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Sample records for hydrogen-consuming bacteria living

  1. Living bacteria in silica gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassif, Nadine; Bouvet, Odile; Noelle Rager, Marie; Roux, Cécile; Coradin, Thibaud; Livage, Jacques

    2002-09-01

    The encapsulation of enzymes within silica gels has been extensively studied during the past decade for the design of biosensors and bioreactors. Yeast spores and bacteria have also been recently immobilized within silica gels where they retain their enzymatic activity, but the problem of the long-term viability of whole cells in an inorganic matrix has never been fully addressed. It is a real challenge for the development of sol-gel processes. Generic tests have been performed to check the viability of Escherichia coli bacteria in silica gels. Surprisingly, more bacteria remain culturable in the gel than in an aqueous suspension. The metabolic activity of the bacteria towards glycolysis decreases slowly, but half of the bacteria are still viable after one month. When confined within a mineral environment, bacteria do not form colonies. The exchange of chemical signals between isolated bacteria rather than aggregates can then be studied, a point that could be very important for 'quorum sensing'.

  2. Microencapsulation of live probiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Choi, Yun-Jaie; Cho, Chong-Su

    2010-10-01

    Scientific research regarding the use of live bacterial cells for therapeutic purposes has been rapidly growing over the years and has generated considerable interest to scientists and health professionals. Probiotics are defined as essential live microorganisms which, when administered in adequate amounts, confer a health benefit on the host. Due to considerable beneficial health effects, these microorganisms are increasingly incorporated into the dairy products; however, many reports demonstrated their poor survival and stability. Their survival in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is also questionable. To overcome these problems, microencapsulation techniques are currently receiving considerable attention. This review describes the importance of live probiotic bacterial microencapsulation using an alginate microparticulate system and presents the potentiality of various coating polymers such as chitosan and polylysine for improving the stability of this microencapsulation.

  3. Bacteria of living and dead larvae of Porthetria dispar (L.)

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    John D. Podgwaite; Benjamin J. Cosenza

    1966-01-01

    A preliminary study of the bacteria associated with living and dead larvae of the gypsy moth (Porthetria dispar (L.)) was undertaken to determine what types of micro-organisms may be associated with disease in this insect. Specific objectives of this study were to enumerate the types of aerobic bacteria, and if possible to further elucidate the role...

  4. Relationships between Free-Living Amoeba and their Intracellular Bacteria

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    Rubeniņa Ilze

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of bacteria have been described as benefiting from interaction with free-living amoeba. The most common association between free-living amoeba and microorganisms is interaction of various non-pathogenic and pathogenic bacterial species with amoeba. Various pathogenic bacterial species have capacity to resist digestion by free-living amoeba, which has been observed by many researchers. Also, several of these pathogens are able to resist digestion by macrophages. In addition, free-living amoeba have been associated with several diseases in humans. Acanthamniioeba castella is an important predator of bacteria. It is a ubiquitous organism in water, soil, and air. Attention from a public health perspective is needed by investigation of interaction of foodborne pathogens and free-living amoeba. Bacteria can use free-living amoeba as reservoirs, mediators or vehicles, an infection route, “biological gym” and evolutionary crib or interaction may result in a close endosymbiotic relationship. The purpose of this review is to describe the interaction mechanisms between free-living amoeba and common bacteria species that survive in host cells.

  5. ANALYSIS OF PARS PLANA VITRECTOMY INCISIONS USING LIVE BACTERIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Michael N; Houston, Samuel K; Roberts, Amity L; Eagle, Ralph C; Gupta, Omesh P

    2017-06-01

    To analyze small gauge pars plana vitrectomy sclerotomies using live bacteria transformed with green fluorescent protein (GFP). Twenty-eight human cadaver eyes were specially harvested for this study. Small gauge vitrectomy was performed on each eye and the wounds were closed with various techniques (sutured, sutureless, and cauterization). Live Staphylococcus epidermidis that has been transformed with a green fluorescent protein was applied to the overlying conjunctival surface. Analysis of all vitreous samples was analyzed with confocal laser microscopy to identify the presence of bacteria. All wounds were analyzed histopathologically. A high concentration of bacteria was noted in 2 of 3 eyes in the sutureless, 23-G perpendicular incision group postinoculation. There were no bacteria detected in any postvitrectomy sample that were closed with cautery or a beveled incision. No bacteria were found in postvitrectomy samples of sutureless 27-G perpendicular incisions and sutureless 27-G beveled incisions. Finally, there were no bacteria detected in both eyes with 23-G perpendicular incisions that had a partial air-fill. Live bacteria can be effectively used to analyze wound integrity. Closing sclerotomy sites with cautery proved effective in a model using fresh, human cadaver eyes. 27-G perpendicular incisions may be just as competent as 27-G beveled incisions.

  6. Topological Defects in a Living Nematic Ensnare Swimming Bacteria

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    Genkin, Mikhail M.; Sokolov, Andrey; Lavrentovich, Oleg D.; Aranson, Igor S.

    2017-01-01

    Active matter exemplified by suspensions of motile bacteria or synthetic self-propelled particles exhibits a remarkable propensity to self-organization and collective motion. The local input of energy and simple particle interactions often lead to complex emergent behavior manifested by the formation of macroscopic vortices and coherent structures with long-range order. A realization of an active system has been conceived by combining swimming bacteria and a lyotropic liquid crystal. Here, by coupling the well-established and validated model of nematic liquid crystals with the bacterial dynamics, we develop a computational model describing intricate properties of such a living nematic. In faithful agreement with the experiment, the model reproduces the onset of periodic undulation of the director and consequent proliferation of topological defects with the increase in bacterial concentration. It yields a testable prediction on the accumulation of bacteria in the cores of +1 /2 topological defects and depletion of bacteria in the cores of -1 /2 defects. Our dedicated experiment on motile bacteria suspended in a freestanding liquid crystalline film fully confirms this prediction. Our findings suggest novel approaches for trapping and transport of bacteria and synthetic swimmers in anisotropic liquids and extend a scope of tools to control and manipulate microscopic objects in active matter.

  7. Nanofibrous solid dosage form of living bacteria prepared by electrospinning

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    I. Wagner

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to investigate the suitability of electrospinning for biodrug delivery and to develop an electrospinning-based method to produce vaginal drug delivery systems. Lactobacillus acidophilus bacteria were encapsulated into nanofibers of three different polymers (polyvinyl alcohol and polyvinylpyrrolidone with two different molar masses. Shelf life of the bacteria could be enhanced by the exclusion of water and by preparing a solid dosage form, which is an advantageous and patient-friendly way of administration. The formulations were stored at –20, 7 and 25°C, respectively. Viability testing showed that the nanofibers can provide long term stability for huge amounts of living bacteria if they are kept at (or below 7°C. Furthermore, all kinds of nanowebs prepared in this work dissolved instantly when they got in contact with water, thus the developed biohybrid nanowebs can provide new potential ways for curing bacterial vaginosis.

  8. Immobilisation of living bacteria for AFM imaging under physiological conditions

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    Louise Meyer, Rikke, E-mail: rikke.meyer@inano.au.dk [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Department of Biological Sciences, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Zhou, Xingfei [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Tang, Lone [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Department of Biological Sciences, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Arpanaei, Ayyoob; Kingshott, Peter [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Besenbacher, Flemming [Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center (iNANO), Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2010-10-15

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) holds great potential for studying the nanoscale surface structures of living cells, and to measure their interactions with abiotic surfaces, other cells, or specific biomolecules. However, the application of AFM in microbiology is challenging due to the difficulty of immobilising bacterial cells to a flat surface without changing the cell surface properties or cell viability. We have performed an extensive and thorough study of how to functionalise surfaces in order to immobilise living bacteria for AFM studies in liquid environments. Our aim was to develop a scheme which allows bacterial cells to be immobilised to a flat surface with sufficient strength to avoid detachment during the AFM scanning, and without affecting cell surface chemistry, structure, and viability. We compare and evaluate published methods, and present a new, reproducible, and generally applicable scheme for immobilising bacteria cells for an AFM imaging. Bacterial cells were immobilised to modified glass surfaces by physical confinement of cells in microwells, physisorption to positively charged surfaces, covalent binding to amine- or carboxyl-terminated surfaces, and adsorption to surfaces coated with highly adhesive polyphenolic proteins originating from the mussel Mytilus edulis. Living cells could be immobilised with all of these approaches, but many cells detached when immobilised by electrostatic interactions and imaged in buffers like PBS or MOPS. Cells were more firmly attached when immobilised by covalent binding, although some cells still detached during AFM imaging. The most successful method revealed was immobilisation by polyphenolic proteins, which facilitated firm immobilisation of the cells. Furthermore, the cell viability was not affected by this immobilisation scheme, and adhesive proteins thus provide a fast, reproducible, and generally applicable scheme for immobilising living bacteria for an AFM imaging.

  9. 9 CFR 113.27 - Detection of extraneous viable bacteria and fungi in live vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. 113.27 Section 113.27 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT... bacteria and fungi in live vaccines. Unless otherwise specified by the Administrator or elsewhere exempted... Seed Bacteria shall be tested for extraneous viable bacteria and fungi as prescribed in this section. A...

  10. Profiling Living Bacteria Informs Preparation of Fecal Microbiota Transplantations.

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    Nathaniel D Chu

    Full Text Available Fecal microbiota transplantation is a compelling treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infections, with potential applications against other diseases associated with changes in gut microbiota. But variability in fecal bacterial communities-believed to be the therapeutic agent-can complicate or undermine treatment efficacy. To understand the effects of transplant preparation methods on living fecal microbial communities, we applied a DNA-sequencing method (PMA-seq that uses propidium monoazide (PMA to differentiate between living and dead fecal microbes, and we created an analysis pipeline to identify individual bacteria that change in abundance between samples. We found that oxygen exposure degraded fecal bacterial communities, whereas freeze-thaw cycles and lag time between donor defecation and transplant preparation had much smaller effects. Notably, the abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii-an anti-inflammatory commensal bacterium whose absence is linked to inflammatory bowel disease-decreased with oxygen exposure. Our results indicate that some current practices for preparing microbiota transplant material adversely affect living fecal microbial content and highlight PMA-seq as a valuable tool to inform best practices and evaluate the suitability of clinical fecal material.

  11. Polymer/bacteria composite nanofiber non-wovens by electrospinning of living bacteria protected by hydrogel microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensheimer, Marco; Brandis-Heep, Astrid; Agarwal, Seema; Thauer, Rudolf K; Greiner, Andreas

    2011-03-10

    Physically crosslinked PVA-hydrogel microparticles are utilized for encapsulation of E. coli and M. luteus. The bacteria survive dry storage or treatment with bacteria-hostile organic solvents significantly better than unprotected bacteria as proven by culture-test experiments. The bacteria-protecting PVA microparticles are available for standard polymer-solution-processing techniques, as exemplarily shown by co-electrospinning of living bacteria encapsulated in dry PVA-hydrogel microparticles together with PVB-, PLLA-, and PCL-form organic solvents. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. 9 CFR 113.26 - Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detection of viable bacteria and fungi except in live vaccine. 113.26 Section 113.26 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH... in live vaccine. Each serial and subserial of biological product except live vaccines shall be tested...

  13. Active invasion of bacteria into living fungal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebius, Nadine; Üzüm, Zerrin; Dijksterhuis, Jan; Lackner, Gerald; Hertweck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The rice seedling blight fungus Rhizopus microsporus and its endosymbiont Burkholderia rhizoxinica form an unusual, highly specific alliance to produce the highly potent antimitotic phytotoxin rhizoxin. Yet, it has remained a riddle how bacteria invade the fungal cells. Genome mining for potential symbiosis factors and functional analyses revealed that a type 2 secretion system (T2SS) of the bacterial endosymbiont is required for the formation of the endosymbiosis. Comparative proteome analyses show that the T2SS releases chitinolytic enzymes (chitinase, chitosanase) and chitin-binding proteins. The genes responsible for chitinolytic proteins and T2SS components are highly expressed during infection. Through targeted gene knock-outs, sporulation assays and microscopic investigations we found that chitinase is essential for bacteria to enter hyphae. Unprecedented snapshots of the traceless bacterial intrusion were obtained using cryo-electron microscopy. Beyond unveiling the pivotal role of chitinolytic enzymes in the active invasion of a fungus by bacteria, these findings grant unprecedented insight into the fungal cell wall penetration and symbiosis formation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03007.001 PMID:25182414

  14. Growth ability of Gram negative bacteria in free-living amoebae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeybek, Zuhal; Binay, Ali Rıza

    2014-11-01

    When bacteria and free-living amoebae (FLAs) live both in natural waters and man-made aquatic systems, they constantly interact with each other. Some bacteria can survive and grow within FLAs. Therefore, it has recently been thought that FLAs play an important role in spreading pathogenic bacteria in aquatic systems. In this study we investigated the intracellular growing ability of 7 different Gram-negative bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Pseudomonas putida, Pasteurella pneumotropica, Aeromonas salmonicida, Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1, L. pneumophila serogroup 3, L. pneumophila serogroup 6) in four different FLA isolates (A1-A4). Among these, four bacterial isolates (P. fluorescens, P.putida, P.pneumotropica, A.salmonicida) and two free-living amoebae isolates (A3, A4) were isolated from the tap water in our city (Istanbul). It was found that 4 different Gram-negative bacteria could grow in A1, 2 different Gram-negative bacteria could grow in A2, 4 different Gram-negative bacteria could grow in A3, 1 Gram-negative bacterium could grow in A4. In conclusion, we think that this ability of growth could vary according to the characteristics of both bacteria and FLA isolates. Also, other factors such as environmental temperature, bacterial concentration, and extended incubation period may play a role in these interactions. This situation can be clarified with future studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Profiling Living Bacteria Informs Preparation of Fecal Microbiota Transplantations

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Nathaniel D.; Smith, Mark B.; Perrotta, Allison R.; Kassam, Zain; Alm, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation is a compelling treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infections, with potential applications against other diseases associated with changes in gut microbiota. But variability in fecal bacterial communities—believed to be the therapeutic agent—can complicate or undermine treatment efficacy. To understand the effects of transplant preparation methods on living fecal microbial communities, we applied a DNA-sequencing method (PMA-seq) that uses propidium ...

  16. Fluid flow and particle dynamics inside an evaporating droplet containing live bacteria displaying chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thokchom, Ashish Kumar; Swaminathan, Rajaram; Singh, Anugrah

    2014-10-21

    Evaporation-induced particle deposition patterns like coffee rings provide easy visual identification that is beneficial for developing inexpensive and simple diagnostic devices for detecting pathogens. In this study, the effect of chemotaxis on such pattern formation has been realized experimentally in drying droplets of bacterial suspensions. We have investigated the velocity field, concentration profile, and deposition pattern in the evaporating droplet of Escherichia coli suspension in the presence and absence of nutrients. Flow visualization experiments using particle image velocimetry (PIV) were carried out with E. coli bacteria as biological tracer particles. Experiments were conducted for suspensions of motile (live) as well as nonmotile (dead) bacteria. In the absence of any nutrient gradient like sugar on the substrate, both types of bacterial suspension showed two symmetric convection cells and a ring like deposition of particles after complete evaporation. Interestingly, the droplet containing live bacterial suspension showed a different velocity field when the sugar was placed at the base of the droplet. This can be attributed to the chemoattractant nature of the sugar, which induced chemotaxis among live bacteria targeted toward the nutrient site. Deposition of the suspended bacteria was also displaced toward the nutrient site as the evaporation proceeded. Our experiments demonstrate that both velocity fields and concentration patterns can be altered by chemotaxis to modify the pattern formation in evaporating droplet containing live bacteria. These results highlight the role of bacterial chemotaxis in modifying coffee ring patterns.

  17. Living Composites of Bacteria and Polymers as Biomimetic Films for Metal Sequestration and Bioremediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knierim, Christian; Enzeroth, Michaela; Kaiser, Patrick; Dams, Christian; Nette, David; Seubert, Andreas; Klingl, Andreas; Greenblatt, Charles L; Jérôme, Valérie; Agarwal, Seema; Freitag, Ruth; Greiner, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Herein, we report on composite materials of biologically active microorganisms placed in a synthetic polymer matrix. These so-called "living composites" were utilized for gold sequestration (Micrococcus luteus) and bioremediation of nitrite (Nitrobacter winogradskyi) to demonstrate functionality. For the preparation of the living composites the bacteria were first encased in a water-soluble polymer fiber (poly(vinyl alcohol), PVA) followed by coating the fibers with a shell of hydrophobic poly(p-xylylene) (PPX) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The combination of bacteria with polymer materials assured the stability and biologically activity of the bacteria in an aqueous environment for several weeks. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Protection of live bacteria from bile acid toxicity using bile acid adsorbing resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Alexander D; Slater, Nigel K H

    2009-06-12

    We previously demonstrated that a dry, room temperature stable formulation of a live bacterial vaccine was highly susceptible to bile, and suggested that this will lead to significant loss of viability of any live bacterial formulation released into the intestine using an enteric coating or capsule. We found that bile and acid tolerance is very rapidly recovered after rehydration with buffer or water, raising the possibility that rehydration in the absence of bile prior to release into the intestine might solve the problem of bile toxicity to dried cells. We describe here a novel formulation that combines extensively studied bile acid adsorbent resins with the dried bacteria, to temporarily adsorb bile acids and allow rehydration and recovery of bile resistance of bacteria in the intestine before release. Tablets containing the bile acid adsorbent cholestyramine release 250-fold more live bacteria when dissolved in a bile solution, compared to control tablets without cholestyramine or with a control resin that does not bind bile acids. We propose that a simple enteric coated oral dosage form containing bile acid adsorbent resins will allow improved live bacterial delivery to the intestine via the oral route, a major step towards room temperature stable, easily administered and distributed vaccine pills and other bacterial therapeutics.

  19. Multiple roles of siderophores in free-living nitrogen-fixing bacteria.

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    Kraepiel, A M L; Bellenger, J P; Wichard, T; Morel, F M M

    2009-08-01

    Free-living nitrogen-fixing bacteria in soils need to tightly regulate their uptake of metals in order to acquire essential metals (such as the nitrogenase metal cofactors Fe, Mo and V) while excluding toxic ones (such as W). They need to do this in a soil environment where metal speciation, and thus metal bioavailability, is dependent on a variety of factors such as organic matter content, mineralogical composition, and pH. Azotobacter vinelandii, a ubiquitous gram-negative soil diazotroph, excretes in its external medium catechol compounds, previously identified as siderophores, that bind a variety of metals in addition to iron. At low concentrations, complexes of essential metals (Fe, Mo, V) with siderophores are taken up by the bacteria through specialized transport systems. The specificity and regulation of these transport systems are such that siderophore binding of excess Mo, V or W effectively detoxifies these metals at high concentrations. In the topsoil (leaf litter layer), where metals are primarily bound to plant-derived organic matter, siderophores extract essential metals from natural ligands and deliver them to the bacteria. This process appears to be a key component of a mutualistic relationship between trees and soil diazotrophs, where tree-produced leaf litter provides a living environment rich in organic matter and micronutrients for nitrogen-fixing bacteria, which in turn supply new nitrogen to the ecosystem.

  20. Co-infection of the macronucleus of Paramecium caudatum by free-living bacteria together with the infectious Holospora obtusa.

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    Fokin, Sergei O; Skovorodkin, Ilya N; Schweikert, Michael; Görtz, Hans-D

    2004-01-01

    Infection experiments were performed incubating Paramecium caudatum with non-infectious free-living bacteria or weakly infectious intracellular bacteria together with the infectious Holospora obtusa. Two of four non-infectious free-living bacteria (Enterobacter aerogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae) were found to get into the nuclei when added to Paramecium together with H. obtusa. The endonuclear bacterium Nonospora macronucleata that is weakly infectious by itself increases its infectivity when presented together with the infectious holosporas. The results provide evidence that H. obtusa may facilitate entry of other, non-infectious bacteria into the nuclei of Paramecium.

  1. Coexistence of free-living amoebae and bacteria in selected South African hospital water distribution systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchesa, P; Leifels, M; Jurzik, L; Hoorzook, K B; Barnard, T G; Bartie, C

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic free-living amoebae (FLA), such as Naegleria fowleri, Balamuthia mandrillaris and Acanthamoeba species isolated from aquatic environments have been implicated in central nervous system, eye and skin human infections. They also allow the survival, growth and transmission of bacteria such as Legionella, Mycobacteria and Vibrio species in water systems. The purpose of this study was to investigate the co-occurrence of potentially pathogenic FLA and their associated bacteria in hospital water networks in Johannesburg, South Africa. A total of 178 water (n = 95) and swab (n = 83) samples were collected from two hospital water distribution systems. FLA were isolated using the amoebal enrichment technique and identified using PCR and 18S rDNA sequencing. Amoebae potentially containing intra-amoebal bacteria were lysed and cultured on blood agar plates. Bacterial isolates were characterized using the VITEK®2 compact System. Free-living amoebae were isolated from 77 (43.3 %) of the samples. Using microscopy, PCR and 18S rRNA sequencing, Acanthamoeba spp. (T3 and T20 genotypes), Vermamoeba vermiformis and Naegleria gruberi specie were identified. The Acanthamoeba T3 and T20 genotypes have been implicated in eye and central nervous system infections. The most commonly detected bacterial species were Serratia marcescens, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Delftia acidovorans, Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Comamonas testosteroni. These nosocomial pathogenic bacteria are associated with systematic blood, respiratory tract, the urinary tract, surgical wounds and soft tissues infections. The detection of FLA and their associated opportunistic bacteria in the hospital water systems point out to a potential health risk to immune-compromised individuals.

  2. Polynucleobacter necessarius, a model for genome reduction in both free-living and symbiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boscaro, Vittorio; Felletti, Michele; Vannini, Claudia; Ackerman, Matthew S; Chain, Patrick S G; Malfatti, Stephanie; Vergez, Lisa M; Shin, Maria; Doak, Thomas G; Lynch, Michael; Petroni, Giulio

    2013-11-12

    We present the complete genomic sequence of the essential symbiont Polynucleobacter necessarius (Betaproteobacteria), which is a valuable case study for several reasons. First, it is hosted by a ciliated protist, Euplotes; bacterial symbionts of ciliates are still poorly known because of a lack of extensive molecular data. Second, the single species P. necessarius contains both symbiotic and free-living strains, allowing for a comparison between closely related organisms with different ecologies. Third, free-living P. necessarius strains are exceptional by themselves because of their small genome size, reduced metabolic flexibility, and high worldwide abundance in freshwater systems. We provide a comparative analysis of P. necessarius metabolism and explore the peculiar features of a genome reduction that occurred on an already streamlined genome. We compare this unusual system with current hypotheses for genome erosion in symbionts and free-living bacteria, propose modifications to the presently accepted model, and discuss the potential consequences of translesion DNA polymerase loss.

  3. Rapid detection and typing of live bacteria from human joint fluid samples by utilizing an integrated microfluidic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Wen-Hsin; Wang, Chih-Hung; Lin, Chih-Lin; Wu, Jiunn-Jong; Lee, Mel S; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-04-15

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is one of the most dreading complications that hinder the merits of an arthroplasty. A prerequisite for treatment of the above procedure is rapid detection of live bacteria to prevent its recurrence and proper choice of antibiotics. Conventional culture methods are time-consuming and associated with a high false negative rate. Amplification of bacterial genetic materials requires a tedious process but is associated with a high false positive rate. An integrated microfluidic system capable of molecular diagnosis for detecting live bacteria was reported in our previous work. However, the system could not provide detailed information about infectious bacteria for the subsequent antibiotic choices. Furthermore, it took at least 55min to finish the entire process. In this work, a microfluidic platform using ethidium monoazide (EMA) which can only penetrate into dead bacteria is presented for live bacteria detection and typing within a short period of time (30min for the detection of live bacteria and another 40min for the typing of bacteria strains). We tested the proposed system by using human joint fluid samples and found its limit of detection for bacterial detection equal to 10(2)CFU (colony formation unit) for live bacteria detection with gold nanoparticle probes and 10(2)-10(4)CFU for typing bacteria by an on-chip polymerase chain reaction. The whole procedure of the integrated microfluidic system is automated with little human intervention. Moreover, this is the first time that sequential live bacteria detection and typing are demonstrated on the same microfluidic platform. Based on the promising results, the proposed system may become in the near future an auxiliary tool for immediate medical decision and choice of antibiotics in routine arthroplasties or PJI's. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigation of Heterotrophic Bacteria, Legionella and Free-Living Amoeba in Cooling Tower Samples by FISH and Culture Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Zeybek, Zuhal; Dogruoz Gungor, Nihal; Turetgen, Irfan

    2018-01-01

    Themicroorganisms living in the cooling towers water can affect both human healththrough inhalation of aerosolized water as well as industrial processes. Inorder to analyse such man-made water systems, microbiological tests that cangive results in a short time are needed. In this study, the presence ofheterotrophic bacteria, Legionella bacteria and free - living amoeba, FLA,including Acanthamoeba, in cooling-tower water and biofilm samples wereinvestigated using two different methods, fluores...

  5. The Role of Attached and Free-Living Bacteria in Biodegradation in Karst Aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Kheder

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Natural attenuation of groundwater contamination occurs at some level for all aquifers impacted with organic contaminants. The issues regarding natural attenuation are whether it takes place at a sufficient rate to be protective of human health and the environment. Implementation of a Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA remedial alternative for groundwater requires parties responsible for the contamination to demonstrate to regulators and the public that MNA is protective at a given site. Analysis of MNA for remediation of karst aquifers is hampered by a lack of understanding of biodegradation in karst environments. The lack of studies examining biodegradation in karst aquifers may in large part be due to the widespread perception that contaminants are rapidly flushed out of karst aquifers resulting in insufficient residence times for contaminants to biodegrade. In highly developed and well-connected conduit systems, the rate of contaminant migration is perceived to be much faster than the rate of biodegradation. This perception of contaminant transport is largely incorrect. Tracer studies for karst aquifers often indicate that these aquifers are characterized by diverse flow regimes and storage capabilities. Additionally, it is also believed that if bioremediation in bedrock aquifers is dependent upon contact between surface-attached bacteria and contaminants, then bioremediation would be limited by the low surface-area-to-volume ratio (SA/V of karst aquifers. A quantitative basis, however, for accepting or rejecting the assumption that attached bacteria dominate the biodegradation process in karst conduits has not been shown. The objective of this research was to determine if free-living karst bacteria from contributed as much to toluene biodegradation as attached bacteria. This is an important area of research. Research indicates bacteria are both attached and free-living in karst aquifers and it is unrealistic to think that only the attached

  6. How To Live with Phosphorus Scarcity in Soil and Sediment: Lessons from Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapia-Torres, Yunuen; Rodríguez-Torres, Maria Dolores; Elser, James J; Islas, Africa; Souza, Valeria; García-Oliva, Felipe; Olmedo-Álvarez, Gabriela

    2016-08-01

    Phosphorus (P) plays a fundamental role in the physiology and biochemistry of all living things. Recent evidence indicates that organisms in the oceans can break down and use P forms in different oxidation states (e.g., +5, +3, +1, and -3); however, information is lacking for organisms from soil and sediment. The Cuatro Ciénegas Basin (CCB), Mexico, is an oligotrophic ecosystem with acute P limitation, providing a great opportunity to assess the various strategies that bacteria from soil and sediment use to obtain P. We measured the activities in sediment and soil of different exoenzymes involved in P recycling and evaluated 1,163 bacterial isolates (mainly Bacillus spp.) for their ability to use six different P substrates. DNA turned out to be a preferred substrate, comparable to a more bioavailable P source, potassium phosphate. Phosphodiesterase activity, required for DNA degradation, was observed consistently in the sampled-soil and sediment communities. A capability to use phosphite (PO3 (3-)) and calcium phosphate was observed mainly in sediment isolates. Phosphonates were used at a lower frequency by both soil and sediment isolates, and phosphonatase activity was detected only in soil communities. Our results revealed that soil and sediment bacteria are able to break down and use P forms in different oxidation states and contribute to ecosystem P cycling. Different strategies for P utilization were distributed between and within the different taxonomic lineages analyzed, suggesting a dynamic movement of P utilization traits among bacteria in microbial communities. Phosphorus (P) is an essential element for life found in molecules, such as DNA, cell walls, and in molecules for energy transfer, such as ATP. The Valley of Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila (Mexico), is a unique desert characterized by an extreme limitation of P and a great diversity of microbial life. How do bacteria in this valley manage to obtain P? We measured the availability of P and the

  7. Seasonal variation in population density and heterotrophic activity of attached and free-living bacteria in coastal waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iriberri, J.; Unanue, M.; Barcina, I.; Egea, L.

    1987-10-01

    The abundance and heterotrophic activity of attached and free-living bacteria was examined seasonally in coastal water. Heterotrophic activity was determined by the uptake of (/sup 14/C)glucose. The density of attached bacteria was always minor, not showing a seasonal variation, whereas the free-living bacteria were more numerous and showed a marked seasonal variation, their density being higher under warmer conditions. The contribution of the attached bacteria to the total assimilation of (/sup 14/C)glucose was lower than that of the free-living bacteria, neither of them showing a seasonal variation. On a cellular basis, attached bacteria were more active, since they assimilated more (/sup 14/C)glucose and showed, under warmer conditions, a higher cellular volume. The authors consider that the factors responsible for these observations were the amount and quality of the particulate material, the different availability of organic matter for the two types of bacteria, and in a fundamental way, the variation in water temperature.

  8. How fast do living organisms move: Maximum speeds from bacteria to elephants and whales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Rospars, Jean-Pierre

    2015-08-01

    Despite their variety and complexity, living organisms obey simple scaling laws due to the universality of the laws of physics. In the present paper, we study the scaling between maximum speed and size, from bacteria to the largest mammals. While the preferred speed has been widely studied in the framework of Newtonian mechanics, the maximum speed has rarely attracted the interest of physicists, despite its remarkable scaling property; it is roughly proportional to length throughout nearly the whole range of running and swimming organisms. We propose a simple order-of-magnitude interpretation of this ubiquitous relationship, based on physical properties shared by life forms of very different body structure and varying by more than 20 orders of magnitude in body mass.

  9. Comparison of cell-specific activity between free-living and attached bacteria using isolates and natural assemblages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, H.P.; Tang, K.W.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Marine snow aggregates are microbial hotspots that support high bacterial abundance and activities. We conducted laboratory experiments to compare cell-specific bacterial protein production (BPP) and protease activity between free-living and attached bacteria. Natural bacterial assemblages attached...... were clustered around the agar-embedded diatom cells, indicating a chemosensing response. Increased protease activity and BPP allow attached bacteria to quickly exploit aggregate resources upon attachment, which may accelerate remineralization of marine snow and reduce the downward carbon fluxes...

  10. Hand-held synchronous scan spectrometer for in situ and immediate detection of live/dead bacteria ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Runze; Goswami, Umang; Walck, Matthew; Khan, Kasfia; Chen, Jie; Cesario, Thomas C.; Rentzepis, Peter M.

    2017-11-01

    The design, construction, and operation of a hand-held synchronously scanned, excitation-emission, double monochromator spectrometer is described. Data show that it is possible to record and display within minutes the fluorescence spectra and ratio of live/dead bacteria in situ. Excitation emission matrix contour plots display clearly bacteria fluorescence spectra before and after UV inactivation, respectively. The separation of the fluorescence band maxima of molecular components, such as tryptophan, tyrosine, and DNA, may be distinguished in the diffused fluorescence spectra of bacteria and mixtures.

  11. Diversity and activity of free-living nitrogen-fixing bacteria and total bacteria in organic and conventionally managed soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Caroline H; James, Angela; Leifert, Carlo; Cooper, Julia M; Cummings, Stephen P

    2011-02-01

    Agricultural soils are heterogeneous environments in which conditions affecting microbial growth and diversity fluctuate widely in space and time. In this study, the molecular ecology of the total bacterial and free-living nitrogen-fixing communities in soils from the Nafferton Factorial Systems Comparison (NFSC) study in northeast England were examined. The field experiment was factorial in design, with organic versus conventional crop rotation, crop protection, and fertility management factors. Soils were sampled on three dates (March, June, and September) in 2007. Total RNA was extracted from all soil samples and reverse transcribed. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) were used to analyze nifH and 16S rRNA genes in order to study free-living diazotrophs and the total bacterial community, respectively. Crop rotation was shown to have a significant effect on total bacterial diversity (and that of free-living N fixers) (P ≤ 0.001). On all three dates, nifH activity was higher in the conventional crop rotation. In contrast, qPCR analysis of free-living N fixers indicated significantly higher levels of activity in conventionally fertilized plots in June (P = 0.0324) and in plots with organic crop protection in September (P = 0.0143). To our knowledge, the effects of organic and conventional farming systems on free-living diazotrophs have never been studied. An increased understanding of the impacts of management practices on free-living N fixers could allow modifications in soil management practices to optimize the activity of these organisms.

  12. Symbiotic Bacteria in Gills and Guts of Chinese Mitten Crab (Eriocheir sinensis) Differ from the Free-Living Bacteria in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meiling; Sun, Yuhong; Chen, Liqiao; Cai, Chunfang; Qiao, Fang; Du, Zhenyu; Li, Erchao

    2016-01-01

    Aquatic animals have a close relationship with water, but differences in their symbiotic bacteria and the bacterial composition in water remains unclear. Wild or domestic Chinese mitten crabs (Eriocheir sinensis) and the water in which they live were collected from four sampling sites in Jiangsu and Shanghai, China. Bacterial composition in water, gills or guts of E. sinensis, were compared by high-throughput sequencing using 16S rRNA genes. Analysis of >660,000 sequences indicated that bacterial diversity was higher in water than in gills or guts. Tenericutes and Proteobacteria were dominant phyla in guts, while Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were dominant in gills and water. Non-metric multidimensional scaling analysis indicated that microbiota from gills, guts or water clearly separated into three groups, suggesting that crabs harbor a more specific microbial community than the water in which they live. The dominant OTUs in crab gut were related to Mycoplasmataceae, which were low in abundance in gills, showing that, like mammals, crabs have body-site specific microbiota. OTUs related to Ilumatobacter and Albimonas, which are commonly present in sediment and seawater, were dominant in gills but almost absent from the sampled water. Considering E. sinensis are bottom-dwelling crustacean and they mate in saline water or seawater, behavior and life cycle of crabs may play an important role in shaping the symbiotic bacterial pattern. This study revealed the relationship between the symbiotic bacteria of Chinese mitten crab and their habitat, affording information on the assembly factors of commensal bacteria in aquatic animals.

  13. Bacterial production and growth rate estimation from ( sup 3 H)thymidine incorporation for attached and free-living bacteria in aquatic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iriberri, J.; Unanue, M.; Ayo, B.; Barcina, I., Egea, L. (Univ. del Pais Vasco, Bilbao (Spain))

    1990-02-01

    Production and specific growth rates of attached and free-living bacteria were estimated in an oligotrophic marine system, La Salvaje Beach, Vizcaya, Spain, and in a freshwater system having a higher nutrient concentration, Butron River, Vizcaya, Spain. Production was calculated from (methyl-{sup 3}H)thymidine incorporation by estimating specific conversion factors (cells or micrograms of C produced per mole of thymidine incorporated) for attached and free-living bacteria, respectively, in each system. Conversion factors were not statistically different between attached and free-living bacteria: 6.812 {times} 10{sup 11} and 8.678 {times} 10{sup 11} {mu}g of C mol{sup {minus}1} for free-living and attached bacteria in the freshwater system, and 1.276 {times} 10{sup 11} and 1.354 {times} 10{sup 11} {mu}g of C mol{sup {minus}1} for free-living and attached bacteria in the marine system. Therefore, use of a unique conversion factor for the mixed bacterial population is well founded. However, conversion factors were higher in the freshwater system than in the marine system. This could be due to the different tropic conditions of the two systems. Free-living bacteria contributed the most to production in the two systems (85% in the marine system and 67% in the freshwater system) because of their greater contribution to total biomass. Specific growth rates calculated from production data and biomass data were similar for attached and free-living bacteria.

  14. The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus and free living nitrogen fixing bacteria on growth, photosynthesis and yield of corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mohsen jahan

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, biological fertilizers have received special attention by scientists in sustainable and low input agriculture. In order to study the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and free living nitrogen fixing bacteria on growth and photosynthesis characteristics of corn in conventional and ecological cropping systems, a field experiment was conducted at the Research Farm of Ferdowsi University of Mashhad during year 2006. A split plots arrangement based on randomized complete block design with three replications was used. Treatments consisted four cropping systems (1- High input conventional system, 2- Medium input conventional system, 3- Low input conventional system and 4- Ecological system and four inoculations (1- Mycorrhiza fungus, Glomus intraradices, 2- Bacteria, Azotobacter paspali and Azospirillum brasilense, 3- Dual inoculation, Fungus plus bacteria, and 4- No-inoculation, control, which were allocated to main plots and sub plots, respectively. All agronomic practices and inputs application during planting and nursing for each of cropping systems were conducted according to regional traditions. Results showed that the effect of inoculation on photosynthesis rates of corn was significant, as the highest photosynthesis rate obtained in dual inoculation. Single inoculation (fungus or bacteria was ranked second. The effect of all inoculations on corn dry matter production was significant and dual inoculation produced the highest dry matter yield. The cropping systems have significant effect on corn yield and the difference between medium input conventional system and high input conventional system was significant, but the high input, low input and ecological cropping systems showed no differences. Inoculants affected the SPAD readings, and dual inoculation showed the highest SPAD readings. This study showed that utilization of low input conventional and ecological systems in combination with use of dual inoculation of

  15. Understanding subcellular function on the nanometer scale in real time: Single-molecule imaging in living bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biteen, Julie

    It has long been recognized that microorganisms play a central role in our lives. By beating the diffraction limit that restricts traditional light microscopy, single-molecule fluorescence imaging is a precise, noninvasive way to sensitively probe position and dynamics, even in living cells. We are pioneering this super-resolution imaging method for unraveling important biological processes in live bacteria, and I will discuss how we infer function from subcellular dynamics (Tuson and Biteen, Analytical Chemistry 2015). In particular, we have understood the mechanism of membrane-bound transcription regulation in the pathogenic Vibrio cholerae, revealed an intimate and dynamic coupling between DNA mismatch recognition and DNA replication, and measured starch utilization in an important member of the human gut microbiome.

  16. Enteric coated spheres produced by extrusion/spheronization provide effective gastric protection and efficient release of live therapeutic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, João M S; Lechner, Tabea; Charalampopoulos, Dimitrios; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V; Edwards, Alexander D

    2015-09-30

    We present a novel but simple enteric coated sphere formulation containing probiotic bacteria (Lactobacillus casei). Oral delivery of live bacterial cells (LBC) requires live cells to survive firstly manufacturing processes and secondly GI microbicidal defenses including gastric acid. We incorporated live L. casei directly in the granulation liquid, followed by granulation, extrusion, spheronization, drying and spray coating to produce dried live probiotic spheres. A blend of MCC, calcium-crosslinked alginate, and lactose was developed that gave improved live cell survival during manufacturing, and gave excellent protection from gastric acid plus rapid release in intestinal conditions. No significant loss of viability was observed in all steps except drying, which resulted in approximately 1 log loss of viable cells. Eudragit coating was used to protect dried live cells from acid, and microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) was combined with sodium alginate to achieve efficient sphere disintegration leading to rapid and complete bacterial cell release in intestinal conditions. Viability and release of L. casei was evaluated in vitro in simulated GI conditions. Uncoated spheres gave partial acid protection, but enteric coated spheres effectively protected dried probiotic LBC from acid for 2h, and subsequently released all viable cells within 1h of transfer into simulated intestinal fluid. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Rapid quantification of live/dead lactic acid bacteria in probiotic products using high-sensitivity flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shengbin; Hong, Xinyi; Huang, Tianxun; Zhang, Wenqiang; Zhou, Yingxing; Wu, Lina; Yan, Xiaomei

    2017-06-01

    A laboratory-built high-sensitivity flow cytometer (HSFCM) was employed for the rapid and accurate detection of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and their viability in probiotic products. LAB were stained with both the cell membrane-permeable SYTO 9 green-fluorescent nucleic acid stain and the red-fluorescent nucleic acid stain, propidium iodide, which penetrates only bacteria with compromised membranes. The side scatter and dual-color fluorescence signals of single bacteria were detected simultaneously by the HSFCM. Ultra-high temperature processing milk and skim milk spiked with Lactobacillus casei were used as the model systems for the optimization of sample pretreatment and staining. The viable LAB counts measured by the HSFCM were in good agreement with those of the plate count method, and the measured ratios between the live and dead LAB matched well with the theoretical ratios. The established method was successfully applied to the rapid quantification of live/dead LAB in yogurts and fermented milk beverages of different brands. Moreover, the concentration and viability status of LAB in ambient yogurt, a relatively new yet popular milk product in China, are also reported.

  18. Data for discriminating dead/live bacteria in homogenous cell suspensions and the effect of insoluble substrates on turbidimetric measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwabena O. Duedu

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of bacterial growth by rapid traditional methods such as spectrophometric measurements at 600 nm (OD600 is not applicable for cultures containing insoluble particles in the growth media. Colony counts are the only suitable alternative but these are laborious and not high-throughput. The data presented in this article is related to the research article entitled “Two-colour fluorescence fluorimetric analysis for direct quantification of bacteria and its application in monitoring bacterial growth in cellulose degradation systems” (Duedu and French, 2017 [1]. This data article presents original primary data describing the discrimination of dead/live bacteria in homogenous cell suspensions and how the presence of insoluble substrates affect the turbidity of the suspensions.

  19. In vivo exposure of Mytilus edulis to living enteric bacteria: a threat for immune competency?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier-Clerc, Sophie; Boily, Isabelle; Fournier, Michel; Lemarchand, Karine

    2013-02-01

    Mussels are widespread in coastal environments and experience various physical, chemical, and bacteriological conditions. Owing to the increase of coastal urbanization, mussels are now commonly exposed not only to indigenous bacteria, but also to enteric bacteria originating from pulsed and chronic sewage discharges into coastal environments. Due to its broad resilience to environmental variations, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis is commonly used as an indicator of environmental quality in bio-monitoring programs. However, since mussel immune system capabilities may be affected by the presence of exogenous fecal bacteria in coastal seawater subjected to sewage discharges, we aimed to determine the effect of in vivo bacterial challenges on mussels' immune competency by using two exogenous enteric bacterial strains, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis, and an indigenous bacterial strain Vibrio splendidus (as control). Bacterial strains were tested individually, by injection into the posterior adductor muscle at three different cell densities (10(2), 10(3), and 10(4) cells). Unlike classic in vitro experiments using higher bacterial concentrations, neither the enteric bacteria nor the indigenous strain induced significant increase or decrease of either cell-mediated (phagocytosis, reactive oxygen species, and NO(x) production) or humoral components (prophenoloxidase-like, acid phosphatase, and L-leucine-aminopeptidase production) of the immune system. This study demonstrates that, at low concentrations, E. coli and E. faecalis do not represent an additional threat that could impair M. edulis immune competency and, as a consequence, its potential of survival in coastal areas subjected to sewage discharges.

  20. Green electricity production with living plants and bacteria in a fuel cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Snel, J.F.H.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2008-01-01

    The world needs sustainable, efficient, and renewable energy production. We present the plant microbial fuel cell (plant-MFC), a concept that exploits a bioenergy source in situ. In the plant-MFC, plants and bacteria were present to convert solar energy into green electricity. The principal idea is

  1. Protection of live bacteria from bile acid toxicity using bile acid adsorbing resins

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, Alexander D.; Slater, Nigel K. H.

    2009-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that a dry, room temperature stable formulation of a live bacterial vaccine was highly susceptible to bile, and suggested that this will lead to significant loss of viability of any live bacterial formulation released into the intestine using an enteric coating or capsule. We found that bile and acid tolerance is very rapidly recovered after rehydration with buffer or water, raising the possibility that rehydration in the absence of bile prior to release into the in...

  2. Evaluation of antibiotics as a methodological procedure to inhibit free-living and biofilm bacteria in marine zooplankton culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa O. Agostini

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a problem with keeping culture medium completely or partially free from bacteria. The use of prokaryotic metabolic inhibitors, such as antibiotics, is suggested as an alternative solution, although such substances should not harm non-target organisms. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of antibiotic treatments in inhibiting free-living and biofilm bacteria and their half-life in artificial marine environment using the copepod Acartia tonsa as bioindicador of non-harmful antibiotic combinations. Regarding to results, the application of 0.025 g L-1 penicillin G potassium + 0.08 g L-1 streptomycin sulphate + 0.04 g L-1 neomycin sulphate showed great potential for use in marine cultures and scientific experiments without lethal effects to non-target organisms. The effect of this combination starts within the first six hours of exposure and reduces up to 93 % the bacterial density, but the half-life is short, requiring replacement. No adverse changes in water quality were observed within 168 hours of exposure. As a conclusion, we can infer that this treatment was an effective procedure for zooplankton cultures and scientific experiments with the aim of measuring the role of free-living and biofilm in the marine community.

  3. Single-molecule imaging can be achieved in live obligate anaerobic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunatilaka, Krishanthi S.; Coupland, Ben R.; Cameron, Elizabeth A.; Martens, Eric C.; Koropatkin, Nicole K.; Biteen, Julie S.

    2013-02-01

    Single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) permits imaging with nanometer-scale resolution. This technique is particularly useful for cellular imaging as it provides a non-invasive, minimally perturbative means to examine macromolecular localization and dynamics, even in live cells. Here, we demonstrate that nanometer-scale SMF imaging can be extended to a new category of experiments: intracellular imaging of live, obligate anaerobic cells on the benchtop. We investigate the starch-utilization system (Sus) proteins in the gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and discuss three different labels that we implemented to detect these proteins: fluorescent proteins, the tetracysteine-based FlAsH tag, and the enzymatic HaloTag.

  4. Artificial Cell Therapy: New Strategies for the Therapeutic Delivery of Live Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    There has been rapid growth in research regarding the use of live bacterial cells for therapeutic purposes. The recognition that these cells can be genetically engineered to synthesize products that have therapeutic potential has generated considerable interest and excitement among clinicians and health professionals. It is expected that a wide range of disease modifying substrates such as enzymes, hormones, antibodies, vaccines, and other genetic products will be used successfully and will impact upon health care substantially. However, a major limitation in the use of these bacterial cells is the complexity of delivering them to the correct target tissues. Oral delivery of live cells, lyophilized cells, and immobilized cells has been attempted but with limited success. Primarily, this is because bacterial cells are incapable of surviving passage through the gastrointestinal tract. In many occasions, when given orally, these cells have been found to provoke immunogenic responses that are undesirable. Recent studies show that these problems can be overcome by delivering live bacterial cells, such as genetically engineered cells, using artificial cell microcapsules. This review summarizes recent advances in the therapeutic use of live bacterial cells for therapy, discusses the principles of using artificial cells for the oral delivery of bacterial cells, outlines methods for preparing suitable artificial cells for this purpose, addresses potentials and limitations for their application in therapy, and provides insight for the future direction of this emergent and highly prospective technology. PMID:15689638

  5. Impacts of organic and conventional crop management on diversity and activity of free-living nitrogen fixing bacteria and total bacteria are subsidiary to temporal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Caroline H; Leifert, Carlo; Cummings, Stephen P; Cooper, Julia M

    2012-01-01

    A three year field study (2007-2009) of the diversity and numbers of the total and metabolically active free-living diazotophic bacteria and total bacterial communities in organic and conventionally managed agricultural soil was conducted using the Nafferton Factorial Systems Comparison (NFSC) study, in northeast England. Fertility management appeared to have little impact on both diazotrophic and total bacterial communities. However, copy numbers of the nifH gene did appear to be negatively impacted by conventional crop protection measures across all years suggesting diazotrophs may be particularly sensitive to pesticides. Impacts of crop management were greatly overshadowed by the influence of temporal effects with diazotrophic communities changing on a year by year basis and from season to season. Quantitative analyses using qPCR of each community indicated that metabolically active diazotrophs were highest in year 1 but the population significantly declined in year 2 before recovering somewhat in the final year. The total bacterial population in contrast increased significantly each year. It appeared that the dominant drivers of qualitative and quantitative changes in both communities were annual and seasonal effects. Moreover, regression analyses showed activity of both communities was significantly affected by soil temperature and climatic conditions.

  6. Impacts of Organic and Conventional Crop Management on Diversity and Activity of Free-Living Nitrogen Fixing Bacteria and Total Bacteria Are Subsidiary to Temporal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Caroline H.; Leifert, Carlo; Cummings, Stephen P.; Cooper, Julia M.

    2012-01-01

    A three year field study (2007–2009) of the diversity and numbers of the total and metabolically active free-living diazotophic bacteria and total bacterial communities in organic and conventionally managed agricultural soil was conducted using the Nafferton Factorial Systems Comparison (NFSC) study, in northeast England. Fertility management appeared to have little impact on both diazotrophic and total bacterial communities. However, copy numbers of the nifH gene did appear to be negatively impacted by conventional crop protection measures across all years suggesting diazotrophs may be particularly sensitive to pesticides. Impacts of crop management were greatly overshadowed by the influence of temporal effects with diazotrophic communities changing on a year by year basis and from season to season. Quantitative analyses using qPCR of each community indicated that metabolically active diazotrophs were highest in year 1 but the population significantly declined in year 2 before recovering somewhat in the final year. The total bacterial population in contrast increased significantly each year. It appeared that the dominant drivers of qualitative and quantitative changes in both communities were annual and seasonal effects. Moreover, regression analyses showed activity of both communities was significantly affected by soil temperature and climatic conditions. PMID:23285218

  7. CRISPR-Cas encoding of a digital movie into the genomes of a population of living bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipman, Seth L; Nivala, Jeff; Macklis, Jeffrey D; Church, George M

    2017-07-20

    DNA is an excellent medium for archiving data. Recent efforts have illustrated the potential for information storage in DNA using synthesized oligonucleotides assembled in vitro. A relatively unexplored avenue of information storage in DNA is the ability to write information into the genome of a living cell by the addition of nucleotides over time. Using the Cas1-Cas2 integrase, the CRISPR-Cas microbial immune system stores the nucleotide content of invading viruses to confer adaptive immunity. When harnessed, this system has the potential to write arbitrary information into the genome. Here we use the CRISPR-Cas system to encode the pixel values of black and white images and a short movie into the genomes of a population of living bacteria. In doing so, we push the technical limits of this information storage system and optimize strategies to minimize those limitations. We also uncover underlying principles of the CRISPR-Cas adaptation system, including sequence determinants of spacer acquisition that are relevant for understanding both the basic biology of bacterial adaptation and its technological applications. This work demonstrates that this system can capture and stably store practical amounts of real data within the genomes of populations of living cells.

  8. A laminated polymer film formulation for enteric delivery of live vaccine and probiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barros, João M S; Scherer, Timothy; Charalampopoulos, Dimitrios; Khutoryanskiy, Vitaliy V; Edwards, Alexander D

    2014-07-01

    Live bacterial cells (LBCs) are administered orally as attenuated vaccines to deliver biopharmaceutical agents and as probiotics to improve gastrointestinal (GI) health. However, LBCs present unique formulation challenges and must survive GI antimicrobial defenses including gastric acid after administration. We present a simple new formulation concept, termed polymer film laminate (PFL). LBCs are ambient dried onto cast acid-resistant enteric polymer films that are then laminated together to produce a solid oral dosage form. LBC of a model live bacterial vaccine and a probiotic were dried directly onto a cast film of enteric polymer. The effectiveness at protecting dried cells in a simulated gastric fluid (SGF, pH 2.0) depended on the composition of enteric polymer film used, with a blend of ethylcellulose plus Eudragit L100 55 providing greater protection from acid than Eudragit alone. However, although PFL made from blended polymer films completely released low-molecular-weight dye into intestinal conditions (pH 7.0), they failed to release LBCs. In contrast, PFL made from Eudragit alone successfully protected dried probiotic or vaccine LBC from SGF for 2 h, and subsequently released all viable cells within 60 min of transfer into simulated intestinal fluid. Release kinetics could be controlled by modifying the lamination method. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  9. Customized Computer Vision and Sensor System for Colony Recognition and Live Bacteria Counting in Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel M. ALVES

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an arrangement based on a dedicated computer and charge-coupled device (CCD sensor system to intelligently allow the counting and recognition of colony formation. Microbes in agricultural environments are important catalysts of global carbon and nitrogen cycles, including the production and consumption of greenhouse gases in soil. Some microbes produce greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide and nitrous oxide while decomposing organic matter in soil. Others consume methane from the atmosphere, helping to mitigate climate change. The magnitude of each of these processes is influenced by human activities and impacts the warming potential of Earth’s atmosphere. In this context, bacterial colony counting is important and requires sophisticated analysis methods. The method implemented in this study uses digital image processing techniques, including the Hough Transform for circular objects. The visual environment Borland Builder C++ was used for development, and a model for decision making was incorporated to aggregate intelligence. For calibration of the method a prepared illuminated chamber was used to enable analyses of the bacteria Escherichia coli, and Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. For validation, a set of comparisons were established between this smart method and the expert analyses. The results show the potential of this method for laboratory applications that involve the quantification and pattern recognition of bacterial colonies in solid culture environments.

  10. Maximum relative speeds of living organisms: Why do bacteria perform as fast as ostriches?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Rospars, Jean-Pierre

    2016-12-01

    Self-locomotion is central to animal behaviour and survival. It is generally analysed by focusing on preferred speeds and gaits under particular biological and physical constraints. In the present paper we focus instead on the maximum speed and we study its order-of-magnitude scaling with body size, from bacteria to the largest terrestrial and aquatic organisms. Using data for about 460 species of various taxonomic groups, we find a maximum relative speed of the order of magnitude of ten body lengths per second over a 1020-fold mass range of running and swimming animals. This result implies a locomotor time scale of the order of one tenth of second, virtually independent on body size, anatomy and locomotion style, whose ubiquity requires an explanation building on basic properties of motile organisms. From first-principle estimates, we relate this generic time scale to other basic biological properties, using in particular the recent generalisation of the muscle specific tension to molecular motors. Finally, we go a step further by relating this time scale to still more basic quantities, as environmental conditions at Earth in addition to fundamental physical and chemical constants.

  11. Surface plasmon excitation using a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer: Live cell and bacteria sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lirtsman, Vladislav; Golosovsky, Michael; Davidov, Dan

    2017-10-01

    We report an accessory for beam collimation to be used as a plug-in for a conventional Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. The beam collimator makes use of the built-in focusing mirror of the FTIR spectrometer which focuses the infrared beam onto the pinhole mounted in the place usually reserved for the sample. The beam is collimated by a small parabolic mirror and is redirected to the sample by a pair of plane mirrors. The reflected beam is conveyed by another pair of plane mirrors to the built-in detector of the FTIR spectrometer. This accessory is most useful for the surface plasmon excitation. We demonstrate how it can be employed for label-free and real-time sensing of dynamic processes in bacterial and live cell layers. In particular, by measuring the intensity of the CO2 absorption peak one can assess the cell layer metabolism, while by measuring the position of the surface plasmon resonance one assesses the cell layer morphology.

  12. Graphene-based potentiometric biosensor for the immediate detection of living bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Rafael; Vallés, Cristina; Benito, Ana M; Maser, Wolfgang K; Rius, F Xavier; Riu, Jordi

    2014-04-15

    In this communication we present a potentiometric aptasensor based on chemically modified graphene (transducer layer of the aptasensor) and aptamers (sensing layer). Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) are the basis for the construction of two versions of the aptasensor for the detection of a challenging living organism such as Staphylococcus aureus. In these two versions, DNA aptamers are either covalently (in the GO case) or non-covalently (in the RGO case) attached to the transducer layer. In both cases we are able to selectively detect a single CFU/mL of S. aureus in an assay close to real time, although the noise level associated to the aptasensors made with RGO is lower than the ones made with GO. These new aptasensors, that show a high selectivity, are characterized by the simplicity of the technique and the materials used for their construction while offering ultra-low detection limits in very short time responses in the detection of microorganisms. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. What Bacteria Are Living in My Food?: An Open-Ended Practical Series Involving Identification of Unknown Foodborne Bacteria Using Molecular Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Prascilla; Turner, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    This open-ended practical series titled "Molecular Identification of Unknown Food Bacteria" which extended over a 6-week period was designed with the aims of giving students an opportunity to gain an understanding of naturally occurring food bacteria and skills in contemporary molecular methods using real food samples. The students first isolated…

  14. Repeatedly Evolved Host-Specific Ectosymbioses between Sulfur-Oxidizing Bacteria and Amphipods Living in a Cave Ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermeister, Jan; Ramette, Alban; Dattagupta, Sharmishtha

    2012-01-01

    Ectosymbioses between invertebrates and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are widespread in sulfidic marine environments and have evolved independently in several invertebrate phyla. The first example from a freshwater habitat, involving Niphargus ictus amphipods and filamentous Thiothrix ectosymbionts, was recently reported from the sulfide-rich Frasassi caves in Italy. Subsequently, two new Niphargus species, N. frasassianus and N. montanarius, were discovered within Frasassi and found to co-occur with N. ictus. Using a variety of microscopic and molecular techniques, we found that all three Frasassi-dwelling Niphargus species harbor Thiothrix ectosymbionts, which belong to three distinct phylogenetic clades (named T1, T2, and T3). T1 and T3 Thiothrix dominate the N. frasassianus ectosymbiont community, whereas T2 and T3 are prevalent on N. ictus and N. montanarius. Relative distribution patterns of the three ectosymbionts are host species-specific and consistent over different sampling locations and collection years. Free-living counterparts of T1–T3 are rare or absent in Frasassi cave microbial mats, suggesting that ectosymbiont transmission among Niphargus occurs primarily through inter- or intraspecific inoculations. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the Niphargus-Thiothrix association has evolved independently at least two times. While ectosymbioses with T1 and T2 may have been established within Frasassi, T3 ectosymbionts seem to have been introduced to the cave system by Niphargus. PMID:23209690

  15. Repeatedly evolved host-specific ectosymbioses between sulfur-oxidizing bacteria and amphipods living in a cave ecosystem.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Bauermeister

    Full Text Available Ectosymbioses between invertebrates and sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are widespread in sulfidic marine environments and have evolved independently in several invertebrate phyla. The first example from a freshwater habitat, involving Niphargus ictus amphipods and filamentous Thiothrix ectosymbionts, was recently reported from the sulfide-rich Frasassi caves in Italy. Subsequently, two new Niphargus species, N. frasassianus and N. montanarius, were discovered within Frasassi and found to co-occur with N. ictus. Using a variety of microscopic and molecular techniques, we found that all three Frasassi-dwelling Niphargus species harbor Thiothrix ectosymbionts, which belong to three distinct phylogenetic clades (named T1, T2, and T3. T1 and T3 Thiothrix dominate the N. frasassianus ectosymbiont community, whereas T2 and T3 are prevalent on N. ictus and N. montanarius. Relative distribution patterns of the three ectosymbionts are host species-specific and consistent over different sampling locations and collection years. Free-living counterparts of T1-T3 are rare or absent in Frasassi cave microbial mats, suggesting that ectosymbiont transmission among Niphargus occurs primarily through inter- or intraspecific inoculations. Phylogenetic analyses indicate that the Niphargus-Thiothrix association has evolved independently at least two times. While ectosymbioses with T1 and T2 may have been established within Frasassi, T3 ectosymbionts seem to have been introduced to the cave system by Niphargus.

  16. Dynamics of Heterocapsa sp. and the associated attached and free-living bacteria under the influence of dispersed and undispersed crude oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Severin, T; Bacosa, H P; Sato, A; Erdner, D L

    2016-12-01

    While many studies have examined the impact of oil on phytoplankton or bacteria, very few considered the effects on the biological complex formed by phytoplankton and their associated phytoplankton-attached (PA) and free-living (FL) bacteria. However, associated bacteria can affect the physiology of phytoplankton and influence their stress responses. In this study, we monitored the growth of Heterocapsa sp., an armoured dinoflagellate, exposed to crude oil, Corexit dispersant, or both. Growth of Heterocapsa sp. is unaffected by crude oil up to 25 ppm, a concentration similar to the lower range measured on Florida beaches after the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. The PA bacteria community was resistant to exposure, whereas the FL community shifted towards oil degraders; both responses could contribute to Heterocapsa sp. oil resistance. The growth rate of Heterocapsa sp. decreased significantly only when exposed to dispersed oil at 25 ppm, indicating a synergistic effect of dispersant on oil toxicity in this organism. For the first time, we demonstrated the decoupling of the responses of the PA and FL bacteria communities after exposure to an environmental stress, in this case oil and dispersant. Our findings suggest new directions to explore in the understanding of interactions between unicellular eukaryotes and prokaryotes. In the environment, oil spills have the capacity to modify phytoplankton communities, with important consequences on the food web and the carbon cycle. We are just beginning to understand the oil resistance of phytoplankton species, making it difficult to predict community response. In this study we highlighted the strong resistance of Heterocapsa sp. to oil, which could be associated with its resilient attached bacteria and oil degradation by the free-living bacteria. This finding suggests new directions to explore in the understanding of oil impacts and interactions between eukaryotic and prokaryotic microbes. © 2016 The Society for Applied

  17. Comparison of DNA-, PMA-, and RNA-based 16S rRNA Illumina sequencing for detection of live bacteria in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ru; Tun, Hein Min; Jahan, Musarrat; Zhang, Zhengxiao; Kumar, Ayush; Fernando, Dilantha; Farenhorst, Annemieke; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2017-07-18

    The limitation of 16S rRNA gene sequencing (DNA-based) for microbial community analyses in water is the inability to differentiate live (dormant cells as well as growing or non-growing metabolically active cells) and dead cells, which can lead to false positive results in the absence of live microbes. Propidium-monoazide (PMA) has been used to selectively remove DNA from dead cells during downstream sequencing process. In comparison, 16S rRNA sequencing (RNA-based) can target live microbial cells in water as both dormant and metabolically active cells produce rRNA. The objective of this study was to compare the efficiency and sensitivity of DNA-based, PMA-based and RNA-based 16S rRNA Illumina sequencing methodologies for live bacteria detection in water samples experimentally spiked with different combination of bacteria (2 gram-negative and 2 gram-positive/acid fast species either all live, all dead, or combinations of live and dead species) or obtained from different sources (First Nation community drinking water; city of Winnipeg tap water; water from Red River, Manitoba, Canada). The RNA-based method, while was superior for detection of live bacterial cells still identified a number of 16S rRNA targets in samples spiked with dead cells. In environmental water samples, the DNA- and PMA-based approaches perhaps overestimated the richness of microbial community compared to RNA-based method. Our results suggest that the RNA-based sequencing was superior to DNA- and PMA-based methods in detecting live bacterial cells in water.

  18. CLIQ-BID: A method to quantify bacteria-induced damage to eukaryotic cells by automated live-imaging of bright nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallez, Yann; Bouillot, Stéphanie; Soleilhac, Emmanuelle; Huber, Philippe; Attrée, Ina; Faudry, Eric

    2018-01-08

    Pathogenic bacteria induce eukaryotic cell damage which range from discrete modifications of signalling pathways, to morphological alterations and even to cell death. Accurate quantitative detection of these events is necessary for studying host-pathogen interactions and for developing strategies to protect host organisms from bacterial infections. Investigation of morphological changes is cumbersome and not adapted to high-throughput and kinetics measurements. Here, we describe a simple and cost-effective method based on automated analysis of live cells with stained nuclei, which allows real-time quantification of bacteria-induced eukaryotic cell damage at single-cell resolution. We demonstrate that this automated high-throughput microscopy approach permits screening of libraries composed of interference-RNA, bacterial strains, antibodies and chemical compounds in ex vivo infection settings. The use of fluorescently-labelled bacteria enables the concomitant detection of changes in bacterial growth. Using this method named CLIQ-BID (Cell Live Imaging Quantification of Bacteria Induced Damage), we were able to distinguish the virulence profiles of different pathogenic bacterial species and clinical strains.

  19. Diversity and Activity of Free-Living Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria and Total Bacteria in Organic and Conventionally Managed Soils ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orr, Caroline H.; James, Angela; Leifert, Carlo; Cooper, Julia M.; Cummings, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Agricultural soils are heterogeneous environments in which conditions affecting microbial growth and diversity fluctuate widely in space and time. In this study, the molecular ecology of the total bacterial and free-living nitrogen-fixing communities in soils from the Nafferton Factorial Systems Comparison (NFSC) study in northeast England were examined. The field experiment was factorial in design, with organic versus conventional crop rotation, crop protection, and fertility management factors. Soils were sampled on three dates (March, June, and September) in 2007. Total RNA was extracted from all soil samples and reverse transcribed. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and quantitative PCR (qPCR) were used to analyze nifH and 16S rRNA genes in order to study free-living diazotrophs and the total bacterial community, respectively. Crop rotation was shown to have a significant effect on total bacterial diversity (and that of free-living N fixers) (P ≤ 0.001). On all three dates, nifH activity was higher in the conventional crop rotation. In contrast, qPCR analysis of free-living N fixers indicated significantly higher levels of activity in conventionally fertilized plots in June (P = 0.0324) and in plots with organic crop protection in September (P = 0.0143). To our knowledge, the effects of organic and conventional farming systems on free-living diazotrophs have never been studied. An increased understanding of the impacts of management practices on free-living N fixers could allow modifications in soil management practices to optimize the activity of these organisms. PMID:21131514

  20. Reversible oxygen-tolerant hydrogenase carried by free-living N2-fixing bacteria isolated from the rhizospheres of rice, maize, and wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roumagnac, Philippe; Richaud, Pierre; Barakat, Mohamed; Ortet, Philippe; Roncato, Marie-Anne; Heulin, Thierry; Peltier, Gilles; Achouak, Wafa; Cournac, Laurent

    2012-12-01

    Hydrogen production by microorganisms is often described as a promising sustainable and clean energy source, but still faces several obstacles, which prevent practical application. Among them, oxygen sensitivity of hydrogenases represents one of the major limitations hampering the biotechnological implementation of photobiological production processes. Here, we describe a hierarchical biodiversity-based approach, including a chemochromic screening of hydrogenase activity of hundreds of bacterial strains collected from several ecosystems, followed by mass spectrometry measurements of hydrogenase activity of a selection of the H(2)-oxidizing bacterial strains identified during the screen. In all, 131 of 1266 strains, isolated from cereal rhizospheres and basins containing irradiating waste, were scored as H(2)-oxidizing bacteria, including Pseudomonas sp., Serratia sp., Stenotrophomonas sp., Enterobacter sp., Rahnella sp., Burkholderia sp., and Ralstonia sp. isolates. Four free-living N(2)-fixing bacteria harbored a high and oxygen-tolerant hydrogenase activity, which was not fully inhibited within entire cells up to 150-250 μmol/L O(2) concentration or within soluble protein extracts up to 25-30 μmol/L. The only hydrogenase-related genes that we could reveal in these strains were of the hyc type (subunits of formate hydrogenlyase complex). The four free-living N(2)-fixing bacteria were closely related to Enterobacter radicincitans based on the sequences of four genes (16S rRNA, rpoB, hsp60, and hycE genes). These results should bring interesting prospects for microbial biohydrogen production and might have ecophysiological significance for bacterial adaptation to the oxic-anoxic interfaces in the rhizosphere. © 2012 The Authors. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Real Time Live Imaging of Phytopathogenic Bacteria Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris MAFF106712 in ‘Plant Sweet Home’

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto-Tomiyama, Chiharu; Furutani, Ayako; Ochiai, Hirokazu

    2014-01-01

    Xanthomonas is one of the most widespread phytobacteria, causing diseases on a variety of agricultural plants. To develop novel control techniques, knowledge of bacterial behavior inside plant cells is essential. Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris, a vascular pathogen, is the causal agent of black rot on leaves of Brassicaceae, including Arabidopsis thaliana. Among the X. campestris pv. campestris stocks in the MAFF collection, we selected XccMAFF106712 as a model compatible pathogen for the A. thaliana reference ecotype Columbia (Col-0). Using modified green fluorescent protein (AcGFP) as a reporter, we observed real time XccMAFF106712 colonization in planta with confocal microscopy. AcGFP-expressing bacteria colonized the inside of epidermal cells and the apoplast, as well as the xylem vessels of the vasculature. In the case of the type III mutant, bacteria colonization was never detected in the xylem vessel or apoplast, though they freely enter the xylem vessel through the wound. After 9 days post inoculation with XccMAFF106712, the xylem vessel became filled with bacterial aggregates. This suggests that Xcc colonization can be divided into main four steps, (1) movement in the xylem vessel, (2) movement to the next cell, (3) adhesion to the host plant cells, and (4) formation of bacterial aggregates. The type III mutant abolished at least steps (1) and (2). Better understanding of Xcc colonization is essential for development of novel control techniques for black rot. PMID:24736478

  2. Oral administration of a medium containing both D-aspartate-producing live bacteria and D-aspartate reduces rectal temperature in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, P H; Tran, P V; Bahry, M A; Yang, H; Han, G; Tsuchiya, A; Asami, Y; Furuse, M; Chowdhury, V S

    2017-10-01

    1. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects on the rectal temperature of young chicks of the oral administration of a medium that contained both live bacteria that produce D-aspartate (D-Asp) and D-Asp. 2. In Experiment 1, chicks were subjected to chronic oral administration of either the medium (containing live bacteria and 2.46 μmol D-Asp) or water from 7 to 14 d of age. Plasma-free amino acids as well as mitochondrial biogenic gene expression in the breast muscle were analysed. In Experiment 2, 7-d-old chicks were subjected to acute oral administration of the above medium or of an equimolar amount of D-Asp to examine their effect on changes in rectal temperature. In Experiment 3, after 1 week of chronic oral administration of the medium, 14-d-old chicks were exposed to either high ambient temperature (HT; 40 ± 1°C, 3 h) or control thermoneutral temperature (CT; 30 ± 1°C, 3 h) to monitor the changes in rectal temperature. 3. Chronic, but not acute, oral administration of the medium significantly reduced rectal temperature in chicks, and a chronic effect also appeared under HT conditions. 4. Chronic oral administration of the medium significantly reduced the mRNA abundance of the avian uncoupling protein (avUCP) in the breast muscle, but led to a significant increase in avian adenine nucleotide translocator (avANT) mRNA in the same muscle. 5. (a) These results indicate that the medium can reduce body temperature through the decline in avUCP mRNA expression in the breast muscle that may be involved in reduced mitochondrial proton leaks and heat production. (b) The increase in avANT further suggests a possible enhancement of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthesis.

  3. The Transcriptome of Bathymodiolus azoricus Gill Reveals Expression of Genes from Endosymbionts and Free-Living Deep-Sea Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egas, Conceição; Pinheiro, Miguel; Gomes, Paula; Barroso, Cristina; Bettencourt, Raul

    2012-01-01

    Deep-sea environments are largely unexplored habitats where a surprising number of species may be found in large communities, thriving regardless of the darkness, extreme cold, and high pressure. Their unique geochemical features result in reducing environments rich in methane and sulfides, sustaining complex chemosynthetic ecosystems that represent one of the most surprising findings in oceans in the last 40 years. The deep-sea Lucky Strike hydrothermal vent field, located in the Mid Atlantic Ridge, is home to large vent mussel communities where Bathymodiolus azoricus represents the dominant faunal biomass, owing its survival to symbiotic associations with methylotrophic or methanotrophic and thiotrophic bacteria. The recent transcriptome sequencing and analysis of gill tissues from B. azoricus revealed a number of genes of bacterial origin, hereby analyzed to provide a functional insight into the gill microbial community. The transcripts supported a metabolically active microbiome and a variety of mechanisms and pathways, evidencing also the sulfur and methane metabolisms. Taxonomic affiliation of transcripts and 16S rRNA community profiling revealed a microbial community dominated by thiotrophic and methanotrophic endosymbionts of B. azoricus and the presence of a Sulfurovum-like epsilonbacterium. PMID:23015773

  4. Big bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    and by actively creating an advective flow through the entire population. Diffusion limitation generally restricts the maximal size of prokaryotic cells and provides a selective advantage for mum-sized cells at the normally low substrate concentrations in the environment. The largest heterotrophic bacteria......, the 80 x 600 mum large Epulopiscium sp. from the gut of tropical fish, are presumably living in a very nutrient-rich medium. Many large bacteria contain numerous inclusions in the cells that reduce the volume of active cytoplasm. The most striking examples of competitive advantage from large cell size....... By their ability to store vast quantities of both nitrate and elemental sulfur in the cells, these bacteria have become independent of the coexistence of their substrates. In fact, a close relative, T. namibiensis, can probably respire in the sulfidic mud for several months before again filling up their large...

  5. Diversity of total and active free-living vs. particle-attached bacteria in the euphotic zone of the NW Mediterranean Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiglione, Jean-François; Conan, Pascal; Pujo-Pay, Mireille

    2009-10-01

    The structure of the total and metabolically active communities of attached and free-living bacteria were analysed in the euphotic zone in the NW Mediterranean Sea with the use of DNA- and RNA-derived capillary electrophoresis single-strand conformation polymorphism fingerprinting. More than half (between 52% and 69%) of the DNA-derived operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were common in both attached and free-living fractions in the euphotic layer, suggesting an exchange or co-occurrence between them. However, analysis targeting 16S rRNA showed that only some of them were found in the dominant active bacterial pool. Especially at the deep chlorophyll maximum, less than half of the attached bacterial populations were found to be active, with regard to the high proportion of OTUs present at the DNA level, but not at the RNA level. These results suggest that even if colonization on and detachment of particles appear to be ubiquitous, most of the particulate organic carbon remineralization appeared to be mediated by a rather low number of dominant active OTUs specialized in exploiting such specific microenvironment. © 2009 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Dynamic modulation of fimbrial extension and FimH-mannose binding force on live bacteria under pH changes: a molecular atomic force microscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquot, A; Sakamoto, C; Razafitianamaharavo, A; Caillet, C; Merlin, J; Fahs, A; Ghigo, J M; Beloin, C; Duval, J F L; Francius, G

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical and conformational properties of type 1 fimbriae were evaluated on live bacterial cells by Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy (SMFS) and Dynamic Force Spectroscopy (DFS) in buffered solutions whose pH varied from 3 to 9. We evidenced that both fimbrial extension and fimbrial binding force to mannosylated-surface are modulated with changing the externally applied shear force and the solution pH. In particular, intertwined FimA-FimA and FimH-mannose interactions lead to a 5 to 25-fold decrease of the fimbrial unwinding for pulling rates larger than 10 μm/s and for pH values outside the range 5 to 7. In this pH range, the FimH-mannose binding force is maximal with a magnitude of -150-200 pN and the fimbriae extension reaches 8 μm. The enhancement of the FimH-mannose binding force at neutral pH, as evidenced from molecular AFM analyses, strongly correlates with an optimum in yeast agglutination detected at pH 5 to 7. The results reported in this work suggest that "catch bond effect" was negligible over the range of pulling rates tested, and both FimA-FimA and FimH-mannose interactions under given pH and external shear force conditions modify the ability of the bacteria to efficiently colonize host surfaces.

  7. Suppression of Penaeus merguiensis densovirus following oral delivery of live bacteria expressing dsRNA in the house cricket (Acheta domesticus) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Fauce, Kathy; Owens, Leigh

    2013-02-01

    Penaeus merguiensis densovirus (PmergDNV) is a serious pathogen of the banana prawn, Penaeus merguiensis leading to at least 28% production loss due to reduced growth rates and mortality of juveniles. In the present study, we reduced PmergDNV titres and subsequent mortality by feeding Acheta domesticus (previously determined as an appropriate animal model for P. merguiensis) with dsRNA specific to the capsid protein by mixing it into their food. Feeding A. domesticus with PmergDNV-specific dsRNA in advance of viral challenge increased their longevity, decreased mortality by 84.4% and reduced viral loads 24-fold below the threshold level required for mortality. Mortalities and viral loads were significantly (both P < 0.001) lower in treatments challenged with PmergDNV following exposure to bacterially expressed PmergDNV-dsRNA. This is the first study to demonstrate gene silencing via RNAi against PmergDNV in vivo through oral administration of live bacteria expressing dsRNA in a model system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pesticides in Ichkeul Lake-Bizerta Lagoon Watershed in Tunisia: use, occurrence, and effects on bacteria and free-living marine nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Fida Ben; Said, Olfa Ben; Aissa, Patricia; Mahmoudi, Ezzeddine; Monperrus, Mathilde; Grunberger, Olivier; Duran, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the most commonly used agricultural pesticides around Ichkeul Lake-Bizerta Lagoon watershed. First survey of pesticide use on agricultural watershed was performed with farmers, Regional Commissioner for Agricultural Development, and pesticide dealers. Then, sediment contamination by pesticides and response of benthic communities (bacteria and free-living marine nematode) were investigated. The analysis of 22 active organochlorine pesticides in sediments was performed according to quick, easy, cheap, effective, rugged, and safe (QuEChERS) method, biodiversity of indigenous bacterial community sediment was determined by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP), and free-living marine nematodes were counted. The results of the field survey showed that iodosulfuron, mesosulfuron, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4 D), glyphosate, and fenoxaprops were the most used herbicides, tebuconazole and epoxiconazole the most used fungicides, and deltamethrin the most used insecticide. Sixteen organochlorine pesticide compounds among the 22 examined were detected in sediments up to 2 ppm in Ichkeul Lake, endrin, dieldrin, and hexachlorocyclohexane being the most detected molecules. The most pesticide-contaminated site in the lake presented the higher density of nematode, but when considering all sites, no clear correlation with organochlorine pesticide (OCP) content could be established. The bacterial community structure in the most contaminated site in the lake was characterized by the terminal restriction fragments (T-RFs) 97, 146, 258, 285, and 335 while the most contaminated site in the lagoon was characterized by the T-RFs 54, 263, 315, 403, and 428. Interestingly, T-RFs 38 and 143 were found in the most contaminated sites of both lake and lagoon ecosystems, indicating that they were resistant to OCPs and able to cope with environmental fluctuation of salinity. In contrast, the T-RFs 63, 100, 118, and 381 in the lake and the T

  9. The Design of Simple Bacterial Microarrays: Development towards Immobilizing Single Living Bacteria on Predefined Micro-Sized Spots on Patterned Surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Bjørk Arnfinnsdottir

    Full Text Available In this paper we demonstrate a procedure for preparing bacterial arrays that is fast, easy, and applicable in a standard molecular biology laboratory. Microcontact printing is used to deposit chemicals promoting bacterial adherence in predefined positions on glass surfaces coated with polymers known for their resistance to bacterial adhesion. Highly ordered arrays of immobilized bacteria were obtained using microcontact printed islands of polydopamine (PD on glass surfaces coated with the antiadhesive polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG. On such PEG-coated glass surfaces, bacteria were attached to 97 to 100% of the PD islands, 21 to 62% of which were occupied by a single bacterium. A viability test revealed that 99% of the bacteria were alive following immobilization onto patterned surfaces. Time series imaging of bacteria on such arrays revealed that the attached bacteria both divided and expressed green fluorescent protein, both of which indicates that this method of patterning of bacteria is a suitable method for single-cell analysis.

  10. Bacterial flora of free-living double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) chicks on Prince Edward Island, Canada, with reference to enteric bacteria and antibiotic resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbin, Greg; Hariharan, Harry; Daoust, Pierre-Yves; Hariharan, Shebel; Heaney, Susan; Coles, Mada; Price, Lawrence; Anne Muckle, C

    2005-01-01

    Cloacal and pharyngeal swabs from 100 tree-nesting Double-crested cormorant (DCC) chicks were examined by culture for commensal and potentially pathogenic bacteria. No Salmonella or Erysipelothrix were isolated from the cloacal swabs. Twenty-two cloacal swabs were positive for Campylobacter, of which 14 were C. jejuni, C. coli, and 1 C. lari. None belonged to common serotypes isolated from humans or animals in recent years in Canada. Tests for antimicrobial drug resistance among 187 commensal Escherichia coli isolates from the cloacal swabs indicated that < or =5% were resistant to any of the 12 antibiotics tested. This contrasts with the frequently high resistance rates among E. coli isolates from poultry. Pharyngeal swabs from DCC were negative for Pasteurella multocida. Culture of cloacal swabs from 100 ground-nesting DCC chicks resulted in the recovery of 19 Salmonella isolates, all of which were S. enterica serotype Typhimurium. None of these isolates were resistant to any of the 12 antibiotics tested. Altogether, these findings suggest that DCC from this region are not being colonized with commensal or potentially pathogenic enteric bacteria from agricultural or human sources and that enteric bacteria isolated from these birds are unlikely to contribute to a gene pool of antimicrobial drug resistance.

  11. DNase I and Proteinase K eliminate DNA from injured or dead bacteria but not from living bacteria in microbial reference systems and natural drinking water biofilms for subsequent molecular biology analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Jessica Varela; Jungfer, Christina; Obst, Ursula; Schwartz, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Molecular techniques, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and quantitative PCR (qPCR), are very sensitive, but may detect total DNA present in a sample, including extracellular DNA (eDNA) and DNA coming from live and dead cells. DNase I is an endonuclease that non-specifically cleaves single- and double-stranded DNA. This enzyme was tested in this study to analyze its capacity of digesting DNA coming from dead cells with damaged cell membranes, leaving DNA from living cells with intact cell membranes available for DNA-based methods. For this purpose, an optimized DNase I/Proteinase K (DNase/PK) protocol was developed. Intact Staphylococcus aureus cells, heat-killed Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells, free genomic DNA of Salmonella enterica, and a mixture of these targets were treated according to the developed DNase/PK protocol. In parallel, these samples were treated with propidium monoazide (PMA) as an already described assay for live-dead discrimination. Quantitative PCR and PCR-DGGE of the eubacterial 16S rDNA fragment were used to test the ability of the DNase/PK and PMA treatments to distinguish DNA coming from cells with intact cell membranes in the presence of DNA from dead cells and free genomic DNA. The methods were applied to three months old autochthonous drinking water biofilms from a pilot facility built at a German waterworks. Shifts in the DNA patterns observed after DGGE analysis demonstrated the applicability of DNase/PK as well as of the PMA treatment for natural biofilm investigation. However, the DNase/PK treatment demonstrated some practical advantages in comparison with the PMA treatment for live/dead discrimination of bacterial targets in drinking water systems. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Dynamic modulation of fimbrial extension and FimH-mannose binding force on live bacteria under pH changes: a molecular atomic force microscopy analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacquot, A.; Sakamoto, C.; Razafitianamaharavo, Angelina; Caillet, C; Merlin, J; Fahs, A; Ghigo, G.; Beloin, C; Duval, J.F.L.; Francius, G.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; Mechanical and conformational properties of type 1 fimbriae were evaluated on live bacterial cells by Single Molecule Force Spectroscopy (SMFS) and Dynamic Force Spectroscopy (DFS) in buffered solutions whose pH varied from 3 to 9. We evidenced that both fimbrial extension and fimbrial binding force to mannosylated-surface are modulated with changing the externally applied shear force and the solution pH. In particular, intertwined FimA-FimA and FimH-mannose interactio...

  13. On-chip cellomics assay enabling algebraic and geometric understanding of epigenetic information in cellular networks of living systems. 1. Temporal aspects of epigenetic information in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    A series of studies aimed at developing methods and systems of analyzing epigenetic information in cells and in cell networks, as well as that of genetic information, was examined to expand our understanding of how living systems are determined. Because cells are minimum units reflecting epigenetic information, which is considered to map the history of a parallel-processing recurrent network of biochemical reactions, their behaviors cannot be explained by considering only conventional DNA information-processing events. The role of epigenetic information on cells, which complements their genetic information, was inferred by comparing predictions from genetic information with cell behaviour observed under conditions chosen to reveal adaptation processes, population effects and community effects. A system of analyzing epigenetic information was developed starting from the twin complementary viewpoints of cell regulation as an "algebraic" system (emphasis on temporal aspects) and as a "geometric" system (emphasis on spatial aspects). Exploiting the combination of latest microfabrication technology and measurement technologies, which we call on-chip cellomics assay, we can control and re-construct the environments and interaction of cells from "algebraic" and "geometric" viewpoints. In this review, temporal viewpoint of epigenetic information, a part of the series of single-cell-based "algebraic" and "geometric" studies of celluler systems in our research groups, are summerized and reported. The knowlege acquired from this study may lead to the use of cells that fully control practical applications like cell-based drug screening and the regeneration of organs.

  14. On-Chip Cellomics Assay Enabling Algebraic and Geometric Understanding of Epigenetic Information in Cellular Networks of Living Systems. 1. Temporal Aspects of Epigenetic Information in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Yasuda

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A series of studies aimed at developing methods and systems of analyzing epigenetic information in cells and in cell networks, as well as that of genetic information, was examined to expand our understanding of how living systems are determined. Because cells are minimum units reflecting epigenetic information, which is considered to map the history of a parallel-processing recurrent network of biochemical reactions, their behaviors cannot be explained by considering only conventional DNA information-processing events. The role of epigenetic information on cells, which complements their genetic information, was inferred by comparing predictions from genetic information with cell behaviour observed under conditions chosen to reveal adaptation processes, population effects and community effects. A system of analyzing epigenetic information was developed starting from the twin complementary viewpoints of cell regulation as an “algebraic” system (emphasis on temporal aspects and as a “geometric” system (emphasis on spatial aspects. Exploiting the combination of latest microfabrication technology and measurement technologies, which we call on-chip cellomics assay, we can control and re-construct the environments and interaction of cells from “algebraic” and “geometric” viewpoints. In this review, temporal viewpoint of epigenetic information, a part of the series of single-cell-based “algebraic” and “geometric” studies of celluler systems in our research groups, are summerized and reported. The knowlege acquired from this study may lead to the use of cells that fully control practical applications like cell-based drug screening and the regeneration of organs.

  15. Films of bacteria at interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccari, Liana; Molaei, Mehdi; Niepa, Tagbo H R; Lee, Daeyeon; Leheny, Robert L; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2017-09-01

    Bacteria are often discussed as active colloids, self-propelled organisms whose collective motion can be studied in the context of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. In such studies, the behavior of bacteria confined to interfaces or in the proximity of an interface plays an important role. For instance, many studies have probed collective behavior of bacteria in quasi two-dimensional systems such as soap films. Since fluid interfaces can adsorb surfactants and other materials, the stress and velocity boundary conditions at interfaces can alter bacteria motion; hydrodynamic studies of interfaces with differing boundary conditions are reviewed. Also, bacteria in bulk can become trapped at or near fluid interfaces, where they colonize and form structures comprising secretions like exopolysaccharides, surfactants, living and dead bacteria, thereby creating Films of Bacteria at Interfaces (FBI). The formation of FBI is discussed at air-water, oil-water, and water-water interfaces, with an emphasis on film mechanics, and with some allusion to genetic functions guiding bacteria to restructure fluid interfaces. At air-water interfaces, bacteria form pellicles or interfacial biofilms. Studies are reviewed that reveal that pellicle material properties differ for different strains of bacteria, and that pellicle physicochemistry can act as a feedback mechanism to regulate film formation. At oil-water interfaces, a range of FBI form, depending on bacteria strain. Some bacteria-laden interfaces age from an initial active film, with dynamics dominated by motile bacteria, through viscoelastic states, to form an elastic film. Others remain active with no evidence of elastic film formation even at significant interface ages. Finally, bacteria can adhere to and colonize ultra-low surface tension interfaces such as aqueous-aqueous systems common in food industries. Relevant literature is reviewed, and areas of interest for potential application are discussed, ranging from health

  16. Antibacterial activity of silver-killed bacteria: the "zombies" effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakshlak, Racheli Ben-Knaz; Pedahzur, Rami; Avnir, David

    2015-04-01

    We report a previously unrecognized mechanism for the prolonged action of biocidal agents, which we denote as the zombies effect: biocidally-killed bacteria are capable of killing living bacteria. The concept is demonstrated by first killing Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 with silver nitrate and then challenging, with the dead bacteria, a viable culture of the same bacterium: Efficient antibacterial activity of the killed bacteria is observed. A mechanism is suggested in terms of the action of the dead bacteria as a reservoir of silver, which, due to Le-Chatelier's principle, is re-targeted to the living bacteria. Langmuirian behavior, as well as deviations from it, support the proposed mechanism.

  17. Controlled assembly of bacteria on chemical patterns using soft lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerf, Aline; Cau, Jean-Christophe; Vieu, Christophe

    2008-09-01

    Highly ordered arrays of single living bacteria were obtained by selective adsorption of bacteria onto chemical patterns with micrometric resolution. The chemically engineered template surfaces were prepared with the combination of microcontact printing process and a simple incubation technique. This methodology can be used for fundamental studies of bacterium's inner mechanisms and sub-cellular organization as well as for interfacing living bacteria with artificial microsystems.

  18. Baseline cutaneous bacteria of free-living New Zealand native frogs (Leiopelma archeyi and Leiopelma hochstetteri) and implications for their role in defense against the amphibian chytrid (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Stephanie D; Berger, Lee; Bell, Sara; Dodd, Sarah; James, Tim Y; Skerratt, Lee F; Bishop, Phillip J; Speare, Rick

    2014-10-01

    Abstract Knowledge of baseline cutaneous bacterial microbiota may be useful in interpreting diagnostic cultures from captive sick frogs and as part of quarantine or pretranslocation disease screening. Bacteria may also be an important part of innate immunity against chytridiomycosis, a fungal skin disease caused by Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). In February 2009, 92 distinct bacterial isolates from the ventral skin of 64 apparently healthy Leiopelma archeyi and Leiopelma hochstetteri native frogs from the Coromandel and Whareorino regions in New Zealand were identified using molecular techniques. The most-common isolates identified in L. archeyi were Pseudomonas spp. and the most common in L. hochstetteri were Flavobacterium spp. To investigate the possible role of bacteria in innate immunity, a New Zealand strain of Bd (Kaikorai Valley-Lewingii-2008-SDS1) was isolated and used in an in vitro challenge assay to test for inhibition by bacteria. One bacterial isolate, a Flavobacterium sp., inhibited growth of Bd. These results imply that diverse cutaneous bacteria are present and may play a role in the innate defense in Leiopelma against pathogens, including Bd, and are a starting point for further investigation.

  19. Assisted Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in other supported-living environments. Adult Foster Care Foster care homes generally provide room, board, and some help with activities of daily living. This is provided by the sponsoring family or other paid caregivers, who usually live on ...

  20. Science ... bacteria ... art ...

    OpenAIRE

    Dimech, Anne Marie; Zammit, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria are everywhere, from the top of the windswept cliffs of Dwejra, Gozo, right to the core of the ancient catacombs in Rabat, Malta. Anne Marie Dimech met Dr Gabrielle Zammit to learn about the unique bacteria discovered growing on artworks in ancient Maltese temples and how these bacteria could be useful to medicine. http://www.um.edu.mt/think/science-bacteria-art/

  1. The Microworld of Marine-Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    JØRGENSEN, BB

    1995-01-01

    Microsensor studies show that the marine environment in the size scale of bacteria is physically and chemically very different from the macroenvironment. The microbial world of the sediment-water interface is thus dominated by water viscosity and steep diffusion gradients. Because of the diverse...... metabolism types, bacteria in the mostly anoxic sea floor play an important role in the major element cycles of the ocean. The communities of giant, filamentous sulfur bacteria that live in the deep-sea hydrothermal vents or along the Pacific coast of South America are presented here as examples....

  2. Bleach vs. Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Articles | Inside Life Science Home Page Bleach vs. Bacteria By Sharon Reynolds Posted April 2, 2014 Your ... hypochlorous acid to help kill invading microbes, including bacteria. Researchers funded by the National Institutes of Health ...

  3. Living Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    This book is aimed at anyone who is interested in learning more about living technology, whether coming from business, the government, policy centers, academia, or anywhere else. Its purpose is to help people to learn what living technology is, what it might develop into, and how it might impact...... our lives. The phrase 'living technology' was coined to refer to technology that is alive as well as technology that is useful because it shares the fundamental properties of living systems. In particular, the invention of this phrase was called for to describe the trend of our technology becoming...... increasingly life-like or literally alive. Still, the phrase has different interpretations depending on how one views what life is. This book presents nineteen perspectives on living technology. Taken together, the interviews convey the collective wisdom on living technology's power and promise, as well as its...

  4. Bacteria and vampirism in cinema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, O; Bourry, A; Thévenot, S; Burucoa, C

    2013-09-01

    A vampire is a non-dead and non-alive chimerical creature, which, according to various folklores and popular superstitions, feeds on blood of the living to draw vital force. Vampires do not reproduce by copulation, but by bite. Vampirism is thus similar to a contagious disease contracted by intravascular inoculation with a suspected microbial origin. In several vampire films, two real bacteria were staged, better integrated than others in popular imagination: Yersinia pestis and Treponema pallidum. Bacillus vampiris was created for science-fiction. These films are attempts to better define humans through one of their greatest fears: infectious disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Linkage between copepods and bacteria in the North Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Corte, D.; Lekunberri, I.; Sintes, E.; Garcia, J.A.L.; Gonzalez, S.; Herndl, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Copepods and bacteria are fundamental components of the pelagic food web andplay a major role in biogeochemical cycles. Marine bacteria have a free-living or particleattachedlifestyle, but as members of the microbial food web, the only biotic interaction of bacteriais commonly assumed to be with

  6. Isolation and characterization of culturable bacteria from bulk soil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Plant growth promoting (PGP) bacteria are microorganisms living in association with plants. PGP bacteria have various physiological activities that they perform which are beneficial to plants. For example, phosphate solubilisation, nitrogen fixation, phytostimulation and formation of siderophores. The aim of this investigation ...

  7. Anti-fungal properties of chitinolytic dune soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, W.; Klein Gunnewiek, P.J.A.; Lafeber, P.; Janse, J.H.; Spit, B.E.; Woldendorp, J.W.

    1998-01-01

    Anti-fungal properties of chitinolytic soil bacteria may enable them to compete successfully for chitin with fungi. Additionally, the production of chitinase may be part of a lytic system that enables the bacteria to use living hyphae rather than chitin as the actual growth substrate, since chitin

  8. Antimicrobial resistant patterns of pathogenic bacteria isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Antibiotic resistance and multi- resistanceof pathogenic bacteria is increasing, becoming a problem for the public health andthreatens lives and increases considerably to healthcare cost. Objective: To determine the antimicrobial resistant patterns of pathogenic bacteria isolated from the Referred Out-Patients ...

  9. Living lab

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mieke Veerman; Tineke Kingma; Jacqueline van Alphen; Carolien Smits; Jan Jukema

    2017-01-01

    In Zwolle werken studenten en ouderen in co-creatie samen met andere partijen aan het ontwikkelen en implementeren van authentieke leeftijdsvriendelijke diensten. Daartoe heeft de opleiding Toegepaste Gerontologie van Hogeschool Windesheim samen met ouderen een living lab ontwikkeld. Het Living

  10. Genomics of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Flaherty, Sarah; Goh, Yong Jun; Klaenhammer, Todd R.

    Probiotic bacteria from the Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species belong to the Firmicutes and the Actinobacteria phylum, respectively. Lactobacilli are members of the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group, a broadly defined family of microorganisms that ferment various hexoses into primarily lactic acid. Lactobacilli are typically low G + C gram-positive species which are phylogenetically diverse, with over 100 species documented to date. Bifidobacteria are heterofermentative, high G + C content bacteria with about 30 species of bifidobacteria described to date.

  11. Fixação do nitrogênio do ar pelas bactérias que vivem em simbiose com as raízes da centrosema Fixation of the atmospheric nitrogen by bacteria which live symbiotically on centrosema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Casado Montojos

    1963-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuando a série de trabalhos sôbre a quantidade de nitrogênio atmosférico fixada por bactérias que vivem em simbiose com raízes de leguminosas, são relatados os resultados encontrados em centrosema (Centrosema pubescens Benth. Foram utilizados vasos de Mitscherlich, com terra-roxa-misturada. A colheita das plantas foi efetuada por ocasião do florescimento. A parte aérea foi pesada para cálculo da quantidade de massa verde produzida, e, em seguida, juntamente com as raízes, sêca a 60°C até pêso constante. Determinaram-se os teores de nitrogênio na parte aérea e subterrânea das plantas, assim como da terra dos vasos. Os resultados mostraram elevada capacidade de fixação simbiótica de nitrogênio pela centrosema correspondente a cêrca de 204 quilogramas de nitrogênio por hectare.Following a series of research work with the purpose of verifying the amount of atmospheric nitrogen fixed by symbiotic bacteria, the authors report in this paper the results on their research with the leguminous plant Centrosema pubescens Benth. This experiment was conducted in Mitscherlich pots containing terra-roxa-misturada obtained from a 20 cm deep layer of soil taken from the Central Experiment Station "Theodureto de Camargo", in Campinas. The plants were cut in the blooming period, as this is the proper season for turning over green manure crops. The aerial portion of the plants was weighed so as to determine the total production of green matter and then it was dried together with the roots at 60°C. Thus, nitrogen of the total plant was determined and the same analysis was done at the end of the experiment for the soil removed from the pots. According to the results of this experiment, it was found that 204 kilograms of nitrogen per hectare were fixed, showing therefore that centrosema has a high capacity of symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

  12. Learning from bacteria about natural information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2009-10-01

    Under natural growth conditions, bacteria live in complex hierarchical communities. To conduct complex cooperative behaviors, bacteria utilize sophisticated communication to the extent that their chemical language includes semantic and even pragmatic aspects. I describe how complex colony forms (patterns) emerge through the communication-based interplay between individual bacteria and the colony. Individual cells assume newly co-generated traits and abilities that are not prestored in the genetic information of the cells, that is, not all the information required for efficient responses to all environmental conditions is stored. To solve newly encountered problems, they assess the problem via collective sensing, recall stored information of past experience, and then execute distributed information processing of the 10(9)-10(12) bacteria in the colony--transforming the colony into a "super-brain." I show illuminating examples of swarming intelligence of live bacteria in which they solve optimization problems that are beyond what human beings can solve. This will lead to a discussion about the special nature of bacterial computational principles compared to Turing algorithm computational principles, in particular about the role of distributed information processing.

  13. Live Well

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... status, healthy eating is good for your overall health. If you are living with HIV, following a healthy diet offers several benefits. Physical Activity - Exercise offers benefits that can help you maintain ...

  14. Healthy Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... changes to your lifestyle. By taking steps toward healthy living, you can help reduce your risk of ... Get the screening tests you need Maintain a healthy weight Eat a variety of healthy foods, and ...

  15. How honey kills bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakman, Paulus H. S.; te Velde, Anje A.; de Boer, Leonie; Speijer, Dave; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Zaat, Sebastian A. J.

    2010-01-01

    With the rise in prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, honey is increasingly valued for its antibacterial activity. To characterize all bactericidal factors in a medical-grade honey, we used a novel approach of successive neutralization of individual honey bactericidal factors. All bacteria

  16. Lived Lives: A Pavee Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, Kevin M; McGuinness, Seamus G; Cleary, Eimear; Jefferies, Janis; Owens, Christabel; Kelleher, Cecily C

    2017-04-13

    Background: Suicide is a significant public health concern, which impacts on health outcomes. Few suicide research studies have been interdisciplinary. We combined a psychobiographical autopsy with a visual arts autopsy, in which families donated stories, images and objects associated with the lived life of a loved one lost to suicide. From this interdisciplinary research platform, a mediated exhibition was created ( Lived Lives ) with artist, scientist and families, co-curated by communities, facilitating dialogue, response and public action around suicide prevention. Indigenous ethnic minorities (IEMs) bear a significant increased risk for suicide. Irish Travellers are an IEM with social and cultural parallels with IEMs internationally, experiencing racism, discrimination, and poor health outcomes including elevated suicide rates (SMR 6.6). Methods: An adjusted Lived Lives exhibition, Lived Lives: A Pavee Perspective manifested in Pavee Point, the national Traveller and Roma Centre. The project was evaluated by the Travelling Community as to how it related to suicide in their community, how it has shaped their understanding of suicide and its impacts, and its relevance to other socio-cultural contexts, nationally and internationally. The project also obtained feedback from all relevant stakeholders. Evaluation was carried out by an international visual arts research advisor and an independent observer from the field of suicide research. Results: Outputs included an arts-science mediated exhibition with reference to elevated Irish Traveller suicide rates. Digital online learning materials about suicide and its aftermath among Irish Travellers were also produced. The project reached its target audience, with a high level of engagement from members of the Travelling Community. Discussion: The Lived Lives methodology navigated the societal barriers of stigma and silence to foster communication and engagement, working with cultural values, consistent with an adapted

  17. Antibiotics from predatory bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Korp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria, which prey on other microorganisms, are commonly found in the environment. While some of these organisms act as solitary hunters, others band together in large consortia before they attack their prey. Anecdotal reports suggest that bacteria practicing such a wolfpack strategy utilize antibiotics as predatory weapons. Consistent with this hypothesis, genome sequencing revealed that these micropredators possess impressive capacities for natural product biosynthesis. Here, we will present the results from recent chemical investigations of this bacterial group, compare the biosynthetic potential with that of non-predatory bacteria and discuss the link between predation and secondary metabolism.

  18. Wanted Alive: Finding Bacteria in Your Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Akira

    2017-08-17

    In this issue of Cell Chemical Biology, Pezacki and co-workers (Sherratt et al., 2017) report a simple method to metabolically label viable bacteria, which can be used to detect and capture foodborne pathogens. The method may also find many other applications because it can be used to recover live cells, pathogens and non-pathogens, from various biomedical and environmental samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Extracellular communication in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chhabra, S.R.; Philipp, B.; Eberl, L.

    2005-01-01

    molecules, in different Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria they control pathogenicity, secondary metabolite production, biofilm differentiation, DNA transfer and bioluminescence. The development of biosensors for the detection of these signal molecules has greatly facilitated their subsequent chemical...

  20. [Darwin and bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann D, Walter

    2009-02-01

    As in 2009 the scientific world celebrates two hundreds years from the birthday of Charles Darwin and one hundred and fifty from the publication of The Origin of Species, an analysis of his complete work is performed, looking for any mention of bacteria. But it seems that the great naturahst never took knowledge about its existence, something rather improbable in a time when the discovery of bacteria shook the medical world, or he deliberately ignored them, not finding a place for such microscopic beings into his theory of evolution. But the bacteria badly affected his familiar life, killing scarlet fever one of his children and worsening to death the evolution of tuberculosis of his favourite Annie. Darwin himself could suffer the sickness of Chagas, whose etiological agent has a similar level to bacteria in the scale of evolution.

  1. Plant-bacteria partnership: phytoremediation of hydrocarbons contaminated soil and expression of catabolic genes

    OpenAIRE

    Hamna Saleem

    2016-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are harmful to living organisms when they are exposed in natural environment. Once they come in contact, it is not an easy to remove them because many of their constituents are persistent in nature. To achieve this target, different approaches have been exploited by using plants, bacteria, and plant-bacteria together. Among them, combined use of plants and bacteria has gained tremendous attention as bacteria possess set of catabolic genes which produce catabolic enzymes...

  2. Countryside Live!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Andrew; Richardson, Gary

    2006-01-01

    The "Countryside Live!" events, organised by the Countryside Foundation for Education (CFE), provide a unique opportunity for urban children to explore a whole new area of possibilities and learning, through becoming aware at first-hand of what goes on in the countryside. The event at Staunton Country Park, Havant, Hampshire, which took…

  3. The talking language in some major Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Goutam; Ray, Arun Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Cell-cell interaction or quorum sensing (QS) is a vital biochemical/physiological process in bacteria that is required for various physiological functions, including nutrient uptake, competence development, biofilm formation, sporulation, as well as for toxin secretion. In natural environment, bacteria live in close association with other bacteria and interaction among them is crucial for survival. The QS-regulated gene expression in bacteria is a cell density-dependent process and the initiation process depends on the threshold level of the signaling molecule, N-acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL). The present review summarizes the QS signal and its respective circuit in Gram-negative bacteria. Most of the human pathogens belong to Gram-negative group, and only a few of them cause disease through QS system. Thus, inhibition of pathogenic bacteria is important. Use of antibiotics creates a selective pressure (antibiotics act as natural selection factor to promote one group of bacteria over another group) for emerging multidrug-resistant bacteria and will not be suitable for long-term use. The alternative process of inhibition of QS in bacteria using different natural and synthetic molecules is called quorum quenching. However, in the long run, QS inhibitors or blockers may also develop resistance, but obviously it will solve some sort of problems. In this review, we also have stated the mode of action of quorum-quenching molecule. The understanding of QS network in pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria will help us to solve many health-related problems in future.

  4. Flagellated ectosymbiotic bacteria propel a eucaryotic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    A devescovinid flagellate from termites exhibits rapid gliding movements only when in close contact with other cells or with a substrate. Locomotion is powered not by the cell's own flagella nor by its remarkable rotary axostyle, but by the flagella of thousands of rod bacteria which live on its surface. That the ectosymbiotic bacteria actually propel the protozoan was shown by the following: (a) the bacteria, which lie in specialized pockets of the host membrane, bear typical procaryotic flagella on their exposed surface; (b) gliding continues when the devescovinid's own flagella and rotary axostyle are inactivated; (c) agents which inhibit bacterial flagellar motility, but not the protozoan's motile systems, stop gliding movements; (d) isolated vesicles derived from the surface of the devescovinid rotate at speeds dependent on the number of rod bacteria still attached; (e) individual rod bacteria can move independently over the surface of compressed cells; and (f) wave propagation by the flagellar bundles of the ectosymbiotic bacteria is visualized directly by video-enhanced polarization microscopy. Proximity to solid boundaries may be required to align the flagellar bundles of adjacent bacteria in the same direction, and/or to increase their propulsive efficiency (wall effect). This motility-linked symbiosis resembles the association of locomotory spirochetes with the Australian termite flagellate Mixotricha (Cleveland, L. R., and A. V. Grimstone, 1964, Proc. R. Soc. Lond. B Biol. Sci., 159:668-686), except that in our case propulsion is provided by bacterial flagella themselves. Since bacterial flagella rotate, an additional novelty of this system is that the surface bearing the procaryotic rotary motors is turned by the eucaryotic rotary motor within. PMID:7130279

  5. [Spectrum and susceptibility of preoperative conjunctival bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Rubio, M E; Cuesta-Rodríguez, T; Urcelay-Segura, J L; Cortés-Valdés, C

    2013-12-01

    To describe the conjunctival bacterial spectrum of our patients undergoing intraocular surgery and their antibiotic sensitivity during the study period. A retrospective study of preoperative conjunctival culture of patients consecutively scheduled for intraocular surgery from 21 February 2011 to 1 April 2013. Specimens were directly seeded onto blood-agar and MacConkey-agar (aerobiosis incubation, 2 days), and on chocolate-agar (6% CO2 incubation, 7 days). The identified bacteria were divided into 3 groups according to their origin; the bacteria susceptibility tests were performed on those more pathogenic and on some of the less pathogenic when more than 5 colonies were isolated. The sensitivity of the exigent growing bacteria was obtained with disk diffusion technique, and for of the non-exigent bacteria by determining their minimum inhibitory concentration. The Epidat 3.1 program was used for statistical calculations. A total of 13,203 bacteria were identified in 6,051 cultures, with 88.7% being typical colonizers of conjunctiva (group 1), 8.8% typical of airways (group 2), and the remaining 2.5% of undetermined origin (group 3). 530 cultures (8.8%) were sterile. The sensitivity of group 1 was: 99% vancomycin, 95% rifampicin, 87% chloramphenicol, 76% tetracycline. Levels of co-trimoxazole, aminoglycosides, quinolones, β-lactams and macrolides decreased since 2007. The group 2 was very sensitive to chloramphenicol, cefuroxime, rifampicin, ciprofloxacin and amoxicillin/clavulanate. In group 3, to levofloxacin 93%, ciprofloxacin 89%, tobramycin 76%, but ceftazidime 53% and cefuroxime 29% decreased. None of the tested antibiotics could eradicate all possible conjunctival bacteria. Bacteria living permanently on the conjunctiva (group 1) have achieved higher resistance than the eventual colonizers. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. The fecal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowsky, Michael J.; Whitman, Richard L.

    2011-01-01

    The Fecal Bacteria offers a balanced, integrated discussion of fecal bacteria and their presence and ecology in the intestinal tract of mammals, in the environment, and in the food supply. This volume covers their use in examining and assessing water quality in order to offer protection from illnesses related to swimming in or ingesting contaminated water, in addition to discussing their use in engineering considerations of water quality, modeling, monitoring, and regulations. Fecal bacteria are additionally used as indicators of contamination of ready-to-eat foods and fresh produce. The intestinal environment, the microbial community structure of the gut microbiota, and the physiology and genomics of this broad group of microorganisms are explored in the book. With contributions from an internationally recognized group of experts, the book integrates medicine, public health, environmental, and microbiological topics in order to provide a unique, holistic understanding of fecal bacteria. Moreover, it shows how the latest basic science and applied research findings are helping to solve problems and develop effective management strategies. For example, readers will discover how the latest tools and molecular approaches have led to our current understanding of fecal bacteria and enabled us to improve human health and water quality. The Fecal Bacteria is recommended for microbiologists, clinicians, animal scientists, engineers, environmental scientists, food safety experts, water quality managers, and students. It will help them better understand fecal bacteria and use their knowledge to protect human and environmental health. They can also apply many of the techniques and molecular tools discussed in this book to the study of a broad range of microorganisms in a variety of habitats.

  7. Antioxidant activity of Sphaerococcus coronopifolius associated bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nádia Fino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Associated bacteria living on macroalgae surfaces are an interesting source of new secondary metabolites with biological activities. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of epiphytic bacteria from the marine algae Sphaerococcus coronopifolius and the evaluation of the antioxidant activity of the bacteria extracts. The identification of epiphytic bacteria was determined by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bacteria extracts were obtained with methanol and dichloromethane (1:1 extraction. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by quantification of total phenolic content (TPC, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity and oxygen radical absorbent capacity (ORAC. The extracts with higher antioxidant activity were tested on MCF-7 and HepG-2 cell lines in oxidative stress conditions induced by H2O2 at 0.2 mM and 0.5 mM, respectively. In total were isolated 21 Sphaerococcus coronopifolius associated bacteria and identified as Vibrio sp. (28.57%, Shewanella sp. (23.81%, Pseudoalteromonas sp. (19.05%, Bacillus sp. (9.52% and Halomonas sp. (9.52%. Two (9.52% of them presented less than 90% Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST match. The epiphytic bacteria with the most antioxidant potential evaluated by ORAC and DPPH methods were Sp2, Sp12, Sp23, Sp25 and Sp27. The strain Sp4 show high antioxidant activity in all antioxidant methods (ORAC, DPPH and TPC. In oxidative stress conditions on MCF-7 cell line, the extracts of bacteria (1mg.ml-1: 24hours Sp4 (16.15%, Sp25 (17.95% and Sp27 (10.65% prevented the cell death induced by H2O2. In the HepG-2 cell line was the extracts of Sp2 (9.01%, Sp4 (11.21%, Sp12 (7.20% and Sp23 (8.81% bacteria that high prevented the oxidative stress condition induced by H2O2. In conclusion, the Sphaerococcus coronopifolius associated bacteria can be an interesting and excellent source of marine natural compounds with antioxidant activity.

  8. Mycorrhiza helper bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deveau, Aurelie [French National Insitute for Agricultural Research (INRA); Labbe, Jessy [ORNL

    2016-10-01

    This chapter focuses on the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacteria (MHB), a generic name given to bacteria which stimulate the formation of mycorrhizal symbiosis. By extension, some bacterial strains that positively impact the functioning of mycorrhizal symbiosis are also called MHB. These bacteria have applicative interests, as they indirectly improve the health and growth of tree seedlings. MHB are not restricted to a specific type of ecosystem, but are rather generalist in the way that they associate with both herbaceous and woody mycorrhizal plants from boreal, temperate, arid and tropical ecosystems. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms and their specificities will help us to know more about the ecology of the MHB. The process of acquisition varies between fungal species; while ectomycorrhizal fungi most probably recurrently acquire them from the environment, the association between bacterial endosymbionts and Glomeromycota probably dates back to very ancient times, and has since been vertically transmitted.

  9. Insufficient Living

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Trine Bernholdt; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe; Moons, Philip

    2015-01-01

    AND METHODS:: Within a phenomenological-hermeneutical framework, a qualitative interview study was conducted that included 6 men and 5 women (aged 29-86 years). Patients were interviewed 3 to 6 months after discharge. Analysis consisted of 3 levels: naive reading, structured analysis, and critical...... interpretation and discussion. FINDINGS:: The overall concept that emerged was "Insufficient Living." Patients all experienced a life after illness, which was perceived as insufficient. The overall concept can be interpreted in terms of the following 3 themes. The first was "an altered life," where participants...

  10. Mycophagous soil bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rudnick, M.B.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract

    Soil microorganisms evolved several strategies to compete for limited nutrients in soil. Bacteria of the genus Collimonas developed a way to exploit fungi as a source of organic nutrients. This strategy has been termed

  11. Do Bacteria Age?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Aging, a progressive deterioration of the physical functions necessary for survival and fertility, resulting from deleterious changes, is one of the most fundamental features of Eukary- otes. Bacteria are thought to be examples of organisms that do not age. They divide by binary fission, which is assumed to be a symmetrical ...

  12. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 12. Antifreeze Proteins of Bacteria. M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 12 Issue 12 December 2007 pp 25-30. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/012/12/0025-0030. Keywords.

  13. Executing Liveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soon, Winnie

    2018-01-01

    -actions this thesis examines the complexity of our current computational environment as evident in the increasing use of data queries, the instantaneous transmission of data streams and the seamless running of automated agents. By drawing together the methods of reflexive practice, close reading, iterative trials...... implications of the reading, writing, running and execution of code, which I refer to as ‘reflexive coding practice.’ This methodology provides an applied approach to computational processes, invisible architectures and a means to reflect on cultural issues through experimentation and practice. A materialist...... scales. The analysis and discussion contributes to a widening of critical attention to software (art) studies primarily in terms of its distinct focus on the live dimension of code. Furthermore, it expands the debate in media and performance studies, providing technical description and analysis...

  14. Living Lands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Suna Møller

    2015-01-01

    , hunters attended to questions like safe-journeying on ice or the role of natural surroundings in children’s education, in ways revealing a relational perception of ‘nature’ and dissolving culture-nature dualisms. Hunters’ experiences in living the land afforded children a dwelling position from which......In this presentation I draw on fieldtrips on dog sledge in Northern Greenland in 2012 and fieldtrips among caribou hunters in West Greenland in 2010 and 2012. I carried out fieldtrips through snow and ice to explore how these landscapes play a role in the life of modern Greenlanders. Fieldtrips...... to grow with the features of the land. Framed this way, ‘nature’ was regarded as part of the social world. I suggest that learning among Arctic hunters is social and twofold. First, we can learn how human-environment relations influence individual life trajectories. Secondly, ‘nature’ as part...

  15. Metabolic plasticity for isoprenoid biosynthesis in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Gil, Jordi; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2013-05-15

    Isoprenoids are a large family of compounds synthesized by all free-living organisms. In most bacteria, the common precursors of all isoprenoids are produced by the MEP (methylerythritol 4-phosphate) pathway. The MEP pathway is absent from archaea, fungi and animals (including humans), which synthesize their isoprenoid precursors using the completely unrelated MVA (mevalonate) pathway. Because the MEP pathway is essential in most bacterial pathogens (as well as in the malaria parasites), it has been proposed as a promising new target for the development of novel anti-infective agents. However, bacteria show a remarkable plasticity for isoprenoid biosynthesis that should be taken into account when targeting this metabolic pathway for the development of new antibiotics. For example, a few bacteria use the MVA pathway instead of the MEP pathway, whereas others possess the two full pathways, and some parasitic strains lack both the MVA and the MEP pathways (probably because they obtain their isoprenoids from host cells). Moreover, alternative enzymes and metabolic intermediates to those of the canonical MVA or MEP pathways exist in some organisms. Recent work has also shown that resistance to a block of the first steps of the MEP pathway can easily be developed because several enzymes unrelated to isoprenoid biosynthesis can produce pathway intermediates upon spontaneous mutations. In the present review, we discuss the major advances in our knowledge of the biochemical toolbox exploited by bacteria to synthesize the universal precursors for their essential isoprenoids.

  16. The friendly bacteria within us Commensal bacteria of the intestine ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The friendly bacteria within us Commensal bacteria of the intestine: Roles in health and disease B.S. Ramakrishna Professor & Head Gastroenterology & Hepatology Christian Medical College Vellore · Slide 2 · Intestinal bacteria: the hidden organ · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · The normal bacterial flora prevents GI disease · Slide 7.

  17. Quantification and qualification of bacteria trapped in chewed gum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan W Wessel

    Full Text Available Chewing of gum contributes to the maintenance of oral health. Many oral diseases, including caries and periodontal disease, are caused by bacteria. However, it is unknown whether chewing of gum can remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Here, we hypothesize that chewing of gum can trap bacteria and remove them from the oral cavity. To test this hypothesis, we developed two methods to quantify numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum. In the first method, known numbers of bacteria were finger-chewed into gum and chewed gums were molded to standard dimensions, sonicated and plated to determine numbers of colony-forming-units incorporated, yielding calibration curves of colony-forming-units retrieved versus finger-chewed in. In a second method, calibration curves were created by finger-chewing known numbers of bacteria into gum and subsequently dissolving the gum in a mixture of chloroform and tris-ethylenediaminetetraacetic-acid (TE-buffer. The TE-buffer was analyzed using quantitative Polymerase-Chain-Reaction (qPCR, yielding calibration curves of total numbers of bacteria versus finger-chewed in. Next, five volunteers were requested to chew gum up to 10 min after which numbers of colony-forming-units and total numbers of bacteria trapped in chewed gum were determined using the above methods. The qPCR method, involving both dead and live bacteria yielded higher numbers of retrieved bacteria than plating, involving only viable bacteria. Numbers of trapped bacteria were maximal during initial chewing after which a slow decrease over time up to 10 min was observed. Around 10(8 bacteria were detected per gum piece depending on the method and gum considered. The number of species trapped in chewed gum increased with chewing time. Trapped bacteria were clearly visualized in chewed gum using scanning-electron-microscopy. Summarizing, using novel methods to quantify and qualify oral bacteria trapped in chewed gum, the hypothesis is confirmed that chewing

  18. Exopolysaccharides from marine bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Zhenming; Fang, Yan

    2005-01-01

    Microbial polysaccharides represent a class of important products of growing interest for many sectors of industry. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in isolating new exopolysaccharides (EPSs)-producing bacteria from marine environments, particularly from various extreme marine environments. Many new marine microbial EPSs with novel chemical compositions, properties and structures have been found to have potential applications in fields such as adhesives, textiles, Pharmaceuticals and medicine for anti-cancer, food additives, oil recovery and metal removal in mining and industrial waste treatments, etc This paper gives a brief summary of the information about the EPSs produced by marine bacteria, including their chemical compositions, properties and structures, together with their potential applications in industry.

  19. Manufacture of Probiotic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, J. A.; Ross, R. P.; Fitzgerald, G. F.; Stanton, C.

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been used for many years as natural biopreservatives in fermented foods. A small group of LAB are also believed to have beneficial health effects on the host, so called probiotic bacteria. Probiotics have emerged from the niche industry from Asia into European and American markets. Functional foods are one of the fastest growing markets today, with estimated growth to 20 billion dollars worldwide by 2010 (GIA, 2008). The increasing demand for probiotics and the new food markets where probiotics are introduced, challenges the industry to produce high quantities of probiotic cultures in a viable and stable form. Dried concentrated probiotic cultures are the most convenient form for incorporation into functional foods, given the ease of storage, handling and transport, especially for shelf-stable functional products. This chapter will discuss various aspects of the challenges associated with the manufacturing of probiotic cultures.

  20. ISS Live!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Jennifer; Harris, Philip; Hochstetler, Bruce; Guerra, Mark; Mendez, Israel; Healy, Matthew; Khan, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    International Space Station Live! (ISSLive!) is a Web application that uses a proprietary commercial technology called Lightstreamer to push data across the Internet using the standard http port (port 80). ISSLive! uses the push technology to display real-time telemetry and mission timeline data from the space station in any common Web browser or Internet- enabled mobile device. ISSLive! is designed to fill a unique niche in the education and outreach areas by providing access to real-time space station data without a physical presence in the mission control center. The technology conforms to Internet standards, supports the throughput needed for real-time space station data, and is flexible enough to work on a large number of Internet-enabled devices. ISSLive! consists of two custom components: (1) a series of data adapters that resides server-side in the mission control center at Johnson Space Center, and (2) a set of public html that renders the data pushed from the data adapters. A third component, the Lightstreamer server, is commercially available from a third party and acts as an intermediary between custom components (1) and (2). Lightstreamer also provides proprietary software libraries that are required to use the custom components. At the time of this reporting, this is the first usage of Web-based, push streaming technology in the aerospace industry.

  1. Surface layers of bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Beveridge, T. J.; Graham, L L

    1991-01-01

    Since bacteria are so small, microscopy has traditionally been used to study them as individual cells. To this end, electron microscopy has been a most powerful tool for studying bacterial surfaces; the viewing of macromolecular arrangements of some surfaces is now possible. This review compares older conventional electron-microscopic methods with new cryotechniques currently available and the results each has produced. Emphasis is not placed on the methodology but, rather, on the importance ...

  2. Growing unculturable bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Eric J

    2012-08-01

    The bacteria that can be grown in the laboratory are only a small fraction of the total diversity that exists in nature. At all levels of bacterial phylogeny, uncultured clades that do not grow on standard media are playing critical roles in cycling carbon, nitrogen, and other elements, synthesizing novel natural products, and impacting the surrounding organisms and environment. While molecular techniques, such as metagenomic sequencing, can provide some information independent of our ability to culture these organisms, it is essentially impossible to learn new gene and pathway functions from pure sequence data. A true understanding of the physiology of these bacteria and their roles in ecology, host health, and natural product production requires their cultivation in the laboratory. Recent advances in growing these species include coculture with other bacteria, recreating the environment in the laboratory, and combining these approaches with microcultivation technology to increase throughput and access rare species. These studies are unraveling the molecular mechanisms of unculturability and are identifying growth factors that promote the growth of previously unculturable organisms. This minireview summarizes the recent discoveries in this area and discusses the potential future of the field.

  3. Motility of electric cable bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Holm, Simon Agner

    2016-01-01

    Cable bacteria are filamentous bacteria that electrically couple sulfide oxidation and oxygen reduction at centimeter distances, and observations in sediment environments have suggested that they are motile. By time-lapse microscopy, we found that cable bacteria used gliding motility on surfaces...

  4. Antibiotic resistance in probiotic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel eGueimonde

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The main probiotic bacteria are strains belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, although other representatives, such as Bacillus or Escherichia coli strains, have also been used. Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium are two common inhabitants of the human intestinal microbiota. Also, some species are used in food fermentation processes as starters, or as adjunct cultures in the food industry. With some exceptions, antibiotic resistance in these beneficial microbes does not constitute a safety concern in itself, when mutations or intrinsic resistance mechanisms are responsible for the resistance phenotype. In fact, some probiotic strains with intrinsic antibiotic resistance could be useful for restoring the gut microbiota after antibiotic treatment. However, specific antibiotic resistance determinants carried on mobile genetic elements, such as tetracycline resistance genes, are often detected in the typical probiotic genera, and constitute a reservoir of resistance for potential food or gut pathogens, thus representing a serious safety issue.

  5. Pepsin homologues in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bateman Alex

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidase family A1, to which pepsin belongs, had been assumed to be restricted to eukaryotes. The tertiary structure of pepsin shows two lobes with similar folds and it has been suggested that the gene has arisen from an ancient duplication and fusion event. The only sequence similarity between the lobes is restricted to the motif around the active site aspartate and a hydrophobic-hydrophobic-Gly motif. Together, these contribute to an essential structural feature known as a psi-loop. There is one such psi-loop in each lobe, and so each lobe presents an active Asp. The human immunodeficiency virus peptidase, retropepsin, from peptidase family A2 also has a similar fold but consists of one lobe only and has to dimerize to be active. All known members of family A1 show the bilobed structure, but it is unclear if the ancestor of family A1 was similar to an A2 peptidase, or if the ancestral retropepsin was derived from a half-pepsin gene. The presence of a pepsin homologue in a prokaryote might give insights into the evolution of the pepsin family. Results Homologues of the aspartic peptidase pepsin have been found in the completed genomic sequences from seven species of bacteria. The bacterial homologues, unlike those from eukaryotes, do not possess signal peptides, and would therefore be intracellular acting at neutral pH. The bacterial homologues have Thr218 replaced by Asp, a change which in renin has been shown to confer activity at neutral pH. No pepsin homologues could be detected in any archaean genome. Conclusion The peptidase family A1 is found in some species of bacteria as well as eukaryotes. The bacterial homologues fall into two groups, one from oceanic bacteria and one from plant symbionts. The bacterial homologues are all predicted to be intracellular proteins, unlike the eukaryotic enzymes. The bacterial homologues are bilobed like pepsin, implying that if no horizontal gene transfer has occurred the duplication

  6. [Experimental interaction of halophilic prokaryotes and opportunistic bacteria in brine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanova, E A; Nemtseva, N V

    2013-01-01

    Study the effect of extremely halophilic archaea and moderately halophilic bacteria on preservation of opportunistic bacteria in brine. 17 strains of moderately halophilic bacteria and 2 strains of extremely halophilic archaea were isolated from continental hypersaline lake Razval of Sol-Iletsk area of Orenburg Region. Identification of pure cultures of prokaryotes was carried out taking into account their phenotype properties and based on determination of 16S RNA gene sequence. The effect of halophilic prokaryote on elimination of Escherichia coli from brine was evaluated during co-cultivation. Antagonistic activity of cell extracts of the studied microorganisms was evaluated by photometric method. A more prolonged preservation of an E. coli strain in brine in the presence of live cells of extremely halophilic archaea Halorubrum tebenquichense and moderately halophilic bacteria Marinococcus halophilus was established. Extracts of cells of extremely halophilic archaea and moderately halophilic bacteria on the contrary displayed antagonistic activity. The protective effect of live cells of halophilic prokaryotes and antagonistic activity of their cell extracts change the period of conservation of opportunistic bacteria in brine that regulates inter-microbial interactions and changes the period of self-purification that reflects the sanitary condition of a hypersaline water body.

  7. Filamentous bacteria transport electrons over centimetre distances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfeffer, Christian; Larsen, Steffen; Song, Jie

    2012-01-01

    across centimetre-wide zones. Here we present evidence that the native conductors are long, filamentous bacteria. They abounded in sediment zones with electric currents and along their length they contained strings with distinct properties in accordance with a function as electron transporters. Living......Oxygen consumption in marine sediments is often coupled to the oxidation of sulphide generated by degradation of organic matter in deeper, oxygen-free layers. Geochemical observations have shown that this coupling can be mediated by electric currents carried by unidentified electron transporters...

  8. Dynamic clustering in suspension of motile bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao; Yang, Xiang; Yang, Mingcheng; Zhang, H. P.

    2015-09-01

    Bacteria suspension exhibits a wide range of collective phenomena, arising from interactions between individual cells. Here we show Serratia marcescens cells near an air-liquid interface spontaneously aggregate into dynamic clusters through surface-mediated hydrodynamic interactions. These long-lived clusters translate randomly and rotate in the counterclockwise direction; they continuously evolve, merge with others and split into smaller ones. Measurements indicate that long-ranged hydrodynamic interactions have strong influences on cluster properties. Bacterial clusters change material and fluid transport near the interface and hence may have environmental and biological consequences.

  9. Living with Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are here Home › Living With Parkinson's Living With Parkinson's While living with Parkinson's can be challenging, there ... life and live well with Parkinson's disease. Managing Parkinson's Read More In Your Area Read More Resources & ...

  10. Living with your ileostomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abdominal pouch - living with; End ileostomy - living with; Ostomy - living with; Crohn's disease - living with; Inflammatory bowel ... about it on their own. Attend a local ostomy support group if there is one in your ...

  11. Impact of Collimonas bacteria on community composition of soil fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Höppener-Ogawa, S.; Leveau, J.H.J.; Hundscheid, M.P.J.; Van Veen, J.A.; De Boer, W.

    2009-01-01

    The genus Collimonas consists of soil bacteria that have the potential to grow at the expense of living fungal hyphae. However, the consequences of this mycophagous ability for soil fungi are unknown. Here we report on the development of fungal communities after introduction of collimonads in a soil

  12. Mucosal Vaccination and Therapy with Genetically Modified Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, J.

    2011-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have proved to be effective mucosal delivery vehicles that overcome the problem of delivering functional proteins to the mucosal tissues. By the intranasal route, both live and killed LAB vaccine strains have been shown to elicit mucosal and systemic immune responses that

  13. Endophytic bacteria with potential for bioremediation of petroleum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endophytic microorganisms live inside plants and show no apparent damage for the host. They often assist in plants' survival and facilitate their growth, or they can metabolize organic contaminants. This study aimed to isolate and identify the endophytic bacteria of plants present in impacted areas, as well as to test their ...

  14. Motility patterns of filamentous sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dunker, Rita; Røy, Hans; Kamp, Anja

    2011-01-01

    The large sulfur bacteria, Beggiatoa spp., live on the oxidation of sulfide with oxygen or nitrate, but avoid high concentrations of both sulfide and oxygen. As gliding filaments, they rely on reversals in the gliding direction to find their preferred environment, the oxygen–sulfide interface. We...

  15. Electron transfer in syntrophic communities of anaerobic bacteria and archaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stams, A.J.M.; Plugge, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    Interspecies electron transfer is a key process in methanogenic and sulphate-reducing environments. Bacteria and archaea that live in syntrophic communities take advantage of the metabolic abilities of their syntrophic partner to overcome energy barriers and break down compounds that they cannot

  16. The evolutionary emergence of stochastic phenotype switching in bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rainey, P.B.; Beaumont, H.J.E.; Ferguson, G.C.; Gallie, J.; Kost, C.; Libby, E.; Zhang, X.X.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic phenotype switching – or bet hedging – is a pervasive feature of living systems and common in bacteria that experience fluctuating (unpredictable) environmental conditions. Under such conditions, the capacity to generate variable offspring spreads the risk of being maladapted in the

  17. Adherent bacteria in heavy metal contaminated marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillan, David C; Pernet, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    The eubacterial communities adherent to sediment particles were studied in heavy metal contaminated coastal sediments. Six sampling sites on the Belgian continental plate and presenting various metal loads, granulometries, and organic matter content, were compared. The results indicated that the total microbial biomass (attached + free-living bacteria) was negatively correlated to HCl-extractable metal levels (pmarine sediments but that the ratio between attached and free living microorganisms is not affected. The composition of the eubacterial communities adherent to the fine fraction of the sediments (bacteria, was not related to the HCl extractable metal levels. Most of the 79 complete 16S rRNA sequences obtained from the attached microbial communities were classified in the gamma- and delta-Proteobacteria and in the CFB bacteria. A large proportion of the attached gamma-Proteobacterial sequences found in this study (56%) was included in the uncultivated GMS clades that are indigenous to marine sediments.

  18. Live bacterial vaccines – a review and identification of potential hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Detmer Ann

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The use of live bacteria to induce an immune response to itself or to a carried vaccine component is an attractive vaccine strategy. Advantages of live bacterial vaccines include their mimicry of a natural infection, intrinsic adjuvant properties and their possibility to be administered orally. Derivatives of pathogenic and non-pathogenic food related bacteria are currently being evaluated as live vaccines. However, pathogenic bacteria demands for attenuation to weaken its virulence. The use of bacteria as vaccine delivery vehicles implies construction of recombinant strains that contain the gene cassette encoding the antigen. With the increased knowledge of mucosal immunity and the availability of genetic tools for heterologous gene expression the concept of live vaccine vehicles gains renewed interest. However, administration of live bacterial vaccines poses some risks. In addition, vaccination using recombinant bacteria results in the release of live recombinant organisms into nature. This places these vaccines in the debate on application of genetically modified organisms. In this review we give an overview of live bacterial vaccines on the market and describe the development of new live vaccines with a focus on attenuated bacteria and food-related lactic acid bacteria. Furthermore, we outline the safety concerns and identify the hazards associated with live bacterial vaccines and try to give some suggestions of what to consider during their development.

  19. Comparison Of Cd2+ Biosorption And Bioaccumulation By Bacteria – A Radiometric Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Machalová Linda; Pipíška Martin; Trajteľová Zuzana; Horník Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    In this work, bioaccumulation and biosorption characteristics of Cd2+ ions by both dead and living non-growing biomass of gram-positive bacteria Kocuria palustris and Micrococcus luteus isolated from spent nuclear fuel pools were compared...

  20. Laterality in living beings, hand dominance, and cerebral lateralization

    OpenAIRE

    Milenković Sanja; Paunović Katarina; Kocijančić Dušica

    2016-01-01

    To date, lateralization in living beings is a phenomenon almost mythologically unexplored. Scientists have proved that lateralization is not exclusively a human feature. Investigations in molecular biology, protein structure, mobility of bacteria, and intracellular lateralization in ciliates, shows important and universal nature of lateralization in living systems. Dominant lateralization implies the appearance of a dominant extremity, or a dominant sense d...

  1. Living Nanomachines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlier, M.-F.; Helfer, E.; Wade, R.; Haraux, F.

    The living cell is a kind of factory on the microscopic scale, in which an assembly of modular machines carries out, in a spatially and temporally coordinated way, a whole range of activities internal to the cell, including the synthesis of substances essential to its survival, intracellular traffic, waste disposal, and cell division, but also activities related to intercellular communication and exchanges with the outside world, i.e., the ability of the cell to change shape, to move within a tissue, or to organise its own defence against attack by pathogens, injury, and so on. These nanomachines are made up of macromolecular assemblies with varying degrees of complexity, forged by evolution, within which work is done as a result of changes in interactions between proteins, or between proteins and nucleic acids, or between proteins and membrane components. All these cell components measure a few nanometers across, so the mechanical activity of these nanomachines all happens on the nanometric scale. The directional nature of the work carried out by biological nanomachines is associated with a dissipation of energy. As examples of protein assemblies, one could mention the proteasome, which is responsible for the degradation of proteins, and linear molecular motors such as actomyosin, responsible for muscle contraction, the dynein-microtubule system, responsible for flagellar motility, and the kinesin-microtubule system, responsible for transport of vesicles, which transform chemical energy into motion. Nucleic acid-protein assemblies include the ribosome, responsible for synthesising proteins, polymerases, helicases, elongation factors, and the machinery of DNA replication and repair; the mitotic spindle is an integrated system involving several of these activities which drive chromosome segregation. The machinery coupling membranes and proteins includes systems involved in the energy metabolism, such as the ATP synthase rotary motor, signalling cascades, endocytosis

  2. Motility of magnetotactic bacteria/MTB to Geomagnetic fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidajatullah-Maksoed, Fatahillah

    2016-03-01

    Bacteria with motility directed by a local geomagnetic fields have been observed in marine sediments'' discussed by R. Blakemore, 1975. Magnetotactic bacteria/MTB discovered in 1963 by Salvatore Bellini. For ``off-axis electron holography in the transmission electron microscope was used to correlates the physical & magnetic microstructure of magnetite nanocrystals in magnetotactic bacteria'' sought ``single-domain magnetite in hemopelagic sediments'' from JF Stolz. Otherwise, for potential source of bioproducts- product meant from result to multiplier -of magnetotactic bacteria[ACV Araujo, et.al, 2014 ] of marine drugs retrieved the `measurement of cellular chemotaxis with ECIS/Taxis, from KM Pietrosimone, 2012, whereas after ``earth magnetic field role on small living models'' are other interpretation of ``taxis'' as a movement of a cell instead usual ``tax'' for yew's taxus cuspidate, hired car & taxes in financial realms. Acknowledgements to HE. Mr. H. TUK SETYOHADI, Jl. Sriwijaya Raya 3, South-Jakarta, INDONESIA.

  3. On the evolutionary ecology of symbioses between chemosynthetic bacteria and bivalves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roeselers, G.; Newton, I.L.G.

    2012-01-01

    Mutualistic associations between bacteria and eukaryotes occur ubiquitously in nature, forming the basis for key ecological and evolutionary innovations. Some of the most prominent examples of these symbioses are chemosynthetic bacteria and marine invertebrates living in the absence of sunlight at

  4. Rhizosphere bacteria from sites with higher fungal densities exhibit greater levels of potential antifungal properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Boer, W.; De Ridder-Duine, A.S.; Klein Gunnewiek, P.J.A.; Smant, W.; Van Veen, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    A field study was performed to examine whether an increased density of saprotrophic fungi in the rhizosphere selects for bacteria with traits advantageous to living in a fungal-rich environment. Fast-growing bacteria were isolated from the rhizosphere of Carex arenaria (sand sedge) plants growing in

  5. The effect of phylogenetically different bacteria on the fitness of Pseudomonas fluorescens in sand microcosms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tyc, Olaf; Wolf, Alexandra; Garbeva, Paolina

    2015-01-01

    n most environments many microorganisms live in close vicinity and can interact in various ways. Recent studies suggest that bacteria are able to sense and respond to the presence of neighbouring bacteria in the environment and alter their response accordingly. This ability might be an important

  6. Surface layers of bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beveridge, T J; Graham, L L

    1991-12-01

    Since bacteria are so small, microscopy has traditionally been used to study them as individual cells. To this end, electron microscopy has been a most powerful tool for studying bacterial surfaces; the viewing of macromolecular arrangements of some surfaces is now possible. This review compares older conventional electron-microscopic methods with new cryotechniques currently available and the results each has produced. Emphasis is not placed on the methodology but, rather, on the importance of the results in terms of our perception of the makeup and function of bacterial surfaces and their interaction with the surrounding environment.

  7. Chemical communication in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suravajhala, Srinivasa Sandeep; Saini, Deepak; Nott, Prabhu

    Luminescence in Vibrio fischeri is a model for quorum-sensing-gene-regulation in bacteria. We study luminescence response of V. fischeri to both internal and external cues at the single cell and population level. Experiments with ES114, a wild-type strain, and ainS mutant show that luminescence induction in cultures is not always proportional to cell-density and there is always a basal level of luminescence. At any given concentration of the exogenously added signals, C6-HSL and C8-HSL, luminescence per cell reaches a maximum during the exponential phase and decreases thereafter. We hypothesize that (1) C6-HSL production and LuxR activity are not proportional to cell-density, and (2) there is a shift in equilibrium from C6-HSL to C8-HSL during the later stages of growth of the culture. RT-PCR analysis of luxI and luxR shows that the expression of these genes is maximum corresponding to the highest level of luminescence. The shift in equilibrium is shown by studying competitive binding of C6-HSL and C8-HSL to LuxR. We argue that luminescence is a unicellular behaviour, and an intensive property like per cell luminescence is more important than gross luminescence of the population in understanding response of bacteria to chemical signalling. Funding from the Department of Science and Technology, India is acknowledged.

  8. Beneficial bacteria inhibit cachexia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Bernard J.; Goureshetti, Sravya; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Lakritz, Jessica R.; Levkovich, Tatiana; Kwok, Caitlin; Teliousis, Konstantinos; Ibrahim, Yassin M.; Mirabal, Sheyla; Erdman, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle wasting, known as cachexia, is a debilitating condition associated with chronic inflammation such as during cancer. Beneficial microbes have been shown to optimize systemic inflammatory tone during good health; however, interactions between microbes and host immunity in the context of cachexia are incompletely understood. Here we use mouse models to test roles for bacteria in muscle wasting syndromes. We find that feeding of a human commensal microbe, Lactobacillus reuteri, to mice is sufficient to lower systemic indices of inflammation and inhibit cachexia. Further, the microbial muscle-building phenomenon extends to normal aging as wild type animals exhibited increased growth hormone levels and up-regulation of transcription factor Forkhead Box N1 [FoxN1] associated with thymus gland retention and longevity. Interestingly, mice with a defective FoxN1 gene (athymic nude) fail to inhibit sarcopenia after L. reuteri therapy, indicating a FoxN1-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, symbiotic bacteria may serve to stimulate FoxN1 and thymic functions that regulate inflammation, offering possible alternatives for cachexia prevention and novel insights into roles for microbiota in mammalian ontogeny and phylogeny. PMID:26933816

  9. Intestinal, segmented, filamentous bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaasen, H L; Koopman, J P; Poelma, F G; Beynen, A C

    1992-06-01

    Segmented, filamentous bacteria (SFBs) are autochthonous, apathogenic bacteria, occurring in the ileum of mice and rats. Although the application of formal taxonomic criteria is impossible due to the lack of an in vitro technique to culture SFBs, microbes with a similar morphology, found in the intestine of a wide range of vertebrate and invertebrate host species, are considered to be related. SFBs are firmly attached to the epithelial cells of the distal ileal mucosa, their preferential ecological niche being the epithelium covering the Peyer's patches. Electron microscopic studies have demonstrated a considerable morphological diversity of SFBs, which may relate to different stages of a life cycle. Determinants of SFB colonization in vivo are host species, genotypical and phenotypical characteristics of the host, diet composition, environmental stress and antimicrobial drugs. SFBs can survive in vitro incubation, but do not multiply. On the basis of their apathogenic character and intimate relationship with the host, it is suggested that SFBs contribute to development and/or maintenance of host resistance to enteropathogens.

  10. Functional amyloids in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Diego; Kolter, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    The term amyloidosis is used to refer to a family of pathologies altering the homeostasis of human organs. Despite having a name that alludes to starch content, the amyloid accumulations are made up of proteins that polymerize as long and rigid fibers. Amyloid proteins vary widely with respect to their amino acid sequences but they share similarities in their quaternary structure; the amyloid fibers are enriched in β-sheets arranged perpendicular to the axis of the fiber. This structural feature provides great robustness, remarkable stability, and insolubility. In addition, amyloid proteins specifically stain with certain dyes such as Congo red and thioflavin-T. The aggregation into amyloid fibers, however, it is not restricted to pathogenic processes, rather it seems to be widely distributed among proteins and polypeptides. Amyloid fibers are present in insects, fungi and bacteria, and they are important in maintaining the homeostasis of the organism. Such findings have motivated the use of the term "functional amyloid" to differentiate these amyloid proteins from their toxic siblings. This review focuses on systems that have evolved in bacteria that control the expression and assembly of amyloid proteins on cell surfaces, such that the robustness of amyloid proteins are used towards a beneficial end. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  11. Beneficial bacteria inhibit cachexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varian, Bernard J; Goureshetti, Sravya; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Lakritz, Jessica R; Levkovich, Tatiana; Kwok, Caitlin; Teliousis, Konstantinos; Ibrahim, Yassin M; Mirabal, Sheyla; Erdman, Susan E

    2016-03-15

    Muscle wasting, known as cachexia, is a debilitating condition associated with chronic inflammation such as during cancer. Beneficial microbes have been shown to optimize systemic inflammatory tone during good health; however, interactions between microbes and host immunity in the context of cachexia are incompletely understood. Here we use mouse models to test roles for bacteria in muscle wasting syndromes. We find that feeding of a human commensal microbe, Lactobacillus reuteri, to mice is sufficient to lower systemic indices of inflammation and inhibit cachexia. Further, the microbial muscle-building phenomenon extends to normal aging as wild type animals exhibited increased growth hormone levels and up-regulation of transcription factor Forkhead Box N1 [FoxN1] associated with thymus gland retention and longevity. Interestingly, mice with a defective FoxN1 gene (athymic nude) fail to inhibit sarcopenia after L. reuteri therapy, indicating a FoxN1-mediated mechanism. In conclusion, symbiotic bacteria may serve to stimulate FoxN1 and thymic functions that regulate inflammation, offering possible alternatives for cachexia prevention and novel insights into roles for microbiota in mammalian ontogeny and phylogeny.

  12. Cable Bacteria in Freshwater Sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risgaard-Petersen, Nils; Kristiansen, Michael; Frederiksen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    In marine sediments cathodic oxygen reduction at the sediment surface can be coupled to anodic sulfide oxidation in deeper anoxic layers through electrical currents mediated by filamentous, multicellular bacteria of the Desulfobulbaceae family, the so-called cable bacteria. Until now, cable...... bacteria have only been reported from marine environments. In this study, we demonstrate that cable bacteria also occur in freshwater sediments. In a first step, homogenized sediment collected from the freshwater stream Giber Å, Denmark, was incubated in the laboratory. After 2 weeks, pH signatures...... marine cable bacteria, with the genus Desulfobulbus as the closest cultured lineage. The results of the present study indicate that electric currents mediated by cable bacteria could be important for the biogeochemistry in many more environments than anticipated thus far and suggest a common evolutionary...

  13. Immunomodulatory properties of probiotic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen

    2007-01-01

    Certain lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are part of the commensal intestinal flora and considered beneficial for health, as they compete with pathogens for adhesion sites in the intestine and ferment otherwise indigestible compounds. Another important property of these so-called probiotic bacteria...... with bacteria, and the cytokine pattern induced by specific bacteria resembled the pattern induced in MoDC, except for TNF-alpha and IL-6, which were induced in response to different bacteria in blood DC/monocytes and monocyte-derived DC. Autologous NK cells produced IFN-gamma when cultured with blood DC......, monocytes and monocyte-derived DC and IL-12-inducing bacteria, whereas only DC induced IFN-gamma production in allogeneic T cells. In vitro-generated DC is a commonly used model of tissue DC, but they differ in certain aspects from intestinal DC, which are in direct contact with the intestinal microbiota...

  14. Biotechnology of Anoxygenic Phototrophic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik

    Anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are a diverse collection of organisms that are defined by their ability to grow using energy from light without evolving oxygen. The dominant groups are purple sulfur bacteria, purple nonsulfur bacteria, green sulfur bacteria, and green and red filamentous anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. They represent several bacterial phyla but they all have bacteriochlorophylls and carotenoids and photochemical reaction centers which generate ATP and cellular reductants used for CO2 fixation. They typically have an anaerobic lifestyle in the light, although some grow aerobically in the dark. Some of them oxidize inorganic sulfur compounds for light-dependent CO2 fixation; this ability can be exploited for photobiological removal of hydrogen sulfide from wastewater and biogas. The anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria also perform bioremediation of recalcitrant dyes, pesticides, and heavy metals under anaerobic conditions. Finally, these organisms may be useful for overexpression of membrane proteins and photobiological production of H2 and other valuable compounds.

  15. Project MERCCURI: Bacteria in Space

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Ruth; Coil, David; Lang, Jenna Morgan; Neches, Russell; Eisen, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Some bacteria grown in microgravity have previously been shown to exhibit different morphological and metabolic capabilities than when grown on Earth. As part of Project MERCCURI’s aim to increase microbiological outreach, we sampled at various high-population sporting venues and sites of historical interest nationwide for 48 strains of BSL 1 bacteria. After we grew these bacteria in culture, the 48 strains will be flown to the International Space Station to be “raced” against parallel plates...

  16. Bacteria, phages and septicemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ausra Gaidelyte

    Full Text Available The use of phages is an attractive option to battle antibiotic resistant bacteria in certain bacterial infections, but the role of phage ecology in bacterial infections is obscure. Here we surveyed the phage ecology in septicemia, the most severe type of bacterial infection. We observed that the majority of the bacterial isolates from septicemia patients spontaneously secreted phages active against other isolates of the same bacterial strain, but not to the strain causing the disease. Such phages were also detected in the initial blood cultures, indicating that phages are circulating in the blood at the onset of sepsis. The fact that most of the septicemic bacterial isolates carry functional prophages suggests an active role of phages in bacterial infections. Apparently, prophages present in sepsis-causing bacterial clones play a role in clonal selection during bacterial invasion.

  17. Acoustofluidic bacteria separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sixing; Ma, Fen; Bachman, Hunter; Cameron, Craig E.; Zeng, Xiangqun; Huang, Tony Jun

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial separation from human blood samples can help with the identification of pathogenic bacteria for sepsis diagnosis. In this work, we report an acoustofluidic device for label-free bacterial separation from human blood samples. In particular, we exploit the acoustic radiation force generated from a tilted-angle standing surface acoustic wave (taSSAW) field to separate Escherichia coli from human blood cells based on their size difference. Flow cytometry analysis of the E. coli separated from red blood cells shows a purity of more than 96%. Moreover, the label-free electrochemical detection of the separated E. coli displays reduced non-specific signals due to the removal of blood cells. Our acoustofluidic bacterial separation platform has advantages such as label-free separation, high biocompatibility, flexibility, low cost, miniaturization, automation, and ease of in-line integration. The platform can be incorporated with an on-chip sensor to realize a point-of-care sepsis diagnostic device.

  18. Tumour targeting with systemically administered bacteria.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Morrissey, David

    2012-01-31

    Challenges for oncology practitioners and researchers include specific treatment and detection of tumours. The ideal anti-cancer therapy would selectively eradicate tumour cells, whilst minimising side effects to normal tissue. Bacteria have emerged as biological gene vectors with natural tumour specificity, capable of homing to tumours and replicating locally to high levels when systemically administered. This property enables targeting of both the primary tumour and secondary metastases. In the case of invasive pathogenic species, this targeting strategy can be used to deliver genes intracellularly for tumour cell expression, while non-invasive species transformed with plasmids suitable for bacterial expression of heterologous genes can secrete therapeutic proteins locally within the tumour environment (cell therapy approach). Many bacterial genera have been demonstrated to localise to and replicate to high levels within tumour tissue when intravenously (IV) administered in rodent models and reporter gene tagging of bacteria has permitted real-time visualisation of this phenomenon. Live imaging of tumour colonising bacteria also presents diagnostic potential for this approach. The nature of tumour selective bacterial colonisation appears to be tumour origin- and bacterial species- independent. While originally a correlation was drawn between anaerobic bacterial colonisation and the hypoxic nature of solid tumours, it is recently becoming apparent that other elements of the unique microenvironment within solid tumours, including aberrant neovasculature and local immune suppression, may be responsible. Here, we consider the pre-clinical data supporting the use of bacteria as a tumour-targeting tool, recent advances in the area, and future work required to develop it into a beneficial clinical tool.

  19. Integron-bearing Gram-negative bacteria in lake waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczura, R; Semkowska, A; Mokracka, J

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the occurrence of integron-bearing Gram-negative bacteria in the water of four lakes located in Wielkopolski National Park, Poland. Altogether, 17 isolates harbouring class 1 or class 2 integrons were found. The integron-bearing bacteria were identified as Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pasteurella multocida and Aeromonas hydrophila. The variable regions of the class 1 integrons contained aadA1 and dfrA1-aadA1 gene cassettes, whereas class 2 integrons carried dfrA1-sat2-aadA1 gene cassette array. The isolates were resistant to 3-20 antimicrobials. One of them produced SHV-type extended-spectrum β-lactamase. Integrons play a major role in the spread of antibiotic resistance among bacteria. They are frequently found in clinical bacterial strains, but are also detected in environmental isolates in sites affected by anthropogenic pressure. Little is known, however, about the presence and characteristics of integrons in bacteria living in water environments in areas of nature preservation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study focused on detection and characterization of integrons in bacteria living in water ecosystems in a national park. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  20. Interactions between marine snow and heterotrophic bacteria: aggregate formation and microbial dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossart, H.P.; Kiørboe, Thomas; Tang, K.W.

    2006-01-01

    as well as abundance, colonization behaviour, and community composition of bacteria during the growth of 2 marine diatoms (Thalassiosira weissflogii and Navicula sp.) under axenic and non-axenic conditions. Community composition of free-living and attached bacteria during phytoplankton growth...... and aggregation was studied by amplification of 16S rRNA gene fragments and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). Our results show that the presence of bacteria was a prerequisite for aggregation of T. weissflogii but not of Navicula sp. Occurrences of distinct populations of free-living and attached...

  1. I Live with Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... turn Javascript on. Feature: Living with Psoriasis I Live with Psoriasis Past Issues / Fall 2013 Table of ... courtesy of Stephen Voss/ National Psoriasis Foundation "I live with the disease," she says, cautious about being ...

  2. Activities of Daily Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Parkinson's › Managing Parkinson's › Activities of Daily Living Activities of Daily Living Sometimes Parkinson’s disease (PD) can complicate the basic daily activities a person with living with Parkinson’s once did ...

  3. Living Gluten Free

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Celiac Disease Living Gluten Free Past Issues / Spring 2015 Table of Contents ... Learning to Live Well with Celiac Disease / Living Gluten-Free Spring 2015 Issue: Volume 10 Number 1 ...

  4. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and public health professionals. More > Hand Hygiene Saves Lives (5:10) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hand Hygiene Saves Lives Hand Hygiene Saves Lives Transcript [28 KB, 2 pages] High resolution [22. ...

  5. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and public health professionals. More > Hand Hygiene Saves Lives (5:10) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hand Hygiene Saves Lives Hand Hygiene Saves Lives Transcript [28 KB, 2 pages] High resolution [22. ...

  6. [Pseudomonas genus bacteria on weeds].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvozdiak, R I; Iakovleva, L M; Pasichnik, L A; Shcherbina, T N; Ogorodnik, L E

    2005-01-01

    It has been shown in the work that the weeds (couch-grass and ryegrass) may be affected by bacterial diseases in natural conditions, Pseudomonas genus bacteria being their agents. The isolated bacteria are highly-aggressive in respect of the host-plant and a wide range of cultivated plants: wheat, rye, oats, barley, apple-tree and pear-tree. In contrast to highly aggressive bacteria isolated from the affected weeds, bacteria-epi phytes isolated from formally healthy plants (common amaranth, orache, flat-leaved spurge, field sow thistle, matricary, common coltsfoot, narrow-leaved vetch) and identified as P. syringae pv. coronafaciens, were characterized by weak aggression. A wide range of ecological niches of bacteria evidently promote their revival and distribution everywhere in nature.

  7. Motility of electric cable bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerg, Jesper Tataru; Damgaard, Lars Riis; Holm, Simon Agner

    2016-01-01

    Cable bacteria are filamentous bacteria that electrically couple sulfide oxidation and oxygen reduction at centimeter distances, and observations in sediment environments have suggested that they are motile. By time-lapse microscopy, we found that cable bacteria used gliding motility on surfaces...... with a highly variable speed of 0.50.3 ms1 (meanstandard deviation) and time between reversals of 155108 s. They frequently moved forward in loops, and formation of twisted loops revealed helical rotation of the filaments. Cable bacteria responded to chemical gradients in their environment, and around the oxic......-anoxic interface, they curled and piled up, with straight parts connecting back to the source of sulfide. Thus, it appears that motility serves the cable bacteria in establishing and keeping optimal connections between their distant electron donor and acceptors in a dynamic sediment environment....

  8. F-pili dynamics by live-cell imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, Margaret; Maddera, Lucinda; Harris, Robin L.; Silverman, Philip M.

    2008-01-01

    Bacteria have evolved numerous mechanisms for cell–cell communication, many of which have important consequences for human health. Among these is conjugation, the direct transfer of DNA from one cell to another. For Gram-negative bacteria, conjugation requires thin, flexible filaments (conjugative pili) that are elaborated by DNA donor cells. The structure, function, and especially the dynamics of conjugative pili are poorly understood. Here, we have applied live-cell imaging to characterize ...

  9. Active targeting of tumor cells using light emitting bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Sung Min; Min, Jung Joon; Hong, Yeong Jin; Kim, Hyun Ju; Le, Uuenchi N.; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Song, Ho Chun; Heo, Young Jun; Bom, Hee Seung; Choy, Hyon E [School of Medicine, Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The presence of bacteria and viruses in human tumors has been recognized for more than 50 years. Today, with the discovery of bacterial strains that specifically target tumors, and aided by genomic sequencing and genetic engineering, there is new interest in the use of bacteria as tumor vectors. Here, we show that bacteria injected intravenously into live animals entered and replicated in solid tumors and metastases using the novel imaging technology of biophotonics. Bioluminescence operon (LuxCDABE) or fluorescence protein, GFP) has been cloned into pUC19 plasmid to engineer pUC19lux or pUC19gfp. Engineered plasmid was transformed into different kinds of wild type (MG1655) or mutant E. coli (DH5, ppGpp, fnr, purE, crpA, flagella, etc.) strains to construct light emitting bacteria. Xenograft tumor model has been established using CT26 colon cancer cell line. Light emitting bacteria was injected via tail vein into tumor bearing mouse. In vivo bioluminescence imaging has been done after 20 min to 14 days of bacterial injection. We observed localization of tumors by light-emitting E. coli in tumor (CT-26) bearing mice. We confirmed the presence of light-emitting bacteria under the fluorescence microscope with E. coli expressing GFP. Althoug varying mutants strain with deficient invading function has been found in tumor tissues, mutant strains of movement (flagella) couldn't show any light signal from the tumor tissue under the cooled CCD camera, indicating bacteria may actively target the tumor cells. Based on their 'tumor-finding' nature, bacteria may be designed to carry multiple genes or drugs for detection and treatment of cancer, such as prodrug-converting enzymes, toxins, angiogenesis inhibitors and cytokines.

  10. Allergy, living and learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chivato, T; Valovirta, E; Dahl, R

    2012-01-01

    Allergy Living and Learning (ALL) is a European initiative designed to increase knowledge and understanding of people living with allergies in order to improve respiratory allergy care.......Allergy Living and Learning (ALL) is a European initiative designed to increase knowledge and understanding of people living with allergies in order to improve respiratory allergy care....

  11. Bacteria-Mineral Interactions on the Surfaces of Metal-Resistant Bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkin, A J

    2010-03-24

    The extraordinary ability of indigenous microorganisms, like metal-resistant bacteria, for biotransformation of toxic compounds is of considerable interest for the emerging area of environmental bioremediation. However, the underlying mechanisms by which metal-resistant bacteria transform toxic compounds are currently unknown and await elucidation. The project's objective was to study stress-induced responses of metal-resistant bacteria to environmental changes and chemical stimulants. This project involved a multi-institutional collaboration of our LLNL group with the group of Dr. H.-Y. Holman (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory). In this project, we have utilized metal-resistant bacteria Arthrobacter oxydans as a model bacterial system. We have utilized atomic force microscopy (AFM) to visualize for the first time at the nanometer scale formation of stress-induced structures on bacterial surfaces in response to Cr (VI) exposure. We have demonstrated that structure, assembly, and composition of these stress-induced structures are dependent on Cr (VI) concentrations. Our AFM observations of the appearance and development of stress-induced layers on the surfaces of Arthrobacter oxydans bacteria exposed to Cr (VI) were confirmed by Dr. Holman's biochemical, electron microscopy, and synchrotron infrared spectromicroscopy studies. In general, in vitro imaging of live microbial and cellular systems represents one of the most challenging issues in application of AFM. Various approaches for immobilization of bacteria on the substrate for in vitro imaging were tested in this project. Imaging of live bacteria was achieved, however further optimization of experimental methods are needed for high-resolution visualization of the cellular environmental structural dynamics by AFM. This project enhanced the current insight into molecular architecture, structural and environmental variability of bacterial systems. The project partially funded research for two book

  12. Interactions between Diatoms and Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Shady A.; Parker, Micaela S.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Diatoms and bacteria have cooccurred in common habitats for hundreds of millions of years, thus fostering specific associations and interactions with global biogeochemical consequences. Diatoms are responsible for one-fifth of the photosynthesis on Earth, while bacteria remineralize a large portion of this fixed carbon in the oceans. Through their coexistence, diatoms and bacteria cycle nutrients between oxidized and reduced states, impacting bioavailability and ultimately feeding higher trophic levels. Here we present an overview of how diatoms and bacteria interact and the implications of these interactions. We emphasize that heterotrophic bacteria in the oceans that are consistently associated with diatoms are confined to two phyla. These consistent bacterial associations result from encounter mechanisms that occur within a microscale environment surrounding a diatom cell. We review signaling mechanisms that occur in this microenvironment to pave the way for specific interactions. Finally, we discuss known interactions between diatoms and bacteria and exciting new directions and research opportunities in this field. Throughout the review, we emphasize new technological advances that will help in the discovery of new interactions. Deciphering the languages of diatoms and bacteria and how they interact will inform our understanding of the role these organisms have in shaping the ocean and how these interactions may change in future oceans. PMID:22933565

  13. Interactions between diatoms and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Shady A; Parker, Micaela S; Armbrust, E Virginia

    2012-09-01

    Diatoms and bacteria have cooccurred in common habitats for hundreds of millions of years, thus fostering specific associations and interactions with global biogeochemical consequences. Diatoms are responsible for one-fifth of the photosynthesis on Earth, while bacteria remineralize a large portion of this fixed carbon in the oceans. Through their coexistence, diatoms and bacteria cycle nutrients between oxidized and reduced states, impacting bioavailability and ultimately feeding higher trophic levels. Here we present an overview of how diatoms and bacteria interact and the implications of these interactions. We emphasize that heterotrophic bacteria in the oceans that are consistently associated with diatoms are confined to two phyla. These consistent bacterial associations result from encounter mechanisms that occur within a microscale environment surrounding a diatom cell. We review signaling mechanisms that occur in this microenvironment to pave the way for specific interactions. Finally, we discuss known interactions between diatoms and bacteria and exciting new directions and research opportunities in this field. Throughout the review, we emphasize new technological advances that will help in the discovery of new interactions. Deciphering the languages of diatoms and bacteria and how they interact will inform our understanding of the role these organisms have in shaping the ocean and how these interactions may change in future oceans.

  14. Entomopathogenic bacteria use multiple mechanisms for bioactive peptide library design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xiaofeng; Nowak, Sarah; Wesche, Frank; Bischoff, Iris; Kaiser, Marcel; Fürst, Robert; Bode, Helge. B.

    2017-04-01

    The production of natural product compound libraries has been observed in nature for different organisms such as bacteria, fungi and plants; however, little is known about the mechanisms generating such chemically diverse libraries. Here we report mechanisms leading to the biosynthesis of the chemically diverse rhabdopeptide/xenortide peptides (RXPs). They are exclusively present in entomopathogenic bacteria of the genera Photorhabdus and Xenorhabdus that live in symbiosis with nematodes delivering them to insect prey, which is killed and utilized for nutrition by both nematodes and bacteria. Chemical diversity of the biologically active RXPs results from a combination of iterative and flexible use of monomodular nonribosomal peptide synthetases including substrate promiscuity, enzyme cross-talk and enzyme stoichiometry as shown by in vivo and in vitro experiments. Together, this highlights several of nature's methods for diversification, or evolution, of natural products and sheds light on the biosynthesis of the bioactive RXPs.

  15. Review on SERS of Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela A. Mosier-Boss

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS has been widely used for chemical detection. Moreover, the inherent richness of the spectral data has made SERS attractive for use in detecting biological materials, including bacteria. This review discusses methods that have been used to obtain SERS spectra of bacteria. The kinds of SERS substrates employed to obtain SERS spectra are discussed as well as how bacteria interact with silver and gold nanoparticles. The roll of capping agents on Ag/Au NPs in obtaining SERS spectra is examined as well as the interpretation of the spectral data.

  16. Development of Mucosal Vaccines Based on Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G.; Innocentin, Silvia; Lefèvre, Francois; Chatel, Jean-Marc; Langella, Philippe

    Today, sufficient data are available to support the use of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), notably lactococci and lactobacilli, as delivery vehicles for the development of new mucosal vaccines. These non-pathogenic Gram-positive bacteria have been safely consumed by humans for centuries in fermented foods. They thus constitute an attractive alternative to the attenuated pathogens (most popular live vectors actually studied) which could recover their pathogenic potential and are thus not totally safe for use in humans. This chapter reviews the current research and advances in the use of LAB as live delivery vectors of proteins of interest for the development of new safe mucosal vaccines. The use of LAB as DNA vaccine vehicles to deliver DNA directly to antigen-presenting cells of the immune system is also discussed.

  17. Beer spoilage bacteria and hop resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sakamoto, K; Konings, WN

    2003-01-01

    For brewing industry, beer spoilage bacteria have been problematic for centuries. They include some lactic acid bacteria such as Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus lindneri and Pediococcus damnosus, and some Gram-negative bacteria such as Pectinatus cerevisiiphilus, Pectinatus frisingensis and

  18. Electron transport chains of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooijmans, R.J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria are generally considered facultative anaerobic obligate fermentative bacteria. They are unable to synthesize heme. Some lactic acid bacteria are unable to form menaquinone as well. Both these components are cofactors of respiratory (electron transport) chains of prokaryotic

  19. Streptomyces bacteria as potential probiotics in aquaculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Loh eTeng Hern

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In response to the increased seafood demand from the ever-going human population, aquaculture has become the fastest growing animal food-producing sector. However, the indiscriminate use of antibiotics as a biological control agents for fish pathogens has led to the emergence of antibiotic resistance bacteria. Probiotics are defined as living microbial supplement that exert beneficial effects on hosts as well as improvement of environmental parameters. Probiotics have been proven to be effective in improving the growth, survival and health status of the aquatic livestock. This review aims to highlight the genus Streptomyces can be a good candidate for probiotics in aquaculture. Studies showed that the feed supplemented with Streptomyces could protect fish and shrimp from pathogens as well as increase the growth of the aquatic organisms. Furthermore, the limitations of Streptomyces as probiotics in aquaculture is also highlighted and solutions are discussed to these limitations.

  20. Beneficial effects of antioxidative lactic acid bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisako Nakagawa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is caused by exposure to reactive oxygen intermediates. The oxidative damage of cell components such as proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids one of the important factors associated with diabetes mellitus, cancers and cardiovascular diseases. This occurs as a result of imbalance between the generations of oxygen derived radicals and the organism’s antioxidant potential. The amount of oxidative damage increases as an organism ages and is postulated to be a major causal factor of senescence. To date, many studies have focused on food sources, nutrients, and components that exert antioxidant activity in worms, flies, mice, and humans. Probiotics, live microorganisms that when administered in adequate amounts provide many beneficial effects on the human health, have been attracting growing interest for their health-promoting effects, and have often been administered in fermented milk products. In particular, lactic acid bacteria (LAB are known to conferre physiologic benefits. Many studies have indicated the antioxidative activity of LAB. Here we review that the effects of lactic acid bacteria to respond to oxidative stress, is connected to oxidative-stress related disease and aging.

  1. Gut Bacteria Affect Immunotherapy Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Three new studies have identified intestinal bacteria that appear to influence the response to checkpoint inhibitors. This Cancer Currents blog post explains how the researchers think their findings could be used to improve patients’ responses to these immunotherapy drugs.

  2. Thymidine kinase diversity in bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandrini, Michael; Clausen, A.R.; Munch-Petersen, B.

    2006-01-01

    Thymidine kinases (TKs) appear to be almost ubiquitous and are found in nearly all prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and several viruses. They are the key enzymes in thymidine salvage and activation of several anti-cancer and antiviral drugs. We show that bacterial TKs can be subdivided into 2 groups. The....... The TKs from Gram-positive bacteria are more closely related to the eukaryotic TK1 enzymes than are TKs from Gram-negative bacteria....

  3. Optical magnetic imaging of living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Sage, D.; Arai, K.; Glenn, D. R.; DeVience, S. J.; Pham, L. M.; Rahn-Lee, L.; Lukin, M. D.; Yacoby, A.; Komeili, A.; Walsworth, R. L.

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic imaging is a powerful tool for probing biological and physical systems. However, existing techniques either have poor spatial resolution compared to optical microscopy and are hence not generally applicable to imaging of sub-cellular structure (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging [MRI]1), or entail operating conditions that preclude application to living biological samples while providing sub-micron resolution (e.g., scanning superconducting quantum interference device [SQUID] microscopy2, electron holography3, and magnetic resonance force microscopy [MRFM]4). Here we demonstrate magnetic imaging of living cells (magnetotactic bacteria) under ambient laboratory conditions and with sub-cellular spatial resolution (400 nm), using an optically-detected magnetic field imaging array consisting of a nanoscale layer of nitrogen-vacancy (NV) colour centres implanted at the surface of a diamond chip. With the bacteria placed on the diamond surface, we optically probe the NV quantum spin states and rapidly reconstruct images of the vector components of the magnetic field created by chains of magnetic nanoparticles (magnetosomes) produced in the bacteria, and spatially correlate these magnetic field maps with optical images acquired in the same apparatus. Wide-field sCMOS acquisition allows parallel optical and magnetic imaging of multiple cells in a population with sub-micron resolution and >100 micron field-of-view. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images of the bacteria confirm that the correlated optical and magnetic images can be used to locate and characterize the magnetosomes in each bacterium. The results provide a new capability for imaging bio-magnetic structures in living cells under ambient conditions with high spatial resolution, and will enable the mapping of a wide range of magnetic signals within cells and cellular networks5, 6. PMID:23619694

  4. Bioreporter bacteria for landmine detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burlage, R.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Youngblood, T. [Frisby Technologies, Aiken, SC (United States); Lamothe, D. [American Technologies, Inc., Huntsville, AL (United States). Ordnance/Explosives Environmental Services Div.

    1998-04-01

    Landmines (and other UXO) gradually leak explosive chemicals into the soil at significant concentrations. Bacteria, which have adapted to scavenge low concentrations of nutrients, can detect these explosive chemicals. Uptake of these chemicals results in the triggering of specific bacterial genes. The authors have created genetically recombinant bioreporter bacteria that detect small concentrations of energetic chemicals. These bacteria are genetically engineered to produce a bioluminescent signal when they contact specific explosives. A gene for a brightly fluorescent compound can be substituted for increased sensitivity. By finding the fluorescent bacteria, you find the landmine. Detection might be accomplished using stand-off illumination of the minefield and GPS technology, which would result in greatly reduced risk to the deminers. Bioreporter technology has been proven at the laboratory scale, and will be tested under field conditions in the near future. They have created a bacterial strain that detects sub-micromolar concentrations of o- and p-nitrotoluene. Related bacterial strains were produced using standard laboratory protocols, and bioreporters of dinitrotoluene and trinitrotoluene were produced, screening for activity with the explosive compounds. Response time is dependent on the growth rate of the bacteria. Although frill signal production may require several hours, the bacteria can be applied over vast areas and scanned quickly, producing an equivalent detection speed that is very fast. This technology may be applicable to other needs, such as locating buried explosives at military and ordnance/explosive manufacturing facilities.

  5. Why do bacteria divide?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vic eNorris

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The problem of not only how but also why cells divide can be tackled using recent ideas. One idea from the origins of life – Life as independent of its constituents – is that a living entity like a cell is a particular pattern of connectivity between its constituents. This means that if the growing cell were just to get bigger the average connectivity between its constituents per unit mass – its cellular connectivity – would decrease and the cell would lose its identity. The solution is division which restores connectivity. The corollary is that the cell senses decreasing cellular connectivity and uses this information to trigger division. A second idea from phenotypic diversity – Life on the Scales of Equilibria – is that a bacterium must find strategies that allow it to both survive and grow. This means that it has learnt to reconcile the opposing constraints that these strategies impose. The solution is that the cell cycle generates daughter cells with different phenotypes based on sufficiently complex equilibrium and non-equilibrium cellular compounds and structures appropriate for survival and growth, respectively, alias `hyperstructures'. The corollary is that the cell senses both the quantity of equilibrium material and the intensity of use of non-equilibrium material and then uses this information to trigger the cell cycle. A third idea from artificial intelligence – Competitive Coherence – is that a cell selects the active subset of elements that actively determine its phenotype from a much larger set of available elements. This means that the selection of an active subset of a specific size and composition must be done so as to generate both a coherent cell state, in which the cell’s contents work together harmoniously, and a coherent sequence of cell states, each coherent with respect to itself and to an unpredictable environment. The solution is the use of a range of mechanisms ranging from hyperstructure dynamics

  6. Endosymbiotic calcifying bacteria across sponge species and oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garate, Leire; Sureda, Jan; Agell, Gemma; Uriz, Maria J.

    2017-03-01

    From an evolutionary point of view, sponges are ideal targets to study marine symbioses as they are the most ancient living metazoans and harbour highly diverse microbial communities. A recently discovered association between the sponge Hemimycale columella and an intracellular bacterium that generates large amounts of calcite spherules has prompted speculation on the possible role of intracellular bacteria in the evolution of the skeleton in early animals. To gain insight into this purportedly ancestral symbiosis, we investigated the presence of symbiotic bacteria in Mediterranean and Caribbean sponges. We found four new calcibacteria OTUs belonging to the SAR116 in two orders (Poecilosclerida and Clionaida) and three families of Demospongiae, two additional OTUs in cnidarians and one more in seawater (at 98.5% similarity). Using a calcibacteria targeted probe and CARD-FISH, we also found calcibacteria in Spirophorida and Suberitida and proved that the calcifying bacteria accumulated at the sponge periphery, forming a skeletal cortex, analogous to that of siliceous microscleres in other demosponges. Bacteria-mediated skeletonization is spread in a range of phylogenetically distant species and thus the purported implication of bacteria in skeleton formation and evolution of early animals gains relevance.

  7. Effects of probiotic bacteria on diarrhea, lipid metabolism, and carcinogenesis: a review of papers published between 1988 and 1998

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos, de N.M.; Katan, M.B.

    2000-01-01

    We reviewed the evidence from human intervention studies for the health effects of probiotic bacteria, ie, live bacteria that survive passage through the gastrointestinal tract and have beneficial effects on the host. Of the 49 studies reviewed, 26 dealt with the prevention or treatment of diarrheal

  8. Influenza Vaccine, Live Intranasal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should NOT be ... What is live, attenuated influenza vaccine-LAIV (nasal spray)?A dose of flu vaccine is recommended every flu season. Children younger ...

  9. ORAL LIVE TULAREMIA VACCINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously reported data on the pathogenesis and immunogenicity of live vaccine strain LVS have been sufficiently encouraging to warrant an...potential for oral immunization with live tularemia vaccine prepared from strain LVS.

  10. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Lives Wash Your Hands Physical Activity Knees Lifted High Making Health Easier: Active Living in Philadelphia, PA ... Go: Passport To Health (4:17) Vital Signs High Blood Pressure Spanish Diseases & Conditions Hablemos de la ...

  11. Administration for Community Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Public Input Working Together, in Our Communities The Administration for Community Living was created around the fundamental ... Meals on Wheels America - November 16, 2017 The Administration for Community Living recently awarded a three-year ...

  12. Modelling live forensic acquisition

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grobler, MM

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the development of a South African model for Live Forensic Acquisition - Liforac. The Liforac model is a comprehensive model that presents a range of aspects related to Live Forensic Acquisition. The model provides forensic...

  13. Living with Alopecia Areata

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Join the Medical Professionals Directory Donate Living with Alopecia Areata Living with alopecia areata Because hair loss and regrowth from alopecia ... the disease say they experience. Common Emotions with Alopecia Areata These include feeling Loneliness, withdrawal and isolation ...

  14. Direct plasma interaction with living tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, Gregory

    For some time, plasma has been used in medicine to cauterize or cut tissue using heat and mechanical energy. In the recent decade, some researchers around the world have started to investigate how gas jets that pass through thermal plasma can be employed in medicine. This thesis presents the first investigation of biomedical uses of non-thermal plasma discharge which comes in direct contact with living tissue. It is demonstrated that the direct application of non-thermal plasma in air can cause rapid deactivation of bacteria on surfaces of tissues without causing any visible tissue damage. Medical need for such a device is discussed. Construction and operation of various types of non-thermal plasma power supplies and many types of treatment electrodes are presented as well. Application of this plasma to living organisms is shown to be safe from both the electrical perspective and from the biological perspective. Biological safety is revealed through a series of differential skin toxicity trials on human cadaver tissue, live hairless mouse skin tissue, live pig skin tissue, and finally in an open wound model on pigs. Direct non-thermal plasma in air is shown to deactivate bacteria about 100 times faster than indirect application using jets. A series of experiments reveal that this effectiveness is due to the ability of direct discharge to bring charges to tissue surfaces. It is demonstrated that neither ultraviolet (UV) radiation nor neutral active species such as hydroxyl radicals or ozone produced in plasma are responsible for the main effect on bacteria. Although much additional work remains on establishing detailed mechanism by which charges from plasma achieve this effect, the work carried out in this thesis clearly demonstrates that direct application of non-thermal plasma in air can be a very useful tool in medicine.

  15. Use of genetically modified bacteria for drug delivery in humans: Revisiting the safety aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegmann, Udo; Carvalho, Ana Lucia; Stocks, Martin; Carding, Simon R

    2017-05-23

    The use of live, genetically modified bacteria as delivery vehicles for biologics is of considerable interest scientifically and has attracted significant commercial investment. We have pioneered the use of the commensal gut bacterium Bacteroides ovatus for the oral delivery of therapeutics to the gastrointestinal tract. Here we report on our investigations of the biological safety of engineered B. ovatus bacteria that includes the use of thymineless death as a containment strategy and the potential for the spread of transgenes in vivo in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract. We demonstrate the ability of GM-strains of Bacteroides to survive thymine starvation and overcome it through the exchange of genetic material. We also provide evidence for horizontal gene transfer in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract resulting in transgene-carrying wild type bacteria. These findings sound a strong note of caution on the employment of live genetically modified bacteria for the delivery of biologics.

  16. Viability assessment of bacteria using long-range surface plasmon waveguide biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béland, Paul; Berini, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate that long-range surface plasmon waveguide biosensors are useful to monitor the quiver of immobilized live bacteria in buffer and in human urine. First, the biosensor captures bacteria selectively, based on gram, using antibodies against gram adsorbed on the surface of the waveguide through Protein G coupling. Then, analysis of the noise present on the optical output signal reveals quiver of bacteria immobilized on the waveguide. Live bacteria produce a noisy signature compared to baseline levels. The standard deviation over time of the optical power output from the biosensor increased by factors of 3-60 over that of the baseline level for Staphylococcus epidermidis and Escherichia coli immobilized selectively on waveguides.

  17. Living with Cat and Dog Increases Vaginal Colonization with E. coli in Pregnant Women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stokholm, Jakob; Schjørring, Susanne; Pedersen, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Furred pets in the household are known reservoirs for pathogenic bacteria, but it is not known if transmission of bacteria between pet and owner leads to significantly increased rate of infections. We studied whether cats and dogs living in the household of pregnant women affect the commensal vag...

  18. [Genetic resources of nodule bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumiantseva, M L

    2009-09-01

    Nodule bacteria (rhizobia) form highly specific symbiosis with leguminous plants. The efficiency of accumulation of biological nitrogen depends on molecular-genetic interaction between the host plant and rhizobia. Genetic characteristics of microsymbiotic strains are crucial in developing highly productive and stress-resistant symbiotic pairs: rhizobium strain-host plant cultivar (species). The present review considers the issue of studying genetic resources of nodule bacteria to identify genes and their blocks, responsible for the ability of rhizobia to form highly effective symbiosis in various agroecological conditions. The main approaches to investigation of intraspecific and interspecific genetic and genomic diversity of nodule bacteria are considered, from MLEE analysis to the recent methods of genomic DNA analysis using biochips. The data are presented showing that gene centers of host plants are centers of genetic diversification of nodule bacteria, because the intraspecific polymorphism of genetic markers of the core and the accessory rhizobial genomes is extremely high in them. Genotypic features of trapped and nodule subpopulations of alfalfa nodule bacteria are discussed. A survey of literature showed that the genomes of natural strains in alfalfa gene centers exhibit significant differences in genes involved in control of metabolism, replication, recombination, and the formation of defense response (hsd genes). Natural populations of rhizobia are regarded as a huge gene pool serving as a source of evolutionary innovations.

  19. Transforming lives with happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-05

    Can prioritising what makes residents happy transform their lives? Simon Jones, writes in Learning Disability Practice about the use of positive behaviour support (PBS) in managing challenging behaviour. By focusing on one priority: bringing happiness and fun into the lives of the people they support, residents with learning disabilities in supported living accommodation are now living their lives within their community. The team developed PBS plans that prioritised enhancing quality of life with behavioural issues a secondary thought. Consequently, physical intervention was rare. The use of PBS also had a positive impact on staff: whole-team involvement kept retention and motivation high.

  20. Methylotrophic bacteria in sustainable agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manish; Tomar, Rajesh Singh; Lade, Harshad; Paul, Diby

    2016-07-01

    Excessive use of chemical fertilizers to increase production from available land has resulted in deterioration of soil quality. To prevent further soil deterioration, the use of methylotrophic bacteria that have the ability to colonize different habitats, including soil, sediment, water, and both epiphytes and endophytes as host plants, has been suggested for sustainable agriculture. Methylotrophic bacteria are known to play a significant role in the biogeochemical cycle in soil ecosystems, ultimately fortifying plants and sustaining agriculture. Methylotrophs also improve air quality by using volatile organic compounds such as dichloromethane, formaldehyde, methanol, and formic acid. Additionally, methylotrophs are involved in phosphorous, nitrogen, and carbon cycling and can help reduce global warming. In this review, different aspects of the interaction between methylotrophs and host plants are discussed, including the role of methylotrophs in phosphorus acquisition, nitrogen fixation, phytohormone production, iron chelation, and plant growth promotion, and co-inoculation of these bacteria as biofertilizers for viable agriculture practices.

  1. Radioresistant Bacteria Came From Mars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, A.; Kalinin, V.; Konstantinov, A.; Shelegedin, V.

    We propose that the radioresistant bacteria (i.e. Deinococcus radiodurans) has been originated on Mars. This bacteria possesses an ability which should have been ab- solutely "unnecessary" in the Earth environment. It can survive very high doses of the ionizing radiation. Our experiments demonstrate that different kinds of non- radioresistant bacteria are able to develop very high radioresistance ability also. To develop radioresistance we exposed different bacterial cultures to several dozens of cycles of high irradiation. Therefore, radioresistance is not a result of some early spontaneous bacterial mutation but rather a consequence of the very specific plane- tary environment. Polar regions of Mars are the most probable (if not the only) place in the Solar System for such a periodical high-dosage irradiation process. We pro- pose a plausible scenario of where and when such an adaptation process could have taken place and also discuss indirect arguments of the Martian origin of Deinococcus Radiodurans based on their specific genetic structure.

  2. Chitin Degradation In Marine Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Sara; Machado, Henrique; Gram, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Chitin is the most abundant polymer in the marine environment and the second most abundant in nature. Chitin does not accumulate on the ocean floor, because of microbial breakdown. Chitin degrading bacteria could have potential in the utilization of chitin as a renewable carbon...... and nitrogen source in the fermentation industry.Methods: Here, whole genome sequenced marine bacteria were screened for chitin degradation using phenotypic and in silico analyses.Results: The in silico analyses revealed the presence of three to nine chitinases in each strain, however the number of chitinases...... chitin regulatory system.Conclusions: This study has provided insight into the ecology of chitin degradation in marine bacteria. It also served as a basis for choosing a more efficient chitin degrading production strain e.g. for the use of chitin waste for large-scale fermentations....

  3. Effects of probiotic (live and inactive Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    LORD

    2012-05-25

    May 25, 2012 ... The present work evaluated the effect of probiotic (live and inactive Saccharomyces cerevisiae) on meat and intestinal ... intestinal and meat microbial properties of Japanese quails, in the probiotic cases, a significant reduction in the ..... Temporal effects of lactic acid bacteria probiotic culture on Salmonella ...

  4. Cell wall as a target for bacteria inactivation by pulsed electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, Flavien; Formosa-Dague, Cécile; Baaziz, Houda; Dague, Etienne; Rols, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The integrity and morphology of bacteria is sustained by the cell wall, the target of the main microbial inactivation processes. One promising approach to inactivation is based on the use of pulsed electric fields (PEF). The current dogma is that irreversible cell membrane electro-permeabilisation causes the death of the bacteria. However, the actual effect on the cell-wall architecture has been poorly explored. Here we combine atomic force microscopy and electron microscopy to study the cell-wall organization of living Bacillus pumilus bacteria at the nanoscale. For vegetative bacteria, exposure to PEF led to structural disorganization correlated with morphological and mechanical alterations of the cell wall. For spores, PEF exposure led to the partial destruction of coat protein nanostructures, associated with internal alterations of cortex and core. Our findings reveal for the first time that the cell wall and coat architecture are directly involved in the electro-eradication of bacteria. PMID:26830154

  5. [Lactic acid bacteria growing at low temperature with a high exploitability--a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongyan; Wang, Xiaofen; Cui, Zongjun

    2008-01-01

    At present, increasing attentions have been paid to lactic acid bacteria because of their probiotic effects. In the nature, there exists a kind of lactic acid bacteria growing at low temperature with a long history of use. However, they have not been well studied and developed. Most articles about the lactic acid bacteria growing at low temperature focused on meat and fish storage at low temperature, or Kimchi, a kind of fermented vegetable. Many microorganisms studied are Leuconostoc and Lactobacillus species. Nevertheless, a few researches in this field are reported in China. In this paper, we review the living environment, varieties and functions of lactic acid bacteria growing at low temperature, to provide an overview for further studies. We also discuss perspectives of further development and utilization of these lactic acid bacteria.

  6. Chromatic acclimation and population dynamics of green sulfur bacteria grown with spectrally tailored light

    CERN Document Server

    Saikin, Semion K; Huh, Joonsuk; Hannout, Moataz; Wang, Yaya; Zare, Farrokh; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang

    2014-01-01

    Living organisms have to adjust to their surrounding in order to survive in stressful conditions. We study this mechanism in one of most primitive creatures - photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria. These bacteria absorb photons very efficiently using the chlorosome antenna complexes and perform photosynthesis in extreme low-light environments. How the chlorosomes in green sulfur bacteria are acclimated to the stressful light conditions, for instance, if the spectrum of light is not optimal for absorption, is unknown. Studying Chlorobaculum tepidum cultures with far-red to near-infrared light-emitting diodes, we found that these bacteria react to changes in energy flow by regulating the amount of light-absorbing pigments and the size of the chlorosomes. Surprisingly, our results indicate that the bacteria can survive in near-infrared lights capturing low-frequency photons by the intermediate units of the light-harvesting complex. The latter strategy may be used by the species recently found near hydrothermal ve...

  7. Symbiotic bacteria of helminths: what role may they play in ecosystems under anthropogenic stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, N J

    2016-11-01

    Symbiotic bacteria are a common feature of many animals, particularly invertebrates, from both aquatic and terrestrial habitats. These bacteria have increasingly been recognized as performing an important role in maintaining invertebrate health. Both ecto- and endoparasitic helminths have also been found to harbour a range of bacterial species which provide a similar function. The part symbiotic bacteria play in sustaining homeostasis of free-living invertebrates exposed to anthropogenic pressure (climate change, pollution), and the consequences to invertebrate populations when their symbionts succumb to poor environmental conditions, are increasingly important areas of research. Helminths are also susceptible to environmental stress and their symbiotic bacteria may be a key aspect of their responses to deteriorating conditions. This article summarizes the ecophysiological relationship helminths have with symbiotic bacteria and the role they play in maintaining a healthy parasite and the relevance of specific changes that occur in free-living invertebrate-bacteria interactions under anthropogenic pressure to helminths and their bacterial communities. It also discusses the importance of understanding the mechanistic sensitivity of helminth-bacteria relationships to environmental stress for comprehending the responses of parasites to challenging conditions.

  8. Bacteria encapsulated electrospun nanofibrous webs for remediation of methylene blue dye in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarioglu, Omer Faruk; Keskin, Nalan Oya San; Celebioglu, Asli; Tekinay, Turgay; Uyar, Tamer

    2017-04-01

    In this study, preparation and application of novel biocomposite materials that were produced by encapsulation of bacterial cells within electrospun nanofibrous webs are described. A commercial strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa which has methylene blue (MB) dye remediation capability was selected for encapsulation, and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyethylene oxide (PEO) were selected as the polymer matrices for the electrospinning of bacteria encapsulated nanofibrous webs. Encapsulation of bacterial cells was monitored by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and fluorescence microscopy, and the viability of encapsulated bacteria was checked by live/dead staining and viable cell counting assay. Both bacteria/PVA and bacteria/PEO webs have shown a great potential for remediation of MB, yet bacteria/PEO web has shown higher removal performances than bacteria/PVA web, which was probably due to the differences in the initial viable bacterial cells for those two samples. The bacteria encapsulated electrospun nanofibrous webs were stored at 4°C for three months and they were found as potentially storable for keeping encapsulated bacterial cells alive. Overall, the results suggest that electrospun nanofibrous webs are suitable platforms for preservation of living bacterial cells and they can be used directly as a starting inoculum for bioremediation of water systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Programmed survival of soil bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Bogø; Molin, Søren; Sternberg, Claus

    Biological containment systems have been developed for Pseudomonas putida and related soil bacteria. The systems are based on combinations of lethal genes and regulated gene expression. Two types of killing function have been employed: 1) A membrane protein interfering with the membrane potential...

  10. ENDOSPORES OF THERMOPHILIC FERMENTATIVE BACTERIA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Volpi, Marta

    2016-01-01

    solely based on endospores of sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), which presumably constitute only a small fraction of the total thermophilic endospore community reaching cold environments. My PhD project developed an experimental framework for using thermophilic fermentative endospores (TFEs) to trace...

  11. Biofilms: Community Behavior by Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    It has been found that waste water treated by the biofilm method (activated sludge) is very effective. Biofilms can also be used to 'eat up' petroleum and other oil products. There is also the concept of microbial leaching. For example, low grade ore is mildly acidified to encourage the growth of bacteria which oxidize the ore to ...

  12. Manipulating Genetic Material in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Lisa Crawford, a graduate research assistant from the University of Toledo, works with Laurel Karr of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in the molecular biology laboratory. They are donducting genetic manipulation of bacteria and yeast for the production of large amount of desired protein. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  13. Engineering robust lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bron, P.A.; Bokhorst-van de Veen, van H.; Wels, M.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2011-01-01

    For centuries, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have been industrially exploited as starter cultures in the fermentation of foods and feeds for their spoilage-preventing and flavor-enhancing characteristics. More recently, the health-promoting effects of LAB on the consumer have been widely acknowledged,

  14. Photoreceptor proteins from purple bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, J.; van der Horst, M.A.; Chua, T.K.; Ávila Pérez, M.; van Wilderen, L.J.; Alexandre, M.T.A.; Groot, M.-L.; Kennis, J.T.M.; Hellingwerf, K.J.; Hunter, C.N.; Daldal, F.; Thurnauer, M.C.; Beatty, J.T.

    2009-01-01

    Purple bacteria contain representatives of four of the six main families of photoreceptor proteins: phytochromes, BLUF domain containing proteins, xanthopsins (i.e., photoactive yellow proteins), and phototropins (containing one or more light, oxygen, or voltage (LOV) domains). Most of them have a

  15. Raman spectroscopy of oral bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Andrew J.; Zhu, Qingyuan; Quivey, Robert G.

    2003-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been employed to measure the varying concentrations of two oral bacteria in simple mixtures. Evaporated droplets of centrifuged mixtures of Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus mutans were analyzed via Raman microspectroscopy. The concentration of s. sanguis was determined based upon the measured Raman spectrum, using partial least squares cross-validation, with an r2 value of 0.98.

  16. Synthetic Biology in Streptomyces Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Medema, Marnix H.; Breitling, Rainer; Takano, Eriko

    2011-01-01

    Actinomycete bacteria of the genus Streptomyces are major producers of bioactive compounds for the biotechnology industry. They are the source of most clinically used antibiotics, as well as of several widely used drugs against common diseases, including cancer . Genome sequencing has revealed that

  17. Functional genomics of intracellular bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Barsy, Marie; Greub, Gilbert

    2013-07-01

    During the genomic era, a large amount of whole-genome sequences accumulated, which identified many hypothetical proteins of unknown function. Rapidly, functional genomics, which is the research domain that assign a function to a given gene product, has thus been developed. Functional genomics of intracellular pathogenic bacteria exhibit specific peculiarities due to the fastidious growth of most of these intracellular micro-organisms, due to the close interaction with the host cell, due to the risk of contamination of experiments with host cell proteins and, for some strict intracellular bacteria such as Chlamydia, due to the absence of simple genetic system to manipulate the bacterial genome. To identify virulence factors of intracellular pathogenic bacteria, functional genomics often rely on bioinformatic analyses compared with model organisms such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The use of heterologous expression is another common approach. Given the intracellular lifestyle and the many effectors that are used by the intracellular bacteria to corrupt host cell functions, functional genomics is also often targeting the identification of new effectors such as those of the T4SS of Brucella and Legionella.

  18. Growth of bacteria in 3-d colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xinxian; Mugler, Andrew; Kim, Justin; Jeong, Ha Jun; Levin, Bruce R; Nemenman, Ilya

    2017-07-01

    The dynamics of growth of bacterial populations has been extensively studied for planktonic cells in well-agitated liquid culture, in which all cells have equal access to nutrients. In the real world, bacteria are more likely to live in physically structured habitats as colonies, within which individual cells vary in their access to nutrients. The dynamics of bacterial growth in such conditions is poorly understood, and, unlike that for liquid culture, there is not a standard broadly used mathematical model for bacterial populations growing in colonies in three dimensions (3-d). By extending the classic Monod model of resource-limited population growth to allow for spatial heterogeneity in the bacterial access to nutrients, we develop a 3-d model of colonies, in which bacteria consume diffusing nutrients in their vicinity. By following the changes in density of E. coli in liquid and embedded in glucose-limited soft agar, we evaluate the fit of this model to experimental data. The model accounts for the experimentally observed presence of a sub-exponential, diffusion-limited growth regime in colonies, which is absent in liquid cultures. The model predicts and our experiments confirm that, as a consequence of inter-colony competition for the diffusing nutrients and of cell death, there is a non-monotonic relationship between total number of colonies within the habitat and the total number of individual cells in all of these colonies. This combined theoretical-experimental study reveals that, within 3-d colonies, E. coli cells are loosely packed, and colonies produce about 2.5 times as many cells as the liquid culture from the same amount of nutrients. We verify that this is because cells in liquid culture are larger than in colonies. Our model provides a baseline description of bacterial growth in 3-d, deviations from which can be used to identify phenotypic heterogeneities and inter-cellular interactions that further contribute to the structure of bacterial

  19. Growth of bacteria in 3-d colonies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinxian Shao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of growth of bacterial populations has been extensively studied for planktonic cells in well-agitated liquid culture, in which all cells have equal access to nutrients. In the real world, bacteria are more likely to live in physically structured habitats as colonies, within which individual cells vary in their access to nutrients. The dynamics of bacterial growth in such conditions is poorly understood, and, unlike that for liquid culture, there is not a standard broadly used mathematical model for bacterial populations growing in colonies in three dimensions (3-d. By extending the classic Monod model of resource-limited population growth to allow for spatial heterogeneity in the bacterial access to nutrients, we develop a 3-d model of colonies, in which bacteria consume diffusing nutrients in their vicinity. By following the changes in density of E. coli in liquid and embedded in glucose-limited soft agar, we evaluate the fit of this model to experimental data. The model accounts for the experimentally observed presence of a sub-exponential, diffusion-limited growth regime in colonies, which is absent in liquid cultures. The model predicts and our experiments confirm that, as a consequence of inter-colony competition for the diffusing nutrients and of cell death, there is a non-monotonic relationship between total number of colonies within the habitat and the total number of individual cells in all of these colonies. This combined theoretical-experimental study reveals that, within 3-d colonies, E. coli cells are loosely packed, and colonies produce about 2.5 times as many cells as the liquid culture from the same amount of nutrients. We verify that this is because cells in liquid culture are larger than in colonies. Our model provides a baseline description of bacterial growth in 3-d, deviations from which can be used to identify phenotypic heterogeneities and inter-cellular interactions that further contribute to the structure of

  20. Fluorescence Live Cell Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Ettinger, Andreas; Wittmann, Torsten

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy of live cells has become an integral part of modern cell biology. Fluorescent protein (FP) tags, live cell dyes, and other methods to fluorescently label proteins of interest provide a range of tools to investigate virtually any cellular process under the microscope. The two main experimental challenges in collecting meaningful live cell microscopy data are to minimize photodamage while retaining a useful signal-to-noise ratio and to provide a suitable environment for ...

  1. Interventions in everyday lives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Ole

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of psychotherapy is to help clients address and overcome problems troubling them in their everyday lives. Therapy can therefore only work if clients include it in their ongoing lives to deal with their problems. Detailed, systematic research is needed on how clients do so in their eve......The purpose of psychotherapy is to help clients address and overcome problems troubling them in their everyday lives. Therapy can therefore only work if clients include it in their ongoing lives to deal with their problems. Detailed, systematic research is needed on how clients do so...

  2. Our Urban Living Room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjortshøj, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    Our Urban Living Room is an exhibition and a book, created by Cobe. The theme is based on Cobe’s ten years of practice, grounded in social livability and urban democracy, and our aim to create buildings and spaces that invite Copenhageners to use and define them; as an extended living room, where...... the boundaries between private and public space become fluid. Based on specific Cobe projects, Our Urban Living Room tells stories about the architectural development of Copenhagen, while exploring the progression of the Danish Capital - from an industrial city into an urban living room, known as one...

  3. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center (EOC) 101 Emergency Operations Center CDC Laboratory Science: Mission Critical Saving Lives, Protecting People Environmental Health CDC Tracking Network Health Begins at Home Smoke- ...

  4. Fuzzy species among recombinogenic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fraser Christophe

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is a matter of ongoing debate whether a universal species concept is possible for bacteria. Indeed, it is not clear whether closely related isolates of bacteria typically form discrete genotypic clusters that can be assigned as species. The most challenging test of whether species can be clearly delineated is provided by analysis of large populations of closely-related, highly recombinogenic, bacteria that colonise the same body site. We have used concatenated sequences of seven house-keeping loci from 770 strains of 11 named Neisseria species, and phylogenetic trees, to investigate whether genotypic clusters can be resolved among these recombinogenic bacteria and, if so, the extent to which they correspond to named species. Results Alleles at individual loci were widely distributed among the named species but this distorting effect of recombination was largely buffered by using concatenated sequences, which resolved clusters corresponding to the three species most numerous in the sample, N. meningitidis, N. lactamica and N. gonorrhoeae. A few isolates arose from the branch that separated N. meningitidis from N. lactamica leading us to describe these species as 'fuzzy'. Conclusion A multilocus approach using large samples of closely related isolates delineates species even in the highly recombinogenic human Neisseria where individual loci are inadequate for the task. This approach should be applied by taxonomists to large samples of other groups of closely-related bacteria, and especially to those where species delineation has historically been difficult, to determine whether genotypic clusters can be delineated, and to guide the definition of species.

  5. Bifurcation kinetics of drug uptake by Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, David A; Krishnamoorthy, Ganesh; Wolloscheck, David; Sarkar, Rupa; Zgurskaya, Helen I; Rybenkov, Valentin V

    2017-01-01

    Cell envelopes of many bacteria consist of two membranes studded with efflux transporters. Such organization protects bacteria from the environment and gives rise to multidrug resistance. We report a kinetic model that accurately describes the permeation properties of this system. The model predicts complex non-linear patterns of drug uptake complete with a bifurcation, which recapitulate the known experimental anomalies. We introduce two kinetic parameters, the efflux and barrier constants, which replace those of Michaelis and Menten for trans-envelope transport. Both compound permeation and efflux display transitions, which delineate regimes of efficient and inefficient efflux. The first transition is related to saturation of the transporter by the compound and the second one behaves as a bifurcation and involves saturation of the outer membrane barrier. The bifurcation was experimentally observed in live bacteria. We further found that active efflux of a drug can be orders of magnitude faster than its diffusion into a cell and that the efficacy of a drug depends both on its transport properties and therapeutic potency. This analysis reveals novel physical principles in the behavior of the cellular envelope, creates a framework for quantification of small molecule permeation into bacteria, and should invigorate structure-activity studies of novel antibiotics.

  6. An approach to measure ciliate grazing on living heterotrophic nanoflagellates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, K.; González, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    The complicated routes by which organic material is channelled up to higher trophic levels via bacteria and protozoans is a major issue in aquatic microbial ecology. Because of the fragile nature of protists it is not straightforward to perform experimental studies of prey–predator interactions. ...... a direct approach to measure ciliate grazing specifically on living heterotrophic nanoflagellates.......The complicated routes by which organic material is channelled up to higher trophic levels via bacteria and protozoans is a major issue in aquatic microbial ecology. Because of the fragile nature of protists it is not straightforward to perform experimental studies of prey–predator interactions....... Here we present an approach for the assessment of ciliate grazing on living heterotrophic nanoflagellates. Stationary phase cultures of a heterotrophic nanoflagellate (Cafeteria sp.) were live-stained by allowing them to take up fluorescently labelled macromolecules. Controls revealed that this label...

  7. Is It Living?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, Page

    2011-01-01

    The word "living" is commonly used throughout elementary science lessons that focus on the biological world. It is a word teachers often take for granted when teaching life science concepts. How similar the constructed meaning of a common word like "living" is to the meaning intended by the teacher or instructional materials depends on how a…

  8. Living the Utopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, John; Warring, Anette Elisabeth

    2011-01-01

    This article examines experiments in communal living in Britain and Denmark in the early 1970s, using life-story interviews from seventeen members of two British and two Danish communes. It examines communal living as a fusion of radical political principles with the practice of experimental coll...

  9. The governmentalization of living

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlberg, Ayo; Rose, Nikolas

    2015-01-01

    and scales (e.g. the QALY and DALY) has contributed to a governmentalization of living, in the course of which the social and personal consequences of living with disease come to be an object of political concern, and made knowable, calculable and thereby amenable to various strategies of intervention. We...

  10. Thioploca spp: filamentous sulfur bacteria with nitrate vacuoles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, BB; Gallardo, VA

    1999-01-01

    communities of large Thioploca species live along the Pacific coast of South America and in other upwelling areas of high organic matter sedimentation with bottom waters poor in oxygen and rich in nitrate. Each cell of these thioplocas harbors a large liquid vacuole which is used as a storage for nitrate...... with a concentration of lip to 506 mM. The nitrate is used as an electron acceptor for sulfide oxidation and the bacteria may grow autotrophically or mixotrophically using acetate or other organic molecules as carbon source. The filaments stretch up into the overlying seawater, from which they take up nitrate......, and then glide down 5-15 cm deep into the sediment through their sheaths to oxidize sulfide formed by intensive sulfate reduction. New major occurrences have bren found in recent years, both in lakes and in the ocean, and have stimulated the interest in these fascinating bacteria. (C) 1999 Federation of European...

  11. Single-cell force spectroscopy of probiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaussart, Audrey; El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Herman, Philippe; Alsteens, David; Mahillon, Jacques; Hols, Pascal; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2013-05-07

    Single-cell force spectroscopy is a powerful atomic force microscopy modality in which a single living cell is attached to the atomic force microscopy cantilever to quantify the forces that drive cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions. Although various single-cell force spectroscopy protocols are well established for animal cells, application of the method to individual bacterial cells remains challenging, mainly owing to the lack of appropriate methods for the controlled attachment of single live cells on cantilevers. We present a nondestructive protocol for single-bacterial cell force spectroscopy, which combines the use of colloidal probe cantilevers and of a bioinspired polydopamine wet adhesive. Living cells from the probiotic species Lactobacillus plantarum are picked up with a polydopamine-coated colloidal probe, enabling us to quantify the adhesion forces between single bacteria and biotic (lectin monolayer) or abiotic (hydrophobic monolayer) surfaces. These minimally invasive single-cell experiments provide novel, to our knowledge, insight into the specific and nonspecific forces driving the adhesion of L. plantarum, and represent a generic platform for studying the molecular mechanisms of cell adhesion in probiotic and pathogenic bacteria. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation of naturally associated bacteria of necromenic Pristionchus nematodes and fitness consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rae, Robbie; Riebesell, Metta; Dinkelacker, Iris; Wang, Qiong; Herrmann, Matthias; Weller, Andreas M; Dieterich, Christoph; Sommer, Ralf J

    2008-06-01

    Nematodes and bacteria are major components of the soil ecosystem. Many nematodes use bacteria for food, whereas others evolved specialized bacterial interactions ranging from mutualism to parasitism. Little is known about the biological mechanisms by which nematode-bacterial interactions are achieved, largely because in the laboratory nematodes are often cultured under artificial conditions. We investigated the bacterial interactions of nematodes from the genus Pristionchus that have a strong association with scarab beetles. Pristionchus has a different feeding strategy than Caenorhabditis and meta-genomic 16S sequence analysis of Pristionchus individuals showed a diversity of living bacteria within the nematode gut and on the nematode cuticle. Twenty-three different bacterial strains were isolated from three Pristionchus-beetle associations and were used to study nematode-bacterial interactions under controlled laboratory conditions. We show a continuum of bacterial interactions from dissemination, to reduction in brood size and nematode mortality caused by bacteria derived from insect hosts. Olfactory discrimination experiments show distinct chemoattraction and fitness profiles of Pristionchus nematodes when exposed to different bacteria. For example, Pristionchus pacificus avoids Serratia marcescens possibly because of pathogenicity. Also, P. pacificus avoids Bacillus thuringiensis and insect pathogenic bacteria but is resistant to the human pathogens Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, unlike Caenorhabditis elegans. Pristionchus specifically recognize and respond to bacteria that cause ill health. Bringing the nematode-bacterial interaction into the laboratory allows detailed functional studies, including the genetic manipulation of the interaction in both nematodes and bacteria.

  13. Population study of the filamentous sulfur bacteria Thioploca spp. off the Bay of Concepcion, Chile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, HN; Strotmann, B.; Gallardo, VA

    2000-01-01

    A population of filamentous sulfur bacteria Thioploca spp. living in the Bay of Concepcion, Chile, and the adjoining shelf area was sampled for 14 mo at 4 to 6 wk intervals to investigate the influence of seasonal variations in upwelling intensity and oxygen concentrations on the population......, filaments with short cells in sheaths, populating the upper 7 cm of the sediment, and filaments without sheaths living at the sediment surface....

  14. Evaluating Living Standard Indicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birčiaková Naďa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the evaluation of selected available indicators of living standards, divided into three groups, namely economic, environmental, and social. We have selected six countries of the European Union for analysis: Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Luxembourg, France, and Great Britain. The aim of this paper is to evaluate indicators measuring living standards and suggest the most important factors which should be included in the final measurement. We have tried to determine what factors influence each indicator and what factors affect living standards. We have chosen regression analysis as our main method. From the study of factors, we can deduce their impact on living standards, and thus the value of indicators of living standards. Indicators with a high degree of reliability include the following factors: size and density of population, health care and spending on education. Emissions of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere also have a certain lower degree of reliability.

  15. Sustained delivery of commensal bacteria from pod-intravaginal rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawardana, Manjula; Mullen, Madeline; Yoo, Jennifer; Webster, Paul; Moss, John A; Baum, Marc M

    2014-01-01

    Topical administration of live commensal bacteria to the vaginal tract holds significant potential as a cost-effective strategy for the treatment of sexually transmitted infections and the delivery of mucosal vaccines. Probiotic-releasing intravaginal rings (IVRs) embody significant theoretical advantages over traditional daily-dosage forms, such as sustained and controlled delivery leading to improved adherence to therapy compared to that of frequent dosing. The conventional IVR designs, however, are not amenable to the delivery of live bacteria. We have developed a novel pod-IVR technology where polymer-coated tablets ("pods") of Lactobacillus gasseri strain ATCC 33323, a commensal microorganism of human origin, are embedded in silicone IVRs. The release rate of bacterial cells is controlled by the diameter of a delivery channel that exposes a portion of the pod to external fluids. In vitro studies demonstrated that the prototype devices released between 1.1×10(7) and 14×10(7) cells per day for up to 21 days in a controlled sustained fashion with stable burst-free release kinetics. The daily release rates were correlated with the cross-sectional area of the delivery channel. Bacteria in the IVR pods remained viable throughout the in vitro studies and formed biofilms on the surfaces of the devices. This proof-of-principle study represents the first demonstration of a prolonged, sustained release of bacteria from an intravaginal device and warrants further investigation of this device as a nonchemotherapeutic agent for the restoration and maintenance of normal urogenital flora.

  16. Drinking Water Fact Sheet: Coliform Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Mesner, Nancy; Daniels, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    This fact sheet provides information about coliform bacteria. Including sections about what coliform bacteria is, how it enters drinking water, health concerns from exposure, drinking water standards, and how to treat drinking water that contains coliforms.

  17. Aggregation Patterns in Stressed Bacteria

    CERN Document Server

    Tsimring, L S; Aranson, I S; Ben-Jacob, E; Cohen, I; Shochet, O; Tsimring, Lev; Levine, Herbert; Aranson, Igor; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Cohen, Inon; Shochet, Ofer

    1995-01-01

    We study the formation of spot patterns seen in a variety of bacterial species when the bacteria are subjected to oxidative stress due to hazardous byproducts of respiration. Our approach consists of coupling the cell density field to a chemoattractant concentration as well as to nutrient and waste fields. The latter serves as a triggering field for emission of chemoattractant. Important elements in the proposed model include the propagation of a front of motile bacteria radially outward form an initial site, a Turing instability of the uniformly dense state and a reduction of motility for cells sufficiently far behind the front. The wide variety of patterns seen in the experiments is explained as being due the variation of the details of the initiation of the chemoattractant emission as well as the transition to a non-motile phase.

  18. Genetics of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorec, Monique; Anba-Mondoloni, Jamila; Coq, Anne-Marie Crutz-Le; Champomier-Vergès, Marie-Christine

    Many meat (or fish) products, obtained by the fermentation of meat originating from various animals by the flora that naturally contaminates it, are part of the human diet since millenaries. Historically, the use of bacteria as starters for the fermentation of meat, to produce dry sausages, was thus performed empirically through the endogenous micro-biota, then, by a volunteer addition of starters, often performed by back-slopping, without knowing precisely the microbial species involved. It is only since about 50 years that well defined bacterial cultures have been used as starters for the fermentation of dry sausages. Nowadays, the indigenous micro-biota of fermented meat products is well identified, and the literature is rich of reports on the identification of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) present in many traditional fermented products from various geographical origin, obtained without the addition of commercial starters (See Talon, Leroy, & Lebert, 2007, and references therein).

  19. Dissipative Shocks behind Bacteria Gliding

    CERN Document Server

    Virga, Epifanio G

    2014-01-01

    Gliding is a means of locomotion on rigid substrates utilized by a number of bacteria includingmyxobacteria and cyanobacteria. One of the hypotheses advanced to explain this motility mechanism hinges on the role played by the slime filaments continuously extruded from gliding bacteria. This paper solves in full a non-linear mechanical theory that treats as dissipative shocks both the point where the extruded slime filament comes in contact with the substrate, called the filament's foot, and the pore on the bacterium outer surface from where the filament is ejected. We prove that kinematic compatibility for shock propagation requires that the bacterium uniform gliding velocity (relative to the substrate) and the slime ejecting velocity (relative to the bacterium) must be equal, a coincidence that seems to have already been observed.

  20. Re-engineering bacteria for ethanol production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yomano, Lorraine P; York, Sean W; Zhou, Shengde; Shanmugam, Keelnatham; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2014-05-06

    The invention provides recombinant bacteria, which comprise a full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes. Expression of the full complement of heterologous ethanol production genes causes the recombinant bacteria to produce ethanol as the primary fermentation product when grown in mineral salts medium, without the addition of complex nutrients. Methods for producing the recombinant bacteria and methods for producing ethanol using the recombinant bacteria are also disclosed.

  1. Laser-Based Identification of Pathogenic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehse, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous in our world. From our homes, to our work environment, to our own bodies, bacteria are the omnipresent although often unobserved companions to human life. Physicists are typically untroubled professionally by the presence of these bacteria, as their study usually falls safely outside the realm of our typical domain. In the…

  2. Bacteria associated with cultures of psathyrella atroumbonata ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These bacteria include Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus subtilis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus cereus and Staphylococcus aureus. The average bacteria count was 1.0 x 106 cfu/ml and these bacteria grew within pH range of 5.0 and 9.0. the optimum temperature range of growth lied ...

  3. Nitrogen-fixing methane-utilizing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, de J.A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Methane occurs abundantly in nature. In the presence of oxygen this gas may be metabolized by bacteria that are able to use it as carbon and energy source. Several types of bacteria involved in the oxidation of methane have been described in literature. Methane-utilizing bacteria have in

  4. Engineering living functional materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Allen Y; Zhong, Chao; Lu, Timothy K

    2015-01-16

    Natural materials, such as bone, integrate living cells composed of organic molecules together with inorganic components. This enables combinations of functionalities, such as mechanical strength and the ability to regenerate and remodel, which are not present in existing synthetic materials. Taking a cue from nature, we propose that engineered 'living functional materials' and 'living materials synthesis platforms' that incorporate both living systems and inorganic components could transform the performance and the manufacturing of materials. As a proof-of-concept, we recently demonstrated that synthetic gene circuits in Escherichia coli enabled biofilms to be both a functional material in its own right and a materials-synthesis platform. To demonstrate the former, we engineered E. coli biofilms into a chemical-inducer-responsive electrical switch. To demonstrate the latter, we engineered E. coli biofilms to dynamically organize biotic-abiotic materials across multiple length scales, template gold nanorods, gold nanowires, and metal/semiconductor heterostructures, and synthesize semiconductor nanoparticles (Chen, A. Y. et al. (2014) Synthesis and patterning of tunable multiscale materials with engineered cells. Nat. Mater. 13, 515-523.). Thus, tools from synthetic biology, such as those for artificial gene regulation, can be used to engineer the spatiotemporal characteristics of living systems and to interface living systems with inorganic materials. Such hybrids can possess novel properties enabled by living cells while retaining desirable functionalities of inorganic systems. These systems, as living functional materials and as living materials foundries, would provide a radically different paradigm of materials performance and synthesis-materials possessing multifunctional, self-healing, adaptable, and evolvable properties that are created and organized in a distributed, bottom-up, autonomously assembled, and environmentally sustainable manner.

  5. Influence of adhesion to activated carbon particles on the viability of waterborne pathogenic bacteria under flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Mei, Henny C; Atema-Smit, Jelly; Jager, Debbie; Langworthy, Don E; Collias, Dimitris I; Mitchell, Michael D; Busscher, Henk J

    2008-07-01

    In rural areas around the world, people often rely on water filtration plants using activated carbon particles for safe water supply. Depending on the carbon surface, adhering microorganisms die or grow to form a biofilm. Assays to assess the efficacy of activated carbons in bacterial removal do not allow direct observation of bacterial adhesion and the determination of viability. Here we propose to use a parallel plate flow chamber with carbon particles attached to the bottom plate to study bacterial adhesion to individual carbon particles and determine the viability of adhering bacteria. Observation and enumeration is done after live/dead staining in a confocal laser scanning microscope. Escherichiae coli adhered in higher numbers than Raoultella terrigena, except to a coconut-based carbon, which showed low bacterial adhesion compared to other wood-based carbon types. After adhesion, 83-96% of the bacteria adhering to an acidic carbon were dead, while on a basic carbon 54-56% were dead. A positively charged, basic carbon yielded 76-78% bacteria dead, while on a negatively charged coconut-based carbon only 32-37% were killed upon adhesion. The possibility to determine both adhesion as well as the viability of adhering bacteria upon adhesion to carbon particles is most relevant, because if bacteria adhere but remain viable, this still puts the water treatment system at risk, as live bacteria can grow and form a biofilm that can then be shedded to cause contamination. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Digital Living at Home

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Pernille Viktoria Kathja; Christiansen, Ellen Tove

    2013-01-01

    Does living with digital technology inevitably lead to digital living? Users talking about a digital home control system, they have had in their homes for eight years, indicate that there is more to living with digital technology than a functional-operational grip on regulation. Our analysis...... of these user voices has directed us towards a ‘home-keeping’ design discourse, which opens new horizons for design of digital home control systems by allowing users to perform as self-determined controllers and groomers of their habitat. The paper concludes by outlining the implications of a ‘home...

  7. [Lactic acid bacteria and health: are probiotics safe for human?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubiszewska, Izabela; Januszewska, Milena; Rybka, Joanna; Gackowska, Lidia

    2014-11-17

    The effect of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium on human health has been examined for many years. Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have confirmed the beneficial activity of some exogenous lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of rotaviral infection, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and other gastrointestinal disorders. Probiotics support the action of the intestinal microflora and exhibit a favorable modulatory effect on the host's immune system. However, it should be remembered that relatively harmless lactobacilli can occasionally induce opportunistic infections. Due to reaching almost 20x10(12) probiotic doses per year which contain live cultures of bacteria, it is essential to monitor the safety aspect of their administration. In recent years, infections caused by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium made up 0.05% to 0.4% of cases of endocarditis and bacteremia. In most cases, the infections were caused by endogenous microflora of the host or bacterial strains colonizing the host's oral cavity. According to a review of cases of infections caused by bacteria of the genus Lactobacillus from 2005 (collected by J.P. Cannot'a), 1.7% of infections have been linked directly with intensive dairy probiotic consumption by patients. Additionally, due to the lack of a precise description of most individuals' eating habits, the possible effect of probiotics on infection development definitively should not be ruled out. The present paper describes cases of diseases caused by lactic acid bacteria, a potential mechanism for the adverse action of bacteria, and the possible hazard connected with probiotic supplementation for seriously ill and hospitalized patients.

  8. Lactic acid bacteria and health: are probiotics safe for human?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Kubiszewska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium on human health has been examined for many years. Numerous in vivo and in vitro studies have confirmed the beneficial activity of some exogenous lactic acid bacteria in the treatment and prevention of rotaviral infection, antibiotic-associated diarrhea, inflammatory bowel disease and other gastrointestinal disorders. Probiotics support the action of the intestinal microflora and exhibit a favorable modulatory effect on the host’s immune system. However, it should be remembered that relatively harmless lactobacilli can occasionally induce opportunistic infections. Due to reaching almost 20 x 1012 probiotic doses per year which contain live cultures of bacteria, it is essential to monitor the safety aspect of their administration. In recent years, infections caused by Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium made up 0.05% to 0.4% of cases of endocarditis and bacteremia. In most cases, the infections were caused by endogenous microflora of the host or bacterial strains colonizing the host’s oral cavity. According to a review of cases of infections caused by bacteria of the genus Lactobacillus from 2005 (collected by J.P. Cannot’a, 1.7% of infections have been linked directly with intensive dairy probiotic consumption by patients. Additionally, due to the lack of a precise description of most individuals’ eating habits, the possible effect of probiotics on infection development definitively should not be ruled out. The present paper describes cases of diseases caused by lactic acid bacteria, a potential mechanism for the adverse action of bacteria, and the possible hazard connected with probiotic supplementation for seriously ill and hospitalized patients.

  9. Mutational and selective pressures on codon and amino acid usage in Buchnera, endosymbiotic bacteria of aphids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rispe, C.; Delmotte, F.; Ham, van R.C.H.J.; Moya, A.

    2004-01-01

    We have explored compositional variation at synonymous (codon usage) and nonsynonymous (amino acid usage) positions in three complete genomes of Buchnera, endosymbiotic bacteria of aphids, and also in their orthologs in Escherichia coli, a close free-living relative. We sought to discriminate genes

  10. Bacteria associated with larvae and adults of the Asian longhorned beetle (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    John D. Podgwaite; Vincent D' Amico; Roger T. Zerillo; Heidi. Schoenfeldt

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria representing several genera were isolated from integument and alimentary tracts of live Asian longhorned beetle, Anaplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky), larvae and adults. Insects examined were from infested tree branches collected from sites in New York and Illinois. Staphylococcus sciuri (Kloos) was the most common...

  11. Methods for baiting and enriching fungus-feeding (Mycophagous) rhizosphere bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ballhausen, Max Bernhard; Veen, Van J.A.; Hundscheid, M.P.J.; Boer, De Wietse

    2015-01-01

    Mycophagous soil bacteria are able to obtain nutrients from living fungal hyphae. However, with exception of the soil bacterial genus Collimonas, occurrence of this feeding strategy has not been well examined. Evaluation of the importance of mycophagy in soil bacterial communities requires

  12. Phaeobacter inhibens as Probiotic Bacteria in Non-Axenic Artemia and Algae Cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grotkjær, Torben; D'Alvise, Paul; Bentzon-Tilia, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial diseases are a major constraint in aquaculture, especially in larviculture. Antibiotics that can control pathogens should be avoided due to risk of antibiotic resistance. We have shown in axenic systems of live larval feed that marine Roseobacter clade bacteria can antagonize fish patho...

  13. Distribution of luminous bacteria and bacterial luminescence in the equatorial region of the Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Chandramohan, D.

    and 500 m, and a free living pattern in the surface samples. Vibrio fischeri contributed to more than 45% of the total luminous bacteria collected for the seawater samples, while, V. harveyi was the dominant species (53%) associated with the zooplankton...

  14. Fluorescent protein vectors for promoter analysis in lactic acid bacteria and Escherichia coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    García-Cayuela, T.; Cadiñanos, de L.P.; Mohedano, M.L.; Palencia, de P.F.; Boden, D.; Wells, J.; Peláez, C.; López, P.; Requena, T.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent reporter genes are valuable tools for real-time monitoring of gene expression in living cells. In this study we describe the construction of novel promoter-probe vectors containing a synthetic mCherry fluorescent protein gene, codon-optimized for lactic acid bacteria, divergently linked,

  15. Yeast pro- and paraprobiotics have the capability to bind pathogenic bacteria associated with animal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Live yeast probiotics and yeast cell wall components (paraprobiotics) may serve as an alternative to the use of antibiotics in prevention and treatment of infections caused by pathogenic bacteria. Probiotics and paraprobiotics can bind directly to pathogens, which limits binding of the pathogens to ...

  16. In vivo assay to identify bacteria with β-glucosidase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erwin Strahsburger

    2017-11-01

    Conclusion: This in vivo β-glucosidase assay can be used as an enzymatic test on living cells without cell disruption. The method is simple, quantitative, and recommended, especially in studies screening for bacteria not only with β-glucosidase activity but also with high β-glucosidase activity.

  17. Writing lives in sport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh

    Writing lives in sport is a book of stories about sports-persons. The people concerned include sports stars, sports people who are not quite so famous, and relatively unknown physical education teachers and sports scientists.Writing lives in sport raises questions about writing biographies...... in the academis world of sport studies. It does not set out to be a methodological treatise but through the writing of lives in sports does raise questions of method. Each essay in this collection deals with problems of writing sports-people's lives. These essays could be said to fall along a spectrum from those...... dealing with anonymous individuals, whose anonymity results from the confidentiality requirements of a social scientific research methodology, to those leaning more towards the literary-historical traditions of 'conventional' biographical writing. However, these examples are polar extremes and none...

  18. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prepared for different audiences including, children, parents, and public health professionals. More > Hand Hygiene Saves Lives (5:10) ... prepared for different audiences including, children, parents, and public health professionals. More > File Formats Help: How do I ...

  19. Healthy Living after Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Stories Stroke Heroes Among Us Healthy Living After Stroke Nutrition Good nutrition is one way to reduce ... the hospital. Thank goodness, she did. Subscribe to Stroke Connection Get quarterly digital issues plus our monthly ...

  20. Living with Low Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Life TIPS To Its Fullest LIVING WITH LOW VISION Savings Medical Bills A VARIETY OF EYE CONDITIONS, ... which occupational therapy practitioners help people with low vision to function at the highest possible level. • Prevent ...

  1. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Corner Stores Healthy Snacking in Philadelphia, PA Hidden Sodium Salt Matters Salt Matters: Preserving Choice, Protecting Health ( ... Health Easier: Active Living in Philadelphia, PA Hidden Sodium Me? Have a baby? Preconception Health Me? Have ...

  2. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Multiunit Housing The Quiet Killer Healthy Living Healthy Eating A Grocery Store’s Healthy Options A Plate Full ... 4:17) Vital Signs High Blood Pressure Spanish Diseases & Conditions Hablemos de la Influenza Influenza Influenza (:30) ...

  3. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is not supported by your browser. For this reason, some items on this page will be unavailable. ... CDC Laboratory Science: Mission Critical Saving Lives, Protecting People Environmental Health CDC Tracking Network Health Begins at ...

  4. Living with Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the lives of people with communication disorders. "Human communication research now has more possibilities for productive exploration than at any other time in history," says James F. Battey, Jr., M.D., Ph. ...

  5. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Balance Healthy Corner Stores Healthy Snacking in Philadelphia, PA Hidden Sodium Salt Matters Salt Matters: Preserving Choice, ... High Making Health Easier: Active Living in Philadelphia, PA Preconception Me? Have a baby? Preconception Health Me? ...

  6. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Quiet Killer Healthy Living Healthy Eating A Grocery Store’s Healthy Options A Plate Full of Color Finding a Balance Healthy Corner Stores Healthy Snacking in Philadelphia, PA Hidden Sodium Salt ...

  7. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

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    Full Text Available ... 101 Emergency Operations Center CDC Laboratory Science: Mission Critical Saving Lives, Protecting People Environmental Health CDC Tracking ... Cultures Are Our Source of Health (:30) Systems Thinking The Value of Systems Thinking (10:09) Systems ...

  8. Living with COPD: Nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Diseases > Lung Disease Lookup > COPD > Living With COPD Nutrition and COPD Most people are surprised to learn ... asking your doctor or visiting the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics at EatRight.org . Be sure to ...

  9. Living With Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Managing Diabetes You can manage your diabetes and live a ... you have diabetes. How can I manage my diabetes? With the help of your health care team, ...

  10. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Health (4:17) Vital Signs High Blood Pressure Spanish Diseases & Conditions Hablemos de la Influenza Influenza Influenza (: ... 2010 Source: Healthcare-associated Infections (HAI) Other versions: Spanish (5:10) Healthy Living Featured Videos Fight Germs. ...

  11. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... public health professionals. More > Hand Hygiene Saves Lives (5:10) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hand ... High resolution [22.9 MB] Open Captioned [14.5 MB] Request a higher resolution file Copy the ...

  12. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Center (EOC) 101 Emergency Operations Center CDC Laboratory Science: Mission Critical Saving Lives, Protecting People Environmental Health ... Break the Silence: Stop the Violence Injury Prevention Research In the Swim of Things Safe Teen Drivers ...

  13. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

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    Full Text Available ... Critical Saving Lives, Protecting People Environmental Health CDC Tracking Network Health Begins at Home Smoke-free Multiunit ... The Story of Folic Acid Fortification Through the Eyes of the Eagle Wes Studi: Don’t Get ...

  14. Living with Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Epidemic Larger than Estimated, American Lung Association Continues Tradition of Funding Research to Investigate TB, Save Lives ... Member Center | RSS | Terms Of Use | Privacy Our Family Of Sites nonprofit software Join the fight for ...

  15. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Obesity Epidemic Outbreaks CDC: Protecting Americans through Global Health Ebola and Contact Tracing Global Disease Detectives in ... Science: Mission Critical Saving Lives, Protecting People Environmental Health CDC Tracking Network Health Begins at Home Smoke- ...

  16. Living with Stepparents

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sometimes spouses die and husbands or wives are forced to start over. Despite all the pain of ... on this topic for: Kids Kids Talk About: Marriage and Divorce (Video) Living With a Single Parent ...

  17. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hospital while being treated for something else. The best way to help prevent infection is to practice proper hand hygiene. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives shows how patients can play an active role in reminding healthcare ...

  18. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Please Parents Want To Do What′s Best The Obesity Epidemic Outbreaks CDC: Protecting Americans through Global Health ... best way to help prevent infection is to practice proper hand hygiene. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives shows ...

  19. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Other versions: Spanish (5:10) Healthy Living Featured Videos Fight Germs. Wash Your Hands! Making Health Easier: ... Us Feedback What do you think of our videos? Your feedback about CDC-TV and our videos ...

  20. Living Lab ammattikorkeakoulussa

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Käyttäjälähtöinen Living Lab –toiminta muodostaa avoimen innovaatioympäristön ja pyrkii luomaan vuorovaikutusta tuotteiden ja palveluiden kehittäjien ja käyttäjien välille. Living Lab –toiminta soveltuu erittäin hyvin ammattikorkeakoulujen työelämälähtöiseen ja käytännönläheiseen tutkimus-, kehitys- ja innovaatiotoimintaan. Oman lisänsä Living Lab –tyyppiseen TKI-toimintaan tuokin juuri käyttäjälähtöisyys – Living Lab –toiminnassa korkeakouluvetoiseen kehittämistyöhön osallistuvat tuotteiden ...

  1. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Summary for General Public in Puerto Rico (2:22) Zika Virus Prevention for Puerto Rico (:30) Vaccination ... Lives Transcript [28 KB, 2 pages] High resolution [22.9 MB] Open Captioned [14.5 MB] Request ...

  2. Evaluating Living Standard Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Birčiaková Naďa; Stávková Jana; Antošová Veronika

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with the evaluation of selected available indicators of living standards, divided into three groups, namely economic, environmental, and social. We have selected six countries of the European Union for analysis: Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Luxembourg, France, and Great Britain. The aim of this paper is to evaluate indicators measuring living standards and suggest the most important factors which should be included in the final measurement. We have tried to determin...

  3. Effects of Bacillus subtilis natto and Different Components in Culture on Rumen Fermentation and Rumen Functional Bacteria In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Peng; Li, Jinan; Bu, Dengpan; Nan, Xuemei; Du, Hong

    2016-05-01

    This study was to investigate the effects of live or autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto, their fermented products and media on rumen fermentation and rumen functional bacteria in vitro. Rumen fluid from three multiparous lactating Holstein cows was combined and transferred into serum bottles after diluted. Fifteen serum bottles were divided into five treatments, which were designed as following: CTR (the fermentation of 0.5 g TMR and ruminal fluids from dairy cows), LBS (CTR plus a minimum of 10(11) cfu live Bacillus subtilis natto), ABS (CTR plus a minimum of 10(11) cfu autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto), BSC (CTR plus 1 ml Bacillus subtilis natto fermentation products without bacteria), and BSM (CTR plus 1 ml liquid fermentation medium). When separated from the culture, live Bacillus subtilis natto individually increased the concentrations of ammonia-N (P Bacillus subtilis natto has the similar function with the live bacteria except for the ratio of acetate and propionate. Except B. fibrisolvens, live or autoclaved Bacillus subtilis natto did not influence or decreased the 16S rRNA gene quantification of the detected bacteria. BSC and BSM altered the relative expression of certain functional bacteria in the rumen. These results indicated that it was Bacillus subtilis natto thalli that played the important role in promoting rumen fermentation when applied as a probiotic in dairy ration.

  4. Viruses, bacteria and suspended particles in a backwater and main channel site of the Danube (Austria)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peduzzi, Peter; Luef, Birgit

    2010-01-01

    A short overview of currently available studies on the ecology of viruses in running waters is provided. Additionally, a survey was conducted on the dynamics of both viruses and bacteria in an isolated floodplain segment of the Danube River and in the main channel near Vienna (Austria) during the hydrologically most dynamic phase (spring – summer). The study evaluates the differences between the main channel and the floodplain segment for suspended particle abundance and quality in relation to bacterial and viral parameters; both free-living forms and those attached to particles are examined. The hydrological disconnection of these two contrasting sampling sites influenced particle abundance and quality as well as the distribution of free-living vs. attached bacteria and viruses. The per-cell activity of bacteria attached to particles was significantly higher than that of the free-living fraction, particularly in the isolated water body. The abundance of bacteria and viruses on particles depended on particle quality (size). In the main channel, bacteria were significantly more abundant on surfaces (per mm2) of suspended matter > 5 μm (aggregates with organic constituents) compared to particles 5μm and attached viruses; free-living viruses were less abundant at high > 5μm particle loads. Only in the isolated floodplain section was viral abundance positively influenced by elevated per-cell productivity of potential host bacteria. The results demonstrate that system variability on a relatively small topographical scale (within a river-floodplain system) has consequences for microbial life, including viruses. PMID:21151810

  5. Aerobic cloacal and pharyngeal bacterial flora in six species of free-living birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenkat, J; Krautwald-Junghanns, M-E; Schmitz Ornés, A; Eilers, A; Schmidt, V

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the culturable aerobic pharyngeal and cloacal bacterial flora of free-living birds, to determine the physiological bacterial microbiota, to identify possible interactions between feeding behaviour and the composition of the pharyngeal and cloacal microflora and to investigate the occurrence of pathogenic bacteria. Cloacal and pharyngeal swabs of 167 free-living birds, including water rails (Rallus aquaticus), spotted crakes (Porzana porzana), mute swans (Cygnus olor), barn swallows (Hirundo rustica), reed warblers (Acrocephalus scirpaceus) and black cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo) from Germany, were cultured to determine the prevalence of aerobic bacteria. Statistical analysis of bacterial findings and feeding behaviour was performed. A widespread soil and water bacteria were isolated, which are expected to be present in the habitat and food. However, some potentially avian- and human-pathogenic bacteria, such as Aeromonas hydrophila, Elizabethkingia meningoseptica, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, were also recovered. Free-living birds of the examined species harbour several environmental bacteria, which could be facultative pathogenic. Prevalence of bacteria in healthy free-living birds of the species included in this survey is influenced by environmental and alimentary factors. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Electrophoretic Concentration and Electrical Lysis of Bacteria in a Microfluidic Device Using a Nanoporous Membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Shehadul Islam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacteria such as Escherichia coli O157, Salmonella and Campylobacter are the main causes for food and waterborne illnesses. Lysis of these bacteria is an important component of the sample preparation for molecular identification of these pathogens. The pathogenicity of these bacteria is so high that they cause illness at very low concentrations (1–10 CFU/100 mL. Hence, there is a need to develop methods to collect a small number of such bacterial cells from a large sample volume and process them in an automated reagent-free manner. An electrical method to concentrate the bacteria and lyse them has been chosen here as it is reagent free and hence more conducive for online and automated sample preparation. We use commercially available nanoporous membranes sandwiched between two microfluidic channels to create thousands of parallel nanopore traps for bacteria, electrophoretically accumulate and then lyse them. The nanopores produce a high local electric field for lysis at moderate applied voltages, which could simplify instrumentation and enables lysis of the bacteria as it approaches them under an appropriate range of electric field (>1000 V/cm. Accumulation and lysis of bacteria on the nanoporous membrane is demonstrated by using the LIVE/DEAD BacLight Bacterial Viability Kit and quantified by fluorescence intensity measurements. The efficiency of the device was determined through bacterial culture of the lysate and was found to be 90% when a potential of 300 V was applied for 3 min.

  7. Medicinal smoke reduces airborne bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Nene, Yeshwant Laxman

    2007-12-03

    This study represents a comprehensive analysis and scientific validation of our ancient knowledge about the effect of ethnopharmacological aspects of natural products' smoke for therapy and health care on airborne bacterial composition and dynamics, using the Biolog microplate panels and Microlog database. We have observed that 1h treatment of medicinal smoke emanated by burning wood and a mixture of odoriferous and medicinal herbs (havan sámagri=material used in oblation to fire all over India), on aerial bacterial population caused over 94% reduction of bacterial counts by 60 min and the ability of the smoke to purify or disinfect the air and to make the environment cleaner was maintained up to 24h in the closed room. Absence of pathogenic bacteria Corynebacterium urealyticum, Curtobacterium flaccumfaciens, Enterobacter aerogenes (Klebsiella mobilis), Kocuria rosea, Pseudomonas syringae pv. persicae, Staphylococcus lentus, and Xanthomonas campestris pv. tardicrescens in the open room even after 30 days is indicative of the bactericidal potential of the medicinal smoke treatment. We have demonstrated that using medicinal smoke it is possible to completely eliminate diverse plant and human pathogenic bacteria of the air within confined space.

  8. The mycorrhiza helper bacteria revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey-Klett, P; Garbaye, J; Tarkka, M

    2007-01-01

    In natural conditions, mycorrhizal fungi are surrounded by complex microbial communities, which modulate the mycorrhizal symbiosis. Here, the focus is on the so-called mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB). This concept is revisited, and the distinction is made between the helper bacteria, which assist mycorrhiza formation, and those that interact positively with the functioning of the symbiosis. After considering some examples of MHB from the literature, the ecological and evolutionary implications of the relationships of MHB with mycorrhizal fungi are discussed. The question of the specificity of the MHB effect is addressed, and an assessment is made of progress in understanding the mechanisms of the MHB effect, which has been made possible through the development of genomics. Finally, clear evidence is presented suggesting that some MHB promote the functioning of the mycorrhizal symbiosis. This is illustrated for three critical functions of practical significance: nutrient mobilization from soil minerals, fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, and protection of plants against root pathogens. The review concludes with discussion of future research priorities regarding the potentially very fruitful concept of MHB.

  9. Being a Living Donor: Risks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to know FAQ Living donation What is living donation? Organs Types Being a living donor First steps Being ... for blood transfusions Medication side effects Abdominal hernia Death Potential long-term organ specific donor complications blank - ...

  10. Cultivation strategies for growth of uncultivated bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartoukian, Sonia R

    2016-11-01

    The majority of environmental bacteria and around a third of oral bacteria remain uncultivated. Furthermore, several bacterial phyla have no cultivable members and are recognised only by detection of their DNA by molecular methods. Possible explanations for the resistance of certain bacteria to cultivation in purity in vitro include: unmet fastidious growth requirements; inhibition by environmental conditions or chemical factors produced by neighbouring bacteria in mixed cultures; or conversely, dependence on interactions with other bacteria in the natural environment, without which they cannot survive in isolation. Auxotrophic bacteria, with small genomes lacking in the necessary genetic material to encode for essential nutrients, frequently rely on close symbiotic relationships with other bacteria for survival, and may therefore be recalcitrant to cultivation in purity. Since in-vitro culture is essential for the comprehensive characterisation of bacteria, particularly with regard to virulence and antimicrobial resistance, the cultivation of uncultivated organisms has been a primary focus of several research laboratories. Many targeted and open-ended strategies have been devised and successfully used. Examples include: the targeted detection of specific bacteria in mixed plate cultures using colony hybridisation; growth in simulated natural environments or in co-culture with 'helper' strains; and modified media preparation techniques or development of customised media eg. supplementation of media with potential growth-stimulatory factors such as siderophores. Despite significant advances in recent years in methodologies for the cultivation of previously uncultivated bacteria, a substantial proportion remain to be cultured and efforts to devise high-throughput strategies should be a high priority.

  11. Magnified Bacteria Powerful Motivator for Hand Hygiene Compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Ashley

    2016-08-01

    Infection prevention specialists at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit have found that showing healthcare workers magnified pictures of bacteria found ontheir hands and in their surrounding units can be a powerful motivator for improved hand hygiene compliance. When tested in four units during a one-month period, the intervention boosted hand hygiene compliance by an average of 24%. Investigators note that to be successful, the intervention must be paired with an effective compliance monitoring program. For the study, investigators visited each unit twice per week, during which they would swab various items as well as employees' hands using and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) meter, a hand-held device that measures living organisms. During each unit visit, infection prevention specialists would show unit personnel pictures from a compilation of 12 magnified images of bacteria that had been lifted from the unit. This was to demonstrate what the bacteria would look like under a microscope. The unsavory pictures produced immediate increases in had hygiene compliance, and prompted healthcare workers to see who could produce the best ATP meter readings on subsequent infection prevention specialist visits.

  12. Living bacterial sacrificial porogens to engineer decellularized porous scaffolds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xu

    Full Text Available Decellularization and cellularization of organs have emerged as disruptive methods in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Porous hydrogel scaffolds have widespread applications in tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and drug discovery as viable tissue mimics. However, the existing hydrogel fabrication techniques suffer from limited control over pore interconnectivity, density and size, which leads to inefficient nutrient and oxygen transport to cells embedded in the scaffolds. Here, we demonstrated an innovative approach to develop a new platform for tissue engineered constructs using live bacteria as sacrificial porogens. E.coli were patterned and cultured in an interconnected three-dimensional (3D hydrogel network. The growing bacteria created interconnected micropores and microchannels. Then, the scafold was decellularized, and bacteria were eliminated from the scaffold through lysing and washing steps. This 3D porous network method combined with bioprinting has the potential to be broadly applicable and compatible with tissue specific applications allowing seeding of stem cells and other cell types.

  13. Psychoanalysis and creative living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jeffrey B

    2003-01-01

    Psychoanalysis is ambivalent about creativity and its own creative potential. On the one hand, psychoanalysis offers enormous resources for elucidating obstacles to creativity, that way of living, making and relating to self and others that is fresh, vital, unpredictable and open to feedback and evolution. On the other hand, when we analysts know too much beforehand about what a work of art really means or the fundamental and singular motives of creativity, then psychoanalysis unconsciously partakes of a perverse scenario in which the work of art serves as merely a means to the author's ends and is psychologically colonized. When psychoanalysis is The Discipline That Knows, then art has nothing new to teach psychoanalysts and our field is impoverished. "Psychoanalysis and Creative Living" attempts to elucidate how psychoanalysis could work through this tension between its creative and perverse possibilities and foster creative living.

  14. Living in the question.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flower, J

    1999-01-01

    We live in a fast moving-world. Business has accelerated to breathtaking speeds in the 1990s--and in the last few years the afterburner has really kicked in. The speed of change is overwhelming. Especially in health care, who has time to "live in the question?" We need to decide things quickly, get the decision out of the way, and move on, right? Maybe. Biology shows us that you can't plan ahead very far. New things come along that you don't even have a category for, and therefore you don't even see them. Things are going to happen that you literally have no notion are even possible. The key to succeeding in this environment? Don't plan ahead. Stay curious. Make small bets. Build organizational hothouses. Feed the seedlings that grow. The challenge is to remain curious, to live in the question, both personally and organizationally.

  15. Characterization of plant growth-promoting bacteria inhabiting Vriesea gigantea Gaud. and Tillandsia aeranthos (Loiseleur) L.B. Smith (Bromeliaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Giongo,Adriana; Beneduzi,Anelise; Gano,Kelsey; Vargas,Luciano Kayser; Utz,Laura; Passaglia,Luciane Maria Pereira

    2013-01-01

    Microorganisms that live inside and around a plant can supply it with essential substances, such as phytohormones and essential nutrients. The present investigation aimed to isolate and characterize the phyllosphere, the endophytic, and the water tank bacteria associated with Vriesea gigantea and Tillandsia aeranthos. The bacteria were tested for siderophore and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production, phosphate solubilization, and presence of the nif H gene. Genetic diversity of the bacterial ...

  16. Research progress in live attenuated Brucella vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Wu, Qingmin

    2013-01-01

    Brucella spp. are facultative intracellular bacteria that cause brucellosis, which is a globally occurring zoonotic disease that is characterized by abortion in domestic animals and undulant fever, arthritis, endocarditis, and meningitis in humans. There are currently no licensed vaccines against brucellosis for human use, and only a few licensed live Brucella vaccines are available for use in animals. However, the available animal vaccines may cause abortion and are associated with lower protection rates in animals and higher virulence in humans. Much research has been performed recently to develop novel Brucella vaccines for the prevention and control of animal brucellosis. This article discusses the approaches and strategies for novel live attenuated vaccine development.

  17. Live and Dead Nodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sune Lehman; Jackson, A. D.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the consequences of a distinction between `live' and `dead' network nodes; `live' nodes are able to acquire new links whereas `dead' nodes are static. We develop an analytically soluble growing network model incorporating this distinction and show that it can provide...... a quantitative description of the empirical network composed of citations and references (in- and out-links) between papers (nodes) in the SPIRES database of scientific papers in high energy physics. We also demonstrate that the death mechanism alone can result in power law degree distributions for the resulting...... network....

  18. Cryopreservation of Living Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasawa, Ichiro; Nagata, Shinichi; Kimura, Naohiro

    Cryopreservation is considered to be the most promising way of preserving living organs or tissues for a long period of time without casuing any damage to their biological functions. However, cryopreservation has been succeeded only for simple and small-size tissues such as spermatozoon, ovum, erythrocyte, bone marrow and cornea. Cryopreservation of more complex and large-scale organs are not yet succssful. The authors have attempted to establish a technique for cryopreservation of larger living organs. An experiment was carried out using daphnia (water flea). The optimum rates of freezing and thawing were determined together with the optimum selection of cryoprotectant. High recovery rate was achieved under these conditions.

  19. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB......). They utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms...... in other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative...

  20. Live and let die

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neves Lundin, Ana Luisa

    that it has for microbiological studies in general. An overview about stress in bacteria and its connection to bacterial heterogeneity is then outlined, followed by practical applications of flow cytometry based methods in the study of stress and heterogeneity in microbial populations. As a final point...... than more traditional data analysis techniques. Analogously, in manuscript 3, a reporter system was developed to investigate physiological heterogeneity by mapping growth and cell membrane robustness towards freeze-thaw stress at different phases of the cell cultivation. A strong inverse correlation...

  1. Transformation of gram positive bacteria by sonoporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yunfeng; Li, Yongchao

    2014-03-11

    The present invention provides a sonoporation-based method that can be universally applied for delivery of compounds into Gram positive bacteria. Gram positive bacteria which can be transformed by sonoporation include, for example, Bacillus, Streptococcus, Acetobacterium, and Clostridium. Compounds which can be delivered into Gram positive bacteria via sonoporation include nucleic acids (DNA or RNA), proteins, lipids, carbohydrates, viruses, small organic and inorganic molecules, and nano-particles.

  2. Synthesis of metal nanoparticles in living plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Marchiol

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, nanotechnologies have evolved from a multidisciplinary research concept to a primary scientific field. Rapid growth of new technologies has led to the development of nanoscale device components, advanced sensors, and novel biomimetic materials. In addition to chemical and physical approaches a new, simple and cheaper strategy to synthesize metal nanoparticles utilizes biological tools such as bacteria, yeasts, fungi, and plants. The majority of research has investigated ex vivo synthesis of nanoparticles in plants, proving that this method is very cost effective, and can therefore be used as an economic and valuable alternative for the large-scale production of metal nanoparticles. Instead, very few studies have been devoted to investigating the potential of living plants. The synthesis of metal nanoparticles using living plants is discussed in this review. So far, metal NPs formation in living plants has been observed for gold, silver, copper and zinc oxide. To date the results achieved demonstrate the feasibility of this process; however several aspects of the plant physiology involved should be clarified in order to be able to gain better control and modulate the formation of these new materials. Plant sciences could significantly contribute to fully exploring the potential of phyto-synthesis of metal nanoparticles.

  3. Cell Size Regulation in Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Ariel

    2014-05-01

    Various bacteria such as the canonical gram negative Escherichia coli or the well-studied gram positive Bacillus subtilis divide symmetrically after they approximately double their volume. Their size at division is not constant, but is typically distributed over a narrow range. Here, we propose an analytically tractable model for cell size control, and calculate the cell size and interdivision time distributions, as well as the correlations between these variables. We suggest ways of extracting the model parameters from experimental data, and show that existing data for E. coli supports partial size control, and a particular explanation: a cell attempts to add a constant volume from the time of initiation of DNA replication to the next initiation event. This hypothesis accounts for the experimentally observed correlations between mother and daughter cells as well as the exponential dependence of size on growth rate.

  4. [Surface layers of methanotrophic bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelenina, V N; Suzina, N E; Trotsenko, Iu A

    2013-01-01

    Structural and functional characteristics of the regular glycoprotein layers in prokaryotes are analyzed with a special emphasis on aerobic methanotrophic bacteria. S-layers are present at the surfaces of Methylococcus, Methylothermus, and Methylomicrobium cells. Different Methylomicrobium species either synthesize S-layers with planar (p2, p4) symmetry or form cup-shaped or conicalstructures with hexagonal (p6) symmetry. A unique, copper-binding polypeptide 'CorA'/MopE (27/45 kDa), which is coexpressed with the diheme periplasmic cytochrome c peroxidase 'CorB'/Mca (80 kDa) was found in Methylomicrobium album BG8, Methylomicrobium alcaliphilum 20Z, and Methylococcus capsulatus Bath. This tandem of the surface proteins is functionally analogous to a new siderophore, methanobactin. Importantly, no 'CorA'/MopE homologue was found in methanotrophs not forming S-layers. The role of surface proteins in copper metabolism and initial methane oxidation is discussed.

  5. Maximum specific growth rate of anammox bacteria revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Narita, Yuko; Gao, Lin; Ali, Muhammad; Oshiki, Mamoru; Okabe, Satoshi

    2017-06-01

    Anammox bacteria have long been considered to be slow-growing bacteria. However, it has recently been reported that they could grow much faster than previously thought when they were cultivated in a membrane bioreactor (MBR) with a step-wise decrease in the solid retention time (SRT). Here, we reevaluated the maximum specific growth rates (μmax) of three phylogenetically distant anammox bacterial species (i.e. "Ca. Brocadia sinica", "Ca. Jettenia caeni" and "Ca. Scalindua sp.") by directly measuring 16S rRNA gene copy numbers using newly developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays. When free-living planktonic "Ca. B. sinica" and "Ca. J. caeni" cells were immobilized in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and sodium alginate (SA) gel beads and cultivated in an up-flow column reactor with high substrate loading rates at 37 °C, the μmax were determined to be 0.33 ± 0.02 d-1 and 0.18 d-1 (corresponding doubling time of 2.1 day and 3.9 day) from the exponential increases in 16S rRNA genes copy numbers, respectively. These values were faster than the fastest growth rates reported for these species so far. The cultivation of anammox bacteria in gel beads was achieved less than one month without special cultivation method and selection pressure, and the exponential increase in 16S rRNA gene numbers was directly measured by qPCR with high reproducibility; therefore, the resulting μmax values were considered accurate. Taken together, the fast growth is, therefore, considered to be an intrinsic kinetic property of anammox bacteria. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of bacteria and dissolved organics on mineral dissolution kinetics:

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokrovsky, Oleg; Shirokova, Liudmila; Benezeth, Pascale; Zabelina, Svetlana

    2010-05-01

    Quantification of the effect of microorganisms and associated organic ligands on mineral dissolution rate is one among the last remaining challenges in modeling of water-rock interactions under earth surface and subsurface environments. This is especially true for deep underground settings within the context of CO2 capture, sequestration and storage. First, elevated CO2 pressures create numerous experimental difficulties for performing robust flow-through experiments at a given saturation state. Second, reactivity of main rock-forming minerals in abiotic systems at pCO2 >> 1 atm and circumneutral pH is still poorly constrained. And third, most of microbial habitats of the subsurface biosphere are not suitable for routine culturing in the laboratory, many of them are anaerobic and even strictly anaerobic, and many bacteria and archae cultures can live only in the consortium of microorganisms which is very hard to maintain at a controlled and stable biomass concentration. For experimental modeling of bio-mineral interactions in the laboratory, two other main conceptual challenges exist. Typical concentration of dissolved organic carbon that serves as a main nutrient for heterotrophic bacteria in underground waters rarely exceeds 3-5 mg/L. Typical concentration of DOC in nutrient media used for bacteria culturing is between 100 and 10,000 mg/L. Therefore, performing mineral-bacteria interactions in the laboratory under environmentally-sound conditions requires significant dilution of the nutrient media or the use of flow-through reactors. Concerning the effect of organic ligands and bacterial excudates on rock-forming mineral dissolution, at the present time, mostly empirical (phenomenological) approach can be used. Indeed, the pioneering studies of Stumm and co-workers have established a firm basis for modeling the catalyzing and inhibiting effects of ligands on metal oxide dissolution rate. This approach, very efficient for studying the interaction of organic and

  7. Quorum sensing in gram-negative bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, H.; Song, Z.J.; Høiby, N.

    2004-01-01

    Bacteria can communicate with each other by means of signal molecules to coordinate the behavior of the entire community, and the mechanism is referred to as quorum sensing (QS). Signal systems enable bacteria to sense the size of their densities by monitoring the concentration of the signal...... molecules. Among Gram-negative bacteria N-acyl-L-homoserine lactone (acyl-HSL)-dependent quorum sensing systems are particularly widespread. These systems are used to coordinate expression of phenotypes that are fundamental to the interaction of bacteria with each other and with their environment...

  8. Bioenergetics of photoheterotrophic bacteria in the oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchman, David L; Hanson, Thomas E

    2013-04-01

    Photoheterotrophic microbes, such as proteorhodopsin (PR)-based phototrophic (PRP) and aerobic anoxygenic phototrophic (AAP) bacteria, are well known to be abundant in the oceans, potentially playing unique roles in biogeochemical cycles. However, the contribution of phototrophy to the energy requirements of these bacteria has not been quantitatively examined to date. To better understand the implications of photoheterophy in the oceans, we calculated energy benefits and costs of phototrophy and compared net benefits with maintenance costs. Benefits depend on the number of photosynthetic units (PSUs), absorption cross-section area of each PSU as function of wavelength, the in situ light quality, and the energy yield per absorbed photon. For costs we considered the energy required for the synthesis of pigments, amino acids and proteins in each PSU. Our calculations indicate that AAP bacteria harvest more light energy than do PRP bacteria, but the costs of phototrophy are much higher for AAP bacteria. Still, the net energy gained by AAP bacteria is often sufficient to meet maintenance costs, while that is not the case for PRP bacteria except with high light intensities and large numbers of proteorhodopsin molecules per cell. The low costs and simplicity of PR-based phototrophy explain the high abundance of proteorhodopsin genes in the oceans. However, even for AAP bacteria, the net energy yield of phototrophy is apparently too low to influence the distribution of photoheterotrophic bacteria among various marine systems. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Organ distribution of gut-derived bacteria caused by bowel manipulation or ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redan, J.A.; Rush, B.F. Jr.; Lysz, T.W.; Smith, S.; Machiedo, G.W. (Univ. of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Translocation of carbon-14-labeled Escherichia coli from the gut was studied at the specified times in the following groups of rats: Group 1, 5 hours after ligation of the superior mesenteric artery; Group 2, 5 hours after laparotomy and exposure of the superior mesenteric artery with gentle removal and replacement of the intestines; and Group 3, 5 hours after handling but no surgical manipulation. Both living and dead bacteria were administered by means of gavage, and the effect of viability, intestinal ischemia without reperfusion, and bowel manipulation on the translocation of enteric bacteria was assessed. We demonstrated that (1) even gentle bowel manipulation causes bacteremia as great as that associated with ligation of the superior mesenteric artery; (2) dead E. coli are absorbed into the blood in the presence of bowel manipulation or ischemia but less effectively than are live E. coli; (3) live bacteria are found in highest concentration in the lung and in descending order in the liver, kidney, heart, and spleen; (4) dead bacteria absorbed from the gut are found in highest concentration in the kidney and the liver. Lesser amounts are found in the lung, spleen, and heart.

  10. Learning from Live Theater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Jay P.; Hitt, Collin; Kraybill, Anne; Bogulski, Cari A.

    2015-01-01

    Culturally enriching field trips matter. They produce significant benefits for students on a variety of educational outcomes that schools and communities care about. This experiment on the effects of field trips to see live theater demonstrates that seeing plays is an effective way to teach academic content; increases student tolerance by…

  11. Living with Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stressed by the hepatitis virus. Omit or severely limit alcohol use. Alcohol should not be taken with other ... Live-R Die © educational DVD addresses binge drinking, drug abuse and other liver ... to college age students with information specific to the functions of ...

  12. Live-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Richard

    2014-01-01

    It would be hard to argue that live-cell imaging has not changed our view of biology. The past 10 years have seen an explosion of interest in imaging cellular processes, down to the molecular level. There are now many advanced techniques being applied to live cell imaging. However, cellular health is often under appreciated. For many researchers, if the cell at the end of the experiment has not gone into apoptosis or is blebbed beyond recognition, than all is well. This is simply incorrect. There are many factors that need to be considered when performing live-cell imaging in order to maintain cellular health such as: imaging modality, media, temperature, humidity, PH, osmolality, and photon dose. The wavelength of illuminating light, and the total photon dose that the cells are exposed to, comprise two of the most important and controllable parameters of live-cell imaging. The lowest photon dose that achieves a measureable metric for the experimental question should be used, not the dose that produces cover photo quality images. This is paramount to ensure that the cellular processes being investigated are in their in vitro state and not shifted to an alternate pathway due to environmental stress. The timing of the mitosis is an ideal canary in the gold mine, in that any stress induced from the imaging will result in the increased length of mitosis, thus providing a control model for the current imagining conditions.

  13. Design for Living

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum, Todd

    2011-01-01

    Bringing a newborn home from the hospital can come with stress for any parent. Coming home with twins can be double the stress. This article shares the story of a couple faced with this situation 12 years ago with the birth of twins, one was born with complications. They lived in a Colonial until the twins were almost five years old, at which time…

  14. Living with others

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabiliute, Emilija

    . Drawing on Levinas’ philosophy, which holds that subjects are relational and vulnerable to each other, and on the anthropology of relatedness and kinship, the study shows how ‘living with others’ entails both dependencies and care.In this light, health-seeking practices among the urban poor areorganizedby...

  15. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... than a million infections in the hospital while being treated for something else. The best way to help prevent infection is to practice proper hand hygiene. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives shows how patients can play an active role ...

  16. Readiness for Living Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peronard, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    This paper is a comparative analysis between workers in healthcare with high and low degree of readiness for living technology such as robotics. To explore the differences among workers’ readiness for robotics in healthcare, statistical analysis was conducted in the data set obtained from 200...

  17. The Living Periodic Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahlik, Mary Schrodt

    2005-01-01

    To help make the abstract world of chemistry more concrete eighth-grade students, the author has them create a living periodic table that can be displayed in the classroom or hallway. This display includes information about the elements arranged in the traditional periodic table format, but also includes visual real-world representations of the…

  18. Loneliness and Living Arrangements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stancliffe, Roger J.; Lakin, K. Charlie; Doljanac, Robert; Byun, Soo-Yong; Taub, Sarah; Chiri, Giuseppina

    2007-01-01

    Adults with ID/DD live in increasingly small community settings, where the risk of loneliness may be greater. We examined self-reported loneliness among 1,002 individuals with ID/DD from 5 states in relation to community residence size, personal characteristics, social contact, and social climate. One third reported being lonely sometimes and one…

  19. New Lives of Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The work and lives of teachers have always been subject to external influence as those who are nearing the end of their careers will attest, but it is arguable that what is new over the last two decades is the pace, complexity, and intensity of change as governments have responded to the shrinking world of economic competitiveness and social…

  20. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... De Las Manos Salva Vidas Mi Salud, Mi Decisión, Mi Futuro Salud Pregestacional ¿Yo? ¿Tener un Bebé? ¿ ... Living Featured Videos Fight Germs. Wash Your Hands! Making Health Easier: Healthy Snacking in Philadelphia, PA Making ...

  1. Living Systems Energy Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-26

    The Living Systems Energy Module, renamed Voyage from the Sun, is a twenty-lesson curriculum designed to introduce students to the major ways in which energy is important in living systems. Voyage from the Sun tells the story of energy, describing its solar origins, how it is incorporated into living terrestrial systems through photosynthesis, how it flows from plants to herbivorous animals, and from herbivores to carnivores. A significant part of the unit is devoted to examining how humans use energy, and how human impact on natural habitats affects ecosystems. As students proceed through the unit, they read chapters of Voyage from the Sun, a comic book that describes the flow of energy in story form (Appendix A). During the course of the unit, an ``Energy Pyramid`` is erected in the classroom. This three-dimensional structure serves as a classroom exhibit, reminding students daily of the importance of energy and of the fragile nature of our living planet. Interactive activities teach students about adaptations that allow plants and animals to acquire, to use and to conserve energy. A complete list of curricular materials and copies of all activity sheets appear in Appendix B.

  2. Framing the Oscars live

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haastrup, Helle Kannik

    2016-01-01

    How is the global media event of the Oscars localised through the talk show on Danish television? How are both the mediated film star and the special brand of Hollywood celebrity culture addressed by the cultural intermediaries in the Danish framing? These are the questions I propose to answer th...... through a brief analysis of the Academy Awards live broadcast on Danish television....

  3. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Activity Knees Lifted High Making Health Easier: Active Living in Philadelphia, PA Preconception Me? Have a baby? Preconception Health Me? Have another baby? Preconception Health My health, my choice, my future Preconception Health (Full) Injury, Violence & Safety A Time ...

  4. Living with HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... Syndicated Content Website Feedback HIV/AIDS Living With HIV Language: English (US) Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook ...

  5. Gun control saves lives

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    homicides[3-5] and that it coincided with the introduction of stricter gun control legislation. One study estimated that more than 4 500 lives were saved across five SA cities from 2001 to 2005.[5] Pro-gun interest groups seeking to promote gun ownership and diffusion have attacked these findings, suggesting that stricter gun ...

  6. Hand Hygiene Saves Lives

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Please Parents Want To Do What′s Best The Obesity Epidemic Outbreaks CDC: Protecting Americans through Global Health ... Multiunit Housing The Quiet Killer Healthy Living Healthy Eating A Grocery Store’s Healthy Options A Plate Full ...

  7. Phage and bacteria support mutual diversity in a narrowing staircase of coexistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Härter, Jan Olaf Mirko; Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The competitive exclusion principle states that phage diversity M should not exceed bacterial diversity N. By analyzing the steady-state solutions of multistrain equations, we find a new constraint: the diversity N of bacteria living on the same resources is constrained to be M or M+1 in terms of...... arms race will typically favor high growth rate, but a phage that infects two bacterial strains differently can occasionally eliminate the fastest growing bacteria. This context-dependent fitness allows abrupt resetting of the 'Red-Queen's race' and constrains the local diversity....

  8. Clearance of bacteria and differential involvement of mussel hyalinocytes, small and large granulocytes in antibacterial immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jouvet, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    and more than 48 h for Vibrio anguillarum. The total hemocyte count (THC) was dramatically lowered by the bacterial injections, as quantified by flow cytometry. V. splendidus induced the strongest decreases with -66% 9h post-injection of living bacteria and -56% 3h post-injection of heat-killed bacteria....... Flow cytometry was used to identify three main sub-populations of hemocytes, namely hyalinocytes, small granulocytes and large granulocytes. When THC was minimal, i.e. within the first 9h post-injection, proportions of the three cell categories varied dramatically, suggesting differential involvement...

  9. Coliform bacteria, fabrics, and the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colclasure, Victoria J; Soderquist, Thomas J; Lynch, Thomas; Schubert, Nina; McCormick, Deirdre S; Urrutia, Erika; Knickerbocker, Corey; McCord, Devon; Kavouras, Jerry H

    2015-02-01

    People come into contact with coliform bacteria at recreational sites. Previous research on bacteria adhering to fabrics and surfaces focused on the viability of clinically significant microbes, but did not examine the quantity of bacteria. This study examined the viability and quantity of coliform bacteria adhered to common fabrics. The fabrics of 100% cotton, blended cotton, and silk were exposed to a mixture of environmental coliform isolates. Fabrics were incubated in the dark at 25°C or 37°C or in direct sunlight at room temperature for 30, 60, 90, and 120 days. The quantity and viability of the bacteria were determined by the Most Probable Number technique using Colilert reagent (IDEXX Laboratories, Westbrook, ME) and eosin methylene blue agar, respectively. The highest numbers of bacteria were detected for each type of fabric when stored in the dark at 25°C, whereas the lowest numbers of bacteria were detected when fabrics were stored in the dark at 37°C. Low numbers of bacteria were detected on silk and blended cotton exposed to sunlight at room temperature, but not 100% cotton. It appears that coliform bacteria can survive on fabrics longer than previous studies have reported. Coliform bacteria survive better in the dark, at lower temperatures, and on fabrics that can retain moisture. These findings can be applied directly to the viability of bacteria on clothing and potential human exposure to fecal pathogens. Copyright © 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Identification of Quorum Quenching Bacteria and Its Biocontrol Potential Against Soft Rot Disease Bacteria, Dickeya Dadantii

    OpenAIRE

    Khoiri, Syaiful; DAMAYANTI, TRI ASMIRA; Giyanto, Giyanto

    2017-01-01

    Dickeya dadantii is one of newly found bacteria causing soft rot on orchids in Indonesia. Infected plants showed severe rot rapidly only in few days. An effort to control the bacteria was conducted by utilizing selected quorum quenching (QQ) inducer bacteria which produce AHL-lactonase by aiiA gene. The aims of this research were to screen and identify of quorum quenching bacteria, and also assayed their biocontrol potential ability against D. dadantii in laboratory. The screening of QQ bacte...

  11. Effect of the environment on horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchsman, Clara A; Collins, Roy Eric; Rocap, Gabrielle; Brazelton, William J

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer, the transfer and incorporation of genetic material between different species of organisms, has an important but poorly quantified role in the adaptation of microbes to their environment. Previous work has shown that genome size and the number of horizontally transferred genes are strongly correlated. Here we consider how genome size confuses the quantification of horizontal gene transfer because the number of genes an organism accumulates over time depends on its evolutionary history and ecological context (e.g., the nutrient regime for which it is adapted). We investigated horizontal gene transfer between archaea and bacteria by first counting reciprocal BLAST hits among 448 bacterial and 57 archaeal genomes to find shared genes. Then we used the DarkHorse algorithm, a probability-based, lineage-weighted method (Podell & Gaasterland, 2007), to identify potential horizontally transferred genes among these shared genes. By removing the effect of genome size in the bacteria, we have identified bacteria with unusually large numbers of shared genes with archaea for their genome size. Interestingly, archaea and bacteria that live in anaerobic and/or high temperature conditions are more likely to share unusually large numbers of genes. However, high salt was not found to significantly affect the numbers of shared genes. Numbers of shared (genome size-corrected, reciprocal BLAST hits) and transferred genes (identified by DarkHorse) were strongly correlated. Thus archaea and bacteria that live in anaerobic and/or high temperature conditions are more likely to share horizontally transferred genes. These horizontally transferred genes are over-represented by genes involved in energy conversion as well as the transport and metabolism of inorganic ions and amino acids. Anaerobic and thermophilic bacteria share unusually large numbers of genes with archaea. This is mainly due to horizontal gene transfer of genes from the archaea to the bacteria. In

  12. Sponge-associated bacteria: general overview and special aspects of bacteria associated with Halichondria panicea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, J F; Stöhr, R

    2003-01-01

    Increasing evidence is accumulating that highlights the important role of bacteria in bacteria-sponge associations. It appears to be equally important to analyse the specific association of bacteria with sponges, to realise the biological function of biologically active substances produced by sponge-associated bacteria, and to consider the relationship between bacteria and sponges in the search for new pharmaceutical products. In this chapter the current knowledge on bacteria-sponge associations is briefly reviewed. Results are summarised that were obtained by three major methodological approaches: (1) classical microscope observations, (2) investigations attempting to characterise sponge-associated bacteria by describing pure culture isolates, and (3) the rapidly growing evidence from genetic analyses of sponge-associated bacteria. Special emphasis is given to the evidence of possible symbiotic interactions between bacteria and sponges and to the synthesis of natural products by bacteria isolated from or associated with marine sponges. Case studies including morphological and genetic studies together with results from pure culture studies have been performed with bacteria from the sponges Rhodopaloeides odorabile, Aplysina cavernicola, and Halichondria panicea. In addition, new results on bacteria associated with Halichondria panicea are also presented.

  13. Nutrient limitation of terrestrial free-living nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynarski, Katherine A; Houlton, Benjamin Z

    2018-02-01

    Nitrogen (N) fixation by free-living bacteria is a primary N input pathway in many ecosystems and sustains global plant productivity. Uncertainty exists over the importance of N, phosphorus (P) and molybdenum (Mo) availability in controlling free-living N fixation rates. Here, we investigate the geographic occurrence and variability of nutrient constraints to free-living N fixation in the terrestrial biosphere. We compiled data from studies measuring free-living N fixation in response to N, P and Mo fertilizers. We used meta-analysis to quantitatively determine the extent to which N, P and Mo stimulate or suppress N fixation, and if environmental variables influence the degree of nutrient limitation of N fixation. Across our compiled dataset, free-living N fixation is suppressed by N fertilization and stimulated by Mo fertilization. Additionally, free-living N fixation is stimulated by P additions in tropical forests. These findings suggest that nutrient limitation is an intrinsic property of the biochemical demands of N fixation, constraining free-living N fixation in the terrestrial biosphere. These findings have implications for understanding the causes and consequences of N limitation in coupled nutrient cycles, as well as modeling and forecasting nutrient controls over carbon-climate feedbacks. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  14. Free-living protozoa in drinking water supplies: community composition and role as hosts for Legionella pneumophila

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valster, R.M.

    2011-01-01

    Free-living protozoa in drinking water supplies: community composition and role as hosts for Legionella pneumophila
    Free-living protozoa, which feed on bacteria, play an important role in the communities of microorganisms and invertebrates in drinking water supplies and in (warm) tap water

  15. Antimicrobial chemicals in hoopoe preen secretions are produced by symbiotic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Vivaldi, Manuel; Peña, Aránzazu; Peralta-Sánchez, Juan Manuel; Sánchez, Lourdes; Ananou, Samir; Ruiz-Rodríguez, Magdalena; Soler, Juan José

    2010-01-01

    Animals frequently use metabolites produced by symbiotic bacteria as agents against pathogens and parasites. Secretions from the preen gland of birds are used for this purpose, although its chemicals apparently are produced by the birds themselves. European hoopoes Upupa epops and green woodhoopoes Phoeniculus purpureus harbour symbiotic bacteria in the uropygial gland that might be partly responsible for the chemical composition of secretions. Here we investigate the antimicrobial activity of the volatile fraction of chemicals in hoopoe preen secretions, and, by means of experimental antibiotic injections, test whether symbiotic bacteria living within the uropygial gland are responsible for their production. Hoopoes produce two different kinds of secretions that differ drastically in their chemical composition. While the malodorous dark secretions produced by nestlings included a complex mix of volatiles, these chemicals did not appear in white secretions produced by non-nesting birds. All volatiles detected showed strong antibacterial activity, and a mixture of the chemicals at the concentrations measured in nestling glands inhibited the growth of all bacterial strains assayed. We found support for the hypothesized role of bacteria in the production of such antimicrobial chemicals because experimental clearance of bacteria from glands of nestlings with antibiotics resulted in secretions without most of the volatiles detected in control individuals. Thus, the presence of symbiotic bacteria in the uropygial gland provides hoopoes with potent antimicrobials for topical use. PMID:19812087

  16. Contribution of midgut bacteria to blood digestion and egg production in aedes aegypti (diptera: culicidae) (L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The insect gut harbors a variety of microorganisms that probably exceed the number of cells in insects themselves. These microorganisms can live and multiply in the insect, contributing to digestion, nutrition, and development of their host. Recent studies have shown that midgut bacteria appear to strengthen the mosquito's immune system and indirectly enhance protection from invading pathogens. Nevertheless, the physiological significance of these bacteria for mosquitoes has not been established to date. In this study, oral administration of antibiotics was employed in order to examine the contribution of gut bacteria to blood digestion and fecundity in Aedes aegypti. Results The antibiotics carbenicillin, tetracycline, spectinomycin, gentamycin and kanamycin, were individually offered to female mosquitoes. Treatment of female mosquitoes with antibiotics affected the lysis of red blood cells (RBCs), retarded the digestion of blood proteins and reduced egg production. In addition, antibiotics did not affect the survival of mosquitoes. Mosquito fertility was restored in the second gonotrophic cycle after suspension of the antibiotic treatment, showing that the negative effects of antibiotics in blood digestion and egg production in the first gonotrophic cycle were reversible. Conclusions The reduction of bacteria affected RBC lysis, subsequently retarded protein digestion, deprived mosquito from essential nutrients and, finally, oocyte maturation was affected, resulting in the production of fewer viable eggs. These results indicate that Ae. aegypti and its midgut bacteria work in synergism to digest a blood meal. Our findings open new possibilities to investigate Ae. aegypti-associated bacteria as targets for mosquito control strategies. PMID:21672186

  17. Plant-bacteria partnership: phytoremediation of hydrocarbons contaminated soil and expression of catabolic genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamna Saleem

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum hydrocarbons are harmful to living organisms when they are exposed in natural environment. Once they come in contact, it is not an easy to remove them because many of their constituents are persistent in nature. To achieve this target, different approaches have been exploited by using plants, bacteria, and plant-bacteria together. Among them, combined use of plants and bacteria has gained tremendous attention as bacteria possess set of catabolic genes which produce catabolic enzymes to decontaminate hydrocarbons. In return, plant ooze out root exudates containing nutrients and necessary metabolites which facilitate the microbial colonization in plant rhizosphere. This results into high gene abundance and gene expression in the rhizosphere and, thus, leads to enhanced degradation. Moreover, high proportions of beneficial bacteria helps plant to gain more biomass due to their plant growth promoting activities and production of phytohromones. This review focuses functioning and mechanisms of catabolic genes responsible for degradation of straight chain and aromatic hydrocarbons with their potential of degradation in bioremediation. With the understanding of expression mechanisms, rate of degradation can be enhanced by adjusting environmental factors and acclimatizing plant associated bacteria in plant rhizosphere.

  18. Separation, Purification and Identification of Bacteria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-05-16

    May 16, 2011 ... 13 strains of bacteria were isolated from 12 shoes that were worn by children aged 6 to 12 for more than half a year. Through morphological observation, physiological and biochemical measurements, as well as 16SrRNA sequence analysis, the bacteria were identified as follows: Bacillus licheniformis, ...

  19. True marine and halophilic anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, J F

    2001-10-01

    Anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria are widely distributed in marine sediments and shallow waters of the coastal zone, where they often form intensely colored mass developments. The phototrophic bacteria have adapted to the whole spectrum of salt concentrations, from freshwater to saturated brines, and it is apparent that individual species have adapted well to particular habitats and mineral salts compositions, both qualitatively and quantitatively. This adaptation is reflected not only in the demand for defined ranges of salt concentrations, but also in the phylogenetic relationships of these bacteria, as established by 16S rDNA sequences. Major phylogenetic branches of purple sulfur bacteria are represented by: (1) marine and extremely halophilic Ectothiorhodospiraceae, (2) truly marine and halophilic Chromatiaceae and (3) freshwater Chromatiaceae, some of which are tolerant to low salt concentrations and are successful competitors in brackish and marine habitats. Quite similarly, salt-dependent green sulfur bacteria form distinct phylogenetic lines. In addition, also among the phototrophic alpha-Proteobacteria (purple nonsulfur bacteria), distinct phylogenetic lines of salt-dependent species are recognized. Available data give rise to the assumption that salt concentrations of natural habitats are an important selective factor that determines the development of a selected range of phototrophic bacteria in an exclusive way. As a consequence, the salt responses of these bacteria are reflected in their phylogenetic relationships.

  20. Comparative Genomics of Green Sulfur Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Davenport, C; Tümmler, B

    2010-01-01

    Eleven completely sequenced Chlorobi genomes were compared in oligonucleotide usage, gene contents, and synteny. The green sulfur bacteria (GSB) are equipped with a core genome that sustains their anoxygenic phototrophic lifestyle by photosynthesis, sulfur oxidation, and CO(2) fixation. Whole...... weight of 10(6), and are probably instrumental for the bacteria to generate their own intimate (micro)environment....

  1. Rock-degrading endophytic bacteria in cacti

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. Esther Puente; Ching Y. Li; Yoav Bashan

    2009-01-01

    A plant-bacterium association of the cardon cactus (Pachycereus pringlei) and endophytic bacteria promotes establishment of seedlings and growth on igneous rocks without soil. These bacteria weather several rock types and minerals, unbind significant amounts of useful minerals for plants from the rocks, fix in vitro N2. produce...

  2. Energy transduction in lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, Bert

    In the discovery of some general principles of energy transduction, lactic acid bacteria have played an important role. In this review, the energy transducing processes of lactic acid bacteria are discussed with the emphasis on the major developments of the past 5 years. This work not only includes

  3. Lactic Acid Bacteria in the Gut

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolaki, M.; Vos, de W.M.; Kleerebezem, M.; Zoetendal, E.G.

    2012-01-01

    From all bacterial groups, the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are probably the group of bacteria that is most associated with human lifestyle. The term LAB mainly refers to the ability of these organisms to convert sugars to lactic acid. The LAB comprise non-sporing, aerotolerant, coccus or rod-shaped,

  4. Resuscitation effects of catalase on airborne bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Marthi, B; Shaffer, B T; Lighthart, B; Ganio, L

    1991-01-01

    Catalase incorporation into enumeration media caused a significant increase (greater than 63%) in the colony-forming abilities of airborne bacteria. Incubation for 30 to 60 min of airborne bacteria in collection fluid containing catalase caused a greater than 95% increase in colony-forming ability. However, catalase did not have any effects on enumeration at high relative humidities (80 to 90%).

  5. Characterization of (per)chlorate-reducing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.

    2004-01-01

    Some bacteria can use (per)chlorateas terminal electron acceptor for growth. These bacteria convert perchlorate via chlorate and chlorite into chloride and molecular oxygen. Oxygen formation in microbial respiration is unique. In this study two chlorate-reducing strains

  6. Rapid methods for detection of bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corfitzen, Charlotte B.; Andersen, B.Ø.; Miller, M.

    2006-01-01

    Traditional methods for detection of bacteria in drinking water e.g. Heterotrophic Plate Counts (HPC) or Most Probable Number (MNP) take 48-72 hours to give the result. New rapid methods for detection of bacteria are needed to protect the consumers against contaminations. Two rapid methods...

  7. Old men living alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristian Frausing; Munk, Karen Pallesgaard

    Background: Even in the Danish welfare state inequality in health proves hard to overcome. According to the literature elderly men living alone seem to be a vulnerable group in several respects: they lead shorter lives; are at increased risk of committing suicide; and some are found to have...... dysfunctional coping patterns in relation to stress, which could indicate difficulties adapting to the challenges of old age. Moreover, as to treatment and prevention men in general do not seem to profit from the offers from the health care system as much as women do. Improving singular elderly men’s health...... and quality of life requires complex action, especially for those in socially marginalized positions whose ways of and attitudes towards life have been thoroughly established, and it raises the interesting question of whether a scarcity of resources leads to a certain notions of health and the good life...

  8. Living in history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Norman R.; Lee, Peter J.; Krslak, Mirna

    2009-01-01

    Foreslår et paradigme - "Living in history" - til undersøgelse af forholdet mellem samtidshistorie og selvbiografisk hukommelse. Metoden spørger ikke direkte og altså ikke til den anknytning, man bevidst ville vælge at fremhæve, men undersøger indirekte, om der spontant associeres til samtidsbegi......Foreslår et paradigme - "Living in history" - til undersøgelse af forholdet mellem samtidshistorie og selvbiografisk hukommelse. Metoden spørger ikke direkte og altså ikke til den anknytning, man bevidst ville vælge at fremhæve, men undersøger indirekte, om der spontant associeres til...

  9. Old men living alone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frausing, Kristian Park

    2014-01-01

    dysfunctional coping patterns in relation to stress, which could indicate difficulties adapting to the challenges of old age. Moreover, as to treatment and prevention men in general do not seem to profit from the offers from the health care system as much as women do. Improving singular elderly men’s health...... that is far from the middle class view of the health care professionals. Methods: The purpose of the study, carried out throughout 2014 and 2015, is to produce knowledge about singular elderly men’s needs, everyday lives and ideas about health, masculinity, and a good aging process. The study is in two phases...... and views on the matters. Results: It is expected that the study will contribute to a nuanced basis of knowledge for the public health care services for elderly men living alone. Also importantly, we wish to focus health care professionals’ attention to the question of realistic and meaningful goals...

  10. Living the (codesign) lab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binder, Thomas; Brandt, Eva; Halse, Joachim

    2011-01-01

    Design research environments are becoming visible in many places, in universities, in design schools, in companies and in public organizations. What most of them have in common is a commitment to the exploration of the possible rather than the factual. In this paper we will discuss what define su...... that the laboratories of design research must have a consistent portfolio yet design researchers still have to mobilize and join forces with the many “living labs” of the everyday....

  11. Hyphae colonizing bacteria associated with Penicillium bilaii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghodsalavi, Behnoushsadat

    shown that mycorrhizal helper bacteria presenting in mycorrhizal fungi could stimulate fungal growth, promote establishment of root-fungus symbiosis and enhance plant production. But it is unknown if the comparable relationship exist between the non-mycorrhizal fungus P. bilaii and its hyphae associated...... bacteria. In the current PhD thesis, we assumed that hyphae-associated microbiome of P. bilaii might harbor helper bacteria with ability to improve fungal growth and P solubilization performance. Therefore, we aimed to isolate bacteria associated with the P. bilaii hyphae and identify the fungal growth...... stimulating bacteria with the perspective of promoting efficiency of Jumpstart in soil – plant system. For this purpose, most of the work within the current project was carried out by development of suitable model systems by mimicking the natural soil habitat to reach to the reliable performance in soil...

  12. HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA AND SURFACTANT ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; jacek Wypych, j

    2006-08-15

    Fate of benzene ethylbenzene toluene xylenes (BTEX) compounds through biodegradation was investigated using two different bacteria, Ralstonia picketti (BP-20) and Alcaligenes piechaudii (CZOR L-1B). These bacteria were isolated from extremely polluted petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. PCR and Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) were used to identify the isolates. Biodegradation was measured using each organism individually and in combination. Both bacteria were shown to degrade each of the BTEX compounds. Alcaligenes piechaudii biodegraded BTEXs more efficiently while mixed with BP-20 and individually. Biosurfactant production was observed by culture techniques. In addition 3-hydroxy fatty acids, important in biosurfactant production, was observed by FAME analysis. In the all experiments toluene and m+p- xylenes were better growth substrates for both bacteria than the other BTEX compounds. In addition, the test results indicate that the bacteria could contribute to bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) pollution increase biodegradation through the action by biosurfactants.

  13. Biodiversity of Bacteria Isolated from Different Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatma YAMAN

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the biodiversity of PHB producing bacteria isolated from soils where fruit and vegetable are cultivated (onion, grape, olive, mulberry and plum in Aydın providence. Morphological, cultural, biochemical, and molecular methods were used for bacteria identification. These isolated bacteria were identified by 16S rRNA sequencing and using BLAST. The following bacteria Bacillus thuringiensis (6, Bacillus cereus (8, Bacillus anthrachis (1, Bacillus circulans (1, Bacillus weihenstephanensis (1, Pseudomonas putida (1, Azotobacter chroococcum (1, Brevibacterium frigoritolerans (1, Burkholderia sp. (1, Staphylococcus epidermidis (1, Streptomyces exfoliatus (1, Variovorax paradoxus (1 were found. The Maximum Likelihood method was used to produce a molecular phylogenetic analysis and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. These bacteria can produce polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB which is an organic polymer with commercial potential as a biodegradable thermoplastic. PHB can be used instead of petrol derivated non-degradable plastics. For this reason, PHB producing microorganisms are substantial in industry.

  14. Molecular characterization of the principal symbiotic bacteria of the weevil Sitophilus oryzae: a peculiar G + C content of an endocytobiotic DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddi, A; Charles, H; Khatchadourian, C; Bonnot, G; Nardon, P

    1998-07-01

    The principal intracellular symbiotic bacteria of the cereal weevil Sitophilus oryzae were characterized using the sequence of the 16S rDNA gene (rrs gene) and G + C content analysis. Polymerase chain reaction amplification with universal eubacterial primers of the rrs gene showed a single expected sequence of 1,501 bp. Comparison of this sequence with the available database sequences placed the intracellular bacteria of S. oryzae as members of the Enterobacteriaceae family, closely related to the free-living bacteria, Erwinia herbicola and Escherichia coli, and the endocytobiotic bacteria of the tsetse fly and aphids. Moreover, by high-performance liquid chromatography, we measured the genomic G + C content of the S. oryzae principal endocytobiotes (SOPE) as 54%, while the known genomic G + C content of most intracellular bacteria is about 39.5%. Furthermore, based on the third codon position G + C content and the rrs gene G + C content, we demonstrated that most intracellular bacteria except SOPE are A + T biased irrespective of their phylogenetic position. Finally, using the hsp60 gene sequence, the codon usage of SOPE was compared with that of two phylogenetically closely related bacteria: E. coli, a free-living bacterium, and Buchnera aphidicola, the intracellular symbiotic bacteria of aphids. Taken together, these results show a peculiar and distinctly different DNA composition of SOPE with respect to the other obligate intracellular bacteria, and, combined with biological and biochemical data, they elucidate the evolution of symbiosis in S. oryzae.

  15. Oxidized magnetosomes in magnetotactic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehring, Andreas U., E-mail: agehring@erdw.ethz.ch [Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Charilaou, Michalis, E-mail: michalis.charilaou@erdw.ethz.ch [Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Garcia-Rubio, Ines, E-mail: garciarubio@phys.chem.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-04-15

    Single domain magnetite particles formed in chain assemblies by magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are taken as proxy in inferring environmental and Earth's magnetism. The reliable use of magnetosomes in MTB, or their fossil remains (magnetofossils), requires that they are unaffected by oxidation. Here we present experimental data from saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) and ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FMR) between room temperature and 10 K, which were applied to detect oxidation in intact MTB. The distinction of non-oxidized from oxidized MTB-assemblies is based mainly on two different characteristic physical properties: (i) the intrinsic Verwey transition in pure magnetite, and (ii) blocking of spins of nano-sized products formed during oxidation at the surface or the interior of the magnetosomes. Suppression of the Verwey transition due to oxidation prevents the shift of the anisotropy axes, which in turn conserves the anisotropic properties at room temperature down to low temperature. The presented methodology assures a distinction between non- and oxidized magnetite assemblies, with pronounced certainty, unlike standard dc methods.

  16. Comparative cytotoxicity of periodontal bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, R.H.; Hammond, B.F.

    1988-11-01

    The direct cytotoxicity of sonic extracts (SE) from nine periodontal bacteria for human gingival fibroblasts (HGF) was compared. Equivalent dosages (in terms of protein concentration) of SE were used to challenge HGF cultures. The cytotoxic potential of each SE was assessed by its ability to (1) inhibit HGF proliferation, as measured by direct cell counts; (2) inhibit 3H-thymidine incorporation in HGF cultures; or (3) cause morphological alterations of the cells in challenged cultures. The highest concentration (500 micrograms SE protein/ml) of any of the SEs used to challenge the cells was found to be markedly inhibitory to the HGFs by all three of the criteria of cytotoxicity. At the lowest dosage tested (50 micrograms SE protein/ml); only SE from Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Bacteroides gingivalis, and Fusobacterium nucleatum caused a significant effect (greater than 90% inhibition or overt morphological abnormalities) in the HGFs as determined by any of the criteria employed. SE from Capnocytophaga sputigena, Eikenella corrodens, or Wolinella recta also inhibited cell proliferation and thymidine incorporation at this dosage; however, the degree of inhibition (5-50%) was consistently, clearly less than that of the first group of three organisms named above. The SE of the three other organisms tested (Actinomyces odontolyticus, Bacteroides intermedius, and Streptococcus sanguis) had little or no effect (0-10% inhibition) at this concentration. The data suggest that the outcome of the interaction between bacterial components and normal resident cells of the periodontium is, at least in part, a function of the bacterial species.

  17. Adaptations of indigenous bacteria to fuel contamination in karst aquifers in south-central Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byl, Thomas D.; Metge, David W.; Agymang, Daniel T.; Bradley, Michael W.; Hileman, Gregg; Harvey, Ronald W.

    2014-01-01

    The karst aquifer systems in southern Kentucky can be dynamic and quick to change. Microorganisms that live in these unpredictable aquifers are constantly faced with environmental changes. Their survival depends upon adaptations to changes in water chemistry, taking advantage of positive stimuli and avoiding negative environmental conditions. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study in 2001 to determine the capability of bacteria to adapt in two distinct regions of water quality in a karst aquifer, an area of clean, oxygenated groundwater and an area where the groundwater was oxygen depleted and contaminated by jet fuel. Water samples containing bacteria were collected from one clean well and two jet fuel contaminated wells in a conduit-dominated karst aquifer. Bacterial concentrations, enumerated through direct count, ranged from 500,000 to 2.7 million bacteria per mL in the clean portion of the aquifer, and 200,000 to 3.2 million bacteria per mL in the contaminated portion of the aquifer over a twelve month period. Bacteria from the clean well ranged in size from 0.2 to 2.5 mm, whereas bacteria from one fuel-contaminated well were generally larger, ranging in size from 0.2 to 3.9 mm. Also, bacteria collected from the clean well had a higher density and, consequently, were more inclined to sink than bacteria collected from contaminated wells. Bacteria collected from the clean portion of the karst aquifer were predominantly (,95%) Gram-negative and more likely to have flagella present than bacteria collected from the contaminated wells, which included a substantial fraction (,30%) of Gram-positive varieties. The ability of the bacteria from the clean portion of the karst aquifer to biodegrade benzene and toluene was studied under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in laboratory microcosms. The rate of fuel biodegradation in laboratory studies was approximately 50 times faster under aerobic conditions as compared to anaerobic, sulfur-reducing conditions. The

  18. Coupling of heterotrophic bacteria to phytoplankton bloom development at different pCO2 levels: a mesocosm study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Thyrhaug

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available The predicted rise in anthropogenic CO2 emissions will increase CO2 concentrations and decrease seawater pH in the upper ocean. Recent studies have revealed effects of pCO2 induced changes in seawater chemistry on a variety of marine life forms, in particular calcifying organisms. To test whether the predicted increase in pCO2 will directly or indirectly (via changes in phytoplankton dynamics affect abundance, activities, and community composition of heterotrophic bacteria during phytoplankton bloom development, we have aerated mesocosms with CO2 to obtain triplicates with three different partial pressures of CO2 (pCO2: 350 μatm (1×CO2, 700 μatm (2×CO2 and 1050 μatm (3×CO2. The development of a phytoplankton bloom was initiated by the addition of nitrate and phosphate. In accordance to an elevated carbon to nitrogen drawdown at increasing pCO2, bacterial production (BPP of free-living and attached bacteria as well as cell-specific BPP (csBPP of attached bacteria were related to the C:N ratio of suspended matter. These relationships significantly differed among treatments. However, bacterial abundance and activities were not statistically different among treatments. Solely community structure of free-living bacteria changed with pCO2 whereas that of attached bacteria seemed to be independent of pCO2 but tightly coupled to phytoplankton bloom development. Our findings imply that changes in pCO2, although reflected by changes in community structure of free-living bacteria, do not directly affect bacterial activity. Furthermore, bacterial activity and dynamics of heterotrophic bacteria, especially of attached bacteria, were tightly correlated to phytoplankton development and, hence, may also potentially depend on changes in pCO2.

  19. Endophytic Bacteria from Pinus taeda L. as Biocontrol Agents of Fusarium circinatum Nirenberg & O'Donnell Bacterias Endófitas de Pinus taeda L. como Agentes de control Biológico de Fusarium circinatum Nirenberg & O'Donnell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvina Soria

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium circinatum Nirenberg & O'Donnell, the pitch canker fungus, has been recently reported in Uruguay affecting Pinus taeda L. seedlings. The spread of this pathogen to plantations constitute a risk to forestry production. The aim of this work was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of live bacteria and their thermostable metabolites on F. circinatum growth in vitro. Four Bacillus subtilis strains and one of Burkholderia sp. isolated as P. taeda endophytes were evaluated as biological control agents of F. circinatum. Dual cultures between live bacteria and pathogen were performed. Furthermore, bacteria metabolites obtained from liquid cultures were sterilized and added to the culture media where fungus was grown. In this study all bacteria showed an antagonist effect on the pathogen growth arresting the mycelia at one cm of the edge of the bacteria colony. Bacteria thermostable metabolites reduced over 50% fungal growth. These results demonstrates that endophytic bacteria, well adapted to live in host tissues, constitute a good alternative to control F. circinatum affecting Pinus seedlings.La presencia de Fusarium circinatum Niremberg & O'Donnell, agente causal del cancro resinoso en pino, ha sido detectada recientemente en plántulas de Pinus taeda L. en Uruguay. La propagación de este patógeno en las plantaciones constituye un riesgo para la producción forestal. El objetivo de este trabajo fue determinar la capacidad inhibitoria de bacterias vivas y de sus metabolitos termoestables sobre el crecimiento de F. circinatum in vitro. Cuatro cepas de Bacillus subtilis y una de Burkholderia sp. aisladas como endófitas de P. taeda, fueron evaluadas como potenciales agentes de control biológico sobre F. circinatum. Para ello, se realizaron enfrentamientos directos entre las bacterias vivas y el micelio del patógeno. Por otra parte, los metabolitos bacterianos obtenidos de cultivos líquidos fueron esterilizados en autoclave y se incorporaron al

  20. Transmission of Airborne Bacteria across Built Environments and Its Measurement Standards: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Fujiyoshi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Human health is influenced by various factors including microorganisms present in built environments where people spend most of their lives (approximately 90%. It is therefore necessary to monitor and control indoor airborne microbes for occupational safety and public health. Most studies concerning airborne microorganisms have focused on fungi, with scant data available concerning bacteria. The present review considers papers published from 2010 to 2017 approximately and factors affecting properties of indoor airborne bacteria (communities and concentration with respect to temporal perspective and to multiscale interaction viewpoint. From a temporal perspective, bacterial concentrations in built environments change depending on numbers of human occupancy, while properties of bacterial communities tend to remain stable. Similarly, the bacteria found in social and community spaces such as offices, classrooms and hospitals are mainly associated with human occupancy. Other major sources of indoor airborne bacteria are (i outdoor environments, and (ii the building materials themselves. Indoor bacterial communities and concentrations are varied with varying interferences by outdoor environment. Airborne bacteria from the outdoor environment enter an indoor space through open doors and windows, while indoor bacteria are simultaneously released to the outer environment. Outdoor bacterial communities and their concentrations are also affected by geographical factors such as types of land use and their spatial distribution. The bacteria found in built environments therefore originate from any of the natural and man-made surroundings around humans. Therefore, to better understand the factors influencing bacterial concentrations and communities in built environments, we should study all the environments that humans contact as a single ecosystem. In this review, we propose the establishment of a standard procedure for assessing properties of indoor airborne

  1. Live from the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnick, W. K.; Haines-Stiles, G.; Warburton, J.; Sunwood, K.

    2003-12-01

    For reasons of geography and geophysics, the poles of our planet, the Arctic and Antarctica, are places where climate change appears first: they are global canaries in the mine shaft. But while Antarctica (its penguins and ozone hole, for example) has been relatively well-documented in recent books, TV programs and journalism, the far North has received somewhat less attention. This project builds on and advances what has been done to date to share the people, places, and stories of the North with all Americans through multiple media, over several years. In a collaborative project between the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) and PASSPORT TO KNOWLEDGE, Live from the Arctic will bring the Arctic environment to the public through a series of primetime broadcasts, live and taped programming, interactive virtual field trips, and webcasts. The five-year project will culminate during the 2007-2008 International Polar Year (IPY). Live from the Arctic will: A. Promote global understanding about the value and world -wide significance of the Arctic, B. Bring cutting-edge research to both non-formal and formal education communities, C. Provide opportunities for collaboration between arctic scientists, arctic communities, and the general public. Content will focus on the following four themes. 1. Pan-Arctic Changes and Impacts on Land (i.e. snow cover; permafrost; glaciers; hydrology; species composition, distribution, and abundance; subsistence harvesting) 2. Pan-Arctic Changes and Impacts in the Sea (i.e. salinity, temperature, currents, nutrients, sea ice, marine ecosystems (including people, marine mammals and fisheries) 3. Pan-Arctic Changes and Impacts in the Atmosphere (i.e. precipitation and evaporation; effects on humans and their communities) 4. Global Perspectives (i.e. effects on humans and communities, impacts to rest of the world) In The Earth is Faster Now, a recent collection of comments by members of indigenous arctic peoples, arctic

  2. Fermentative Bacteria Influence the Competition between Denitrifiers and DNRA Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline M. van den Berg

    2017-09-01

    results of this study clearly show that not only the ratio of available substrates, but also the nature of the electron donor influences the outcome of competition between DNRA and denitrification. Apparently, fermentative bacteria are competitive for the electron donor and thereby alter the ratio of available substrates for nitrate reduction.

  3. Folate Production by Probiotic Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Raimondi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Probiotic bacteria, mostly belonging to the genera Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, confer a number of health benefits to the host, including vitamin production. With the aim to produce folate-enriched fermented products and/or develop probiotic supplements that accomplish folate biosynthesis in vivo within the colon, bifidobacteria and lactobacilli have been extensively studied for their capability to produce this vitamin. On the basis of physiological studies and genome analysis, wild-type lactobacilli cannot synthesize folate, generally require it for growth, and provide a negative contribution to folate levels in fermented dairy products. Lactobacillus plantarum constitutes an exception among lactobacilli, since it is capable of folate production in presence of para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA and deserves to be used in animal trials to validate its ability to produce the vitamin in vivo. On the other hand, several folate-producing strains have been selected within the genus Bifidobacterium, with a great variability in the extent of vitamin released in the medium. Most of them belong to the species B. adolescentis and B. pseudocatenulatum, but few folate producing strains are found in the other species as well. Rats fed a probiotic formulation of folate-producing bifidobacteria exhibited increased plasma folate level, confirming that the vitamin is produced in vivo and absorbed. In a human trial, the same supplement raised folate concentration in feces. The use of folate-producing probiotic strains can be regarded as a new perspective in the specific use of probiotics. They could more efficiently confer protection against inflammation and cancer, both exerting the beneficial effects of probiotics and preventing the folate deficiency that is associated with premalignant changes in the colonic epithelia.

  4. Magnetotactic Bacteria from Extreme Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T. Lefèvre

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB represent a diverse collection of motile prokaryotes that biomineralize intracellular, membrane-bounded, tens-of-nanometer-sized crystals of a magnetic mineral called magnetosomes. Magnetosome minerals consist of either magnetite (Fe3O4 or greigite (Fe3S4 and cause cells to align along the Earth’s geomagnetic field lines as they swim, a trait called magnetotaxis. MTB are known to mainly inhabit the oxic–anoxic interface (OAI in water columns or sediments of aquatic habitats and it is currently thought that magnetosomes function as a means of making chemotaxis more efficient in locating and maintaining an optimal position for growth and survival at the OAI. Known cultured and uncultured MTB are phylogenetically associated with the Alpha-, Gamma- and Deltaproteobacteria classes of the phylum Proteobacteria, the Nitrospirae phylum and the candidate division OP3, part of the Planctomycetes-Verrucomicrobia-Chlamydiae (PVC bacterial superphylum. MTB are generally thought to be ubiquitous in aquatic environments as they are cosmopolitan in distribution and have been found in every continent although for years MTB were thought to be restricted to habitats with pH values near neutral and at ambient temperature. Recently, however, moderate thermophilic and alkaliphilic MTB have been described including: an uncultured, moderately thermophilic magnetotactic bacterium present in hot springs in northern Nevada with a probable upper growth limit of about 63 °C; and several strains of obligately alkaliphilic MTB isolated in pure culture from different aquatic habitats in California, including the hypersaline, extremely alkaline Mono Lake, with an optimal growth pH of >9.0.

  5. On The Living Room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Richards

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This text discusses the work The Living Room, directed by the author, and reflects on its meanings and functions. The article confronts problems performance raises in relation to contemporary social life, bringing forward the isolation of life today and the possibilities performance offers to fight it. We problematise the crisis experienced by the author and the consequent creation of the work as a mobile performative device in relation to the staging space. Finally, the work questions the forms of interaction and type of participation possible in performance.

  6. Microencapsulation Of Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Manchium; Kendall, James M.; Wang, Taylor G.

    1989-01-01

    In experimental technique, living cells and other biological materials encapsulated within submillimeter-diameter liquid-filled spheres. Sphere material biocompatible, tough, and compliant. Semipermeable, permitting relatively small molecules to move into and out of sphere core but preventing passage of large molecules. New technique promises to make such spherical capsules at high rates and in uniform, controllable sizes. Capsules injected into patient through ordinary hypodermic needle. Promising application for technique in treatment of diabetes. Also used to encapsulate pituitary cells and thyroid hormone adrenocortical cells for treatment of other hormonal disorders, to encapsulate other secreting cells for transplantation, and to package variety of pharmaceutical products and agricultural chemicals for controlled release.

  7. Toimiva sairaala Living Lab

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Teknologiset innovaatiot ja niiden tehokas hyödyntäminen voivat auttaa terveydenhuollon organisaatioita lisäämään toiminnan tuottavuutta, palveluiden laatua sekä kuntalaisten hyvinvointia, johon muun muassa väestön ikääntyminen ne haastaa. Merkittävien tulosten saavuttamiseksi koulutuksen, tutkimuksen ja palvelujärjestelmän rakenteiden tulisi kuitenkin integroitua nykyistä vahvemmaksi kehittämistoiminnan ekosysteemiksi. Living Lab -kehittämisympäristöt ovat syntyneet vastaamaan tähän tarpeese...

  8. A reservoir of drug-resistant pathogenic bacteria in asymptomatic hosts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel G Perron

    Full Text Available The population genetics of pathogenic bacteria has been intensively studied in order to understand the spread of disease and the evolution of virulence and drug resistance. However, much less attention has been paid to bacterial carriage populations, which inhabit hosts without producing disease. Since new virulent strains that cause disease can be recruited from the carriage population of bacteria, our understanding of infectious disease is seriously incomplete without knowledge on the population structure of pathogenic bacteria living in an asymptomatic host. We report the first extensive survey of the abundance and diversity of a human pathogen in asymptomatic animal hosts. We have found that asymptomatic swine from livestock productions frequently carry populations of Salmonella enterica with a broad range of drug-resistant strains and genetic diversity greatly exceeding that previously described. This study shows how agricultural practice and human intervention may lead and influence the evolution of a hidden reservoir of pathogens, with important implications for human health.

  9. Coryneform bacteria associated with canine otitis externa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalbæk, Bent; Bemis, David A; Schjærff, Mette; Kania, Stephen A; Frank, Linda A; Guardabassi, Luca

    2010-10-26

    This study aims to investigate the occurrence of coryneform bacteria in canine otitis externa. A combined case series and case-control study was carried out to improve the current knowledge on frequency and clinical significance of coryneform bacteria in samples from canine otitis externa. A total of 16 cases of otitis externa with involvement of coryneform bacteria were recorded at two referral veterinary hospitals in Denmark and the US, respectively. Coryneform bacteria were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Corynebacterium auriscanis was the most common coryneform species (10 cases). Small colony variants of this species were also observed. Other coryneform isolates were identified as Corynebacterium amycolatum (3 cases), Corynebacterium freneyi (2 cases) and an Arcanobacterium-like species (1 case). The coryneform bacteria were in all cases isolated together with other bacteria, mainly Staphylococcus pseudintermedius alone (n=5) or in combination with Malassezia pachydermatis (n=5). Some coryneform isolates displayed resistance to fusidic acid or enrofloxacin, two antimicrobial agents commonly used for the treatment of otitis externa in dogs. The frequency of isolation of coryneform bacteria was 16% among 55 cases of canine otitis externa examined at the Danish hospital during 2007. In contrast, detectable levels of coryneform bacteria were not demonstrated in samples from the acustic meatus of 35 dogs with apparently healthy ears, attending the hospital during the same year. On basis of the current knowledge, these coryneform bacteria should be regarded as potential secondary pathogens able to proliferate in the environment of an inflamed ear canal. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Bacteria classification using Cyranose 320 electronic nose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gardner Julian W

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An electronic nose (e-nose, the Cyrano Sciences' Cyranose 320, comprising an array of thirty-two polymer carbon black composite sensors has been used to identify six species of bacteria responsible for eye infections when present at a range of concentrations in saline solutions. Readings were taken from the headspace of the samples by manually introducing the portable e-nose system into a sterile glass containing a fixed volume of bacteria in suspension. Gathered data were a very complex mixture of different chemical compounds. Method Linear Principal Component Analysis (PCA method was able to classify four classes of bacteria out of six classes though in reality other two classes were not better evident from PCA analysis and we got 74% classification accuracy from PCA. An innovative data clustering approach was investigated for these bacteria data by combining the 3-dimensional scatter plot, Fuzzy C Means (FCM and Self Organizing Map (SOM network. Using these three data clustering algorithms simultaneously better 'classification' of six eye bacteria classes were represented. Then three supervised classifiers, namely Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP, Probabilistic Neural network (PNN and Radial basis function network (RBF, were used to classify the six bacteria classes. Results A [6 × 1] SOM network gave 96% accuracy for bacteria classification which was best accuracy. A comparative evaluation of the classifiers was conducted for this application. The best results suggest that we are able to predict six classes of bacteria with up to 98% accuracy with the application of the RBF network. Conclusion This type of bacteria data analysis and feature extraction is very difficult. But we can conclude that this combined use of three nonlinear methods can solve the feature extraction problem with very complex data and enhance the performance of Cyranose 320.

  11. Coryneform bacteria associated with canine otitis externa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aalbæk, Bent; Bemis, David A.; Schjærff, Mette

    2010-01-01

    of 16 cases of otitis externa with involvement of coryneform bacteria were recorded at two referral veterinary hospitals in Denmark and the US, respectively. Coryneform bacteria were identified by partial 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Corynebacterium auriscanis was the most common coryneform species (10...... cases). Small colony variants of this species were also observed. Other coryneform isolates were identified as Corynebacterium amycolatum (3 cases), Corynebacterium freneyi (2 cases) and an Arcanobacterium-like species (1 case). The coryneform bacteria were in all cases isolated together with other...

  12. Temperature - Live Hauling of Fish

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In certain markets, live fish can be sold for substantially higher prices than fresh dressed fish. A significant live-haul industry has developed in the U.S. and...

  13. KLA - Live Hauling of Fish

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In certain markets, live fish can be sold for substantially higher prices than fresh dressed fish. A significant live-haul industry has developed in the U.S. and...

  14. Living with Lupus (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Living With Lupus KidsHealth > For Parents > Living With Lupus Print A ... disease for both doctors and their patients. About Lupus A healthy immune system produces proteins called antibodies ...

  15. Long-lived coherence in carotenoids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, J A; Cannon, E; Van Dao, L; Hannaford, P [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science, Centre for Atom Optics and Ultrafast Spectroscopy, Swinburne University of Technology, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Quiney, H M; Nugent, K A, E-mail: jdavis@swin.edu.a [ARC Centre of Excellence for Coherent X-ray Science, School of Physics, University of Melbourne, Victoria 3010 (Australia)

    2010-08-15

    We use two-colour vibronic coherence spectroscopy to observe long-lived vibrational coherences in the ground electronic state of carotenoid molecules, with decoherence times in excess of 1 ps. Lycopene and spheroidene were studied isolated in solution, and within the LH2 light-harvesting complex extracted from purple bacteria. The vibrational coherence time is shown to increase significantly for the carotenoid in the complex, providing further support to previous assertions that long-lived electronic coherences in light-harvesting complexes are facilitated by in-phase motion of the chromophores and surrounding proteins. Using this technique, we are also able to follow the evolution of excited state coherences and find that for carotenoids in the light-harvesting complex the (S{sub 2}|S{sub 0}) superposition remains coherent for more than 70 fs. In addition to the implications of this long electronic decoherence time, the extended coherence allows us to observe the evolution of the excited state wavepacket. These experiments reveal an enhancement of the vibronic coupling to the first vibrational level of the C-C stretching mode and/or methyl-rocking mode in the ground electronic state 70 fs after the initial excitation. These observations open the door to future experiments and modelling that may be able to resolve the relaxation dynamics of carotenoids in solution and in natural light-harvesting systems.

  16. Bacteria Culture Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/bacteriaculturetest.html Bacteria Culture Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Bacteria Culture Test? Bacteria are a large group of ...

  17. CERN's live webcasts

    CERN Document Server

    IT Department

    2012-01-01

    You may well have noticed when watching the seminar on 4 July that the CERN webcast site has had a makeover.   The new-look site went live on 26 June and provides a detailed schedule of upcoming webcasts as well as easy access to those of recent events.  It is fully compatible with Smartphones and tablets - which wasn't the case until now – and enables viewers to see both the speaker and the presentation, thanks to two separate video recordings. Another innovation: permanent webcasts. In a single click, you can access and view all the channels run by the ATLAS collaboration, including Public Outreach channel, Technical channel and Public Development channel.   And if you want to add your own event to the schedule and broadcast it live via the web,  just go to this address. You can also restrict access to your webcasts to a pre-defined audience. Behind the scenes, the webcast service has also been busy modernising its infrastructure:...

  18. Exotic Long - Lived Particles

    CERN Document Server

    Jørgensen, Morten Dam

    A search for hadronising long-lived massive particles at the Large Hadron Collider is conducted with the ATLAS detector. No excess events are found. Based on statistical analysis, upper limits on the production cross section are observed to be between $0.01$ pb and $0.006$ pb for colour octet particles (gluinos) with masses ranging from $300 \\ \\mathrm{GeV/c}^2$ to $1400 \\ \\mathrm{GeV/c}^2$, and $0.01$ pb to $0.004$ pb for colour triplet particles (stops and sbottoms) with masses ranging from $200 \\ \\mathrm{GeV/c}^2$ to $900 \\ \\mathrm{GeV/c}^2$. In the context of Supersymmetry with decoupled sfermion and sboson sectors (Split-SUSY), this gives a lower limit on the gluino mass of $989 \\ \\mathrm{GeV/c}^2$, and $683 \\ \\mathrm{GeV/c}^2$ for the stop mass and $618 \\ \\mathrm{GeV/c}^2$ for the sbottom mass. In addition, a new method is presented that improves the speed ($\\beta$) estimation for long-lived particles in the ATLAS tile calorimeter with a factor of $7$ improvement in resolution at low-$\\beta$ and ...

  19. Enrichment of Root Endophytic Bacteria from Populus deltoides and Single-Cell-Genomics Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utturkar, Sagar M; Cude, W Nathan; Robeson, Michael S; Yang, Zamin K; Klingeman, Dawn M; Land, Miriam L; Allman, Steve L; Lu, Tse-Yuan S; Brown, Steven D; Schadt, Christopher W; Podar, Mircea; Doktycz, Mitchel J; Pelletier, Dale A

    2016-09-15

    Bacterial endophytes that colonize Populus trees contribute to nutrient acquisition, prime immunity responses, and directly or indirectly increase both above- and below-ground biomasses. Endophytes are embedded within plant material, so physical separation and isolation are difficult tasks. Application of culture-independent methods, such as metagenome or bacterial transcriptome sequencing, has been limited due to the predominance of DNA from the plant biomass. Here, we describe a modified differential and density gradient centrifugation-based protocol for the separation of endophytic bacteria from Populus roots. This protocol achieved substantial reduction in contaminating plant DNA, allowed enrichment of endophytic bacteria away from the plant material, and enabled single-cell genomics analysis. Four single-cell genomes were selected for whole-genome amplification based on their rarity in the microbiome (potentially uncultured taxa) as well as their inferred abilities to form associations with plants. Bioinformatics analyses, including assembly, contamination removal, and completeness estimation, were performed to obtain single-amplified genomes (SAGs) of organisms from the phyla Armatimonadetes, Verrucomicrobia, and Planctomycetes, which were unrepresented in our previous cultivation efforts. Comparative genomic analysis revealed unique characteristics of each SAG that could facilitate future cultivation efforts for these bacteria. Plant roots harbor a diverse collection of microbes that live within host tissues. To gain a comprehensive understanding of microbial adaptations to this endophytic lifestyle from strains that cannot be cultivated, it is necessary to separate bacterial cells from the predominance of plant tissue. This study provides a valuable approach for the separation and isolation of endophytic bacteria from plant root tissue. Isolated live bacteria provide material for microbiome sequencing, single-cell genomics, and analyses of genomes of

  20. Immunomodulation of monocytes by probiotic and selected lactic Acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Hanne; Drømtorp, Signe Marie; Axelsson, Lars; Grimmer, Stine

    2015-03-01

    Some lactic acid bacteria (LAB), especially bacteria belonging to the genus Lactobacillus, are recognized as common inhabitants of the human gastrointestinal tract and have received considerable attention in the last decades due to their postulated health-promoting effects. LAB and probiotic bacteria can modulate the host immune response. However, much is unknown about the mediators and mechanisms responsible for their immunological effect. Here, we present a study using cytokine secretion from the monocytic cell line THP-1 and NF-κB activation in the monocytic cell line U937-3xkB-LUC to elucidate immune stimulating abilities of LAB in vitro. In this study, we investigate both commercially available and potential probiotic LAB strains, and the role of putative surface proteins of L. reuteri using mutants. L. reuteri strains induced the highest cytokine secretion and the highest NF-κB activation, whereas L. plantarum strains and L. rhamnosus GG were low inducers/activators. One of the putative L. reuteri surface proteins, Hmpref0536_10802, appeared to be of importance for the stimulation of THP-1 cells and the activation of NF-κB in U937-3xkB-LUC cells. Live and UV-inactivated preparations resulted in different responses for two of the strains investigated. Our results add to the complexity in the interaction between LAB and human cells and suggest the possible involvement of secreted pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators of LAB. It is likely that it is the sum of bacterial surface proteins and bacterial metabolites and/or secreted proteins that induce cytokine secretion in THP-1 cells and activate NF-κB in U937-3xkB-LUC cells in this study.

  1. BACTERIA OF NOCАRDIA GENUS AS OBJECT OF BIOTECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. P. Pirog

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The literature and own experimental data, concerning biotechnological potential of bacteria of Nocаrdia genus are given. The use of these microorganisms as destructors of aliphatic (octane, pentadecanol, eicosane, octacosane, hexatriacontane, pristane, aromatic (phenol, octylbenzene, phenanthrene, anthracene, nitroaromatic (4-nitrophenol, heterocyclic (pyridine, ?-picoline hydrocarbons is described. The prospects of use of Nocаrdia in processes of substances bio-transformation (production of daidzein, ibuprofen, nicotinic acid and synthesis of some valuable metabolites, in particular antimicrobial and cytotoxic substances (ayamycin, transvalencin А, nocathiacin, brasilibactin A, nocaracins etc. as well as substances with surface-active and emulsifying properties are discussed. The own experimental data concerning optimization of cultivation conditions and intensification of surfactant synthesis on glycerol (byproduct of biodiesel production by oil oxidizing bacteria strain Nocardia vaccinii K-8, that was isolated from oil polluted samples of soil are presented. The ability of strain K-8 to assimilate some aromatic compounds (phenol, benzene, toluene, naphthalene, hexachlorbenzene, sulfanilic acid and N-phenylanthranilic acid, 0.3–0.5% was determined. It was shown that the highest oil destruction degree (94–98% in polluted water (2.6 g/L was achieved in the case of treatment with suspension of N. vaccinii K-8 cells (9.8 x 107 CFU/mL after 30 days, while surfactant preparation of post fermentative cultural liquid (100–300 mL/kg was more effective for remediation (destruction of 74–83% of oil of oil polluted soil (20 g/kg. It was determined that surfactants (0.085–0.85 mg/mL and other exocellular metabolites of strain К-8 possess antimicrobial activity against some phytopathogen bacteria of Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas strains. In this connection the quantity of living cells decreased by 80–100% after the treatment with the

  2. Parallel genome reduction in symbionts descended from closely related free-living bacteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boscaro, V.; Kolísko, Martin; Felletti, M.; Vannini, C.; Lynn, D. H.; Keeling, P.J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 8 (2017), s. 1160-1167 E-ISSN 2397-334X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : polynucleobacter-necessarius * phylogenetic analysis * maximum-likelihood * evolution * replacement * model * endosymbionts * acceleration * perspectives Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  3. Imaging of Single Dye-Labeled Chemotaxis Proteins in Live Bacteria Using Electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Paolo, Diana; Berry, Richard M

    2018-01-01

    For the last 2 decades, the use of genetically fused fluorescent proteins (FPs) has greatly contributed to the study of chemotactic signaling in E. coli, including the activation of the response regulator protein CheY and its interaction with the flagellar motor. However, this approach suffers from a number of limitations, both biological and biophysical. For example, not all fusions are fully functional when fused to a bulky FP, which can have a similar molecular weight to its fused counterpart. FPs may interfere with the native interactions of the protein, and their chromophores have low brightness and photostability, and fast photobleaching rates. Electroporation allows for internalization of purified CheY proteins labeled with organic dyes into E. coli cells in controllable concentrations. Using fluorescence video microscopy, it is possible to observe single CheY molecules diffusing within cells and interacting with the sensory clusters and the flagellar motors in real time.

  4. The progression of replication forks at natural replication barriers in live bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moolman, M.C.; Tiruvadi Krishnan, S; Kerssemakers, J.W.J.; de Leeuw, R.; Lorent, V.J.F.; Sherratt, David J.; Dekker, N.H.

    2016-01-01

    Protein-DNA complexes are one of the principal barriers the replisome encounters during replication. One such barrier is the Tus-ter complex, which is a direction dependent barrier for replication fork progression. The details concerning the dynamics of the replisome when encountering these

  5. [Essential genes, minimal genome and synthetic cell of bacteria: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Dongru

    2012-05-01

    Single-cell prokaryotes represent a simple and primitive cellular life form. The identification of the essential genes of bacteria and the minimal genome for the free-living cellular life could provide insights into the origin, evolution, and essence of life forms. The principles, methodology, and recent progresses in the identification of essential genes and minimal genome and the creation of synthetic cells are reviewed and particularly the strategies for creating the minimal genome and the potential applications are introduced.

  6. The Fungal Mycobiome and Its Interaction with Gut Bacteria in the Host

    OpenAIRE

    Qi Hui Sam; Matthew Wook Chang; Louis Yi Ann Chai

    2017-01-01

    The advent of sequencing technology has endowed us with the capacity to study microbes constituting the human commensal community that were previously non-culturable. Much of the initial works have concentrated on the bacterial flora constituting the gut microbiome, since specimens are readily accessible in health and disease. Less, however, is understood of the “silent population”—the fungal species, also known as the mycobiome. Living in symbiosis with bacteria as commensals in our body, it...

  7. Virulence of entomopathogenic bacteria in the bed bug, Cimex lectularius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietri, Jose E; Liang, Dangsheng

    2017-10-24

    Due in part to the development of insecticide resistance, the common bed bug, Cimex lectularius, has overcome human intervention efforts to make a global resurgence. The failure of chemical pesticides has created a need for novel strategies to combat bed bugs. While a number of insect pests are susceptible to the use of entomopathogenic microbes or microbial-derived toxins, biological control methods have not been thoroughly explored in bed bugs. Here, we tested the virulence of three entomopathogenic bacterial species in C. lectularius to determine their potential for bed bug control. We examined bed bug survival after inoculation with live or heat-killed Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, and Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis at varying temperatures. We also analyzed the viability and growth of the same bacteria in infected bed bugs. All three bacterial species were pathogenic to bed bugs. However, the effects of S. marcescens and P. fluorescens were temperature-dependent while the lethality of B. thuringiensis israelensis was not. In addition, bacterial virulence was partly dependent on the route of infection but was not strongly associated with proliferation. Thus, our results suggest multiple possible mechanisms of microbial pathogenicity in the bed bug and indicate that entomopathogenic bacteria, or products derived from them, may have useful applications for bed bug control. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Utilization of bacteriocin-producing bacteria in dairy products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matěj Patrovský

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid bacteria have been used since ancient times for food preparation and for bio-conservation by fermentation. Selected strains are capable of producing antimicrobial peptides - bacteriocins, which can be natural preservatives, especially in products with short shelf lives. The present study is focused on inhibitory effects of the bacteriocin-producing bacteria strains Enterococcus faecium, Pediococccus acidilactici and Lactobacillus plantarum against Listeria innocua as an indicator microorganism. Freeze-dried preparations of bacterial strains producing particular bacteriocins were tested by agar well-diffusion assay and by the traditional spread plate method. Plantaricin exhibited the highest anti-listerial effect among the tested bacteriocins. Pediocin also demonstrated a distinct inhibitory effect, but enterocin appeared to be heat labile and its efficiency was also suppressed under cold storage conditions. Plantaricin reduced Listeria innocua counts by 1 log in dairy spread made from cheese and quark. The formation of bacteriocins by various Lactobacillus plantarum strains were substantially influenced by the cultivation conditions of the mother culture and by the microbial preparation process before freeze-drying. Bacteriocins introduced into foodstuffs via protective cultures in situ offer new perspectives on enhancing food quality and safety.

  9. Searching for novel photolyases in UVC-resistant Antarctic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marizcurrena, Juan José; Morel, María A; Braña, Victoria; Morales, Danilo; Martinez-López, Wilner; Castro-Sowinski, Susana

    2017-03-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation has serious consequences for cell survival, including DNA damage by formation of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPD) and pyrimidine (6,4) pyrimidone photoproducts. In general, the Nucleotide Excision Repair pathway repairs these lesions; however, all living forms, except placental mammals and some marsupials, produce a flavoprotein known as photolyase that directly reverses these lesions. The aim of this work was the isolation and identification of Antarctic UVC-resistant bacteria, and the search for novel photolyases. Two Antarctic water samples were UVC-irradiated (254 nm; 50-200 J m- 2) and 12 UVC-resistant bacteria were isolated and identified by 16S rDNA amplification/analysis as members of the genera Pseudomonas, Janthinobacterium, Flavobacterium, Hymenobacter and Sphingomonas. The UVC 50% lethal dose and the photo-repair ability of isolates were analyzed. The occurrence of photolyase coding sequences in Pseudomonas, Hymenobacter and Sphingomonas isolates were searched by PCR or by searching in the draft DNA genome. Results suggest that Pseudomonas and Hymenobacter isolates produce CDP-photolyases, and Sphingomonas produces two CPD-photolyases and a 6,4-photolyase. Results suggest that the Antarctic environment is an important source of genetic material for the identification of novel photolyase genes with potential biotechnological applications.

  10. Horizontal gene transfer from Bacteria to rumen Ciliates indicates adaptation to their anaerobic, carbohydrates-rich environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ricard, G.; McEwan, N.R.; Dutilh, B.E.; Jouany, J.P.; Macheboeuf, D.; Mitsumori, M.; McIntosh, F.M.; Michalowski, T.; Nagamine, T.; Nelson, N.; Newbold, C.J.; Nsabimana, E.; Takenaka, A.; Thomas, N.A.; Ushida, K.; Hackstein, J.H.P.; Huynen, M.A.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The horizontal transfer of expressed genes from Bacteria into Ciliates which live in close contact with each other in the rumen (the foregut of ruminants) was studied using ciliate Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs). More than 4000 ESTs were sequenced from representatives of the two major

  11. Ecology: Electrical Cable Bacteria Save Marine Life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter

    2016-01-01

    Animals at the bottom of the sea survive oxygen depletion surprisingly often, and a new study identifies cable bacteria in the sediment as the saviors. The bacterial electrical activity creates an iron 'carpet', trapping toxic hydrogen sulfide....

  12. Do bacteria, not fish, produce 'fish kairomone'?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringelberg, J.; Van Gool, E.

    1998-01-01

    Fish-associated chemicals enhance phototactic downward swimming in Daphnia. If perch were treated with the antibiotic ampicillin, this enhancement was significantly decreased. Therefore, not fish, but bacteria associated with fish, seem to produce this kairomone. [KEYWORDS: Diel vertical migration;

  13. Lactic acid bacteria: microbiological and functional aspects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lahtinen, Sampo

    2012-01-01

    "Updated with the substantial progress made in lactic acid and bacteria research since the third edition, this fourth volume discusses improved insights in genetics and new molecular biological techniques...

  14. Discovering lactic acid bacteria by genomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaenhammer, T; Altermann, E; Arigoni, F; Bolotin, A; Breidt, F; Broadbent, J; Cano, R; Chaillou, S; Deutscher, J; Gasson, M; van de Guchte, M; Guzzo, J; Hartke, A; Hawkins, T; Hols, P; Hutkins, R; Kleerebezem, M; Kok, J; Kuipers, O; Maguin, E; McKay, L; Mills, D; Nauta, A; Overbeek, R; Pel, H; Pridmore, D; Saier, M; van Sinderen, D; Sorokin, A; Steele, J; O'Sullivan, D; de Vos, W; Weimer, B; Zagorec, M; Siezen, R

    This review summarizes a collection of lactic acid bacteria that are now undergoing genomic sequencing and analysis. Summaries are presented on twenty different species, with each overview discussing the organisms fundamental and practical significance, environmental habitat, and its role in

  15. Synchronized rotation in swarms of magnetotactic bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belovs, M.; Livanovičs, R.; CÄ`bers, A.

    2017-10-01

    Self-organizing behavior has been widely reported in both natural and artificial systems, typically distinguishing between temporal organization (synchronization) and spatial organization (swarming). Swarming has been experimentally observed in systems of magnetotactic bacteria under the action of external magnetic fields. Here we present a model of ensembles of magnetotactic bacteria in which hydrodynamic interactions lead to temporal synchronization in addition to the swarming. After a period of stabilization during which the bacteria form a quasiregular hexagonal lattice structure, the entire swarm begins to rotate in a direction opposite to the direction of the rotation of the magnetic field. We thus illustrate an emergent mechanism of macroscopic motion arising from the synchronized microscopic rotations of hydrodynamically interacting bacteria, reminiscent of the recently proposed concept of swarmalators.

  16. Abundance, viability and culturability of Antarctic bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; DeSouza, M.J.B.D.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    The viability of total number of bacteria decide the mineralisation rate in any ecosystem and ultimately the fertility of the region. This study aims at establishing the extent of viability in the standing stock of the Antarctic bacterial population...

  17. Distribution of phytopathogenic bacteria in infested seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Populations of phytopathogenic bacteria representing five host-pathogen combinations were assessed to determine if there was a mathematical relationship common across seedborne bacterial diseases. Bacterial populations were estimated from naturally-infested seeds of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata), peppe...

  18. Pathomorphology and aerobic bacteria associated with pneumonia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aerobic bacteria isolated from the pneumonic lungs were Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Mannheimia haemolytica, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus and Pasteurella multocida respectively. There was no significant seasonal, species and breed associations (p>0.05) between pneumonic lesions ...

  19. Flow cytometry, fluorescent probes, and flashing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunthof, C.J.

    2002-01-01


    Key words: fluorescent probes, flow cytometry, CSLM, viability, survival, microbial physiology, lactic acid bacteria, Lactococcus lactis , Lactobacillus plantarum , cheese, milk,

  20. Prevalence, histopathological findings and aerobic bacteria flora ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aliyu.jibril

    2017-04-01

    % was the most predominant isolate. There was no significant association between the lung lesions observed and the associated aerobic bacterial isolates, seasons, sexes and breeds. Keywords: Aerobic bacteria isolates, ...

  1. Acetamide Agar for Differentiation of Nonfermentative Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhofer, Thomas R.; Rowen, Joyce W.

    1974-01-01

    An acetamide agar medium is described for use in the differentiation of nonfermentative gram-negative bacteria. With few exceptions, indicator reactions were rapid, intense, and clear-cut. PMID:4417708

  2. Comparative genomics of the lactic acid bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, K.; Slesarev, A.; Wolf, Y.; Sorokin, A.; Mirkin, B.; Koonin, E.; Pavlov, A.; Pavlova, N.; Karamychev, V.; Polouchine, N.; Shakhova, V.; Grigoriev, I.; Lou, Y.; Rokhsar, D.; Lucas, S.; Huang, K.; Goodstein, D. M.; Hawkins, T.; Plengvidhya, V.; Welker, D.; Hughes, J.; Goh, Y.; Benson, A.; Baldwin, K.; Lee, J. -H.; Diaz-Muniz, I.; Dosti, B.; Smeianov, V; Wechter, W.; Barabote, R.; Lorca, G.; Altermann, E.; Barrangou, R.; Ganesan, B.; Xie, Y.; Rawsthorne, H.; Tamir, D.; Parker, C.; Breidt, F.; Broadbent, J.; Hutkins, R.; O' Sullivan, D.; Steele, J.; Unlu, G.; Saier, M.; Klaenhammer, T.; Richardson, P.; Kozyavkin, S.; Weimer, B.; Mills, D.

    2006-06-01

    Lactic acid-producing bacteria are associated with various plant and animal niches and play a key role in the production of fermented foods and beverages. We report nine genome sequences representing the phylogenetic and functional diversity of these bacteria. The small genomes of lactic acid bacteria encode a broad repertoire of transporters for efficient carbon and nitrogen acquisition from the nutritionally rich environments they inhabit and reflect a limited range of biosynthetic capabilities that indicate both prototrophic and auxotrophic strains. Phylogenetic analyses, comparison of gene content across the group, and reconstruction of ancestral gene sets indicate a combination of extensive gene loss and key gene acquisitions via horizontal gene transfer during the coevolution of lactic acid bacteria with their habitats.

  3. Living with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subasic, Kim

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide an insider's account of what it is like to live with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM), a genetic cardiovascular illness that carries the risk for sudden cardiac death. This study aims to reveal how HCM impacts the family and guides the decision whether or not to pursue genetic testing, how the physical limitations associated with HCM alter being-in-the-world, and how HCM alters social relationships. Fifteen adults with HCM were recruited for a longitudinal, phenomenological, qualitative study through purposive sampling and word of mouth. A total of 45 interviews were conducted by the researcher at a time and place designated by the participant between August 2011 and January 2012. The first interview with each participant was conducted in person. While efforts were made to conduct all interviews in person, a total of three interviews were conducted by telephone as requested by three participants due to scheduling conflicts. Through methods of interpretive phenomenology, three audio-recorded, semistructured interviews occurred over the course of 3 months. Detailed narratives were solicited and transcribed verbatim. Methodological and analytical documentation was supported with the identification of key phrases, similar experiences, themes, and documentation of the rationale for decisions throughout the research process. Participation in genetic testing carries a multitude of personal, familial, financial, and emotional implications. The results of a genetic test elicited an emotional response regardless of whether the results were negative, positive, or inconclusive. Living with a potentially life-threatening illness altered identity, disrupted social relationships, and generated chronic fear and uncertainty. A new normal was re-ordered or transformed by the demands and limitations posed by HCM, and by the person's concerns, priorities, and the meaning of the illness. Results from this study underscore the need for healthcare

  4. Toward living radical polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moad, Graeme; Rizzardo, Ezio; Thang, San H

    2008-09-01

    Radical polymerization is one of the most widely used processes for the commercial production of high-molecular-weight polymers. The main factors responsible for the preeminent position of radical polymerization are the ability to polymerize a wide array of monomers, tolerance of unprotected functionality in monomer and solvent, and compatibility with a variety of reaction conditions. Radical polymerization is simple to implement and inexpensive in relation to competitive technologies. However, conventional radical polymerization severely limits the degree of control that researchers can assert over molecular-weight distribution, copolymer composition, and macromolecular architecture. This Account focuses on nitroxide-mediated polymerization (NMP) and polymerization with reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT), two of the more successful approaches for controlling radical polymerization. These processes illustrate two distinct mechanisms for conferring living characteristics on radical polymerization: reversible deactivation (in NMP) and reversible or degenerate chain transfer (in RAFT). We devised NMP in the early 1980s and have exploited this method extensively for the synthesis of styrenic and acrylic polymers. The technique has undergone significant evolution since that time. New nitroxides have led to faster polymerization rates at lower temperatures. However, NMP is only applicable to a restricted range of monomers. RAFT was also developed at CSIRO and has proven both more robust and more versatile. It is applicable to the majority of monomers subject to radical polymerization, but the success of the polymerization depends upon the selection of the RAFT agent for the monomers and reaction conditions. We and other groups have proposed guidelines for selection, and the polymerization of most monomers can be well-controlled to provide minimal retardation and a high fraction of living chains by using one of just two RAFT agents. For example, a

  5. Potentials of Exopolysaccharides from Lactic Acid Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Seema; Majumder, Avishek; Goyal, Arun

    2011-01-01

    Recent research in the area of importance of microbes has revealed the immense industrial potential of exopolysaccharides and their derivative oligosaccharides from lactic acid bacteria. However, due to lack of adequate technological knowledge, the exopolysaccharides have remained largely under exploited. In the present review, the enormous potentials of different types of exopolysaccharides from lactic acid bacteria are described. This also summarizes the recent advances in the applications ...

  6. Potentials of exopolysaccharides from lactic Acid bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Seema; Majumder, Avishek; Goyal, Arun

    2012-03-01

    Recent research in the area of importance of microbes has revealed the immense industrial potential of exopolysaccharides and their derivative oligosaccharides from lactic acid bacteria. However, due to lack of adequate technological knowledge, the exopolysaccharides have remained largely under exploited. In the present review, the enormous potentials of different types of exopolysaccharides from lactic acid bacteria are described. This also summarizes the recent advances in the applications of exopolysaccharides, certain problems associated with their commercial production and the remedies.

  7. Obligate oil-degrading marine bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Yakimov, Michail M; Timmis, Kenneth N; Golyshin, Peter N.

    2007-01-01

    Over the past few years, a new and ecophysiologically unusual group of marine hydrocarbon-degrading bacteria - the obligate hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria (OHCB) - has been recognized and shown to play a significant role in the biological removal of petroleum hydrocarbons from polluted marine waters. The introduction of oil or oil constituents into seawater leads to successive blooms of a relatively limited number of indigenous marine bacterial genera--Alcanivorax, Marinobacter, Thallassolituus...

  8. [Teichoic acids from lactic acid bacteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livins'ka, O P; Harmasheva, I L; Kovalenko, N K

    2012-01-01

    The current view of the structural diversity of teichoic acids and their involvement in the biological activity of lactobacilli has been reviewed. The mechanisms of effects of probiotic lactic acid bacteria, in particular adhesive and immunostimulating functions have been described. The prospects of the use of structure data of teichoic acid in the assessment of intraspecific diversity of lactic acid bacteria have been also reflected.

  9. How magnetotactic bacteria make magnetosomes queue up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Richard B; Bazylinski, Dennis A

    2006-08-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria contain chains of magnetosomes that comprise a permanent magnetic dipole in each cell. In two separate, recent papers, Scheffel et al. and Komeili et al. describe the roles of the proteins MamJ and MamK in magnetosome chain formation. Here, we describe the two studies and highlight questions that must be addressed in future investigations of how magnetotactic bacteria construct their magnetic compass needles.

  10. ORAL BACTERIA AND SYSTEMS DISEASES: A REVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    Moromi Nakata, Hilda; Profesor Principal de Microbiología, jefe de la sección de C. Dinámicas. D.A. Ciencia Básicas. Miembro permanente del Instituto de Investigaciones Estomatológicas de la Facultad de Odontología de la Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima. Perú.

    2014-01-01

    In order to show a global vision of oral bacteria in systemic diseases, it is important to analyze the presence and consequences of these microorganisms in relation with: bacteremia, endocarditis, cardiovascular disease, cerebrovascular disease, bacterial pneumonia, neonatal weight, nefritis, arthritis, dermatitis and diabetes mellitus, reaching conclusions for each one of them. Con el objeto de presentar una visión general de la bacterias orales en los procesos sistémicos, se analiza la p...

  11. Live-striimauksen toteuttaminen tapahtumassa

    OpenAIRE

    Vataja, Jussi; Varila, Miikka

    2015-01-01

    Tämä opinnäytetyö käsittelee live-striimauksen toteuttamista tapahtumassa Seinäjoen ammattikorkeakoulun tarjoaman kaluston avulla. Toteutimme live-striimauksen FlakeLAN 2014 -verkkopelitapahtumassa ilman rahoitusta. Mediatyönä toimii live-striimauksesta leikkaamamme monikameratuotannon osio. Kirjallisen työn tarkoituksena on arvioida ja käsitellä laadukkaan live-striimauksen toteuttamista tuottajan näkökulmasta kvalitatiivisin keinoin sekä tarjota lukijalle näkökulmia live-striimin toteuk...

  12. Microemulsion-Based Soft Bacteria-Driven Microswimmers for Active Cargo Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay Vikram; Hosseinidoust, Zeinab; Park, Byung-Wook; Yasa, Oncay; Sitti, Metin

    2017-10-24

    Biohybrid cell-driven microsystems offer unparalleled possibilities for realization of soft microrobots at the micron scale. Here, we introduce a bacteria-driven microswimmer that combines the active locomotion and sensing capabilities of bacteria with the desirable encapsulation and viscoelastic properties of a soft double-micelle microemulsion for active transport and delivery of cargo (e.g., imaging agents, genes, and drugs) to living cells. Quasi-monodisperse double emulsions were synthesized with an aqueous core that encapsulated the fluorescence imaging agents, as a proof-of-concept cargo in this study, and an outer oil shell that was functionalized with streptavidin for specific and stable attachment of biotin-conjugated Escherichia coli. Motile bacteria effectively propelled the soft microswimmers across a Transwell membrane, actively delivering imaging agents (i.e., dyes) encapsulated inside of the micelles to a monolayer of cultured MCF7 breast cancer and J744A.1 macrophage cells, which enabled real-time, live-cell imaging of cell organelles, namely mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and Golgi body. This in vitro model demonstrates the proof-of-concept feasibility of the proposed soft microswimmers and offers promise for potential biomedical applications in active and/or targeted transport and delivery of imaging agents, drugs, stem cells, siRNA, and therapeutic genes to live tissue in in vitro disease models (e.g., organ-on-a-chip devices) and stagnant or low-flow-velocity fluidic regions of the human body.

  13. Molecular probe technology detects bacteria without culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyman Richard W

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our ultimate goal is to detect the entire human microbiome, in health and in disease, in a single reaction tube, and employing only commercially available reagents. To that end, we adapted molecular inversion probes to detect bacteria using solely a massively multiplex molecular technology. This molecular probe technology does not require growth of the bacteria in culture. Rather, the molecular probe technology requires only a sequence of forty sequential bases unique to the genome of the bacterium of interest. In this communication, we report the first results of employing our molecular probes to detect bacteria in clinical samples. Results While the assay on Affymetrix GenFlex Tag16K arrays allows the multiplexing of the detection of the bacteria in each clinical sample, one Affymetrix GenFlex Tag16K array must be used for each clinical sample. To multiplex the clinical samples, we introduce a second, independent assay for the molecular probes employing Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection. By adding one unique oligonucleotide barcode for each clinical sample, we combine the samples after processing, but before sequencing, and sequence them together. Conclusions Overall, we have employed 192 molecular probes representing 40 bacteria to detect the bacteria in twenty-one vaginal swabs as assessed by the Affymetrix GenFlex Tag16K assay and fourteen of those by the Sequencing by Oligonucleotide Ligation and Detection assay. The correlations among the assays were excellent.

  14. Gaia Live in School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, N. A.; Barnes, R.; Soubiran, C.; Vogt, S.

    2014-07-01

    Gaia is the European Space Agency's (ESA) next major astronomy telescope mission that was launched December 19, 2013. Gaia will measure accurate distances to about one billion stars across our Milky Way, allowing us to better understand how our galaxy formed and evolved. Gaia will have a profound impact on our understand ing of the Universe and the nature of dark matter, and provide a deeper understanding of how planets form around stars in our local neighbourhood. Gaia scientists and science education advisors are organising a Gaia post-launch event to link approximately forty schools across Europe. The event will include a live stream connection to ESA Gaia Mission Control and local Gaia research students to act as “explainers” and give practical demonstrations in each school. This paper describes the challenges in conducting this Europe-wide event.

  15. Living with psoriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Kirsten Tarri

    2004-01-01

    Living with psoriasis is a considerable burden and quality of life in patients is deeply affected, yet compliance with therapy is a major problem. The literature is abundant in quantitative studies stating the incidence of decrease in quality of life and related, measurable terms, and in efforts...... directed at the improvement of therapies. However, it is sparse concerning the experiences of patients. This study aims to promote an understanding of the daily life of patients with psoriasis with particular regard to how they manage the disease, ultimately to improve nursing care to these patients....... A qualitative, collective case study design was applied. The participants were 4 adult patients with a long and complicated psoriasis history. They were interviewed in depth focusing on their experiences related to psoriasis and its treatment. The patients suffered physically from itch and pain. However...

  16. Live and let die

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Næss, Petter

    2004-01-01

    Under a paradigm of unlimited natural resources and recipient capacity for emissions, raising the material standard of the world`s poor did not seem to be seriously in conflict with increasing consumption levels in affluent nations, even with a growing global population. In a finite world......, increased consumption in wealthy countries will reduce the possibility of meeting the needs of a growing population in developing countries within the limits set by the Earth`s ecological carrying capacity. Today, the willingness among the decision makers in rich countries to pursue a sustainable...... article ?Living on a Lifeboat?. Below, Hardin`s ?Lifeboat ethic? is reviewed and critically discussed, focusing on the hidden premises embedded in Hardin`s position. In the final part of the paper, the environmental consequences of economic growth and increasing consumption levels in wealthy nations...

  17. Living hours under pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Anna; Larsen, Trine Pernille; Felbo-Kolding, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of part-time work on absolute wages. The empirical focus is wages and working hours in three selected sectors within private services in the Danish labour market – industrial cleaning, retail, hotels and restaurants – and their agreem......Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of part-time work on absolute wages. The empirical focus is wages and working hours in three selected sectors within private services in the Danish labour market – industrial cleaning, retail, hotels and restaurants...... in industrial cleaning includes a minimum floor of 15 weekly working hours – this is not the case in retail, hotels and restaurants. This creates a loophole in the latter two sectors that can be exploited by employers to gain wage flexibility through part-time work. Originality/value The living wage literature...

  18. Living in the Present

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Barns

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the findings from a qualitative research project exploring eight women’s experiences of living with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Through semistructured interviews, the women provided insights into the physical, emotional, and social impacts of RA and the “work” involved in negotiating its influence in the everyday life. In narrating their experiences of adapting to RA, the women express a common desire for “normalcy,” to return to a time and space before the disruption of RA. The women’s accounts also emphasized the interrelatedness between bodily experience and constructions of self, highlighting the corporeal nature of RA and the constant shaping and reshaping of personal meanings and values.

  19. Living With Semantic Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, Karen; Wilkinson, Ray; Keady, John

    2014-01-01

    Semantic dementia is a variant of frontotemporal dementia and is a recently recognized diagnostic condition. There has been some research quantitatively examining care partner stress and burden in frontotemporal dementia. There are, however, few studies exploring the subjective experiences of family members caring for those with frontotemporal dementia. Increased knowledge of such experiences would allow service providers to tailor intervention, support, and information better. We used a case study design, with thematic narrative analysis applied to interview data, to describe the experiences of a wife and son caring for a husband/father with semantic dementia. Using this approach, we identified four themes: (a) living with routines, (b) policing and protecting, (c) making connections, and (d) being adaptive and flexible. Each of these themes were shared and extended, with the importance of routines in everyday life highlighted. The implications for policy, practice, and research are discussed. PMID:24532121

  20. Living with nuclear weapons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnesale, A.; Doty, P.; Hoffmann, S.; Huntington, S.P.; Nye, J.S. Jr.; Sagan, S.D.

    1983-01-01

    At Harvard President Derek Bok's request, six Harvard professors explain nuclear arms issues to help citizens understand all sides of the national security debates. The goal is to encourage public participation in policy formulation. The book emphasizes that escapism will not improve security; that idealistic plans to eliminate nuclear weapons are a form of escapism. Learning to live with nuclear weapons, they suggest, requires an understanding of the current nuclear predicament and the implications of alternative weapons and policy choices. After reviewing these matters, they emphasize that informed persons will continue to disagree, but that knowledge will improve understanding and appreciation of their differences and improve the quality of policy debates. 54 references, 5 figures, 2 tables. (DCK)

  1. Living in Translation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke Jakobsen, Arnt

    Exaugural presentation. A retrospect of my personal itinerary from literature, across translation studies to translation process research and a look ahead. In the retrospect, I range over diverse topics, all of which have sprung from my concern with the phenomenon of translation. I reflect on how......, as humans, we generate meaning, interpret meaning, and reformulate or translate meaning. I also reflect on the way computing has influenced research into these phenomena as seen e.g. in my creation of the Translog program and in projects I have been involved in, such as OFT (Translation of Professional...... for global communication purposes, and for improving research into translation, the phenomenon of translation and the world of translation in which we all live....

  2. The living company.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Geus, A

    1997-01-01

    What can explain the longevity gap between a company that survives for centuries--the Swedish company Stora, for example, which is more than 700 years old--and the average corporation, which does not last 20 years? A team at Royal Dutch/Shell Group explored that question. Arie de Geus, a retired Shell executive, writes about the team's findings and describes what he calls living companies-organizations that have beaten the high mortality rate of the average corporation. Many companies die young, de Geus argues, because their policies and practices are based too heavily on the thinking and language of economics. Their managers focus on producing goods and services and forget that the organization is a community of human beings that is in business--any business--to stay alive. In contrast, managers of living companies consider themselves to be stewards of a long-standing enterprise. Their priorities reflect their commitment to the organization's long-term survival in an unpredictable world. Like careful gardeners, they encourage growth and renewal without endangering the plant they are tending. They value profits the same way most people value oxygen: as necessary for life but not the purpose of it. They scuttle assets when necessary to make a dramatic change in the business portfolio. And they constantly search for new ideas. These managers also focus on developing people. They create opportunities for employees to learn from one another. Such organizations are suited for survival in a world in which success depends on the ability to learn, to adapt, and to evolve.

  3. Experiencing Liveness in Contemporary Performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This volume brings together dynamic perspectives on the concept of liveness in the performing arts, engaging with the live through the particular analytical focus of audiences and experience. The status and significance of the live in performance has become contested: perceived as variously...... of making. Drawing together contributions from theatre, music, dance, and performance art, it takes an interdisciplinary approach in asking not what liveness is, but how it matters and to whom. The book invites readers to consider how liveness is produced through processes of audiencing - as spectators...... bring qualities of (a)liveness into being through the nature of their attention - and how it becomes materialized in acts of performance, acts of making, acts of archiving, and acts of remembering. Theoretical chapters and practice-based reflections explore liveness, eventness and nowness as key...

  4. Marine pollution by heavy oil and bio-purification. Bacteria decomposing oil hydrocarbon; Juyu ni yoru umi no osen to seibutsu joka. Juyu tanka suiso wo bunkaisuru saikin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itagaki, E. [Kanazawa Univ., Ishikawa (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1997-10-20

    It is said that 23 genuses of bacteria decomposing hydrocarbon such as bacterium species, actinomycetes species, mold species and yeast of 10-10{sup 5}/ml live in seawater. No survey has been made on bacteria decomposing heavy oil hydrocarbon in the area contaminated by heavy oil from Russian tanker `Nakhodka` in the Sea of Japan. Survey was thus made on the existence and distribution of bacteria decomposing heavy oil hydrocarbon along the coast of Kaga district, Ishikawa prefecture. Such bacteria were successfully separated by repeated cultivation. The bacteria are short bacillus of nearly 1{mu}m long, and show a spherical shape as preserved at low temperature. Since the bacteria change their shape according to growth conditions, those are the germ of `Arthrobacter` genus. The bacteria of nearly 10{sup 5}/g lived along the sand beach in spite of low seawater and air temperatures in the early spring. The bacteria increased to nearly 10{sup 7}/g in May, however, decreased with a progress of oil decomposition in June. 3 figs.

  5. Whole genome sequencing of bacteria in cystic fibrosis as a model for bacterial genome adaptation and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Poonam; Gupta, Sushim Kumar; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2014-03-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) airways harbor a wide variety of new and/or emerging multidrug resistant bacteria which impose a heavy burden on patients. These bacteria live in close proximity with one another, which increases the frequency of lateral gene transfer. The exchange and movement of mobile genetic elements and genomic islands facilitate the spread of genes between genetically diverse bacteria, which seem to be advantageous to the bacterium as it allows adaptation to the new niches of the CF lungs. Niche adaptation is one of the major evolutionary forces shaping bacterial genome composition and in CF the chronic strains adapt and become less virulent. The purpose of this review is to shed light on CF bacterial genome alterations. Next-generation sequencing technology is an exciting tool that may help us to decipher the genome architecture and the evolution of bacteria colonizing CF lungs.

  6. Chance and necessity in the genome evolution of endosymbiotic bacteria of insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Toft, Christina; Alvarez-Ponce, David; Fares, Mario A

    2017-06-01

    An open question in evolutionary biology is how does the selection-drift balance determine the fates of biological interactions. We searched for signatures of selection and drift in genomes of five endosymbiotic bacterial groups known to evolve under strong genetic drift. Although most genes in endosymbiotic bacteria showed evidence of relaxed purifying selection, many genes in these bacteria exhibited stronger selective constraints than their orthologs in free-living bacterial relatives. Remarkably, most of these highly constrained genes had no role in the host-symbiont interactions but were involved in either buffering the deleterious consequences of drift or other host-unrelated functions, suggesting that they have either acquired new roles or their role became more central in endosymbiotic bacteria. Experimental evolution of Escherichia coli under strong genetic drift revealed remarkable similarities in the mutational spectrum, genome reduction patterns and gene losses to endosymbiotic bacteria of insects. Interestingly, the transcriptome of the experimentally evolved lines showed a generalized deregulation of the genome that affected genes encoding proteins involved in mutational buffering, regulation and amino acid biosynthesis, patterns identical to those found in endosymbiotic bacteria. Our results indicate that drift has shaped endosymbiotic associations through a change in the functional landscape of bacterial genes and that the host had only a small role in such a shift.

  7. Chromatic acclimation and population dynamics of green sulfur bacteria grown with spectrally tailored light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikin, Semion K.; Khin, Yadana; Huh, Joonsuk; Hannout, Moataz; Wang, Yaya; Zare, Farrokh; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Tang, Joseph Kuo-Hsiang

    2014-05-01

    Living organisms have to adjust to their surrounding in order to survive in stressful conditions. We study this mechanism in one of most primitive creatures - photosynthetic green sulfur bacteria. These bacteria absorb photons very efficiently using the chlorosome antenna complexes and perform photosynthesis in extreme low-light environments. How the chlorosomes in green sulfur bacteria are acclimated to the stressful light conditions, for instance, if the spectrum of light is not optimal for absorption, is unknown. Studying Chlorobaculum tepidum cultures with far-red to near-infrared light-emitting diodes, we found that these bacteria react to changes in energy flow by regulating the amount of light-absorbing pigments and the size of the chlorosomes. Surprisingly, our results indicate that the bacteria can survive in near-infrared lights capturing low-frequency photons by the intermediate units of the light-harvesting complex. The latter strategy may be used by the species recently found near hydrothermal vents in the Pacific Ocean.

  8. Inactivation of koi-herpesvirus in water using bacteria isolated from carp intestines and carp habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, N; Sasaki, R-K; Kasai, H; Yoshimizu, M

    2013-12-01

    Since its first outbreak in Japan in 2003, koi-herpesvirus (KHV) remains a challenge to the carp Cyprinus carpio L. breeding industry. In this study, inactivation of KHV in water from carp habitats (carp habitat water) was investigated with the aim of developing a model for rapidly inactivating the pathogen in aquaculture effluent. Experiments with live fish showed that, in carp habitat water, KHV lost its infectivity within 3 days. Indications were that inactivation of KHV was caused by the antagonistic activity of bacteria (anti-KHV bacteria) in the water from carp habitats. Carp habitat water and the intestinal contents of carp were therefore screened for anti-KHV bacteria. Of 581 bacterial isolates, 23 showed anti-KHV activity. An effluent treatment model for the disinfection of KHV in aquaculture effluent water using anti-KHV bacteria was developed and evaluated. The model showed a decrease in cumulative mortality and in the number of KHV genome copies in kidney tissue of fish injected with treated effluent compared with a positive control. It is thought that anti-KHV bacteria isolated from the intestinal contents of carp and from carp habitat water can be used to control KHV outbreaks. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Elevated temperature increases carbon and nitrogen fluxes between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria through physical attachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor; Weber, Peter K; Alonso-Sáez, Laura; Morán, Xosé Anxelu G; Mayali, Xavier

    2017-03-01

    Quantifying the contribution of marine microorganisms to carbon and nitrogen cycles and their response to predicted ocean warming is one of the main challenges of microbial oceanography. Here we present a single-cell NanoSIMS isotope analysis to quantify C and N uptake by free-living and attached phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria, and their response to short-term experimental warming of 4 °C. Elevated temperature increased total C fixation by over 50%, a small but significant fraction of which was transferred to heterotrophs within 12 h. Cell-to-cell attachment doubled the secondary C uptake by heterotrophic bacteria and increased secondary N incorporation by autotrophs by 68%. Warming also increased the abundance of phytoplankton with attached heterotrophs by 80%, and promoted C transfer from phytoplankton to bacteria by 17% and N transfer from bacteria to phytoplankton by 50%. Our results indicate that phytoplankton-bacteria attachment provides an ecological advantage for nutrient incorporation, suggesting a mutualistic relationship that appears to be enhanced by temperature increases.

  10. [Spatial distribution of dead and vital bacteria in the native dental biofilm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Ya-Kun; Ling, Jun-Qi

    2007-05-01

    To examine the spatial distribution of dead and vital bacteria in the early formation of native dental biofilm. An experimental dental biofilm model in the oral cavity was established by enamel slabs and the spatial distribution of dead and vital bacteria in the early colonization of native dental biofilm on the enamel surface was observed by in situ real-time and dynamic observations and optical sections utilizing confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and live and dead bacterial fluorescence staining technique. At the initial stage of dental biofilm formation, the structure was sparse and the percentage of dead cells reached 70% - 80% at the inner layers. In the middle layers the structure became denser than in the inner layers, which was mainly composed of vital cells (40% - 70%), and void-like structures were surrounded by vital bacteria. In the outer layers, the structure was sparse and vital cells occupied 20% - 40%. Native dental biofilms showed an uneven spatial distribution of vital and dead microorganisms. The percentage of vital microorganisms was lower adjacent to the enamel surface, increased in the z-axis towards the central parts, and decreased again towards the outer layers. The dead bacteria is an integral component in the early formation of native dental biofilm. Bacteria in the biofilms increased with time forming abundant channels.

  11. Protein aggregation in bacteria: the thin boundary between functionality and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarska, Natalia G; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Van Eldere, Johan

    2013-09-01

    Misfolding and aggregation of proteins have a negative impact on all living organisms. In recent years, aggregation has been studied in detail due to its involvement in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, and type II diabetes--all associated with accumulation of amyloid fibrils. This research highlighted the central importance of protein homeostasis, or proteostasis for short, defined as the cellular state in which the proteome is both stable and functional. It implicates an equilibrium between synthesis, folding, trafficking, aggregation, disaggregation and degradation. In accordance with the eukaryotic systems, it has been documented that protein aggregation also reduces fitness of bacterial cells, but although our understanding of the cellular protein quality control systems is perhaps most detailed in bacteria, the use of bacterial proteostasis as a drug target remains little explored. Here we describe protein aggregation as a normal physiological process and its role in bacterial virulence and we shed light on how bacteria defend themselves against the toxic threat of aggregates. We review the impact of aggregates on bacterial viability and look at the ways that bacteria use to maintain a balance between aggregation and functionality. The proteostasis in bacteria can be interrupted via overexpression of proteins, certain antibiotics such as aminoglycosides, as well as antimicrobial peptides--all leading to loss of cell viability. Therefore intracellular protein aggregation and disruption of proteostatic balance in bacteria open up another strategy that should be explored towards the discovery of new antimicrobials.

  12. Elevated temperature increases carbon and nitrogen fluxes between phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria through physical attachment

    KAUST Repository

    Arandia-Gorostidi, Nestor

    2016-12-06

    Quantifying the contribution of marine microorganisms to carbon and nitrogen cycles and their response to predicted ocean warming is one of the main challenges of microbial oceanography. Here we present a single-cell NanoSIMS isotope analysis to quantify C and N uptake by free-living and attached phytoplankton and heterotrophic bacteria, and their response to short-term experimental warming of 4 °C. Elevated temperature increased total C fixation by over 50%, a small but significant fraction of which was transferred to heterotrophs within 12 h. Cell-to-cell attachment doubled the secondary C uptake by heterotrophic bacteria and increased secondary N incorporation by autotrophs by 68%. Warming also increased the abundance of phytoplankton with attached heterotrophs by 80%, and promoted C transfer from phytoplankton to bacteria by 17% and N transfer from bacteria to phytoplankton by 50%. Our results indicate that phytoplankton-bacteria attachment provides an ecological advantage for nutrient incorporation, suggesting a mutualistic relationship that appears to be enhanced by temperature increases.

  13. Enhance wastewater biological treatment through the bacteria induced graphene oxide hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Liang; Jin, Ziheng; Wang, Dian; Wang, Yuanpeng; Lu, Yinghua

    2018-01-01

    The interaction between bacteria and graphene-family materials like pristine graphene, graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) is such an elusive issue that its implication in environmental biotechnology is unclear. Herein, two kinds of self-assembled bio-rGO-hydrogels (BGHs) were prepared by cultivating specific Shewanella sp. strains with GO solution for the first time. The microscopic examination by SEM, TEM and CLSM indicated a porous 3D structure of BGHs, in which live bacteria firmly anchored and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) abundantly distributed. Spectra of XRD, FTIR, XPS and Raman further proved that GO was reduced to rGO by bacteria along with the gelation process, which suggests a potential green technique to produce graphene. Based on the characterization results, four mechanisms for the BGH formation were proposed, i.e., stacking, bridging, rolling and cross-linking of rGO sheets, through the synergistic effect of activities and EPS from special bacteria. More importantly, the BGHs obtained in this study were found able to achieve unique cleanup performance that the counterpart free bacteria could not fulfill, as exemplified in Congo red decolorization and Cr(VI) bioreduction. These findings therefore enlighten a prospective application of graphene materials for the biological treatment of wastewaters in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Frost related dieback in Estonian energy plantations of willows in relation to fertilisation and pathogenic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cambours, M.A.; Nejad, P. [Department of Forest Mycology and Pathology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7026, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden); Heinsoo, K. [Institute of Zoology and Botany, Estonian Agricultural University, Riia 181, 51014 Tartu (Estonia); Granhall, U. [Department of Microbiology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Box 7025, 750 07 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2006-03-15

    Two 9-year old Estonian Salix plantations suffering from dieback were studied: one situated on poor mineral soil and divided into fertilised and unfertilised plots (Saare plantation) and another growing on a well-decomposed and nitrogen-rich organic soil, without fertiliser application (Kambja plantation). Bacteria from internal tissues of visually damaged shoots from seven clones were isolated in spring and autumn. The strains were subsequently biochemically characterised and tested for ice nucleation activity and pathogenicity on Salix. Some strains were also analysed with 16S rRNA. High numbers of culturable bacteria were found, belonging mainly to Erwinia, Sphingomonas, Pseudomonas and Xanthomonas spp. Fertilised plots were significantly more colonised by bacteria than unfertilised plots and also more extensively damaged, showing a lower density of living plants after 7 years of culture. More ice nucleation active (INA) strains were found in Saare fertilised plots and at Kambja than in Saare unfertilised plots. Likewise, most pathogenic strains were isolated from Saare fertilised plots and from Kambja. For some of the willow clones studied, dieback appeared to be related to both clonal frost sensitivity and abundance of INA and pathogenic bacteria. The plantations probably suffered from the presence of high amounts of pathogens and from frost related injuries aggravated by INA bacteria. Most probably the fertilisation at Saare and the nitrogen-rich soil at Kambja created a favourable environment for bacterial development and led to high dieback levels after the first harvest. (author)

  15. Isolation and identification of soil bacteria growing at the expense of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, Julie; St-Arnaud, Marc; Hijri, Mohamed

    2011-04-01

    Soil-microorganism symbioses are of fundamental importance for plant adaptation to the environment. Research in microbial ecology has revealed that some soil bacteria are associated with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). However, these interactions may be much more complex than originally thought. To assess the type of bacteria associated with AMF, we initially isolated spores of Glomus irregulare from an Agrostis stolonifera rhizosphere. The spores were washed with sterile water and plated onto G. irregulare mycelium growing in vitro in a root-free compartment of bicompartmented Petri dishes. We hypothesized that this system should select for bacteria closely associated with the fungus because the only nutrients available to the bacteria were those derived from the hyphae. Twenty-nine bacterial colonies growing on the AMF hyphae were subcultured and identified using 16S rRNA gene sequences. All bacterial isolates showed high sequence identity to Bacillus cereus, Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus simplex, Kocuria rhizophila, Microbacterium ginsengisoli, Sphingomonas sp. and Variovorax paradoxus. We also assessed bacterial diversity on the surface of spores by PCR-denaturating gradient gel electrophoresis. Finally, we used live cellular imaging to show that the bacteria isolated can grow on the surface of hyphae with different growing patterns in contrast to Escherichia coli as a control. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Study of Volcanic-Ash-Impregnated-Bacteria Filler to the Compressive Strength of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Purwanto Hendry Anjar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Technology of concrete has been advanced recently to improve the properties of concrete. Utilization of ash as the substitute of cement or filler of concrete also indicates good result in compressive strength concrete in certain amount. Harnessing the bacteria for self-healing concrete has also been successfully performed in order to maintain the destruction of the concrete by itself. Past research indicated that bacteria can be beneficiary to improve the compressive strength, absorption, permeability, and so on. In this paper, Bacillus Altitudinis was extracted from the karst (source from the limestone mountain and bred through liquid media to be impregnated inside the volcanic ash. The impregnated bacteria in volcanic ash were used as the filler to the concrete mixture with the proportion of filler varied from 1%, 1.5% and 2% to the weight of cement. Mechanical properties of the concrete specimen showed that the compressive strength reached its best when the filler proportion was 1.5%. The absorption referred analogously to the increment of compressive strength due to the success of filling the void inside the concrete. Based on compression test to all the concrete specimens, there was enhancement about 18% and the average absorption can be abated around 23%. Future research due to some drawbacks turning up is the need of developing another media for bacteria to live and making sure the exact amount of bacteria impregnated to the media so that the desired advance of concrete compressive strength can be acquired.

  17. Screening, Isolation and Identification of Lactic Acid Bacteria From a Traditional Dairy Product of Sabzevar, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Rashid

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lactic acid bacteria (LAB are a major group of probiotics. Isolation of these bacteria is difficult, because they have a complex ecosystem in fermented dairy products. Objectives: The aim of this study was to detect Lactobacillus and Lactococcus in a conventional dairy product (Khameh and study their probiotic characteristics. Materials and Methods: To isolateLAB, samples were collected from four different villages. Afterwards, screening was performed in pH = 2.5. The selected strains were examined for their tolerance to acidic pH (3 and 0.3% bile salt. Moreover, the antimicrobial activity of the isolated strains against two pathogenic bacteria, Salmonella typhimurium and Staphylococcus aureus, was assessed using the disc plate method. Finally, the selected strains were identified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR screening and sequencing. Results: Among the isolated samples, two strains (Lactobacillus and Lactococcus were highly resistant to unfavorable conditions and the L1 strain showed the highest antimicrobial activity. Conclusions: This study showed that the conventional dairy product (Khameh contained probiotic bacteria, which are capable of fighting against pathogenic bacteria and living in the digestive tract.

  18. MAVIS: An integrated system for live microscopy and vitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koning, Roman I., E-mail: r.i.koning@lumc.nl [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Faas, Frank G. [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Boonekamp, Michael; Visser, Bram de; Janse, Jan [Department of Instrumental Development, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Wiegant, Joop C. [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Breij, Anna de [Department of Infectious Diseases, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Willemse, Joost [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Nibbering, Peter H. [Department of Infectious Diseases, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Tanke, Hans J.; Koster, Abraham J. [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Albinusdreef 2, P.O. Box 9600, 2300 RC, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-08-01

    Cryo-electron microscopy of vitrified biological samples can provide three-dimensional reconstructions of macromolecules and organelles within bacteria and cells at nanometer scale resolution, even in native conditions. Localization of specific structures and imaging of cellular dynamics in cellular cryo-electron microscopy is limited by (i) the use of cryo-fixation to preserve cellular structures, (ii) the restricted availability of electron dense markers to label molecules inside cells and (iii) the inherent low contrast of cryo electron microscopy. These limitations can be mitigated to a large extend by correlative light and electron microscopy, where the sample is imaged by both light and electron microscopy. Here we present a Microscopy and Vitrification Integrated System (MAVIS) that combines a light microscope with a plunger to vitrify thin specimens. MAVIS provides the capability for fluorescence light microscopic imaging of living cells and bacteria that are adhered to an electron microscopy grid and subsequent vitrification within a time frame of seconds. The instrument allows targeting of dynamic biological events in time and space by fluorescence microscopy for subsequent cryo light and electron microscopy. Here we describe the design and performance of the MAVIS, illustrated with biological examples. - Highlights: • We developed new plunger: a Microscopy and Vitrification Integrated System (MAVIS). • The MAVIS is a new tool for integrating of live microscopy and vitrification. • The MAVIS allows fluorescence LM of living cells and vitrification within seconds. • Here we describe the MAVIS design and performance, and show biological examples.

  19. Nanotextile membranes for bacteria Escherichia coli capturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaroslav Lev

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes an experimental study dealing with the possibility of nanotextile materials usa­ge for microbiologically contaminated water filtration. The aim of the study is to verify filtration ability of different nanotextile materials and evaluate the possibilities of practical usage. Good detention ability of these materials in the air filtration is the presumption for nanotextile to be used for bacteria filtration from a liquid. High nanotextile porosity with the nanotextile pores dimensions smaller than a bacteria size predicates the possibility of a successful usage of these materials. For the experiment were used materials made from electrospinning nanofibres under the label PA612, PUR1, PUR2 s PUR3 on the supporting unwoven textiles (viscose and PP. As a model simulation of the microbial contamination, bacteria Escherichia coli was chosen. Contaminated water was filtered during the overpressure activity of 105Pa on the input side of the filter from the mentioned material. After three-day incubation on the nutrient medium, cultures found in the samples before and after filtration were compared. In the filtrated water, bacteria E. coli were indicated, which did not verify the theoretical presumptions about an absolut bacteria detention. However, used materials caught at least 94% of bacteria in case of material PUR1 and up to 99,996% in case of material PUR2. These results predict the possibility of producing effective nanotextile filters for microbiologically contaminated water filtration.Recommendation: For the production of materials with better filtrating qualities, experiments need to be done, enabling better understanding of the bacteria detention mechanisms on the nanotextile material, and parameters of the used materials that influence the filtrating abilities need to be verified.

  20. Molecular investigation of luxA gene to identify luminescent bacteria in Caspian sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojtaba Mohseni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bioluminescence is a chemical reaction that causes light emission in the living organisms. Luminous bacteria are the most abundant bioluminescent organisms in natural environments. Biochemical tests are used for identification of luminous bacteria. However, molecular characterization of luxA gene could be suitable for investigation of luminescent bacteria due to differences in the sequences. In this study, the results of identification of luminescent bacteria were compared to the results of biochemical tests and PCR amplification of luxA using designed specific primers. In addition, thr results were confirmed by sequencing of 16S rDNA gene in the isolated luminescent bacteria. Samples of sea water were collected from several locations of southern shores of the Caspian sea. Luminous bacteria were isolated using specific cultures SWB and SWA. Then, morphological and physiological characterization of the isolates was identified. Specific primers for amplification of luxA were designed and synthesized after classification of luminescent bacteria according to the sequence of luxA. Polymerase chain reaction for luxA and 16S rDNA genes was performed after nucleic acid extraction of bacteria. Sequencing of 16S rDNA gene was obtained and then phylogenetic tree was constructed. Nine strains of luminescent bacteria were isolated from the Caspian sea. According to the results of biochemical tests, 5 strains belonged to the Photobacterium genus and 4 strains belonged to the Vibrio genus. Also, luxA PCR amplification of Aliivibrio, Photobacterium and Vibrio was done in order to specify primers luxA1, luxA2 and luxA3, respectively. In addition, BLAST subroutine of the 16S rDNA sequences revealed that the isolates were most similar to Photobacterium leiognathi with 99% homology. Results of isolates determination are according to the biochemical tests, molecular investigation of PCR luxA using specific primer and 16S rDNA analyses was correspondent. Therefore

  1. Live videotransmitteret undervisning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rikke Ørngreen

    2013-11-01

    På Bioanalytikeruddannelsen i Aarhus, VIAs sundhedsfaglige højskole, har man i en længere periode haft et kombi-hold, hvor man kombinerer traditionel og live transmitteret undervisning (via et innovativt valg af videokonferencesystem. På de såkaldte netdage er der mulighed for enten at møde op til undervisningen, som man plejer, eller at deltage i undervisningen hjemmefra. Artiklen præsenterer et deltagende aktionsforskningsprojekt mellem projektteamet på udannelsen og forskere fra Aalborg Universitet. Målet var at: afdække potentialer og barrierer ud fra et it-støttet læringsperspektiv; udvikle robuste didaktiske undervisningsscenarier; samt kvalificere underviserne og hermed forankringen af projektet. Forskningsdata blev indsamlet gennem videooptagelser, ”dagens spørgsmål” til de studerende, fokusgruppeinterview med lærerne, og Pædagogisk Dag-workshop. Analysen sætter fokus på erfaringerne under anvendelse af professionshøjskolernes Rektorkollegiums Studieaktivitetsmodel. Slutteligt samles der i artiklen op på de teknologsike, sociale og didaktiske-pædagogiske relationer set i lyset af projektets mål og resultater. Abstract in English At the education for Biomedical Laboratory Scientist at Aarhus, VIA's healthcare college, they have a combi-class, combining traditional and live broadcast teaching (via an innovative choice of video conferencing system. In the so-called net-days, there is the option to either attend the classes as usual, or to attend classes from home. This paper presents a participatory action research project between the project team at VIA and researchers from Aalborg University. The objectives were to: identify potentials and barriers from an IT-supported learning perspective; develop robust didactic teaching scenarios; qualify teachers, and secure the anchoring of the project. Research data were collected through video recordings, "questions of the day" to the students, focus group interviews with teachers and

  2. Living-with Shakespeare?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Broqua

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article studies three interpretations of Sonnet 130 by three American experimental poets. Rereading Bloom’s considerations on Shakespeare in The Anxiety of Influence and comparing them with Jacques Derrida’s Specters of Marx, this article shows that rather than thinking of Shakespeare as a cursing ghost, Harryette Mullen’s, Stephen Ratcliffe’s and Jen Bervin’s texts reveal Shakespeare as a ghost and a host. Their texts are attempts to live with Shakespeare in the present, thus prompting us to look back on the theory of the intertext.Cet article étudie trois réinterpretations du sonnet 130 de Shakespeare par trois poètes expérimentaux des Etats-Unis. Après avoir relu la théorie d’Harold Bloom telle qu’il l’applique à Shakespeare dans The Anxiety of Influence et l’avoir rapidement mise en contraste avec celle de Jacques Derrida dans Spectres de Marx, cet article montre que les textes de Harryette Mullen, Stephen Ratcliffe et Jen Bervin ne font pas de Shakespeare un fantôme de la malédiction. Ils tentent plutôt de vivre-avec Shakespeare dans le présent, nous amenant ainsi à reconsidérer la théorie de l’intertexte.

  3. Biogeochemistry of Phosphorus Exchange in Magnetic Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drennen, C.; Popa, R.; Nealson, K.

    2005-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria swim (some at high relative speeds of ~5 mm/min) across the sediment water interface, in both freshwater and marine ecosystems, this occurs in an apparent diurnal pattern. We hypothesized that this is part of a migratory life cycle across the oxic anoxic transition zone (OATZ), at the water-sediment interface. Magnetotactic bacteria have been shown to contain sizable reserves of metals, phosphorus and sulfur. If the migration model is true, then this migration has important consequences on the exchange of phosphorous, sulfur and metals between water and sediments. Our results show that the exchange of phosphorus between magnetic bacteria and water is consistent with a periodic life cycle. These results also show that magnetic cells accumulate large amounts of phosphate under oxidizing conditions. Under reducing and anaerobic conditions (e.g. sulfidic, low Eh sediments) cells release phosphorus. This research shows the importance of magnetic bacteria in the exchange of materials across redox interfaces. Magnetotactic bacteria may also play a significant role in biomineralization and bioweathering of metal oxides and phosphates, as well as possibly contributing to the magnetization of sediments.

  4. Role of rhomboid proteases in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rather, Philip

    2013-12-01

    The first member of the rhomboid family of intramembrane serine proteases in bacteria was discovered almost 20years ago. It is now known that rhomboid proteins are widely distributed in bacteria, with some bacteria containing multiple rhomboids. At the present time, only a single rhomboid-dependent function in bacteria has been identified, which is the cleavage of TatA in Providencia stuartii. Mutational analysis has shown that loss of the GlpG rhomboid in Escherichia coli alters cefotaxime resistance, loss of the YqgP (GluP) rhomboid in Bacillus subtilis alters cell division and glucose uptake, and loss of the MSMEG_5036 and MSMEG_4904 genes in Mycobacterium smegmatis results in altered colony morphology, biofilm formation and antibiotic susceptibilities. However, the cellular substrates for these proteins have not been identified. In addition, analysis of the rhombosortases, together with their possible Gly-Gly CTERM substrates, may shed new light on the role of these proteases in bacteria. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Intramembrane Proteases. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Modulation of immune homeostasis by commensal bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo I.; Littman, Dan R.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal bacteria form a resident community that has co-evolved with the mammalian host. In addition to playing important roles in digestion and harvesting energy, commensal bacteria are crucial for the proper functioning of mucosal immune defenses. Most of these functions have been attributed to the presence of large numbers of “innocuous” resident bacteria that dilute or occupy niches for intestinal pathogens or induce innate immune responses that sequester bacteria in the lumen, thus quenching excessive activation of the mucosal immune system. However it has recently become obvious that commensal bacteria are not simply beneficial bystanders, but are important modulators of intestinal immune homeostasis and that the composition of the microbiota is a major factor in pre-determining the type and robustness of mucosal immune responses. Here we review specific examples of individual members of the microbiota that modify innate and adaptive immune responses, and we focus on potential mechanisms by which such species-specific signals are generated and transmitted to the host immune system. PMID:21215684

  6. Engineering Diagnostic and Therapeutic Gut Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Brian P; Tabor, Jeffrey J

    2017-10-01

    Genetically engineered bacteria have the potential to diagnose and treat a wide range of diseases linked to the gastrointestinal tract, or gut. Such engineered microbes will be less expensive and invasive than current diagnostics and more effective and safe than current therapeutics. Recent advances in synthetic biology have dramatically improved the reliability with which bacteria can be engineered with the sensors, genetic circuits, and output (actuator) genes necessary for diagnostic and therapeutic functions. However, to deploy such bacteria in vivo, researchers must identify appropriate gut-adapted strains and consider performance metrics such as sensor detection thresholds, circuit computation speed, growth rate effects, and the evolutionary stability of engineered genetic systems. Other recent reviews have focused on engineering bacteria to target cancer or genetically modifying the endogenous gut microbiota in situ. Here, we develop a standard approach for engineering "smart probiotics," which both diagnose and treat disease, as well as "diagnostic gut bacteria" and "drug factory probiotics," which perform only the former and latter function, respectively. We focus on the use of cutting-edge synthetic biology tools, gut-specific design considerations, and current and future engineering challenges.

  7. Biodegradation of shea nut cake by indigenous soil bacteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is to isolate bacteria with high shea nut cake degrading ability and consequently select the potential application of these bacteria in bioremediation. The bacteria were grown in mineral salt medium supplemented with 2% shea nut cake as sole source of carbon. More Gram negative bacteria were involved in shea nut ...

  8. Autopoiesis and the origin of bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischaker, G. R.; Margulis, L.

    ``Autopoiesis'' is the explanatory principle for the organization of living systems, a concept directly applicable to the problematic issues surrounding the origins of life. Because it provides criteria by which a system may be judged as living, autopoiesis can be used to characterize a minimal living system. Once these defining characteristics have been established, we can extrapolate the conditions which would have made possible the emergence of earliest life. Because autopoiesis is a principle of organization, it provides a definition of living systems not restricted to specific molecules or structures - that is, to those nucleic-acid/protein/lipid cellular life forms with which we are familiar. Autopoiesis provides the conceptual and systematic framework within which any living system may be identified. In examining living systems, then, autopoiesis gives us a literally ``meta-physical'' view of life.

  9. SOLO: Self Organizing Live Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    1 SOLO: Self Organizing Live Objects Qi Huang1, 2 (contact, tel. +16073519956), Ken Birman2 1School of Computer Science & Technology...levels of performance, relia- bility, or other QoS objectives. Here, we describe SOLO, a new platform we’re constructing as part of Cornell’s Live ...scenarios that would be expected in wide-area environments. Category: Regular paper for the PDS track (5700 words). Keywords: Self-organization, Live

  10. 4Pi live cell imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Sauter, Dorothea

    2009-01-01

    One distinctive advantage of light microscopy over electron microscopy is it ability to selectively image sub-cellular details three-dimensionally in living cells. Live cell imaging is the domain of light microscopy. In this thesis a live cell imaging setup relying on 4Pi fluorescence microscopy is presented. To speed up the imaging process and record cellular processes of the order of a few seconds a new method of multifoci-generation via the stacking of birefringent crystals is implemented....

  11. Method of Detecting Coliform Bacteria and Escherichia Coli Bacteria from Reflected Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Robert (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting coliform bacteria in water from reflected light and a method of detecting Eschericha Coli bacteria in water from reflected light, and also includes devices for the measurement, calculation and transmission of data relating to that method.

  12. COMPETITION BETWEEN ANOXYGENIC PHOTOTROPHIC BACTERIA AND COLORLESS SULFUR BACTERIA IN A MICROBIAL MAT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VISSCHER, PT; VANDENENDE, FP; SCHAUB, BEM; VANGEMERDEN, H

    The populations of chemolithoautotrophic (colorless) sulfur bacteria and anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria were enumerated in a marine microbial mat. The highest population densities were found in the 0-5 mm layer of the mat: 2.0 X 10(9) cells CM-3 sediment, and 4.0 X 10(7) cells cm-3 sediment for

  13. Nutritional Interdependence Among Rumen Bacteria During Cellulose Digestion In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Miura, Hideki; Horiguchi, Masaaki; Ogimoto, Keiji; MATSUMOTO, Tatsuro

    1983-01-01

    A study has been made of the promoting effect of starch on cellulose digestion by mixed rumen bacteria in a cellulose-urea medium. Starch supplementation of the medium promoted the growth of bacteria that required neither amino acids (AA) nor branched-chain fatty acids (BrFA). The growth of these bacteria was followed by the growth of AA-dependent bacteria, AA- or BrFA-dependent bacteria, BrFA-producing bacteria, and finally, BrFA-dependent cellulolytic bacteria. Population changes of these b...

  14. Specificity and temporal dynamics of complex bacteria--sponge symbiotic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björk, Johannes R; Díez-Vives, C; Coma, Rafel; Ribes, Marta; Montoya, José M

    2013-12-01

    Microbes are known to form intricate and intimate relationships with most animal and plant taxa. Microbe--host symbiotic associations are poorly explored in comparison with other species interaction networks. The current paradigm on symbiosis research stems from species-poor systems where pairwise and reciprocally specialized interactions between a single microbe and a single host that coevolve are the norm. These symbioses involving just a few species are fascinating in their own right, but more diverse and complex host-associated microbial communities are increasingly found, with new emerging questions that require new paradigms and approaches. Here we adopt an intermediate complexity approach to study the specificity, phylogenetic community structure, and temporal variability of the subset of the most abundant bacteria associated with different sponge host species with diverse eco-evolutionary characteristics. We do so by using a monthly resolved annual temporal series of host-associated and free-living bacteria. Bacteria are very abundant and diverse within marine sponges, and these symbiotic interactions are hypothesized to have a very ancient origin. We show that host-bacteria reciprocal specialization depends on the temporal scale and level of taxonomic aggregation considered. Sponge hosts with similar eco-evolutionary characteristics (e.g., volume of tissue corresponding to microbes, water filtering rates, and microbial transmission type) have similar bacterial phylogenetic community structure when looking at interactions aggregated over time. In general, sponge hosts hypothesized to form more intricate relationships with bacteria show a remarkably persistent bacterial community over time. Other hosts, however, show a large turnover similar to that observed for free-living bacterioplankton. Our study highlights the importance of exploring temporal variability in host--microbe interaction networks if we aim to determine how specific and persistent these

  15. The power of living things: Living memorials as therapeutic landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather L. McMillen; Lindsay K. Campbell; Erika S. Svendsen

    2017-01-01

    In response to the events of 11 September 2001 (9/11), many communities came together to create living memorials. Many living memorials were established near the crash sites, but others were created across the United States from urban to rural areas, with designs ranging from entire forests to single trees. They were created by surviving family members, supporters of...

  16. Viruses as living processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, John; Guttinger, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    The view that life is composed of distinct entities with well-defined boundaries has been undermined in recent years by the realisation of the near omnipresence of symbiosis. What had seemed to be intrinsically stable entities have turned out to be systems stabilised only by the interactions between a complex set of underlying processes (Dupré, 2012). This has not only presented severe problems for our traditional understanding of biological individuality but has also led some to claim that we need to switch to a process ontology to be able adequately to understand biological systems. A large group of biological entities, however, has been excluded from these discussions, namely viruses. Viruses are usually portrayed as stable and distinct individuals that do not fit the more integrated and collaborative picture of nature implied by symbiosis. In this paper we will contest this view. We will first discuss recent findings in virology that show that viruses can be 'nice' and collaborate with their hosts, meaning that they form part of integrated biological systems and processes. We further offer various reasons why viruses should be seen as processes rather than things, or substances. Based on these two claims we will argue that, far from serving as a counterexample to it, viruses actually enable a deeper understanding of the fundamentally interconnected and collaborative nature of nature. We conclude with some reflections on the debate as to whether viruses should be seen as living, and argue that there are good reasons for an affirmative answer to this question. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Probiotics: "living drugs".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, G W

    2001-06-15

    The uses, mechanisms of action, and safety of probiotics are discussed. Probiotics are live microorganisms or microbial mixtures administered to improve the patient's microbial balance, particularly the environment of the gastrointestinal tract and the vagina. The yeast Saccharomyces boulardii and the bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus, strain GG, have shown efficacy in clinical trials for the prevention of antimicrobial-associated diarrhea. Other probiotics that have demonstrated at least some promise as prophylaxis for this type of diarrhea are Lactobacillus acidophilus, Bifidobacterium longum, and Enterococcus faecium. The use of S. boulardii as an adjunctive treatment to therapy with metronidazole or vancomycin has been found in controlled studies to decrease further recurrences of Clostridium difficile-associated disease. Other gastrointestinal disorders for which probiotics have been studied include traveler's diarrhea, acute infantile diarrhea, and acute diarrhea in adults. Several Lactobacillus species given in yogurt or in tablet or suppository form have shown clinical efficacy as a treatment for vaginal infections. Lactobacillus strains have also been examined as a treatment for urinary-tract infections. Putative mechanisms of action of probiotics include production of pathogen-inhibitory substances, inhibition of pathogen attachment, inhibition of the action of microbial toxins, stimulation of immunoglobulin A, and trophic effects on intestinal mucosa. The available probiotics are considered nonpathogenic, but even benign microorganisms can be infective when a patient is severely debilitated or immunosuppressed. Probiotics have demonstrated an ability to prevent and treat some infections. Effective use of probiotics could decrease patients' exposure to antimicrobials. Additional controlled studies are needed to clearly define the safety and efficacy of these agents.

  18. Copper tolerance and virulence in bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladomersky, Erik; Petris, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Copper (Cu) is an essential trace element for all aerobic organisms. It functions as a cofactor in enzymes that catalyze a wide variety of redox reactions due to its ability to cycle between two oxidation states, Cu(I) and Cu(II). This same redox property of copper has the potential to cause toxicity if copper homeostasis is not maintained. Studies suggest that the toxic properties of copper are harnessed by the innate immune system of the host to kill bacteria. To counter such defenses, bacteria rely on copper tolerance genes for virulence within the host. These discoveries suggest bacterial copper intoxication is a component of host nutritional immunity, thus expanding our knowledge of the roles of copper in biology. This review summarizes our current understanding of copper tolerance in bacteria, and the extent to which these pathways contribute to bacterial virulence within the host. PMID:25652326

  19. Microgravity effects on pathogenicity of bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-juan WANG

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity is one of the important environmental conditions during spaceflight. A series of studies have shown that many kinds of bacteria could be detected in space station and space shuttle. Space environment or simulated microgravity may throw a certain influence on those opportunistic pathogens and lead to some changes on their virulence, biofilm formation and drug tolerance. The mechanism of bacteria response to space environment or simulated microgravity has not been defined. However, the conserved RNA-binding protein Hfq has been identified as a likely global regulator involved in the bacteria response to this environment. In addition, microgravity effects on bacterial pathogenicity may threaten astronauts' health. The present paper will focus on microgravity-induced alterations of pathogenicity and relative mechanism in various opportunistic pathogens.

  20. Mortality of fecal bacteria in seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Lara, J.; Menon, P.; Servais, P.; Billen, G. (Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium))

    1991-03-01

    The authors propose a method for determining the mortality rate for allochthonous bacteria released in aquatic environments without interference due to the loss of culturability in specific culture media. This method consists of following the disappearance of radioactivity from the trichloracetic acid-insoluble fraction in water samples to which ({sup 3}H)thymidine-prelabeled allochthonous bacteria have been added. In coastal seawater, they found that the actual rate of disappearance of fecal bacteria was 1 order of magnitude lower than the rate of loss of culturability on specific media. Minor adaptation of the procedure may facilitate assessment of the effect of protozoan grazing and bacteriophage lysis on the overall bacterial mortality rate.

  1. Widespread Oceanospirillaceae Bacteria in Porites spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Speck

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present evidence that a clade of bacteria in the Oceanospirillaceae is widely distributed in Porites spp. and other hermatypic corals. Bacteria 16S rDNA clone libraries were prepared from community genomic DNA extracted from Porites compressa and Porites lobata surface mucus and adjacent seawater collected along a line transect off Maui. Phylogenetic affiliations of operational taxonomic units (OTUs defined at the 97% level of nucleotide identity varied within and between the respective Porites spp. along the transect and differed from those in the seawater. One OTU (C7-A01, however, occurred in all mucus samples from both Porites species. C7-A01c affiliates with a clade of uncultivated Oceanospirillum-like bacteria; the nearest neighbors of this OTU have been reported only in the surface mucus layer of Porites spp. and other stony corals, in reef-dwelling invertebrates, and the corallivorous six-banded angelfish, Pomacanthus sexstriatus.

  2. Liveness redux: on media and their claim to be live.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Es, Karin

    2017-11-01

    Increasingly media are asserting themselves as live. In television, this has been an important strategy and recently it has been employed by new media platforms such as Facebook, Periscope and Snapchat. This commentary explains the revival of live media by exploring the meaning and operations of the concept and argues the continued relevance of the concept for the study of social media. Traditionally, there have been three main approaches to the live in academic writing (i.e. liveness as ontology, as phenomenology and as rhetoric): each has its particular shortcoming. This paper proposes that it is more productive to understand the live as a construction that assists to secure media a central role in everyday life.

  3. The living publication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-04

    Within the ICSTI Insights Series we offer three articles on the 'living publication' that is already available to practitioners in the important field of crystal structure determination and analysis. While the specific examples are drawn from this particular field, we invite readers to draw parallels in their own fields of interest. The first article describes the present state of the crystallographic living publication, already recognized by an ALPSP (Association of Learned and Professional Society Publishers) Award for Publishing Innovation in 2006. The second article describes the potential impact on the record of science as greater post-publication analysis becomes more common within currently accepted data deposition practices, using processed diffraction data as the starting point. The third article outlines a vision for the further improvement of crystallographic structure reports within potentially achievable enhanced data deposition practices, based upon raw (unprocessed) diffraction data. The IUCr in its Commissions and Journals has for many years emphasized the importance of publications being accompanied by data and the interpretation of the data in terms of atomic models. This has been followed as policy by numerous other journals in the field and its cognate disciplines. This practice has been well served by databases and archiving institutions such as the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the Cambridge Crystallographic Data Centre (CCDC), and the Inorganic Crystal Structure Database (ICSD). Normally the models that are archived are interpretations of the data, consisting of atomic coordinates with their displacement parameters, along with processed diffraction data from X-ray, neutron or electron diffraction studies. In our current online age, a reader can not only consult the printed word, but can display and explore the results with molecular graphics software of exceptional quality. Furthermore, the routine availability of processed diffraction

  4. Using Fluorescent Viruses for Detecting Bacteria in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabacco, Mary Beth; Qian, Xiaohua; Russo, Jaimie A.

    2009-01-01

    A method of detecting water-borne pathogenic bacteria is based partly on established molecular-recognition and fluorescent-labeling concepts, according to which bacteria of a species of interest are labeled with fluorescent reporter molecules and the bacteria can then be detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. The novelty of the present method lies in the use of bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to deliver the fluorescent reporter molecules to the bacteria of the species of interest.

  5. Exploring the Behavior and Metabolic Transformations of SeNPs in Exposed Lactic Acid Bacteria. Effect of Nanoparticles Coating Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo-Siguero, Maria; Madrid, Yolanda

    2017-01-01

    The behavior and transformation of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) in living systems such as microorganisms is largely unknown. To address this knowledge gap, we examined the effect of three types of SeNP suspensions toward Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus LB-12 using a variety of techniques. SeNPs were synthesized using three types of coating agents (chitosan (CS-SeNPs), hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC-SeNPs) and a non-ionic surfactant, surfynol (ethoxylated-SeNPs)). Morphologies of SeNPs were all spherical. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to locate SeNPs in the bacteria. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on line coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was applied to evaluate SeNP transformation by bacteria. Finally, flow cytometry employing the live/dead test and optical density measurements at 600 nm (OD600) were used for evaluating the percentages of bacteria viability when supplementing with SeNPs. Negligible damage was detected by flow cytometry when bacteria were exposed to HEC-SeNPs or CS-SeNPs at a level of 10 μg Se mL−1. In contrast, ethoxylated-SeNPs were found to be the most harmful nanoparticles toward bacteria. CS-SeNPs passed through the membrane without causing damage. Once inside, SeNPs were metabolically transformed to organic selenium compounds. Results evidenced the importance of capping agents when establishing the true behavior of NPs. PMID:28783048

  6. Experimental taphonomy of giant sulphur bacteria: implications for the interpretation of the embryo-like Ediacaran Doushantuo fossils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, J A; Thomas, C-W; Bengtson, S; Marone, F; Stampanoni, M; Turner, F R; Bailey, J V; Raff, R A; Raff, E C; Donoghue, P C J

    2012-05-07

    The Ediacaran Doushantuo biota has yielded fossils interpreted as eukaryotic organisms, either animal embryos or eukaryotes basal or distantly related to Metazoa. However, the fossils have been interpreted alternatively as giant sulphur bacteria similar to the extant Thiomargarita. To test this hypothesis, living and decayed Thiomargarita were compared with Doushantuo fossils and experimental taphonomic pathways were compared with modern embryos. In the fossils, as in eukaryotic cells, subcellular structures are distributed throughout cell volume; in Thiomargarita, a central vacuole encompasses approximately 98 per cent cell volume. Key features of the fossils, including putative lipid vesicles and nuclei, complex envelope ornament, and ornate outer vesicles are incompatible with living and decay morphologies observed in Thiomargarita. Microbial taphonomy of Thiomargarita also differed from that of embryos. Embryo tissues can be consumed and replaced by bacteria, forming a replica composed of a three-dimensional biofilm, a stable fabric for potential fossilization. Vacuolated Thiomargarita cells collapse easily and do not provide an internal substrate for bacteria. The findings do not support the hypothesis that giant sulphur bacteria are an appropriate interpretative model for the embryo-like Doushantuo fossils. However, sulphur bacteria may have mediated fossil mineralization and may provide a potential bacterial analogue for other macroscopic Precambrian remains.

  7. Exploring the Behavior and Metabolic Transformations of SeNPs in Exposed Lactic Acid Bacteria. Effect of Nanoparticles Coating Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Palomo-Siguero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The behavior and transformation of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs in living systems such as microorganisms is largely unknown. To address this knowledge gap, we examined the effect of three types of SeNP suspensions toward Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus LB-12 using a variety of techniques. SeNPs were synthesized using three types of coating agents (chitosan (CS-SeNPs, hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC-SeNPs and a non-ionic surfactant, surfynol (ethoxylated-SeNPs. Morphologies of SeNPs were all spherical. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was used to locate SeNPs in the bacteria. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC on line coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS was applied to evaluate SeNP transformation by bacteria. Finally, flow cytometry employing the live/dead test and optical density measurements at 600 nm (OD600 were used for evaluating the percentages of bacteria viability when supplementing with SeNPs. Negligible damage was detected by flow cytometry when bacteria were exposed to HEC-SeNPs or CS-SeNPs at a level of 10 μg Se mL−1. In contrast, ethoxylated-SeNPs were found to be the most harmful nanoparticles toward bacteria. CS-SeNPs passed through the membrane without causing damage. Once inside, SeNPs were metabolically transformed to organic selenium compounds. Results evidenced the importance of capping agents when establishing the true behavior of NPs.

  8. Bacteria Provide Cleanup of Oil Spills, Wastewater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Through Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Marshall Space Flight Center, Micro-Bac International Inc., of Round Rock, Texas, developed a phototrophic cell for water purification in space. Inside the cell: millions of photosynthetic bacteria. Micro-Bac proceeded to commercialize the bacterial formulation it developed for the SBIR project. The formulation is now used for the remediation of wastewater systems and waste from livestock farms and food manufacturers. Strains of the SBIR-derived bacteria also feature in microbial solutions that treat environmentally damaging oil spills, such as that resulting from the catastrophic 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in the Gulf of Mexico.

  9. Bacteria-Triggered Release of Antimicrobial Agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Komnatnyy, Vitaly V.; Chiang, Wen-Chi; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Medical devices employed in healthcare practice are often susceptible to microbial contamination. Pathogenic bacteria may attach themselves to device surfaces of catheters or implants by formation of chemically complex biofilms, which may be the direct cause of device failure. Extracellular...... material is demonstrated by the bacteria‐triggered release of antibiotics to control bacterial populations and signaling molecules to modulate quorum sensing. The self‐regulating system provides the basis for the development of device‐relevant polymeric materials, which only release antibiotics...... in dependency of the titer of bacteria surrounding the medical device....

  10. Bacterial biofilms. Bacteria Quorum sensing in biofilms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. S. Vorobey

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Data on biofilms, their structure and properties, peculiarities of formation and interaction between microorganisms in the film are presented. Information on discovery and study of biofilms, importance of biofilms in the medical and clinical microbiology are offered. The data allow to interpret biofilm as a form of existence of human normal microflora. For the exchange of information within the biofilm between the individual cells of the same or different species bacteria use the signal molecules of the Quorum sensing system. Coordination of bacterial cells activity in the biofilms gives them significant advantages: in the biofilms bacteria are protected from the influence of the host protective factors and the antibacterial drugs.

  11. Magnetite and Magnetotaxis in Bacteria and Algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-15

    4JUL Gemommxit~ ft o flin 4111-W410-4 --- ef I Io_ I IIII -173 -4 Magnetite and Magnetotaxis in Bacteria and Algae R.B. Frankel Francis Bitter National...motile, magnetot ctlc algae of the genus Anisonema. 1. Introduction "--; Magnetotactic bacteria that orient and swim along magnetic field lin, s are...has been isolated and cu turdd in v chemically defined medium. Iron accounts for 2 per cent of the dry eight of the organism with most of the iron

  12. Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blow, M. J.; Deutschbauer, A. M.; Hoover, C. A.; Lamson, J.; Lamson, J.; Price, M. N.; Waters, J.; Wetmore, K. M.; Bristow, J.; Arkin, A. P.

    2013-03-20

    Bacteria and Archaea exhibit a huge diversity of metabolic capabilities with fundamental importance in the environment, and potential applications in biotechnology. However, the genetic bases of these capabilities remain unclear due largely to an absence of technologies that link DNA sequence to molecular function. To address this challenge, we are developing a pipeline for high throughput annotation of gene function using mutagenesis, growth assays and DNA sequencing. By applying this pipeline to annotate gene function in 50 diverse microbes we hope to discover thousands of new gene functions and produce a proof of principle `Functional Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea?.

  13. Biodegradation of complex bacteria on phenolic derivatives in river water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Guang-Hua; Wang, Chao; Sun, Zhe

    2009-04-01

    To isolate, incubate, and identify 4-chlorophenol-degrading complex bacteria, determine the tolerance of these bacteria to phenolic derivatives and study their synergetic metabolism as well as the aboriginal micrpbes and co-metabolic degradation of mixed chlorophenols in river water. Microbial community of complex bacteria was identified by plate culture observation techniques and Gram stain method. Bacterial growth inhibition test was used to determine the tolerance of complex bacteria to toxicants. Biodegradability of phenolic derivatives was determined by adding 4-chlorophenol-degrading bacteria in river water. The complex bacteria were identified as Mycopiana, Alcaligenes, Pseudomonas, and Flavobacterium. The domesticated complex bacteria were more tolerant to phenolic derivatives than the aboriginal bacteria from Qinhuai River. The biodegradability of chlorophenols, dihydroxybenzenes and nitrophenols under various aquatic conditions was determined and compared. The complex bacteria exhibited a higher metabolic efficiency on chemicals than the aboriginal microbes, and the final removal rate of phenolic derivatives was increased at least by 55% when the complex bacteria were added into river water. The metabolic relationship between dominant mixed bacteria and river bacteria was studied. The complex bacteria domesticated by 4-chlorophenol can grow and be metabolized to take other chlorophenols, dihydroxybenzenes and nitrophenols as the sole carbon and energy source. There is a synergetic metabolism of most compounds between the aboriginal microbes in river water and the domesticated complex bacteria. 4-chlorophenol-degrading bacteria can co-metabolize various chlorophenols in river water.

  14. Free-living protozoa in two unchlorinated drinking water supplies identified by phylogenic analysis of 18S rRNA gene sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valster, R.M.; Wullings, B.A.; Bakker, G.; Smidt, H.; Kooij, van der D.

    2009-01-01

    Free-living protozoan communities in water supplies may include hosts for Legionella pneumophila and other undesired bacteria and also pathogens. This study aimed at identifying free-living protozoa in two unchlorinated groundwater supplies using cultivation-independent molecular approaches. For

  15. Living your own life, together

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerling, Allan

    show that 81% of the respondents who lived with a partner in 2014 lived with the same partner in 2003. This paper analyzes this stability in couple relationship. The empirical focus is on social and emotional support, on the character of the social networks as well as gender equality among partners...

  16. Glycoarray Technologies: Deciphering Interactions from Proteins to Live Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania M. Puvirajesinghe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray technologies inspired the development of carbohydrate arrays. Initially, carbohydrate array technology was hindered by the complex structures of glycans and their structural variability. The first designs of glycoarrays focused on the HTP (high throughput study of protein–glycan binding events, and subsequently more in-depth kinetic analysis of carbohydrate–protein interactions. However, the applications have rapidly expanded and now achieve successful discrimination of selective interactions between carbohydrates and, not only proteins, but also viruses, bacteria and eukaryotic cells, and most recently even live cell responses to immobilized glycans. Combining array technology with other HTP technologies such as mass spectrometry is expected to allow even more accurate and sensitive analysis. This review provides a broad overview of established glycoarray technologies (with a special focus on glycosaminoglycan applications and their emerging applications to the study of complex interactions between glycans and whole living cells.

  17. A novel plasma source for sterilization of living tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martines, E.; Zuin, M.; Cavazzana, R.; Gazza, E.; Serianni, G.; Spagnolo, S.; Spolaore, M.; Leonardi, A.; Deligianni, V.; Brun, P.; Aragona, M.; Castagliuolo, I.; Brun, P.

    2009-11-01

    A source for the production of low-power plasmas at atmospheric pressure, to be used for the nondamaging sterilization of living tissues, is presented. The source, powered by radiofrequency and working with a helium flow, has a specific configuration, studied to prevent the formation of electric arcs dangerous to living matter. It is capable of killing different types of bacteria with a decimal reduction time of 1-2 min; on the contrary, human cells such as conjunctival fibroblasts were found to be almost unharmed by the plasma. A high concentration of OH radicals, likely to be the origin of the sterilizing effect, is detected through their UV emission lines. The effect of the UV and the OH radicals on the fibroblasts was analysed and no significant effects were detected.

  18. [Long live the kidney donor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fijter, Johan W; Meinders, Arend E

    2014-01-01

    Kidney transplantation offers longer life expectancy and improves quality of life in selected patients with end-stage renal failure. The availability of living donors is critical, particularly to meet the increasing demand and potentially pre-emptive transplantation. In addition, living donor transplantation is associated with better outcomes on comparison with dialysis or transplants from deceased donors. The major disadvantage of living donation is that complications may occur both directly perioperatively and in the long-term. Two recent studies confirmed that the risk of renal failure among selected living donors is extremely low. This implies that there is no need to alter the existing positive attitude towards living donation. Finding a comparable long-term control group with relevant genetic and non-genetic risk factors remains a challenge to studies looking at long-term effects.

  19. Influence of Asellus aquaticus on Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Campylobacter jejuni and naturally occurring heterotrophic bacteria in drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Sarah C B; Nissen, Erling; Arvin, Erik; Albrechtsen, Hans-Jørgen

    2012-10-15

    Water lice, Asellus aquaticus (isopoda), frequently occur in drinking water distribution systems where they are a nuisance to consumers and water utilities. Whether they are solely an aesthetic problem or also affect the microbial water quality is a matter of interest. We studied the influence of A. aquaticus on microbial water quality in non-chlorinated drinking water in controlled laboratory experiments. Pure cultures of the indicator organisms Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae and the pathogen Campylobacter jejuni as well as naturally occurring heterotrophic drinking water bacteria (measured as heterotrophic plate counts, HPC) were investigated in microcosms at 7 °C, containing non-sterilised drinking water, drinking water sediment and A. aquaticus collected from a non-chlorinated ground water based drinking water supply system. Concentrations of E. coli, K. pneumoniae and C. jejuni decreased over time, following a first order decay with half lives of 5.3, 18.4 and 1.3 days, respectively. A. aquaticus did not affect survival of indicators and pathogens substantially whereas HPC were influenced by presence of dead A. aquaticus. Growth rates increased with an average of 48% for bacteria grown on R-2A agar and an average of 83% for bacteria grown on yeast extract agar when dead A. aquaticus were present compared to no and living A. aquaticus present. A. aquaticus associated E. coli, K. pneumoniae and C. jejuni were measured (up to 25 per living and 500 per dead A. aquaticus) and so were A. aquaticus associated heterotrophic bacteria (>1.8*10(4) CFU per living and >6*10(4) CFU per dead A. aquaticus). A. aquaticus did not serve as an optimised habitat that increased survival of indicators and pathogens, since A. aquaticus associated E. coli, K. pneumoniae and C. jejuni were only measured as long as the bacteria were also present in the water and sediment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. UGA is an additional glycine codon in uncultured SR1 bacteria from the human microbiota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James H.; O’Donoghue, Patrick; Campbell, Alisha G.; Schwientek, Patrick; Sczyrba, Alexander; Woyke, Tanja; Söll, Dieter; Podar, Mircea

    2013-01-01

    The composition of the human microbiota is recognized as an important factor in human health and disease. Many of our cohabitating microbes belong to phylum-level divisions for which there are no cultivated representatives and are only represented by small subunit rRNA sequences. For one such taxon (SR1), which includes bacteria with elevated abundance in periodontitis, we provide a single-cell genome sequence from a healthy oral sample. SR1 bacteria use a unique genetic code. In-frame TGA (opal) codons are found in most genes (85%), often at loci normally encoding conserved glycine residues. UGA appears not to function as a stop codon and is in equilibrium with the canonical GGN glycine codons, displaying strain-specific variation across the human population. SR1 encodes a divergent tRNAGlyUCA with an opal-decoding anticodon. SR1 glycyl-tRNA synthetase acylates tRNAGlyUCA with glycine in vitro with similar activity compared with normal tRNAGlyUCC. Coexpression of SR1 glycyl-tRNA synthetase and tRNAGlyUCA in Escherichia coli yields significant β-galactosidase activity in vivo from a lacZ gene containing an in-frame TGA codon. Comparative genomic analysis with Human Microbiome Project data revealed that the human body harbors a striking diversity of SR1 bacteria. This is a surprising finding because SR1 is most closely related to bacteria that live in anoxic and thermal environments. Some of these bacteria share common genetic and metabolic features with SR1, including UGA to glycine reassignment and an archaeal-type ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO) involved in AMP recycling. UGA codon reassignment renders SR1 genes untranslatable by other bacteria, which impacts horizontal gene transfer within the human microbiota. PMID:23509275

  1. Relationship between oral bacteria count and pneumonia onset in elderly nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikutani, Takeshi; Tamura, Fumiyo; Tashiro, Haruki; Yoshida, Mitsuyoshi; Konishi, Kiyoshi; Hamada, Ryo

    2015-04-01

    Oral bacteria, which are a source of infection for aspiration pneumonia, were examined in frail older adults with the aim of establishing a standard bacteria count that indicates the risk of pneumonia onset in this group. A survey of bacteria count in the saliva using a simple instrument for measurement of the number of oral bacteria, along with factors including swallowing function and nutritional status, was carried out in 691 elderly individuals requiring care (137 men; mean age 82.6 ± 8.3 years; 554 women; mean age 88.0 ± 7.1 years; total mean age 86.7 ± 7.8 years) at 16 nursing homes in Japan. All participants gave their consent for inclusion in the present study. During a 6-month follow-up period, participants who developed pneumonia were identified, and relationships between the factors measured at the start of the period and pneumonia onset were examined. During the 6-month follow-up period, 33 participants (4.8%; 5 men, 28 women; mean age 88.3 ± 7.4 years) developed pneumonia. Pneumonia onset was significantly associated with reduced activities of daily living, swallowing dysfunction and undernourishment. Logistic regression analysis identified a saliva bacteria count of 10(8.5)  colony-forming units/mL as an independent explanatory factor for pneumonia onset (P = 0.012, RR = 3.759). Oral bacteria count of 10(8.5)  colony-forming units/mL saliva in an elderly person requiring care was identified as a risk factor for pneumonia onset. © 2014 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  2. UGA is an additional glycine codon in uncultured SR1 bacteria from the human microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James H; O'Donoghue, Patrick; Campbell, Alisha G; Schwientek, Patrick; Sczyrba, Alexander; Woyke, Tanja; Söll, Dieter; Podar, Mircea

    2013-04-02

    The composition of the human microbiota is recognized as an important factor in human health and disease. Many of our cohabitating microbes belong to phylum-level divisions for which there are no cultivated representatives and are only represented by small subunit rRNA sequences. For one such taxon (SR1), which includes bacteria with elevated abundance in periodontitis, we provide a single-cell genome sequence from a healthy oral sample. SR1 bacteria use a unique genetic code. In-frame TGA (opal) codons are found in most genes (85%), often at loci normally encoding conserved glycine residues. UGA appears not to function as a stop codon and is in equilibrium with the canonical GGN glycine codons, displaying strain-specific variation across the human population. SR1 encodes a divergent tRNA(Gly)UCA with an opal-decoding anticodon. SR1 glycyl-tRNA synthetase acylates tRNA(Gly)UCA with glycine in vitro with similar activity compared with normal tRNA(Gly)UCC. Coexpression of SR1 glycyl-tRNA synthetase and tRNA(Gly)UCA in Escherichia coli yields significant β-galactosidase activity in vivo from a lacZ gene containing an in-frame TGA codon. Comparative genomic analysis with Human Microbiome Project data revealed that the human body harbors a striking diversity of SR1 bacteria. This is a surprising finding because SR1 is most closely related to bacteria that live in anoxic and thermal environments. Some of these bacteria share common genetic and metabolic features with SR1, including UGA to glycine reassignment and an archaeal-type ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase (RubisCO) involved in AMP recycling. UGA codon reassignment renders SR1 genes untranslatable by other bacteria, which impacts horizontal gene transfer within the human microbiota.

  3. From Laboratory Research to a Clinical Trial: Copper Alloy Surfaces Kill Bacteria and Reduce Hospital-Acquired Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Harold T; Keevil, C William; Salgado, Cassandra D; Schmidt, Michael G

    2015-01-01

    This is a translational science article that discusses copper alloys as antimicrobial environmental surfaces. Bacteria die when they come in contact with copper alloys in laboratory tests. Components made of copper alloys were also found to be efficacious in a clinical trial. There are indications that bacteria found on frequently touched environmental surfaces play a role in infection transmission. In laboratory testing, copper alloy samples were inoculated with bacteria. In clinical trials, the amount of live bacteria on the surfaces of hospital components made of copper alloys, as well as those made from standard materials, was measured. Finally, infection rates were tracked in the hospital rooms with the copper components and compared to those found in the rooms containing the standard components. Greater than a 99.9% reduction in live bacteria was realized in laboratory tests. In the clinical trials, an 83% reduction in bacteria was seen on the copper alloy components, when compared to the surfaces made from standard materials in the control rooms. Finally, the infection rates were found to be reduced by 58% in patient rooms with components made of copper, when compared to patients' rooms with components made of standard materials. Bacteria die on copper alloy surfaces in both the laboratory and the hospital rooms. Infection rates were lowered in those hospital rooms containing copper components. Thus, based on the presented information, the placement of copper alloy components, in the built environment, may have the potential to reduce not only hospital-acquired infections but also patient treatment costs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. The roles of haemocytes and the lymphoid organ in the clearance of injected Vibrio bacteria in Penaeus monodon shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Braak, C B T; Botterblom, M H A; Taverne, N; van Muiswinkel, W B; Rombout, J H W M; van der Knaap, W P W

    2002-10-01

    In order to study the reaction of Penaeus monodon haemocytes, live Vibrio anguillarum bacteria were injected and the shrimp were periodically sampled. Immuno-double staining analysis with specific antisera against the haemocyte granules and bacteria showed that large numbers of haemocytes encapsulated the bacteria at the site of injection. A rapid decrease of live circulating bacteria was detected in the haemolymph. Bacterial clearance in the haemolymph was induced by humoral factors, as observed by agglutinated bacteria, and followed by uptake in different places in the body. Bacteria mainly accumulated in the lymphoid organ (LO), where they, or their degradation products, could be detected for at least 7 days after injection. The LO consists of folded tubules with a central haemal lumen and a wall, layered with cells. The haemolymph, including the antigens, seemed to migrate from the central tubular lumen through the wall, where the bacteria are arrested and their degradation is started. Electron microscopy of the LO revealed the presence of many phagocytic cells that morphologically resemble small-granular haemocytes. It is proposed that haemocytes settle in the tubule walls before they phagocytose. Immunostaining suggests that many of the haemocytes degranulate in the LO, producing a layer of fibrous material in the outer tubule wall. These findings might contribute to the reduced haemocyte concentration in the haemolymph of diseased animals or following injection of foreign material. It is proposed that the LO is a filter for virtually all foreign material encountered in the haemolymph. Observations from the present study are similar to clearance mechanisms in the hepatic haemolymph vessel in most decapod crustaceans that do not possess a LO. The experimental shrimp appeared to contain many LO spheroids, where bacterial antigens were finally observed as well. It is proposed that the spheroids have a degradation function for both bacterial and viral material

  5. Bacteria in crude oil survived autoclaving and stimulated differentially by exogenous bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Cui Gong

    Full Text Available Autoclaving of crude oil is often used to evaluate the hydrocarbon-degrading abilities of bacteria. This may be potentially useful for bioaugmentation and microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR. However, it is not entirely clear if "endogenous" bacteria (e.g., spores in/on crude oil survive the autoclaving process, or influence subsequent evaluation of the hydrocarbon-degradation abilities of the "exogenous" bacterial strains. To test this, we inoculated autoclaved crude oil medium with six exogenous bacterial strains (three Dietzia strains, two Acinetobacter strains, and one Pseudomonas strain. The survival of the spore-forming Bacillus and Paenibacillus and the non-spore-forming mesophilic Pseudomonas, Dietzia, Alcaligenes, and Microbacterium was detected using a 16S rRNA gene clone library and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP analysis. However, neither bacteria nor bacterial activity was detected in three controls consisting of non-inoculated autoclaved crude oil medium. These results suggest that detection of endogenous bacteria was stimulated by the six inoculated strains. In addition, inoculation with Acinetobacter spp. stimulated detection of Bacillus, while inoculation with Dietzia spp. and Pseudomonas sp. stimulated the detection of more Pseudomonas. In contrast, similar exogenous bacteria stimulated similar endogenous bacteria at the genus level. Based on these results, special emphasis should be applied to evaluate the influence of bacteria capable of surviving autoclaving on the hydrocarbon-degrading abilities of exogenous bacteria, in particular, with regard to bioaugmentation and MEOR. Bioaugmentation and MEOR technologies could then be developed to more accurately direct the growth of specific endogenous bacteria that may then improve the efficiency of treatment or recovery of crude oil.

  6. Exopolysaccharides produced by lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caggianiello, Graziano; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Spano, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is able to produce capsular or extracellular polysaccharides, with various chemical compositions and properties. Polysaccharides produced by LAB alter the rheological properties of the matrix in which they are dispersed, leading to typically viscous and

  7. Stress Physiology of Lactic Acid Bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Alegría, Ángel; Bron, Peter A; de Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Lemos, José A; Linares, Daniel M; Ross, Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Turroni, Francesca; van Sinderen, Douwe; Varmanen, Pekka; Ventura, Marco; Zúñiga, Manuel; Tsakalidou, Effie; Kok, Jan

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are important starter, commensal, or pathogenic microorganisms. The stress physiology of LAB has been studied in depth for over 2 decades, fueled mostly by the technological implications of LAB robustness in the food industry. Survival of probiotic LAB in the host and the

  8. Role of Outer Membrane Vesicles of Bacteria

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 8. Role of Outer Membrance Vesicles of Bacteria. M V Jagannadham M K Chattopadhyay. General Article Volume 20 Issue 8 ... Keywords. Outer membrane ves ic les (OMVs); secretion; communication; virulence; antibiotic resistance; vaccines.

  9. Antibiotic Resistance of Bacteria: A Global Challenge

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    property rights. 2Madhab K Chattopadhyay is a scientist at the Centre for Cellular and Molecular. Biology (CSIR). His areas of interest are stress adaptation of bacteria and ... of activity in the presence of biological materials such as pus,. Any chemical ..... An update from the Infectious Diseases Society of America, Clin. Infect.

  10. Bioluminescent hydrocarbonclastic bacteria of the Niger Delta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Utilization of three petroleum hydrocarbons (Mobil SAE 40 Engine Oil, Diesel and Bonny light Crude Oil) by four bioluminescent bacteria (Vibrio harveyi, V. fisheri, Photobacterium leiognathi and P. Phosphoreum isolated from the Bonny estuary in the Niger Delta, Nigeria was investigated. Microbial utilization was monitored ...

  11. SOLUTE TRANSPORT AND ENERGY TRANSDUCTION IN BACTERIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KONINGS, WN; POOLMAN, B; VANVEEN, HW

    1994-01-01

    In bacteria two forms of metabolic energy are usually present, i.e. ATP and transmembrane ion-gradients, that can be used to drive the various endergonic reactions associated with cellular growth. ATP can be formed directly in substrate level phosphorylation reactions whereas primary transport

  12. Metabolic engineering of bacteria for ethanol production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ingram, L.O.; Gomez, P.F.; Lai, X.; Moniruzzaman, M.; Wood, B.E.; Yomano, L.P.; York, S.W. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Cell Science

    1998-04-20

    Technologies are available which will allow the conversion of lignocellulose into fuel ethanol using genetically engineered bacteria. Assembling these into a cost-effective process remains a challenge. The authors` work has focused primarily on the genetic engineering of enteric bacteria using a portable ethanol production pathway. Genes encoding Zymomonas mobilis pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase have been integrated into the chromosome of Escherichia coli B to produce strain KO11 for the fermentation of hemicellulose-derived syrups. This organism can efficiently ferment all hexose and pentose sugars present in the polymers of hemicellulose. Klebsiella oxytoca M5A1 has been genetically engineered in a similar manner to produce strain P2 for ethanol production from cellulose. This organism has the native ability to ferment cellobiose and cellotriose, eliminating the need for one class of cellulase enzymes. The optimal pH for cellulose fermentation with this organism is near that of fungal cellulases. The general approach for the genetic engineering of new biocatalysts has been most successful with enteric bacteria thus far. However, this approach may also prove useful with gram-positive bacteria which have other important traits for lignocellulose conversion. Many opportunities remain for further improvements in the biomass to ethanol processes.

  13. Volatile communication between fungi and bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmidt, Ruth Lydia

    2017-01-01

    If you are small, smells are a good way to stand out. Soil microorganisms, such as bacteria and fungi, produce an array of pleasant or repelling odors, also known as volatile compounds. These compounds can easily travel through the abundant air- and water-filled pockets of the soil, mediating

  14. Seeing Streptococcus pneumoniae, a Common Killer Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Rikke Schmidt; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth

    2014-01-01

    of the bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae by use of ink, watercolours and computer graphics. We propose a novel artistic visual rendering of Streptococcus pneumoniae and ask what the value of these kind of representations are compared to traditional scientific data. We ask if drawings and computer...

  15. Antimicrobial resistant bacteria in the food chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wegener, Henrik Caspar

    2003-01-01

    Antimicrobials are used for treatment and prevention of disease in food animals and as feed additives for growth promotion. All uses lead to the development of resistant bacteria, some of which are pathogenic to humans. Current main concerns are with resistance in Salmonella and Campylobacter...

  16. Anhydrobiosis in bacteria: From physiology to applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this review, we present the basic theoretical concepts related to anhydrobiosis, focusing on bacterial species. An update about desiccation tolerance in bacteria is given; and the general mechanisms of desiccation tolerance and desiccation damage are described. In addition, we show how the study of anhydrobiosis in ...

  17. Biological Potential of Chitinolytic Marine Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Sara Skøtt; Andersen, Birgitte; Gram, Lone

    2016-01-01

    Chitinolytic microorganisms secrete a range of chitin modifying enzymes, which can be exploited for production of chitin derived products or as fungal or pest control agents. Here, we explored the potential of 11 marine bacteria (Pseudoalteromonadaceae, Vibrionaceae) for chitin degradation using...

  18. Occurrence of pathogenic bacteria associated with Clarias ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Occurrence of pathogenic bacteria associated with Clarias gariepinus in selected fish farms of Kumbotso local governement area of Kano state, Nigeria. ... recommended limit of < 5 x 105 cfu/g for APC and, 11 for Escherichia coli MPN/ml by International Commission for Microbiological Specification for Food (ICMSF, 2007).

  19. Stress physiology of lactic acid bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Alegría, Ángel; Bron, Peter A.; Angelis, De Maria; Gobbetti, Marco; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Lemos, José A.; Linares, Daniel M.; Ross, Paul; Stanton, Catherine; Turroni, Francesca; Sinderen, Van Douwe; Varmanen, Pekka; Ventura, Marco; Zúñiga, Manuel; Tsakalidou, Effie; Kok, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are important starter, commensal, or pathogenic microorganisms. The stress physiology of LAB has been studied in depth for over 2 decades, fueled mostly by the technological implications of LAB robustness in the food industry. Survival of probiotic LAB in the host and

  20. Solvent-tolerant bacteria in biocatalysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bont, de J.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The toxicity of fine chemicals to the producer organism is a problem in several biotechnological production processes. In several instances, an organic phase can be used to extract the toxic product from the aqueous phase during a fermentation. With the discovery of solvent-tolerant bacteria, more