailored by the structure of the amphiphile. The ester linkage in betaine ester surfactants is particularly susceptible to alkaline hydrolysis and this surfactant type can be used as a biocide with short-lived action. This paper is not intended as a full review on the topic. Instead it highlights concepts that are unique to amino acid-based surfactants and that we believe can have practical implications.

  15. Theoretical and computational studies of hydrophobic and hydrophilic hydration: Towards a molecular description of the hydration of proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garde, Shekhar

    The unique balance of forces underlying biological processes-such as protein folding, aggregation, molecular recognition, and the formation of biological membranes-owes its origin in large part to the surrounding aqueous medium. A quantitative description of fundamental noncovalent interactions, in particular hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions at molecular- scale separations, requires an accurate description of water structure. Thus, the primary goals of our research are to understand the role of water in mediating interactions between molecules and to incorporate this understanding into molecular theories for calculating water-mediated interactions. We have developed a molecular model of hydrophobic interactions that uses methods of information theory to relate hydrophobic effects to the density fluctuations in liquid water. This model provides a quantitative description of small-molecule hydration thermodynamics, as well as insights into the entropies of unfolding globular proteins. For larger molecular solutes, we relate the inhomogeneous water structure in their vicinity to their hydration thermodynamics. We find that the water structure in the vicinity of nonpolar solutes is only locally sensitive to the molecular details of the solute. Water structures predicted using this observation are used to study the association of two neopentane molecules and the conformational equilibria of n-pentane molecule. We have also studied the hydration of a model molecular ionic solute, a tetramethylammonium ion, over a wide range of charge states of the solute. We find that, although the charge dependence of the ion hydration free energy is quadratic, negative ions are more favorably hydrated compared to positive ions. Moreover, this asymmetry of hydration can be reconciled by considering the differences in water organization surrounding positive and negative ions. We have also developed methods for predicting water structure surrounding molecular ions and relating

  16. QID74 Cell wall protein of Trichoderma harzianum is involved in cell protection and adherence to hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Iván V; Rey, Manuel; Codón, Antonio C; Govantes, Javier; Moreno-Mateos, Miguel A; Benítez, Tahía

    2007-10-01

    Trichoderma is widely used as biocontrol agent against phytopathogenic fungi, and as biofertilizer because of its ability to establish mycorriza-like association with plants. The key factor to the ecological success of this genus is the combination of very active mycoparasitic mechanisms plus effective defense strategies induced in plants. This work, different from most of the studies carried out that address the attacking mechanisms, focuses on elucidating how Trichoderma is able to tolerate hostile conditions. A gene from Trichoderma harzianum CECT 2413, qid74, was strongly expressed during starvation of carbon or nitrogen sources; it encoded a cell wall protein of 74kDa that plays a significant role in mycelium protection. qid74 was originally isolated and characterized, in a previous work, by a differential hybridization approach under simulated mycoparasitism conditions. Heterologous expression of Qid74 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicated that the protein, located in the cell wall, interfered with mating and sporulation but not with cell integrity. The qid74 gene was disrupted by homologous recombination and it was overexpressed by isolating transformants selected for the amdS gene that carried several copies of qid74 gene under the control of the pki promoter. Disruptants and transformants showed similar growth rate and viability when they were cultivated in different media, temperatures and osmolarities, or were subjected to different abiotic stress conditions. However, disruptants produced about 70% mass yield under any condition and were substantially more sensitive than the wild type to cell wall degradation by different lytic preparations. Transformants had similar mass yield and were more resistant to lytic enzymes but more sensitive to copper sulfate than the wild type. When experiments of adherence to hydrophobic surfaces were carried out, the disruptants had a reduced capacity to adhere, whereas that capacity in the overproducer transformants was

  17. Surfactant Protein D Levels in Umbilical Cord Blood and Capillary Blood of Premature Infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Marianne; Holmskov, Uffe; Husby, Steffen

    2006-01-01

    of SP-D in capillary blood day 1 was 1,466 ng/mL (range 410-5,051 ng/mL), with lowest values in infants born with ROM and delivered vaginally. High SP-D levels in umbilical cord blood and capillary blood on day 1 were found to be more likely in infants in need for respiratory support or surfactant...

  18. Alterations in nanoparticle protein corona by biological surfactants: impact of bile salts on β-lactoglobulin-coated gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winuprasith, Thunnalin; Chantarak, Sirinya; Suphantharika, Manop; He, Lili; McClements, David Julian

    2014-07-15

    The impact of biological surfactants (bile salts) on the protein (β-lactoglobulin) corona surrounding gold nanoparticles (200 nm) was studied using a variety of analytical techniques at pH 7: dynamic light scattering (DLS); particle electrophoresis (ζ-potential); UV-visible (UV) spectroscopy; transmission electron microscopy (TEM); and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The bile salts adsorbed to the protein-coated nanoparticle surfaces and altered their interfacial composition, charge, and structure. SERS spectra of protein-coated nanoparticles after bile salt addition contained bands from both protein and bile salts, indicating that the protein was not fully displaced by the bile salts. UV, DLS and TEM techniques also indicated that the protein coating was not fully displaced from the nanoparticle surfaces. The impact of bile salts could be described by an orogenic mechanism: mixed interfaces were formed that consisted of islands of aggregated proteins surrounded by a sea of bile salts. This knowledge is useful for understanding the interactions of bile salts with protein-coated colloidal particles, which may be important for controlling the fate of colloidal delivery systems in the human gastrointestinal tract, or the gastrointestinal fate of ingested inorganic nanoparticles.

  19. Displacement chromatography of proteins using a retained pH front in a hydrophobic charge induction chromatography column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, N D S; Frey, Douglas D

    2015-03-27

    The chromatographic separation of two proteins into a displacement train of two adjoined rectangular bands was accomplished using a novel method for hydrophobic charge induction chromatography (HCIC) which employs a self-sharpening pH front as the displacer. This method exploits the fact that protein elution in HCIC is promoted by a pH change, but is relatively independent of salt effects, so that a retained pH front can be used in place of a traditional displacer in displacement chromatography. The retained pH front was produced using the two adsorbed buffering species tricine and acetic acid. The separation of lysozyme and α-chymotrypsinogen A into adjoined, rectangular bands was accomplished with overall recoveries based on the total mass injected greater than 90 and 70%, respectively. The addition of urea to the buffer system increased the sharpness of the pH front by 36% while the yields of lysozyme and α-chymotrypsinogen A based on the total mass eluted increased from 76% to 99% and from 37% to 85%, respectively, when the purities of both proteins in their product fractions were fixed at 85%. The results demonstrate that the method developed in this study is a useful variant of HCIC and is also a useful alternative to other displacement chromatography methods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hydrophobic charge-induction resin with 5-aminobenzimidazol as the functional ligand: preparation, protein adsorption and immunoglobulin G purification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Zhang, Qi-Lei; Tong, Hong-Fei; Lin, Dong-Qiang; Yao, Shan-Jing

    2015-07-01

    A new hydrophobic charge-induction chromatography resin was prepared with 5-aminobenzimidazol as functional ligand and polyacrylic ester beads as matrix. Adsorption isotherms and adsorption in columns were investigated using human immunoglobulin G and bovine serum albumin as model proteins, and the influence of pH and NaCl concentration was discussed. Results showed that the ligand density was 195 μmol/mL gel, and protein selectivity can be improved by controlling pH and salt addition. An optimized purification process (sample loading at pH 8.0 with 0.2 M NaCl and elution at pH 5.0) was performed to purify human immunoglobulin G from bovine serum albumin containing feedstock, which resulted in human immunoglobulin G purity of 99.7% and recovery of 94.6%. A similar process was applied for the purification of monoclonal antibody from cell culture supernatant, which showed antibody purity of 94.9% and recovery of 92.5%. The results indicated that the new resin developed had comparable performance as Protein A chromatography and would be suitable for antibody purification from complex feedstock. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Post-translational processing of surfactant protein-C proprotein: targeting motifs in the NH(2)-terminal flanking domain are cleaved in late compartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A L; Braidotti, P; Pietra, G G; Russo, S J; Kabore, A; Wang, W J; Beers, M F

    2001-03-01

    Rat surfactant protein (SP)-C is a 3.7-kD hydrophobic lung-specific protein generated from proteolytic processing of a 21-kD propeptide (SP-C(21)). We have demonstrated that initial post-translational processing of SP-C(21) involves two cleavages of the COOH-terminus (Beers and colleagues, J. Biol. Chem. 1994;269:20,318--20,328). The goal of the current study was to define processing and function of the NH(2)-terminal flanking domain. Epitope-specific antisera directed against spatially distinct regions of the NH(2) terminus, NPROSP-C(2-9) (epitope = D(2)-L(9)) and NPROSP-C(11-23) (= E(11)-Q(23)) were produced. By Western blotting, both antisera identified SP-C(21) in microsomes. A 6-kD form (SP-C(6)), enriched in lamellar bodies (LBs), was detected only by NPROSP-C(11-23) and not extractable with NaCO(3) treatment. Immunogold staining of ultrathin lung sections with NPROSP-C(11-23) identified proSP-C in both multivesicular bodies (mvb) and LBs whereas NPROSP-C(2-9) labeled only mvb. (35)S-pulse chase analysis demonstrated synthesis of SP-C(21) and three intermediate forms (SP-C(16), SP-C(7), and SP-C(6)). Complete processing involved four separate cleavages with a precursor- product relationship between the low molecular weight forms SP-C(7) and SP-C(6). Fluorescence microscopy of A549 cells expressing fusion proteins of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and proSP-C NH(2)-terminal deletion mutants showed targeting of EGFP/SP-C(1-194) and EGFP/SP-C(10-194) to early endosomal antigen-1-negative, CD-63-positive cytoplasmic vesicles whereas EGFP/SP-C(19-194), EGFP/SP-C(Delta 10-18), and EGFP/SP-C(24-194) were restricted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). We conclude that synthetic processing includes a previously unrecognized cleavage of the proximal NH(2) terminus (M(1)-L(9)), which occurs after removal of COOH-flanking domains (H(59)-I(194)) but before packaging in LBs, and that the region M(10)-T(18) is required for targeting of proSP-C to post-ER vesicular

  2. Role of NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic motif in the subcellular localization of ATP-binding cassette protein subfamily D: Common features in eukaryotic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Asaka; Asahina, Kota; Okamoto, Takumi; Kawaguchi, Kosuke [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Kostsin, Dzmitry G. [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Institute of Biophysics and Cell Engineering, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Academicheskaya Str. 27, Minsk 220072 (Belarus); Kashiwayama, Yoshinori [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Takanashi, Kojiro; Yazaki, Kazufumi [Laboratory of Plant Gene Expression, Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoko University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Imanaka, Tsuneo, E-mail: imanaka@pha.u-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan); Morita, Masashi [Department of Biological Chemistry, Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • ABCD proteins classifies based on with or without NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment. • The ABCD proteins with the segment are targeted peroxisomes. • The ABCD proteins without the segment are targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum. • The role of the segment in organelle targeting is conserved in eukaryotic organisms. - Abstract: In mammals, four ATP-binding cassette (ABC) proteins belonging to subfamily D have been identified. ABCD1–3 possesses the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic region and are targeted to peroxisomes, while ABCD4 lacking the region is targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Based on hydropathy plot analysis, we found that several eukaryotes have ABCD protein homologs lacking the NH{sub 2}-terminal hydrophobic segment (H0 motif). To investigate whether the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in subcellular localization is conserved across species, we expressed ABCD proteins from several species (metazoan, plant and fungi) in fusion with GFP in CHO cells and examined their subcellular localization. ABCD proteins possessing the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif were localized to peroxisomes, while ABCD proteins lacking this region lost this capacity. In addition, the deletion of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif of ABCD protein resulted in their localization to the ER. These results suggest that the role of the NH{sub 2}-terminal H0 motif in organelle targeting is widely conserved in living organisms.

  3. Surfactant protein D, Club cell protein 16, Pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine, C-reactive protein, and Fibrinogen biomarker variation in chronic obstructive lung disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Sofie Lock; Vestbo, J.; Sorensen, G. L.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multifaceted condition that cannot be fully described by the severity of airway obstruction. The limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted researchers to investigate a multitude of surrogate biomarkers of disease for the assessm......Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a multifaceted condition that cannot be fully described by the severity of airway obstruction. The limitations of spirometry and clinical history have prompted researchers to investigate a multitude of surrogate biomarkers of disease...... for the assessment of patients, prediction of risk, and guidance of treatment. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive summary of observations for a selection of recently investigated pulmonary inflammatory biomarkers (Surfactant protein D (SP-D), Club cell protein 16 (CC-16), and Pulmonary...... and activation-regulated chemokine (PARC/CCL-18)) and systemic inflammatory biomarkers (C-reactive protein (CRP) and fibrinogen) with COPD. The relevance of these biomarkers for COPD is discussed in terms of their biological plausibility, their independent association to disease and hard clinical outcomes...

  4. Characterizing hydrophobicity of amino acid side chains in a protein environment via measuring contact angle of a water nanodroplet on planar peptide network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chongqin; Gao, Yurui; Li, Hui; Meng, Sheng; Li, Lei; Francisco, Joseph S; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-11-15

    Hydrophobicity of macroscopic planar surface is conventionally characterized by the contact angle of water droplets. However, this engineering measurement cannot be directly extended to surfaces of proteins, due to the nanometer scale of amino acids and inherent nonplanar structures. To measure the hydrophobicity of side chains of proteins quantitatively, numerous parameters were developed to characterize behavior of hydrophobic solvation. However, consistency among these parameters is not always apparent. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative way of characterizing hydrophobicity of amino acid side chains in a protein environment by constructing a monolayer of amino acids (i.e., artificial planar peptide network) according to the primary and the β-sheet secondary structures of protein so that the conventional engineering measurement of the contact angle of a water droplet can be brought to bear. Using molecular dynamics simulations, contact angles θ of a water nanodroplet on the planar peptide network, together with excess chemical potentials of purely repulsive methane-sized Weeks-Chandler-Andersen solute, are computed. All of the 20 types of amino acids and the corresponding planar peptide networks are studied. Expectedly, all of the planar peptide networks with nonpolar amino acids are hydrophobic due to θ [Formula: see text] 90°, whereas all of the planar peptide networks of the polar and charged amino acids are hydrophilic due to θ [Formula: see text] 90°. Planar peptide networks of the charged amino acids exhibit complete-wetting behavior due to θ [Formula: see text] 0°. This computational approach for characterization of hydrophobicity can be extended to artificial planar networks of other soft matter.

  5. Monoclonal antibody-assisted structure-function analysis of the carbohydrate recognition domain of surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartshorn, Kevan L; White, Mitchell R; Rynkiewicz, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays important roles in host defense against a variety of pathogens including influenza A virus (IAV). Ligand binding by SP-D is mediated by the trimeric neck and carbohydrate recognition domain (NCRD). We used monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against human SP-D and a panel...... of mutant collectin NCRD constructs to identify functionally and structurally important epitopes. The ability of SP-D to bind to IAV and mannan involved partially overlapping binding sites that are distinct from those involved in binding to the glycoprotein-340 (gp-340) scavenger receptor protein. A species...... abrogated antiviral activity, were associated with decreased binding to multiple blocking mAbs, consistent with critical structural roles. More conservative substitutions at 335, which showed a significant increase in neutralization activity, caused selective loss of binding to one mAb. The analysis reveals...

  6. Intrinsic structural differences in the N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant protein SP-C from different species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, I; Rivas, L; Casals, C

    2001-01-01

    Predictive studies suggest that the known sequences of the N-terminal segment of surfactant protein SP-C from animal species have an intrinsic tendency to form beta-turns, but there are important differences on the probable location of these motifs in different SP-C species. Our hypothesis...... is that intrinsic structural determinants of the sequence of the N-terminal region of SP-C could define conformation, acylation and perhaps surface properties of the mature protein. To test this hypothesis we have synthesized peptides corresponding to the 13-residue N-terminal sequence of porcine and canine SP-C......-terminal end of SP-C may modulate these intrinsic conformational features and the changes induced could be important for the development of its surface activity. Udgivelsesdato: 2001-May...

  7. Concentration-dependent displacement of cholesterol in micelles by hydrophobic rice bran protein hydrolysates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent production of rice bran oil in Asia and the U.S. has resulted in large quantities of defatted rice bran as a low-value byproduct. Peptides from soy, milk, and other foods have been shown to have the potential hypocholesterolemic property and rice bran protein (RBP) may also contain bioact...

  8. Performance of Hydrophobic Associating Water-solute Polymer/Surfactant System%疏水缔合聚合物/表面活性剂二元体系性能研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹伟佳; 卢祥国; 苏鑫; 杨怀军; 张杰

    2016-01-01

    of Dagang oilfield and the poor development effect of water flooding,the feasibility of the application of hydrophobic associating polymer/surfactant displacement system was probed. The dimension of polymer molecular coil Dh,interfacial tension between the crude oil and the hydrophobic associating polymer AP-P7 solution or“polymer/surfactant”displacement system,compounded of AP-P7 and nonionic surfactant Guan 109PS985,and their influential factors were studied under the experimental conditions,andβ-cyclodextrin(β-cd) was used as the regulator to improve the suitability of polymer with oil reservoir,also the EOR mechanism of polymer flooding and“polymer/surfactant”displacement system in high viscosity and high condensate reservoirs was analyzed. The results showed that,β-cd could change the molecular morphological structure of the hydrophobic associating polymer,and make the matching of the polymer structure and core pore throat stronger,resulting in the reduction of the blockage. The viscosity hydrophobic associating polymer solution and“polymer/surfactant”system prepared with soft water,increased by 35.2%and 20.2%compared to that of the inject water,the viscosity of the polymer solution at the concentration of 2000 mg/L prepared with injected water and soft water, respectively,were 223.4 mPa.s and 302.5 mPa·s,When adding 700 mg/L ofβ-cd,the viscosity decreased to be of 26.5 mPa·s and 35.3 mPa·s,respectively,which indicated that the addition of theβ-cd made the viscosity of AP-P7 solutions decrease obviously. When the concentration of β-cd increased from 10 mg/L to 700 mg/L,the Dh of AP-P7 decreased from 235 nm to 155 nm. In addition,when the concentration ofβ-cd increased from 10 mg/L to 700 mg/L or the concentration of Ca2+and Mg2+decreased from 508 mg/L to 0,the interfacial tension between the polymer system and the simulated reduced to some degree. The 2000 mg/L polymer solution containingβ-cd was injected into the core with permeability

  9. THE FUNGAL HYDROPHOBIN SC3P SELF-ASSEMBLES AT THE SURFACE OF AERIAL HYPHAE AS A PROTEIN MEMBRANE CONSTITUTING THE HYDROPHOBIC RODLET LAYER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOSTEN, HAB; ASGEIRSDOTTIR, SA; KROOK, JH; DRENTH, JHH; WESSELS, JGH

    1994-01-01

    The Schizophyllum commune hydrophobin Sc3p is a small, hydrophobic, cysteine-rich protein involved in the formation of aerial hyphae. Using an antibody against purified Sc3p we found that the hydrophobin is secreted into the medium at the spices of growing submerged hyphae but in emerging aerial hyp

  10. Moderate pressure has no distinct impact on hydrophobic hydration of proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yegorov, Alexander Y.; Potekhin, Sergey A., E-mail: spot@vega.protres.ru

    2015-06-20

    Highlights: • Δc{sub p} is the heat capacity increment of any protein under denaturation. • We studied the effect of pressure on Δc{sub p} using a high pressure calorimeter. • Pressure has no impact on Δc{sub p} up to 178 MPa. • There is no noticeable pressure effect on hydration of unfolded proteins. - Abstract: The effect of high pressure on the change in the heat capacity (Δc{sub p}) of ribonuclease A and lysozyme upon denaturation has been studied using scanning microcalorimetry techniques. It has been shown that the pressure has no impact on Δc{sub p} up to 178 MPa, although appreciably varies the denaturation enthalpy. This result confirms the thermodynamic similarity of the denaturation process and the hydration degree of polypeptide chain in the denatured state at ambient and elevated pressure. Our findings are in conflict with some hypotheses concerning the high pressure effect on the structure stability of proteins.

  11. Small hydrophobic protein of human metapneumovirus does not affect virus replication and host gene expression in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda de Graaf

    Full Text Available Human metapneumovirus (HMPV encodes a small hydrophobic (SH protein of unknown function. HMPV from which the SH open reading frame was deleted (HMPVΔSH was viable and displayed similar replication kinetics, cytopathic effect and plaque size compared with wild type HMPV in several cell-lines. In addition, no differences were observed in infection efficiency or cell-to-cell spreading in human primary bronchial epithelial cells (HPBEC cultured at an air-liquid interphase. Host gene expression was analyzed in A549 cells infected with HMPV or HMPVΔSH using microarrays and mass spectrometry (MS based techniques at multiple time points post infection. Only minor differences were observed in mRNA or protein expression levels. A possible function of HMPV SH as apoptosis blocker, as proposed for several members of the family Paramyxoviridae, was rejected based on this analysis. So far, a clear phenotype of HMPV SH deletion mutants in vitro at the virus and host levels is absent.

  12. Effects of the conjugation of whey proteins with gellan polysaccharides on surfactant-induced competitive displacement from the air-water interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, B; Ikeda, S

    2016-08-01

    Whey proteins can be used to stabilize foams and emulsions against coalescence because of their ability to form viscoelastic films at the interface that resist film rupture on collision between colloidal particles. However, whey proteins are competitively displaced from the interface if small-molecule surfactants are added, leading to destabilization of the entire system. This is because surfactants are more effective in molecular packing at the interface, and they lower interfacial tension to a greater degree than whey proteins do, but their interfacial films are poor in viscoelasticity. We hypothesized that whey proteins would become more resistant to surfactant-induced competitive displacement if they were conjugated with network-forming polysaccharides. The protein moiety of the conjugate would be expected to enable its adsorption to the interface, and the polysaccharide moiety would be expected to form self-assembled networks, strengthening the interfacial film as a whole. In this study, whey proteins were conjugated with gellan polysaccharides using the Maillard reaction. Atomic force microscopy images of interfacial films formed by the whey protein-gellan conjugate at the air-water interface and transferred onto mica sheets using the Langmuir-Blodgett method revealed that gellan did form self-assembled networks at the interface and that interfacial films also contained a large number of unconjugated whey protein molecules. Following the addition of a small-molecule surfactant (Tween 20) to the sub-phase, surface pressure increased, indicating spontaneous adsorption of surfactants to the interface. Atomic force microscopy images showed decreases in interfacial area coverage by whey proteins as surface pressure increased. At a given surface pressure, the interfacial area coverage by whey protein-gellan conjugates was greater than coverage by unconjugated whey proteins, confirming that whey proteins became more resistant to surfactant-induced displacement after

  13. First-order phase transition during displacement of amphiphilic biomacromolecules from interfaces by surfactant molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettelaie, Rammile; Dickinson, Eric; Pugnaloni, Luis

    2014-11-19

    The adsorption of surfactants onto a hydrophobic interface, already laden with a fixed number of amphiphilic macromolecules, is studied using the self consistent field calculation method of Scheutjens and Fleer. For biopolymers having unfavourable interactions with the surfactant molecules, the adsorption isotherms show an abrupt jump at a certain value of surfactant bulk concentration. Alternatively, the same behaviour is exhibited when the number of amphiphilic chains on the interface is decreased. We show that this sudden jump is associated with a first-order phase transition, by calculating the free energy values for the stable and the metastable states at both sides of the transition point. We also observe that the transition can occur for two approaching surfaces, from a high surfactant coverage phase to a low surfactant coverage one, at sufficiently close separation distances. The consequence of this finding for the steric colloidal interactions, induced by the overlap of two biopolymer + surfactant films, is explored. In particular, a significantly different interaction, in terms of its magnitude and range, is predicted for these two phases. We also consider the relevance of the current study to problems involving the competitive displacement of proteins by surfactants in food colloid systems.

  14. Hydrophobic-domain-dependent protein-protein interactions mediate the localization of GPAT enzymes to ER subdomains

    Science.gov (United States)

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is a dynamic network that consists of numerous regions or subdomains with discrete morphological features and functional properties, including those involved in protein and oil-body formation, anterograde transport of secretory proteins, the exchange of macromolecules ...

  15. The Alteration and Significance of Surfactant Protein A in Rats Chronically Exposed to Cigarette Smoke

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiongjie HU; Huilan ZHANG; Shengdao XIONG; Xuemei SHI; Yongjian XU; Zhenxiang ZHANG; Guohua ZHEN; Jianping ZHAO

    2008-01-01

    In order to confirm the alteration and significance of cigarette smoke exposure on SP-A in rats, 20 Wistar rats were assigned randomly to two groups: an N group (n=10), and an S group (n=10). The ultra-structural change was observed by electron microscopy. The number of cells positive for SPA was by immunohistochemically measured. The mRNA expression in the lung tissues was deter-mined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The number of cells positive for SPA of the S group (0.52±0.05) was lower than that of the N group (0.72±0.06) (P<0.05). The lev-els of mRNA of SPA in the lung tissues of the S group (0.3522±0.0512) was significantly lower than that of the N group (0.4432±0.05628) (P<0.05). It is concluded that cigarette smoke alone decreased the level of SP-A and that might have an important effect on surfactant metabolism and the host deense functions of surfactant in the peripheral airways, which might play a crucial role in the devel-opment of chronic obstructive lung disease.

  16. Circadian rhythm and the influence of physical activity on circulating surfactant protein D in early and long-standing rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, A F; Hoegh, S V; Lottenburger, T

    2011-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) belongs to the collectin family and has pro-and anti-inflammatory capacities depending on its oligomerization. Previously, circulating SP-D was shown to be decreased in early rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and negatively correlated to disease activity. This study aimed...

  17. Synthesis of β-arabinofuranoside glycolipids, studies of their binding to surfactant protein-A and effect on sliding motilities of M. smegmatis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naresh, Kottari; Avaji, Prakash Gouda; Maiti, Krishnagopal

    2012-01-01

    Surfactant protein A (SP-A), which is a lung innate immune system component, is known to bind glycolipids present at the cell surface of a mycobacterial pathogen. Lipoarabinomannan (LAM), a component of mycobacterial thick, waxy cell wall, is one of the glycolipid ligands for SP-A. In order to as...

  18. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) deficiency is attenuated in humanised mice expressing the Met(11)Thr short nucleotide polymorphism of SP-D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Lars; Ochs, Katharina; Boxler, Laura;

    2013-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is part of the innate immune system involved in lung homeostasis. SP-D knockout mice show accumulations of foamy alveolar macrophages, alveolar lipoproteinosis and pulmonary emphysema. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been described in the coding...

  19. OSCAR Is a Receptor for Surfactant Protein D That Activates TNF-α Release from Human CCR2+ Inflammatory Monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barrow, Alexander D; Palarasah, Yaseelan; Bugatti, Mattia;

    2015-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is critical for maintenance of lung homeostasis and provides a first line of defense to pathogens at mucosal surfaces. Polymorphisms in the SP-D-encoding gene SFTPD have been associated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and ulcerative colitis. Identification...... of recombinant SP-D and captured native SP-D from human bronchoalveolar lavage. OSCAR localized in an intracellular compartment of alveolar macrophages together with SP-D. Moreover, we found OSCAR on the surface of interstitial lung and blood CCR2(+) inflammatory monocytes, which secreted TNF-α when exposed...... therapeutic target in chronic inflammatory diseases of the lung as well as other diseases involving tissue accumulation of SP-D, infiltration of inflammatory monocytes, and release of TNF-α....

  20. Chemotherapy modulates intestinal immune gene expression including surfactant Protein-D and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1 in piglets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Thomassen, Mads; Shen, René L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Information about chemotherapy-induced intestinal gene expression may provide insight into the mechanisms underlying gut toxicity and help identify biomarkers and targets for intervention. Methods: We analyzed jejunal tissue from piglets subjected to two different, clinically relevant...... the upregulated genes for both treatments. Conclusion: In the developing intestine, chemotherapy increases the expression of genes related to innate immune functions involved in surveillance, protection, and homeostasis of mucosal surfaces....... the BUCY and DOX piglets. Selected genes of potential biological significance with a similar change in expression across the treatments were controlled by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Key innate defense molecules, including surfactant protein-D and deleted in malignant brain tumors 1, were among...

  1. Flocculation, hydrophobic agglomeration and filtration of ultrafine coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Z. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Department of Mineral and Mineral Process Engineering

    1999-07-01

    Selective flocculation tests were run on three types of coal and three additives in tests on a new hydrophobic agglomeration process using hydrophobic latices. The coals differed widely in surface wettability. The additives were hydrophobic latexes, a semi-hydrophobic flocculant, and a typical hydrophilic polyelectrolyte. The results show that coal wettability is very important in selective flocculation. UBC-1 hydrophobic latex flocculated hydrophobic coal particles only, while the polyelectrolyte flocculated all the coal samples and minerals that were tested. Tests of oil agglomeration using kerosene emulsified with surfactants of various ionic properties show that even oxidized coals can be agglomerated, if cationic surfactants are used to emulsify the oil. The hydrophobic latex and emulsified oils also significantly increase filtration rate and reduce filter cake moisture content.

  2. Relevance of structural segregation and chain compaction for the thermodynamics of folding of a hydrophobic protein model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Marco Aurélio A; de Araújo, Antônio F Pereira

    2003-05-01

    The relevance of inside-outside segregation and chain compaction for the thermodynamics of folding of a hydrophobic protein model is probed by complete enumeration of two-dimensional chains of up to 18 monomers in the square lattice. The exact computation of Z scores for uniquely designed sequences confirms that Z tends to decrease linearly with sigma square root of N, as previously suggested by theoretical analysis and Monte Carlo simulations, where sigma, the standard deviation of the number of contacts made by different monomers in the target structure, is a measure of structural segregation and N is the chain length. The probability that the target conformation is indeed the unique global energy minimum of the designed sequence is found to increase dramatically with sigma, approaching unity at maximal segregation. However, due to the huge number of conformations with sub-maximal values of sigma, which correspond to intermediate, only mildly discriminative, values of Z, in addition to significant oscillations of Z around its estimated value, the probability that a correctly designed sequence corresponds to a maximally segregated conformation is small. This behavior of Z also explains the observed relation between sigma and different measures of folding cooperativity of correctly designed sequences.

  3. Possible influence of surfactants and proteins on the efficiency of contact agar microbiological surface sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Sylvie M; Sindic, Marianne; Anceau, Christine; Brostaux, Yves; Detry, Jean G

    2010-11-01

    Agar contact microbiological sampling techniques, based on a transfer of the microorganisms present on a surface to a culture medium, are widely used to assess and control surface cleanliness and to evaluate microbial contamination levels. The effectiveness of these techniques depends on many environmental parameters that influence the strength of attachment of the bacteria to the surface. In the present study, stainless steel and high density polyethylene surfaces were inoculated with known concentrations of Staphylococcus epidermidis. Following an experimental design, the surfaces were sampled with different types of replicate organism direct agar contact plates and Petrifilm; results indicated that recovery rates were influenced by the presence of egg white albumin or Tween 80 in the inoculum solutions or by the introduction of surfactants into the contact agar of the microbiological sampling techniques. The techniques yielded significantly different results, depending on sampling conditions, underlining the need for a standardization of laboratory experiments to allow relevant comparisons of such techniques.

  4. The cost of living in the membrane: a case study of hydrophobic mismatch for the multi-segment protein LeuT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sayan; Khelashvili, George; Shi, Lei; Weinstein, Harel

    2013-04-01

    Many observations of the role of the membrane in the function and organization of transmembrane (TM) proteins have been explained in terms of hydrophobic mismatch between the membrane and the inserted protein. For a quantitative investigation of this mechanism in the lipid-protein interactions of functionally relevant conformations adopted by a multi-TM segment protein, the bacterial leucine transporter (LeuT), we employed a novel method, Continuum-Molecular Dynamics (CTMD), that quantifies the energetics of hydrophobic mismatch by combining the elastic continuum theory of membrane deformations with an atomistic level description of the radially asymmetric membrane-protein interface from MD simulations. LeuT has been serving as a model for structure-function studies of the mammalian neurotransmitter:sodium symporters (NSSs), such as the dopamine and serotonin transporters, which are the subject of intense research in the field of neurotransmission. The membrane models in which LeuT was embedded for these studies were composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid, or 3:1 mixture of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (POPG) lipids. The results show that deformation of the host membrane alone is not sufficient to alleviate the hydrophobic mismatch at specific residues of LeuT. The calculations reveal significant membrane thinning and water penetration due to the specific local polar environment produced by the charged K288 of TM7 in LeuT, that is membrane-facing deep inside the hydrophobic milieu of the membrane. This significant perturbation is shown to result in unfavorable polar-hydrophobic interactions at neighboring hydrophobic residues in TM1a and TM7. We show that all the effects attributed to the K288 residue (membrane thinning, water penetration, and the unfavorable polar-hydrophobic interactions at TM1a and TM7), are abolished in calculations with the

  5. Stabilization of secondary structure elements by specific combinations of hydrophilic and hydrophobic amino acid residues is more important for proteins encoded by GC-poor genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrustalev, Vladislav Victorovich; Barkovsky, Eugene Victorovich

    2012-12-01

    Stabilization of secondary structure elements by specific combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids has been studied by the way of analysis of pentapeptide fragments from twelve partial bacterial proteomes. PDB files describing structures of proteins from species with extremely high and low genomic GC-content, as well as with average G + C were included in the study. Amino acid residues in 78,009 pentapeptides from alpha helices, beta strands and coil regions were classified into hydrophobic and hydrophilic ones. The common propensity scale for 32 possible combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acid residues in pentapeptide has been created: specific pentapeptides for helix, sheet and coil were described. The usage of pentapeptides preferably forming alpha helices is decreasing in alpha helices of partial bacterial proteomes with the increase of the average genomic GC-content in first and second codon positions. The usage of pentapeptides preferably forming beta strands is increasing in coil regions and in helices of partial bacterial proteomes with the growth of the average genomic GC-content in first and second codon positions. Due to these circumstances the probability of coil-sheet and helix-sheet transitions should be increased in proteins encoded by GC-rich genes making them prone to form amyloid in certain conditions. Possible causes of the described fact that importance of alpha helix and coil stabilization by specific combinations of hydrophobic and hydrophilic amino acids is growing with the decrease of genomic GC-content have been discussed.

  6. Adsorption of proteins at the solution/air interface influenced by added nonionic surfactants at very low concentrations for both components. 3. Dilational surface rheology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fainerman, V B; Aksenenko, E V; Lylyk, S V; Lotfi, M; Miller, R

    2015-03-05

    The influence of the addition of the nonionic surfactants C12DMPO, C14DMPO, C10OH, and C10EO5 at concentrations between 10(-5) and 10(-1) mmol/L to solutions of β-casein (BCS) and β-lactoglobulin (BLG) at a fixed concentration of 10(-5) mmol/L on the dilational surface rheology is studied. A maximum in the viscoelasticity modulus |E| occurs at very low surfactant concentrations (10(-4) to 10(-3) mmol/L) for mixtures of BCS with C12DMPO and C14DMPO and for mixtures of BLG with C10EO5, while for mixture of BCS with C10EO5 the value of |E| only slightly increased. The |E| values calculated with a recently developed model, which assumes changes in the interfacial molar area of the protein molecules due to the interaction with the surfactants, are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. A linear dependence exists between the ratio of the maximum modulus for the mixture to the modulus of the single protein solution and the coefficient reflecting the influence of the surfactants on the adsorption activity of the protein.

  7. Interaction of the C-terminal peptide of pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B with a bicellar lipid mixture containing anionic lipid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Sylvester

    Full Text Available The hydrophobic lung surfactant SP-B is essential for respiration. SP-B promotes spreading and adsorption of surfactant at the alveolar air-water interface and may facilitate connections between the surface layer and underlying lamellar reservoirs of surfactant material. SP-B63-78 is a cationic and amphipathic helical peptide containing the C-terminal helix of SP-B. (2H NMR has been used to examine the effect of SP-B63-78 on the phase behavior and dynamics of bicellar lipid dispersions containing the longer chain phospholipids DMPC-d 54 and DMPG and the shorter chain lipid DHPC mixed with a 3∶1∶1 molar ratio. Below the gel-to-liquid crystal phase transition temperature of the longer chain components, bicellar mixtures form small, rapidly reorienting disk-like particles with shorter chain lipid components predominantly found around the highly curved particle edges. With increasing temperature, the particles coalesce into larger magnetically-oriented structures and then into more extended lamellar phases. The susceptibility of bicellar particles to coalescence and large scale reorganization makes them an interesting platform in which to study peptide-induced interactions between lipid assemblies. SP-B63-78 is found to lower the temperature at which the orientable phase transforms to the more extended lamellar phase. The peptide also changes the spectrum of motions contributing to quadrupole echo decay in the lamellar phase. The way in which the peptide alters interactions between bilayered micelle structures may provide some insight into some aspects of the role of full-length SP-B in maintaining a functional surfactant layer in lungs.

  8. Interaction of the C-terminal peptide of pulmonary surfactant protein B (SP-B) with a bicellar lipid mixture containing anionic lipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvester, Alexander; MacEachern, Lauren; Booth, Valerie; Morrow, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    The hydrophobic lung surfactant SP-B is essential for respiration. SP-B promotes spreading and adsorption of surfactant at the alveolar air-water interface and may facilitate connections between the surface layer and underlying lamellar reservoirs of surfactant material. SP-B63-78 is a cationic and amphipathic helical peptide containing the C-terminal helix of SP-B. (2)H NMR has been used to examine the effect of SP-B63-78 on the phase behavior and dynamics of bicellar lipid dispersions containing the longer chain phospholipids DMPC-d 54 and DMPG and the shorter chain lipid DHPC mixed with a 3∶1∶1 molar ratio. Below the gel-to-liquid crystal phase transition temperature of the longer chain components, bicellar mixtures form small, rapidly reorienting disk-like particles with shorter chain lipid components predominantly found around the highly curved particle edges. With increasing temperature, the particles coalesce into larger magnetically-oriented structures and then into more extended lamellar phases. The susceptibility of bicellar particles to coalescence and large scale reorganization makes them an interesting platform in which to study peptide-induced interactions between lipid assemblies. SP-B63-78 is found to lower the temperature at which the orientable phase transforms to the more extended lamellar phase. The peptide also changes the spectrum of motions contributing to quadrupole echo decay in the lamellar phase. The way in which the peptide alters interactions between bilayered micelle structures may provide some insight into some aspects of the role of full-length SP-B in maintaining a functional surfactant layer in lungs.

  9. A fast method for the quantitative estimation of the distribution of hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments in alpha-helices of membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzhkov, V B; Surkov, N F

    2000-01-01

    The work presents a fast quantitative approach for estimating the orientations of hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions in the helical wheels of membrane-spanning alpha-helices of transmembrane proteins. The common hydropathy analysis provides an estimate of the integral hydrophobicity in a moving window which scans an amino acid sequence. The new parameter, orientation hydrophobicity, is based on the estimate of hydrophobicity of the angular segment that scans the helical wheel of a given amino acid sequence. The corresponding procedure involves the treatment of transmembrane helices as cylinders with equal surface elements for each amino acid residue. The orientation hydrophobicity, P(phi), phi = 0-360 degrees, of a helical cylinder is given as a sum of hydrophobicities of individual amino acids which are taken as the S-shaped functions of the angle between the centre of amino acid surface element and the centre of the segment. Non-zero contribution to P(phi) comes only from the amino acids belonging to the angular segment for a given angle phi. The size of the angular segment is related to the size of the channel pore. The amplitudes of amino acid S-functions are calibrated in the way that their maximum values (reached when the amino acid is completely exposed into the pore) are equal to the corresponding hydropathy index in the selected scale (here taken as Goldman-Engelman-Steitz hydropathy scale). The given procedure is applied in the studies of three ionic channels with well characterized three-dimensional structures where the channel pore is formed by a bundle of alpha-helices: cholera toxin B, nicotinic acetylcholine homopentameric alpha7 receptor, and phospholamban. The estimated maximum of hydrophilic properties at the helical wheels are in a good agreement with the spatial orientations of alpha-helices in the corresponding channel pores.

  10. Adsorption of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus furiosus of hydrophobic (polysterene) and hydrophilic (silica) surfaces increases protein heat stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, S.; Oost, van der J.; Norde, W.

    2004-01-01

    The interaction of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic microorganism Pyrococcus furiosus with two types of surfaces, that is, hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica, was investigated, and the adsorption isotherms were determined. The adsorbed hyperthermostable enzyme did not undergo

  11. Adsorption of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus furiosus on hydrophobic (polystyrene) and hydrophilic (silica) surfaces increases protein heat stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koutsopoulos, S.; van der Oost, J.; Norde, Willem

    2004-01-01

    The interaction of an endoglucanase from the hyperthermophilic microorganism Pyrococcus furiosus with two types of surfaces, that is, hydrophobic polystyrene and hydrophilic silica, was investigated, and the adsorption isotherms were determined. The adsorbed hyperthermostable enzyme did not undergo

  12. Impact of SDS surfactant on the interactions of Cu(2+) ions with the amyloidogenic region of human prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecel, Aleksandra; Migliorini, Caterina; Valensin, Daniela; Luczkowski, Marek; Kozlowski, Henryk

    2015-08-01

    Prion diseases, known as Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs), are a group of fatal neuronal, and to some extent infectious disorders, associated with a pathogenic protein agent called prion protein (PrP). The human prion protein (hPrP) fragment encompassing the 91-127 region, also known as the amyloidogenic domain, comprises two copper-binding sites corresponding to His-96 and His-111 residues that act as anchors for Cu(2+) binding. In this work, we investigated Cu(2+) interaction with hPrP91-127 in the presence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), which induces a partial α-helix folding of the peptide. Our data indicate that the Cu(2+) coordination ability of the amyloidogenic fragment in the presence of SDS micelles is significantly different to that observed in aqueous solution. This is mainly due to the fact that SDS micelles strongly stabilize the formation of the α-helical structure of the peptide backbone, which is well conserved also upon Cu(2+) binding, contrary to the random coil conformation mainly assumed by hPrP91-127 in aqueous solutions. Potentiometric and spectroscopic studies clearly indicate that in the case of SDS containing solutions, Cu(2+) ions coordinate simultaneously to both imidazoles, while in the case of water solutions, metal ion coordination involves only a single His side chain, which individually acts as an independent Cu(2+) anchoring site.

  13. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and inhaled steroids alter surfactant protein D (SP-D levels: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beers Michael F

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Surfactant protein D (SP-D, an innate immune molecule, plays an important protective role during airway inflammation. Deficiency of this molecule induces emphysematous changes in murine lungs, but its significance in human COPD remains unclear. Methods We collected bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from 20 subjects with varying degrees of COPD (8 former smokers and 12 current smokers and 15 asymptomatic healthy control subjects (5 never smokers, 3 remote former smokers, and 7 current smokers. All subjects underwent a complete medical history and pulmonary function testing. SP-D was measured by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay. Statistical analysis was performed using nonparametric methods and multivariable linear regression for control of confounding. The effect of corticosteroid treatment on SP-D synthesis was studied in vitro using an established model of isolated type II alveolar epithelial cell culture. Results Among former smokers, those with COPD had significantly lower SP-D levels than healthy subjects (median 502 and 1067 ng/mL, respectively, p = 0.01. In a multivariable linear regression model controlling for age, sex, race, and pack-years of tobacco, COPD was independently associated with lower SP-D levels (model coefficient -539, p = 0.04 and inhaled corticosteroid use was independently associated with higher SP-D levels (398, p = 0.046. To support the hypothesis that corticosteroids increase SP-D production we used type II alveolar epithelial cells isolated from adult rat lungs. These cells responded to dexamethasone treatment by a significant increase of SP-D mRNA (p = 0.041 and protein (p = 0.037 production after 4 days of culture. Conclusion Among former smokers, COPD is associated with lower levels of SP-D and inhaled corticosteroid use is associated with higher levels of SP-D in the lung. Dexamethasone induced SP-D mRNA and protein expression in isolated epithelial cells in vitro. Given the importance of this

  14. Influence of hydrophobic and electrostatic residues on SARS-coronavirus S2 protein stability: insights into mechanisms of general viral fusion and inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Halil; Al-Khooly, Dina; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2014-05-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) is an acute respiratory disease caused by the SARS-coronavirus (SARS-CoV). SARS-CoV entry is facilitated by the spike protein (S), which consists of an N-terminal domain (S1) responsible for cellular attachment and a C-terminal domain (S2) that mediates viral and host cell membrane fusion. The SARS-CoV S2 is a potential drug target, as peptidomimetics against S2 act as potent fusion inhibitors. In this study, site-directed mutagenesis and thermal stability experiments on electrostatic, hydrophobic, and polar residues to dissect their roles in stabilizing the S2 postfusion conformation was performed. It was shown that unlike the pH-independent retroviral fusion proteins, SARS-CoV S2 is stable over a wide pH range, supporting its ability to fuse at both the plasma membrane and endosome. A comprehensive SARS-CoV S2 analysis showed that specific hydrophobic positions at the C-terminal end of the HR2, rather than electrostatics are critical for fusion protein stabilization. Disruption of the conserved C-terminal hydrophobic residues destabilized the fusion core and reduced the melting temperature by 30°C. The importance of the C-terminal hydrophobic residues led us to identify a 42-residue substructure on the central core that is structurally conserved in all existing CoV S2 fusion proteins (root mean squared deviation=0.4 Å). This is the first study to identify such a conserved substructure and likely represents a common foundation to facilitate viral fusion. We have discussed the role of key residues in the design of fusion inhibitors and the potential of the substructure as a general target for the development of novel therapeutics against CoV infections. © 2014 The Protein Society.

  15. Synthesis and properties evaluation of sulfobetaine surfactant with double hydroxyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Luo, Gang; Zhang, Ze; Li, Sisi; Wang, Chengwen

    2017-09-01

    A series of sulfobetaine surfactants {N-[(3-alkoxy-2-hydroxyl)propoxy] ethyl-N,N-dimethyl-N-(2-hydroxyl)propyl sulfonate} ammonium chloride were synthesized with raw materials containing linear saturated alcohol, N,N-dimethylethanolamine, sodium 3-chloro-2-hydroxyl propane sulfonic acid and epichlorohydrin. The molecule structures of sulfobetaine surfactants were characterized by FTIR, 1HNMR and elemental analysis. Surface tension measurements can provide us information about the surface tension at the CMC (γCMC), pC20, Γmax and Amin. The pC20 values of sulfobetaine surfactants increase with the hydrophobic chain length increasing. Amin values of the surfactants decrease with increasing hydrophobic chain length from 10 to 14. The critical micelle concentration (CMC) and surface tension (γCMC) values of the sulfobetaine surfactants decrease with increasing hydrophobic chain length from 10 to 16. The lipophilicity of surfactant was enhanced with the increase of the carbon chain, however, the ability of anti-hard water was weakened. The minimum oil/water interfacial tension of four kinds of sulfobetaine surfactants is 10-2-10-3 mN/m magnitude, which indicates that the synthesized bis-hydroxy sulfobetaine surfactants have a great ability to reduce interfacial tension in the surfactant flooding system. The surface tension (γCMC) values of synthesized surfactants were lower compared with conventional anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfonate.

  16. Values of surfactant protein-A and surfactant protein-D in Interstitial lung disease%血清肺表面活性蛋白A、D在间质性肺疾病中的价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓立; 吕长俊; 王晓芝

    2008-01-01

    The pathological diagnosis of interstitial lung disease (ILD) by surgical lung biopsy is important for clinical decision. There is a need, however, to use serum markers which is non-invasive for differentiating ILD. Surfactant protein(SP)-A, SP-D are useful markers for the diagnosis and evaluation of activity of ILD. More studies have appeared on the proteins' usefulness in recent years and they are reviewed as follows.%开胸肺活检取得病理诊断是对间质性肺疾病(interstitial lung disease,ILD)的诊断起决定作用的.然而,需要一种非侵入性的血清标志物来区别ILD,尤其是对于最常见、预后最差的寻常型间质性肺炎.肺表面活性蛋白A、D在ILD鉴别诊断及评定疾病活动性上有提示意义.近年来这类蛋白的研究进展显著,现对ILD的价值作一综述.

  17. Surfactant gene polymorphisms and interstitial lung diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pantelidis Panagiotis

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary surfactant is a complex mixture of phospholipids and proteins, which is present in the alveolar lining fluid and is essential for normal lung function. Alterations in surfactant composition have been reported in several interstitial lung diseases (ILDs. Furthermore, a mutation in the surfactant protein C gene that results in complete absence of the protein has been shown to be associated with familial ILD. The role of surfactant in lung disease is therefore drawing increasing attention following the elucidation of the genetic basis underlying its surface expression and the proof of surfactant abnormalities in ILD.

  18. Superficial disposition of the N-terminal region of the surfactant protein SP-C and the absence of specific SP-B-SP-C interactions in phospholipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, I; Cruz, A; Casals, C;

    2001-01-01

    A dansylated form of porcine surfactant-associated protein C (Dns-SP-C), bearing a single dansyl group at its N-terminal end, has been used to characterize the lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions of SP-C reconstituted in phospholipid bilayers, using fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluor......A dansylated form of porcine surfactant-associated protein C (Dns-SP-C), bearing a single dansyl group at its N-terminal end, has been used to characterize the lipid-protein and protein-protein interactions of SP-C reconstituted in phospholipid bilayers, using fluorescence spectroscopy...... of the N-terminal segment of the protein into less polar environments that originate during protein lateral segregation. This suggests that conformation and interactions of the N-terminal segment of SP-C could be important in regulating the lateral distribution of the protein in surfactant bilayers...

  19. Localization of Membrane-Associated Proteins in Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Use of Hydrophobic Membrane Probes and Cross-Linking Reagents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakowski, Jack J.; Wagner, Robert R.

    1980-01-01

    The location of membrane-associated proteins of vesicular stomatitis virus was investigated by using two monofunctional and three bifunctional probes that differ in the degree to which they partition into membranes and in their specific group reactivity. Two hydrophobic aryl azide probes, [125I]5-iodonaphthyl-1-azide and [3H]pyrenesulfonylazide, readily partitioned into virion membrane and, when activated to nitrenes by UV irradiation, formed stable covalent adducts to membrane constituents. Both of these monofunctional probes labeled the glyco-protein G and matrix M proteins, but [125I]5-iodonaphthyl-1-azide also labeled the nucleocapsid N protein and an unidentified low-molecular-weight component. Protein labeling of intact virions was unaffected by the presence of cytochrome c or glutathione, but disruption of membrane by sodium dodecyl sulfate greatly enhanced the labeling of all viral proteins except G. Labeling of G protein was essentially restricted to the membrane-embedded, thermolysin-resistant tail fragment. Three bifunctional reagents, tartryl diazide, dimethylsuberimidate, and 4,4′-dithiobisphenylazide, were tested for their capacity to cross-link proteins to membrane phospholipids of virions grown in the presence of [3H]palmitate. Only G and M proteins of intact virions were labeled with 3H-phospholipid by these cross-linkers; the reactions were not affected by cytochrome c but were abolished by disruption of virus with sodium dodecyl sulfate. Dimethylsuberimidate, which reacts with free amino groups, cross-linked 3H-phospholipid to both G and M protein. In contrast, the hydrophilic tartryl diazide cross-linked phospholipid primarily to the M protein, whereas the hydrophobic 4,4′-dithiobisphenylazide cross-linked phospholipid primarily to the intrinsic G protein. These data support the hypothesis that the G protein traverses the virion membrane and that the M protein is membrane associated but does not penetrate very deeply, if at all. PMID:6255216

  20. The impact of surfactant protein-A on ozone-induced changes in the mouse bronchoalveolar lavage proteome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Floros Joanna

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ozone is a major component of air pollution. Exposure to this powerful oxidizing agent can cause or exacerbate many lung conditions, especially those involving innate immunity. Surfactant protein-A (SP-A plays many roles in innate immunity by participating directly in host defense as it exerts opsonin function, or indirectly via its ability to regulate alveolar macrophages and other innate immune cells. The mechanism(s responsible for ozone-induced pathophysiology, while likely related to oxidative stress, are not well understood. Methods We employed 2-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE, a discovery proteomics approach, coupled with MALDI-ToF/ToF to compare the bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL proteomes in wild type (WT and SP-A knockout (KO mice and to assess the impact of ozone or filtered air on the expression of BAL proteins. Using the PANTHER database and the published literature most identified proteins were placed into three functional groups. Results We identified 66 proteins and focused our analysis on these proteins. Many of them fell into three categories: defense and immunity; redox regulation; and protein metabolism, modification and chaperones. In response to the oxidative stress of acute ozone exposure (2 ppm; 3 hours there were many significant changes in levels of expression of proteins in these groups. Most of the proteins in the redox group were decreased, the proteins involved in protein metabolism increased, and roughly equal numbers of increases and decreases were seen in the defense and immunity group. Responses between WT and KO mice were similar in many respects. However, the percent change was consistently greater in the KO mice and there were more changes that achieved statistical significance in the KO mice, with levels of expression in filtered air-exposed KO mice being closer to ozone-exposed WT mice than to filtered air-exposed WT mice. Conclusion We postulate that SP-A plays a role

  1. Preparation of a novel hydrophobic affinity cryogel for adsorption of lipase and its utilization as a chromatographic adsorbent for fast protein liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünlüer, Özlem Biçen; Özcan, Ayça; Uzun, Lokman

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we have prepared a hydrophobic cryogel for the chromatographic separation of lipase from its aqueous solutions including single protein and protein mixture and also Yarrowia lipolytica cell extract. N-methacryloyl-(l)-phenylalanine methyl ester was used as a monomer to provide the hydrophobic character to the prepared cryogels. The highest adsorption capacity was observed at pH 5.0 at 0.5 mL min(-1) flow rate. The chromatographic separation of lipase was achieved from a binary mixture of lipase:bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lipase:lysozyme, and was also achieved from triple-mixture of lipase:lysozyme:BSA by using fast protein liquid chromatography. Finally, lipase purification was performed from Yarrowia lipolytica cell extract used as a natural source. These studies have shown that the hydrophobic cryogel has good chromatographic performance for the separation and purification of lipase not only from aqueous solution, but also from cell extract as a natural source of lipase. © 2013 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  2. Ultrastructural study of nuclear inclusions immunohistochemically positive for surfactant protein A in pulmonary adenocarcinoma with special reference to their morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shu-Hui; Ohtsuki, Yuji; Nonami, Yoshiki; Sasaguri, Shiro; Fujita, Jiro; Uomoto, Masashi; Tao, Fu-Shan; Kobayashi, Makoto; Furihata, Mutsuo

    2006-12-01

    To investigate the fine-structural nature of nuclear inclusions immunopositive for surfactant protein A (SP-A) antibody staining, a detailed ultrastructural study was performed, as well as immunohistochemical examination of pulmonary adenocarcinomas. Surgically resected tumor specimens from 31 patients were examined by immunohistochemistry focused on reactivity to SP-A and thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) antibodies. Only cases with >5% positive nuclear inclusions in cancer cells were considered positive, some of which were examined by electron microscopy. Immunohistochemically, 6 of 31 cases were doubly positive for SP-A and TTF-1 antibodies. On electron microscopy, SP-A-positive nuclei contained diffuse or globular fine granular substance as inclusions. Both types of globular and diffuse inclusions were sometimes connected to the inner nuclear membrane, in association with fragmented or stacked membranous structures. The findings of this study suggested that nuclear inclusions positive for SP-A antibody staining in adenocarcinomas of the lung were derived from accumulated content in the perinuclear cistern resembling pseudoinclusion processes and composed of proteins antigenically cross-reactive with SP-A.

  3. Analysis of pulmonary surfactant by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy after exposure to sevoflurane and isoflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrbanović Mijatović, Vilena; Šerman, Ljiljana; Gamulin, Ozren

    2017-02-21

    Pulmonary surfactant, consisting primarily of phospholipids and four surfactant-specific proteins, is among the first structures that is exposed to inhalation anesthetics. Consequently, changes of pulmonary surfactant due to this exposure could cause respiratory complications after long anesthetic procedures. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used to explore the effects of two inhalation anesthetics, sevoflurane and isoflurane, on a commercially available pulmonary surfactant. The research was primarily focused on the effect of anesthetics on the lipid component of the surfactant. Four different concentrations of anesthetics were added, and the doses were higher from the low clinical doses typically used. Recorded spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis, and the Student's t-test was performed to confirm the results. The exposure to both anesthetics induced similar changes, consistent with the increase of the anesthetic concentration. The most pronounced effect was on the hydrophilic head group of phospholipids, which is in agreement with the disruption of the hydrogen bond, caused by the anesthetics. A change in the band intensities of CH2 stretching vibrations, indicative of a disordering effect of anesthetics on the hydrophobic tails of phospholipids, was also observed. Changes induced by isoflurane appear to be more pronounced than those induced by sevoflurane. Furthermore, our results suggest that FTIR spectroscopy is a promising tool in studying anesthetic effects on pulmonary surfactant.

  4. The binding and insertion of imidazolium-based ionic surfactants into lipid bilayers: the effects of the surfactant size and salt concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwankyu; Jeon, Tae-Joon

    2015-02-28

    Imidazolium-based ionic surfactants with hydrocarbon tails of different sizes were simulated with lipid bilayers at different salt concentrations. Starting with the random position of ionic surfactants outside the bilayer, surfactants with long tails mostly insert into the bilayer, while those with short tails show the insertion of fewer surfactant molecules, indicating the effect of the tail length. In particular, surfactants with a tail of two or four hydrocarbons insert and reversibly detach from the bilayer, while the inserted longer surfactants cannot be reversibly detached because of the strong hydrophobic interaction with lipid tails, in quantitative agreement with experiments. Longer surfactants insert more deeply and irreversibly into the bilayer and thus increase lateral diffusivities of the bilayer, indicating that longer surfactants more significantly disorder lipid bilayers, which also agrees with experiments regarding the effect of the tail length of ionic surfactants on membrane permeability and toxicity. Addition of NaCl ions weakens the electrostatic interactions between headgroups of surfactants and lipids, leading to the binding of fewer surfactants into the bilayer. In particular, our simulation findings indicate that insertion of ionic surfactants can be initiated by either the hydrophobic interaction between tails of surfactants and lipids or the electrostatic binding between imidazolium heads and lipid heads, and the strength of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions depends on the tail length of surfactants.

  5. Adsorption of dimeric surfactants in lamellar silicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balcerzak, Mateusz; Pietralik, Zuzanna [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Domka, Ludwik [Department of Metalorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznań (Poland); Skrzypczak, Andrzej [Institute of Chemical Technology, Poznań University of Technology, Berdychowo 4, 60-965 Poznań (Poland); Kozak, Maciej, E-mail: mkozak@amu.edu.pl [Department of Macromolecular Physics, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • The intercalation of dimeric surfactants changed the morphology of MMT samples. • XRD indicated structures formed by surfactant molecules in interlayer space. • The four-step thermal decomposition of dimeric surfactant, confirms intercalation. - Abstract: The adsorption of different types of cationic surfactants in lamellar silicates changes their surface character from hydrophilic to hydrophobic. This study was undertaken to obtain lamellar silicates modified by a series of novel dimeric (gemini) surfactants of different length alkyl chains and to characterise these organophilised materials. Synthetic sodium montmorillonite SOMASIF® ME 100 (M) and enriched bentonite of natural origin (Nanoclay – hydrophilic bentonite®) were organophilised with dimeric (gemini) surfactants (1,1′-(1,4-butanediyl)bis(alkoxymethyl)imidazolium dichlorides). As a result of surfactant molecule adsorption in interlamellar space, the d-spacing (d{sub 001}) increased from 0.97 nm (for the anhydrous structure) to 2.04 nm. A Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis of the modified systems reveals bands assigned to the stretching vibrations of the CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} groups and the scissoring vibrations of the NH group from the structure of the dimeric surfactants. Thermogravimetric (TG) and derivative thermogravimetric (DTG) studies imply a four-stage process of surfactant decomposition. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images provide information on the influence of dimeric surfactant intercalation into the silicate structures. Particles of the modified systems show a tendency toward the formation of irregularly shaped agglomerates.

  6. Ligand binding induces a sharp decrease in hydrophobicity of folate binding protein assessed by 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate which suppresses self-association of the hydrophobic apo-protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jan; Lawaetz, Anders Juul; Hansen, Steen I.

    2012-01-01

    intensity and a blueshift of emission maximum from 510-520 nm to 460-470 nm upon addition of apo-FBP indicating binding to a strongly hydrophobic environment. Neither enhancement of fluorescence nor blueshift of ANS emission maximum occurred when folate-ligated holo-FBP replaced apo-FBP. The drastic...

  7. Hydrophobic interactions leading to a complex interplay between bioelectrocatalytic properties and multilayer meso-organization in layer-by-layer assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorena Cortez, M; De Matteis, Nicolás; Ceolín, Marcelo; Knoll, Wolfgang; Battaglini, Fernando; Azzaroni, Omar

    2014-10-14

    The present study explores the development of mesostructured bioelectrochemical interfaces with accurate compositional and topological control of the supramolecular architecture through the layer-by-layer assembly of ternary systems based on poly(allylamine) containing an osmium polypyridyl complex (OsPA), an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or sodium octodecyl sulfate (ODS), and glucose oxidase (GOx). We show that the introduction of the anionic surfactant allows a sensitive increase of the polyelectrolyte and the enzyme uptake at pH 7.0, enhancing its catalytic behavior in the presence of glucose as compared to the surfactant-free system (OsPA/GOx)n constructed at the same pH. Structural characterization of the multilayer films was performed by means of grazing-incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS), which showed the formation of mesostructured domains within the composite assemblies. Experimental results indicate that the balance between ionic and hydrophobic interactions plays a leading role not only in the construction of the self-assembled system but also in the functional properties of the bioactive interface. The structure of the ternary multilayered films depends largely on the length of the alkyl chain of the surfactant. We show that surfactants incorporated into the film also play a role as chemical entities capable of tuning the hydrophobicity of the whole assembly. In this way, the deliberate introduction of short-range hydrophobic forces was exploited as an additional variable to manipulate the adsorption and coverage of protein during each assembly step. However, the integration of long-chain surfactants may lead to the formation of very well-organized interfacial architectures with poor electron transfer properties. This, in turn, leads to a complex trade-off between enzyme coverage and redox wiring that is governed by the meso-organization and the hydrophobic characteristics of the multilayer assembly.

  8. Sex differences in the response of the alveolar macrophage proteome to treatment with exogenous surfactant protein-A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phelps David S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male wild type (WT C57BL/6 mice are less capable of clearing bacteria and surviving from bacterial pneumonia than females. However, if an oxidative stress (acute ozone exposure occurs before infection, the advantage shifts to males who then survive at higher rates than females. We have previously demonstrated that survival in surfactant protein-A (SP-A knockout (KO mice compared to WT was significantly reduced. Because the alveolar macrophage (AM is pivotal in host defense we hypothesized that SP-A and circulating sex hormones are responsible for these sex differences. We used 2D-DIGE to examine the relationship of sex and SP-A on the AM proteome. The role of SP-A was investigated by treating SP-A KO mice with exogenous SP-A for 6 and 18 hr and studying its effects on the AM proteome. Results We found: 1 less variance between KO males and females than between the WT counterparts by principal component analysis, indicating that SP-A plays a role in sex differences; 2 fewer changes in females when the total numbers of significantly changing protein spots or identified whole proteins in WT or 18 hr SP-A-treated males or females were compared to their respective KO groups; 3 more proteins with functions related to chaperones or protease balance and Nrf2-regulated proteins changed in response to SP-A in females than in males; and 4 the overall pattern of SP-A induced changes in actin-related proteins were similar in both sexes, although males had more significant changes. Conclusions Although there seems to be an interaction between sex and the effect of SP-A, it is unclear what the responsible mechanisms are. However, we found that several of the proteins that were expressed at significantly higher levels in females than in males in WT and/or in KO mice are known to interact with the estrogen receptor and may thus play a role in the SP-A/sex interaction. These include major vault protein, chaperonin subunit 2 (beta (CCT2, and Rho

  9. THE CONCENTRATION OF SURFACTANT PROTEIN-A IN AMNIOTIC FLUID DECREASES IN SPONTANEOUS HUMAN PARTURITION AT TERM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiworapongsa, Tinnakorn; Hong, Joon-Seok; Hull, William M.; Kim, Chong Jai; Gomez, Ricardo; Mazor, Moshe; Romero, Roberto; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The fetus is thought to play a central role in the onset of labor. Pulmonary surfactant protein (SP)-A, secreted by the maturing fetal lung, has been implicated in the mechanisms initiating parturition in mice. The present study was conducted to determine whether amniotic fluid concentrations of SP-A and SP-B change during human parturition. STUDY DESIGN Amniotic fluid SP-A and SP-B concentrations were measured with sensitive and specific ELISA in the following groups of pregnant women: 1) mid-trimester of pregnancy between 15th and 18th weeks of gestation (n=29); 2) term pregnancy not in labor (n=28); and 3) term pregnancy in spontaneous labor (n=26). Non-parametric statistics were used for analysis. RESULTS SP-A was detected in all amniotic fluid samples. SP-B was detected in 24.1% (7/29) of mid-trimester samples and in all samples at term. The median amniotic fluid concentration of SP-A and SP-B were significantly higher in women at term than in women in the mid-trimester (SP-A term no labor: median 5.6 μg/ml, range 2.2–15.2 μg/ml vs. mid-trimester: median 1.64 μg/ml, range 0.1–4.7 μg/ml; and SP-B term no labor: median 0.54 μg/ml, range 0.17–1.99 μg/ml vs. mid-trimester: median 0 μg/ml, range 0–0.35 μg/ml; both plabor was significantly lower than that in women at term not in labor (term in labor: median 2.7 μg/ml, range 1.2–10.1 μg/ml vs. term no labor: median 5.6 μg/ml, range 2.2–15.2 μg/ml; plabor and those not in labor (term in labor: median 0.47 μg/ml range 0.04–1.32 μg/ml vs. term no labor: median 0.54 μg/ml range 0.17–1.99 μg/ml; p=0.2). CONCLUSION The amniotic fluid concentration of surfactant protein-A decreases in spontaneous human parturition at term. PMID:18828058

  10. Pulmonary infections in swine induce altered porcine surfactant protein D expression and localization to dendritic cells in bronchial-associated lymphoid tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, C.M.; Holmskov, U.; Aalbæk, B.;

    2005-01-01

    Surfactant protein D (SP-D) is a pattern-recognition molecule of the innate immune system that recognizes various microbial surface-specific carbohydrate and lipid patterns. In vitro data has suggested that this binding may lead to increased microbial association with macrophages and dendritic...... among pSP-D, pathogens, phagocytic cells and dendritic cells. Lung tissue was collected from experimental and natural bronchopneumonias caused by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae or Staphylococcus aureus, and from embolic and diffuse interstitial pneumonia, caused by Staph. aureus or Arcanobacterium......SP-D through the specialized M cells overlying (BALT). In conclusion, we have shown that pSP-D expression in the lung surfactant is induced by bacterial infection by an aerogenous route rather than by a haematogenous route, and that the protein interacts specifically with alveolar macrophages...

  11. Influence of poly(ethylene oxide)-based copolymer on protein adsorption and bacterial adhesion on stainless steel: modulation by surface hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Rouxhet, Paul G; Chudziak, Dorota; Telegdi, Judit; Dupont-Gillain, Christine C

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the adhesion of Pseudomonas NCIMB 2021, a typical aerobic marine microorganism, on stainless steel (SS) substrate. More particularly, the potential effect on adhesion of adsorbed poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) triblock copolymer is investigated. Bacterial attachment experiments were carried out using a modified parallel plate flow chamber, allowing different surface treatments to be compared in a single experiment. The amount of adhering bacteria was determined via DAPI staining and fluorescence microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to characterize the surface chemical composition of SS and hydrophobized SS before and after PEO-PPO-PEO adsorption. The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model protein, was investigated to test the resistance of PEO-PPO-PEO layers to protein adsorption. The results show that BSA adsorption and Pseudomonas 2021 adhesion are significantly reduced on hydrophobized SS conditioned with PEO-PPO-PEO. Although PEO-PPO-PEO is also found to adsorb on SS, it does not prevent BSA adsorption nor bacterial adhesion, which is attributed to different PEO-PPO-PEO adlayer structures on hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces. The obtained results open the way to a new strategy to reduce biofouling on metal oxide surfaces using PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymer.

  12. Circulating surfactant protein D as a potential lung-specific biomarker of health outcomes in COPD: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man SF Paul

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a paucity of surrogate lung-specific biological markers that can be used to track disease progression and predict clinical outcomes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. The principal aim of this pilot study was to determine whether circulating surfactant protein D (SPD or Clara Cell protein-16 (CC16 levels are associated with lung function or health status in patients with severe COPD. Methods We studied 23 patients with advanced COPD. Lung function measurements, Chronic Respiratory Disease Questionnaire (CRQ scores, and serum levels of SPD, CC16, and C-reactive protein (CRP were determined at baseline and at 3 months. Results At baseline, FEV1 was inversely associated with serum SPD levels (P = 0.045 but not with CC16 (P = 0.675 or CRP levels (P = 0.549. Over a 3 month period, changes in SPD levels correlated significantly with changes in CRQ scores (adjusted P = 0.008 such that patients who had the largest declines in serum SPD levels experienced the largest gains in health status. The association was particularly notable between circulating SPD level and the dyspnea domain of the CRQ score (P = 0.018. Changes in CC16 or CRP levels did not correlate with changes in CRQ scores. Conclusion Changes in serum SPD levels tracked well with changes in health status over a 3 month period in patients with severe COPD. These data suggest that circulating SPD levels may be useful biomarkers to track health outcomes of COPD patients.

  13. Switchable Surfactants

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yingxin Liu; Philip G. Jessop; Michael Cunningham; Charles A. Eckert; Charles L. Liotta

    2006-01-01

    .... We report that long-chain alkyl amidine compounds can be reversibly transformed into charged surfactants by exposure to an atmosphere of carbon dioxide, thereby stabilizing water/alkane emulsions...

  14. Effects of Ionic Surfactants on Bacterial Luciferase and α-Amylase%离子型表面活性剂对荧光素酶和α-脂肪酶的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫桑田; 李安; 郑浩; 罗明芳; 邢新会

    2009-01-01

    In order to study the effects of ionic surfactants on bacterial luciferase, the cationic surfactant dodecyl-trimethylammonium biomide (DTAB) and anionic surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) were chosen. For comparison with bacterial luciferase, α-amylase was used since these two enzymes have similar electrostatic potential and charged active sites. After the enzymes were treated with the surfactants, the catalytic properties of bacterial luciferase and a-amylase were assayed, and fluorescence spectroscopy and circular dichroism (CD) were used to analyze the alteration of the protein structure. The results showed that when the DTAB concentration was low, the cationic surfactant DTAB enhanced the enzymatic activities of bacterial luciferase and a-amylase. On the other hand, the anionic surfactant SDS did not alter the enzymatic activity. The main interaction of cationic surfactant DTAB and the negatively charged surface of the proteins was the ionic interaction, which could alter the environment for the enzyme to work when the DTAB/enzyme molar ratio was low. However, at high cationic surfactant concentration, the ionic interaction and hydrophobic interaction might destroy the secondary and tertiary structures of the proteins, leading to the loss of enzymatic activities.

  15. Pulmonary surfactant protein A inhibits the lipid peroxidation stimulated by linoleic acid hydroperoxide of rat lung mitochondria and microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrasa, Ana M; Guajardo, Margarita H; de Armas Sanabria, Elizabeth; Catalá, Angel

    2005-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species play an important role in several acute lung injuries. The lung tissue contains polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that are substrates of lipid peroxidation that may lead to loss of the functional integrity of the cell membranes. In this study, we compare the in vitro protective effect of pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A), purified from porcine surfactant, against ascorbate-Fe(2+) lipid peroxidation stimulated by linoleic acid hydroperoxide (LHP) of the mitochondria and microsomes isolated from rat lung; deprived organelles of ascorbate and LHP were utilized as control. The process was measured simultaneously by chemiluminescence as well as by PUFA degradation of the total lipids isolated from these organelles. The addition of LHP to rat lung mitochondria or microsomes produces a marked increase in light emission; the highest value of activation was produced in microsomes (total chemiluminescence: 20.015+/-1.735 x 10(5) cpm). The inhibition of lipid peroxidation (decrease of chemiluminescence) was observed with the addition of increasing amounts (2.5 to 5.0 microg) of SP-A in rat lung mitochondria and 2.5 to 7.5 microg of SP-A in rat lung microsomes. The inhibitory effect reaches the highest values in the mitochondria, thus, 5.0 microg of SP-A produces a 100% inhibition in this membranes whereas 7.5 microg of SP-A produces a 51.25+/-3.48% inhibition in microsomes. The major difference in the fatty acid composition of total lipids isolated from native and peroxidized membranes was found in the arachidonic acid content; this decreased from 9.68+/-1.60% in the native group to 5.72+/-1.64% in peroxidized mitochondria and from 7.39+/-1.14% to 3.21+/-0.77% in microsomes. These changes were less pronounced in SP-A treated membranes; as an example, in the presence of 5.0 microg of SP-A, we observed a total protection of 20:4 n-6 (9.41+/-3.29%) in mitochondria, whereas 7.5 microg of SP-A produced a 65% protection in microsomes (5

  16. Microfibril-associated Protein 4 Binds to Surfactant Protein A (SP-A) and Colocalizes with SP-A in the Extracellular Matrix of the Lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlosser, Anders; Thomsen, Theresa H.; Shipley, J. Michael

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) is an oligomeric collectin that recognizes lipid and carbohydrate moieties present on broad range of micro-organisms, and mediates microbial lysis and clearance. SP-A also modulates multiple immune-related functions including cytokine production and chemotaxis...... for phagocytes. Here we describe the molecular interaction between the extracellular matrix protein microfibril-associated protein 4 (MFAP4) and SP-A. MFAP4 is a collagen-binding molecule containing a C-terminal fibrinogen-like domain and a N-terminal located integrin-binding motif. We produced recombinant MFAP4...... with a molecular mass of 36 and 66 kDa in the reduced and unreduced states respectively. Gel filtration chromatography and chemical crosslinking showed that MFAP4 forms oligomers of four dimers. We demonstrated calcium-dependent binding between MFAP4 and human SP-A1 and SP-A2. No binding was seen to recombinant SP-A...

  17. Effects of salt or cosolvent addition on solubility of a hydrophobic solute in water: Relevance to those on thermal stability of a protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Shota; Hayashi, Tomohiko; Kinoshita, Masahiro

    2017-02-01

    The solubility of a nonpolar solute in water is changed upon addition of a salt or cosolvent. Hereafter, "solvent" is formed by water molecules for pure water, by water molecules, cations, and anions for water-salt solution, and by water and cosolvent molecules for water-cosolvent solution. Decrease and increase in the solubility, respectively, are ascribed to enhancement and reduction of the hydrophobic effect. Plenty of experimental data are available for the change in solubility of argon or methane arising from the addition. We show that the integral equation theory combined with a rigid-body model, in which the solute and solvent particles are modeled as hard spheres with different diameters, can reproduce the data for the following items: salting out by an alkali halide and salting in by tetramethylammonium bromide, increase in solubility by a monohydric alcohol, and decrease in solubility by sucrose or urea. The orders of cation or anion species in terms of the power of decreasing the solubility can also be reproduced for alkali halides. With the rigid-body model, the analyses are focused on the roles of entropy originating from the translational displacement of solvent particles. It is argued by decomposing the solvation entropy of a nonpolar solute into physically insightful constituents that the solvent crowding in the bulk is a pivotal factor of the hydrophobic effect: When the solvent crowding in the bulk becomes more serious, the effect is strengthened, and when it becomes less serious, the effect is weakened. It is experimentally known that the thermal stability of a protein is also influenced by the salt or cosolvent addition. The additions which decrease and increase the solubility of a nonpolar solute, respectively, usually enhance and lower the thermal stability. This suggests that the enhanced or reduced hydrophobic effect is also a principal factor governing the stability change. However, urea decreases the solubility but lowers the stability

  18. Thermodynamic Investigation on Micellization of Cationic Gemini Surfactants with Nitrophenoxy Groups in Hydrophobic Chains%尾链含对硝基苯醚基团的阳离子Gemini表面活性剂的胶束化热力学

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄旭; 韩玉淳; 王毅琳

    2013-01-01

    is akin to a separate phase-precipitation.Based on these two models,an ITC curve of observed enthalpy change versus surfactant concentration allows the determination of CMC and the enthalpy of micellization (△Hrmic)of a surfactant.Other thermodynamic parameters related to micellization,namely the free energy (△Gmic),the entropy (△Smic)and the heat capacity of micellization (△Cp.mic) can be calculated from the experimentally determined CMC and △Hmic.In this paper,ITC and electrical conductivity were employed to investigate the micellization process of cationic gemini surfactants,N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-N,N'-bis[10-(4-nitrophenoxy)alkyl]-l,6-hexanediammonium dibromide (Nm-6-mN,with m=8,10 and 12,which are the numbers of carbon in the hydrocarbon chains),in aqueous solutions.Both phase separation model and mass action model were used to obtain a series of thermodynamic parameters.The results show that the obtained△Hmic values based on the two models are very close,however,the obtained △Gmic values based on the two models are not consistent.In addition,the △Cp,mic of the micellization process is mainly from the dehydration contribution of hydrophobic alkyl chains of the surfactants,which means the nitrophenoxy group located in the hydrophobic chain still contacts with water after the micellization.Furthermore,the micellar aggregation number n can be obtained by employing the mass action model.The micellar aggregation number n decreases with the increase of the hydrophobic chain length.The reason is that the surfactant with longer hydrophobic chains prefers to form premicelles,leading to the decrease of the average aggregation number.

  19. Selecting surfactants for the maximum inhibition of the activity of the multidrug resistance efflux pump transporter, P-glycoprotein: conceptual development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shireesh Apte

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Amphiphilic excipients, such as surfactants, have been shown to be inhibitors of the multidrug resistance (MDR efflux pump transporter protein, P glycoprotein (Pgp. In vitro studies using many surfactants have demonstrated that those with an optimum hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB exhibit greater efflux pump inhibition than those that are either very hydrophobic, or very hydrophilic, although the correlation of HLB to Pgp inhibition activity remains weak. Using the data from multiple in vitro studies, a model has been conceptualized that underscores the attributes of both the HLB and the critical micellar concentration (CMC, occurring in tandem, and unable of being varied independently, as key determinants toward prediction of surfactant Pgp inhibition activity. The algorithm that formalizes this concept provides a ‘semi-rational’ method of choosing surfactants for a specific type of cancer for maximum inhibition of MDR.

  20. Surfactant Proteins SP-A and SP-D Modulate Uterine Contractile Events in ULTR Myometrial Cell Line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios Sotiriadis

    Full Text Available Pulmonary surfactant proteins SP-A and SP-D are pattern recognition innate immune molecules. However, there is extrapulmonary existence, especially in the amniotic fluid and at the feto-maternal interface. There is sufficient evidence to suggest that SP-A and SP-D are involved in the initiation of labour. This is of great importance given that preterm birth is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. In this study, we investigated the effects of recombinant forms of SP-A and SP-D (rhSP-A and rhSP-D, the comprising of trimeric lectin domain on contractile events in vitro, using a human myometrial cell line (ULTR as an experimental model. Treatment with rhSP-A or rhSP-D increased the cell velocity, distance travelled and displacement by ULTR cells. rhSP-A and rhSP-D also affected the contractile response of ULTRs when grown on collagen matrices showing reduced surface area. We investigated this effect further by measuring contractility-associated protein (CAP genes. Treatment with rhSP-A and rhSP-D induced expression of oxytocin receptor (OXTR and connexin 43 (CX43. In addition, rhSP-A and rhSP-D were able to induce secretion of GROα and IL-8. rhSP-D also induced the expression of IL-6 and IL-6 Ra. We provide evidence that SP-A and SP-D play a key role in modulating events prior to labour by reconditioning the human myometrium and in inducing CAP genes and pro-inflammatory cytokines thus shifting the uterus from a quiescent state to a contractile one.

  1. Metathesis depolymerization for removable surfactant templates.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zifer, Thomas (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Wheeler, David Roger; Rahimian, Kamayar; McElhanon, James Ross (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Long, Timothy Michael; Jamison, Gregory Marks; Loy, Douglas Anson (Los Alamos National Laboratories, Los Alamos, NM); Kline, Steven R. (National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD); Simmons, Blake Alexander (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA)

    2005-03-01

    Current methodologies for the production of meso- and nanoporous materials include the use of a surfactant to produce a self-assembled template around which the material is formed. However, post-production surfactant removal often requires centrifugation, calcination, and/or solvent washing which can damage the initially formed material architecture(s). Surfactants that can be disassembled into easily removable fragments following material preparation would minimize processing damage to the material structure, facilitating formation of templated hybrid architectures. Herein, we describe the design and synthesis of novel cationic and anionic surfactants with regularly spaced unsaturation in their hydrophobic hydrocarbon tails and the first application of ring closing metathesis depolymerization to surfactant degradation resulting in the mild, facile decomposition of these new compounds to produce relatively volatile nonsurface active remnants.

  2. New Y-shaped surfactants from renewable resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Tammar Hussein; Hussen, Rusnah Syahila Duali; Heidelberg, Thorsten

    2014-11-01

    A series of sugar-based surfactants, involving a single hydrophobic chain (C12) and two side-by-side arranged head groups, was prepared form simple glucose precursors. All surfactants were highly water soluble and exhibited exclusively micellar assemblies. This behavior makes them interesting candidates for oil in water emulsifiers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. 不同类型表面活性剂与蛋白质作用研究进展%Research Progress of the Interaction of Different Type Surfactants with Proteins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹洪玉; 张莹莹; 唐乾; 郑学仿

    2014-01-01

    Surfactants interact with proteins in multifarious ways which depend on surfactant types, concentration, structure, and physical-chemical properties. To obtain a global overview of this process, the physicochemical properties of the interaction was began with introducing between proteins and surfactants, the recent research including the structural properties of protein-surfactant complex, the adsorption mechanisms of the complex, as well as the structural changes of proteins induced by surfactants. Then different phase behaviors and interaction mechanisms of proteins interaction were expounded with five different classes of surfactants, including anionic surfactants, cationic surfactants, zwitterionic surfactants, non-ionic surfactants, fluorine and Gemini surfactants. Recent research scope and current situation in every field had also been reviewed. Our results and methods in studying protein-surfactant interaction were systematically summarized in the suitable part.%表面活性剂和蛋白质作用的方式与表面活性剂的种类、结构、浓度和其理化性质有关。本文系统地总结了多种类型表面活性剂(阴离子型、阳离子型、两性离子型、非离子型、氟表面活性剂及 Gemini 表面活性剂)的结构特点,以蛋白质-表面活性剂相互作用的物理化学特征为出发点,综述了该体系相互作用的最新研究成果及进展,包括二者作用时所形成的复合物的结构理论,复合物的吸附机理及其作用过程中蛋白质结构的变化;结合本课题组的工作总结分析了蛋白质分别与各类表面活性剂相互作用过程中作用力特征、相行为、作用机理及应用。

  4. Tunable, antibacterial activity of silicone polyether surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Madiha F; Zepeda-Velazquez, Laura; Brook, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Silicone surfactants are used in a variety of applications, however, limited data is available on the relationship between surfactant structure and biological activity. A series of seven nonionic, silicone polyether surfactants with known structures was tested for in vitro antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli BL21. The compounds varied in their hydrophobic head, comprised of branched silicone structures with 3-10 siloxane linkages and, in two cases, phenyl substitution, and hydrophilic tail of 8-44 poly(ethylene glycol) units. The surfactants were tested at three concentrations: below, at, and above their Critical Micelle Concentrations (CMC) against 5 concentrations of E. coli BL21 in a three-step assay comprised of a 14-24h turbidometric screen, a live-dead stain and viable colony counts. The bacterial concentration had little effect on antibacterial activity. For most of the surfactants, antibacterial activity was higher at concentrations above the CMC. Surfactants with smaller silicone head groups had as much as 4 times the bioactivity of surfactants with larger groups, with the smallest hydrophobe exhibiting potency equivalent to sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Smaller PEG chains were similarly associated with higher potency. These data link lower micelle stability and enhanced permeability of smaller silicone head groups to antibacterial activity. The results demonstrate that simple manipulation of nonionic silicone polyether structure leads to significant changes in antibacterial activity.

  5. A simple system for the identification of fluorescent dyes capable of reporting differences in secondary structure and hydrophobicity among amyloidogenic protein oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Emma

    2012-02-01

    Thioflavin T and Congo Red are fluorescent dyes that are commonly used to identify the presence of amyloid structures, ordered protein aggregates. Despite the ubiquity of their use, little is known about their mechanism of interaction with amyloid fibrils, or whether other dyes, whose photophysics indicate that they may be more responsive to differences in macromolecular secondary structure and hydrophobicity, would be better suited to the identification of pathologically relevant oligomeric species in amyloid diseases. In order to systematically address this question, we have designed a strategy that discretely introduces differences in secondary structure and hydrophobicity amidst otherwise identical polyamino acids. This strategy will enable us to quantify and compare the affinities of Thioflavin T, Congo Red, and other, incompletely explored, fluorescent dyes for different secondary structural elements and hydrophobic motifs. With this information, we will identify dyes that give the most robust and quantitative information about structural differences among the complex population of oligomeric species present along an aggregation pathway between soluble monomers and amyloid fibrils, and correlate the resulting structural information with differential oligomeric toxicity.

  6. Myths and verities in protein folding theories: From Frank and Evans iceberg-conjecture to explanation of the hydrophobic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Naim, Arieh

    2013-10-01

    Starting from the seminal article by Frank and Evans where the "iceberg formation" idea was first expressed, we follow the evolution of this idea to the explanation of the hydrophobic effect. We show that the idea of iceberg formation can provide an explanation to the entropy, and enthalpy of solvation of non-polar solutes in water, provided one first explains why a simple non-polar solute would form icebergs in the first place. Having done that, the questions regarding the outstanding large hydrophobic solvation Gibbs energy remains unexplained. This conclusion follows from the exact entropy-enthalpy-compensation pertaining to any structural changes induced in the solvent. We also comment on some misinterpretation of the partial molar heat capacity of non-polar solutes in water.

  7. Prognostic value of immunohistochemical surfactant protein A expression in regenerative/hyperplastic alveolar epithelial cells in idiopathic interstitial pneumonias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kajiki Akira

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is difficult to predict survival in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Recently, several proteins, such as surfactant protein (SP and KL-6, have been reported to be useful biologic markers for prediction of prognosis for interstitial pneumonias. It is not clear whether there is any relationship between expression of these proteins in regenerative/hyperplastic alveolar epithelial cells and prognosis of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs. Objectives This study aimed to elucidate the clinical significance of the expression of such lung secretory proteins as SP-A and KL-6 in lung tissues of patients with IIPs. Methods We retrospectively investigated the immunohistochemical expression of SP-A, KL-6, cytokeratin (CK, and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA in alveolar epithelial cells in lung tissues obtained from surgical lung biopsy in 43 patients with IIPs, and analyzed the correlation between expression of these markers and the prognosis of each IIP patient. CK and EMA were used as general markers for epithelial cells. Results In patients with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP, the ratio of SP-A positive epithelial cells to all alveolar epithelial cells (SP-A positive ratio in the collapsed and mural fibrosis areas varied, ranging from cases where almost all alveolar epithelial cells expressed SP-A to cases where only a few did. On the other hand, in many patients with nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP, many of the alveolar epithelial cells in the diseased areas expressed SP-A. The SP-A positive ratio was significantly lower in patients who died from progression of UIP than in patients with UIP who remained stable or deteriorated but did not die. In NSIP patients, a similar tendency was noted between the SP-A positive ratio and prognosis. Conclusions The results suggest that the paucity of immunohistochemical SP-A expression in alveolar epithelial cells in diseased areas (i.e. regenerative

  8. Protein–Protein Interaction between Surfactant Protein D and DC-SIGN via C-Type Lectin Domain Can Suppress HIV-1 Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eswari Dodagatta-Marri

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein D (SP-D is a soluble C-type lectin, belonging to the collectin (collagen-containing calcium-dependent lectin family, which acts as an innate immune pattern recognition molecule in the lungs at other mucosal surfaces. Immune regulation and surfactant homeostasis are salient functions of SP-D. SP-D can bind to a range of viral, bacterial, and fungal pathogens and trigger clearance mechanisms. SP-D binds to gp120, the envelope protein expressed on HIV-1, through its C-type lectin or carbohydrate recognition domain. This is of importance since SP-D is secreted by human mucosal epithelial cells and is present in the female reproductive tract, including vagina. Another C-type lectin, dendritic cell (DC-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN, present on the surface of the DCs, also binds to HIV-1 gp120 and facilitates viral transfer to the lymphoid tissues. DCs are also present at the site of HIV-1 entry, embedded in vaginal or rectal mucosa. In the present study, we report a direct protein–protein interaction between recombinant forms of SP-D (rfhSP-D and DC-SIGN via their C-type lectin domains. Both SP-D and DC-SIGN competed for binding to immobilized HIV-1 gp120. Pre-incubation of human embryonic kidney cells expressing surface DC-SIGN with rfhSP-D significantly inhibited the HIV-1 transfer to activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In silico analysis revealed that SP-D and gp120 may occupy same sites on DC-SIGN, which may explain the reduced transfer of HIV-1. In summary, we demonstrate, for the first time, that DC-SIGN is a novel binding partner of SP-D, and this interaction can modulate HIV-1 capture and transfer to CD4+ T cells. In addition, the present study also reveals a novel and distinct mechanism of host defense by SP-D against HIV-1.

  9. Alterations of the murine gut microbiome in allergic airway disease are independent of surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barfod, Kenneth Klingenberg; Roggenbuck, Michael; Al-Shuweli, Suzan

    2017-01-01

    on microbiota and interfere with the interpretation of immunological data from the model. Generally, little is known about the effect of the SP-D protein in itself and in combination with airway disease on the microbiota. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that microbiome composition would change......Background SP-D is an important host defense lectin in innate immunity and SP-D deficient mice show several abnormal immune effects and are susceptible to allergen-induced airway disease. At the same time, host microbiome interactions play an important role in the development of allergic airway...

  10. Study of the binding between lysozyme and C10-TAB: determination and interpretation of the partial properties of protein and surfactant at infinite dilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgado, Jorge; Aquino-Olivos, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Hernández, Ranulfo; Corea, Mónica; Grolier, Jean Pierre E; del Río, José Manuel

    2008-06-01

    This work examines the binding in aqueous solution, through the experimental determination of specific volumes and specific adiabatic compressibility coefficients, of decyltrimethylammonium bromide to lysozyme and to non-charged polymeric particles (which have been specially synthesized by emulsion polymerization). A method was developed to calculate the specific partial properties at infinite dilution and it was shown that a Gibbs-Duhem type equation holds at this limit for two solutes. With this equation, it is possible to relate the behavior of the partial properties along different binding types at a constant temperature. It was found that the first binding type, specific with high affinity, is related to a significant reduction of surfactant compressibility. The second binding type is accompanied by the unfolding of the protein and the third one is qualitatively identical to the binding of the surfactant to non-charged polymeric particles.

  11. Cell wall protein and glycoprotein constituents of Aspergillus fumigatus that bind to polystyrene may be responsible for the cell surface hydrophobicity of the mycelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñalver, M C; Casanova, M; Martínez, J P; Gil, M L

    1996-07-01

    Cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of Aspergillus fumigatus grown both in complex medium (yeast extract/peptone/dextrose; YPD) and minimal (Vogel's N) medium was monitored by assessing attachment of polystyrene microspheres to the cell surface. It was found that mature mycelium was hydrophobic. Treatment of intact mycelium with beta-mercaptoethanol (beta ME) abolished binding of the microspheres to hyphal elements, and coating of the microspheres with beta ME extracts from mycelium inhibited their attachment to intact mycelial cells. A. fumigatus mycelium was tagged in vivo with biotin and treated with beta ME. The beta ME extracts were analysed by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting with both peroxidase-conjugated-ExtrAvidin and concanavalin A (ConA). This procedure allowed identification of cell wall surface proteins and glycoproteins. Rabbit polyclonal antisera were raised against beta ME extracts obtained from cells grown in YPD and Vogel's N media. These antisera defined some major cell-wall-bound antigens. SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis of the cell wall material released by beta ME and adsorbed on polystyrene microspheres revealed about 19 protein species with apparent molecular masses ranging from 20 to 70 kDa, and two high-molecular-mass glycoproteins of 115 and 210 kDa. Treatment of cells grown in YPD, but not those grown in Vogel's N medium, with beta ME released a 55 kDa polypeptide able to adsorb to polystyrene microspheres that was detectable with the antisera. The ability to bind to polystyrene particles exhibited by several protein and glycoprotein species released by beta ME treatment suggested that these cell wall moieties possess exposed hydrophobic domains that could be responsible for the CSH of mycelium.

  12. Three dimensional liquid chromatography coupling ion exchange chromatography/hydrophobic interaction chromatography/reverse phase chromatography for effective protein separation in top-down proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeja, Santosh G; Xiu, Lichen; Gregorich, Zachery R; Guner, Huseyin; Jin, Song; Ge, Ying

    2015-01-01

    To address the complexity of the proteome in mass spectrometry (MS)-based top-down proteomics, multidimensional liquid chromatography (MDLC) strategies that can effectively separate proteins with high resolution and automation are highly desirable. Although various MDLC methods that can effectively separate peptides from protein digests exist, very few MDLC strategies, primarily consisting of 2DLC, are available for intact protein separation, which is insufficient to address the complexity of the proteome. We recently demonstrated that hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) utilizing a MS-compatible salt can provide high resolution separation of intact proteins for top-down proteomics. Herein, we have developed a novel 3DLC strategy by coupling HIC with ion exchange chromatography (IEC) and reverse phase chromatography (RPC) for intact protein separation. We demonstrated that a 3D (IEC-HIC-RPC) approach greatly outperformed the conventional 2D IEC-RPC approach. For the same IEC fraction (out of 35 fractions) from a crude HEK 293 cell lysate, a total of 640 proteins were identified in the 3D approach (corresponding to 201 nonredundant proteins) as compared to 47 in the 2D approach, whereas simply prolonging the gradients in RPC in the 2D approach only led to minimal improvement in protein separation and identifications. Therefore, this novel 3DLC method has great potential for effective separation of intact proteins to achieve deep proteome coverage in top-down proteomics.

  13. Stability of an amphipathic helix-hairpin surfactant peptide in liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Alan J; Gupta, Monik; Gordon, Larry M; Fujii, Gary; Walther, Frans J

    2016-12-01

    Surfactant protein B (SP-B; 79 residues) is a member of the saposin superfamily and plays a pivotal role in lung function. The N- and C-terminal regions of SP-B, cross-linked by two disulfides, were theoretically predicted to fold as charged amphipathic helices, suggesting participation in surfactant activities. Previous studies with oxidized Super Mini-B (SMB), a construct based on the N- and C-regions of SP-B (i.e., residues 1-25 and 63-78) joined with a designer turn (-PKGG-) and two disulfides, indicated that freshly prepared SMB in lipids folded as a surface active, α-helix-hairpin. Because other peptides modeled on α-helical SP domains lost helicity and surfactant activity on storage, experiments were here performed on oxidized SMB in surfactant liposomes stored at ~2-8°C for ≤5.5years. Captive bubble surfactometry confirmed low minimum surface tensions for fresh and stored SMB preparations. FTIR spectroscopy of fresh and stored SMB formulations showed secondary structures compatible with the peptide folding as α-helix-hairpin. A homology (I-TASSER) model of oxidized SMB demonstrated a globular protein, exhibiting a core of hydrophobic residues and a surface of polar residues. Since mass spectroscopy indicated that the disulfides were maintained on storage, the stability of SMB may be partly due to the disulfides bringing the N- and C-α-helices closer. Mass spectroscopy of stored SMB preparations showed some methionine oxidation, and also partial deacylation of surfactant phospholipids to form lyso-derivatives. However, the stable conformation and activity of stored SMB surfactant suggest that the active helix-hairpin resists these chemical changes which otherwise may lead to surfactant inhibition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Enthalpy of interaction and binding isotherms of non-ionic surfactants onto micellar amphiphilic polymers (amphipols).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diab, C; Winnik, F M; Tribet, C

    2007-03-13

    The interactions in water between short amphiphilic macromomolecules, known as amphipols, and three neutral surfactants (detergents), dodecylmaltoside (DM), n-octylthioglucoside (OTG), and n-octyltetraethyleneoxide (C8E4), have been assessed by static and dynamic light-scattering (SLS and DLS), capillary electrophoresis (CE), and isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The amphipols selected are random copolymers of the hydrophobic n-octylacrylamide (25-30 mol %), a charged hydrophilic monomer, either acrylic acid ( approximately 35 mol %) or a phosphorylcholine-modified acrylamide (40-70 mol %), and, optionally, N-isopropylacrylamide (30-40 mol %). In water, the copolymers form micelles of small size (hydrodynamic radius: approximately 5 nm). Neutral surfactants, below their critical micellar concentration (cmc), form mixed micelles with the amphipols irrespective of the chemical structure of the detergent or the polymer. The fraction of detergent in the surfactant/polymer complexes increases significantly (cooperatively) as the surfactant concentration nears the cmc. The ITC data, together with data gathered by CE, were fitted via a regular mixing model, which allowed us to predict the detergent concentration in equilibrium with complexes and the heat evolved upon transfer of detergent from water into a mixed surfactant/polymer complex. The enthalpy of transfer was found to be almost equal to the enthalpy of micellization, and the regular mixing model points to a near-ideal mixing behavior for all systems. Amphipols are promising tools in biochemistry where they are used, together with neutral surfactants, for the stabilization and handling of proteins. This study provides guidelines for the optimization of current protein purification protocols and for the formulations of surfactant/polymer systems used in pharmaceutics, cosmetics, and foodstuffs.

  15. Polymorphisms in the surfactant protein a gene are associated with the susceptibility to recurrent urinary tract infection in chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiao; Hu, Fengqi; Liang, Wei; Wang, Guirong; Singhal, Pravin C; Ding, Guohua

    2010-05-01

    Some risk factors for susceptibility to recurrent urinary tract infection (r-UTI) are well known, but the genetic role in acquiring the disease is poorly understood. Surfactant protein A and D (SP-A and SP-D) play an important role in modulation of lung inflammatory processes. The SP-A1 and SP-A2 genes encoding SP-A and the SP-D gene are highly polymorphic, and some of polymorphisms are associated with several infective diseases, including pyelonephritis. In the present study, we investigated whether some of these polymorphisms are associated with the risk of r-UTI in Chinese population. Genomic DNA was extracted from blood samples of 32 female patients with r-UTI and 30 age-matched, unrelated healthy female subjects. Genotyping of gene polymorphisms was analyzed by PCR. Among 11 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (five of SP-A1, four of SP-A2 and two of SP-D) observed in the enrolled subjects, Ala19Val of SP-A1 and Lys223Gln of SP-A2 were associated with susceptibility to r-UTI. The frequencies of 19Ala allele of SP-A1 gene (p = 0.038) and 223Gln allele of SP-A2 gene (p = 0.012) in the patients were significantly higher than those in healthy subjects. The serum SP-A and SP-D levels were increased and the urine SP-A and SP-D levels were decreased in r-UTI patients compared with control subjects (p UTI patients with 19Ala/Ala or 223Gln/Gln genotype were associated with high serum and low urine SP-A levels (p UTI.

  16. Comparison of surfactant protein B polymorphisms of healthy term newborns with preterm newborns having respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P.R. Lyra

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Polymorphisms and mutations in the surfactant protein B (SP-B gene have been associated with the pathogenesis of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS. The objective of the present study was to compare the frequencies of SP-B gene polymorphisms between preterm babies with RDS and healthy term newborns. We studied 50 preterm babies with RDS (inclusion criteria - newborns with RDS and gestational age between 28 and 33 weeks and 6 days, and 100 healthy term newborns. Four SP-B gene polymorphisms were analyzed: A/C at nucleotide -18, C/T at nucleotide 1580, A/G at nucleotide 9306, and G/C at nucleotide 8714, by PCR amplification of genomic DNA and genotyping by cRFLP. The healthy newborns comprised 42 female and 58 male neonates; 39 were white and 61 non-white. The RDS group comprised 21 female and 29 male preterm neonates; 28 were white and 22 non-white. Weight ranged from 640 to 2080 g (mean: 1273 g; mean gestational age was 31 weeks and 2 days (range: 28-33 weeks and 6 days. When white children were analyzed separately, a statistically significant difference in the G/C polymorphism at 8714 was observed between groups (P = 0.028. All other genotype frequencies were similar for both groups when sex and race were analyzed together. Analysis of the SP-B polymorphism G/C at nucleotide 8714 showed that among white neonates the GG genotype was found only in the RDS group at a frequency of 17% and the GC genotype was more frequently found in healthy term newborns. These data demonstrate an association of GG genotype with RDS.

  17. Comparison of surfactant protein B polymorphisms of healthy term newborns with preterm newborns having respiratory distress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyra, P P R; Vaz, F A C; Moreira, P E; Hoffmann, J W; Demello, D E; Diniz, E M A

    2007-06-01

    Polymorphisms and mutations in the surfactant protein B (SP-B) gene have been associated with the pathogenesis of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). The objective of the present study was to compare the frequencies of SP-B gene polymorphisms between preterm babies with RDS and healthy term newborns. We studied 50 preterm babies with RDS (inclusion criteria - newborns with RDS and gestational age between 28 and 33 weeks and 6 days), and 100 healthy term newborns. Four SP-B gene polymorphisms were analyzed: A/C at nucleotide -18, C/T at nucleotide 1580, A/G at nucleotide 9306, and G/C at nucleotide 8714, by PCR amplification of genomic DNA and genotyping by cRFLP. The healthy newborns comprised 42 female and 58 male neonates; 39 were white and 61 non-white. The RDS group comprised 21 female and 29 male preterm neonates; 28 were white and 22 non-white. Weight ranged from 640 to 2080 g (mean: 1273 g); mean gestational age was 31 weeks and 2 days (range: 28-33 weeks and 6 days). When white children were analyzed separately, a statistically significant difference in the G/C polymorphism at 8714 was observed between groups (P = 0.028). All other genotype frequencies were similar for both groups when sex and race were analyzed together. Analysis of the SP-B polymorphism G/C at nucleotide 8714 showed that among white neonates the GG genotype was found only in the RDS group at a frequency of 17% and the GC genotype was more frequently found in healthy term newborns. These data demonstrate an association of GG genotype with RDS.

  18. Common genetic variants of surfactant protein-D (SP-D are associated with type 2 diabetes.

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    Neus Pueyo

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Surfactant protein-D (SP-D is a primordial component of the innate immune system intrinsically linked to metabolic pathways. We aimed to study the association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs affecting SP-D with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes (T2D. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We evaluated a common genetic variant located in the SP-D coding region (rs721917, Met(31Thr in a sample of T2D patients and non-diabetic controls (n = 2,711. In a subset of subjects (n = 1,062, this SNP was analyzed in association with circulating SP-D concentrations, insulin resistance, and T2D. This SNP and others were also screened in the publicly available Genome Wide Association (GWA database of the Meta-Analyses of Glucose and Insulin-related traits Consortium (MAGIC. RESULTS: We found the significant association of rs721917 with circulating SP-D, parameters of insulin resistance and T2D. Indeed, G carriers showed decreased circulating SP-D (p = 0.004, decreased fasting glucose (p = 0.0002, glycated hemoglobin (p = 0.0005, and 33% (p = 0.002 lower prevalence of T2D, estimated under a dominant model, especially among women. Interestingly, these differences remained significant after controlling for origin, age, gender, and circulating SP-D. Moreover, this SNP and others within the SP-D genomic region (i.e. rs10887344 were significantly associated with quantitative measures of glucose homeostasis, insulin sensitivity, and T2D, according to GWAS datasets from MAGIC. CONCLUSIONS: SP-D gene polymorphisms are associated with insulin resistance and T2D. These associations are independent of circulating SP-D concentrations.

  19. Non-ionic Surfactants and Non-Catalytic Protein Treatment on Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Pretreated Creeping Wild Ryegrass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Pan, Zhongli; Zhang, Ruihong; Wang, Donghai; Jenkins, Bryan

    Our previous research has shown that saline Creeping Wild Ryegrass (CWR), Leymus triticoides, has a great potential to be used for bioethanol production because of its high fermentable sugar yield, up to 85% cellulose conversion of pretreated CWR. However, the high cost of enzyme is still one of the obstacles making large-scale lignocellulosic bioethanol production economically difficult. It is desirable to use reduced enzyme loading to produce fermentable sugars with high yield and low cost. To reduce the enzyme loading, the effect of addition of non-ionic surfactants