WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydromagnetic rayleigh-taylor instability

  1. Overview of Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharp, D.H.

    1983-01-01

    The aim of this talk is to survey Rayleigh-Taylor instability, describing the phenomenology that occurs at a Taylor unstable interface, and reviewing attempts to understand these phenomena quantitatively.

  2. ALE simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbarlooei, H.R. [Univ. of Science and Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mazaheri, K. [Univ. of Tarbiyat Modares, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Tehran, (Iran, Islamic Republic of)]. E-mail: Kiumars@modares.ac.ir; Bidabadi, M. [Univ. of Science and Technology, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    This paper investigates the use of an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) technique for the simulation of a single mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A compatible Lagrangian algorithm is used on a simply connected quadrilateral grid in Lagrangian Phase. This algorithm includes subzonal pressures, which are used to control spurious grid motion, and an edge centered artificial viscosity. We use Reference Jacobians optimization based rezone algorithm in the rezoning phase of ALE method. Also a second order sign preserving method is used for remapping. To force monotonocity in remapping phase a Repair algorithm is used. Finally, for remapping of nodal variables we used a second order transformer to transfer these data to cell centers. It is shown that the usage of these algorithms for an ALE method can improve the simulation of a single mode Rayleigh-Taylor Instability. (author)

  3. Kinetic Simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Sagert, Irina; Colbry, Dirk; Howell, Jim; Staber, Alec; Strother, Terrance

    2014-01-01

    We report on an ongoing project to develop a large scale Direct Simulation Monte Carlo code. The code is primarily aimed towards applications in astrophysics such as simulations of core-collapse supernovae. It has been tested on shock wave phenomena in the continuum limit and for matter out of equilibrium. In the current work we focus on the study of fluid instabilities. Like shock waves these are routinely used as test-cases for hydrodynamic codes and are discussed to play an important role in the explosion mechanism of core-collapse supernovae. As a first test we study the evolution of a single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface of a light and a heavy fluid in the presence of a gravitational acceleration. To suppress small-wavelength instabilities caused by the irregularity in the separation layer we use a large particle mean free path. The latter leads to the development of a diffusion layer as particles propagate from one fluid into the other. For small amplitudes, when the instability is i...

  4. Rayleigh-Taylor instability simulations with CRASH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C.-C.; Fryxell, B.; Drake, R. P.

    2012-03-01

    CRASH is a code package developed for the predictive study of radiative shocks. It is based on the BATSRUS MHD code used extensively for space-weather research. We desire to extend the applications of this code to the study of hydrodynamically unstable systems. We report here the results of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) simulations with CRASH, as a necessary step toward the study of such systems. Our goal, motivated by the previous comparison of simulations and experiment, is to be able to simulate the magnetic RTI with self-generated magnetic fields produced by the Biermann Battery effect. Here we show results for hydrodynamic RTI, comparing the effects of different solvers and numerical parameters. We find that the early-time behavior converges to the analytical result of the linear theory. We observe that the late-time morphology is sensitive to the numerical scheme and limiter beta. At low-resolution limit, the growth of RTI is highly dependent on the setup and resolution, which we attribute to the large numerical viscosity at low resolution.

  5. Compressible, inviscid Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Yan

    2009-01-01

    We consider the Rayleigh-Taylor problem for two compressible, immiscible, inviscid, barotropic fluids evolving with a free interface in the presence of a uniform gravitational field. After constructing Rayleigh-Taylor steady-state solutions with a denser fluid lying above the free interface with the second fluid, we turn to an analysis of the equations obtained from linearizing around such a steady state. By a natural variational approach, we construct normal mode solutions that grow exponentially in time with rate like $e^{t \\sqrt{\\abs{\\xi}}}$, where $\\xi$ is the spatial frequency of the normal mode. A Fourier synthesis of these normal mode solutions allows us to construct solutions that grow arbitrarily quickly in the Sobolev space $H^k$, which leads to an ill-posedness result for the linearized problem. Using these pathological solutions, we then demonstrate ill-posedness for the original non-linear problem in an appropriate sense. More precisely, we use a contradiction argument to show that the non-linear...

  6. Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in ablation fronts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piriz A.R.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an ablation front is studied by considering the simplest possible modulations in the acceleration. Explicit analytical expressions for the instability growth rate and for the boundaries of the stability region are obtained by considering a sequence of Dirac deltas. Besides, general square waves allow for studying the effect of the driving asymmetries on the stability region as well as the optimization process. The essential role of compressibility is phenomenologically addressed in order to find the constraints it imposes on the stability region.

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Studies of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Yue Ying [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Gilgenbach, Ronald [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2013-07-07

    Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT) is important to magnetized target fusion, wire-array z-pinches, and equation-of-state studies using flyer plates or isentropic compression. It is also important to the study of the crab nebula. The investigators performed MRT experiments on thin foils, driven by the mega-ampere linear transformer driver (LTD) facility completed in their laboratory. This is the first 1-MA LTD in the USA. Initial experiments on the seeding of MRT were performed. Also completed was an analytic study of MRT for a finite plasma slab with arbitrary magnetic fields tangential to the interfaces. The effects of magnetic shear and feedthrough were analyzed.

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in accelerated solid media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piriz, A. R.; Sun, Y. B.; Tahir, N. A.

    2017-01-01

    A linear study of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability based on momentum conservation and the consideration of an irrotational velocity field for incompressible perturbations is discussed. The theory allows for a very appealing physical picture and for a relatively simple description of the main features of the instability. As a result, it is suitable for the study of the very complex problem of the instability of accelerated solids with non-linear elastic-plastic constitutive properties, which cannot be studied by the usual normal modes approach. The elastic to plastic transition occurring early in the instability process determines the entire evolution and makes the instability exhibit behavior that cannot be captured by an asymptotic analysis.

  9. Plasma transport driven by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, X.; Delamere, P. A.; Otto, A.

    2016-06-01

    Two important differences between the giant magnetospheres (i.e., Jupiter's and Saturn's magnetospheres) and the terrestrial magnetosphere are the internal plasma sources and the fast planetary rotation. Thus, there must be a radially outward flow to transport the plasma to avoid infinite accumulation of plasma. This radial outflow also carries the magnetic flux away from the inner magnetosphere due to the frozen-in condition. As such, there also must be a radial inward flow to refill the magnetic flux in the inner magnetosphere. Due to the similarity between Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability and the centrifugal instability, we use a three-dimensional RT instability to demonstrate that an interchange instability can form a convection flow pattern, locally twisting the magnetic flux, consequently forming a pair of high-latitude reconnection sites. This process exchanges a part of the flux tube, thereby transporting the plasma radially outward without requiring significant latitudinal convection of magnetic flux in the ionosphere.

  10. Experimental Study of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Using Paramagnetic Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiklashvili, Vladimer; Likhachev, Oleg; Jacobs, Jeffry

    2009-11-01

    Experiments that take advantage of the properties of paramagnetic liquids are used to study Rayleigh-Taylor instability. A gravitationally unstable combination of a paramagnetic salt solution and a nonmagnetic solution is initially stabilized by a magnetic field gradient that is produced by the contoured pole-caps of a large electromagnet. Rayleigh-Taylor instability originates with the rapid removal of current from the electromagnet, which results in the heavy liquid falling into the light liquid due to gravity and, thus, mixing with it. The mixing zone is visualized by back-lit photography and is recorded with a digital video camera. For visualization purposes, a blue-green dye is added to the magnetic fluid. The mixing rate of the two liquids is determined from an averaged dye concentration across the mixing layer by means of the Beer-Lambert law. After removal of the suspending magnetic field, the initially flat interface between the two liquids develops a random surface pattern with the dominant length scale well approximated by the fastest growing wavelength in accordance with the viscous linear stability theory. Several combinations of paramagnetic and nonmagnetic solutions have been considered during the course of the research. A functional dependence of the mixing layer growth constant, α, on the properties of the liquids is a primary subject of the present study.

  11. Rayleigh-Taylor instability of viscous fluids with phase change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byoung Jae; Kim, Kyung Doo

    2016-04-01

    Film boiling on a horizontal surface is a typical example of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. During the film boiling, phase changes take place at the interface, and thus heat and mass transfer must be taken into consideration in the stability analysis. Moreover, since the vapor layer is not quite thick, a viscous flow must be analyzed. Existing studies assumed equal kinematic viscosities of two fluids, and/or considered thin viscous fluids. The purpose of this study is to derive the analytical dispersion relation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for more general conditions. The two fluids have different properties. The thickness of the vapor layer is finite, but the liquid layer is thick enough to be nearly semi-infinite in view of perturbation. Initially, the vapor is in equilibrium with the liquid at the interface, and the direction of heat transfer is from the vapor side to the liquid side. In this case, the phase change has a stabilizing effect on the growth rate of the interface. When the vapor layer is thin, there is a coupled effect of the vapor viscosity, phase change, and vapor thickness on the critical wave number. For the other limit of a thick vapor, both the liquid and vapor viscosities influence the critical wave number. Finally, the most unstable wavelength is investigated. When the vapor layer is thin, the most unstable wavelength is not affected by phase change. When the vapor layer is thick, however, it increases with the increasing rate of phase change.

  12. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in soft elastic layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccobelli, D.; Ciarletta, P.

    2017-04-01

    This work investigates the morphological stability of a soft body composed of two heavy elastic layers attached to a rigid surface and subjected only to the bulk gravity force. Using theoretical and computational tools, we characterize the selection of different patterns as well as their nonlinear evolution, unveiling the interplay between elastic and geometric effects for their formation. Unlike similar gravity-induced shape transitions in fluids, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, we prove that the nonlinear elastic effects saturate the dynamic instability of the bifurcated solutions, displaying a rich morphological diagram where both digitations and stable wrinkling can emerge. The results of this work provide important guidelines for the design of novel soft systems with tunable shapes, with several applications in engineering sciences. This article is part of the themed issue 'Patterning through instabilities in complex media: theory and applications.'

  13. The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in astrophysical discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contopoulos, I.; Kazanas, D.; Papadopoulos, D. B.

    2016-10-01

    This is our first study of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the inner edge of an astrophysical disc around a central back hole. We derive the equations governing small-amplitude oscillations in general relativistic ideal magnetodydrodynamics and obtain a criterion for the onset of the instability. We suggest that static disc configurations where magnetic field is held by the disc material are unstable around a Schwarzschild black hole. On the other hand, we find that such configurations are stabilized by the space-time rotation around a Kerr black hole. We obtain a crude estimate of the maximum amount of poloidal magnetic flux that can be accumulated around the centre, and suggest that it is proportional to the black hole spin. Finally, we discuss the astrophysical implications of our result for the theoretical and observational estimations of the black hole jet power.

  14. The Magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Astrophysical Discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contopoulos, I.; Kazanas, D.; Papadopoulos, D. B.

    2016-01-01

    This is our first study of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the inner edge of an astrophysical disc around a central back hole. We derive the equations governing small-amplitude oscillations in general relativistic ideal magnetodydrodynamics and obtain a criterion for the onset of the instability. We suggest that static disc configurations where magnetic field is held by the disc material are unstable around a Schwarzschild black hole. On the other hand, we find that such configurations are stabilized by the space-time rotation around a Kerr black hole. We obtain a crude estimate of the maximum amount of poloidal magnetic flux that can be accumulated around the centre, and suggest that it is proportional to the black hole spin. Finally, we discuss the astrophysical implications of our result for the theoretical and observational estimations of the black hole jet power.

  15. Suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability by gyroviscosity and sheared axial flow in imploding plasma pinches

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Lin; JIAN Guang-de; QIU Xiao-ming

    2007-01-01

    The synergistic stabilizing effect of gyroviscosity and sheared axial flow on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions is studied by means of the incompressible viscid magneto-hydrodynamic equations. The gyroviscosity (or finite Larmor radius) effects are introduced in the momentum equation through an anisotropic ion stress tensor. Dispersion relation with the effect of a density discontinuity is derived. The results indicate that the short-wavelength modes of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are easily stabilized by the gyroviscosity effects. The long wavelength modes are stabilized by the sufficient sheared axial flow. However, the synergistic effects of the finite Larmor radius and sheared axial flow can heavily mitigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. This synergistic effect can compress the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to a narrow wave number region. Even with a sufficient gyroviscosity and large enough flow velocity, the synergistic effect can completely suppressed the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in whole wave number region.

  16. THE RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY IN SMALL ASPECT RATIO CONTAINERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RIVERA, MICHAEL K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; ECKE, ROBERT E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-22

    We present experimental measurements of density and velocity obtained from the mixing zone of buoyancy driven turbulence initiated by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a small aspect ration chamber (a chamber who's vertical height is significantly larger than its lateral dimesion). The mixing front propogates at a slightly slower rate than the expected t{sup 2} behavior obtained from earlier experiments and numerics. Once the front has propogated significantly far away, we observe that the mixing zone develops to a statistically stationary state. In this stationary state, the spectral distributions of energy and density deviate from the familiar k{sup -5/3} ubiquitous to turbulence in three dimensions.

  17. Non-stationary Rayleigh-Taylor instability in supernovae ejecta

    CERN Document Server

    Ribeyre, X; Tikhonchuk, V T; Bouquet, S; Sanz, J; Ribeyre, Xavier; Hallo, Ludovic; Tikhonchuk, Vladimir; Bouquet, Serge; Sanz, Javier

    2005-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability plays an important role in the dynamics of several astronomical objects, in particular, in supernovae (SN) evolution. In this paper we develop an analytical approach to study the stability analysis of spherical expansion of the SN ejecta by using a special transformation in the co-moving coordinate frame. We first study a non-stationary spherical expansion of a gas shell under the pressure of a central source. Then we analyze its stability with respect to a no radial, non spherically symmetric perturbation of the of the shell. We consider the case where the polytropic constant of the SN shell is $\\gamma=5/3$ and we examine the evolution of a arbitrary shell perturbation. The dispersion relation is derived. The growth rate of the perturbation is found and its temporal and spatial evolution is discussed. The stability domain depends on the ejecta shell thickness, its acceleration, and the perturbation wavelength.

  18. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in partially ionized prominence plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Khomenko, E; de Vicente, A; Collados, M; Luna, M

    2013-01-01

    We study Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at the coronal-prominence boundary by means of 2.5D numerical simulations in a single-fluid MHD approach including a generalized Ohm's law. The initial configuration includes a homogeneous magnetic field forming an angle with the direction in which the plasma is perturbed. For each field inclination we compare two simulations, one for the pure MHD case, and one including the ambipolar diffusion in the Ohm's law, otherwise identical. We find that the configuration containing neutral atoms is always unstable. The growth rate of the small-scale modes in the non-linear regime is larger than in the purely MHD case.

  19. The cylindrical magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability for viscous fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, K.; Forbes, L. K. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, Private Bag 37-Hobart, Tasmania 7005 (Australia)

    2012-10-15

    This paper considers a cylindrical Rayleigh-Taylor instability, in which a heavy fluid surrounds a light fluid, and gravity is directed radially inwards. A massive object is located at the centre of the light fluid, and it behaves like a line dipole both for fluid flow and magnetic field strength. The initially circular interface between the two conducting fluids evolves into plumes, dependent on the magnetic and fluid dipole strengths and the nature of the initial disturbance to the interface. A spectral method is presented to solve the time-dependent interface shapes, and results are presented and discussed. Bipolar solutions are possible, and these are of particular relevance to astrophysics. The solutions obtained resemble structures of some HII regions and nebulae.

  20. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in a Relativistic Fireball on a Moving Computational Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Duffell, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    We numerically calculate the growth and saturation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability caused by the deceleration of relativistic outflows with Lorentz factor \\Gamma = 10, 30, and 100. The instability generates turbulence whose scale exhibits strong dependence on Lorentz factor, as only modes within the causality scale \\Delta \\theta ~ 1/\\Gamma can grow. We develop a simple diagnostic to measure the fraction of energy in turbulent eddies and use it to estimate magnetic field amplification by the instability. We estimate a magnetic energy fraction ~ 0.01 due to Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence in a shock-heated region behind the forward shock. The instability completely disrupts the contact discontinuity between the ejecta and the swept up circumburst medium. The reverse shock is stable, but is impacted by the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which strengthens the reverse shock and pushes it away from the forward shock. The forward shock front is unaffected by the instability, but Rayleigh-Taylor fingers can penetrate abo...

  1. Linear Rayleigh-Taylor instability for viscous, compressible fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Yan

    2009-01-01

    We study the equations obtained from linearizing the compressible Navier-Stokes equations around a steady-state profile with a heavier fluid lying above a lighter fluid along a planar interface, i.e. a Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We consider the equations with or without surface tension, with the viscosity allowed to depend on the density, and in both periodic and non-periodic settings. In the presence of viscosity there is no natural variational framework for constructing growing mode solutions to the linearized problem. We develop a general method of studying a family of modified variational problems in order to produce maximal growing modes. Using these growing modes, we construct smooth (when restricted to each fluid domain) solutions to the linear equations that grow exponentially in time in Sobolev spaces. We then prove an estimate for arbitrary solutions to the linearized equations in terms of the fastest possible growth rate for the growing modes. In the periodic setting, we show that sufficiently sm...

  2. Critical Magnetic Number in the MHD Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yanjin

    2010-01-01

    We reformulate in Lagrangian coordinates the two-phase free boundary problem for the equations of Magnetohydrodynamics in a infinite slab, which is incompressible, viscous and of zero resistivity, as one for the Navier-Stokes equations with a force term induced by the fluid flow map. We study the stabilized effect of the magnetic field for the linearized equations around the steady-state solution by assuming that the upper fluid is heavier than the lower fluid, $i. e.$, the linear Rayleigh-Taylor instability. We identity the critical magnetic number $|B|_c$ by a variational problem. For the cases $(i)$ the magnetic number $\\bar{B}$ is vertical in 2D or 3D; $(ii)$ $\\bar{B}$ is horizontal in 2D, we prove that the linear system is stable when $|\\bar{B}|\\ge |B|_c$ and is unstable when $|\\bar{B}|<|B|_c$. Moreover, for $|\\bar{B}|<|B|_c$ the vertical $\\bar{B}$ stabilizes the low frequency interval while the horizontal $\\bar{B}$ stabilizes the high frequency interval, and the growth rate of growing modes is bou...

  3. Reynolds and Atwood Numbers Effects on Homogeneous Rayleigh Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslangil, Denis; Livescu, Daniel; Banerjee, Arindam

    2015-11-01

    The effects of Reynolds and Atwood numbers on turbulent mixing of a heterogeneous mixture of two incompressible, miscible fluids with different densities are investigated by using high-resolution Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS). The flow occurs in a triply periodic 3D domain, with the two fluids initially segregated in random patches, and turbulence is generated in response to buoyancy. In turn, stirring produced by turbulence breaks down the scalar structures, accelerating the molecular mixing. Statistically homogeneous variable-density (VD) mixing, with density variations due to compositional changes, is a basic mixing problem and aims to mimic the core of the mixing layer of acceleration driven Rayleigh Taylor Instability (RTI). We present results covering a large range of kinematic viscosity values for density contrasts including small (A =0.04), moderate (A =0.5), and high (A =0.75 and 0.9) Atwood numbers. Particular interest will be given to the structure of the turbulence and mixing process, including the alignment between various turbulence and scalar quantities, as well as providing fidelity data for verification and validation of mix models. Arindam Banerjee acknowledges support from NSF CAREER award # 1453056.

  4. DSMC Simulations of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallis, Michael; Koehler, Timothy; Torczynski, John; Plimpton, Steven

    2015-11-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of molecular gas dynamics is applied to simulate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in atmospheric-pressure monatomic gases (e.g., argon and helium). The computational domain is a 1 mm × 4 mm rectangle divided into 50-nm square cells. Each cell is populated with 1000 computational molecules, and time steps of 0.1 ns are used. Simulations are performed to quantify the growth of a single-mode perturbation on the interface as a function of the Atwood number and the gravitational acceleration. The DSMC results qualitatively reproduce all observed features of the RTI and are in reasonable quantitative agreement with existing theoretical and empirical models. Consistent with previous work in this field, the DSMC simulations indicate that the growth of the RTI follows a universal behavior. For cases with multiple-mode perturbations, the numbers of bubble-spike pairs that eventually appear are found to be in agreement with theoretical results for the most unstable wavelength. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  5. Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Y. B. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 73000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Piriz, A. R., E-mail: roberto.piriz@uclm.es [E.T.S.I. Industriales (Spain); CYTEMA (Spain); Instituto de Investigaciones Energéticas, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

    2014-07-15

    A linear analysis of the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability at the interface between a Newtonian fluid and an elastic-plastic solid is performed by considering a uniform magnetic B{sup →}, parallel to the interface, which has diffused into the fluid but not into the solid. It is found that the magnetic field attributes elastic properties to the viscous fluid which enhance the stability region by stabilizing all the perturbation wavelengths shorter than λ{sub 0}∝B{sup 2} for any initial perturbation amplitude. Longer wavelengths are stabilized by the mechanical properties of the solid provided that the initial perturbation wavelength is smaller than a threshold value determined by the yield strength and the shear modulus of the solid. Beyond this threshold, the amplitude grows initially with a growth rate reduced by the solid strength properties. However, such properties do not affect the asymptotic growth rate which is only determined by the magnetic field and the fluid viscosity. The described physical situation intends to resemble some of the features present in recent experiments involving the magnetic shockless acceleration of flyers plates.

  6. Cylindrical Effects on Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Matthew; Lau, Yue Ying; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Jennings, Christopher; Hess, Mark

    2012-10-01

    This paper concentrates on the effects of cylindrical geometry on the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT), a major concern in the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept (MagLIF) [1]. Several issues are being studied, such as the Bell-Plesset effect [2], the effects of magnetic shear and feedthrough [3], and the nonzero MRT growth rate that remains (but was hardly noticed) in the k = m = 0 limit in Harris' seminal paper on a cylindrical liner [4], where k and m are respectively the azimuthal and axial wavenumber. We shall use simulation and direct integration of the eigenvalue equation to investigate the importance of the cylindrical geometry, which is particularly relevant in the final stage of compression in the MagLIF concept. [4pt] [1] S. A. Slutz, et. al, Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010). [0pt] [2] G. I. Bell, Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, Report LA-1321 (1951); M. S. Plesset, J. Appl. Phys. 25, 96 (1954).[0pt] [3] P. Zhang et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 200703 (2012); Y. Y. Lau et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 006405 (2011). [0pt] [4] E. G. Harris, Phys. Fluids 5, 1057 (1962).

  7. The role of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in filament threads

    CERN Document Server

    Terradas, J; Ballester, J L

    2012-01-01

    Many solar filaments and prominences show short-lived horizontal threads lying parallel to the photosphere. In this work the possible link between Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and thread lifetimes is investigated. This is done by calculating the eigenmodes of a thread modelled as a Cartesian slab under the presence of gravity. An analytical dispersion relation is derived using the incompressible assumption for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) perturbations. The system allows a mode that is always stable, independently of the value of the Alfv\\'en speed in the thread. The character of this mode varies from being localised at the upper interface of the slab when the magnetic field is weak, to having a global nature and resembling the transverse kink mode when the magnetic field is strong. On the contrary, the slab model permits another mode that is unstable and localised at the lower interface when the magnetic field is weak. The growth rates of this mode can be very short, of the order of minutes for typical thr...

  8. Direct Numerical Simulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with the Spectral Element Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Xu; TAN Duo-Wang

    2009-01-01

    A novel method is proposed to simulate Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities using a specially-developed unsteady threedimensional high-order spectral element method code.The numerical model used consists of Navier-Stokes equations and a transport-diffusive equation.The code is first validated with the results of linear stability perturbation theory.Then several characteristics of the Rayleigh-Taylor instabjJjties are studied using this three-dimensional unsteady code,inducling instantaneous turbulent structures and statistical turbulent mixing heights under different initial wave numbers.These results indicate that turbulent structures ofRayleigh-Taylor instabilities are strongly dependent on the initial conditions.The results also suggest that a high-order numerical method should provide the capability of sir.ulating small scale fluctuations of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities of turbulent flows.

  9. Non-equilibrium Thermodynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Tapan K.; Sengupta, Aditi; Shruti, K. S.; Sengupta, Soumyo; Bhole, Ashish

    2016-10-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) has been studied here as a non-equilibrium thermodynamics problem. Air masses with temperature difference of 70K, initially with heavier air resting on lighter air isolated by a partition, are allowed to mix by impulsively removing the partition. This results in interface instabilities, which are traced here by solving two dimensional (2D) compressible Navier-Stokes equation (NSE), without using Boussinesq approximation (BA henceforth). The non-periodic isolated system is studied by solving NSE by high accuracy, dispersion relation preserving (DRP) numerical methods described in Sengupta T.K.: High Accuracy Computing Method (Camb. Univ. Press, USA, 2013). The instability onset is due to misaligned pressure and density gradients and is evident via creation and evolution of spikes and bubbles (when lighter fluid penetrates heavier fluid and vice versa, associated with pressure waves). Assumptions inherent in compressible formulation are: (i) Stokes' hypothesis that uses zero bulk viscosity assumption and (ii) the equation of state for perfect gas which is a consequence of equilibrium thermodynamics. Present computations for a non-equilibrium thermodynamic process do not show monotonic rise of entropy with time, as one expects from equilibrium thermodynamics. This is investigated with respect to the thought-experiment. First, we replace Stokes' hypothesis, with another approach where non-zero bulk viscosity of air is taken from an experiment. Entropy of the isolated system is traced, with and without the use of Stokes' hypothesis. Without Stokes' hypothesis, one notes the rate of increase in entropy to be higher as compared to results with Stokes' hypothesis. We show this using the total entropy production for the thermodynamically isolated system. The entropy increase from the zero datum is due to mixing in general; punctuated by fluctuating entropy due to creation of compression and rarefaction fronts originating at the interface

  10. Large eddy simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability using the arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darlington, R

    1999-12-01

    This research addresses the application of a large eddy simulation (LES) to Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian (ALE) simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. First, ALE simulations of simplified Rayleigh-Taylor instability are studied. The advantages of ALE over Eulerian simulations are shown. Next, the behavior of the LES is examined in a more complicated ALE simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The effects of eddy viscosity and stochastic backscatter are examined. The LES is also coupled with ALE to increase grid resolution in areas where it is needed. Finally, the methods studied above are applied to two sets of experimental simulations. In these simulations, ALE allows the mesh to follow expanding experimental targets, while LES can be used to mimic the effect of unresolved instability modes.

  11. Large-eddy-simulation of 3-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability in incompressible fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; Lili

    2002-01-01

    [1]Sharp, D. H., An overview of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, Physica D, 1984, 12: 3-18.[2]Baker, G. R., Meiron, D. I., Orszag, S. A., Vortex simulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, Phys. Fluids, 1980, 23: 1485-1490.[3]Tryggvason, G., Numerical simulations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, J. Comput. Phys., 1988, 75: 253-282.[4]Mulder, W., Osher, S., Sethian, J., Computing interface motion in compressible gas dynamics, J. Comput. Phys., 1992, 100: 209-228.[5]Osher, S., Sethian, J., Fronts propagating with curvature-dependent speed: algorithms based on Hamilton-Jacobi formulations, J. Compput. Phys., 1988, 79(1): 12-49.[6]Li, X. L., Study of three-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability in compressible fluids through level set method and parallel computation, Phys. Fluids, 1993, A(5): 1904-1913.[7]Holmes, R. L, Grove, J. W., Sharp, D. H., Numerical investigation of Richtmyer-Meshkov instability using front tracking, J. Fluid Mech., 1995, 301: 51-64.[8]Gardner, C., Glimm, J., McBryan, O. et al., The dynamics of bubble growth for Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interfaces, Phys. Fluids, 1988, 31: 447-465.[9]He Xiaoyi, Chen Shiyi, Zhang Raoyang, A lattice Boltzmann scheme for incompressible multiphase flow and its application in simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, J. Comput Phys., 1999, 152: 642-663.[10]Li, X. L., Jin, B. X., Glimm, J., Numerical study for the three-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability through the TVD/AC scheme and parallel computation, J. Comput. Phys., 1996, 126: 343-355.[11]Taylor, G. I., The stability of liquid surface when accelerated in a direction perpendicular to their planes, I, Proc. Roy. Soc., London, 1950, A201: 192-196.[12]Abarzhi, S. I., Stable steady flow in the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, Phs. Rev. Lett., 1998, 81: 337-340.[13]Zhang, Q., The motion of single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interfaces, IMPACT Comput. Sci. Eng., 1991, 3: 277-389.[14]Deardorff. J. W

  12. Three-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability analysis of implosion system with scientific animation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakagami, Hitoshi [Himeji Inst. of Tech., Hyogo (Japan)

    1999-05-01

    A fully three-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability taking place at the pusher-fuel contact surface in spherically stagnating systems has been investigated. Scientific color animations were rendered and constructed from the simulation results. At first, the rendering algorithm for an isovalue surface is discussed, and then the construction methods for scientific color animation are summarized by comparing analog based animation systems and digital ones. It is showed that the nonlinear dynamics of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are characterized by vortex rings that are induced in bubble-spike structures with the use of scientific animation analysis. (author)

  13. Toward analytic theory of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability: lessons from a toy model

    CERN Document Server

    Mailybaev, Alexei A

    2016-01-01

    In this work we suggest that a turbulent phase of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can be explained as a universal stochastic wave traveling with constant speed in a properly renormalized system. This wave, originating from ordinary deterministic chaos in a renormalized time, has two constant limiting states at both sides. These states are related to the initial discontinuity at large scales and to stationary turbulence at small scales. The theoretical analysis is confirmed with extensive numerical simulations made for a new shell model, which features all basic properties of the phenomenological theory for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  14. A new approach to Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Application to accelerated elastic solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piriz, A.R. [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla - La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)]. E-mail: roberto.piriz@uclm.es; Lopez Cela, J.J. [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla - La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Serna Moreno, M.C. [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla - La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Cortazar, O.D. [E.T.S.I. Industriales, Universidad de Castilla - La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain); Tahir, N.A. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Hoffmann, D.H.H. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institut fuer Kernephysik, Technische Universitaet of Darmstadt, 64289 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    A new approach to Rayleigh-Taylor instability based on the Newton second law is presented. The model is applied to the instability analysis of elastic solid/viscous fluid interfaces. The effect of the thickness of the elastic medium is studied by considering a thin elastic plate. The importance of the initial transient phase that takes place before reaching the asymptotic regime is also shown.

  15. Rayleigh-Taylor-Instability Evolution in Colliding-Plasma-Jet Experiments with Magnetic and Viscous Stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Colin Stuart [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability causes mixing in plasmas throughout the universe, from micron-scale plasmas in inertial confinement fusion implosions to parsec-scale supernova remnants. The evolution of this interchange instability in a plasma is influenced by the presence of viscosity and magnetic fields, both of which have the potential to stabilize short-wavelength modes. Very few experimental observations of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in plasmas with stabilizing mechanisms are reported in the literature, and those that are reported are in sub-millimeter scale plasmas that are difficult to diagnose. Experimental observations in well-characterized plasmas are important for validation of computational models used to make design predictions for inertial confinement fusion efforts. This dissertation presents observations of instability growth during the interaction between a high Mach-number, initially un-magnetized plasma jet and a stagnated, magnetized plasma. A multi-frame fast camera captures Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth while interferometry, spectroscopy, photodiode, and magnetic probe diagnostics are employed to estimate plasma parameters in the vicinity of the collision. As the instability grows, an evolution to longer mode wavelength is observed. Comparisons of experimental data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization. These data provide the opportunity to benchmark computational models used in astrophysics and fusion research.

  16. Rayleigh-Taylor-instability evolution in colliding-plasma-jet experiments with magnetic and viscous stabilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, Colin Stuart [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-01-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability causes mixing in plasmas throughout the universe, from micron-scale plasmas in inertial confinement fusion implosions to parsec-scale supernova remnants. The evolution of this interchange instability in a plasma is influenced by the presence of viscosity and magnetic fields, both of which have the potential to stabilize short-wavelength modes. Very few experimental observations of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in plasmas with stabilizing mechanisms are reported in the literature, and those that are reported are in sub-millimeter scale plasmas that are difficult to diagnose. Experimental observations in well-characterized plasmas are important for validation of computational models used to make design predictions for inertial confinement fusion efforts. This dissertation presents observations of instability growth during the interaction between a high Mach-number, initially un-magnetized plasma jet and a stagnated, magnetized plasma. A multi-frame fast camera captures Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth while interferometry, spectroscopy, photodiode, and magnetic probe diagnostics are employed to estimate plasma parameters in the vicinity of the collision. As the instability grows, an evolution to longer mode wavelength is observed. Comparisons of experimental data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization. These data provide the opportunity to benchmark computational models used in astrophysics and fusion research.

  17. Large-eddy-simulation of 3-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability in incompressible fluids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The 3-dimensional incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability is numerically studied through the large-eddy-simulation (LES) approach based on the passive scalar transport model. Both the instantaneous velocity and the passive scalar fields excited by sinusoidal perturbation and random perturbation are simulated. A full treatment of the whole evolution process of the instability is addressed. To verify the reliability of the LES code, the averaged turbulent energy as well as the flux of passive scalar are calculated at both the resolved scale and the subgrid scale. Our results show good agreement with the experimental and other numerical work. The LES method has proved to be an effective approach to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  18. Simulation of isotropic homogeneous turbulence and Rayleigh-Taylor instability; Simulations de turbulence homogene isotrope et d`instabilite de Rayleigh-Taylor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ducros, F.

    1996-06-12

    Here is a study about fluid flows (the hydrodynamic part of codes modeling the plasma dynamics) showing great gradients and unsteady flows (Rayleigh-Taylor, Richtmyer-Meshkov). The numerical resolution of these problems needs codes able to simulate the transition at the turbulence. The code exposed here (NSMP), tries to answer to these demands by the resolution of Navier-Stokes equations. After the resolution of these equations are presented the consequences of the discretization of continuous equations of fluids mechanics and then a modeling of turbulence is introduced. The two last chapters are devoted to the simulation of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. (N.C.). 34 refs., 39 figs., 8 colour plates.

  19. Influence of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability on Liquid Propellant Reorientation in a Low-Gravity Environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhang-Guo; LIU Qiu-Sheng; LIU Rong; HU Wei; DENG Xin-Yu

    2009-01-01

    A computational simulation is conducted to investigate the influence of Rayleigh-Taylor instability on liquid propellant reorientation flow dynamics for the tank of CZ-3A launch vehicle series fuel tanks in a low-gravity environment. The volume-of-fluid (VOF) method is used to simulate the free surface flow of gas-liquid. The process of the liquid propellant reorientation started from initially fiat and curved interfaces are numerically studied. These two different initial conditions of the gas-liquid interface result in two modes of liquid flow. It is found that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can be reduced evidently at the initial gas-liquid interface with a high curve during the process of liquid reorientation in a low-gravity environment.

  20. Mitigation Effect of Finite Larmor Radius on Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Z-Pinch Implosions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱孝明; 黄林; 简广德

    2002-01-01

    Based on the framework of magnetohydrodynamic theory, a simple model is proposed to study the mitigation effect of finite Larmor radius on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions. In this model, taking account of Ti ≥ Te in Z-pinch implosions we believe that the magnetohydrodynamic plasma responds to a perturbation (~ exp [i (k. x - ωt)]) at frequency (ω + ik2⊥ρ2iΩi) instead of frequency ω, where k2⊥ρ2i is due to the finite Larmor radius effects expressed from the generalkinetic theory of magnetized plasma. Therefore the linearized continuity and momentum equations for the perturbed mass-density and velocity include the finite Larmor radius effects. The calculations indicate that, in the wavenumber region of interest, the finite Larmor radius effects can mitigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions.

  1. Study on Electrohydrodynamic Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with Heat and Mass Transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukesh Kumar Awasthi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The linear analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the interface between two viscous and dielectric fluids in the presence of a tangential electric field has been carried out when there is heat and mass transfer across the interface. In our earlier work, the viscous potential flow analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in presence of tangential electric field was studied. Here, we use another irrotational theory in which the discontinuities in the irrotational tangential velocity and shear stress are eliminated in the global energy balance. Stability criterion is given by critical value of applied electric field as well as critical wave number. Various graphs have been drawn to show the effect of various physical parameters such as electric field, heat transfer coefficient, and vapour fraction on the stability of the system. It has been observed that heat transfer and electric field both have stabilizing effect on the stability of the system.

  2. SYNERGETIC MITIGATION OF THE RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY BY SHEAR AXIAL FLOWS AND FINITE LARMOR RADIUS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A hybrid model of MHD and kinetic theory is proposed to investigate the synergetic stabilizing effects of sheared axial flow and finite Larmor radius on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions.In our model the MHD plasma is considered to respond to a perturbation with exp[i(k*x-ωt)] at frequency ω+ik2⊥ρ2iΩi instead of frequency ω,where k2⊥ρ2i is the finite Larmor radius effects given from the general kinetic theory of magnetized plasma.Therefore linearized continuity and momentum equations include automatically the finite Larmor radius effects.Dispersion relation is derived,which includes the effects of a density discontinuity and the finite Larmor radius as well as a sheared flow that produces the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.The dispersion equation is examined in three cases.The results indicate that the synergetic effect of sheared axial flow and the finite Larmor radius can mitigate both the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the hybrid Rayleigh-Taylor/Kelvin-Helmholtz instability.Moreover,the synergetic mitigation effect is stronger than either of them acting separately.

  3. Ablative Stabilization of the Deceleration-Phase Rayleigh-Taylor Instability, control No. 2000-107

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobatchev, V.; Betti, R.

    2000-10-01

    The growth rates of the deceleration-phase Rayleigh-Taylor instability for imploding inertial confinement fusion capsules are calculated and compared with the results of numerical simulations. It is found that the unstable spectrum and the growth rates are significantly reduced by the finite ablation flow at the shell's inner surface. For typical direct-drive capsules designed for the National Ignition Facility, the unstable spectrum exhibits a cutoff for {ell} {approx} 90.

  4. Direct numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae flames II: The Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, J.B.; Day, M.S.; Rendleman, C.A.; Woosley, S.E.; Zingale, M.

    2004-01-12

    A Type Ia supernova explosion likely begins as a nuclear runaway near the center of a carbon-oxygen white dwarf. The outward propagating flame is unstable to the Landau-Darrieus, Rayleigh-Taylor, and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, which serve to accelerate it to a large fraction of the speed of sound. We investigate the Rayleigh-Taylor unstable flame at the transition from the flamelet regime to the distributed-burning regime, around densities of 10e7 gm/cc, through detailed, fully resolved simulations. A low Mach number, adaptive mesh hydrodynamics code is used to achieve the necessary resolution and long time scales. As the density is varied, we see a fundamental change in the character of the burning--at the low end of the density range the Rayleigh-Taylor instability dominates the burning, whereas at the high end the burning suppresses the instability. In all cases, significant acceleration of the flame is observed, limited only by the size of the domain we are able to study. We discuss the implications of these results on the potential for a deflagration to detonation transition.

  5. Theoretical and numerical studies of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in magnetized plasmas; Etude theorique et numerique des instabilites Rayleigh-Taylor en plasmas magnetises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, A.A

    2001-06-01

    The instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type are considered in the thesis. The topic of the thesis was inspired by recent advances in the physics of plasma compression, especially with the aid of systems like Z-pinch. Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) plays an important role in the evolution of magnetized plasmas in these experiments, as well as in stellar plasmas and classic fluids. For the phenomena concerning the nuclear fusion the RTI is very often the factor limiting the possibility of compression. In the current work we try to examine in detail the characteristic features of the instabilities of this type in order to eliminate their detrimental influence. In this thesis we are studying both the general case of the 'classic' Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in incompressible fluids) and more specific cases of the instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type in magnetized plasmas, in the liners or wire array implosions etc. We have studied the influence of the Hall diffusion of magnetic field on the growth rate of the instability. We have obtained in this work a self-similar solution for the widening of the initial profile of the magnetic field and for the wave of the penetration of magnetic field. After that the subsequent evolution of the magnetic field in plasma opening switches (POS) has been examined. We have shown the possibility of the existence of a strong rarefaction wave for collisional and non-collisional cases. This wave can explain the phenomenon of the opening of POS. The effect of the suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability by forced oscillations of the boundary between two fluids permits us to propose some ideas for the experiments of inertial fusion. We have considered the general case of the instability, in other words, two incompressible viscous superposed fluids in a gravitational field. We have obtained an exact analytical expression for the growth rate and then we have analyzed the influence of the parameters of external &apos

  6. Theoretical and numerical study of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in magnetized plasmas; Etude theorique et numerique des instabilites rayleigh-taylor en plasmas magnetises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrei, A. Ivanov

    2001-06-15

    In this thesis we're studying both the general case of the 'classic' Rayleigh-Taylor instability (in incompressible fluids) and more specific cases of the instabilities of Rayleigh-Taylor type in magnetized plasmas, in the liners or wire array implosions etc. We have studied the influence of the Hall diffusion of magnetic field on the growth rate of the instability. We have obtained in this work a self-similar solution for the widening of the initial profile of the magnetic field and for the wave of the penetration of magnetic field. After that the subsequent evolution of the magnetic field in plasma opening switches (POS) has been examined. We have shown the possibility of the existence of a strong rarefaction wave for collisional and non-collisional cases. This wave can explain the phenomenon of the opening of POS. The effect of the suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability by forced oscillations of the boundary between two fluids permits us to propose some ideas for the experiments of inertial fusion. We have considered the general case of the instability, in other words - two incompressible viscous superposed fluids in a gravitational field. We have obtained an exact analytical expression for the growth rate and then we have analyzed the influence of the parameters of external 'pumping' on the instability. These results can be applied to a wide range of systems, starting from classic hydrodynamics and up to astrophysical plasmas. The scheme of wire arrays has become recently a very popular method to obtain a high power X-radiation or for a high quality implosion in Z-pinches. The experimental studies have demonstrated that the results of implosion are much better for the case of multiple thin wires situated cylindrically than in a usual liner scheme. We have examined the problem modeling the stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability for a wire array system. The reason for instability suppression is the regular spatial modulation of

  7. Rayleigh Taylor Instability Growth in NIC Capsules with Engineered Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, K. J.; Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Clark, D. S.; Farley, D. R.; Landen, O. L.; Scott, H.; Moreno, K.; Vesey, R. A.; Herrmann, M. C.; Nakhleh, C. W.; Golovkin, I.; Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.

    2011-10-01

    In order to achieve thermonuclear burn and energy gain in ICF capsules, the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities must be understood and controlled. Experiments are planned to measure time dependent hydrodynamic instability growth of engineered defects on the surface of NIC capsules using x-ray radiography. We will present an analysis of synthetic radiography from 2D and 3D HYDRA simulations with various x-ray drive fluxes and show how these results will be used to assess code predictions of instability growth and mix. We will also discuss how these results correlate with capsule performance and observables from hot spot self emission imaging and Ge spectroscopy. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  8. Strong stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability by material strength at Mbar pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H S; Lorenz, K T; Cavallo, R M; Pollaine, S M; Prisbrey, S T; Rudd, R E; Becker, R C; Bernier, J V; Remington, B A

    2009-11-19

    Experimental results showing significant reductions from classical in the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth rate due to high pressure effective lattice viscosity are presented. Using a laser created ramped drive, vanadium samples are compressed and accelerated quasi-isentropically at {approx}1 Mbar pressures, while maintaining the sample in the solid-state. Comparisons with simulations and theory indicate that the high pressure, high strain rate conditions trigger a phonon drag mechanism, resulting in the observed high effective lattice viscosity and strong stabilization of the RT instability.

  9. The viscous surface-internal wave problem: nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yanjin

    2011-01-01

    We consider the free boundary problem for two layers of immiscible, viscous, incompressible fluid in a uniform gravitational field, lying above a rigid bottom in a three-dimensional horizontally periodic setting. The effect of surface tension is either taken into account at both free boundaries or neglected at both. We are concerned with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, so we assume that the upper fluid is heavier than the lower fluid. When the surface tension at the free internal interface is below a critical value, which we identify, we establish that the problem under consideration is nonlinearly unstable.

  10. Combined effect of horizontal magnetic field and vorticity on Rayleigh Taylor instability

    CERN Document Server

    Banerjee, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    In this research, the height, curvature and velocity of the bubble tip in Rayleigh-Taylor instability at arbitrary Atwood number with horizontal magnetic field are investigated. To support the earlier simulation and experimental results, the vorticity generation inside the bubble is introduced. It is found that, in early nonlinear stage, the temporal evolution of the bubble tip parameters depend essentially on the strength and initial perturbation of the magnetic field, although the asymptotic nature coincides with the non magnetic case. The model proposed here agrees with the previous linear, nonlinear and simulation observations.

  11. Proton Beam Fast Ignition Fusion: Synergy of Weibel and Rayleigh-Taylor Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    The proton beam generation and focusing in fast ignition inertial confinement fusion is studied. The spatial and energy spread of the proton beam generated in a laser-solid interaction is increased due to the synergy of Weibel and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. The focal spot radius can reach 100 μm, which is nearly an order of magnitude larger than the optimal value. The energy spread decreases the beam deposition energy in the focal spot. Under these conditions, ignition of a precompressed DT fuel is achieved with the beam powers much higher than the values presently in consideration. Work supported in part by NIKOLA TESLA Laboratories (Stefan University), La Jolla, CA.

  12. Quantum Effects on Rayleigh-Taylor Instability of Incompressible Plasma in a Vertical Magnetic Field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.A.Hoshoudy

    2010-01-01

    @@ Quantum effects on Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a stratified incompressible plasmas layer under the influence of vertical magnetic field are investigated.The solutions of the linearized equations of motion together with the boundary conditions lead to deriving the relation between square normalized growth rate and square normalized wawe number in two algebraic equations and are numerically analyzed.In the case of the real solution of these two equations,they can be combined to generate a single equation.The results show that the presence of vertical magnetic field beside the quantum effect will bring about more stability on the growth rate of unstable configuration.

  13. Comprehensive numerical methodology for direct numerical simulations of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reckinger, Scott James [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Livescu, Daniel [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Vasilyev, Oleg V. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2016-09-02

    A comprehensive numerical methodology has been developed that handles the challenges introduced by considering the compressive nature of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) systems, which include sharp interfacial density gradients on strongly stratified background states, acoustic wave generation and removal at computational boundaries, and stratification-dependent vorticity production. The computational framework is used to simulate two-dimensional single-mode RTI to extreme late-times for a wide range of flow compressibility and variable density effects. The results show that flow compressibility acts to reduce the growth of RTI for low Atwood numbers, as predicted from linear stability analysis.

  14. Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in indirect laser drive with rugby-shaped hohlraums; Experiences d'instabilites Rayleigh-Taylor en attaque indirecte avec des cavites rugby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casner, A.; Galmiche, D.; Huser, G.; Jadaud, J.P.; Richard, A.; Liberatore, S.; Vandenboomgaerde, M. [CEA Bruyeres-le-Chatel, 91 (France)

    2009-07-01

    The mastering of the development of hydrodynamic instabilities like Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities is an important milestone on the way to perform efficient laser implosions. The complexity of these instabilities implies an experimental validation of the theoretical models and their computer simulations. An experimental platform involving the Omega laser has allowed us to perform indirect drive with rugby-shaped hohlraums. The experiments have validated the growth of 2- and 3-dimensional initial defects as predicted by theory. We have shown that the 3-dimensional defect saturates for an higher amplitude than the 2-dimensional one does. The experiments have been made by using a plastic shell doped with Germanium (CH:Ge). (A.C.)

  15. Simulations of Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities in the presence of a Strong Radiative shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trantham, Matthew; Kuranz, Carolyn; Shvarts, Dov; Drake, R. P.

    2016-10-01

    Recent Supernova Rayleigh Taylor experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are relevant to the evolution of core-collapse supernovae in which red supergiant stars explode. Here we report simulations of these experiments using the CRASH code. The CRASH code, developed at the University of Michigan to design and analyze high-energy-density experiments, is an Eulerian code with block-adaptive mesh refinement, multigroup diffusive radiation transport, and electron heat conduction. We explore two cases, one in which the shock is strongly radiative, and another with negligible radiation. The experiments in all cases produced structures at embedded interfaces by the Rayleigh Taylor instability. The weaker shocked environment is cooler and the instability grows classically. The strongly radiative shock produces a warm environment near the instability, ablates the interface, and alters the growth. We compare the simulated results with the experimental data and attempt to explain the differences. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas, Grant Number DE-NA0002956.

  16. Ablative stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in regimes relevant to inertial confinement fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilkenny, J.D.

    1994-08-04

    As shown elsewhere an ablatively imploded shell is hydrodynamically unstable, the dominant instability being the well known Rayleigh-Taylor instability with growth rate {gamma} = {radical}Akg where k = 2{pi}/{lambda} is the wave number, g is the acceleration and A the Attwood number ({rho}{sub hi} {minus} {rho}{sub lo})/({rho}{sub hi} + {rho}{sub lo}) where {rho}{sub hi} is the density of the heavier fluid and {rho}{sub lo} is the density of the lighter fluid. A theoretical understanding of ablative stabilization has gradually evolved, confirmed over the last five years by experiments. The linear growth is very well understood with excellent agreement between experiment and simulation for planar geometry with wavelengths in the region of 30--100{mu}m. There is an accurate, albeit phenomenological dispersion relation. The non-linear growth has been measured and agrees with calculations. In this lecture, the authors go into the fundamentals of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the experimental measurements that show it is stabilized sufficiently by ablation in regimes relevant to ICF.

  17. Simulation of the growth of the 3D Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Supernova Remnants using an expanding reference frame

    CERN Document Server

    Fraschetti, Federico; Ballet, Jean; Decourchelle, Anne

    2010-01-01

    Context: The Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities generated by the deceleration of a supernova remnant during the ejecta-dominated phase are known to produce finger-like structures in the matter distribution which modify the geometry of the remnant. The morphology of supernova remnants is also expected to be modified when efficient particle acceleration occurs at their shocks. Aims: The impact of the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities from the ejecta-dominated to the Sedov-Taylor phase is investigated over one octant of the supernova remnant. We also study the effect of efficient particle acceleration at the forward shock on the growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Methods: We modified the Adaptive Mesh Refinement code RAMSES to study with hydrodynamic numerical simulations the evolution of supernova remnants in the framework of an expanding reference frame. The adiabatic index of a relativistic gas between the forward shock and the contact discontinuity mimics the presence of accelerated particles. Results: The ...

  18. Assembling Stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability by the Effects of Finite Larmor Radius and Sheared Axial Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian Guangde; Huang Lin; Qiu Xiaoming

    2005-01-01

    The assembling stabilizing effect of the finite Larmor radius (FLR) and the sheared axial flow (SAF) on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch implosions is studied by means of the incompressible finite Larmor radius magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations. The finite Larmor radius effects are introduced in the momentum equation with the sheared axial flow through an anisotropic ion stress tensor. In this paper a linear mode equation is derived that is valid for arbitrary kL, where k is the wave number and L is the plasma shell thickness. Numerical solutions are presented. The results indicate that the short-wavelength modes of the RayleighTaylor instability are easily stabilized by the individual effect of the finite Larmor radius or the sheared axial flow. The assembling effects of the finite Larmor radius and sheared axial flow can heavily mitigate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and the unstable region can be compressed considerably.

  19. Accretion to Magnetized Stars through the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability: Global Three-Dimensional Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kulkarni, Akshay K

    2008-01-01

    We present results of 3D simulations of MHD instabilities at the accretion disk-magnetosphere boundary. The instability is Rayleigh-Taylor, and develops for a fairly broad range of accretion rates and stellar rotation rates and magnetic fields. It manifests itself in the form of tall, thin tongues of plasma that penetrate the magnetosphere in the equatorial plane. The shape and number of the tongues changes with time on the inner-disk dynamical timescale. In contrast with funnel flows, which deposit matter mainly in the polar region, the tongues deposit matter much closer to the stellar equator. The instability appears for relatively small misalignment angles, $\\Theta\\lesssim30^\\circ$, between the star's rotation and magnetic axes, and is associated with higher accretion rates. The hot spots and light curves during accretion through instability are generally much more chaotic than during stable accretion. The unstable state of accretion has possible implications for quasi-periodic oscillations and intermitten...

  20. Miscible experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using planar laser induced fluorescence visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokler, Matthew; Roberts, Michael; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2011-11-01

    Incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments are presented in which two stratified miscible liquids having Atwood number of 0.2 are accelerated in a vertical linear induction motor driven drop tower. A test sled having only vertical freedom of motion contains the experiment tank and visualization equipment. The sled is positioned at the top of the tower within the linear motors and accelerated downward causing the initially stable interface to be unstable and allowing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. Experiments are presented with and without forced initial perturbations produced by vertically oscillating the test sled prior to the start of acceleration. The interface is visualized using a 445nm laser light source that illuminates a fluorescent dye mixed in one of the fluids. The resulting fluorescent images are recorded using a monochromatic high speed video camera. The laser beam is synchronously swept across the fluorescent fluid, at the frame rate of the camera, exposing a single plane of the interface allowing for the measurement of spike and bubble mixing layer growth rates.

  1. Miscible and immiscible experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using planar laser induced fluorescence visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokler, Matthew; Roberts, Michael; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    Incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments are presented in which two stratified liquids having Atwood number of 0.2 are accelerated in a vertical linear induction motor driven drop tower. A test sled having only vertical freedom of motion contains the experiment tank and visualization equipment. The sled is positioned at the top of the tower within the linear induction motors and accelerated downward causing the initially stable interface to be unstable and allowing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. Forced and unforced experiments are conducted using both immiscible and miscible liquid combinations. Forced initial perturbations are produced by vertically oscillating the test sled prior to the start of acceleration. The interface is visualized using a 445 nm laser light source that illuminates a fluorescent dye mixed in one of the fluids. The resulting fluorescent images are recorded using a monochromatic high speed video camera. The laser beam is synchronously swept across the fluorescent fluid, at the frame rate of the camera, exposing a single plane of the interface allowing for the measurement of spike and bubble growth. Comparisons between miscible and immiscible mixing layer distributions are made from the resulting interface concentration profiles.

  2. Analytical modeling of magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in compressible fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatore, Stéphane; Bouquet, Serge

    2008-11-01

    The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRTI) is investigated in the case of compressible plasmas. The goal of this work is highlighting the influence of both the magnetic field and the compressibility of the material on the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, compared to the classical growth rate derived for incompressible fluids. Our analytical linear models are derived in the framework of the ideal magnetohydrodynamics theory. Three general dispersion relations are obtained: (1) Two for stratified fluids, including compressible (denoted CS∥ when the wave vector k is parallel to the equilibrium magnetic field B0 and CS⊥ when k ⊥B0) and incompressible (denoted IS∥ and IS⊥) and (2) one for incompressible uniform density fluids, including finite mass (denoted Ifm) and infinite (denoted IU). For k ⊥B0, Ifm, IU, and IS⊥ are unmagnetized cases. Comparisons of those various configurations are performed and several differences are pointed out. The main results are as follows: Stratification weakens the MRTI while compressibility has a destabilizing effect. The magnetic field enhances these phenomena. The CS∥ and IU configurations have an identical cutoff wave number. The upper fluid (also called heavy fluid) is more sensitive to compressibility than the light one when k ∥B0. Finally, the CS∥ case is more sensitive than the CS⊥ one to physical variations.

  3. Similar Rayleigh-Taylor Instability of Shock Fronts Perturbed by Corrugated Interfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Yong; HU Xi-Wei; JIANG Zhong-He

    2011-01-01

    @@ Instability of a planar shock front perturbed by a corrugated interface is analyzed,where the perturbation wavelength is along the shock front plane.The presented analysis involves the effects of the features on the shock front,which is different from a general method presented by D'yakov and Kontorovich,where the shock front is taken as an infinitely discontinuity.The growth rate of the instability of the perturbed shock front is obtained and compared with the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability(RTI) of an interface,on which the density gradient and the initial conditions are similar to the perturbed shock front.The analysis and comparisons of the growth rate of the instability indicate that the features of the shock front should be considered seriously in the shock interface interactions.%Instability of a planar shock front perturbed by a corrugated interface is analyzed, where the perturbation wavelength is along the shock front plane. The presented analysis involves the effects of the features on the shock front, which is different from a general method presented by D'yakov and Kontorovich, where the shock front is taken as an infinitely discontinuity. The growth rate of the instability of the perturbed shock front is obtained and compared with the growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) of an interface, on which the density gradient and the initial conditions are similar to the perturbed shock front. The analysis and comparisons of the growth rate of the instability indicate that the features of the shock front should be considered seriously in the shock interface interactions.

  4. Development of Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in presence of magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Manoranjan; Banerjee, Rahul; Roy, Sourav; Gupta, M R

    2011-01-01

    Fluid instabilities like Rayleigh-Taylor,Richtmyer-Meshkov and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability can occur in a wide range of physical phenomenon from astrophysical context to Inertial Confinement Fusion(ICF).Using Layzer's potential flow model, we derive the analytical expressions of growth rate of bubble and spike for ideal magnetized fluid in R-T and R-M cases. In presence of transverse magnetic field the R-M and R-T instability are suppressed or enhanced depending on the direction of magnetic pressure and hydrodynamic pressure. Again the interface of two fluid may oscillate if both the fluids are conducting. However the magnetic field has no effect in linear case.

  5. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability for a thin film on the inside of a horizontal cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Naima; Trinh, Philippe; Howell, Peter; Chapman, Jonathan; Stone, Howard

    2013-11-01

    Thin films on curved surfaces are widely observed in coating and painting processes and wetting problems. We consider a thin film on a curved substrate under the effect of gravitational, viscous, and surface tension forces. When the film is on the underside of the substrate, gravity works as a destabilizing force, and a Rayleigh-Taylor type instability is expected. We consider the stability of a uniform thin film coating the inside of a horizontal circular cylinder. Using asymptotic methods, we find that instabilities are of a transient nature, thus showing that curvature helps stabilize the film. We also find that these ``instabilities'' occur primarily in the angular direction with the axial perturbations only appearing as higher-order corrections. These results seem to agree well with experiments (H. Kim et al., this conference).

  6. Direct simulation Monte Carlo investigation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallis, M. A.; Koehler, T. P.; Torczynski, J. R.; Plimpton, S. J.

    2016-08-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) is investigated using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of molecular gas dynamics. Here, fully resolved two-dimensional DSMC RTI simulations are performed to quantify the growth of flat and single-mode perturbed interfaces between two atmospheric-pressure monatomic gases as a function of the Atwood number and the gravitational acceleration. The DSMC simulations reproduce many qualitative features of the growth of the mixing layer and are in reasonable quantitative agreement with theoretical and empirical models in the linear, nonlinear, and self-similar regimes. In some of the simulations at late times, the instability enters the self-similar regime, in agreement with experimental observations. For the conditions simulated, diffusion can influence the initial instability growth significantly.

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability within Sediment Layers Due to Gas Retention: Preliminary Theory and Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Wells, Beric E.; Buchmiller, William C.; Rassat, Scot D.

    2013-03-21

    In Hanford underground waste storage tanks, a typical waste configuration is settled beds of waste particles beneath liquid layers. The settled beds are typically composed of layers, and these layers can have different physical and chemical properties. One postulated configuration within the settled bed is a less-dense layer beneath a more-dense layer. The different densities can be a result of different gas retention in the layers or different degrees of settling and compaction in the layers. This configuration can experience a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability where the less dense lower layer rises into the upper layer. Previous studies of gas retention and release have not considered potential buoyant motion within a settle bed of solids. The purpose of this report is to provide a review of RT instabilities, discuss predictions of RT behavior for sediment layers, and summarize preliminary experimental observations of RT instabilities in simulant experiments.

  8. The effect of a magnetic field on the development of Rayleigh Taylor type instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syusyukin, A.I.

    1984-01-01

    The results are presented of an experimental study of magnetohydrodynamic (MGD) instability of the Rayleigh Taylor type. The effect of a magnetic field on the development of magnetohydrodynamic instability was studied in the free surfaces of an accelerating electricity conducting piston. The tests were conducted with a liquid metallic piston and with a piston which is made up of a liquid which does not conduct electricity and one which does. It is shown that a rise in the magnetic induction leads to a more intense development of the instability which is accompanied by a more rapid destruction of the dense structure of the piston. The mechanism of destruction of a free surface under the effects of bulk forces is discussed.

  9. Three-Dimensional Single-Mode Nonlinear Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, R.; Betti, R.; Sanz, J.; Liu, B.; Frank, A.

    2015-11-01

    The nonlinear evolution of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (ART) instability is studied in three dimensions for conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion targets. The simulations are performed using our newly developed code ART3D and an astrophysical code AstroBEAR. The laser ablation can suppress the growth of the short-wavelength modes in the linear phase but may enhance their growth in the nonlinear phase because of the vortex-acceleration mechanism. As the mode wavelength approaches the cutoff of the linear spectrum (short-wavelength modes), it is found that the bubble velocity grows faster than predicted in the classical 3-D theory. When compared to 2-D results, 3-D short-wavelength bubbles grow faster and do not reach saturation. The unbounded 3-D bubble acceleration is driven by the unbounded accumulation of vorticity inside the bubble. The vorticity is transferred by mass ablation from the Rayleigh-Taylor spikes into the ablated plasma filling the bubble volume. A density plateau is observed inside a nonlinear ART bubble and the plateau density is higher for shorter-wavelength modes. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  10. Compressibility Effect on the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with Sheared Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, M. S.

    2017-04-01

    We study the effect of plasma compressibility on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a magnetic interface with a sheared magnetic field. We assume that the plasma is ideal and the equilibrium quantities are constant above and below the interface. We derive the dispersion equation. Written in dimensionless variables, it contains seven dimensionless parameters: the ratio of plasma densities above and below the interface ζ, the ratio of magnetic field magnitude squared χ, the shear angle α, the plasma beta above and below the interface, β2 and β1, the angle between the perturbation wave number and the magnetic field direction above the interface φ, and the dimensionless wave number κ. Only six of these parameters are independent because χ, β1, and β2 are related by the condition of total pressure continuity at the interface. Only perturbations with the wave number smaller than the critical wave number are unstable. The critical wave number depends on φ, but it is independent of β1 and β2, and is the same as that in the incompressible plasma approximation. The dispersion equation is solved numerically with ζ= 100, χ= 1, and β1 = β2 = β. We obtain the following results. When β decreases, so does the maximum instability increment. However, the effect is very moderate. It is more pronounced for high values of α. We also calculate the dependence on φ of the maximum instability increment with respect to κ. The instability increment takes its maximum at φ= φm. Again, the decrease of β results in the reduction of the instability increment. This reduction is more pronounced for high values of |φ- φm|. When both α and |φ- φm| are small, the reduction effect is practically negligible. The theoretical results are applied to the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability of prominence threads in the solar atmosphere.

  11. Experiments and simulations on the incompressible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability with small wavelength initial perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael Scott

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is a buoyancy driven instability that takes place in a stratified fluid system with a constant acceleration directed from the heavy fluid into the light fluid. In this study, both experimental data and numerical simulations are presented. Experiments are performed primarily using a lithium-tungstate aqueous solution as the heavy liquid, but sometimes a calcium nitrate aqueous solution is used for comparison purposes. Experimental data is obtained for both miscible and immiscible fluid combinations. For the miscible experiments the light liquid is either ethanol or isopropanol, and for the immiscible experiments either silicone oil or trans-anethole is used. The resulting Atwood number is either 0.5 when the lithium-tungstate solution is used or 0.2 when the calcium nitrate solution is used. These fluid combinations are either forced or left unforced. The forced experiments have an initial perturbation imposed by vertically oscillating the liquid containing tank to produce Faraday waves at the interface. The unforced experiments rely on random interfacial fluctuations, due to background noise, to seed the instability. The liquid combination is partially enclosed in a test section that is accelerated downward along a vertical rail system causing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Accelerations of approximately 1g (with a weight and pulley system) or 10g (with a linear induction motor system) are experienced by the liquids. The tank is backlit and digitally recorded with high speed video cameras. These experiments are then simulated with the incompressible, Navier-Stokes code Miranda. The main focus of this study is the growth parameter (α) of the mixing region produced by the instability after it has become apparently self-similar and turbulent. The measured growth parameters are compared to determine the effects of miscibility and initial perturbations (of the small wavelength, finite bandwidth type used here). It is found that while

  12. Late-time quadratic growth in single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Tie; Livescu, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    The growth of the two-dimensional single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at low Atwood number (A=0.04) is investigated using Direct Numerical Simulations. The main result of the paper is that, at long times and sufficiently high Reynolds numbers, the bubble acceleration becomes stationary, indicating mean quadratic growth. This is contrary to the general belief that single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability reaches a constant bubble velocity at long times. At unity Schmidt number, the development of the instability is strongly influenced by the perturbation Reynolds number, defined as Rep≡λsqrt[Agλ/(1+A)]/ν. Thus, the instability undergoes different growth stages at low and high Rep. A new stage, chaotic development, was found at sufficiently high Rep values, after the reacceleration stage. During the chaotic stage, the instability experiences seemingly random acceleration and deceleration phases, as a result of complex vortical motions, with strong dependence on the initial perturbation shape (i.e., wavelength, amplitude, and diffusion thickness). Nevertheless, our results show that the mean acceleration of the bubble front becomes constant at late times, with little influence from the initial shape of the interface. As Rep is lowered to small values, the later instability stages, chaotic development, reacceleration, potential flow growth, and even the exponential growth described by linear stability theory, are subsequently no longer reached. Therefore, the results suggest a minimum Reynolds number and a minimum development time necessary to achieve all stages of single-mode RTI development, requirements which were not satisfied in the previous studies of single-mode RTI.

  13. The effect of normal electric field on the evolution of immiscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofighi, Nima; Ozbulut, Murat; Feng, James J.; Yildiz, Mehmet

    2016-10-01

    Manipulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using an external electric field has been the subject of many studies. However, most of these studies are focused on early stages of the evolution. In this work, the long-term evolution of the instability is investigated, focusing on the forces acting on the interface between the two fluids. To this end, numerical simulations are carried out at various electric permittivity and conductivity ratios as well as electric field intensities using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method. The electric field is applied in parallel to gravity to maintain unstable evolution. The results show that increasing top-to-bottom permittivity ratio increases the rising velocity of the bubble while hindering the spike descent. The opposite trend is observed for increasing top-to-bottom conductivity ratio. These effects are amplified at larger electric field intensities, resulting in narrower structures as the response to the excitation is non-uniform along the interface.

  14. Effect of enhanced thermal dissipation on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in emulsion-like media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toor, A.; Ryutov, D.

    1997-07-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a finely structured emulsion-like medium consisting of the two components of different compressibility is considered. Although the term ``emulsion`` is used to describe the structure of the medium, under typical fast Z-pinch conditions both components behave as gases. The two components are chosen in such a way that their densities in the unperturbed state are approximately equal. Specific emphasis has been made on the analysis of perturbations with the scale {lambda} considerably exceeding the size of the grains a. Averaged equations describing such perturbations am derived. The difference in compressibility of the two components leads to the formation of temperature variations at the scale a, and increases the rate of the thermal dissipation by a factor ({lambda}/a){sup 2}. The strongest stabilizing effect of the thermal dissipation takes place when the thermal relaxation time is comparable with the instability growth rate.

  15. Particle drift model for Z-pinch-driven magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Jia Kun; Xu, Qiang; Wang, Kun Lun; Ren, Xiao Dong; Huang, Xian Bin

    2016-09-01

    A theoretical model of Z-pinch driven magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability is proposed based on the particle drift point of view, which can explain the helical instability structure observed in premagnetized imploding liner experiments. It is demonstrated that all possible drift motions, including polarization drift, gradient drift, and curvature drift, which can lead to charge separations, each will attribute to an effective gravity acceleration. Theoretical predictions given by this model are dramatically different from those given by previous theories which have been readily recovered in the theory presented here as a limiting case. The theory shows qualitative agreement with available experimental data of the pitch angle and provides certain predictions to be verified.

  16. Non-linear Evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in a Radiation Supported Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James

    2012-01-01

    The non-linear regime of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in a radiation supported atmosphere, consisting of two uniform fluids with different densities, is studied numerically. We perform simulations using our recently developed numerical algorithm for multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics based on a variable Eddington tensor as implemented in Athena, focusing on the regime where scattering opacity greatly exceeds absorption opacity. We find that the radiation field can reduce the growth and mixing rate of RTI, but this reduction is only significant when radiation pressure significantly exceeds gas pressure. Small scale structures are also suppressed in this case. In the non-linear regime, dense fingers sink faster than rarefied bubbles can rise, leading to asymmetric structures about the interface. By comparing the calculations that use a variable Eddington tensor (VET) versus the Eddington approximation, we demonstrate that anisotropy in the radiation field can affect the non-linear development of RTI...

  17. Miscible and immiscible, forced and unforced experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael; Mokler, Matthew; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2012-11-01

    Experiments are presented in which an incompressible system of two liquids is accelerated to produce the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In these experiments, the initially stable, stratified liquid combination is accelerated downward on a vertical rail system in one of two experimental apparatuses: an apparatus in which a system of weights and pulleys accelerates the liquid filled tank, or a new apparatus which uses linear induction motors to accelerate the tank to produce much greater acceleration levels. Both miscible and immiscible liquid combinations are used. In both apparatuses the resulting fluid flows are visualized with backlit imaging using LED backlights in conjunction with monochrome high-speed video cameras, both of which travel with the moving fluid filled containers. Initial perturbations are either unforced and allowed to progress from background noise or forced by vertically oscillating the liquid combination to produce parametric internal waves. The mixing layer growth rate α is determined for all cases and compared to numerical simulations and past experiments.

  18. Nonequilibrium thermohydrodynamic effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in compressible flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Huilin; Xu, Aiguo; Zhang, Guangcai; Gan, Yanbiao; Ying, Yangjun; Succi, Sauro

    2016-08-01

    The effects of compressibility on Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) are investigated by inspecting the interplay between thermodynamic and hydrodynamic nonequilibrium phenomena (TNE, HNE, respectively) via a discrete Boltzmann model. Two effective approaches are presented, one tracking the evolution of the local TNE effects and the other focusing on the evolution of the mean temperature of the fluid, to track the complex interfaces separating the bubble and the spike regions of the flow. It is found that both the compressibility effects and the global TNE intensity show opposite trends in the initial and the later stages of the RTI. Compressibility delays the initial stage of RTI and accelerates the later stage. Meanwhile, the TNE characteristics are generally enhanced by the compressibility, especially in the later stage. The global or mean thermodynamic nonequilibrium indicators provide physical criteria to discriminate between the two stages of the RTI.

  19. On the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for incompressible viscous magnetohydrodynamic equations

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Fei; Wang, Yanjin

    2012-01-01

    We study the Rayleigh-Taylor problem for two incompressible, immiscible, viscous magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows, with zero resistivity, surface tension (or without surface tenstion) and special initial magnetic field, evolving with a free interface in the presence of a uniform gravitational field. First, we reformulate in Lagrangian coordinates MHD equations in a infinite slab as one for the Navier-Stokes equations with a force term induced by the fluid flow map. Then we analyze the linearized problem around the steady state which describes a denser immiscible fluid lying above a light one with an free interface separating the two fluids, and both fluids being in (unstable) equilibrium. By a general method of studying a family of modified variational problems, we construct smooth (when restricted to each fluid domain) solutions to the linearized problem that grow exponentially fast in time in Sobolev spaces, thus leading to an global instability result for the linearized problem. Finally, using these patholo...

  20. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability of Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doludenko, A. N.; Fortova, S. V.; Son, E. E.

    2016-10-01

    Along with Newtonian fluids (for example, water), fluids with non-Newtonian rheology are widespread in nature and industry. The characteristic feature of a non-Newtonian fluid is the non-linear dependence between the shear stress and shear rate tensors. The form of this relation defines the types of non-Newtonian behavior: viscoplastic, pseudoplastic, dilatant and viscoelastic. The present work is devoted to the study of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in pseudoplastic fluids. The main aim of the work is to undertake a direct three-dimensional numerical simulation of the mixing of two media with various rheologies and obtain the width of the mixing layer and the kinetic energy spectra, depending on the basic properties of the shear thinning liquids and the Atwood number. A theoretical study is carried out on the basis of the Navier-Stokes equation system for weakly compressible media.

  1. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Magnetohydrodynamic Simulations of the Crab Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Porth, Oliver; Keppens, Rony

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the development of Rayleigh-Taylor filaments in axisymmetric simulations of Pulsar wind nebulae (PWN). High-resolution adaptive mesh refinement magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations are used to resolve the non-linear evolution of the instability. The typical separation of filaments is mediated by the turbulent flow in the nebula and hierarchical growth of the filaments. The strong magnetic dissipation and field-randomization found in recent global three-dimensional simulations of PWN suggests that magnetic tension is not strong enough to suppress the growth of RT filaments, in agreement with the observations of prominent filaments in the Crab nebula. The long-term axisymmetric results presented here confirm this finding.

  2. Revisiting the Effects of Compressibility on the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Qianhong; LI Ding

    2007-01-01

    The effects of compressibility on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability(RTI)are investigated.It is shown that the controversy over compressibility effects in the previous studies is due to improper comparison,in which the density varying effect obscures the real role of compressibility.After eliminating the density varying effect,it is found that the compressibility destabilizes RTI in both the cases of constant density and exponentially varying density when M<1.This destabilizing effect is more important at smaller values of the Atwood number AT or greater values of gravity g,and the increment in the growth rate produced by compressibility depends inversely on the pressure p or the ratio of specific heat I.

  3. Comparison of two- and three-dimensional simulations of miscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabot, W

    2006-02-23

    A comparison of two-dimensional and three-dimensional high-resolution numerical large-eddy simulations of planar, miscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability flows are presented. The resolution of the three-dimensional simulation is sufficient to attain a fully turbulent state. A number of different statistics from the mixing region (e.g., growth rates, PDFs, mixedness measures, and spectra) are used to demonstrate that two-dimensional flow simulations differ substantially from the three-dimensional one. It is found that the two-dimensional flow grows more quickly than its three-dimensional counterpart at late times, develops larger structures, and is much less well mixed. These findings are consistent with the concept of inverse cascade in two-dimensional flow, as well as the influence of a reduced effective Atwood number on miscible flow.

  4. Numerical study on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in the lightning return stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Qiang, E-mail: cq0405@126.com [National Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Environment and Electro-optical Engineering, PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210007 (China); Luoyang Electronic Equipment Testing Center, Luoyang 471000 (China); Chen, Bin, E-mail: emcchen@163.com; Shi, Lihua; Yi, Yun [National Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Environment and Electro-optical Engineering, PLA University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210007 (China); Wang, Yangyang [Department of Electro-optical Engineering, Electronic Engineering Institute of PLA, Hefei 230037 (China)

    2015-09-15

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities are important hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) phenomena that are found in systems in high energy density physics and normal fluids. The formation and evolution of the R-T instability at channel boundary during back-flow of the lightning return stroke are analyzed using the linear perturbation theory and normal mode analysis methods, and the linear growth rate of the R-T instability in typical condition for lightning return stroke channel is obtained. Then, the R-T instability phenomena of lightning return stroke are simulated using a two-dimensional Eulerian finite volumes resistive radiation MHD code. The numerical results show that the evolution characteristics of the R-T instability in the early stage of back-flow are consistent with theoretical predictions obtained by linear analysis. The simulation also yields more evolution characteristics for the R-T instability beyond the linear theory. The results of this work apply to some observed features of the return stroke channel and further advance previous theoretical and experimental work.

  5. Numerical study on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in the lightning return stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; Chen, Bin; Shi, Lihua; Yi, Yun; Wang, Yangyang

    2015-09-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities are important hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) phenomena that are found in systems in high energy density physics and normal fluids. The formation and evolution of the R-T instability at channel boundary during back-flow of the lightning return stroke are analyzed using the linear perturbation theory and normal mode analysis methods, and the linear growth rate of the R-T instability in typical condition for lightning return stroke channel is obtained. Then, the R-T instability phenomena of lightning return stroke are simulated using a two-dimensional Eulerian finite volumes resistive radiation MHD code. The numerical results show that the evolution characteristics of the R-T instability in the early stage of back-flow are consistent with theoretical predictions obtained by linear analysis. The simulation also yields more evolution characteristics for the R-T instability beyond the linear theory. The results of this work apply to some observed features of the return stroke channel and further advance previous theoretical and experimental work.

  6. Simulating the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in polymer fluids with dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanggui; Geng, Xingguo; Zhuang, Xin; Wang, Lihua; Ouyang, Jie

    2016-04-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability that occurs in the flow of polymer fluids is numerically investigated with dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) method at the mesoscale particle level. For modeling two-phase flow, the Flory-Huggins parameter is introduced to model binary fluids. And the polymer chains in fluids are described by the modified FENE model that depicts both the elastic tension and the elastic repulsion between the adjacent beads with bond length as the equilibrium length of one segment. Besides, a bead repulsive potential is employed to capture entanglements between polymer chains. Through our model and numerical simulation, we research the dynamics behaviors of the RT instability in polymer fluid medium. Furthermore, we also explore the effects of polymer volume concentration, chain length, and extensibility on the evolution of RT instability. These simulation results show that increasing any of the parameters, concentration, chain length, and extensibility, the saturation length of spikes becomes longer, and the two polymer fluids have less mixture. On the contrary, for the case of low concentration, or short chain, or small extensibility, the spikes easily split and break up, and the RT instability pattern evolves into chaotic structure. These observations indicate that the polymer and its properties drastically modify the RT instability pattern.

  7. The Experimental Study of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability using a Linear Induction Motor Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Nicholas; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2009-11-01

    The experiments to be presented utilize an incompressible system of two stratified miscible liquids of different densities that are accelerated in order to produce the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Three liquid combinations are used: isopropyl alcohol with water, a calcium nitrate solution or a lithium polytungstate solution, giving Atwood numbers of 0.11, 0.22 and 0.57, respectively. The acceleration required to drive the instability is produced by two high-speed linear induction motors mounted to an 8 m tall drop tower. The motors are mounted in parallel and have an effective acceleration length of 1.7 m and are each capable of producing 15 kN of thrust. The liquid system is contained within a square acrylic tank with inside dimensions 76 x76x184 mm. The tank is mounted to an aluminum plate, which is driven by the motors to create constant accelerations in the range of 1-20 g's, though the potential exists for higher accelerations. Also attached to the plate are a high-speed camera and an LED backlight to provide continuous video of the instability. In addition, an accelerometer is used to provide acceleration measurements during each experiment. Experimental image sequences will be presented which show the development of a random three-dimensional instability from an unforced initial perturbation. Measurements of the mixing zone width will be compared with traditional growth models.

  8. Observation of Rayleigh-Taylor-Instability Evolution in a Plasma Regime Expected to Provide Magnetic and Viscous Stabilization

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, Colin S; Hsu, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    We present time-resolved observations of Rayleigh-Taylor-instability growth at the interface between an unmagnetized plasma jet colliding with a stagnated, magnetized plasma. The observed instability growth time ($\\sim 10$ $\\mu$s) is consistent with the estimated linear Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate calculated using experimentally inferred values of density ($\\sim 10^{14}$ cm$^{-3}$) and acceleration ($10^9$ m/s$^2$). The observed instability wavelengths ($\\gtrsim 1$ cm) are consistent with stabilization of short wavelengths by a magnetic field of the experimentally measured magnitude ($\\sim 15$ G) and direction. Comparisons of data with idealized magnetohydrodynamic simulations including a physical viscosity model suggest that the observed instability evolution is consistent with both magnetic and viscous stabilization.

  9. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in prominences from numerical simulations including partial ionization effects

    CERN Document Server

    Khomenko, E; de Vicente, A; Collados, M; Luna, M

    2014-01-01

    We study the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at a prominence-corona transition region in a non-linear regime. Our aim is to understand how the presence of neutral atoms in the prominence plasma influences the instability growth rate, and the evolution of velocity, magnetic field vector and thermodynamic parameters of turbulent drops. We perform 2.5D numerical simulations of the instability initiated by a multi-mode perturbation at the corona-prominence interface using a single-fluid MHD approach including a generalized Ohm's law. The initial equilibrium configuration is purely hydrostatic and contains a homogeneous horizontal magnetic field forming an angle with the direction in which the plasma is perturbed. We analyze simulations with two different orientations of the magnetic field. For each field orientation we compare two simulations, one for the pure MHD case, and one including the ambipolar diffusion in the Ohm's law (AD case). Other than that, both simulations for each field orientation are identica...

  10. Experimental Studies of the Electrothermal and Magneto-Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities on Thin Metal Foil Ablations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Adam; Yager-Elorriaga, David; Patel, Sonal; Jordan, Nicholas; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Lau, Y. Y.

    2015-11-01

    The electrothermal instability (ETI) and magneto-Rayleigh Taylor instability (MRT) are important in the implosion of metallic liners, such as magnetized liner implosion fusion (MagLIF). The MAIZE linear transformer driver (LTD) at the University of Michigan generates 200 ns risetime-current pulses of 500 to 600 kA into Al foil liners to study plasma instabilities and implosion dynamics, most recently MRT growth on imploding cylindrical liners. A full circuit model of MAIZE, along with I-V measurements, yields time-resolved load inductance. This has enabled measurements of an effective current-carrying radius to determine implosion velocity and plasma-vacuum interface acceleration. Measurements are also compared to implosion data from 4-time-frame laser shadowgraphy. Improved resolution measurements on the laser shadowgraph system have been used to examine the liner interface early in the shot to examine surface perturbations resulting from ETI for various seeding conditions. Fourier analysis examines the growth rates of wavelength bands of these structures to examine the transition from ETI to MRT. This work was supported by the U.S. DoE through award DE-SC0012328. S.G. Patel is supported by Sandia National Labs. D.A. Yager is supported by NSF fellowship grant DGE 1256260.

  11. Highly symmetric interfacial structures in Rayleigh Taylor instability with time-dependent acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-10-01

    Rayleigh Taylor instability in a power-law time dependent acceleration field is investigated for a flow with the symmetry group p6mm (hexagonal) in the plane normal to acceleration. The Regular asymptotic solutions form a one-parameter family and the physically significant solution is identified with the one having the fastest growth and being stable (bubble tip velocity). Two distinct regimes are identified dependent on the acceleration exponent, the RM-type regime, where the dynamics is identical to conventional RM instability and is dominated by initial conditions, and the RT-type regime where the dynamics is dominated by the acceleration term. For the latter, the time dependence has profound effects on the dynamics. In the RT non-linear regime, the time dependence has no consequence on the morphology of the bubbles but the growth rate (bubble tip velocity) evolves as power law with the exponent set by the acceleration. The solutions for a one-parameter family, and are convergent with exponential decay of Fourier amplitudes close to the physical solution. The solutions are stable at maximum tip velocity and flat bubbles are unstable, and the growth/decay of perturbations is no longer purely exponential and depends on the acceleration exponent. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  12. Highly symmetric interfacial coherent structures in Rayleigh Taylor instability with time-dependent acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Aklant K.; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    Rayleigh Taylor instability in a power-law time dependent acceleration field is investigated theoretically for a flow with the symmetry group p6mm (hexagon) in the plane normal to acceleration. In the nonlinear regime, regular asymptotic solutions form a one-parameter family. The physically significant solution is identified with the one having the fastest growth and being stable (bubble tip velocity). Two distinct regimes are identified depending on the acceleration exponent. Particularly, the RM-type regime, where the dynamics is identical to conventional RM instability and is dominated by initial conditions, and the RT-type regime where the dynamics is dominated by the acceleration term. For the latter, the time dependence has profound effects on the dynamics. In the RT non-linear regime, the time dependence has no consequence on the morphology of the bubbles; the growth rate (bubble tip velocity) evolves as power law with the exponent set by the acceleration. The solutions for a one-parameter family, and are convergent with exponential decay of Fourier amplitudes. The solutions are stable at maximum tip velocity, whereas flat bubbles are unstable, and the growth/decay of perturbations is no longer purely exponential and depends on the acceleration exponent. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  13. Algorithm and exploratory study of the Hall MHD Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardiner, Thomas Anthony

    2010-09-01

    This report is concerned with the influence of the Hall term on the nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability. This begins with a review of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations including the Hall term and the wave modes which are present in the system on time scales short enough that the plasma can be approximated as being stationary. In this limit one obtains what are known as the electron MHD (EMHD) equations which support two characteristic wave modes known as the whistler and Hall drift modes. Each of these modes is considered in some detail in order to draw attention to their key features. This analysis also serves to provide a background for testing the numerical algorithms used in this work. The numerical methods are briefly described and the EMHD solver is then tested for the evolution of whistler and Hall drift modes. These methods are then applied to study the nonlinear evolution of the MHD RT instability with and without the Hall term for two different configurations. The influence of the Hall term on the mixing and bubble growth rate are analyzed.

  14. Effects of acceleration rate on Rayleigh-Taylor instability in elastic-plastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arindam; Polavarapu, Rinosh

    2016-11-01

    The effect of acceleration rate in the elastic-plastic transition stage of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in an accelerated non-Newtonian material is investigated experimentally using a rotating wheel experiment. A non-Newtonian material (mayonnaise) was accelerated at different rates by varying the angular acceleration of a rotating wheel and growth patterns of single mode perturbations with different combinations of amplitude and wavelength were analyzed. Experiments were run at two different acceleration rates to compare with experiments presented in prior years at APS DFD meetings and the peak amplitude responses are captured using a high-speed camera. Similar to the instability acceleration, the elastic-plastic transition acceleration is found to be increasing with increase in acceleration rate for a given amplitude and wavelength. The experimental results will be compared to various analytical strength models and prior experimental studies using Newtonian fluids. Authors acknowledge funding support from Los Alamos National Lab subcontract(370333) and DOE-SSAA Grant (DE-NA0001975).

  15. Rayleigh-Taylor instability in partially ionized compressible plasmas: one fluid approach

    CERN Document Server

    Diaz, A J; Collados, M

    2014-01-01

    We study the modification of the classical criterion for the linear onset and growth rate of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in a partially ionized (PI) plasma in the one-fluid description, considering a generalized induction equation. The governing linear equations and appropriate boundary conditions, including gravitational terms, are derived and applied to the case of the RTI in a single interface between two partially ionized plasmas. The boundary conditions lead to an equation for the frequencies in which some of them have positive complex parts, marking the appearance of the RTI. We study the ambipolar term alone first, extending the result to the full induction equation later. We find that the configuration is always unstable because of the presence of a neutral species. In the classical stability regime the growth rate is small, since the collisions prevent the neutral fluid to fully develop the RTI. For parameters in the classical instability regime the growth rate is lowered, but for the consi...

  16. Evidence for a bubble-competition regime in indirectly driven ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments on the NIF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, D A; Smalyuk, V A; Kane, J O; Casner, A; Liberatore, S; Masse, L P

    2015-05-29

    We investigate on the National Ignition Facility the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regimes. A planar plastic package with preimposed two-dimensional broadband modulations is accelerated for up to 12 ns by the x-ray drive of a gas-filled Au radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. This extended tailored drive allows a distance traveled in excess of 1 mm for a 130  μm thick foil. Measurements of the modulation optical density performed by x-ray radiography show that a bubble-merger regime for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability at an ablation front is achieved for the first time in indirect drive. The mutimode modulation amplitudes are in the nonlinear regime, grow beyond the Haan multimode saturation level, evolve toward the longer wavelengths, and show insensitivity to the initial conditions.

  17. Experimental Observation of Nonlinear Mode Coupling In the Ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability on the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, David

    2015-11-01

    We investigate on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the transition from linear to highly nonlinear regimes. This work is part of the Discovery Science Program on NIF and of particular importance to indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where careful attention to the form of the rise to final peak drive is calculated to prevent the RT instability from shredding the ablator in-flight and leading to ablator mixing into the cold fuel. The growth of the ablative RT instability was investigated using a planar plastic foil with pre-imposed two-dimensional broadband modulations and diagnosed using x-ray radiography. The foil was accelerated for 12ns by the x-ray drive created in a gas-filled Au radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. The dependence on initial conditions was investigated by systematically changing the modulation amplitude, ablator material and the modulation pattern. For each of these cases bubble mergers were observed and the nonlinear evolution of the RT instability showed insensitivity to the initial conditions. This experiment provides critical data needed to validate current theories on the ablative RT instability for indirect drive that relies on the ablative stabilization of short-scale modulations for ICF ignition. This paper will compare the experimental data to the current nonlinear theories. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC.

  18. Stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in quantum magnetized plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L. F.; Ye, W. H.; He, X. T. [HEDPS and CAPT, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Yang, B. L. [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 (China); Graduate School, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Beijing 100088 (China)

    2012-07-15

    In this research, stabilization of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) due to density gradients, magnetic fields, and quantum effects, in an ideal incompressible plasma, is studied analytically and numerically. A second-order ordinary differential equation (ODE) for the RTI including quantum corrections, with a continuous density profile, in a uniform external magnetic field, is obtained. Analytic expressions of the linear growth rate of the RTI, considering modifications of density gradients, magnetic fields, and quantum effects, are presented. Numerical approaches are performed to solve the second-order ODE. The analytical model proposed here agrees with the numerical calculation. It is found that the density gradients, the magnetic fields, and the quantum effects, respectively, have a stabilizing effect on the RTI (reduce the linear growth of the RTI). The RTI can be completely quenched by the magnetic field stabilization and/or the quantum effect stabilization in proper circumstances leading to a cutoff wavelength. The quantum effect stabilization plays a central role in systems with large Atwood number and small normalized density gradient scale length. The presence of external transverse magnetic fields beside the quantum effects will bring about more stability on the RTI. The stabilization of the linear growth of the RTI, for parameters closely related to inertial confinement fusion and white dwarfs, is discussed. Results could potentially be valuable for the RTI treatment to analyze the mixing in supernovas and other RTI-driven objects.

  19. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability and Excitation of Super-Dreicer Electric Fields in the Solar Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Kronshtadtov, P. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2016-11-01

    Within the framework of the long-standing so-called "number problem" in the physics of solar flares, we consider the excitation of a super-Dreicer electric field at the leading edge of the electric current pulse that occurs at the chromospheric legs of a coronal magnetic loop as a result of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. It is shown that for a sufficiently strong electric current, I0 ≥ 10^{10} A, the current pulse propagates in the non-linear mode and generates a strong longitudinal electric field Ez, which strongly depends on the current (Ez ∝ I03) and can exceed the Dreicer field (Ez > ED). In this case, the bulk of electrons in the site of the current pulse is in a runaway mode, and the energy release rate in the chromosphere increases significantly. Super-Dreicer electric fields also provide injection of protons into the regime of acceleration by Langmuir turbulence generated by fast electrons at the leading edge of the electric current pulse. The electric field at the pulse edge can exceed the Dreicer field starting from the chromosphere level with the number density n ≈ 10^{13} cm^{-3}. At a lower current I0 < 10^{10} A, a super-Dreicer mode at the higher levels of the chromosphere with n < 10^{12} cm^{-3} occurs.

  20. Solar effect on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth rate as simulated by the NCAR TIEGCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qian

    2017-04-01

    The TIEGCM (Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model) is used to investigate the solar effect on the equatorial ionospheric Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability growth rate, which is responsible for the occurrence of the plasma bubbles. The R-T growth rate is calculated for the solar maximum year 2003 and minimum 2009. The growth rate is strongly dependent on the solar activity. During solar maximum, the pre-reversal enhancement is much stronger leading to higher R-T growth rate. The R-T growth rates from the TIEGCM follow the same solar dependence as the observed occurrence of equatorial plasma bubbles by DMSP satellites. The R-T growth rate also enhances when the day/night terminator is parallel to the magnetic field line near the equator. The R-T growth rate does not correlate well with the solar F10.7 index on a short time scale ( 10 days) because the field-line integrated electron content gradient cancels out the positive correlation between the vertical ion drift with the F10.7 index. The TIEGCM result shows the importance of the electron content gradient to the R-T growth rate and the plasma bubble occurrence. The bubble occurrence rates were estimated based on the vertical ion drift simulation results.

  1. Comprehensive numerical methodology for direct numerical simulations of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckinger, Scott J.; Livescu, Daniel; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2016-05-01

    An investigation of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) using Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) requires efficient numerical methods, advanced boundary conditions, and consistent initialization in order to capture the wide range of scales and vortex dynamics present in the system, while reducing the computational impact associated with acoustic wave generation and the subsequent interaction with the flow. An advanced computational framework is presented that handles the challenges introduced by considering the compressive nature of RTI systems, which include sharp interfacial density gradients on strongly stratified background states, acoustic wave generation and removal at computational boundaries, and stratification dependent vorticity production. The foundation of the numerical methodology described here is the wavelet-based grid adaptivity of the Parallel Adaptive Wavelet Collocation Method (PAWCM) that maintains symmetry in single-mode RTI systems to extreme late-times. PAWCM is combined with a consistent initialization, which reduces the generation of acoustic disturbances, and effective boundary treatments, which prevent acoustic reflections. A dynamic time integration scheme that can handle highly nonlinear and potentially stiff systems, such as compressible RTI, completes the computational framework. The numerical methodology is used to simulate two-dimensional single-mode RTI to extreme late-times for a wide range of flow compressibility and variable density effects. The results show that flow compressibility acts to reduce the growth of RTI for low Atwood numbers, as predicted from linear stability analysis.

  2. Phase-field model for the Rayleigh--Taylor instability of immiscible fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Celani, Antonio; Muratore-Ginanneschi, Paolo; Vozella, Lara

    2008-01-01

    The Rayleigh--Taylor instability of two immiscible fluids in the limit of small Atwood numbers is studied by means of a phase-field description. In this method the sharp fluid interface is replaced by a thin, yet finite, transition layer where the interfacial forces vary smoothly. This is achieved by introducing an order parameter (the phase field) whose variation is continuous across the interfacial layers and is uniform in the bulk region. The phase field model obeys a Cahn--Hilliard equation and is two-way coupled to the standard Navier--Stokes equations. Starting from this system of equations we have first performed a linear analysis from which we have analytically rederived the known gravity-capillary dispersion relation in the limit of vanishing mixing energy density and capillary width. We have performed numerical simulations and identified a region of parameters in which the known properties of the linear phase (both stable and unstable) are reproduced in a very accurate way. This has been done both i...

  3. Miscible and immiscible liquid experiments and simulations on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael; Mokler, Matthew; Cabot, William; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2011-11-01

    Experiments and numerical simulations are presented in which an incompressible system of two liquids is accelerated to produce the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. In these experiments, the initially stable, stratified liquid combination is accelerated downward on a vertical rail system in one of two experimental apparatuses: an apparatus in which a system of weights and pulleys accelerates the liquid filled tank (which is affixed to a test sled), or a new apparatus which uses linear induction motors to accelerate the tank (which is attached to an aluminum plate) to produce much greater acceleration levels. Both miscible and immiscible liquid combinations are used. In both apparatuses the resulting fluid flows are visualized with backlit imaging using LED backlights in conjunction with monochrome high-speed video cameras, both of which travel with the moving fluid filled containers. Initial perturbations are either unforced and allowed to progress from background noise or forced by vertically oscillating the liquid combination to produce parametric internal waves. The results of these experiments are compared to numerical simulations performed using the CFD code Miranda.

  4. Rayleigh-Taylor Instability and Excitation of Super-Dreicer Electric Fields in the Solar Chromosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsev, V. V.; Kronshtadtov, P. V.; Stepanov, A. V.

    2016-09-01

    Within the framework of the long-standing so-called "number problem" in the physics of solar flares, we consider the excitation of a super-Dreicer electric field at the leading edge of the electric current pulse that occurs at the chromospheric legs of a coronal magnetic loop as a result of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. It is shown that for a sufficiently strong electric current, I0 ≥ 10^{10} A, the current pulse propagates in the non-linear mode and generates a strong longitudinal electric field Ez, which strongly depends on the current ( Ez ∝ I03) and can exceed the Dreicer field ( Ez > ED). In this case, the bulk of electrons in the site of the current pulse is in a runaway mode, and the energy release rate in the chromosphere increases significantly. Super-Dreicer electric fields also provide injection of protons into the regime of acceleration by Langmuir turbulence generated by fast electrons at the leading edge of the electric current pulse. The electric field at the pulse edge can exceed the Dreicer field starting from the chromosphere level with the number density n ≈ 10^{13} cm^{-3}. At a lower current I0 < 10^{10} A, a super-Dreicer mode at the higher levels of the chromosphere with n < 10^{12} cm^{-3} occurs.

  5. The Destruction of 3He by Rayleigh-Taylor Instability on the First Giant Branch

    CERN Document Server

    Eggleton, P P; Lattanzio, J C

    2006-01-01

    Low-mass stars, ~1-2 solar masses, near the Main Sequence are efficient at producing 3He, which they mix into the convective envelope on the giant branch and distribute into the Galaxy by way of envelope loss. This process is so efficient that it is difficult to reconcile the observed cosmic abundance of 3He with the predictions of Big Bang nucleosynthesis. In this paper we find, by modeling a red giant with a fully three-dimensional hydrodynamic code and a full nucleosynthetic network, that mixing arises in the supposedly stable and radiative zone between the hydrogen-burning shell and the base of the convective envelope. This mixing is due to Rayleigh-Taylor instability within a zone just above the hydrogen-burning shell. In this zone the burning of the 3He left behind by the retreating convective envelope is predominantly by the reaction 3He + 3He -> 4He + 2p, a reaction which, untypically for stellar nuclear reactions, {\\it lowers} the mean molecular weight, leading to a local minimum. This local minimum ...

  6. Rayleigh-Taylor instability under curved substrates: An optimal transient growth analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, Gioele; Brun, P.-T.; Gallaire, François

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the stability of thin viscous films coated on the inside of a horizontal cylindrical substrate. In such a case, gravity acts both as a stabilizing force through the progressive drainage of the film and as a destabilizing force prone to form droplets via the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The drainage solution, derived from lubrication equations, is found asymptotically stable with respect to infinitesimally small perturbations, although in reality, droplets often form. To resolve this paradox, we perform an optimal transient growth analysis for the first-order perturbations of the liquid's interface, generalizing the results of Trinh et al. [Phys. Fluids 26, 051704 (2014), 10.1063/1.4876476]. We find that the system displays a linear transient growth potential that gives rise to two different scenarios depending on the value of the Bond number (prescribing the relative importance of gravity and surface tension forces). At low Bond numbers, the optimal perturbation of the interface does not generate droplets. In contrast, for higher Bond numbers, perturbations on the upper hemicircle yield gains large enough to potentially form droplets. The gain increases exponentially with the Bond number. In particular, depending on the amplitude of the initial perturbation, we find a critical Bond number above which the short-time linear growth is sufficient to trigger the nonlinear effects required to form dripping droplets. We conclude that the transition to droplets detaching from the substrate is noise and perturbation dependent.

  7. Viscous effects on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability with background temperature gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Gerashchenko, S

    2016-01-01

    The growth rate of the compressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability is studied in the presence of a background temperature gradient, $\\Theta$, using a normal mode analysis. The effect of $\\Theta$ variation is examined for three interface types corresponding to combinations of the viscous properties of the fluids (inviscid-inviscid, viscous-viscous and viscous-inviscid) at different Atwood numbers, $At$, and, when at least one of the fluids' viscosity is non-zero, as a function of the Grashof number. For the general case, the resulting ordinary differential equations are solved numerically; however, dispersion relations for the growth rate are presented for several limiting cases. An analytical solution is found for the inviscid-inviscid interface and the corresponding dispersion equation for the growth rate is obtained in the limit of a large $\\Theta$. For the viscous-inviscid case, a dispersion relation is derived in the incompressible limit and $\\Theta=0$. Compared to $\\Theta=0$ case, the role of $\\Theta0$ (col...

  8. Numerical Experiments with a Turbulent Single-Mode Rayleigh-Taylor Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cloutman, L.D.

    2000-04-01

    Direct numerical simulation is a powerful tool for studying turbulent flows. Unfortunately, it is also computationally expensive and often beyond the reach of the largest, fastest computers. Consequently, a variety of turbulence models have been devised to allow tractable and affordable simulations of averaged flow fields. Unfortunately, these present a variety of practical difficulties, including the incorporation of varying degrees of empiricism and phenomenology, which leads to a lack of universality. This unsatisfactory state of affairs has led to the speculation that one can avoid the expense and bother of using a turbulence model by relying on the grid and numerical diffusion of the computational fluid dynamics algorithm to introduce a spectral cutoff on the flow field and to provide dissipation at the grid scale, thereby mimicking two main effects of a large eddy simulation model. This paper shows numerical examples of a single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which this procedure produces questionable results. We then show a dramatic improvement when two simple subgrid-scale models are employed. This study also illustrates the extreme sensitivity to initial conditions that is a common feature of turbulent flows.

  9. Fully-kinetic simulations of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in high-energy-density plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, E. Paulo; Mori, Warren B.; Fiuza, Frederico

    2016-10-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in high-energy-density (HED) plasmas is a central problem in a wide range of scenarios. It dictates, for instance, the dynamics of supernovae in astrophysical plasmas, and is also recognized as a critical challenge to achieving ignition in inertial confinement fusion. In some of these conditions the Larmor radius or Coulomb mean free path (m.f.p.) is finite, allowing kinetic effects to become important, and it is not fully clear how the development of the RTI deviates from standard hydrodynamic behavior. In order to obtain an accurate description of the RTI in these HED conditions it is essential to capture the self-consistent interplay between collisional and collisionless plasma processes, and the role of self-generated electric and magnetic fields. We have explored the dynamics of the RTI in HED plasma conditions using first-principles particle-in-cell simulations combined with Monte Carlo binary collisions. Our simulations capture the role of kinetic diffusion as well as the self-generated electric (e.g. space-charge) and magnetic (e.g. Biermann battery) fields on the growth rate and nonlinear evolution of the RTI for different plasma conditions. We will discuss how different collisional m.f.p. relative to the collisionless plasma skin depth affect the RTI development. This work was supported by the DOE Office of Science, Fusion Energy Science (FWP 100182).

  10. Three-Dimensional DSMC Simulations of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, T. P.; Gallis, M. A.; Torczynski, J. R.; Plimpton, S. J.

    2016-11-01

    The Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method of molecular gas dynamics is applied to simulate the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) in atmospheric-pressure monatomic gases (e.g., argon and helium). The computational domain is a 1-mm by 1-mm by 4-mm cuboid uniformly divided into 62.5 billion cubical cells. A total of 1 trillion computational molecules are used, and time steps of 0.1 ns are used. Simulations are performed to quantify the growth of perturbations on an initially flat interface as a function of the Atwood number. The DSMC results reproduce many features of the RTI and are in reasonable agreement with theoretical and empirical models. Consistent with previous work, the DSMC simulations indicate that the growth of the RTI follows a universal behavior. The numbers of bubble-spike pairs that eventually appear agree with theoretical values based on the most unstable wavelength and are independent of the statistical representation of the gas. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  11. Rayleigh-Taylor finger instability mixing in hydrodynamic shell convection models

    CERN Document Server

    Mocak, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Mixing processes in stars driven by composition gradients as a result of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability are not anticipated. They are supported only by hydrodynamic studies of stellar convection. We find that such mixing occurs below the bottom edge of convection zones in our multidimensional hydrodynamic shell convection models. It operates at interfaces created by off-center nuclear burning, where less dense gas with higher mean molecular weight is located above denser gas with a lower mean molecular weight. We discuss the mixing under various conditions with hydrodynamic convection models based on stellar evolutionary calculations of the core helium flash in a 1.25 Msun star, the core carbon flash in a 9.3 Msun star, and of oxygen burning shell in a star with a mass of 23 Msun. We simulate the hydrodynamic behavior of shell convection during various phases of stellar evolution with the Eulerian hydrodynamics code HERAKLES in two and three spatial dimensions. Initial models for this purpose are obtained by...

  12. Controlling Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in solid liner implosions with rotating magnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, P. F.; McBride, R. D.; Robertson, G. K.; Velikovich, A. L.

    2016-10-01

    We report calculations demonstrating that a remarkable reduction in the growth of the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRTI) in initially solid, cylindrical metal shells can be achieved by applying a magnetic drive with a tilted, dynamic polarization, forming a solid-liner dynamic screw pinch (SLDSP). Using a self-consistent analytic framework, we demonstrate that MRTI growth factors of the most detrimental modes may be reduced by up to two orders of magnitude relative to conventional z-pinch implosions. One key application of this technique is to enable increasingly stable, higher performance liner implosions to achieve fusion. We weigh the potentially dramatic benefits of the SLDSP against the practical tradeoffs required to achieve the desired drive field history and identify promising target designs for future experimental and computational investigations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. DoE's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  13. A new data processing technique for Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Yongteng; Tu, Shaoyong; Miao, Wenyong; Yin, Chuansheng; Hao, Yidan; Ding, Yongkun; Jiang, Shaoen, E-mail: jiangshn@vip.sina.com [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Wu, Junfeng; Wang, Lifeng; Ye, Wenhua [Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2016-06-15

    Typical face-on experiments for Rayleigh-Taylor instability study involve the time-resolved radiography of an accelerated foil with line-of-sight of the radiography along the direction of motion. The usual method which derives perturbation amplitudes from the face-on images reverses the actual image transmission procedure, so the obtained results will have a large error in the case of large optical depth. In order to improve the accuracy of data processing, a new data processing technique has been developed to process the face-on images. This technique based on convolution theorem, refined solutions of optical depth can be achieved by solving equations. Furthermore, we discuss both techniques for image processing, including the influence of modulation transfer function of imaging system and the backlighter spatial profile. Besides, we use the two methods to the process the experimental results in Shenguang-II laser facility and the comparison shows that the new method effectively improve the accuracy of data processing.

  14. A new data processing technique for Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongteng Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Typical face-on experiments for Rayleigh-Taylor instability study involve the time-resolved radiography of an accelerated foil with line-of-sight of the radiography along the direction of motion. The usual method which derives perturbation amplitudes from the face-on images reverses the actual image transmission procedure, so the obtained results will have a large error in the case of large optical depth. In order to improve the accuracy of data processing, a new data processing technique has been developed to process the face-on images. This technique based on convolution theorem, refined solutions of optical depth can be achieved by solving equations. Furthermore, we discuss both techniques for image processing, including the influence of modulation transfer function of imaging system and the backlighter spatial profile. Besides, we use the two methods to the process the experimental results in Shenguang-II laser facility and the comparison shows that the new method effectively improve the accuracy of data processing.

  15. A new data processing technique for Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yongteng; Tu, Shaoyong; Miao, Wenyong; Wu, Junfeng; Wang, Lifeng; Yin, Chuansheng; Hao, Yidan; Ye, Wenhua; Ding, Yongkun; Jiang, Shaoen

    2016-06-01

    Typical face-on experiments for Rayleigh-Taylor instability study involve the time-resolved radiography of an accelerated foil with line-of-sight of the radiography along the direction of motion. The usual method which derives perturbation amplitudes from the face-on images reverses the actual image transmission procedure, so the obtained results will have a large error in the case of large optical depth. In order to improve the accuracy of data processing, a new data processing technique has been developed to process the face-on images. This technique based on convolution theorem, refined solutions of optical depth can be achieved by solving equations. Furthermore, we discuss both techniques for image processing, including the influence of modulation transfer function of imaging system and the backlighter spatial profile. Besides, we use the two methods to the process the experimental results in Shenguang-II laser facility and the comparison shows that the new method effectively improve the accuracy of data processing.

  16. Analysis of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability Part I: Bubble and Spike Count

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamath, C; Gezahegne, A; Miller, P

    2006-08-08

    The use of high-performance computers to simulate hydrodynamic instabilities has resulted in the generation of massive amounts of data. One aspect of the analysis of this data involves the identification and characterization of coherent structures known as ''bubbles'' and ''spikes''. This can be a challenge as there is no precise definition of these structures, and the large size of the data, as well as its distributed nature, precludes any extensive experimentation with different definitions and analysis algorithms. In this report, we describe the use of image processing techniques to identify and count bubbles and spikes in the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which occurs when an initially perturbed interface between a heavier fluid and a lighter fluid is allowed to grow under the influence of gravity. We analyze data from two simulations, one a large-eddy simulation with 30 terabytes of analysis data, and the other a direct numerical simulation with 80 terabytes of analysis data. We consider different techniques to first convert the three-dimensional data to two dimensions and then count the structures of interest in the two-dimensional data. Our analysis of the bubble and spike counts over time indicates that there are four distinct regimes in the process of the mixing of the two fluids, starting from the initial linear stage, followed by the non-linear stage with weak turbulence, the mixing transition stage, and the final stage of strong turbulence. We also show that our results are relatively insensitive to the parameters used in our algorithms.

  17. Experimental techniques for measuring Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion (ICF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smalyuk, V A

    2012-06-07

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is one of the major concerns in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) because it amplifies target modulations in both acceleration and deceleration phases of implosion, which leads to shell disruption and performance degradation of imploding targets. This article reviews experimental results of the RT growth experiments performed on OMEGA laser system, where targets were driven directly with laser light. RT instability was studied in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The experiments were performed in acceleration phase, using planar and spherical targets, and in deceleration phase of spherical implosions, using spherical shells. Initial target modulations consisted of 2-D pre-imposed modulations, and 2-D and 3-D modulations imprinted on targets by the non-uniformities in laser drive. In planar geometry, the nonlinear regime was studied using 3-D modulations with broadband spectra near nonlinear saturation levels. In acceleration-phase, the measured modulation Fourier spectra and nonlinear growth velocities are in good agreement with those predicted by Haan's model [Haan S W 1989 Phys. Rev. A 39 5812]. In a real-space analysis, the bubble merger was quantified by a self-similar evolution of bubble size distributions [Oron D et al 2001 Phys. Plasmas 8, 2883]. The 3-D, inner-surface modulations were measured to grow throughout the deceleration phase of spherical implosions. RT growth rates are very sensitive to the drive conditions, therefore they can be used to test and validate drive physics in hydrodynamic codes used to design ICF implosions. Measured growth rates of pre-imposed 2-D target modulations below nonlinear saturation levels were used to validate non-local thermal electron transport model in laser-driven experiments.

  18. Lattice Boltzmann simulation of three-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, H.; Li, Q. X.; Shi, B. C.; Chai, Z. H.

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, the three-dimensional (3D) Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) with low Atwood number (At=0.15 ) in a long square duct (12 W ×W ×W ) is studied by using a multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann (LB) multiphase model. The effect of the Reynolds number on the interfacial dynamics and bubble and spike amplitudes at late time is investigated in detail. The numerical results show that at sufficiently large Reynolds numbers, a sequence of stages in the 3D immiscible RTI can be observed, which includes the linear growth, terminal velocity growth, reacceleration, and chaotic development stages. At late stage, the RTI induces a very complicated topology structure of the interface, and an abundance of dissociative drops are also observed in the system. The bubble and spike velocities at late stage are unstable and their values have exceeded the predictions of the potential flow theory [V. N. Goncharov, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 134502 (2002), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.88.134502]. The acceleration of the bubble front is also measured and it is found that the normalized acceleration at late time fluctuates around a constant value of 0.16. When the Reynolds number is reduced to small values, some later stages cannot be reached sequentially. The interface becomes relatively smoothed and the bubble velocity at late time is approximate to a constant value, which coincides with the results of the extended Layzer model [S.-I. Sohn, Phys. Rev. E 80, 055302(R) (2009), 10.1103/PhysRevE.80.055302] and the modified potential theory [R. Banerjee, L. Mandal, S. Roy, M. Khan, and M. R. Guptae, Phys. Plasmas 18, 022109 (2011), 10.1063/1.3555523]. In our simulations, the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) parallel computing is also used to relieve the massive computational cost.

  19. Generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the presence of time-dependent equilibrium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, B.

    1997-08-01

    Plasma instability under the combined influence of the gravity and an eastward electric field, commonly referred to as the generalized Rayleigh-Taylor instability, is considered for a time-dependent equilibrium situation. In the nighttime equatorial ionosphere the time-dependent equilibrium situation arises because of the vertically upward E0×B0 drift of the plasma in conjunction with the altitude-dependent recombination process and the collisional diffusion process. After determining the time-dependent equilibrium density and, in particular, the inverse density gradient scale length L-1, which determines the growth rate of the instability, the stability of small-amplitude perturbations is analyzed. The general solution of the problem, where the effects of all of the above-mentioned processes are included simultaneously, requires numerical analysis. In this paper the effects are studied in limiting situations for which useful analytic solutions can be obtained. The effect of diffusion on L-1 is studied by neglecting both the upward plasma drift and the altitude variation of the recombination frequency νR, and it is verified that the effect is negligible for typical values of the ionospheric parameters. The effects of the other two processes on L-1 are studied by neglecting diffusion. The effect of the altitude variation of νR on the linear growth of the perturbations is studied by adopting the so-called local approximation. It is found that the value of L-1 and hence the value of the growth rate are enhanced by the altitude variation of νR. The enhancements rapidly increase with time to large values at lower altitudes and to significant values at higher altitudes when compared with the values for the spatially uniform νR case. Consequently, the time evolution of the instability and, more importantly, the level of fluctuations at saturation will be significantly affected by the enhancements. The nonlocal aspect of the instability in the upward drifting plasma

  20. Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Instability: Theory and simulation in planar and cylindrical pulsed power targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Matthew R.

    Cylindrical liner implosions in the Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) concept are susceptible to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT). The danger of MRT enters in two phases, (1) during the main implosion, the outer surface of the liner is MRT unstable, and (2) during the short time period when the liner decelerates onto hot fuel, the inner surface becomes unstable. Growth of MRT on the outer surface may also feedthrough, which may seed the inner surface leading to high MRT growth in the second phase. If MRT growth becomes large enough, confinement of the fuel is lost. To characterize MRT we solve the linearized, ideal MHD equations in both planar and cylindrical geometries, including the presence of an axial magnetic field and the effects of sausage and kink modes (present in cylindrical coordinates only). In general, the total instability growth rates in cylindrical geometry are found to be larger than those in planar geometry. MRT and feedthrough is shown to be suppressed by strong magnetic field line bending (tension). However, for the same amount of field line bending, feedthrough is the most stabilized. Application of the planar and the cylindrical model to results from the Z-machine at Sandia National Laboratories is presented. Analytic MRT growth rates for a typical magnetized MagLIF-like implosion show the kink mode to be the fastest growing early and very late in the liner implosion (during deceleration). 1D HYDRA MHD simulations are used to generate realistic, evolving profiles (in density, pressure, and magnetic field) during the implosion from which instantaneous growth rates can be computed exactly, using either the planar or cylindrical analytic formulae developed in this thesis. Sophisticated 2D HYDRA MHD simulations were also performed to compare with the analytic theory and experimental results. In 2D, highly compressed axial magnetic fields can reduce the growth of perturbations at the fuel/liner interface during the implosion

  1. Observed transition from Richtmyer-Meshkov jet formation through feedout oscillations to Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a laser target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aglitskiy, Y. [Science Applications International Corporation, McLean, Virginia 22150 (United States); Karasik, M.; Velikovich, A. L.; Serlin, V.; Weaver, J. L.; Kessler, T. J.; Schmitt, A. J.; Obenschain, S. P. [Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Nikitin, S. P.; Oh, J. [Research Support Instruments, Lanham, Maryland 20706 (United States); Metzler, N. [Research Support Instruments, Lanham, Maryland 20706 (United States); Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva (Israel)

    2012-10-15

    Experimental study of hydrodynamic perturbation evolution triggered by a laser-driven shock wave breakout at the free rippled rear surface of a plastic target is reported. At sub-megabar shock pressure, planar jets manifesting the development of the Richtmyer-Meshkov-type instability in a non-accelerated target are observed. As the shock pressure exceeds 1 Mbar, an oscillatory rippled expansion wave is observed, followed by the 'feedout' of the rear-surface perturbations to the ablation front and the development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, which breaks up the accelerated target.

  2. Effect of quantum corrections on Rayleigh-Taylor instability and internal waves in strongly coupled magnetized viscoelastic fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prajapati, Ramprasad

    2016-07-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability is recently investigated is strongly coupled plasma looking to its importance in dense stellar systems and Inertial Confinement Fusion [1-3]. In the present work, the effect of quantum corrections are studied on Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability and internal wave propagation in a strongly coupled, magnetized, viscoelastic fluid. The modified generalized hydrodynamic model is used to derive the analytical dispersion relation. The internal wave mode and dispersion relation are modified due to the presence of quantum corrections and viscoelastic effects. We observe that strong coupling effects and quantum corrections significantly modifies the dispersion characteristics. The dispersion relation is also discussed in weakly coupled (hydrodynamic) and strongly coupled (kinetic) limits. The explicit expression of R-T instability criterion is derived which is influenced by shear velocity and quantum corrections. Numerical calculations are performed in astrophysical and experimental relevance and it is examined that both the shear and quantum effects suppresses the growth rate of R-T instability. The possible application of the work is discussed in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) to discuss the suppression of R-T instability under considered situation. References: [1] R. P. Prajapati, Phys. Plasmas 23, 022106 (2016). [2] K. Avinash and A. Sen, Phys. Plasmas 22, 083707 (2015). [3] A. Das and P. Kaw, Phys. Plasmas 21 (2014) 062102.

  3. Nonlinear Rayleigh--Taylor instability of the cylindrical fluid flow with mass and heat transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ALY R SEADAWY; K EL-RASHIDY

    2016-08-01

    The nonlinear Rayleigh--Taylor stability of the cylindrical interface between the vapour and liquid phases of a fluid is studied. The phases enclosed between two cylindrical surfaces coaxial with mass and heat transfer is derived from nonlinear Ginzburg--Landau equation. The F-expansion method is used to get exactsolutions for a nonlinear Ginzburg--Landau equation. The region of solutions is displayed graphically.

  4. Relative role of convective and diffusive mixing in the miscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, S. S.; Carballido-Landeira, J.; De Wit, A.; Knaepen, B.

    2017-01-01

    The relative role of convection and diffusion is characterized both numerically and experimentally for porous media flows due to a Rayleigh-Taylor instability of a horizontal interface between two miscible solutions in the gravity field. We show that, though globally convection dominates over diffusion during the nonlinear regime, diffusion can locally be as important as convection and even dominates over lateral convection far away from the fingertips. Our experimental and numerical computations of the temporal evolution of the mixing length, the width of the fingers, and their wavelength are in good agreement and show that the lateral evolution of fingers is governed by diffusion.

  5. A comparative study of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in 2D and 3D in tantalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberger, Z.; Maddox, B. R.; Opachich, Y. P.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Kraus, R. G.; Remington, B. A.; Randall, G. C.; Farrell, M.; Ravichandran, G.

    2017-01-01

    Driving a shock wave through the interface between two materials with different densities can result in the Richtmyer-Meshkov or Rayleigh-Taylor instability and initial perturbations at the interface will grow. If the shock wave is sufficiently strong, the instability will lead to plastic flow at the interface. Material strength will reduce the amount of plastic flow and suppress growth. While such instabilities have been investigated in 2D, no studies of this phenomena have been performed in 3D on materials with strength. Initial perturbations to seed the hydrodynamic instability were coined into tantalum recovery targets. Two types of perturbations were used, two dimensional (2D) perturbations (hill and valley) and three-dimensional (3D) perturbations (egg crate pattern). The targets were subjected to dynamic loading using the Janus laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility. Shock pressures ranged from 50 GPa up to 150 GPa and were calibrated using VISAR drive targets.

  6. Miscible and immiscible experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using simultaneous planar laser induced fluorescence and backlight visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokler, Matthew; Roberts, Michael; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2012-11-01

    Incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments are presented in which two stratified liquids having Atwood number of 0.2 are accelerated in a vertical linear induction motor driven drop tower. A test sled having only vertical freedom of motion contains the experiment tank and visualization equipment. The sled is positioned at the top of the tower within the linear motors and accelerated downward causing the initially stable interface to be unstable and allowing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. Experiments are presented with and without forced initial perturbations produced by vertically oscillating the test sled prior to the start of acceleration. Half of the experimental tank is visualized using a 445nm laser light source that illuminates a fluorescent dye mixed in one of the fluids. The other half is illuminated with a white backlight. The resulting images are recorded using a monochromatic high speed video camera allowing for the measurement of spike and bubble mixing layer growth rates for both visualization techniques in a single experiment.

  7. Immiscible experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using simultaneous particle image velocimetry and planar laser induced fluorescence concentration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokler, Matthew; Jacobs, Jeffrey

    2014-11-01

    Incompressible Rayleigh-Taylor instability experiments are presented in which two stratified liquids having Atwood number of 0.2 are accelerated in a vertical linear induction motor driven drop tower. A test sled having only vertical freedom of motion contains the experiment tank and visualization equipment. The sled is positioned at the top of the tower within the linear induction motors and accelerated downward causing the initially stable interface to be unstable and allowing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability to develop. Forced and unforced experiments are conducted using an immiscible liquid combination. Forced initial perturbations are produced by vertically oscillating the test sled prior to the start of acceleration. The interface is visualized using a 445 nm laser light source that illuminates a fluorescent dye mixed in one of the fluids and aluminum oxide particles dispersed in both fluids. The laser beam is synchronously swept across the fluorescent fluid, at the frame rate of the camera, exposing a single plane of the interface. The resulting images are recorded using a monochromatic high speed video camera. Time dependent velocity and density fields are obtained from the recorded images allowing for 2D full field measurements of turbulent kinetic energy and turbulent mass transport.

  8. Roles of bulk viscosity on Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Non-equilibrium thermodynamics due to spatio-temporal pressure fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Tapan K.; Sengupta, Aditi; Sharma, Nidhi; Sengupta, Soumyo; Bhole, Ashish; Shruti, K. S.

    2016-09-01

    Direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) between two air masses with a temperature difference of 70 K is presented using compressible Navier-Stokes formulation in a non-equilibrium thermodynamic framework. The two-dimensional flow is studied in an isolated box with non-periodic walls in both vertical and horizontal directions. The non-conducting interface separating the two air masses is impulsively removed at t = 0 (depicting a heaviside function). No external perturbation has been used at the interface to instigate the instability at the onset. Computations have been carried out for rectangular and square cross sections. The formulation is free of Boussinesq approximation commonly used in many Navier-Stokes formulations for RTI. Effect of Stokes' hypothesis is quantified, by using models from acoustic attenuation measurement for the second coefficient of viscosity from two experiments. Effects of Stokes' hypothesis on growth of mixing layer and evolution of total entropy for the Rayleigh-Taylor system are reported. The initial rate of growth is observed to be independent of Stokes' hypothesis and the geometry of the box. Following this stage, growth rate is dependent on the geometry of the box and is sensitive to the model used. As a consequence of compressible formulation, we capture pressure wave-packets with associated reflection and rarefaction from the non-periodic walls. The pattern and frequency of reflections of pressure waves noted specifically at the initial stages are reflected in entropy variation of the system.

  9. Roles of bulk viscosity on Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Non-equilibrium thermodynamics due to spatio-temporal pressure fronts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Tapan K., E-mail: tksen@iitk.ac.in; Bhole, Ashish; Shruti, K. S. [HPCL, Department of Aerospace Engineering, IIT Kanpur, Kanpur, UP (India); Sengupta, Aditi [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Sharma, Nidhi [Graduate Student, HPCL, Department of Aerospace Engineering, IIT Kanpur, Kanpur, UP (India); Sengupta, Soumyo [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) between two air masses with a temperature difference of 70 K is presented using compressible Navier-Stokes formulation in a non-equilibrium thermodynamic framework. The two-dimensional flow is studied in an isolated box with non-periodic walls in both vertical and horizontal directions. The non-conducting interface separating the two air masses is impulsively removed at t = 0 (depicting a heaviside function). No external perturbation has been used at the interface to instigate the instability at the onset. Computations have been carried out for rectangular and square cross sections. The formulation is free of Boussinesq approximation commonly used in many Navier-Stokes formulations for RTI. Effect of Stokes’ hypothesis is quantified, by using models from acoustic attenuation measurement for the second coefficient of viscosity from two experiments. Effects of Stokes’ hypothesis on growth of mixing layer and evolution of total entropy for the Rayleigh-Taylor system are reported. The initial rate of growth is observed to be independent of Stokes’ hypothesis and the geometry of the box. Following this stage, growth rate is dependent on the geometry of the box and is sensitive to the model used. As a consequence of compressible formulation, we capture pressure wave-packets with associated reflection and rarefaction from the non-periodic walls. The pattern and frequency of reflections of pressure waves noted specifically at the initial stages are reflected in entropy variation of the system.

  10. Analysis of gradient-diffusion modeling of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability-induced mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Oleg; Mueschke, Nicholas; Latini, Marco; Don, Wai Sun; Andrews, Malcolm

    2006-11-01

    Gradient-diffusion models of turbulent transport in Rayleigh- Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability-induced mixing are assessed using direct numerical simulation (DNS) and implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) data. Mean and fluctuating fields, defined from spatial averages over the periodic directions of the DNS, are used to construct the unclosed terms in the turbulent kinetic energy transport equation. These terms are then compared a priori with the corresponding terms modeled using the gradient-diffusion approximation to assess the validity of this approximation for these buoyancy- and shock- driven flows. Implications for two-equation turbulence modeling of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instability-induced mixing are discussed. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. This research was also sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program through DOE Research Grant No. DE-FG03- 02NA00060. UCRL-ABS-223369

  11. On effects of viscosity and magnetic fields on the largest growth rate of linear Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fei

    2016-11-01

    In this article, we investigate the effect of viscosity on the largest growth rate in the linear Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability of a three-dimensional nonhomogeneous incompressible viscous flow in a bounded domain. By adapting a modified variational approach and careful analysis, we show that the largest growth rate in linear RT instability tends to zero as the viscosity coefficient goes to infinity. Moreover, the largest growth rate increasingly converges to one of the corresponding inviscid fluids as the viscosity coefficient goes to zero. Applying these analysis techniques to the corresponding viscous magnetohydrodynamic fluids, we can also show that the largest growth rate in linear magnetic RT instability tends to zero as the strength of horizontal (or vertical) magnetic field increasingly goes to a critical value.

  12. Surface effects of Rayleigh-Taylor instability: Feedback between drip dynamics and crustal deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H.; Currie, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    For many continental plates, significant vertical motion of Earth's surface has occurred within the plate interior which can not be clearly linked to plate tectonic processes. For example, several craton areas exhibit anomalous basins, e.g., the Williston basin, Illinois basin and Michigan basin in North America. In orogenic belts, there are examples of local areas (~100 km wide) where the surface has undergone subsidence and then uplift of >1 km, such as the Arizaro basin (central Andes) and Wallowa Mountains (northeast Oregon). Given the near-circular shape of the surface deflection, it has been suggested that they may be related to gravitational foundering of dense lower lithosphere, i.e., Rayleigh-Taylor instability (or 'RT drip'). In order to investigate the surface effects of an RT drip, we use two methods: (1) 2D thermal-mechanical numerical models to study links between drip dynamics and crustal deformation and (2) a theoretical analysis of the crustal deformation induced by stresses from the RT drip. The numerical models consist of a continental lithosphere overlying a sublithospheric mantle. A high-density material is placed in the mantle lithosphere or lower crust to initiate a drip event, and a stress-free boundary condition allows the development of surface topography during model evolution. A reasonable range of crustal viscosity and thickness is tested to study the RT drip in different tectonic settings, from a cold craton to a hot orogen with thick crust. Four types of surface deflection are observed: (1) subsidence; (2) subsidence followed by uplift; (3) uplift; and (4) little deflection. When the crust is relatively strong or thin, the surface has a negative elevation, forming a basin. For a weak or thick crust, the RT drip induces crustal flow, leading to crustal thickening that can uplift the surface; an extremely weak crust decouples the surface and RT drip and the surface is unperturbed. Our theoretical analysis considers the surface

  13. Stable radiation pressure acceleration of ions by suppressing transverse Rayleigh-Taylor instability with multiple Gaussian pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, M. L.; Liu, B.; Hu, R. H.; Shou, Y. R.; Lin, C.; Lu, H. Y.; Lu, Y. R.; Gu, Y. Q.; Ma, W. J.; Yan, X. Q.

    2016-08-01

    In the case of a thin plasma slab accelerated by the radiation pressure of an ultra-intense laser pulse, the development of Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) will destroy the acceleration structure and terminate the acceleration process much sooner than theoretical limit. In this paper, a new scheme using multiple Gaussian pulses for ion acceleration in a radiation pressure acceleration regime is investigated with particle-in-cell simulation. We found that with multiple Gaussian pulses, the instability could be efficiently suppressed and the divergence of the ion bunch is greatly reduced, resulting in a longer acceleration time and much more collimated ion bunch with higher energy than using a single Gaussian pulse. An analytical model is developed to describe the suppression of RTI at the laser-plasma interface. The model shows that the suppression of RTI is due to the introduction of the long wavelength mode RTI by the multiple Gaussian pulses.

  14. Further numerical studies of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in the context of accreting X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.-M.; Nepveu, M.; Robertson, J. A.

    1984-06-01

    An earlier investigation of the nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor instability for accreting X-ray sources is extended to allow for more realistic initial conditions. The two-dimensional computations show the heavy and light fluids undergoing complementary circulatory motions which result in the formation of alternating inverted and upright 'mushroom' structures along the interface. The structures develop independently of the shape of the initial perturbation. Short wavelength modes have a strong tendency to dominate long ones, with the lower bound being set by viscous damping. A relatively modest vertical magnetic field will act to suppress the vortex motions and produce a 'bubble and spike' structure. A crude simulation of the instability occurring in a radiation-supported accretion column is presented; after a slow start, the magnetically constrained plasma drips down into the photon medium in the form of long narrow fingers, the dominant scale-length being determined by radiative viscosity.

  15. Experimental and numerical investigations of beryllium strength models using the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry de Frahan, M. T., E-mail: marchdf@umich.edu; Johnsen, E. [Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Belof, J. L.; Cavallo, R. M.; Ancheta, D. S.; El-dasher, B. S.; Florando, J. N.; Gallegos, G. F.; LeBlanc, M. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States); Raevsky, V. A.; Ignatova, O. N.; Lebedev, A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, Sarov 607188 (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-14

    We present a set of high explosive driven Rayleigh-Taylor strength experiments for beryllium to produce data to distinguish predictions by various strength models. Design simulations using existing strength model parameterizations from Steinberg-Lund and Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) suggested an optimal design that would delineate between not just different strength models, but different parameters sets of the PTW model. Application of the models to the post-shot results, however, suggests growth consistent with little material strength. We focus mostly on efforts to simulate the data using published strength models as well as the more recent RING relaxation model developed at VNIIEF. The results of the strength experiments indicate weak influence of strength in mitigating the growth with the RING model coming closest to predicting the material behavior. Finally, we present shock and ramp-loading recovery experiments.

  16. Experimental and numerical investigations of beryllium strength models using the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry de Frahan, M. T. [Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA; Belof, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Cavallo, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Raevsky, V. A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, Sarov 607188, Russia; Ignatova, O. N. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, Sarov 607188, Russia; Lebedev, A. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center-VNIIEF, Sarov 607188, Russia; Ancheta, D. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; El-dasher, B. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Florando, J. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Gallegos, G. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Johnsen, E. [Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA; LeBlanc, M. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA

    2015-06-14

    A recent collaboration between LLNL and VNIIEF has produced a set of high explosive driven Rayleigh-Taylor strength data for beryllium. Design simulations using legacy strength models from Steinberg-Lund and Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) suggested an optimal design that would delineate between not just different strength models, but different parameters sets of the PTW model. Application of the models to the post-shot results, however, shows close to classical growth. We characterize the material properties of the beryllium tested in the experiments. We also discuss recent efforts to simulate the data using the legacy strength models as well as the more recent RING relaxation model developed at VNIIEF. Finally, we present shock and ramp-loading recovery experiments conducted as part of the collaboration.

  17. Scaling Laws of Nonlinear Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities in Two and Three Dimensions (IFSA 1999)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvarts, D.; Oron, D.; Kartoon, D.; Rikanati, A.; Sadot, O.; Srebro, Y.; Yedvab, Y.; Ofer, D.; Levin, A.; Sarid, E.; Ben-Dor, G.; Erez, L.; Erez, G.; Yosef-Hai, A.; Alon, U.; Arazi, L.

    2016-10-01

    The late-time nonlinear evolution of the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities for random initial perturbations is investigated using a statistical mechanics model based on single-mode and bubble-competition physics at all Atwood numbers (A) and full numerical simulations in two and three dimensions. It is shown that the RT mixing zone bubble and spike fronts evolve as h ~ α · A · gt2 with different values of a for the bubble and spike fronts. The RM mixing zone fronts evolve as h ~ tθ with different values of θ for bubbles and spikes. Similar analysis yields a linear growth with time of the Kelvin-Helmholtz mixing zone. The dependence of the RT and RM scaling parameters on A and the dimensionality will be discussed. The 3D predictions are found to be in good agreement with recent Linear Electric Motor (LEM) experiments.

  18. Mode selection of magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability from the point of view of Landau phase transition theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Jia Kun; Huang, Xian Bin; Ren, Xiao Dong; Wei, Bing

    2017-08-01

    A theoretical model referring to mode selection of Z-pinch-driven magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability, which explains the generation of fundamental instability mode and evolution of fundamental wavelength in experiments, is proposed on the basis of the Landau theory of phase transition. The basic idea of this phase transition model lies in that the appearance of MRT instability pattern can be considered as a consequence of the spontaneous generation of interfacial structure like the spontaneous magnetization in a ferromagnetic system. It is demonstrated that the amplitude of instability is responsible for the order parameter in the Landau theory of phase transition and the fundamental wavelength appears to play a role analogous to inverse temperature in thermodynamics. Further analysis indicates that the MRT instability is characterized by first order phase transition and the fundamental wavelength is proportional to the square root of energy entering into the system from the driving source. The theory predicts that the fundamental wavelength grows rapidly and saturates reaching a limiting wavelength of the order of the liner's final outer radius. The results given by this theory show qualitative agreement with the available experimental data of MRT instability of liner implosions conducted on the Sandia Z machine as well as Primary Test Stand facility at the Institute of Fluid Physics.

  19. Coupling of sausage, kink, and magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in a cylindrical liner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weis, M. R.; Zhang, P.; Lau, Y. Y., E-mail: yylau@umich.edu; Gilgenbach, R. M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2104 (United States); Schmit, P. F.; Peterson, K. J.; Hess, M. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    This paper analyzes the coupling of magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT), sausage, and kink modes in an imploding cylindrical liner, using ideal MHD. A uniform axial magnetic field of arbitrary value is included in each region: liner, its interior, and its exterior. The dispersion relation is solved exactly, for arbitrary radial acceleration (-g), axial wavenumber (k), azimuthal mode number (m), liner aspect ratio, and equilibrium quantities in each region. For small k, a positive g (inward radial acceleration in the lab frame) tends to stabilize the sausage mode, but destabilize the kink mode. For large k, a positive g destabilizes both the kink and sausage mode. Using the 1D-HYDRA simulation results for an equilibrium model that includes a pre-existing axial magnetic field and a preheated fuel, we identify several stages of MRT-sausage-kink mode evolution. We find that the m = 1 kink-MRT mode has a higher growth rate at the initial stage and stagnation stage of the implosion, and that the m = 0 sausage-MRT mode dominates at the main part of implosion. This analysis also sheds light on a puzzling feature in Harris' classic paper of MRT [E. G. Harris, Phys. Fluids 5, 1057 (1962)]. An attempt is made to interpret the persistence of the observed helical structures [Awe et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235005 (2013)] in terms of non-axisymmetric eigenmode.

  20. Coupling of sausage, kink, and magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in a cylindrical liner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, M. R.; Zhang, P.; Lau, Y. Y.; Schmit, P. F.; Peterson, K. J.; Hess, M.; Gilgenbach, R. M.

    2015-03-01

    This paper analyzes the coupling of magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT), sausage, and kink modes in an imploding cylindrical liner, using ideal MHD. A uniform axial magnetic field of arbitrary value is included in each region: liner, its interior, and its exterior. The dispersion relation is solved exactly, for arbitrary radial acceleration (-g), axial wavenumber (k), azimuthal mode number (m), liner aspect ratio, and equilibrium quantities in each region. For small k, a positive g (inward radial acceleration in the lab frame) tends to stabilize the sausage mode, but destabilize the kink mode. For large k, a positive g destabilizes both the kink and sausage mode. Using the 1D-HYDRA simulation results for an equilibrium model that includes a pre-existing axial magnetic field and a preheated fuel, we identify several stages of MRT-sausage-kink mode evolution. We find that the m = 1 kink-MRT mode has a higher growth rate at the initial stage and stagnation stage of the implosion, and that the m = 0 sausage-MRT mode dominates at the main part of implosion. This analysis also sheds light on a puzzling feature in Harris' classic paper of MRT [E. G. Harris, Phys. Fluids 5, 1057 (1962)]. An attempt is made to interpret the persistence of the observed helical structures [Awe et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235005 (2013)] in terms of non-axisymmetric eigenmode.

  1. Direct numerical simulation of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueschke, Nicholas; Schilling, Oleg; Andrews, Malcolm

    2005-11-01

    A direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer was performed using a spectral/compact-difference scheme. The initial conditions were parameterized from interfacial and velocity perturbations measured from water channel experiments at Texas A&M University. Turbulence and mixing statistics, as well as energy spectra, obtained from experimental measurements are compared with those from the DNS to validate the use of experimental measurements as computational initial conditions. The experimental and numerical data are used to examine the transitional dynamics of the mixing layer. The DNS results indicate that initial conditions including both interfacial and velocity perturbations are required to accurately simulate the flow. This research was sponsored by the U.S. DOE National Nuclear Security Administration under the Stewardship Science Academic Alliances program through DOE Research Grant #DE-FG03- 02NA00060. This work was also performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by the University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. W- 7405-Eng-48. UCRL-ABS-214352.

  2. Measurements of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in solid liners on the 20 MA Z facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigman, Verle; Vesey, Roger Alan; Shores, Jonathon; Herrmann, Mark C.; Stamm, Robert (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Killebrew, Korbie (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Holt, Randy (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Blue, Brent (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Nakhleh, Charlie; McBride, Ryan D.; Leifeste, Gordon T.; Smith, Ian Craig; Stygar, William A.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Bennett, Guy R.; Schroen, Diana Grace (General Atomics, San Diego, CA); Sinars, Daniel Brian; Lopez, Mike R.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Atherton, Briggs W.; Tomlinson, Kurt; Edens, Aaron D.; Savage, Mark Edward; Peterson, Kyle J.

    2010-07-01

    The magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability is the most important instability for determining whether a cylindrical liner can be compressed to its axis in a relatively intact form, a requirement for achieving the high pressures needed for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and other high energy-density physics applications. While there are many published RT studies, there are a handful of well-characterized MRT experiments at time scales >1 {micro}s and none for 100 ns z-pinch implosions. Experiments used solid Al liners with outer radii of 3.16 mm and thicknesses of 292 {micro}m, dimensions similar to magnetically-driven ICF target designs [1]. In most tests the MRT instability was seeded with sinusoidal perturbations ({lambda} = 200, 400 {micro}m, peak-to-valley amplitudes of 10, 20 {micro}m, respectively), wavelengths similar to those predicted to dominate near stagnation. Radiographs show the evolution of the MRT instability and the effects of current-induced ablation of mass from the liner surface. Additional Al liner tests used 25-200 {micro}m wavelengths and flat surfaces. Codes being used to design magnetized liner ICF loads [1] match the features seen except at the smallest scales (<50 {micro}m). Recent experiments used Be liners to enable penetrating radiography using the same 6.151 keV diagnostics and provide an in-flight measurement of the liner density profile.

  3. On the nature of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Astrophysical Plasma: The case of uniform magnetic field strength

    CERN Document Server

    Hillier, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability has been shown to play a key role in many astrophysical systems. The equation for the growth rate of this instability in the incompressible limit, and the most-unstable mode that can be derived from it, are often used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field that is associated with the observed dynamics. However, there are some issues with the interpretations given. Here we show that the class of most unstable modes $k_u$ for a given $\\theta$, the class of modes often used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field from observations, for the system leads to the instability growing as $\\sigma^2=1/2 A g k_u$, a growth rate which is independent of the strength of the magnetic field and which highlights that small scales are preferred by the system, but not does not give the fastest growing mode for that given $k$. We also highlight that outside of the interchange ($\\mathbf{k}\\cdot\\mathbf{B}=0$) and undular ($\\mathbf{k}$ parallel to $\\mathbf{B}$) modes, all the o...

  4. Experimental evidence of a bubble-merger regime for the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability at the ablation front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, A.; Liberatore, S.; Masse, L.; Martinez, D.; Haan, S. W.; Kane, J.; Moore, A. S.; Seugling, R.; Farrell, M.; Giraldez, E.; Nikroo, A.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Remington, B. A.

    2016-05-01

    Under the Discovery Science program, the longer pulses and higher laser energies provided by the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been harnessed to study, first time in indirect-drive, the highly nonlinear stage of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) at the ablation front. A planar plastic package with pre-imposed two-dimensional broadband modulations is accelerated for up to 12 ns by the x-ray drive of a gas-filled gold radiation cavity with a radiative temperature plateau at 175 eV. This extended tailored drive allows a distance traveled in excess of 1 mm for a 130 μm thick foil, a factor 3x larger than previously achieved on other laser facilities. As a consequence, we have measured the ablative RTI in transition from the weakly nonlinear stage up to the deep nonlinear stage for various initial conditions. A bubble merger regime has been observed and the ablative stabilization strength varied by changing the plastic dopant from iodine to germanium.

  5. Magneto Rayleigh-Taylor, Sausage, and Kink Instability Experiments on a MegaAmpere Linear Transformer Driver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yager-Elorriaga, D. A.; Steiner, A. M.; Patel, S. G.; Jordan, N. M.; Gilgenbach, R. M.; Lau, Y. Y.; Weis, M. R.; Zhang, P.

    2015-11-01

    At the Michigan Accelerator for Inductive Z-Pinch Experiments (MAIZE) facility, a 1-MA Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) is being used to deliver 500-600 kA to cylindrical liners in order to study the magneto Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT), sausage, and kink instabilities in imploding and exploding Al plasmas. The liners studied in this experiment had thicknesses of 400 nm to 30 μm, heights of 1-2 cm, and diameters of 1-6 mm. The plasmas were imaged using 4-time-frame, laser shadowgraphy and shearing-interferometry at 532 nm. For imploding liners, the measured acceleration was found to be less than predicted from the current pulse, indicating significant diffusion of the azimuthal magnetic field. A simple experimental configuration is presented for ``end-on'' laser probing in the r- θ plane in order to study the interior of the liner. Finally, the effects of axial magnetic fields are determined by modifying the return current posts and incorporating external coils. Experimental growth rates are determined and discussed. This work was supported by DOE award DE-SC0012328. S.G. Patel supported by Sandia National Labs. D.A. Yager was supported by NSF fellowship grant DGE 1256260.

  6. On the nature of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in astrophysical plasma: the case of uniform magnetic field strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, Andrew S.

    2016-10-01

    The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability has been shown to play a key role in many astrophysical systems. The equation for the growth rate of this instability in the incompressible limit, and the most-unstable mode that can be derived from it, are often used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field that is associated with the observed dynamics. However, there are some issues with the interpretations given. Here, we show that the class of most unstable modes ku for a given θ, the class of modes often used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field from observations, for the system leads to the instability growing as σ2 = 1/2Agku, a growth rate which is independent of the strength of the magnetic field and which highlights that small scales are preferred by the system, but not does not give the fastest growing mode for that given k. We also highlight that outside of the interchange (k ṡ B = 0) and undular (k parallel to B) modes, all the other modes have a perturbation pair of the same wavenumber and growth rate that when excited in the linear regime can result in an interference pattern that gives field aligned filamentary structure often seen in 3D simulations. The analysis was extended to a sheared magnetic field, where it was found that it was possible to extend the results for a non-sheared field to this case. We suggest that without magnetic shear it is too simplistic to be used to infer magnetic field strengths in astrophysical systems.

  7. Contribution to modelization and simulation of the ablative-like Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities for ICF; Contribution a la modelisation et a la simulation des instabilites de type Rayleigh-Taylor ablatif pour la FCI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egly, H

    2007-10-15

    This thesis deals with the dynamics of accelerated ablative front spreading in Inertial Confinement Fusion experiments. ICF is designed for the implosion of a deuterium-tritium spherical target. The outer shell, the ablator, is irradiated providing a high level pressure inside the target. During this first stage, the ablation front propagating inwards is perturbed by hydrodynamics instabilities, which can prevent the fusion reaction in the decelerated stage. We propose here a study on Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities during ablation process, in the two dimensional case. In order to obtain a numerical solution, we perform an asymptotic analysis in the limit of a high temperature ratio, between the remaining cold ablator and the hot ablated plasma. This study is divided in two steps. First, the thermo-diffusive part of the set of equations is approximated by a Hele-Shaw model, which is then perturbed by the hydrodynamics part. Using a vortex method, we have to solve the advection of a vortical sheet moving with the ablation front. We compute the numerical solution on an Eulerian mesh coupled with a marker method. The thermal part is computed by implementing the Fat Boundary Method, recently developed. The hydrodynamic part is obtained from a Finite Volume scheme. (author)

  8. Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in supernova experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swisher, N. C.; Abarzhi, S. I., E-mail: snezhana.abarzhi@gmail.com [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Kuranz, C. C. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Arnett, D. [University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona 85721 (United States); Hurricane, O.; Remington, B. A.; Robey, H. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    We report a scrupulous analysis of data in supernova experiments that are conducted at high power laser facilities in order to study core-collapse supernova SN1987A. Parameters of the experimental system are properly scaled to investigate the interaction of a blast-wave with helium-hydrogen interface, and the induced Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Rayleigh-Taylor mixing of the denser and lighter fluids with time-dependent acceleration. We analyze all available experimental images of the Rayleigh-Taylor flow in supernova experiments and measure delicate features of the interfacial dynamics. A new scaling is identified for calibration of experimental data to enable their accurate analysis and comparisons. By properly accounting for the imprint of the experimental conditions, the data set size and statistics are substantially increased. New theoretical solutions are reported to describe asymptotic dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor flow with time-dependent acceleration by applying theoretical analysis that considers symmetries and momentum transport. Good qualitative and quantitative agreement is achieved of the experimental data with the theory and simulations. Our study indicates that in supernova experiments Rayleigh-Taylor flow is in the mixing regime, the interface amplitude contributes substantially to the characteristic length scale for energy dissipation; Rayleigh-Taylor mixing keeps order.

  9. Simulating Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability using PPM hydrodynamics @scale on Roadrunner (u)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, Paul R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimonte, Guy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rockefeller, Gabriel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fryer, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dimonte, Guy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dai, W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kares, R. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-05

    The effect of initial conditions on the self-similar growth of the RT instability is investigated using a hydrodynamics code based on the piecewise-parabolic-method (PPM). The PPM code was converted to the hybrid architecture of Roadrunner in order to perform the simulations at extremely high speed and spatial resolution. This paper describes the code conversion to the Cell processor, the scaling studies to 12 CU's on Roadrunner and results on the dependence of the RT growth rate on initial conditions. The relevance of the Roadrunner implementation of this PPM code to other existing and anticipated computer architectures is also discussed.

  10. Suppression of transverse ablative Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration by using elliptically polarized laser pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Dong; Qiao, B; Zhou, C T; Yan, X Q; Yu, M Y; He, X T

    2014-01-01

    It is shown that the transverse Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) instability in the hole boring radiation pressure acceleration can be suppressed by using elliptically polarized (EP) laser. A moderate ${J}\\times{B}$ heating of the EP laser will thermalize the local electrons, which leads to the transverse diffusion of ions, suppressing the short wavelength perturbations of RT instability. A proper condition of polarization ratio is obtained analytically for the given laser intensity and plasma density. The idea is confirmed by two dimensional Particle-in-Cell simulations, showing that the ion beam driven by the EP laser is more concentrated and intense compared with that of the circularly polarized laser.

  11. Hydromagnetic Instabilities in Neutron Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Lasky, Paul D; Kokkotas, Kostas D; Glampedakis, Kostas

    2011-01-01

    We model the non-linear ideal magnetohydrodynamics of poloidal magnetic fields in neutron stars in general relativity assuming a polytropic equation of state. We identify familiar hydromagnetic modes, in particular the 'sausage/varicose' mode and 'kink' instability inherent to poloidal magnetic fields. The evolution is dominated by the kink instability, which causes a cataclysmic reconfiguration of the magnetic field. The system subsequently evolves to new, non-axisymmetric, quasi-equilibrium end-states. The existence of this branch of stable quasi-equilibria may have consequences for magnetar physics, including flare generation mechanisms and interpretations of quasi-periodic oscillations.

  12. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF THE MAGNETIC RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY IN THE KIPPENHAHN-SCHLUeTER PROMINENCE MODEL. I. FORMATION OF UPFLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillier, Andrew; Isobe, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Berger, Thomas, E-mail: andrew@kwasan.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2012-02-20

    The launch of the Hinode satellite led to the discovery of rising plumes, dark in chromospheric lines, that propagate from large ({approx}10 Mm) bubbles that form at the base of quiescent prominences. The plumes move through a height of approximately 10 Mm while developing highly turbulent profiles. The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability was hypothesized to be the mechanism that drives these flows. In this study, using three-dimensional (3D) MHD simulations, we investigate the nonlinear stability of the Kippenhahn-Schlueter prominence model for the interchange mode of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The model simulates the rise of a buoyant tube inside the quiescent prominence model, where the interchange of magnetic field lines becomes possible at the boundary between the buoyant tube and the prominence. Hillier et al. presented the initial results of this study, where upflows of constant velocity (maximum found 6 km s{sup -1}) and a maximum plume width Almost-Equal-To 1.5 Mm which propagate through a height of approximately 6 Mm were found. Nonlinear interaction between plumes was found to be important for determining the plume dynamics. In this paper, using the results of ideal MHD simulations, we determine how the initial parameters for the model and buoyant tube affect the evolution of instability. We find that the 3D mode of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability grows, creating upflows aligned with the magnetic field of constant velocity (maximum found 7.3 km s{sup -1}). The width of the upflows is dependent on the initial conditions, with a range of 0.5-4 Mm which propagate through heights of 3-6 Mm. These results are in general agreement with the observations of the rising plumes.

  13. Suppression of transverse ablative Rayleigh-Taylor-like instability in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration by using elliptically polarized laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, D; Zheng, C Y; Qiao, B; Zhou, C T; Yan, X Q; Yu, M Y; He, X T

    2014-08-01

    It is shown that the transverse Rayleigh-Taylor-like (RT) instability in the hole-boring radiation pressure acceleration can be suppressed by using an elliptically polarized (EP) laser. A moderate J×B heating of the EP laser will thermalize the local electrons, which leads to the transverse diffusion of ions, suppressing the short wavelength perturbations of RT instability. A proper condition of polarization ratio is obtained analytically for the given laser intensity and plasma density. The idea is confirmed by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, showing that the ion beam driven by the EP laser is more concentrated and intense compared with that of the circularly polarized laser.

  14. Comparison Between Mitigation Effects of the Finite Larmor Radius and Sheared Axial Flow on Rayleigh-Taylor Instability in Z-Pinch implosions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱孝明; 黄林; 简广德

    2002-01-01

    A magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) formulation is derived to investigate and compare the mitigation effects of both the sheared axial flow and finite Larmor radius (FLR) on the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in Z-pinch implosions. The sheared axial flow is introduced into MHD equations in a conventional way and the FLR effect into the equations via а/аt → -i(ω + ik2⊥ρi2Ωi), as proposed in our previous paper [Chin. Phys. Lett. 2002, 19:217] , where k2⊥ρ2i is referred to FLR effect from the general kinetic theory of magnetized plasma. Therefore the linearized continuity and momentum equations for the perturbed massdensity and velocity include both the sheared axial flow and the FLR effect. It is found that the effect of sheared axial flow with a lower peak velocity can mitigate RT instability in the whole wavenumber region and the effect of sheared axial flow with a higher one can mitigate RT instability only in the large wavenumber region (for normalized wavenumber κ> 2.4); The effect of FLR can mitigate RT instability in the whole wavenumber region and the mitigation effect is stronger than that of the sheared axial flow with a lower peak velocity in the almost whole wavenumber region.

  15. A platform for studying the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities in a planar geometry at high energy density at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, S. R.; Raman, K. S.; Huntington, C. M.; MacLaren, S. A.; Wang, P.; Barrios, M. A.; Baumann, T.; Bender, J. D.; Benedetti, L. R.; Doane, D. M.; Felker, S.; Fitzsimmons, P.; Flippo, K. A.; Holder, J. P.; Kaczala, D. N.; Perry, T. S.; Seugling, R. M.; Savage, L.; Zhou, Y.

    2017-07-01

    A new experimental platform has been developed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for studying the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instabilities in a planar geometry at high-energy-densities. The platform uses 60 beams of the NIF laser to drive an initially solid shock tube containing a pre-machined interface between dense and light materials. The strong shock turns the initially solid target into a plasma and the material boundary into a fluid interface with the imprinted initial condition. The interface evolves by action of the RT and RM instabilities, and the growth is imaged with backlit x-ray radiography. We present our first data involving sinusoidal interface perturbations driven from the heavy side to the light side. Late-time radiographic images show the initial conditions reaching the deeply nonlinear regime, and an evolution of fine structure consistent with a transition to turbulence. We show preliminary comparisons with post-shot numerical simulations and discuss the implications for future campaigns.

  16. Probing the deep nonlinear stage of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in indirect drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casner, A., E-mail: alexis.casner@cea.fr; Masse, L.; Liberatore, S.; Loiseau, P.; Masson-Laborde, P. E.; Jacquet, L. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Martinez, D.; Moore, A. S.; Seugling, R.; Felker, S.; Haan, S. W.; Remington, B. A.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Farrell, M.; Giraldez, E.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Academic tests in physical regimes not encountered in Inertial Confinement Fusion will help to build a better understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities and constitute the scientifically grounded validation complementary to fully integrated experiments. Under the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Discovery Science program, recent indirect drive experiments have been carried out to study the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) in transition from weakly nonlinear to highly nonlinear regime [A. Casner et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 082708 (2012)]. In these experiments, a modulated package is accelerated by a 175 eV radiative temperature plateau created by a room temperature gas-filled platform irradiated by 60 NIF laser beams. The unique capabilities of the NIF are harnessed to accelerate this planar sample over much larger distances (≃1.4 mm) and longer time periods (≃12 ns) than previously achieved. This extended acceleration could eventually allow entering into a turbulent-like regime not precluded by the theory for the RTI at the ablation front. Simultaneous measurements of the foil trajectory and the subsequent RTI growth are performed and compared with radiative hydrodynamics simulations. We present RTI growth measurements for two-dimensional single-mode and broadband multimode modulations. The dependence of RTI growth on initial conditions and ablative stabilization is emphasized, and we demonstrate for the first time in indirect-drive a bubble-competition, bubble-merger regime for the RTI at ablation front.

  17. Bell-Plessett effect on harmonic evolution of spherical Rayleigh-Taylor instability in weakly nonlinear scheme for arbitrary Atwood numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wanhai; Yu, Changping; Jiang, Hongbin; Li, Xinliang

    2017-02-01

    Based on the harmonic analysis [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 22, 112112 (2015)], the analytical investigation on the harmonic evolution in Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) at a spherical interface has been extended to the general case of arbitrary Atwood numbers by using the method of the formal perturbation up to the third order in a small parameter. Our results show that the radius of the initial interface [i.e., Bell-Plessett (BP) effect] dramatically influences the harmonic evolution for arbitrary Atwood numbers. When the initial radius approaches infinity compared against the initial perturbation wavelength, the amplitudes of the first four harmonics will recover those in planar RTI. The BP effect makes the amplitudes of the zeroth, second, and third harmonics increase faster for a larger Atwood number than smaller one. The BP effect reduces the third-order negative feedback to the fundamental mode for a smaller Atwood number, and strengthens it for a larger one. Hence, the BP effect helps the fundamental mode grow faster for a smaller Atwood number.

  18. Small-amplitude magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth in cylindrical liners and Z-pinches imploded in an axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikovich, A. L.; Giuliani, J. L.; Clark, R. W.; Mikitchuk, D.; Kroupp, E.; Maron, Y.; Fisher, A.; Schmit, P. F.

    2014-10-01

    Recent progress in developing the MagLIF approach to pulsed-power driven inertial confinement fusion has stimulated the interest in observation and mitigation of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRTI) of liners and Z-pinches imploded in an axial magnetic field. Theoretical analysis of these issues is particularly important because direct numerical simulation of the MRTI development is challenging due to intrinsically 3D helical structure of the fastest-growing modes. We review the analytical small-amplitude theory of the MRTI perturbation development and the weakly nonlinear theory of MRTI mode interaction, emphasizing basic physics, opportunity for 3D code verification against exact analytical solutions, and stabilization criteria. The theory is compared to the experimental results obtained at Weizmann Institute with gas-puff Z pinches and on the Z facility at Sandia with solid liners imploded in an axial magnetic field. Work supported by the US DOE/NNSA, and by the US-Israel Binational Science Foundation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF THE MAGNETIC RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR INSTABILITY IN THE KIPPENHAHN-SCHLUeTER PROMINENCE MODEL. II. RECONNECTION-TRIGGERED DOWNFLOWS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hillier, Andrew; Isobe, Hiroaki; Shibata, Kazunari [Kwasan and Hida Observatories, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Berger, Thomas [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    2012-09-10

    The launch of the Hinode satellite has allowed high-resolution observations of supersonic bright downflows in quiescent prominences, known as prominence knots. We present observations in the Ca II H spectral line using the Solar Optical Telescope on board the Hinode satellite of a descending plasma knot of size {approx}900 km. The knot initially undergoes ballistic motion before undergoing impulsive accelerations at the same time as experiencing increases in intensity. We also present a subset of our three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, performed to investigate the nonlinear stability of the Kippenhahn-Shlueter prominence model to the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in which interchange reconnection occurs. The interchange reconnection in the model breaks the force balance along the field lines which initiates the downflows. The downflows propagate with a downward fluid velocity of {approx}15 km s{sup -1} and a characteristic size of {approx}700 km. We conclude that the observed plasma blob and the simulated downflow are driven by the breaking of the force balance along the magnetic field as a result of a change in magnetic topology caused by reconnection of the magnetic field.

  20. Role of source-layer tilts in the axi-asymmetric growth of diapirs triggered by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Urmi; Baruah, Amiya; Mandal, Nibir

    2016-09-01

    In many geological systems, inversion of density stratification sets in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instabilities, leading to an ascent of relatively low-density materials through the high-density overburden in the form of diapirs. These diapirs often originate from dipping low-density layers. This study aims to show how the initial tilt of such source layers can control the ascent behaviour of diapirs initiated by RT instabilities. Using two-layer viscous models we produced RT instabilities in physical experiments, and investigated the effects of source-layer tilts (beta;). Our experiments suggest that these diapirs ascend with contrasting lateral spreading rates in the up and down slope directions, resulting in their axi-asymmetric geometry. However, their heads retain a circular outline on the horizontal top surface, where the upwelling axis is located away from their geometric centre in the upslope direction. In this paper, we present a series of experimental models to demonstrate the spectrum of axi-symmetric to -asymmetric geometrical transitions with increasing beta;. Our experiments also reveal that when beta; is large (>4°) the diapirs become unstable, resulting in a continuous migration of their stems in the upslope direction. Using the volume of fluid method we ran computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations to study the underlying hydrodynamics of axi-asymmetric diapiric growth. The CFD simulations show that beta; > 0° conditions develop stronger flow vortices on the downslope side of an ascending diapir, leading to a pressure difference between the up- and downslope flanks. Such a differential pressure causes the diapir head to spread at a faster rate in the tilt direction. An estimate of the asymmetric spreading rates is given as a function of beta;. Our present study provides a fundamental understanding of the hydrodynamic flow structure responsible for the asymmetric growth of RT instabilities on tilted source layers, as applicable to a wide range of

  1. LAD Early Career Prize Talk:Laboratory astrophysics experiments investigating the effects of high energy fluxes on Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth relevant to young supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranz, Carolyn C.; Drake, R. Paul; Park, Hye Sook; Huntington, Channing; Miles, Aaron R.; Remington, Bruce A.; Plewa, Tomek; Trantham, Matt; Shvarts, Dov; Raman, Kumar; MacLaren, Steven; Wan, Wesley; Doss, Forrest; Kline, John; Flippos, Kirk; Malamud, Guy; Handy, Timothy; Prisbey, Shon; Grosskopf, Michael; Krauland, Christine; Klein, Sallee; Harding, Eric; Wallace, Russell; Marion, Donna; Kalantar, Dan

    2017-06-01

    Energy-transport effects can alter the structure that develops as a supernova evolves into a supernova remnant. The Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability is thought to produce structure at the interface between the stellar ejecta and the circumstellar matter (CSM), based on simple models and hydrodynamic simulations. When a blast wave emerges from an exploding star, it drives a forward shock into the CSM and a reverse shock forms in the expanding stellar ejecta, creating a young supernova remnant (SNR). As mass accumulates in the shocked layers, the interface between these two shocks decelerates, becoming unstable to the RT instability. Simulations predict that RT produces structures at this interface, having a range of spatial scales. When the CSM is dense enough, as in the case of SN 1993J, the hot shocked matter can produce significant radiative fluxes that affect the emission from the SNR. Here we report experimental results from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to explore how large energy fluxes, which are present in supernovae such as SN 1993J, might affect this structure. The experiment used NIF to create a RT unstable interface subject to a high energy flux by the emergence of a blast wave into lower-density matter, in analogy to the SNR. We also preformed and with a low energy flux to compare the affect of the energy flux on the instability growth. We found that the RT growth was reduced in the experiments with a high energy flux. In analyzing the comparison with SN 1993J, we discovered that the energy fluxes produced by heat conduction appear to be larger than the radiative energy fluxes, and large enough to have dramatic consequences. No reported astrophysical simulations have included radiation and heat conduction self-consistently in modeling SNRs.

  2. Numerical simulations of the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability in planar inertial-confinement-fusion targets using the FastRad3D code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, J. W.; Schmitt, A. J.; Karasik, M.; Zalesak, S. T.

    2016-12-01

    The ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is a central issue in the performance of laser-accelerated inertial-confinement-fusion targets. Historically, the accurate numerical simulation of this instability has been a challenging task for many radiation hydrodynamics codes, particularly when it comes to capturing the ablatively stabilized region of the linear dispersion spectrum and modeling ab initio perturbations. Here, we present recent results from two-dimensional numerical simulations of the ablative RT instability in planar laser-ablated foils that were performed using the Eulerian code FastRad3D. Our study considers polystyrene, (cryogenic) deuterium-tritium, and beryllium target materials, quarter- and third-micron laser light, and low and high laser intensities. An initial single-mode surface perturbation is modeled in our simulations as a small modulation to the target mass density and the ablative RT growth-rate is calculated from the time history of areal-mass variations once the target reaches a steady-state acceleration. By performing a sequence of such simulations with different perturbation wavelengths, we generate a discrete dispersion spectrum for each of our examples and find that in all cases the linear RT growth-rate γ is well described by an expression of the form γ = α [ k g / ( 1 + ɛ k L m ) ] 1 / 2 - β k V a , where k is the perturbation wavenumber, g is the acceleration of the target, Lm is the minimum density scale-length, Va is the ablation velocity, and ɛ is either one or zero. The dimensionless coefficients α and β in the above formula depend on the particular target and laser parameters and are determined from two-dimensional simulation results through the use of a nonlinear curve-fitting procedure. While our findings are generally consistent with those of Betti et al. (Phys. Plasmas 5, 1446 (1998)), the ablative RT growth-rates predicted in this investigation are somewhat smaller than the values previously reported for the

  3. Rotating Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffetta, G.; Mazzino, A.; Musacchio, S.

    2016-09-01

    The turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor system in a rotating reference frame is investigated by direct numerical simulations within the Oberbeck-Boussinesq approximation. On the basis of theoretical arguments, supported by our simulations, we show that the Rossby number decreases in time, and therefore the Coriolis force becomes more important as the system evolves and produces many effects on Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence. We find that rotation reduces the intensity of turbulent velocity fluctuations and therefore the growth rate of the temperature mixing layer. Moreover, in the presence of rotation the conversion of potential energy into turbulent kinetic energy is found to be less effective, and the efficiency of the heat transfer is reduced. Finally, during the evolution of the mixing layer we observe the development of a cyclone-anticyclone asymmetry.

  4. The dynamical oscillation and propulsion of magnetic fields in the convective zone of a star. II - Thermal shadows. III - Accumulation of heat and the onset of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1987-01-01

    The dynamics of thermal shadows which develop in the convective zone of a star around an insulating obstacle such as a horizontal band in intense magnetic field are studied. The depth of the shadow on the cool side of the obstacle is found to depend largely on the width of the obstacle multiplied by the temperature gradient. Thermal shadows pressing fields up to 10,000 G downward against the bottom of the convective zone are produced by the broad bands of the azimuthal field in the sun's convective zone. In the third part, the time-dependent accumulation of heat beneath a thermal barrier simulating such a band in the lower convective zone of the sun is considered. The resulting Rayleigh-Taylor instability is shown to cause tongues of heated gas to penetrate upward through the field, providing the emerging magnetic fields that give rise to the activity of the sun.

  5. A Comparative Analysis of Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes Model Predictions for Rayleigh-Taylor Instability and Mixing with Constant and Complex Accelerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Oleg

    2016-11-01

    Two-, three- and four-equation, single-velocity, multicomponent Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models, based on the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate or lengthscale, are used to simulate At = 0 . 5 Rayleigh-Taylor turbulent mixing with constant and complex accelerations. The constant acceleration case is inspired by the Cabot and Cook (2006) DNS, and the complex acceleration cases are inspired by the unstable/stable and unstable/neutral cases simulated using DNS (Livescu, Wei & Petersen 2011) and the unstable/stable/unstable case simulated using ILES (Ramaprabhu, Karkhanis & Lawrie 2013). The four-equation models couple equations for the mass flux a and negative density-specific volume correlation b to the K- ɛ or K- L equations, while the three-equation models use a two-fluid algebraic closure for b. The lengthscale-based models are also applied with no buoyancy production in the L equation to explore the consequences of neglecting this term. Predicted mixing widths, turbulence statistics, fields, and turbulent transport equation budgets are compared among these models to identify similarities and differences in the turbulence production, dissipation and diffusion physics represented by the closures used in these models. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Rayleigh--Taylor spike evaporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schappert, G. T.; Batha, S. H.; Klare, K. A.; Hollowell, D. E.; Mason, R. J.

    2001-09-01

    Laser-based experiments have shown that Rayleigh--Taylor (RT) growth in thin, perturbed copper foils leads to a phase dominated by narrow spikes between thin bubbles. These experiments were well modeled and diagnosed until this '' spike'' phase, but not into this spike phase. Experiments were designed, modeled, and performed on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton , Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] to study the late-time spike phase. To simulate the conditions and evolution of late time RT, a copper target was fabricated consisting of a series of thin ridges (spikes in cross section) 150 {mu}m apart on a thin flat copper backing. The target was placed on the side of a scale-1.2 hohlraum with the ridges pointing into the hohlraum, which was heated to 190 eV. Side-on radiography imaged the evolution of the ridges and flat copper backing into the typical RT bubble and spike structure including the '' mushroom-like feet'' on the tips of the spikes. RAGE computer models [R. M. Baltrusaitis, M. L. Gittings, R. P. Weaver, R. F. Benjamin, and J. M. Budzinski, Phys. Fluids 8, 2471 (1996)] show the formation of the '' mushrooms,'' as well as how the backing material converges to lengthen the spike. The computer predictions of evolving spike and bubble lengths match measurements fairly well for the thicker backing targets but not for the thinner backings.

  7. Rayleigh-Taylor stabilization by material strength at Mbar pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, Bruce; Park, Hye-Sook; Lorenz, Thomas; Cavallo, Robert; Pollaine, Stephen; Prisbrey, Shon; Rudd, Robert; Becker, Richard; Bernier, Joel

    2009-11-01

    We present experiments on the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the plastic flow regime of solid-state vanadium (V) foils at 1 Mbar pressures and strain rates of 1.e6-1.e8 1/s, using a laser based, ramped-pressure acceleration technique. High pressure material strength causes strong stabilization of the RT instability at short wavelengths. Comparisons with 2D simulations utilizing models of high pressure strength show that the V strength increases by factors of 3-4 at peak pressure, compared to its ambient strength. An effective lattice viscosity of 400 poise would have a similar effect. [1] Constitutive models, and theoretical implications of these experiments will be discussed. [1] H.S. Park, B.A. Remington et al., submitted for publication (July, 2009).

  8. Suppression of Instability in Rotatory Hydromagnetic Convection

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Joginder S Dhiman

    2000-08-01

    Recently discovered hydrodynamic instability [1], in a simple Bénard configuration in the parameter regime 02 > 1 under the action of a nonadverse temperature gradient, is shown to be suppressed by the simultaneous action of a uniform rotation and a uniform magnetic field both acting parallel to gravity for oscillatory perturbations whenever $(\\mathscr{Q}_1/^2+\\mathscr{J}/^4) > 1$ and the effective Rayleigh number $\\mathcal{R}$(1-02) is dominated by either 274(1 + 1/1)/4 or 274/2 according as 1 ≥ 1 or 1 ≤ 1 respectively. Here 0 is the temperature of the lower boundary while 2 is the coefficient of specific heat at constant volume due to temperature variation and 1, $\\mathcal{R}, \\mathscr{Q}$ and $\\mathscr{T}$ respectively denote the magnetic Prandtl number, the Rayleigh number, the Chandrasekhar number and the Taylor number.

  9. Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor growth and feedthrough in cylindrical liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Matthew; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Peterson, Kyle; Hess, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Cylindrical liner implosions in the MagLIF concept are susceptible to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT). The linearized ideal MHD equations are solved, including the presence of an axial magnetic field and the effects of sausage and kink modes. The eigenmode solution, using appropriate equilibrium profiles, allows an assessment of the local MRT growth rate and of the instantaneous feedthrough factor during the entire implosion process. Of particular interest will be the high convergence/stagnation phase, which is difficult to image experimentally. Strong axial magnetic fields can mitigate feedthrough and MRT growth, which may be useful at the fuel/liner interface during this phase of the MagLIF implosion. For the MRT growth rate and feedthrough factors, the LLNL code, HYDRA, is used to benchmark with the analytic theory, and with experiments on the Z-machine. This work was supported by DoE and NSF.

  10. Collisional effects on Rayleigh-Taylor-induced magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manuel, M. J.-E. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Flaig, M.; Plewa, T. [Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States); Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Casey, D. T.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Hu, S. X.; Betti, R.; Hager, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Smalyuk, V. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Magnetic-field generation from the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability was predicted more than 30 years ago, though experimental measurements of this phenomenon have only occurred in the past few years. These pioneering observations demonstrated that collisional effects are important to B-field evolution. To produce fields of a measurable strength, high-intensity lasers irradiate solid targets to generate the nonaligned temperature and density gradients required for B-field generation. The ablation process naturally generates an unstable system where RT-induced magnetic fields form. Field strengths inferred from monoenergetic-proton radiographs indicate that in the ablation region diffusive effects caused by finite plasma resistivity are not negligible. Results from the first proof-of-existence experiments are reviewed and the role of collisional effects on B-field evolution is discussed in detail.

  11. Anelastic Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, N.; Gauthier, S.

    2016-07-01

    Anelastic Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layers for miscible fluids are investigated with a recently built model (Schneider and Gauthier 2015 J. Eng. Math. 92 55-71). Four Chebyshev-Fourier-Fourier direct numerical simulations are analyzed. They use different values for the compressibility parameters: Atwood number (the dimensionless difference of the heavy and light fluid densities) and stratification (accounts for the vertical variation of density due to gravity). For intermediate Atwood numbers and finite stratification, compressibility effects quickly occurs. As a result only nonlinear behaviours are reached. The influence of the compressibility parameters on the growth speed of the RTI is discussed. The 0.1—Atwood number/0.4—stratification configuration reaches a turbulent regime. This turbulent mixing layer is analyzed with statistical tools such as moments, PDFs, anisotropy indicators and spectra.

  12. Stability of Rayleigh-Taylor Vortices in Dusty Plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jun; CHEN Yin-Hua; GAN Bao-Xia; WANG Fei-Hu; WANG Dong

    2006-01-01

    @@ The evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor mode in dusty plasma with vortex-flow is investigated. Based on fluid theory and Bayly's method, we derive the coupling equations describing the Rayleigh-Taylor mode in the core of vortex,and research the evolution characteristics of the perturbation amplitude with time numerically. It is shown that the eccentric of vortex and the content of dust have considerable effects on the amplitude evolutions.

  13. Very-high-growth-factor Planar Ablative Rayleigh Taylor Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, D K; Braun, D G; Glendinning, S G; Edwards, M J; Milovich, J L; Sorce, C M; Collins, G W; Haan, S W; Page, R H

    2006-10-30

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is an important factor in bounding the performance envelope of ignition targets. This paper describes an experiment for ablative RT instability that for the first time achieves growth factors close to those expected to occur in ignition targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The large growth allows small seed perturbations to be detected and can be used to place an upper bound on perturbation growth at the ablation front resulting from microstructure in the preferred Be ablator. The experiments were performed on the Omega laser using a halfraum 1.2 mm long by 2 mm diameter with a 75% laser entrance hole. The halfraum was filled with {approx} 1 atm of neopentane to delay gold plasma from closing the diagnostic line of sight down the axis of the halfraum. The ablator was mounted at the base of the halfraum, and was accelerated by a two stepped X-ray pulse consisting of an early time section {approx} 100 eV to emulate the NIF foot followed by an approximately constant {approx} 150 eV drive sustained over an additional 5-7ns. It is this long pulse duration and late time observation that distinguishes the present work from previous experiments, and is responsible for the large growth that is achieved. The growth of a 2D sinusoidal perturbation machined on the drive side of the ablator was measured using face-on radiography. The diagnostic view remained open until {approx} 11 ns with maximum growth factors measured to be {approx} 200. The trajectory of the ablator was measured using streaked backlit radiography. The design and analysis of the experiments is described, and implications for experiments on ignition target ablators are discussed.

  14. Rayleigh-Taylor-Unstable Accretion and Variability of Magnetized Stars: Global Three-Dimensional Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Kulkarni, Akshay K

    2008-01-01

    We present results of 3D simulations of MHD instabilities at the accretion disk-magnetosphere boundary. The instability is Rayleigh-Taylor, and develops for a fairly broad range of accretion rates and stellar rotation rates and magnetic fields. It produces tall, thin tongues of plasma that penetrate the magnetosphere in the equatorial plane. The shape and number of the tongues changes with time on the inner-disk dynamical timescale. In contrast with funnel flows, which deposit matter mainly in the polar region, the tongues deposit matter much closer to the stellar equator. The instability appears for relatively small misalignment angles, $\\Theta\\lesssim30^\\circ$, between the star's rotation and magnetic axes, and is associated with higher accretion rates. The hot spots and light curves during accretion through instability are generally much more chaotic than during stable accretion. The unstable state of accretion has possible implications for quasi-periodic oscillations and intermittent pulsations from accre...

  15. Experimental study of 3D Rayleigh-Taylor convection between miscible fluids in a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Yuji; Hyodo, Akimitsu; Wang, Lei; Suekane, Tetsuya

    2016-11-01

    The natural convection of miscible fluids in porous media has applications in several fields, such as geoscience and geoengineering, and can be employed for the geological storage of CO2. In this study, we used X-ray computer tomography to visualize 3D fingering structures associated with the Rayleigh-Taylor instability between miscible fluids in a porous medium. In the early stages of the onset of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, a fine crinkling pattern gradually appeared at the interface. As the wavelength and amplitude increased, descending fingers formed on the interface and extended vertically downward; in addition, ascending and highly symmetric fingers formed. The adjacent fingers were cylindrical in shape and coalesced to form large fingers. The fingers appearing on the interface tended to become finer with increasing Rayleigh number, which is consistent with linear perturbation theory. When the Péclet number exceeded 10, transverse dispersion increased the finger diameter and enhanced the finger coalescence, strongly impacting the decrease in finger number density. When mechanical dispersion was negligible, the finger-extension velocity and the dimensionless mass-transfer rate scaled with the characteristic velocity and the Rayleigh number with an appropriate length scale. Mechanical dispersion not only reduced the onset time but also enhanced the mass transport.

  16. Nonlinear diffusion model for Rayleigh-Taylor mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffetta, G; De Lillo, F; Musacchio, S

    2010-01-22

    The complex evolution of turbulent mixing in Rayleigh-Taylor convection is studied in terms of eddy diffusivity models for the mean temperature profile. It is found that a nonlinear model, derived within the general framework of Prandtl mixing theory, reproduces accurately the evolution of turbulent profiles obtained from numerical simulations. Our model allows us to give very precise predictions for the turbulent heat flux and for the Nusselt number in the ultimate state regime of thermal convection.

  17. Nonlinear diffusion model for Rayleigh-Taylor mixing

    CERN Document Server

    Boffetta, G; Musacchio, S

    2010-01-01

    The complex evolution of turbulent mixing in Rayleigh-Taylor convection is studied in terms of eddy diffusiviy models for the mean temperature profile. It is found that a non-linear model, derived within the general framework of Prandtl mixing theory, reproduces accurately the evolution of turbulent profiles obtained from numerical simulations. Our model allows to give very precise predictions for the turbulent heat flux and for the Nusselt number in the ultimate state regime of thermal convection.

  18. Ablation Front Rayleigh-Taylor Growth Experiments in Spherically Convergent Geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glendinning, S.G.; Cherfils, C.; Colvin, J.; Divol, L.; Galmiche, D.; Haan, S.; Marinak, M.M.; Remington, B.A.; Richard, A.L.; Wallace, R.

    1999-11-03

    Experiments were performed on the Nova laser, using indirectly driven capsules mounted in cylindrical gold hohlraums, to measure the Rayleigh-Taylor growth at the ablation front by time-resolved radiography. Modulations were preformed on the surface of Ge-doped plastic capsules. With initial modulations of 4 {micro}m, growth factors of about 6 in optical depth were seen, in agreement with simulations using the radiation hydrocode FCI2. With initial modulations of 1 {micro}m, growth factors of about 100-150 in optical depth were seen. The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability at the ablation front in an inertial confinement fusion capsule has been the subject of considerable investigation. Much of this research has been concentrated on planar experiments, in which RT growth is inferred from radiography. The evolution is somewhat different in a converging geometry; the spatial wavelength decreases (affecting the onset of nonlinear saturation), and the shell thickens and compresses rather than decompressing as in a planar geometry. In a cylindrically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius, while in spherically convergent geometry, the latter effect is proportional to the radius squared. Experiments were performed on the Nova and Omega lasers in cylindrical geometry (using both direct and indirect drive) and have been performed in spherical geometry using direct drive.

  19. The Dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor Stable and Unstable Contact Discontinuities with Anisotropic Thermal Conduction

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoanet, Daniel; Quataert, Eliot

    2012-01-01

    We study the effects of anisotropic thermal conduction along magnetic field lines on an accelerated contact discontinuity in a weakly collisional plasma. We first perform a linear stability analysis similar to that used to derive the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) dispersion relation. We find that anisotropic conduction is only important for compressible modes, as incompressible modes are isothermal. Modes grow faster in the presence of anisotropic conduction, but growth rates do not change by more than a factor of order unity. We next run fully non-linear numerical simulations of a contact discontinuity with anisotropic conduction. The non-linear evolution can be thought of as a superposition of three physical effects: temperature diffusion due to vertical conduction, the RTI, and the heat flux driven buoyancy instability (HBI). In simulations with RTI-stable contact discontinuities, the temperature discontinuity spreads due to vertical heat conduction. This occurs even for initially horizontal magnetic f...

  20. 2D HYDRA Calculations of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor Growth and Feedthrough in Cylindrical Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weis, Matthew; Zhang, Peng; Lau, Y. Y.; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Peterson, Kyle; Hess, Mark

    2014-10-01

    Cylindrical liner implosions are susceptible to the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor instability (MRT), along with the azimuthal current-carrying modes (sausage, kink, etc). ``Feedthrough'' of these instabilities has a strong influence on the integrity of the liner/fuel interface in the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept (MagLIF). The linearized ideal MHD equations can be solved to quantify these effects, including the presence of an effective gravity and an axial magnetic field. We investigate the potential of this field to mitigate feedthrough, due to MRT growth from various initial surface finishes (seeded, rough), throughout the implosion using our analytic results and the LLNL code, HYDRA. We will present both low and high convergence cases. Lastly, we illustrate the effect shock compression can have on feedthrough in seeded liners for various fill gases (cold and pre-heated) and magnetic field configurations. M. R. Weis was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories.

  1. Elliptical instabilities of stratified, hydromagnetic waves and the Earth's outer core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerswell, R.R.

    1992-01-01

    The streamlines of the basic rotating flow within the Earth's outer core are thought to be slightly elliptical due to tidal and precessional effects. Such a 2-dimensional elliptical flow is inertially unstable to 3-dimensional disturbances. This thesis assesses the relevance of this elliptical instability for the Earth's outer core and discusses possible implications for the geodynamo. Elliptical instability arises through a triad-type resonance of two linear waves with the underlying distorted state. When the fluid is stratified and carries a magnetic field, three different sets of waves, categorized by their dominant restoring mechanism, can exist and may potentially excite each other through the elliptical distortion. Simple cylindrical models are constructed to examine these various couplings using Earth-like parameters. It is estimated that resonances between fast (frequency comparable to the basic rotation) hydromagnetic waves can produce growth with an e-folding time of 100,000 years in the outer core, comparing favorably with typical geomagnetic inter-reversal times of O(10[sup 5]/10[sup 6]) years. Extension is made to the more geophysically-relevant, elliptically-distorted spheroidal container, in which an upper bound of 9/16 [beta] is deduced for the exponential growth rate ([beta] is the ratio of strain to rotation rate for the elliptical flow). The breakdown of a slightly distorted, rotating spheroid through an elliptical instability in commonplace. The effect of an orbiting moon is discussed and connection made between the well known middle-moment-of-inertia instability of rotating, rigid bodies and the elliptical instability. To assess the effect of ohmic and viscous dissipations upon these instabilities, a boundary layer analysis is undertaken to calculate hydromagnetic decay rates for the relevant fast waves in the outer core. The elliptical excitation of these fast hydromagnetic waves is just insufficient to overcome dissipative processes.

  2. A generalised Rayleigh-Taylor condition for the Muskat problem

    CERN Document Server

    Escher, Joachim; Matioc, Bogdan-Vasile

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we consider the evolution of two fluid phases in a porous medium. The fluids are separated from each other and also the wetting phase from air by interfaces which evolve in time. We reduce the problem to an abstract evolution equation. A generalised Rayleigh-Taylor condition characterizes the parabolicity regime of the problem and allows us to establish a general well-posedness result and to study stability properties of flat steady-states. When considering surface tension effects at the interface between the fluids and if the more dense fluid lies above, we find bifurcating finger-shaped equilibria which are all unstable.

  3. Hydromagnetic Waves and Instabilities in Kappa Distribution Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    perpendicular effective particle temperatures, respec- tively. Two other parameters related to pM and pnl which naturally occur in the study of...role in determin- ing the excitation conditions of the field swelling and mirror instabilities [see Eqs. (60) and (65)]. Calculating pnl /pni from Eq...more convenient form of the perturbed distribution function /„ that may be used in- stead of Eq. (12) to obtain nn, pM, and pnl given by Eqs. (72

  4. Measurements of Molecular Mixing in a High Schmidt Number Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing Layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N J; Schilling, O; Youngs, D L; Andrews, M

    2007-12-03

    Rayleigh?Taylor instability-induced mixing are discussed.

  5. Qualitative and quantitative features of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaprabhu, Praveen; Karkhanis, Varad; Lawrie, Andrew; Bhowmick, Aklant; Abarzhi, Snezhana; RTI Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    We consider dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) flow in a large aspect ratio three-dimensional domain with square symmetry in the plane for fluids with contrasting densities. In order to quantify the interface evolution from a small amplitude single-mode initial perturbation to advanced stage of RT mixing, we apply numerical simulations using the MOBILE code, theoretical analyses, including group theory and momentum model, as well as parameters describing the interplay between acceleration and turbulence. We find: In RT flow, the fluid motion is intense near the interface and is negligible far from the interface. At late times the growth rates of RT bubbles and spikes may increase without a corresponding increase of length-scales in the direction normal to acceleration. The parameters describing the interplay between acceleration and turbulence in RT mixing are shown to scale well with the flow Reynolds number and Froude number.

  6. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2006-03-24

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  7. Experimental characterization of initial conditions and spatio-temporal evolution of a small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N J; Andrews, M J; Schilling, O

    2005-09-26

    The initial multi-mode interfacial velocity and density perturbations present at the onset of a small Atwood number, incompressible, miscible, Rayleigh-Taylor instability-driven mixing layer have been quantified using a combination of experimental techniques. The streamwise interfacial and spanwise interfacial perturbations were measured using high-resolution thermocouples and planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), respectively. The initial multi-mode streamwise velocity perturbations at the two-fluid density interface were measured using particle-image velocimetry (PIV). It was found that the measured initial conditions describe an initially anisotropic state, in which the perturbations in the streamwise and spanwise directions are independent of one another. The evolution of various fluctuating velocity and density statistics, together with velocity and density variance spectra, were measured using PIV and high-resolution thermocouple data. The evolution of the velocity and density statistics is used to investigate the early-time evolution and the onset of strongly-nonlinear, transitional dynamics within the mixing layer. The early-time evolution of the density and vertical velocity variance spectra indicate that velocity fluctuations are the dominant mechanism driving the instability development. The implications of the present experimental measurements on the initialization of Reynolds-averaged turbulent transport and mixing models and of direct and large-eddy simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor instability-induced turbulence are discussed.

  8. A simple model for hydromagnetic instabilities in the presence of a constant magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, A; Arrieta, A

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we study a simple model consisting of a dilute fully ionized plasma in the presence of the gravitational and a constant magnetic field to analyze the propagation of hydromagnetic instabilities. In particular we show that the so called Jeans instability is in principle affected by the presence of the magnetic field. A brief discussion is made attempting to assess this influence in the stage of the evolution of the Universe where structures were formed. The most logical conclusion is that if magnetic fields existed in those times their magnitudes were too small to modify Jeans' mass. Our results places limits of the possible values of seed magnetic fields consistent with the formation structures in the Universe. These values are within the range of the results obtained by other authors.

  9. Evolution of a double-front Rayleigh-Taylor system using a GPU-based high resolution thermal Lattice-Boltzmann model

    CERN Document Server

    Ripesi, P; Schifano, S F; Tripiccione, R

    2014-01-01

    We study the turbulent evolution originated from a system subjected to a Rayleigh-Taylor instability with a double density at high resolution in a 2 dimensional geometry using a highly optimized thermal Lattice Boltzmann code for GPUs. The novelty of our investigation stems from the initial condition, given by the superposition of three layers with three different densities, leading to the development of two Rayleigh-Taylor fronts that expand upward and downward and collide in the middle of the cell. By using high resolution numerical data we highlight the effects induced by the collision of the two turbulent fronts in the long time asymptotic regime. We also provide details on the optimized Lattice-Boltzmann code that we have run on a cluster of GPUs

  10. Application of monotone integrated large eddy simulation to Rayleigh-Taylor mixing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngs, David L

    2009-07-28

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability occurs when a dense fluid rests on top of a light fluid in a gravitational field. It also occurs in an equivalent situation (in the absence of gravity) when an interface between fluids of different density is accelerated by a pressure gradient, e.g. in inertial confinement fusion implosions. Engineering models (Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes models) are needed to represent the effect of mixing in complex applications. However, large eddy simulation (LES) currently makes an essential contribution to understanding the mixing process and calibration or validation of the engineering models. In this paper, three cases are used to illustrate the current role of LES: (i) mixing at a plane boundary, (ii) break-up of a layer of dense fluid due to RT instability, and (iii) mixing in a simple spherical implosion. A monotone integrated LES approach is preferred because of the need to treat discontinuities in the flow, i.e. the initial density discontinuities or shock waves. Of particular interest is the influence of initial conditions and how this needs to be allowed for in engineering modelling. It is argued that loss of memory of the initial conditions is unlikely to occur in practical applications.

  11. Planar and cylindrical Rayleigh-Taylor experiments on Nova (HEP2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remington, B.A.; Weber, S.V.; Marinak, M.M. [and others

    1996-06-01

    A high-density fluid on top of a low-density fluid is Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable. Driven by gravity, random perturbations at the interface between the two fluids will grow: fingers ({open_quotes}spikes{close_quotes}) of the heavier fluid will poke through the lighter fluid, and bubbles of the lighter fluid will rise into the heavier fluid. The RT instability and its shock-driven analog, the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability, have been a focus of research in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for some time. In ICF, the driver - laser light, x rays, or ions - heats the outer layer of the capsule wall, causing it to ionize and expand rapidly. The result is a low-density ablated plasma accelerating the high-density capsule wall ({open_quotes}Pusher{close_quotes}). The ablation front is RT unstable, and outer-surface imperfections grow. This growth can seed perturbations at the pusher inner wall, which in turn become RT unstable during deceleration and stagnation. Ultimately, pusher material can mix into the fuel, degrading performance.

  12. Investigating iron material strength up to 1 Mbar using Rayleigh-Taylor growth measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, C. M.; Belof, J. L.; Blobaum, K. J. M.; Cavallo, R. M.; Kostinski, N. B.; Maddox, B. R.; Park, H.-S.; Plechaty, C.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Rudd, R.; Swift, D. W.; Wallace, R. J.; Weber, S. V.; Wehrenberg, C.; Wilson, M. J.; Remington, B. A.

    2017-01-01

    The solid-solid phase transition between the bcc (α) and hcp (ɛ) lattice structures in iron is known to occur as the material is compressed. When kept below its melting point, an effective increase in the macroscopic strength of the material accompanies this phase transition. Understanding the material strength of iron throughout the deformation process presents a significant computational challenge, but is important for improving models of planetary structure, including interpretation of seismic measurements taken through our own Earth's core. To explore the strength of iron at high pressures and strain rates, we have developed the IronRT campaign at the OMEGA laser [1]. This laser-driven platform produces pressure greater than 1 Mbar on a thin Fe disk with a sinusoidal ripple pattern imposed on its face. These ripples seed the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability, the growth of which is suppressed by the material strength of the sample. The amplitude of the ripples is diagnosed with high-energy x-ray radiography, and the measured growth is compared to simulations performed with different strength models. By matching the simulations to the low level of growth measured, we infer an average flow stress of greater than 40 GPa over the course of the experiment. This value is in agreement with other dynamic iron strength experiments at pressures greater than 1 Mbar [2].

  13. Rayleigh Taylor growth at an embedded interface driven by a radiative shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntington, Channing

    2016-10-01

    Radiative shocks are those where the radiation generated by the shock influences the hydrodynamics of the matter in the system. Radiative shocks are common in astrophysics, including during type II supernovae, and have also been observed in the rebound phase of a compressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule. It is predicted that the radiative heating serves to stabilize hydrodynamic instabilities in these systems, but studying the effect is challenging. Only in recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility has the energy been available to drive a radiative shock across a planar, Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interface in solid-density materials. Because the generation of radiation at the shock front is a strong function of shock velocity (v8) , the RT growth rates in the presence of fast and slow shockas were directly compared. We observe reduced RT spike development when the driving shock is expected to be radiative. Both low drive (225 eV) hydrodynamic RT growth and high drive (325 eV), radiatively-stabilized growth rates are in good agreement with 2D models. This NIF Discovery Science result has important implications for our understanding of astrophysical radiative shocks, as well as the dynamics of ICF capsules. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Adjoint-based approach to Enhancing Mixing in Rayleigh-Taylor Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kord, Ali; Capecelatro, Jesse

    2016-11-01

    A recently developed adjoint method for multi-component compressible flow is used to measure sensitivity of the mixing rate to initial perturbations in Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) turbulence. Direct numerical simulations (DNS) of RT instabilities are performed at moderate Reynolds numbers. The DNS are used to provide an initial prediction, and the corresponding space-time discrete-exact adjoint provides a sensitivity gradient for a specific quantity of interest (QoI). In this work, a QoI is defined based on the time-integrated scalar field to quantify the mixing rate. Therefore, the adjoint solution is used to measure sensitivity of this QoI to a set of initial perturbations, and inform a gradient-based line search to optimize mixing. We first demonstrate the adjoint approach in the linear regime and compare the optimized initial conditions to the expected values from linear stability analysis. The adjoint method is then used in the high Reynolds number limit where theory is no longer valid. Finally, chaos is known to contaminate the accuracy of the adjoint gradient in turbulent flows when integrated over long time horizons. We assess the influence of chaos on the accuracy of the adjoint gradient to guide the work of future studies on adjoint-based sensitivity of turbulent mixing. PhD Student, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI.

  15. Understanding the impact of initial condition on low Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor driven flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchibhatla, Sarat Chandra; Ranjan, Devesh

    2012-11-01

    Experimental investigation of the effects of initial conditions on Rayleigh-Taylor instability was performed using the Water Channel facility at Texas A&M University. Hot and cold water (with a temperature difference of ~7-8 degrees C) selected as working fluids were unstably stratified using a splitter plate resulting in a low Atwood number of ~0.0015. Using a servo controlled flapper system the effect of initial conditions is studied using different diagnostics such as optical imaging, thermocouples and hot-wire anemometry. A parametric study comprising of up to 10 modes of the initial condition was performed by varying the number of modes as well as modal composition (i . e . ratio of wavenumbers and phase differences). Variation of density, temperature and velocity field in the linear and non-linear stages of RT growth was recorded and analyzed. At non-dimensional time, t* = t (At g /H)0.5= 1.3, where t is the time, H is the width of the Channel, and g is the acceleration due to gravity, power spectra of the non-dimensional density showed fine-scale components that are dependent upon the initial condition. Plots of scalar dissipation and mixing rate indicate greater dissipation rate at early times that tends to asymptote to the order of kinematic viscosity at late times.

  16. Beryllium liner z-pinches for magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor studies on Z

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, R. D.; Slutz, S. A.; Sinars, D. B.; Lemke, R. W.; Martin, M. R.; Jennings, C. A.; Cuneo, M. E.; Herrmann, M. C.; Blue, B. E.

    2011-10-01

    Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) [S. A. Slutz, et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] is a promising new concept for achieving >100 kJ of fusion yield on Z. The greatest threat to this concept is the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. Thus experimental campaigns have been initiated to study MRT growth in fast imploding (<100 ns) cylindrical liners. This talk will present results from experiments that used 6.151-keV radiography to study the implosions of unperturbed (surface roughness only) beryllium (Be) liners. The high transmission efficiency of 6.151-keV photons through Be allowed us to obtain radiographs with finite transmission throughout the radial extent of the imploding liners. The data from these experiments will be shown and compared to simulation data from several magneto-hydrodynamic codes. These data are allowing us to evaluate the integrity of the inside (fuel-confining) surface of the imploding liner as it approaches stagnation. Sandia is a multi-program laboratory operated by Sandia Corp, a Lockheed-Martin company, for the US Dept of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Emergence of nonlinearity and plausible turbulence in accretion disks via hydromagnetic transient growth faster than magnetorotational instability

    CERN Document Server

    Nath, Sujit K

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of hydromagnetic perturbations in a small section of accretion disks. It is known that molecular viscosity is negligible in accretion disks. Hence, it has been argued that Magnetorotational Instability (MRI) is responsible for transporting matter in the presence of weak magnetic field. However, there are some shortcomings, which question effectiveness of MRI. Now the question arises, whether other hydromagnetic effects, e.g. transient growth (TG), can play an important role to bring nonlinearity in the system, even at weak magnetic fields. Otherwise, whether MRI or TG, which is primarily responsible to reveal nonlinearity to make the flow turbulent? Our results prove explicitly that the flows with high Reynolds number (Re), which is the case of realistic astrophysical accretion disks, exhibit nonlinearity by best TG of perturbation modes faster than that by best modes producing MRI. For a fixed wavevector, MRI dominates over transient effects, only at low Re, lower than its value ...

  18. The mutual attraction of magnetic knots. [solar hydromagnetic instability in sunspot regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1978-01-01

    It is observed that the magnetic knots associated with active regions on the sun have an attraction for each other during the formative period of the active regions, when new magnetic flux is coming to the surface. The attraction disappears when new flux ceases to rise through the surface. Then the magnetic spots and knots tend to come apart, leading to disintegration of the sunspots previously formed. The dissolution of the fields is to be expected, as a consequence of the magnetic repulsion of knots of like polarity and as a consequence of the hydromagnetic exchange instability. The purpose of this paper is to show that the mutual attraction of knots during the formative stages of a sunspot region may be understood as the mutual hydrodynamic attraction of the rising flux tubes. Two rising tubes attract each other, as a consequence of the wake of the leading tube when one is moving behind the other, and as a consequence of the Bernoulli effect when rising side by side.

  19. Indirect drive ablative Rayleigh-Taylor experiments with rugby hohlraums on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, A.; Galmiche, D.; Huser, G.; Jadaud, J.-P.; Liberatore, S.; Vandenboomgaerde, M.

    2009-09-01

    Results of ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth experiments performed in indirect drive on the OMEGA laser facility [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, S. Craxton et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] are reported. These experiments aim at benchmarking hydrocodes simulations and ablator instabilities growth in conditions relevant to ignition in the framework of the Laser MégaJoule [C. Cavailler, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 47, 389 (2005)]. The modulated samples under study were made of germanium-doped plastic (CHGe), which is the nominal ablator for future ignition experiments. The incident x-ray drive was provided using rugby-shaped hohlraums [M. Vandenboomgaerde, J. Bastian, A. Casner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 065004 (2007)] and was characterized by means of absolute time-resolved soft x-ray power measurements through a dedicated diagnostic hole, shock breakout data and one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) side-on radiographies. All these independent x-ray drive diagnostics lead to an actual on-foil flux that is about 50% smaller than laser-entrance-hole measurements. The experimentally inferred flux is used to simulate experimental optical depths obtained from face-on radiographies for an extensive set of initial conditions: front-side single-mode (wavelength λ =35, 50, and 70 μm) and two-mode perturbations (wavelength λ =35 and 70 μm, in phase or in opposite phase). Three-dimensional pattern growth is also compared with the 2D case. Finally the case of the feedthrough mechanism is addressed with rear-side modulated foils.

  20. Study of Rayleigh-Taylor growth in directly driven cryogenic-deuterium targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hager, J. D.; Hu, S. X.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Direct-drive, Rayleigh-Taylor growth experiments in liquid deuterium (D{sub 2}) were performed on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] using planar cryogenic targets at a laser intensity of {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. These are the first Rayleigh-Taylor measurements in deuterium at conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion using a mass preimposed initial modulation. The measured modulation optical depths are in agreement with the 2D hydrodynamics code DRACO using flux-limited local thermal transport, providing an important step in the experimental validation of simulations for direct-drive ignition.

  1. Rayleigh-Taylor-Induced Electromagnetic Fields in Laser-Produced Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Mario J.-E.

    Spontaneous electromagnetic fields can be important to the dynamic evolution of a plasma by directing heat flow as well as providing additional pressures on the conducting fluids through the Lorentz force. Electromagnetic fields are predicted to affect fluid behavior during the core-collapse of supernovae through generation of fields due to hydrodynamic instabilities. In the coronae of stars, self-generated magnetic fields lead to filamentary structure in the hot plasma. Recent experiments by Gregori et al. investigated sources of protogalactic magnetic fields generated by laser-produced shock waves. In inertial confinement fusion experiments, self-generated electromagnetic fields can also play a role and have recently become of great interest to the community. Present day laser facilities provide a unique opportunity to study spontaneous field-generation in these extreme environments under controlled conditions. Instability-induced electromagnetic fields were investigated using a novel monoenergetic-proton radiography system. Fusion protons generated by an 'exploding-pusher' implosion were used to probe laser-irradiated plastic foils with various preimposed surface perturbations. Imaging protons are sensitive to electromagnetic fields and density modulations in the plasma through the Lorentz force and Coulomb collisions, respectively. Corresponding x-ray radiographs of these targets provided mass density distributions and Coulomb effects on protons were assessed using a Monte Carlo code written using the Geant4 framework. Proton fluence distributions were recorded on CR-39 detectors and Fourier analyzed to infer path-integrated field strengths. Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) growth of preimposed surface perturbations generated magnetic fields by the RT-induced Biermann battery and were measured for the first time. Good data were obtained during linear growth and when compared to ideal calculations, demonstrated that field diffusion near the source played an important role

  2. Numerical simulations of compressible Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence in stratified fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Scagliarini, A; Sbragaglia, M; Sugiyama, K; Toschi, F

    2010-01-01

    We present results from numerical simulations of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence, performed using a recently proposed lattice Boltzmann method able to describe consistently a thermal compressible flow subject to an external forcing. The method allowed us to study the system both in the nearly-Boussinesq and strongly compressible regimes. Moreover, we show that when the stratification is important, the presence of the adiabatic gradient causes the arrest of the mixing process.

  3. Effect of noise on Rayleigh-Taylor mixing with time-dependent acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swisher, Nora; Pandian, Arun; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    We perform a detailed stochastic study of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing with time-dependent acceleration. A set of nonlinear stochastic differential equations with multiplicative noise is derived on the basis of momentum model and group theory analysis. A broad range of parameters is investigated, and self-similar asymptotic solutions are found. The existence is shown of two sub-regimes of RT mixing dynamics - the acceleration-driven and the dissipation-driven mixing. In each sub-regime, statistic properties of the solutions are investigated, and dynamic invariants are found. Transition between the sub-regimes is studied. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  4. Experimental Reduction of Laser Imprinting and Rayleigh--Taylor Growth in Spherically Compressed, Medium-Z--Doped Plastic Targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, G.; Hu, S. X.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Yaakobi, B.; Bonino, M. J.; Jungquist, R. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2012-10-01

    The effect of medium-Z doping of plastic ablators on laser imprinting and Rayleigh-- Taylor (RT) instability growth was studied using spherical direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA Laser System. The targets were spherical plastic (CH) shells, with an outer diameter of 860 μm and a thickness of 22 μm, doped with a varied concentration of Si (4.3% and 7.4%) and Ge (3.9%). The targets were imploded with 48 beams with a low-adiabat, triple-picket laser shape pulse with a peak intensity of 4 x 10^14 W/cm^2 and a pulse duration of 2.5 ns. The shells were x-ray radiographed through a 400-μm opening in the side of the target. The results show that impurity doping strongly reduces the shell-density modulation and the instability growth rate. The amplitude of the initial imprint is reduced by a factor of 2.5±0.5 for CH[4.3% Si] targets and a factor of 3±0.5 for CH[7.4% Si] and CH[3.9% Ge] targets. At the end of the acceleration phase, the reduction factor becomes 3±0.5 and 5±0.5, correspondingly. The RT instability growth rate in doped targets is reduced by a factor of 1.5 compared to undoped ones. Simulations using the 2-D radiation--hydrodynamics code DRACO show good agreement with the measurements. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC52-08NA28302.

  5. Experimental reduction of laser imprinting and Rayleigh-Taylor growth in spherically compressed, medium-Z-doped plastic targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiksel, G.; Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Yaakobi, B.; Bonino, M. J.; Jungquist, R.

    2012-06-01

    The effect of medium-Z doping of plastic ablators on laser imprinting and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth was studied using spherical direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1977)]. The targets were spherical plastic (CH) shells, with an outer diameter of 860 μm and a thickness of 22 μm, volume doped with a varied concentration of Si (4.3% and 7.4%) and Ge (3.9%). The targets were imploded with 48 beams with a low-adiabat, triple-picket laser shape pulse with a peak intensity of 4×1014W/cm2, and a pulse duration of 2.5 ns. The shells were x-ray radiographed through a 400 -μm opening in the side of the target. The results show that volumetric impurity doping strongly reduces the shell density modulation and the instability growth rate. The amplitude of the initial imprint is reduced by a factor of 2.5 ± 0.5 for CH[4.3% Si] targets and by a factor of 3 ± 0.5 for CH[7.4% Si] and CH[3.9% Ge] targets. At the end of the acceleration phase, the reduction factor becomes 3 ± 0.5 and 5 ± 0.5, correspondingly. The RT instability growth rate in doped targets is reduced by a factor of 1.5 compared to undoped ones. Simulations using the two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamics code draco show good agreement with the measurements.

  6. Experimental reduction of laser imprinting and Rayleigh-Taylor growth in spherically compressed, medium-Z-doped plastic targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiksel, G.; Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. A.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Yaakobi, B.; Bonino, M. J.; Jungquist, R. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Rd., Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    The effect of medium-Z doping of plastic ablators on laser imprinting and Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth was studied using spherical direct-drive implosions on the OMEGA Laser System [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1977)]. The targets were spherical plastic (CH) shells, with an outer diameter of 860 {mu}m and a thickness of 22 {mu}m, volume doped with a varied concentration of Si (4.3% and 7.4%) and Ge (3.9%). The targets were imploded with 48 beams with a low-adiabat, triple-picket laser shape pulse with a peak intensity of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14}W/cm{sup 2}, and a pulse duration of 2.5 ns. The shells were x-ray radiographed through a 400 -{mu}m opening in the side of the target. The results show that volumetric impurity doping strongly reduces the shell density modulation and the instability growth rate. The amplitude of the initial imprint is reduced by a factor of 2.5 {+-} 0.5 for CH[4.3% Si] targets and by a factor of 3 {+-} 0.5 for CH[7.4% Si] and CH[3.9% Ge] targets. At the end of the acceleration phase, the reduction factor becomes 3 {+-} 0.5 and 5 {+-} 0.5, correspondingly. The RT instability growth rate in doped targets is reduced by a factor of 1.5 compared to undoped ones. Simulations using the two-dimensional, radiation-hydrodynamics code draco show good agreement with the measurements.

  7. Experimental investigation of late time Rayleigh-Taylor mixing at high Atwood number

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchandra, Prasoon; Mikhaeil, Mark; Ranjan, Devesh

    2016-11-01

    Dynamics of late time, high Reynolds number (Re >20000) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing is studied using statistically steady experiments performed in a multi-layer gas tunnel. The density ratio of air and air-Helium mixture used in the present experiment results in an Atwood number 0.73. Three types of diagnostics - back-lit visualization, hot-wire anemometry and stereo particle image velocimetry (S-PIV) - are employed to obtain mixing width, velocity and density fields, with S-PIV employed for the first time for such experimental conditions. Velocity and density statistics, and their correlations (u', v', w',ρ' ,ρ'v') are presented. Calculations of probability density functions (p.d.f.s) and energy spectra are made to provide further insight into the flow physics. Energy budget of the flow is also discussed.

  8. Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor, Sausage And Kink Mode In Cylindrical Liners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Y. Y.; Zhang, Peng; Weis, Matthew; Gilgenbach, Ronald; Hess, Mark; Peterson, Kyle

    2014-10-01

    This paper analyzes the coupling of magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT), sausage (azimuthal mode number m = 0) and kink mode (m = 1) in an imploding cylindrical liner, using ideal MHD. A uniform axial magnetic field of arbitrary value is included in each region: liner, its interior, and its exterior. The dispersion relation, the feedthrough factor, and the temporal evolution of perturbations were solved exactly, for arbitrary values of g (= gravity), k (= axial wavenumber), m, aspect ratio, and equilibrium quantities in each region. For small k, a positive g (inward radial acceleration in the lab frame) tends to stabilize the sausage mode, but destabilize the kink mode. For large k, a positive g destabilizes both the kink and sausage mode. This analysis might shed lights into some puzzling features in Harris' classic paper, and in the recent cylindrical liner experiments on MRT. M. R. Weis was supported by the Sandia National Laboratories.

  9. Retarding viscous Rayleigh-Taylor mixing by an optimized additional mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, C. Y.; Tao, J. J.; Sun, Z. L.; Li, J.

    2017-02-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing induced by random interface disturbances between two incompressible viscous fluids is simulated numerically. The ensemble averaged spike velocity is found to be remarkably retarded when the random interface disturbances are superimposed with an optimized additional mode. The mode's wavenumber is selected to be large enough to avoid enhancing the dominance of long-wavelength modes, but not so large that its saturated spike and bubble velocities are too small to stimulate a growing effective density-gradient layer suppressing the long-wavelength modes. Such an optimized suppressing mode is expected to be found in the RT mixing including other diffusion processes, e.g., concentration diffusion and thermal diffusion.

  10. Statistically steady measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing in a gas channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Arindam

    A novel gas channel experiment was constructed to study the development of high Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing. Two gas streams, one containing air and the other containing helium-air mixture, flow parallel to each other separated by a thin splitter plate. The streams meet at the end of a splitter plate leading to the formation of an unstable interface and of buoyancy driven mixing. This buoyancy driven mixing experiment allows for long data collection times, short transients and was statistically steady. The facility was designed to be capable of large Atwood number studies of At ˜ 0.75. We describe work to measure the self similar evolution of mixing at density differences corresponding to 0.035 hot-wire anemometer, and high resolution digital image analysis. The hot-wire probe gives velocity, density and velocity-density statistics of the mixing layer. Two different multi-position single-wire techniques were used to measure the velocity fluctuations in three mutually perpendicular directions. Analysis of the measured data was used to explain the mixing as it develops to a self-similar regime in this flow. These measurements are to our knowledge, the first use of hot-wire anemometry in the Rayleigh-Taylor community. Since the measurement involved extensive calibration of the probes in a binary gas mixture of air and helium, a new convective heat transfer correlation was formulated to account for variable-density low Reynolds number flows past a heated cylinder. In addition to the hot-wire measurements, a digital image analysis procedure was used to characterize various properties of the flow and also to validate the hot-wire measurements. A test of statistical convergence was performed and the study revealed that the statistical convergence was a direct consequence of the number of different large three-dimensional structures that were averaged over the duration of the run.

  11. Hydrodynamic Instability of Ionization Fronts in HII Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizuta, A; Kane, J; Ryutov, D; Remington, B; Takabe, H; Pound, M

    2003-08-21

    The authors investigate hydrodynamic instability of accelerating ionization fronts with two dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. When recombination in the ionized region is turned off, Rayleigh-Taylor instability is effective. Perturbation grows up with classical Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate. In the case with recombination, the local difference of absorption profile works to smooth the surface. The perturbation does not grow and the amplitude follows a damped oscillations with time.

  12. RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR STRENGTH EXPERIMENTS OF THE PRESSURE-INDUCED alpha->epsilon->alpha' PHASE TRANSITION IN IRON

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belof, J L; Cavallo, R M; Olson, R T; King, R S; Gray, G T; Holtkamp, D B; Chen, S R; Rudd, R E; Barton, N R; Arsenlis, A; Remington, B A; Park, H; Prisbrey, S T; Vitello, P A; Bazan, G; Mikaelian, K O; Comley, A J; Maddox, B R; May, M J

    2011-08-10

    We present here the first dynamic Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) strength measurement of a material undergoing solid-solid phase transition. Iron is quasi-isentropically driven across the pressure-induced bcc ({alpha}-Fe) {yields} hcp ({var_epsilon}-Fe) phase transition and the dynamic strength of the {alpha}, {var_epsilon} and reverted {alpha}{prime} phases have been determined via proton radiography of the resulting Rayleigh-Taylor unstable interface between the iron target and high-explosive products. Simultaneous velocimetry measurements of the iron free surface yield the phase transition dynamics and, in conjunction with detailed hydrodynamic simulations, allow for determination of the strength of the distinct phases of iron. Forward analysis of the experiment via hydrodynamic simulations reveals significant strength enhancement of the dynamically-generated {var_epsilon}-Fe and reverted {alpha}{prime}-Fe, comparable in magnitude to the strength of austenitic stainless steels.

  13. Effect of noise on Rayleigh-Taylor mixing with space-dependent acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, Arun; Abarzhi, Snezhana

    2016-11-01

    We analyze, for the first time by our knowledge, the effect of noise on Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing with space-dependent acceleration by applying the stochastic model. In these conditions, the RT mixing is a statistically unsteady process where the means values of the flow quantities vary in space and time, and there are also the space and time dependent fluctuations around these mean values. The stochastic model is derived from the momentum model and is represented by a set of nonlinear differential equations with multiplicative noise. The models equations are solved theoretically and numerically. Investigating a broad range of values of acceleration, self-similar asymptotic solutions are found in the mixing regime. There are two types of mixing sub-regimes (acceleration-driven and dissipation-driven respectively), each of which has its own types of solutions and characteristic values with the latter saturating to a value on the order of one. It is also observed that the representation of the dynamics in an implicit form is noisier as compared to the case of an explicit time-dependent form. The work is supported by the US National Science Foundation.

  14. An Investigation of the Influence of Initial Conditions on Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, Nicholas J. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2004-12-01

    Experiments and direct numerical simulations (DNS) have been performed to examine the effects of initial conditions on the dynamics of a Rayleigh-Taylor unstable mixing layer. Experiments were performed on a water channel facility to measure the interfacial and velocity perturbations initially present at the two-fluid interface in a small Atwood number mixing layer. The experimental measurements have been parameterized for use in numerical simulations of the experiment. Two- and three-dimensional DNS of the experiment have been performed using the parameterized initial conditions. It is shown that simulations implemented with initial velocity and density perturbations, rather than density perturbations alone, are required to match experimentally-measured statistics and spectra. Data acquired from both the experiment and numerical simulations are used to examine the role of initial conditions on the evolution of integral-scale, turbulence, and mixing statistics. Early-time turbulence and mixing statistics are shown to be strongly-dependent upon the early-time transition of the initial perturbation from a weakly-nonlinear to a strongly-nonlinear flow.

  15. On hot-wire diagnostics in Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraft, Wayne N. [Texas A and M University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, College Station, TX (United States); Banerjee, Arindam [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rolla, MO (United States); Andrews, Malcolm J. [Texas A and M University, Department of Mechanical Engineering, College Station, TX (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Two hot-wire flow diagnostics have been developed to measure a variety of turbulence statistics in the buoyancy driven, air-helium Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer. The first diagnostic uses a multi-position, multi-overheat (MPMO) single wire technique that is based on evaluating the wire response function to variations in density, velocity and orientation, and gives time-averaged statistics inside the mixing layer. The second diagnostic utilizes the concept of temperature as a fluid marker, and employs a simultaneous three-wire/cold-wire anemometry technique (S3WCA) to measure instantaneous statistics. Both of these diagnostics have been validated in a low Atwood number (A{sub t}{<=} 0.04), small density difference regime, that allowed validation of the diagnostics with similar experiments done in a hot-water/cold-water water channel facility. Good agreement is found for the measured growth parameters for the mixing layer, velocity fluctuation anisotropy, velocity fluctuation p.d.f behavior, and measurements of molecular mixing. We describe in detail the MPMO and S3WCA diagnostics, and the validation measurements in the low Atwood number regime (A{sub t}{<=} 0.04). We also outline the advantages of each technique for measurement of turbulence statistics in fluid mixtures with large density differences. (orig.)

  16. 3-D simulations to investigate initial condition effects on the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Malcolm J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    The effect of initial conditions on the growth rate of turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing has been studied using carefully formulated numerical simulations. An integrated large-eddy simulation (ILES) that uses a finite-volume technique was employed to solve the three-dimensional incompressible Euler equations with numerical dissipation. The initial conditions were chosen to test the dependence of the RT growth parameters ({alpha}{sub b}, {alpha}{sub s}) on variations in (a) the spectral bandwidth, (b) the spectral shape, and (c) discrete banded spectra. Our findings support the notion that the overall growth of the RT mixing is strongly dependent on initial conditions. Variation in spectral shapes and bandwidths are found to have a complex effect of the late time development of the RT mixing layer, and raise the question of whether we can design RT transition and turbulence based on our choice of initial conditions. In addition, our results provide a useful database for the initialization and development of closures describing RT transition and turbulence.

  17. The onset of thermal instability of a two-dimensional hydromagnetic stagnation point flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaouche, Mustapha; Bouda, Faical Nait [Laboratoire de physique theorique, Universite de Bejaia, Route de Targua Ouzemour Bejaia (Algeria); Sadat, Hamou [Laboratoire d' Etudes Thermiques, Universite de Poitiers, 40 Avenue du Recteur Pineau, 86022 Poitiers (France)

    2005-10-01

    The aim of the present paper is to examine the effects of a constant magnetic field on the thermal instability of a two-dimensional stagnation point flow. First, it is shown that a basic flow, described by an exact solution of the full Navier-Stokes equations exists under some conditions relating the orientation of the magnetic field in the plane of motion to the obliqueness of free stream. The stability of the basic flow is then investigated in the usual fashion by making use of the normal mode decomposition. The resulting eigenvalue problem is solved numerically by means of a pseudo spectral collocation method based upon Laguerre's functions. The use of this procedure is warranted by the exponential damping of disturbances far from the boundary layer and the appropriate distribution of the roots of Laguerre's polynomials to treat boundary layer problems. It is found through the calculation of neutral stability curves that magnetic field acts to increase the stability of the basic flow. (author)

  18. The Nonlinear Asymptotic Stage of the Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with Wide Bubbles and Narrowing Spikes

    CERN Document Server

    Cherniavski, V M

    2013-01-01

    The potential flow of an incompressible inviscid heavy fluid over a light one is considered. The integral version of the method of matched asymptotic expansion is applied to the construction of the solution over long intervals of time. The asymptotic solution describes the flow in which a bubble rises with constant speed and the "tongue" is in free fall. The outer expansion is stationary, but the inner one depends on time. It is shown that the solution exists within the same range of Froude number obtained previously by Vanden-Broeck (1984a,b). The Froude number and the solution depend on the initial energy of the disturbance. At the top of the bubble, the derivative of the free-surface curvature has a discontinuity when the Froude number is not equal to 0.23. This makes it possible to identify the choice of the solution obtained in a number of studies with the presence of an artificial numerical surface tension. The first correction term in the neighborhood of the tongue is obtained when large surface tensio...

  19. Long-wave analysis and control of the viscous Rayleigh-Taylor instability with electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimpeanu, Radu; Anderson, Thomas; Petropoulos, Peter; Papageorgiou, Demetrios

    2016-11-01

    We investigate the electrostatic stabilization of a viscous thin film wetting the underside of a solid surface in the presence of a horizontally acting electric field. The competition between gravity, surface tension and the nonlocal effect of the applied electric field is captured analytically in the form of a nonlinear evolution equation. A semi-spectral solution strategy is employed to resolve the dynamics of the resulting partial differential equation. Furthermore, we conduct direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the Navier-Stokes equations and assess the accuracy of the obtained solutions when varying the electric field strength from zero up to the point when complete stabilization at the target finite wavelengths occurs. We employ DNS to examine the limitations of the asymptotically derived behavior in the context of increasing liquid film heights, with agreement found to be excellent even beyond the target lengthscales. Regimes in which the thin film assumption is no longer valid and droplet pinch-off occurs are then analyzed. Finally, the asymptotic and computational approaches are used in conjunction to identify efficient active control mechanisms allowing the manipulation of the fluid interface in light of engineering applications at small scales, such as mixing.

  20. Detailed Measurements of Turbulent Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing at Large and Small Atwood Numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm J. Andrews, Ph.D.

    2004-12-14

    This project has two major tasks: Task 1. The construction of a new air/helium facility to collect detailed measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing at high Atwood number, and the distribution of these data to LLNL, LANL, and Alliance members for code validation and design purposes. Task 2. The collection of initial condition data from the new Air/Helium facility, for use with validation of RT simulation codes at LLNL and LANL. Also, studies of multi-layer mixing with the existing water channel facility. Over the last twelve (12) months there has been excellent progress, detailed in this report, with both tasks. As of December 10, 2004, the air/helium facility is now complete and extensive testing and validation of diagnostics has been performed. Currently experiments with air/helium up to Atwood numbers of 0.25 (the maximum is 0.75, but the highest Reynolds numbers are at 0.25) are being performed. The progress matches the project plan, as does the budget, and we expect this to continue for 2005. With interest expressed from LLNL we have continued with initial condition studies using the water channel. This work has also progressed well, with one of the graduate Research Assistants (Mr. Nick Mueschke) visiting LLNL the past two summers to work with Dr. O. Schilling. Several journal papers are in preparation that describe the work. Two MSc.'s have been completed (Mr. Nick Mueschke, and Mr. Wayne Kraft, 12/1/03). Nick and Wayne are both pursuing Ph.D.s' funded by this DOE Alliances project. Presently three (3) Ph.D. graduate Research Assistants are supported on the project, and two (2) undergraduate Research Assistants. During the year two (2) journal papers and two (2) conference papers have been published, ten (10) presentations made at conferences, and three (3) invited presentations.

  1. Hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic stability

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrasekhar, S

    1981-01-01

    Dr. Chandrasekhar's book received high praise when it first appeared in 1961 as part of Oxford University Press' International Series of Monographs on Physics. Since then it has been reprinted numerous times in its expensive hardcover format. This first lower-priced, sturdy paperback edition will be welcomed by graduate physics students and scientists familiar with Dr. Chandrasekhar's work, particularly in light of the resurgence of interest in the Rayleigh-Bénard problem. This book presents a most lucid introduction to the Rayleigh-Bénard problem: it has also been applauded for its thorough, clear coverage of the theory of instabilities causing convection. Dr. Chandrasekhar considers most of the typical problems in hydromagnetic stability, with the exception of viscous shear flow; a specialized domain deserving a book unto itself. Contents include: Rotation; Stability of More General Flows; Bénard Problem; Gravitational Equilibrium and Instability; Stability of a Magnetic Field; Thermal Instability of a L...

  2. Solutions to Buoyancy-Drag Equation for Dynamical Evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Mixing Zone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.G. Cao; W.K. Chow; N.K. Fong

    2011-01-01

    With a self-similar parameter b(At) = Hi/λi, where At is the Atwood number, Hi and λi are the a.mplluae and wavelength of bubble (i = 1) and spike (i = 2) respectively, we derive analytically the solutions to the buoyancy-drag equation recently proposed for dynamical evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing zone. Numerical solutions are obtained with a simple form ofb(At)--- 1/(1 + At) and comparisons with recent LEM (linear electric motor) experiments are made, and an agreement is found with properly chosen initial conditions.

  3. Rayleigh-Taylor Gravity Waves and Quasiperiodic Oscillation Phenomenon in X-ray Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titarchuk, Lev

    2002-01-01

    Accretion onto compact objects in X-ray binaries (black hole, neutron star (NS), white dwarf) is characterized by non-uniform flow density profiles. Such an effect of heterogeneity in presence of gravitational forces and pressure gradients exhibits Rayleigh-Taylor gravity waves (RTGW). They should be seen as quasiperiodic wave oscillations (QPO) of the accretion flow in the transition (boundary) layer between the Keplerian disk and the central object. In this paper the author shows that the main QPO frequency, which is very close to the Keplerian frequency, is split into separate frequencies (hybrid and low branch) under the influence of the gravitational forces in the rotational frame of reference. The RTGWs must be present and the related QPOs should be detected in any system where the gravity, buoyancy and Coriolis force effects cannot be excluded (even in the Earth and solar environments). The observed low and high QPO frequencies are an intrinsic signature of the RTGW. The author elaborates the conditions for the density profile when the RTGW oscillations are stable. A comparison of the inferred QPO frequencies with QPO observations is presented. The author finds that hectohertz frequencies detected from NS binaries can be identified as the RTGW low branch frequencies. The author also predicts that an observer can see the double NS spin frequency during the NS long (super) burst events when the pressure gradients and buoyant forces are suppressed. The Coriolis force is the only force which acts in the rotational frame of reference and its presence causes perfect coherent pulsations with a frequency twice of the NS spin. The QPO observations of neutron binaries have established that the high QPO frequencies do not go beyond of the certain upper limit. The author explains this observational effect as a result of the density profile inversions. Also the author demonstrates that a particular problem of the gravity waves in the rotational frame of reference in the

  4. Deterministic and stochastic dynamics of Rayleigh-Taylor mixing with a power-law time-dependent acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandian, Arun; Swisher, Nora C.; Abarzhi, S. I.

    2017-01-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing occurs in a variety of natural and man-made phenomena in fluids, plasmas and materials, from celestial event to atoms. In many circumstances, RT flows are driven by variable acceleration, whereas majority of existing studies have considered only sustained acceleration. In this work we perform detailed analytical and numerical study of RT mixing with a power-law time-dependent acceleration. A set of deterministic nonlinear non-homogeneous ordinary differential equations and nonlinear stochastic differential equations with multiplicative noise are derived on the basis of momentum model. For a broad range of parameters, self-similar asymptotic solutions are found analytically, and their statistical properties are studied numerically. We identify two sub-regimes of RT mixing dynamics depending on the acceleration exponent—the acceleration-driven mixing and dissipation-driven mixing. Transition between the sub-regimes is studied, and it is found that each sub-regime has its own characteristic dimensionless invariant quantity.

  5. Self-similarity of a Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer at low Atwood number with a multimode initial perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Brandon; Olson, Britton; White, Justin; McFarland, Jacob

    2016-11-01

    High-fidelity large eddy simulation (LES) of a low-Atwood number (A = 0.05) Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer is performed using the tenth-order compact difference code Miranda. An initial multimode perturbation spectrum is specified in Fourier space as a function of mesh resolution such that a database of results is obtained in which each successive level of increased grid resolution corresponds approximately to one additional doubling of the mixing layer width, or generation. The database is then analyzed to determine approximate requirements for self-similarity, and a new metric is proposed to quantify how far a given simulation is from the limit of self-similarity. It is determined that the present database reaches a high degree of self-similarity after approximately 4.5 generations. Finally, self-similar turbulence profiles from the LES database are compared with one-dimensional simulations using the k- L- a and BHR-2 Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) models. The k- L- a model, which is calibrated to reproduce a quadratic turbulence kinetic energy profile for a self-similar mixing layer, is found to be in better agreement with the LES than BHR-2 results. This work was preformed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Hydromagnetic thermosolutal instability of compressible walters' (model B' rotating fluid permeated with suspended particles in porous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Rana

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The thermosolutal instability of compressible Walters' (model B' elastico-viscous rotating fluid permeated with suspended particles (fine dust in the presence of vertical magnetic field in porous medium is considered. By applying normal mode analysis method, the dispersion relation has been derived and solved analytically. It is observed that the rotation, magnetic field, suspended particles and viscoelasticity introduce oscillatory modes. For stationary convection the Walters' (model B' fluid behaves like an ordinary Newtonian fluid and it is observed that the rotation and stable solute gradient has stabilizing effects and suspended particles are found to have destabilizing effect on the system, whereas the medium permeability has stabilizing or destabilizing effect on the system under certain conditions. The magnetic field has destabilizing effect in the absence of rotation, whereas in the presence of rotation, magnetic field has stabilizing or destabilizing effect under certain conditions.

  7. Investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence and mixing using direct numerical simulation with experimentally-measured initial conditions. I. Comparison to experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueschke, N; Schilling, O

    2008-07-23

    A 1152 x 760 x 1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) using initial conditions, geometry, and physical parameters chosen to approximate those of a transitional, small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment [Mueschke, Andrews and Schilling, J. Fluid Mech. 567, 27 (2006)] is presented. The density and velocity fluctuations measured just off of the splitter plate in this buoyantly unstable water channel experiment were parameterized to provide physically-realistic, anisotropic initial conditions for the DNS. The methodology for parameterizing the measured data and numerically implementing the resulting perturbation spectra in the simulation is discussed in detail. The DNS model of the experiment is then validated by comparing quantities from the simulation to experimental measurements. In particular, large-scale quantities (such as the bubble front penetration hb and the mixing layer growth parameter {alpha}{sub b}), higher-order statistics (such as velocity variances and the molecular mixing parameter {theta}), and vertical velocity and density variance spectra from the DNS are shown to be in favorable agreement with the experimental data. Differences between the quantities obtained from the DNS and from experimental measurements are related to limitations in the dynamic range of scales resolved in the simulation and other idealizations of the simulation model. This work demonstrates that a parameterization of experimentally-measured initial conditions can yield simulation data that quantitatively agrees well with experimentally-measured low- and higher-order statistics in a Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer. This study also provides resolution and initial conditions implementation requirements needed to simulate a physical Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment. In Part II [Mueschke and Schilling, Phys. Fluids (2008)], other quantities not measured in the experiment are obtained from the DNS and discussed, such as the integral- and Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers

  8. Laminar hydromagnetic flows in an inclined heated layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Falsaperla

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate, analytically, stationary laminar flow solutions of an inclined layer filled with a hydromagnetic fluid heated from below and subject to the gravity field. In particular we describe in a systematic way the many basic solutions associated to the system. This extensive work is the basis to linear instability and nonlinear stability analysis of such motions.

  9. Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with mixing zone; Instabilite de Kelvin-Helmholtz avec zone de melange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong-Techer, R. [CEA Saclay, Dept. Modelisation de Systemes et Structures (DEN/DANS/DM2S/DIR-SFME), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    This thesis is part of the FATHER experiment and the analyze of the hydrodynamical instabilities which appear during the mixing of two liquids of same volume mass with shearing speed in the mixing zone. The aim is to understand the possible influence of a Kelvin-Helmholtz hydrodynamical instability with mixing zone, compared to classical Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with interface and with theoretical results of Rayleigh-Taylor instability. (A.L.B.)

  10. Experimental, Numerical and Analytical Studies of the MHD-driven plasma jet, instabilities and waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Xiang

    This thesis describes a series of experimental, numerical, and analytical studies involving the Caltech magnetohydrodynamically (MHD)-driven plasma jet experiment. The plasma jet is created via a capacitor discharge that powers a magnetized coaxial planar electrodes system. The jet is collimated and accelerated by the MHD forces. We present three-dimensional ideal MHD finite-volume simulations of the plasma jet experiment using an astrophysical magnetic tower as the baseline model. A compact magnetic energy/helicity injection is exploited in the simulation analogous to both the experiment and to astrophysical situations. Detailed analysis provides a comprehensive description of the interplay of magnetic force, pressure, and flow effects. We delineate both the jet structure and the transition process that converts the injected magnetic energy to other forms. When the experimental jet is sufficiently long, it undergoes a global kink instability and then a secondary local Rayleigh-Taylor instability caused by lateral acceleration of the kink instability. We present an MHD theory of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability on the cylindrical surface of a plasma flux rope in the presence of a lateral external gravity. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is found to couple to the classic current-driven instability, resulting in a new type of hybrid instability. The coupled instability, produced by combination of helical magnetic field, curvature of the cylindrical geometry, and lateral gravity, is fundamentally different from the classic magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability occurring at a two-dimensional planar interface. In the experiment, this instability cascade from macro-scale to micro-scale eventually leads to the failure of MHD. When the Rayleigh-Taylor instability becomes nonlinear, it compresses and pinches the plasma jet to a scale smaller than the ion skin depth and triggers a fast magnetic reconnection. We built a specially designed high-speed 3D magnetic probe and

  11. Gravitational instability of thin gas layer between two thick liquid layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenova, A. V.; Goldobin, D. S.

    2016-12-01

    We consider the problem of gravitational instability (Rayleigh-Taylor instability) of a horizontal thin gas layer between two liquid half-spaces (or thick layers), where the light liquid overlies the heavy one. This study is motivated by the phenomenon of boiling at the surface of direct contact between two immiscible liquids, where the rate of the "break-away" of the vapor layer growing at the contact interface due to development of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability on the upper liquid-gas interface is of interest. The problem is solved analytically under the assumptions of inviscid liquids and viscous weightless vapor. These assumptions correspond well to the processes in real systems, e.g., they are relevant for the case of interfacial boiling in the system water- n-heptane. In order to verify the results, the limiting cases of infinitely thin and infinitely thick gas layers were considered, for which the results can be obviously deduced from the classical problem of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. These limiting cases are completely identical to the well-studied cases of gravity waves at the liquidliquid and liquid-gas interfaces. When the horizontal extent of the system is long enough, the wavenumber of perturbations is not limited from below, and the system is always unstable. The wavelength of the most dangerous perturbations and the rate of their exponential growth are derived as a function of the layer thickness. The dependence of the exponential growth rate on the gas layer thickness is cubic.

  12. Sedimentation and gravitational instability of Escherichia coli Suspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douarche, Carine; Salin, Dominique; Collaboration between Laboratory FAST; LPS Collaboration

    2016-11-01

    The successive run and tumble of Escherichia coli bacteria provides an active matter suspension of rod-like particles with a large swimming diffusion. As opposed to inactive elongated particles, this diffusion prevents clustering and instability in the gravity field. We measure the time dependent E . coli concentration profile during their sedimentation. After some hours, due to the dioxygen consumption, a motile / non-motile front forms leading to a Rayleigh-Taylor type gravitational instability. Analyzing both sedimentation and instability in the framework of active particle suspensions, we can measure the relevant bacteria hydrodynamic characteristics such as its single particle sedimentation velocity and its hindrance volume.

  13. Interfacial instabilities and Kapitsa pendula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Madison

    2015-11-01

    Determining the critera for onset and amplitude growth of instabilities is one of the central problems of fluid mechanics. We develop a parallel between the Kapitsa effect, in which a pendulum subject to high-frequency low-amplitude vibrations becomes stable in the inverted position, and interfaces separating fluids of different density. It has long been known that such interfaces can be stabilized by vibrations, even when the denser fluid is on top. We demonstrate that the stability diagram for these fluid interfaces is identical to the stability diagram for an appopriate Kapitsa pendulum. We expand the robust, ``dictionary''-type relationship between Kapitsa pendula and interfacial instabilities by considering the classical Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz and Plateau instabilities, as well as less-canonical examples ranging in scale from the micron to the width of a galaxy.

  14. Strong electron-scale instability in relativistic shear flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Eduardo Paulo; Grismayer, Thomas; Fonseca, Ricardo; Silva, Luis

    2013-10-01

    Collisionless shear-driven plasma instabilities have recently been shown to be capable of generating strong and large-scale magnetic fields and may therefore play an important role in relativistic astrophysical outflows. We present a new collisionless shear-driven plasma instability, which operates in the plane transverse to the Kelvin Helmholtz instability (KHI). We develop the linear stability analysis of electromagnetic modes in the transverse plane and find that the growth rate of this instability is greater than the competing KHI in relativistic shears. The analytical results are confirmed with 2D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Simulations also reveal the nonlinear evolution of the instability which leads to the development of mushroom-like electron-density structures, similar to the Rayleigh Taylor instability. Finally, the interplay between the competing instabilities is investigated in 3D PIC simulations.

  15. Interfacial fluid instabilities and Kapitsa pendula

    CERN Document Server

    Krieger, Madison Ski

    2015-01-01

    The onset and development of instabilities is one of the central problems in fluid mechanics. Here we develop a connection between instabilities of free fluid interfaces and inverted pendula. When acted upon solely by the gravitational force, the inverted pendulum is unstable. This position can be stabilised by the Kapitsa phenomenon, in which high-frequency low-amplitude vertical vibrations of the base creates a fictitious force which opposes the gravitational force. By transforming the dynamical equations governing a fluid interface into an appropriate pendulum, we demonstrate how stability can be induced in fluid systems by properly tuned vibrations. We construct a "dictionary"-type relationship between various pendula and the classical Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Plateau and the self-gravitational instabilities. This makes several results in control theory and dynamical systems directly applicable to the study of "tunable" fluid instabilities, where the critical wavelength depends on the e...

  16. EFFECTS OF DIFFERENT NUMERICAL INTERFACE METHODS ON HYDRODYNAMICS INSTABILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FRANCOIS, MARIANNE M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; DENDY, EDWARD D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; LOWRIE, ROBERT B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; LIVESCU, DANIEL [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEINKAMP, MICHAEL J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-11

    The authors compare the effects of different numerical schemes for the advection and material interface treatments on the single-mode Rayleigh-Taylor instability, using the RAGE hydro-code. The interface growth and its surface density (interfacial area) versus time are investigated. The surface density metric shows to be better suited to characterize the difference in the flow, than the conventional interface growth metric. They have found that Van Leer's limiter combined to no interface treatment leads to the largest surface area. Finally, to quantify the difference between the numerical methods they have estimated the numerical viscosity in the linear-regime at different scales.

  17. Fingering Instability in a Water-Sand Mixture

    CERN Document Server

    Lange, A; Scherer, M A; Engel, A; Rehberg, I

    1997-01-01

    The temporal evolution of a water-sand interface driven by gravity is experimentally investigated. By means of a Fourier analysis of the evolving interface the growth rates are determined for the different modes appearing in the developing front. To model the observed behavior we apply the idea of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability for two stratified fluids. Carrying out a linear stability analysis we calculate the growth rates from the corresponding dispersion relations for finite and infinite cell sizes. Taking into account the uncertainty in the viscosity measurements for sand dispersed in water, the theoretical results catch the essence of the experiment but also demonstrate the limitations of this approach.

  18. Mitigation of Electrothermal Instabilities with Thick Insulating Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Kyle; Awe, Thomas; Yu, Edmund; Sinars, Daniel; Cuneo, Michael

    2013-10-01

    We will show results of recent experiments on Sandia's Z facility that demonstrate a dramatic reduction in instability growth when thick insulating coatings are used to mitigate electrothermal instability growth in magnetically driven imploding liners. These results also provide further evidence that the inherent surface roughness as a result of target fabrication is not the dominant seed for the growth of Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities in liners with carefully machined smooth surfaces (~100 nm surface RMS or better), but rather electrothermal instabilities that form early in the electrical current pulse as Joule heating melts and vaporizes the liner surface. More importantly, these results suggest a mechanism for possibly reducing the integral MRT instability growth substantially in magnetically driven inertial confinement fusion concepts such as MagLIF. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  19. 3rd year final contractor report for: U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Project Title: Detailed Measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing at Large and Small Atwood Numbers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm J. Andrews

    2006-04-14

    This project had two major tasks: Task 1. The construction of a new air/helium facility to collect detailed measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing at high Atwood number, and the distribution of these data to LLNL, LANL, and Alliance members for code validation and design purposes. Task 2. The collection of initial condition data from the new Air/Helium facility, for use with validation of RT simulation codes at LLNL and LANL. This report describes work done in the last twelve (12) months of the project, and also contains a summary of the complete work done over the three (3) life of the project. As of April 1, 2006, the air/helium facility (Task 1) is now complete and extensive testing and validation of diagnostics has been performed. Initial condition studies (Task 2) is also comp lete. Detailed experiments with air/helium with Atwood numbers up to 0.1 have been completed, and Atwood numbers of 0.25. Within the last three (3) months we have been able to successfully run the facility at Atwood numbers of 0.5. The progress matches the project plan, as does the budget. We have finished the initial condition studies using the water channel, and this work has been accepted for publication on the Journal of Fluid Mechanics (the top fluid mechanics journal). Mr. Nick Mueschke and Mr. Wayne Kraft are continuing with their studies to obtain PhDs in the same field, and will also continue their collaboration visits to LANL and LLNL. Over its three (3) year life the project has supported two(2) Ph.D.’s and three (3) MSc’s, and produced nine (9) international journal publications, twenty four (24) conference publications, and numerous other reports. The highlight of the project has been our close collaboration with LLNL (Dr. Oleg Schilling) and LANL (Drs. Dimonte, Ristorcelli, Gore, and Harlow).

  20. Transverse electron-scale instability in relativistic shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Alves, E P; Fonseca, R A; Silva, L O

    2015-01-01

    Electron-scale surface waves are shown to be unstable in the transverse plane of a shear flow in an initially unmagnetized plasma, unlike in the (magneto)hydrodynamics case. It is found that these unstable modes have a higher growth rate than the closely related electron-scale Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in relativistic shears. Multidimensional particle-in-cell simulations verify the analytic results and further reveal the emergence of mushroom-like electron density structures in the nonlinear phase of the instability, similar to those observed in the Rayleigh Taylor instability despite the great disparity in scales and different underlying physics. Macroscopic ($\\gg c/\\omega_{pe}$) fields are shown to be generated by these microscopic shear instabilities, which are relevant for particle acceleration, radiation emission and to seed MHD processes at long time-scales.

  1. Elliptic and magneto-elliptic instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyra Wladimir

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Vortices are the fundamental units of turbulent flow. Understanding their stability properties therefore provides fundamental insights on the nature of turbulence itself. In this contribution I briely review the phenomenological aspects of the instability of elliptic streamlines, in the hydro (elliptic instability and hydromagnetic (magneto-elliptic instability regimes. Vortex survival in disks is a balance between vortex destruction by these mechanisms, and vortex production by others, namely, the Rossby wave instability and the baroclinic instability.

  2. Statistical hydrodynamic models for mixing instability flows in turbulent regime: theoretical 0D evaluation criteria and comparison of one and two-fluid approaches; Modeles hydrodynamiques statistiques pour les ecoulements d'instabilites de melange en regime developpe: criteres theoriques d'evaluation ''0D'' et comparaison des approches mono et bifluides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llor, A

    2001-07-01

    Theoretical criteria are defined to perform quick analytical evaluations of statistical hydro models for turbulent mixing flows induced by Kelvin-Helmholtz, Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities. They are based on a global energy balance analysis of the mixing zone ('0D' projection) in the limit of zero Atwood number, for incompressible fluids, and in self-similar regime. It is then shown that single-fluid descriptions must be replaced by two-fluid descriptions, particularly for the Rayleigh-Taylor case with variable acceleration. The interaction between a shock and heterogeneities is also considered. Various approaches for the development of new models are finally given. (author)

  3. Two-Fluid Interface Instability Being Studied

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederhaus, Charles E.

    2003-01-01

    The interface between two fluids of different density can experience instability when gravity acts normal to the surface. The relatively well known Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability results when the gravity is constant with a heavy fluid over a light fluid. An impulsive acceleration applied to the fluids results in the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability. The RM instability occurs regardless of the relative orientation of the heavy and light fluids. In many systems, the passing of a shock wave through the interface provides the impulsive acceleration. Both the RT and RM instabilities result in mixing at the interface. These instabilities arise in a diverse array of circumstances, including supernovas, oceans, supersonic combustion, and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The area with the greatest current interest in RT and RM instabilities is ICF, which is an attempt to produce fusion energy for nuclear reactors from BB-sized pellets of deuterium and tritium. In the ICF experiments conducted so far, RM and RT instabilities have prevented the generation of net-positive energy. The $4 billion National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is being constructed to study these instabilities and to attempt to achieve net-positive yield in an ICF experiment.

  4. Progress toward Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities in a High-Energy-Density Plasma on the Nike laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, E. C.; Drake, R. P.; Gillespie, R. S.; Grosskopf, M. J.; Huntington, C. M.; Aglitskiy, Y.; Weaver, J. L.; Velikovich, A. L.; Plewa, T.; Dwarkadas, V. V.

    2008-04-01

    In the realm of high-energy-density (HED) plasmas, there exist three primary hydrodynamic instabilities of concern: Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH). Although the RT and the RM instabilities have been readily observed and diagnosed in the laboratory, the KH instability remains relatively unexplored in HED plasmas. Unlike the RT and RM instabilities, the KH instability is driven by a lifting force generated by a strong velocity gradient in a stratified fluid. Understanding the KH instability mechanism in HED plasmas will provide essential insight into oblique shock systems, jets, mass stripping, and detailed RT-spike development. In addition, our KH experiment will help provide the groundwork for future transition to turbulence experiments. We present 2D FLASH simulations and experimental data from our initial attempts to create a pure KH system using the Nike laser at the Naval Research Laboratory.

  5. Numerical analysis of anisotropic diffusion effect on ICF hydrodynamic instabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olazabal-Loumé M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of anisotropic diffusion on hydrodynamic instabilities in the context of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF flows is numerically assessed. This anisotropy occurs in indirect-drive when laminated ablators are used to modify the lateral transport [1,2]. In direct-drive, non-local transport mechanisms and magnetic fields may modify the lateral conduction [3]. In this work, numerical simulations obtained with the code PERLE [4], dedicated to linear stability analysis, are compared with previous theoretical results [5]. In these approaches, the diffusion anisotropy can be controlled by a characteristic coefficient which enables a comprehensive study. This work provides new results on the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor (RT, ablative Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM and Darrieus-Landau (DL instabilities.

  6. Hydrodynamic Instability Experiments at the GEKKO XII/HIPER Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azechi, Hiroshi; Nakai, Mitsuo; Shiraga, Hiroyuki; Miyanaga, Noriaki; Shigemori, Keisuke; Nishikino, Masaharu; Sakaiya, Tatsuro; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Fujita, Kazuhisa; Kang, Young-Gwang; Nagatomo, Hideo; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Yamanaka, Tatsuhiko

    2000-10-01

    We have constructed the HIPER laser system that combines all 12 beams of the existing GEKKO XII laser to irradiate a target from one side.The laser pulse in standard operation consists of partially coherent light for foot (green) and two-dimensional SSD for main drive (blue). We will test in the first series of experiment the ablation pressure and its uniformity, ablative Rayleigh-Taylor instability, and instability at explosion phase.\\x81@ Although the primary objective is to test hydrodynamic stability of an ignition target (both in fast ignition and conventional self-ignition), the HIPER laser is expected to be a major tool for a number of high energy-density physics, such as laboratory astrophysics, equation-of-state study.

  7. Compressible hydromagnetic nonlinearities in the predecoupling plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The adiabatic inhomogeneities of the scalar curvature lead to a compressible flow affecting the dynamics of the hydromagnetic nonlinearities. The influence of the plasma on the evolution of a putative magnetic field is explored with the aim of obtaining an effective description valid for sufficiently large scales. The bulk velocity of the plasma, computed in the framework of the LambdaCDM scenario, feeds back into the evolution of the magnetic power spectra leading to a (nonlocal) master equation valid in Fourier space and similar to the ones discussed in the context of wave turbulence. Conversely, in physical space, the magnetic power spectra obey a Schroedinger-like equation whose effective potential depends on the large-scale curvature perturbations. Explicit solutions are presented both in physical space and in Fourier space. It is argued that curvature inhomogeneities, compatible with the WMAP 7yr data, shift to lower wavenumbers the magnetic diffusivity scale.

  8. Multiphase Instabilities in Explosive Dispersal of Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Bertrand; Ouellet, Frederick; Annamalai, Subramanian; Balachandar, S. ``Bala''

    2015-11-01

    Explosive dispersal of particles is a complex multiphase phenomenon that can be observed in volcanic eruptions or in engineering applications such as multiphase explosives. As the layer of particles moves outward at high speed, it undergoes complex interactions with the blast-wave structure following the reaction of the energetic material. Particularly in this work, we are interested in the multiphase flow instabilities related to Richmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Rayleigh-Taylor (RM) instabilities (in the gas phase and particulate phase), which take place as the particle layer disperses. These types of instabilities are known to depend on initial conditions for a relatively long time of their evolution. Using a Eulerian-Lagrangian approach, we study the growth of these instabilities and their dependence on initial conditions related to the particulate phase - namely, (i) particle size, (ii) initial distribution, and (iii) mass ratio (particles to explosive). Additional complexities associated with compaction of the layer of particles are avoided here by limiting the simulations to modest initial volume fraction of particles. A detailed analysis of the initial conditions and its effects on multiphase RM/RT-like instabilities in the context of an explosive dispersal of particles is presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science Academic Alliance Program, Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  9. Linear Simulations of the Cylindrical Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability in Hydrodynamics and MHD

    KAUST Repository

    Gao, Song

    2013-05-01

    The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability occurs when density-stratified interfaces are impulsively accelerated, typically by a shock wave. We present a numerical method to simulate the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in cylindrical geometry. The ideal MHD equations are linearized about a time-dependent base state to yield linear partial differential equations governing the perturbed quantities. Convergence tests demonstrate that second order accuracy is achieved for smooth flows, and the order of accuracy is between first and second order for flows with discontinuities. Numerical results are presented for cases of interfaces with positive Atwood number and purely azimuthal perturbations. In hydrodynamics, the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability growth of perturbations is followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor growth phase. In MHD, numerical results indicate that the perturbations can be suppressed for sufficiently large perturbation wavenumbers and magnetic fields.

  10. Laboratory blast wave driven instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuranz, Carolyn

    2008-11-01

    This presentation discusses experiments involving the evolution of hydrodynamic instabilities in the laboratory under high-energy-density (HED) conditions. These instabilities are driven by blast waves, which occur following a sudden, finite release of energy, and consist of a shock front followed by a rarefaction wave. When a blast wave crosses an interface with a decrease in density, hydrodynamic instabilities will develop. Instabilities evolving under HED conditions are relevant to astrophysics. These experiments include target materials scaled in density to the He/H layer in SN1987A. About 5 kJ of laser energy from the Omega Laser facility irradiates a 150 μm plastic layer that is followed by a low-density foam layer. A blast wave structure similar to those in supernovae is created in the plastic layer. The blast wave crosses an interface having a 2D or 3D sinusoidal structure that serves as a seed perturbation for hydrodynamic instabilities. This produces unstable growth dominated by the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the nonlinear regime. We have detected the interface structure under these conditions using x-ray backlighting. Recent advances in our diagnostic techniques have greatly improved the resolution of our x-ray radiographic images. Under certain conditions, the improved images show some mass extending beyond the RT spike and penetrating further than previously observed or predicted by current simulations. The observed effect is potentially of great importance as a source of mass transport to places not anticipated by current theory and simulation. I will discuss the amount of mass in these spike extensions, the associated uncertainties, and hypotheses regarding their origin We also plan to show comparisons of experiments using single mode and multimode as well as 2D and 3D initial conditions. This work is sponsored by DOE/NNSA Research Grants DE-FG52-07NA28058 (Stewardship Sciences Academic Alliances) and DE-FG52-04NA00064 (National Laser User

  11. Long term instability growth of radiatively driven thin planar shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mason, R.J.; Hollowell, D.E. [and others

    2000-10-01

    The authors study Rayleigh-Taylor instability of radiatively driven thin copper foils under pure ablation, as well as with beryllium tampers to provide additional pressure drive. Modeling was done with the RAGE adaptive mesh refinement code of experiments done on the NOVA and OMEGA lasers. The copper foils were typically 11.5 {micro}m thick with 0.45 {micro}m amplitude, 45 {micro}m wavelength cosine surface perturbations. The beryllium layer was 5 {micro}m thick. The drive was a P26-like laser pulse delivering a peak 160-185 eV radiation temperatures. Good agreement between experiment and simulation has been obtained out to 4.5 ns. Mechanisms for late time agreement are discussed.

  12. Can the magnetic field in the Orion arm inhibit the growth of instabilities in the bow shock of Betelgeuse?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Marle, A. J.; Decin, L.; Meliani, Z.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Many evolved stars travel through space at supersonic velocities, which leads to the formation of bow shocks ahead of the star where the stellar wind collides with the interstellar medium (ISM). Herschel observations of the bow shock of α-Orionis show that the shock is almost free of instabilities, despite being, at least in theory, subject to both Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. Aims: A possible explanation for the lack of instabilities lies in the presence of an interstellar magnetic field. We wish to investigate whether the magnetic field of the ISM in the Orion arm can inhibit the growth of instabilities in the bow shock of α-Orionis. Methods: We used the code MPI-AMRVAC to make magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of a circumstellar bow shock, using the wind parameters derived for α-Orionis and interstellar magnetic field strengths of B = 1.4, 3.0, and 5.0 μG, which fall within the boundaries of the observed magnetic field strength in the Orion arm of the Milky Way. Results: Our results show that even a relatively weak magnetic field in the ISM can suppress the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, which occur along the contact discontinuity between the shocked wind and the shocked ISM. Conclusions: The presence of even a weak magnetic field in the ISM effectively inhibits the growth of instabilities in the bow shock. This may explain the absence of such instabilities in the Herschel observations of α-Orionis. Appendix A and associated movies are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  13. Rotating, hydromagnetic laboratory experiment modelling planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Douglas H.

    2009-10-01

    This dissertation describes a series of laboratory experiments motivated by planetary cores and the dynamo effect, the mechanism by which the flow of an electrically conductive fluid can give rise to a spontaneous magnetic field. Our experimental apparatus, meant to be a laboratory model of Earth's core, contains liquid sodium between an inner, solid sphere and an outer, spherical shell. The fluid is driven by the differential rotation of these two boundaries, each of which is connected to a motor. Applying an axial, DC magnetic field, we use a collection of Hall probes to measure the magnetic induction that results from interactions between the applied field and the flowing, conductive fluid. We have observed and identified inertial modes, which are bulk oscillations of the fluid restored by the Coriolis force. Over-reflection at a shear layer is one mechanism capable of exciting such modes, and we have developed predictions of both onset boundaries and mode selection from over-reflection theory which are consistent with our observations. Also, motivated by previous experimental devices that used ferromagnetic boundaries to achieve dynamo action, we have studied the effects of a soft iron (ferromagnetic) inner sphere on our apparatus, again finding inertial waves. We also find that all behaviors are more broadband and generally more nonlinear in the presence of a ferromagnetic boundary. Our results with a soft iron inner sphere have implications for other hydromagnetic experiments with ferromagnetic boundaries, and are appropriate for comparison to numerical simulations as well. From our observations we conclude that inertial modes almost certainly occur in planetary cores and will occur in future rotating experiments. In fact, the predominance of inertial modes in our experiments and in other recent work leads to a new paradigm for rotating turbulence, starkly different from turbulence theories based on assumptions of isotropy and homogeneity, starting instead

  14. Effect of initial conditions and Mach number on the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in ICF like conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pooja; She, Dan; Lim, Hyunkyung; Glimm, James

    2015-11-01

    The qualitative and quantitative effect of initial conditions (linear and non-linear) and high Mach number (1.3 and 1.45) is studied on the turbulent mixing induced by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in idealized ICF conditions. The Richtmyer-Meshkov instability seeds Rayleigh-taylor instabilities in ICF experiments and is one of the factors that contributes to reduced performance of ICF experiments. Its also found in collapsing cores of stars and supersonic combustion. We use the Stony Brook University code, FronTier, which is verified via a code comparison study against the AMR multiphysics code FLASH, and validated against vertical shock tube experiments done by the LANL Extreme Fluids Team. These simulations are designed as a step towards simulating more realistic ICF conditions and quantifying the detrimental effects of mixing on the yield.

  15. On physical and numerical instabilities arising in simulations of non-stationary radiatively cooling shocks

    CERN Document Server

    Badjin, D A; Manukovskiy, K V; Blinnikov, S I

    2015-01-01

    We describe our experience of modelling of the radiatively cooling shocks and their thin shells with various numerical tools in different physical and calculational setups. We have found that under certain physical conditions, the circular shaped shells show a strong bending instability and successive fragmentation on Cartesian grids soon after their formation, while remain almost unperturbed when simulated on polar meshes. We explain these results as an interplay of numerical perturbations superimposed by grids not aligned to the flow lines, and a physical Rayleigh--Taylor like instability of the thin shell inner boundary being accelerated during re-estabilshing of pressure balance within and behind the shell after preceding sudden temperature loss. This phenomenon also sets new requirements on further radiatively cooling shocks simulations in order to be physically correct and free of numerical artefacts.

  16. Instability of an ablatively-accelerated slab in the case of non-normal irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D D [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Kane, J O [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States); Pound, M W [Astronomy Department, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Remington, B A [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2003-05-01

    When a surface of a radiation-absorbing material is illuminated by a sufficiently intense radiation, the gas ablated from the surface produces reactive a force causing an acceleration of the initial matter and setting a stage for instabilities of the Rayleigh-Taylor type. New effects associated with the non-normal incidence of the radiation are analysed. It has been shown that, at large enough tilt, the instability becomes significantly faster than in the 'normal' case and unstable modes acquire finite phase velocity along the surface. The most unstable perturbations are rolls whose orientation depends on the angular distribution of radiation. These results are of interest for laboratory studies of ablation fronts and for the theory of photoevaporation fronts in astrophysics.

  17. A hydrodynamic instability is used to create aesthetically appealing patterns in painting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Zetina

    Full Text Available Painters often acquire a deep empirical knowledge of the way in which paints and inks behave. Through experimentation and practice, they can control the way in which fluids move and deform to create textures and images. David Alfaro Siqueiros, a recognized Mexican muralist, invented an accidental painting technique to create new and unexpected textures. By pouring layers of paint of different colors on a horizontal surface, the paints infiltrate into each other creating patterns of aesthetic value. In this investigation, we reproduce the technique in a controlled manner. We found that for the correct color combination, the dual viscous layer becomes Rayleigh-Taylor unstable: the density mismatch of the two color paints drives the formation of a spotted pattern. Experiments and a linear instability analysis were conducted to understand the properties of the process. We also argue that this flow configuration can be used to study the linear properties of this instability.

  18. Unsteady hydromagnetic Couette flow within a porous channel with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    It may be noted that the study of hydromagnetic flow within a porous channel may find application in designing of cooling systems with liquid metals, geothermal reservoirs, ... The paper is organized as follows: In Section 2, formulation of the problem and its ...... Combined effect of free and forced convection on MHD flow in a.

  19. Kinetic Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at a finite sized object

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, V. A.

    1995-01-01

    Two-dimensional hybrid simulations with particle ions and fluid electrons are used to calculate the kinetic evolution of the self-consistent flow around a two-dimensional obstacle with zero intrinsic magnetic field. Plasma outlfow from the obstacle is used to establish a boundary layer between the incoming solar wind and the outgoing plasma. Because the self-consistent flow solution, a velocity shear is naturally set up at this interface, and since the magnetic field for these simulations is transverse to this flow, the Kelvin-Helmholtz (K-H) instability can be excited at low-velocity shear. Simulations demonstrate the existence of the instability even near the subsolar location, which normally is thought to be stable to this instability. The apparent reason for this result is the overall time dependence at the boundary layer, which gives rise to a Rayleigh-Taylor like instability which provides seed perturbations for the K-H instability. These results are directly applicable to Venus, comets, artificial plasma releases, and laser target experiments. This result has potentially important ramifications for the interpretation of observational results as well as for an estimation of the cross-field transport. The results suggest that the K-H instability may play a role in dayside processes and the Venus ionopause, and may exist within the context of more general situations, for example, the Earth's magnetopause.

  20. Computational and experimental studies of hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulent mixing: Review of VNIIEF efforts. Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andronov, V.A.; Zhidov, I.G.; Meskov, E.E.; Nevmerzhitskii, N.V.; Nikiforov, V.V.; Razin, A.N.; Rogatchev, V.G.; Tolshmyakov, A.I.; Yanilkin, Y.V. [Russian Federal Nuclear Center (Russian Federation)

    1994-12-31

    The report presents the basic results of some calculations, theoretical and experimental efforts in the study of Rayleigh-Taylor, Kelvin-Helmholtz, Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities and the turbulent mixing which is caused by their evolution. Since the late forties the VNIIEF has been conducting these investigations. This report is based on the data which were published in different times in Russian and foreign journals. The first part of the report deals with calculations an theoretical techniques for the description of hydrodynamic instabilities applied currently, as well as with the results of several individual problems and their comparison with the experiment. These methods can be divided into two types: direct numerical simulation methods and phenomenological methods. The first type includes the regular 2D and 3D gasdynamical techniques as well as the techniques based on small perturbation approximation and on incompressible liquid approximation. The second type comprises the techniques based on various phenomenological turbulence models. The second part of the report describes the experimental methods and cites the experimental results of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meskov instability studies as well as of turbulent mixing. The applied methods were based on thin-film gaseous models, on jelly models and liquid layer models. The research was done for plane and cylindrical geometries. As drivers, the shock tubes of different designs were used as well as gaseous explosive mixtures, compressed air and electric wire explosions. The experimental results were applied in calculational-theoretical technique calibrations. The authors did not aim at covering all VNIIEF research done in this field of science. To a great extent the choice of the material depended on the personal contribution of the author in these studies.

  1. Lessons Learned from Numerical Simulations of Interfacial Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Andrew

    2015-11-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities serve as efficient mixing mechanisms in a wide variety of flows, from supernovae to jet engines. Over the past decade, we have used the Miranda code to temporally integrate the multi-component Navier-Stokes equations at spatial resolutions up to 29 billion grid points. The code employs 10th-order compact schemes for spatial derivatives, combined with 4th-order Runge-Kutta time advancement. Some of our major findings are as follows: The rate of growth of a mixing layer is equivalent to the net mass flux through the equi-molar plane. RT growth rates can be significantly reduced by adding shear. RT instability can produce shock waves. The growth rate of RM instability can be predicted from known interfacial perturbations. RM vortex projectiles can far outrun the mixing region. Thermal fluctuations in molecular dynamics simulations can seed instabilities along the braids in KH instability. And finally, enthalpy diffusion is essential in preserving the second law of thermodynamics. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. MARCHING CUBES BASED FRONT TRACKING METHOD AND ITS APPLICATION TO SOME INTERFACE INSTABILITY PROBLEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jing-yi; ZOU Jian-feng; ZHENG Yao; REN An-lu

    2011-01-01

    A front tracking method based on a marching cubes isosurface extractor,which is related filter generating isosurfaces from a structured point set,is provided to achieve sharp resolution for the simulation of non-diffusive interfacial flow.Compared with the traditional topology processing procedure,the current front tracking method is easier to be implemented and presents high performance in terms of computational resources.The numerical tests for 2-D highly-shearing flows and 3-D bubbles merging process are conducted to numerically examine the performance of the current methodology for tracking interfaces between two immiscible fluids.The Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability problems are successfully investigated with the present marching cubes based front tracking method.

  3. CHF Enhancement by Surface Patterning based on Hydrodynamic Instability Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Han; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    If the power density of a device exceeds the CHF point, bubbles and vapor films will be covered on the whole heater surface. Because vapor films have much lower heat transfer capabilities compared to the liquid layer, the temperature of the heater surface will increase rapidly, and the device could be damaged due to the heater burnout. Therefore, the prediction and the enhancement of the CHF are essential to maximizing the efficient heat removal region. Numerous studies have been conducted to describe the CHF phenomenon, such as hydrodynamic instability theory, macrolayer dryout theory, hot/dry spot theory, and bubble interaction theory. The hydrodynamic instability model, proposed by Zuber, is the predominant CHF model that Helmholtz instability attributed to the CHF. Zuber assumed that the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability wavelength is related to the Helmholtz wavelength. Lienhard and Dhir proposed a CHF model that Helmholtz instability wavelength is equal to the most dangerous RT wavelength. In addition, they showed the heater size effect using various heater surfaces. Lu et al. proposed a modified hydrodynamic theory that the Helmholtz instability was assumed to be the heater size and the area of the vapor column was used as a fitting factor. The modified hydrodynamic theories were based on the change of Helmholtz wavelength related to the RT instability wavelength. In the present study, the change of the RT instability wavelength, based on the heater surface modification, was conducted to show the CHF enhancement based on the heater surface patterning in a plate pool boiling. Sapphire glass was used as a base heater substrate, and the Pt film was used as a heating source. The patterning surface was based on the change of RT instability wavelength. In the present work the study of the CHF was conducted using bare Pt and patterned heating surfaces.

  4. Hydromagnetic thin film flow: Linear stability

    KAUST Repository

    Amaouche, Mustapha

    2013-08-30

    This paper deals with the long wave instability of an electroconductor fluid film, flowing down an inclined plane at small to moderate Reynolds numbers, under the action of electromagnetic fields. A coherent second order long wave model and two simplified versions of it, referred to as first and second reduced models (FRM and SRM), are proposed to describe the nonlinear behavior of the flow. The modeling procedure consists of a combination of the lubrication theory and the weighted residual approach using an appropriate projection basis. A suitable choice of weighting functions allows a significant reduction of the dimension of the problem. The full model is naturally unique, i.e., independent of the particular form of the trial functions. The linear stability of the problem is investigated, and the influence of electromagnetic field on the flow stability is analyzed. Two cases are considered: the applied magnetic field is either normal or parallel to the fluid flow direction, while the electric field is transversal. The numerical solution of the Orr-Sommerfeld (OS) eigenvalue problem and those of the depth averaging model are used to assess the accuracy of the reduced models. It is found that the current models have the advantage of the Benney-like model, which is known to asymptote the exact solution near criticality. Moreover, far from the instability threshold, the current reduced models continue to follow the OS solution up to moderate Reynolds numbers, while the averaging model diverges rapidly. The model SRM gives better results than FRM beyond sufficiently high Reynolds numbers.

  5. Shear flow past a flat plate in hydromagnetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. N. Sastry

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of simple shear flow past a flat plate has been extended to the hydromagnetic case in which a viscous, electrically conducting, incompressible fluid flows past an electrically insulated flat plate with a magnetic field parallel to the plate. For simplicity all physical parameters are assumed constant. A series solution for the velocity field has been developed for small values of a magnetic parameter. The equations governing this flow field were integrated numerically It is found that the effect of the magnetic field is to diminish and increase respectively, the first and second order contributions for the skin friction.

  6. Dynamics of the Innermost Accretion Flows Around Compact Objects: Magnetosphere-Disc Interface, Global Oscillations and Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Wen

    2012-01-01

    We study global non-axisymmetric oscillation modes and instabilities in magnetosphere- disc systems, as expected in neutron star X-ray binaries and possibly also in accreting black hole systems. Our two-dimensional magnetosphere-disc model consists of a Keplerian disc in contact with an uniformly rotating magnetosphere with low plasma density. Two types of global overstable modes exist in such systems, the interface modes and the disc inertial-acoustic modes. We examine various physical effects and parameters that influence the properties of these oscillation modes, particularly their growth rates, including the magnetosphere field configuration, the velocity and density contrasts across the magnetosphere-disc interface, the rotation profile (with Newtonian or General Relativistic potential), the sound speed and magnetic field of the disc. The interface modes are driven unstable by Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz in- stabilities, but can be stabilized by the toroidal field (through magnetic tension) and ...

  7. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic instability experiments and flow mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAI JingSong; WANG Tao; LI Ping; ZOU LiYong; LIU CangLi

    2009-01-01

    Based on the numerical methods of volume of fluid (VOF) and piecewise parabolic method (PPM) and parallel circumstance of Message Passing Interface (MPI), a parallel multi-viscosity-fluid hydrodynamic code MVPPM (Multi-Viscosity-Fluid Piecewise Parabolic Method) is developed and performed to study the hydrodynamic instability and flow mixing. Firstly, the MVPPM code is verified and validated by simulating three instability cases: The first one is a Riemann problem of viscous flow on the shock tube;the second one is the hydrodynamic instability and mixing of gaseous flows under re-shocks; the third one is a half height experiment of interfacial instability, which is conducted on the AWE's shock tube. By comparing the numerical results with experimental data, good agreement is achieved. Then the MVPPM code is applied to simulate the two cases of the interfacial instabilities of jelly models accelerated by explosion products of a gaseous explosive mixture (GEM), which are adopted in our experiments. The first is implosive dynamic interfacial instability of cylindrical symmetry and mixing. The evolving process of inner and outer interfaces, and the late distribution of mixing mass caused by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the center of different radius are given. The second is jelly layer experiment which is initialized with one periodic perturbation with different amplitude and wave length. It reveals the complex processes of evolution of interface, and presents the displacement of front face of jelly layer, bubble head and top of spike relative to initial equilibrium position vs. time. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with that experimental images, and show that the amplitude of initial perturbations affects the evolvement of fluid mixing zone (FMZ) growth rate extremely, especially at late times.

  8. Numerical simulation of the hydrodynamic instability experiments and flow mixing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the numerical methods of volume of fluid (VOF) and piecewise parabolic method (PPM) and parallel circumstance of Message Passing Interface (MPI),a parallel multi-viscosity-fluid hydrodynamic code MVPPM (Multi-Viscosity-Fluid Piecewise Parabolic Method) is developed and performed to study the hydrodynamic instability and flow mixing. Firstly,the MVPPM code is verified and validated by simulating three instability cases:The first one is a Riemann problem of viscous flow on the shock tube; the second one is the hydrodynamic instability and mixing of gaseous flows under re-shocks; the third one is a half height experiment of interfacial instability,which is conducted on the AWE’s shock tube. By comparing the numerical results with experimental data,good agreement is achieved. Then the MVPPM code is applied to simulate the two cases of the interfacial instabilities of jelly models acceler-ated by explosion products of a gaseous explosive mixture (GEM),which are adopted in our experi-ments. The first is implosive dynamic interfacial instability of cylindrical symmetry and mixing. The evolving process of inner and outer interfaces,and the late distribution of mixing mass caused by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability in the center of different radius are given. The second is jelly layer ex-periment which is initialized with one periodic perturbation with different amplitude and wave length. It reveals the complex processes of evolution of interface,and presents the displacement of front face of jelly layer,bubble head and top of spike relative to initial equilibrium position vs. time. The numerical results are in excellent agreement with that experimental images,and show that the amplitude of initial perturbations affects the evolvement of fluid mixing zone (FMZ) growth rate extremely,especially at late times.

  9. Cloud formation by combined instabilities in galactic gas layers - Evidence for a Q threshold in the fragmentation of shearing wavelets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmegreen, Bruce G.

    1991-09-01

    The growth of shearing wavelets in thick galactic gas disks is studied, including the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability perpendicular to the plane, various degrees of thermal instability, and the gravitational instability. Growth rates are calculated numerically for a wide range of parameter values, giving an effective dispersion relation and mass distribution function, and an approximate dispersion relation is derived analytically for the epoch of peak growth. An extensive coverage of parameter space illustrates the relative insensitivity of the gaseous shear instability to the axisymmetric stability parameter Q. The fragmentation of shearing wavelets by self-gravitational collapse parallel to the wave crest is also considered. Such fragmentation is sensitive to Q, requiring Q equal to or less than 1-2 for the growth of parallel perturbations to overcome shear inside the wavelet. Fragmentation instabilities may provide the link between shear instabilities and the formation of individual clouds. They are much more sensitive to Q than shear instabilities, and may regulate star formation so that Q approximately equals 1.

  10. Progress in indirect and direct-drive planar experiments on hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casner, A.; Masse, L.; Delorme, B.; Martinez, D.; Huser, G.; Galmiche, D.; Liberatore, S.; Igumenshchev, I.; Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Breil, J.; Michel, D. T.; Froula, D.; Seka, W.; Riazuelo, G.; Fujioka, S.; Sunahara, A.; Grech, M.; Chicanne, C.; Theobald, M.; Borisenko, N.; Orekhov, A.; Tikhonchuk, V. T.; Remington, B.; Goncharov, V. N.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and the fuel mix are the key elements for achieving ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Cryogenic indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility have evidenced that the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is a driver of the hot spot mix. This motivates the switch to a more flexible higher adiabat implosion design [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056313 (2014)]. The shell instability is also the main candidate for performance degradation in low-adiabat direct drive cryogenic implosions [Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014)]. This paper reviews recent results acquired in planar experiments performed on the OMEGA laser facility and devoted to the modeling and mitigation of hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front. In application to the indirect-drive scheme, we describe results obtained with a specific ablator composition such as the laminated ablator or a graded-dopant emulator. In application to the direct drive scheme, we discuss experiments devoted to the study of laser imprinted perturbations with special phase plates. The simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov phase reversal during the shock transit phase are challenging, and of crucial interest because this phase sets the seed of the RTI growth. Recent works were dedicated to increasing the accuracy of measurements of the phase inversion. We conclude by presenting a novel imprint mitigation mechanism based on the use of underdense foams. The foams induce laser smoothing by parametric instabilities thus reducing the laser imprint on the CH foil.

  11. Linear simulations of the cylindrical Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in magnetohydrodynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Bakhsh, Abeer

    2016-03-09

    Numerical simulations and analysis indicate that the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability(RMI) is suppressed in ideal magnetohydrodynamics(MHD) in Cartesian slab geometry. Motivated by the presence of hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial confinement fusion and suppression by means of a magnetic field, we investigate the RMI via linear MHD simulations in cylindrical geometry. The physical setup is that of a Chisnell-type converging shock interacting with a density interface with either axial or azimuthal (2D) perturbations. The linear stability is examined in the context of an initial value problem (with a time-varying base state) wherein the linearized ideal MHD equations are solved with an upwind numerical method. Linear simulations in the absence of a magnetic field indicate that RMI growth rate during the early time period is similar to that observed in Cartesian geometry. However, this RMI phase is short-lived and followed by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability phase with an accompanied exponential increase in the perturbation amplitude. We examine several strengths of the magnetic field (characterized by β=2p/B^2_r) and observe a significant suppression of the instability for β ≤ 4. The suppression of the instability is attributed to the transport of vorticity away from the interface by Alfvén fronts.

  12. Progress in indirect and direct-drive planar experiments on hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Casner, A., E-mail: alexis.casner@cea.fr; Masse, L.; Huser, G.; Galmiche, D.; Liberatore, S.; Riazuelo, G. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Delorme, B. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); CELIA, University of Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, F-33400 Talence (France); Martinez, D.; Remington, B.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Igumenshchev, I.; Michel, D. T.; Froula, D.; Seka, W.; Goncharov, V. N. [Laboratory of Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Olazabal-Loumé, M.; Nicolaï, Ph.; Breil, J.; Tikhonchuk, V. T. [CELIA, University of Bordeaux-CNRS-CEA, F-33400 Talence (France); Fujioka, S. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565 (Japan); and others

    2014-12-15

    Understanding and mitigating hydrodynamic instabilities and the fuel mix are the key elements for achieving ignition in Inertial Confinement Fusion. Cryogenic indirect-drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility have evidenced that the ablative Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI) is a driver of the hot spot mix. This motivates the switch to a more flexible higher adiabat implosion design [O. A. Hurricane et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056313 (2014)]. The shell instability is also the main candidate for performance degradation in low-adiabat direct drive cryogenic implosions [Goncharov et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 056315 (2014)]. This paper reviews recent results acquired in planar experiments performed on the OMEGA laser facility and devoted to the modeling and mitigation of hydrodynamic instabilities at the ablation front. In application to the indirect-drive scheme, we describe results obtained with a specific ablator composition such as the laminated ablator or a graded-dopant emulator. In application to the direct drive scheme, we discuss experiments devoted to the study of laser imprinted perturbations with special phase plates. The simulations of the Richtmyer-Meshkov phase reversal during the shock transit phase are challenging, and of crucial interest because this phase sets the seed of the RTI growth. Recent works were dedicated to increasing the accuracy of measurements of the phase inversion. We conclude by presenting a novel imprint mitigation mechanism based on the use of underdense foams. The foams induce laser smoothing by parametric instabilities thus reducing the laser imprint on the CH foil.

  13. Nonlinear Saturation Amplitude in Classical Planar Richtmyer-Meshkov Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wan-Hai; Wang, Xiang; Jiang, Hong-Bin; Ma, Wen-Fang

    2016-04-01

    The classical planar Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI) at a fluid interface supported by a constant pressure is investigated by a formal perturbation expansion up to the third order, and then according to definition of nonlinear saturation amplitude (NSA) in Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI), the NSA in planar RMI is obtained explicitly. It is found that the NSA in planar RMI is affected by the initial perturbation wavelength and the initial amplitude of the interface, while the effect of the initial amplitude of the interface on the NSA is less than that of the initial perturbation wavelength. Without marginal influence of the initial amplitude, the NSA increases linearly with wavelength. The NSA normalized by the wavelength in planar RMI is about 0.11, larger than that corresponding to RTI. Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11472278 and 11372330, the Scientific Research Foundation of Education Department of Sichuan Province under Grant No. 15ZA0296, the Scientific Research Foundation of Mianyang Normal University under Grant Nos. QD2014A009 and 2014A02, and the National High-Tech ICF Committee

  14. Development of the electrothermal instability from resistive inclusions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Edmund; Awe, T. J.; Bauer, B. S.; Yates, K. C.; Yelton, W. G.; Hutchinson, T. M.; Fuelling, S.; McKenzie, B. B.; Peterson, K. J.

    2016-10-01

    The magneto Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability limits the performance of all magnetically imploded systems. In the case of compressing metal liners, as in the magnetized liner inertial fusion concept, a dominant seed for MRT is believed to be the electrothermal instability (ETI). Here, linear theory predicts the most unstable mode manifests as horizontal (i.e. perpendicular to current flow) bands of heated and expanded metal. However, how do such bands, known as striations, actually develop from a smooth metal surface? Recent experiments on ETI evolution, performed at the University of Nevada, Reno, provide a possible answer: pre-shot characterization of aluminum rods show numerous resistive inclusions, several microns in diameter and distributed throughout the rod. In this work, we use 3D MHD simulation and analytic theory to explore how current redistribution around these isolated inclusions, combined with ETI, can lead to rapid formation of the global striation structures. Later in time, striations expand and form density perturbations much larger than the initial inclusion size. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the National Nuclear Security Administration under DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  15. Low Energy Particle Oscillations and Correlations with Hydromagnetic Waves in the Jovian Magnetosphere: Ulysses Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupp, N.; Tsurutani, B. T.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Maclennan, C. G.

    1996-01-01

    We report on measurements of energetic particle modulations observed by the HI-SCALE instrument aboard the Ulysses Spacecraft that were associated with the only hydromagnetic wave event measured inside the Jovian magnetosphere by the Ulysses magnetometer investigation.

  16. Reflection and refraction of hydromagnetic waves at the magnetopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verzariu, P.

    1973-01-01

    Reflection and transmission coefficients of MHD waves are obtained at a stable, plane interface which separates two compressible, perfectly conducting media in relative motion to each other. The coefficients are evaluated for representative conditions of the quiet-time, near-earth magnetopause. The transmission coefficient averaged over a hemispherical distribution of incident waves is found to be 1-2%. Yet the magnitude of the energy flux deposited into the magnetosphere in a day averaged over a hemispherical distribution of waves having amplitudes of say 2-3 gamma, is estimated to be of the order 10 to the 22-nd power erg. Therefore the energy input of MHD waves must contribute significantly to the energy budget of the magnetosphere. The assumption that the boundary surface is a tangential discontinuity with no curvature limits the present theory to hydromagnetic frequencies higher than about .1 Hz.

  17. On the stability of certain collisional configurations of hydromagnetic flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nunez, Manuel, E-mail: mnjmhd@am.uva.e [Departamento de Analisis Matematico, Universidad de Valladolid, 47005 Valladolid (Spain)

    2010-09-06

    We study the flow of a hydromagnetic fluid toward an obstacle in two different cases: when this is a rigid wall or when two plasma masses collide with each other. The magnetic field far from the obstacle is assumed to be aligned with the flow. The diffusivity is taken as low, and a boundary layer approach for the stationary MHD system is considered. The relevant equations turn out to be a generalization of the Falkner-Skan ones, and while analytical solutions are impossible to obtain, a qualitative analysis shows that whenever the size of the Alfven speed far from the interface exceeds the size of the fluid velocity, the system has no nontrivial solutions. The interpretation of this is that in this case disturbances occurring in the boundary layer travel upstream and disturb the boundary conditions at the outer layers.

  18. Modified helix-like instability structure on imploding z-pinch liners that are pre-imposed with a uniform axial magnetic fielda)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awe, T. J.; Jennings, C. A.; McBride, R. D.; Cuneo, M. E.; Lamppa, D. C.; Martin, M. R.; Rovang, D. C.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Owen, A. C.; Tomlinson, K.; Gomez, M. R.; Hansen, S. B.; Herrmann, M. C.; Jones, M. C.; McKenney, J. L.; Robertson, G. K.; Rochau, G. A.; Savage, M. E.; Schroen, D. G.; Stygar, W. A.

    2014-05-01

    Recent experiments at the Sandia National Laboratories Z Facility have, for the first time, studied the implosion dynamics of magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) style liners that were pre-imposed with a uniform axial magnetic field. As reported [T. J. Awe et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 235005 (2013)] when premagnetized with a 7 or 10 T axial field, these liners developed 3D-helix-like hydrodynamic instabilities; such instabilities starkly contrast with the azimuthally correlated magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instabilities that have been consistently observed in many earlier non-premagnetized experiments. The helical structure persisted throughout the implosion, even though the azimuthal drive field greatly exceeded the expected axial field at the liner's outer wall for all but the earliest stages of the experiment. Whether this modified instability structure has practical importance for magneto-inertial fusion concepts depends primarily on whether the modified instability structure is more stable than standard azimuthally correlated MRT instabilities. In this manuscript, we discuss the evolution of the helix-like instability observed on premagnetized liners. While a first principles explanation of this observation remains elusive, recent 3D simulations suggest that if a small amplitude helical perturbation can be seeded on the liner's outer surface, no further influence from the axial field is required for the instability to grow.

  19. Hydrodynamic instability measurements in DT-layered ICF capsules using the layered-HGR platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, C.; Döppner, T.; Casey, D.; Bunn, T.; Carlson, L.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Kozioziemski, B.; MacPhee, A. G.; Sater, J.; Nikroo, A.; Robey, H.; Smalyuk, V.

    2016-05-01

    The first measurements of hydrodynamic instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface in an ICF implosion are reported. Previous instability measurements on the National Ignition Facility have used plastic capsules to measure ablation front Rayleigh-Taylor growth with the Hydro.-Growth Radiography (HGR) platform. These capsules substituted an additional thickness of plastic ablator material in place of the cryogenic layer of Deuterium- Tritium (DT) fuel. The present experiments are the first to include a DT ice layer, which enables measurements of the instability growth occurring at the fuel-ablator interface. Instability growth at the fuel-ablator interface is seeded differently in two independent NIF experiments. In the first case, a perturbation on the outside of the capsule feeds through and grows on the interface. Comparisons to an implosion without a fuel layer produce a measure of the fuel's modulation. In the second case, a modulation was directly machined on the inner ablator before the fuel layer was added. The measurement of growth in these two scenarios are compared to 2D rad-hydro modeling.

  20. Kelvin-Helmholtz Instability in the Solar Atmosphere, Solar Wind and Geomagnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishin, V. V.; Tomozov, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    Modern views on the nature of the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instability and its manifestations in the solar corona, in the interplanetary medium, and at the geomagnetospheric boundary are under consideration. We briefly describe the main theoretical results of the KH instability obtained in the linear approximation. Analysis of observational data, confirming the occurrence of the KH instability in magnetic formations of the solar coronal plasma and on the daytime magnetopause, was mainly performed in the approximation of incompressibility. We show that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability can significantly enhance the KH instability in the above regions due to interface accelerations or its curvature. Special attention is focused on the compressibility effect on the supersonic shear flow instability in the solar wind (SW) and at the geomagnetic tail boundary where this instability is usually considered to be ineffective. We have shown that the phase velocity of oblique perturbations is substantially less than the flow velocity, and values of the growth rate and frequency range are considerably higher than when only taking velocity-aligned disturbances into account. We emphasize that the magnetic field and plasma density inhomogeneity which weaken the KH instability of subsonic shear flows, in the case of a supersonic velocity difference weaken the stabilizing effect of the medium compressibility, and can significantly increase the instability. Effective generation of oblique disturbances by the supersonic KH instability explains the observations of magnetosonic waves and the formation of diffuse shear flows in the SW and on the distant magnetotail boundary, as well as the SW-magnetosphere energy and impulse transfer.

  1. Interfacial Instabilities Driven by Self-Gravity in the ISM: Onset and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueckstaedt, R. M.; Hunter, J. H., Jr.

    2000-12-01

    As the sites of all present day star formation within the Milky Way, cold molecular clouds are a vital link in the evolution of tenuous interstellar gas into stars. Any comprehensive theory of star formation must include a study of the hydrodynamic processes that effect molecular cloud morphology. In the ISM, hydrodynamic instabilities and turbulence play large roles in shaping clouds and creating regions capable of gravitational collapse. One of the key forces in the interstellar environment is self-gravity. Regardless of the mechanism initially responsible for creating density enhancements, self-gravity must ultimately drive the final collapse. A recent study has shown that self-gravity also gives rise to an interfacial instability that persists in the static limit when a density discontinuity exists (Hunter, Whitaker & Lovelace 1997). This instability also persists in the absence of a constant gravitational acceleration, unlike the familiar Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Analytic studies in Cartesian geometry predict that for perturbations proportional to exp(-iωt), the instability has an incompressible growth rate ω2= -2πG(ρ 1-ρ 2)2/(ρ1+ρ2). The growth rate is independent of the perturbation wavelength. Studies have also included cases in cylindrical geometry in which a static density interface has proven stable to kink modes but unstable to sausage modes. In the case of sausage modes, (perturbations in the radial direction), there exists a critical wavelength below which the instability does not appear. In this paper, we present two-dimensional numerical models designed to examine this self-gravity driven instability. A hydrodynamic code with self-gravity is used to test the analytic predictions in Cartesian and cylindrical geometries and to follow the instability into the nonlinear regime. We consider how the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities, including self-gravity driven instabilities, can have a role in shaping the ISM. We discuss implications for

  2. Hydrodynamic Instabilities in High-Energy-Density Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalyuk, Vladimir

    2016-10-01

    Our understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities, such as the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT), Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM), and Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) instabilities, in high-energy-density (HED) settings over past two decades has progressed enormously. The range of conditions where hydrodynamic instabilities are experimentally observed now includes direct and indirect drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) where surprises continue to emerge, linear and nonlinear regimes, classical interfaces vs. stabilized ablation fronts, tenuous ideal plasmas vs. high density Fermi degenerate plasmas, bulk fluid interpenetration vs. mixing down to the atomic level, in the presence of magnetic fields and/or intense radiation, and in solid state plastic flow at high pressures and strain rates. Regimes in ICF can involve extreme conditions of matter with temperatures up to kilovolts, densities of a thousand times solid densities, and time scales of nanoseconds. On the other hand, scaled conditions can be generated that map to exploding stars (supernovae) with length and time scales of millions of kilometers and hours to days or even years of instability evolution, planetary formation dynamics involving solid-state plastic flow which severely modifies the RT growth and continues to challenge reliable theoretical descriptions. This review will look broadly at progress in probing and understanding hydrodynamic instabilities in these very diverse HED settings, and then will examine a few cases in more depth to illustrate the detailed science involved. Experimental results on large-scale HED facilities such as the Omega, Nike, Gekko, and Shenguang lasers will be reviewed and the latest developments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and Z machine will be covered. Finally, current overarching questions and challenges will be summarized to motivate research directions for future. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  3. Instability growth for magnetized liner inertial fusion seeded by electro-thermal, electro-choric, and material strength effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecover, J. D.; Chittenden, J. P. [The Centre for Inertial Fusion Studies, The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-15

    A critical limitation of magnetically imploded systems such as magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] is the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability which primarily disrupts the outer surface of the liner. MagLIF-relevant experiments have showed large amplitude multi-mode MRT instability growth growing from surface roughness [McBride et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 135004 (2012)], which is only reproduced by 3D simulations using our MHD code Gorgon when an artificially azimuthally correlated initialisation is added. We have shown that the missing azimuthal correlation could be provided by a combination of the electro-thermal instability (ETI) and an “electro-choric” instability (ECI); describing, respectively, the tendency of current to correlate azimuthally early in time due to temperature dependent Ohmic heating; and an amplification of the ETI driven by density dependent resistivity around vapourisation. We developed and implemented a material strength model in Gorgon to improve simulation of the solid phase of liner implosions which, when applied to simulations exhibiting the ETI and ECI, gave a significant increase in wavelength and amplitude. Full circumference simulations of the MRT instability provided a significant improvement on previous randomly initialised results and approached agreement with experiment.

  4. Instability growth for magnetized liner inertial fusion seeded by electro-thermal, electro-choric, and material strength effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecover, J. D.; Chittenden, J. P.

    2015-10-01

    A critical limitation of magnetically imploded systems such as magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) [Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)] is the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability which primarily disrupts the outer surface of the liner. MagLIF-relevant experiments have showed large amplitude multi-mode MRT instability growth growing from surface roughness [McBride et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 135004 (2012)], which is only reproduced by 3D simulations using our MHD code Gorgon when an artificially azimuthally correlated initialisation is added. We have shown that the missing azimuthal correlation could be provided by a combination of the electro-thermal instability (ETI) and an "electro-choric" instability (ECI); describing, respectively, the tendency of current to correlate azimuthally early in time due to temperature dependent Ohmic heating; and an amplification of the ETI driven by density dependent resistivity around vapourisation. We developed and implemented a material strength model in Gorgon to improve simulation of the solid phase of liner implosions which, when applied to simulations exhibiting the ETI and ECI, gave a significant increase in wavelength and amplitude. Full circumference simulations of the MRT instability provided a significant improvement on previous randomly initialised results and approached agreement with experiment.

  5. Spike Penetration in Blast-Wave-Driven Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, R. Paul

    2010-05-01

    Recent experiments by C. Kuranz and collaborators, motivated by structure in supernovae, have studied systems in which planar blast waves encounter interfaces where the density decreases. During the Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) phase of such experiments, they observed greater penetration of the RT spikes than tends to be seen in simulations. Here we seek to employ semi-analytic theory to understand the general nature and regimes of spike penetration for blast-wave-driven instabilities. This problem is not trivial as one must account for the initial vorticity deposition at the interface, for its time-dependent deceleration, for the expansion of the shocked material in time and space, and for the drag on the broadened tips of the spikes. We offer here an improved evaluation of the material expansion in comparison to past work. The goal is to use such models to increase our ability to interpret the behavior of simulations of such systems, in both the laboratory and astrophysics. Supported by the US DOE NNSA under the Predictive Sci. Academic Alliance Program by grant DE-FC52-08NA28616, the Stewardship Sci. Academic Alliances program by grant DE-FG52-04NA00064, and the Nat. Laser User Facility by grant DE-FG03-00SF22021.

  6. Hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic stability of black holes with radiative transfer

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Roger Blandford; Jonathan C Mckinney; Nadia Zakamska

    2011-07-01

    Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar (Chandra) was just eight years old when the first astrophysical jet was discovered in M87. Since then, jets have been uncovered with a wide variety of sources including accretion disks orbiting stellar and massive black holes, neutron stars, isolated pulsars, -ray bursts, protostars and planetary nebulae. This talk will be primarily concerned with collimated hydromagnetic outflows associated with spinning, massive black holes in active galactic nuclei. Jets exhibit physical processes central to three of the major research themes in Chandrasekhar’s research career – radiative transfer, magnetohydrodynamics and black holes. Relativistic jets can be thought of as `exhausts’ from both the hole and its orbiting accretion disk, carrying away the energy liberated by the rotating spacetime and the accreting gas that is not radiated. However, no aspect of jet formation, propagation and radiation can be regarded as understood in detail. The combination of new -ray, radio and optical observations together with impressive advances in numerical simulation make this a good time to settle some long-standing debates.

  7. Theoretical and simulation research of hydrodynamic instabilities in inertial-confinement fusion implosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, LiFeng; Ye, WenHua; He, XianTu; Wu, JunFeng; Fan, ZhengFeng; Xue, Chuang; Guo, HongYu; Miao, WenYong; Yuan, YongTeng; Dong, JiaQin; Jia, Guo; Zhang, Jing; Li, YingJun; Liu, Jie; Wang, Min; Ding, YongKun; Zhang, WeiYan

    2017-05-01

    Inertial fusion energy (IFE) has been considered a promising, nearly inexhaustible source of sustainable carbon-free power for the world's energy future. It has long been recognized that the control of hydrodynamic instabilities is of critical importance for ignition and high-gain in the inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) hot-spot ignition scheme. In this mini-review, we summarize the progress of theoretical and simulation research of hydrodynamic instabilities in the ICF central hot-spot implosion in our group over the past decade. In order to obtain sufficient understanding of the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities in ICF, we first decompose the problem into different stages according to the implosion physics processes. The decomposed essential physics pro- cesses that are associated with ICF implosions, such as Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI), Richtmyer-Meshkov instability (RMI), Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI), convergent geometry effects, as well as perturbation feed-through are reviewed. Analyti- cal models in planar, cylindrical, and spherical geometries have been established to study different physical aspects, including density-gradient, interface-coupling, geometry, and convergent effects. The influence of ablation in the presence of preheating on the RTI has been extensively studied by numerical simulations. The KHI considering the ablation effect has been discussed in detail for the first time. A series of single-mode ablative RTI experiments has been performed on the Shenguang-II laser facility. The theoretical and simulation research provides us the physical insights of linear and weakly nonlinear growths, and nonlinear evolutions of the hydrodynamic instabilities in ICF implosions, which has directly supported the research of ICF ignition target design. The ICF hot-spot ignition implosion design that uses several controlling features, based on our current understanding of hydrodynamic instabilities, to address shell implosion stability, has

  8. Hall Effects on Unsteady Hydromagnetic Flow Past an Accelerated Porous Plate in a Rotating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanatan Das

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An unsteady hydromagnetic flow of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid past an accelerated porous flat plate in the presence of a uniform transverse magnetic field in a rotating system taking the Hall effects into account have been presented. An analytical solution describing the flow at large and small times after the start is obtained by the use of Laplace transform technique. The influences of the physical parameters acting on the flow are discussed in detail with the help of several graphs. It is found that interplay of Coriolis force and hydromagnetic force in the presence of Hall currents plays an important role in characterizing the flow behavior.

  9. Influence of heat and mass flux conditions in hydromagnetic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasi, F. M. [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Shehzad, S. A., E-mail: ali-qau70@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Hayat, T. [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia); Alsaedi, A.; Obid, Mustafa A. [Nonlinear Analysis and Applied Mathematics (NAAM) Research Group, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-03-15

    This article explores the hydromagnetic steady flow of Jeffrey fluid in the presence of thermal radiation. The chosen nanofluid model takes into account the Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects. Flow and heat transfer characteristics are determined by a stretching surface with flux conditions. The nonlinear boundary layer flow through partial differential systems is converted into the ordinary differential systems. The resulting reduced systems are computed for the convergent solutions of velocity, temperature and nanoparticle concentration. Graphs of dimensionless temperature and nanoparticle concentration profiles are presented for different values of emerging parameters. Skin-friction coefficient are computed and analyzed in both hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic flow situations.

  10. Influence of heat and mass flux conditions in hydromagnetic flow of Jeffrey nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. Abbasi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the hydromagnetic steady flow of Jeffrey fluid in the presence of thermal radiation. The chosen nanofluid model takes into account the Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects. Flow and heat transfer characteristics are determined by a stretching surface with flux conditions. The nonlinear boundary layer flow through partial differential systems is converted into the ordinary differential systems. The resulting reduced systems are computed for the convergent solutions of velocity, temperature and nanoparticle concentration. Graphs of dimensionless temperature and nanoparticle concentration profiles are presented for different values of emerging parameters. Skin-friction coefficient are computed and analyzed in both hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic flow situations.

  11. High-fidelity numerical simulations of compressible turbulence and mixing generated by hydrodynamic instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Movahed, Pooya

    High-speed flows are prone to hydrodynamic interfacial instabilities that evolve to turbulence, thereby intensely mixing different fluids and dissipating energy. The lack of knowledge of these phenomena has impeded progress in a variety of disciplines. In science, a full understanding of mixing between heavy and light elements after the collapse of a supernova and between adjacent layers of different density in geophysical (atmospheric and oceanic) flows remains lacking. In engineering, the inability to achieve ignition in inertial fusion and efficient combustion constitute further examples of this lack of basic understanding of turbulent mixing. In this work, my goal is to develop accurate and efficient numerical schemes and employ them to study compressible turbulence and mixing generated by interactions between shocked (Richtmyer-Meshkov) and accelerated (Rayleigh-Taylor) interfaces, which play important roles in high-energy-density physics environments. To accomplish my goal, a hybrid high-order central/discontinuity-capturing finite difference scheme is first presented. The underlying principle is that, to accurately and efficiently represent both broadband motions and discontinuities, non-dissipative methods are used where the solution is smooth, while the more expensive and dissipative capturing schemes are applied near discontinuous regions. Thus, an accurate numerical sensor is developed to discriminate between smooth regions, shocks and material discontinuities, which all require a different treatment. The interface capturing approach is extended to central differences, such that smooth distributions of varying specific heats ratio can be simulated without generating spurious pressure oscillations. I verified and validated this approach against a stringent suite of problems including shocks, interfaces, turbulence and two-dimensional single-mode Richtmyer-Meshkov instability simulations. The three-dimensional code is shown to scale well up to 4000 cores

  12. Analytic approach to nonlinear hydrodynamic instabilities driven by time-dependent accelerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikaelian, K O

    2009-09-28

    We extend our earlier model for Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov instabilities to the more general class of hydrodynamic instabilities driven by a time-dependent acceleration g(t) . Explicit analytic solutions for linear as well as nonlinear amplitudes are obtained for several g(t)'s by solving a Schroedinger-like equation d{sup 2}{eta}/dt{sup 2} - g(t)kA{eta} = 0 where A is the Atwood number and k is the wavenumber of the perturbation amplitude {eta}(t). In our model a simple transformation k {yields} k{sub L} and A {yields} A{sub L} connects the linear to the nonlinear amplitudes: {eta}{sup nonlinear} (k,A) {approx} (1/k{sub L})ln{eta}{sup linear} (k{sub L}, A{sub L}). The model is found to be in very good agreement with direct numerical simulations. Bubble amplitudes for a variety of accelerations are seen to scale with s defined by s = {integral} {radical}g(t)dt, while spike amplitudes prefer scaling with displacement {Delta}x = {integral}[{integral}g(t)dt]dt.

  13. NIF laboratory astrophysics simulations investigating the effects of a radiative shock on hydrodynamic instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, A. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Drake, R. P.; Huntington, C. M.; Park, H.-S.; Remington, B. A.; Kalantar, D.; MacLaren, S.; Raman, K.; Miles, A.; Trantham, Matthew; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K.; Doss, F. W.; Shvarts, D.

    2016-10-01

    This poster will describe simulations based on results from ongoing laboratory astrophysics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) relevant to the effects of radiative shock on hydrodynamically unstable surfaces. The experiments performed on NIF uniquely provide the necessary conditions required to emulate radiative shock that occurs in astrophysical systems. The core-collapse explosions of red supergiant stars is such an example wherein the interaction between the supernova ejecta and the circumstellar medium creates a region susceptible to Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instabilities. Radiative and nonradiative experiments were performed to show that R-T growth should be reduced by the effects of the radiative shocks that occur during this core-collapse. Simulations were performed using the radiation hydrodynamics code Hyades using the experimental conditions to find the mean interface acceleration of the instability and then further analyzed in the buoyancy drag model to observe how the material expansion contributes to the mix-layer growth. This work is funded by the NNSA-DS and SC-OFES Joint Program in High-Energy-Density Laboratory Plasmas under Grant Number DE-FG52-09NA29548.

  14. R-T instability model of magnetic fluid and its numerical simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑秋云; 李明军; 舒适

    2008-01-01

    The Rayleigh-Taylor(R-T) instability of ferrofluid has been the subject of recent research,because of its implications on the stability of stellar.By neglecting the viscosity and rotation of magnetic fluid,and assuming that the magnetic particles are irrotational and temperature insensitive,we obtain a simplified R-T instability model of magnetic fluid.For the interface tracing,we use five-order weighted essentially non-oscillatory(WENO) scheme to spatial direction and three-order TVD R-K method to time direction on the uniform mesh,respectively.If the direction of the external magnetic field is the same as that of gravity,the velocities of the interface will be increased.But if the direction of the external magnetic field is in opposition to the direction of gravity,the velocities of the interface will be decreased.When the direction of the external magnetic field is perpendicular to the direction of gravity,the symmetry of the interface will be destroyed.Because of the action which is produced by perpendicular external magnetic field,there are other bubbles at the boudaries which parallel the direction of gravity.When we increase the magnetic susceptibility of the magnetic fluids,the effects of external magnetic fields will be more distinct for the interface tracing.

  15. A mirror instability associated with newly created ions in a moving plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. S.; Krauss-Varban, D.; Huo, T. S.

    1988-10-01

    Using a plasma model in which the ambient magnetic field is parallel to the z axis and the wave vector, an instability that resembles the usual hydromagnetic mirror instability is demonstrated. The instability is caused by freshly created ions in a moving plasma; the source of its free energy is associated with the ring distribution of the newly created ions, resulting in a high ion kinetic temperature in the direction transverse to the ambient magnetic field. The results of a stability analysis indicate that this instability can lead to the amplification of magnetosonic waves.

  16. Hydromagnetic Stability of Metallic Nanofluids (Cu-Water and Ag-Water Using Darcy-Brinkman Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ahuja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal convection of a nanofluid layer in the presence of imposed vertical magnetic field saturated by a porous medium is investigated for both-free, rigid-free, and both-rigid boundaries using Darcy-Brinkman model. The effects of Brownian motion and thermophoretic forces due to the presence of nanoparticles and Lorentz’s force term due to the presence of magnetic field have been considered in the momentum equations along with Maxwell’s equations. Keeping in mind applications of flow through porous medium in geophysics, especially in the study of Earth’s core, and the presence of nanoparticles therein, the hydromagnetic stability of a nanofluid layer in porous medium is considered in the present formulation. An analytical investigation is made by applying normal mode technique and Galerkin type weighted residuals method and the stability of Cu-water and Ag-water nanofluids is compared. Mode of heat transfer is through stationary convection without the occurrence of oscillatory motions. Stability of the system gets improved appreciably by raising the Chandrasekhar number as well as Darcy number whereas increase in porosity hastens the onset of instability. Further, stability of the system gets enhanced as we proceed from both-free boundaries to rigid-free and to both-rigid boundaries.

  17. GLOBAL CLASSICAL SOLUTIONS FOR ONE DIMENSIONAL HYDROMAGNETIC FLOW WITH DISSIPATIVE TERMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Fagui; Yang Hah; Jiang Chengshun

    2002-01-01

    This paper concerned with the classical solutions to system of one di-mensional hydromagnetic dynamics with dissipative mechanism. Under certain hy-potheses on the initial data, the global existence and the formation of singularities forclassical solution are obtained. Our results show that the damping dissipation is strongenough to preserve the smoothness of the classical solution.

  18. Development of azimuthally correlated instabilities for MagLIF seeded by electro-thermal and material strength effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecover, James; Weinwurm, Marcus; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2014-10-01

    Magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) is a promising route to controlled thermonuclear fusion. The concept involves magnetically imploding a metal liner; a key limitation of such systems is the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. MagLIF relevant liner implosions carried out at Sandia showed high amplitude MRT growth. 3D simulations with our MHD code Gorgon have shown that azimuthal correlation required to explain this can be contributed to by early time effects the electro-thermal instability (ETI) and an ``electro-choric instability'' (ECI). Shear forces can damp short wavelength perturbations while the liner remains solid, potentially setting axial wavelengths for the ETI and ECI. We can now model shear stresses in solids with Gorgon using a Johnson-Cook strength model and a bulk modulus calculated from the FEOS equation of state. Gorgon results with the strength model are compared to results from the shock hydrodynamics code iSALE. Results for liners show elongation of perturbations at the outer edge relative to the case without strength. We present results showing the model applied to liner implosions with axial magnetic fields of 0 T and 10 T.

  19. Laboratory experiments and numerical simulations on magnetic instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Stefani, F; Kasprzyk, Ch; Paredes, A; Ruediger, G; Seilmayer, M

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields of planets, stars and galaxies are generated by self-excitation in moving electrically conducting fluids. Once produced, magnetic fields can play an active role in cosmic structure formation by destabilizing rotational flows that would be otherwise hydrodynamically stable. For a long time, both hydromagnetic dynamo action as well as magnetically triggered flow instabilities had been the subject of purely theoretical research. Meanwhile, however, the dynamo effect has been observed in large-scale liquid sodium experiments in Riga, Karlsruhe and Cadarache. In this paper, we summarize the results of some smaller liquid metal experiments devoted to various magnetic instabilities such as the helical and the azimuthal magnetorotational instability, the Tayler instability, and the different instabilities that appear in a magnetized spherical Couette flow. We conclude with an outlook on a large scale Tayler-Couette experiment using liquid sodium, and on the prospects to observe magnetically triggered ...

  20. Morphology and Dynamics of Lithospheric Body Force Instabilities: Sheets, Drips and In-Between

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, A.; Moresi, L. N.

    2014-12-01

    Foundering of the Earth's lithosphere, and consequent energy and mass flux across the upper boundary layer and mantle interface, is driven locally by gravitational body forces. The related instabilities are usually classified as having sheet-like or drip-like morphologies. The former is associated with whole lithosphere (subduction) or delamination type foundering such as suggested for beneath the southern Sierra-Nevada and the Colorado Plateau, the latter to classic Rayleigh-Taylor instability below an upper layer, suggested to have occurred beneath the Tibetan Plateau and North Island, New Zealand. This dichotomy is non-trivial; classification of phenomena into one or the other is often debated and is difficult to infer from observables. The two morphologies are most likely end-members. Here I refine the dynamics driving morphology selection as a function of rheological lamination and boundary layer Rayleigh number in 2D and 3D, using the finite-element particle-in-cell code Underworld. I explore the influence of morphology on mass flux, topography and crustal deformation as well as deviation from classic 2D scalings. Additionally, tectonic displacement interference with instability development is discussed using basic 3D shear-box style models. By quantifying and describing the theoretical instability dynamics which could result in a plausible range of morphological expressions, I aim to build a general framework which can be paired to the discussion involving firstly, the recognition of varied styles of body force instabilities in the modern Earth and rock record and secondly, to what degree pattern selection impacts boundary layer mass and energy flux.

  1. Sausage instabilities on top of kinking lengthening current-carrying magnetic flux tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    von der Linden, Jens; You, Setthivoine

    2017-05-01

    We theoretically explore the possibility of sausage instabilities developing on top of a kink instability in lengthening current-carrying magnetic flux tubes. Observations indicate that the dynamics of magnetic flux tubes in our cosmos and terrestrial experiments can involve topological changes faster than time scales predicted by resistive magnetohydrodynamics. Recent laboratory experiments suggest that hierarchies of instabilities, such as kink and Rayleigh-Taylor, could be responsible for initiating fast topological changes by locally accessing two-fluid and kinetic regimes. Sausage instabilities can also provide this coupling mechanism between disparate scales. Flux tube experiments can be classified by the flux tube's evolution in a configuration space described by a normalized inverse aspect-ratio k ¯ and current-to-magnetic flux ratio λ ¯ . A lengthening current-carrying magnetic flux tube traverses this k ¯ - λ ¯ space and crosses stability boundaries. We derive a single general criterion for the onset of the sausage and kink instabilities in idealized magnetic flux tubes with core and skin currents. The criterion indicates a dependence of the stability boundaries on current profiles and shows overlapping kink and sausage unstable regions in the k ¯ - λ ¯ space with two free parameters. Numerical investigation of the stability criterion reduces the number of free parameters to a single one that describes the current profile and confirms the overlapping sausage and kink unstable regions in k ¯ - λ ¯ space. A lengthening, ideal current-carrying magnetic flux tube can therefore become sausage unstable after it becomes kink unstable.

  2. The effect of electro-thermal and electro-choric instabilities and material strength on MagLIF liner stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecover, James; Chittenden, Jeremy

    2015-11-01

    Magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) is a promising route to controlled thermonuclear fusion. The concept involves magnetically imploding a metal liner containing fuel with an azimuthal magnetic field (Bz) ; a key limitation of such systems is the magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability. MagLIF relevant liner implosions with Bz = 0 carried out at SNL showed high amplitude MRT growth; we present a quantitative comparison between experimental results and 3D results from our MHD code Gorgon, demonstrating closer agreement for the MRT properties with the inclusion of electro-thermal and electro-choric instabilities (ETI and ECI) and material strength. The ETI and ECI result in early time azimuthally correlated structures which provide a seed for the MRT. Material strength increases the ETI amplitude due to positive feedback during the solid phase of the liner. Similar liner implosions with Bz exhibited a re-orientation of the MRT into helical structures, which are yet to be reproduced by simulations without an artificial helical initialisation. Our 3D Gorgon results with Bz show helices prior to vapourisation; these occur at initially positive angles before changing sign, tending to zero later in time. This angle does not follow the relative magnitudes of Bz and Bθ as would be expected for the MRT. The angle instead follows the ratio of axial and azimuthal currents (induced by compression or rarefaction of the initial Bz) , indicating an electro-thermal origin.

  3. Hydrodynamic instabilities and mix studies on NIF: predictions, observations, and a path forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remington, B. A.; Atherton, L. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; Berzak-Hopkins, L.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Cerjan, C. J.; Clark, D. S.; Dewald, E. L.; Dittrich, T. R.; Dixit, S. N.; Döppner, T.; Edgell, D. H.; Edwards, M. J.; Epstein, R.; Frenje, J.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; Grim, G.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hamza, A.; Hicks, D.; Hsing, W. W.; Hurricane, O.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Key, M. H.; Khan, S. F.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kline, J. L.; Kyrala, G. A.; Landen, O. L.; Le Pape, S.; Lindl, J. D.; Ma, T.; MacGowan, B. J.; Mackinnon, A. J.; MacPhee, A. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Moses, E. I.; Nikroo, A.; Pak, A.; Parham, T.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Petrasso, R.; Pino, J.; Ralph, J. E.; Raman, K.; Regan, S. P.; Robey, H. F.; Ross, J. S.; Spears, B. K.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Springer, P. T.; Suter, L. J.; Tipton, R.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P.; Weber, S. V.

    2016-03-01

    The goals of the Mix Campaign are to determine how mix affects performance, locate the “mix cliff”, locate the source of the mix, and develop mitigation methods that allow performance to be increased. We have used several different drive pulse shapes and capsule designs in the Mix Campaign, to understand sensitivity to drive peak power, level of coast, rise time to peak power, adiabat, and dopant level in the capsule. Ablator material mixing into the hot spot has been shown conclusively with x-ray spectroscopy. The observed neutron yield drops steeply when the hot spot mix mass becomes too large. The mix appears to be driven by ablation- front Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities. A high foot, higher adiabat drive has a more stable ablation front and has allowed the mix mass in the hot spot to be reduced significantly. Two recent high foot shots achieved neutron yields > 1015 and measured neutron yield over clean 1D simulation (YOC) > 50%, which was one of the central goals of the Mix Campaign.

  4. On the spreading and instability of gravity current fronts of arbitrary shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgheib, N.; Bonometti, T.; Balachandar, S.

    2012-11-01

    Experiments, simulations and theoretical analysis were carried out to study the influence of geometry on the spreading of gravity currents. The horizontal spreading of three different intial planforms of initial release were investigated: an extended ellipse, a cross, and a circle. The experiments used a pulley system for a swift nearly instantaneous release. The case of the axisymmetric cylinder compared favorably with earlier simulations. We ran experiments for multiple aspect ratios for all three configurations. Perhaps the most intriguing of the three cases is the ``ellipse,'' which within a short period of release flipped the major and minor axes. This behavior cannot be captured by current theoretical methods (such as the Box Model). These cases have also been investigated using shallow water and direct numerical simulations. Also, in this study, we investigate the possibility of a Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability of the radially moving, but decelerating front. We present a simple theoretical framework based on the inviscid Shallow Water Equations. The theoretical results are supplemented and compared to highly resolved three-dimensional simulations with the Boussinesq approximation. Chateaubriand Fellowship - NSF PIRE grant OISE-0968313.

  5. Simulation of direct contact condensation of steam jets based on interfacial instability theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, David; Schulenberg, Thomas; Class, Andreas; Behnke, Lars

    2014-11-01

    A simulation model for the direct contact condensation of steam in subcooled water is presented that allows to determine major parameters of the process such as the jet penetration length. Entrainment of water by the steam jet is modeled based on the Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor instability theories. Primary atomization due to acceleration of interfacial waves and secondary atomization due to aerodynamic forces account for the initial size of entrained droplets. The resulting steam-water two-phase flow is simulated based on a one-dimensional two-fluid model. An interfacial area transport equation is used to track changes of the interfacial area density due to droplet entrainment and steam condensation. Interfacial heat and mass transfer rates during condensation are calculated using the two-resistance model. The resulting two-phase flow equations constitute a system of ordinary differential equations which is discretized by means of an explicit Runge-Kutta method. The simulation results are in good agreement with published experimental data over a wide range of pool temperatures and mass flow rates. funded by RWE Power AG.

  6. Nova Experiments Examining Raleigh-Taylor Instability in Materials with Strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, S.V.; Kalantar, D.H.; Colvin, J.D.; Gold, D.M.; Mikaelian, K.O.; Remington, B.A.; Wiley, L.G.

    1999-10-06

    Material strength can affect the growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in solid materials, where growth occurs through plastic flow. In order to study this effect at megabar pressures, we have shocked metal foils using hohlraum x-ray drive on Nova, and observed the growth of pre-imposed modulations with x-ray radiography. Previous experiments employing Cu foils did not conclusively show strength effects for resolvable wavelengths. Therefore, we have redesigned the experiment to use aluminum foils. As aluminum has higher specific strength at pressures {approx}1 Mbar, the new design is predicted to show growth reduction due to strength of at least a factor of two for some wavelengths in the observable range of 10 - 50 {micro}m. We have also modified the drive history to extend the interval of uniform acceleration and to reduce the risk of melting the foils with coalesced shocks. The design changes, as well as Nova operational constraints, limit peak pressures to 1-1.5 Mbar. Foil surface motion has been measured with high sensitivity by laser interferometry to look for thermal expansion due to preheat. We have continued to pursue dynamic x-ray diffraction as the most definitive measurement of crystal state.

  7. The instability of a horizontal magnetic field in an atmosphere stable against convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, E. N.

    1979-01-01

    The theoretical problem posed by the buoyant escape of a magnetic field from the interior of a stably stratified body bears directly on the question of the present existence of primordial magnetic fields in stars. This paper treats the onset of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability of the upper boundary of a uniform horizontal magnetic field in a stably stratified atmosphere. The calculations are carried out in the Boussinesq approximation and show the rapid growth of the initial infinitesimal perturbation of the boundary. This result is in contrast to the extremely slow buoyant rise of a separate flux tube in the same atmosphere. Thus for instance, at a depth of 1/3 of a solar radius beneath the surface of the sun, a field of 100 G develops ripples over a scale of 1000 km in a characteristic time of 50 years, whereas the characteristic rise time of the same field in separate flux tubes with the same dimensions is 10 billion years. Thus, the development of irregularities proceeds quickly, soon slowing, however, to a very slow pace when the amplitude of the irregularities becomes significant. Altogether, the calculations show the complexity of the question of the existence of remnant primordial magnetic fields in stellar interiors.

  8. Transient hydromagnetic reactive Couette flow and heat transfer in a rotating frame of reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Das

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the study of a transient hydromagnetic Couette flow and heat transfer of a reactive viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid between two infinitely long horizontal parallel plates when one of the plate is set into uniform accelerated motion in the presence of a uniform transverse magnetic field under Arrhenius reaction rate. The transient momentum equations are solved analytically using the Laplace transform technique and the velocity field and shear stresses are obtained in a unified closed form. The energy equation is tackled numerically using MATLAB. The effects of the pertinent parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature, the shear stress and the rate of heat transfer at the plates are presented in graphical form and discussed in detail. Our results reveal that the combined effects of magnetic field, rotation, exothermic reaction and variable thermal conductivity have significant impact on the hydromagnetic flow and heat transfer.

  9. Exponential Class of Similarity Solutions for the Hydromagnetic Falkner-Skan Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Haas, F

    2010-01-01

    A systematic search for the Lie point symmetries admitted by the steady hydromagnetic two-dimensional incompressible viscous flow boundary layer equation and associated boundary conditions is performed. Unlike previous works, the specific forms of the external velocity and transverse magnetic fields are not postulated from the very beginning. In this way a whole new class of similarity reductions for the problem is derived, for applied fields having an exponential nature. The corresponding hydromagnetic Falkner-Skan equation is numerically solved for different velocity profiles at the wall, considering stretching, expansion, injection or suction. For intense magnetic fields a series solution is derived and used to investigate the behaviour of the skin friction with respect to the initial conditions for both expanding and converging flows.

  10. The Blast-Wave-Driven Instability as a Vehicle for Understanding Supernova Explosion Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miles, A R

    2008-05-27

    Blast-wave-driven instabilities play a rich and varied role throughout the evolution of supernovae from explosion to remnant, but interpreting their role is difficult due to the enormous complexity of the stellar systems. We consider the simpler and fundamental hydrodynamic instability problem of a material interface between two constant-density fluids perturbed from spherical and driven by a divergent central Taylor-Sedov blast wave. The existence of unified solutions at high Mach number and small density ratio suggests that general conclusions can be drawn about the likely asymptotic structure of the mixing zone. To this end we apply buoyancy-drag and bubble merger models modified to include the effects of divergence and radial velocity gradients. In general, these effects preclude the true self-similar evolution of classical Raleigh-Taylor, but can be incorporated into a quasi-self-similar growth picture. Loss of memory of initial conditions can occur in the quasi-self-similar model, but requires initial mode numbers higher than those predicted for pre-explosion interfaces in Type II SNe, suggesting that their late-time structure is likely strongly influenced by details of the initial perturbations. Where low-modes are dominant, as in the Type Ia Tycho remnant, they result from initial perturbations rather than generation from smaller scales. Therefore, structure observed now contains direct information about the explosion process. When large-amplitude modes are present in the initial conditions, the contribution to the perturbation growth from the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability is significant or dominant compared to Rayleigh-Taylor. Such Richtmyer-Meshkov growth can yield proximity of the forward shock to the growing spikes and structure that strongly resembles that observed in the Tycho. Laser-driven high-energy-density laboratory experiments offer a promising avenue for testing model and simulation descriptions of blast-wave-driven instabilities and making

  11. Three-dimensional simulations of ablative hydrodynamic instabilities in indirectly driven targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinak, M.M.; Tipton, R.E.; Remington, B.A. [and others

    1996-06-01

    To model ignition in a National Ignition Facility (NIF) capsule implosion, the authors must understand the behavior of instabilities that can cause breakup of the pellet shell. During a capsule implosion, shocks that transit the shell cause growth of perturbations at the surface or at an interface because of a Richtmyer-Meshkov type of instability. Following shock breakout, or earlier for a shaped pulse, the low-density ablated plasma accelerates the pusher, and the ablation front is Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable. Ablation and finite density gradients have the effect of stabilizing the short wavelength modes. Unstable modes present on the outer surface grow and feed through to the inner surface. Once the shell encounters the rebounding shock from the capsule center, it decelerates and the inner surface becomes RT unstable. If perturbations grow large enough, pusher material mixes into the core, degrading implosion performance. Capsule designs for the NIF depend on ablative stabilization and saturation to prevent perturbations initially present on the capsule surface from growing large enough to quench ignition. Here, the authors examine the first simulations and experiments to study the effect of 3-D perturbation shape on instability growth and saturation in indirectly driven targets. The first section discusses HYDRA, the radiation hydrodynamics code developed for these simulations. The subsequent section examines 3-D shape effects in single-mode perturbations in planar foil simulations and experiments. A discussion of the evolution of multimode perturbations on planar foils is followed by a discussion of 3-D simulations of instability growth in Nova capsule implosions.

  12. FOREWORD: Second International Symposium on Instability and Bifurcations in Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar Yoseph, P. Z.; Brøns, M.; Gelfgat, A.; Sørensen, J. N.

    2007-05-01

    Hydrodynamic stability is of fundamental importance in fluid dynamics and is a well-established subject of scientific investigation that continues to attract great interest in the fluid mechanics community. Hydrodynamic instabilities of prototypical character are, for example, the Rayleigh-Bénard, the Taylor-Couette, the Bénard-Marangoni, the Rayleigh-Taylor, and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. A fundamental understanding of various patterns of bifurcations such as identifying the most dominant mechanisms responsible for the instability threshold is also required if one is to design reliable and efficient industrial processes and applications, such as melting, mixing, crystal growth, coating, welding, flow re-attachment over wings, and others. The collection of papers in this volume is a selection of the presentations given at the Second International Symposium on Instability and Bifurcations in Fluid Dynamics, Technical University of Denmark, 15-18 August 2006. With more than 40 invited and contributed papers the symposium gave an overview of the state-of-the art of the field including experimental, theoretical, and computational approaches to problems related to convection, effects of magnetic fields, wake flows, rotating flows, and many others. The complete program can be found at the conference website http://www2.mat.dtu.dk/BIFD2006/. The symposium was the follow-up of a minisymposium held as a part of the `International Conference on Computational and Experimental Engineering and Sciences', 26-29 July 2004, Madeira, Portugal. We hope it will be possible to continue this series of highly successful events with a third symposium in 2008. P Z Bar Yoseph, M Brøns, A Gelfgat and J N Sørensen Editors

  13. A couple stress fluid modeling on free convection oscillatory hydromagnetic flow in an inclined rotating channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahin Ahmed

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses analytically on the oscillatory hydromagnetic flow of a viscous, incompressible, electrically-conducting, non-Newtonian fluid in an inclined, rotating channel with non-conducting walls, incorporating couple stress effects. The model is then non-dimensionalized with appropriate variables and shown to be controlled by the inverse Ekman number (K2 = 1/Ek, the hydromagnetic body force parameter (M, channel inclination (α, Grashof number (Gr, Prandtl number (Pr, oscillation frequency (ω and time variable (ωT. Analytical solutions are derived using complex variables. Excellent agreement is obtained between both previous and present work. The influence of the governing parameters on the primary velocity, secondary velocity, temperature (θ, primary and secondary flow discharges per unit depth in the channel, and frictional shear stresses due to primary and secondary flow, is studied graphically and using tables. Applications of the study arise in the simulation of the manufacture of electrically-conducting polymeric liquids and hydromagnetic energy systems exploiting rheological working fluids.

  14. Stochastically driven instability in rotating shear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata

    2012-01-01

    Origin of hydrodynamic turbulence in rotating shear flows is investigated. The particular emphasis is the flows whose angular velocity decreases but specific angular momentum increases with increasing radial coordinate. Such flows are Rayleigh stable, but must be turbulent in order to explain observed data. Such a mismatch between the linear theory and observations/experiments is more severe when any hydromagnetic/magnetohydrodynamic instability and then the corresponding turbulence therein is ruled out. The present work explores the effect of stochastic noise on such hydrodynamic flows. We essentially concentrate on a small section of such a flow which is nothing but a plane shear flow supplemented by the Coriolis effect. This also mimics a small section of an astrophysical accretion disk. It is found that such stochastically driven flows exhibit large temporal and spatial correlations of perturbation velocities, and hence large energy dissipations of perturbation, which presumably generate instability. A ra...

  15. Hydrodynamic Instability, Integrated Code, Laboratory Astrophysics, and Astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabe, Hideaki

    2016-10-01

    This is an article for the memorial lecture of Edward Teller Medal and is presented as memorial lecture at the IFSA03 conference held on September 12th, 2003, at Monterey, CA. The author focuses on his main contributions to fusion science and its extension to astrophysics in the field of theory and computation by picking up five topics. The first one is the anomalous resisitivity to hot electrons penetrating over-dense region through the ion wave turbulence driven by the return current compensating the current flow by the hot electrons. It is concluded that almost the same value of potential as the average kinetic energy of the hot electrons is realized to prevent the penetration of the hot electrons. The second is the ablative stabilization of Rayleigh-Taylor instability at ablation front and its dispersion relation so-called Takabe formula. This formula gave a principal guideline for stable target design. The author has developed an integrated code ILESTA (ID & 2D) for analyses and design of laser produced plasma including implosion dynamics. It is also applied to design high gain targets. The third is the development of the integrated code ILESTA. The forth is on Laboratory Astrophysics with intense lasers. This consists of two parts; one is review on its historical background and the other is on how we relate laser plasma to wide-ranging astrophysics and the purposes for promoting such research. In relation to one purpose, I gave a comment on anomalous transport of relativistic electrons in Fast Ignition laser fusion scheme. Finally, I briefly summarize recent activity in relation to application of the author's experience to the development of an integrated code for studying extreme phenomena in astrophysics.

  16. The nature of blast-wave-driven interfacial instabilities - important implications for modeling supernovae explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Aaron

    2004-11-01

    In this talk we discuss the nature of late-time, broad-banded instability development at an interface when a strong blast wave travels from a heavier to lighter fluid, as is the case in a supernova explosion. After a short period of Richtmyer-Meshkov growth, the interface is unstable via the Rayleigh-Taylor mechanism, which rapidly becomes the dominant energy source for growth. This situation is distinct from the classical case in two important ways, both of which can be understood in terms of a bubble merger model we have developed for blast-wave-driven systems. Rather than the constant acceleration feeding the instability to spawn ever larger scales and accelerate the growth, the decaying acceleration in the blast-wave case leads to a decay in the RT growth rate, and a freezing in of a preferred largest scale, which is dependent on the precise details of the system. In the language of bubble-merger models, this can be understood in terms of the time for the generation of the next largest scale being longer than the lifetime of the blast wave. Secondly, the continual expansion behind the blast front precludes the emergence of a self-similar regime, independent of the initial conditions, in the planar case. Self-similarity may be recovered in diverging systems but may be difficult to observe in reality because of rather restrictive conditions that must be met. These observations are borne out by hi-resolution numerical simulations using the higher order Godunov AMR hydrocode Raptor in 2 and 3D, and explain other simulations of instability growth in supernovae explosions; the initial "interfacial" structure is likely very important in determining the late-time growth. The model predictions are also consistent with numerous images of natural and manmade explosions.

  17. Hydromagnetic Stability of a Slim Disk in a Stationary Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Araya-Gochez, R A

    2002-01-01

    The magnetorotational instability originates from the elastic coupling of fluid elements in orbit around a gravitational well. Since inertial accelerations play a fundamental dynamical role in the process, one may expect substantial modifications by strong gravity in the case of accretion onto a black hole. In this paper, we develop a fully covariant, Lagrangian displacement vector field formalism with the aim of addressing these issues for a disk embedded in a stationary geometry with negligible radial flow. This construction avails a transparent connection between particle dynamics and the ensuing dispersion relation for MHD wave modes. The MRI--in its incompressible variant--is found to operate virtually unabated down to the marginally stable orbit; the putative inner boundary of standard accretion disk theory. To get a qualitative feel for the dynamical evolution of the flow below $r_{\\rm ms}$, we assume a mildly advective accretion flow such that the angular velocity profile departs slowly from circular ...

  18. On Hydromagnetic Stresses in Accretion Disk Boundary Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pessah, Martin Elias; Chan, Chi-kwan

    2012-01-01

    Detailed calculations of the physical structure of accretion disk boundary layers, and thus their inferred observational properties, rely on the assumption that angular momentum transport is opposite to the radial angular frequency gradient of the disk. The standard model for turbulent shear...... viscosity satisfies this assumption by construction. However, this behavior is not supported by numerical simulations of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) accretion disks, which show that angular momentum transport driven by the magnetorotational instability (MRI) is inefficient in disk regions where...... with angular frequencies that increase outward in the shearing-sheet framework. We isolate the modes that are unrelated to the standard MRI and provide analytic solutions for the long-term evolution of the resulting shearing MHD waves. We show that, although the energy density of these waves can be amplified...

  19. Influence of phase transition on the instability of a liquid-vapor interface in a gravitational field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, V. V.; Lyubimov, D. V.; Lyubimova, T. P.

    2017-06-01

    This study is concerned with the linear stability of the horizontal interface between thick layers of a viscous heat-conducting liquid and its vapor in a gravitational field subject to phase transition. We consider the case when the hydrostatic base state is consistent with a balanced heat flux at the liquid-vapor interface. The corrections to the growth rate of the most dangerous perturbations and cutoff wave number, characterizing the influence of phase transition on the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, are found to be different from the data in the literature. Most of the previous results were obtained in the framework of a quasiequilibrium approximation, which had been shown to conform to the limit of thin media layers under equality of the interface temperature to a saturation temperature. The main difference from the results obtained with the quasiequilibrium approach is new values of the proportionality coefficients that correlate our corrections with the intensity of weak heating. Moreover, at large values of the heat flux rate, when deviations from the approximate linear law are important, the effect of phase transition is limited and does not exceed the size of the vapor viscosity effect.

  20. Unsteady hydromagnetic flow of dusty fluid and heat transfer over a vertical stretching sheet with thermal radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isa, Sharena Mohamad; Ali, Anati [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Johor Bahru, Johor, Malaysia sharena-ina@yahoo.com, anati@utm.my (Malaysia)

    2015-10-22

    In this paper, the hydromagnetic flow of dusty fluid over a vertical stretching sheet with thermal radiation is investigated. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations using similarity transformation. These nonlinear ordinary differential equations are solved numerically using Runge-Kutta Fehlberg fourth-fifth order method (RKF45 Method). The behavior of velocity and temperature profiles of hydromagnetic fluid flow of dusty fluid is analyzed and discussed for different parameters of interest such as unsteady parameter, fluid-particle interaction parameter, the magnetic parameter, radiation parameter and Prandtl number on the flow.

  1. Unsteady Hydromagnetic Rotating Flow through an Oscillating Porous Plate Embedded in a Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates unsteady hydromagnetic flow of a viscous fluid in a rotating frame. The fluid is bounded by an oscillating porous plate embedded in a porous medium. The Laplace transform and Fourier sine transform methods are employed to find the exact solutions. They satisfy all imposed initial and boundary conditions and as special cases are reduced to some published results from the literature. The graphical results are plotted for different values of pertinent parameters and some interesting conclusions are made.

  2. Hypergeometric steady solution of hydromagnetic nano liquid film flow over an unsteady stretching sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metri, Prashant G.; Narayana, Mahesha; Silvestrov, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the hydromagnetic boundary layer flow and heat transfer characteristics of a laminar nanoliquid film over an unsteady stretching sheet is presented. The highly nonlinear partial differential equations governing flow and heat transport are simplified using similarity transformation. The analytical solutions of the resulting ODEs are obtained for some special case of nano liquid film using hypergeometric power series functions, and from which the analytical solutions of the original problem are presented. The influence of pertinent parameters such as the magnetic parameter, the solid volume fraction of nanoparticles and the type of nanofluid on the flow, heat transfer, Nusselt number and skin friction coefficient is discussed analytically.

  3. Unsteady hydromagnetic Couette flow through a porous medium in a rotating system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the unsteady hydromagnetic Couette fluid flow through a porous medium between two infinite horizontal plates induced by the non-torsional oscillations of one of the plates in a rotating system using boundary layer approximation.The fluid is assumed to be Newtonian and incompressible.Laplace transform technique is adopted to obtain a unified solution of the velocity fields.Such a flow model is of great interest,not only for its theoretical significance,but also for its wide applicatio...

  4. Life-span of classical solutions for one-dimensional hydromagnetic flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Fa-gui

    2007-01-01

    The paper concerns Cauchy problem for one-dimensional hydromagnetic dynamics with dissipative terms. When the dissipation coefficient is equal to zero it is shown that the smooth solutions develop shocks in the finite time if the initial amounts of entropy and magnetic field are smaller than those of sound waves; when it is larger than zero, and the initial amounts of entropy, this dissipation coefficient and the magnetic field in each period are smaller than those of sound waves, then the smooth solutions blow up in the finite time. Moreover, the life-span of the smooth solution is given.

  5. Gravitational instability due to the dissolution of carbon dioxide in a Hele-Shaw cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vreme, A.; Nadal, F.; Pouligny, B.; Jeandet, P.; Liger-Belair, G.; Meunier, P.

    2016-10-01

    We present an experimental study of the gravitational instability triggered by dissolution of carbon dioxide through a water-gas interface. We restrict the study to vertical parallelepipedic Hele-Shaw geometries, for which the thickness is smaller than the other dimensions. The partial pressure of carbon dioxide is quickly increased, leading to a denser layer of CO2-enriched water underneath the surface. This initially one-dimensional diffusive layer destabilizes through a convection-diffusion process. The concentration field of carbon dioxide, which is visualized by means of a pH-sensitive dye, shows a fingering pattern whose characteristics (wavelength and amplitude growth rate) are functions of the Rayleigh (Ra) and the Darcy (Da) numbers. At low Rayleigh numbers, the growth rate and the wave numbers are independent of the Rayleigh number and in excellent agreement with the classical results obtained numerically and theoretically in the Darcy regime. However, above a threshold of Ra√{Da} of the order of 10, the growth rate and the wave number strongly decrease due to the Brinkman term associated with the viscous diffusion in the vertical and longitudinal directions. In this Darcy-Brinkman regime, the growth rate and the wave number depend only on the thickness-based Rayleigh number Ra√{Da} . The classical Rayleigh-Taylor theory including the Brinkman term has been extended to this diffusive gravitational instability and gives an excellent prediction of the growth rate over four decades of Rayleigh numbers. However, the Brinkman regime seems to be valid only until Ra√{Da}=1000 . Above this threshold, the transverse velocity profile is no longer parabolic, which leads to an overestimation of the wave number by the theory.

  6. Hydrodynamic instabilities at ablation front: numerical investigation on stabilization by adiabat shaping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olazabal-Loume, M.; Hallo, L. [Bordeaux-1 Univ., CELIA UMR 5107, 33 - Talence (France)

    2006-06-15

    This study deals with the hydrodynamic stability of a planar target in the context of inertial confinement fusion direct drive. Recently, different schemes have been proposed in order to reduce ablative Rayleigh-Taylor growth. They are based on the target adiabatic shaping in the ablation zone. In this work, we consider an adiabatic shaping scheme by relaxation: a prepulse is followed by a relaxation period where the laser is turned off. A numerical study is performed with a perturbation code dedicated to the linear stability analysis. The simulations show stabilizing effects of the relaxation scheme on the linear Rayleigh-Taylor growth rate. Influence of the picket parameters is also discussed. (authors)

  7. LSWS linked with the low-latitude Es and its implications for the growth of the R-T instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, L. M.

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive investigation of spread F irregularities over the Indian sector has been carried out using VHF radar and ionosonde observations. Two different categories of spread F observations, one where the onset of the range spread F (RSF) was concurrent with the peak h'F (category 1) and another where the RSF onset happened ~90 min after the peak h'F time (category 2), are presented. RSF in category 2 was preceded by the presence of oblique echoes in ionograms, indicating the irregularity genesis westward of Sriharikota. The average peak h'F in category 1 was ~30 km higher than that in category 2 indicating the presence of standing large-scale wave structure (LSWS). Occurrence of the blanketing Es during 19:30 to 20:30 Indian Standard Time in category 1 (category 2) was 0% (>50%). Model computation is also carried out to further substantiate the observational results. Model computation indicates that zonal variation of low-latitude Es can generate zonal modulation in the F layer height rise. It is found that the modulation of the F layer height, linked with the low-latitude Es, assists the equatorial spread F onset by modifying both the growth rate of the collisional Rayleigh-Taylor (R-T) instability and also its efficiency. A predominant presence of low-latitude Es has been observed, but the increase in the F layer height and the R-T instability growth in the evening hours will maximize with complete absence of low-latitude Es. A new mechanism for the generation of LSWS and its implications on R-T instability is discussed.

  8. FOREWORD: Third International Symposium on Instability and Bifurcations in Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Yoseph, P. Z.; Brøns, M.; Cliffe, K. A.; Gelfgat, A.; Oron, A.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrodynamic stability is of fundamental importance in fluid dynamics and is a well-established subject of scientific investigation that continues to attract great interest of the fluid mechanics community. Bifurcations and instabilities are observed in all areas of fundamental and applied fluid dynamics and remain a challenge for experimental, theoretical and computational studies. Hydrodynamic instabilities of prototypical character are, for example, the Rayleigh-Bénard, the Taylor-Couette, the Bénard-Marangoni, the Rayleigh-Taylor, and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. A fundamental understanding of various patterns of bifurcations such as identifying the most dominant mechanisms responsible for the instability threshold is also required if one is to design reliable and efficient industrial processes and applications, such as melting, mixing, crystal growth, coating, welding, flow re-attachment over wings, and others. Modeling of various instability mechanisms in biological and biomedical systems is currently a very active and rapidly developing area of research with important biotechnological and medical applications (biofilm engineering, wound healing, etc). The understanding of breaking symmetry in hemodynamics could have important consequences for vascular biology and diseases and its implication for vascular interventions (grafting, stenting, etc). The collection of papers in this volume is a selection of the presentations given at the Third International Symposium on Instability and Bifurcations in Fluid Dynamics, University of Nottingham, UK, 10-13 August 2009. With more than 100 invited and contributed papers the symposium gave an overview of the state-of-the art of the field including experimental, theoretical, and computational approaches to problems related to convection, effects of magnetic fields, wake flows, rotating flows, and many others. The complete program can be found at the conference website. The symposium was the follow-up of two

  9. Nonlinear Radiation Effects on Hydromagnetic Boundary Layer Flow and Heat Transfer over a Shrinking Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    anjali devi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of nonlinear radiation on hydromagnetic boundary layer flow and heat transfer over a shrinking surface is investigated in the present work. Using suitable similarity transformations, the governing nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The resultant equations which are highly nonlinear are solved numerically using Nachtsheim Swigert shooting iteration scheme together with Fourth Order Runge Kutta method. Numerical solutions for velocity, skin friction coefficient and temperature are obtained for various values of physical parameters involved in the study namely Suction parameter, Magnetic parameter, Prandtl number, Radiation parameter and Temperature ratio parameter. Numerical values for dimensionless rate of heat transfer are also obtained for various physical parameters and are shown through tables. The analytical solution of the energy equation when the radiation term is taken in linear form is obtained using Confluent hypergeometric function.

  10. Unsteady Hydromagnetic Flow of Radiating Fluid Past a Convectively Heated Vertical Plate with the Navier Slip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. D. Makinde

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the unsteady hydromagnetic-free convection of an incompressible electrical conducting Boussinesq’s radiating fluid past a moving vertical plate in an optically thin environment with the Navier slip, viscous dissipation, and Ohmic and Newtonian heating. The nonlinear partial differential equations governing the transient problem are obtained and tackled numerically using a semidiscretization finite difference method coupled with Runge-Kutta Fehlberg integration technique. Numerical data for the local skin friction coefficient and the Nusselt number have been tabulated for various values of parametric conditions. Graphical results for the fluid velocity, temperature, skin friction, and the Nusselt number are presented and discussed. The results indicate that the skin friction coefficient decreases while the heat transfer rate at the plate surface increases as the slip parameter and Newtonian heating increase.

  11. Hydromagnetic flow of third grade nanofluid with viscous dissipation and flux conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, T. [Faculty of Computing, Mohammad Ali Jinnah University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Shehzad, S. A., E-mail: ali-qau70@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Comsats Institute of Information Technology, Sahiwal 57000 (Pakistan); Hayat, T. [Department of Mathematics, Quaid-I-Azam University 45320, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Alsaedi, A. [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-08-15

    This article investigates the magnetohydrodynamic flow of third grade nanofluid with thermophoresis and Brownian motion effects. Energy equation is considered in the presence of thermal radiation and viscous dissipation. Rosseland’s approximation is employed for thermal radiation. The heat and concentration flux conditions are taken into account. The governing nonlinear mathematical expressions of velocity, temperature and concentration are converted into dimensionless expressions via transformations. Series solutions of the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration are developed. Convergence of the constructed solutions is checked out both graphically and numerically. Effects of interesting physical parameters on the temperature and concentration are plotted and discussed in detail. Numerical values of skin-friction coefficient are computed for the hydrodynamic and hydromagnetic flow cases.

  12. Magnetic field and thermal radiation effects on steady hydromagnetic Couette flow through a porous channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chigozie Israel-Cookey

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates effects of thermal radiation and magnetic field on hydromagnetic Couette flow of a highly viscous fluid with temperature-dependent viscosity and thermal conductivity at constant pressure through a porous channel. The influence of the channel permeability is also assessed. The relevant governing partial differential equations have been transformed to non-linear coupled ordinary differential equations by virtue of the steady nature of the flow and are solved numerically using a marching finite difference scheme to give approximate solutions for the velocity and temperature profiles. We highlight the effects of Nahme numbers, magnetic field, radiation and permeability parameters on both profiles. The results obtained are used to give graphical illustrations of the distribution of the flow variables and are discussed.

  13. Second Law Analysis for Variable Viscosity Hydromagnetic Boundary Layer Flow with Thermal Radiation and Newtonian Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oluwole Daniel Makinde

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper is concerned with the analysis of inherent irreversibility in hydromagnetic boundary layer flow of variable viscosity fluid over a semi-infinite flat plate under the influence of thermal radiation and Newtonian heating. Using local similarity solution technique and shooting quadrature, the velocity and temperature profiles are obtained numerically and utilized to compute the entropy generation number. The effects of magnetic field parameter, Brinkmann number, the Prandtl number, variable viscosity parameter, radiation parameter and local Biot number on the fluid velocity profiles, temperature profiles, local skin friction and local Nusselt number are presented. The influences of the same parameters and the dimensionless group parameter on the entropy generation rate in the flow regime and Bejan number are calculated, depicted graphically and discussed quantitatively. It is observed that the peak of entropy generation rate is attained within the boundary layer region and plate surface act as a strong source of entropy generation and heat transfer irreversibility.

  14. Damping and coupling of long-period hydromagnetic waves by the ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, F. B.; Allan, W.

    The theory that long-period geomagnetic pulsations are due to hydromagnetic waves resonating in a magnetosphere bounded by an anisotropically conducting ionosphere, insulating atmosphere, and conducting earth is reviewed. The history of the subject is outlined, covering the effects of the ionospheric boundary on: pulsations seen at ground level and in the ionosphere (ionospheric screening, 90 deg rotation of polarization, attenuation of short wavelengths, mode coupling via Hall conductance); and wave systems above the ionosphere (wave-boundary impedance matching, damping, phase variation along the geomagnetic field, and allowed resonances). Coupling of non-axisymmetric modes within the magnetosphere is also mentioned, and a summary of the present picture given, with suggestions for future work.

  15. Slip Flow Effects over Hydromagnetic Forced Convective Flow over a Slendering Stretching Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    anjali devi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Theobjectiveofthisstudyistodeterminethecharacteristicsofhydromagneticflowoveraslendering stretching sheet in slip flow regime. Steady, two dimensional, nonlinear, hydromagnetic laminar flow of an incompressible, viscous and electrically conducting fluid over a stretching sheet with variable thickness in the presence of variable magnetic field and slip flow regime is considered. Governing equations of the problem are converted into ordinary differential equations utilizing similarity transformations. The resulting non-linear differential equations are solved numerically by utilizing Nachtsheim-swigert shooting iterative scheme for satisfaction of asymptotic boundary conditions along with fourth order Runge-Kutta integration method. Numerical computations are carried out for various values of the physical parameters and their effects over the velocity and temperature are analyzed. Numerical values of dimensionless skin friction coefficient and non-dimensional rate of heat transfer are also obtained.

  16. Cross-diffusion-driven hydrodynamic instabilities in a double-layer system: General classification and nonlinear simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budroni, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Cross diffusion, whereby a flux of a given species entrains the diffusive transport of another species, can trigger buoyancy-driven hydrodynamic instabilities at the interface of initially stable stratifications. Starting from a simple three-component case, we introduce a theoretical framework to classify cross-diffusion-induced hydrodynamic phenomena in two-layer stratifications under the action of the gravitational field. A cross-diffusion-convection (CDC) model is derived by coupling the fickian diffusion formalism to Stokes equations. In order to isolate the effect of cross-diffusion in the convective destabilization of a double-layer system, we impose a starting concentration jump of one species in the bottom layer while the other one is homogeneously distributed over the spatial domain. This initial configuration avoids the concurrence of classic Rayleigh-Taylor or differential-diffusion convective instabilities, and it also allows us to activate selectively the cross-diffusion feedback by which the heterogeneously distributed species influences the diffusive transport of the other species. We identify two types of hydrodynamic modes [the negative cross-diffusion-driven convection (NCC) and the positive cross-diffusion-driven convection (PCC)], corresponding to the sign of this operational cross-diffusion term. By studying the space-time density profiles along the gravitational axis we obtain analytical conditions for the onset of convection in terms of two important parameters only: the operational cross-diffusivity and the buoyancy ratio, giving the relative contribution of the two species to the global density. The general classification of the NCC and PCC scenarios in such parameter space is supported by numerical simulations of the fully nonlinear CDC problem. The resulting convective patterns compare favorably with recent experimental results found in microemulsion systems.

  17. Observations of altered instability structure for imploding z-pinch liners that are premagnetized with a uniform axial field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awe, Thomas

    2013-10-01

    Magnetically driven implosions provide an energy-rich platform for inertial confinement fusion. The magnetized liner inertial fusion concept (MagLIF, Slutz et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056303 (2010)) uses a pulsed-power-driven metallic liner to compress and inertially confine preheated and premagnetized fusion fuel. The fuel is premagnetized with a uniform axial seed field Bz , 0 of 10 to 30 T, which is then compressed by the liner to nearly 1000 T. In the fuel, the ultra-high field reduces thermal conduction and enhances alpha-particle heating. Preheating the fuel to 100-300 eV eases requirements on liner-convergence; nonetheless, convergence ratios at stagnation of 20 or more may be necessary. The ability to maintain liner stability and uniformity through stagnation may ultimately determine the success of the MagLIF concept. The integrity of magnetically imploded liners is compromised both by electrode instabilities and by the magneto-Rayleigh Taylor (MRT) instability. Electrode instabilities form local perturbations that can mix liner material into the fuel prior to bulk compression. Recent experiments on the Z facility have shown that this instability is mitigated when the liner's ends implode onto a nylon ``cushion,'' which impedes local perturbation growth. Other recent experiments have, for the first time, studied the implosion dynamics of premagnetized (Bz , 0 > 0) MagLIF-type liners. When seeded with a 7 or 10 T axial field, these liners developed 3D-helix-like surface instabilities; such instabilities starkly contrast with the azimuthally-correlated MRT instabilities that have been consistently observed in many earlier unmagnetized (Bz , 0 = 0 T) experiments. Quite unexpectedly, the helical structure persisted throughout the implosion, even though the azimuthal drive field greatly exceeded the expected axial field at the liner surface for all but the earliest stages of the experiment. Thus far, no self-consistent model has reproduced this fundamentally 3D

  18. Lithospheric Architecture, Heterogenities, Instabilities, Melting - insight form numerical modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyk, Weronika; Hobbs, Bruce; Ord, Alison; Gessner, Klaus; Gerya, Taras V.

    2010-05-01

    yield stress of the blocks (representing heterogeneous fused material) nucleates localised deformation and creates conditions for delamination via a Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Above the site of localised delamination of the mantle lithosphere, a series of deep crustal faults develop that may extend into the upper mantle. These deep structures can act as the pathways for mantle derived CO2±H2O fluids and alkaline igneous complexes. Isotherms are commonly elevated throughout the lithosphere in the hanging wall of deep through-going structures and are depressed in the footwalls. This means that some architectures favour devolatilisation and melting in the hanging wall. A large spectrum of behaviour is observed and results from minor changes in the orientation and strength of the blocks.

  19. HIGH-MODE RAYLEIGH-TAYLOR GROWTH IN NIF IGNITION CAPSULES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammel, B A; Haan, S W; Clark, D; Edwards, M J; Langer, S H; Marinak, M; Patel, M; Salmonson, J; Scott, H A

    2009-08-04

    An assessment of short wavelength hydrodynamic stability is an essential component in the optimization of NIF ignition target designs. Using highly-resolved massively-parallel 2-D Hydra simulations, we routinely evaluate target designs up to mode numbers of 2000 ({lambda} {approx} 2 {micro}m). On the outer ablator surface, mode numbers up to {approx}300 ({lambda} {approx} 20 {micro}m) can have significant growth in CH capsule designs. At the internal fuel:ablator interface mode numbers up to {approx}2000 are important for both CH and Be designs. In addition, 'isolated features' on the capsule, such as the 'fill-tube' ({approx} 5 {micro}m scale-length) and defects, can seed short wavelength growth at the ablation front and the fuel:ablator interface, leading to the injection of {approx} 10's ng of ablator material into the central hot-spot. We are developing methods to measure high-mode mix on NIF implosion experiments. X-ray spectroscopic methods are appealing since mix into the hot-spot will result in x-ray emission from the high-Z dopant (Cu or Ge) in the ablator material (Be or CH).

  20. Hydromagnetic oscillatory Couette flow in rotating system with induced magnetic field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.S.SETH; S.M.HUSSAIN; S.SARKAR

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a study of hydromagnetic Couette flow of an incompress-ible and electrically conducting fluid between two parallel rotating plates, one of which is oscillating in its own plane. A uniform transverse magnetic field is used, and the induced magnetic field is taken into account. The exact solution to the governing equations is obtained in a closed form. The solution to the problem in the case of vanishing and small finite magnetic Prandtl numbers is also derived from the general solution. The asymp-totic behavior of the solution for large values of the frequency parameter is analyzed to gain some physical insights into the flow pattern. Expressions for the shear stress at both the oscillatory and stationary plates due to primary and secondary flows and mass flow rate in the primary and secondary flow directions are also obtained. The results of the fluid velocity and the induced magnetic field are presented. The shear stresses on the plates due to the primary and secondary flows and the corresponding mass flow rates are presented in a tabular form.

  1. Hydromagnetic Waves in a Compressed Dipole Field via Field-Aligned Klein-Gordon Equations

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Jinlei; McKenzie, J F; Webb, G M

    2014-01-01

    Hydromagnetic waves, especially those of frequencies in the range of a few milli-Hz to a few Hz observed in the Earth's magnetosphere, are categorized as Ultra Low Frequency (ULF) waves or pulsations. They have been extensively studied due to their importance in the interaction with radiation belt particles and in probing the structures of the magnetosphere. We developed an approach in examining the toroidal standing Aflv\\'{e}n waves in a background magnetic field by recasting the wave equation into a Klein-Gordon (KG) form along individual field lines. The eigenvalue solutions to the system are characteristic of a propagation type when the corresponding eigen-frequency is greater than a cut-off frequency and an evanescent type otherwise. We apply the approach to a compressed dipole magnetic field model of the inner magnetosphere, and obtain the spatial profiles of relevant parameters and the spatial wave forms of harmonic oscillations. We further extend the approach to poloidal mode standing Alfv\\'{e}n waves...

  2. On the propagation of hydromagnetic waves in a plasma of thermal and suprathermal components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Sikka, Himanshu

    2007-12-01

    The propagation of MHD waves is studied when two ideal fluids, thermal and suprathermal gases, coupled by magnetic field are moving with the steady flow velocity. The fluids move independently in a direction perpendicular to the magnetic field but gets coupled along the field. Due to the presence of flow in suprathermal and thermal fluids there appears forward and backward waves. All the forward and backward modes propagate in such a way that their rate of change of phase speed with the thermal Mach number is same. It is also found that besides the usual hydromagnetic modes there appears a suprathermal mode which propagates with faster speed. Surface waves are also examined on an interface formed with composite plasma (suprathermal and thermal gases) on one side and the other is a non-magnetized plasma. In this case, the modes obtained are two or three depending on whether the sound velocity in thermal gas is equal to or greater than the sound velocity in suprathermal gas. The results lead to the conclusion that the interaction of thermal and suprathermal components may lead to the occurrence of an additional mode called suprathermal mode whose phase velocity is higher than all the other modes.

  3. Effects of Thermal Radiation on Hydromagnetic Flow due to a Porous Rotating Disk with Hall Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P Anjali Devi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation effect on steady laminar hydromagnetic flow of a viscous, Newtonian and electrically conducting fluid past a porous rotating infinite disk is studied taking Hall current into account. The system of axisymmetric nonlinear partial differential equations governing the MHD flow and heat transfer are reduced to nonlinear ordinary differential equations by introducing suitable similarity variables introduced by von Karman and the resulting nonlinear equations are solved numerically using Runge-Kutta based shooting method. A parametric study of all parameters involved was conducted and a representative set of results showing the effect of the magnetic field, the radiation parameter, the uniform suction/injection parameter and Hall parameter are illustrated graphically. The numerical values of the radial and tangential skin-friction coefficient and Nusselt number are calculated and displayed in the tables showing the effects of various parameters. Finally, a good comparison between the present numerical predictions and the previously published data are presented in the absence of magnetic field and radiation.

  4. Dissipative Effects in Hydromagnetic Boundary Layer Nanofluid Flow past a Stretching Sheet with Newtonian Heating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupesh Kumar Mahatha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Two dimensional steady hydromagnetic boundary layer flow of a viscous, incompressible, and electrically conducting nanofluid past a stretching sheet with Newtonian heating, in the presence of viscous and Joule dissipations is studied. The transport equations include the combined effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis. The governing nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed to a set of nonlinear ordinary differential equations which are then solved using Spectral Relaxation Method (SRM and the results are validated by comparison with numerical approximations obtained using the Matlab in-built boundary value problem solver bvp4c, and with existing results available in literature. Numerical values of fluid velocity, fluid temperature and species concentration are displayed graphically versus boundary layer coordinate for various values of pertinent flow parameters whereas those of skin friction, rate of heat transfer and rate of mass transfer at the plate are presented in tabular form for various values of pertinent flow parameters. Such nanofluid flows are useful in many applications in heat transfer, including microelectronics, fuel cells, pharmaceutical processes, and hybrid-powered engines, engine cooling/vehicle thermal management, domestic refrigerator, chiller, heat exchanger, in grinding, machining and in boiler flue gas temperature reduction.

  5. Waves, instabilities and turbulence properties in Depolarisation Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapenta, Giovanni; Goldman, Martin; Newman, David L.; Olshevskyi, Vyacheslav; Eastwood, Jonathan; Divin, Andrey; Pucci, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    The new mission MMS is currently focusing on the magnetopause but we need to be ready for the study of the tail. An aspect of great importance there are the Dipolarization fronts (DF), formed by reconnection outflows interacting with the pre-existing environment. These regions are host of important energy and wave phenomena [1-3]. Our recent work has investigated these regions via fully kinetic 3D simulations [4-5]. As reported recently on Nature Physics [3], based on 3D fully kinetic simulations started with a well defined x-line, we observe that in the DF reconnection transitions towards a more chaotic regime. In the fronts an instability develops caused by the local gradients of the density and by the unfavourable acceleration and field line curvature. The consequence is the break up of the fronts in a fashion similar to the classical fluid Rayleigh-Taylor instability and the onset of waves and secondary instabilities, transitioning towards a turbulent state. We investigate here especially the wave signatures that are observed in fully 3D simulations, looking for signatures of interchange-type lower hybrid waves [8], of whistler waves [7]. The end result present a vast array of waves and it is best analysed relying on concepts mutated by the turbulence theory. The end result of these waves and particle flows [2,6] are energy exchanges. We evaluate the different terms of the energy exchanges (energy deposition, J.E, and energy fluxes) and evaluate their relative improtance. The results presented are contrasted against existing results [1,9] and will provided useful guidance in analysis of future MMS data. [1] Hamrin, Maria, et al. "The evolution of flux pileup regions in the plasma sheet: Cluster observations." Journal of Geophysical Research: Space Physics 118.10 (2013): 6279-6290. [2] Angelopoulos, V., et al. "Electromagnetic energy conversion at reconnection fronts." Science 341.6153 (2013): 1478-1482. [3] Zhou, Meng, et al. "THEMIS observation of multiple

  6. Hydromagnetic convective flow past a vertical porous plate through a porous medium with suction and heat source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.S.Das, U.K.Tripathy, J.K.Das

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper theoretically analyzes the unsteady hydromagnetic free convective flow of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid past an infinite vertical porous plate through a porous medium in presence of constant suction and heat source. Approximate solutions are obtained for velocity field, temperature field, skin friction and rate of heat transfer using multi-parameter perturbation technique. The effects of the flow parameters on the flow field are analyzed with the aid of figures and tables. The problem has some relevance in the geophysical and astrophysical studies.

  7. Irreversibility analysis of hydromagnetic flow of couple stress fluid with radiative heat in a channel filled with a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eegunjobi, A. S.; Makinde, O. D.

    Numerical analysis of the intrinsic irreversibility of a mixed convection hydromagnetic flow of an electrically conducting couple stress fluid through upright channel filled with a saturated porous medium and radiative heat transfer was carried out. The thermodynamics first and second laws were employed to examine the problem. We obtained the dimensionless nonlinear differential equations and solves numerically with shooting procedure joined with a fourth order Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg integration scheme. The temperature and velocity obtained, used to analyse the entropy generation rate together with some various physical parameters of the flow. Our results are presented graphically and talk over.

  8. Initiation, ablation, precursor formation, and instability analysis of thin foil liner Z-pinches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blesener, Isaac Curtis

    result because reduced precursor formation is important for fuel compression and heating in MagLIF. Less precursor can also lead to enhanced x-ray production because there is less mass on axis to cushion the conversion of kinetic energy into x-rays during the implosion and stagnation phases. Finally, in the instability studies, it was observed in laser shadow graph images that liners develop a much larger amplitude instability on their outside surface as compared to wire-arrays. This is an important discovery and could be detrimental to liner performance (compression, x-ray production, etc.) because it could lead to enhanced magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor (MRT) instability during the implosion phase. The reason for the larger instability in liners is again probably due to the fact that plasma builds up on the outside of the liners with no where to go. A possible source of the enhanced instability was found using 2D (xy) PERSEUS simulations comparing the results of MHD and Hall MHD simulations. The instability only developed in the Hall MHD case. The 2D nature of the simulation, along with all simulation parameters being equal between the two cases, rules out the possibility of MRT or m=0 for the cause of the instability (in the simulation). It was found that the Hall term was responsible for causing a shear-flow instability that developed later in time to resemble the experimental results.

  9. Mechanical instability

    CERN Document Server

    Krysinski, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a study of the stability of mechanical systems, i.e. their free response when they are removed from their position of equilibrium after a temporary disturbance. After reviewing the main analytical methods of the dynamical stability of systems, it highlights the fundamental difference in nature between the phenomena of forced resonance vibration of mechanical systems subjected to an imposed excitation and instabilities that characterize their free response. It specifically develops instabilities arising from the rotor-structure coupling, instability of control systems, the se

  10. Collective instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.Y. Ng

    2003-08-25

    The lecture covers mainly Sections 2.VIII and 3.VII of the book ''Accelerator Physics'' by S.Y. Lee, plus mode-coupling instabilities and chromaticity-driven head-tail instability. Besides giving more detailed derivation of many equations, simple interpretations of many collective instabilities are included with the intention that the phenomena can be understood more easily without going into too much mathematics. The notations of Lee's book as well as the e{sup jwt} convention are followed.

  11. THERMAL INSTABILITY OF COMPRESSIBLE WALTERS' (MODEL B' FLUID IN THE PRESENCE OF HALL CURRENTS AND SUSPENDED PARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urvashi GUPTA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Effect of Hall currents and suspended particles is considered on the hydromagnetic stability of a compressible, electrically conducting Walters' (Model B' elastico-viscous fluid. After linearizing the relevant hydromagnetic equations, the perturbation equations are analyzed in terms of normal modes. A dispersion relation governing the effects of visco-elasticity, magnetic field, Hall currents and suspended particles is derived. It has been found that for stationary convection, the Walters' (Model B' fluid behaves like an ordinary Newtonian fluid due to the vanishing of the visco-elastic parameter. The compressibility and magnetic field have a stabilizing effect on the system, as such their effect is to postpone the onset of thermal instability whereas Hall currents and suspended particles are found to hasten the onset of thermal instability for permissible range of values of various parameters. Also, the dispersion relation is analyzed numerically and the results shown graphically. The critical Rayleigh numbers and the wavenumbers of the associated disturbances for the onset of instability as stationary convection are obtained and the behavior of various parameters on critical thermal Rayleigh numbers has been depicted graphically. The visco-elasticity, suspended particles and Hall currents (hence magnetic field introduce oscillatory modes in the system which were non-existent in their absence.

  12. Explicit numerical study of unsteady hydromagnetic mixed convective nanofluid flow from an exponentially stretching sheet in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bég, O. Anwar; Khan, M. S.; Karim, Ifsana; Alam, Md. M.; Ferdows, M.

    2013-10-01

    A numerical investigation of unsteady magnetohydrodynamic mixed convective boundary layer flow of a nanofluid over an exponentially stretching sheet in porous media, is presented. The transformed, non-similar conservations equations are solved using a robust, explicit, finite difference method (EFDM). A detailed stability and convergence analysis is also conducted. The regime is shown to be controlled by a number of emerging thermophysical parameters i.e. combined porous and hydromagnetic parameter (R), thermal Grashof number (G r ), species Grashof number (G m ), viscosity ratio parameter (Λ), dimensionless porous media inertial parameter (∇), Eckert number (E c ), Lewis number (L e ), Brownian motion parameter (N b) and thermophoresis parameter (N t). The flow is found to be accelerated with increasing thermal and species Grashof numbers and also increasing Brownian motion and thermophoresis effects. However, flow is decelerated with increasing viscosity ratio and combined porous and hydromagnetic parameters. Temperatures are enhanced with increasing Brownian motion and thermophoresis as are concentration values. With progression in time the flow is accelerated and temperatures and concentrations are increased. EFDM solutions are validated with an optimized variational iteration method. The present study finds applications in magnetic nanomaterials processing.

  13. The Kelvin-Helmholtz instability at the magnetopause and inner boundary layer surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Keith W.; Fitzenreiter, Richard J.

    1989-01-01

    Observations by the vector electron spectrometer on the ISEE 1 spacecraft are used to directly check the incompressible hydromagnetic stability condition given by Hasegawa (1975), which indicates how stability is influenced by the velocity shear, density ratio, magnetic field, and the direction of the wave vector of the unstable wave mode. The magnetopause is generally found to be stable, by a large margin. In contrast, many cases of marginal stability or instability are found across density transitions in, and at the inner edge of, the boundary layer for wave vectors in plausible directions. It thus appears that the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability is of importance at the inner edge of the magnetospheric boundary layer, as predicted by MHP theory.

  14. Recombination instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Angelo, N.

    1967-01-01

    A recombination instability is considered which may arise in a plasma if the temperature dependence of the volume recombination coefficient, alpha, is sufficiently strong. Two cases are analyzed: (a) a steady-state plasma produced in a neutral gas by X-rays or high energy electrons; and (b) an af...

  15. Hard X-Ray Burst Detected From Caltech Plasma Jet Experiment Magnetic Reconnection Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Ryan S.; Bellan, Paul M.

    2016-10-01

    In the Caltech plasma jet experiment a 100 kA MHD driven jet becomes kink unstable leading to a Rayleigh-Taylor instability that quickly causes a magnetic reconnection event. Movies show that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is simultaneous with voltage spikes across the electrodes that provide the current that drives the jet. Hard x-rays between 4 keV and 9 keV have now been observed using an x-ray scintillator detector mounted just outside of a kapton window on the vacuum chamber. Preliminary results indicate that the timing of the x-ray burst coincides with a voltage spike on the electrodes occurring in association with the Rayleigh-Taylor event. The x-ray signal accompanies the voltage spike and Rayleigh-Taylor event in approximately 50% of the shots. A possible explanation for why the x-ray signal is sometimes missing is that the magnetic reconnection event may be localized to a specific region of the plasma outside the line of sight of the scintillator. The x-ray signal has also been seen accompanying the voltage spike when no Rayleigh-Taylor is observed. This may be due to the interframe timing on the camera being longer than the very short duration of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.

  16. Unsteady Hydromagnetic Natural Convection Flow past an Impulsively Moving Vertical Plate with Newtonian Heating in a Rotating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauri Shanker Seth

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of unsteady hydromagnetic natural convection flow of a viscous, incompressible, electrically conducting and heat absorbing fluid past an impulsively moving vertical plate with Newtonian heating embedded in a porous medium in a rotating system is carried out. The governing partial differential equations are first subjected to Laplace transformation and then inverted numerically using INVLAP routine of Matlab. The governing partial differential equations are also solved numerically by Crank-Nicolson implicit finite difference scheme and a comparison has been provided between the two solutions. The numerical solution for fluid velocity and fluid temperature are depicted graphically whereas the numerical values of skin friction and Nusselt number are presented in tabular form for various values of pertinent flow parameters. Present solution in special case is compared with previously obtained solution and is found to be in excellent agreement.

  17. [Carpal instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redeker, J; Vogt, P M

    2011-01-01

    Carpal instability can be understood as a disturbed anatomical alignment between bones articulating in the carpus. This disturbed balance occurs either only dynamically (with movement) under the effect of physiological force or even statically at rest. The most common cause of carpal instability is wrist trauma with rupture of the stabilizing ligaments and adaptive misalignment following fractures of the radius or carpus. Carpal collapse plays a special role in this mechanism due to non-healed fracture of the scaphoid bone. In addition degenerative inflammatory alterations, such as chondrocalcinosis or gout, more rarely aseptic bone necrosis of the lunate or scaphoid bones or misalignment due to deposition (Madelung deformity) can lead to wrist instability. Under increased pressure the misaligned joint surfaces lead to bone arrosion with secondary arthritis of the wrist. In order to arrest or slow down this irreversible process, diagnosis must occur as early as possible. Many surgical methods have been thought out to regain stability ranging from direct reconstruction of the damaged ligaments, through ligament replacement to partial stiffening of the wrist joint.

  18. FINANCIAL INSTABILITY AND POLITICAL INSTABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionescu Cristian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available There is an important link between the following two variables: financial instability and political instability. Often, the link is bidirectional, so both may influence each other. This is way the lately crisis are becoming larger and increasingly complex. Therefore, the academic environment is simultaneously talking about economic crises, financial crises, political crises, social crises, highlighting the correlation and causality between variables belonging to the economic, financial, political and social areas, with repercussions and spillover effects that extend from one area to another. Given the importance, relevance and the actuality of the ones described above, I consider that at least a theoretical analysis between economic, financial and political factors is needed in order to understand the reality. Thus, this paper aims to find links and connections to complete the picture of the economic reality.

  19. Axisymmetry vs. nonaxisymmetry of hydromagnetic Taylor-Couette flows with axial electric currents

    CERN Document Server

    Gellert, M; Rüdiger, G

    2013-01-01

    The stability of a Taylor-Couette flow with resting outer cylinder under the influence of a homogeneous axial electric current is investigated. In the linear theory the critical Reynolds number for axisymmetric perturbations Re=68 is not influenced by the current-induced magnetic field but all the axisymmetric magnetic perturbations decay. The nonaxisymmetric perturbations with |m|=1 are excited even without rotation for large enough Hartmann numbers ('Tayler Instability') but the growth rate increases with Reynolds number. In the nonlinear regime shear energy is pumped into the neighboring modes m=0 and |m|=2. The ratio q of the energy of the magnetic |m|=1 modes and the toroidal background field is very small for the pure (non-rotating) Tayler instability and grows strongly if differential rotation is present. For super-Alfv\\'enic rotation the energy in the |m|=1 modes of flow and field are in equipartition, with about 1% of the centrifugal energy of the inner cylinder. If the electric current is strong eno...

  20. Sensitivity Analysis of Pulsatile Hydromagnetic Biofluid Flow and Heat Transfer with Non Linear Darcy-Forchheimer Drag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Rawat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper we examine the pulsatile hydromagnetic flow and heat transfer of a non-Newtonian biofluid through a saturated non-Darcian porous medium channel. The upper plate of the channel is heated and the lower plate is cooled. The Nakamura-Sawada rheological model is employed which provides a higher yield stress than the Casson model. A Darcy-Forchheimer porous medium drag force model is incorporated to simulate blood vessel blockage with deposits in the cardiovascular system. Viscous heating is also included in the energy equation. The governing conservation equations for mass, momentum and energy equation are transformed into a system of nonlinear, coupled ordinary differential equations and these are solved numerically using finite element method. The effect of other important parameters such as magnetohydrodynamic parameter (Nm, Reynolds number (Re, Eckert number (Ec, Darcian parameter (, Forchheimer parameter (NF and Prandtl number on velocity and temperature profiles are studied graphically. Spatial-temporal velocity and temperature profile visualizations are also presented. Numerical results shows that normalized fluid velocity (U increases throughout the channel (-1 < Y < 1 with an increase in Reynolds number, Darcian parameter, steady pressure gradient parameter and rheological parameter; conversely velocity is decreased with the increase in magnetic parameter and Forchheimer quadratic drag parameter. Higher Eckert number (Ec = 3 is also found to have a considerable effect on temperature ( profile. Finite difference numerical computations are also compared with the finite element solutions to verify efficiency and accuracy.

  1. Newtonian heating effect on unsteady hydromagnetic Casson fluid flow past a flat plate with heat and mass transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Das

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of Newtonian heating on heat and mass transfer in unsteady hydromagnetic flow of a Casson fluid past a vertical plate in the presence of thermal radiation and chemical reaction is studied. The Casson fluid model is used to distinguish the non-Newtonian fluid behavior. The fluid flow is induced due to periodic oscillations of the plate along its length and a uniform transverse magnetic field is applied in a direction which is normal to the direction of fluid flow. The partial differential equations governing the flow, heat, and mass transfer are transformed to non-dimensional form using suitable non-dimensional variables which are then solved analytically by using Laplace transform technique. The numerical values of the fluid velocity, fluid temperature, and species concentration are depicted graphically whereas the values of skin-friction, Nusselt number, and Sherwood number are presented in tabular form. It is noticed that the fluid velocity and temperature decrease with increasing values of Casson parameter while concentration decreases with increasing values of chemical reaction parameter and Schmidt number. Such a fluid flow model has several industrial and medical applications such as in glass manufacturing, paper production, purification of crude oil and study of blood flow in the cardiovascular system.

  2. Hydromagnetic Energy Conversion and Prompt Collimation in Mildly Advective, Kerr Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Araya-Gochez, R A

    1999-01-01

    Recent evidence of the phenomenal energetics involved in gamma ray burstevents strongly suggests that the progenitor must efficiently convertgravitational binding energy into a moderately collimated outflow, possibly inthe form of a Poynting jet. We show that an MHD-instability driven dynamo (IDD)operating in a hot accretion disk is capable of generating energeticallyadecuate magnetic flux deposition rates above and below a mildly advectiveaccretion disk structure. The dynamo is driven by the magnetorotationalinstability (MRI) of a toroidal field in a shear flow and is limited by thebuoyancy of `horizontal' flux and by reconnection in the turbulent medium. Inthe comoving frame of a semi-thick, slim disk setting, the predominant fieldcomponents reside in surfaces perpendicular to the local meridian and the fluxis deposited in funnels that are relatively free of baryons. The efficiency ofmagnetic energy deposition is estimated to be comparable to the neutrino lossesbut the strong effective shear induced by the ...

  3. On specification of initial conditions in turbulence models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rollin, Bertrand [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Andrews, Malcolm J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-01

    Recent research has shown that initial conditions have a significant influence on the evolution of a flow towards turbulence. This important finding offers a unique opportunity for turbulence control, but also raises the question of how to properly specify initial conditions in turbulence models. We study this problem in the context of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability is an interfacial fluid instability that leads to turbulence and turbulent mixing. It occurs when a light fluid is accelerated in to a heavy fluid because of misalignment between density and pressure gradients. The Rayleigh-Taylor instability plays a key role in a wide variety of natural and man-made flows ranging from supernovae to the implosion phase of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). Our approach consists of providing the turbulence models with a predicted profile of its key variables at the appropriate time in accordance to the initial conditions of the problem.

  4. Effect of Suction/Injection on Unsteady Hydromagnetic Convective Flow of Reactive Viscous Fluid between Vertical Porous Plates with Thermal Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uwanta, I. J.; Hamza, M. M.

    2014-01-01

    An investigation is performed to study the effect of suction/injection on unsteady hydromagnetic natural convection flow of viscous reactive fluid between two vertical porous plates in the presence of thermal diffusion. The partial differential equations governing the flow have been solved numerically using semi-implicit finite-difference scheme. For steady case, analytical solutions have been derived using perturbation series method. Suction/injection is used to control the fluid flow in the channel, and an exothermic chemical reaction of Arrhenius kinetic is considered. Numerical results are presented graphically and discussed quantitatively with respect to various parameters embedded in the problem. PMID:27382632

  5. Bubble shape oscillations and the onset of sonoluminescence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brenner, Michael P.; Lohse, Detlef; Dupont, T. F.

    1995-01-01

    An air bubble trapped in water by an oscillating acoustic field undergoes either spherical or nonspherical pulsations depending on the strength of the forcing pressure. Two different instability mechanisms (the Rayleigh-Taylor instability and parametric instability) cause deviations from sphericity.

  6. Electron heat flux instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Sundas; Sarfraz, M.; Yoon, P. H.; Lazar, M.; Qureshi, M. N. S.

    2017-02-01

    The heat flux instability is an electromagnetic mode excited by a relative drift between the protons and two-component core-halo electrons. The most prominent application may be in association with the solar wind where drifting electron velocity distributions are observed. The heat flux instability is somewhat analogous to the electrostatic Buneman or ion-acoustic instability driven by the net drift between the protons and bulk electrons, except that the heat flux instability operates in magnetized plasmas and possesses transverse electromagnetic polarization. The heat flux instability is also distinct from the electrostatic counterpart in that it requires two electron species with relative drifts with each other. In the literature, the heat flux instability is often called the 'whistler' heat flux instability, but it is actually polarized in the opposite sense to the whistler wave. This paper elucidates all of these fundamental plasma physical properties associated with the heat flux instability starting from a simple model, and gradually building up more complexity towards a solar wind-like distribution functions. It is found that the essential properties of the instability are already present in the cold counter-streaming electron model, and that the instability is absent if the protons are ignored. These instability characteristics are highly reminiscent of the electron firehose instability driven by excessive parallel temperature anisotropy, propagating in parallel direction with respect to the ambient magnetic field, except that the free energy source for the heat flux instability resides in the effective parallel pressure provided by the counter-streaming electrons.

  7. Evaluating shoulder instability treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linde, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder instability common occurs. When treated nonoperatively, the resulting societal costs based on health care utilization and productivity losses are significant. Shoulder function can be evaluated using patient reported outcome measurements (PROMs). For shoulder instability, these include the

  8. Jeans instability in superfluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hason, Itamar; Oz, Yaron [Tel-Aviv University, Raymond and Beverly Sackler School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2014-11-15

    We analyze the effect of a gravitational field on the sound modes of superfluids. We derive an instability condition that generalizes the well-known Jeans instability of the sound mode in normal fluids. We discuss potential experimental implications. (orig.)

  9. An Experimantal Study of The Rayleigh—Taylor Instability Critical Wave Length

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KongXujing

    1992-01-01

    A physical model has been constructed to represent the condensate film pattern on a horizontal downward-facing surface with fins,which is based on visual observation in experiment,The results of analysis using this model confirums the validity of the critical wave length formula obtained from Rayleigh-Taylor staility analysis .This formula may be used as a criterion to design horzontal downward-facing surfaces with fins that can best destabilize the condensate film,thus enhancing condensation heat transfer.

  10. Turbulent transport of cold and dense solar wind plasma into the magnetosphere by 3-D evolution of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Y.; Seki, K.

    2006-12-01

    An appearance of cold and dense plasma at the geosynchronous orbit is one of the characteristic natures after a prolonged northward IMF duration. This cold dense material can contribute to the enhancement of the ring current density, which results a further declination of Dst. Therefore investigating the origin, path and fate of the cold dense plasma is important to understand how it preconditions the magnetosphere during a quiet interval before storm [Borovsky and Steinberg, 2006]. Observational evidences have shown that the cold dense material builds up during the northward IMF intervals in the flanks of the magnetosphere [e.g., Wing and Newell, 2002] which is referred to as the low latitude boundary layer (LLBL). The entry process of the solar wind plasma into the magnetosphere during the northward IMF conditions has been controversial in contrast to the Dungey's reconnection model for the southward IMF cases. The major candidate processes are the double lobe reconnection model [Song et al., 1999], in which newly closed magnetic field lines on the dayside magnetopause capture the solar wind plasma, and the turbulent transport by the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) driven by the fast solar wind flow. We have studied the solar wind entry process by the KHI. Matsumoto and Hoshino [2004, 2006] showed by 2- D MHD and full particle simulation studies that the strong flow turbulence is a natural consequence of the nonlinear development of the KHI through the secondary Rayleigh-Taylor instability, if there is a large density difference between the two media. The mechanism is fundamentally two-dimensional and therefore we term it the 2-D secondary instability. They also showed that the turbulent development greatly contributes to the solar wind plasma transport deep into the magnetosphere. Based on the previous 2-D studies, the 3-D nonlinear evolution of the KHI is studied by performing MHD simulation. Starting with a uniform background field configuration and a

  11. Relativistic Gravothermal Instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Roupas, Zacharias

    2014-01-01

    The thermodynamic instabilities of the self-gravitating, classical ideal gas are studied in the case of static, spherically symmetric configurations in General Relativity taking into account the Tolman-Ehrenfest effect. One type of instabilities is found at low energies, where thermal energy becomes too weak to halt gravity and another at high energies, where gravitational attraction of thermal pressure overcomes its stabilizing effect. These turning points of stability are found to depend on the total rest mass $\\mathcal{M}$ over the radius $R$. The low energy instability is the relativistic generalization of Antonov instability, which is recovered in the limit $G\\mathcal{M} \\ll R c^2$ and low temperatures, while in the same limit and high temperatures, the high energy instability recovers the instability of the radiation equation of state. In the temperature versus energy diagram of series of equilibria, the two types of gravothermal instabilities make themselves evident as a double spiral! The two energy l...

  12. Initial conditions for turbulent mixing simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kaman

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the classical Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamical instability, we examine the much debated question of models for initial conditions and the possible influence of unrecorded long wave length contributions to the instability growth rate α.

  13. Shoulder instability; Schulterinstabilitaeten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreitner, Karl-Friedrich [Mainiz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie

    2014-06-15

    In the shoulder, the advantages of range of motion are traded for the disadvantages of vulnerability to injury and the development of instability. Shoulder instability and the lesion it produces represent one of the main causes of shoulder discomfort and pain. Shoulder instability is defined as a symptomatic abnormal motion of the humeral head relative to the glenoid during active shoulder motion. Glenohumeral instabilities are classified according to their causative factors as the pathogenesis of instability plays an important role with respect to treatment options: instabilities are classified in traumatic and atraumatic instabilities as part of a multidirectional instability syndrome, and in microtraumatic instabilities. Plain radiographs ('trauma series') are performed to document shoulder dislocation and its successful reposition. Direct MR arthrography is the most important imaging modality for delineation the different injury patterns on the labral-ligamentous complex and bony structures. Monocontrast CT-arthrography with use of multidetector CT scanners may be an alternative imaging modality, however, regarding the younger patient age, MR imaging should be preferred in the diagnostic work-up of shoulder instabilities. (orig.)

  14. Hydromagnetic Hiemenz flow of micropolar fluid over a nonlinearly stretching/shrinking sheet: Dual solutions by using Chebyshev Spectral Newton Iterative Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Asad; Chen, Bin; Ghaffari, Abuzar

    2016-10-01

    Hydromagnetic stagnation point flow and heat transfer over a nonlinearly stretching/shrinking surface of micropolar fluid is investigated. The numerical simulation is carried out through Chebyshev Spectral Newton Iterative Scheme, after transforming the governing equations into dimensionless boundary layer form. The dual solutions are reported for different values of magnetic and material parameters against the limited range of stretching/shrinking parameter. It is also noted that second solution only occurs for the negative values of stretching/shrinking parameter, whereas for the positive values unique solution exists. The effects of dimensionless parameters are described through graphs. It is seen that the flow and heat transfer rates can be controlled through the material parameter and magnetic force.

  15. Numerical Modeling of Two-Phase Hydromagnetic Flow and Heat Transfer in a Particle-Suspension through a non-Darcian Porous Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Dr. S. Rawat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model is presented for the steady, two-dimensional magneto-convection heat transfer of a two-phase, electrically-conducting, particle-suspension in a channel containing a non-Darcian porous medium intercalated between two parallel plates, in the presence of a transverse magnetic field. The channel walls are assumed to be isothermal but at different temperatures. The governing equations for the one-dimensional steady flow are formulated following Marble (1970 and extended to include the influence of Darcian porous drag, Forcheimmer quadratic drag, buoyancy effects, Lorentz body force (hydromagnetic retardation force and particle-phase viscous stresses. Special boundary conditions for the particle-phase wall conditions are implemented. The governing coupled, non-linear differential equations are reduced from an (x,y coordinate system to a one-dimensional (y coordinate system. A series of transformations is then employed to non-dimensionalize the model in terms of a single independent variable, , yielding a quartet of coupled ordinary differential equations which are solved numerically using the finite element method, under appropriate transformed boundary conditions. The influence of for example Grashof free convection number (Gr, Hartmann hydromagnetic number (Ha, inverse Stokes number (Skm, Darcy number (Da, Forcheimmer number (Fs,particle loading parameter (PL, buoyancy parameter (B on the fluid-phase velocity and particle-phase velocity are presented graphically. A number of special cases of the transformed model are also studied. The mathematical model finds applications in solar collector devices, electronic fabrication, jet nozzle flows, industrial materials processing transport phenomena, MHD energy generator systems etc.

  16. Cavitation Instabilities in Inducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    gas handling turbomachines . The fluctuation of the cavity length is plotted in Fig.8 under the surge mode oscillation vi . The major differences...Cavitation Instabilities of Turbomachines .” AIAA Journal of Propulsion and Power, Vol.17, No.3, 636-643. [5] Tsujimoto, Y., (2006), “Flow Instabilities in

  17. Instability in evolutionary games.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zimo Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phenomena of instability are widely observed in many dissimilar systems, with punctuated equilibrium in biological evolution and economic crises being noticeable examples. Recent studies suggested that such instabilities, quantified by the abrupt changes of the composition of individuals, could result within the framework of a collection of individuals interacting through the prisoner's dilemma and incorporating three mechanisms: (i imitation and mutation, (ii preferred selection on successful individuals, and (iii networking effects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We study the importance of each mechanism using simplified models. The models are studied numerically and analytically via rate equations and mean-field approximation. It is shown that imitation and mutation alone can lead to the instability on the number of cooperators, and preferred selection modifies the instability in an asymmetric way. The co-evolution of network topology and game dynamics is not necessary to the occurrence of instability and the network topology is found to have almost no impact on instability if new links are added in a global manner. The results are valid in both the contexts of the snowdrift game and prisoner's dilemma. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The imitation and mutation mechanism, which gives a heterogeneous rate of change in the system's composition, is the dominating reason of the instability on the number of cooperators. The effects of payoffs and network topology are relatively insignificant. Our work refines the understanding on the driving forces of system instability.

  18. Treatment of hip instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, G M; Masri, B A; Garbuz, D S; Greidanus, N; Duncan, C P

    2001-10-01

    Instability after total hip arthroplasty is a major source of patient morbidity, second only to aseptic loosening. Certain patient groups have been identified as having a greater risk of instability, including patients undergoing revision arthroplasty as early or late treatment for proximal femoral fractures.

  19. LLE Review: Quarterly report, July--September 1994. Volume 60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knauer, J.P. [ed.

    1994-12-31

    This volume contains articles on efficient generation of second-harmonic radiation from short-pulse lasers; calculation of the stabilization cutoff wave numbers for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability; a high-frequency silicon optical modulator; the angular dependence of stimulated Brillouin scattering; and femtosecond dynamics of ladder polymers. Three of these articles--second-harmonic generation, Rayleigh-Taylor cutoff wave numbers, and angular dependence of Brillouin scattering--are directly related to the OMEGA Upgrade, currently under construction. A summary of the status of the OMEGA Upgrade laser facility and the NLUF News for FY94 are included in this volume.

  20. Nonlinear helical MHD instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zueva, N.M.; Solov' ev, L.S.

    1977-07-01

    An examination is made of the boundary problem on the development of MHD instability in a toroidal plasma. Two types of local helical instability are noted - Alfven and thermal, and the corresponding criteria of instability are cited. An evaluation is made of the maximum attainable kinetic energy, limited by the degree to which the law of conservation is fulfilled. An examination is made of a precise solution to a kinematic problem on the helical evolution of a cylindrical magnetic configuration at a given velocity distribution in a plasma. A numerical computation of the development of MHD instability in a plasma cylinder by a computerized solution of MHD equations is made where the process's helical symmetry is conserved. The development of instability is of a resonance nature. The instability involves the entire cross section of the plasma and leads to an inside-out reversal of the magnetic surfaces when there is a maximum unstable equilibrium configuration in the nonlinear stage. The examined instability in the tore is apparently stabilized by a magnetic hole when certain limitations are placed on the distribution of flows in the plasma. 29 references, 8 figures.

  1. Spondylolisthesis and Posterior Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niggemann, P.; Beyer, H.K.; Frey, H.; Grosskurth, D. (Privatpraxis fuer Upright MRT, Koeln (Germany)); Simons, P.; Kuchta, J. (Media Park Klinik, Koeln (Germany))

    2009-04-15

    We present the case of a patient with a spondylolisthesis of L5 on S1 due to spondylolysis at the level L5/S1. The vertebral slip was fixed and no anterior instability was found. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in an upright MRI scanner, posterior instability at the level of the spondylolytic defect of L5 was demonstrated. A structure, probably the hypertrophic ligament flava, arising from the spondylolytic defect was displaced toward the L5 nerve root, and a bilateral contact of the displaced structure with the L5 nerve root was shown in extension of the spine. To our knowledge, this is the first case described of posterior instability in patients with spondylolisthesis. The clinical implications of posterior instability are unknown; however, it is thought that this disorder is common and that it can only be diagnosed using upright MRI.

  2. Instabilities in nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Csernai, László P; Papp, G

    1995-01-01

    The evolution of dynamical perturbations is examined in nuclear multifragmentation in the frame of Vlasov equation. Both plane wave and bubble type of perturbations are investigated in the presence of surface (Yukawa) forces. An energy condition is given for the allowed type of instabilities and the time scale of the exponential growth of the instabilities is calculated. The results are compared to the mechanical spinodal region predictions. PACS: 25.70 Mn

  3. Prediction of Algebraic Instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaretzky, Paula; King, Kristina; Hill, Nicole; Keithley, Kimberlee; Barlow, Nathaniel; Weinstein, Steven; Cromer, Michael

    2016-11-01

    A widely unexplored type of hydrodynamic instability is examined - large-time algebraic growth. Such growth occurs on the threshold of (exponentially) neutral stability. A new methodology is provided for predicting the algebraic growth rate of an initial disturbance, when applied to the governing differential equation (or dispersion relation) describing wave propagation in dispersive media. Several types of algebraic instabilities are explored in the context of both linear and nonlinear waves.

  4. Flares in the X-ray source EXO 2030 + 375

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apparao, Krishna M. V.

    1991-01-01

    Six X-ray flares were observed in the source EXO 2030 + 375 with an average time interval of about 4 hr between the flares. It is shown here that the flares can be due to Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities near the magnetospheric boundary of the neutron star when it reaches the equilibrium period.

  5. Electron Beam Pumped Krypton-Fluoride (KrF) Lasers for Fusion Energy: A Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-11-15

    1 Naval Research Laboratory M. Friedman M. Myers S. Obenschain R. Lehmberg J. Giuliani P. Kepple Commonwealth Tech F. Hegeler SAIC M. Wolford R...34Seed" for Rayleigh Taylor Instability 5 6 7 8 9 y (mm) 18 Shape laser pulse to help raise ablator isentrope: “main” Low

  6. Nonspherical supernova remnants. IV - Sequential explosions in OB associations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio-Tagle, G.; Bodenheimer, P.; Rozyczka, M.

    1987-01-01

    Multisupernova remnants, driven by sequential supernova explosions in OB associations, are modelled by means of two-dimensional hydrodynamical calculations. It is shown that due to the Rayleigh-Taylor instability the remnants quickly evolve into highly irregular structures. A critical evaluation of the multisupernova model as an explanation for supershells is given.

  7. Integrated code development for studying laser driven plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takabe, Hideaki; Nagatomo, Hideo; Sunahara, Atsusi; Ohnishi, Naofumi; Naruo, Syuji; Mima, Kunioki [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

    1998-03-01

    Present status and plan for developing an integrated implosion code are briefly explained by focusing on motivation, numerical scheme and issues to be developed more. Highly nonlinear stage of Rayleigh-Taylor instability of ablation front by laser irradiation has been simulated so as to be compared with model experiments. Improvement in transport and rezoning/remapping algorithms in ILESTA code is described. (author)

  8. Propagating Instabilities in Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakides, Stelios

    1998-03-01

    Instability is one of the factors which limit the extent to which solids can be loaded or deformed and plays a pivotal role in the design of many structures. Such instabilities often result in localized deformation which precipitates catastrophic failure. Some materials have the capacity to recover their stiffness following a certain amount of localized deformation. This local recovery in stiffness arrests further local deformation and spreading of the instability to neighboring material becomes preferred. Under displacement controlled loading the propagation of the transition fronts can be achieved in a steady-state manner at a constant stress level known as the propagation stress. The stresses in the transition fronts joining the highly deformed zone to the intact material overcome the instability nucleation stresses and, as a result, the propagation stress is usually much lower than the stress required to nucleate the instability. The classical example of this class of material instabilities is L/"uders bands which tend to affect mild steels and other metals. Recent work has demonstrated that propagating instabilities occur in several other materials. Experimental and analytical results from four examples will be used to illustrate this point: First the evolution of L=FCders bands in mild steel strips will be revisited. The second example involves the evolution of stress induced phase transformations (austenite to martensite phases and the reverse) in a shape memory alloy under displacement controlled stretching. The third example is the crushing behavior of cellular materials such as honeycombs and foams made from metals and polymers. The fourth example involves the axial broadening/propagation of kink bands in aligned fiber/matrix composites under compression. The microstructure and, as a result, the micromechanisms governing the onset, localization, local arrest and propagation of instabilities in each of the four materials are vastly different. Despite this

  9. Effects of Dufour and Modified Forchhemier for Hydromagnetic Free Convective Heat and Mass Transfer Flow along a Permeable Inclined porous Plate with Heat Generation and Thermophoresis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Enamul Karim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the numerical simulations to investigate the effects of the magnetic field parameter, Modified Forchhemier number, Prandtl number, Modified Darcy number, the Local Grashof number, the Dufour number and the Schmidt number on steady two-dimensional, laminar, hydromagnetic flow with heat and mass transfer over a semi-infinite, permeable inclined plate in the presence of thermophoresis and heat generation is carefully considered and equipped numerically. A similarity transformation is used to shrink the governing non-linear partial differential equations into ordinary differential equations. The obtained locally similar equations are then solved numerically by applying Nachtsheim-Swigert shooting iteration technique with sixth-order Runge-Kutta integration scheme. Comparisons with previously published study are performed and the results are found to be in very good agreement. Numerical results for the dimensionless velocity, temperature and concentration profiles are reported graphically as well as for the skin-friction coefficient, wall heat transfer and particle deposition rates are investigated for an assortment of values of the parameters inflowing into the problem.

  10. Hydromagnetic Hiemenz flow of micropolar fluid over a nonlinearly stretching/shrinking sheet: Dual solutions by using Chebyshev Spectral Newton Iterative Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmood, Asad, E-mail: asadmahmood_86@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, International Islamic University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Chen, Bin [School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Ghaffari, Abuzar [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, International Islamic University, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2016-10-15

    Hydromagnetic stagnation point flow and heat transfer over a nonlinearly stretching/shrinking surface of micropolar fluid is investigated. The numerical simulation is carried out through Chebyshev Spectral Newton Iterative Scheme, after transforming the governing equations into dimensionless boundary layer form. The dual solutions are reported for different values of magnetic and material parameters against the limited range of stretching/shrinking parameter. It is also noted that second solution only occurs for the negative values of stretching/shrinking parameter, whereas for the positive values unique solution exists. The effects of dimensionless parameters are described through graphs. It is seen that the flow and heat transfer rates can be controlled through the material parameter and magnetic force. - Highlights: • Constitutive equations of micropolar fluid and heat transfer are employed. • Magnetic effect on velocity and temperature profile of micropolar fluid is observed. • Dual solution is reported in the region of stagnation point flow. • A numerical technique i.e. Chebyshev Spectral Newton Iterative Scheme is applied to obtain the desire results.

  11. Neutrino beam plasma instability

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vishnu M Bannur

    2001-10-01

    We derive relativistic fluid set of equations for neutrinos and electrons from relativistic Vlasov equations with Fermi weak interaction force. Using these fluid equations, we obtain a dispersion relation describing neutrino beam plasma instability, which is little different from normal dispersion relation of streaming instability. It contains new, nonelectromagnetic, neutrino-plasma (or electroweak) stable and unstable modes also. The growth of the instability is weak for the highly relativistic neutrino flux, but becomes stronger for weakly relativistic neutrino flux in the case of parameters appropriate to the early universe and supernova explosions. However, this mode is dominant only for the beam velocity greater than 0.25 and in the other limit electroweak unstable mode takes over.

  12. Causes of genome instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langie, Sabine A S; Koppen, Gudrun; Desaulniers, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    , genome instability can be defined as an enhanced tendency for the genome to acquire mutations; ranging from changes to the nucleotide sequence to chromosomal gain, rearrangements or loss. This review raises the hypothesis that in addition to known human carcinogens, exposure to low dose of other...... scientists aware of the increasing need to unravel the underlying mechanisms via which chemicals at low doses can induce genome instability and thus promote carcinogenesis.......Genome instability is a prerequisite for the development of cancer. It occurs when genome maintenance systems fail to safeguard the genome's integrity, whether as a consequence of inherited defects or induced via exposure to environmental agents (chemicals, biological agents and radiation). Thus...

  13. Mixing through shear instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Brüggen, M

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of numerical simulations of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability in a stratified shear layer. This shear instability is believed to be responsible for extra mixing in differentially rotating stellar interiors and is the prime candidate to explain the abundance anomalies observed in many rotating stars. All mixing prescriptions currently in use are based on phenomenological and heuristic estimates whose validity is often unclear. Using three-dimensional numerical simulations, we study the mixing efficiency as a function of the Richardson number and compare our results with some semi-analytical formalisms of mixing.

  14. Shock instability in dissipative gases

    OpenAIRE

    Radulescu, Matei I.; Sirmas, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Previous experiments have revealed that shock waves in thermally relaxing gases, such as ionizing, dissociating and vibrationally excited gases, can become unstable. To date, the mechanism controlling this instability has not been resolved. Previous accounts of the D'yakov-Kontorovich instability, and Bethe-Zel'dovich-Thompson behaviour could not predict the experimentally observed instability. To address the mechanism controlling the instability, we study the propagation of shock waves in a ...

  15. Finite difference analysis of hydromagnetic mixed convective mass diffusion boundary layer flow past an accelerated vertical porous plate through a porous medium with suction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, S.S. [Department of Physics, K.B.D.A.V. College, Nirakarpur, Khordha-752 019 (Odisha) (India); Saran, M.R. [Department of Physics, Maharishi College of Natural Law, Sahid Nagar, Bhubaneswar-751 007 (Odisha) (India); Mohanty, S. [Department of Chemistry, Christ College, Mission Road, Cuttack-753 001 (Odisha) (India); Padhy, R.K. [Department of Physics, ODM Public School, Shishu Vihar, Patia, Bhubaneswar-751 024 (Odisha) (India)

    2013-07-01

    This paper focuses on the unsteady hydromagnetic mixed convective heat and mass transfer boundary layer flow of a viscous incompressible electrically conducting fluid past an accelerated infinite vertical porous flat plate in a porous medium with suction in presence of foreign species such as H2, He, H2O vapour and NH3. The governing equations are solved both analytically and numerically using error function and finite difference scheme. The flow phenomenon has been characterized with the help of flow parameters such as magnetic parameter (M), suction parameter (a), permeability parameter (Kp), Grashof number for heat and mass transfer (Gr, Gc), Schmidt number (Sc) and Prandtl number (Pr). The effects of the above parameters on the fluid velocity, temperature, concentration distribution, skin friction and heat flux have been analyzed and the results are presented graphically and discussed quantitatively for Grashof number Gr>0 corresponding to cooling of the plate. It is observed that a growing magnetic parameter (M) retards the velocity of the flow field at all points and a greater suction leads to a faster reduction in the velocity of the flow field. Further, as we increase the permeability parameter (Kp) and the Grashof numbers for heat and mass transfer (Gr, Gc) the velocity of the flow field enhances at all points, while a greater suction/Prandtl number leads to a faster cooling of the plate. It is also observed that a more diffusive species has a significant decrease in the concentration boundary layer of the flow field and a growing suction parameter enhances both skin friction (T') and heat flux (Nu) at the wall corresponding to cooling of the plate (Gr>0).

  16. Influence of cooling on dynamics of buoyant jet

    CERN Document Server

    Goncharov, V P

    2016-01-01

    The Rayleigh--Taylor instability which is responsible for the occurrence of narrow upward jets are studied in the scope of the nonhydrostatic model with horizontally--nonuniform density and the Newtonian cooling. As analysis shows, the total hierarchy of instabilities in this model consists of three regimes -- collapse, algebraic instability, and inertial motion. Realization of these stages, mutual transitions and interference depend on a ratio between two characteristic time scales -- collapse time and cooling time.

  17. Genetic instability in Gynecological Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing-hua; ZHOU Hong-lin

    2003-01-01

    Defects of mismatch repair (MMR) genes also have beenidentified in many kinds of tumors. Loss of MMR functionhas been linked to genetic instability especially microsatelliteinstability that results in high mutation rate. In this review, wediscussed the microsatellite instability observed in thegynecological tumors. We also discussed defects in the DNAmismatch repair in these tumors and their correlation to themicrosatellite instability, as well as the gene mutations due tothe microsatellite instability in these tumors. From thesediscussion, we tried to understand the mechanism ofcarcinogenesis in gynecological tumors from the aspect ofgenetic instability due to mismatch repair defects.

  18. Instabilities in sensory processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, J.

    2014-07-01

    In any organism there are different kinds of sensory receptors for detecting the various, distinct stimuli through which its external environment may impinge upon it. These receptors convey these stimuli in different ways to an organism's information processing region enabling it to distinctly perceive the varied sensations and to respond to them. The behavior of cells and their response to stimuli may be captured through simple mathematical models employing regulatory feedback mechanisms. We argue that the sensory processes such as olfaction function optimally by operating in the close proximity of dynamical instabilities. In the case of coupled neurons, we point out that random disturbances and fluctuations can move their operating point close to certain dynamical instabilities triggering synchronous activity.

  19. Modulation instability: The beginning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noskov, Roman; Belov, Pavel; Kivshar, Yuri

    2012-11-01

    The study of metal nanoparticles plays a central role in the emerging novel technologies employing optics beyond the diffraction limit. Combining strong surface plasmon resonances, high intrinsic nonlinearities and deeply subwavelength scales, arrays of metal nanoparticles offer a unique playground to develop novel concepts for light manipulation at the nanoscale. Here we suggest a novel principle to control localized optical energy in chains of nonlinear subwavelength metal nanoparticles based on the fundamental nonlinear phenomenon of modulation instability. In particular, we demonstrate that modulation instability can lead to the formation of long-lived standing and moving nonlinear localized modes of several distinct types such as bright and dark solitons, oscillons, and domain walls. We analyze the properties of these nonlinear localized modes and reveal different scenarios of their dynamics including transformation of one type of mode to another. We believe this work paves a way towards the development of nonlinear nanophotonics circuitry.

  20. Instability and internet design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Braman

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Instability - unpredictable but constant change in one’s environment and the means with which one deals with it - has replaced convergence as the focal problem for telecommunications policy in general and internet policy in particular. Those who designed what we now call the internet during the first decade of the effort (1969-1979, who in essence served simultaneously as its policy-makers, developed techniques for coping with instability of value for network designers today and for those involved with any kind of large-scale sociotechnical infrastructure. Analysis of the technical document series that was medium for and record of that design process reveals coping techniques that began with defining the problem and went on to include conceptual labour, social practices, and technical approaches.

  1. Gravitational instabilities of superspinars

    CERN Document Server

    Pani, Paolo; Berti, Emanuele; Cardoso, Vitor

    2010-01-01

    Superspinars are ultracompact objects whose mass M and angular momentum J violate the Kerr bound (cJ/GM^2>1). Recent studies analyzed the observable consequences of gravitational lensing and accretion around superspinars in astrophysical scenarios. In this paper we investigate the dynamical stability of superspinars to gravitational perturbations, considering either purely reflecting or perfectly absorbing boundary conditions at the "surface" of the superspinar. We find that these objects are unstable independently of the boundary conditions, and that the instability is strongest for relatively small values of the spin. Also, we give a physical interpretation of the various instabilities that we find. Our results (together with the well-known fact that accretion tends to spin superspinars down) imply that superspinars are very unlikely astrophysical alternatives to black holes.

  2. The instability of markets

    CERN Document Server

    Huberman, B A; Huberman, Bernardo A; Youssefmir, Michael

    1995-01-01

    Recent developments in the global liberalization of equity and currency markets, coupled to advances in trading technologies, are making markets increasingly interdependent. This increased fluidity raises questions about the stability of the international financial system. In this paper, we show that as couplings between stable markets grow, the likelihood of instabilities is increased, leading to a loss of general equilibrium as the system becomes increasingly large and diverse.

  3. Modulation instability: The beginning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, V. E.; Ostrovsky, L. A.

    2009-03-01

    We discuss the early history of an important field of “sturm and drang” in modern theory of nonlinear waves. It is demonstrated how scientific demand resulted in independent and almost simultaneous publications by many different authors on modulation instability, a phenomenon resulting in a variety of nonlinear processes such as envelope solitons, envelope shocks, freak waves, etc. Examples from water wave hydrodynamics, electrodynamics, nonlinear optics, and convection theory are given.

  4. Carpal instability nondissociative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Scott W; Garcia-Elias, Marc; Kitay, Alison

    2012-09-01

    Carpal instability nondissociative (CIND) represents a spectrum of conditions characterized by kinematic dysfunction of the proximal carpal row, often associated with a clinical "clunk." CIND is manifested at the midcarpal and/or radiocarpal joints, and it is distinguished from carpal instability dissociative (CID) by the lack of disruption between bones within the same carpal row. There are four major subcategories of CIND: palmar, dorsal, combined, and adaptive. In palmar CIND, instability occurs across the entire proximal carpal row. When nonsurgical management fails, surgical options include arthroscopic thermal capsulorrhaphy, soft-tissue reconstruction, or limited radiocarpal or intercarpal fusions. In dorsal CIND, the capitate subluxates dorsally from its reduced resting position. Dorsal CIND usually responds to nonsurgical management; refractory cases respond to palmar ligament reefing and/or dorsal intercarpal capsulodesis. Combined CIND demonstrates signs of both palmar and dorsal CIND and can be treated with soft-tissue or bony procedures. In adaptive CIND, the volar carpal ligaments are slackened and are less capable of inducing the physiologic shift of the proximal carpal row from flexion into extension as the wrist ulnarly deviates. Treatment of choice is a corrective osteotomy to restore the normal volar tilt of the distal radius.

  5. Chromosomal instability in meningiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Tilborg, Angela A G; Al Allak, Bushra; Velthuizen, Sandra C J M; de Vries, Annie; Kros, Johan M; Avezaat, Cees J J; de Klein, Annelies; Beverloo, H Berna; Zwarthoff, Ellen C

    2005-04-01

    Approximately 60% of sporadic meningiomas are caused by inactivation of the NF2 tumor suppressor gene on chromosome 22. No causative gene is known for the remaining 40%. Cytogenetic analysis shows that meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene can be divided into tumors that show monosomy 22 as the sole abnormality and tumors with a more complex karyotype. Meningiomas not caused by the NF2 gene usually have a diploid karyotype. Here we report that, besides the clonal chromosomal aberrations, the chromosome numbers in many meningiomas varied from one metaphase spread to the other, a feature that is indicative of chromosomal instability. Unexpectedly and regardless of genotype, a subgroup of tumors was observed with an average number of 44.9 chromosomes and little variation in the number of chromosomes per metaphase spread. In addition, a second subgroup was recognized with a hyperdiploid number of chromosomes (average 48.5) and considerable variation in numbers per metaphase. However, this numerical instability resulted in a clonal karyotype with chromosomal gains and losses in addition to loss of chromosome 22 only in meningiomas caused by inactivation of the NF2 gene. In cultured cells of all tumor groups, bi- and multinucleated cells were seen, as well as anaphase bridges, residual chromatid strings, multiple spindle poles, and unseparated chromatids, suggesting defects in the mitotic apparatus or kinetochore. Thus, we conclude that even a benign and slow-growing tumor like a meningioma displays chromosomal instability.

  6. Shoulder instability; Schultergelenkinstabilitaet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sailer, J.; Imhof, H. [Abteilung Osteoradiologie, Univ.-Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik Wien (Austria)

    2004-06-01

    Shoulder instability is a common clinical feature leading to recurrent pain and limitated range of motion within the glenohumeral joint. Instability can be due a single traumatic event, general joint laxity or repeated episodes of microtrauma. Differentiation between traumatic and atraumatic forms of shoulder instability requires careful history and a systemic clinical examination. Shoulder laxity has to be differentiated from true instability followed by the clinical assessment of direction and degree of glenohumeral translation. Conventional radiography and CT are used for the diagnosis of bony lesions. MR imaging and MR arthrography help in the detection of soft tissue affection, especially of the glenoid labrum and the capsuloligamentous complex. The most common lesion involving the labrum is the anterior labral tear, associated with capsuloperiostal stripping (Bankart lesion). A number of variants of the Bankart lesion have been described, such as ALPSA, SLAP or HAGL lesions. The purpose of this review is to highlight different forms of shoulder instability and its associated radiological findings with a focus on MR imaging. (orig.) [German] Die Schultergelenkinstabilitaet ist haeufig fuer wiederholt auftretende Schmerzen sowie eine eingeschraenkte Beweglichkeit im Glenohumeralgelenk verantwortlich. Sie kann als Folge eines vorangegangenen Traumas, einer generellen Hyperlaxitaet oder infolge wiederholter Mikrotraumen entstehen. Die Differenzierung zwischen traumatischer und atraumatischer Form der Gelenkinstabilitaet erfordert eine sorgfaeltige Anamnese und eine genaue klinische Untersuchung. Die Gelelenklaxitaet als Differenzialdiagnose muss von der echten Instabilitaet unterschieden werden, die Instabilitaet wird dann im Rahmen des klinischen Status nach Grad und Richtung der glenohumeralen Translation unterteilt. Zur Diagnose knoecherner Laesionen werden das konventionelle Roentgen sowie die CT herangezogen. MRT sowie MR-Arthrographie dienen zur Detektion

  7. Linear and Two-Dimensional Nonlinear Studies of Resistive Instabilities in the Cylindrical Spheromak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delucia, James

    We study various aspects of the linear and 2D (helically symmetric) nonlinear development of m = 1 resistive instabilities in the cylindrical spheromak. The cylindrical spheromak is a fictitious configuration in which the toroidal spheromak has been cut and straightened out to become a circular cylinder of radius a, length 2(pi)R, and with periodic boundary conditions. It has proven to be a usefull model for studying spheromak instabilities in which toroidal effects are not important. The majority of interest in this area lies in attempting to understand the effect that the resistive interchange instability has on confinement in the spheromak, the reason being that finite pressure spheromak configurations are always unstable to this mode. Therefore, most of the results presented in this thesis pertain to the nonlinear development of the resistive interchange mode. Our goal is to understand the quasilinear modifications of the equilibrium profile due to the growth of this instability, and the subsequent effect that the equilibrium modification has on the growth rate and eigenfunctions. Our studies of the resistive interchange mode reveal that mode saturation can occur due to the quasilinear flattening of the pressure profile in the vicinity of the mode rational surface. However, this saturation process is defeated when the plasma overheats and in regions of the plasma where the shear is low. Also, we found that fluid compression plays a significant, and optomistic role in the long term nonlinear development of this mode. Finally, in a tearing mode stable cylindrical spheromak configuration with an axial beta value of 6%, complete overlap of the m = 1 islands occurs in about 3% of the resistive skin time for a magnetic Reynold's number of S = 10('5). For typical parameters of the S-1 device at Princeton, this time corresponds to nearly one millisecond. We show that incorporation of the Hall terms into the resistive MHD model can stabilize the m = 1 resistive

  8. Radiation Induced Genomic Instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, William F.

    2011-03-01

    Radiation induced genomic instability can be observed in the progeny of irradiated cells multiple generations after irradiation of parental cells. The phenotype is well established both in vivo (Morgan 2003) and in vitro (Morgan 2003), and may be critical in radiation carcinogenesis (Little 2000, Huang et al. 2003). Instability can be induced by both the deposition of energy in irradiated cells as well as by signals transmitted by irradiated (targeted) cells to non-irradiated (non-targeted) cells (Kadhim et al. 1992, Lorimore et al. 1998). Thus both targeted and non-targeted cells can pass on the legacy of radiation to their progeny. However the radiation induced events and cellular processes that respond to both targeted and non-targeted radiation effects that lead to the unstable phenotype remain elusive. The cell system we have used to study radiation induced genomic instability utilizes human hamster GM10115 cells. These cells have a single copy of human chromosome 4 in a background of hamster chromosomes. Instability is evaluated in the clonal progeny of irradiated cells and a clone is considered unstable if it contains three or more metaphase sub-populations involving unique rearrangements of the human chromosome (Marder and Morgan 1993). Many of these unstable clones have been maintained in culture for many years and have been extensively characterized. As initially described by Clutton et al., (Clutton et al. 1996) many of our unstable clones exhibit persistently elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (Limoli et al. 2003), which appear to be due dysfunctional mitochondria (Kim et al. 2006, Kim et al. 2006). Interestingly, but perhaps not surprisingly, our unstable clones do not demonstrate a “mutator phenotype” (Limoli et al. 1997), but they do continue to rearrange their genomes for many years. The limiting factor with this system is the target – the human chromosome. While some clones demonstrate amplification of this chromosome and thus lend

  9. Modulational instability of nematic phase

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Mithun; K Porsezian

    2014-02-01

    We numerically observe the effect of homogeneous magnetic field on the modulationally stable case of polar phase in = 2 spinor Bose–Einstein condensates (BECs). Also we investigate the modulational instability of uniaxial and biaxial (BN) states of polar phase. Our observations show that the magnetic field triggers the modulational instability and demonstrate that irrespective of the magnetic field effect the uniaxial and biaxial nematic phases show modulational instability.

  10. Political Instability and Economic Growth

    OpenAIRE

    Swagel, Phillip; Roubini, Nouriel; Ozler, Sule; Alesina, Alberto

    1992-01-01

    This paper investigates the relationship between political instability and per capita GDP growth in a sample of 113 countries for the period 1950-1982. We define ?political instability? as the propensity of a government collapse, and we estimate a model in which political instability and economic growth are jointly determined. The main result of this paper is that in countries and time periods with a high propensity of government collapse, growth is significantly lower than otherwise. This ef...

  11. Weibel instability with nonextensive distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Hui-Bin; Liu, Shi-Bing [Strong-field and Ultrafast Photonics Lab, Institute of Laser Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Weibel instability in plasma, where the ion distribution is isotropic and the electron component of the plasma possesses the anisotropic temperature distribution, is investigated based on the kinetic theory in context of nonextensive statistics mechanics. The instability growth rate is shown to be dependent on the nonextensive parameters of both electron and ion, and in the extensive limit, the result in Maxwellian distribution plasma is recovered. The instability growth rate is found to be enhanced as the nonextensive parameter of electron increases.

  12. Instabilities in mimetic matter perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firouzjahi, Hassan; Gorji, Mohammad Ali; Mansoori, Seyed Ali Hosseini

    2017-07-01

    We study cosmological perturbations in mimetic matter scenario with a general higher derivative function. We calculate the quadratic action and show that both the kinetic term and the gradient term have the wrong sings. We perform the analysis in both comoving and Newtonian gauges and confirm that the Hamiltonians and the associated instabilities are consistent with each other in both gauges. The existence of instabilities is independent of the specific form of higher derivative function which generates gradients for mimetic field perturbations. It is verified that the ghost instability in mimetic perturbations is not associated with the higher derivative instabilities such as the Ostrogradsky ghost.

  13. [Aspirin suppresses microsatellite instability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallinger, S; Dietmaier, W; Beyser, K; Bocker, T; Hofstädter, F; Fishel, R; Rüschoff, J

    1999-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) exhibit cancer preventive effects and have been shown to induce regression of adenomas in FAP patients. In order to elucidate the probable underlying mechanism, the effect of NSAIDs on mismatch repair related microsatellite instability was investigated. Six colorectal cancer cell lines all but one deficient for human mismatch repair (MMR) genes were examined for microsatellite instability (MSI) prior and after treatment with Aspirin or Sulindac. For rapid in vitro analysis of MSI a microcloning assay was developed by combining Laser microdissection and random (PEP-) PCR prior to specific MSI-PCR. Effects of NSAIDs on cell cycle and apoptosis were systematically investigated by using flow cytometry and cell-sorting. MSI frequency in cells deficient of MMR genes (hMSH2, hMLH1, hMSH6) was markedly reduced after long-term (> 10 weeks) NSAID treatment. This effect was reversible, time- and concentration dependent. However, in the hPMS2 deficient endometrial cancer cell line (HEC-1-A) the MSI phenotype kept unchanged. According to cell sorting, non-apoptotic cells were stable and apoptotic cells were unstable. These results suggest that aspirin/sulindac induces a genetic selection for microsatellite stability in a subset of MMR-deficient cells and may thus provide an effective prophylactic therapy for HNPCC related colorectal carcinomas.

  14. Instability of enclosed horizons

    CERN Document Server

    Kay, Bernard S

    2013-01-01

    We study the classical massless scalar wave equation on the region of 1+1-dimensional Minkowski space between the two branches of the hyperbola $x^2-t^2=1$ with vanishing boundary conditions on it. We point out that there are initially finite-energy initially, say, right-going waves for which the stress-energy tensor becomes singular on the null-line $t+x=0$. We also construct the quantum theory of this system and show that, while there is a regular Hartle-Hawking-Israel-like state, there are coherent states built on this for which there is a similar singularity in the expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor. We conjecture that in 1+3-dimensional situations with 'enclosed horizons' such as a (maximally extended) Schwarzschild black hole in equilibrium in a stationary box or the (maximally extended) Schwarzschild-AdS spacetime, there will be a similar singularity at the horizon and that would signal an instability when matter perturbations and/or gravity are switched on. Such an instability ...

  15. Libration driven multipolar instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Cébron, David; Herreman, Wietze

    2014-01-01

    We consider rotating flows in non-axisymmetric enclosures that are driven by libration, i.e. by a small periodic modulation of the rotation rate. Thanks to its simplicity, this model is relevant to various contexts, from industrial containers (with small oscillations of the rotation rate) to fluid layers of terrestial planets (with length-of-day variations). Assuming a multipolar $n$-fold boundary deformation, we first obtain the two-dimensional basic flow. We then perform a short-wavelength local stability analysis of the basic flow, showing that an instability may occur in three dimensions. We christen it the Libration Driven Multipolar Instability (LDMI). The growth rates of the LDMI are computed by a Floquet analysis in a systematic way, and compared to analytical expressions obtained by perturbation methods. We then focus on the simplest geometry allowing the LDMI, a librating deformed cylinder. To take into account viscous and confinement effects, we perform a global stability analysis, which shows that...

  16. Experiments on the fragmentation of a buoyant liquid volume in another liquid

    CERN Document Server

    Landeau, Maylis; Olson, Peter

    2014-01-01

    We present experiments on the instability and fragmentation of volumes of heavier liquid released into lighter immiscible liquids. We focus on the regime defined by small Ohnesorge numbers, density ratios of order one, and variable Weber numbers. The observed stages in the fragmentation process include deformation of the released fluid by either Rayleigh-Taylor instability or vortex ring roll-up and destabilization, formation of filamentary structures, capillary instability, and drop formation. At low and intermediate Weber numbers, a wide variety of fragmentation regimes is identified. Those regimes depend on early deformations, which mainly result from a competition between the growth of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and the roll-up of a vortex ring. At high Weber numbers, turbulent vortex ring formation is observed. We have adapted the standard theory of turbulent entrainment to buoyant vortex rings with initial momentum. We find consistency between this theory and our experiments, indicating that the conc...

  17. Imploding process and x-ray emission of shotgun z-pinch plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, Ryusuke [Nihon University, College of Science and Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Takasugi, Keiichi; Miyamoto, Tetsu [Nihon University, Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-09-01

    Rayleigh-Taylor instability was observed on the surface of a contracting z-pinch plasma. Wavelength of the instability was analyzed from the envelope of the profile, and it increased with implosion. Analysis with finite Larmor radius effect shows that there is some acceleration of ions during the contraction process. A suggestion to obtain macroscopically uniform plasma is to increase plasma current without heating the plasma. (author)

  18. Development of Table-Top mirror trap for flute stabilization research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seemann, Omri; Be'Ery, Ilan

    2015-11-01

    Mirror traps might be viable candidates for fusion machines. These machines are technically and physically simple but suffer from the Rayleigh-Taylor-like flute instability. A new table top mirror machine was built in order to research ways to mitigate this instability. One possible solution for this problem which was researched in the past is using oscillatory fields. A description of the system and diagnostics, preliminary results and a review of the main mechanisms with which stabilization might occur are presented.

  19. Bony instability of the shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushnell, Brandon D; Creighton, R Alexander; Herring, Marion M

    2008-09-01

    Instability of the shoulder is a common problem treated by many orthopaedists. Instability can result from baseline intrinsic ligamentous laxity or a traumatic event-often a dislocation that injures the stabilizing structures of the glenohumeral joint. Many cases involve soft-tissue injury only and can be treated successfully with repair of the labrum and ligamentous tissues. Both open and arthroscopic approaches have been well described, with recent studies of arthroscopic soft-tissue techniques reporting results equal to those of the more traditional open techniques. Over the last decade, attention has focused on the concept of instability of the shoulder mediated by bony pathology such as a large bony Bankart lesion or an engaging Hill-Sachs lesion. Recent literature has identified unrecognized large bony lesions as a primary cause of failure of arthroscopic reconstruction for instability, a major cause of recurrent instability, and a difficult diagnosis to make. Thus, although such bony lesions may be relatively rare compared with soft-tissue pathology, they constitute a critically important entity in the management of shoulder instability. Smaller bony lesions may be amenable to arthroscopic treatment, but larger lesions often require open surgery to prevent recurrent instability. This article reviews recent developments in the diagnosis and treatment of bony instability.

  20. Cinerama sickness and postural instability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bos, J.E.; Ledegang, W.D.; Lubeck, A.J.A.; Stins, J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Motion sickness symptoms and increased postural instability induced by motion pictures have been reported in a laboratory, but not in a real cinema. We, therefore, carried out an observational study recording sickness severity and postural instability in 19 subjects before, immediately and 45 min af

  1. Marital instability after midlife.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Z; Penning, M J

    1997-09-01

    "Divorce in later life has been shown to produce dramatic declines in the economic, psychological, and physical well-being of marital partners. This study examines the prevalence and determinants of marital disruption after midlife using Becker's theory of marital instability. Using recent Canadian national data, the marital outcomes of women and men who were married as of age 40 are tracked across the remaining years of the marriage. Cox proportional hazard regression models indicate stabilizing effects of the duration of the marriage, the age at first marriage, the presence of young children, as well as of remarriage for middle-aged and older persons. Other significant risk factors include education, heterogamous marital status, premarital cohabitation, number of siblings, and region."

  2. Instability and Information

    CERN Document Server

    Patzelt, Felix

    2015-01-01

    Many complex systems exhibit extreme events far more often than expected for a normal distribution. This work examines how self-similar bursts of activity across several orders of magnitude can emerge from first principles in systems that adapt to information. Surprising connections are found between two apparently unrelated research topics: hand-eye coordination in balancing tasks and speculative trading in financial markets. Seemingly paradoxically, locally minimising fluctuations can increase a dynamical system's sensitivity to unpredictable perturbations and thereby facilitate global catastrophes. This general principle is studied in several domain-specific models and in behavioural experiments. It explains many findings in both fields and resolves an apparent antinomy: the coexistence of stabilising control or market efficiency and perpetual instabilities resembling critical phenomena in physical systems.

  3. Structural and Material Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cifuentes, Gustavo Cifuentes

    This work is a small contribution to the general problem of structural and material instability. In this work, the main subject is the analysis of cracking and failure of structural elements made from quasi-brittle materials like concrete. The analysis is made using the finite element method. Three...... use of interface elements) is used successfully to model cases where the path of the discontinuity is known in advance, as is the case of the analysis of pull-out of fibers embedded in a concrete matrix. This method is applied to the case of non-straight fibers and fibers with forces that have....... Numerical problems associated with the use of elements with embedded cracks based on the extended finite element method are presented in the next part of this work. And an alternative procedure is used in order to successfully remove these numerical problems. In the final part of this work, a computer...

  4. The bar instability revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Chiodi, Filippo; Claudin, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The river bar instability is revisited, using a hydrodynamical model based on Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations. The results are contrasted with the standard analysis based on shallow water Saint-Venant equations. We first show that the stability of both transverse modes (ripples) and of small wavelength inclined modes (bars) predicted by the Saint-Venant approach are artefacts of this hydrodynamical approximation. When using a more reliable hydrodynamical model, the dispersion relation does not present any maximum of the growth rate when the sediment transport is assumed to be locally saturated. The analysis therefore reveals the fundamental importance of the relaxation of sediment transport towards equilibrium as it it is responsible for the stabilisation of small wavelength modes. This dynamical mechanism is characterised by the saturation number, defined as the ratio of the saturation length to the water depth Lsat/H. This dimensionless number controls the transition from ripples (transverse patte...

  5. Beam instability Workshop - plenary sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to provide a review of the mechanisms of limiting beam instabilities, their cures, including feedback, and beam measurement for synchrotron radiation light sources. 12 plenary sessions took place whose titles are: 1) challenging brilliance and lifetime issues with increasing currents; 2) limiting instabilities in multibunch; 3) experience from high currents in B factories; 4) longitudinal dynamics in high intensity/bunch; 5) Transverse instabilities for high intensity/bunch; 6) working group introduction from ESRF experience; 7) impedance modelling: simulations, minimization; 8) report on the broadband impedance measurements and modelling workshop; 9) feedback systems for synchrotron light sources; 10) beam instabilities diagnostics; 11) harmonic cavities: the pros and cons; and 12) experimental study of fast beam-ion instabilities at PLS. This document gathers the 12 articles that were presented during these sessions.

  6. Equilibrium Electro-osmotic Instability

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinstein, Isaak

    2014-01-01

    Since its prediction fifteen years ago, electro-osmotic instability has been attributed to non-equilibrium electro-osmosis related to the extended space charge which develops at the limiting current in the course of concentration polarization at a charge-selective interface. This attribution had a double basis. Firstly, it has been recognized that equilibrium electro-osmosis cannot yield instability for a perfectly charge-selective solid. Secondly, it has been shown that non-equilibrium electro-osmosis can. First theoretical studies in which electro-osmotic instability was predicted and analyzed employed the assumption of perfect charge-selectivity for the sake of simplicity and so did the subsequent numerical studies of various time-dependent and nonlinear features of electro-osmotic instability. In this letter, we show that relaxing the assumption of perfect charge-selectivity (tantamount to fixing the electrochemical potential in the solid) allows for equilibrium electro-osmotic instability. Moreover, we s...

  7. Instability in Shocked Granular Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Sirmas, Nick; Radulescu, Matei

    2013-01-01

    Shocks in granular media, such as vertically oscillated beds, have been shown to develop instabilities. Similar jet formation has been observed in explosively dispersed granular media. Our previous work addressed this instability by performing discrete-particle simulations of inelastic media undergoing shock compression. By allowing finite dissipation within the shock wave, instability manifests itself as distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. In the present study we have extended this work to investigate this instability at the continuum level. We modeled the Euler equations for granular gases with a modified cooling rate to include an impact velocity threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. Our results showed a fair agreement between the continuum and discrete-particle models. Discrepancies, such as higher frequency instabilities in our continuum results may be attributed to the absence of higher order effects.

  8. Instability in shocked granular gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirmas, Nick; Falle, Sam; Radulescu, Matei

    2014-05-01

    Shocks in granular media, such as vertically oscillated beds, have been shown to develop instabilities. Similar jet formation has been observed in explosively dispersed granular media. Our previous work addressed this instability by performing discrete-particle simulations of inelastic media undergoing shock compression. By allowing finite dissipation within the shock wave, instability manifests itself as distinctive high density non-uniformities and convective rolls within the shock structure. In the present study we have extended this work to investigate this instability at the continuum level. We modeled the Euler equations for granular gases with a modified cooling rate to include an impact velocity threshold necessary for inelastic collisions. Our results showed a fair agreement between the continuum and discrete-particle models. Discrepancies, such as higher frequency instabilities in our continuum results may be attributed to the absence of higher order effects.

  9. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Kratter, Kaitlin M

    2016-01-01

    [Abridged] Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability, and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability, supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the non-linear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analyt...

  10. Gravitational Instabilities in Circumstellar Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratter, Kaitlin; Lodato, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Star and planet formation are the complex outcomes of gravitational collapse and angular momentum transport mediated by protostellar and protoplanetary disks. In this review, we focus on the role of gravitational instability in this process. We begin with a brief overview of the observational evidence for massive disks that might be subject to gravitational instability and then highlight the diverse ways in which the instability manifests itself in protostellar and protoplanetary disks: the generation of spiral arms, small-scale turbulence-like density fluctuations, and fragmentation of the disk itself. We present the analytic theory that describes the linear growth phase of the instability supplemented with a survey of numerical simulations that aim to capture the nonlinear evolution. We emphasize the role of thermodynamics and large-scale infall in controlling the outcome of the instability. Despite apparent controversies in the literature, we show a remarkable level of agreement between analytic predictions and numerical results. In the next part of our review, we focus on the astrophysical consequences of the instability. We show that the disks most likely to be gravitationally unstable are young and relatively massive compared with their host star, Md/M*≥0.1. They will develop quasi-stable spiral arms that process infall from the background cloud. Although instability is less likely at later times, once infall becomes less important, the manifestations of the instability are more varied. In this regime, the disk thermodynamics, often regulated by stellar irradiation, dictates the development and evolution of the instability. In some cases the instability may lead to fragmentation into bound companions. These companions are more likely to be brown dwarfs or stars than planetary mass objects. Finally, we highlight open questions related to the development of a turbulent cascade in thin disks and the role of mode-mode coupling in setting the maximum angular

  11. Abelianization of QCD plasma instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Peter; Lenaghan, Jonathan

    2004-12-01

    QCD plasma instabilities appear to play an important role in the equilibration of quark-gluon plasmas in heavy-ion collisions in the theoretical limit of weak coupling (i.e. asymptotically high energy). It is important to understand what nonlinear physics eventually stops the exponential growth of unstable modes. It is already known that the initial growth of plasma instabilities in QCD closely parallels that in QED. However, once the unstable modes of the gauge fields grow large enough for non-Abelian interactions between them to become important, one might guess that the dynamics of QCD plasma instabilities and QED plasma instabilities become very different. In this paper, we give suggestive arguments that non-Abelian self-interactions between the unstable modes are ineffective at stopping instability growth, and that the growing non-Abelian gauge fields become approximately Abelian after a certain stage in their growth. This in turn suggests that understanding the development of QCD plasma instabilities in the nonlinear regime may have close parallels to similar processes in traditional plasma physics. We conjecture that the physics of collisionless plasma instabilities in SU(2) and SU(3) gauge theory becomes equivalent, respectively, to (i) traditional plasma physics, which is U(1) gauge theory, and (ii) plasma physics of U(1)×U(1) gauge theory.

  12. Flow of a thin liquid film coating a horizontal stationary cylinder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachile, M; Aguirre, M A; Lenschen, M; Calvo, A

    2013-12-01

    An experimental and theoretical study of the flow of liquid films around a stationary horizontal cylinder is reported. The film presents two different behaviors: The flow is stable in the upper zone (up to ∼150° with the vertical) and Rayleigh-Taylor-like instabilities appear in the lower zone. For the stable region, film thickness evolution could be described by numerically integrating an evolution equation obtained using a lubrication approximation. For the unstable region, a linear stability analysis allows us to determine the maximum growth wavelength for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Approximate analytical solutions were obtained for generatrices at an angle with the vertical θ=0 (stable region) and θ=π (where the instability appears).

  13. RANS modeling of RTI and HVDT with BHR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trettel, Ben [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-15

    The BHR3 turbulence model was improved to include two different scales as suggested by Livescu et al. [Liv+09, {section}4.4.6]: one for turbulent transport and the other for turbulent dissipation. Additionally, destruction terms modeled analogously to production terms were added to the turbulent mass-weighted velocity equation. New model coefficients were developed for this model. The first change was to use C{sub 2} = 1.77 for the isotropic turbulence decay coefficient rather than the k-e model's 1.92, which is outside of the experimentally measured values [ML90; KF09]. The new model coefficients were developed to accurately model a wide range of experimental and numerical results: constant and variable density Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities, Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, and homogeneous variable density turbulence (HVDT) [LR07]. My work focused on the buoyancy-driven flows: Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and HVDT.

  14. Instability of ties in compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Thomas Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Masonry cavity walls are loaded by wind pressure and vertical load from upper floors. These loads results in bending moments and compression forces in the ties connecting the outer and the inner wall in a cavity wall. Large cavity walls are furthermore loaded by differential movements from...... exact instability solutions are complex to derive, not to mention the extra complexity introducing dimensional instability from the temperature gradients. Using an inverse variable substitution and comparing an exact theory with an analytical instability solution a method to design tie...

  15. Microsatellite instability in bladder cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Zulueta, M; Ruppert, J M; Tokino, K;

    1993-01-01

    Somatic instability at microsatellite repeats was detected in 6 of 200 transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder. Instabilities were apparent as changes in (GT)n repeat lengths on human chromosome 9 for four tumors and as alterations in a (CAG)n repeat in the androgen receptor gene on the X...... chromosome for three tumors. Single locus alterations were detected in three tumors, while three other tumors revealed changes in two or more loci. In one tumor we found microsatellite instability in all five loci analyzed on chromosome 9. The alterations detected were either minor 2-base pair changes...

  16. Subject to Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Bouwer

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available For Plantier, language constitutes reality and is male dominated. Readers of texts, she says, are at a disadvantage because the author imposes a logic that we must accept in order to understand the text. The discourses shaping our social reality have the same effect. Plantier has struggled against individual voices, discourses, and the very fabric of language informed by these discourses. "Subject to Instability" examines the impact on her generic evolution of a changing sense of self, of who her interlocutors are, and of those for whom she is speaking. I argue that her increasing attempt to juggle many different voices destabilizes her "monologic," poetical voice, resulting in a blurring of generic boundaries and eventually the abandonment of poetry. Recognizing that our entry into language is a form of alienation also unsettles Plantier because it undermines the very identity that allows her to speak for others. She concludes that each woman needs to become a Subject in her own right, but she continues to struggle against dominant discourses, modeling "resisting reader" strategies. If she can no longer practice "monologic steadfastness," this does not deter her from attempting to dismantle patriarchal language and striving to make her voice prevail over others.

  17. Turbulent transport in hydromagnetic flows

    CERN Document Server

    Brandenburg, A; Del Sordo, F; Hubbard, A; Käpylä, P J; Rheinhardt, M

    2010-01-01

    The predictive power of mean-field theory is emphasized by comparing theory with simulations under controlled conditions. The recently developed test-field method is used to extract turbulent transport coefficients both in kinematic as well as nonlinear and quasi-kinematic cases. A striking example of the quasi-kinematic method is provided by magnetic buoyancy-driven flows that produce an alpha effect and turbulent diffusion.

  18. Atlantoaxial instability in Down's syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1987-01-01

    The radiographs and clinical evaluations of 90 children with Down’s syndrome were reassessed after an interval of 5 years in a study of atlantoaxial instability (AAI) at the Derbyshire Children’s Hospital and Infirmary, Derby, UK.

  19. Evaporative instabilities in climbing films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosoi, A. E.; Bush, John W. M.

    2001-09-01

    We consider flow in a thin film generated by partially submerging an inclined rigid plate in a reservoir of ethanol or methanol water solution and wetting its surface. Evaporation leads to concentration and surface tension gradients that drive flow up the plate. An experimental study indicates that the climbing film is subject to two distinct instabilities. The first is a convective instability characterized by flattened convection rolls aligned in the direction of flow and accompanied by free-surface deformations; in the meniscus region, this instability gives rise to pronounced ridge structures aligned with the mean flow. The second instability, evident when the plate is nearly vertical, takes the form of transverse surface waves propagating up the plate.

  20. Intrinsic Instability of Coronal Streamers

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Y; Song, H Q; Shi, Q Q; Feng, S W; Xia, L D; 10.1088/0004-637X/691/2/1936

    2009-01-01

    Plasma blobs are observed to be weak density enhancements as radially stretched structures emerging from the cusps of quiescent coronal streamers. In this paper, it is suggested that the formation of blobs is a consequence of an intrinsic instability of coronal streamers occurring at a very localized region around the cusp. The evolutionary process of the instability, as revealed in our calculations, can be described as follows: (1) through the localized cusp region where the field is too weak to sustain the confinement, plasmas expand and stretch the closed field lines radially outward as a result of the freezing-in effect of plasma-magnetic field coupling; the expansion brings a strong velocity gradient into the slow wind regime providing the free energy necessary for the onset of a subsequent magnetohydrodynamic instability; (2) the instability manifests itself mainly as mixed streaming sausage-kink modes, the former results in pinches of elongated magnetic loops to provoke reconnections at one or many loc...

  1. Material Instabilities in Particulate Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goddard, J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Following is a brief summary of a theoretical investigation of material (or constitutive) instability associated with shear induced particle migration in dense particulate suspensions or granular media. It is shown that one can obtain a fairly general linear-stability analysis, including the effects of shear-induced anisotropy in the base flow as well as Reynolds dilatancy. A criterion is presented here for simple shearing instability in the absence of inertia and dilatancy.

  2. Instability following total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2011-10-01

    Background Knee prosthesis instability (KPI) is a frequent cause of failure of total knee arthroplasty. Moreover, the degree of constraint required to achieve immediate and long-term stability in total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is frequently debated. Questions This review aims to define the problem, analyze risk factors, and review strategies for prevention and treatment of KPI. Methods A PubMed (MEDLINE) search of the years 2000 to 2010 was performed using two key words: TKA and instability. One hundred and sixty-five initial articles were identified. The most important (17) articles as judged by the author were selected for this review. The main criteria for selection were that the articles addressed and provided solutions to the diagnosis and treatment of KPI. Results Patient-related risk factors predisposing to post-operative instability include deformity requiring a large surgical correction and aggressive ligament release, general or regional neuromuscular pathology, and hip or foot deformities. KPI can be prevented in most cases with appropriate selection of implants and good surgical technique. When ligament instability is anticipated post-operatively, the need for implants with a greater degree of constraint should be anticipated. In patients without significant varus or valgus malalignment and without significant flexion contracture, the posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) can be retained. However, the PCL should be sacrificed when deformity exists particularly in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy, previous high tibial osteotomy or distal femoral osteotomy, and posttraumatic osteoarthritis with disruption of the PCL. In most cases, KPI requires revision surgery. Successful outcomes can only be obtained if the cause of KPI is identified and addressed. Conclusions Instability following TKA is a common cause of the need for revision. Typically, knees with deformity, rheumatoid arthritis, previous patellectomy or high tibial osteotomy, and

  3. Midcarpal instability: a radiological perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toms, Andoni Paul [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Norwich, Norfolk (United Kingdom); Radiology Academy, Cotman Centre, Norwich, Norfolk (United Kingdom); Chojnowski, Adrian [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Norwich, Norfolk (United Kingdom); Cahir, John G. [Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Norwich, Norfolk (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Midcarpal instability (MCI) is the result of complex abnormal carpal motion at the midcarpal joint of the wrist. It is a form of non-dissociative carpal instability (CIND) and can be caused by various combinations of extrinsic ligament injuries that then result in one of several subtypes of MCI. The complex patterns of injury and the kinematics are further complicated by competing theories, terminology and classifications of MCI. Palmar, dorsal, ulna midcarpal instability, and capitolunate or chronic capitolunate instability are all descriptions of types of MCI with often overlapping features. Palmar midcarpal instability (PMCI) is the most commonly reported type of MCI. It has been described as resulting from deficiencies in the ulna limb of the palmar arcuate ligament (triquetrohamate-capitate) or the dorsal radiotriquetral ligaments, or both. Unstable carpal articulations can be treated with limited carpal arthrodesis or the ligamentous defects can be treated with capsulorrhaphy or ligament reconstruction. Conventional radiographic abnormalities are usually limited to volar intercalated segment instability (VISI) patterns of carpal alignment and are not specific. For many years stress view radiographs and videofluoroscopy have been the methods of choice for demonstrating carpal instability and abnormal carpal kinematics respectively. Dynamic US can be also used to demonstrate midcarpal dyskinesia including the characteristic triquetral ''catch-up'' clunk. Tears of the extrinsic ligaments can be demonstrated with MR arthrography, and probably with CT arthrography, but intact yet redundant ligaments are more difficult to identify. The exact role of these investigations in the diagnosis, categorisation and management of midcarpal instability has yet to be determined. (orig.)

  4. Instability of enclosed horizons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Bernard S.

    2015-03-01

    We point out that there are solutions to the scalar wave equation on dimensional Minkowski space with finite energy tails which, if they reflect off a uniformly accelerated mirror due to (say) Dirichlet boundary conditions on it, develop an infinite stress-energy tensor on the mirror's Rindler horizon. We also show that, in the presence of an image mirror in the opposite Rindler wedge, suitable compactly supported arbitrarily small initial data on a suitable initial surface will develop an arbitrarily large stress-energy scalar near where the two horizons cross. Also, while there is a regular Hartle-Hawking-Israel-like state for the quantum theory between these two mirrors, there are coherent states built on it for which there are similar singularities in the expectation value of the renormalized stress-energy tensor. We conjecture that in other situations with analogous enclosed horizons such as a (maximally extended) Schwarzschild black hole in equilibrium in a (stationary spherical) box or the (maximally extended) Schwarzschild-AdS spacetime, there will be similar stress-energy singularities and almost-singularities—leading to instability of the horizons when gravity is switched on and matter and gravity perturbations are allowed for. All this suggests it is incorrect to picture a black hole in equilibrium in a box or a Schwarzschild-AdS black hole as extending beyond the past and future horizons of a single Schwarzschild (/Schwarzschild-AdS) wedge. It would thus provide new evidence for 't Hooft's brick wall model while seeming to invalidate the picture in Maldacena's ` Eternal black holes in AdS'. It would thereby also support the validity of the author's matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis and of the paper ` Brick walls and AdS/CFT' by the author and Ortíz.

  5. Vector-Resonance-Multimode Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeyev, S. V.; Kbashi, H.; Tarasov, N.; Loiko, Yu.; Kolpakov, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    The modulation and multimode instabilities are the main mechanisms which drive spontaneous spatial and temporal pattern formation in a vast number of nonlinear systems ranging from biology to laser physics. Using an Er-doped fiber laser as a test bed, here for the first time we demonstrate both experimentally and theoretically a new type of a low-threshold vector-resonance-multimode instability which inherits features of multimode and modulation instabilities. The same as for the multimode instability, a large number of longitudinal modes can be excited without mode synchronization. To enable modulation instability, we modulate the state of polarization of the lasing signal with the period of the beat length by an adjustment of the in-cavity birefringence and the state of polarization of the pump wave. As a result, we show the regime's tunability from complex oscillatory to periodic with longitudinal mode synchronization in the case of resonance matching between the beat and cavity lengths. Apart from the interest in laser physics for unlocking the tunability and stability of dynamic regimes, the proposed mechanism of the vector-resonance-multimode instability can be of fundamental interest for the nonlinear dynamics of various distributed systems.

  6. Scrambled and Unscrambled Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ramaprabhu, P; Lawrie, A G W

    2013-01-01

    The linked fluid dynamics videos depict Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence when driven by a complex acceleration profile involving two stages of acceleration interspersed with a stage of stabilizing deceleration. Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability occurs at the interface separating two fluids of different densities, when the lighter fluid is accelerated in to the heavier fluid. The turbulent mixing arising from the development of the miscible RT instability is of key importance in the design of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsules, and to the understanding of astrophysical events, such as Type Ia supernovae. By driving this flow with an accel-decel-accel profile, we have investigated how structures in RT turbulence are affected by a sudden change in the direction of the acceleration first from destabilizing acceleration to deceleration, and followed by a restoration of the unstable acceleration. By studying turbulence under such highly non-equilibrium conditions, we hope to develop an understanding of the response and ...

  7. Featured Image: Modeling Supernova Remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-05-01

    This image shows a computer simulation of the hydrodynamics within a supernova remnant. The mixing between the outer layers (where color represents the log of density) is caused by turbulence from the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, an effect that arises when the expanding core gas of the supernova is accelerated into denser shell gas. The past standard for supernova-evolution simulations was to perform them in one dimension and then, in post-processing, manually smooth out regions that undergo Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence (an intrinsically multidimensional effect). But in a recent study, Paul Duffell (University of California, Berkeley) has explored how a 1D model could be used to reproduce the multidimensional dynamics that occur in turbulence from this instability. For more information, check out the paper below!CitationPaul C. Duffell 2016 ApJ 821 76. doi:10.3847/0004-637X/821/2/76

  8. Direct drive heavy-ion-beam inertial fusion at high coupling efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, B.G.; Perkins, L.J.; Barnard, J.J.

    2008-05-16

    Issues with coupling efficiency, beam illumination symmetry, and Rayleigh-Taylor instability are discussed for spherical heavy-ion-beam-driven targets with and without hohlraums. Efficient coupling of heavy-ion beams to compress direct-drive inertial fusion targets without hohlraums is found to require ion range increasing several-fold during the drive pulse. One-dimensional implosion calculations using the LASNEX inertial confinement fusion target physics code shows the ion range increasing fourfold during the drive pulse to keep ion energy deposition following closely behind the imploding ablation front, resulting in high coupling efficiencies (shell kinetic energy/incident beam energy of 16% to 18%). Ways to increase beam ion range while mitigating Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are discussed for future work.

  9. Interfacial Instability during Granular Erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Gautier; Merceron, Aymeric; Jop, Pierre

    2016-02-12

    The complex interplay between the topography and the erosion and deposition phenomena is a key feature to model granular flows such as landslides. Here, we investigated the instability that develops during the erosion of a wet granular pile by a dry dense granular flow. The morphology and the propagation of the generated steps are analyzed in relation to the specific erosion mechanism. The selected flowing angle of the confined flow on a dry heap appears to play an important role both in the final state of the experiment, and for the shape of the structures. We show that the development of the instability is governed by the inertia of the flow through the Froude number. We model this instability and predict growth rates that are in agreement with the experiment results.

  10. Evaporative Instability in Binary Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ranga; Uguz, Erdem

    2012-11-01

    In this talk we depict the physics of evaporative convection for binary systems in the presence of surface tension gradient effects. Two results are of importance. The first is that a binary system, in the absence of gravity, can generate an instability only when heated from the vapor side. This is to be contrasted with the case of a single component where instability can occur only when heated from the liquid side. The second result is that a binary system, in the presence of gravity, will generate an instability when heated from either the vapor or the liquid side provided the heating is strong enough. In addition to these results we show the conditions at which interfacial patterns can occur. Support from NSF OISE 0968313, Partner Univ. Fund and a Chateaubriand Fellowship is acknowledged.

  11. Telomere dysfunction and chromosome instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murnane, John P., E-mail: jmurnane@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, 2340 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94143-1331 (United States)

    2012-02-01

    The ends of chromosomes are composed of a short repeat sequence and associated proteins that together form a cap, called a telomere, that keeps the ends from appearing as double-strand breaks (DSBs) and prevents chromosome fusion. The loss of telomeric repeat sequences or deficiencies in telomeric proteins can result in chromosome fusion and lead to chromosome instability. The similarity between chromosome rearrangements resulting from telomere loss and those found in cancer cells implicates telomere loss as an important mechanism for the chromosome instability contributing to human cancer. Telomere loss in cancer cells can occur through gradual shortening due to insufficient telomerase, the protein that maintains telomeres. However, cancer cells often have a high rate of spontaneous telomere loss despite the expression of telomerase, which has been proposed to result from a combination of oncogene-mediated replication stress and a deficiency in DSB repair in telomeric regions. Chromosome fusion in mammalian cells primarily involves nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), which is the major form of DSB repair. Chromosome fusion initiates chromosome instability involving breakage-fusion-bridge (B/F/B) cycles, in which dicentric chromosomes form bridges and break as the cell attempts to divide, repeating the process in subsequent cell cycles. Fusion between sister chromatids results in large inverted repeats on the end of the chromosome, which amplify further following additional B/F/B cycles. B/F/B cycles continue until the chromosome acquires a new telomere, most often by translocation of the end of another chromosome. The instability is not confined to a chromosome that loses its telomere, because the instability is transferred to the chromosome donating a translocation. Moreover, the amplified regions are unstable and form extrachromosomal DNA that can reintegrate at new locations. Knowledge concerning the factors promoting telomere loss and its consequences is

  12. Stringy bounces and gradient instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Bouncing solutions are obtained from a generally covariant action characterized by a potential which is a nonlocal functional of the dilaton field at two separated space-time points. Gradient instabilities are shown to arise in this context but they are argued to be nongeneric. After performing a gauge-invariant and frame-invariant derivation of the evolution equations of the fluctuations, a heuristic criterium for the avoidance of pathological instabilities is proposed and corroborated by a number of explicit examples that turn out to be compatible with a quasi-flat spectrum of curvature inhomogeneities for typical wavelengths larger than the Hubble radius.

  13. Research on aviation fuel instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C. E.; Bittker, D. A.; Cohen, S. M.; Seng, G. T.

    1984-01-01

    The problems associated with aircraft fuel instability are discussed. What is currently known about the problem is reviewed and a research program to identify those areas where more research is needed is discussed. The term fuel instability generally refers to the gums, sediments, or deposits which can form as a result of a set of complex chemical reactions when a fuel is stored for a long period at ambient conditions or when the fuel is thermally stressed inside the fuel system of an aircraft.

  14. Mechanical Instabilities of Biological Tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannezo, Edouard; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François

    2012-07-01

    We study theoretically the morphologies of biological tubes affected by various pathologies. When epithelial cells grow, the negative tension produced by their division provokes a buckling instability. Several shapes are investigated: varicose, dilated, sinuous, or sausagelike. They are all found in pathologies of tracheal, renal tubes, or arteries. The final shape depends crucially on the mechanical parameters of the tissues: Young’s modulus, wall-to-lumen ratio, homeostatic pressure. We argue that since tissues must be in quasistatic mechanical equilibrium, abnormal shapes convey information as to what causes the pathology. We calculate a phase diagram of tubular instabilities which could be a helpful guide for investigating the underlying genetic regulation.

  15. Political instability and illegal immigration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, J E; Lien, D

    1995-01-01

    "Economic theory suggests that transnational migration results from the push-pull effect of wage differentials between host and source countries. In this paper, we argue that political instability exacerbates the migration flow, with greater instability leading to relatively larger flows. We conclude then that an optimal solution to the illegal immigration problem requires proper coordination of immigration and foreign policies by the host country. A narrow preoccupation with tougher immigration laws is wasteful and may be marginally effective." Emphasis is on the United States as a host country.

  16. Undulation Instability of Epithelial Tissues

    CERN Document Server

    Basan, Markus; Prost, Jacques; Risler, Thomas; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.158101

    2011-01-01

    Treating the epithelium as an incompressible fluid adjacent to a viscoelastic stroma, we find a novel hydrodynamic instability that leads to the formation of protrusions of the epithelium into the stroma. This instability is a candidate for epithelial fingering observed in vivo. It occurs for sufficiently large viscosity, cell-division rate and thickness of the dividing region in the epithelium. Our work provides physical insight into a potential mechanism by which interfaces between epithelia and stromas undulate, and potentially by which tissue dysplasia leads to cancerous invasion.

  17. Molecular Clouds: Observation to Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kane, J O; Ryutov, D D; Mizuta, A; Remington, B A; Pound, M W

    2004-05-06

    Our ongoing investigation of how 'Pillars' and other structure form in molecular clouds irradiated by ultraviolet (UV) stars has revealed that the Rayleigh-Taylor instability is strongly suppressed by recombination in the photoevaporated outflow, that clumps and filaments may be key, that the evolution of structure is well-modeled by compressible hydrodynamics, and that directionality of the UV radiation may have significant effects. We discuss a generic, flexible set of laboratory experiments that can address these issues.

  18. Comment on "Deep mixing of 3He: reconciling Big Bang and stellar nucleosynthesis".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balser, Dana S; Rood, Robert T; Bania, T M

    2007-08-31

    Eggleton et al. (Reports, 8 December 2006, p. 1580) reported on a deep-mixing mechanism in low-mass stars caused by a Rayleigh-Taylor instability that destroys all of the helium isotope 3He produced during the star's lifetime. Observations of 3He in planetary nebulae, however, indicate that some stars produce prodigious amounts of 3He. This is inconsistent with the claim that all low-mass stars should destroy 3He.

  19. Laboratory Experiments to Simulate and Investigate the Physics Underlying the Dynamics of Merging Solar Corona Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-05

    intimately related to fast reconnection. 8. Bellan et al. (2015) provided an overview of the experimental activities by the Bellan plasma group at...wave. Physics of Plasmas, 20(4). 042117. Bellan, P. M. 2014. Fast , purely growing collisionless reconnection as an eigen- function problem related to...induced by kink-driven Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Physics of Plasmas, 23. 032122. Chaplin, Vernon H., & Bellan, Paul M. 2013. Fast Ignitron Trigger

  20. Inertial confinement fusion. Quarterly report, July--September 1993: Volume 3, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacks, R.A.; Murphy, P.W.; Schleich, D.P. [eds.

    1993-12-31

    This report discusses the following research: Diode-pumped solid- state-laser driver for inertial fusion energy power plants; Longitudinal beam dynamics in heavy ion fusion accelerators; Design of the ion sources for heavy ion fusion; Measurement of electron density in laser-produced plasma with a soft x-ray moire deflectometer; and Analysis of weakly nonlinear three-dimensional Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth.

  1. Secondary instabilities of linearly heated falling films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Jun; SUN Dejun; HU Guohui; YIN Xieyuan

    2005-01-01

    Secondary instabilities of linearly heated failing films are studied through three steps. Firstly, the analysis of the primary linear instability on Miladinova's long wave equation of the linearly heated film is performed. Secondly, the similar Landau equation is derived through weak nonlinear theory, and a two-dimensional nonlinear saturation solution of primary instability is obtained within the weak nonlinear domain. Thirdly, the secondary (three-dimensional) instability of the two-dimensional wave is studied by the Floquet theorem.Our secondary instability analysis shows that the Marangoni number has destabilization effect on the secondary instability.

  2. Edge instabilities of topological superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Johannes S.; Assaad, Fakher F.; Schnyder, Andreas P.

    2016-05-01

    Nodal topological superconductors display zero-energy Majorana flat bands at generic edges. The flatness of these edge bands, which is protected by time-reversal and translation symmetry, gives rise to an extensive ground-state degeneracy. Therefore, even arbitrarily weak interactions lead to an instability of the flat-band edge states towards time-reversal and translation-symmetry-broken phases, which lift the ground-state degeneracy. We examine the instabilities of the flat-band edge states of dx y-wave superconductors by performing a mean-field analysis in the Majorana basis of the edge states. The leading instabilities are Majorana mass terms, which correspond to coherent superpositions of particle-particle and particle-hole channels in the fermionic language. We find that attractive interactions induce three different mass terms. One is a coherent superposition of imaginary s -wave pairing and current order, and another combines a charge-density-wave and finite-momentum singlet pairing. Repulsive interactions, on the other hand, lead to ferromagnetism together with spin-triplet pairing at the edge. Our quantum Monte Carlo simulations confirm these findings and demonstrate that these instabilities occur even in the presence of strong quantum fluctuations. We discuss the implications of our results for experiments on cuprate high-temperature superconductors.

  3. Lending sociodynamics and economic instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Raymond J.

    2011-11-01

    We show how the dynamics of economic instability and financial crises articulated by Keynes in the General Theory and developed by Minsky as the Financial Instability Hypothesis can be formalized using Weidlich’s sociodynamics of opinion formation. The model addresses both the lending sentiment of a lender in isolation as well as the impact on that lending sentiment of the behavior of other lenders. The risk associated with lending is incorporated through a stochastic treatment of loan dynamics that treats prepayment and default as competing risks. With this model we are able to generate endogenously the rapid changes in lending opinion that attend slow changes in lending profitability and find these dynamics to be consistent with the rise and collapse of the non-Agency mortgage-backed securities market in 2007/2008. As the parameters of this model correspond to well-known phenomena in cognitive and social psychology, we can both explain why economic instability has proved robust to advances in risk measurement and suggest how policy for reducing economic instability might be formulated in an experimentally sound manner.

  4. The Chemistry of Beer Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Graham G.

    2004-01-01

    Brewing of beer, one of the oldest biotechnology industries was one of the earliest processes to be undertaken on commercial basis. Biological instability involves contamination of bacteria, yeast, or mycelia fungi and there is always a risk in brewing that beer can become contaminated by micro-organisms.

  5. Size effects on cavitation instabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2006-01-01

    In metal-ceramic systems the constraint on plastic flow leads to so high stress triaxialities that cavitation instabilities may occur. If the void radius is on the order of magnitude of a characteristic length for the metal, the rate of void growth is reduced, and the possibility of unstable cavi...... as the void grows to a size well above the characteristic material length....

  6. Waves and instabilities in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Chen Liu

    1987-01-01

    The topics covered in these notes are selective and tend to emphasize more on kinetic-theory approaches to waves and instabilities in both uniform and non-uniform plasmas, students are assumed to have some basic knowledge of plasma dynamics in terms of single-particle and fluid descriptions.

  7. GENETIC INSTABILITY IN CERVICAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵旻; 伍欣星; 邱小萍; 李晖; 戴天力; 谭云

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the development of cervical carcinoma has been clearly established but other factors could be involved in cervical tumorigenesis such as loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and microsatellite instability (MI). The aim of the present study was to investigate the genetic instability in cervical carcinoma tissues and provide evidence for discoveringnew tumor suppressor genes and screening diagnostic molecular marker of cervical carcinoma. Methods: Fifty primary cervical carcinoma samples from high-incidence area were analyzed by PCR for HPV16 infection, LOH and microsatellite instability. Results: HPV16 was detected in 88% of the cases. Sixty-six percent of total cases showed LOH with no more than 3 different loci per case. The highest frequency of the allelic loss was found in D18S474 (18q21, 40.5%). MI was detected in 4 cases (8%) only. Conclusion: Different percentages of LOH on specific chromosomal regions were found and MI was very infrequent in cervical carcinoma. The putative suppressor gene(s) could be located on specific chromosome regions such as 18q, and genetic instability could be involved in cervical tumorigenesis.

  8. Singlet and triplet instability theorems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Tomonori; Hirata, So

    2015-09-01

    A useful definition of orbital degeneracy—form-degeneracy—is introduced, which is distinct from the usual energy-degeneracy: Two canonical spatial orbitals are form-degenerate when the energy expectation value in the restricted Hartree-Fock (RHF) wave function is unaltered upon a two-electron excitation from one of these orbitals to the other. Form-degenerate orbitals tend to have isomorphic electron densities and occur in the highest-occupied and lowest-unoccupied molecular orbitals (HOMOs and LUMOs) of strongly correlated systems. Here, we present a mathematical proof of the existence of a triplet instability in a real or complex RHF wave function of a finite system in the space of real or complex unrestricted Hartree-Fock wave functions when HOMO and LUMO are energy- or form-degenerate. We also show that a singlet instability always exists in a real RHF wave function of a finite system in the space of complex RHF wave functions, when HOMO and LUMO are form-degenerate, but have nonidentical electron densities, or are energy-degenerate. These theorems provide Hartree-Fock-theory-based explanations of Hund's rule, a singlet instability in Jahn-Teller systems, biradicaloid electronic structures, and a triplet instability during some covalent bond breaking. They also suggest (but not guarantee) the spontaneous formation of a spin density wave (SDW) in a metallic solid. The stability theory underlying these theorems extended to a continuous orbital-energy spectrum proves the existence of an oscillating (nonspiral) SDW instability in one- and three-dimensional homogeneous electron gases, but only at low densities or for strong interactions.

  9. Observation of Parametric Instability in Advanced LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Matthew; Fritschel, Peter; Miller, John; Barsotti, Lisa; Martynov, Denis; Brooks, Aidan; Coyne, Dennis; Abbott, Rich; Adhikari, Rana; Arai, Koji; Bork, Rolf; Kells, Bill; Rollins, Jameson; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Vajente, Gabriele; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Derosa, Ryan; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Betzweiser, Joseph; Frolov, Valera; Mullavey, Adam; O`Reilly, Brian; Dwyer, Sheila; Izumi, Kiwamu; Kawabe, Keita; Landry, Michael; Sigg, Daniel; Ballmer, Stefan; Massinger, Thomas J; Staley, Alexa; Mueller, Chris; Grote, Hartmut; Ward, Robert; King, Eleanor; Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, Chunnong

    2015-01-01

    Parametric instabilities have long been studied as a potentially limiting effect in high-power interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Until now, however, these instabilities have never been observed in a kilometer-scale interferometer. In this work we describe the first observation of parametric instability in an Advanced LIGO detector, and the means by which it has been removed as a barrier to progress.

  10. Analogy between thermal convective and magnetohydrodynamic instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdmanis, Ya.Ya.; Kukainis, O.A.

    1977-01-01

    An examination is made of the analogy between thermo-convective instability and instability produced by various electromagnetic forces both in steady and alternating thermal and electromagnetic fields. An example is given for calculating an assumed bubble instability which could occur in an alternating magnetic field. 17 references.

  11. Amplitude Equation for Instabilities Driven at Deformable Surfaces - Rosensweig Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleiner, Harald; Bohlius, Stefan; Brand, Helmut R.

    2008-11-01

    The derivation of amplitude equations from basic hydro-, magneto-, or electrodynamic equations requires the knowledge of the set of adjoint linear eigenvectors. This poses a particular problem for the case of a free and deformable surface, where the adjoint boundary conditions are generally non-trivial. In addition, when the driving force acts on the system via the deformable surface, not only Fredholm's alternative in the bulk, but also the proper boundary conditions are required to get amplitude equations. This is explained and demonstrated for the normal field (or Rosensweig) instability in ferrofluids as well as in ferrogels. An important aspect of the problem is its intrinsic dynamic nature, although at the end the instability is stationary. The resulting amplitude equation contains cubic and quadratic nonlinearities as well as first and (in the gel case) second order time derivatives. Spatial variations of the amplitudes cannot be obtained by using simply Newell's method in the bulk.

  12. Observations of post-flare supra-arcades: instabilities at the head of reconnection jets

    CERN Document Server

    Innes, Davina; Bhattacharjee, Amitava; Huang, Yi-Min

    2014-01-01

    Supra-arcades are bright fans of emission that develop after eruptive flares, above post-flare arcades. The underlying flare arcades are thought to be a consequence of magnetic reconnection along a current sheet in the corona. At the same time, theory predicts plasma jets from the reconnection site which, because of their low density, are extremely difficult to observe directly. It has been suggested, however, that the dark supra-arcade downflows (SADs) seen falling through supra-arcade fans may be low-density jet plasma. The head of a low density jet directed towards higher density plasma would be Rayleigh-Taylor unstable, and lead to the development of rapidly growing low and high density fingers along the interface. Here we show details of SADs forming at the top of bright supra-arcade fans, as seen in Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 131A images. The SADs often formed near the top of fan spikes. Some of the SADs were seen to split at their heads. Most SADs did not show enhanced emis...

  13. Competing structural instabilities in cubic perovskites

    CERN Document Server

    Vanderbilt, D

    1994-01-01

    We study the antiferrodistortive instability and its interaction with ferroelectricity in cubic perovskite compounds. Our first-principles calculations show that coexistence of both instabilities is very common. We develop a first-principles scheme to study the thermodynamics of these compounds when both instabilities are present, and apply it to SrTiO$_3$. We find that increased pressure enhances the antiferrodistortive instability while suppressing the ferroelectric one. Moreover, the presence of one instability tends to suppress the other. A very rich $P$--$T$ phase diagram results.

  14. Quad-Bike Operational Instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ross H. Macmillan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The stake-holders in the quad-bike (QB industry in Australia have failed to reach a satisfactory resolution of the present impasse that exists with respect to the causes and mitigation of the trauma suffered by riders due to QB instability. In an effort to provide purchasers with data enabling them to discriminate between safer and less safe machines, static longitudinal and lateral tests have been conducted by various interested parties; quasi-static lateral tests have also been conducted under some operational conditions. It is argued that while these static tests are valid, under many operating conditions QBs will not reach such unstable slopes due to poor traction. Further, these tests do not include the quasi-static and dynamic factors which also influence the processes associated with operational instability. For these reasons, the static tests do not provide an adequate basis for discrimination between safer and less safe machines.

  15. Nonlinear evolution of drift instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, W.W.; Krommes, J.A.; Oberman, C.R.; Smith, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    The nonlinear evolution of collisionless drift instabilities in a shear-free magnetic field has been studied by means of gyrokinetic particle simulation as well as numerical integration of model mode-coupling equations. The purpose of the investigation is to identify relevant nonlinear mechanisms responsible for the steady-state drift wave fluctuations. It is found that the saturation of the instability is mainly caused by the nonlinear E x B convection of the resonant electrons and their associated velocity space nonlinearity. The latter also induces energy exchange between the competing modes, which, in turn, gives rise to enhanced diffusion. The nonlinear E x B convection of the ions, which contributes to the nonlinear frequency shift, is also an important ingredient for the saturation.

  16. Streaming Instabilities in Protoplanetary Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Youdin, A N; Youdin, Andrew N.; Goodman, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Interpenetrating streams of solids and gas in a Keplerian disk produce a local, linear instability. The two components mutually interact via aerodynamic drag, which generates radial drift and triggers unstable modes. The secular instability does not require self-gravity, yet it generates growing particle density perturbations that could seed planetesimal formation. Growth rates are slower than dynamical, but faster than radial drift, timescales. Growth rates, like streaming velocities, are maximized for marginal coupling (stopping times comparable dynamical times). Fastest growth occurs when the solid to gas density ratio is order unity and feedback is strongest. Curiously, growth is strongly suppressed when the densities are too nearly equal. The relation between background drift and wave properties is explained by analogy with Howard's semicircle theorem. The three-dimensional, two-fluid equations describe a sixth order (in the complex frequency) dispersion relation. A terminal velocity approximation allows...

  17. Instability of supersymmetric microstate geometries

    CERN Document Server

    Eperon, Felicity C; Santos, Jorge E

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the classical stability of supersymmetric, asymptotically flat, microstate geometries with five non-compact dimensions. Such geometries admit an "evanescent ergosurface": a timelike hypersurface of infinite redshift. On such a surface, there are null geodesics with zero energy relative to infinity. These geodesics are stably trapped in the potential well near the ergosurface. We present a heuristic argument indicating that this feature is likely to lead to a nonlinear instability of these solutions. We argue that the precursor of such an instability can be seen in the behaviour of linear perturbations: nonlinear stability would require that all linear perturbations decay sufficiently rapidly but the stable trapping implies that some linear perturbation decay very slowly. We study this in detail for the most symmetric microstate geometries. By constructing quasinormal modes of these geometries we show that generic linear perturbations decay slower than any inverse power of time.

  18. Buckling instability of squeezed droplets

    CERN Document Server

    Elfring, Gwynn J

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by recent experiments, we consider theoretically the compression of droplets pinned at the bottom on a surface of finite area. We show that if the droplet is sufficiently compressed at the top by a surface, it will always develop a shape instability at a critical compression. When the top surface is flat, the shape instability occurs precisely when the apparent contact angle of the droplet at the pinned surface is pi, regardless of the contact angle of the upper surface, reminiscent of past work on liquid bridges and sessile droplets as first observed by Plateau. After the critical compression, the droplet transitions from a symmetric to an asymmetric shape. The force required to deform the droplet peaks at the critical point then progressively decreases indicative of catastrophic buckling. We characterize the transition in droplet shape using illustrative examples in two dimensions followed by perturbative analysis as well as numerical simulation in three dimensions. When the upper surface is not f...

  19. Stretching Folding Instability and Nanoemulsions

    CERN Document Server

    Chan, Chon U

    2009-01-01

    Here we show a folding-stretching instability in a microfluidic flow focusing device using silicon oil (100cSt) and water. The fluid dynamics video demonstrates an oscillating thread of oil focused by two co-flowing streams of water. We show several high-speed sequences of these oscillations with 30,000 frames/s. Once the thread is decelerated in a slower moving pool downstream an instability sets in and water-in-oil droplets are formed. We reveal the details of the pinch-off with 500,000 frames/s. The pinch-off is so repeatable that complex droplet patterns emerge. Some of droplets are below the resolution limit, thus smaller than 1 micrometer in diameter.

  20. Instability of ties in compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buch-Hansen, Thomas Cornelius

    2013-01-01

    Masonry cavity walls are loaded by wind pressure and vertical load from upper floors. These loads results in bending moments and compression forces in the ties connecting the outer and the inner wall in a cavity wall. Large cavity walls are furthermore loaded by differential movements from...... the temperature gradient between the outer and the inner wall, which results in critical increase of the bending moments in the ties. Since the ties are loaded by combined compression and moment forces, the loadbearing capacity is derived from instability equilibrium equations. Most of them are iterative, since......-connectors in cavity walls was developed. The method takes into account constraint conditions limiting the free length of the wall tie, and the instability in case of pure compression which gives an optimal load bearing capacity. The model is illustrated with examples from praxis....

  1. Instability of supersymmetric microstate geometries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eperon, Felicity C.; Reall, Harvey S.; Santos, Jorge E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-07

    We investigate the classical stability of supersymmetric, asymptotically flat, microstate geometries with five non-compact dimensions. Such geometries admit an “evanescent ergosurface”: a timelike hypersurface of infinite redshift. On such a surface, there are null geodesics with zero energy relative to infinity. These geodesics are stably trapped in the potential well near the ergosurface. We present a heuristic argument indicating that this feature is likely to lead to a nonlinear instability of these solutions. We argue that the precursor of such an instability can be seen in the behaviour of linear perturbations: nonlinear stability would require that all linear perturbations decay sufficiently rapidly but the stable trapping implies that some linear perturbation decay very slowly. We study this in detail for the most symmetric microstate geometries. By constructing quasinormal modes of these geometries we show that generic linear perturbations decay slower than any inverse power of time.

  2. Modern management of patellar instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Shin-Jae; Pavlou, George; Oakley, Jeremy; Barlow, David; Haddad, Farres

    2012-12-01

    Recurrent patellofemoral instability is a disabling condition, attributed to a variety of anatomical aetiologies. Trochlear dysplasia, patella alta, an increased tibial tubercle trochlear groove distance of greater than 20 mm and soft tissue abnormalities such as a torn medial patellofemoral ligament and inadequate vastus medialis obliquus are all factors to be considered. Management of this condition remains difficult and controversial and knowledge of the functional anatomy and biomechanics of the patellofemoral joint, a detailed history and clinical examination, and an accurate patient assessment are all imperative to formulate an appropriate management plan. Surgical treatment is based on the underlying anatomical pathology with an aim to restore normal patellofemoral kinematics. We summarise aspects of assessment, treatment and outcome of patellofemoral instability and propose an algorithm of treatment.

  3. Mechanical Instabilities of Biological Tubes

    CERN Document Server

    Hannezo, Edouard; Prost, Jacques; 10.1103/PhysRevLett.109.018101

    2012-01-01

    We study theoretically the shapes of biological tubes affected by various pathologies. When epithelial cells grow at an uncontrolled rate, the negative tension produced by their division provokes a buckling instability. Several shapes are investigated : varicose, enlarged, sinusoidal or sausage-like, all of which are found in pathologies of tracheal, renal tubes or arteries. The final shape depends crucially on the mechanical parameters of the tissues : Young modulus, wall-to-lumen ratio, homeostatic pressure. We argue that since tissues must be in quasistatic mechanical equilibrium, abnormal shapes convey information as to what causes the pathology. We calculate a phase diagram of tubular instabilities which could be a helpful guide for investigating the underlying genetic regulation.

  4. Fluctuations and Instability in Sedimentation

    KAUST Repository

    Guazzelli, Élisabeth

    2011-01-21

    This review concentrates on the fluctuations of the velocities of sedimenting spheres, and on the structural instability of a suspension of settling fibers. For many years, theoretical estimates and numerical simulations predicted the fluctuations of the velocities of spheres to increase with the size of the container, whereas experiments found no such variation. Two ideas have increased our understanding. First, the correlation length of the velocity fluctuations was found experimentally to be 20 interparticle separations. Second, in dilute suspensions, a vertical variation in the concentration due to the spreading of the front with the clear fluid can inhibit the velocity fluctuations. In a very dilute regime, a homogeneous suspension of fibers suffers a spontaneous instability in which fast descending fiber-rich columns are separated by rising fiber-sparse columns. In a semidilute regime, the settling is hindered, more so than for spheres. © 2011 by Annual Reviews. All rights reserved.

  5. Placing Marangoni instabilities under arrest

    CERN Document Server

    Bhamla, M Saad

    2016-01-01

    Soap bubbles occupy the rare position of delighting and fascinating both young children and scientific minds alike. Sir Isaac Newton, Joseph Plateau, Carlo Marangoni, and Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, not to mention countless others, have discovered remarkable results in optics, molecular forces and fluid dynamics from investigating this seemingly simple system. We present here a compilation of curiosity-driven experiments that systematically investigate the surface flows on a rising soap bubble. From childhood experience, we are familiar with the vibrant colors and mesmerizing display of chaotic flows on the surface of a soap bubble. These flows arise due to surface tension gradients, also known as Marangoni flows or instabilities. In Figure 1, we show the surprising effect of layering multiple instabilities on top of each other, highlighting that unexpected new phenomena are still waiting to be discovered, even in the simple soap bubble.

  6. Circulation in blast driven instabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry de Frahan, Marc; Johnsen, Eric

    2016-11-01

    Mixing in many natural phenomena (e.g. supernova collapse) and engineering applications (e.g. inertial confinement fusion) is often initiated through hydrodynamic instabilities. Explosions in these systems give rise to blast waves which can interact with perturbations at interfaces between different fluids. Blast waves are formed by a shock followed by a rarefaction. This wave profile leads to complex time histories of interface acceleration. In addition to the instabilities induced by the acceleration field, the rarefaction from the blast wave decompresses the material at the interface, further increasing the perturbation growth. After the passage of the wave, circulation circulation generated by the blast wave through baroclinic vorticity continues to act upon the interface. In this talk, we provide scaling laws for the circulation and amplitude growth induced by the blast wave. Numerical simulations of the multifluid Euler equations solved using a high-order accurate Discontinuous Galerkin method are used to validate the theoretical results.

  7. MD 751: Train Instability Threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Carver, Lee Robert; Metral, Elias; Salvant, Benoit; Levens, Tom; Nisbet, David; Zobov, M; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this MD is to measure the octupole current thresholds for stability for a single bunch, and then make an immediate comparison (with the same operational settings) for a train of 72 bunches separated by 25ns. From theory, the expected thresholds should be similar. Any discrepancy between the two cases will be of great interest as it could indicate the presence of additional mechanisms that contribute to the instability threshold, for example electron cloud.

  8. Polygonal instabilities on interfacial vorticities

    CERN Document Server

    Labousse, Matthieu

    2015-01-01

    We report the results of a theoretical investigation of the stability of a toroidal vortex bound by an interface. Two distinct instability mechanisms are identified that rely on, respectively, surface tension and fluid inertia, either of which may prompt the transformation from a circular to a polygonal torus. Our results are discussed in the context of three experiments, a toroidal vortex ring, the hydraulic jump, and the hydraulic bump.

  9. Instability of colliding metastable strings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiramatsu, Takashi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Yukawa Inst. for Theoretical Physics; Eto, Minoru [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kamada, Kohei [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Kobayashi, Tatsuo [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Ookouchi, Yutaka [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Kyoto Univ. (Japan). The Hakubi Center for Advanced Research

    2013-04-15

    We investigate the collision dynamics of two metastable strings which can be viewed as tube-like domain walls with winding numbers interpolating a false vacuum and a true vacuum. We find that depending on the relative angle and speed of two strings, instability of strings increases and the false vacuum is filled out by rapid expansion of the strings or of a remnant of the collision.

  10. Gravitational instabilities in astrophysical fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohline, Joel E.

    1990-01-01

    Over the past decade, the significant advancements that have been made in the development of computational tools and numerical techniques have allowed astrophysicists to begin to model accurately the nonlinear growth of gravitational instabilities in a variety of physical systems. The fragmentation or rotationally driven fission of dynamically evolving, self-gravitating ``drops and bubbles'' is now routinely modeled in full three-dimensional generality as we attempt to understand the behavior of protostellar clouds, rotating stars, galaxies, and even the primordial soup that defined the birth of the universe. A brief review is presented here of the general insights that have been gained from studies of this type, followed by a somewhat more detailed description of work, currently underway, that is designed to explain the process of binary star formation. A short video animation sequence, developed in conjunction with some of the research being reviewed, illustrates the basic-nature of the fission instability in rotating stars and of an instability that can arise in a massive disk that forms in a protostellar cloud.

  11. Microphysics of cosmic ray driven plasma instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Bykov, A M; Malkov, M A; Osipov, S M

    2013-01-01

    Energetic nonthermal particles (cosmic rays, CRs) are accelerated in supernova remnants, relativistic jets and other astrophysical objects. The CR energy density is typically comparable with that of the thermal components and magnetic fields. In this review we discuss mechanisms of magnetic field amplification due to instabilities induced by CRs. We derive CR kinetic and magnetohydrodynamic equations that govern cosmic plasma systems comprising the thermal background plasma, comic rays and fluctuating magnetic fields to study CR-driven instabilities. Both resonant and non-resonant instabilities are reviewed, including the Bell short-wavelength instability, and the firehose instability. Special attention is paid to the longwavelength instabilities driven by the CR current and pressure gradient. The helicity production by the CR current-driven instabilities is discussed in connection with the dynamo mechanisms of cosmic magnetic field amplification.

  12. Mathematics for 2d Interfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bardos, Claude

    2010-01-01

    We present here a survey of recent results concerning the mathematical analysis of instabilities of the interface between two incompressible, non viscous, fluids of constant density and vorticity concentrated on the interface. This configuration includes the so-called Kelvin-Helmholtz (the two densities are equal), Rayleigh-Taylor (two different, nonzero, densities) and the water waves (one of the densities is zero) problems. After a brief review of results concerning strong and weak solutions of the Euler equation, we derive interface equations (such as the Birkhoff-Rott equation) that describe the motion of the interface. A linear analysis allows us to exhibit the main features of these equations (such as ellipticity properties); the consequences for the full, non linear, equations are then described. In particular, the solutions of the Kelvin-Helmholtz and Rayleigh-Taylor problems are necessarily analytic if they are above a certain threshold of regularity (a consequence is the illposedness of the initial ...

  13. A High-Order Projection Method for Tracking Fluid Interfaces in Variable Density Incompressible Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckett, Elbridge Gerry; Almgren, Ann S.; Bell, John B.; Marcus, Daniel L.; Rider, William J.

    1997-01-01

    We present a numerical method for computing solutions of the incompressible Euler or Navier-Stokes equations when a principal feature of the flow is the presence of an interface between two fluids with different fluid properties. The method is based on a second-order projection method for variable density flows using an "approximate projection" formulation. The boundary between the fluids is tracked with a second-order, volume-of-fluid interface tracking algorithm. We present results for viscious Rayleigh-Taylor problems at early time with equal and unequal viscosities to demonstrate the convergence of the algorithm. We also present computational results for the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in air-helium and for bubbles and drops in an air-water system without surface tension to demonstrate the behavior of the algorithm on problems with large density and viscosity contrasts.

  14. Modes of storage ring coherent instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.M.

    1986-12-01

    Longitudinal impedance in a beam and various modes of longitudinal coherent instabilities are discussed. The coasting beam coherent instability, microwave instability, and single-bunch longitudinal coherent instabilities are considered. The Vlasov equation is formulated, and a method of solving it is developed. The synchrotron modes are treated, which take the possible bunch shape distortion fully into consideration. A method of treating the synchrotron mode coupling in the case of a small bunch is discussed which takes advantage of the fact that only a few of the synchrotron modes can contribute in such a case. The effect of many bunches on the coherent motion of the beam and the longitudinal symmetric coupled bunch modes are discussed. The transverse impedance is then introduced, and the transverse coasting beam instability is discussed. Various bunched beam instabilities are discussed, including both single bunch instabilities and coupled bunch instabilities. The Vlasov equation for transverse as well as longitudinal motion of particles is introduced as well as a method of solving it within a linear approximation. Head-tail modes and short bunch instabilities and strong coupling instabilities in the long bunch case are covered. (LEW)

  15. Compressor instability with integral methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, Y.K. Eddie [Nanyang Technological Univ., Singapore (Singapore). School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Liu, Ningyu [Singapore National Univ. (Singapore). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    ''Compressor Instability with Integral Methods'' is a book, to bring together the quick integral approaches and advances in the field for the prediction of stall and surge problem in compressor. This book is useful for people involved in the flow analysis, design and testing of rotating machinery. For students, it can be used as a specialized topic of senior undergraduate or graduate study. The book can also be served as a self-study material to those who keen to acquire this knowledge. In brief, this book focuses on the numerical/computational analysis for the effect of distorted inlet flow propagation on the rotating stall and surge in axial compressors. It gains insight into the basic phenomena controlling these flow instabilities, and reveals the influence of inlet parameters on rotating stall and surge. The book starts from the confirmation and application of Kim et al's integral method and then follows by a development to this method through the proposing and applying a critical distortion line. This line is applied successfully on the stall prediction of in-flight compressor due to flaming of refueling leakage near inlet, a typical real and interesting example of compressor stall and surge operation. Further, after a parametric study on the integral method and the distorted flow field of compressor using Taguchi method, a novel integral method is formulated using more appropriate and practical airfoil characteristics, with a less assumptions needed for derivation. Finally, as an extended work, the famous Greitzer's instability flow model, the well-known B-parameter model applied for analyzing the stall and surge characteristics, is studied parametrically using Taguchi method. (orig.)

  16. Bathtub vortex induced by instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Jiro; Abe, Kazuki; Yokoyama, Naoto

    2014-10-01

    The driving mechanism and the swirl direction of the bathtub vortex are investigated by the linear stability analysis of the no-vortex flow as well as numerical simulations. We find that only systems having plane symmetries with respect to vertical planes deserve research for the swirl direction. The bathtub vortex appearing in a vessel with a rectangular cross section having a drain hole at the center of the bottom is proved to be induced by instability when the flow rate exceeds a threshold. The Coriolis force is capable of determining the swirl direction to be cyclonic.

  17. Spatiotemporal chaos involving wave instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenstein, Igal; Carballido-Landeira, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate pattern formation in a model of a reaction confined in a microemulsion, in a regime where both Turing and wave instability occur. In one-dimensional systems, the pattern corresponds to spatiotemporal intermittency where the behavior of the systems alternates in both time and space between stationary Turing patterns and traveling waves. In two-dimensional systems, the behavior initially may correspond to Turing patterns, which then turn into wave patterns. The resulting pattern also corresponds to a chaotic state, where the system alternates in both space and time between standing wave patterns and traveling waves, and the local dynamics may show vanishing amplitude of the variables.

  18. Nonlinear Instability of Liquid Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhouse, Lori Ann

    The nonlinear instability of two superposed viscous liquid layers in planar and axisymmetric configurations is investigated. In the planar configuration, the light layer fluid is bounded below by a wall and above by a heavy semiinfinite fluid. Gravity drives the instability. In the first axisymmetric configuration, the layer is confined between a cylindrical wall and a core of another fluid. In the second, a thread is suspended in an infinite fluid. Surface tension forces drive the instability in the axisymmetric configurations. The nonlinear evolution of the fluid-fluid interface is computed for layers of arbitrary thickness when their dynamics are fully coupled to those of the second fluid. Under the assumption of creeping flow, the flow field is represented by an interfacial distribution of Green's functions. A Fredholm integral equation of the second kind for the strength of the distribution is derived and then solved using an iterative technique. The Green's functions produce flow fields which are periodic in the direction parallel to the wall and have zero velocity on the wall. For small and moderate surface tension, planar layers evolve into a periodic array of viscous plumes which penetrate into the overlying fluid. The morphology of the plumes depends on the surface tension and the ratio of the fluid viscosities. As the viscosity of the layer increases, the plumes change from a well defined drop on top of a narrow stem to a compact column of rising fluid. The capillary instability of cylindrical interfaces and interfaces in which the core thickness varies in the axial direction are investigated. In both the unbounded and wall bounded configurations, the core evolves into a periodic array of elongated fluid drops connected by thin, almost cylindrical fluid links. The characteristics of the drop-link structure depend on the core thickness, the ratio of the core radius to the wall radius, and the ratio of the fluid viscosities. The factors controlling the

  19. Mode-locking via dissipative Faraday instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Nikita; Perego, Auro M.; Churkin, Dmitry V.; Staliunas, Kestutis; Turitsyn, Sergei K.

    2016-08-01

    Emergence of coherent structures and patterns at the nonlinear stage of modulation instability of a uniform state is an inherent feature of many biological, physical and engineering systems. There are several well-studied classical modulation instabilities, such as Benjamin-Feir, Turing and Faraday instability, which play a critical role in the self-organization of energy and matter in non-equilibrium physical, chemical and biological systems. Here we experimentally demonstrate the dissipative Faraday instability induced by spatially periodic zig-zag modulation of a dissipative parameter of the system--spectrally dependent losses--achieving generation of temporal patterns and high-harmonic mode-locking in a fibre laser. We demonstrate features of this instability that distinguish it from both the Benjamin-Feir and the purely dispersive Faraday instability. Our results open the possibilities for new designs of mode-locked lasers and can be extended to other fields of physics and engineering.

  20. Transverse Instabilities in the Fermilab Recycler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prost, L.R.; Burov, A.; Shemyakin, A.; Bhat, C.M.; Crisp, J.; Eddy, N.; /Fermilab

    2011-07-01

    Transverse instabilities of the antiproton beam have been observed in the Recycler ring soon after its commissioning. After installation of transverse dampers, the threshold for the instability limit increased significantly but the instability is still found to limit the brightness of the antiprotons extracted from the Recycler for Tevatron shots. In this paper, we describe observations of the instabilities during the extraction process as well as during dedicated studies. The measured instability threshold phase density agrees with the prediction of the rigid beam model within a factor of 2. Also, we conclude that the instability threshold can be significantly lowered for a bunch contained in a narrow and shallow potential well due to effective exclusion of the longitudinal tails from Landau damping.