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Sample records for hydrogen uranyl phosphate

  1. Polaron effects in the protonic conductor hydrogen uranyl phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupu, D. (Inst. of Isotopic and Molecular Technology, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)); Grecu, R. (Inst. of Chemistry, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)); Biris, A.R. (Inst. of Isotopic and Molecular Technology, Cluj-Napoca (Romania))

    1993-08-01

    The isotope effects on the conductivity of hydrogen uranyl phosphate reveal ionic polaron effects in this solid protonic conductor, in agreement with the small polaron theory. An absorption band is observed at 0.67 eV, which can be correlated with the conduction mechanism consisting in both tunnelling and over-barrier hopping processes. (orig.)

  2. Determination of the stability of the uranyl ion sipped in {tau}-hydrogen phosphate of zirconium in sodic form; Determinacion de la estabilidad del ion uranilo sorbido en {tau}-hidrogenofosfato de zirconio en forma sodica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E.; Fernandez V, S.M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Drot, R.; Simoni, E. [Universite de Paris-Sud-XI, Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, Groupe de radiochimie, Bat. 100, 91406 Orsay (France)]. e-mail: edo@nuclear.inin.mx

    2005-07-01

    The stability of the uranyl sipped in the zirconium {tau}-hydrogen phosphate in sodic form ({tau}-NaZrP), was carried out characterizing the complexes formed by Laser spectroscopy in the visible region and by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The material was prepared by a new synthesis technique working in nitrogen atmosphere and to low temperatures. The sorption of the uranyl ion was made in acid media with concentrations of 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -5} of uranyl nitrate and with ion forces of 0.1 and 0.5 M of NaClO{sub 4}. The spectra of induced fluorescence with laser (TRLFS) show that the uranyl is fixed in very acid media in three well differentiated species, to pH less acid, the specie of long half life disappears and are only those of short half life. The results of the binding energy obtained by XPS indicate that the binding energy of the uranyl confer it a stable character to the complex formed in the {tau}-NaZP, that makes to this material appropriate to retain to the uranyl in solution to high ion forces and in acid media. (Author)

  3. Durable phosphate-selective electrodes based on uranyl salophenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wroblewski, Wojciech; Wojciechowski, Kamil; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew; Egberink, Richard J.M.; Snellink-Ruel, Bianca H.M.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2001-01-01

    Lipophilic uranyl salophenes derivatives were used as ionophores in durable phosphate-selective electrodes. The influence of the ionophore structure and membrane composition (polarity of plasticizer, the amount of incorporated ionic sites) on the electrode selectivity and long-term stability were st

  4. Acute toxicity of uranium hexafluoride, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Just, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Uranium hexafluoride (UF/sub 6/) released into the atmosphere will react rapidly with moisture in the air to form the hydrolysis products uranyl fluoride (UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/) and hydrogen fluoride (HF). Uranium compounds such as UF/sub 6/ and UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/ exhibit both chemical toxicity and radiological effects, while HF exhibits only chemical toxicity. This paper describes the development of a methodology for assessing the human health consequences of a known acute exposure to a mixture of UF/sub 6/, UO/sub 2/F/sub 2/, and HF. 4 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. A new uranyl phosphate sheet in the crystal structure of furongite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Bo, Fabrice; Hatert, Frederic [Liege Univ. (Belgium). Lab. de Mineralogie; Philippo, Simon [Musee National d' Historie Naturelle, Luxembourg (Luxembourg). Section Mineralogie

    2017-06-15

    The crystal structure of furongite, Al{sub 4}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}](OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 19.5}, from the Kobokobo pegmatite, Kivu, Democratic Republic of Congo, was solved for the first time. Furongite is triclinic, the space group P anti 1, Z=2, a = 12.1685(8), b = 14.1579(6), c = 17.7884(6) Aa, α = 79.822(3), β = 77.637(4), γ = 67.293(2) , and V = 2746.2(2)Aa{sup 3}. The crystal structure was refined from single crystal X-ray diffraction data to R{sub 1} = 0.0733 for 7716 unique observed reflections, and to wR{sub 2} = 0.2081 for all 12,538 unique reflections. The structure of furongite contains infinite uranyl phosphate sheets of composition [(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}]{sup 10-} which are parallel to (1 0 1). The sheets are constituted by UrO{sub 5} pentagonal bipyramids and PO{sub 4} tetrahedra which share edges and vertices, and adjacent sheets are linked by a dense network of hydrogen bonds. Running through the sheets and connected mainly to the free apical oxygen atom of PO4 tetrahedra are Al octahedra connected together to form remarkable Al{sub 2}O{sub 5}(OH)(H{sub 2}O){sub 5} and Al{sub 4}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 10} clusters. These Al clusters are only bonded to one sheet, and do not connect two adjacent sheets together. The topology of the uranyl phosphate sheets is related to the uranophane anion topology, and can be described as a new geometrical isomer of the uranophane group. Furongite is the first uranyl phosphate reported in nature with a U:P ratio of 2:3.

  6. Uranyl salophenes as ionophores for phosphate-selective electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wroblewski, Wojciech; Wojciechowski, Kamil; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew; Egberink, Richard J.M.; Snellink-Ruel, Bianca H.M.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    2000-01-01

    Anion selectivities of poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) plasticized membranes containing uranyl salophene derivatives were presented. The influence of the membrane components (i.e. ionophore structure, dielectric constant and structure of plasticizer, the amount of incorporated ammonium salt) on its phosph

  7. A cryogenic fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate, phosphate and oxyhydroxide minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Z.; Zachara, J.M.; Liu, C.; Gassman, P.L.; Felmy, A.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Clark, S.B. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States)

    2008-07-01

    In this work we applied time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIF) at both room temperature (RT) and near liquid-helium temperature (6 K) to characterize a series of natural and synthetic minerals of uranium carbonate, phosphate and oxyhydroxides including rutherfordine, zellerite, liebigite, phosphuranylite, meta-autunite, meta-torbernite, uranyl phosphate, sodium-uranyl-phosphate, becquerelite, schoepite, meta-schoepite, dehydrated schoepite and compreignacite, and have compared the spectral characteristics among these minerals as well as our previously published data on uranyl silicates. For the carbonate minerals, the fluorescence spectra of rutherfordine showed significant difference from those of zellerite and liebigite. The fluorescence spectra of the phosphate minerals closely resemble each other despite the differences in their composition and structure. For all uranium oxyhydroxides, the fluorescence spectra are largely red-shifted as compared to those of the uranium carbonates and phosphates and their vibronic bands are broad and less resolved at RT. The enhanced spectra resolution at 6 K allows more accurate determination of the fluorescence band origin and offers a complemental method to measure the O=U=O symmetrical stretch frequency, {nu}{sub 1}, from the spacings of the vibronic bands of the fluorescence spectra. The average {nu}{sub 1} values appear to be inversely correlated with the average pK{sub a} values of the anions. (orig.)

  8. A cryogenic fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate, phosphate, and oxyhydroxide minerals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zheming; Zachara, John M.; Liu, Chongxuan; Gassman, Paul L.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Clark, Sue B.

    2008-11-03

    In this work we have applied liquid-helium temperature (LHeT) time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLIF) to characterize a series of natural and synthetic minerals of uranium carbonate, phosphate and oxyhydroxides including rutherfordine, zellerite, liebigite, phosphuranylite, meta-autunite, meta-torbernite, uranyl phosphate, sodium-uranyl-phosphate, bequerelite, clarkeite, curite, schoepite and compregnacite, and compared their spectral characteristics among these minerals as well as our previously published data on uranyl silicates. For the carbonate minerals, the fluorescence spectra depend on the stoichiometry of the mineral. For the phosphate minerals the fluorescence spectra closely resemble each other despite the differences in their composition and structure. For all uranium oxyhydroxides, the fluorescence spectra are largely red-shifted as compared with those of the uranium carbonates and phosphates and their vibronic bands are broadened and less resolved. The much enhanced spectra resolution at LHeT allows more accurate calculation of the O=U=O symmetrical stretch frequency, ν1, corresponding to the average spacing of the vibronic peaks of the fluorescence spectra and the spectral origin as reflected by the position of the first vibronic band. It was found that both the average ν1 and λ1 values correlate well with the average basicity of the inorganic anion.

  9. Insight into Hydrogen Bonding of Uranyl Hydroxide Layers and Capsules by Use of 1H Magic-Angle Spinning NMR Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Todd M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Organic Material Science; Liao, Zuolei [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Materials; Nyman, May [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Materials; Yates, Jonathan [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials

    2016-04-27

    In this paper, solid-state 1H magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR was used to investigate local proton environments in anhydrous [UO2(OH)2] (α-UOH) and hydrated uranyl hydroxide [(UO2)4O(OH)6·5H2O (metaschoepite). For the metaschoepite material, proton resonances of the μ2-OH hydroxyl and interlayer waters were resolved, with two-dimensional (2D) double-quantum (DQ) 1H–1H NMR correlation experiments revealing strong dipolar interactions between these different proton species. The experimental NMR results were combined with first-principles CASTEP GIPAW (gauge including projector-augmented wave) chemical shift calculations to develop correlations between hydrogen-bond strength and observed 1H NMR chemical shifts. Finally, these NMR correlations allowed characterization of local hydrogen-bond environments in uranyl U24 capsules and of changes in hydrogen bonding that occurred during thermal dehydration of metaschoepite.

  10. Hydrogen Bonding in Phosphine Oxide/Phosphate-Phenol Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cuypers, R.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.; Zuilhof, H.

    2010-01-01

    To develop a new solvent-impregnated resin (SIR) system for the removal of phenols and thiophenols from water, complex formation by hydrogen bonding of phosphine oxides and phosphates is studied using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and quantum chemical modeling. Six different computational m

  11. Structure-configurational entropy and its effect on the thermodynamic stability of uranyl phases: With special application for geological disposal of nuclear waste

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN; Fanrong(陈繁荣); Rodney; C.Ewing

    2003-01-01

    Spent UO2 fuel will rapidly be altered to U6+ phases in nuclear waste repositories. Because most uranyl phases are based on sheet or chain structures and usually contain several molecular water groups, site-mixing, vacancies, as well as disorder in the orientation of hydrogen bonds may occur. A systematic survey of the published crystallographic data for uranates, uranyl oxide hydrates, phosphates, silicates, carbonates, and sulfates demonstrates that site-mixing apparently occurs in the structures of at least 31 uranyl phases. Calculations of the ideal site-mixing entropy indicate that the residual contribution that arises from substitution and vacancies to the third-law entropies of some uranyl phases is large. A brief examination of the crystal chemistry of water molecules in uranyl phases suggests that considerable residual entropy may be caused by the disorder of hydrogen bonds associated with interstitial H2O groups. In the geochemical environment that expected to occur in the near-field of nuclear waste repositories, the existence of structure-configurational entropy may reduce the uranium concentration of several log units in solutions equilibrated with some uranyl phases. Therefore, compositional analysis and structural determinations must be made on the samples used in calorimetric measurements, and the calorimetric data must be combined with solubility data to evaluate the thermodynamic stability of the interested phases.

  12. Effect of temperature on the mechanisms of interaction between uranyl ion and zirconium oxo-phosphate; Effet de la temperature sur les mechanismes d'interaction entre l'ion uranyle et l'oxophosphate de zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almazan Torres, Maria Guadalupe [Universite de Paris XI Orsay, Orsay (France)

    2007-07-01

    Uranium sorption onto Zr{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} has been studied between 298 K and 363 K, in 0.1 M NaClO{sub 4} medium. Potentiometric titrations were realized to determine temperature dependency of the acid-base properties (pH{sub pcn}, acidity constants). Classical batch experiments were performed at different temperatures. The sorption experiments revealed that the uranium sorption onto Zr{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} is favoured with the temperature. Structural characterization of the surface complexes was performed by both Time-Resolved Laser-Induced Fluorescence (TRLIF) and EXAFS spectroscopy. The TRLIF measurements vs. temperature revealed two uranyl surface complexes. No influence of the temperature onto the nature surface complex was observed. The EXAFS analysis showed a splitting of the equatorial oxygen atoms in two shells, corresponding to uranyl bidentate, inner-sphere complexes. The obtained structural uranyl surface complex information was used to simulate (using a constant capacitance model) the sorption edges. The proposed complexes equilibrium model consists of the following surface complexes: ({identical_to}ZrOH){sub 2}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and ({identical_to}PO){sub 2}UO{sub 2}. Besides the stability constants for the surface complexes, the thermodynamic parameters {delta}H{sup 0} and {delta}S{sup 0} were determined using the van't Hoff equation. The enthalpy values associated to the U(VI) retention onto Zr{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, determined by the temperature dependence of the stability constants, testify that the formation of the complex ({identical_to}PO){sub 2}UO{sub 2} (55 kJ/mol) is endothermic, while no influence of the temperature was observed for the formation of the complex ({identical_to}ZrOH){sub 2}UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The adsorption reaction of the last complex is then driven by entropy. In addition, calorimetric measurements of uranium sorption onto Zr{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} were carried out to directly quantify the enthalpy

  13. A facile synthesis of ω-aminoalkyl ammonium hydrogen phosphates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Bo Kong; Xiao Yong Zhou; Yang Yang; Xing Yi Xie

    2012-01-01

    A series of ω-aminoalkyl ammonium hydrogen phosphates were synthesized through a simple and efficient three-step method.The starting materials,ω-aminoalkyl alcohols (AC-n,with carbon number n =3,4,5,6),were amino-protected with 9-fluorenylmethyl chloroformate (Fmoc-Cl),followed by phosphorylation with POCl3 and deprotection in piperidine/DMF The structures of each intermediate and final product were confirmed by 1H NMR,FTIR and mass spectrum.The yield of each step was about 77-92%,with a total yield higher than 56%.This new method was superior in low-cost raw materials,mild reaction temperatures (0-25 ℃) and easy purification methods.

  14. Uranyl ion coordination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, H.T.

    1963-01-01

    A review of the known crystal structures containing the uranyl ion shows that plane-pentagon coordination is equally as prevalent as plane-square or plane-hexagon. It is suggested that puckered-hexagon configurations of OH - or H2O about the uranyl group will tend to revert to plane-pentagon coordination. The concept of pentagonal coordination is invoked for possible explanations of the complex crystallography of the natural uranyl hydroxides and the unusual behavior of polynuclear ions in hydrolyzed uranyl solutions.

  15. Molten salt flux synthesis and crystal structure of a new open-framework uranyl phosphate Cs{sub 3}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(PO{sub 4})O{sub 2}: Spectroscopic characterization and cationic mobility studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagoubi, S., E-mail: said.yagoubi@cea.fr [LEEL SIS2M UMR 3299 CEA-CNRS-Université Paris-Sud 11, CEA Saclay, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Renard, C.; Abraham, F. [Unité de Catalyse et de Chimie du Solide, UCCS UMR CNRS 8181, ENSCL-USTL, B.P. 90108, 59652 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Obbade, S. [Laboratoire d’Electrochimie et de Physicochimie des Matériaux et des Interfaces, LEPMI, UMR 5279, CNRS-Grenoble INP-UdS-UJF, 1130 Rue de la Piscine, BP75, 38402 Saint-Martin d’Hères (France)

    2013-04-15

    The reaction of triuranyl diphosphate tetrahydrate precursor (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} with a CsI flux at 750 °C yields a yellow single crystals of new compound Cs{sub 3}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(PO{sub 4})O{sub 2}. The crystal structure (monoclinic, space group C2/c, a=13.6261 (13) Å, b=8.1081(8) Å, c=12.3983(12) Å, β=114.61(12)°, V=1245.41(20) Å{sup 3} with Z=4) has been solved using direct methods and Fourier difference techniques. A full-matrix least-squares refinement on the basis of F{sup 2} yielded R1=0.028 and wR2=0.071 for 79 parameters and 1352 independent reflections with I≥2σ(I) collected on a BRUKER AXS diffractometer with MoKα radiation and a charge-coupled device detector. The crystal structure is built by two independent uranium atoms in square bipyramidal coordination, connected by two opposite corners to form infinite chains {sup 1}{sub ∞}[UO{sub 5}] and by one phosphorus atom in a tetrahedral environment PO{sub 4}. The two last entities {sup 1}{sub ∞}[UO{sub 5}] and PO{sub 4} are linked by sharing corners to form a three-dimensional structure presenting different types of channels occupied by Cs{sup +} alkaline cations. Their mobility within the tunnels were studied between 280 and 800 °C and compared with other tunneled uranyl minerals. The infrared spectrum shows a good agreement with the values inferred from the single crystal structure analysis of uranyl phosphate compound. - Graphical abstract: Arrhenius plot of the electrical conductivity of tunneled compounds Cs{sub 3}U{sub 2}PO{sub 10} and CsU{sub 2}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 11.5}. Highlights: ► The reaction of (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4} in excess of molten CsI leads to single-crystals of new tunneled compound Cs{sub 3}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}(PO{sub 4})O{sub 2}. ► Ionic conductivity measurements and crystal structure analysis indicate a strong connection of the Cs{sup +} cations to the tunnels. ► A low symmetry in Cs{sub 3}(UO{sub 2

  16. Simultaneous removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate in semiconductor acidic wastewater by zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Hiroyuki; Tokumura, Masahiro; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    The zero-valent iron (ZVI) wastewater treatment has been applied to simultaneous removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate in semiconductor acidic wastewaters. The simultaneous removal occurs by the reactions performed due to the sequential transformation of ZVI under the acidic condition. Fortunately the solution pH of semiconductor acidic wastewaters is low which is effective for the sequential transformation of ZVI. Firstly the reduction of nitrate is taken place by electrons generated by the corrosion of ZVI under acidic conditions. Secondly the ferrous ion generated by the corrosion of ZVI reacts with hydrogen peroxide and generates ·OH radical (Fenton reaction). The Fenton reaction consists of the degradation of hydrogen peroxide and the generation of ferric ion. Finally phosphate precipitates out with iron ions. In the simultaneous removal process, 1.6 mM nitrate, 9.0 mM hydrogen peroxide and 1.0 mM phosphate were completely removed by ZVI within 100, 15 and 15 min, respectively. The synergy among the reactions for the removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate was found. In the individual pollutant removal experiment, the removal of phosphate by ZVI was limited to 80% after 300 min. Its removal rate was considerably improved in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and the complete removal of phosphate was achieved after 15 min.

  17. Engineering the pentose phosphate pathway to improve hydrogen yield in recombinant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young Mi; Cho, Han-Saem; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Park, Jong Moon

    2011-12-01

    Among various routes for the biological hydrogen production, the NAD(P)H-dependent pentose phosphate (PP) pathway is the most efficient for the dark fermentation. Few studies, however, have focused on the glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase, encoded by zwf, as a key enzyme activating the PP pathway. Although the gluconeogenic activity is essential for activating the PP pathway, it is difficult to enhance the NADPH production by regulating only this activity because the gluconeogenesis is robust and highly sensitive to concentrations of glucose and AMP inside the cell. In this study, the FBPase II (encoded by glpX), a regulation-insensitive enzyme in the gluconeogenic pathway, was activated. Physiological studies of several recombinant, ferredoxin-dependent hydrogenase system-containing Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) strains showed that overexpression of glpX alone could increase the hydrogen yield by 1.48-fold compared to a strain with the ferredoxin-dependent hydrogenase system only; the co-overexpression of glpX with zwf increased the hydrogen yield further to 2.32-fold. These results indicate that activation of the PP pathway by glpX overexpression-enhanced gluconeogenic flux is crucial for the increase of NAD(P)H-dependent hydrogen production in E. coli BL21(DE3).

  18. Uranyl Oxalate Solubility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leturcq, G.; Costenoble, S.; Grandjean, S. [CEA Marcoule DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LCA - BP17171 - 30207 Bagnols sur Ceze cedex (France)

    2008-07-01

    The solubility of uranyl oxalate was determined at ambient temperature by precipitation in oxalic-nitric solutions, using an initial uranyl concentration of 0.1 mol/L. Oxalic concentration varied from 0.075 to 0.3 mol/L while nitric concentration ranged between 0.75 and 3 mol/L. Dissolution tests, using complementary oxalic-nitric media, were carried out for 550 hours in order to study the kinetic to reach thermodynamic equilibrium. Similar solubility values were reached by dissolution and precipitation. Using the results, it was possible to draw the solubility surface versus oxalic and nitric concentrations and to determine both the apparent solubility constant of UO{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}, 3H{sub 2}O (Ks) and the apparent formation constant of the first uranyl-oxalate complex UO{sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4} (log {beta}1), for ionic strengths varying between 1 and 3 mol/L. Ks and log {beta}1 values were found to vary from 1.9 10{sup -8} to 9.2 10{sup -9} and from 5.95 to 6.06, respectively, when ionic strength varied from 1 to 3 mol/L. A second model may fit our data obtained at an ionic strength of 3 mol/L suggesting as reported by Moskvin et al. (1959) that no complexes are formed for [H{sup +}] at 3 M. The Ks value would then be 1.3 10{sup -8}. (authors)

  19. Can uranyl complexes encapsulate to carbon nanotubes? A periodic DFT study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K SRINIVASU; MAHESH SUNDARARAJAN

    2017-06-01

    Periodic density functional theory (DFT)-based calculations were carried out on a series of uranyl complexes encapsulated within single walled (SW)-CNT to understand their encapsulation affinities. We find that uranyl-aqua complex ([UO₂(H₂O)₅]²⁺) binds stronger as compared to uranyl-hydroxo-complex ([UO₂(OH)₄]²⁻) due to the variable overall charge of the complex. Further, binding affinities of uranyl formate complexes with different formate stoichiometries (1:1, 1:2 and 1:3) with SW-CNT are considered. Here again, due to variable charges, cationic mono-‘formate-uranyl ([UO2(FM)(H₂O)₃]¹⁺) complex binds stronger as compared to anionic tri-formate uranyl ([UO2(FM)₃]¹⁻). Further, due to the very weak binding commonly found in [UO₂(FM)₃]¹⁻ to CNT, the tubular ends of SW-CNT are sealed with functionalized C₃₆ fullerene. The binding affinity of uranyl complex is not improved when C₃₆ fullerene is used to seal to the SW-CNT as compared to its unsealed counterpart. However, upon functionalizing (at the hub carbon) the C36 cork, the binding affinity of [UO₂(FM)3]¹⁻ is larger inside the CNT due to favorable hydrogen bonding interactions with the uranyl oxygens. Our findings are consistent with the experimental observations which will help to design novel nanomaterials for nuclear waste management processes.

  20. Understanding the bonding nature of uranyl ion and functionalized graphene: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qun-Yan; Lan, Jian-Hui; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Wei, Yue-Zhou; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2014-03-20

    Studying the bonding nature of uranyl ion and graphene oxide (GO) is very important for understanding the mechanism of the removal of uranium from radioactive wastewater with GO-based materials. We have optimized 22 complexes between uranyl ion and GO applying density functional theory (DFT) combined with quasi-relativistic small-core pseudopotentials. The studied oxygen-containing functional groups include hydroxyl, carboxyl, amido, and dimethylformamide. It is observed that the distances between uranium atoms and oxygen atoms of GO (U-OG) are shorter in the anionic GO complexes (uranyl/GO(-/2-)) compared to the neutral GO ones (uranyl/GO). The formation of hydrogen bonds in the uranyl/GO(-/2-) complexes can enhance the binding ability of anionic GO toward uranyl ions. Furthermore, the thermodynamic calculations show that the changes of the Gibbs free energies in solution are relatively more negative for complexation reactions concerning the hydroxyl and carboxyl functionalized anionic GO complexes. Therefore, both the geometries and thermodynamic energies indicate that the binding abilities of uranyl ions toward GO modified by hydroxyl and carboxyl groups are much stronger compared to those by amido and dimethylformamide groups. This study can provide insights for designing new nanomaterials that can efficiently remove radionuclides from radioactive wastewater.

  1. ION EXCHANGE SUBSTANCES BY SAPONIFICATION OF ALLYL PHOSPHATE POLYMERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, J.

    1959-04-14

    An ion exchange resin having a relatively high adsorption capacity tor uranyl ion as compared with many common cations is reported. The resin comprises an alphyl-allyl hydrogen phosphate polymer, the alphyl group being either allyl or a lower alkyl group having up to 5 carbon atoins. The resin is prepared by polymerizing compounds such as alkyl-diallyl phosphate and triallyl phosphate in the presence of a free radical generating substance and then partially hydrolyzing the resulting polymer to cause partial replacement of organic radicals by cations. A preferred free radical gencrating agent is dibenzoyl peroxide. The partial hydrolysis is brought about by refluxing the polymer with concentrated aqueous NaOH for three or four hours.

  2. Conversion of Oximes to Carbonyl Compounds by Triscetylpyridinium Tetrakis(oxodiperoxotungsto) Phosphate (PCWP)-mediated Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Toscano, Rosa M.; Gaetano Tomaselli; Antonio Rescifina; Ugo Chiacchio; Francesco P. Ballistreri

    2008-01-01

    Aromatic and aliphatic oximes have been deoximated in chloroform-water to the corresponding aldehydes with dilute hydrogen peroxide and triscetylpyridinium tetrakis (oxodiperoxotungsto) phosphate as catalyst. The presence of dipolarophiles in the reaction mixtures allows a competitive reaction that converts oximes into isoxazole and isoxazoline derivatives via the intermediate formation of nitrile oxide species.

  3. Conversion of Oximes to Carbonyl Compounds by Triscetylpyridinium Tetrakis(oxodiperoxotungsto Phosphate (PCWP-mediated Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M. Toscano

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Aromatic and aliphatic oximes have been deoximated in chloroform-water to the corresponding aldehydes with dilute hydrogen peroxide and triscetylpyridinium tetrakis (oxodiperoxotungsto phosphate as catalyst. The presence of dipolarophiles in the reaction mixtures allows a competitive reaction that converts oximes into isoxazole and isoxazoline derivatives via the intermediate formation of nitrile oxide species.

  4. Adsorption of uranyl species on hydroxylated titanium carbide nanosheet: A first-principles study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Juan; Lan, Jian-Hui; Wang, Lin; Wu, Qun-Yan; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Bo, Tao; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2016-05-05

    In this work, hydroxylated titanium carbide Ti3C2(OH)2, a representative of the two-dimensional transition metal carbides, has been predicted to be an effective adsorbent for uranyl ions in aqueous environments for the first time using density functional theory simulations. The calculations revealed that the uranyl ion can strongly bind with Ti3C2(OH)2 nanosheet in aqueous solution regardless of the presence of anionic ligands such as OH(-), Cl(-) and NO3(-). The bidentate coordination of uranyl to the surface is energetically more favorable than other adsorption configurations, and the uranyl ion prefers to bind with the deprotonated O adsorption site rather than the protonated one on the hydroxylated surface. During the adsorption process, the chemical adsorption as well as the formation of hydrogen bonds is the dominant factor.

  5. Solvent Extraction and QSPR of Catecholamines with a Bis(2-ethlhexyl) Hydrogen Phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizuka, Kazuharu.; Fujimoto, Yuko.; Ota, Keisuke.; Inoue, Katsutoshi. [Saga University, Saga (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    1999-02-01

    In order to develop an effective separation recess for catecholamine (CA), a basic investigation on solvent extraction of dopamine (DA), adrenaline (Ad) and noradrenaline (NA) from hydrochloric acid solution and their stripping is conducted at 30 degree C employing bis(2-ethylhexyl) hydrogen phosphate (D2EHPA) in chloroform, n-hexane and toluene as the organic diluents. From the dependencies of the distribution ratios on the concentrations of reactant species, i.e. CA, hydrogen ion and D2EHPA, it is elucidated that CA (RNH{sub 2}) is extracted with D2EHPA (HR`) according to the ion exchange mechanism, as the complex type, RNH{sub 3}R` (HR`){sub 3}, and the equilibrium constants (K{sub ex,CA}) for the extraction reactions are also evaluated. The quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) of K{sub ex,CA} values for each organic diluent is discussed using molecular modeling with semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations considering the solvent effect. (author)

  6. Electrochemical uranyl cation biosensor with DNA oligonucleotides as receptor layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarczewska, Marta; Ziółkowski, Robert; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2014-04-01

    The present study aims at the further development of the uranyl oligonucleotide-based voltammetric biosensor, which takes advantage of strong interaction between UO2(2+) and phosphate DNA backbone. Herein we report the optimization of working parameters of previously elaborated electrochemical DNA biosensor. It is shown that the sensor sensitivity is highly dependent on the oligonucleotide probe length and the incubation time of sensor in a sample solution. Consequently, the highest sensitivity was obtained for 10-nucleotide sequence and 60 min incubation time. The lower detection limit towards uranyl cation for developed biosensor was 30 nM. The influence of mixed monolayers and the possibility of developing a non-calibration device were also investigated. The selectivity of the proposed biosensor was significantly improved via elimination of adenine nucleobases from the DNA probe. Moreover, the regeneration procedure was elaborated and tested to prolong the use of the same biosensor for 4 subsequent determinations of UO2(2+).

  7. Growth and characterization of calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate crystals from single diffusion gel technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendran, K.; Dale Keefe, C. [Department of Chemistry, Cape Breton University, Sydney, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2010-09-15

    Calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O, CHPD) a dissolved mineral in urine is known to cause renal or bladder stones in both human and animals. Growth of CHPD or brushite using sodium metasilicate gel techniques followed by light and polarizing microscopic studies revealed its structural and morphological details. Crystal identity by powder x-ray diffraction confirmed the FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopic techniques as alternate methods for fast analysis of brushite crystals which could form as one type of renal stones. P-O-P asymmetric stretchings in both FT-IR (987.2, 874.1 and 792 cm{sup -1}) and FT-Raman (986.3 cm{sup -1}, 1057.6 cm{sup -1} and 875.2 cm{sup -1}) were found as characteristics of brushite crystals. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) analysis revealed brushite crystallization purity using gel method by studying their endothermic peaks. This study incorporated a multidisciplinary approach in characterizing CHPD crystals grown in vitro to help formulate prevention or dissolution strategy in controlling urinary stone growth. Initial studies with 0.2 M citric acid ions as controlling agent in the nucleation of brushite crystals further support the presented approach. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Tryptophanase-catalyzed L-tryptophan synthesis from D-serine in the presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka; Saito, Takeshi; Noriko, Fujii

    2009-06-01

    Tryptophanase, an enzyme with extreme absolute stereospecificity for optically active stereoisomers, catalyzes the synthesis of l-tryptophan from l-serine and indole through a beta-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type, and has no activity on d-serine. We previously reported that tryptophanase changed its stereospecificity to degrade d-tryptophan in highly concentrated diammonium hydrogen phosphate, (NH(4))(2)HPO(4) solution. The present study provided the same stereospecific change seen in the d-tryptophan degradation reaction also occurs in tryptophan synthesis from d-serine. Tryptophanase became active to d-serine to synthesize l-tryptophan in the presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate. This reaction has never been reported before. d-serine seems to undergo beta-replacement via an enzyme-bonded alpha-aminoacylate intermediate to yield l-tryptophan.

  9. Tryptophanase-Catalyzed l-Tryptophan Synthesis from d-Serine in the Presence of Diammonium Hydrogen Phosphate

    OpenAIRE

    Fujii Noriko; Haruka Ozaki; Takeshi Saito; Akihiko Shimada

    2009-01-01

    Tryptophanase, an enzyme with extreme absolute stereospecificity for optically active stereoisomers, catalyzes the synthesis of L-tryptophan from L-serine and indole through a β-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type, and has no activity on D-serine. We previously reported that tryptophanase changed its stereospecificity to degrade D-tryptophan in highly concentrated diammonium hydrogen phosphate, (NH4)2HPO4 solution. The present study provided the same stereospecific change seen in the...

  10. Tryptophanase-Catalyzed l-Tryptophan Synthesis from d-Serine in the Presence of Diammonium Hydrogen Phosphate

    OpenAIRE

    Shimada, Akihiko; Ozaki, Haruka; Saito, Takeshi; Fujii, Noriko

    2009-01-01

    Tryptophanase, an enzyme with extreme absolute stereospecificity for optically active stereoisomers, catalyzes the synthesis of l-tryptophan from l-serine and indole through a β-substitution mechanism of the ping-pong type, and has no activity on d-serine. We previously reported that tryptophanase changed its stereospecificity to degrade d-tryptophan in highly concentrated diammonium hydrogen phosphate, (NH4)2HPO4 solution. The present study provided the same stereospecific change seen in the...

  11. New hydrogen titanium phosphate sulfate electrodes for Li-ion and Na-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ran; Mieritz, Daniel; Seo, Dong-Kyun; Chan, Candace K.

    2017-03-01

    NASICON-type materials with general formula AxM2(PO4)3 (A = Li or Na, M = Ti, V, and Fe) are promising candidates for Li- and Na-ion batteries due to their open three-dimensional framework structure. Here we report the electrochemical properties of hydrogen titanium phosphate sulfate, H0.4Ti2(PO4)2.4(SO4)0.6 (HTPS), a new mixed polyanion material with NASICON structure. Micron-sized HTPS aggregates with crystallite grain size of ca. 23 nm are synthesized using a sol-gel synthesis in an acidic medium. The properties of the as-synthesized HTPS, ball-milled HTPS, and samples prepared as carbon composites using an in-situ glucose decomposition reaction are investigated. A capacity of 148 mAh g-1 corresponding to insertion of 2 Li+ per formula unit is observed in the ball-milled HTPS over the potential window of 1.5-3.4 V vs. Li/Li+. Lithiation at ca. 2.8 and 2.5 V is determined to occur through filling of the M1 and M2 sites, respectively. Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) are used characterize the HTPS before and after cycling. Evaluation of the HTPS in a Na-ion cell is also performed. A discharge capacity of 93 mAh g-1 with sodiation at ca. 2.9 and 2.2 V vs. Na/Na+ is observed.

  12. Use of triphenyl phosphate as risk mitigant for metal amide hydrogen storage materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes-Concepcion, Jose A.; Anton, Donald L.

    2016-04-26

    A process in a resulting product of the process in which a hydrogen storage metal amide is modified by a ball milling process using an additive of TPP. The resulting product provides for a hydrogen storage metal amide having a coating that renders the hydrogen storage metal amide resistant to air, ambient moisture, and liquid water while improving useful hydrogen storage and release kinetics.

  13. Nucleobase assemblies supported by uranyl cation coordination and other non-covalent interactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jitendra Kumar; Sandeep Verma

    2011-11-01

    We describe synthesis and solid state structural description of uranyl complexes of carboxylate functionalized adenine and uracil derivatives. The metal coordination through carboxylate pendant leads to the formation of dimeric assemblies, whereas the directional nature of hydrogen bonding interaction supported by nucleobases and aqua ligands, result in the generation of complex 3-D architectures containing embedded nucleobase ribbons.

  14. Optical apparatus and method for sensing uranyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylor, L.C.; Buchanan, B.R.

    1994-01-01

    An optical sensing device for uranyl and other substances, a method for making an optical sensing device and a method for chemically binding uranyl and other indicators to glass, quartz, cellulose and similar substrates. The indicator, such as arsenazo III, is immobilized on the substrate using a chemical binding process. The immobilized arsenazo III causes uranyl from a fluid sample to bind irreversibly to the substrate at its active sites, thus causing absorption of a portion of light transmitted through the substrate. Determination of the amount of light absorbed, using conventional means, yields the concentration of uranyl present in the sample fluid. The binding of uranyl on the substrate can be reversed by subsequent exposure of the substrate to a solution of 2,6-pyridinedicarboxylic acid. The chemical binding process is suitable for similarly binding other indicators, such as bromocresol green.

  15. Analysis of uranyl in solution through the formation of luminescent complexes; Analisis de uranilo en solucion mediante la formacion de complejos luminiscentes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, N.; Ordonez R, E.; Barrera D, C.E. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    The luminescence is one of the techniques used to determine the speciation of those complex that forms the uranyl in the solid-liquid interphase of distinct zirconium phosphates, also has the advantage that it allows to carry out its quantification at mid of high ion forces, because it has been demonstrated that this detection technique and quantification is reliable and sufficiently quick in the obtaining of results. For it that in this work, the quantification of the uranyl is presented by means of a luminescent complex with the aim of phosphates that avoid the fluorescence signal extinction, then the uranyl ion is very sensitive to the medium that contains it (pH, ion force, concentration, etc.) for what was necessary to establish the analysis conditions of the uranyl ion without signal lost, in inferior concentrations to 1X10{sup -3} M at mid of sodium perchlorate 0.5 M. (Author)

  16. The Effect of 3% Phosphate Ascorbyl Gel on Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Enamel treated with 35% Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Castro, Milena de Fátima Schalcher; Silva, Alice Carvalho; Franco, Marcela Mayana Pereira; Silva, Ana Paula Brito; Bramante, Fausto da Silva; da Silva, Monica Barros; Lima, Darlon Martins; Pereira, Adriana de Fátima Vasconcelos

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effect of 3% phosphate ascorbyl gel (PA) in different times onto the microshear bond strength of composite resin (CR) to bovine enamel treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP). Thirty enamel blocks of bovine incisors were made and divided into 5 groups (n = 6) with three specimens per group (n = 18), according to treatment: G1= No bleaching + CR; G2 = HP + CR after 15d; G3 = HP + CR after 24 hours; G4 = HP + PA (15 min) + CR after 24 hours; G5 = HP + PA (2 hours) + CR after 24 hours. The resin cylinders were made by Tygon matrices. Microshear bond strength test was performed using universal testing machine with a 50N load at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. Fracture modes were assessed by a stereomicroscope 40 ×. Microshear bond strength values were submitted to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) one-way and Tukey test (p 0.05). Failure modes were categorized into adhesive (90%) and mixed (10%). The use of 3% phosphate ascorbyl gel for 15 minutes was able to improve bond strength of composite resin to bleached bovine enamel, but when 3% phosphate ascorbyl gel was applied during 40 minutes it negatively interfered in the adhesion of the resin to bleached bovine enamel.

  17. On the hydrates of codeine phosphate: the remarkable influence of hydrogen bonding on the crystal size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runčevski, Tomče; Petruševski, Gjorgji; Makreski, Petre; Ugarkovic, Sonja; Dinnebier, Robert E

    2014-07-07

    Codeine phosphate forms three hydrates and two anhydrates. The sesquihydrate and hemihydrate, which differ by one water molecule, are stable at room temperature. The influence of this molecule on the internal crystal structure and how it translates into the external crystal shape are reported.

  18. Study of the extraction mechanisms by TBP saturated by uranyl nitrate; Etude des mecanismes d'extraction du TBP sature par le nitrate d'uranyle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meze, F

    2004-02-15

    This work deals with a particular phenomenon likely to occur in the nuclear waste reprocessing process PUREX. It was shown earlier by Russian works that the extractant molecule, tributyl phosphate (TBP), saturated by uranyl nitrate keeps its extraction capacities for nitric acid and tetravalent actinides. This study is composed of three parts. Firstly, some liquid-liquid extraction experiments were conducted to verify the ability of TBP saturated by uranyl nitrate to conserve its extraction capacities for nitric acid. Then, during these experiments, the UV and infrared spectra of both phases were recorded to obtain the organic phase speciation. At last, the informations gathered during the experimental part were used to build a general species distribution model of the H{sub 2}O/HNO{sub 3}/UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}/TBP system. (author)

  19. Identification of Uranyl Minerals Using Oxygen K-Edge X Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Jesse D.; Bowden, Mark E.; Resch, Charles T.; Smith, Steven C.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Buck, Edgar C.; Eiden, Gregory C.; Duffin, Andrew M.

    2016-03-01

    Uranium analysis is consistently needed throughout the fuel cycle, from mining to fuel fabrication to environmental monitoring. Although most of the world’s uranium is immobilized as pitchblende or uraninite, there exists a plethora of secondary uranium minerals, nearly all of which contain the uranyl cation. Analysis of uranyl compounds can provide clues as to a sample’s facility of origin and chemical history. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is one technique that could enhance our ability to identify uranium minerals. Although there is limited chemical information to be gained from the uranium X-ray absorption edges, recent studies have successfully used ligand NEXAFS to study the physical chemistry of various uranium compounds. This study extends the use of ligand NEXAFS to analyze a suite of uranium minerals. We find that major classes of uranyl compounds (carbonate, oxyhydroxide, silicate, and phosphate) exhibit characteristic lineshapes in the oxygen K-edge absorption spectra. As a result, this work establishes a library of reference spectra that can be used to classify unknown uranyl minerals.

  20. Fabrication of Carbonate Apatite Block through a Dissolution–Precipitation Reaction Using Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate Dihydrate Block as a Precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanji Tsuru

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbonate apatite (CO3Ap block, which is a bone replacement used to repair defects, was fabricated through a dissolution–precipitation reaction using a calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (DCPD block as a precursor. When the DCPD block was immersed in NaHCO3 or Na2CO3 solution at 80 °C, DCPD converted to CO3Ap within 3 days. β-Tricalcium phosphate was formed as an intermediate phase, and it was completely converted to CO3Ap within 2 weeks when the DCPD block was immersed in Na2CO3 solution. Although the crystal structures of the DCPD and CO3Ap blocks were different, the macroscopic structure was maintained during the compositional transformation through the dissolution–precipitation reaction. CO3Ap block fabricated in NaHCO3 or Na2CO3 solution contained 12.9 and 15.8 wt % carbonate, respectively. The diametral tensile strength of the CO3Ap block was 2 MPa, and the porosity was approximately 57% regardless of the carbonate solution. DCPD is a useful precursor for the fabrication of CO3Ap block.

  1. {tau} - hydrogen phosphate of zirconia in sodium salt form and some of its properties; {tau} - hidrogenofosfato de zirconio en forma sodica y algunas de sus propiedades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez V, S.M.; Ordonez R, E. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    It is reported the obtaining and characterization in the sodium salt form of the {tau}-hydrogen phosphate of zirconium in sodium form, this compound it was synthesized, for a new technique developed in the laboratory of Dept. of Chemistry of the ININ. The characterization was carried out for XRD, IR, Sem and EDS the thermal gravimetric analysis is also reported. (Author)

  2. Crystal Structure And Magnetic Property of the Complex of Hydrogen-bonded Two-dimensional Layer Copper(Ⅱ) Acrylate with Trimethyl Phosphate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    @@ Copper carboxylate complexes play an important role in catalysing the enzymatic activities[1-4], and the phosphate has an especial use in DNA recognition[5]. Indeed the report about copper carboxylate complexes with phosphate ligands is rare. A chain structure supramolecule [Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2]n has been reported recently[6], in which a Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2 unit is linked by four O(water)-H...O(carboxyl) hydrogen bonds with two adjacent units(Fig.1). In this work a layer structure complex {Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2[OP(OCH3)3]}n was synthesized by means of hydrogen-bonded assembly approach between complex [Cu2(CH2CH-COO)4(H2O)2]n with trimethyl phosphate(TMP).

  3. Uranyl Sequestration: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Uranyl Complexes with a Tetradentate Methylterephthalamide Ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Chengbao; Shuh, David; Raymond, Kenneth

    2011-03-07

    Uranyl complexes of a bis(methylterephthalamide) ligand (LH{sub 4}) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure is an unexpected [Me{sub 4}N]{sub 8}[L(UO{sub 2})]{sub 4} tetramer, formed via coordination of the two MeTAM units of L to two uranyl moieties. Addition of KOH to the tetramer gave the corresponding monomeric uranyl methoxide species [Me{sub 4}N]K{sub 2}[LUO{sub 2}(OMe)].

  4. Uranyl Sequestration: Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Uranyl Complexes with a Tetradentate Methylterephthalamide Ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Chengbao; Shuh, David; Raymond, Kenneth

    2011-03-07

    Uranyl complexes of a bis(methylterephthalamide) ligand (LH{sub 4}) have been synthesized and characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure is an unexpected [Me{sub 4}N]{sub 8}[L(UO{sub 2})]{sub 4} tetramer, formed via coordination of the two MeTAM units of L to two uranyl moieties. Addition of KOH to the tetramer gave the corresponding monomeric uranyl methoxide species [Me{sub 4}N]K{sub 2}[LUO{sub 2}(OMe)].

  5. Hydrogen cyanide in the rhizosphere: not suppressing plant pathogens, but rather regulating availability of phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Rijavec

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria produce chemical compounds with different benefits for the plant. Among them, HCN is recognized as a biocontrol agent, based on its ascribed toxicity against plant pathogens. Based on several past studies questioning the validity of this hypothesis, we have re-addressed the issue by designing a new set of in vitro experiments, to test if HCN-producing rhizobacteria could inhibit the growth of phytopathogens. The level of HCN produced by the rhizobacteria in vitro does not correlate with the observed biocontrol effects, thus disproving the biocontrol hypothesis. We developed a new concept, in which HCN does not act as a biocontrol agent, but rather is involved in geochemical processes in the substrate (e.g. chelation of metals, indirectly increasing the availability of phosphate. Since this scenario can be important for the pioneer plants living in oligotrophic alpine environments, we inoculated HCN producing bacteria into sterile mineral sand together with germinating plants and showed that the growth of the pioneer plant French sorrel was increased on granite-based substrate. No such effect could be observed for maize, where plantlets depend on the nutrients stored in the endosperm. To support our concept, we used KCN and mineral sand and showed that mineral mobilization and phosphate release could be caused by cyanide in vitro. We propose that in oligotrophic alpine environments, and possibly elsewhere, the main contribution of HCN is in the sequestration of metals and the consequential indirect increase of nutrient availability, which is beneficial for the rhizobacteria and their plant hosts.

  6. Spectroscopic study on uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at the surface layer of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Thomas; Rossberg, Andre; Barkleit, Astrid; Steudtner, Robin; Selenska-Pobell, Sonja; Merroun, Mohamed L

    2015-02-14

    The complexation of U(vi) at the proteinaceous surface layer (S-layer) of the archaeal strain Sulfolobus acidocaldarius was investigated over a pH range from pH 1.5 to 6 at the molecular scale using time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) and U L(III)-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The S-layer, which represents the interface between the cell and its environment, is very stable against high temperatures, proteases, and detergents. This allowed the isolation and purification of S-layer ghosts (= empty cells) that maintain the size and shape of the cells. In contrast to many other microbial cell envelope compounds the studied S-layer is not phosphorylated, enabling the investigation of uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at microbial surfaces. The latter are usually masked by preferentially formed uranyl phosphate complexes. We demonstrated that at highly acidic conditions (pH 1.5 to 3) no uranium was bound by the S-layer. In contrast to that, at moderate acidic pH conditions (pH 4.5 and 6) a complexation of U(vi) at the S-layer via deprotonated carboxylic groups was stimulated. Titration studies revealed dissociation constants for the carboxylic groups of glutamic and aspartic acid residues of pK(a) = 4.78 and 6.31. The uranyl carboxylate complexes formed at the S-layer did not show luminescence properties at room temperature, but only under cryogenic conditions. The obtained luminescence maxima are similar to those of uranyl acetate. EXAFS spectroscopy demonstrated that U(vi) in these complexes is mainly coordinated to carboxylate groups in a bidentate binding mode. The elucidation of the molecular structure of these complexes was facilitated by the absence of phosphate groups in the studied S-layer protein.

  7. A Structural and Spectroscopic Study of the First Uranyl Selenocyanate, [Et4N]3[UO2(NCSe5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Nuzzo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The first example of a uranyl selenocyanate compound is reported. The compound [Et4N]3[UO2(NCSe5] has been synthesized and fully characterized by vibrational and multinuclear (1H, 13C{1H} and 77Se{1H} NMR spectroscopy. The photophysical properties have also been recorded and trends in a series of uranyl pseudohalides discussed. Spectroscopic evidence shows that the U–NCSe bonding is principally ionic. An electrochemical study revealed that the reduced uranyl(V species is unstable to disproportionation and a ligand based oxidation is also observed. The structure of [Et4N]4[UO2(NCSe5][NCSe] is also presented and Se···H–C hydrogen bonding and Se···Se chalcogen–chalcogen interactions are seen.

  8. 1,1′-Binaphthalene-2,2′-diyl hydrogen phosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanta K. Nayak

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, racemic bnppa, C20H13O4P, crystallizes with four molecules in the asymmetric unit. Two independent centrosymmetric O—H...O hydrogen-bonded tetramers, each involving two of the symmetry-independent molecules in the asymmetric unit generate the packing motif in the crystal structure. The hydrophobic parts of the tetramers connect to their neighbours via C—H...π and π–π interactions [3.899 (2, 3.895 (2 and 3.803 (2 Å within the symmetric unit, 3.851 (2, 4.000 (2, 3.988 (2 and 3.905 (2 Å across centres of symmetry].

  9. Stoichiometry of uranyl salophene anion complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonisse, M.M.G.; Ruel, Bianca H.M.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    In PVC/NPOE ion-selective membranes of potentiometric sensors, the guest-host stoichiometry of the anion complex of H2PO4 - and F- selective uranyl salophene derivatives is 2:1. This stoichiometry is different from the stoichiometry observed in DMSO solution (1H NMR) or solid state (X-ray crystal

  10. Stoichiometry of uranyl salophene anion complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonisse, M.M.G.; Ruel, Bianca H.M.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    1998-01-01

    In PVC/NPOE ion-selective membranes of potentiometric sensors, the guest-host stoichiometry of the anion complex of H2PO4 - and F- selective uranyl salophene derivatives is 2:1. This stoichiometry is different from the stoichiometry observed in DMSO solution (1H NMR) or solid state (X-ray crystal st

  11. Stoichiometry of uranyl salophene anion complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonisse, Martijn M.G.; Snellink-Ruel, Bianca H.M.; Engbersen, Johan F.J.; Reinhoudt, David N.

    1998-01-01

    In PVC/NPOE ion-selective membranes of potentiometric sensors, the guest-host stoichiometry of the anion complex of H2PO4 - and F- selective uranyl salophene derivatives is 2:1. This stoichiometry is different from the stoichiometry observed in DMSO solution (1H NMR) or solid state (X-ray crystal st

  12. Solid-state dynamics of uranyl polyoxometalates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Todd M; Liao, Zuolei; Zakharov, Lev N; Nyman, May

    2014-07-01

    Understanding fundamental uranyl polyoxometalate (POM) chemistry in solution and the solid state is the first step to defining its future role in the development of new actinide materials and separation processes that are vital to every step of the nuclear fuel cycle. Many solid-state geometries of uranyl POMs have been described, but we are only beginning to understand their chemical behavior, which thus far includes the role of templates in their self-assembly, and the dynamics of encapsulated species in solution. This study provides unprecedented detail into the exchange dynamics of the encapsulated species in the solid state through Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopy. Although it was previously recognized that capsule-like molybdate and uranyl POMs exchange encapsulated species when dissolved in water, analogous exchange in the solid state has not been documented, or even considered. Here, we observe the extremely high rate of transport of Li(+) and aqua species across the uranyl shell in the solid state, a process that is affected by both temperature and pore blocking by larger species. These results highlight the untapped potential of emergent f-block element materials and vesicle-like POMs. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Spectrin interactions with globin chains in the presence of phosphate metabolites and hydrogen peroxide: implications for thalassaemia

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Poppy Datta; Sudipa Chakrabarty; Amit Chakrabarty; Abhijit Chakrabarti

    2007-09-01

    We have shown the differential interactions of the erythroid skeletal protein spectrin with the globin subunits of adult haemoglobin (HbA); these indicate a preference for -globin over that for -globin and intact HbA in an adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP)-dependent manner. The presence of Mg/ATP led to an appreciable decrease in the binding affinity of the -globin chain to spectrin and the overall yield of globin–spectrin cross-linked complexes formed in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Similar effects were also seen in the presence of 2-,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3 DPG), the other important phosphate metabolite of erythrocytes. The binding affinity and yield of cross-linked high molecular weight complexes (HMWCs) formed under oxidative conditions were significantly higher in -globin compared with intact haemoglobin, HbA and the -globin chain. The results of this study indicate a possible correlation of the preferential spectrin binding of the -globin chain over that of the -globin in the haemoglobin disorder -thalassaemia.

  14. Comparative study of the hydration systems formed during interactions of hydrogen phosphate dianions with putrescine, nor-putrescine and magnesium dications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figlerowicz, M.; Utzig, E.; Alejska, M.; Bratek-Wiewiórowska, M. D.; Wiewiórowski, M.

    1997-10-01

    A comparative study of hydration systems, formed as a result of the interaction between hydrogen phosphate dianions and three naturally occurring cations (putrescine (Put), its nor-homologue (nPut) and magnesium), is presented. On the basis of X-ray data and IR, NMR and calorimetric measurements, we have determined how the structure and physicochemical properties of the cations influence the system of phosphate residue hydration. Our study demonstrates that the stability of the hydration systems depends not only on the character of the bonds used by water to link with other salt components (coordinate or hydrogen bonds), but also on the location of the water molecules in the crystal lattice. In addition, contrary to magnesium salts, the dehydration of diamine (Put and nPut) hydrogen phosphates is reversible. Both dehydration and rehydration processes take place in the solid state. During rehydration, the crystalline anhydrous salt absorbs water molecules from the atmosphere. This leads to the reconstruction of the hydrated salt structure; this means that the salt which is the product of rehydration is identical with that obtained by crystallization from water solution.

  15. Expanding the crystal chemistry of uranyl peroxides: four hybrid uranyl-peroxide structures containing EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jie; Ling, Jie; Sieradzki, Claire; Nguyen, Kevin; Wylie, Ernest M; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Burns, Peter C

    2014-11-17

    The first four uranyl peroxide compounds containing ethylenediaminetetra-acetate (EDTA) were synthesized and characterized from aqueous uranyl peroxide nitrate solutions with a pH range of 5-7. Raman spectra demonstrated that reaction solutions that crystallized [NaK15[(UO2)8(O2)8(C10H12O10N2)2(C2O4)4]·(H2O)14] (1) and [Li4K6[(UO2)8(O2)6(C10H12O10N2)2(NO3)6]·(H2O)26] (2) contained excess peroxide, and their structures contained oxidized ethylenediaminetetraacetate, EDTAO2(4-). The solutions from which [K4[(UO2)4(O2)2(C10H13O8N2)2(IO3)2]·(H2O)16] (3) and LiK3[(UO2)4(O2)2(C10H12O8N2)2(H2O)2]·(H2O)18 (4) crystallized contained no free peroxide, and the structures incorporated intact EDTA(4-). In contrast to the large family of uranyl peroxide cage clusters, coordination of uranyl peroxide units in 1-4 by EDTA(4-) or EDTAO2(4-) results in isolated tetramers or dimers of uranyl ions that are bridged by bidentate peroxide groups. Two tetramers are bridged by EDTAO2(4-) to form octamers in 1 and 2, and dimers of uranyl polyhedra are linked through iodate groups in 3 and EDTA(4-) in 4, forming chains in both cases. In each structure the U-O2-U dihedral angle is strongly bent, at ∼140°, consistent with the configuration of this linkage in cage clusters and other recently reported uranyl peroxides.

  16. Thermal Analysis of the Decomposition of Ammonium Uranyl Carbonate (AUC) in Different Atmospheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hälldahl, L.; Sørensen, Ole Toft

    1979-01-01

    The intermediate products formed during thermal decomposition of ammonium uranyl carbonate (AUC) in different atmospheres, (air, helium and hydrogen) have been determined by thermal analysis, (TG, and DTA) and X-ray analysis. The endproducts observed are U3O8 and UO2 in air/He and hydrogen, respe......, respectively. The following intermediate products were observed in all atmospheres: http://www.sciencedirect.com.globalproxy.cvt.dk/cache/MiamiImageURL/B6THV-44K80TV-FB-1/0?wchp=dGLzVlz-zSkWW X-ray diffraction analysis showed that these phases were amorphous....

  17. Synthesis and characterization of two polyoxometalates consisting of different Cu-ligand hydrogen phosphate units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Jinshuang; Zhao, Xiaofang; Huang, Jiao; Gong, Kaining; Han, Zhangang, E-mail: hanzg116@126.com; Zhai, Xueliang, E-mail: xlzhai253@mail.hebtu.edu.cn

    2014-03-15

    Two polyoxometalates [(Cu-mbpy){sub 4}(HPO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}][PMo{sub 12}O{sub 40}]·H{sub 2}O (1) and [(Cu-mbpy){sub 6}(HPO{sub 4}){sub 4}][PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}]·4H{sub 2}O (2) (mbpy=4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-dipyridyl in 1; 5,5″-dimethyl-2,2'-dipyridyl in 2) have been synthesized and characterized by IR, X-ray powder diffraction, TG analysis and electrochemical property. The structural features of 1–2 are in their cationic moieties consisting of different linkages of [Cu-mbpy]{sup 2+} and HPO{sub 4}{sup 2−} groups. In 1 four Cu-mbpy bridged by two HPO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ions form a discrete cluster with an interesting octahedron of (Cu{sub 4}P{sub 2}), while in 2 Cu-mbpy fragments are bridged by HPO{sub 4}{sup 2−} ions into 1D structure consisting of trigonal bipyramidal polyhedra of (Cu{sub 3}P{sub 2}). Photocatalytic experiments indicate that compounds 1 and 2 are actively photocatalytic for degradation of methyl orange in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under UV light irradiation. -- Graphical abstract: Two polyoxometalate-based supramolecular compounds consisting of different linkages based on Cu-ligand and HPO{sub 4}{sup 2−} groups have been synthesized and characterized. The photocatalytic activity are studied. Highlights: • Two polyoxometalate-based supramolecular compounds consisting of different linkages based on Cu-ligand and HPO{sub 4}{sup 2−} groups have been synthesized. • Hydrogen bonding and π…π interactions play important roles in constructing crystal supramolecular frameworks. • Two compounds represent a high photocatalytic activity in the degradation of methyl orange.

  18. Effect of a new phosphorus source, magnesium hydrogen phosphate (MHP on growth, utilization of phosphorus, and physiological responses in carp Cyprinus carpio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Hyun Yoon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Magnesium hydrogen phosphate (MHP, MgHPO4 recovered from swine manure was prepared as an alternative phosphorus (P source. Conventional P additives, monocalcium phosphate (MCP, dicalcium phosphate (DCP, and tricalcium phosphate (TCP were compared with the MHP in terms of growth and P availability by juvenile carp Cyprinus carpio. A basal diet as a negative control was prepared using practical feed ingredients without P supplementation to which four supplemental P sources were added at the level of 2%. Five groups of 450 fish having mean body weight of 6.5 g following 24 h fasting after 2 weeks of adaptation period were randomly distributed into each of 15 tanks (30 fish/tank. Fish were hand-fed to apparent satiety twice a day for 9 weeks. Fish fed the MHP had weight gain (WG, feed conversion ratio (FCR, protein efficiency ratio (PER, and specific growth rate (SGR comparable to those fed the MCP. Those values of both the MHP and MCP groups were significantly different (p  0.05 from other phosphate groups, fish fed the MCP and MHP retained higher P in whole body than the other groups. P availability was determined to be 93.2, 62.4, 6.1, and 98.0% for MCP, DCP, TCP, and MHP, respectively. The present results suggested that the MHP recovered from wastewater stream could be used as an alternative P source in carp diet.

  19. Micro-SHINE Uranyl Sulfate Irradiations at the Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youker, Amanda J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kalensky, Michael [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Schneider, John [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Byrnes, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Peroxide formation due to water radiolysis in a uranyl sulfate solution is a concern for the SHINE Medical Technologies process in which Mo-99 is generated from the fission of dissolved low enriched uranium. To investigate the effects of power density and fission on peroxide formation and uranyl-peroxide precipitation, uranyl sulfate solutions were irradiated using a 50-MeV electron linac as part of the micro-SHINE experimental setup. Results are given for uranyl sulfate solutions with both high and low enriched uranium irradiated at different linac powers.

  20. DNA conformational analysis in solution by uranyl mediated photocleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E.; Møllegaard, N E; Jeppesen, C

    1990-01-01

    by uranyl in a way indicating strongest uranyl binding at the center of the minor groove of the AT-region. The A-tracts of kinetoplast DNA show the highest reactivity at the 3'-end of the tract--as opposed to cleavage by EDTA/Fell--in accordance with the minor groove being more narrow at this end. Finally...

  1. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is largely unresponsive to low regulatory levels of hydrogen peroxide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa-Lopes Ana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reversible oxidation of protein SH groups has been considered to be the basis of redox regulation by which changes in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 concentrations may control protein function. Several proteins become S-glutathionylated following exposure to H2O2 in a variety of cellular systems. In yeast, when using a high initial H2O2 dose, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH was identified as the major target of S-glutathionylation which leads to reversible inactivation of the enzyme. GAPDH inactivation by H2O2 functions to reroute carbohydrate flux to produce NADPH. Here we report the effect of low regulatory H2O2 doses on GAPDH activity and expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results A calibrated and controlled method of H2O2 delivery - the steady-state titration - in which cells are exposed to constant, low, and known H2O2 concentrations, was used in this study. This technique, contrary to the common bolus addition, allows determining which H2O2 concentrations trigger specific biological responses. This work shows that both in exponential- and stationary-phase cells, low regulatory H2O2 concentrations induce a large upregulation of catalase, a fingerprint of the cellular oxidative stress response, but GAPDH oxidation and the ensuing activity decrease are only observed at death-inducing high H2O2 doses. GAPDH activity is constant upon incubation with sub-lethal H2O2 doses, but in stationary-phase cells there is a differential response in the expression of the three GAPDH isoenzymes: Tdh1p is strongly upregulated while Tdh2p/Tdh3p are slightly downregulated. Conclusions In yeast GAPDH activity is largely unresponsive to low to moderate H2O2 doses. This points to a scenario where (a cellular redoxins efficiently cope with levels of GAPDH oxidation induced by a vast range of sub-lethal H2O2 concentrations, (b inactivation of GAPDH cannot be considered a sensitive biomarker of H2O2-induced oxidation in vivo

  2. The effects of non-metabolizing bacterial cells on the precipitation of U, Pb and Ca phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham-Cheatham, Sarrah; Rui, Xue; Bunker, Bruce; Menguy, Nicolas; Hellmann, Roland; Fein, Jeremy

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we test the potential for passive cell wall biomineralization by determining the effects of non-metabolizing bacteria on the precipitation of uranyl, lead, and calcium phosphates from a range of over-saturated conditions. Experiments were performed using Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis and Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1. After equilibration, the aqueous phases were sampled and the remaining metal and P concentrations were analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES); the solid phases were collected and analyzed using X-ray diffractometry (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). At the lower degrees of over-saturation studied, bacterial cells exerted no discernable effect on the mode of precipitation of the metal phosphates, with homogeneous precipitation occurring exclusively. However, at higher saturation states in the U system, we observed heterogeneous mineralization and extensive nucleation of hydrogen uranyl phosphate (HUP) mineralization throughout the fabric of the bacterial cell walls. This mineral nucleation effect was observed in both B. subtilis and S. oneidensis cells. In both cases, the biogenic mineral precipitates formed under the higher saturation state conditions were significantly smaller than those that formed in the abiotic controls. The cell wall nucleation effects that occurred in some of the U systems were not observed under any of the saturation state conditions studied in the Pb or Ca systems. The presence of B. subtilis significantly decreased the extent of precipitation in the U system, but had little effect in the Pb and Ca systems. At least part of this effect is due to higher solubility of the nanoscale HUP precipitate relative to macroscopic HUP. This study documents several effects of non-metabolizing bacterial cells on the nature and extent of metal phosphate precipitation. Each of these effects likely contributes to higher

  3. The Influence of Linker Geometry on Uranyl Complexation by Rigidly-Linked Bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szigethy, Geza; Raymond, Kenneth

    2010-04-22

    A series of bis(3-hydroxy-N-methyl-pyridin-2-one) ligands was synthesized, and their respective uranyl complexes were characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. These structures were inspected for high-energy conformations and evaluated using a series of metrics to measure co-planarity of chelating moieties with each other and the uranyl coordination plane, as well as to measure coordinative crowding about the uranyl dication. Both very short (ethyl, 3,4-thiophene and o-phenylene) and very long ({alpha},{alpha}{prime}-m-xylene and 1,8-fluorene) linkers provide optimal ligand geometries about the uranyl cation, resulting in planar, unstrained molecular arrangements. The planarity of the rigid linkers also suggests there is a degree of pre-organization for a planar coordination mode that is ideal for uranyl-selective ligand design. Comparison of intramolecular N{sub amide}-O{sub phenolate} distances and {sup 1}H NMR chemical shifts of amide protons supports earlier results that short linkers provide the optimal geometry for intramolecular hydrogen bonding.

  4. Structure and spectroscopy of uranyl salicylaldiminate complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamasi, A.L.; Barnes, C.L.; Walensky, J.R. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-07-01

    The synthesis of uranyl complexes coordinated to tridentate, monoanionic salicylaldiminate (Schiff base) ligands was achieved by the reaction of UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}(THF){sub 3}, 1, with one equivalent of the corresponding sodium salicylaldiminate salts affording [(C{sub 9}H{sub 6}N)N=C(H)C{sub 6}H{sub 2}'Bu{sub 2}O]UO{sub 2}Cl(THF), 2, [(NC{sub 5}H{sub 4})N=C(H)C{sub 6}H{sub 2}'Bu{sub 2}O]UO{sub 2}Cl(THF), 3, and [(C{sub 6}H{sub 4}SCH{sub 3})N=C(H)C{sub 6}H{sub 2}'Bu{sub 2}O]UO{sub 2}Cl(THF), 4. These are uncommon examples of uranyl complexes with a monoanionic ancillary ligand to stabilize the coordination sphere and one chloride ligand. Compounds 2-4 have been characterized by {sup 1}H and {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy as well as IR and UVVis spectroscopy and their structures determined by X-ray crystallography. (orig.)

  5. Uranyl-oxo coordination directed by non-covalent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Andrew J; Yin, Haolin; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2014-07-28

    Directed coordination of weakly Lewis acidic K(+) ions to weakly Lewis basic uranyl oxo ligands is accomplished through non-covalent cation-π and cation-F interactions for the first time. Comparison of a family of structurally related diarylamide ligands highlights the role that the cation-π and cation-F interactions play in guiding coordination. Cation binding to uranyl is demonstrated in the solid state and in solution, providing the shortest reported crystallographic uranyl-oxo to potassium distance. UV-Vis, TD-DFT calculations, and electrochemical measurements show that cation coordination directly impacts the electronics at the uranium(vi) cation.

  6. Ferroelectric phase transition in hydrogen-bonded 2-aminopyridine phosphate (NC sub 4 H sub 4 NH sub 2)centre dot H sub 3 PO sub 4

    CERN Document Server

    Czapla, Z; Waskowska, A

    2003-01-01

    A new crystal of 2-aminopyridine phosphate (NC sub 4 H sub 4 NH sub 2)centre dot H sub 3 PO sub 4 has been grown and its x-ray structure and physical properties were studied. At room temperature the crystals are monoclinic, space group C2/c. The flat 2-aminopyridine cations are hydrogen bonded to the anionic [PO sub 4 ] groups. The interesting feature of the crystal structure is the three-dimensional network of hydrogen bonds including, among others, two strong, symmetrical O centre dot centre dot centre dot H, H centre dot centre dot centre dot O interactions with disordered proton locations. Symmetrically related PO sub 4 anions linked through these protons form infinite (PO sub 4) subinfinity chains along the crystal a-axis. The anomalies in the temperature dependence of the electric permittivity showed that the crystal undergoes ferroelectric phase transition at T sub c = 103.5 K. The spontaneous polarization takes place along the crystal a-axis, being parallel to the chains of the hydrogen-bonded PO sub ...

  7. New reactivity of the uranyl(VI) ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Robert J. [School of Chemistry, University of Dublin, Trinity College (Ireland)

    2012-12-14

    The chemistry of the uranyl ion ([UO{sub 2}]{sup 2+}) has evolved remarkably over the past few years, with unexpected reactivity observed that challenge our understanding of this ion, and of actinides in general. This review highlights some recent advances in the field, focussing on the organometallic chemistry of the uranyl moiety, which is not well developed in comparison to lower oxidation states of uranium. The use of uranyl as a catalyst is highlighted and the newly developed supramolecular chemistry is described. The uranyl oxygen atoms have been considered as inert, but recent work has shown that is not necessarily the case and is discussed herein. Finally, reduction to the [UO{sub 2}]{sup +} ion will be discussed. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Adsorption isotherm of uranyl ions by fish scales of corvina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Caroline Hastenreiter; Santos, Bruno Zolotareff dos; Yamamura, Amanda Pongeluppe Gualberto; Yamaura, Mitiko, E-mail: hc.caroline@gmail.co, E-mail: bzsantos@gmail.co, E-mail: amandaifusp@yahoo.com.b, E-mail: myamaura@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Fish scale is by-product of fishery. The scales are mainly formed by hydroxyapatite and collagen forming a kind of natural composite with a large specific surface area that intensifies the adsorption process. In this paper the potential of adsorption of scales of Corvina fish for uranyl ions from nitric solutions was studied. The scales were washed several times with faucet water, sun-dried, triturated and sieved. Equilibrium and kinetic studies in adsorption of uranyl ions in batch systems were carried out at room temperature. Equilibrium time was reached at 5 min for 0.1 g L{sup -1} uranyl solution with removal efficiency over 82%, and at 1 min of contact was observed about 60% of removal. The equilibrium isotherm was obtained and the Langmuir model fitted best. These preliminary results are very promising, showing great perspectives of application of the fish scales as biosorbent for uranyl ions in radioactive wastewater treatment processes with a sustainable technology. (author)

  9. Influence of Different Phosphate Concentrations on Hydrogen Production by Anaerobic Granular Sludge%不同磷酸盐浓度对厌氧颗粒污泥发酵产氢的影响研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蓝伟平; 周兴求; 伍健东

    2012-01-01

    The experiments were carried out to study the fermentative bio-hydrogen production by granular sludge under conditions of different phosphate concentrations with high concentrated organic wastewater as fermentation substrate. The results showed that, the phosphate under concentration of 6 mmol · L-1 ~ 8 mmol · L-1 had a catalytic effect on hydrogen production. The maximum hydrogen content of 56. 3% was appeared at phosphate concentration of 8 mmol · L-1. The phosphate concentration, COD removal rate and effluent VFA concentrations gradually increased with the increase of phosphate concentration. But hydrogen production decreased when the phosphate concentration reached to 10 mmol · L-1, due to the imbalance of nutrition and the activity of hydrogen - producing acetic bacteria was inhibited.%实验以高浓度有机废水为发酵底物,接种颗粒污泥进行厌氧发酵制氢,研究不同磷酸盐浓度条件下的产氢效果.结果表明:当磷酸盐的浓度为6mmol·L-1~8mmol·L-1时,对有机废水制氢具有促进作用,在浓度为8mmol·L-1时,氢气含量为56.3%达到最大.随着磷酸盐浓度的增加,化学需氧量(COD)去除率和出水挥发性脂肪酸(VFA)浓度也逐步提高,但当磷酸盐浓度升至10 mmol·L-1时,由于进水营养比例失衡,产氢产乙酸菌群的活性受到抑制,产气率也因此减少.

  10. Glutathione attenuates uranyl toxicity in Lactococcus lactis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahmy, Karim; Oertel, Jana [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Biophysics; Obeid, M. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Solioz, M. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland)

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the role of intracellular glutathione (GSH), which in a large number of taxa plays a role in the protection against the toxicity of heavy metals. Anaerobically grown Lactococcus lactis containing an inducible GSH synthesis pathway was used as a model organism allowing the study of GSH-dependent uranyl detoxification without interference from additional reactive oxygen species. Microcalorimetric measurements of the metabolic heat showed that intracellular GSH attenuates the toxicity of uranium at a concentration in the range of 10-150 μM. Isothermal titration calorimetry revealed the endothermic binding of U(VI) to the carboxyl group(s) of GSH. The data indicate that the primary detoxifying mechanism is the intracellular sequestration of carboxyl-coordinated U(VI) into an insoluble complex with GSH.

  11. Rapid dissolution of soluble uranyl phases in arid, mine-impacted catchments near Church Rock, NM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deLemos, Jamie L; Bostick, Benjamin C; Quicksall, Andrew N; Landis, Joshua D; George, Christine C; Slagowski, Naomi L; Rock, Tommy; Brugge, Doug; Lewis, Johnnye; Durant, John L

    2008-06-01

    We tested the hypothesis that runoff of uranium-bearing particles from mining waste disposal areas was a significant mechanism for redistribution of uranium in the northeastern part of the Upper Puerco River watershed (New Mexico). However, our results were not consistent with this hypothesis. Analysis of > 100 sediment and suspended sediment samples collected adjacent to and downstream from uranium source areas indicated that uranium levels in the majority of the samples were not elevated above background. Samples collected within 50 m of a known waste disposal site were subjected to detailed geochemical characterization. Uranium in these samples was found to be highly soluble; treatment with synthetic pore water for 24 h caused dissolution of 10--50% of total uranium in the samples. Equilibrium uranium concentrations in pore water were > 4.0 mg/L and were sustained in repeated wetting events, effectively depleting soluble uranium from the solid phase. The dissolution rate of uranium appeared to be controlled by solid-phase diffusion of uranium from within uranium-bearing mineral particles. X-ray adsorption spectroscopy indicated the presence of a soluble uranyl silicate, and possibly a uranyl phosphate. These phases were exhausted in transported sediment suggesting that uranium was readily mobilized from sediments in the Upper Puerco watershed and transported in the dissolved load. These results could have significance for uranium risk assessment as well as mining waste management and cleanup efforts.

  12. Rapid Dissolution of Soluble Uranyl Phases in Arid, Mine-Impacted Catchments near Church Rock, NM

    Science.gov (United States)

    DELEMOS, JAMIE L.; BOSTICK, BENJAMIN C.; QUICKSALL, ANDREW N.; LANDIS, JOSHUA D.; GEORGE, CHRISTINE C.; SLAGOWSKI, NAOMI L.; ROCK, TOMMY; BRUGGE, DOUG; LEWIS, JOHNNYE; DURANT, JOHN L.

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that runoff of uranium-bearing particles from mining waste disposal areas was a significant mechanism for redistribution of uranium in the northeastern part of the Upper Puerco River watershed (New Mexico). However, our results were not consistent with this hypothesis. Analysis of >100 sediment and suspended sediment samples collected adjacent to and downstream from uranium source areas indicated that uranium levels in the majority of the samples were not elevated above background. Samples collected within 50 m of a known waste disposal site were subjected to detailed geochemical characterization. Uranium in these samples was found to be highly soluble; treatment with synthetic pore water for 24 h caused dissolution of 10–50% of total uranium in the samples. Equilibrium uranium concentrations in pore water were >4.0 mg/L and were sustained in repeated wetting events, effectively depleting soluble uranium from the solid phase. The dissolution rate of uranium appeared to be controlled by solid-phase diffusion of uranium from within uranium-bearing mineral particles. X-ray adsorption spectroscopy indicated the presence of a soluble uranyl silicate, and possibly a uranyl phosphate. These phases were exhausted in transported sediment suggesting that uranium was readily mobilized from sediments in the Upper Puerco watershed and transported in the dissolved load. These results could have significance for uranium risk assessment as well as mining waste management and cleanup efforts. PMID:18589950

  13. XPS evidence for structure-performance relationship in selective hydrogenation of crotonaldehyde to crotyl alcohol on platinum systems supported on natural phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo-Carrillo, Jesús; Sebti, Jalila; Marinas, Alberto; Marinas, José M; Sebti, Said; Urbano, Francisco J

    2012-09-15

    Natural phosphates are an important natural resource in Morocco, which needs to be valorised. They can be used not only as fertilisers but also as catalysts. Here, we report for the first time on its use as support for platinum and the application of the resulting systems to the liquid-phase selective hydrogenation of an α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compound (crotonaldehyde) to the corresponding unsaturated alcohol (crotyl alcohol), a process of interest in the production of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and fragrances. Catalytic results are related to the surface solid structure as determined by XPS. Therefore, the most active systems showed new surface interactions as evidenced by the appearance of new P, O, Ca, F and C peaks and the shift of Pt ones to lower binding energies. Further modification of the most active system with FeCl(2) led to 70% selectivity to crotyl alcohol at 34% conversion.

  14. Urinary stone formation: Efficacy of seed extract of Ensete superbum (Roxb.) Cheesman on growth inhibition of calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diana, K. J.; George, K. V.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of aqueous seed extract of Ensete superbum (Roxb.) Cheesman on in vitro crystallization and growth patterns of calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO4·2H2O, CHPD) crystals was studied using single diffusion gel growth technique. Reduction in growth of CHPD crystals was noticed with increasing concentrations of seed extract. The morphology of CHPD or brushite crystals was studied by microscopy. The structural changes of the treated crystals were assessed by SEM, FT-IR, XRD and TGA/DTA analysis. It is expected that this multidisciplinary approach for in vitro crystallization and characterization of CHPD crystals will provide a better explanation to develop novel strategies for prevention of urinary stones.

  15. Indigo Carmine-Cu complex probe exhibiting dual colorimetric/fluorimetric sensing for selective determination of mono hydrogen phosphate ion and its logic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavallali, Hossein; Deilamy-Rad, Gohar; Moaddeli, Ali; Asghari, Khadijeh

    2017-08-01

    A new selective probe based on copper complex of Indigo Carmine (IC-Cu2) for colorimetric, naked-eye, and fluorimetric recognition of mono hydrogen phosphate (MHP) ion in H2O/DMSO (4:1 v/v, 1.0 mmol L- 1 HEPES buffer solution pH 7.5) was developed. Detection limit of HPO42 - determination, achieved by fluorimetric and 3lorimetric method, are 0.071 and 1.46 μmol L- 1, respectively. Potential, therefore is clearly available in IC-Cu2 complex to detect HPO42 - in micromolar range via dual visible color change and fluorescence response. Present method shows high selectivity toward HPO42 - over other phosphate species and other anions and was successfully utilized for analysis of P2O5 content of a fertilizer sample. The results obtained by proposed chemosensor presented good agreement with those obtained the colorimetric reference method. INHIBIT and IMPLICATION logic gates operating at molecular level have been achieved using Cu2 + and HPO42 - as chemical inputs and UV-Vis absorbance signal as output.

  16. Ligand sensitized luminescence of uranyl by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium: a new luminescent uranyl benzoate specie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S; Joseph, M; Sankaran, K

    2015-03-05

    Benzoic acid (BA) is shown to sensitize and enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in acetonitrile medium. Luminescence spectra and especially UV-Vis spectroscopy studies reveal the formation of tri benzoate complex of uranyl i.e. [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) which is highly luminescent. In particular, three sharp bands at 431, 443, 461nm of absorption spectra provides evidence for tri benzoate specie of uranyl in acetonitrile medium. The luminescence lifetime of uranyl in this complex is 68μs which is much more compared to the lifetime of uncomplexed uranyl (20μs) in acetonitrile medium. In contrary to aqueous medium where uranyl benzoate forms 1:1 and 1:2 species, spectroscopic data reveal formation of 1:3 complex in acetonitrile medium. Addition of water to acetonitrile results in decrease of luminescence intensity of this specie and the luminescence features implode at 20% (v/v) of water content. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the existence of [UO2(C6H5COO)3](-) specie in acetonitrile is reported. Mechanism of luminescence enhancement is discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Ligand sensitized luminescence of uranyl by benzoic acid in acetonitrile medium: A new luminescent uranyl benzoate specie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Satendra; Maji, S.; Joseph, M.; Sankaran, K.

    2015-03-01

    Benzoic acid (BA) is shown to sensitize and enhance the luminescence of uranyl ion in acetonitrile medium. Luminescence spectra and especially UV-Vis spectroscopy studies reveal the formation of tri benzoate complex of uranyl i.e. [UO2(C6H5COO)3]- which is highly luminescent. In particular, three sharp bands at 431, 443, 461 nm of absorption spectra provides evidence for tri benzoate specie of uranyl in acetonitrile medium. The luminescence lifetime of uranyl in this complex is 68 μs which is much more compared to the lifetime of uncomplexed uranyl (20 μs) in acetonitrile medium. In contrary to aqueous medium where uranyl benzoate forms 1:1 and 1:2 species, spectroscopic data reveal formation of 1:3 complex in acetonitrile medium. Addition of water to acetonitrile results in decrease of luminescence intensity of this specie and the luminescence features implode at 20% (v/v) of water content. For the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the existence of [UO2(C6H5COO)3]- specie in acetonitrile is reported. Mechanism of luminescence enhancement is discussed.

  18. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  19. An Innovative Approach to Treat Incisors Hypomineralization (MIH: A Combined Use of Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Hydrogen Peroxide—A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Mastroberardino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH is characterized by a developmentally derived deficiency in mineral enamel. Affected teeth present demarcated enamel opacities, ranging from white to brown; also hypoplasia can be associated. Patient frequently claims aesthetic discomfort if anterior teeth are involved. This problem leads patients to request a bleaching treatment to improve aestheticconditions.Nevertheless, hydrogen peroxide can produce serious side-effects, resulting from further mineral loss. Microabrasion and/or a composite restoration are the treatments of choice in teeth with mild/moderate MIH, but they also need enamel loss. Recently, a new remineralizing agent based on Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP has been proposed to be effective in hypomineralized enamel, improving also aesthetic conditions. The present paper presents a case report of a young man with white opacities on incisors treated with a combined use of CPP-ACP mousse and hydrogen peroxide gel to correct the aesthetic defect. The patient was instructed to use CPP-ACP for two hours per day for three months in order to obtain enamel remineralization followed by a combined use of CPP-ACP and bleaching agent for further two months. At the end of this five-month treatment, a noticeable aesthetic improvement of the opacities was observed.

  20. An Innovative Approach to Treat Incisors Hypomineralization (MIH): A Combined Use of Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Hydrogen Peroxide-A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroberardino, Stefano; Campus, Guglielmo; Strohmenger, Laura; Villa, Alessandro; Cagetti, Maria Grazia

    2012-01-01

    Molar Incisor Hypomineralization (MIH) is characterized by a developmentally derived deficiency in mineral enamel. Affected teeth present demarcated enamel opacities, ranging from white to brown; also hypoplasia can be associated. Patient frequently claims aesthetic discomfort if anterior teeth are involved. This problem leads patients to request a bleaching treatment to improve aestheticconditions.Nevertheless, hydrogen peroxide can produce serious side-effects, resulting from further mineral loss. Microabrasion and/or a composite restoration are the treatments of choice in teeth with mild/moderate MIH, but they also need enamel loss. Recently, a new remineralizing agent based on Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate (CPP-ACP) has been proposed to be effective in hypomineralized enamel, improving also aesthetic conditions. The present paper presents a case report of a young man with white opacities on incisors treated with a combined use of CPP-ACP mousse and hydrogen peroxide gel to correct the aesthetic defect. The patient was instructed to use CPP-ACP for two hours per day for three months in order to obtain enamel remineralization followed by a combined use of CPP-ACP and bleaching agent for further two months. At the end of this five-month treatment, a noticeable aesthetic improvement of the opacities was observed.

  1. Surface complexation model of uranyl sorption on Georgia kaolinite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, T.E.; Davis, J.A.; Lumpkin, G.R.; Chisari, R.; Waite, T.D.

    2004-01-01

    The adsorption of uranyl on standard Georgia kaolinites (KGa-1 and KGa-1B) was studied as a function of pH (3-10), total U (1 and 10 ??mol/l), and mass loading of clay (4 and 40 g/l). The uptake of uranyl in air-equilibrated systems increased with pH and reached a maximum in the near-neutral pH range. At higher pH values, the sorption decreased due to the presence of aqueous uranyl carbonate complexes. One kaolinite sample was examined after the uranyl uptake experiments by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) to determine the U content. It was found that uranium was preferentially adsorbed by Ti-rich impurity phases (predominantly anatase), which are present in the kaolinite samples. Uranyl sorption on the Georgia kaolinites was simulated with U sorption reactions on both titanol and aluminol sites, using a simple non-electrostatic surface complexation model (SCM). The relative amounts of U-binding >TiOH and >AlOH sites were estimated from the TEM/EDS results. A ternary uranyl carbonate complex on the titanol site improved the fit to the experimental data in the higher pH range. The final model contained only three optimised log K values, and was able to simulate adsorption data across a wide range of experimental conditions. The >TiOH (anatase) sites appear to play an important role in retaining U at low uranyl concentrations. As kaolinite often contains trace TiO2, its presence may need to be taken into account when modelling the results of sorption experiments with radionuclides or trace metals on kaolinite. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Reduction of Oxygen Bound with Hemoglobin by Electrolytic Method Using Hydrogen Gas in Phosphate-buffered Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Hemoglobin(Hb) is important as an oxygen carrier.The trace amount of oxygen in Hb was reduced by an electrolytic method using hydrogen as an electron donor.The deoxygenated Hb(deoxyHb) was stable against heat treatment at 60 ℃ with little precipitant.This method is safe,fast,and would be of potential use for large scale purification of Hb.

  3. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  4. Potential remediation approach for uranium-contaminated groundwaters through potassium uranyl vanadate precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, T.K.; Kim, Y.; Wan, J.

    2009-06-01

    Methods for remediating groundwaters contaminated with uranium (U) through precipitation under oxidizing conditions are needed because bioreduction-based approaches require indefinite supply of electron donor. Although strategies based on precipitation of some phosphate minerals within the (meta)autunite group have been considered for this purpose, thermodynamic calculations for K- and Ca-uranyl phopsphates, meta-ankoleite and autunite, predict that U concentrations will exceed the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL = 0.13 {micro}M for U) at any pH and pCO{sub 2}, unless phosphate is maintained at much higher concentrations than the sub-{micro}M levels typically found in groundwaters. We hypothesized that potassium uranyl vanadate will control U(VI) concentrations below regulatory levels in slightly acidic to neutral solutions based on thermodynamic data available for carnotite, K{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}V{sub 2}O8. The calculations indicate that maintaining U concentrations below the MCL through precipitation of carnotite will be sustainable in some oxidizing waters having pH in the range of 5.5 to 7, even when dissolution of this solid phase becomes the sole supply of sub-{micro}M levels of V. Batch experiments were conducted in solutions at pH 6.0 and 7.8, chosen because of their very different predicted extents of U(VI) removal. Conditions were identified where U concentrations dropped below its MCL within 1 to 5 days of contact with oxidizing solutions containing 0.2 to 10 mM K, and 0.1 to 20 {micro}M V(V). This method may also have application in extracting (mining) U and V from groundwaters where they both occur at elevated concentrations.

  5. A Phosphorylation Tag for Uranyl Mediated Protein Purification and Photo Assisted Tag Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Qiang; Jørgensen, Thomas. J. D.; Nielsen, Peter E;

    2014-01-01

    enables target protein purification from an E. coli extract by immobilized uranyl affinity chromatography. Subsequently, the tag can be efficiently removed by UV-irradiation assisted uranyl photocleavage. We therefore suggest that the divalent uranyl ion (UO22+) may provide a dual function in protein...

  6. Uranyl-selective electrodes based on acyclic oligoethers with terminal phosphonate groups

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khramov, A.N.; Garifzyanov, A.R.; Toropova, V.F. [Kazan State Univ., Tatarstan (Russian Federation)

    1994-10-01

    In recent years, a number of attempts have been made to develop ion-selective electrodes sensitive to uranyl ions. The most appropriate ionophores for uranyl-selective electrodes have been found among both acyclic oligoethers (podands) with terminal amide groups and organophosphorous compounds (conventional extracting agents for uranyl salts). However, in the first case, the proposed uranyl-selective electrodes exhibit a linear electrode response in a rather narrow range; in the second case, the electrodes are insufficiently selective. The goal of this work was to examine the possibility of using podands with terminal phosphonate groups as ionophores in uranyl-selective electrodes.

  7. Rate theory on water exchange in aqueous uranyl ion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Liem X.; Vo, Quynh N.; Nilsson, Mikael; Nguyen, Hung D.

    2017-03-01

    We report a classical rate theory approach to predict the exchange mechanism that occurs between water and aqueous uranyl ion. Using our water and ion-water polarizable force field and molecular dynamics techniques, we computed the potentials of mean force for the uranyl ion-water pair as a function of different pressures at ambient temperature. These potentials of mean force were used to calculate rate constants using transition rate theory; the transmission coefficients also were examined using the reactive flux method and Grote-Hynes approach. The computed activation volumes are positive; thus, the mechanism of this particular water-exchange is a dissociative process.

  8. The role of hydrogen bonding in the thermal expansion and dehydration of brushite, di-calcium phosphate dihydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, P. F.; Knight, K. S.; Houwen, J. A. M. Van Der; Valsami-Jones, E.

    2004-12-01

    The unit-cell and atomic parameters of perdeuterated brushite have been extracted from Rietveld analysis of neutron powder diffraction data within the temperature range 4.2 to 470 K. The thermal expansion of brushite is anisotropic, with the largest expansion along the b axis due principally to the effect of the O(1)···D(4) and O(3)···D(2) hydrogen bonds. Expansion along the c axis, influenced by the Ow1···D(5) interwater hydrogen bond, is also large. The high temperature limits for the expansion coefficients for the unit-cell edges a, b and c are 9.7(5) × 10-6, 3.82(9) × 10-5 and 5.54(5) × 10-5 K-1, respectively, and for the cell volume it is 9.7(1) × 10-5 K-1. The β angle displays oscillatory variation, and empirical data analysis results in αβ = 1.28(3) × 10-6sin(0.0105 T) K-1, within this temperature range. The evolution of the thermal expansion tensor of brushite has been calculated between 50 ≤T≤ 400 K. At 300 K the magnitudes of the principal axes are α11 = 50(6) × 10-6 K-1, α22 = 26.7(7) × 10-6 K-1 and α33 = 7.0(5) × 10-6 K-1. The intermediate axis, α22, is parallel to b, and using IRE convention for the tensor orthonormal basis, the axes α11 and α33 have directions equal to (-0.228, 0, -0.974) and (-0.974, 0, 0.228) respectively. Under the conditions of these experiments, the onset of dehydration occurred at temperatures above 400 K. Bond valence analysis combined with assessments of the thermal evolution of the bonding within brushite suggests that dehydration is precipitated through instabilities in the chemical environment of the second water molecule.

  9. Co-production of hydrogen and ethanol from glucose by modification of glycolytic pathways in Escherichia coli - from Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway to pentose phosphate pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Eunhee; Sekar, Balaji Sundara; Raj, Subramanian Mohan; Park, Sunghoon

    2016-02-01

    Hydrogen (H2) production from glucose by dark fermentation suffers from the low yield. As a solution to this problem, co-production of H2 and ethanol, both of which are good biofuels, has been suggested. To this end, using Escherichia coli, activation of pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, which can generate more NADPH than the Embden-Meyhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway, was attempted. Overexpression of two key enzymes in the branch nodes of the glycolytic pathway, Zwf and Gnd, significantly improved the co-production of H2 and ethanol with concomitant reduction of pyruvate secretion. Gene expression analysis and metabolic flux analysis (MFA) showed that, upon overexpression of Zwf and Gnd, glucose assimilation through the PP pathway, compared with that of the EMP or Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway, was greatly enhanced. The maximum co-production yields were 1.32 mol H2 mol(-1) glucose and 1.38 mol ethanol mol(-1) glucose, respectively. It is noteworthy that the glycolysis and the amount of NAD(P)H formed under anaerobic conditions could be altered by modifying (the activity of) several key enzymes. Our strategy could be applied for the development of industrial strains for biological production of reduced chemicals and biofuels which suffers from lack of reduced co-factors.

  10. A Raman spectroscopic study of the mono-hydrogen phosphate mineral dorfmanite Na 2(PO 3OH)·2H 2O and in comparison with brushite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L.; Palmer, Sara J.; Xi, Yunfei

    2011-11-01

    Aspects of the molecular structure of the mineral dorfmanite Na 2(PO 3OH)·2H 2O were determined by Raman spectroscopy. The mineral originated from the Kedykverpakhk Mt., Lovozero, Kola Peninsula, Russia. Raman bands are assigned to the hydrogen phosphate units. The intense Raman band at 949 cm -1 and the less intense band at 866 cm -1 are assigned to the PO 3 and POH stretching vibrations. Bands at 991, 1066 and 1141 cm -1 are assigned to the ν3 antisymmetric stretching modes. Raman bands at 393, 413 and 448 cm -1 and 514, 541 and 570 cm -1 are attributed to the ν2 and ν4 bending modes of the HPO 4 units, respectively. Raman bands at 3373, 3443 and 3492 cm -1 are assigned to water stretching vibrations. POH stretching vibrations are identified by bands at 2904, 3080 and 3134 cm -1. Raman spectroscopy has proven very useful for the study of the structure of the mineral dorfmanite.

  11. Uranium(VI) Scavenging by Amorphous Iron Phosphate Encrusting Sphaerotilus natans Filaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seder-Colomina, Marina; Morin, Guillaume; Brest, Jessica; Ona-Nguema, Georges; Gordien, Nilka; Pernelle, Jean-Jacques; Banerjee, Dipanjan; Mathon, Olivier; Esposito, Giovanni; van Hullebusch, Eric D

    2015-12-15

    U(VI) sorption to iron oxyhydroxides, precipitation of phosphate minerals, as well as biosorption on bacterial biomass are among the most reported processes able to scavenge U(VI) under oxidizing conditions. Although phosphates significantly influence bacterially mediated as well as iron oxyhydroxide mediated scavenging of uranium, the sorption or coprecipitation of U(VI) with poorly crystalline nanosized iron phosphates has been scarcely documented, especially in the presence of microorganisms. Here we show that dissolved U(VI) can be bound to amorphous iron phosphate during their deposition on Sphaerotilus natans filamentous bacteria. Uranium LIII-edge EXAFS analysis reveals that the adsorbed uranyl ions share an equatorial oxygen atom with a phosphate tetrahedron of the amorphous iron phosphate, with a characteristic U-P distance of 3.6 Å. In addition, the uranyl ions are connected to FeO6 octahedra with U-Fe distances at ~3.4 Å and at ~4.0 Å. The shortest U-Fe distance corresponds to a bidentate edge-sharing complex often reported for uranyl adsorption onto iron oxyhydroxides, whereas the longest U-Fe and U-P distances can be interpreted as a bidentate corner-sharing complex, in which two adjacent equatorial oxygen atoms are shared with the vertices of a FeO6 octahedron and of a phosphate tetrahedron. Furthermore, based on these sorption reactions, we demonstrate the ability of an attached S. natans biofilm to remove uranium from solution without any filtration step.

  12. Gas Phase Reactions of Ions Derived from Anionic Uranyl Formate and Uranyl Acetate Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Evan; Hanley, Cassandra; Koehler, Stephen; Pestok, Jordan; Polonsky, Nevo; Van Stipdonk, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The speciation and reactivity of uranium are topics of sustained interest because of their importance to the development of nuclear fuel processing methods, and a more complete understanding of the factors that govern the mobility and fate of the element in the environment. Tandem mass spectrometry can be used to examine the intrinsic reactivity (i.e., free from influence of solvent and other condensed phase effects) of a wide range of metal ion complexes in a species-specific fashion. Here, electrospray ionization, collision-induced dissociation, and gas-phase ion-molecule reactions were used to create and characterize ions derived from precursors composed of uranyl cation (UVIO2 2+) coordinated by formate or acetate ligands. Anionic complexes containing UVIO2 2+ and formate ligands fragment by decarboxylation and elimination of CH2=O, ultimately to produce an oxo-hydride species [UVIO2(O)(H)]-. Cationic species ultimately dissociate to make [UVIO2(OH)]+. Anionic complexes containing acetate ligands exhibit an initial loss of acetyloxyl radical, CH3CO2•, with associated reduction of uranyl to UVO2 +. Subsequent CID steps cause elimination of CO2 and CH4, ultimately to produce [UVO2(O)]-. Loss of CH4 occurs by an intra-complex H+ transfer process that leaves UVO2 + coordinated by acetate and acetate enolate ligands. A subsequent dissociation step causes elimination of CH2=C=O to leave [UVO2(O)]-. Elimination of CH4 is also observed as a result of hydrolysis caused by ion-molecule reaction with H2O. The reactions of other anionic species with gas-phase H2O create hydroxyl products, presumably through the elimination of H2.

  13. Thermodynamics of Uranyl Minerals: Enthalpies of Formation of Uranyl Oxide Hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. Kubatko; K. Helean; A. Navrotsky; P.C. Burns

    2005-05-11

    The enthalpies of formation of seven uranyl oxide hydrate phases and one uranate have been determined using high-temperature oxide melt solution calorimetry: [(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O(OH){sub 6}](H{sub 2}O){sub 5}, metaschoepite; {beta}-UO{sub 2}(OH){sub 2}; CaUO{sub 4}; Ca(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}, becquerelite; Ca(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O{sub 3}(OH){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}; Na(UO{sub 2})O(OH), clarkeite; Na{sub 2}(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 7}, the sodium analogue of compreignacite and Pb{sub 3}(UO{sub 2}){sub 8}O{sub 8}(OH){sub 6}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}, curite. The enthalpy of formation from the binary oxides, {Delta}H{sub f-ox}, at 298 K was calculated for each compound from the respective drop solution enthalpy, {Delta}H{sub ds}. The standard enthalpies of formation from the elements, {Delta}H{sub f}{sup o}, at 298 K are -1791.0 {+-} 3.2, -1536.2 {+-} 2.8, -2002.0 {+-} 3.2, -11389.2 {+-} 13.5, -6653.1 {+-} 13.8, -1724.7 {+-} 5.1, -10936.4 {+-} 14.5 and -13163.2 {+-} 34.4 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. These values are useful in exploring the stability of uranyl oxide hydrates in auxiliary chemical systems, such as those expected in U-contaminated environments.

  14. Colorimetric peroxidase mimetic assay for uranyl detection in sea water

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Dingyuan

    2015-03-04

    Uranyl (UO2 2+) is a form of uranium in aqueous solution that represents the greatest risk to human health because of its bioavailability. Different sensing techniques have been used with very sensitive detection limits especially the recently reported uranyl-specific DNAzymes systems. However, to the best of our knowledge, few efficient detection methods have been reported for uranyl sensing in seawater. Herein, gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) are employed in an efficient spectroscopic method to detect uranyl ion (UO2 2+) with a detection limit of 1.86 ÎM. In the absence of UO2 2+, the BSA-stabilized AuNCs (BSA-AuNCs) showed an intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. In the presence of UO2 2+, this activity can be efficiently restrained. The preliminary quenching mechanism and selectivity of UO2 2+ was also investigated and compared with other ions. This design strategy could be useful in understanding the binding affinity of protein-stabilized AuNCs to UO2 2+ and consequently prompt the recycling of UO2 2+ from seawater.

  15. Multi-scale modelling of uranyl chloride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thanh-Nghi; Duvail, Magali, E-mail: magali.duvail@icsm.fr; Villard, Arnaud; Dufrêche, Jean-François, E-mail: jean-francois.dufreche@univ-montp2.fr [Institut de Chimie Séparative de Marcoule (ICSM), UMR 5257, CEA-CNRS-Université Montpellier 2-ENSCM, Site de Marcoule, Bâtiment 426, BP 17171, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France); Molina, John Jairo [Fukui Institute for Fundamental Chemistry, Kyoto University, Takano-Nishihiraki-cho 34-4, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8103 (Japan); Guilbaud, Philippe [CEA/DEN/DRCP/SMCS/LILA, Marcoule, F-30207 Bagnols-sur-Cèze Cedex (France)

    2015-01-14

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations with explicit polarization have been successfully used to determine the structural and thermodynamic properties of binary aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride (UO{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}). Concentrated aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride have been studied to determine the hydration properties and the ion-ion interactions. The bond distances and the coordination number of the hydrated uranyl are in good agreement with available experimental data. Two stable positions of chloride in the second hydration shell of uranyl have been identified. The UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-Cl{sup −} association constants have also been calculated using a multi-scale approach. First, the ion-ion potential averaged over the solvent configurations at infinite dilution (McMillan-Mayer potential) was calculated to establish the dissociation/association processes of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}-Cl{sup −} ion pairs in aqueous solution. Then, the association constant was calculated from this potential. The value we obtained for the association constant is in good agreement with the experimental result (K{sub UO{sub 2Cl{sup +}}} = 1.48 l mol{sup −1}), but the resulting activity coefficient appears to be too low at molar concentration.

  16. The energy landscape of uranyl-peroxide species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiferet, Eitan [Peter A. Rock Thermochemistry Laboratory, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Nuclear Research Center - Negev, Be' er-Sheva (Israel); Gil, Adria; Bo, Carles [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), Tarragona (Spain); Departament de Quimica Fisica i Inorganica, Universitat Rovira i Virgil, Tarragona (Spain); Shvareva, Tatiana Y.; Navrotsky, Alexandra [Peter A. Rock Thermochemistry Laboratory, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Nyman, May [Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2014-03-24

    Nanoscale uranyl peroxide clusters containing UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} groups bonded through peroxide bridges to form polynuclear molecular species (polyoxometalates) exist both in solution and in the solid state. There is an extensive family of clusters containing 28 uranium atoms (U{sub 28} clusters), with an encapsulated anion in the center, for example, [UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 3-x}(OH){sub x}{sup 4-}], [Nb(O{sub 2}){sub 4}{sup 3-}], or [Ta(O{sub 2}){sub 4}{sup 3-}]. The negative charge of these clusters is balanced by alkali ions, both encapsulated, and located exterior to the cluster. The present study reports measurement of enthalpy of formation for two such U{sub 28} compounds, one of which is uranyl centered and the other is peroxotantalate centered. The [Ta(O{sub 2}){sub 4}]-centered U{sub 28} capsule is energetically more stable than the [(UO{sub 2})(O{sub 2}){sub 3}]-centered capsule. These data, along with our prior studies on other uranyl-peroxide solids, are used to explore the energy landscape and define thermochemical trends in alkali-uranyl-peroxide systems. It was suggested that the energetic role of charge-balancing alkali ions and their electrostatic interactions with the negatively charged uranyl-peroxide species is the dominant factor in defining energetic stability. These experimental data were supported by DFT calculations, which agree that the [Ta(O{sub 2}){sub 4}]-centered U{sub 28} capsule is more stable than the uranyl-centered capsule. Moreover, the relative stability is controlled by the interactions of the encapsulated alkalis with the encapsulated anion. Thus, the role of alkali-anion interactions was shown to be important at all length scales of uranyl-peroxide species: in both comparing clusters to clusters; and clusters to monomers or extended solids. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Effect of Cd⁺² on phosphate solubilizing abilities and hydrogen peroxide production of soil-borne micromycetes isolated from Phragmites australis-rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga-Silva, Jose Roberto; Chan-Cupul, Wilberth; Kuschk, Peter; Loera, Octavio; Aguilar-López, Ricardo; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Refugio

    2016-03-01

    The aims of this work were to evaluate the phosphate-solubilization and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) production by the soil-borne micromycetes, Aspergillus japonicus, Penicillium italicum and Penicillium dipodomyicola, isolated from Phragmites australis rhizosphere and to study the effect of several concentrations of Cadmium (Cd(2+)) on both variables. Our results showed that P. italicum achieved a higher P-solubilization and H2O2 production than A. japonicus and P. dipodomyicola, as only P. italicum showed a positive correlation (R(2) = 0.71) between P-solubilization and H2O2 production. In dose-response assays, P. italicum was also more tolerant to Cd(2+) (0.31 mM) in comparison to A. japonicus (0.26 mM). Analysis of the 2(4) factorial experimental design showed that P-solubilization by P. italicum was negatively affected by increases in Cd(2+) (p = 0.04) and yeast extract (p = 0.02) in the culture medium. The production of H2O2 was positively affected only by glucose (p = 0.002). Fungal biomass production was reduced significantly (p = 0.0009) by Cd(2+) and increased (p = 0.0003) by high glucose concentration in the culture medium. The tolerance and correlation between P-solubilization and H2O2 production in the presence of Cd(2+) was strain and species dependent. The effects of Cd(2+), glucose, ammonium sulfate and yeast extract on those variables were evaluated through a two-level factorial design. P. italicum is promising for P-solubilization in soils contaminated with Cd(2+) and may be an alternative for manufacture of biofertilizers to replace chemical fertilizers.

  18. Residual biomass for removal of uranyl ions;Biomassa residual para remocao de ions uranilo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boniolo, Milena Rodrigues [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFScar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Biogeoquimica Ambiental; Yamaura, Mitiko; Monteiro, Raquel Almeida, E-mail: milenaboniolo@usp.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Quimica e Meio Ambiente

    2010-07-01

    Activities related to nuclear industry, production of phosphoric acid and hospitals have generated considerable volumes of radioactive waste containing uranyl ions. Banana pith was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and was investigated as a biosorbent for uranyl ions from nitric solutions by batch experiments. Influences of adsorbent size, kinetics and equilibrium adsorption were studied. The biosorption of the uranyl ions followed pseudo-second-order kinetics. The adsorption isotherm data were closely fitted to the Freundlich equation. (author)

  19. Adsorption of uranyl ion on acid-modified zeolitic mineral clinoptilolite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matijašević Srđan D.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the results of adsorption of uranyl ion on acid-modified zeolitic mineral clinoptilolite are presented. Adsorption was investigated at different amounts of solid phase in suspension, as well as at different pH values. The modified clinoptilolite samples were obtained by treatment of clinoptilolite with acids: hydrochloric, oxalyc and citric. Starting and modified clinoptilolites were characterized by chemical analysis, thermal (DT/TG analysis and by determination of cation exchange capacity, while starting and nonadsorbed amounts of uranyl ion were determined by fluorometric method. Uranyl ion adsorption experiments on natural unmodified zeolitic mineral showed that uranyl ion adsorption was low (29.2% and that treatment of clinoptilolite with acids significantly increases the adsorption of uranyl ion (>90%. In the case of acid treated clinoptilolites, the highest adsorption of uranyl ion was achieved on clinoptilolite modified with hydrochloric acid. Kinetics of adsorption showed that adsorption of uranyl ion begins very fast and that the most of uranyl ion was adsorbed in first 30 min. Practically, there were no changes in uranyl ion adsorption within next 72 h.

  20. Quantum chemical modeling of uranyl adsorption on mineral surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kremleva, A.; Krueger, S.; Roesch, N. [Dept. Chemie and Catalysis Research Center, Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We overview quantum mechanical simulations that model the adsorption of actinide ions at solvated mineral surfaces. Pertinent examples illustrate the status of this emerging field of computational chemistry. In particular, we describe our own studies on uranyl adsorption on kaolinite. Already the few available results, from applications of density functional methods to cluster models or periodic slab models, show that such calculations are a useful complement to experimental investigations. Detailed information at the atomic level from accurate electronic structure calculations on well defined model systems helps to refine current interpretations of the chemical nature of uranyl adsorption species and to discover new features of these interface systems. Results from quantum mechanical simulations also provide a valuable reference for future experimental investigations. (orig.)

  1. Uranyl(VI) luminescence spectroscopy at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steudtner, Robin; Franzen, Carola; Brendler, Vinzenz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Div. Surface Processes; Haubitz, Toni [Brandenburg Univ. of Technology, Cottbus-Senftenberg (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We studied the influence of temperature and ionic strength on the luminescence characteristics (band position, decay time and intensity) of the free uranyl ion (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) in acidic aqueous solution. Under the chosen conditions an increasing temperature reduced both intensity and luminescence decay time of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} luminescence, but the individual U(VI) emission bands did not change.

  2. Structure and bonding in crystalline cesium uranyl tetrachloride under pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, Hussien H; Pertierra, Pilar; Salvadó, Miguel A; Izquierdo-Ruiz, F; Recio, J M

    2016-07-21

    A thorough investigation of pressure effects on the structural properties of crystalline cesium uranyl chloride was performed by means of first-principles calculations within the density functional theory framework. Total energies, equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies were computed at selected pressures up to 50 GPa. Zero pressure results present good agreement with available experimental and theoretical data. Our calculated equation of state parameters reveal that Cs2UO2Cl4 is a high compressible material, similar to other ionic compounds with cesium cations, and displays a structural anisotropic behavior guided by the uranyl moiety. An unexpected variation of the U-O bond length, dUO, is detected as pressure is applied. It leads to a dUO-stretching frequency relationship that cannot be described by the traditional Badger's rule. Interestingly enough, it can be explained in terms of a change in the main factor controlling dUO. At low pressure, the charge transferred to the uranyl cation induces an increase of the bond length and a red shift of the stretching frequencies, whereas it is the mechanical effect of the applied pressure above 10 GPa that is the dominant factor that leads to a shortening of dUO and a blue shift of the stretching frequencies.

  3. Efficient uranium immobilization on red clay with phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabias, Ewelina; Gładysz-Płaska, Agnieszka; Książek, Anna; Majdan, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Uranium is a very toxic and radioactive element. Removal of uranium from wastewaters requires remediation technologies. Actual methods are costly and ineffective when uranium concentration is very low. Little is known about the enhancement of sorption of uranyl ions by phosphate ions on aluminosilicates. Here, we studied sorption of uranyl acetate on red clay in the presence of phosphates. The concentration of U(VI) ranged 0.0001-0.001 mol/L, whereas the concentration of PO4(3-) was constant at 0.0001 mol/L. We designed a new method for the analysis of ternary surface complexes. We observed for the first time a remarkable improvement of U(VI) sorption on red clay under the influence of phosphates. We also found that at least two different ternary surface complexes U(VI)-phosphate-clay are formed in the sorbent phase. The complexation of UO2(2+) cations by phosphate ligands in the sorbent phase was confirmed by the X-ray photoelectron spectra of U 4f electrons.

  4. Correlation of biological value of feed phosphates with their solubility in water, dilute hydrogen chloride, dilute citric acid, and neutral ammonium citrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, T W; Douglas, J H; Gonzalez, N J; Bond, P L

    1992-12-01

    Relative biological values (BV) of 36 feed phosphates were determined with female turkeys in bioassays of 21-day duration using three response criteria: weight gain, tibia ash percentage, and gain:feed ratio. Calcium phosphate, dibasic dihydrate (United States Pharmacopeia) was the reference standard. Nine mono-dicalcium phosphates (M-DCP, 21.0% phosphorus), 13 di-monocalcium phosphates (D-MCP, 18.5% phosphorus), and 14 defluorinated phosphates (DFP, 18.0% phosphorus) were evaluated. The average relative BV for M-DCP, D-MCP, and DFP samples were 97.6, 94.6, and 90.8%, respectively. Solubility of phosphates was determined by four recognized methods. The solvents were water, .4% HCl, 2.0% citric acid (CA), and neutral ammonium citrate (NAC). Water solubility of M-DCP samples was greater (67.5%) than that of D-MCP (38.8%) and DFP (8.9%) samples. Correlation of water solubility of phosphates to their relative BV was quite low, and water solubility was a poor indicator of BV. When .4% HCl was the solvent, correlation coefficients (r) were .55, .33, and .72 for M-DCP, D-MCP, and DFP, respectively. Based on these results and prediction equations, .4% HCl solubility would be inappropriate for estimating BV of M-DCP and D-MCP samples. Solubility of feed phosphates (mainly D-MCP and DFP) in 2.0% CA or NAC was positively correlated with BV; the r values were .87 to .95. Both of these solubility tests provided a good index of BV. However, it would seem inappropriate and risky to replace bioassays totally with these tests. Feed phosphate users could perform either the 2.0% CA or NAC solubility test easily as a screen for BV along with other quality control procedures (i.e., phosphorus, calcium, sodium, and fluoride determinations).

  5. Significantly Dense Two-Dimensional Hydrogen-Bond Network in a Layered Zirconium Phosphate Leading to High Proton Conductivities in Both Water-Assisted Low-Temperature and Anhydrous Intermediate-Temperature Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Daxiang; Zheng, Tao; Xie, Jian; Cai, Yawen; Wang, Yaxing; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Shuao

    2016-12-19

    A highly stable layered zirconium phosphate, (NH4)2[ZrF2(HPO4)2] (ZrP-1), was synthesized by an ionothermal method and contains an extremely dense two-dimensional hydrogen-bond network that is thermally stable up to 573 K, leading to combined ultrahigh water-assisted proton conductivities of 1.45 × 10(-2) S cm(-1) at 363 K/95% relative humidity and sustainable anhydrous proton conductivity of 1.1 × 10(-5) S cm(-1) at 503 K.

  6. Sodium Phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodium phosphate is used in adults 18 years of age or older to empty the colon (large intestine, bowel) ... view of the walls of the colon. Sodium phosphate is in a class of medications called saline ...

  7. Phosphate salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... levels that are too high, and for preventing kidney stones. They are also taken for treating osteomalacia (often ... But intravenous phosphate salts should not be used. Kidney stones (nephrolithiasis). Taking potassium phosphate by mouth might help ...

  8. Subtle interactions and electron transfer between U{sup III}, Np{sup III}, or Pu{sup III} and uranyl mediated by the oxo group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, Polly L.; Dutkiewicz, Michal S.; Zegke, Markus [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom). EaStCHEM School of Chemistry; and others

    2016-10-04

    A dramatic difference in the ability of the reducing An{sup III} center in AnCp{sub 3} (An = U, Np, Pu; Cp = C{sub 5}H{sub 5}) to oxo-bind and reduce the uranyl(VI) dication in the complex [(UO{sub 2})(THF)(H{sub 2}L)] (L = ''Pacman'' Schiff-base polypyrrolic macrocycle), is found and explained. These are the first selective functionalizations of the uranyl oxo by another actinide cation. At-first contradictory electronic structural data are explained by combining theory and experiment. Complete one-electron transfer from Cp{sub 3}U forms the U{sup IV}-uranyl(V) compound that behaves as a U{sup V}-localized single molecule magnet below 4 K. The extent of reduction by the Cp{sub 3}Np group upon oxo-coordination is much less, with a Np{sup III}-uranyl(VI) dative bond assigned. Solution NMR and NIR spectroscopy suggest Np{sup IV}U{sup V} but single-crystal X-ray diffraction and SQUID magnetometry suggest a Np{sup III}-U{sup VI} assignment. DFT-calculated Hirshfeld charge and spin density analyses suggest half an electron has transferred, and these explain the strongly shifted NMR spectra by spin density contributions at the hydrogen nuclei. The Pu{sup III}-U{sup VI} interaction is too weak to be observed in THF solvent, in agreement with calculated predictions.

  9. Production and Characterization of Desmalonichrome Relative Binding Affinity for Uranyl Ions in Relation to Other Siderophores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mo, Kai-For; Dai, Ziyu; Wunschel, David S.

    2016-06-24

    Siderophores are Fe binding secondary metabolites that have been investigated for their uranium binding properties. Much of the previous work has focused on characterizing hydroxamate types of siderophores, such as desferrioxamine B, for their uranyl binding affinity. Carboxylate forms of these metabolites hold potential to be more efficient chelators of uranyl, yet they have not been widely studied and are more difficult to obtain. Desmalonichrome is a carboxylate siderophore which is not commercially available and so was obtained from the ascomycete fungus Fusarium oxysporum cultivated under Fe depleted conditions. The relative affinity for uranyl binding of desmalonichrome was investigated using a competitive analysis of binding affinities between uranyl acetate and different concentrations of iron(III) chloride using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). In addition to desmalonichrome, three other siderophores, including two hydroxamates (desferrioxamine B and desferrichrome) and one carboxylate (desferrichrome A) were studied to understand their relative affinities for the uranyl ion at two pH values. The binding affinities of hydroxymate siderophores to uranyl ion were found to decrease to a greater degree at lower pH as the concentration of Fe (III) ion increases. On the other hand, lowering pH has little impact on the binding affinities between carboxylate siderophores and uranyl ion. Desmalonichrome was shown to have the greatest relative affinity for uranyl at any pH and Fe(III) concentration. These results suggest that acidic functional groups in the ligands are critical for strong chelation with uranium at lower pH.

  10. Synthesis of phosphorylated calix[4]arene derivatives for the design of solid phases immobilizing uranyl cations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroun, E.B.; Hagege, A.; Asfari, Z. [Laboratoire de Chimie Analytique et Minerale, UMR 7178 ULP/CNRS/IN2P3 LC4, ECPM, Strasbourg Cedex (France); Basset, CH.; Quemeneur, E.; Vidaud, C. [CEA IBEB, SBTN, Centre de Marcoule, Bagnols-sur-Ceze (France)

    2009-07-01

    With the aim of developing supports for uranyl cations immobilisation, new 1, 3-alternate calix[4]arenes bearing both phosphonic acid functions as chelating sites and N-succinimide-4-oxa-butyrate as the anchoring arm were synthesised in good yields. The coupling of such calixarenes to a gel was performed and a successful immobilisation of uranyl cations was obtained. (authors)

  11. A protein engineered to bind uranyl selectively and with femtomolar affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lu; Bosscher, Mike; Zhang, Changsheng; Özçubukçu, Salih; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Wen; Li, Charles J.; Liu, Jianzhao; Jensen, Mark P.; Lai, Luhua; He, Chuan

    2014-03-01

    Uranyl (UO22+), the predominant aerobic form of uranium, is present in the ocean at a concentration of ~3.2 parts per 109 (13.7 nM) however, the successful enrichment of uranyl from this vast resource has been limited by the high concentrations of metal ions of similar size and charge, which makes it difficult to design a binding motif that is selective for uranyl. Here we report the design and rational development of a uranyl-binding protein using a computational screening process in the initial search for potential uranyl-binding sites. The engineered protein is thermally stable and offers very high affinity and selectivity for uranyl with a Kd of 7.4 femtomolar (fM) and >10,000-fold selectivity over other metal ions. We also demonstrated that the uranyl-binding protein can repeatedly sequester 30-60% of the uranyl in synthetic sea water. The chemical strategy employed here may be applied to engineer other selective metal-binding proteins for biotechnology and remediation applications.

  12. Quantification of uranyl in presence of citric acid; Cuantificacion de uranilo en presencia de acido citrico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia G, N.; Barrera D, C.E. [UAEM, Facultad de Quimica, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Ordonez R, E. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: nidgg@yahoo.com.mx

    2007-07-01

    To determine the influence that has the organic matter of the soil on the uranyl sorption on some solids is necessary to have a detection technique and quantification of uranyl that it is reliable and sufficiently quick in the obtaining of results. For that in this work, it intends to carry out the uranyl quantification in presence of citric acid modifying the Fluorescence induced by UV-Vis radiation technique. Since the uranyl ion is very sensitive to the medium that contains it, (speciation, pH, ionic forces, etc.) it was necessary to develop an analysis technique that stands out the fluorescence of uranyl ion avoiding the out one that produce the organic acids. (Author)

  13. Effects of aqueous uranyl speciation on the kinetics of microbial uranium reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belli, Keaton M.; DiChristina, Thomas J.; Van Cappellen, Philippe; Taillefert, Martial

    2015-05-01

    The ability to predict the success of the microbial reduction of soluble U(VI) to highly insoluble U(IV) as an in situ bioremediation strategy is complicated by the wide range of geochemical conditions at contaminated sites and the strong influence of aqueous uranyl speciation on the bioavailability and toxicity of U(VI) to metal-reducing bacteria. To determine the effects of aqueous uranyl speciation on uranium bioreduction kinetics, incubations and viability assays with Shewanella putrefaciens strain 200 were conducted over a range of pH and dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), Ca2+, and Mg2+ concentrations. A speciation-dependent kinetic model was developed to reproduce the observed time series of total dissolved uranium concentration over the range of geochemical conditions tested. The kinetic model yielded the highest rate constant for the reduction of uranyl non-carbonate species (i.e., the 'free' hydrated uranyl ion, uranyl hydroxides, and other minor uranyl complexes), indicating that they represent the most readily reducible fraction of U(VI) despite being the least abundant uranyl species in solution. The presence of DIC, Ca2+, and Mg2+ suppressed the formation of more bioavailable uranyl non-carbonate species and resulted in slower bioreduction rates. At high concentrations of bioavailable U(VI), however, uranium toxicity to S. putrefaciens inhibited bioreduction, and viability assays confirmed that the concentration of non-carbonate uranyl species best predicts the degree of toxicity. The effect of uranium toxicity was accounted for by incorporating the free ion activity model of metal toxicity into the bioreduction rate law. Overall, these results demonstrate that, in the absence of competing terminal electron acceptors, uranium bioreduction kinetics can be predicted over a wide range of geochemical conditions based on the bioavailability and toxicity imparted on U(VI) by solution composition. These findings also imply that the concentration of uranyl non

  14. Sonochemical precipitation of amorphous uranium phosphates from trialkyl phosphate solutions and their thermal conversion to UP2O7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doroshenko, Iaroslav; Zurkova, Jana; Moravec, Zdenek; Bezdicka, Petr; Pinkas, Jiri

    2015-09-01

    Insoluble amorphous precipitates containing uranyl and phosphate ions are obtained by sonication of solutions of three uranyl precursors, UO2(X)2, X=NO3, CH3COO, CH3C(O)CHC(O)CH3 (acetylacetonate, acac), in triesters of phosphoric acid, OP(OR)3, R=Me (trimethyl phosphate, TMP), Et (triethyl phosphate, TEP). TMP and TEP are used as high-boiling solvents and they serve also as a source of phosphate anions. Sonolysis experiments were carried out under flow of Ar at 40°C on a Sonics and Materials VXC 500W system (f=20 kHz, Pac=0.49 W cm(-3)). Powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) reveals amorphous character of all obtained precipitates. The presence of uranyl and phosphate is evidenced by IR spectroscopy and ICP-OES analysis reveals the content of both U (38.6-43.4 wt%) and P (11.0-13.6 wt%). The thermal behavior of the substances was studied by TG/DSC analysis, which shows weight losses in the range of 19.21-24.08%. On heating the amorphous precipitates to 1000°C, crystalline uranium diphosphate UP2O7 is obtained in all cases as the only crystalline phase. Uranyl(VI) is reduced during thermolysis to U(IV) as there is no characteristic vibration of UO2(2+) in the IR spectra of solid UP2O7 products. The ICP-OES analysis of U and P content in precipitates allowed us to calculate the efficiency of precipitation of uranium from mother liquor and to compare it with the efficiency calculated from the data received by the PXRD and TG/DSC analyses. The efficiency of the uranium removal attained by our sonoprecipitation procedure was typically 30-35%. These sonochemical precipitation reactions providing insoluble uranium phosphates may be potentially interesting models for the description of behavior of uranium-containing waste or reprocessing streams.

  15. Effects of Dietary Supplementation of Magnesium Hydrogen Phosphate (MgHPO4) as an Alternative Phosphorus Source on Growth and Feed Utilization of Juvenile Far Eastern Catfish (Silurus asotus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Tae-Hyun; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Won, Seung-Gun; Ra, Chang-Six; Kim, Jeong-Dae

    2014-08-01

    The present study was conducted to investigate a supplemental effect of magnesium hydrogen phosphate (MHP, MgHPO4) as an alternative phosphorus (P) source on growth and feed utilization of juvenile far eastern catfish (Silurus asotus) in comparison with three conventional P additives (monocalcium phosphate (MCP), dicalcium phosphate (DCP) and tricalcium phosphate [TCP]) as positive controls. A basal diet as a negative control was prepared without P supplementation and four supplemental P sources were added at the level of 2%. Five groups of 450 fish having mean body weight of 11.3 g following 24 h fasting after three week adaptation period were randomly distributed into each of 15 tanks (30 fish/tank). Fish were hand-fed to apparent satiety twice a day for 8 weeks. Fish fed MHP had weight gain (WG), protein efficiency ratio and specific growth rate comparable to those fed MCP. Fish fed MHP and MCP had feed efficiency (FE) significantly higher (pDCP. Fish groups fed control and TCP showed the lower FE than the other groups which was significantly different (p0.05) among treatments. Fish fed control had the lowest hematocrit, which was significantly different (pDCP and TCP to MHP were found to be 100.5 and 101.3%, 92.0 and 91.6%, and 79.1 and 80.9% for WG and FE, respectively. P availability was determined to be 88.1%, 75.2%, 8.7%, and 90.9% for MCP, DCP, TCP, and MHP, respectively. Consequently, MHP recovered from wastewater stream showed that as an alternative P source its performance was comparative with MCP on growth and feed utilization of juvenile far eastern catfish.

  16. Enhanced adsorption and recovery of uranyl ions by NikR mutant-displaying yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ebisutani, Kazuki; Iida, Katsuya; Nishitani, Takashi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2014-04-11

    Uranium is one of the most important metal resources, and the technology for the recovery of uranyl ions (UO22+) from aqueous solutions is required to ensure a semi-permanent supply of uranium. The NikR protein is a Ni2+-dependent transcriptional repressor of the nickel-ion uptake system in Escherichia coli, but its mutant protein (NikRm) is able to selectively bind uranyl ions in the interface of the two monomers. In this study, NikRm protein with ability to adsorb uranyl ions was displayed on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To perform the binding of metal ions in the interface of the two monomers, two metal-binding domains (MBDs) of NikRm were tandemly fused via linker peptides and displayed on the yeast cell surface by fusion with the cell wall-anchoring domain of yeast α-agglutinin. The NikRm-MBD-displaying yeast cells with particular linker lengths showed the enhanced adsorption of uranyl ions in comparison to the control strain. By treating cells with citrate buffer (pH 4.3), the uranyl ions adsorbed on the cell surface were recovered. Our results indicate that the adsorption system by yeast cells displaying tandemly fused MBDs of NikRm is effective for simple and concentrated recovery of uranyl ions, as well as adsorption of uranyl ions.

  17. Enhanced Adsorption and Recovery of Uranyl Ions by NikR Mutant-Displaying Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kouichi Kuroda

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Uranium is one of the most important metal resources, and the technology for the recovery of uranyl ions (UO22+ from aqueous solutions is required to ensure a semi-permanent supply of uranium. The NikR protein is a Ni2+-dependent transcriptional repressor of the nickel-ion uptake system in Escherichia coli, but its mutant protein (NikRm is able to selectively bind uranyl ions in the interface of the two monomers. In this study, NikRm protein with ability to adsorb uranyl ions was displayed on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To perform the binding of metal ions in the interface of the two monomers, two metal-binding domains (MBDs of NikRm were tandemly fused via linker peptides and displayed on the yeast cell surface by fusion with the cell wall-anchoring domain of yeast α-agglutinin. The NikRm-MBD-displaying yeast cells with particular linker lengths showed the enhanced adsorption of uranyl ions in comparison to the control strain. By treating cells with citrate buffer (pH 4.3, the uranyl ions adsorbed on the cell surface were recovered. Our results indicate that the adsorption system by yeast cells displaying tandemly fused MBDs of NikRm is effective for simple and concentrated recovery of uranyl ions, as well as adsorption of uranyl ions.

  18. Escherichia coli response to uranyl exposure at low pH and associated protein regulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arbia Khemiri

    Full Text Available Better understanding of uranyl toxicity in bacteria is necessary to optimize strains for bioremediation purposes or for using bacteria as biodetectors for bioavailable uranyl. In this study, after different steps of optimization, Escherichia coli cells were exposed to uranyl at low pH to minimize uranyl precipitation and to increase its bioavailability. Bacteria were adapted to mid acidic pH before exposure to 50 or 80 µM uranyl acetate for two hours at pH≈3. To evaluate the impact of uranium, growth in these conditions were compared and the same rates of cells survival were observed in control and uranyl exposed cultures. Additionally, this impact was analyzed by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis proteomics to discover protein actors specifically present or accumulated in contact with uranium.Exposure to uranium resulted in differential accumulation of proteins associated with oxidative stress and in the accumulation of the NADH/quinone oxidoreductase WrbA. This FMN dependent protein performs obligate two-electron reduction of quinones, and may be involved in cells response to oxidative stress. Interestingly, this WrbA protein presents similarities with the chromate reductase from E. coli, which was shown to reduce uranyl in vitro.

  19. Removal of uranyl ions from residual waters using some algae types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecal, Al; Palamaru, I.; Humelnicu, D.; Popa, K.; Salaru, V. V.; Rudic, V.; Gulea, A.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with a study on the bioaccumulation of uranyl ions resulted from residual effluents by means of some microbiological collectors: Scenedesmus quadricauda, Anabaena karakumica, Calothrix brevissima, Penicillinium sp, as well as the Glucide extract of Porphyridium cruentum, under various experimental conditions. The retaining degree of the bioaccumulated uranyl ions, as well as the leaching degree, in HCl and H2O media, of the same ions previously retained on algae were established. The retaining degree decreases in the serie: Scenedesmus quadricauda >Anabaena karakumica >Penicillinium sp>Calothrix brevissima. The leaching effect of bioaccumulated uranyl ions is higher in hydrochloric acid than in water.

  20. Synthesis, X-ray crystallography, thermal studies, spectroscopic and electrochemistry investigations of uranyl Schiff base complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, Zahra; Shorkaei, Mohammad Ranjkesh

    2013-03-15

    Some tetradentate salen type Schiff bases and their uranyl complexes were synthesized and characterized by UV-Vis, NMR, IR, TG, C.H.N. and X-ray crystallographic studies. From these investigations it is confirmed that a solvent molecule occupied the fifth position of the equatorial plane of the distorted pentagonal bipyramidal structure. Also, the kinetics of complex decomposition by using thermo gravimetric methods (TG) was studied. The thermal decomposition reactions are first order for the studied complexes. To examine the properties of uranyl complexes according to the substitutional groups, we have carried out the electrochemical studies. The electrochemical reactions of uranyl Schiff base complexes in acetonitrile were reversible.

  1. Self-assembly of uranyl-peroxide nanocapsules in basic peroxidic environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miro, Pere; Vlaisavljevich, Bess [Department of Chemistry, Supercomputing Institute, and Chemical Theory Center, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Gil, Adria [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Tarragona (Spain); Burns, Peter C. [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, South Bend, IN (United States); Nyman, May [Materials Science of Actinides, Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States); Bo, Carles [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, Tarragona (Spain); Departament de Quimica Fisica i Inorganica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Campus Sescelades, Tarragona (Spain)

    2016-06-13

    A wide range of uranyl-peroxide nanocapsules have been synthesized using very simple reactants in basic media; however, little is known about the process to form these species. We have performed a density functional theory study of the speciation of the uranyl ions under different experimental conditions and explored the formation of dimeric species via a ligand exchange mechanism. We shed some light onto the importance of the excess of peroxide and alkali counterions as a thermodynamic driving force towards the formation of larger uranyl-peroxide species. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  2. Structures and luminescent properties of new uranyl-based hybrid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Severance, R.C.; Vaughn, S.A.; Smith, M.D.; Hans-Conrad zur, Loye [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina, 631 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Six uranyl coordination compounds, UO{sub 2}(OH)(PYCA) (1), UO{sub 2}(PYCA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O).2H{sub 2}O (2), UO{sub 2}(PIC){sub 2} (3), UO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(NIC){sub 2} (4), UO{sub 2}(OH)(HINIC)(INIC) (5), and UO{sub 2}(PYTAC){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (6) were grown as single crystals via hydrothermal synthesis (PYCA - pyrazine-2-carboxylate, PIC - picolinate, NIC - nicotinate, INIC - iso-nicotinate, and PYTAC - 2-(pyridin-4-yl)thiazole-5-carboxylate) to study their optical properties. All six compounds have been identified via single crystal X-ray diffraction and fully characterized via powder X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Three of the complexes, 1, 3, and 6, represent new structures, and their synthesis and structural characterization is detailed within. The structures of 2, 4, and 5 have previously been reported in the literature. Coordination polymer 1 crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pca21 (a = 13.5476(5) Angstroms, b = 6.6047(2) Angstroms, c = 8.3458(3) Angstroms), and forms infinite 1-D chains of corner-sharing uranium polyhedra connected into 2-D layers by bridging ligands. Coordination polymer 3 crystallizes in the monoclinic space group Cc (a = 8.4646(8) Angstroms, b = 13.0357(11) Angstroms, c = 11.8955(10) Angstroms, {beta} = 96.815(2) degrees), and forms ligand-bridged 1-D chains. Complex 6 crystallizes in the triclinic space group P-1 (a = 5.6272(7) Angstroms, b = 8.9568(10) Angstroms, c = 10.4673(12) Angstroms, {alpha} 90.508(2) degrees, {beta} = 104.194(2) degrees, {gamma} = 91.891(2) Angstroms), and consists of isolated uranyl complexes connected via hydrogen bonds. The structures and luminescent properties of UO{sub 2}(OH)(PYCA) (1), UO{sub 2}(PYCA){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O).2H{sub 2}O (2), UO{sub 2}(PIC){sub 2} (3), UO{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(NIC){sub 2} (4), UO{sub 2}(OH)(HINIC)(INIC) (5), and UO{sub 2}(PYTAC){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2} (6) are discussed. (authors)

  3. UO₂²⁺ uptake by proteins: understanding the binding features of the super uranyl binding protein and design of a protein with higher affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odoh, Samuel O; Bondarevsky, Gary D; Karpus, Jason; Cui, Qiang; He, Chuan; Spezia, Riccardo; Gagliardi, Laura

    2014-12-17

    The capture of uranyl, UO2(2+), by a recently engineered protein (Zhou et al. Nat. Chem. 2014, 6, 236) with high selectivity and femtomolar sensitivity has been examined by a combination of density functional theory, molecular dynamics, and free-energy simulations. It was found that UO2(2+) is coordinated to five carboxylate oxygen atoms from four amino acid residues of the super uranyl binding protein (SUP). A network of hydrogen bonds between the amino acid residues coordinated to UO2(2+) and residues in its second coordination sphere also affects the protein's uranyl binding affinity. Free-energy simulations show how UO2(2+) capture is governed by the nature of the amino acid residues in the binding site, the integrity and strength of the second-sphere hydrogen bond network, and the number of water molecules in the first coordination sphere. Alteration of any of these three factors through mutations generally results in a reduction of the binding free energy of UO2(2+) to the aqueous protein as well as of the difference between the binding free energies of UO2(2+) and other ions (Ca(2+), Cu(2+), Mg(2+), and Zn(2+)), a proxy for the protein's selectivity over these ions. The results of our free-energy simulations confirmed the previously reported experimental results and allowed us to discover a mutant of SUP, specifically the GLU64ASP mutant, that not only binds UO2(2+) more strongly than SUP but that is also more selective for UO2(2+) over other ions. The predictions from the computations were confirmed experimentally.

  4. Removal of uranyl ions from residual waters using some algae types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cecal, A; Palamaru, [No Value; Humelnicu, D; Popa, K; Salaru, VV; Rudic, [No Value; Gulea, A

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with a study on the bioaccumulation of uranyl ions resulted from residual effluents by means of some microbiological collectors: Scenedesmus quadricauda, Anabaena karakumica, Calothrix brevissima, Penicillinium sp, as well as the Glucide extract of Porphyridium cruentum, under

  5. Nonionic metal-chelating surfactants mediated solvent-free thermo-induced separation of uranyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larpent, Ch.; Prevost, S. [Versailles-St-Quentin Univ., Institut Lavoisier, UMR-CNRS 8180, 78 - Versailles (France); Prevost, S.; Zemb, Th.; Testard, F. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Recherche sur l' Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules (DSM/DRECAM/SCM/LIONS), 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France); Berthon, L. [CEA Valrho, Site de Marcoule, Dept. Radiochimie et Procedes (DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LCSE), 30 (France)

    2007-08-15

    Thermo-responsive metal-chelating surfactants permit the solvent-free, cloud point extraction of uranyl nitrate and afford a real molecular economy compared to conventional separation techniques. (authors)

  6. Hydrothermal syntheses and characterization of uranyl tungstates with electro-neutral structural units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balboni, Enrica; Burns, Peter C. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Civil and Enviromental Engineering and Earth Sciences; Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2015-11-01

    Two uranyl tungstates, (UO{sub 2})(W{sub 2}O{sub 7})(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (1) and (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(W{sub 2}O{sub 8})F{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3} (2), were synthesized under hydrothermal conditions at 220 C and were structurally, chemically, and spectroscopically characterized. 1 Crystallizes in space group Pbcm, a = 6.673(5) Aa, b = 12.601(11) Aa, c = 11.552 Aa; 2 is in C2/m, a = 13.648(1) Aa, b = 16.852(1) Aa, c = 9.832(1) Aa, β = 125.980(1) {sup circle}. In 1 the U(VI) cations are present as (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl ions that are coordinated by five oxygen atoms to give pentagonal bipyramids. These share two edges with two tungstate octahedra and single vertices with four additional octahedra, resulting in a sheet with the iriginite-type anion topology. Only water molecules are located in the interlayer. The structural units of 2 consist of (UO{sub 2}){sup 2+} uranyl oxy-fluoride pentagonal bipyramids present as either [UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}O{sub 3}]{sup -6} or [UO{sub 2}FO{sub 4}]{sup -5}, and strongly distorted tungstate octahedra. The linkage of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and tungstate octahedra gives a unique sheet anion topology consisting of pentagons, squares and triangles. In 2, the uranyl tungstates sheets are connected into a novel electro-neutral three-dimensional framework through dimers of uranyl pentagonal bipyramids. These dimers connecting the sheets share an edge defined by F anions. 2 is the first example of a uranyl tungstate oxy-fluoride, and 1 and 2 are rare examples of uranyl compounds containing electro-neutral structural units.

  7. Control of oxo-group functionalization and reduction of the uranyl ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Polly L; Pécharman, Anne-Frédérique; Lord, Rianne M; Jones, Guy M; Hollis, Emmalina; Nichol, Gary S; Maron, Laurent; Fang, Jian; Davin, Thomas; Love, Jason B

    2015-04-01

    Uranyl complexes of a large, compartmental N8-macrocycle adopt a rigid, "Pacman" geometry that stabilizes the U(V) oxidation state and promotes chemistry at a single uranyl oxo-group. We present here new and straightforward routes to singly reduced and oxo-silylated uranyl Pacman complexes and propose mechanisms that account for the product formation, and the byproduct distributions that are formed using alternative reagents. Uranyl(VI) Pacman complexes in which one oxo-group is functionalized by a single metal cation are activated toward single-electron reduction. As such, the addition of a second equivalent of a Lewis acidic metal complex such as MgN″2 (N″ = N(SiMe3)2) forms a uranyl(V) complex in which both oxo-groups are Mg functionalized as a result of Mg-N bond homolysis. In contrast, reactions with the less Lewis acidic complex [Zn(N″)Cl] favor the formation of weaker U-O-Zn dative interactions, leading to reductive silylation of the uranyl oxo-group in preference to metalation. Spectroscopic, crystallographic, and computational analysis of these reactions and of oxo-metalated products isolated by other routes have allowed us to propose mechanisms that account for pathways to metalation or silylation of the exo-oxo-group.

  8. Temperature and pH driven association in uranyl aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Druchok

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available An association behavior of uranyl ions in aqueous solutions is explored. For this purpose a set of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations is performed. During the simulation, the fractions of uranyl ions involved in dimer and trimer formations were monitored. To accompany the fraction statistics one also collected distributions characterizing average times of the dimer and trimer associates. Two factors effecting the uranyl association were considered: temperature and pH. As one can expect, an increase of the temperature decreases an uranyl capability of forming the associates, thus lowering bound fractions/times and vice versa. The effect of pH was modeled by adding H+ or OH- ions to a "neutral" solution. The addition of hydroxide ions OH- favors the formation of the associates, thus increasing bound times and fractions. The extra H+ ions in a solution produce an opposite effect, thus lowering the uranyl association capability. We also made a structural analysis for all the observed associates to reveal the mutual orientation of the uranyl ions.

  9. Assessment of CE-ICP/MS hyphenation for the study of uranyl/protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Thi-Ngoc Suong; Bourgeois, Damien; Basset, Christian; Vidaud, Claude; Hagège, Agnès

    2015-06-01

    Identification of uranyl transport proteins is key to develop efficient detoxification approaches. Therefore, analytical approaches have to be developed to cope with the complexity of biological media and allow the analysis of metal speciation. CE-ICP/MS was used to combine the less-intrusive character and high separation efficiency of CE with the sensitive detection of ICP/MS. The method was based on the incubation of samples with uranyl prior to the separation. Electrophoretic buffers were compared to select a 10 mM Tris to 15 mM NaCl buffer, which enabled analyses at pH 7.4 and limited dissociation. This method was applied to the analysis of a serum. Two main fractions were observed. By comparison with synthetic mixtures of proteins, the first one was attributed to fetuin and in a lesser extent to HSA, and the second one to uranyl unbound to proteins. The analysis showed that fetuin was likely to be the main target of uranyl. CE-ICP/MS was also used to investigate the behavior of the fetuin-uranyl complex, in the presence of carbonate, an abundant complexing agent of uranyl in blood. This method enabled association constants determination, suggesting the occurrence of both FETUA(UO2(2+)) and FETUA(UO2(2+))(CO3(2-)) complexes, depending on the carbonate concentration. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Characterization of the Aqueous Uranyl-Silicate Complex Using X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Ab Initio Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vu, M.; Massey, M.; Huang, P.

    2015-12-01

    The speciation of aqueous uranium ions is an important factor in predicting its mobility and fate in the environment. Two major controls on speciation are pH and the presence of complexing ligands. For the case of aqueous uranyl, UO22+(aq), some common complexes include uranyl-hydroxy, uranyl-carbonato, and uranyl-calcium-carbonato complexes, all of which differ in chemical reactivity and mobility. Uranyl-silicate complexes are also known but remain poorly characterized. In this work, we studied uranyl speciation in a series of aqueous solutions of 0.1 mM uranyl and 2 mM silicate with pH ranging from 4 to 7. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra of these samples were recorded at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory). Of particular note are the uranyl and silicate concentrations employed in our experiments, which are lower than conditions in previously reported EXAFS studies and approach conditions in natural groundwater systems. Preliminary analyses of EXAFS data indicate that uranyl speciation changes across the pH range, consistent with published thermodynamic data that suggest uranyl-silicate complexes may be important for pH ~ 5 and below, while uranyl-carbonato complexes become dominant at circumneutral pH. To guide the interpretation of the EXAFS data, molecular-scale simulations were carried out using density functional theory. We considered two classes of models: (i) hydrated clusters, and (ii) ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of 3D-periodic models involving uranyl and silicate in water. These calculations reveal that at pH ~ 5, the uranyl speciation is the [UO2(H2O)4H3SiO4]+ complex formed by the substitution of an equatorial uranyl water with a monodentate silicate ligand. The evidence from experiments and simulations provide a consistent picture for the uranyl-silicate complex, which may be important in the transport of uranyl in acidic, silicate-rich waters.

  11. Predicting laser-induced bulk damage and conditioning for deuterated potassium di-hydrogen phosphate crystals using ADM (absorption distribution model)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Z M; Spaeth, M L; Manes, K; Adams, J J; Carr, C W

    2010-02-26

    We present an empirical model that describes the experimentally observed laser-induced bulk damage and conditioning behavior in deuterated Potassium dihydrogen Phosphate (DKDP) crystals in a self-consistent way. The model expands on an existing nanoabsorber precursor model and the multi-step absorption mechanism to include two populations of absorbing defects, one with linear absorption and another with nonlinear absorption. We show that this model connects previously uncorrelated small-beam damage initiation probability data to large-beam damage density measurements over a range of ns pulse widths relevant to ICF lasers such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In addition, this work predicts the damage behavior of laser-conditioned DKDP and explains the upper limit to the laser conditioning effect. The ADM model has been successfully used during the commissioning and early operation of the NIF.

  12. Gas Phase Reactions of Ions Derived from Anionic Uranyl Formate and Uranyl Acetate Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Evan; Hanley, Cassandra; Koehler, Stephen; Pestok, Jordan; Polonsky, Nevo; Van Stipdonk, Michael

    2016-09-01

    The gas-phase oxidation of doubly protonated peptides containing neutral basic residues to various products, including [M + H + O]+, [M - H]+, and [M - H - NH3]+, is demonstrated here via ion/ion reactions with periodate. It was previously demonstrated that periodate anions are capable of oxidizing disulfide bonds and methionine, tryptophan, and S-alkyl cysteine residues. However, in the absence of these easily oxidized sites, we show here that systems containing neutral basic residues can undergo oxidation. Furthermore, we show that these neutral basic residues primarily undergo different types of oxidation (e.g., hydrogen abstraction) reactions than those observed previously (i.e., oxygen transfer to yield the [M + H + O]+ species) upon gas-phase ion/ion reactions with periodate anions. This chemistry is illustrated with a variety of systems, including a series of model peptides, a cell-penetrating peptide containing a large number of unprotonated basic sites, and ubiquitin, a roughly 8.6 kDa protein.

  13. Synthesis, structure, luminescence and photocatalytic properties of an uranyl-2,5-pyridinedicarboxylate coordination polymer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Si, Zhen-Xiu; Xu, Wei, E-mail: xuwei@nbu.edu.cn; Zheng, Yue-Qing, E-mail: yqzhengmc@163.com

    2016-07-15

    An uranium coordination polymer, namely [(UO{sub 2}(pydc)(H{sub 2}O)]·H{sub 2}O (1) (H{sub 2}pydc=2,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid), has been obtained by hydrothermal method and characterized by X-ray single crystal structure determination. Structural analysis reveals that complex 1 exhibits 1D chain coordination polymer, in which UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} ions are bridged by 2,5-pyridinedicarboxylate ligands and the chains are connected into a 3D supramolecular network by O–H···O hydrogen bond interactions and π–π stacking interactions. The photocatalytic properties of 1 for degradation of methylene blue (MB), Rhodamine B (RhB) and methyl orange (MO) under Hg-lamp irradiation have been performed, and the amount of the catalyst as well as Hg-lamp irradiation with different power on the photodegradation efficiency of MB have been investigated. Elemental analyses, infrared spectroscopy, TG-DTA analyses and luminescence properties were also discussed. - Graphical abstract: Complex 1 exhibits 1D chain coordination polymer in which UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} ions are bridged by 2,5-pyridinedicarboxylate ligand. Photoluminescence studies reveal that complex 1 exhibits characteristic emissions of uranyl centers. The compound is selective to degraded dye and displays good photocatalytic activities for the degradation of MB under Hg-lamp. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Complex 1 exhibits 1D chain coordination polymer. • Complex 1 could degrade methylene blue and Rhodamine B under Hg-lamp irradiation. • Luminescent property of 1 has been studied.

  14. Crystal structure of the uranyl-oxide mineral rameauite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plasil, Jakub [ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Physics; Skoda, Radek [Masaryk Univ., Brno (Czech Republic). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Cejka, Jiri [National Museum, Prague (Czech Republic). Dept. of Mineralogy and Petrology; Bourgoin, Vincent; Boulliard, Jean-Claude [Pierre et Marie Curie Univ., Paris (France). Association Jean Wyart, Collection des Mineraux de Jussieu

    2016-12-15

    Rameauite is a rare supergene uranyl-oxide hydroxy-hydrate mineral that forms during hydration-oxidation weathering of uraninite. On the basis of single-crystal X-ray diffraction data collected on a microfocus source, rameauite is monoclinic, space group Cc, with a = 13.9458(19), b = 14.3105(19), c = 13.8959(18) Aa, β = 118.477(14) , V = 2437.7(6) Aa{sup 3} and Z = 4, with D{sub calc} = 5.467 g cm{sup -3}. The structure of rameauite (R = 0.060 for 1698 unique observed reflections) contains sheets of the β-U{sub 3}O{sub 8} topology, with both UO{sub 6} and UO{sub 7} bipyramids, which is similar to the sheets found in spriggite, ianthinite and wyartite. The sheets alternate with the interlayer, which contains K{sup +}, Ca{sup 2+} and H{sub 2}O molecules. Interstitial cations are linked into infinite chains that extend along [10-1]. Adjacent sheets are linked through K-O, Ca-O and H-bonds. The structural formula of rameauite is K{sub 2} Ca(H{sub 2}{sup [3]}O){sub 1}(H{sub 2}{sup [5]}O){sub 4}[(UO{sub 2}) {sub 6}O{sub 6}(OH){sub 4}](H{sub 2}{sup [4]}O){sub 1}. The empirical formula obtained from the average of eight electron-microprobe analyses is (on the basi s of 6 U p.f.u.) K{sub 1.87}(Ca{sub 1.10}Sr{sub 0.04}){sub Σ1.14}[(UO 2){sub 6}O{sub 6}(OH){sub 4.15}].6H{sub 2}O. The Raman spectrum is dominate d by U.O and O.H vibrations. A discussion of related uranyl-oxide minerals is given.

  15. The influenza fusion peptide promotes lipid polar head intrusion through hydrogen bonding with phosphates and N-terminal membrane insertion depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Légaré, Sébastien; Lagüe, Patrick

    2014-09-01

    Influenza infection requires fusion between the virus envelope and a host cell endosomal membrane. The influenza hemagglutinin fusion peptide (FP) is essential to viral membrane fusion. It was recently proposed that FPs would fuse membranes by increasing lipid tail protrusion, a membrane fusion transition state. The details of how FPs induce lipid tail protrusion, however, remain to be elucidated. To decipher the molecular mechanism by which FPs promote lipid tail protrusion, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of the wild-type (WT) FP, fusogenic mutant F9A, and nonfusogenic mutant W14A in model bilayers. This article presents the peptide-lipid interaction responsible for lipid tail protrusion and a related lipid perturbation, polar head intrusion, where polar heads are sunk under the membrane surface. The backbone amides from the four N-terminal peptide residues, deeply inserted in the membrane, promoted both perturbations through H bonding with lipid phosphates. Polar head intrusion correlated with peptides N-terminal insertion depth and activity: the N-termini of WT and F9A were inserted deeper into the membrane than nonfusogenic W14A. Based on these results, we propose that FP-induced polar head intrusion would complement lipid tail protrusion in catalyzing membrane fusion by reducing repulsions between juxtaposed membranes headgroups. The presented model provides a framework for further research on membrane fusion and influenza antivirals.

  16. Temperature and pH driven association in uranyl aqueous solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Druchok, M; 10.5488/CMP.15.43602

    2013-01-01

    An association behavior of uranyl ions in aqueous solutions is explored. For this purpose a set of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations is performed. During the simulation, the fractions of uranyl ions involved in dimer and trimer formations were monitored. To accompany the fraction statistics one also collected distributions characterizing average times of the dimer and trimer associates. Two factors effecting the uranyl association were considered: temperature and pH. As one can expect, an increase of the temperature decreases an uranyl capability of forming the associates, thus lowering bound fractions/times and vice versa. The effect of pH was modeled by adding H^+ or OH^- ions to a "neutral" solution. The addition of hydroxide ions OH^- favors the formation of the associates, thus increasing bound times and fractions. The extra H^+ ions in a solution produce an opposite effect, thus lowering the uranyl association capability. We also made a structural analysis for all the observed associates to reveal...

  17. Atomistic simulations of calcium uranyl(VI) carbonate adsorption on calcite and stepped-calcite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doudou, Slimane; Vaughan, David J; Livens, Francis R; Burton, Neil A

    2012-07-17

    Adsorption of actinyl ions onto mineral surfaces is one of the main mechanisms that control the migration of these ions in environmental systems. Here, we present computational classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the behavior of U(VI) in contact with different calcite surfaces. The calcium-uranyl-carbonate [Ca(2)UO(2)(CO(3))(3)] species is shown to display both inner- and outer-sphere adsorption to the flat {101̅4} and the stepped {314̅8} and {31̅2̅16} planes of calcite. Free energy calculations, using the umbrella sampling method, are employed to simulate adsorption paths of the same uranyl species on the different calcite surfaces under aqueous condition. Outer-sphere adsorption is found to dominate over inner-sphere adsorption because of the high free energy barrier of removing a uranyl-carbonate interaction and replacing it with a new uranyl-surface interaction. An important binding mode is proposed involving a single vicinal water monolayer between the surface and the sorbed complex. From the free energy profiles of the different calcite surfaces, the uranyl complex was also found to adsorb preferentially on the acute-stepped {314̅8} face of calcite, in agreement with experiment.

  18. Modulation of the Structure and Properties of Uranyl Ion Coordination Polymers Derived from 1,3,5-Benzenetriacetate by Incorporation of Ag(I) or Pb(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuéry, Pierre; Harrowfield, Jack

    2016-07-05

    Reaction of uranyl nitrate with 1,3,5-benzenetriacetic acid (H3BTA) in the presence of additional species, either organic bases or their conjugate acids or metal cations, has provided 12 new crystalline complexes, all but one obtained under solvo-hydrothermal conditions. The complexes [C(NH2)3][UO2(BTA)]·H2O (1) and [H2NMe2][UO2(BTA)] (2) crystallize as one- or two-dimensional (1D or 2D) assemblies, respectively, both with uranyl tris-chelation by carboxylate groups and hydrogen-bonded counterions but different ligand conformations. One of the bound carboxylate units is replaced by chelating 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) or 3,4,7,8-tetramethyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Me4phen) in the complexes [(UO2)3(BTA)2(phen)3]·4H2O (3) and [(UO2)3(BTA)2(Me4phen)3]·NMP·3H2O (4) (NMP = N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone), which are a 2D network with honeycomb topology and a 1D polymer, respectively. With silver(I) cations, [UO2Ag(BTA)] (5), a three-dimensional (3D) framework in which the ligand assumes various chelating/bridging coordination modes, and the aromatic ring is involved in Ag(I) bonding, is obtained. A series of seven heterometallic complexes results when lead(II) cations and N-chelating molecules are both present. The complexes [UO2Pb(BTA)(NO3)(bipy)] (6) and [UO2Pb2(BTA)2(bipy)2]·3H2O (7), where bipy is 2,2'-bipyridine, crystallize from the one solution, as 1D and 2D assemblies, respectively. The two 1D coordination polymers [UO2Pb(BTA)(HCOO)(phen)] (8 and 9), again obtained from the one synthesis, provide an example of coordination isomerism, with the formate anion bound either to lead(II) or to uranyl cations. Another 2D architecture is found in [(UO2)2Pb2(BTA)2(HBTA)(H2O)2(phen)2]·2H2O (10), which provides a possible example of a Pb-oxo(uranyl) "cation-cation" interaction. While [UO2Pb(BTA)(HCOO)0.5(NO3)0.5(Me2phen)] (11), where Me2phen is 5,6-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline, is a 1D assembly close to those in 6 and 8, [UO2Pb2(BTA)2(Me4phen)2] (12), obtained together with

  19. Closing uranyl polyoxometalate capsules with bismuth and lead polyoxocations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renier, Olivier; Falaise, Clement; Neal, Harrison; Kozma, Karoly; Nyman, May [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-10-17

    Uranyl polyoxometalate clusters are both fundamentally fascinating and potentially relevant to nuclear energy applications. With only ten years of development, there is still much to be discovered about heterometal derivatives and aqueous speciation and behavior. Herein, we show that it is possible to encapsulate the polyoxocations [Bi{sub 6}O{sub 8}]{sup 2+} and [Pb{sub 8}O{sub 6}]{sup 4+} in [(UO{sub 2})(O{sub 2})(OH)]{sub 24}{sup 24-} (denoted Bi rate at U{sub 24} and Pb rate at U{sub 24}) in pure form and high yields despite the fact that under aqueous conditions, these compounds are stable on opposite ends of the pH scale. Moreover, [Pb{sub 8}O{sub 6}]{sup 4+} is a formerly unknown Pb{sup II} polynuclear species, both in solution and in the solid state. Raman spectroscopic and mass spectrometric analysis of the reaction solutions revealed the very rapid assembly of the nested clusters, driven by bismuth- or lead-promoted decomposition of excess peroxide, which inhibits U{sub 24} formation. Experimental and simulated small-angle X-ray scattering data of Bi rate at U{sub 24} and Pb rate at U{sub 24} solutions revealed that this technique is very sensitive not only to the size and shape of the clusters, but also to the encapsulated species.

  20. Ultrastructural and metabolic changes in osteoblasts exposed to uranyl nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasat, D.R. [Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Pcia de Bs.As. (Argentina); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Catedra de Histologia y Embriologia, Facultad de Odontologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Orona, N.S. [Universidad Nacional de San Martin, Escuela de Ciencia y Tecnologia, Pcia de Bs.As. (Argentina); Mandalunis, P.M. [Universidad de Buenos Aires, Catedra de Histologia y Embriologia, Facultad de Odontologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cabrini, R.L. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Departamento de Radiobiologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Ubios, A.M. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Departamento de Radiobiologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad de Buenos Aires, Catedra de Histologia y Embriologia, Facultad de Odontologia, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2007-05-15

    Exposure to uranium is an occupational hazard to workers who continually handle uranium and an environmental risk to the population at large. Since the cellular and molecular pathways of uranium toxicity in osteoblast cells are still unknown, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the adverse effects of uranyl nitrate (UN) on osteoblasts both in vivo and in vitro. Herein we studied the osteoblastic ultrastructural changes induced by UN in vivo and analyzed cell proliferation, generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), apoptosis, and alkaline phosphatase (APh) activity in osteoblasts exposed to various UN concentrations (0.1, 1, 10, and 100 {mu}M) in vitro. Cell proliferation was quantified by means of the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, ROS was determined using the nitro blue tetrazolium test, apoptosis was morphologically determined using Hoechst 3332 and APh activity was assayed spectrophotometrically. Electron microscopy revealed that the ultrastructure of active and inactive osteoblasts exposed to uranium presented cytoplasmic and nuclear alterations. In vitro, 1-100 {mu}M UN failed to modify cell proliferation ratio and to induce apoptosis. ROS generation increased in a dose-dependent manner in all tested doses. APh activity was found to decrease in 1-100 {mu}M UN-treated cells vs. controls. Our results show that UN modifies osteoblast cell metabolism by increasing ROS generation and reducing APh activity, suggesting that ROS may play a more complex role in cell physiology than simply causing oxidative damage. (orig.)

  1. Status Update: Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2009-01-01

    The successful completion of a field trial of safeguards monitoring equipment at a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP) demonstrated the need for a facility in which to perform full-scale equipment testing under controlled conditions prior to field deployment of safeguards systems at additional plants. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed a Uranyl Nitrate Calibration Loop Equipment (UNCLE) facility to simulate the full-scale operating conditions for a purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process conducted in an NUCP. In addition to calibrating instruments such as the neutron detector developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, UNCLE will be used to test other in-line instruments (mass and volumetric flowmeters, spectrophotometers, etc.). UNCLE will be able to test commercially available equipment, such as the Endress+Hauser Promass 83F Coriolis meter that was used in the field test and other equipment that is presently under development. UNCLE is designed to accommodate different pipe sizes, flow rates, solution concentrations, and other variables of interest. Construction is expected to be completed by the end of September 2008 with initial testing beginning later that year. The design and current status of UNCLE will be presented, along with the capabilities of the facility and the proposed test plans.

  2. Dehydration of Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate to Uranyl Nitrate Trihydrate under Ambient Conditions as Observed via Dynamic Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2015-05-22

    the hexahydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] (UNH) and the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3] (UNT) forms. Their stabilities depend on both relative humidity and temperature. Both phases have previously been studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy, but the data were limited by both instrumental resolution and the ability to prepare the samples as pellets without desiccating them. We report time-resolved infrared (IR) measurements using an integrating sphere that allow us to observe the transformation from the hexahydrate to the trihydrate simply by flowing dry nitrogen gas over the sample. Hexahydrate samples were prepared and confirmed via known XRD patterns, then measured in reflectance mode. The hexahydrate has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm-1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample dehydrates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a blue edge shoulder but ultimately resulting in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm-1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT since UNT has two non-equivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a morphological and structural change that has the lustrous lime green crystals changing to the dull greenish yellow of the trihydrate. Crystal structures and phase transformation were confirmed theoretically using DFT calculations and experimentally via microscopy methods. Both methods showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, as opposed to a single crystallographic site in the hexahydrate.

  3. Liquid-liquid extraction kinetics of uranyl nitrate and actinides (III)-lanthanides nitrates by extractants with amide function; Cinetique d`extraction liquide-liquide du nitrate d`uranyle et des nitrates d`actinides (III) et de lanthanides (III) par des extractants a fonction amide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toulemonde, V.

    1995-12-20

    Nowadays, the most important part of electric power is generated by fission energy. But spent fuels have then to be reprocessed. The production of these reprocessed materials separately and with a high purity level is done according to a liquid-liquid extraction process (Purex process) with the use of tributyl phosphate as solvent. Optimization studies concerning the extracting agent have been undertaken. This work gives the results obtained for the uranyl nitrate and the actinides (III)-lanthanides (III) nitrates extraction by extractants with amide function (monoamide for U(VI) and diamide for actinides (III) and lanthanides (III)). The extraction kinetics have been studied in the case of a metallic specie transfer from the aqueous phase towards the organic phase. The experiments show that the nitrates extraction kinetics is limited by the complexation chemical reaction of the species at the interface between the two liquids. An adsorption-desorption interfacial reactional mechanism (Langmuir theory) is proposed for the uranyl nitrate. (O.M.). 89 refs.

  4. Molecular simulation of the diffusion of uranyl carbonate species in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerisit, Sebastien; Liu, Chongxuan

    2010-09-01

    Potential-based molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous uranyl carbonate species (M xUO 2(CO 3) y2+2x-2y with M = Mg, Ca, or Sr) were carried out to gain molecular-level insight into the hydration properties of these species. The simulation results were used to estimate the self-diffusion coefficients of these uranyl carbonate species, which often dominate uranyl speciation in groundwater systems. The diffusion coefficients obtained for the monoatomic alkaline-earth cations and polyatomic ions (uranyl, carbonate, and uranyl tri-carbonate) were compared with those calculated from the Stokes-Einstein (SE) equation and its variant formulation by Impey et al. (1983). Our results show that the equation of Impey et al. (1983), originally formulated for monovalent monoatomic ions, can be extended to divalent monoatomic ions, with some success in reproducing the absolute values and the overall trend determined from the molecular dynamics simulations, but not to polyatomic ions, for which the hydration shell is not spherically symmetrical. Despite the quantitative failure of both SE formulations, a plot of the diffusion coefficients of the uranyl carbonate complexes as a function of the inverse of the equivalent spherical radius showed that a general linear dependence is observed for these complexes as expected from the SE equation. The nature of the alkaline-earth cation in the uranyl carbonate complexes was not found to have a significant effect on the ion's diffusion coefficient, which suggests that the use of a single diffusion coefficient for different alkaline-earth uranyl carbonate complexes in microscopic diffusion models is appropriate. The potential model reproduced well published quantum mechanical and experimental data of UO(CO)32x-4 and of the individual constituent ions, and therefore is expected to offer reliable predictions of the structure of magnesium and strontium uranyl carbonate aqueous species, for which there is no structural data available to date

  5. Synthesis, spectroscopy, and thermal study of uranyl unsymmetrical Schiff base complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kianfar, Ali Hossein; Dostani, Morteza

    2011-11-01

    The new uranyl complexes with tetradentate unsymmetrical N(2)O(2) Schiff base ligands were synthesized and characterized by IR, UV-vis, NMR and elemental analysis. The DMF solvent is coordinated to uranyl complexes. The thermogravimetry (TG) and differential thermoanalysis (DTA) of the uranyl complexes were carried out in the range of 20-700°C. The UO(2)L(1) complex was decomposed in two and the others were decomposed in three stages. Up to 100°C, the coordinated solvent was released then the Schiff base ligands were decomposed in one or two steps. Decomposition of synthesized complexes is related to the Schiff base characteristics. The thermal decomposition reaction is first order for the studied complexes.

  6. Selectivity in ligand binding to uranyl compounds: A synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, John [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-01-21

    The uranyl cation (UO₂²⁺) is the most abundant form of uranium on the planet. It is estimated that 4.5 billion tons of uranium in this form exist in sea water. The ability to bind and extract the uranyl cation from aqueous solution while separating it from other elements would provide a limitless source of nuclear fuel. A large body of research concerns the selective recognition and extraction of uranyl. A stable molecule, the cation has a linear O=U=O geometry. The short U-O bonds (1.78 Å) arise from the combination of uranium 5f/6d and oxygen 2p orbitals. Due to the oxygen moieties being multiply bonded, these sites were not thought to be basic enough for Lewis acidic coordination to be a viable approach to sequestration. The goal of this research is thus to broaden the coordination chemistry of the uranyl ion by studying new ligand systems via synthetic, structural, thermodynamic and computational methods. It is anticipated that this fundamental science will find use beyond actinide separation technologies in areas such as nuclear waste remediation and nuclear materials. The focus of this study is to synthesize uranyl complexes incorporating amidinate and guanidinate ligands. Both synthetic and computational methods are used to investigate novel equatorial ligand coordination and how this affects the basicity of the oxo ligands. Such an understanding will later apply to designing ligands incorporating functionalities that can bind uranyl both equatorially and axially for highly selective sequestration. Efficient and durable chromatography supports for lanthanide separation will be generated by (1) identifying robust peptoid-based ligands capable of binding different lanthanides with variable affinities, and (2) developing practical synthetic methods for the attachment of these ligands to Dowex ion exchange resins.

  7. Molecular Simulation of the Diffusion of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Aqueous Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan

    2010-09-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of aqueous uranyl carbonate species were carried out with two different potential models to gain molecular-level insight into the hydration properties of these species and evaluate the ability of the two models to reproduce published ab initio and experimental data. The simulation results were used to estimate the self-diffusion coefficients of uranyl carbonate species that often dominate uranyl speciation in groundwater systems. The first potential model was based on a series of shell models developed by Parker and co-workers (including (DE LEEUW and PARKER, 1998; KERISIT and PARKER, 2004; PAVESE et al., 1996). The second potential model was a rigid-ion model based on the flexible SPC water model (TELEMAN et al., 1987), the uranyl model of Guilbaud and Wipff (GUILBAUD and WIPFF, 1996), and the parameters for the carbonate ion given by Greathouse and co-workers (GREATHOUSE and CYGAN, 2005; GREATHOUSE et al., 2002). Analysis of structural (mean interatomic distances and coordination numbers) and dynamical (water residence times in hydration shell and self-diffusion coefficients) properties showed that, overall, the first potential model performed best when compared to published data, although the only major discrepancy with the second model was a misrepresentation of the configuration adopted by the alkaline-earth uranyl carbonate ions. The diffusion coefficients obtained for the alkaline-earth cations and the uranyl ion were compared with three variants of the Stokes-Einstein (SE) equation and it was found that none of the three SE models were able to reproduce both the absolute values and the overall trend determined from the molecular dynamics simulations. However, as would be expected based on the SE equation, a plot of the diffusion coefficients of the uranyl carbonate complexes as a function of the inverse of the equivalent spherical radius showed a general linear dependence with the two models yielding almost identical gradients

  8. Removal of uranyl ions by p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arene acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popescu, Ioana-Carmen [R and D National Institute for Metals and Radioactive Resources–ICPMRR, B-dul Carol I No.70, Sector 2, Bucharest 020917 (Romania); Petru, Filip [“C.D. Nenitescu” Institute of Organic Chemistry, Splaiul Independentei 202B, Sector 6, Bucharest 71141 (Romania); Humelnicu, Ionel [“Al.I. Cuza” University of Iasi, The Faculty of Chemistry, Bd. Carol-I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania); Mateescu, Marina [National R and D Institute for Chemistry and Petrochemistry, Splaiul Independenţei No. 202, Bucharest 060021 (Romania); Militaru, Ecaterina [R and D National Institute for Metals and Radioactive Resources–ICPMRR, B-dul Carol I No.70, Sector 2, Bucharest 020917 (Romania); Humelnicu, Doina, E-mail: doinah@uaic.ro [“Al.I. Cuza” University of Iasi, The Faculty of Chemistry, Bd. Carol-I No. 11, Iasi 700506 (Romania)

    2014-10-15

    Radioactive pollution is a significant threat for the people’s health. Therefore highly effective radioactive decontamination methods are required. Ion exchange, biotechnologies and phytoremediation in constructed wetlands have been used as radioactive decontamination technologies for uranium contaminated soil and water remediation. Recently, beside those classical methods the calix[n]arenic derivatives’ utilization as radioactive decontaminators has jogged attention. The present work aims to present the preliminary research results of uranyl ion sorption studies on the p-hexasulfonated calyx[6]arenic acid. The effect of temperature, contact time, sorbent amount and uranyl concentration variation on sorption efficiency was investigated. Isotherm models revealed that the sorption process fit better Langmuir isotherm.

  9. Standard test method for isotopic analysis of hydrolyzed uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solutions by thermal ionization mass spectrometry

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This method applies to the determination of isotopic composition in hydrolyzed nuclear grade uranium hexafluoride. It covers isotopic abundance of 235U between 0.1 and 5.0 % mass fraction, abundance of 234U between 0.0055 and 0.05 % mass fraction, and abundance of 236U between 0.0003 and 0.5 % mass fraction. This test method may be applicable to other isotopic abundance providing that corresponding standards are available. 1.2 This test method can apply to uranyl nitrate solutions. This can be achieved either by transforming the uranyl nitrate solution to a uranyl fluoride solution prior to the deposition on the filaments or directly by depositing the uranyl nitrate solution on the filaments. In the latter case, a calibration with uranyl nitrate standards must be performed. 1.3 This test method can also apply to other nuclear grade matrices (for example, uranium oxides) by providing a chemical transformation to uranyl fluoride or uranyl nitrate solution. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address al...

  10. Experimental Results for Direct Electron Irradiation of a Uranyl Sulfate Solution: Bubble Formation and Thermal Hydraulics Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gromov, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, Vakhtang [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heltemes, Thad [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sun, Zaijing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wardle, Kent E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stepinski, Dominique [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jerden, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-30

    In support of the development of accelerator-driven production of fission product Mo-99 as proposed by SHINE Medical Technologies, a 35 MeV electron linac was used to irradiate depleted-uranium (DU) uranyl sulfate dissolved in pH 1 sulfuric acid at average power densities of 6 kW, 12 kW, and 15 kW. During these irradiations, gas bubbles were generated in the solution due to the radiolytic decomposition of water molecules in the solution. Multiple video cameras were used to record the behavior of bubble generation and transport in the solution. Seven six-channel thermocouples were used to record temperature gradients in the solution from self-heating. Measurements of hydrogen and oxygen concentrations in a helium sweep gas were recorded by a gas chromatograph to estimate production rates during irradiation. These data are being used to validate a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the experiment that includes multiphase flow and a custom bubble injection model for the solution region.

  11. Synthesis, characterization, anticancer activity, thermal and electrochemical studies of some novel uranyl Schiff base complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asadi, Zahra; Asadi, Mozaffar; Firuzabadi, Fahimeh Dehghani [Shiraz Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Chemistry; Yousefi, Reza; Jamshidi, Mehrnaz [Shiraz Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Protein Chemistry Lab. (PCL)

    2014-04-15

    Some tetradentate N{sub 2}O{sub 2} Schiff base ligands, such as N,N{sup '}-bis(naphtalidene)-1,2-phenylenediamine, N,N{sup '}-bis(naphtalidene)-4-methyl-1,2-phenylenediamine, N,N{sup '}-bis(naphtalidene)-4-chloro-1,2-phenylenediamine, N,N{sup '}-bis(naphtalidene)-4-nitro-1,2-phenylenediamine, N,N{sup '}-bis(naphtalidene)-4-carboxyl-1,2-phenylenediamine, and their uranyl complexes were synthesized and characterized by {sup 1}H NMR, IR, UV-Vis spectroscopy, TG (thermogravimetry), and elemental analysis (C.H.N.). Thermogravimetric analysis shows that uranyl complexes have very different thermal stabilities. This method is used also to establish that only one solvent molecule is coordinated to the central uranium ion and this solvent molecule does not coordinate strongly and is removed easier than the tetradentate ligand and also trans oxides. The electrochemical properties of the uranyl complexes were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Electrochemistry of these complexes showed a quasireversible redox reaction without any successive reactions. Also, the kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition were calculated using Coats-Redfern equation. According to Coats-Redfern plots the kinetics of thermal decomposition of the studied complexes is first-order in all stages. Anticancer activity of the uranyl Schiff base complexes against cancer cell lines (Jurkat) was studied and determined by MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazoliumbromide) assay.

  12. On the retention of uranyl and thorium ions from radioactive solution on peat moss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humelnicu, Doina; Bulgariu, Laura; Macoveanu, Matei

    2010-02-15

    The efficiency of the radioactive uranyl and thorium ions on the peat moss from aqueous solutions has been investigated under different experimental conditions. The sorption and desorption of uranyl and thorium ions on three types (unmodified peat moss, peat moss treated with HNO(3) and peat moss treated with NaOH) of peat moss were studied by the static method. Peat moss was selected as it is available in nature, in any amount, as a cheap and accessible sorbent. Study on desorption of such ions led to the conclusion that the most favourable desorptive reagent for the uranyl ions is Na(2)CO(3) 1M while, for the thorium ions is HCl 1M. The results obtained show that the parameters here under investigation exercise a significant effect on the sorption process of the two ions. Also, the investigations performed recommend the peat moss treated with a base as a potential sorbent for the uranyl and thorium ions from a radioactive aqueous solution.

  13. Removal of uranyl ions from residual waters using some algae types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cecal, A; Palamaru, [No Value; Humelnicu, D; Popa, K; Salaru, VV; Rudic, [No Value; Gulea, A

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with a study on the bioaccumulation of uranyl ions resulted from residual effluents by means of some microbiological collectors: Scenedesmus quadricauda, Anabaena karakumica, Calothrix brevissima, Penicillinium sp, as well as the Glucide extract of Porphyridium cruentum, under vario

  14. On the bonding and the electric field gradient of the uranyl ion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, WA; Visscher, L; Nieuwpoort, WC

    1999-01-01

    Molecular properties of the uranyl ion ([UO2](2+)) are studied using both a non-relativistic and a relativistic method. Inclusion of relativity leads to a bond length expansion and makes the electric field gradient (EFG) at the uranium nucleus strongly dependent on the U-O bond distance, The non-rel

  15. Carbonization of solid uranyl-ascorbate gel as an indirect step of uranium carbide synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brykala Marcin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The studies of the synthesis of uranium carbide from uranyl-ascorbate gels using the complex sol-gel process (CSGP have been carried out. The synthesis of uranyl-ascorbate mixture as liquid sol from uranium trioxide and ascorbic acid and solid gel by extraction of water from sol were carefully examined. Ascorbic acid was used as a complexing agent in complex sol-gel process and as a carbon source. The crucial step to obtain final uranium carbides from the aforementioned substrates is the carbonization process. The thermal behavior of ascorbic acid and uranyl-ascorbate gels in a nitrogen atmosphere in the temperature range of 25-900°C were investigated using TG-DTG. Furthermore, the products of the carbonization of uranyl-ascorbate gels in nitrogen, argon and vacuum atmosphere were identified by X-ray diffraction. TG-DTG was used also as a method for determining of carbon residues in the samples.

  16. The Sorption Processes of U(VI) onto SiO2 in the Presence of Phosphate: from Binary Surface Species to Precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comarmond, M Josick; Steudtner, Robin; Stockmann, Madlen; Heim, Karsten; Müller, Katharina; Brendler, Vinzenz; Payne, Timothy E; Foerstendorf, Harald

    2016-11-01

    The ternary system containing aqueous U(VI), aqueous phosphate and solid SiO2 was comprehensively investigated using a batch sorption technique, in situ attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy, time-resolved luminescence spectroscopy (TRLS), and surface complexation modeling (SCM). The batch sorption studies on silica gel (10 g/L) in the pH range 2.5 to 5 showed no significant increase in U(VI) uptake in the presence of phosphate at equimolar concentration of 20 μM, but significant increase in U(VI) uptake was observed for higher phosphate concentrations. In situ infrared and luminescence spectroscopic studies evidence the formation of two binary U(VI) surface species in the absence of phosphate, whereas after prolonged sorption in the presence of phosphate, the formation of a surface precipitate, most likely an autunite-like phase, is strongly suggested. From SCM, excellent fitting results were obtained exclusively considering two binary uranyl surface species and the formation of a solid uranyl phosphate phase. Ternary surface complexes were not needed to explain the data. The results of this study indicate that the sorption of U(VI) on SiO2 in the presence of inorganic phosphate initially involves binary surface-sorption species and evolves toward surface precipitation.

  17. An investigation of the interactions of Eu³⁺ and Am³⁺ with uranyl minerals: implications for the storage of spent nuclear fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Saptarshi; Steudtner, Robin; Schmidt, Moritz; McKenna, Cora; León Vintró, Luis; Twamley, Brendan; Baker, Robert J

    2016-04-21

    The reaction of a number of uranyl minerals of the (oxy)hydroxide, phosphate and carbonate types with Eu(iii), as a surrogate for Am(iii), have been investigated. A photoluminescence study shows that Eu(iii) can interact with the uranyl minerals Ca[(UO2)6(O)4(OH)6]·8H2O (becquerelite) and A[UO2(CO3)3]·xH2O (A/x = K3Na/1, grimselite; CaNa2/6, andersonite; and Ca2/11, liebigite). For the minerals [(UO2)8(O)2(OH)12]·12H2O (schoepite), K2[(UO2)6(O)4(OH)6]·7H2O (compreignacite), A[(UO2)2(PO4)2]·8H2O (A = Ca, meta-autunite; Cu, meta-torbernite) and Cu[(UO2)2(SiO3OH)2]·6H2O (cuprosklodowskite) no Eu(iii) emission was observed, indicating no incorporation into, or sorption onto the structure. In the examples with Eu(3+) incorporation, sensitized emission is seen and the lifetimes, hydration numbers and quantum yields have been determined. Time Resolved Laser Induced Fluroescence Spectroscpoy (TRLFS) at 10 K have also been measured and the resolution enhancements at these temperatures allow further information to be derived on the sites of Eu(iii) incorporation. Infrared and Raman spectra are recorded, and SEM analysis show significant morphology changes and the substitution of particularly Ca(2+) by Eu(3+) ions. Therefore, Eu(3+) can substitute Ca(2+) in the interlayers of becquerelite and liebigite and in the structure of andersonite, whilst in grimselite only sodium is exchanged. These results have guided an investigation into the reactions with (241)Am on a tracer scale and results from gamma-spectrometry show that becquerelite, andersonite, grimselite, liebigite and compreignacite can include americium in the structure. Shifts in the U[double bond, length as m-dash]O and C-O Raman active bands are similar to that observed in the Eu(iii) analogues and Am(iii) photoluminescence measurements are also reported on these phases; the Am(3+) ion quenches the emission from the uranyl ion.

  18. Extraction of uranyl nitrate, sulphate and chloride with tri-n-octyl amine (TOA from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DJORDJE M. PETKOVIC

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of uranyl nitrate, chloride and sulphate with tri-n-octyl amine (TOA in benzene as a function of the TOA concentration has been studied. The concentration based extraction equilibrium constants were calculated from the distribution data of the uranyl salts, fitting the parameters of a chemical model to the experimentally obtained extraction isotherms. The calculated equilibrium constants are 46.5, 89.4 and 4.2·104 for uranyl nitrate, chloride and sulphate, respectively. These values are in good agreement with the previously reported extraction equilibrium constants calculated by the inflection point method.

  19. Stimulation of d- and l-lactate dehydrogenases transcriptional levels in presence of diammonium hydrogen phosphate resulting to enhanced lactic acid production by Lactobacillus strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhvi, Mamata; Zendo, Takeshi; Iida, Hiroshi; Gokhale, Digambar; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2017-08-08

    The present study revealed the effect of nitrogen sources on lactic acid production and stimulation of d- and l-lactate dehydrogenases (LDH) of parent Lactobacillus lactis NCIM 2368 and its mutant RM2-24 generated after UV mutagenesis. Both the parent and mutant strains were evaluated for d-lactic acid production in control and modified media. The modified media did not show remarkable effect on lactic acid production in case of parent whereas mutant exhibited significant enhancement in d-lactic acid production along with the appearance of l-lactic acid in the broth. Both LDH activities and specific activities were found to be higher in mutant than the parent strain. These results suggested that the diammonium hydrogen phosphate in modified media triggered the expression of LDH genes leading to enhanced lactic acid production. This observation has been proved by studying the expression levels of d- and l-LDH genes of parent and mutant in control and modified media using quantitative RT-PCR technique. In case of mutant, the transcriptional levels of d-LDH and l-LDH increased ∼17 fold and ∼1.38 fold respectively in modified medium compared to the values obtained with control medium. In case of parent, no significant change in transcriptional levels of d- and l-LDH was found when the cells were grown in either control medium or modified medium. This study suggested that the mutant, RM2-24 has l-LDH gene which is expressed in presence of (NH4)2HPO4 resulting in l-lactic acid production. Co-production of l-lactic acid in d-lactic acid fermentation may be detrimental in the PLA production. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Rates and mechanisms of uranyl oxyhydroxide mineral dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinoso-Maset, Estela; Steefel, Carl I.; Um, Wooyong; Chorover, Jon; O'Day, Peggy A.

    2017-06-01

    Uranyl oxyhydroxide minerals are important weathering products in uranium-contaminated surface and subsurface environments that regulate dissolved uranium (U) concentrations. However, dissolution rates for this class of minerals and associated dissolution mechanisms have not been previously reported for circumneutral pH conditions, particularly for the case of flow through porous media. In this work, the dissolution rates of K- and Na-compreignacite (K2(UO2)6O4(OH)6·8H2O and Na2(UO2)6O4(OH)6·8H2O, respectively) were measured using flow-through columns reacted with two simulated background porewater (BPW) solutions of low and high dissolved carbonate concentration (ca. 0.2 and 2.8 mmol L-1). Column materials were characterized before and after reaction with electron microscopy, bulk chemistry, and EXAFS to identify structural and chemical changes during dissolution and to obtain insight into molecular-scale processes. The reactive transport code CrunchFlow was used to calculate overall dissolution rates while accounting for fluid transport and changes in mineral volume and reactive surface area, and results were compared to steady-state dissolution rate calculations. In low carbonate BPW systems, interlayer K and Na were initially leached from both minerals, and in Na-compreignacite, K and minor divalent cations from the input solution were incorporated into the mineral structure. Results of characterization analyses suggested that after reaction both K- and Na-compreignacite resembled a disordered K-compreignacite with altered surfaces. A 10-fold increase in dissolved carbonate concentration and corresponding increase in pH (from 6.65 to 8.40) resulted in a net removal of 58-87% of total U mass from the columns, compared to mass removal during dissolution more accurately reproduced effluent data in high carbonate systems, and resulted in faster overall rates compared with a steady-state dissolution assumption. This study highlights the importance of coupling

  1. Uptake of uranyl ions from uranium ores and sludges by means of Spirulina platensis, Porphyridium cruentum and Nostok linckia alga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecal, Alexandru; Humelnicu, Doina; Rudic, Valeriu; Cepoi, Liliana; Ganju, Dumitru; Cojocari, Angela

    2012-08-01

    In this paper was studied the uranyl ions biosorption on three types of alga: Nostok linckia, Porphyridium cruentum and Spirulina platensis. These ions were supplied either from a pure solution of uranyl nitrate, or after leaching process of uranium ore, or from the sludge resulting in the output of pure UO(2) technology. It was investigated the retention degree versus contact time and afterwards the Langmuir and Freundlich biosorption isotherms of uranyl ions on the three alga types. The retention of UO(2)(2+) ions on alga was proved through FTIR spectra plotted before and after biosorption processes. From the experimental data it was found that regardless of origin of uranyl ions, the retention degree on alga decreased in the series. Spirulina platensis > Porphyridium cruentum ≥ Nostok linckia.

  2. Coordination of the uranyl ion in solution and ionic liquids : a combined UV-Vis absorption and EXAFS study

    OpenAIRE

    Servaes, Kelly

    2007-01-01

    The uranyl ion (UO22+) has been extensively studied for decades and nowadays it is still a hot topic in a number of contemporary issues like nuclear waste treatment and the Balkan syndrome. Therefore, besides our fundamental interest in this complex system, the aim of this study was to provide a convenient and straightforward approach to identify the structure of various uranyl complexes formed in solution. To achieve this goal, spectroscopic techniques like UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, ...

  3. Ab initio study of the mechanism for photoinduced Yl-oxygen exchange in uranyl(VI) in acidic aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réal, Florent; Vallet, Valérie; Wahlgren, Ulf; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2008-09-03

    The mechanism for the photochemically induced isotope-exchange reaction U(17/18)O2(2+)(aq) + H2(16)O U(16)O2(2+)(aq) + H2(17/18)O has been studied using quantum-chemical methods. There is a dense manifold of states between 22,000 and 54,000 cm(-1) that results from excitations from the sigma(u) and pi(u) bonding orbitals in the (1)Sigma(g)(+) ground state to the nonbonding f(delta) and f(phi) orbitals localized on uranium. On the basis of investigations of the reaction profile in the (1)Sigma(g)(+) ground state and the excited states (3)Delta(g) (the lowest triplet state) and (3)Gamma(g) (one of the several higher triplet states), the latter two of which have the electron configurations sigma(u)f(delta) and pi(u)f(phi), respectively, we suggest that the isotope exchange takes place in one of the higher triplet states, of which the (3)Gamma(g) state was used as a representative. The geometries of the luminescent (3)Delta(g) state, the lowest in the sigma(u)f(delta,phi) manifold (the "sigma" states), and the (1)Sigma(g)(+) ground state are very similar, except that the bond distances are slightly longer in the former. This is presumably a result of transfer of a bonding electron to a nonbonding f orbital, which makes the excited state in some respects similar to uranyl(V). As is the case for all of the states of the pi(u)f(delta,phi) manifold (the "pi" states), the geometry of the (3)Gamma(g) state is very different from that of the (3)Delta(g) "sigma" state and has nonequivalent U-O(yl) distances of 1.982 and 1.763 A; in the (3)Gamma(g) state, the yl-exchange takes place by transfer of a proton or hydrogen from water to the more distant yl-oxygen. The activation barriers for proton/hydrogen transfer in the ground state and the (3)Delta(g) and (3)Gamma(g) states are 186, 219, and 84 kJ/mol, respectively. The relaxation energy for the (3)Gamma(g) state in the solvent after photoexcitation is -86 kJ/mol, indicating that the energy barrier can be overcome; the "pi

  4. DFT studies of uranyl acetate, carbonate, and malonate, complexes in solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez, Jordi; Bo, Carles; Poblet, Josep Maria; de Pablo, Joan; Bruno, Jordi

    2003-09-22

    The aim of this work is to demonstrate that theoretical chemistry can be used as a complementary tool in determining geometric parameters of a number of uranyl complexes in solution, which are not observable by experimental methods. In addition, we propose plausible structures with partial geometric data from experimental results. A gradient corrected DFT methodology with relativistic effects is used employing a COSMO solvation model. The theoretical calculations show good agreement with experimental X-ray and EXAFS data for the triacetato-dioxo-uranium(VI) and tricarbonato-dioxo-uranium(VI) complexes and are used to assign possible geometries for dicalcium-tricarbonato-dioxo-uranium(VI) and malonato-dioxo-uranium(VI) complexes. The results of this exercise indicate that carbonate bonding in these complexes is mainly bidentate and that hydroxo bridging plays a critical role in the stabilization of the polynuclear uranyl complexes.

  5. Effect of uranyl intoxication on renal corticomedullary gradient of orthoiodohippurate in laboratory rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlcek, J.; Kvetina, J. (Karlova Univ., Hradec Kralove (Czechoslovakia). Farmaceuticka Fakulta)

    1983-08-05

    The assessment is attempted of the intrarenal distribution (by means of the cortico-medullary gradient and the cortico-pelvic gradient) of a model diagnostic substance (O-/sup 125/I-hippurate) for the analysis of mechanisms causing damage to the renal function during intoxication induced by uranyl ions (uranyl nitrate). The findings were correlated with other indicators of the renal lesion (creatinine and urea plasma levels). Relative shifts of different gradients, i.e. mutual shifts and shifts in relation to hippurate blood levels, make it possible to describe the stepwise character of functional changes in the damaged kidney. The method used is suitable for investigating the dynamics of substances transport during functional renal changes in particular when combined with the determination the intensity of the uptake of model substances by renal tissue slices.

  6. Syntheses and structures of uranyl ethylenediphosphonates: from layers to elliptical nanochannels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tao; Yang, Weiting; Wang, Hao; Dang, Song; Pan, Qing-Jiang; Sun, Zhong-Ming

    2013-06-17

    A family of uranium diphosphonates have been hydrothermally synthesized through the reaction of ethylenediphosphonic acid (EDP, H4L) and uranyl nitrate/zinc uranyl acetate in the presence of organic templates, such as tetraethyl ammonium (NEt4(+)), 4,4'-bipyridine (bipy), and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen). The UO2(2+) in UO2(H2O)(H2L)(EDP-U1) is equatorially five-coordinated by four phosphonate groups and one aqua ligand, forming a pentagonal bipyramid. Each EDP ligand is doubly protonated and chelates three UO2(2+), resulting in a layered structure. Compounds (NEt4)2(UO2)3(HL)2(H2L)·4H2O (EDP-U2) and (H2bipy)UO2L (EDP-U3) have the same layered structure in which NEt4(+) and protonated bipy fill in the uranyl-phosphonate interlayers, respectively, and play a role to balance the negative charges. Different from that in EDP-U1, the UO2(2+) exists in the form of a UO6 tetragonal bipyramid and is surrounded by four different EDP ligands in EDP-U2 and EDP-U3. (Hphen)2(UO2)2(H2L)3 (EDP-U4) features a three-dimensional framework structure with large elliptical channels along the c axis (1.3 × 1.1 nm(2)). Monoprotonated phen molecules fill in these channels and hold together through strong π···π interactions. All of the four compounds have been characterized by IR and photoluminescent spectroscopy. Their characteristic emissions have been attributed as transition properties of uranyl cations. The ion-exchange study indicates that [Co(en)3](3+) could partially replace the protonated phen molecules.

  7. Recuperation of uranyl ions from effluents by means of microbiological collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cecal, A.; Palamaru, I.; Humelnicu, D.; Goanta, M. [Al.I.Cuza Univ., Iasi (Romania). Faculty of Chemistry; Rudic, V.; Salaru, V.V. [Academy of Science, Kishinew (Moldova, Republic of). Inst. of Microbiology; Gulea, A. [State Univ., Kishinew (Moldova, Republic of). Faculty of Chemistry

    1997-12-31

    This paper deals with the study of bioaccumulation of uranyl ions (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) from industrial effluents, using microbiological collectors: Nostoc linkia sp., Tolipotrix sp., Spirulina sp., Porphyridium cruentum and also the glucide extract of P. cruentum. The values of retaining degree of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} on the biomass, for several experimental conditions, were established between 14.22 and 91.99%.

  8. Engaging the Terminal: Promoting Halogen Bonding Interactions with Uranyl Oxo Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Korey P; Kalaj, Mark; Surbella, Robert G; Ducati, Lucas C; Autschbach, Jochen; Cahill, Christopher L

    2017-07-13

    Engaging the nominally terminal oxo atoms of the linear uranyl (UO2(2+) ) cation in non-covalent interactions represents both a significant challenge and opportunity within the field of actinide hybrid materials. An approach has been developed for promoting oxo atom participation in a range of non-covalent interactions, through judicious choice of electron donating equatorial ligands and appropriately polarizable halogen-donor atoms. As such, a family of uranyl hybrid materials was generated based on a combination of 2,5-dihalobenzoic acid and aromatic, chelating N-donor ligands. Delineation of criteria for oxo participation in halogen bonding interactions has been achieved by preparing materials containing 2,5-dichloro- (25diClBA) and 2,5-dibromobenzoic acid (25diBrBA) coupled with 2,2'-bipyridine (bipy) (1 and 2), 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) (3-5), 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (terpy) (6-8), or 4'-chloro-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine (Cl-terpy) (9-10), which have been characterized through single crystal X-ray diffraction, Raman, Infrared (IR), and luminescence spectroscopy, as well as through density functional calculations of electrostatic potentials. Looking comprehensively, these results are compared with recently published analogues featuring 2,5-diiodobenzoic acid which indicate that although inclusion of a capping ligand in the uranyl first coordination sphere is important, it is the polarizability of the selected halogen atom that ultimately drives halogen bonding interactions with the uranyl oxo atoms. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Coordination mode of nitrate in uranyl(VI) complexes: a first-principles molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühl, Michael; Diss, Romain; Wipff, Georges

    2007-06-25

    According to Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations for [UO(2)(NO(3))(3)](-), [UO(2)(NO(3))(4)](2-), and [UO(2)(OH(2))(4-)(NO(3))](+) complexes in the gas phase and in aqueous solution, the nitrate coordination mode to uranyl depends on the interplay between ligand-metal attractions, interligand repulsions, and solvation. In the trinitrate, the eta(2)-coordination is clearly favored in water and in the gas phase, leading to a coordination number (CN) of 6. According to pointwise thermodynamic integration involving constrained molecular dynamics simulations, a change in free energy of +6 kcal/mol is predicted for eta(2)- to eta(1)-transition of one of the three nitrate ligands in the gas phase. In the gas phase, the mononitrate-hydrate complex also prefers a eta(2)-binding mode but with a CN of 5, one H(2)O molecule being in the second shell. This contrasts with the aqueous solution where the nitrate binds in a eta(1)-fashion and uranyl coordinates to four H2O ligands. A driving force of ca. -3 kcal/mol is predicted for the eta(2)- to eta(1)- transition in water. This structural preference is interpreted in terms of steric arguments and differential solvation of terminal vs uranyl-coordinated O atoms of the nitrate ligands. The [UO(2)(NO(3))(4)](2-) complex with two eta(2)- and two eta(1)- coordinated nitrates, observed in the solid state, is stable for 1-2 ps in the gas phase and in solution. In the studied series, the modulation of uranyl-ligand distances upon immersion of the complex in water is found to depend on the nature of the ligand and the composition of the complex.

  10. A relativistic density functional study of uranyl hydrolysis and complexation by carboxylic acids in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ray, Rupashree Shyama

    2009-02-10

    In this work, the complexation of uranium in its most stable oxidation state VI in aqueous solution was studied computationally, within the framework of density functional (DF) theory. The thesis is divided into the following parts: Chapter 2 briefly summarizes the relevant general aspects of actinide chemistry and then focuses on actinide environmental chemistry. Experimental results on hydrolysis, actinide complexation by carboxylic acids, and humic substances are presented to establish a background for the subsequent discussion. Chapter 3 describes the computational method used in this work and the relevant features of the parallel quantum chemistry code PARAGAUSS employed. First, the most relevant basics of the applied density functional approach are presented focusing on relativistic effects. Then, the treatment of solvent effects, essential for an adequate modeling of actinide species in aqueous solution, will be introduced. At the end of this chapter, computational parameters and procedures will be summarized. Chapter 4 presents the computational results including a comparison to available experimental data. In the beginning, the mononuclear hydrolysis product of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, [UO{sub 2}OH]{sup +}, will be discussed. The second part deals with actinide complexation by carboxylate ligands. First of all the coordination number for uranylacetate will be discussed with respect to implications for the complexation of actinides by humic substances followed by the uranyl complexation of aromatic carboxylic acids in comparison to earlier results for aliphatic ones. In the end, the ternary uranyl-hydroxo-acetate are discussed, as models of uranyl humate complexation at ambient condition.

  11. Determination of uranyl incorporation into biogenic manganese oxides using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, S.M.; Fuller, C.C.; Tebo, B.M.; Bargar, J.R.

    2006-01-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides are common and an important source of reactive mineral surfaces in the environment that may be potentially enhanced in bioremediation cases to improve natural attenuation. Experiments were performed in which the uranyl ion, UO22+ (U(VI)), at various concentrations was present during manganese oxide biogenesis. At all concentrations, there was strong uptake of U onto the oxides. Synchrotron-based extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to determine the molecular-scale mechanism by which uranyl is incorporated into the oxide and how this incorporation affects the resulting manganese oxide structure and mineralogy. The EXAFS experiments show that at low concentrations (2 mol % U, >4 ??M U(VI) in solution), the presence of U(VI) affects the stability and structure of the Mn oxide to form poorly ordered Mn oxide tunnel structures, similar to todorokite. EXAFS modeling shows that uranyl is present in these oxides predominantly in the tunnels of the Mn oxide structure in a tridentate complex. Observations by XRD corroborate these results. Structural incorporation may lead to more stable U(VI) sequestration that may be suitable for remediation uses. These observations, combined with the very high uptake capacity of the Mn oxides, imply that Mn-oxidizing bacteria may significantly influence dissolved U(VI) concentrations in impacted waters via sorption and incorporation into Mn oxide biominerals. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  12. Fluorescence sensor for sequential detection of zinc and phosphate ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Miran; Kim, Bo-Yeon; Seo, Hansol; Helal, Aasif; Kim, Hong-Seok

    2016-12-01

    A new, highly selective turn-on fluorescent chemosensor based on 2-(2‧-tosylamidophenyl)thiazole (1) for the detection of zinc and phosphate ions in ethanol was synthesized and characterized. Sensor 1 showed a high selectivity for zinc compared to other cations and sequentially detected hydrogen pyrophosphate and hydrogen phosphate. The fluorescence mechanism can be explained by two different mechanisms: (i) the inhibition of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) and (ii) chelation-induced enhanced fluorescence by binding with Zn2 +. The sequential detection of phosphate anions was achieved by the quenching and subsequent revival of ESIPT.

  13. Phosphate Barriers for Immobilization of Uranium Plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, Peter C.

    2004-12-01

    Uranium contamination of the subsurface remains a persistent problem plaguing remedial design at sites across the U.S. that were involved with production, handling, storage, milling, and reprocessing of uranium for both civilian and defense related purposes. Remediation efforts to date have relied upon excavation, pump-and-treat, or passive remediation barriers (PRB?s) to remove or attenuate uranium mobility. Documented cases convincingly demonstrate that excavation and pump-and-treat methods are ineffective for a number of highly contaminated sites. There is growing concern that use of conventional PRB?s, such as zero-valent iron, may be a temporary solution to a problem that will persist for thousands of years. Alternatives to the standard treatment methods are therefore warranted. The core objective of our research is to demonstrate that a phosphorus amendment strategy will result in a reduction of dissolved uranium to below the proposed drinking water standard. Our hypothesis is that long-chain sodium polyphosphate compounds forestall precipitation of sparingly soluble uranyl phosphate compounds, which is paramount to preventing fouling of wells at the point of injection.

  14. Phosphate Barriers for Immobilization of Uranium Plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Burns, Peter C.

    2005-06-01

    Uranium contamination of the subsurface remains a persistent problem plaguing remedial design at sites across the U.S. that were involved with production, handling, storage, milling, and reprocessing of uranium for both civilian and defense related purposes. Remediation efforts to date have relied upon excavation, pump-and-treat, or passive remediation barriers (PRB?s) to remove or attenuate uranium mobility. Documented cases convincingly demonstrate that excavation and pump-and-treat methods are ineffective for a number of highly contaminated sites. There is growing concern that use of conventional PRB's, such as zero-valent iron, may be a temporary solution to a problem that will persist for thousands of years. Alternatives to the standard treatment methods are therefore warranted. The core objective of our research is to demonstrate that a phosphorous amendment strategy will result in a reduction of dissolved uranium to below the proposed drinking water standard. Our hypothesis is that long-chain sodium polyphosphate compounds forestall precipitation of sparingly soluble uranyl phosphate compounds, which is paramount to preventing fouling of wells at the point of injection.

  15. Gas-phase reactions of molecular oxygen with uranyl(V) anionic complexes-synthesis and characterization of new superoxides of uranyl(VI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, Ana F; Carretas, José M; Marçalo, Joaquim; Michelini, Maria C; Gong, Yu; Gibson, John K

    2015-04-16

    Gas-phase complexes of uranyl(V) ligated to anions X(-) (X = F, Cl, Br, I, OH, NO3, ClO4, HCO2, CH3CO2, CF3CO2, CH3COS, NCS, N3), [UO2X2](-), were produced by electrospray ionization and reacted with O2 in a quadrupole ion trap mass spectrometer to form uranyl(VI) anionic complexes, [UO2X2(O2)](-), comprising a superoxo ligand. The comparative rates for the oxidation reactions were measured, ranging from relatively fast [UO2(OH)2](-) to slow [UO2I2](-). The reaction rates of [UO2X2](-) ions containing polyatomic ligands were significantly faster than those containing the monatomic halogens, which can be attributed to the greater number of vibrational degrees of freedom in the polyatomic ligands to dissipate the energy of the initial O2-association complexes. The effect of the basicity of the X(-) ligands was also apparent in the relative rates for O2 addition, with a general correlation between increasing ligand basicity and O2-addition efficiency for polyatomic ligands. Collision-induced dissociation of the superoxo complexes showed in all cases loss of O2 to form the [UO2X2](-) anions, indicating weaker binding of the O2(-) ligand compared to the X(-) ligands. Density functional theory computations of the structures and energetics of selected species are in accord with the experimental observations.

  16. Series of mixed uranyl-lanthanide (Ce, Nd) organic coordination polymers with aromatic polycarboxylates linkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihalcea, Ionut; Volkringer, Christophe; Henry, Natacha; Loiseau, Thierry

    2012-09-17

    Three series of mixed uranyl-lanthanide (Ce or Nd) carboxylate coordination polymers have been successfully synthesized by means of a hydrothermal route using either conventional or microwave heating methods. These compounds have been prepared from mixtures of uranyl nitrate, lanthanide nitrate together with phthalic acid (1,2), pyromellitic acid (3,4), or mellitic acid (5,6) in aqueous solution. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) single-crystal revealed that the phthalate complex (UO(2))(4)O(2)Ln(H(2)O)(7)(1,2-bdc)(4)·NH(4)·xH(2)O (Ln = Ce(1), Nd(2); x = 1 for 1, x = 0 for 2), is based on the connection of tetranuclear uranyl-centered building blocks linked to discrete monomeric units LnO(2)(H(2)O)(7) via the organic species to generate infinite chains, intercalated by free ammonium cations. The pyromellitate phase (UO(2))(3)Ln(2)(H(2)O)(12)(btec)(3)·5H(2)O (Ce(3), Nd(4)) contains layers of monomeric uranyl-centered hexagonal and pentagonal bipyramids linked via the carboxylate arms of the organic molecules. The three-dimensionality of the structure is ensured by the connection of remaining free carboxylate groups with isolated monomeric units LnO(2)(H(2)O)(7). The network of the third series (UO(2))(2)(OH)Ln(H(2)O)(7)(mel)·5H(2)O (Ce(5), Nd(6)) is built up from dinuclear uranyl units forming layers through connection with the mellitate ligands, which are further linked to each other through discrete monomers LnO(3)(H(2)O)(6). The thermal decomposition of the various coordination complexes led to the formation of mixed uranium-lanthanide oxide, with the fluorite-type structure at 1500 °C (for 1, 2) or 1400 °C for 3-6. Expected U/Ln ratio from the crystal structures were observed for compounds 1-6.

  17. Phosphate homeostasis and disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghat, P; Sodi, R; Swaminathan, R

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies of inherited disorders of phosphate metabolism have shed new light on the understanding of phosphate metabolism. Phosphate has important functions in the body and several mechanisms have evolved to regulate phosphate balance including vitamin D, parathyroid hormone and phosphatonins such as fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF23). Disorders of phosphate homeostasis leading to hypo- and hyperphosphataemia are common and have clinical and biochemical consequences. Notably, recent studies have linked hyperphosphataemia with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. This review outlines the recent advances in the understanding of phosphate homeostasis and describes the causes, investigation and management of hypo- and hyperphosphataemia.

  18. [Effects of Phosphate and Zeolite on the Transformation of Cd Speciation in Soil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-li; Liang, Cheng-hua; Ma, Zi-hui; Han, Yue

    2015-04-01

    The test simulated exogenous Cd contaminated soil indoors, and studied separate application of potassium dihydrogen phosphate, diammonium hydrogen phosphate and zeolite, and combined application of zeolite and dipotassium hydrogen phosphate, zeolite and diammonium hydrogen phosphate, as well as the effect on the morphological changes of Cd contaminated soil. The results showed that soil exchangeable Cd contents were reduced in different degrees after the application of different modifiers, and the carbonate bound and Fe-Mn oxide bound, organic bound and residual Cd contents increased. By comparison, the separate application of potassium dihydrogen phosphate, diammonium hydrogen phosphate and zeolite, and the combined application of zeolite and dipotassium hydrogen phosphate, zeolite and diammonium hydrogen phosphate respectively reduced the soil available Cd contents at 25.2% -51.7%, 21.6% - 46.8%, 6.4% - 23.2%, 38.6% - 61.4%, and 34.1% - 56.4%. All treatments could increase the soil available phosphorus contents, making the soil available phosphorus contents negatively correlated with the available Cd contents significantly, with the correlation coefficient r = - 0.902 6, and the soil pH values had a negative correlation with the available Cd content during the treatments. Therefore, it could be known that the changes of soil available phosphorus contents were the major factor in reducing the availability of soil cadmium under the conditions of the application of phosphate and natural zeolite.

  19. Uranium recovery from Uro area phosphate ore, Nuba Mountains, Sudan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelmajid A. Adam

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out in a laboratory scale to recover uranium from Uro area phosphate ore in the eastern part of Nuba Mountains in Sudan. Phosphate ore samples were collected, and analyzed for uranium abundance. The results showed that the samples contain a significant concentration of uranium with an average of 310.3 μg/g, which is 2.6 times higher than the world average of phosphate. The green phosphoric acid obtained from the samples was found to contain uranium in the range of 186–2049 μg/g, with an average of 603.3 μg/g, and about 98% of uranium content of the phosphate ore was rendered soluble in the phosphoric acid. An extraction process using 25% tributylphosphate, followed by stripping process using 0.5 M sodium carbonate reported that more than 98% of uranium in the green phosphoric acid exists as uranyl tricarbonate complex, moreover, sodic decomposition using 50% sodium hydroxide showed that about 98% of the uranium was precipitated as sodium diuranate concentrate that is known as the yellow cake (Na2U2O7. Further purification and calcinations of the yellow cake led to the formation of the orange powder of uranium trioxide (UO3. The chemical analysis of the obtained uranium concentrates; yellow cake and uranium trioxide proved their nuclear purity and that they meet the standard commercial specification. The obtained results proved that uranium from Uro phosphate ore was successfully recovered as uranium trioxide with an overall recovery percentage of 93%.

  20. S-Transnitrosation reactions of hydrogen sulfide (H2S/HS(-)/S(2-)) with S-nitrosated cysteinyl thiols in phosphate buffer of pH 7.4: Results and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikas, Dimitrios; Böhmer, Anke

    2017-05-01

    Cysteine (CysSH) and its derivatives including N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione (GSH), and cysteine residues in proteins and enzymes are nitrosated with nitric oxide (NO) reaction products such as N2O3 to form S-nitrosated cysteine thiols (RCysSNO). RCysSNO undergo with cysteine thiols (RCysSH) S-transnitrosation reactions, thereby transferring reversibly their nitrosyl ((+)NO) group to RCysSH to form RCysSNO. (•)NO release from RCysSNO and S-transnitrosation are considered the most important features and signalling pathways of RCysSNO. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S: pKa1, 7; HS(-): pKa2, 12.9) is an endogenous product of cysteine metabolism. We hypothesized that RCysSNO would also undergo S-transnitrosation reaction with H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) to form thionitrite (ONS(-)), the smallest S-nitrosated thiol. This article describes spectrophotometric and mass spectrometric investigations of S-transnitrosation reactions in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) of pH 7.4 between H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) (supplied as Na2S) and S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO), S-nitroso-l-cysteine (CysSNO), S-nitroso-N-acetyl-l-cysteine (SNAC), and the synthetic S-nitroso-N-acetyl-l-cysteine ethyl ester (SNACET). For comparison, we also investigated the reactions of H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) with NO(+)BF4(-) and NO2(+)BF4(-), direct ON(+) and O2N(+) donors, respectively, and assumed formation of ONS(-) and thionitrate (O2NS(-)), respectively. Addition of Na2S (at 1 mM) to buffered RCysSNO solutions resulted in decreases of the absorbance at 340 nm and concomitant increases in the absorbance at 410 nm depending upon the nature and concentration of RCysSNO (range, 25-1000 μM). The reactivity order of RCysSNO against H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) was: CysSNO > SNACET > GSNO > SNAC. Our spectrophotometric and GC-MS analyses indicate that H2S/HS(-)/S(2-) and RCysSNO undergo multiple reactions. Major final reaction products were found to be nitrite and nitrate. ONS(-) and O2NS(-) were not detected by GC-MS, suggesting rapid and

  1. Dihydrogen Phosphate Selective Anion Receptor Based on Acylhydrazone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthil Pandian, T.; Kang, Jongmin [Sejong Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    Anion receptor based on acylhydrazone has been designed and synthesized. UV-vis and {sup 1}H NMR titration showed that receptor is selective receptor for dihydrogen phosphate (H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -}). Dihydrogen phosphate was complexed by the receptor via at least 4 hydrogen bonding interactions, contributing from two amide N-Hs and two imine C-Hs. In addition, nitrogen in the aromatic ring could make 2 additional hydrogen bondings with OH groups in the dihydrogen phosphate. However, the receptor could make only 4 hydrogen bonds with halides. Therefore, receptor could bind anions through hydrogen bonds with a selectivity in the order of H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -} > Br{sup -} > Cl{sup -} in highly polar solvent such as DMSO.

  2. Chloroquine Phosphate Oral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chloroquine phosphate is in a class of drugs called antimalarials and amebicides. It is used to prevent and treat ... Chloroquine phosphate comes as a tablet to take by mouth. For prevention of malaria in adults, one dose is ...

  3. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003671.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) is a protein that helps red ...

  4. Theoretical stability assessment of uranyl phosphates and apatites: Selection of amendments for in situ remediation of uranium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raicevic, S. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Radiation and Environmental Protection Laboratory, P.O.Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)]. E-mail: raich@beotel.yu; Wright, J.V. [PIMS NW, Inc., 201 North Edison, Suite 226, Richland, WA 99336 (United States); Veljkovic, V. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, Center for Multidisciplinary Research and Engineering, P.O.Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Conca, J.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, 115 North Main Street, Carlsbad, NM 88220 (United States)

    2006-02-15

    Addition of an amendment or reagent to soil/sediment is a technique that can decrease mobility and reduce bioavailability of uranium (U) and other heavy metals in the contaminated site. According to data from literature and results obtained in field studies, the general mineral class of apatites was selected as a most promising amendment for in situ immobilization/remediation of U. In this work we presented theoretical assessment of stability of U(VI) in four apatite systems (hydroxyapatite (HAP), North Carolina Apatite (NCA), Lisina Apatite (LA), and Apatite II) in order to determine an optimal apatite soil amendment which could be used for in situ remediation of uranium. In this analysis we used a theoretical criterion which is based on calculation of the ion-ion interaction potential, representing the main term of the cohesive energy of the matrix/pollutant system. The presented results of this analysis indicate (i) that the mechanism of immobilization of U by natural apatites depends on their chemical composition and (ii) that all analyzed apatites represent, from the point of view of stability, promising materials which could be used in field remediation of U-contaminated sites.

  5. Theoretical stability assessment of uranyl phosphates and apatites: selection of amendments for in situ remediation of uranium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raicevic, S; Wright, J V; Veljkovic, V; Conca, J L

    2006-02-15

    Addition of an amendment or reagent to soil/sediment is a technique that can decrease mobility and reduce bioavailability of uranium (U) and other heavy metals in the contaminated site. According to data from literature and results obtained in field studies, the general mineral class of apatites was selected as a most promising amendment for in situ immobilization/remediation of U. In this work we presented theoretical assessment of stability of U(VI) in four apatite systems (hydroxyapatite (HAP), North Carolina Apatite (NCA), Lisina Apatite (LA), and Apatite II) in order to determine an optimal apatite soil amendment which could be used for in situ remediation of uranium. In this analysis we used a theoretical criterion which is based on calculation of the ion-ion interaction potential, representing the main term of the cohesive energy of the matrix/pollutant system. The presented results of this analysis indicate (i) that the mechanism of immobilization of U by natural apatites depends on their chemical composition and (ii) that all analyzed apatites represent, from the point of view of stability, promising materials which could be used in field remediation of U-contaminated sites.

  6. Isotherms and kinetic study of dihydrogen and hydrogen phosphate ions (H{2}PO{4}- and HPO{4}2-) adsorption onto crushed plant matter of the semi-arid zones of Morocco: Asphodelus microcarpus, Asparagus albus and Senecio anthophorbium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiban, M.; Benhima, H.; Saadi, B.; Nounah, A.; Sinan, F.

    2005-03-01

    In the present work H{2}PO4- and HPO42- ions adsorption onto organic matter (OM) obtained from ground dried three plants growing in arid zones of Morocco has been studied. The adsorption process is affected by various parameters such as contact time, particle size and initial concentration of phosphate solution (Ci ≤ 30 mg/l). The uptake of both ions is increased by increasing the concentration of them selves. The retention of phosphate ions by Asphodelus microcarpus, Asparagus albus are well defined by several isotherms such as the Langmuir, Temkin and Freundlich.

  7. Selective recognition of uranyl ions from bulk of thorium(iv) and lanthanide(iii) ions by tetraalkyl urea: a combined experimental and quantum chemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, Bal Govind; Das, Debasish; Sadhu, Biswajit; Kannan, S; Pius, I C; Noronha, D M; Sundararajan, Mahesh; Kumar, Mukesh

    2016-06-21

    The selective separation of uranyl ions from an aqueous solution is one of the most important criteria for sustainable nuclear energy production. We report herein a known, but unexplored extractant, tetraalkyl urea, which shows supreme selectivity for uranium in the presence of interfering thorium and other lanthanide ions from a nitric acid medium. The structural characterization of the uranyl complex (UO2X2·2L, where X = NO3(-), Cl(-) and Br(-)) by IR, NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction provides insight into the strong interaction between the uranyl ion and the ligand. The origin of this supreme selectivity for uranyl ions is further supported by electronic structure calculations. Uranyl binding with the extractant is thermodynamically more favourable when compared to thorium and the selectivity is achieved through a combination of electronic and steric effects.

  8. FY-15 Progress Report on Cleanup of irradiated SHINE Target Solutions Containing 140g-U/L Uranyl Sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, Megan E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bowers, Delbert L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    During FY 2012 and 2013, a process was developed to convert the SHINE Target Solution (STS) of irradiated uranyl sulfate (140 g U/L) to uranyl nitrate. This process is necessary so that the uranium solution can be processed by the UREX (Uranium Extraction) separation process, which will remove impurities from the uranium so that it can be recycled. The uranyl sulfate solution must contain <0.02 M SO42- so that the uranium will be extractable into the UREXsolvent. In addition, it is desired that the barium content be below 0.0007 M, as this is the limit in the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA).

  9. Why nature chose phosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westheimer, F H

    1987-03-06

    Phosphate esters and anhydrides dominate the living world but are seldom used as intermediates by organic chemists. Phosphoric acid is specially adapted for its role in nucleic acids because it can link two nucleotides and still ionize; the resulting negative charge serves both to stabilize the diesters against hydrolysis and to retain the molecules within a lipid membrane. A similar explanation for stability and retention also holds for phosphates that are intermediary metabolites and for phosphates that serve as energy sources. Phosphates with multiple negative charges can react by way of the monomeric metaphosphate ion PO3- as an intermediate. No other residue appears to fulfill the multiple roles of phosphate in biochemistry. Stable, negatively charged phosphates react under catalysis by enzymes; organic chemists, who can only rarely use enzymatic catalysis for their reactions, need more highly reactive intermediates than phosphates.

  10. Selective Se-for-S substitution in Cs-bearing uranyl compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurzhiy, Vladislav V.; Tyumentseva, Olga S.; Krivovichev, Sergey V.; Tananaev, Ivan G.

    2017-04-01

    Phase formation in the mixed sulfate-selenate aqueous system of uranyl nitrate and cesium nitrate has been investigated. Two types of crystalline compounds have been obtained and characterized using a number of experimental (single crystal XRD, FTIR, SEM) and theoretical (information-based complexity calculations, topological analysis) techniques. No miscibility gaps have been observed for Cs2[(UO2)2(TO4)3] (T= S, Se), which crystallizes in tetragonal system, P-421m, a =9.616(1)-9.856(2), c =8.105(1)-8.159(1) Å, V =749.6(2)-792.5(3) Å3. Nine phases with variable amount of S and Se have been structurally characterized. The structures of the Cs2[(UO2)2(TO4)3] (T= S, Se) compounds are based upon the [(UO2)2(TO4)3]2- layers of corner-sharing uranyl pentagonal bipyramids and TO4 tetrahedra. The layers contain two types of tetrahedral sites: T1 (3-connected, i.e. having three O atoms shared by adjacent uranyl polyhedra) and T2 (4-connected). The Se-for-S substitution in tetrahedral sites is highly selective with smaller S6+ cation showing a strong preference for the more tightly bonded T2 site. Crystallization in the pure Se system starts with the formation of Cs2[(UO2)(SeO4)2(H2O)](H2O) crystals, its subsequent dissolution and formation of Cs2[(UO2)2(SeO4)3]. The information-based structural complexity calculations for these two phases support the rule that more topologically complex structures form at the latest stages of crystallization.

  11. Computer simulation of uranyl uptake by the rough lipopolysaccharide membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Roberto D; Vorpagel, Erich R; Guglielmi, Matteo; Straatsma, T P

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metal environmental contaminants cannot be destroyed but require containment, preferably in concentrated form, in a solid or immobile form for recycling or final disposal. Microorganisms are able to take up and deposit high levels of contaminant metals, including radioactive metals such as uranium and plutonium, into their cell wall. Consequently, these microbial systems are of great interest as the basis for potential environmental bioremediation technologies. The outer membranes of Gram-negative microbes are highly nonsymmetric and exhibit a significant electrostatic potential gradient across the membrane. This gradient has a significant effect on the uptake and transport of charged and dipolar compounds. However, the effectiveness of microbial systems for environmental remediation will depend strongly on specific properties that determine the uptake of targeted contaminants by a particular cell wall. To aid in the design of microbial remediation technologies, knowledge of the factors that determine the affinity of a particular bacterial outer membrane for the most common ionic species found in contaminated soils and groundwater is of great importance. Using our previously developed model for the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) membrane of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, this work presents the potentials of mean force as the estimate of the free energy profile for uptake of sodium, calcium, chloride, uranyl ions, and a water molecule by the bacterial LPS membrane. A compatible classical parameter set for uranyl has been developed and validated. Results show that the uptake of uranyl is energetically a favorable process relative to the other ions studied. At neutral pH, this nuclide is shown to be retained on the surface of the LPS membrane through chelation with the carboxyl and hydroxyl groups located in the outer core.

  12. Benchmark calculation for water reflected STACY cores containing low enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyoshi, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Nakamura, Takemi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2001-08-01

    In order to validate the availability of criticality calculation codes and related nuclear data library, a series of fundamental benchmark experiments on low enriched uranyl nitrate solution have been performed with a Static Experiment Criticality Facility, STACY in JAERI. The basic core composed of a single tank with water reflector was used for accumulating the systematic data with well-known experimental uncertainties. This paper presents the outline of the core configurations of STACY, the standard calculation model, and calculation results with a Monte Carlo code and JENDL 3.2 nuclear data library. (author)

  13. Synthesis, characterization and photo luminescence studies of uranyl doped SrBPO{sub 5}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rout, Annapurna; Suriyamurthy, N.; Panigrahi, B. S., E-mail: bsp@igcar.gov.in [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam – 603 102 (India)

    2015-06-24

    SrBPO{sub 5}: UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} was synthesized using solid state reaction method and characterized using powder X-ray diffraction. PXRD data showed the formation of single phase confirming successful doping of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}. Photo luminescence investigation informed stabilization of Uranium as Uranyl (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) in SrBPO{sub 5} matrix. Luminescence decay time data suggested two possible environments for UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} with two different life time values.

  14. New complexes of heteroaromatic N-oxides with europium, uranyl and zinc ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zbigniew Hnatejko

    2012-01-01

    New solid complexes of europium,uranyl and zinc ions with N-oxides of 4-chloro-2,6-dimethylpyridine,quinoline and 4-methoxyquinaldinic acid in presence different anions were obtained and characterized by elemental and TG analyses,IR and luminescence spectra.The compounds are crystalline,hydrated or anhydrous salts with colours typical of metal ions.Thermal studies showed that in hydrated salts lattice or coordination water molecules are present.A role of different anions in the formation of various types of the complexes is presented.

  15. Research and engineering assessment of biological solubilization of phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.D.; McIlwain, M.E.; Losinski, S.J.; Taylor, D.D.

    1993-03-01

    This research and engineering assessment examined a microbial phosphate solubilization process as a method of recovering phosphate from phosphorus containing ore compared to the existing wet acid and electric arc methods. A total of 860 microbial isolates, collected from a range of natural environments were tested for their ability to solubilize phosphate from rock phosphate. A bacterium (Pseudomonas cepacia) was selected for extensive characterization and evaluation of the mechanism of phosphate solubilization and of process engineering parameters necessary to recover phosphate from rock phosphate. These studies found that concentration of hydrogen ion and production of organic acids arising from oxidation of the carbon source facilitated microbial solubilization of both pure chemical insoluble phosphate compounds and phosphate rock. Genetic studies found that phosphate solubilization was linked to an enzyme system (glucose dehydrogenase). Process-related studies found that a critical solids density of 1% by weight (ore to liquid) was necessary for optimal solubilization. An engineering analysis evaluated the cost and energy requirements for a 2 million ton per year sized plant, whose size was selected to be comparable to existing wet acid plants.

  16. Synthesis and structure determination of uranyl peroxide nanospheres in the presence of organic structure directing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, T. Z.; Burns, P. C.

    2007-12-01

    Recently, actinyl peroxide nanoclusters containing 20, 24, 28, or 32 actinyl polyhedra have been synthesized and their structures identified with single crystal X-ray diffraction [1]. Most nanomaterials are composed of main group elements or transition metals, therefore, these actinyl nanospheres may display vastly different chemical and physical properties due to the presence of filled f-orbitals. A major goal of our research group is to create novel actinyl materials, focusing on nano- and mesoporous materials. The original nanosphere syntheses were limited to inorganic crystallization agents, such as monovalent cations. Over the last decade, the use of organic compounds and surfactants have received increased attention as structure-directing agents for the generation of novel inorganic materials. Using structure-directing organic amines we have successfully synthesized and determined the structures of uranyl nanospheres containing 40 and 50 uranyl polyhedra. The topology of the skeletal U-50 nanosphere is identical to the C50Cl10 fullerene [2]. The topographical relationship between the actinyl nanospheres and fullerene or fullerene-like material may provide additional insight into stable configurations for lower fullerenes. [1] Burns et al., Actinyl peroxide nanospheres. Angewandte Chemie, International Edition, 2005. 44(14): p. 2135. [2] Xie et al., Capturing the Labile Fullerene[50] as C50Cl10. Science, (2004) 305(5671): p. 699.

  17. Isotope selectivity of infrared laser-driven unimolecular dissociation of a volatile uranyl compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, D M; Hall, R B; Horsley, J A; Kramer, G M; Rabinowitz, P; Kaldor, A

    1979-07-27

    Isotope-selective photodissociation of the volatile complex uranyl hexafluoroacetylacetonate . tetrahydrofuran [UO(2)(hfacac)(2) . THF] has been achieved with both a continuous-wave and a pulsed carbon dioxide laser. The photodissociation was carried out in a low-density molecular beam under collisionless conditions. Transitions of the laser are in resonance with the asymmetric O-U-O stretch of the uranyl moiety, a vibrational mode whose frequency is sensitive to the masses of the uranium and oxygen isotopes. Unimolecular dissociation is observed mass spectrometrically at an extremely low energy fluence, with no evidence of an energy fluence or intensity threshold. The dissociation yield increases nearly linearly with increasing energy fluence. At constant fluence the dissociation yield is independent of contact time between the radiation field and the molecule, indicating that the decomposition is driven by laser energy fluence and not laser intensity. The oxygen and uranium isotope selectivities measured in these experiments are nearly those predicted by the ratio of the linear absorption cross sections for the respective isotopes. Thus, essentially complete selectivity is observed for oxygen isotopes, while a selectivity of only about 1.25 is measured for the uranium isotopes. A model presented to describe these results is based on rapid intramolecular vibrational energy flow from the pumped mode into a limited number of closely coupled modes.

  18. Extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate from aqueous nitric acid solutions with CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1995-08-01

    DOE sponsored development of the transuranium extraction (TRUEX) process for removing actinides from radioactive wastes. The solvent is a mixture of CMPO and TBP. Since the extraction characteristics of CMPO are not as well understood as those of TBP, the extraction of nitric acid, uranyl nitrate, and bismuth nitrate with CMPO (dissolved in n-dodecane) were studied. Results indicate that CMPO extracts nitric acid with a 1:1 stoichiometry; equilibrium constant is 2. 660{plus_minus}0.092 at 25 C, and extraction enthalpy is -5. 46{plus_minus}0.46 kcal/mol. Slope analysis indicates that uranyl nitrate extracts with a mixed equilibria of 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries in nearly equal proportion. Equil. constant of the 2: 1 extraction was 1.213 {times} 10{sup 6}{plus_minus}3.56 {times} 10{sup 4} at 25 C; reaction enthalpy was -9.610{plus_minus}0.594 kcal/mol. Nitration complexation constant is 8.412{plus_minus}0.579, with an enthalpy of -10.72{plus_minus}1.87 kcal/mol. Bismuth nitrate also extracts with a mixed equilibria of (perhaps) 1:1 and 2:1 stoichiometries. A 2:1 extraction equilibrium and a nitrate complexation adequately model the data. Kinetics and enthalpies were also measured.

  19. Alternative process to produce UF{sub 4} using the effluent from ammonium uranyl carbonate route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva Neto, Joao B.; Garcia, Rafael Henrique Lazzari; Dal Vechio, Edvaldo, E-mail: jbsneto@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), SP (Brazil); Riella, Humberto G., E-mail: riella@enq.ufsc.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencias e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (INCT/CNPq) (Brazil); Carvalho, Elita F. Urano de; Durazzo, Michelangelo [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), SP (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciencias e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores (INCT/CNPq) (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The Nuclear Fuel Centre of IPEN / CNEN - SP develops and manufactures dispersion fuel with high uranium concentration. It meets the demand of the IEA-R1 reactor and future research reactors to be constructed in Brazil. The fuel uses uranium silicide (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}) dispersed in aluminum. For producing the fuel, the process of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) conversion consist in obtaining U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} and / or U{sub 3}O{sub 8} through the preparation of intermediate compounds, among them ammonium uranyl carbonate - AUC, ammonium diuranate - DUA and uranium tetrafluoride - UF{sub 4}. This work describes a procedure for preparing uranium tetrafluoride via a dry route, using as raw material the filtrate generated when ammonium uranyl carbonate is routinely produced. The filtrate consists mainly of a solution containing high concentrations of ammonium (NH{sup 4+}), fluoride (F{sup -}), carbonate (CO{sup 3-}) and low concentrations of uranium. The procedure consists in recovering NH{sup 4F} and uranium, as UF{sub 4}, through the crystallization of ammonium bifluoride (NH{sub 4}HF{sub 2}) and, in a later step, the addition of UO{sub 2}, occurring fluoridation and decomposition. The UF{sub 4} obtained is further diluted in the UF{sub 4} produced routinely at IPEN / CNEN-SP by a wet route process. (author)

  20. Structural elucidation and physicochemical properties of mononuclear Uranyl(VI) complexes incorporating dianionic units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Mohammad; Velmurugan, Gunasekaran; Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata; Kruszynski, Rafal; Al-Resayes, Saud I.; Al-Othman, Zeid A.; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam

    2016-01-01

    Two derivatives of organouranyl mononuclear complexes [UO2(L)THF] (1) and [UO2(L)Alc] (2), where L = (2,2′-(1E,1′E)-(2,2-dimethylpropane-1,3-dyl)bis(azanylylidene, THF = Tetrahydrofuran, Alc = Alcohol), have been prepared. These complexes have been determined by elemental analyses, single crystal X-ray crystallography and various spectroscopic studies. Moreover, the structure of these complexes have also been studied by DFT and time dependent DFT measurements showing that both the complexes have distorted pentagonal bipyramidal environment around uranyl ion. TD-DFT results indicate that the complex 1 displays an intense band at 458.7 nm which is mainly associated to the uranyl centered LMCT, where complex 2 shows a band at 461.8 nm that have significant LMCT character. The bonding has been further analyzed by EDA and NBO. The photocatalytic activity of complexes 1 and 2 for the degradation of rhodamine-B (RhB) and methylene blue (MB) under the irradiation of 500W Xe lamp has been explored, and found more efficient in presence of complex 1 than complex 2 for both dyes. In addition, dye adsorption and photoluminescence properties have also been discussed for both complexes. PMID:27595801

  1. Synthesis and Crystal Structure of Bis(nitrate)bis(dipiperidin-1-yl-methanone)uranyl(II)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱利明; 何雪雁; 周俊慧; 于正风; 李宝龙; 张勇

    2004-01-01

    The new uranyl complex UO2(NO3)2[C5H10NC(O)NH10C5]2 has been synthesized and its structure was determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Crystal data: C22H40N6O10U, monoclinic, space group P21/c, a = 11.151(3), b = 13.907(3), c = 10.067(2)A,β= 115.602(4)0,V = 1408.0(5) A3, Mr = 786.63, Z = 2, Dc = 1.855 g/cm3, F(000) = 772,μ = 5.827 mm-1, R = 0.0465 and wR = 0.1065 for 2916 observed reflections (I > 2σ(I)). The central uranyl ion is coordinated by six oxygen atoms, of which two are from the carbonyl groups of di-piperidin-1-yl-methanone molecules and the other four from two nitrate groups.

  2. New thermo-sensitive chelating surfactants for selective solvent-free extraction of uranyl nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevost, S.; Larpent, C.; Testard, F.; Coulombeau, H.; Baczko, K.; Berthon, L.; Desvaux, H.; Madic, C.; Zemb, T

    2004-07-01

    Functional surfactants were synthesised by grafting a chelating group (amino-acid residue) to the tip of a poly-ethoxylated nonionic surfactant chain (C{sub i}E{sub j}: C{sub i}H{sub 2i}+1(OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub j}OH)) or in a branched position. C{sub i}E{sub j} nonionic surfactants are known to be thermo-reversible and to exhibit a clouding phenomenon associated to phase separation of micelles. The functional surfactants retain both surface-active properties, characteristic thermo-reversible behaviour and have efficient complexing properties toward uranyl. In the presence of uranyl nitrate, small micelles are formed at ambient temperature and the de-mixing leads to a separation of the target ion trapped by the functional surfactant (cloud point extraction). Those surfactants are more efficient than mixture of classical C{sub i}E{sub j} and complexing agent solubilized in the micelles. This reveals a synergistic effect of the covalent bond between the chelating group and the nonionic surfactant C{sub i}E{sub j}. This paper presents a systematic study of the extraction and aggregation properties and the influence of the nature of the ions. (authors)

  3. Structure and spectroscopy of uranyl and thorium complexes with substituted phosphine oxide ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breshears, Andrew T.; Barnes, Charles L.; Wagle, Durgesh V.; Baker, Gary A.; Walensky, Justin R. [Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Takase, Michael K. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States). Beckman Institute

    2015-05-01

    Phosphine oxide ligands are important in the chemistry of the nuclear fuel cycle. We have synthesized and characterized a series of phosphine oxide ligands with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) groups to enhance the spectroscopic features of uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, and to make detection more efficient. Complexation of OPPh{sub 2}R, R = C{sub 10}H{sub 7} (naphthyl); C{sub 14}H{sub 9} (phenanthrenyl); C{sub 14}H{sub 9} (anthracenyl); and C{sub 16}H{sub 9} (pyrenyl), to UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} afforded the eight-coordinate complexes, UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(OPPh{sub 2}R){sub 2}. An eleven-coordinate complex, Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}[OPPh{sub 2}(C{sub 14}H{sub 9})]{sub 3}, C{sub 14}H{sub 9} = phenanthrenyl, was structurally characterized, and was found to be the first thorium compound isolated with three phosphine oxide ligands bound. The phosphine oxide ligands were not fluorescent but the anthracenyl-substituted ligand showed broad, red-shifted emission at approximately 50 nm relative to typical anthracene, making this ligand set a possibility for use in detection. The synthesis and spectroscopy of the uranyl and thorium complexes are presented.

  4. Deciphering the energy landscape of the interaction uranyl-DCP with antibodies using dynamic force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulon, Jean-Marie; Parot, Pierre; Odorico, Michael; Pellequer, Jean-Luc

    2008-11-15

    Previous studies on molecular recognition of uranyl-DCP (dicarboxy-phenanthroline chelator) compound by two distinct monoclonal antibodies (Mabs U04S and U08S) clearly showed the presence of a biphasic shape in Bell-Evans' plots and an accentuated difference in slopes at the high loading rates. To further explore the basis in the slope difference, we have performed complementary experiments using antibody PHE03S, raised against uranyl-DCP but, presenting a strong cross-reactivity toward the DCP chelator. This work allowed us to obtain a reallocation of the respective contributions of the metal ion itself and that of the chelator. Results led us to propose a 2D schematic model representing two energy barriers observed in the systems Mabs U04S- and U08S-[UO(2)-DCP] where the outer barrier characterizes the interaction between UO(2) and Mab whereas the inner barrier characterizes the interaction between DCP and Mab. Using dynamic force spectroscopy, it is thus possible to dissect molecular interactions during the unbinding between proteins and ligands.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of uranyl ion-imprinted microspheres based on amidoximated modified alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, M; Abdel-Latif, D A; Mohammed, Hassan A

    2015-04-01

    Surface ion-imprinting technique was utilized for the preparation of surface ion-imprinted chelating microspheres based on amidoximated modified alginate (U-AOX) in presence of uranyl ions as a template and glutaraldehyde cross-linker. Different instrumental techniques such as elemental analysis, scanning electron microscope (SEM), FTIR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction spectra were employed for full investigation of the manufactured materials. The synthesized microspheres displayed a higher ability for selective extraction of UO2(2+) when compared to the non-imprinted microspheres (NI-AOX). In addition, the essential parameters such as pH, temperature, time and initial uranyl ion concentration were evaluated in order to optimize the conditions of the adsorption process. The results indicated that pH 5 was the best for the UO2(2+) removal, also, the adsorption was endothermic in nature, follows the second-order kinetics and the adsorption isotherm showed the best fit with Langmuir model with maximum adsorption capacity of 155 ± 1 and 64 ± 1 mg/g for both U-AOX and NI-AOX respectively. Desorption and regeneration had been carried out using 0.5M HNO3 solution and the results indicated that the microspheres maintained about 96% of its original efficiency after five consecutive adsorption-desorption cycles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Structural elucidation and physicochemical properties of mononuclear Uranyl(VI) complexes incorporating dianionic units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azam, Mohammad; Velmurugan, Gunasekaran; Wabaidur, Saikh Mohammad; Trzesowska-Kruszynska, Agata; Kruszynski, Rafal; Al-Resayes, Saud I.; Al-Othman, Zeid A.; Venuvanalingam, Ponnambalam

    2016-09-01

    Two derivatives of organouranyl mononuclear complexes [UO2(L)THF] (1) and [UO2(L)Alc] (2), where L = (2,2‧-(1E,1‧E)-(2,2-dimethylpropane-1,3-dyl)bis(azanylylidene, THF = Tetrahydrofuran, Alc = Alcohol), have been prepared. These complexes have been determined by elemental analyses, single crystal X-ray crystallography and various spectroscopic studies. Moreover, the structure of these complexes have also been studied by DFT and time dependent DFT measurements showing that both the complexes have distorted pentagonal bipyramidal environment around uranyl ion. TD-DFT results indicate that the complex 1 displays an intense band at 458.7 nm which is mainly associated to the uranyl centered LMCT, where complex 2 shows a band at 461.8 nm that have significant LMCT character. The bonding has been further analyzed by EDA and NBO. The photocatalytic activity of complexes 1 and 2 for the degradation of rhodamine-B (RhB) and methylene blue (MB) under the irradiation of 500W Xe lamp has been explored, and found more efficient in presence of complex 1 than complex 2 for both dyes. In addition, dye adsorption and photoluminescence properties have also been discussed for both complexes.

  7. Acidity constants and redox potentials of uranyl ions in hydrothermal solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiandong; Cheng, Jun; He, Mengjia; Lu, Xiancai; Wang, Rucheng

    2016-09-21

    We report a first principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) study of the structures, acidity constants (pKa) and redox potentials (E(0)) of uranyl (UO2(2+)) from ambient conditions to 573 K. It is found that UO2(2+) keeps five coordination up to 573 K whereas UO2(+) transforms from 5 to 4-coordinate as temperature increases to 573 K. The FPMD-based vertical energy gap method is used to derive pKas and E(0)s. The method is validated by comparing with available experimental data (for E(0) under the ambient conditions and for pKas from ambient conditions to 367 K), with an uncertainty of 1-2 pKa units and 0.2 V for pKa and E(0). The encouraging results demonstrate that the method may be used to predict the pH-Eh diagrams of f-block elements under the conditions of hydrothermal solutions. The results show that the acidity constants of uranyl decrease with temperature and are lower than 3.0 when the temperature is above 473 K, indicating that hydrolytic forms are dominant for U(vi) in the near neutral pH range. The reduction potential increases with temperature, indicating that the reduced state is more significant at higher temperatures.

  8. Molecular Simulations of the Diffusion of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized Mineral Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerisit, S.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-01

    Uranium is a major groundwater contaminant at uranium processing and mining sites as a result of intentional and accidental discharges of uranium-containing waste products into subsurface environments. Recent characterization has shown that uranium preferentially associates with intragrain and intra-aggregate domains in some of the uranium-contaminated sediments collected from the US Department of Energy Hanford Site [1, 2]. In these sediments, uranium existed as precipitated and/or adsorbed phases in grain micropores with nano- to microscale sizes. Desorption and diffusion characterization studies and continuum-scale modeling indicated that ion diffusion in the microfractures is a major mechanism that led to preferential uranium concentration in the microfracture regions and will control the future mobility of uranium in the subsurface sediments [1, 3-4]. However, the diffusion properties of uranyl species in the intragrain regions, especially at the solid-liquid interface, are still poorly understood. Therefore, a general aim of this work is to provide atomic-level insights into the contribution of microscopic surface effects to the slow diffusion process of uranyl species in porous media with nano- to microsized fractures. In this presentation, we will first present molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of feldspar-water interfaces to investigate their interfacial structure and dynamics and establish a theoretical framework for subsequent simulations of water and ion diffusion at these interfaces [5]. We will then report on MD simulations carried out to probe the effects of confinement and of the presence of the mineral surface on the diffusion of water and electrolyte ions in nanosized feldspar fractures [6]. Several properties of the mineral-water interface were varied, such as the fracture width, the ionic strength of the contacting solution, and the surface charge. Our calculations reveal a 2.0-2.5 nm interfacial region within which the diffusion properties of

  9. Discussion about magnesium phosphating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pokorny

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes results from recently published research focused on production of non-conventional magnesium phosphate Mg3(PO42・4H2O – bobierrite, or MgHPO4・3H2O – newberyite coating for both magnesium alloys and/or mild steel. This new kind of coating is categorized in the context of current state of phosphating technology and its potential advantages and crystal structure is discussed. At the same time, the suitable comparison techniques for magnesium phosphate coating and conventional zinc phosphate coating are discussed.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of crystallization impacting calcium phosphate cements

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    The biomineral calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO4·2H2O), known as brushite, is a malleable material that both grows and dissolves faster than most other calcium minerals, including other calcium phosphate phases, calcium carbonates and calcium oxalates. Within the body, this ready formation and dissolution can play a role in certain diseases, such as kidney stone and plaque formation. However, these same properties, along with brushite’s excellent biocompatibility, can be used to gr...

  11. Treatment of uranyl nitrate and flouride solutions; Tratamiento de soluciones que contienen nitrato de uranilo y fluoruros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigo Otero, A.; Rodrigo Vilaseca, F.; Morales Calvo, G.

    1977-07-01

    A theoretical study on the fluoride complexes contained in uranyl and aluminium solutions has been carried out. Likewise concentration limits and Duhring diagrams for those solutions have been experimentally established. As a result, the optimum operation conditions for concentration by evaporation in the treatment plant, have been deduced. (Author) 12 refs.

  12. Thermo-responsive metal-chelating surfactants. Properties and use in cloud point extraction of uranyl nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevost, S.; Coulombeau, H. [CEA, IRAMIS, SCM, LIONS, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Univ. de Versailles St Quentin en Y. Institut Lavoisier UMR CNRS 8180 (France); Baczko, K.; Larpent, C. [Univ. de Versailles St Quentin en Y. Institut Lavoisier UMR CNRS 8180 (France); Berthon, L.; Zorz, N. [CEA/DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LCSE, 30 - Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Desvaux, H.; Testard, F. [CEA, IRAMIS, SCM, LIONS, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Zemb, T. [ICSM, UMR 5257 CEA/CNRS/UM2/ENSCM, 30 - Bagnols sur Ceze (France)

    2009-03-15

    The properties of new thermo-responsive functional surfactants, capable of forming a metal chelate, synthesized by grafting a diamide group (amino-acid residue) to the tip hydrophilic endgroup or in a branched position to polyoxyethylene nonionic surfactants [C{sub i}E{sub j}:C{sub i}H{sub 2i+1}(OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub j}OH)], are studied. Their use in cloud point extraction of uranyl nitrate is tested. The reversible temperature-dependent behavior of classical non-ionic surfactants associated to phase separation of micellar solutions known as clouding behavior is exploited for separation based on cation specific binding to the chelating group. The functional surfactants under investigation combine surface-active properties and characteristic thermoreversible behavior with a capacity to bind uranyl cation. The influence of the complexation on the cloud points of functional surfactants is determined. The chelating surfactants are found efficient for the cloud point extraction of uranyl nitrate at low surfactant-to-uranyl ratio. These new thermoresponsive surfactants with chelating properties hold most promise for the development of new solvent free extraction processes.

  13. Thermo-responsive Metal-chelating Surfactants: Properties and Use in Cloud Point Extraction of Uranyl Nitrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prevost, S.; Coulombeau, H.; Baczko, K.; Larpent, C. [Univ Versailles St Wuentin Y, Inst Lavoisier, UMR 8180, CNRS, F-78035 Versailles, (France); Prevost, S.; Coulombeau, H.; Desvaux, H.; Testard, F. [CEA, IRAMIS, SCM, LIONS, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Berthon, L.; Zorz, N. [CEA, DEN DRCP SCPS LCSE, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France); Zemb, Th. [ICSM, UMR 5257, CEA CNRS UM2 ENSCM, F-30207 Bagnols Sur Ceze, (France)

    2009-07-01

    The properties of new thermo-responsive functional surfactants, capable of forming a metal chelate, synthesized by grafting a diamide group (amino-acid residue) to the tip hydrophilic end-group or in a branched position to polyoxyethylene nonionic surfactants [CiEj: C{sub i}H{sub 2i+1}(OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}){sub j}OH)], are studied. Their use in cloud point extraction of uranyl nitrate is tested. The reversible temperature-dependent behavior of classical non-ionic surfactants associated to phase separation of micellar solutions known as clouding behavior is exploited for separation based on cation specific binding to the chelating group. The functional surfactants under investigation combine surface-active properties and characteristic thermo-reversible behavior with a capacity to bind uranyl cation. The influence of the complexation on the cloud points of functional surfactants is determined. The chelating surfactants are found efficient for the cloud point extraction of uranyl nitrate at low surfactant-to-uranyl ratio. These new thermo-responsive surfactants with chelating properties hold most promise for the development of new solvent free extraction processes. (authors)

  14. A New Form of Triple-Stranded Helicate Found in Uranyl Complexes of Aliphatic α,ω-Dicarboxylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuéry, Pierre; Harrowfield, Jack

    2015-11-16

    The reaction of uranyl ions with azelaic or dodecanedioic acids under solvohydrothermal conditions leads to crystallization of anionic dinuclear cage compounds with [M(bipy/phen)3](2+) counterions (M = 3d-block cation), while the smaller suberic acid yields heterometallic metallacycles. Complexes with the longer aliphatic chains are the first triple-stranded helicates reported in actinide chemistry.

  15. Synthesis of thermally stable extra-large pore crystalline materials: a uranyl germanate with 12-ring channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Hui; Chiang, Ray-Kuang; Lii, Kwang-Hwa

    2009-02-18

    A thermally stable extra-large pore uranyl germanate is synthesized under high-temperature, high-pressure hydrothermal conditions at 585 degrees C and 150 MPa. The structure contains U(6+)O(6) tetragonal bipyramids which are interconnected by digermanate groups to form a 3D framework with 12-ring pore openings.

  16. An unprecedented two-fold nested super-polyrotaxane: sulfate-directed hierarchical polythreading assembly of uranyl polyrotaxane moieties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Lei; Wu, Qun-yan; Yuan, Li-yong; Wang, Lin; An, Shu-wen; Xie, Zhen-ni; Hu, Kong-qiu; Shi, Wei-qun [Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Chemistry and Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Chai, Zhi-fang [Laboratory of Nuclear Energy Chemistry and Key Laboratory for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); School of Radiological and Interdisciplinary Sciences and Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Burns, Peter C. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-08-01

    The hierarchical assembly of well-organized submoieties could lead to more complicated superstructures with intriguing properties. We describe herein an unprecedented polyrotaxane polythreading framework containing a two-fold nested super-polyrotaxane substructure, which was synthesized through a uranyl-directed hierarchical polythreading assembly of one-dimensional polyrotaxane chains and two-dimensional polyrotaxane networks. This special assembly mode actually affords a new way of supramolecular chemistry instead of covalently linked bulky stoppers to construct stable interlocked rotaxane moieties. An investigation of the synthesis condition shows that sulfate can assume a vital role in mediating the formation of different uranyl species, especially the unique trinuclear uranyl moiety [(UO{sub 2}){sub 3}O(OH){sub 2}]{sup 2+}, involving a notable bent [O=U=O] bond with a bond angle of 172.0(9) . Detailed analysis of the coordination features, the thermal stability as well as a fluorescence, and electrochemical characterization demonstrate that the uniqueness of this super-polyrotaxane structure is mainly closely related to the trinuclear uranyl moiety, which is confirmed by quantum chemical calculations. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Solvothermal synthesis of strontium phosphate chloride nanowire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, W. M.; Wong, C. T.; Li, Z. Y.; Luk, K. D. K.; Chan, W. K.; Yang, C.; Chiu, K. Y.; Xu, B.; Lu, W. W.

    2007-08-01

    Strontium phosphate chloride nanowire was synthesized via a solvothermal treatment of strontium tri-polyphosphate and Collin salt in 1,4-dioxane at 150 °C. The effects of 1,4-dioxane concentration on particle morphology, crystallinity and phase purity were investigated in this study. The specimen morphology was analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). When the concentration of 1,4-dioxane was below 10%, micron-sized whisker was the dominant form. At 20-25% concentration of 1,4-dioxane, strontium phosphate chloride single-crystalline nanowire was 31±12 nm in diameter and 1.43±0.6 μm in length with an aspect ratio of 52.28±29.41. X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of this nanowire matched with that of strontium phosphate chloride (JCPDS #083-0973). When 1,4-dioxane concentration exceeded 25%, nanorod aggregate was the dominant form instead of nanowire. At 20-25% 1,4-dioxane concentration suitable strontium concentration combine with high chemical potential environment favors the formation of nanowires. By adding 1,4-dioxane impure phase such as β-strontium hydrogen phosphate, nanorod formation was suppressed. This method provides an efficient way to synthesize high aspect ratio strontium phosphate chloride nanowire. It has potential bioactive nanocomposite, high mechanical performance bioactive bone cement filler and fluorescent material applications.

  18. Final Report: Dominant Mechanisms of Uranium-Phosphate Reactions in Subsurface Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catalano, Jeffrey G. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Giammar, Daniel E. [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Wang, Zheming [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-03-08

    Phosphate addition is an in situ remediation approach that may enhance the sequestration of uranium without requiring sustained reducing conditions. However, the geochemical factors that determine the dominant immobilization mechanisms upon phosphate addition are insufficiently understood to design efficient remediation strategies or accurately predict U(VI) transport. The overall objective of our project is to determine the dominant mechanisms of U(VI)-phosphate reactions in subsurface environments. Our research approach seeks to determine the U(VI)-phosphate solid that form in the presence of different groundwater cations, characterize the effects of phosphate on U(VI) adsorption and precipitation on smectite and iron oxide minerals, examples of two major reactive mineral phases in contaminated sediments, and investigate how phosphate affects U(VI) speciation and fate during water flow through sediments from contaminated sites. The research activities conducted for this project have generated a series of major findings. U(VI) phosphate solids from the autunite mineral family are the sole phases to form during precipitation, with uranyl orthophosphate not occurring despite its predicted greater stability. Calcium phosphates may take up substantial quantities of U(VI) through three different removal processes (adsorption, coprecipitation, and precipitation) but the dominance of each process varies with the pathway of reaction. Phosphate co-adsorbs with U(VI) onto smectite mineral surfaces, forming a mixed uranium-phosphate surface complex over a wide range of conditions. However, this molecular-scale association of uranium and phosphate has not effect on the overall extent of uptake. In contrast, phosphate enhanced U(VI) adsorption to iron oxide minerals at acidic pH conditions but suppresses such adsorption at neutral and alkaline pH, despite forming mixed uranium-phosphate surface complexes during adsorption. Nucleation barriers exist that inhibit U(VI) phosphate

  19. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  20. Accessing alkali-free NASICON-type compounds through mixed oxoanion sol-gel chemistry: Hydrogen titanium phosphate sulfate, H1-xTi2(PO4)3-x(SO4)x (x=0.5-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieritz, Daniel; Davidowski, Stephen K.; Seo, Dong-Kyun

    2016-10-01

    We report a direct sol-gel synthesis and characterization of new proton-containing, rhombohedral NASICION-type titanium compounds with mixed phosphate and sulfate oxoanions. The synthetic conditions were established by utilizing peroxide ion as a decomposable and stabilizing ligand for titanyl ions in the presence of phosphates in a strong acidic medium. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), induction-coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopic (ICP-OES) elemental analysis, and Raman and 1H magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS-NMR) spectroscopic studies have determined the presence of sulfate and proton ions in the structure, for which the compositional range has been found to be H1-xTi2(PO4)3-x(SO4)x (x=0.5-1). The particulate products exhibit a nanocrystalline nature observed through characterization with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The N2 sorption isotherm measurements and subsequent Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Barrett-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) analyses confirmed the presence of the textural meso- and macropores in the materials. Future studies would determine the potential of the new compounds in various applications as battery materials, proton conductors and solid acid catalysts.

  1. Insights into the mechanism of extraction of uranium (VI) from nitric acid solution into an ionic liquid by using tri-n-butyl phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaillard, Dr Clotilde; Boltoeva, Maria; Billard, Isabelle; Georg, Sylvia; Mazan, Valérie; Ouadi, Ali; Ternova, Dariia; Hennig, Christoph

    2015-08-24

    We present new results on the liquid-liquid extraction of uranium (VI) from a nitric acid aqueous phase into a tri-n-butyl phosphate/1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (TBP/[C4 mim][Tf2 N]) phase. The individual solubilities of the ionic-liquid ions in the upper part of the biphasic system are measured over the whole acidic range and as a function of the TBP concentration. New insights into the extraction mechanism are obtained through the in situ characterization of the extracted uranyl complexes by coupling UV/Vis and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. We propose a chemical model to explain uranium (VI) extraction that describes the data through a fit of the uranyl distribution ratio DU . In this model, at low acid concentrations uranium (VI) is extracted as the cationic complex [UO2 (TBP)2 ](2+) , by an exchange with one proton and one C4 mim(+) . At high acid concentrations, the extraction proceeds through a cationic exchange between [UO2 (NO3 )(HNO3 )(TBP)2 ](+) and one C4 mim(+) . As a consequence of this mechanism, the variation of DU as a function of TBP concentration depends on the C4 mim(+) concentration in the aqueous phase. This explains why noninteger values are often derived by analysis of DU versus [TBP] plots to determine the number of TBP molecules involved in the extraction of uranyl in an ionic-liquid phase.

  2. Radioactivity of phosphate mineral products

    OpenAIRE

    Mitrović Branislava; Vitorović Gordana; Stojanović Mirjana; Vitorović Duško

    2011-01-01

    The phosphate industry is one of the biggest polluters of the environment with uranium. Different products are derived after processing phosphoric ore, such as mineral and phosphate fertilizers and phosphate mineral supplements (dicalcium-and monocalcium phosphate) for animal feeding. Phosphate mineral additives used in animal food may contain a high activity of uranium. Research in this study should provide an answer to the extent in which phosphate minera...

  3. Uranyl-selective PVC membrane electrodes based on some recently synthesized benzo-substituted macrocyclic diamides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamsipur, Mojtaba; Soleymanpour, Ahmad; Akhond, Morteza; Sharghi, Hashem; Massah, Ahmad Reza

    2002-08-23

    Four different recently synthesized macrocyclic diamides were studied to characterize their abilities as uranyl ion carriers in PVC membrane electrodes. The electrodes based on macrocycle 1,18-diaza-3,4;15,16-dibenzo-5,8,11,14,21,24-hexaoxacyclohexaeicosane-2,17-dione resulted in a Nernstian response for UO(2)(2+) ion over wide concentration ranges. The linear concentration range for the polymeric membrane electrode (PME) is 3.0x10(-6)-8.2x10(-3) M with a detection limit of 2.2x10(-6) and that for the coated graphite electrode (CGE) is 5.0x10(-7)-1.5x10(-3) M with a detection limit of 3.5x10(-7) M. The electrodes manifest advantages of low resistance, very fast response and, most importantly, good selectivities relative to a wide variety of other cations.

  4. Complexes of uranyl nitrate with 2,6-pyridinedicarboxamides: synthesis, crystal structure, and DFT study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alyapyshev, Mikhail; Babain, Vasiliy [ITMO University, 49, Kronverksky pr., 197101, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); ThreeArc Mining Ltd., 5, Stary Tolmachevskiy per., 115184, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tkachenko, Lyudmila; Lumpov, Alexander [Khlopin Radium Institute, 28, 2nd Murinskiy pr., 194021, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Gurzhiy, Vladislav; Zolotarev, Andrey; Dar' in, Dmitriy [St. Petersburg State University, 7-9, Universitetskaya nab., 199034, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ustynyuk, Yuriy; Gloriozov, Igor [M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119991, Moscow (Russian Federation); Paulenova, Alena [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2017-05-04

    Two complexes of uranyl nitrate with N,N,N',N'-tetrabutyl-2,6-pyridinedicarboxamide (TBuDPA) and N,N'-diethyl-N,N'-diphenyl-2,6-pyridinedicarboxamide (EtPhDPA) were synthesized and studied. The complex of tetraalkyl-2,6-pyridinedicarboxamide with metal nitrate was synthesized for the first time. XRD analysis revealed the different type of complexation: a 1:1 metal:ligand complex for EtPhDPA and complex with polymeric structure for TBuDPA. The quantum chemical calculations (DFT) confirm that both ligands form the most stable complexes that match the minimal values pre-organization energy of the ligands. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. MCNP-DSP calculations of measurements with uranyl nitrate solution system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The {sup 252}Cf-source-driven noise analysis method has been used to determine the subcriticality of various configurations of fissile materials. In the past, the application of this method was limited because point-kinetics models had to be used to interpret the data; however, with the development of the Monte Carlo code MCNP-DSP, the measurements can be analyzed using the more general Monte Carlo models. The results of the Monte carlo calculations will be dependent on the ability to model the experiment accurately and on the nuclear data used to perform the calculations. This paper presents a comparison of the measured and calculated ratio of spectral densities for a subset of measurements performed with a uranyl nitrate solution tank filled to various heights. The results presented are for calculations that were performed with both ENDF/B-IV and ENDF/B-V cross-section data sets.

  6. Hydrogen in Martian Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peslier, A. H.; Hervig, R.; Irving, T.

    2017-01-01

    Most volatile studies of Mars have targeted its surface via spacecraft and rover data, and have evidenced surficial water in polar caps and the atmosphere, in the presence of river channels, and in the detection of water bearing minerals. The other focus of Martian volatile studies has been on Martian meteorites which are all from its crust. Most of these studies are on hydrous phases like apatite, a late-stage phase, i.e. crystallizing near the end of the differentiation sequence of Martian basalts and cumulates. Moreover, calculating the water content of the magma a phosphate crystallized from is not always possible, and yet is an essential step to estimate how much water was present in a parent magma and its source. Water, however, is primarily dissolved in the interiors of differentiated planets as hydrogen in lattice defects of nominally anhydrous minerals (olivine, pyroxene, feldspar) of the crust and mantle. This hydrogen has tremendous influence, even in trace quantities, on a planet's formation, geodynamics, cooling history and the origin of its volcanism and atmosphere as well as its potential for life. Studies of hydrogen in nominally anhydrous phases of Martian meteorites are rare. Measuring water contents and hydrogen isotopes in well-characterized nominally anhydrous minerals of Martian meteorites is the goal of our study. Our work aims at deciphering what influences the distribution and origin of hydrogen in Martian minerals, such as source, differentiation, degassing and shock.

  7. Comprehensive analysis of the renal transcriptional response to acute uranyl nitrate exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argiles Angel

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemical and radiological toxicities related to uranium acute exposure have been widely studied in nuclear fuel workers and military personnel. It is well known that uranyl nitrate induces acute renal failure (ARF. However, the mechanisms of this metal-induced injury are not well defined at the molecular level. Results Renal function and histology were assessed in mice receiving uranyl nitrate (UN(+ and controls (UN(-. To identify the genomic response to uranium exposure, serial analysis gene expression (SAGE of the kidney was performed in both groups. Over 43,000 mRNA SAGE tags were sequenced. A selection of the differentially expressed transcripts was confirmed by real-time quantitative PCR and Western blotting. UN(+ animals developed renal failure and displayed the characteristic histological lesions of UN nephropathy. Of the >14,500 unique tags identified in both libraries, 224 had a modified expression level; they are known to participate in inflammation, ion transport, signal transduction, oxidative stress, apoptosis, metabolism, and catabolism. Several genes that were identified had not previously been evaluated within the context of toxic ARF such as translationally controlled tumor protein, insulin like growth factor binding protein 7 and ribosomal protein S29, all apoptosis related genes. Conclusion We report a comprehensive description of the UN induced modifications in gene expression levels, including the identification of genes previously unrelated to ARF. The study of these genes and the metabolisms they control should improve our understanding of toxic ARF and enlighten on the molecular targets for potential therapeutic interventions.

  8. Tetramethylammonium dihydrogen phosphate hemihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Fujita

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title compound, C4H12N+·H2PO4−·0.5H2O, the anions form an infinite hydrogen-bonded chain along the [1overline{1}0] direction. The anion chains are connected by water molecules, which lie on crystallographic twofold rotation axes, through O—H...O hydrogen bonds. These hydrogen bonds are almost perpendicular to the other hydrogen bonds which create an assembled structure of anions. In addition, C—H...O hydrogen bonds between anions and cations are observed.

  9. Sorption of uranyl(VI) cations on suspended silicate: effects of N-donor ligands, carboxylic acids, organic cosolvents, and metal ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, P.N.; Choppin, G.R. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    2007-07-01

    Sorption of uranyl ion, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, on silicate particles (3.00g/L) was studied in sodium perchlorate solution as a function of pcH and ionic strength at 298 K. The effects of different ligands (e.g., N-donors, carboxylic acids) on the uranyl sorption were investigated. At I = 0.20 M (NaClO{sub 4}), uranyl sorption on silicate increased from ca. 6% (pcH 3.0) to ca. 99% (at pcH 6.5), above which a small decrease was observed. A synergistic enhancement in uranyl sorption was observed in the presence of N-donor ligands such as 1,10-phenanthroline and ethylenediamine in the pcH range 3 to 4.5 as compared to that in the absence of ligands. Carboxylic acids inhibited the sorption in the order: citric acid > malonic acid > nitrilotriacetic acid > iminodiacetic acid > sulfosalicylic acid > succinic acid > glycolic acid. The presence of organic cosolvents such as dimethylsulfoxide, glycerol and tetrahydrofuran had no significant influence on the uranyl sorption profile. Uranyl sorption decreased marginally in the presence of 1.00 x 10{sup -3} M Eu(III). (orig.)

  10. Effect of the temperature and oxalic acid in the uranyl sorption in zircon; Efecto de la temperatura y acido oxalico en la sorcion de uranilo en circon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ordonez R, E.; Almazan T, M. G.; Garcia G, N. [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Hernandez O, R., E-mail: eduardo.ordonez@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Tecnologico de Veracruz, Ingenieria Quimica, Miguel Angel de Quevedo No. 2779, 91860 Veracruz (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    In this work the results of the temperature effect study are presented on uranyl solutions adsorbed on zirconium silicate (ZrSiO{sub 4}) and also on the compounds formed in surface with oxalic acid. The adsorption isotherms of uranyl on hydrated zircon with NaClO{sub 4} 0.5 M, show an increase of the uranyl sorption efficiency when increasing the temperature from 20 to 4 C with a sudden descent in this efficiency when changing the temperature at 60 C. The uranyl sorption efficiency increases to hydrate the zircon with a solution of oxalic acid 0.1 M, maintaining the same tendency regarding to the temperatures of the sorption in medium NaClO{sub 4} 0.5 M. The complex formation in the zircon surface with organic acids of low molecular weight increases the fixation of the uranyl in solution due to the formation of ternary systems, in the order Zircon/A. Organic/Uranyl, without altering their response to the temperature. (Author)

  11. Surface modified magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles as a selective sorbent for solid phase extraction of uranyl ions from water samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadeghi, Susan, E-mail: ssadeghi@birjand.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Birjand, P.O. Box. 97175/615, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azhdari, Hoda [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Birjand, P.O. Box. 97175/615, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arabi, Hadi [Magnetism and Superconducting Research Lab, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Birjand, P.O. Box. 97175/615, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moghaddam, Ali Zeraatkar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, University of Birjand, P.O. Box. 97175/615, Birjand (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A new sorbent based on functionalized magnetite nanoparticles with quercetin is reported. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The quercetin based magnetic nanoparticles could be used as a sorbent to remove toxic uranyl ions from water samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The sorbent provides a rapidly and easy separation of uranyl ions only by using a permanent magnet. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This technique is considered more efficient separation compared to conventional filtering or centrifuging methods for the removing of the sorbent. - Abstract: In this study, silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles modified with quercetin were synthesized by a sol-gel method. These magnetic nanoparticles were assessed as a new solid phase sorbent for extraction of uranyl ions from aqueous solutions. The crystal and chemical structures and magnetic property of the new sorbent were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FT-IR), and vibration sample magnetometer (VSM). The experimental parameters affecting the extraction efficiency of uranyl ions from aqueous solutions using the synthesized sorbent were optimized by means of the response surface methodology. The adsorption equilibrium of uranyl ions onto the sorbent was explained by Langmuir isotherm and maximum monolayer adsorption capacity was found 12.33 mg/g. The synthesized sorbent was applied to extraction of uranyl ions from different water samples.

  12. Sources of conductance changes during bacterial reduction of trimethylamine oxide to trimethylammonium in phosphate buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, J D; Miskin, D R; Wacher-Viveros, M C; Benge, L C

    1985-06-01

    The sources of conductance changes during reduction of trimethylamine oxide to trimethylamine by Escherichia coli with formate as electron donor and in the presence of phosphate buffer were investigated. Theoretical considerations and experimental results suggest that the major source of conductance change is the conversion of dihydrogen phosphate to hydrogen phosphate. This transformation contributes almost twice as much to the total conductance change as does the conversion of uncharged trimethylamine oxide to charged trimethylammonium.

  13. Metal-phosphate binders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Beth Ann [Lewistown, IL; Chaps-Cabrera, Jesus Guadalupe [Coahuila, MX

    2009-05-12

    A metal-phosphate binder is provided. The binder may include an aqueous phosphoric acid solution, a metal-cation donor including a metal other than aluminum, an aluminum-cation donor, and a non-carbohydrate electron donor.

  14. Development and validation of mathematical methods for the evaluation of spectroscopic data of uranyl (VI) hxdrolysis; Entwicklung und Validierung mathematischer Methoden zur Auswertung spektroskopischer Daten der Uranyl(VI)-Hydrolyse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drobot, Bjoern

    2016-08-18

    The availability of metals in the biosphere is determined by the chemical state. Spectroscopic methods are appropriate for the analysis of speciation - the problem is the data processing. In the frame of the thesis the use of the software PARAFAC was used to analyze the excitation spectra of uranyl (VI) hydrolysis. It was shown that modern mathematical tools are essential for the data processing. The range of applicability covers deprotonation processes up to complex biochemical processes.

  15. Phosphate control in dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupisti, Adamasco; Gallieni, Maurizio; Rizzo, Maria Antonietta; Caria, Stefania; Meola, Mario; Bolasco, Piergiorgio

    2013-10-04

    Prevention and correction of hyperphosphatemia is a major goal of chronic kidney disease-mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) management, achievable through avoidance of a positive phosphate balance. To this aim, optimal dialysis removal, careful use of phosphate binders, and dietary phosphate control are needed to optimize the control of phosphate balance in well-nourished patients on a standard three-times-a-week hemodialysis schedule. Using a mixed diffusive-convective hemodialysis tecniques, and increasing the number and/or the duration of dialysis tecniques are all measures able to enhance phosphorus (P) mass removal through dialysis. However, dialytic removal does not equal the high P intake linked to the high dietary protein requirement of dialysis patients; hence, the use of intestinal P binders is mandatory to reduce P net intestinal absorption. Unfortunately, even a large dose of P binders is able to bind approximately 200-300 mg of P on a daily basis, so it is evident that their efficacy is limited in the case of an uncontrolled dietary P load. Hence, limitation of dietary P intake is needed to reach the goal of neutral phosphate balance in dialysis, coupled to an adequate protein intake. To this aim, patients should be informed and educated to avoid foods that are naturally rich in phosphate and also processed food with P-containing preservatives. In addition, patients should preferentially choose food with a low P-to-protein ratio. For example, patients could choose egg white or protein from a vegetable source. Finally, boiling should be the preferred cooking procedure, because it induces food demineralization, including phosphate loss. The integrated approach outlined in this article should be actively adapted as a therapeutic alliance by clinicians, dieticians, and patients for an effective control of phosphate balance in dialysis patients.

  16. Mechanistic study of the interaction of uranyl ions with zirconium oxide and zirconium silicate; Etude mecanistique de l'interaction des ions uranyle avec l'oxyde et le silicate de zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lomenech, C

    2002-04-01

    This work deals with structural and thermodynamic studies of the sorption of uranyl species on zircon and zirconia. After determination of the specific areas, of the pH of the isoelectric points, and of the sorption site numbers, thermodynamic data were obtained using alpha spectrometry, for different uranyl concentrations, different background electrolytes (NaClO{sub 4} or KNO{sub 3}) and different ionic strengths. The structural identification of the surface complexes and sorption sites was carried out using several spectroscopies: XPS spectroscopy allowed a determination of the nature of the sorption sites ({identical_to}Zr-O- on zirconia and {identical_to}Si-O- on zircon). Whereas fluorescence decay measurements gave the number of surface species, the combined use of XPS spectroscopy and laser spectro-fluorimetry enabled us to correlate differences in bonding energies and emission wavelengths with differences in the nature of the background electrolyte or in the pH of sorption; DRIFT spectroscopy was a powerful tool for the determination of the presence of sorbed uranyl nitrate species. EXAFS results clearly showed a splitting of the equatorial oxygen atoms in two shells, corresponding to a polydentate, inner-sphere complex. EXAFS results also indicated strong similarities between dry samples and in situ experiments, which confirms the validity of all the spectroscopic measurements. Macroscopic thermodynamic data were then modeled using a surface complexation model (2 pK and constant capacitance models), the results of the structural study being used as constraints for the simulation code FITEQL. (author)

  17. NMR studies on mechanism of isomerisation of fructose 6-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate catalysed by phosphoglucose isomerase from Thermococcus kodakarensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Shahzada Nadeem; Mok, Kenneth Hun; Rashid, Naeem; Xie, Yongjing; Ruether, Manuel; O'Brien, John; Akhtar, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    The fate of hydrogen atoms at C-2 of glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) and C-1 of fructose 6-phosphate (F6P) was studied in the reaction catalysed by phosphoglucose isomerase from Thermococcus kodakarensis (TkPGI) through 1D and 2D NMR methods. When the reaction was performed in (2)H2O the hydrogen atoms in the aforementioned positions were exchanged with deuterons indicating that the isomerization occurred by a cis-enediol intermediate involving C-1 pro-R hydrogen of F6P. These features are similar to those described for phosphoglucose isomerases from rabbit muscle and Pyrococcus furiosus.

  18. Actinide-Transition Metal heteronuclear Ions and Their Oxides: {IrUO}+ as an Analogue to Uranyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, John K [ORNL

    2006-01-01

    Recent theoretical calculations have shown that Ir should behave as a chemical analogue to N, with the result that IrUO{sup +}, like known NUO{sup +}, is predicted to be a stable species isoelectronic with UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, the uranyl dication. The target heterometallic analogue to uranyl has now been prepared by direct laser desorption/ionization of a U/Ir alloy, and by oxidation of UIr{sup +} with N{sub 2}O and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}O. Properties of UIr{sup +}, UPt{sup +}, and UAu{sup +} bimetallic ions have been studied. They demonstrate direct actinide-transition metal bonding, and support the concept of autogenic isolobality.

  19. Synthesis of microspheres of triuranium octaoxide by simultaneous water and nitrate extraction from ascorbate-uranyl sols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brykala, M; Deptula, A; Rogowski, M; Lada, W; Olczak, T; Wawszczak, D; Smolinski, T; Wojtowicz, P; Modolo, G

    A new method for synthesis of uranium oxide microspheres (diameter Sol-Gel Process, which has been used to synthesize high-quality powders of a wide variety of complex oxides. Starting uranyl-nitrate-ascorbate sols were prepared by addition of ascorbic acid to uranyl nitrate hexahydrate solution and alkalizing by aqueous ammonium hydroxide and then emulsified in 2-ethylhexanol-1 containing 1v/o SPAN-80. Drops of emulsion were firstly gelled by extraction of water by the solvent. Destruction of the microspheres during thermal treatment, owing to highly reactive components in the gels, requires modification of the gelation step by Double Extraction Process-simultaneously extraction of water and nitrates using Primene JMT, which completely eliminates these problem. Final step was calcination in air of obtained microspheres of gels to triuranium octaoxide.

  20. Apatite Formation from Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Mixed Amorphous Calcium Phosphate/Amorphous Calcium Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsen, Casper J S; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-08-22

    Crystallization from amorphous phases is an emerging pathway for making advanced materials. Biology has made use of amorphous precursor phases for eons and used them to produce structures with remarkable properties. Herein, we show how the design of the amorphous phase greatly influences the nanocrystals formed therefrom. We investigate the transformation of mixed amorphous calcium phosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate phases into bone-like nanocrystalline apatite using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The speciation of phosphate was controlled by pH to favor HPO4 (2-) . In a carbonate free system, the reaction produces anisotropic apatite crystallites with large aspect ratios. The first formed crystallites are highly calcium deficient and hydrogen phosphate rich, consistent with thin octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-like needles. During growth, the crystallites become increasingly stoichiometric, which indicates that the crystallites grow through addition of near-stoichiometric apatite to the OCP-like initial crystals through a process that involves either crystallite fusion/aggregation or Ostwald ripening. The mixed amorphous phases were found to be more stable against phase transformations, hence, the crystallization was inhibited. The resulting crystallites were smaller and less anisotropic. This is rationalized by the idea that a local phosphate-depletion zone formed around the growing crystal until it was surrounded by amorphous calcium carbonate, which stopped the crystallization.

  1. Structural determination of some uranyl compounds by vibrational spectroscopy; Determinacion estructural de algunos compuestos de uranilo por espectroscopia vibracional

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez S, A.; Martinez Q, E

    1990-07-15

    The vibrational spectra of different uranyl compounds has been studied and of it spectral information has been used the fundamental asymmetric vibrational frequency, to determine the length and constant bond force U=O by means of the combination of the concept of absorbed energy and the mathematical expression of Badger modified by Jones. It is intended a factor that simplifies the mathematical treatment and the results are compared with the values obtained for other methods. (Author)

  2. Role of aqueous sulfide and sulfate-reducing bacteria in the kinetics and mechanisms of the reduction of uranyl ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohagheghi, A.

    1985-01-01

    Formation of sedimentary rock-hosted uranium ore deposits is thought to have resulted from the reduction by aqueous sulfide species of relatively soluble uranyl ion (U(VI)) to insoluble uranium(IV) oxides and silicates. The origin of this H/sub 2/S in such deposits can be either biogenic or abiogenic. Therefore, the kinetics and mechanism of uranyl ion reduction by aqueous sulfide, and the effect of several key variables on the reduction process in non-bacterial (sterile) systems was studied. The role of both pure and mixed cultures of sulfate-reducing bacteria on the reduction process was also investigated. In sterile systems the reduction reaction generally occurred by a two step reaction sequence. Uranium(V) (as UO/sub 2//sup +/) and U(IV) (as UO/sub 2/ the mineral uraninite) were the intermediate and final products, respectively. The initial concentration of uranyl ion required for reaction initiation had a minimum value of 0.8 ppm at pH 7, and was higher at pH values less than or greater than 7. An induction period was observed in all experiments. No reduction was observed after 8 hours at pH 8. Although increasing ionic strength increased the length of the induction period, it also increased the rate of the reduction of UO/sub 2//sup +/ in the second step. No reaction was observed under any experimental conditions with initial UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ concentration less than 0.1 ppm, which is thought to be typical for ore forming solutions. However, by absorbing uranyl ion onto kaolinite, the reduction by H/sub 2/S occurred at lower UO/sub 2//sup 2 +/ concentrations (approx. 0.1 ppm) in that in the homogeneous system. Thus, adsorption may play a significant role in the reduction and therefore in the formation of ore deposits.

  3. Oxidative lixiviation of pitchblende and precipitation of uranium with hydrogen; Lixiviation oxydante des pechblendes et precipitation de l'uranium par l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouret, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires; Balaceanu, J.C.; Coussemant, F. [Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP), 92 - Rueil-Malmaison (France)

    1958-07-01

    Earlier work on the preparation of uranium by F.A. Forward and his colleagues has shown the possibilities presented by oxidative lixiviation of ores in a carbonate medium, and the catalytic reduction of uranyl carbonate solutions by hydrogen. The carbonate attack is of considerable interest because of the selectivity of the uranium dissolution, which means it can be applied particularly to the treatment of low grade ores with a reduced consumption of cheap reagents. The subsequent reduction with hydrogen is of the same nature, and not only enables relatively dilute uranyl carbonate solutions to be treated, but also avoids any significant alteration of the attacking solution which can therefore be used again in the lixiviation stage. The experimental work, undertaken at the request of the Commissariat a I'Energie Atomique, was aimed at determining the quantitative characteristics of each of the two stages in order to ascertain their possibilities for industrial application to the principal low grade ores found in France. (author) [French] Les travaux anterieurs de F.A. FORWARD et de ses collaborateurs ont mis en evidence les possibilites que presentent, dans la preparation de l'uranium, la lixiviation oxydante des minerais en milieu carbonate, et la reduction catalytique des solutions d'uranyl carbonate par l'hydrogene. L'attaque carbonatee presente, en effet, un interet considerable du fait de la selectivite de la dissolution de l'uranium qui permet de l'appliquer en particulier au traitement des minerais pauvres avec une consommation reduite de reactifs peu couteux. La reduction subsequente par l'hydrogene presente les memes caracteres et permet non seulement de traiter des solutions relativement diluees d'uranyl carbonate, mais encore evite toute modification significative de la solution d'attaque qui peut donc etre reemployee dans l'etape de lixiviation. L'experimentation, entreprise a la demande du

  4. Determination of Vitamin D2 Content in Vitamin D2 and Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate Tablets by RP-HPLC%反相高效液相色谱法测定维D2磷酸氢钙片中维生素D2含量

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯国

    2013-01-01

    Objective To establish a RP-HPLC method for the content determination of vitamin D2 in Vitamin D2 and Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate Tablets.Methods The chromatographic column of AlltimaTM C18 was adopted with the mobile phase of acetonitrilemethanol(1∶9).The detection wavelength was set at 265 nm,the flow velocity was 1.0 mL/min and column temperature was 30 ℃.Results The sample size of vitamin D2 within the range of 0.005-0.065 μg(r=1.000 0)showed the good linearity with the peak area.The mean recovery rate was 99.38%,RSD =0.68% (n =9).Conclusion This method has the advantages of rapidness,simpleness,accuracy and low test cost,and can be used for the quality control of vitamin D2 in Vitamin D2 and Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate Tablets.%目的 建立测定维D2磷酸氢钙片中维生素D2含量的反相高效液相色谱法.方法 采用Alhima C18色谱柱(250 mm×4.6mm,5 μm),流动相为乙腈-甲醇(1∶9),检测波长为265 nm,流速为1.0 mL/min,柱温30℃.结果 维生素D2进样量在0.005~0.065 μg范围内与峰面积具有良好的线性关系,r=1.0000,平均回收率为99.38%,RSD=0.68%(n=9).结论 该法具有快速、简便、准确、检验成本低的优点,可用于维D2磷酸氢钙片中维生素D2的质量控制.

  5. Improvement of the determination method for the contents of vitamin D2 in Eight Vitamins and Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate,Zinc Sulphate Tablets%八维钙锌片中维生素D2含量测定方法的改进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柳小秦; 尹琳; 吴少平

    2011-01-01

    目的 改进八维钙锌片中维生素D2含量测定的方法.方法 采用HPLC法,以Thermo 硅胶(250 mm×4.6 mm,5 μm) 为色谱柱;流动相:正己烷-异丙醇(110∶1);流速:1.0 mL·min-1;检测波长:254 nm;柱温:35 ℃.结果 维生素D2的线性范围为质量浓度0.5~10 mg·L-1,相关系数为0.995 8,回收率为100.8%(n=9).结论 该方法简便准确,重复性好,可作为控制八维钙锌片中维生素D2的含量测定方法.%Objective To improve the contents determination method of vitamin D2 in Eight Vitamins and Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate, Zinc Sulphate Tablets. Methods The contents of vitamin D2 were measured by HPLC with a Thermo Silica chromatographic column (250 mm×4.6 mm,5 μm). n -Hexane-isopropanol(ll0 ∶ 1) was used as the mobile phase at flow rate 1. 0 mL · min-1. The detection wavelength was 254 nm and the column temperature was 35 ℃ . Results The calibration curves showed good linearity in the range of 0. 5-10 mg · L-1 and the correlation coefficient was 0. 995 8. The average recoveries were 100. 8% ( n = 9) .Conclusion The established method is accurate and reproducible,and can be used for the quality control of vitamin D2 in Eight Vitamins and Calcium Hydrogen Phosphate, Zinc Sulphate Tablets.

  6. SHINE and Mini-SHINE Column Designs for Recovery of Mo from 140 g-U/L Uranyl Sulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepinski, Dominique C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies (SHINE) in their efforts to develop an accelerator-driven process that utilizes a uranyl-sulfate solution for the production of fission Mo-99. In an effort to design a Mo-recovery system for the SHINE project using low-enriched uranium (LEU), we conducted batch, breakthrough, and pulse tests to determine the Mo isotherm, mass-transfer zone (MTZ), and system parameters for a 130 g-U/L uranyl sulfate solution at pH 1 and 80°C, as described previously. The VERSE program was utilized to calculate the MTZ under various loading times and velocities. The results were then used to design Mo separation and recovery columns employing a pure titania sorbent (110-μm particles, S110, and 60 Å pore size). The plant-scale column designs assume Mo will be separated from 271 L of a 141 g-U/L uranyl sulfate solution, pH 1, containing 0.0023 mM Mo. The VERSE-designed recovery systems have been tested and verified in laboratory-scale experiments, and this approach was found to be very successful.

  7. Phosphate mineral formation on the supported dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szcześ, Aleksandra

    2014-07-01

    Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) mono- and bilayers supported on mica surface were soaked for two weeks in a simulated body fluid (SBF) with ion concentrations nearly equal to those of human blood plasma. Two solutions were investigated: with and without Tris. The experiment was conducted at 20°C and at a physiological temperature equal to 37°C. Raman spectroscopy was used for the characterization of the precipitated phosphate minerals. These studies may provide information about the physiological mineralization of cell membranes that are mainly composed of phospholipids. Findings from these experiments suggest that the DPPC bilayers enhance the formation of less soluble phosphate forms especially at a temperature of 37°C. In the solution without Tris temperature increase gives more mineral deposits. It is probably the hydrogen interactions between phosphate groups of the phospholipid and hydroxyl groups from Tris that lower exposure of the phosphate group to interact with calcium ions.

  8. Reagentless phosphate ion sensor system for environmental monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, M.; Kurata, H.; Inoue, Y.; Shin, H. [Kyushu Institute of Technology, Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of computer Science and Systems; Kubo, I. [Soka University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Nakamura, H.; Ikebukuro, K.; Karube, I. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Research Center for Advanced Science and Technology

    1998-06-05

    Phosphate ion sensor system using an electrochemical detector was developed by the use of recombinant pyruvate oxidase (PyOD) from Lactobacillus plantarum, which needs no addition of thiamine pyrophosphate and flavin adenine dinucleotide for reaction. This system could detect 2 nM hydrogen peroxide. Response time for phosphate ion was 80 s and total measurement time for one sample was 3 min. Citrate buffer solution (pH 6.3) was most suitable for the measurement and optimum flow rate was 0.6 ml/min. Under these optimum conditions minimum detection limit of phosphate ion was 15 nM, which was enough for the determination of phosphate ion in dam-lake. 6 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Iron Phosphate Coating:A Novel Approach to Controlling Pyrite Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANGXIAO; V.P.EVANGELOU

    1997-01-01

    A novel coating technique was develped for controlling pyrite oxidation .The technique involved leaching pyrite particles with a solution containing low concentrations of phosphate and hydrogen peroxide.During the leaching rpocess,the iron released from pyrite by hydrogen proxide was precipitated by phosphate as a ferric phosphate coating .This coating was shown to be able to effectively prevent pyirte from oxidation and it could be established at the expense of only surface portions of pyrite.The emergence of this technique could provide a unique potential route for abating acid mine draingage and reclaiming sulfide-containing degraded mining land.

  10. Phosphate control in dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cupisti A

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Adamasco Cupisti,1 Maurizio Gallieni,2 Maria Antonietta Rizzo,2 Stefania Caria,3 Mario Meola,4 Piergiorgio Bolasco31Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy; 2Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, San Carlo Borromeo Hospital, Milan, Italy; 3Territorial Department of Nephrology and Dialysis, ASL Cagliari, Italy; 4Sant'Anna School of Advanced Studies, University of Pisa, Pisa, ItalyAbstract: Prevention and correction of hyperphosphatemia is a major goal of chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD management, achievable through avoidance of a positive phosphate balance. To this aim, optimal dialysis removal, careful use of phosphate binders, and dietary phosphate control are needed to optimize the control of phosphate balance in well-nourished patients on a standard three-times-a-week hemodialysis schedule. Using a mixed diffusive–convective hemodialysis tecniques, and increasing the number and/or the duration of dialysis tecniques are all measures able to enhance phosphorus (P mass removal through dialysis. However, dialytic removal does not equal the high P intake linked to the high dietary protein requirement of dialysis patients; hence, the use of intestinal P binders is mandatory to reduce P net intestinal absorption. Unfortunately, even a large dose of P binders is able to bind approximately 200–300 mg of P on a daily basis, so it is evident that their efficacy is limited in the case of an uncontrolled dietary P load. Hence, limitation of dietary P intake is needed to reach the goal of neutral phosphate balance in dialysis, coupled to an adequate protein intake. To this aim, patients should be informed and educated to avoid foods that are naturally rich in phosphate and also processed food with P-containing preservatives. In addition, patients should preferentially choose food with a low P-to-protein ratio. For example, patients could choose egg white or protein from a vegetable source

  11. Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-09-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produce hydrogen. It includes an overview of research goals as well as “quick facts” about hydrogen energy resources and production technologies.

  12. Hydrogen storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C.J.; Sloan, E.D.

    2005-01-01

    The invention relates to the storage of hydrogen. The invention relates especially to storing hydrogen in a clathrate hydrate. The clathrate hydrate according to the present invention originates from a composition, which comprises water and hydrogen, as well as a promotor compound. The promotor comp

  13. Influence of uranyl speciation and iron oxides on uranium biogeochemical redox reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, B.D.; Amos, R.T.; Nico, P.S.; Fendorf, S.

    2010-03-15

    Uranium is a pollutant of concern to both human and ecosystem health. Uranium's redox state often dictates its partitioning between the aqueous- and solid-phases, and thus controls its dissolved concentration and, coupled with groundwater flow, its migration within the environment. In anaerobic environments, the more oxidized and mobile form of uranium (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} and associated species) may be reduced, directly or indirectly, by microorganisms to U(IV) with subsequent precipitation of UO{sub 2}. However, various factors within soils and sediments may limit biological reduction of U(VI), inclusive of alterations in U(VI) speciation and competitive electron acceptors. Here we elucidate the impact of U(VI) speciation on the extent and rate of reduction with specific emphasis on speciation changes induced by dissolved Ca, and we examine the impact of Fe(III) (hydr)oxides (ferrihydrite, goethite and hematite) varying in free energies of formation on U reduction. The amount of uranium removed from solution during 100 h of incubation with S. putrefaciens was 77% with no Ca or ferrihydrite present but only 24% (with ferrihydrite) and 14% (no ferrihydrite) were removed for systems with 0.8 mM Ca. Imparting an important criterion on uranium reduction, goethite and hematite decrease the dissolved concentration of calcium through adsorption and thus tend to diminish the effect of calcium on uranium reduction. Dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) can proceed through different enzyme pathways, even within a single organism, thus providing a potential second means by which Fe(III) bearing minerals may impact U(VI) reduction. We quantify rate coefficients for simultaneous dissimilatory reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) in systems varying in Ca concentration (0 to 0.8 mM), and using a mathematical construct implemented with the reactive transport code MIN3P, we reveal the predominant influence of uranyl speciation, specifically the formation of uranyl

  14. Phosphate Mines, Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Jordan's leading industry and export commodities are phosphate and potash, ranked in the top three in the world. These are used to make fertilizer. The Jordan Phosphate Mines Company is the sole producer, having started operations in 1935. In addition to mining activities, the company produces phosphoric acid (for fertilizers, detergents, pharmaceuticals), diammonium phosphate (for fertilizer), sulphuric acid (many uses), and aluminum fluoride (a catalyst to make aluminum and magnesium). The image covers an area of 27.5 x 49.4 km, was acquired on September 17, 2005, and is located near 30.8 degrees north latitude, 36.1 degrees east longitude. The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

  15. Synthesis and controllable wettability of micro- and nanostructured titanium phosphate thin films formed on titanium plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yada, Mitsunori; Inoue, Yuko; Sakamoto, Ayako; Torikai, Toshio; Watari, Takanori

    2014-05-28

    The hydrothermal treatment of a titanium plate in a mixed aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide and aqueous phosphoric acid under different conditions results in the formation of various titanium phosphate thin films. The films have various crystal structures such as Ti2O3(H2PO4)2·2H2O, α-titanium phosphate (Ti(HPO4)2·H2O), π-titanium phosphate (Ti2O(PO4)2·H2O), or low-crystallinity titanium phosphate and different morphologies that have not been previously reported such as nanobelts, microflowers, nanosheets, nanorods, or nanoplates. The present study also suggests the mechanisms behind the formation of these thin films. The crystal structure and morphology of the titanium phosphate thin films depend strongly on the concentration of the aqueous hydrogen peroxide solution, the amount of phosphoric acid, and the reaction temperature. In particular, hydrogen peroxide plays an important role in the formation of the titanium phosphate thin films. Moreover, controllable wettability of the titanium phosphate thin films, including superhydrophilicity and superhydrophobicity, is reported. Superhydrophobic surfaces with controllable adhesion to water droplets are obtained on π-titanium phosphate nanorod thin films modified with alkylamine molecules. The adhesion force between a water droplet and the thin film depends on the alkyl chain length of the alkylamine and the duration of ultraviolet irradiation utilized for photocatalytic degradation.

  16. HPLC法同时测定三维葡磷钙咀嚼片中维生素B1、维生素B2的含量%Content Determination of Vitamin B1 and Vitamin B2 in Trivitamin and Calcium Gluconate,Calcium Hydro-gen Phosphate Chewable Tablets by HPLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丹凤

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:To establish a method for the content determination of vitamin B1 and vitamin B2 in Trivitamin and calci-um gluconate,calcium hydrogen phosphate chewable tablets. METHODS:HPLC was conducted. The column was Inertsil C18 with the mobile phase of 1%triethylamine contained 0.02 mol/L of sodium heptane solution(pH was adjusted to 5.5 by phosphate)-methanol (74∶26,V/V)at the flow rate of 1.0 ml/min,the detection wavelength was 260 nm,temperature was 30℃and the volume was 20μl. RESULTS:There was a good linear relationship between the quality concentration of vitamin B1 and peak area in the range of 0.22-1.10μg/ml(r=0.999 8)and vitamin B2 was in the range of 0.22-1.09μg/ml(r=0.999 7). The RSDs of precision,reproducibility and stabil-ity tests were all less than 1%;the average recovery was respectively 99.66%(RSD=0.96%,n=9)and 100.31%(RSD=0.92%,n=9). CONCLUSIONS:The method is simple,accurate,sensitive and reliable and suitable for the content determination of vitamin B1 and vitamin B2 in Trivitamin and calcium gluconate,calcium hydrogen phosphate chewable tablets.%目的:建立同时测定三维葡磷钙咀嚼片中维生素B1、维生素B2含量的方法。方法:采用高效液相色谱法。色谱柱为Inertsil C18,流动相为含1%三乙胺的0.02 mol/L庚烷磺酸钠溶液(磷酸调pH至5.5)-甲醇(74∶26,V/V),检测波长为260 nm,流速为1.0 ml/min,柱温为30℃,进样量为20μl。结果:维生素B1、维生素B2质量浓度分别在0.22~1.10、0.22~1.09μg/ml范围内与各自峰面积呈良好的线性关系(r=0.9998、0.9997);精密度、稳定性、重复性试验的RSD<1%;平均加样回收率分别为99.66%、100.31%,RSD分别为0.96%、0.92%(n=9)。结论:本方法简便、准确度高,可用于三维葡磷钙咀嚼片中维生素B1、维生素B2的含量测定。

  17. Uranyl(VI) nitrate salts: modeling thermodynamic properties using the binding mean spherical approximation theory and determination of "fictive" binary data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruas, Alexandre; Bernard, Olivier; Caniffi, Barbara; Simonin, Jean-Pierre; Turq, Pierre; Blum, Lesser; Moisy, Philippe

    2006-02-23

    This work is aimed at a description of the thermodynamic properties of highly concentrated aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate at 25 degrees C. A new resolution of the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA) theory, taking into account 1-1 and also 1-2 complex formation, is developed and used to reproduce, from a simple procedure, experimental uranyl nitrate osmotic coefficient variation with concentration. For better consistency of the theory, binary uranyl perchlorate and chloride osmotic coefficients are also calculated. Comparison of calculated and experimental values is made. The possibility of regarding the ternary system UO(2)(NO(3))(2)/HNO(3)/H(2)O as a "simple" solution (in the sense of Zdanovskii, Stokes, and Robinson) is examined from water activity and density measurements. Also, an analysis of existing uranyl nitrate binary data is proposed and compared with our obtained data. On the basis of the concept of "simple" solution, values for density and water activity for the binary system UO(2)(NO(3))(2)/H(2)O are proposed in a concentration range on which uranyl nitrate precipitates from measurements on concentrated solutions of the ternary system UO(2)(NO(3))(2)/HNO(3)/H(2)O. This new set of binary data is "fictive" in the sense that the real binary system is not stable chemically. Finally, a new, interesting predictive capability of the BIMSA theory is shown.

  18. Sorption of strontium on uranyl peroxide: implications for a high-level nuclear waste repository.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, Rosa; Martínez-Lladó, Xavier; Rovira, Miquel; de Pablo, Joan; Casas, Ignasi; Giménez, Javier

    2010-09-15

    Strontium-90 is considered the most important radioactive isotope in the environment and one of the most frequently occurring radionuclides in groundwaters at nuclear facilities. The uranyl peroxide studtite (UO2O2 . 4H2O) has been observed to be formed in spent nuclear fuel leaching experiments and seems to have a relatively high sorption capacity for some radionuclides. In this work, the sorption of strontium onto studtite is studied as a function of time, strontium concentration in solution and pH. The main results obtained are (a) sorption is relatively fast although slower than for cesium; (b) strontium seems to be sorbed via a monolayer coverage of the studtite surface, (c) sorption has a strong dependence on ionic strength, is negligible at acidic pH, and increases at neutral to alkaline pH (almost 100% of the strontium in solution is sorbed above pH 10). These results point to uranium secondary solid phase formation on the spent nuclear fuel as an important mechanism for strontium retention in a high-level nuclear waste repository (HLNW).

  19. Highly sensitive detection of ionizing radiations by a photoluminescent uranyl organic framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Jian; Wang, Yaxing; Liu, Wei; Yin, Xuemiao; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Shuao [School for Radiological and interdisciplinary Sciences (RAD-X) and Collaborative Innovation Center of Radiation Medicine of Jiangsu Higher Education Institutions, Soochow University, Suzhou (China); Zou, Youming [High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL (United States); Liu, Guokui [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-06-19

    Precise detection of low-dose X- and γ-radiations remains a challenge and is particularly important for studying biological effects under low-dose ionizing radiation, safety control in medical radiation treatment, survey of environmental radiation background, and monitoring cosmic radiations. We report here a photoluminescent uranium organic framework, whose photoluminescence intensity can be accurately correlated with the exposure dose of X- or γ-radiations. This allows for precise and instant detection of ionizing radiations down to the level of 10{sup -4} Gy, representing a significant improvement on the detection limit of approximately two orders of magnitude, compared to other chemical dosimeters reported up to now. The electron paramagnetic resonance analysis suggests that with the exposure to radiations, the carbonyl double bonds break affording oxo-radicals that can be stabilized within the conjugated uranium oxalate-carboxylate sheet. This gives rise to a substantially enhanced equatorial bonding of the uranyl(VI) ions as elucidated by the single-crystal structure of the γ-ray irradiated material, and subsequently leads to a very effective photoluminescence quenching through phonon-assisted relaxation. The quenched sample can be easily recovered by heating, enabling recycled detection for multiple runs. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    The standard covers analytical procedures to determine compliance of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to specifications. The following methods are described in detail: uranium by ferrous sulfate reduction-potassium dichromate titrimetry and by ignition gravimetry; specific gravity by pycnometry; free acid by oxalate complexation; thorium by the Arsenazo(III) (photometric) method; chromium by the diphenylcarbazide (photometric) method; molybdenum by the thiocyanate (photometric) method; halogens separation by steam distillation; fluorine by specific ion electrode; halogen distillate analysis: chloride, bromide and iodide by amperometric microtitrimetry; bromine by the fluorescein (photometric) method; sulfate sulfur by (photometric) turbidimetry; phosphorus by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; silicon by the molybdenum blue (photometric) method; carbon by persulfate oxidation-acid titrimetry; nonvolatile impurities by spectrography; volatile impurities by rotating-disk spark spectrography; boron by emission spectrography; impurity elements by spark source mass spectrography; isotopic composition by multiple filament surface-ionization mass spectrometry; uranium-232 by alpha spectrometry; total alpha activity by direct alpha counting; fission product activity by beta and gamma counting; entrained organic matter by infrared spectrophotometry. (JMT)

  1. Uranyl-specific binding at a functionalised interface: a chemophotonic fibre optic sensor platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Neil W; Tremlett, Clare J; Melfi, Patricia J; Sessler, Jonathon D; Shaw, Andrew M

    2008-05-01

    Detection of radiological materials in the solution phase is restricted by conventional radiation-counting techniques owing to extreme attenuation. Chemical sensing of the resultant radiological species such as uranyl UO(2)(2+) is possible on the surface of a plastic or glass fibre optic. A dihydroxy isoamethryin complex is tethered to the fibre surface which has a large extinction coefficient (119 000 M(-1) cm(-1) at lambda = 439 nm) and changes colour upon binding UO(2)(2+). The spectral changes are greater on the surface than in solution and binding is specific to UO(2)(2+) with small interferences from Gd(3+). Monitoring the spectral response in three detector bands in the red, green and blue enable the optical power change to be measured with sensitivities of 1 mdB, allowing UO(2)(2+) to be detected confidently at 50-100 ppb levels. Real-time kinetic analysis enables discrimination between the target species and possible interferents.

  2. Synthesis, structural investigation and kinetic studies of uranyl(VI) unsymmetrical Schiff base complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Zahra Asadi; Mozaffar Asadi; Azade Zeinali; Mohammad Ranjkeshshorkaei; Karla Fejfarova; Vaclav Eigner; Michal Dusek; Aliakbar Dehnokhalaji

    2014-11-01

    Uranyl(VI) complexes with unsymmetrical N2O2 Schiff base ligands were synthesized and characterized. Their characterization was performed using UV-Vis, 1H NMR, cyclic voltammetry, single-crystal X-ray crystallography, IR, TG and C.H.N. techniques. X-ray crystallography of the complexes show that beside coordination of the tetradentate Schiff base, one DMF molecule is also coordinated. In order to investigate the effect of the substitutional groups of the Schiff base on the oxidation and reduction potentials, we used the cyclic voltammetry method. Electrochemistry of these complexes showed that the presence of electron releasing groups accelerates oxidation of the complexes. The kinetics of thermal decomposition was studied using thermal gravimetric method (TG) and Coats-Redfern equation. According to Coats-Redfern plots, the kinetics of thermal decomposition of the studied complexes is first-order in all stages. Also the kinetics and mechanism of the exchange reaction of the coordinated solvent with tributylphosphine was carried out in solution, using spectrophotometric method. As a result, the second order rate constants at four temperatures and the activation parameters were calculated showing an associative mechanism for all corresponding complexes. It was concluded that the steric and the electronic properties of the complexes influence the reaction rate significantly.

  3. Structural, mechanical and vibrational study of uranyl silicate mineral soddyite by DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenero, Francisco; Bonales, Laura J.; Cobos, Joaquín; Timón, Vicente

    2017-09-01

    Uranyl silicate mineral soddyite, (UO2)2(SiO4)·2(H2O), is a fundamental component of the paragenetic sequence of secondary phases that arises from the weathering of uraninite ore deposits and corrosion of spent nuclear fuel. In this work, soddyite was studied by first principle calculations based on the density functional theory. As far as we know, this is the first time that soddyite structure is determined theoretically. The computed structure of soddyite reproduces the one determined experimentally by X-Ray diffraction (orthorhombic symmetry, spatial group Fddd O2; lattice parameters a = 8.334 Å, b = 11.212 Å; c = 18.668 Å). Lattice parameters, bond lengths, bond angles and X-Ray powder pattern were found to be in very good agreement with their experimental counterparts. Furthermore, the mechanical properties were obtained and the satisfaction of the Born conditions for mechanical stability of the structure was demonstrated by means of calculations of the elasticity tensor. The equation of state of soddyite was obtained by fitting lattice volumes and pressures to a fourth order Birch-Murnahan equation of state. The Raman spectrum was also computed by means of density functional perturbation theory and compared with the experimental spectrum obtained from a natural soddyite sample. The results were also found in agreement with the experimental data. A normal mode analysis of the theoretical spectra was carried out and used in order to assign the main bands of the Raman spectrum.

  4. Critical Parameters of Complex Geometry Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothe, Robert Emil; Briggs, Joseph Blair

    1999-06-01

    About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a "tree") having long, thin arms (or "branches") extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes; and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves when each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

  5. A new low temperature route to uranyl borates with structural variations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Shijun [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geowissenschaften; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou (China). Guangzhou Inst. of Geochemistry; Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung (IEK-6); Wang, Shuao [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences; Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochememistry; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (United States). Actinide Chemistry Group; California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Polinski, Matthew J. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences; Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochememistry; Depmeier, Wulf [Kiel Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Geowissenschaften; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Alekseev, Evgeny V. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung (IEK-6); RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kristallographie

    2013-10-01

    Three new uranyl borates, K(UO{sub 2})(BO{sub 3}) (1), Rb(UO{sub 2})(BO{sub 3}) (2) and Cs(UO{sub 2})(BO{sub 3}) (3) have been prepared using B{sub 2}O{sub 3} fluxes at 1000 C. 1 and 3 can also be synthesized using potassium tetraborate tetrahydrate as a molten flux at 290 C, which provides a new low temperature route to prepare actinide borates. 1 possesses an a-uranophane anion sheet topology identical to that in the previously reported compounds Li(UO{sub 2})(BO{sub 3}) and Na(UO{sub 2})(BO3). 2 and 3 display a new [UO{sub 5}]{sub 1{infinity}} anion topology with a basic building block of edge-sharing dimers comprised of (UO{sub 7}){sub 2} polyhedra. The A(UO{sub 2})(BO{sub 3}) (A = alkali metal) series shows a systematic structural evolution, which will be discussed in the main text. (orig.)

  6. Improvement of the cloud point extraction of uranyl ions by the addition of ionic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Song; Sun, Taoxiang; Chen, Qingde; Shen, Xinghai

    2013-12-15

    The cloud point extraction (CPE) of uranyl ions by different kinds of extractants in Triton X-114 (TX-114) micellar solution was investigated upon the addition of ionic liquids (ILs) with various anions, i.e., bromide (Br(-)), tetrafluoroborate (BF4(-)), hexafluorophosphate (PF6(-)) and bis[(trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl]imide (NTf2(-)). A significant increase of the extraction efficiency was found on the addition of NTf2(-) based ILs when using neutral extractant tri-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO), and the extraction efficiency kept high at both nearly neutral and high acidity. However, the CPE with acidic extractants, e.g., bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (HDEHP) and 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) which are only effective at nearly neutral condition, was not improved by ILs. The results of zeta potential and (19)F NMR measurements indicated that the anion NTf2(-) penetrated into the TX-114 micelles and was enriched in the surfactant-rich phase during the CPE process. Meanwhile, NTf2(-) may act as a counterion in the CPE of UO2(2+) by TOPO. Furthermore, the addition of IL increased the separation factor of UO2(2+) and La(3+), which implied that in the micelle TOPO, NTf2(-) and NO3(-) established a soft template for UO2(2+). Therefore, the combination of CPE and IL provided a supramolecular recognition to concentrate UO2(2+) efficiently and selectively.

  7. Critical Parameters of Complex Geometries of Intersecting Cylinders Containing Uranyl Nitrate Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. B. Briggs (INEEL POC); R. E. Rothe

    1999-06-14

    About three dozen previously unreported critical configurations are presented for very complex geometries filled with high concentration enriched uranyl nitrate solution. These geometries resemble a tall, thin Central Column (or trunk of a ''tree'') having long, thin arms (or ''branches'') extending up to four directions off the column. Arms are equally spaced from one another in vertical planes, and that spacing ranges from arms in contact to quite wide spacings. Both the Central Column and the many different arms are critically safe by themselves with each, alone, is filled with fissile solution; but, in combination, criticality occurs due to the interactions between arms and the column. Such neutronic interactions formed the principal focus of this study. While these results are fresh to the nuclear criticality safety industry and to those seeking novel experiments against which to validate computer codes, the experiments, themselves, are not recent. Over 100 experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory between September, 1967, and February of the following year.

  8. Capture chromatography for Mo-99 recovery from uranyl sulfate solutions: minimum-column-volume design method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Lei; Chung, Pei-Lun; Youker, Amanda; Stepinski, Dominique C; Vandegrift, George F; Wang, Nien-Hwa Linda

    2013-09-27

    Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99), generated from the fission of Uranium-235 (U-235), is the radioactive parent of the most widely used medical isotope, technetium-99m (Tc-99m). An efficient, robust, low-pressure process is developed for recovering Mo-99 from uranyl sulfate solutions. The minimum column volume and the maximum column length for required yield, pressure limit, and loading time are determined using a new graphical method. The method is based on dimensionless groups and intrinsic adsorption and diffusion parameters, which are estimated using a small number of experiments and simulations. The design is tested with bench-scale experiments with titania columns. The results show a high capture yield and a high stripping yield (95±5%). The design can be adapted to changes in design constraints or the variations in feed concentration, feed volume, or material properties. The graph shows clearly how the column utilization is affected by the required yield, loading time, and pressure limit. The cost effectiveness of various sorbent candidates can be evaluated based on the intrinsic parameters. This method can be used more generally for designing other capture chromatography processes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Oxo Ligand Substitution in a Cationic Uranyl Complex: Synergistic Interaction of an Electrophile and a Reductant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrick, Elizabeth A; Wu, Guang; Hayton, Trevor W

    2015-07-20

    Reaction of [U(VI)O2(dppmo)2(OTf)][OTf] (dppmo = Ph2P(O)CH2P(O)Ph2) with 4 equiv of Ph3SiOTf and 2 equiv of Cp2Co generates the U(IV) complex U(IV)(OTf)4(dppmo)2 (1), as a yellow-green crystalline solid in 83% yield, along with Ph3SiOSiPh3 and [Cp2Co][OTf]. This reaction proceeds via a U(IV) silyloxide intermediate, [U(IV)(OSiPh3)(dppmo)2(OTf)2][OTf] (2), which we have isolated and structurally characterized. Similarly, reaction of [U(VI)O2(TPPO)4][OTf]2 (TPPO = Ph3PO) with 6 equiv of Me3SiOTf and 2 equiv of Cp2Co generates the U(IV) complex, [Cp2Co][U(IV)(OTf)5(TPPO)2] (3), as a yellow-green crystalline solid in 76% yield, concomitant with formation of Me3SiOSiMe3, [Ph3POSiMe3][OTf], and [Cp2Co][OTf]. Complexes 1 and 3 have been fully characterized, including analysis by X-ray crystallography. The conversion of [U(VI)O2(dppmo)2(OTf)][OTf] and [U(VI)O2(TPPO)4][OTf]2 to complexes 1 and 3, respectively, represents rare examples of well-defined uranyl oxo ligand substitution.

  10. Research on Uncrystallized Phosphating Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG En-jun; XING Ze-kuan

    2004-01-01

    This article excogitated a kind of uncrystallized phosphating film bears wearing capacity goodly by adding Ca2 + in normal phosphating solution. This technology is very useful to protect steel parts working in oil from abrasion.

  11. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000528.htm Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency is a condition in which ...

  12. Phosphate enhances Fgf23 expression through reactive oxygen species in UMR-106 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Michiko; Kinoshita, Yuka; Taguchi, Manabu; Fukumoto, Seiji

    2016-03-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) has been shown to work as a phosphotropic hormone. Although FGF23 reduces the serum phosphate level, it has not been established that phosphate directly regulates FGF23 production. In this study, we investigated whether phosphate can enhance Fgf23 expression using the rat osteoblastic cell line UMR-106, which has been shown to express Fgf23 in response to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D [1,25(OH)2D]. Phosphate increased Fgf23 expression in a dose- and time-dependent manner in the presence of 1,25(OH)2D. Phosphate also increased Fgf23 promoter activity, but showed no effect on the half-life of Fgf23 messenger RNA. Phosphonoformic acid and PD98059, an inhibitor of MEK, inhibited the effects of phosphate on Fgf23 expression and promoter activity. In addition, phosphate enhanced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in UMR-106 cells, and hydrogen peroxide enhanced FGF23 production in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Hydrogen peroxide also enhanced Elk1 reporter activity, a target of the MEK-extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Furthermore, the effect of phosphate on ROS production and Fgf23 expression was inhibited by apocynin, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidase. These results indicate that phosphate directly enhances Fgf23 transcription without affecting the stability of Fgf23 messenger RNA by stimulating NADPH-induced ROS production and the MEK-ERK pathway in UMR-106 cells.

  13. Uranium extraction from TRISO-coated fuel particles using supercritical CO2 containing tri-n-butyl phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Liyang; Duan, Wuhua; Xu, Jingming; Zhu, Yongjun

    2012-11-30

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are advanced nuclear systems that will receive heavy use in the future. It is important to develop spent nuclear fuel reprocessing technologies for HTGR. A new method for recovering uranium from tristructural-isotropic (TRISO-) coated fuel particles with supercritical CO(2) containing tri-n-butyl phosphate (TBP) as a complexing agent was investigated. TRISO-coated fuel particles from HTGR fuel elements were first crushed to expose UO(2) pellet fuel kernels. The crushed TRISO-coated fuel particles were then treated under O(2) stream at 750°C, resulting in a mixture of U(3)O(8) powder and SiC shells. The conversion of U(3)O(8) into solid uranyl nitrate by its reaction with liquid N(2)O(4) in the presence of a small amount of water was carried out. Complete conversion was achieved after 60 min of reaction at 80°C, whereas the SiC shells were not converted by N(2)O(4). Uranyl nitrate in the converted mixture was extracted with supercritical CO(2) containing TBP. The cumulative extraction efficiency was above 98% after 20 min of online extraction at 50°C and 25 MPa, whereas the SiC shells were not extracted by TBP. The results suggest an attractive strategy for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from HTGR to minimize the generation of secondary radioactive waste.

  14. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  15. Practical application of phosphate treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caravaggio, Mike [Integrated Chemistry Solutions Pte. Ltd., Singapore (Singapore)

    2011-05-15

    Phosphate treatment has been applied to subcritical fossil power boilers for well over half a century, as well as being used frequently in heat recovery steam generators. The use of this treatment has evolved over the decades, with the operating sodium to phosphate ratio being the defining factor for the evolution of the treatment. The evolving prescribed sodium to phosphate ratios have been based on the scientific research results and operating experience available at the time, and in the latest EPRI Guidelines issued in 2004 are set at a minimum sodium to phosphate ratio of 3:1, with provision to add up to 1 mg . L{sup -1} of additional free caustic. The ratio limitation has always been set in an effort to minimize the potential for corrosion caused by the potential misapplication of the treatment. Typically, the operating ranges for phosphate treatments are depicted on an x-y plot with the x-axis the phosphate concentration and the y-axis the corrected pH value based on the maximum sodium to phosphate ratio allowed for by the treatment. These operating range plots define the theoretical operating range of a phosphate treatment. This paper briefly discusses the origin of the current phosphate control limits in the EPRI Guidelines, discusses phosphate chemistry, outlines the limitations involved when applying a phosphate treatment and provides additional practical guidance for overcoming these limitations and minimizing the potential for corrosion induced by the incorrect application of a phosphate treatment. (orig.)

  16. Expanding sapphyrin: towards selective phosphate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayev, Evgeny A; Boev, Nikolay V; Myshkovskaya, Ekaterina; Khrustalev, Victor N; Ustynyuk, Yu A

    2008-01-01

    The anion-templated syntheses and binding properties of novel macrocyclic oligopyrrole receptors in which pyrrole rings are linked through amide or imine bonds are described. The efficient synthesis was accomplished by anion-templated [1+1] Schiff-base condensation and acylation macrocyclization reactions. Free receptors and their host-guest complexes with hydrochloric acid, acetic acid, tetrabutylammonium chloride, and hydrogen sulfate were analyzed by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. Stability constants with different tetrabutylammonium salts of inorganic acids were determined by standard 1H NMR and UV/Vis titration techniques in [D6]DMSO/0.5% water solution. According to the titration data, receptors containing three pyrrole rings (10 and 12) exhibit high affinity (log Ka=5-7) for bifluoride, acetate, and dihydrogen phosphate, and interact weakly with chloride and hydrogen sulfate. The amido-bipyrrole receptors 11 and 13 with four pyrrole rings exhibit 10(4)- and 10(2)-fold selectivity for dihydrogen phosphate, respectively, as inferred from competitive titrations in the presence of tetrabutylammonium acetate.

  17. Hydrogen Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The series of absorption or emission lines that are characteristic of the hydrogen atom. According to the Bohr theory of the hydrogen atom, devised by Danish physicist Neils Bohr (1885-1962) in 1913, the hydrogen atom can be envisaged as consisting of a central nucleus (a proton) around which a single electron revolves. The electron is located in one of a number of possible permitted orbits, each...

  18. Alkali-metal ion coordination in uranyl(VI) poly-peroxo complexes in solution, inorganic analogues to crown-ethers. Part 2. Complex formation in the tetramethyl ammonium-, Li(+)-, Na(+)- and K(+)-uranyl(VI)-peroxide-carbonate systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanonato, Pier Luigi; Szabó, Zoltán; Vallet, Valerie; Di Bernardo, Plinio; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2015-10-01

    The constitution and equilibrium constants of ternary uranyl(vi) peroxide carbonate complexes [(UO2)p(O2)q(CO3)r](2(p-q-r)) have been determined at 0 °C in 0.50 M MNO3, M = Li, K, and TMA (tetramethyl ammonium), ionic media using potentiometric and spectrophotometric data; (17)O NMR data were used to determine the number of complexes present. The formation of cyclic oligomers, "[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]n", n = 4, 5, 6, with different stoichiometries depending on the ionic medium used, suggests that Li(+), Na(+), K(+) and TMA ions act as templates for the formation of uranyl peroxide rings where the uranyl-units are linked by μ-η(2)-η(2) bridged peroxide-ions. The templating effect is due to the coordination of the M(+)-ions to the uranyl oxygen atoms, where the coordination of Li(+) results in the formation of Li[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]4(7-), Na(+) and K(+) in the formation of Na/K[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) complexes, while the large tetramethyl ammonium ion promotes the formation of two oligomers, TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-). The NMR spectra demonstrate that the coordination of Na(+) in the five- and six-membered oligomers is significantly stronger than that of TMA(+); these observations suggest that the templating effect is similar to the one observed in the synthesis of crown-ethers. The NMR experiments also demonstrate that the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]5(9-) and TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is slow on the (17)O chemical shift time-scale, while the exchange between TMA[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) and Na[(UO2)(O2)(CO3)]6(11-) is fast. There was no indication of the presence of large clusters of the type identified by Burns and Nyman (M. Nyman and P. C. Burns, Chem. Soc. Rev., 2012, 41, 7314-7367) and possible reasons for this and the implications for the synthesis of large clusters are briefly discussed.

  19. Determination of formation constants of uranyl(VI complexes with a hydrophilic SO3-Ph-BTP ligand, using liquid-liquid extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steczek Lukasz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Complex formation between uranyl ion, UO22+, and a hydrophilic anionic form of SO3-Ph-BTP4- ligand, L4-, in water was studied by liquid-liquid extraction experiments performed over a range of the ligand and HNO3 concentrations in the aqueous phase, at a constant concentration of nitrate anions at 25°C . The competition for UO22+ ions between the lipophilic TODGA extractant and the hydrophilic L4- ligand leads to the decrease in the uranyl distribution ratios, D, with an increasing L4- concentration. The model of the solvent extraction process used accounts - apart from uranyl complexation by TODGA and SO3-Ph-BTP4- - also for uranyl complexation by nitrates and for the decrease in the concentration of the free L4- ligand in the aqueous phase, due to its protonation, bonding in the uranyl complex and the distribution between the two liquid phases. The unusually strong dependence of the D values on the acidity, found in the experiment, could hardly be explained as due to L4- protonation merely. Three hypotheses were experimentally tested, striving to interpret the data in terms of additional extraction to the organic phase of ion associates of protonated TODGA cation with either partly protonated anionic L4- ligands or anionic UO22+ complexes with NO3 - or L4-. None of them has been confirmed. The analysis of the results, based on the formal correction of free ligand concentrations, points to the formation of 1 : 1 and 1 : 2 uranyl - SO3-Ph-BTP complexes in the aqueous phase. The conditional formation constant of the 1:1 complex has been determined, logßL,1 = 2.95 ± 0.15.

  20. An integrated study of uranyl mineral dissolution processes. Etch pit formation, effects of cations in solution, and secondary precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindler, M. [Laurentian Univ., Sudbury, ON (Canada). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Hawthorne, F.C. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Mandaliev, P. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zurich (Switzerland). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Burns, P.C.; Maurice, P.A. [Notre Dame Univ., IN (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences

    2011-07-01

    Understanding the mechanism(s) of uranium-mineral dissolution is crucial for predictive modeling of U mobility in the subsurface. In order to understand how pH and type of cation in solution may affect dissolution, experiments were performed on mainly single crystals of curite, Pb{sup 2+}{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 3}]{sub 2}, becquerelite, Ca(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}], billietite, Ba(H{sub 2}O){sub 7}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 6}O{sub 4}(OH){sub 6}], fourmarierite Pb{sup 2+}{sub 1-x}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O{sub 3-2x}(OH){sub 4+2x}] (x= 0.00-0.50), uranophane, Ca(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}[(UO{sub 2})(SiO{sub 3}OH)]{sub 2}, zippeite, K{sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 3}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}O{sub 3}(OH)], and Na-substituted metaschoepite, Na{sub 1-x}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O{sub 2-x}(OH){sub 5+x}] (H{sub 2}O){sub n}. Solutions included: deionized water; aqueous HCl solutions at pH 3.5 and 2; 0.5 mol L{sup -1} Pb(II)-, Ba-, Sr-, Ca-, Mg-, HCl solutions at pH 2; 1.0 mol L{sup -1} Na- and K-HCl solutions at pH 2; and a 0.1 mol L{sup -1} Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution at pH 10.5. Uranyl mineral basal surface microtopography, micromorphology, and composition were examined prior to, and after dissolution experiments on micrometer scale specimens using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Evolution of etch pit depth at different pH values and experimental durations can be explained using a stepwave dissolution model. Effects of the cation in solution on etch pit symmetry and morphology can be explained using an adsorption model involving specific surface sites. Surface precipitation of the following phases was observed: (a) a highly-hydrated uranyl-hydroxy-hydrate in ultrapure water (on all minerals), (b) a Na-uranyl-hydroxy-hydrate in Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solution of pH 10.5 (on uranyl-hydroxy-hydrate minerals), (c) a Na-uranyl-carbonate on zippeite, (d) Ba- and

  1. Evaluation of iron phosphate (III) as reactive material for removal of uranium in water; Evaluacion del fosfato de hierro (III) como material reactivo para la remocion de uranio en agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solis M, L

    2004-02-01

    The levels of toxic metals in the atmosphere are topic of growing interest. This has provoked that the legislation is stricter, for that that the industry and centers of investigation has worried and busy of to look for and to develop more effective methods for the control of the contamination, with the purpose of being inside this levels. The phosphate compounds are being investigated for the removal of pollutants of the water and soil. In this work, it was synthesized to the ferric phosphate in a simple way in the laboratory, obtaining high grade of purity and yield. The characterization of this product was in a physicochemical way and of surface, through diverse analytical techniques. In the first place, the physicochemical characterization was carried out for Scanning Electron Microscopy of High Vacuum, X-ray diffraction, Infrared Spectroscopy with Fourier Transform, and Thermal gravimetric Analysis, the surface characterization was carried out for analysis of the surface area, determination of the isoelectric point by potentiometric and of mass titrations. The previous techniques allowed to identify the ferric phosphate synthesized as a compound amorphous beige color, with a relationship of atoms Fe:1, P:1, O:4, which showed connections P-O and went stable to changes of temperature. The surface area it was of 21 g / m{sup 2}, the isoelectric point corresponded to a p H of 1.5, which coincided so much by potentiometric like by mass titration. The number of active sites was of 106 sites /nm{sup 2}. After the characterization of the ferric phosphate the compound was evaluated as reactive material for the removal of uranyl ions through sorption tests. The kinetics of hydration showed that the product requires of 24 hours to saturate the sites capable of to be hydrated. The sorption kinetics required 22 hours of contact to reach the maximum sorption of uranyl ions for the ferric phosphate. The sorption isotherms showed that not significant difference exists when

  2. Calcium Phosphate Biomaterials: An Update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Current calcium phosphate (CaP) biomaterials for bone repair, substitution, augmentation and regeneration include hydroxyapatite ( HA ) from synthetic or biologic origin, beta-tricalcium phosphate ( β-TCP ) , biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), and are available as granules, porous blocks, components of composites (CaP/polymer) cements, and as coatings on orthopedic and dental implants. Experimental calcium phosphate biomaterials include CO3- and F-substituted apatites, Mg-and Zn-substituted β-TCP, calcium phosphate glasses. This paper is a brief review of the different types of CaP biomaterials and their properties such as bioactivity, osteoconductivity, osteoinductivity.

  3. Highly Enriched Uranyl Nitrate in Annular Tanks with Concrete Reflection: 1 x 3 Line Array of Nested Pairs of Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Cleaver; John D. Bess; Nathan Devine; Fitz Trumble

    2009-09-01

    A series of seven experiments were performed at the Rocky Flats Critical Mass Laboratory beginning in August, 1980 (References 1 and 2). Highly enriched uranyl nitrate solution was introduced into a 1-3 linear array of nested stainless steel annular tanks. The tanks were inside a concrete enclosure, with various moderator and absorber materials placed inside and/or between the tanks. These moderators and absorbers included boron-free concrete, borated concrete, borated plaster, and cadmium. Two configurations included placing bottles of highly enriched uranyl nitrate between tanks externally. Another experiment involved nested hemispheres of highly enriched uranium placed between tanks externally. These three configurations are not evaluated in this report. The experiments evaluated here are part of a series of experiments, one set of which is evaluated in HEU-SOL-THERM-033. The experiments in this and HEU-SOL-THERM-033 were performed similarly. They took place in the same room and used the same tanks, some of the same moderators and absorbers, some of the same reflector panels, and uranyl nitrate solution from the same location. There are probably additional similarities that existed that are not identified here. Thus, many of the descriptions in this report are either the same or similar to those in the HEU-SOL-THERM-033 report. Seventeen configurations (sixteen of which were critical) were performed during seven experiments; six of those experiments are evaluated here with thirteen configurations. Two configurations were identical, except for solution height, and were conducted to test repeatability. The solution heights were averaged and the two were evaluated as one configuration, which gives a total of twelve evaluated configurations. One of the seventeen configurations was subcritical. Of the twelve critical configurations evaluated, nine were judged as acceptable as benchmarks.

  4. Chemical controls on uranyl citrate speciation and the self-assembly of nanoscale macrocycles and sandwich complexes in aqueous solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, M; Unruh, D K; Gojdas, K; Flores, E; Streicher, L; Forbes, T Z

    2015-03-28

    Uranyl citrate forms trimeric species at pH > 5.5, but exact structural characteristics of these important oligomers have not previously been reported. Crystallization and structural characterization of the trimers suggests the self-assembly of the 3 : 3 and 3 : 2 U : Cit complexes into larger sandwich and macrocyclic molecules. Raman spectroscopy and ESI-MS have been utilized to investigate the relative abundance of these species in solution under varying pH and citrate concentrations. Additional dynamic light scattering experiments indicate that self-assembly of the larger molecules does occur in aqueous solution.

  5. Mechanism of rhythmic contractions induced by uranyl ion in the ileal longitudinal muscle of guinea-pig

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenmei Fu; Shoeiyn Linshiau

    1985-07-17

    The uranyl ion (UO2S ) produces rhythmic contractions of the longitudinal muscle of the ileum, similar to those induced by repetitive transmural stimulation. Hexamethonium inhibited the action of UO2S , indicating a preganglionic site of action of UO2S and interneurons possibly being involved in the ACh-releasing effect of UO2S . In addition, the action of UO2S was enhanced by physostigmine but antagonized by atropine, ATP, adrenaline and morphine suggesting multiple sites of action of UO2S . The effects of BaS were studied simultaneously in order to compare them with those of UO2S . (Auth.). 25 refs.; 4 figs.

  6. Biomediated continuous release phosphate fertilizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Alan H.; Rogers, Robert D.

    1999-01-01

    A composition is disclosed for providing phosphate fertilizer to the root zone of plants. The composition comprises a microorganism capable of producing and secreting a solubilization agent, a carbon source for providing raw material for the microorganism to convert into the solubilization agent, and rock phosphate ore for providing a source of insoluble phosphate that is solubilized by the solubilization agent and released as soluble phosphate. The composition is provided in a physical form, such as a granule, that retains the microorganism, carbon source, and rock phosphate ore, but permits water and soluble phosphate to diffuse into the soil. A method of using the composition for providing phosphate fertilizer to plants is also disclosed.

  7. Hydrogen Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  8. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  9. Hydrogen carriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Teng; Pachfule, Pradip; Wu, Hui; Xu, Qiang; Chen, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen has the potential to be a major energy vector in a renewable and sustainable future energy mix. The efficient production, storage and delivery of hydrogen are key technical issues that require improvement before its potential can be realized. In this Review, we focus on recent advances in materials development for on-board hydrogen storage. We highlight the strategic design and optimization of hydrides of light-weight elements (for example, boron, nitrogen and carbon) and physisorbents (for example, metal-organic and covalent organic frameworks). Furthermore, hydrogen carriers (for example, NH3, CH3OH-H2O and cycloalkanes) for large-scale distribution and for on-site hydrogen generation are discussed with an emphasis on dehydrogenation catalysts.

  10. Study of the changes in composition of ammonium diuranate with progress of precipitation, and study of the properties of ammonium diuranate and its subsequent products produced from both uranyl nitrate and uranyl fluoride solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manna, Subhankar; Kumar, Raj; Satpati, Santosh K.; Roy, Saswati B. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai (India); Joshi, Jyeshtharaj B. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, Mumbai (India)

    2017-04-15

    Uranium metal used for fabrication of fuel for research reactors in India is generally produced by magnesio-thermic reduction of UF{sub 4}. Performance of magnesio-thermic reaction and recovery and quality of uranium largely depends on properties of UF{sub 4}. As ammonium diuranate (ADU) is first product in powder form in the process flow-sheet, properties of UF{sub 4} depend on properties of ADU. ADU is generally produced from uranyl nitrate solution (UNS) for natural uranium metal production and from uranyl fluoride solution (UFS) for low enriched uranium metal production. In present paper, ADU has been produced via both the routes. Variation of uranium recovery and crystal structure and composition of ADU with progress in precipitation reaction has been studied with special attention on first appearance of the precipitate Further, ADU produced by two routes have been calcined to UO{sub 3}, then reduced to UO{sub 2} and hydroflorinated to UF{sub 4}. Effect of two different process routes of ADU precipitation on the characteristics of ADU, UO{sub 3}, UO{sub 2} and UF{sub 4} were studied here.

  11. Structural study of the uranyl and rare earth complexation functionalized by the CMPO; Etude structurale de la complexation de l'uranyle et des ions lanthanides par des calixarenes fonctionnalises par le CMPO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherfa, S

    1998-12-10

    In view of reducing the volume of nuclear waste solutions, a possible way is to extract simultaneously actinide and lanthanide ions prior to their ulterior separation.. Historically, the two extractant families used for nuclear waste reprocessing are the phosphine oxides and the CMPO (Carbamoyl Methyl Phosphine Oxide). For a better understanding of the complexes formed during extraction, we undertook structural studies of the complexes formed between uranyl and lanthanide (III) ions and the two classes of ligands cited above. These studies have been performed by X-ray diffraction on single crystals. Recently, a new type of extractants of lanthanide (III) and actinide (III) ions has been developed. When the Organic macrocycle called calixarene (an oligomeric compound resulting from the poly-condensation of phenolic units) is functionalized by a CMPO ligand, the extracting power, in terms of yield and selectivity towards lightest lanthanides, is greatly enhanced compared to the one measured for the single CMPO. Our X-ray diffraction studies allowed us to characterise, in terms of stoichiometry and monodentate or bidentate coordination mode of the CMPO functions, the complexes of calix[4]arene-CMPO (with four phenolic units) with lanthanide nitrates and uranyl. These different steps of characterisation enabled us to determine the correlation between the structures of the complexes and both selectivity and exacerbation of the extracting power measured in the liquid phase. (author)

  12. Characterizing the interaction between uranyl ion and fulvic acid using regional integration analysis (RIA) and fluorescence quenching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bingqi; Ryan, David K

    2016-03-01

    The development of chemometric methods has substantially improved the quantitative usefulness of the fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) in the analysis of dissolved organic matter (DOM). In this study, Regional Integration Analysis (RIA) was used to quantitatively interpret EEMs and assess fluorescence quenching behavior in order to study the binding between uranyl ion and fulvic acid. Three fulvic acids including soil fulvic acid (SFA), Oyster River fulvic acid (ORFA) and Suwannee River fulvic acid (SRFA) were used and investigated by the spectroscopic techniques. The EEM spectra obtained were divided into five regions according to fluorescence structural features and two distinct peaks were observed in region III and region V. Fluorescence quenching analysis was conducted for these two regions with the stability constants, ligand concentrations and residual fluorescence values calculated using the Ryan-Weber model. Results indicated a relatively strong binding ability between uranyl ion and fulvic acid samples at low pH (log K value varies from 4.11 to 4.67 at pH 3.50). Fluorophores in region III showed a higher binding ability with fewer binding sites than in region V. Stability constants followed the order, SFA > ORFA > SRFA, while ligand concentrations followed the reverse order, SRFA > ORFA > SFA. A comparison between RIA and Parallel Factor Analysis (PARAFAC) data treatment methods was also performed and good agreement between these two methods (less than 4% difference in log K values) demonstrates the reliability of the RIA method in this study.

  13. Standard test method for gamma energy emission from fission products in uranium hexafluoride and uranyl nitrate solution

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the measurement of gamma energy emitted from fission products in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. It is intended to provide a method for demonstrating compliance with UF6 specifications C 787 and C 996 and uranyl nitrate specification C 788. 1.2 The lower limit of detection is 5000 MeV Bq/kg (MeV/kg per second) of uranium and is the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual reporting limits of the nuclides to be measured. The limit of detection was determined on a pure, aged natural uranium (ANU) solution. The value is dependent upon detector efficiency and background. 1.3 The nuclides to be measured are106Ru/ 106Rh, 103Ru,137Cs, 144Ce, 144Pr, 141Ce, 95Zr, 95Nb, and 125Sb. Other gamma energy-emitting fission nuclides present in the spectrum at detectable levels should be identified and quantified as required by the data quality objectives. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its us...

  14. Uranyl ion extraction with conventional PUREX/TRUEX ligands assessed by electroanalytical chemistry at micro liquid/liquid interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmann, Tom J; Ding, Zhifeng

    2011-10-01

    The facilitated ion transfer (FIT) of uranyl or dioxouranium (UO(2)(2+)) was studied electrochemically using a micro interface between two immiscible electrolytic solutions (micro-ITIES) in order to evaluate the complexation stoichiometry and complexation constants (β) of two widely used ligands in spent fuel reprocessing: tributylphosphate (TBP) and octyl(phenyl)-N,N-diisobutylcarbamoylmethyl-phosphine oxide (CMPO). For the first time, discrete interfacial complexation reaction steps of varying uranyl to the two ligands ratios were resolved using the micro-ITIES hosted at the tip of a 25 μm diameter glass capillary. Two stoichiometries for UO(2)NO(3)TBP(n)(+) were determined including n = 3 and 4 with β values of 3.2 × 10(11) and 3.9 × 10(13), respectively. Subsequently, three distinct complexation reactions of CMPO with UO(2)(2+) were discovered corresponding to UO(2)NO(3)CMPO(2)(+), UO(2)NO(3)CMPO(3)(+), and UO(2)CMPO(5)(2+) whose respective complexation constants were determined to be 8.0 × 10(11), 8.8 × 10(14), and 6.5 × 10(32). The participation of nitrate anions in these complexation reactions is also discussed.

  15. Effects of a low-radiotoxicity uranium salt (uranyl acetate) on biochemical and hematological parameters of the catfish, Clarias gariepinus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghanim, Khalid A.; Ahmad, Zubair; Al-Kahem Al-Balawi, Hmoud F.; Al-Misned, Fahad; Maboob, Shahid; Suliman, El-Amin M.

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of Clarias gariepinus were treated with lethal (70, 75, 80, 85, 90, and 95 mg/L) and sub-lethal concentrations (8, 12 and 16 mg/L) of uranyl acetate, a low-radiotoxicity uranium salt. The LC 50 value was registered as 81.45 mg/L. The protein and glycogen concentrations in liver and muscles were decreased in the fish exposed to sub-lethal concentrations. The red blood cell (RBC) and white blood cell (WBC) counts, haemoglobin (Hb) concentration and haematocrit (Hct) values were decreased. Different blood indices like mean corpuscular volume (MCV), mean corpuscular haemoglobin (MCH) and mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration (MCHC) were negatively affected. Level of plasma glucose was elevated whereas protein was decreased. The level of calcium concentration (Ca) was declined in the blood of exposed fish whereas magnesium (Mg) remains unchanged. The activity level of glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) was elevated in exposed fish. These effects were more pronounced in the last period of exposure and in higher concentrations. Results of the present study indicate that uranyl acetate has adverse effects on Clarias gariepinus and causes changes in the biochemical and hematological parameters of the fish.

  16. Crystal chemistry and application development of uranyl extended structure and nanoscale materials and actinyl ion-substituted mineral phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Ernest M.

    The worldwide use of nuclear energy presents both significant advantages and challenges for society. Actinide research seeks to address these challenges and drive advancement in the fields of nuclear science and engineering. Here, key aspects of the fuel cycle are examined from both a fundamental and an applications-based perspective. Hydrothermal, ionothermal, room-temperature evaporation, and liquid diffusion synthesis techniques and single-crystal X-ray diffraction were used to study the structures of 18 uranyl compounds and six actinyl-doped mineral phases. These compounds represent a diverse group ranging from unique molecular clusters to novel and known extended structures isolated from aqueous and ionic liquid media. Ultrafiltration techniques were utilized to separate uranyl peroxide nanoclusters from complex aqueous solutions. Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and mass spectrometry were used to quantify elemental distributions in the feed and permeate solutions while Raman spectroscopy, small-angle X-ray scattering, and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry were used to define the characteristics of the cluster species across a range different solution conditions.

  17. Pyridoxal phosphate-dependent neonatal epileptic encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci, S; Zschocke, J; Hoffmann, G F; Bast, T; Klepper, J; Müller, A; Heep, A; Bartmann, P; Franz, A R

    2008-03-01

    Pyridox(am)ine-5'-phosphate oxidase converts pyridoxine phosphate and pyridoxamine phosphate to pyridoxal phosphate, a cofactor in many metabolic reactions, including neurotransmitter synthesis. A family with a mutation in the pyridox(am)ine-5'-phosphate oxidase gene presenting with neonatal seizures unresponsive to pyridoxine and anticonvulsant treatment but responsive to pyridoxal phosphate is described. Pyridoxal phosphate should be considered in neonatal epileptic encephalopathy unresponsive to pyridoxine.

  18. Pyridoxal phosphate-dependent neonatal epileptic encephalopathy

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Pyridox(am)ine-5′-phosphate oxidase converts pyridoxine phosphate and pyridoxamine phosphate to pyridoxal phosphate, a cofactor in many metabolic reactions, including neurotransmitter synthesis. A family with a mutation in the pyridox(am)ine-5′-phosphate oxidase gene presenting with neonatal seizures unresponsive to pyridoxine and anticonvulsant treatment but responsive to pyridoxal phosphate is described. Pyridoxal phosphate should be considered in neonatal epileptic encephalopathy unrespons...

  19. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrels: D-Allulose 6-Phosphate 3-Epimerase from Escherichia coli K-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan,K.; Fedorov, A.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2008-01-01

    phosphate group hydrogen bonds not only with the conserved motif but also with an active site loop following the sixth {beta}-strand, providing a potential structural mechanism for coupling substrate binding with catalysis.

  20. Ligand size dependence of U-N and U-O bond character in a series of uranyl hexaphyrin complexes: quantum chemical simulation and density based analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pietro, Poppy; Kerridge, Andrew

    2017-03-02

    A series of uranyl complexes with hexaphyrin ligands are investigated at the density functional level of theory and analysed using a variety of density-based techniques. A relationship is identified between the size of the ligand and the stability of the complex, controlled by the presence of meso-carbon centres in the porphyrin ring. The complex with the smallest ligand, cyclo[6]pyrrole, is found to have enhanced covalent character in equatorial U-N bonds as defined by the quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM), as well as enhanced stability, compared to the larger complexes. QTAIM data are supported by electron density difference distributions, integrated electronic properties and analysis of the reduced density gradient (RDG), which all show unambiguous evidence of electron sharing in all U-N bonds. In all complexes, a weakening of the covalent axial U-Oyl interaction in comparison to free uranyl is found, with evidence for a separation of electronic charge resulting in a more ionic interaction. A relationship between covalent character in the U-N bonds and the magnitude of uranyl charge redistribution is identified, where the greater the covalent character of the U-N interaction, the more ionic the U-Oyl interaction appears. The complex with the largest ligand, hexaphyrin(1.1.1.1.1.1), is found to have additional interactions with the uranyl oxygen centres, perturbing the U-Oyl interaction.

  1. Preparation of magnesium phosphate cement by recycling the product of thermal transformation of asbestos containing wastes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Asbestos containing wastes have been employed for the first time in the formulation of magnesium phosphate cements. Two samples were mixed with magnesium carbonate and calcined at 1100 and 1300 C. Under these conditions, complete destruction of asbestos minerals is known to occur. The product, containing MgO, after reaction with water-soluble potassium di-hydrogen phosphate, led to the formation of hydrated phases at room temperature. Crystalline and amorphous reaction products were detected,...

  2. Uranyl(VI) nitrate salts: Modeling thermodynamic properties using the binding mean spherical approximation theory and determination of 'fictive' binary data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruas, Alexandre; Bernard, Olivier; Caniffi, Barbara; Simonin, Jean-Pierre; Turq, Pierre; Blum, Lesser; Moisy, Philippe [CEA-Valrho Marcoule, DEN/DRCP/SCPS/LCA, Bat 399, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France); Laboratoire LI2C (UMR 7612), Universite P. M. Curie, Boite No. 51, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Department of Physics, POB 23343, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Pedras, Puerto Rico 00931-3343 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    This work is aimed at a description of the thermodynamic properties of highly concentrated aqueous solutions of uranyl nitrate at 25 degrees C. A new resolution of the binding mean spherical approximation (BIMSA) theory, taking into account 1-1 and also 1-2 complex formation, is developed and used to reproduce, from a simple procedure, experimental uranyl nitrate osmotic coefficient variation with concentration. For better consistency of the theory, binary uranyl perchlorate and chloride osmotic coefficients are also calculated. Comparison of calculated and experimental values is made. The possibility of regarding the ternary system UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}/HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O as a 'simple' solution (in the sense of Zdanovskii, Stokes, and Robinson) is examined from water activity and density measurements. Also, an analysis of existing uranyl nitrate binary data is proposed and compared with our obtained data. On the basis of the concept of 'simple' solution, values for density and water activity for the binary system UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}/H{sub 2}O are proposed in a concentration range on which uranyl nitrate precipitates from measurements on concentrated solutions of the ternary System UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}/HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O. This new set of binary data is 'fictive' in the sense that the real binary system is not stable chemically. Finally, a new, interesting predictive capability of the BIMSA theory is shown. (authors)

  3. Triphenyl phosphate allergy from spectacle frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, L; Andersen, K E; Egsgaard, Helge

    1986-01-01

    A case of triphenyl phosphate allergy from spectacle frames is reported. Patch tests with analytical grade triphenyl phosphate, tri-m-cresyl phosphate, and tri-p-cresyl phosphate in the concentrations 5%, 0.5% and 0.05% pet. showed positive reactions to 0.05% triphenyl phosphate and 0.5% tri-m-cr...

  4. Folding of RNA tertiary structure: Linkages between backbone phosphates, ions, and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, David E

    2013-12-01

    The functional forms of many RNAs have compact architectures. The placement of phosphates within such structures must be influenced not only by the strong electrostatic repulsion between phosphates, but also by networks of interactions between phosphates, water, and mobile ions. This review first explores what has been learned of the basic thermodynamic constraints on these arrangements from studies of hydration and ions in simple DNA molecules, and then gives an overview of what is known about ion and water interactions with RNA structures. A brief survey of RNA crystal structures identifies several interesting architectures in which closely spaced phosphates share hydration shells or phosphates are buried in environments that provide intramolecular hydrogen bonds or site-bound cations. Formation of these structures must require strong coupling between the uptake of ions and release of water.

  5. Metal Phosphates as Proton Conducting Materials for Intermediate Temperature Fuel Cell and Electrolyser Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anfimova, Tatiana

    The present thesis presents the results achieved during my ph.d. project on a subject of intermediate temperature proton conducting metal phosphates as electrolyte materials for fuel cells and electrolysers. Fuel cells and electrolysers are electrochemical devices with high energy conversion...... with a proton conductivity of above 10-2S cm-1. Chapter 1 of the thesis is an introduction to basics of fuel cell and electrolyser technologies as well as proton conducting materials. Extended discussion on the proton conducting materials, a particularly phosphates is made in Chapter 2. Three major types...... of phosphates were systematically reviewed including solid acids or alkali hydrogen phosphates, pyrophosphates, and rare earth metal phosphates. Demonstration of the fuel cell technology based on solid acid proton conductor CsH2PO4 has inspired the active research in the area. Based on the literature survey...

  6. Time-Resolved Infrared Reflectance Studies of the Dehydration-Induced Transformation of Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate to the Trihydrate Form

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Timothy J.; Sweet, Lucas E.; Meier, David E.; Mausolf, Edward J.; Kim, Eunja; Weck, Philippe F.; Buck, Edgar C.; McNamara, Bruce K.

    2015-10-01

    Uranyl nitrate is a key species in the nuclear fuel cycle. However, this species is known to exist in different states of hydration, including the hexahydrate ([UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6] often called UNH), the trihydrate [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 or UNT], and in very dry environments the dihydrate form [UO2(NO3)2(H2O)2]. Their relative stabilities depend on both water vapor pressure and temperature. In the 1950s and 1960s the different phases were studied by infrared transmission spectroscopy, but were limited both by instrumental resolution and by the ability to prepare the samples for transmission. We have revisited this problem using time-resolved reflectance spectroscopy, which requires no sample preparation and allows dynamic analysis while the sample is exposed to a flow of N2 gas. Samples of known hydration state were prepared and confirmed via X-ray diffraction patterns of known species. In reflectance mode the hexahydrate UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 has a distinct uranyl asymmetric stretch band at 949.0 cm-1 that shifts to shorter wavelengths and broadens as the sample desiccates and recrystallizes to the trihydrate, first as a shoulder growing in on the blue edge but ultimately results in a doublet band with reflectance peaks at 966 and 957 cm-1. The data are consistent with transformation from UNH to UNT as UNT has two inequivalent UO22+ sites. The dehydration of UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 to UO2(NO3)2(H2O)3 is both a structural and morphological change that has the lustrous lime green UO2(NO3)2(H2O)6 crystals changing to the matte greenish yellow of the trihydrate solid. The phase transformation and crystal structures were confirmed by density functional theory calculations and optical microscopy methods, both of which showed a transformation with two distinct sites for the uranyl cation in the trihydrate, with but one in the hexahydrate.

  7. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  8. Light weight phosphate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Arun S.; Natarajan, Ramkumar,; Kahn, David

    2010-03-09

    A sealant having a specific gravity in the range of from about 0.7 to about 1.6 for heavy oil and/or coal bed methane fields is disclosed. The sealant has a binder including an oxide or hydroxide of Al or of Fe and a phosphoric acid solution. The binder may have MgO or an oxide of Fe and/or an acid phosphate. The binder is present from about 20 to about 50% by weight of the sealant with a lightweight additive present in the range of from about 1 to about 10% by weight of said sealant, a filler, and water sufficient to provide chemically bound water present in the range of from about 9 to about 36% by weight of the sealant when set. A porous ceramic is also disclosed.

  9. THERMODINAMIC PARAMETERS ON THE SORPTION OF PHOSPHATE IONS BY MONTMORILLONITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ikhsan Jaslin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The sorption of phosphate by montmorillonite at 10, 30, and 50 oC were investigated aiming to mainly determine thermodynamic parameters for the formation of surface complexes in the adsorption of phosphate ions by montmorillonite. Data were collected by adsorption edge experiments investigating the effect of pH, adsorption isotherms enabling the effect of sorbate concentration, and acid-base titration calculating protons released or taken up by adsorption process. Data analysis was carried out using surface complexation model to fit the data collected in this study using the parameters obtained from previous study, as well as to calculate the values of ΔH and ΔS. Previous study reported that phosphate ions formed two outer-sphere surface complexes with active sites of montmorillonite through hydrogen bonding. In the first complex,  [(XH0– H2L─]─, the phosphate was held to permanent-charge X─ sites on the tetrahedral siloxane faces, and the second complex, [[(SO─(SOH]– – [H2L]─] 2─ was formed through the interaction between the phosphate and variable charge surface hydroxyl groups at the edges of montmorillonite crystals and on the octahedral alumina faces. The values of ΔH for the first and second reactions are 39.756 and 3.765x10-7 kJ mol‒1 respectively. Since both reactions have positive enthalpy values, it can be concluded that the reactions are endothermic. Large energy for the first reaction is needed by X─  sites (permanent negatively charge sites of montmorillonite to be partially desolvated, on which K+ or other surface cations are replaced by H+ ions in the surface protonated process, and are then ready to interact phosphate ions in the solution. Small values of ΔH for the second reactions indicates that hydrogen bonds formed by phosphate and SOH sites in the second reaction are easily broken out, and the phosphate can easily desorbed from the surface. The values of ΔS for the first and second reactions are

  10. Crystallo-chemical analyses of calcium phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakae, Toshiro; Hayakawa, Tohru; Maruyama, Fumiaki; Nemoto, Kimiya; Kozawa, Yukishige [Nihon Univ., Matsudo, Chiba (Japan). School of Dentistry

    1997-12-01

    Several analytical techniques, methodology and their practical data processing were briefly described to investigate the crystallographic properties of calcium phosphates which are encountered in the field of dental sciences. The applied analytical techniques were X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XFS), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The used materials were tetracalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite, fluorapatite, {alpha}-tricalcium phosphate, {beta}-tricalcium phosphate, octacalcium phosphate, monetite, brushite and monocalcium phosphate monohydrate. (author)

  11. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

  12. Ethane 1-hydroxy-1, 1-diphosphonate (EHDP) counteracts the inhibitory effect of uranyl nitrate on bone formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ubios, A.M.; Guglielmotti, M.B. (Univ. of Buenos Aires (Argentina)); Cabrini, R.L. (Univ. of Buenos Aires (Argentina) National Atomic Energy Commission, Buenos Aires (Argentina))

    The beneficial effect of ethane 1-hydroxy-1, 1-diphosphonate (EHDP) in restoring the inhibition of bone formation in cases of acute uranium intoxication is presented. Bone formation was studied histomorphometrically in a model of alveolar bone healing. After tooth extraction, 40 rats were divided into 4 groups that received (1) no further treatment, (2) 10 daily intraperitoneal injections of 7.5 mg/kg of body weight of EHDP, (3) an intraperitoneal injection of 2.0 mg/kg of body weight of uranyl nitrate, and (4) the same treatment as was provided rats in groups 2 and 3. The results showed that the healing of bone did not occur in exposed animals, whereas healing in EHDP-treated exposed animals did not differ from that of nonexposed controls. This effect might result from a blocking and/or competitive action of EHDP and/or the stimulation that EHDP elicits at the doses and in the administration period studied.

  13. Solid state interaction studies on binary nitrate mixtures of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate and lanthanum nitrate hexahydrate at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalekar, Bhupesh; Raje, Naina; Reddy, A. V. R.

    2017-02-01

    Interaction behavior of uranyl nitrate hexahydrate (UNH) and lanthanum nitrate hexahydrate (LaNH) have been investigated on the mixtures in different molar ratios of the two precursors and monitoring the reactions at elevated temperatures with thermoanalytical and X-ray diffraction measurement techniques. During the decomposition of equimolar mixture of LaNH and UNH, formation of lanthanum uranate (U0.5La0.5)O2, was seen by the temperature of 500 °C along with lanthanum oxide (La2O3) and uranium trioxide (UO3). By the temperature of 700 °C, the formation of uranium sesquioxide (U3O8) was observed along with (U0.5La0.5)O2 as end products in uranium rich mixtures. Lanthanum rich compositions decomposed by the temperature of 700 °C to give (U0.5La0.5)O2 and La2O3 as end products.

  14. Radiation chemistry of cis-syn-cis dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6): Acidity and uranyl nitrate dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Draye, Micheline [Laboratoire de Chimie Moleculaire et Environnement (EA1651), Universite de Savoie-Polytech' Savoie, Campus Scientifique, 73376 Le Bourget du Lac Cedex (France)], E-mail: micheline.draye@univ-savoie.fr; Favre-Reguillon, Alain [Laboratoire de Chimie Organique (UMR7084), Conservatoire National des Arts et Metiers, 2 rue conte, 75003 Paris (France); Faure, Rene [Laboratoire des sciences analytiques, UMR CNRS 5180, Universite Claude Bernard, Lyon 1, 43 boulevard du 11 Novembre 1918, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Lemaire, Marc [Laboratoire de Catalyse et Synthese Organique, UMR CNRS 5246, Institut de Chimie et Biochimie Moleculaires et Supramoleculaires, Universite Lyon 1 CPE, 43 boulevard du 11 novembre 1918, Villeurbanne 69622 (France)

    2008-05-15

    The cis-syn-cis isomer of dicyclohexano-18-crown-6 (DCH18C6) has been shown to be an efficient extractant able to perform the separation of Pu(IV) and U(VI) from fission products and then the separation of Pu(IV) from U(VI) without valence exchange as required in the PUREX process. This macrocycle was irradiated in nitric acid with a {sup 137}Cs {gamma} source to study its radiation chemical stability. Radiation chemical yields (G) were determined by gas chromatography. The results show that the presence of uranyl nitrate has a strong influence on DCH18C6 radiation chemical stability. Indeed, the presence of this template ion increases the macrocycle stability by promoting fragments recombination.

  15. Sperm motility under exposure of hydrogen dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Evdokimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains research data on the effect of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide on human sperm motility and specific enzyme activity of sperms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. It is shown that incubation of sperms with hydrogen dioxide in a low concentration leads to a change and motility in sperm and activity of sperm enzyme. Intensity of observed effect depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide: active mobility increased by 17–19 % and the total mobility – 11 %. Motility changes in sperms were accompanied by increased activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by 24 %, in normozoospermia response was higher than in pathozoospermia and also depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide. The use of sperm analyzer enabled revealing changes in the diapason of different speeds of the active fraction of sperm, which have been observed in the first 15 min of incubation with hydrogen dioxide. A possible mechanism of action of the detected effect is discussed. Reactive oxygen species easily oxidize enzyme for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of sperms, which leads to a loss of sperm motility, for example, in varicocele. Initially low enzyme activity in varicocele (pathozoospermia may be associated with the suppression of sperm antioxidant defense. Addition of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide into sperm samples leads to an increase in the concentration of reduced glutathione in a cell. Increase of sperm motility in this case can serve as an indicator of normal operation of the cellular antioxidant defense system. Obtained experimental results provide a background for their introduction into clinical practice in the program of assisted reproductive technologies. 

  16. Sperm motility under exposure of hydrogen dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Evdokimov

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains research data on the effect of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide on human sperm motility and specific enzyme activity of sperms of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. It is shown that incubation of sperms with hydrogen dioxide in a low concentration leads to a change and motility in sperm and activity of sperm enzyme. Intensity of observed effect depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide: active mobility increased by 17–19 % and the total mobility – 11 %. Motility changes in sperms were accompanied by increased activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase by 24 %, in normozoospermia response was higher than in pathozoospermia and also depended on the concentration of hydrogen dioxide. The use of sperm analyzer enabled revealing changes in the diapason of different speeds of the active fraction of sperm, which have been observed in the first 15 min of incubation with hydrogen dioxide. A possible mechanism of action of the detected effect is discussed. Reactive oxygen species easily oxidize enzyme for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of sperms, which leads to a loss of sperm motility, for example, in varicocele. Initially low enzyme activity in varicocele (pathozoospermia may be associated with the suppression of sperm antioxidant defense. Addition of low concentrations of hydrogen dioxide into sperm samples leads to an increase in the concentration of reduced glutathione in a cell. Increase of sperm motility in this case can serve as an indicator of normal operation of the cellular antioxidant defense system. Obtained experimental results provide a background for their introduction into clinical practice in the program of assisted reproductive technologies. 

  17. Design and Construction of Experiment for Direct Electron Irradiation of Uranyl Sulfate Solution: Bubble Formation and Thermal Hydraulics Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chemerisov, Sergey [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Gromov, Roman [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Makarashvili, Vakho [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heltemes, Thad [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sun, Zaijing [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wardle, Kent E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bailey, James [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Quigley, Kevin [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Stepinski, Dominique [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vandegrift, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies in developing SHINE, a system for producing fission-product 99Mo using a D/T-accelerator to produce fission in a non-critical target solution of aqueous uranyl sulfate. We have developed an experimental setup for studying thermal-hydraulics and bubble formation in the uranyl sulfate solution to simulate conditions expected in the SHINE target solution during irradiation. A direct electron beam from the linac accelerator will be used to irradiate a 20 L solution (sector of the solution vessel). Because the solution will undergo radiolytic decomposition, we will be able to study bubble formation and dynamics and effects of convection and temperature on bubble behavior. These experiments will serve as a verification/ validation tool for the thermal-hydraulic model. Utilization of the direct electron beam for irradiation allows homogeneous heating of a large solution volume and simplifies observation of the bubble dynamics simultaneously with thermal-hydraulic data collection, which will complement data collected during operation of the miniSHINE experiment. Irradiation will be conducted using a 30-40 MeV electron beam from the high-power linac accelerator. The total electron-beam power will be 20 kW, which will yield a power density on the order of 1 kW/L. The solution volume will be cooled on the front and back surfaces and central tube to mimic the geometry of the proposed SHINE solution vessel. Also, multiple thermocouples will be inserted into the solution vessel to map thermal profiles. The experimental design is now complete, and installation and testing are in progress.

  18. Uranyl-glycine-water complexes in solution: comprehensive computational modeling of coordination geometries, stabilization energies, and luminescence properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jing; Zhang, Kai; Schwarz, W H Eugen; Li, Jun

    2011-03-21

    Comprehensive computational modeling of coordination structures, thermodynamic stabilities, and luminescence spectra of uranyl-glycine-water complexes [UO(2)(Gly)(n)aq(m)](2+) (Gly = glycine, aq = H(2)O, n = 0-2, m = 0-5) in aqueous solution has been carried out using relativistic density functional approaches. The solvent is approximated by a dielectric continuum model and additional explicit water molecules. Detailed pictures are obtained by synergic combination of experimental and theoretical data. The optimal equatorial coordination numbers of uranyl are determined to be five. The energies of several complex conformations are competitively close to each other. In non-basic solution the most probable complex forms are those with two water ligands replaced by the bidentate carboxyl groups of zwitterionic glycine. The N,O-chelation in non-basic solution is neither entropically nor enthalpically favored. The symmetric and antisymmetric stretch vibrations of the nearly linear O-U-O unit determine the luminescence features. The shapes of the vibrationally resolved experimental solution spectra are reproduced theoretically with an empirically fitted overall line-width parameter. The calculated luminescence origins correspond to thermally populated, near-degenerate groups of the lowest electronically excited states of (3)Δ(g) and (3)Φ(g) character, originating from (U-O)σ(u) → (U-5f)δ(u),ϕ(u) configurations of the linear [OUO](2+) unit. The intensity distributions of the vibrational progressions are consistent with U-O bond-length changes around 5 1/2 pm. The unusually high intensity of the short wavelength foot is explained by near-degeneracy of vibrationally and electronically excited states, and by intensity enhancement through the asymmetric O-U-O stretch mode. The combination of contemporary computational chemistry and experimental techniques leads to a detailed understanding of structures, thermodynamics, and luminescence of actinide compounds, including

  19. An experimental and ab initio study on the abiotic reduction of uranyl by ferrous iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S. D.; Marcano, M. C.; Rosso, K. M.; Becker, U.

    2015-05-01

    It is important to understand the mechanisms controlling the removal of uranyl from solution from an environmental standpoint, particularly whether soluble Fe(II) is capable of reducing soluble U(VI) to insoluble U(IV). Experiments were performed to shed light into discrepancies of recent studies about precipitation of U-containing solids without changing oxidation states versus precipitation/reduction reactions, especially with respect to the kinetics of these reactions. To understand the atomistic mechanisms, thermodynamics, and kinetics of these redox processes, ab initio electron transfer (ET) calculations, using Marcus theory, were applied to study the reduction of U(VI)aq to U(V)aq by Fe(II)aq (the first rate-limiting ET-step). Outer-sphere (OS) and inner-sphere (IS) Fe-U complexes were modeled to represent simple species within a homogeneous environment through which ET could occur. Experiments on the chemical reduction were performed by reacting 1 mM Fe(II)aq at pH 7.2 with high (i.e., 0.16 mM) and lower (i.e., 0.02 mM) concentrations of U(VI)aq. At higher U concentration, a rapid decrease in U(VI)aq was observed within the first hour of reaction. XRD and XPS analyses of the precipitates confirmed the presence of (meta)schoepite phases, where up to ∼25% of the original U was reduced to U4+ and/or U5+-containing phases. In contrast, at 0.02 mM U, the U(VI)aq concentration remained fairly constant for the first 3 h of reaction and only then began to decrease due to slower precipitation kinetics. XPS spectra confirm the partial chemical reduction U associated with the precipitate (up to ∼30%). Thermodynamic calculations support that the reduction of U(VI)aq to U(IV)aq by Fe(II)aq is energetically unfavorable. The batch experiments in this study show U(VI) is removed from solution by precipitation and that transitioning to a heterogeneous system in turn enables the solid U phase to be partially reduced. Ab initio ET calculations revealed that OS ET is

  20. Metallic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac; Zaghoo, Mohamed; Salamat, Ashkan

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is the simplest and most abundant element in the Universe. At high pressure it is predicted to transform to a metal with remarkable properties: room temperature superconductivity, a metastable metal at ambient conditions, and a revolutionary rocket propellant. Both theory and experiment have been challenged for almost 80 years to determine its condensed matter phase diagram, in particular the insulator-metal transition. Hydrogen is predicted to dissociate to a liquid atomic metal at multi-megabar pressures and T =0 K, or at megabar pressures and very high temperatures. Thus, its predicted phase diagram has a broad field of liquid metallic hydrogen at high pressure, with temperatures ranging from thousands of degrees to zero Kelvin. In a bench top experiment using static compression in a diamond anvil cell and pulsed laser heating, we have conducted measurements on dense hydrogen in the region of 1.1-1.7 Mbar and up to 2200 K. We observe a first-order phase transition in the liquid phase, as well as sharp changes in optical transmission and reflectivity when this phase is entered. The optical signature is that of a metal. The mapping of the phase line of this transition is in excellent agreement with recent theoretical predictions for the long-sought plasma phase transition to metallic hydrogen. Research supported by the NSF, Grant DMR-1308641, the DOE Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance Program, Grant DE-FG52-10NA29656, and NASA Earth and Space Science Fellowship Program, Award NNX14AP17H.

  1. Triphenyl phosphate allergy from spectacle frames

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Lars; Andersen, Klaus E.; Egsgaard, Helge

    1986-01-01

    A case of triphenyl phosphate allergy from spectacle frames is reported. Patch tests with analytical grade triphenyl phosphate, tri-m-cresyl phosphate, and tri-p-cresyl phosphate in the concentrations 5%, 0.5% and 0.05% pet. showed positive reactions to 0.05% triphenyl phosphate and 0.5% tri......-m-cresyl phosphate, but no reaction to tri-p-cresyl phosphate. Gas chromatography of the tricresyl phosphate 5% pet. patch test material supplied from Trolab showed that it contained a mixture of a wide range of triaryl phosphates, including 0.08% triphenyl phosphate which is above the threshold for detecting...... triphenyl phosphate allergy in our patient....

  2. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canillas, M.; Pena, P.; Aza, A.H. de; Rodriguez, M.A.

    2017-07-01

    The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies. (Author)

  3. Variability of nitrate and phosphate

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sardessai, S.; Sundar, D.

    Nitrate and phosphate are important elements of the biogeochemical system of an estuary. Observations carried out during the dry season April-May 2002, and March 2003 and wet season September 2002, show temporal and spatial variability of these two...

  4. Recent advances in phosphate biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Lata Sheo Bachan; Verma, Nishant

    2015-07-01

    A number of biosensors have been developed for phosphate analysis particularly, concerning its negative impact within the environmental and biological systems. Enzymatic biosensors comprising either a single or multiple enzymatic system have been extensively used for the direct and indirect analysis of phosphate ions. Furthermore, some non-enzymatic biosensors, such as affinity-based biosensors, provide an alternative analytical approach with a higher selectivity. This article reviews the recent advances in the field of biosensor developed for phosphate estimation in clinical and environmental samples, concerning the techniques involved, and the sensitivity toward phosphate ions. The biosensors have been classified and discussed on the basis of the number of enzymes used to develop the analytical system, and a comparative analysis has been performed.

  5. Luminescent properties of [UO{sub 2}(TFA){sub 2}(DMSO){sub 3}], a promising material for sensing and monitoring the uranyl ion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin-Ramos, Pablo; Silva, Manuela Ramos; Silva, Pedro S. Pereira da [Centro de Fisica da Universidade de Coimbra (CFisUC), Department of Physics, Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal); Costa, Ana L.; Melo, J. Sergio Seixas de [Centro de Quimica de Coimbra, Department of Chemistry, Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal); Pereira, Laura C.J. [Centro de Ciencias e Tecnologias Nucleares, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Martin-Gil, Jesus, E-mail: pmr@unizar.es [Advanced Materials Laboratory, Escuela Tecnica Superior de Ingenierias Agrarias, University of Valladolid, Palencia (Spain)

    2016-03-15

    An uranyl complex [UO{sub 2}(TFA){sub 2}(DMSO){sub 3}] (TFA=deprotonated trifluoroacetic acid; DMSO=dimethyl sulfoxide) has been successfully synthesized by reacting UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} ·H{sub 2} O with one equivalent of (CF{sub 3} CO){sub 2} O and DMSO. The complex has been characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, X-ray powder diffraction, elemental analysis, FTIR spectroscopy, thermal analysis and absorption and emission spectroscopies. The spectroscopic properties of the material make it suitable for its application in the sensing and monitoring of uranyl in the PUREX process. (author)

  6. Enhanced effects of nonisotopic hafnium chloride in methanol as a substitute for uranyl acetate in TEM contrast of ultrastructure of fungal and plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Ken-Ichi; Inoue, Kanako; Kanematsu, Satoko; Horiuchi, Yoshitaka; Park, Pyoyun

    2011-09-01

    This ultrastructural study showed that nonisotopic methanolic hafnium chloride and aqueous lead solution was an excellent new electron stain for enhancing TEM contrasts of fungal and plant cell structures. The ultrastructural definition provided by the new stain was often superior to that provided by conventional staining with uranyl acetate and lead. Definition of fine ultrastructure was also supported by quantitative data on TEM contrast ratios of organelles and components in fungal and plant cells. In particular, polysaccharides, which were localized in cell walls, glycogen particles, starch grains, and plant Golgi vesicle components, were much more reactive to the new stain than to the conventional one. The new nonisotopic stain is useful for enhancing the contrast of ultrastructure in biological tissues and is a safer alternative to uranyl acetate. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. 21 CFR 573.320 - Diammonium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Diammonium phosphate. 573.320 Section 573.320 Food... Additive Listing § 573.320 Diammonium phosphate. The food additive diammonium phosphate may be safely used... crude protein from diammonium phosphate, adequate directions for use and a prominent statement,...

  8. 21 CFR 184.1434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... solution of magnesite with phosphoric acid. (b) Magnesium phosphate, dibasic, meets the specifications of... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium phosphate. 184.1434 Section 184.1434 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Magnesium phosphate includes...

  9. FORMATION OF PHOSPHATE-CONTAINING CALCIUM-FLUORIDE AT THE EXPENSE OF ENAMEL, HYDROXYAPATITE AND FLUORAPATITE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHRISTOFFERSEN, J; CHRISTOFFERSEN, MR; ARENDS, J; LEONARDSEN, ES

    1995-01-01

    During the caries process complex reactions involving calcium, phosphate, hydrogen and fluoride ions as main species take place. In this study the precipitation and dissolution reactions occurring in suspensions of enamel, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and fluorapatite (FAP) on addition of fluoride were inve

  10. FORMATION OF PHOSPHATE-CONTAINING CALCIUM-FLUORIDE AT THE EXPENSE OF ENAMEL, HYDROXYAPATITE AND FLUORAPATITE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHRISTOFFERSEN, J; CHRISTOFFERSEN, MR; ARENDS, J; LEONARDSEN, ES

    1995-01-01

    During the caries process complex reactions involving calcium, phosphate, hydrogen and fluoride ions as main species take place. In this study the precipitation and dissolution reactions occurring in suspensions of enamel, hydroxyapatite (HAP) and fluorapatite (FAP) on addition of fluoride were

  11. Preliminary Assessment of Potential for Metal-Ligand Speciation in Aqueous Solution via the Liquid Sampling-Atmospheric Pressure Glow Discharge (LS-APGD) Ionization Source: Uranyl Acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lynn X; Manard, Benjamin T; Powell, Brian A; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2015-07-21

    The determination of metals, including the generation of metal-ligand speciation information, is essential across a myriad of biochemical, environmental, and industrial systems. Metal speciation is generally affected by the combination of some form of chromatographic separation (reflective of the metal-ligand chemistry) with element-specific detection for the quantification of the metal composing the chromatographic eluent. Thus, the identity of the metal-ligand is assigned by inference. Presented here, the liquid sampling-atmospheric pressure glow discharge (LS-APGD) is assessed as an ionization source for metal speciation, with the uranyl ion-acetate system used as a test system. Molecular mass spectra can be obtained from the same source by simple modification of the sustaining electrolyte solution. Specifically, chemical information pertaining to the degree of acetate complexation of uranyl ion (UO2(2+)) is assessed as a function of pH in the spectral abundance of three metallic species: inorganic (nonligated) uranyl, UO2Ac(H2O)n(MeOH)m(+), and UO2Ac2(H2O)n(MeOH)(m)H(+) (n = 1, 2, 3, ...; m = 1, 2, 3, ...). The product mass spectra are different from what are obtained from electrospray ionization sources that have been applied to this system. The resulting relationships between the speciation and pH values have been compared to calculated concentrations of the corresponding uranyl species: UO2(2+), UO2Ac(+), UO2Ac2. The capacity for the LS-APGD to affect both atomic mass spectra and structurally significant spectra for organometallic complexes is a unique and potentially powerful combination.

  12. Uranyl complexes formed with a para-t-butylcalix[4]arene bearing phosphinoyl pendant arms on the lower rim. Solid and solution studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, F. de M. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac (Mexico). Dept. de Quimica; Varbanov, S. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (Bulgaria). Inst. of Organic Chemistry with Center of Phytochemistry; Buenzli, J.C.G. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) (Switzerland). Inst. of Chemical Sciences and Engineering; Rivas-Silva, J.F.; Ocana-Bribiesca, M.A. [Instituto de Fisica de la BUAP, Puebla (Mexico); Cortes-Jacome, M.A.; Toledo-Antonio, J.A. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo/Programa de Ingenieria Molecular (Mexico)

    2012-07-01

    The current interest in functionalized calixarenes with phosphorylated pendant arms resides in their coordination ability towards f elements and capability towards actinide/rare earth separation. Uranyl cation forms 1:1 and 1:2 (M:L) complexes with a tetra-phosphinoylated p-tert-butylcalix[4]arene, B{sub 4}bL{sup 4}: UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(B{sub 4}bL{sup 4}){sub n} . xH{sub 2}O (n = 1, x = 2, 1; n = 2, x = 6, 2). Spectroscopic data point to the inner coordination sphere of 1 containing one monodentate nitrate anion, one water molecule and the four phosphinoylated arms bound to UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} while in 2, uranyl is only coordinated to calixarene ligands. In both cases the U(VI) ion is 8-coordinate. Uranyl complexes display enhanced metal-centred luminescence due to energy transfer from the calixarene ligands; the luminescence decays are bi-exponential with associated lifetimes in the ranges 220 {mu}s < {tau}{sub s} < 250 {mu}s and 630 {mu}s < {tau}{sub L} < 640 {mu}s, pointing to the presence of two species with differently coordinated calixarene, as substantiated by a XPS study of U(4f{sub 5/2,7/2}), O(1s) and P(2p) levels on solid state samples. The extraction study of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} cation and trivalent rare-earth (Y, La, Eu) ions from acidic nitrate media by B{sub 4}bL{sup 4} in chloroform shows the uranyl cation being much more extracted than rare earths. (orig.)

  13. Novel Hydrogen Bioreactor and Detection Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollin, Joseph A; Ye, Xinhao; Del Campo, Julia Martin; Adams, Michael W W; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2016-01-01

    In vitro hydrogen generation represents a clear opportunity for novel bioreactor and system design. Hydrogen, already a globally important commodity chemical, has the potential to become the dominant transportation fuel of the future. Technologies such as in vitro synthetic pathway biotransformation (SyPaB)-the use of more than 10 purified enzymes to catalyze unnatural catabolic pathways-enable the storage of hydrogen in the form of carbohydrates. Biohydrogen production from local carbohydrate resources offers a solution to the most pressing challenges to vehicular and bioenergy uses: small-size distributed production, minimization of CO2 emissions, and potential low cost, driven by high yield and volumetric productivity. In this study, we introduce a novel bioreactor that provides the oxygen-free gas phase necessary for enzymatic hydrogen generation while regulating temperature and reactor volume. A variety of techniques are currently used for laboratory detection of biohydrogen, but the most information is provided by a continuous low-cost hydrogen sensor. Most such systems currently use electrolysis for calibration; here an alternative method, flow calibration, is introduced. This system is further demonstrated here with the conversion of glucose to hydrogen at a high rate, and the production of hydrogen from glucose 6-phosphate at a greatly increased reaction rate, 157 mmol/L/h at 60 °C.

  14. Uranyl ion interaction at the water/NiO(100) interface: A predictive investigation by first-principles molecular dynamic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sebbari, Karim [EDF-R and D, Departement Materiaux et Mecanique des Composants, Les Renardieres, Ecuelles, 77818 Moret Sur Loing (France); Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS UMR 8608, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, Batiment 100, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Roques, Jerome; Simoni, Eric [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, Universite Paris-Sud, CNRS UMR 8608, 15 rue Georges Clemenceau, Batiment 100, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Domain, Christophe [EDF-R and D, Departement Materiaux et Mecanique des Composants, Les Renardieres, Ecuelles, 77818 Moret Sur Loing (France)

    2012-10-28

    The behavior of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} uranyl ion at the water/NiO(100) interface was investigated for the first time using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamic simulations with the spin polarized DFT +U extension. A water/NiO(100) interface model was first optimized on a defect-free five layers slab thickness, proposed as a reliable surface model, with an explicit treatment of the solvent. Water molecules are adsorbed with a well-defined structure in a thickness of about 4 A above the surface. The first layer, adsorbed on nickel atoms, remains mainly in molecular form but can partly dissociate at 293 K. Considering low acidic conditions, a bidentate uranyl ion complex was characterized on two surface oxygen species (arising from water molecules adsorption on nickel atoms) with d{sub U-O{sub a{sub d{sub s{sub o{sub r{sub p{sub t{sub i{sub o{sub n}}}}}}}}}}}=2.39 A. This complex is stable at 293 K due to iono-covalent bonds with an estimated charge transfer of 0.58 electron from the surface to the uranyl ion.

  15. Uranyl ion interaction at the water/NiO(100) interface: a predictive investigation by first-principles molecular dynamic simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebbari, Karim; Roques, Jérôme; Domain, Christophe; Simoni, Eric

    2012-10-28

    The behavior of the UO(2)(2+) uranyl ion at the water/NiO(100) interface was investigated for the first time using Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamic simulations with the spin polarized DFT + U extension. A water/NiO(100) interface model was first optimized on a defect-free five layers slab thickness, proposed as a reliable surface model, with an explicit treatment of the solvent. Water molecules are adsorbed with a well-defined structure in a thickness of about 4 Å above the surface. The first layer, adsorbed on nickel atoms, remains mainly in molecular form but can partly dissociate at 293 K. Considering low acidic conditions, a bidentate uranyl ion complex was characterized on two surface oxygen species (arising from water molecules adsorption on nickel atoms) with d(U-O(adsorption))=2.39 Å. This complex is stable at 293 K due to iono-covalent bonds with an estimated charge transfer of 0.58 electron from the surface to the uranyl ion.

  16. Hydrogen as a fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    A panel of the Committee on Advanced Energy Storage Systems of the Assembly of Engineering has examined the status and problems of hydrogen manufacturing methods, hydrogen transmission and distribution networks, and hydrogen storage systems. This examination, culminating at a time when rapidly changing conditions are having noticeable impact on fuel and energy availability and prices, was undertaken with a view to determining suitable criteria for establishing the pace, timing, and technical content of appropriate federally sponsored hydrogen R and D programs. The increasing urgency to develop new sources and forms of fuel and energy may well impact on the scale and timing of potential future hydrogen uses. The findings of the panel are presented. Chapters are devoted to hydrogen sources, hydrogen as a feedstock, hydrogen transport and storage, hydrogen as a heating fuel, automotive uses of hydrogen, aircraft use of hydrogen, the fuel cell in hydrogen energy systems, hydrogen research and development evaluation, and international hydrogen programs.

  17. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  18. Recognizing the Effects of Terrestrial Contamination on D/H Ratios in Shergottite Phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, D. K.; Ito, M.; Hervig, R.; Rao, M. N.; Nyquist, L. E.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope ratios in shergottite phosphate minerals have been investigated by SIMS in the meteorites Queen Alexandra Range (QUE) 94201 and Los Angeles. We have also collected electron probe data on these phosphates in order to characterize the phosphate minerals and attempt to document any potential hydrogen isotopic differences between chlor-apatite and whitlockite. In the section of Los Angeles we studied (748), we found both chlor-apatite and whitlockite, but in the section of QUE 94201,38 studied, we found only whitlockite. In both meteorites, D/H ratios (expressed in units of delta D (sub SMOW) vary, from terrestrial values up to approximately 5400%o in QUE 94201, and to approximately 3800%o in Los Angeles. We have carefully examined the ion probed pits with high-resolution FE-SEM. In most cases where the D/H ratios are low, we have iden-tified cracks that instersect the ion probe pit. These cracks are not visible in the optical microscope attached to the SIMS instument, making them impossible to avoid during SIMS data collection. We contend that the low ratios are a function of substantial terrestrial contamination, and that similar contamination is a likely factor in previously published studies on D/H ratios in martian phosphates. Here we highlight the difficulty of attempts to constrain the martian mantle D/H ratio using phosphate data, given that both terrestrial contamination and martian mantle hydrogen will move phosphate D/H ratios in the same direction, toward lower values. We note that our data include some of the most deuterium-rich values ever reported for martian phosphates. It is clear that some of our measurements are only minimally or totally uncontaminated, but the question arises, are intermediate values diminished because of true martian variability, or do they reflect contamination?

  19. Thermally highly stable amorphous zinc phosphate intermediates during the formation of zinc phosphate hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, Sven; Celinski, Vinicius R; Dietzsch, Michael; Panthöfer, Martin; Bienert, Ralf; Emmerling, Franziska; Schmedt auf der Günne, Jörn; Tremel, Wolfgang

    2015-02-18

    The mechanisms by which amorphous intermediates transform into crystalline materials are still poorly understood. Here we attempt to illuminate the formation of an amorphous precursor by investigating the crystallization process of zinc phosphate hydrate. This work shows that amorphous zinc phosphate (AZP) nanoparticles precipitate from aqueous solutions prior to the crystalline hopeite phase at low concentrations and in the absence of additives at room temperature. AZP nanoparticles are thermally stable against crystallization even at 400 °C (resulting in a high temperature AZP), but they crystallize rapidly in the presence of water if the reaction is not interrupted. X-ray powder diffraction with high-energy synchrotron radiation, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and small-angle X-ray scattering showed the particle size (≈20 nm) and confirmed the noncrystallinity of the nanoparticle intermediates. Energy dispersive X-ray, infrared, and Raman spectroscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, and optical emission spectrometry as well as thermal analysis were used for further compositional characterization of the as synthesized nanomaterial. (1)H solid-state NMR allowed the quantification of the hydrogen content, while an analysis of (31)P{(1)H} C rotational echo double resonance spectra permitted a dynamic and structural analysis of the crystallization pathway to hopeite.

  20. Synthesis of nanocrystalline calcium phosphate in microemulsion--effect of nature of surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sujata; Bhardwaj, Pallavi; Singh, V; Aggarwal, S; Mandal, U K

    2008-03-01

    Nanosized calcium phosphate (CP) powders have been synthesized by an inverse microemulsion system using kerosene as the oil phase, a cationic surfactant Aliquat 336, a non-ionic surfactant Tween 20 and their mixture and aqueous solutions of calcium nitrate tetrahydrate and biammonium hydrogen phosphate as the water phase. It has been found that the nature of surfactants played an important role to regulate the size and morphologies of the calcium phosphate nanoparticles. The cationic surfactant Aliquat 336 has been found to regulate the nucleation and crystal growth. The synthesized powders have been comprehensively characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Our results show that the brushite (DCPD) is the major phase comprising the calcium phosphate nanoparticles. In mixed surfactants mediated system a morphological controlled highly crystalline particles have been synthesized. Further, the role of Aliquat 336 has been established and a plausible synthetic mechanism has been proposed.

  1. A Nuclear Reactor and Chemical Processing Design for Production of Molybdenum-99 with Crystalline Uranyl Nitrate Hexahydrate Fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Gary Michael

    Medical radioisotopes are used in tens of millions of procedures every year to detect and image a wide variety of maladies and conditions in the human body. The most widely-used diagnostic radioisotope is technetium-99m, a metastable isomer of technetium-99 that is generated by the radioactive decay of molybdenum-99. For a number of reasons, the supply of molybdenum-99 has become unreliable and the techniques used to produce it have become unattractive. This has spurred the investigation of new technologies that avoid the use of highly enriched uranium to produce molybdenum-99 in the United States, where approximately half of the demand originates. The first goal of this research is to develop a critical nuclear reactor design powered by solid, discrete pins of low enriched uranium. Analyses of single-pin heat transfer and whole-core neutronics are performed to determine the required specifications. Molybdenum-99 is produced directly in the fuel of this reactor and then extracted through a series of chemical processing steps. After this extraction, the fuel is left in an aqueous state. The second goal of this research is to describe a process by which the uranium may be recovered from this spent fuel solution and reconstituted into the original fuel form. Fuel recovery is achieved through a crystallization step that generates solid uranyl nitrate hexahydrate while leaving the majority of fission products and transuranic isotopes in solution. This report provides background information on molybdenum-99 production and crystallization chemistry. The previously unknown thermal conductivity of the fuel material is measured. Following this is a description of the modeling and calculations used to develop a reactor concept. The operational characteristics of the reactor core model are analyzed and reported. Uranyl nitrate crystallization experiments have also been conducted, and the results of this work are presented here. Finally, a process flow scheme for uranium

  2. The key role of U{sub 28} in the aqueous self-assembly of uranyl peroxide nanocages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falaise, Clement; Nyman, May [Energy Frontier Research Center, Materials Science of Actinides, Department of Chemistry, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2016-10-04

    For 11 years now, the structural diversity and aesthetic beauty of uranyl-peroxide capsules have fascinated researchers from the diverse fields of mineralogy, polyoxometalate chemistry, and nuclear fuel technologies. There is still much to be learned about the mechanisms of the self-assembly process, and the role of solution parameters including pH, alkali template, temperature, time, and others. Here we have exploited the high solubility of the UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/LiOH aqueous system to address the effect of the hydroxide concentration. Important techniques of this study are single-crystal X-ray diffraction, small-angle X-ray scattering, and Raman spectroscopy. Three key phases dominate the solution speciation as a function of time and the LiOH/UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} ratio: the uranyl-triperoxide monomer [UO{sub 2}(O{sub 2}){sub 3}]{sup 4-}and the two capsules [(UO{sub 2})(O{sub 2})(OH)]{sub 24}{sup 24-}(U{sub 24}) and [(UO{sub 2})(O{sub 2}){sub 1.5}]{sub 28}{sup 28-}(U{sub 28}). When the LiOH/U ratio is around three, U{sub 28} forms rapidly and this cluster can be isolated in high yield and purity. This result was most surprising and challenges the hypothesis that alkali templating is the most important determinant in the cluster geometry. Moreover, analogous experiments with KOH, NH{sub 4}OH, and TEAOH (TEA=tetraethylammonium) also rapidly yield U{sub 28}, which suggests that U{sub 28} is the kinetically favored species. Complete mapping of the pH-time phase space reveals only a narrow window of the U{sub 28} dominance, which is why it was previously overlooked as an important kinetic species in this chemical system, as well as others with different counterions. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Effectiveness of nano-calcium phosphate paste on sensitivity during and after bleaching: a randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    LOGUERCIO, Alessandro Dourado; Lidia Yileng TAY; HERRERA,Daniel Rodrigo; Bauer,Jose; Reis, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of in-office bleaching and associated tooth sensitivity on application of nano-calcium phosphate paste as desensitizing agent. Bleaching was performed with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel in 40 patients who were randomly divided into placebo and nano-calcium phosphate paste groups. Bleaching efficacy (BE) was evaluated using a value-oriented Vita shade guide. Tooth sensitivity was recorded using a numeric rating scale (0–4) during bleaching and up...

  4. Surface chemistry studies of phosphate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Amy Suzanne

    This research examined the surface of an undoped and rare-earth doped sodium alumino metaphosphate glass after fracture or surface finishing and subsequent exposure to humid and aqueous environments. In addition, the adsorption of aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APS), and the dominant parameters controlling the structure of the deposited film, were studied. Typically, commercial glasses must be cut and polished into optical components for engineering applications. This process involves a series of aqueous treatments in both acidic and basic media. The experiments performed here on aluminophosphate glass showed that this results in dissolution, surface composition changes (depletion of Na) and surface pitting. In both alkaline detergent and acid etching solution, dissolution at a rate of approximately 4 x 10 -3 mol/m2/hr (0.2 mum/hr) occurs along with a drastic alteration of the surface morphology. When exposed to an environment of elevated humidity and temperature for an extended period of time, this aluminophosphate glass was observed to break down, forming a soluble phosphate gel that dissolves away from the surface. Simultaneously, the surface became enriched in silica, a trace contaminant in the glass, which eventually precipitated and coalesced into a dendritic pattern that covered the surface. The freshly powdered phosphate glass was found to contain surface hydroxyls weakly associated with one another, and some bound by a stronger hydrogen bond, likely to adjacent non-bridging oxygens. Most of these hydroxyls could be desorbed upon heating above the glass transition temperature to leave only a small concentration of weakly associated hydroxyls and free hydroxyls on the surface. The characterization of hydroxyls and water on the phosphate glass surface was used to understand the adsorption of aminopropyl tri-ethoxysilane (APS) also through the use of in-situ DRIFTS. The concentration of adsorbed APS was found to be independent of solution pH, but the measured

  5. Formation of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate by isomerization from phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate.

    OpenAIRE

    Walsh, J P; Caldwell, K K; Majerus, P W

    1991-01-01

    We have synthesized phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate from phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate by using diisopropylcarbodiimide to promote migration of the 4-phosphate via a cyclic phosphodiester intermediate. The product was isolated by a thin-layer chromatographic method that depends on the ability of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, but not phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, to form complexes with boric acid. The final yield of the procedure was 8% phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate, which was a...

  6. Temperature effects on the interaction mechanisms between the europium (III) and uranyl ions and zirconium diphosphate; Effets de la temperature sur les mecanismes d'interaction entre les ions europium (3) et uranyle et le diphosphate de zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Finck, N

    2006-10-15

    Temperature should remain higher than 25 C in the near field environment of a nuclear waste repository for thousands years. In this context, the aim of this work is to study the temperature influence on the interaction mechanisms between europium (III) and uranyl ions and zirconium diphosphate, as well as the influence of a complexing medium (nitrate) on the sorption of the lanthanide. The experimental definition of the equilibria was achieved by combining a structural investigation with the macroscopic sorption data. Surface complexes were characterized at all temperatures (25 C to 90 C) by TRLFS experiments carried out on dry and in situ samples using an oven. This characterization was completed by XPS experiments carried out at 25 C on samples prepared at 25 C and 90 C. The reaction constants (surface hydration and cations sorption) were obtained by simulating the experimental data with the constant capacitance surface complexation model. The reaction constants temperature dependency allowed one to characterize thermodynamically the different reactions by application of the van't Hoff relation. The validity of this law was tested by performing microcalorimetric measurements of the sorption heat for both cations. (author)

  7. Decontamination of liquid radioactive waste by thorium phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousselle, J.; Grandjean, S.; Dacheux, N.; Genet, M

    2004-07-01

    In the field of the complete reexamination of the chemistry of thorium phosphate and of the improvement of the homogeneity of Thorium Phosphate Diphosphate (TPD, Th{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}) prepared at high temperature, several crystallized compounds were prepared as initial powdered precursors. Due to the very low solubility products associated to these phases, their use in the field of the efficient decontamination of high-level radioactive liquid waste containing actinides (An) was carefully considered. Two main processes (called 'oxalate' and 'hydrothermal' chemical routes) were developed through a new concept combining the decontamination of liquid waste and the immobilization of the actinides in a ceramic matrix (TPD). In phosphoric media ('hydrothermal route'), the key-precursor was the Thorium Phosphate Hydrogen Phosphate hydrate (Th{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(HPO{sub 4}). H{sub 2}O, TPHP, solubility product log(K{sub S,0}{sup 0}) {approx} - 67). The replacement of thorium by other tetravalent actinides (U, Np, Pu) in the structure, leading to the preparation of Th{sub 2-x/2}An{sub x/2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(HPO{sub 4}). H{sub 2}O solid solutions, was examined. A second method was also considered in parallel to illustrate this concept using the more well-known precipitation of oxalate as the initial decontamination step. For this method, the final transformation to single phase TPD containing actinides was purchased by heating a mixture of phosphate ions with the oxalate precipitate at high temperature. (authors)

  8. [Phosphate metabolism and iron deficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, Keitaro

    2016-02-01

    Autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets(ADHR)is caused by gain-of-function mutations in FGF23 that prevent its proteolytic cleavage. Fibroblast growth factor 23(FGF23)is a hormone that inhibits renal phosphate reabsorption and 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D biosynthesis. Low iron status plays a role in the pathophysiology of ADHR. Iron deficiency is an environmental trigger that stimulates FGF23 expression and hypophosphatemia in ADHR. It was reported that FGF23 elevation in patients with CKD, who are often iron deficient. In patients with nondialysis-dependent CKD, treatment with ferric citrate hydrate resulted in significant reductions in serum phosphate and FGF23.

  9. Synthesis, structure, luminescence and photocatalytic properties of an uranyl-2,5-pyridinedicarboxylate coordination polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Zhen-Xiu; Xu, Wei; Zheng, Yue-Qing

    2016-07-01

    An uranium coordination polymer, namely [(UO2(pydc)(H2O)]·H2O (1) (H2pydc=2,5-pyridinedicarboxylic acid), has been obtained by hydrothermal method and characterized by X-ray single crystal structure determination. Structural analysis reveals that complex 1 exhibits 1D chain coordination polymer, in which UO22+ ions are bridged by 2,5-pyridinedicarboxylate ligands and the chains are connected into a 3D supramolecular network by O-H···O hydrogen bond interactions and π-π stacking interactions. The photocatalytic properties of 1 for degradation of methylene blue (MB), Rhodamine B (RhB) and methyl orange (MO) under Hg-lamp irradiation have been performed, and the amount of the catalyst as well as Hg-lamp irradiation with different power on the photodegradation efficiency of MB have been investigated. Elemental analyses, infrared spectroscopy, TG-DTA analyses and luminescence properties were also discussed.

  10. Grain-Size Based Additivity Models for Scaling Multi-rate Uranyl Surface Complexation in Subsurface Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Chongxuan; Hu, Bill X.; Hu, Qinhong

    2016-07-31

    The additivity model assumed that field-scale reaction properties in a sediment including surface area, reactive site concentration, and reaction rate can be predicted from field-scale grain-size distribution by linearly adding reaction properties estimated in laboratory for individual grain-size fractions. This study evaluated the additivity model in scaling mass transfer-limited, multi-rate uranyl (U(VI)) surface complexation reactions in a contaminated sediment. Experimental data of rate-limited U(VI) desorption in a stirred flow-cell reactor were used to estimate the statistical properties of the rate constants for individual grain-size fractions, which were then used to predict rate-limited U(VI) desorption in the composite sediment. The result indicated that the additivity model with respect to the rate of U(VI) desorption provided a good prediction of U(VI) desorption in the composite sediment. However, the rate constants were not directly scalable using the additivity model. An approximate additivity model for directly scaling rate constants was subsequently proposed and evaluated. The result found that the approximate model provided a good prediction of the experimental results within statistical uncertainty. This study also found that a gravel-size fraction (2 to 8 mm), which is often ignored in modeling U(VI) sorption and desorption, is statistically significant to the U(VI) desorption in the sediment.

  11. Entangled Uranyl Organic Frameworks with (10,3)-b Topology and Polythreading Network: Structure, Luminescence, and Computational Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Gao, Chao-Ying; Yang, Weiting; Chen, Fang-Yuan; Pan, Qing-Jiang; Li, Jiyang; Sun, Zhong-Ming

    2016-06-06

    Two 3D uranyl organic frameworks (UOFs) with entangled structures, (HPhen)2[(UO2)2L2]·4.5H2O (1) and [(UO2)3(H2O)4L2]·6H2O (2), were synthesized using a rigid tripodal linker (4,4',4″-(phenylsilanetriyl)tribenzoic acid, H3L). Compound 1 represents a 2-fold interpenetrating UOF with the unique (10,3)-b topology. Compound 2 is composed of three interlocked sets of identical singlet networks and thus exhibits a rare 3D polythreading network with (3,4)-connected topology. These two compounds have been characterized by IR, UV-vis, and photoluminescent spectroscopy. A density functional theory (DFT) study on the model compounds of 1 and 2 shows good agreement of structural parameters and U═O stretching vibrational frequencies with experimental data. The experimentally measured absorption bands were well reproduced by the time-dependent DFT calculations.

  12. Nanoscale UO{sub 2} and novel complex U(IV)-sulphate phase formation from electrolytically reduced uranyl sulphate solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gil, D.; Malmbeck, R.; Spino, J.; Fanghaenel, T. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Inst. for Transuranium Elements, Karlsruhe (Germany); Dinnebier, R. [Max Planck Inst. for Solid State Research, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Three different processes have been explored to determine the ranges of U-concentration and acidity (pH-value) for nanocrystalline U{sub 2+x} precipitation from electrolytically reduced uranyl sulphate solutions. Precipitation of U{sub 2+x} nanoparticles aggregates was found to occur only in the narrow range of pH {proportional_to} 4.5 to 5 and for U-concentrations of {proportional_to} 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -7} M. The solid phase crystallized with the typical UO{sub 2}-fcc structure and with a crystallite size {<=} 3 nm. The average aggregate size was mostly {<=} 80 nm. At higher U-concentrations, ranging from [U] {proportional_to} 10{sup -1} M at pH {proportional_to} 1.5 to [U] {proportional_to} 5 x 10{sup -4} M at pH {proportional_to} 4.9, formation of microscale precipitates of a novel complex U(IV)-sulphate phase occurred, which was characterized by SEM/EDX-WDX, ICP-OES and XRD-powder diffraction. The crystal structure was identified with an orthorhombic cell (space group Cmca), with the following lattice parameters: a = 1.974(0)(2) nm, b = 1.3336(2) nm and c = 2.0643(2) nm. Further composition analyses indicated a basic sulphate hydrate of the type Na{sub 3}U(SO{sub 4}){sub 3}(OH).nH{sub 2}O. (orig.)

  13. Adsorption characteristics of uranyl ions onto micelle surface for treatment of radioactive liquid wastes by micelle enhanced ultrafiltration technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K. W.; Choi, W. K.; Jeong, K. H.; Lee, D. K.; Jeong, K. J. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-10-01

    The objective of this investigation is to establish the rejection behavior of uranium bearing waste water by micelle enhanced ultrafiltration technique. An extensive experimental investigation was conducted with uranium only and uranium in the presence of electrolyte, utilizing ultrasfiltration stirred cell. The effects of experimental parameters such as solution pH and concentration of uranium on rejection were examined from the change of micelle concentration. The rejection dependence of the uranium was found to be a function of pH and uranium to surfactant concentration ratio. Over 95% removal was observed at pH 3 {approx} 5 and SDS concentration of 40 mM. In the presence of electrolytes, the rejection of uranium was observed to decrease significantly, the addition of cobalt ion showed more reduction than that obtained by presence of sodium and cesium ions on rejection of uranium. The rejection behavior was explained in terms of apparent distribution constants. The rejection efficiencies of uranyl ions was significantly affected by the chemical species of the given system. For all cases, the rejection was highly dependent on uranium complex species.

  14. Toward equatorial planarity about uranyl: synthesis and structure of tridentate nitrogen-donor {UO2}2+ complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copping, Roy; Jeon, Byoungseon; Pemmaraju, C Das; Wang, Shuao; Teat, Simon J; Janousch, Markus; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Canning, Andrew; Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Prendergast, David; Shuh, David K

    2014-03-01

    The reaction of UO2Cl2·3THF with the tridentate nitrogen donor ligand 2,6-bis(2-benzimidazolyl)pyridine (H2BBP) in pyridine leads to the formation of three different complexes: [(UO2)(H2BBP)Cl2] (1), [(UO)2(HBBP)(Py)Cl] (2), and [(UO2)(BBP)(Py)2] (3) after successive deprotonation of H2BBP with a strong base. Crystallographic determination of 1-3 reveals that increased charge through ligand deprotonation and displacement of chloride leads to equatorial planarity about uranyl as well as a more compact overall coordination geometry. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra of 1-3 at the U-4d edges have been recorded using a soft X-ray Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscope (STXM) and reveal the uranium 4d5/2 and 4d3/2 transitions at energies associated with uranium in the hexavalent oxidation state. First-principles Density Functional Theory (DFT) electronic structure calculations for the complexes have been performed to determine and validate the coordination characteristics, which correspond well to the experimental results.

  15. Photorelease of phosphates: Mild methods for protecting phosphate derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjeewa N. Senadheera

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new photoremovable protecting group for caging phosphates in the near UV. Diethyl 2-(4-hydroxy-1-naphthyl-2-oxoethyl phosphate (14a quantitatively releases diethyl phosphate upon irradiation in aq MeOH or aq MeCN at 350 nm, with quantum efficiencies ranging from 0.021 to 0.067 depending on the solvent composition. The deprotection reactions originate from the triplet excited state, are robust under ambient conditions and can be carried on to 100% conversion. Similar results were found with diethyl 2-(4-methoxy-1-naphthyl-2-oxoethyl phosphate (14b, although it was significantly less efficient compared with 14a. A key step in the deprotection reaction in aq MeOH is considered to be a Favorskii rearrangement of the naphthyl ketone motif of 14a,b to naphthylacetate esters 25 and 26. Disruption of the ketone-naphthyl ring conjugation significantly shifts the photoproduct absorption away from the effective incident wavelength for decaging of 14, driving the reaction to completion. The Favorskii rearrangement does not occur in aqueous acetonitrile although diethyl phosphate is released. Other substitution patterns on the naphthyl or quinolin-5-yl core, such as the 2,6-naphthyl 10 or 8-benzyloxyquinolin-5-yl 24 platforms, also do not rearrange by aryl migration upon photolysis and, therefore, do not proceed to completion. The 2,6-naphthyl ketone platform instead remains intact whereas the quinolin-5-yl ketone fragments to a much more complex, highly absorbing reaction mixture that competes for the incident light.

  16. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available of hydrogen in metals processing and treatment identified, and mechanisms for hydrogen entry into a ferritic surface are discussed. The differences between hydrogen attack of ferritic steels and copper alloys are contrasted, and an unusual case study...

  17. Phosphorus release from phosphate rock and iron phosphate by low-molecular-weight organic acids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Ren-kou; ZHU Yong-guan; David Chittleborough

    2004-01-01

    Low-molecular-weight(LMW) organic acids widely exist in soils, particularly in the rhizosphere. A series of batch experiments were carried out to investigate the phosphorus release from rock phosphate and iron phosphate by Iow-molecular-weight organic acids.Results showed that citric acid had the highest capacity to solubilize P from both rock and iron phosphate. P solubilization from rock phosphate and iron phosphate resulted in net proton consumption. P release from rock phosphate was positively correlated with the pKa values. P release from iron phosphate was positively correlated with Fe-organic acid stability constants except for aromatic acids, but was not correlated with PKa. Increase in the concentrations of organic acids enhanced P solubilization from both rock and iron phosphate almost linearrly. Addition of phenolic compounds further increased the P release from iron phosphate. Initial solution pH had much more substantial effect on P release from rock phosphate than from iron phosphate.

  18. Characterization of hydroxyphenol-terminated alkanethiol self-assembled monolayers: interactions with phosphates by chemical force spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Alyza A; Ebralidze, Iraklii I; Dickson, Steven E; Horton, J Hugh

    2013-03-01

    Tannins and humic substances, commonly referred to as natural organic matter (NOM), constitute an important component of natural water and soil systems. These species contain numerous hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups whose reactivity is strongly dependent on both the quantity and location of these moieties on the aromatic ring. In the present study, self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 4-(12-mercaptododecyl)benzene-1,2-diol (o-hydroxyphenol-terminated); 5-(12-mercaptododecyl)benzene-1,3-diol (m-hydroxyphenol-terminated); bis(11-thioundecyl) hydrogen phosphate (monoprotic phosphate); and 11-thioundecyl dihydrogen phosphate (diprotic phosphate) were prepared and characterized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), and water contact angle measurements. The interactions between phenolic groups with phosphates were examined as a function of pH using the chemical force spectrometry (CFS) technique. The observations are discussed in the context of hydrogen bonding and electrostatic repulsion interaction between corresponding species. Adhesion force profiles of hydroxyphenol isomers interacting with monoprotic phosphate are dominated by ionic H-bonding; however the strength of o-hydroxyphenol interactions is significantly higher. The difference in location of hydroxyl groups on the interface also results in significantly different force-distance profiles for the isomeric hydroxyphenols when interacting with diprotic phosphate.

  19. Hydrogen heat treatment of hydrogen absorbing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choong-Nyeon

    2000-12-01

    This study introduces the hydrogen heat treatment of hydrogen absorbing materials and its applicability for practical use. This treatment is somewhat different from normal heat treatment because of the interaction between metal atoms and hydrogen. Since hydrogen can be removed very fast by pumping it out the hydrogen-induced new lattice phase which can not be obtained without hydrogen can be preserved in a meta-stable state. A thermodynamic interpretation of the hydrogen heat treatment established previously was reformulated for graphical and analytical methods and applied to Pd-Pt-H and Pd-Ag-H alloy systems and a fair correlation between the calculation and experimental results was shown. The feasibility of applying the thermodynamic interpretation to intermetallic compounds-hydrogen systems was also discussed.

  20. SCALEUP OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE CATALYST FOR PILOT PLANT LPDMEtm RUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew W. Wang

    2002-01-01

    The Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) process converts synthesis gas to dimethyl ether in a single slurry bubble column reactor. A mixed slurry of methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst in a neutral mineral oil simultaneously synthesizes methanol from syngas and converts some of it to dimethyl ether and water. The reaction scheme is shown below: 2H{sub 2} + CO = CH{sub 3}OH; 2CH{sub 3}OH = CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O; H{sub 2}O + CO = CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. Most of the water produced in this reaction is converted to hydrogen by reduction with carbon monoxide (water gas shift reaction). This synergy permits higher per pass conversion than methanol synthesis alone. The enhancement in conversion occurs because dehydration of the methanol circumvents the equilibrium constraint of the syngas-to-methanol step. The slurry bubble column reactor provides the necessary heat transfer capacity to handle the greater heat duty associated with high conversion. In order to improve the stability of the catalyst system, non-stoichiometric aluminum phosphate was proposed as the dehydration catalyst for the LPDME{trademark} process. This aluminum phosphate material is a proprietary catalyst. This catalyst system of a standard methanol catalyst and the aluminum phosphate provided stable process performance that met the program targets under our standard test process conditions in the laboratory. These targets are (1) an initial methanol equivalent productivity of 28 gmol/kg/hr, (2) a CO{sub 2}-free, carbon selectivity of 80% to dimethyl ether and (3) stability of both catalysts equivalent to that of the methanol catalyst in the absence of the aluminum phosphate. A pilot plant trial of the LPDME{trademark} process using the aluminum phosphate catalyst was originally planned for March 1998 at the DOE-owned, Air Products (APCI)-operated facility at LaPorte, Texas. Because the aluminum phosphate catalyst is not commercially available, we initiated a

  1. SCALEUP OF ALUMINUM PHOSPHATE CATALYST FOR PILOT PLANT LPDMEtm RUN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew W. Wang

    2002-05-15

    The Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) process converts synthesis gas to dimethyl ether in a single slurry bubble column reactor. A mixed slurry of methanol synthesis catalyst and methanol dehydration catalyst in a neutral mineral oil simultaneously synthesizes methanol from syngas and converts some of it to dimethyl ether and water. The reaction scheme is: 2H{sub 2} + CO = CH{sub 3}OH 2CH{sub 3}OH = CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}O H{sub 2}O + CO = CO{sub 2} + H{sub 2}. Most of the water produced in this reaction is converted to hydrogen by reduction with carbon monoxide (water gas shift reaction). This synergy permits higher per pass conversion than methanol synthesis alone. The enhancement in conversion occurs because dehydration of the methanol circumvents the equilibrium constraint of the syngas-to-methanol step. The slurry bubble column reactor provides the necessary heat transfer capacity to handle the greater heat duty associated with high conversion. In order to improve the stability of the catalyst system, non-stoichiometric aluminum phosphate was proposed as the dehydration catalyst for the LPDME{trademark} process. This aluminum phosphate material is a proprietary catalyst. This catalyst system of a standard methanol catalyst and the aluminum phosphate provided stable process performance that met the program targets under our standard test process conditions in the laboratory. These targets are (1) an initial methanol equivalent productivity of 28 gmol/kg/hr, (2) a CO{sub 2}-free, carbon selectivity of 80% to dimethyl ether and (3) stability of both catalysts equivalent to that of the methanol catalyst in the absence of the aluminum phosphate. A pilot plant trial of the LPDME{trademark} process using the aluminum phosphate catalyst was originally planned for March 1998 at the DOE-owned, Air Products (APCI)-operated facility at LaPorte, Texas. Because the aluminum phosphate catalyst is not commercially available, we initiated a scaleup project

  2. Zinc phosphate as versatile material for potential biomedical applications Part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschke, L; Rottstegge, J; Lieberwirth, I; Wegner, G

    2006-01-01

    Synthetic alpha - and beta -Hopeite, two polymorphs of zinc phosphate tetrahydrates (ZPT) have been synthesized by hydrothermal crystallization from aqueous solution at 20 degrees C and 90 degrees C respectively. Aside from their sub-title crystallographic differences originating from a unique hydrogen bonding pattern, their thermodynamic interrelation has been thoroughfully investigated by means of X-Ray diffraction (XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), combined with thermogravimetry (TGA-MS). Using a new heterogeneous step-reaction approach, the kinetics of dehydration of the two forms of ZPT was studied and their corresponding transition temperature determined. Low temperature DRIFT, FT-Raman and (1)H, (31)P MAS-NMR reveal an oriented distortion of the zinc phosphate tetrahedra, due to a characteristic hydrogen bonding pattern and in accordance with the molecular tetrahedral linkage scheme of the phosphate groups. Biogenic Hydroxyapatite (HAP) and one of its metastable precursors, a calcium dihydrogen phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) or Brushite were also obtained and used to underline the resulting variations of chemical reactivity in zinc phosphates.

  3. Uranium and thorium based phosphate matrix: synthesis, characterizations and lixiviation; Matrices a base de phosphate d'uranium et de thorium: syntheses, caracterisations et lixiviation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dacheux, N

    1995-03-01

    In the framework of the search for a ceramic material usable in the radioactive waste storage, uranium and thorium phosphates have been investigated. Their experimental synthesis conditions have been entirely reviewed, they lead to the preparation of four new compounds: U(UO{sub 2})(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, U{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}, UCIPO{sub 4}, 4H{sub 2}O, and Th{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}. Experimental evidenced are advanced for non existent compounds such as: U{sub 3}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}, U{sub 2}O{sub 3}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Th{sub 3} (PO{sub 4}){sub 4}. Characterization by several techniques (X-rays and neutron powder diffractions, UV-Visible and Infra-red spectroscopies, XPS,...) were performed. The ab initio structure determination of U(UO{sub 2})(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} has been achieved by X-rays and refined by neutron diffractions. Through its physico-chemical analysis, we found that this compound was a new mixed valence uranium phosphate in which U{sup 4+} and UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} ions are ordered in pairs along parallel chains according to a new type of arrangement. Reaction mechanism, starting from UCIPO{sub 4}, 4H{sub 2}O and based on redox processes of uranium in solid state was set up. From two main matrices U(UO{sub 2})(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} and Th{sub 4}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}, solid solutions were studied. They consist of replacement of U(IV) by Th(IV) and reversely. The leaching tests on pure, loaded and doped matrices were performed in terms of storage time, pH of solutions, and determined by the use of solids labelled with {sup 230}U or by the measurement of uranyl concentration by Laser-Induced Time-Resolved Spectro-fluorimetry. Average concentration of uranium in the liquid phase is around 10{sup -4} M to 10{sup -6} M. Taking into account the very low solubilities of the studied phosphate ceramics, we estimated their chemical performances promising as an answer to the important nuclear waste problem, if we compare them to the glasses

  4. Phosphate Recognition in Structural Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, Anna K.H.; Fischer, Felix R.; Diederich, François

    2007-01-01

    Drug-discovery research in the past decade has seen an increased selection of targets with phosphate recognition sites, such as protein kinases and phosphatases, in the past decade. This review attempts, with the help of database-mining tools, to give an overview of the most important principles in

  5. Sintering of calcium phosphate bioceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, E

    2013-04-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics have become of prime importance for biological applications in the field of bone tissue engineering. This paper reviews the sintering behaviour of these bioceramics. Conventional pressureless sintering of hydroxyapatite, Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2, a reference compound, has been extensively studied. Its physico-chemistry is detailed. It can be seen as a competition between two thermally activated phenomena that proceed by solid-state diffusion of matter: densification and grain growth. Usually, the objective is to promote the first and prevent the second. Literature data are analysed from sintering maps (i.e. grain growth vs. densification). Sintering trajectories of hydroxyapatite produced by conventional pressureless sintering and non-conventional techniques, including two-step sintering, liquid phase sintering, hot pressing, hot isostatic pressing, ultrahigh pressure, microwave and spark plasma sintering, are presented. Whatever the sintering technique may be, grain growth occurs mainly during the last step of sintering, when the relative bulk density reaches 95% of the maximum value. Though often considered very advantageous, most assisted sintering techniques do not appear very superior to conventional pressureless sintering. Sintering of tricalcium phosphate or biphasic calcium phosphates is also discussed. The chemical composition of calcium phosphate influences the behaviour. Similarly, ionic substitutions in hydroxyapatite or in tricalcium phosphate create lattice defects that modify the sintering rate. Depending on their nature, they can either accelerate or slow down the sintering rate. The thermal stability of compounds at the sintering temperature must also be taken into account. Controlled atmospheres may be required to prevent thermal decomposition, and flash sintering techniques, which allow consolidation at low temperature, can be helpful.

  6. Phosphate based oil well cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natarajan, Ramkumar

    The main application of the cement in an oil well is to stabilize the steel casing in the borehole and protect it from corrosion. The cement is pumped through the borehole and is pushed upwards through the annulus between the casing and the formation. The cement will be exposed to temperature and pressure gradients of the borehole. Modified Portland cement that is being used presently has several shortcomings for borehole sealant. The setting of the Portland cement in permafrost regions is poor because the water in it will freeze even before the cement sets and because of high porosity and calcium oxide, a major ingredient it gets easily affected by the down hole gases such as carbon dioxide. The concept of phosphate bonded cements was born out of considerable work at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) on their use in stabilization of radioactive and hazardous wastes. Novel cements were synthesized by an acid base reaction between a metal oxide and acid phosphate solution. The major objective of this research is to develop phosphate based oil well cements. We have used thermodynamics along with solution chemistry principles to select calcined magnesium oxide as candidate metal oxide for temperatures up to 200°F (93.3°C) and alumina for temperatures greater than 200°F (93.3°C). Solution chemistry helped us in selecting mono potassium phosphate as the acid component for temperatures less than 200°F (93.3°C) and phosphoric acid solution greater than 200°F (93.3°C). These phosphate cements have performance superior to common Portland well cements in providing suitable thickening time, better mechanical and physical properties.

  7. Kinetic of liquid-liquid extraction for uranyl nitrate and actinides (III) and lanthanides (III) nitrates by amide extractants; Cinetique d`extraction liquide-liquide du nitrate d`uranyle et des nitrates d`actinides (III) et de lanthanides (III) par des extractants a fonction amide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toulemonde, V. [CEA Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, 91 -Gif-sur-Yvette (France)]|[CEA Centre d`Etudes de la Vallee du Rhone, 30 -Marcoule (France). Dept. d`Exploitation du Retraitement et de Demantelement

    1995-12-20

    The kinetics of liquid-liquid extraction by amide extractants have been investigated for uranyl nitrate (monoamide extractants), actinides (III) and lanthanides (III) nitrates (diamide extractants). The transfer of the metallic species from the aqueous phase to the organic phase was studied using two experimental devices: ARMOLLEX (Argonne Modified Lewis cell for Liquid Liquid Extraction) and RSC (Rotating Stabilized Cell). The main conclusions are: for the extraction of uranyl nitrate by DEHDMBA monoamide, the rate-controlling step is the complexation of the species at the interface of the two liquids. Thus, an absorption-desorption (according to Langmuir theory) reaction mechanism was proposed; for the extraction of actinides (III) and lanthanides (III) nitrates in nitric acid media by DMDBTDMA diamide, the kinetic is also limited by interfacial reactions. The behavior of Americium and Europium is very similar as fare as their reaction kinetics are concerned. (author). 89 refs.

  8. Uranyl tris-(carbohydrazide) nitrate [UO{sub 2}((N{sub 2}H{sub 3}){sub 2}CO){sub 3}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Synthesis, structure and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leshok, Darya Y.; Samoilo, Alexander A.; Kirik, Sergei D. [Siberian Federal Univ., Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation); Alekseenko, Vladimir N. [Federal Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Safety, Moscow (Russian Federation); Gavrilov, Peter M.; Alekseenko, Sergei N.; Dyachenko, Anton S. [Mining and Chemical Combine, Zheleznogorsk, Krasnoyarskii region (Russian Federation); Kondrasenko, Alexander A. [NMR Facility at Krasnoyarsk Multiaccesed Centre SB RAN, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-01

    Uranyl tris-(carbohydrazide) nitrate [UO{sub 2}((N{sub 2}H{sub 3}){sub 2}CO){sub 3}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2} was prepared by the reaction of water solution of dioxouranium(VI) nitrate UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 6} with ethanol solution of carbohydrazide (N{sub 2}H{sub 3}){sub 2}CO in a molar ratio of 1 to 3 in an neutral medium. The substance was characterized by elemental, thermal analysis and IR and {sup 15}N MAS CP NMR spectroscopy. Ab initio crystal structure determination was carried out using X-ray powder diffraction techniques. The compound crystallizes in monoclinic lattice with unit cell parameters: a = 15.193(1) Aa, b = 12.005(1) Aa, c = 10.842(1) Aa, β = 109.15(1) , V = 1868.11 Aa{sup 3}, Z = 4, SG = Cc. The type of carbohydrazide coordination was additionally confirmed by {sup 15}N MAS CP NMR and IR spectroscopy. In the complex ion [UO{sub 2}((N{sub 2}H{sub 3}){sub 2}CO){sub 3}]{sup 2+} three carbohydrazide ligands coordinate to UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} through oxygen and nitrogen forming three five-membered chelate rings. The carbohydrazide rings are tuned to the equatorial plane of complex. The crystal structure consists of zig-zag chains of [UO{sub 2}((N{sub 2}H{sub 3}){sub 2}CO){sub 3}]{sup 2+} cations stretched along c-axis. The cations in the chain are linked by the hydrogen bonds between the cations themselves. The anions are located in the pores between chains and participate in hydrogen bonding between adjacent chains and additionally link the chain sections. The length of the chain section is 5.768 Aa and the angle between sections is 140 . The substance [UO{sub 2}((N{sub 2}H{sub 3}){sub 2}CO){sub 3}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2} is thermally stable up to 215 C and then decomposes with an explosion.

  9. 21 CFR 184.1301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Ferric phosphate. 184.1301 Section 184.1301 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Ferric phosphate (ferric orthophosphate, iron (III) phosphate, FePO4·xH2O, CAS Reg. No. 10045-86-0) is an odorless, yellowish-white...

  10. Tribology in Gaseous Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawae, Yoshinori; Sugimura, Joich

    Hydrogen is expected as a clean and renewable energy carrier for future environment-friendly society. Many machine elements in hydrogen energy systems should be operating within hydrogen gas and tribological behavior, such as friction and wear, of bearings and seals are affected by the hydrogen environment through some interactions between material surfaces and gaseous hydrogen, i.e., physisorption of hydrogen molecules and following chemisorptions of dissociated atoms on metal surfaces, formation of metal hydride and reduction of metal oxide layer by hydrogen atoms diffused into bulk. Therefore, friction and wear characteristics of tribomaterials in the hydrogen environment should be appropriately understood to establish a design guideline for reliable hydrogen utilizing systems. This paper reviews the current knowledge about the effect of hydrogen on friction and wear of materials, and then describes our recent progress of hydrogen research in the tribology field.

  11. 21 CFR 182.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium phosphate. 182.1778 Section 182.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5301 - Ferric phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ferric phosphate. 582.5301 Section 582.5301 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5301 Ferric phosphate. (a) Product. Ferric phosphate. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 182.8778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium phosphate. 182.8778 Section 182.8778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  14. 21 CFR 582.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.6778 Section 582.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 21 CFR 582.1778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.1778 Section 582.1778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  16. 21 CFR 582.5778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sodium phosphate. 582.5778 Section 582.5778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5778 Sodium phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  17. 21 CFR 182.6778 - Sodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Sodium phosphate. 182.6778 Section 182.6778 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Sodium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  18. 21 CFR 582.5217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.5217 Section 582.5217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  19. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  20. 40 CFR 721.5995 - Polyalkyl phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Polyalkyl phosphate. 721.5995 Section... Substances § 721.5995 Polyalkyl phosphate. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a polyalkyl phosphate (PMN P-95-1772)...

  1. 21 CFR 582.6285 - Dipotassium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dipotassium phosphate. 582.6285 Section 582.6285 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Dipotassium phosphate. (a) Product. Dipotassium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  2. 21 CFR 582.1141 - Ammonium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonium phosphate. 582.1141 Section 582.1141 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1141 Ammonium phosphate. (a) Product. Ammonium phosphate (mono- and dibasic). (b)...

  3. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  4. 21 CFR 582.6290 - Disodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disodium phosphate. 582.6290 Section 582.6290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Disodium phosphate. (a) Product. Disodium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  5. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  6. 21 CFR 582.5434 - Magnesium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium phosphate. 582.5434 Section 582.5434 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5434 Magnesium phosphate. (a) Product. Magnesium phosphate (di- and tribasic)....

  7. 21 CFR 182.6285 - Dipotassium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Dipotassium phosphate. 182.6285 Section 182.6285 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD... Dipotassium phosphate. (a) Product. Dipotassium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  8. 21 CFR 182.6290 - Disodium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Disodium phosphate. 182.6290 Section 182.6290 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Disodium phosphate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized...

  9. The system uranyl nitrate-dietyl ether-water. Extraction by water in spray and packed columns from uranyl nitrate-either solutions; El sistema nitrato de uranilo-eter dietilico-agua, extraccion de nitrato de uranilo con agua a partir de disoluciones etereas en columnas de pulverizacion y de relleno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Luina, A.; Gutierrez Jodra, L.

    1960-07-01

    This paper is a continuation of the one published in Chemical Engineering Progress. Symposium Series, 50, n. 12, 127 (1954). New runs for spray columns, are given and other concentrations in uranyl nitrate for the packed columns. New correlations for the overall H.T.U. are also given. The individual H.T.U. have been grapycally calculated and show that the film resistances have similar values, being independent of the concentration of the ether phase. (Author) 24 refs.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of crystallization impacting calcium phosphate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giocondi, Jennifer L.; El-Dasher, Bassem S.; Nancollas, George H.; Orme, Christine A.

    2010-01-01

    The biomineral calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO4·2H2O), known as brushite, is a malleable material that both grows and dissolves faster than most other calcium minerals, including other calcium phosphate phases, calcium carbonates and calcium oxalates. Within the body, this ready formation and dissolution can play a role in certain diseases, such as kidney stone and plaque formation. However, these same properties, along with brushite’s excellent biocompatibility, can be used to great benefit in making resorbable biomedical cements. To optimize cements, additives are commonly used to control crystallization kinetics and phase transformation. This paper describes the use of in situ scanning probe microscopy to investigate the role of several solution parameters and additives in brushite atomic step motion. Surprisingly, this work demonstrates that the activation barrier for phosphate (rather than calcium) incorporation limits growth kinetics and that additives such as magnesium, citrate and bisphosphonates each influence step motion in distinctly different ways. Our findings provide details of how, and where, molecules inhibit or accelerate kinetics. These insights have the potential to aid in designing molecules to target specific steps and to guide synergistic combinations of additives. PMID:20308110

  11. Molecular mechanisms of crystallization impacting calcium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giocondi, Jennifer L; El-Dasher, Bassem S; Nancollas, George H; Orme, Christine A

    2010-04-28

    The biomineral calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate (CaHPO(4).2H(2)O), known as brushite, is a malleable material that both grows and dissolves faster than most other calcium minerals, including other calcium phosphate phases, calcium carbonates and calcium oxalates. Within the body, this ready formation and dissolution can play a role in certain diseases, such as kidney stone and plaque formation. However, these same properties, along with brushite's excellent biocompatibility, can be used to great benefit in making resorbable biomedical cements. To optimize cements, additives are commonly used to control crystallization kinetics and phase transformation. This paper describes the use of in situ scanning probe microscopy to investigate the role of several solution parameters and additives in brushite atomic step motion. Surprisingly, this work demonstrates that the activation barrier for phosphate (rather than calcium) incorporation limits growth kinetics and that additives such as magnesium, citrate and bisphosphonates each influence step motion in distinctly different ways. Our findings provide details of how, and where, molecules inhibit or accelerate kinetics. These insights have the potential to aid in designing molecules to target specific steps and to guide synergistic combinations of additives.

  12. Injectability and mechanical properties of magnesium phosphate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseke, Claus; Saratsis, Vasileios; Gbureck, Uwe

    2011-12-01

    Up to now magnesium phosphate cements are mainly being utilized in wastewater treatment due to their adsorptive properties. Recently they also have been shown to have a high potential as degradable biocements for application as replacement materials for bone defects. In comparison to degradable calcium phosphate cements they have the advantage of setting at neutral pH, which is favorable in biological environment. In this study two parameters of the cement composition, namely powder-to-liquid ratio (PLR) and citrate content, were varied in order to optimize the injectability properties of the cement paste and the mechanical properties of the reaction product. These properties were determined by means of testing setting time and temperature, paste viscosity, and injectability as well as phase composition and compressive strength of the set cements. Best results were obtained, when the cements were prepared with a PLR of 2.5 and a binder liquid consisting of an aqueous solution of 3 mol/l diammonium hydrogen phosphate and 0.5 mol/l diammonium citrate.

  13. Novel vanadium phosphate phases as catalysts for selective oxidation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arunabha Datta; Monika Agarwal; Soumen Dasgupta

    2002-08-01

    In our effort to induce novel modifications in the structure of some important vanadium phosphate phases used as selective oxidation catalysts, it has been observed that metal ions such as Zn2+, Ni2+, Pd2+ can be incorporated into the vanadyl hydrogen phosphate VOHPO4$\\cdot$0.5H2O phase in very different ways depending upon the medium of preparation. It has been found that the metal ions are either substituted into the lattice with retention of structure of the parent compound or intercalated between the layers of a new mixed-valent phase. These new metalincorporated phases are catalytically active and the palladium incorporated compound in particular displays shape selective catalysis for different oxidation and reduction reactions. In another approach, the preparation of VOHPO4$\\cdot$0.5H2O has been modified to give a novel crystalline phase containing mixed-valent vanadium and having NH3 species bound to the lattice. This phase could be a potential catalyst for ammoxidation reactions. In addition, novel mesostructured vanadium phosphate phases have been prepared using a long-chain amine as the templating agent involving a ligand templating mechanism of formation.

  14. Mineral phosphate solubilizing bacterial community in agro-ecosystem

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-12-15

    Dec 15, 2009 ... patterns. Four insoluble phosphate sources; purulia rock phosphate (PRP), mussourie rock phosphate .... phosphate in gradient soils, there might be changes in ..... resistance properties, fatty acid profiling and nucleic acid.

  15. Calcium phosphate cements: study of the beta-tricalcium phosphate--monocalcium phosphate system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirtchi, A A; Lemaitre, J; Terao, N

    1989-09-01

    The possibility of making cements based on beta-tricalcium phosphate (beta-TCP), a promising bone graft material, was investigated. Upon admixture with water, beta-TCP/monocalcium phosphate monohydrate (MCPM) mixtures were found to set and harden like conventional hydraulic cements. Beta-TCP powders with larger particle size, obtained by sintering at higher temperatures, increased the ultimate strength of the cement. Results show that setting occurs after dissolution of MCPM, as a result of the precipitation of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) in the paste. The ultimate tensile strength of the hardened cement is proportional to the amount of DCPD formed. Upon ageing above 40 degrees C, DCPD transforms progressively into anhydrous dicalcium phosphate (DCP), thereby decreasing the strength. Ageing of the pastes in 100% r.h. results in a decay of the mechanical properties. This can be ascribed to an intergranular dissolution of the beta-TCP aggregates as a result of the pH lowering brought about by the MCPM to DCPD conversion.

  16. Hydrogen sulphide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidotti, T L

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen sulphide (H2S) is the primary chemical hazard in natural gas production in 'sour' gas fields. It is also a hazard in sewage treatment and manure-containment operations, construction in wetlands, pelt processing, certain types of pulp and paper production, and any situation in which organic material decays or inorganic sulphides exist under reducing conditions. H2S dissociates into free sulphide in the circulation. Sulphide binds to many macromolecules, among them cytochrome oxidase. Although this is undoubtedly an important mechanism of toxicity due to H2S, there may be others H2S provides little opportunity for escape at high concentrations because of the olfactory paralysis it causes, the steep exposure-response relationships, and the characteristically sudden loss of consciousness it can cause which is colloquially termed 'knockdown.' Other effects may include mucosal irritation, which is associated at lower concentrations with a keratoconjunctivitis called 'gas eye' and at higher concentrations with risk of pulmonary oedema. Chronic central nervous system sequelae may possibly follow repeated knockdowns: this is controversial and the primary effects of H2S may be confounded by anoxia or head trauma. Treatment is currently empirical, with a combination of nitrite and hyperbaric oxygen preferred. The treatment regimen is not ideal and carries some risk.

  17. Polarity and Chirality in Uranyl Borates: Insights into Understanding the Vitrification of Nuclear Waste and the Development of Nonlinear Optical Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuao; Alekseev, Evgeny V.; Ling, Jie; Liu, Guokui; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.

    2010-03-23

    Four new sodium uranyl borates, α-Na[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 15}(OH){sub 5})] (NaUBO-1), β-Na[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 15}(OH){sub 5}] (NaUBO-2), Na[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 15}(OH){sub 5}]·3H{sub 2}O (NaUBO-3), and Na[(UO{sub 2})B{sub 6}O{sub 10}(OH)]·2H{sub 2}O (NaUBO-4), and four new thallium uranyl borates, α-Tl{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 18}(OH){sub 3}] (TlUBO-1), β-Tl{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 18}(OH){sub 3}] (TlUBO-2), Tl[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 10}O{sub 16}(OH){sub 3}] (TlUBO-3), and Tl{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 19}(OH)] (TlUBO-4), have been prepared via the reaction of sodium nitrate or thallium nitrate, uranyl nitrate, and excess boric acid at 190 °C. These compounds share a common structural motif consisting of a linear uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, cation surrounded by BO{sub 3} triangles and BO{sub 4} tetrahedra to create a UO{sub 8} hexagonal bipyramidal environment around uranium. The borate anions bridge between uranyl units to create sheets. Additional BO{sub 3} triangles extend from the polyborate layers and are directed approximately perpendicular to the sheets. In some compounds, these units can link the layers together to yield three-dimensional networks with large pores to house the Na{sup +} or Tl{sup+} cations and water molecules. The structures are all noncentrosymmetric and are either polar or chiral. While the uranyl borate layers are noncentrosymmetric in and of themselves, there is also twisting of the interlayer BO{sub 3} groups to reduce the interlayer spacing, producing helical features in some structures. Na[(UO{sub 2})B{sub 6}O{sub 10}(OH)]·2H{sub 2}O and β-Tl{sub 2}[(UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 11}O{sub 18}(OH){sub 3}], which can be obtained as pure phases, display second-harmonic generation of 532 nm light from 1064 nm light.

  18. Effect of the substitutional groups on the electrochemistry, kinetic of thermal decomposition and kinetic of substitution of some uranyl Schiff base complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asadi, Zahra; Nasrollahi, Rahele; Ranjkeshshorkaei, Mohammad; Firuzabadi, Fahimeh Dehghani [Shiraz Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Chemistry Dept.; Dusek, Michal; Fejfarova, Karla [ASCR, Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Physics

    2016-05-15

    Uranyl(VI) complexes, [UO{sub 2}(X-saloph)(solvent)], where saloph denotes N,N{sup '}-bis(salicylidene)-1,2-phenylenediamine and X = NO{sub 2}, Cl, Me, H; were synthesized and characterized by 61H NMR, IR, UV-Vis spectroscopy, thermal gravimetry (TG), cyclic voltammetry, elemental analysis (C.H.N) and X-ray crystallography. X-ray crystallography of [UO{sub 2}(4-nitro-saloph)(DMF)] revealed coordination of the uranyl by the tetradentate Schiff base ligand and one solvent molecule, resulting in seven-coordinated uranium. The complex of [UO{sub 2}(4-nitro-saloph)(DMF)] was also synthesized in nano form. Transmission electron microscopy image showed nano-particles with sizes between 30 and 35 nm. The TG method and analysis of Coats-Redfern plots revealed that the kinetics of thermal decomposition of the complexes is of the first-order in all stages. The kinetics and mechanism of the exchange reaction of the coordinated solvent with tributylphosphine was investigated by spectrophotometric method. The second-order rate constants at four temperatures and the activation parameters showed an associative mechanism for all corresponding complexes with the following trend: 4-Nitro > 4-Cl > H > 4-Me. It was concluded that the steric and electronic properties of the complexes were important for the reaction rate. For analysis of anticancer properties of uranyl Schiff base complexes, cell culture and MTT assay was carried out. These results showed a reduction of jurkat cell line concentration across the complexes.

  19. Establishment of the conditions for the determination of the concentration of the uranyl ion in perchloric media by Fluorescence; Establecimiento de las condiciones para la determinacion de la concentracion del ion uranilo en medio perclorico por Fluorescencia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras R, A.; Ordonez R, E.; Fernandez V, S.M. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: contraida@yahoo.com.mx

    2004-07-01

    The influence of the p H is reported in the spectra of luminescence of the ion uranyl in sodium perchlorate 2M. The best spectra were observed to ph <3 that to neutral and basic p Hs this is explained by the present species. They were carried out four calibration curves for the uranyl in perchloric acid media, taking into account the area under the curve, the maximum height of two characteristic peaks of this ion, in those that one observes a better correlation with the maximum height of the peak located to 486.7 nm. (Author)

  20. Annual report of STACY operation in F.Y. 1997. 280mm thickness slab core {center_dot} 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, Seiji; Sono, Hiroki; Hirose, Hideyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    1998-06-01

    Fifty-three times critical experiments (run number R0104 to R0156) with STACY in NUCEF, were performed in F.Y. 1997. During these experiments, 10% enriched uranyl nitrate solution was used as fuel, and core configuration was 280mm thickness and 1.5m height slab core tank with various rectangular solid reflectors; ordinary or borated concrete, polyethylene and so on, to measure mainly reactivity worth by changes of reflecting material and its thickness. Operation data of STACY in F.Y. 1997 are summarized in this report. (author)

  1. 2,6-Diiminopiperidin-1-ol: an overlooked motif relevant to uranyl and transition metal binding on poly(amidoxime) adsorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Zachary C.; Cardenas, Allan J.; Corbey, Jordan F.; Warner, Marvin G.

    2016-06-06

    Glutardiamidoxime, a structural motif on sorbents used in uranium extraction from seawater, was discovered to cyclize in situ at room temperature to 2,6-diimino-piperidin-1-ol in the presence of uranyl nitrate. The new diimino motif was also generated when exposed to competing transition metals Cu(II) and Ni(II). Multinuclear μ-O bridged U(VI), Cu(II), and Ni(II) complexes featuring bound diimino ligands were isolated. A Cu(II) complex with the historically relevant cyclic imide dioxime motif is also reported for structural comparison to the reported diimino complexes.

  2. A hydrogen ice cube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept

  3. A hydrogen ice cube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept b

  4. Grain-Size Based Additivity Models for Scaling Multi-rate Uranyl Surface Complexation in Subsurface Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xiaoying; Liu, Chongxuan; Hu, Bill X.; Hu, Qinhong

    2016-07-01

    This study statistically analyzed a grain-size based additivity model that has been proposed to scale reaction rates and parameters from laboratory to field. The additivity model assumed that reaction properties in a sediment including surface area, reactive site concentration, reaction rate, and extent can be predicted from field-scale grain size distribution by linearly adding reaction properties for individual grain size fractions. This study focused on the statistical analysis of the additivity model with respect to reaction rate constants using multi-rate uranyl (U(VI)) surface complexation reactions in a contaminated sediment as an example. Experimental data of rate-limited U(VI) desorption in a stirred flow-cell reactor were used to estimate the statistical properties of multi-rate parameters for individual grain size fractions. The statistical properties of the rate constants for the individual grain size fractions were then used to analyze the statistical properties of the additivity model to predict rate-limited U(VI) desorption in the composite sediment, and to evaluate the relative importance of individual grain size fractions to the overall U(VI) desorption. The result indicated that the additivity model provided a good prediction of the U(VI) desorption in the composite sediment. However, the rate constants were not directly scalable using the additivity model, and U(VI) desorption in individual grain size fractions have to be simulated in order to apply the additivity model. An approximate additivity model for directly scaling rate constants was subsequently proposed and evaluated. The result found that the approximate model provided a good prediction of the experimental results within statistical uncertainty. This study also found that a gravel size fraction (2-8mm), which is often ignored in modeling U(VI) sorption and desorption, is statistically significant to the U(VI) desorption in the sediment.

  5. CsUV{sub 3}O{sub 11}, a new uranyl vanadate with a layered structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duribreux, I.; Dion, C.; Abraham, F. [Univ. des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Villeneuve d`Ascq (France). Lab. de Cristallochimie et Physicochimie du Solide; Saadi, M. [Univ. Chouaib Doukkali, El Jadida (Morocco). Lab. de Chimie de Coordination et Analytique

    1999-08-01

    A new cesium uranyl vanadate CsUV{sub 3}O{sub 11} has been synthesized by solid state reaction. Its crystal structure has been determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. It crystallizes in the monoclinic system with space group P2{sub 1}/a and unit cell parameters a = 11.904(2) {angstrom}, b = 6.8321(6) {angstrom}, c = 12.095(2) {angstrom}, {beta} = 106.989(5){degree}, Z = 4, and D{sub exp} = 4.89(2) g/cm{sup 3}. A full-matrix least squares refinement yielded R = 0.046 and R{sub w} = 0.045 for 1831 independent reflections with I > 3{sigma}(I) collected on a Nonius CAD4 diffractometer (MoK{alpha} radiation). The structure of CsUV{sub 3}O{sub 11} is characterized by [UV{sub 3}O{sub 11}]{sub {infinity}} layers parallel to the (001) plane. The layers, very similar to those found in UV{sub 3}O{sub 10}, are built up from VO{sub 5} square pyramids sharing corners of their equatorial bases and UO{sub 8} hexagonal bipyramids, the U atoms occupying the hexagonal holes created by the VO{sub 5} array. The Cs{sup +} ions are located between two successive layers and hold them together; the Cs{sup +} ions and two layers constitute a neutral sandwich {l_brace}(UV{sub 3}O{sub 11}{sup {minus}})-(Cs){sub 2}{sup 2+}-(UV{sub 3}O{sub 11}{sup {minus}}){r_brace}. In this unusual structure, the neutral sandwiches are stacked one above another along the [104] direction with no formal chemical bonds between the neutral sandwiches. The Cs mobilities in CsUV{sub 3}O{sub 11} and Cs carnotite are compared.

  6. Europium, uranyl, and thorium-phenanthroline amide complexes in acetonitrile solution: an ESI-MS and DFT combined investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Mei, Lei; Zhang, Xin-Rui; Wall, Nathalie; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2015-08-28

    The tetradentate N,N'-diethyl-N,N'-ditolyl-2,9-diamide-1,10-phenanthroline (Et-Tol-DAPhen) ligand with hard-soft donor atoms has been demonstrated to be promising for the group separation of actinides from highly acidic nuclear wastes. To identify the formed complexes of this ligand with actinides and lanthanides, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) combined with density functional theory (DFT) calculations was used to probe the possible complexation processes. The 1 : 2 Eu-L species ([EuL2(NO3)](2+)) can be observed in ESI-MS at low metal-to-ligand ([M]/[L]) ratios, whereas the 1 : 1 Eu-L species ([EuL(NO3)2](+)) can be observed when the [M]/[L] ratio is higher than 1.0. However, ([UO2L(NO3)](+)) is the only detected species for the uranyl complexes. The [ThL2(NO3)2](2+) species can be observed at low [M]/[L] ratios; the 1 : 2 species ([ThL2(NO3)](3+)) and a new 1 : 1 species ([ThL(NO3)3](+)) can be detected at high [M]/[L] ratios. Collision-induced dissociation (CID) results showed that Et-Tol-DAPhen ligands can coordinate strongly with metal ions, and the coordination moieties remain intact under CID conditions. Natural bond orbital (NBO), molecular electrostatic potential (MEP), electron localization function (ELF), atoms in molecules (AIM) and molecular orbital (MO) analyses indicated that the metal-ligand bonds of the actinide complexes exhibited more covalent character than those of the lanthanide complexes. In addition, according to thermodynamic analysis, the stable cationic M-L complexes in acetonitrile are found to be in good agreement with the ESI-MS results.

  7. Study of magnetite as adsorbent material of uranyl ions; Estudo da magnetita como material adsorvedor de ions de uranilo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, Roberto

    2006-07-01

    Magnetite, also known as iron ferrite, is a mineral iron and a natural magnet found in iron deposits. In addition to its magnetic intrinsic behavior, the magnetite has the capacity to remove the metallic ions from aqueous medium by adsorption phenomena. The strong magnetic character of magnetite distinguishes it from other adsorbent types, which it allows to be readily removed from solution by magnetic separation. In this work, uranium (VI) adsorption, as UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} ions, from nitric solution by synthetic magnetite was investigated. It was prepared by simultaneous precipitation process, adding a NaOH solution into a solution containing Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} ions. The synthetic magnetite, a black powder, has exhibited a strong magnetic response in presence of a magnetic field, without nevertheless becomes magnetic. This typical superparamagnetic behavior was confirmed by magnetization measurements. Adsorption parameters of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} ions such as pH, the adsorbent dose, contact time and equilibrium isotherm were evaluated. Maximum uranium adsorption was observed in the pH 4.0-5.0 range. It was noticed that increase in magnetite dose increased the percent removal of uranium, but decreased the adsorption capacity of the magnetite. It was observed from the relation between adsorption and contact time that the removal has increased very fast with time, and achieved the equilibrium within 30 minutes. The results of equilibrium isotherm agreed well with the Langmuir model, and so the theoretical saturation capacity of the magnetite was determined for uranyl ions. The interaction between UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} ions and the magnetite was defined as a spontaneous chemical adsorption. (author)

  8. Microbial removal of uranyl by sulfate reducing bacteria in the presence of Fe (III) (hydr)oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhengji, Yi

    2010-09-01

    Microbiological reduction of uranyl by sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) has been proposed as a promising method for removal of radionuclide from groundwater. In this study, we examined the effect of two naturally occurring Fe(III) (hydr)oxides, hematite and goethite, on the bioreduction of U(VI) by a mixed culture of SRB via laboratory batch experiments. The biogenic precipitate from U(VI) bioreduction was determined using X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis, showing a typical feature of uraninite (UO(2)). In the presence of either hematite or goethite-containing Fe(III) ranging from 10 to 30 mM, the reduction of U(VI) was retarded by both minerals and the retardatory effect was enhanced with increasing amount of Fe(III) (hydr)oxide. When exposed to a mixture of hematite and goethite with the total Fe(III) kept constant at 20 mM, the retardatory effect on U(VI) reduction by the minerals were directly correlated with the fraction of hematite present. A slow increase in U(VI) concentration was also found in all Fe(III) (hydr)oxide treatments after 10-13 days, accompanied by the release of Fe(II) into the solution. The presence of Fe(III) (hydr)oxide can cause the eventual incomplete bioreduction of U(VI). However, it was not the case for the control without minerals. When mixing biogenic uraninite with hematite or goethite without SRB, Fe(II) was also detected in the solution. These findings suggest that the U(VI) remobilization after 1013 days may be due to reoxidation of the uraninite by the solid-phase Fe(III) (hydr)oxide. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Phosphate sensing and parathyroid gland].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizobuchi, Masahide; Suzuki, Taihei

    2012-10-01

    In the latter 1990s, phosphate, as well as calcium, has been shown to have a direct action on parathyroid function. Since then although many researchers have tried to detect the phosphate sensor in parathyroid gland, none has found it yet. In 2000s, the importance of FGF23 was revealed in patients with autosomal dominant hypophosphatemic rickets and then investigating the role of FGF23 in mineral metabolism has spread. FGF23 target organs comprise those that express coreceptor Klotho, such as kidney and parathyroid glands. While associations of calcium sensing receptor or vitamin D receptor with parathyroid function have been mainly investigated for parathyroid dysfunction, many efforts recently have made to study the effects of FGF23 on parathyroid glands.

  10. Calcium phosphate polymer hybrid materials

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) is of strong interest to the medical field because of its potential for bone repair, gene transfection, etc.1-3 Nowadays, the majority of the commercially available materials are fabricated via “classical” materials science approaches, i.e. via high temperature or high pressure approaches, from rather poorly defined slurries, or from organic solvents.3,4 Precipitation of inorganics with (polymeric) additives from aqueous solution on the other hand enables the synthesis...

  11. Effects of phosphates on microstructure and bioactivity of micro-arc oxidized calcium phosphate coatings on Mg-Zn-Zr magnesium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y K; Chen, C Z; Wang, D G; Zhao, T G

    2013-09-01

    Calcium phosphate (CaP) coatings were prepared on Mg-Zn-Zr magnesium alloy by micro-arc oxidation (MAO) in electrolyte containing calcium acetate monohydrate (CH3COO)2Ca·H2O) and different phosphates (i.e. disodium hydrogen phosphate dodecahydrate (Na2HPO4·12H2O), sodium phosphate (Na3PO4·H2O) and sodium hexametaphosphate((NaPO3)6)). Scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDS) and X-ray diffractometer (XRD) were employed to characterize the microstructure, elemental distribution and phase composition of the CaP coatings. Simulated body fluid (SBF) immersion test was used to evaluate the coating bioactivity and degradability. Systemic toxicity test was used to evaluate the coating biocompatibility. Fluoride ion selective electrode (ISE) was used to measure F(-) ions concentration during 30 days SBF immersion. The CaP coatings effectively reduced the corrosion rate and the surfaces of CaP coatings were covered by a new layer formed of numerous needle-like and scale-like apatites. The formation of these calcium phosphate apatites indicates that the coatings have excellent bioactivity. The coatings formed in (NaPO3)6-containging electrolyte exhibit thicker thickness, higher adhesive strength, slower degradation rate, better apatite-inducing ability and biocompatibility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Hydrogen isotope geochemistry of lherzolitic shergottite in Martian meteorite GRV99027 from the Grove Mountains in Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Henan; HSU Weibiao; GUAN Yunbin; LIANG Ying

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopic composition was measured using an ion microprobe for lherzolitic shergottite in Martian meteorite GRV 99027 from the Grove Mountains in Antarctica. The D/H ratios of phosphate whitlockites were analyzed and water concentrations of tested points were calculated. The result show that their δD values vary from +1300‰ to +4700‰, and water contents from 0.04 wt% to 0.43 wt%. Comparing the results with the hydrogen isotopic compositions of whole rock, hydrous minerals and phosphates in SNC meteorites indicates that water highly enriched in deuterium is a unique feature of Martian meteorites, especially the phosphates prominent. It is interpreted as the result of isotopic exchange between magmatic water and Martian crustal fluids. The high D/H ratios observed in GRV 99027 phosphates indicate that they have hydrogen isotopic compositions similar to those of apatite in other Martian meteorites. The results further confirmed the association of GRV 99027 with the Martian meteorite group.

  13. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  14. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  15. Hexa-kis-(3-chloro-2-methyl-anilinium) cyclo-hexa-phosphate dihydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bel Haj Salah, Raoudha; Khederi, Lamia; Rzaigui, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    In the organic/inorganic salt hydrate, 6C7H9ClN(+)·P6O18 (6-)·2H2O, the cyclo-hexa-phosphate anion resides on an inversion centre. The asymmetric unit consists of three cations, one half-anion and a water mol-ecule. In the crystal, the water mol-ecules and the [P6O18](6-) anions are linked by O-H⋯O hydrogen bonds, generating infinite layers parallel to the ab plane. These layers are inter-connected by the organic cations through N-H⋯O hydrogen bonds.

  16. Water structure and dynamics in phosphate fluorosurfactant based reverse micelle: A computer simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senapati, Sanjib; Berkowitz, Max L.

    2003-01-01

    We performed a molecular dynamics simulation on a system containing a water pool inside the reverse micelle made up of an assembly of phosphate fluorosurfactant molecules dissolved in supercritical carbon dioxide. The water molecules in the first solvation shell of the headgroup lose the water to water tetrahedral hydrogen bonded network but are strongly bonded to the surfactant headgroups. This change in inter-water hydrogen bonding in connection with the confined geometry of the reverse micelle slows down the translational and especially the rotational dynamics of water.

  17. Phosphate: are we squandering a scarce commodity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferro, Charles J; Ritz, Eberhard; Townend, Jonathan N

    2015-02-01

    Phosphorus is an essential element for life but is a rare element in the universe. On Earth, it occurs mostly in the form of phosphates that are widespread but predominantly at very low concentration. This relative rarity has resulted in a survival advantage, in evolutionary terms, to organisms that conserve phosphate. When phosphate is made available in excess it becomes a cause for disease, perhaps best recognized as a potential cardiovascular and renal risk factor. As a reaction to the emerging public health issue caused by phosphate additives to food items, there have been calls for a public education programme and regulation to bring about a reduction of phosphate additives to food. During the Paleoproterzoic era, an increase in the bioavailability of phosphate is thought to have contributed significantly to the oxygenation of our atmosphere and a dramatic increase in the evolution of new species. Currently, phosphate is used poorly and often wasted with phosphate fertilizers washing this scarce commodity into water bodies causing eutrophication and algal blooms. Ironically, this is leading to the extinction of hundreds of species. The unchecked exploitation of phosphate rock, which is an increasingly rare natural resource, and our dependence on it for agriculture may lead to a strange situation in which phosphate might become a commodity to be fought over whilst at the same time, health and environmental experts are likely to recommend reductions in its use.

  18. Zinc phosphate as versatile material for potential biomedical applications Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschke, L; Lieberwirth, I; Wegner, G

    2006-01-01

    Surface chemical reactivity of two modifications of synthetic zinc phosphate tetrahydrate (alpha - and beta -form of Hopeite, alpha -,beta -ZPT) has been studied by selective chemical and e-beam etching in presence of diluted phosphoric acid and ammonia by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and microelectrophoresis (zeta potential measurements) in correlation with the corresponding bulk properties and crystal size distributions. The subtitle crystallographic differences between alpha -and beta -ZPT originating from a unique hydrogen bonding pattern, induce drastic variations of both surface potential and surface charge. Biogenic Hydroxyapatite (HAP) and one of its metastable precursors, a calcium dihydrogen phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) or Brushite were used to underline this resulting variation of chemical reactivity in zinc phosphates. In-situ monitoring of the transformation of Brushite in Hydroxyapatite is also reported.

  19. Multifunctional uranyl hybrid materials: structural diversities as a function of pH, luminescence with potential nitrobenzene sensing, and photoelectric behavior as p-type semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jian; Gao, Xue; Wang, Zhi-Nan; Li, Cheng-Ren; Xu, Qi; Bai, Feng-Ying; Shi, Zhong-Feng; Xing, Yong-Heng

    2015-09-21

    A series of uranyl-organic frameworks (UOFs), {[(UO2)2(H2TTHA)(H2O)]·4,4'-bipy·2H2O}n (1), {[(UO2)3(TTHA)(H2O)3]}n (2), and {[(UO2)5(TTHA) (HTTHA)(H2O)3]·H3O}n (3), have been obtained by the hydrothermal reaction of uranyl acetate with a flexible hexapodal ligand (1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triamine hexaacetic acid, H6TTHA). These compounds exhibited three distinct 3D self-assembly architectures as a function of pH by single-crystal structural analysis, although the used ligand was the same in each reaction. Surprisingly, all of the coordination modes of the H6TTHA ligand in this work are first discovered. Furthermore, the photoluminescent results showed that these compounds displayed high-sensitivity luminescent sensing functions for nitrobenzene. Additionally, the surface photovoltage spectroscopy and electric-field-induced surface photovoltage spectroscopy showed that compounds 1-3 could behave as p-type semiconductors.

  20. Additional studies on mixed uranyl oxide-hydroxide hydrate alteration products of uraninite from the palermo and ruggles granitic pegmatites, grafton county, New Hampshire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foord, E.E.; Korzeb, S.L.; Lichte, F.E.; Fitzpatrick, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    Additional studies on an incompletely characterized secondary uranium "mineral" from the Ruggles and Palermo granitic pegmatites, New Hampshire, referred to as mineral "A" by Frondel (1956), reveal a mixture of schoepite-group minerals and related uranyl oxide-hydroxide hydrated compounds. A composite chemical analysis yielded (in wt.%): PbO 4.85 (EMP), UO3 83.5 (EMP), BaO 0.675 (av. of EMP and ICP), CaO 0.167 (av. of EMP and ICP), K2O 2.455 (av. of EMP and ICP), SrO 0.21 (ICP), ThO2 0.85 (ICP), H2O 6.9, ??99.61. Powder-diffraction X-ray studies indicate a close resemblance in patterns between mineral "A" and several uranyl oxide-hydroxide hydrated minerals, including the schoepite family of minerals and UO2(OH)2. The powder-diffraction data for mineral "A" are most similar to those for synthetic UO2.86??1.5H2O and UO2(OH)2, but other phases are likely present as well. TGA analysis of both mineral "A" and metaschoepite show similar weight-loss and first derivative curves. The dominant losses are at 100??C, with secondary events at 400?? and 600??C. IR spectra show the presence of (OH) and H2O. Uraninite from both pegmatites, analyzed by LAM-ICP-MS, shows the presence of Th, Pb, K and Ca.

  1. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  2. Structure determination of a complex tubular uranyl phenylphosphonate, (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(HO{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}{center_dot}H{sub 2}O, from conventional x-ray powder diffraction data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poojary, D.M. [Texas A& M Univ. College Station, TX (United States); Cabeza, A.; Aranda, A.G. [Universidad de Malaga (Spain)] [and others

    1996-03-13

    The three-dimensional structure of a complex tubular uranyl phosphonate, (UO{sub 2}){sub 3}(HO{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2}(O{sub 3}PC{sub 6}H{sub 5}){sub 2} {center_dot} H{sub 2}O, was determined ab initio from laboratory X-ray powder diffraction data and refined by the Rietveld method. The crystals belong to the space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with {alpha} = 17.1966(2) {Angstrom}, b = 7.2125(2) {Angstrom}, c = 27.8282(4) {Angstrom}, and Z = 4. The structure consists of three independent uranium atoms, among which two are seven-coordinated and the third is eight-coordinated. These metal atoms are connected by four different phosphonate groups to form a one-dimensional channel structure along the b axis. The phenyl groups are arranged on the outer periphery of the channels, and their stacking forces keep the channels intact in the lattice. The determination of this structure which contains 50 non-hydrogen atoms in the asymmetric unit, from conventional X-ray powder data, represents significant progress in the application of powder techniques to structure of complex inorganic compounds, including organometallic compounds.

  3. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  4. Hydrogen in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pankove, Jacques I

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen plays an important role in silicon technology, having a profound effect on a wide range of properties. Thus, the study of hydrogen in semiconductors has received much attention from an interdisciplinary assortment of researchers. This sixteen-chapter volume provides a comprehensive review of the field, including a discussion of hydrogenation methods, the use of hydrogen to passivate defects, the use of hydrogen to neutralize deep levels, shallow acceptors and shallow donors in silicon, vibrational spectroscopy, and hydrogen-induced defects in silicon. In addition to this detailed cove

  5. Sensing of aqueous phosphates by polymers with dual modes of signal transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldakov, Dmitry; Anzenbacher, Pavel

    2004-04-21

    A new approach to sensing of aqueous phosphate-related anions based on chromogenic conductive polymers is demonstrated. This method utilizes synergy between low-level p-doping in a polythiophene polymer and hydrogen bonding to increase anion-sensor affinity. These chromogenic conductive polymers show anion-specific changes both in color and in conductivity upon increasing concentration of anions, thus providing two independent modes of signal transduction.

  6. Phosphate adsorption onto hematite: an in situ ATR-FTIR investigation of the effects of pH and loading level on the mode of phosphate surface complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzinga, Evert J; Sparks, Donald L

    2007-04-01

    Phosphate adsorption on hematite was characterized as a function of pH (3.5-8.9) and phosphate concentration (5-500 microM) by in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Under most conditions a mixture of different (inner-sphere) phosphate complexes existed at the hematite surface, with the relative importance of these complexes varying with pH and surface coverage. Experiments using D(2)O and H(2)O indicated the presence of two protonated phosphate surface complexes at pH/pD=3.5-7.0. Comparison to spectra of protonated aqueous phosphate species suggested that these surface complexes are monoprotonated. The difference in the IR spectra of these complexes is tentatively interpreted to result from a different surface coordination, with one surface complex coordinated in a monodentate binuclear (bridging) fashion, and the second as a monodentate mononuclear complex. Alternatively, the bridging complex may be a (protonated) monodentate mononuclear complex exhibiting strong hydrogen bonding to an adjacent surface site, and the second species a monodentate complex exhibiting limited hydrogen bonding. Formation of the bridging complex is favored at lower pH values and higher surface loadings in the 3.5-7.0 pH range. At the highest pH values studied (8.5-9.0) a third complex, interpreted to be a nonprotonated monodentate mononuclear complex, is present along with the monodentate monoprotonated surface species. The importance of the nonprotonated monodentate complex increases with increasing surface coverage at these high pH values.

  7. Molecular basis of reduced pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase catalytic activity in neonatal epileptic encephalopathy disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musayev, Faik N; Di Salvo, Martino L; Saavedra, Mario A; Contestabile, Roberto; Ghatge, Mohini S; Haynes, Alexina; Schirch, Verne; Safo, Martin K

    2009-11-06

    Mutations in pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase are known to cause neonatal epileptic encephalopathy. This disorder has no cure or effective treatment and is often fatal. Pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of pyridoxine 5'-phosphate to pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, the active cofactor form of vitamin B(6) required by more than 140 different catalytic activities, including enzymes involved in amino acid metabolism and biosynthesis of neurotransmitters. Our aim is to elucidate the mechanism by which a homozygous missense mutation (R229W) in the oxidase, linked to neonatal epileptic encephalopathy, leads to reduced oxidase activity. The R229W variant is approximately 850-fold less efficient than the wild-type enzyme due to an approximately 192-fold decrease in pyridoxine 5'-phosphate affinity and an approximately 4.5-fold decrease in catalytic activity. There is also an approximately 50-fold reduction in the affinity of the R229W variant for the FMN cofactor. A 2.5 A crystal structure of the R229W variant shows that the substitution of Arg-229 at the FMN binding site has led to a loss of hydrogen-bond and/or salt-bridge interactions between FMN and Arg-229 and Ser-175. Additionally, the mutation has led to an alteration of the configuration of a beta-strand-loop-beta-strand structure at the active site, resulting in loss of two critical hydrogen-bond interactions involving residues His-227 and Arg-225, which are important for substrate binding and orientation for catalysis. These results provide a molecular basis for the phenotype associated with the R229W mutation, as well as providing a foundation for understanding the pathophysiological consequences of pyridoxine 5'-phosphate oxidase mutations.

  8. [La(UO2)V2O7][(UO2)(VO4)] the first lanthanum uranyl-vanadate with structure built from two types of sheets based upon the uranophane anion-topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mer, A.; Obbade, S.; Rivenet, M.; Renard, C.; Abraham, F.

    2012-01-01

    The new lanthanum uranyl vanadate divanadate, [La(UO2)V2O7][(UO2)(VO4)] was obtained by reaction at 800 °C between lanthanum chloride, uranium oxide (U3O8) and vanadium oxide (V2O5) and the structure was determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data. This compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with space group P212121 and unit-cell parameters a=6.9470(2) Å, b=7.0934(2) Å, c=25.7464(6) Å, V=1268.73(5) Å3, Z=4. A full matrix least-squares refinement yielded R1=0.0219 for 5493 independent reflections. The crystal structure is characterized by the stacking of uranophane-type sheets [(UO2)(VO4)]-∞2 and double layers [La(UO2)(V2O7)]+∞2 connected through La-O bonds involving the uranyl oxygen of the uranyl-vanadate sheets. The double layers result from the connection of two [La(UO2)(VO4)2]-∞2 sheets derived from the uranophane anion-topology by replacing half of the uranyl ions by lanthanum atoms and connected through the formation of divanadate entities.

  9. Calcium phosphate coating on magnesium alloy by biomimetic method :Investigation of morphology ,composition and formation process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Magnesium alloy has similar mechanical properties with natural bone and can degrade via corrosion in the electrolytic environment of the human body.Calcium phosphate has been proven to possess bioactivity and bone inductivity.In order to integrate both advantages,calcium phosphate coating was fabricated on magnesium alloy by a biomimetic method.Supersaturated calcification solutions (SCSs) with different Ca/P ratio and C1- concentration were used as mimetic solutions.The morphology,composition and formation process of the coating were studied with scanning electron microscopy (SEM),energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS),Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD).The results show that a uniform calcium phosphate coating was observed on magnesium alloy,the properties of which could be adjusted by the SCSs with different Ca/P ratio.The formation process of the coating was explored by immersing magnesium alloy in SCSs with different Cl- concentration which could adjust the hydrogen production.According to SEM results,the hydrogen bubbles were associated with the formation of grass-like and flower-like coating morphologies.In conclusion,the biomimetic method was effective to form calcium phosphate coating on magnesium alloy and the morphology and composition of the coating could be accommodated by the Ca/P ratio and Cl- concentration in SCSs.

  10. Can Phosphate Salts Recovered from Manure Replace Conventional Phosphate Fertilizer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Ehmann

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pig farming produces more manure than can reasonably be spread onto surrounding fields, particularly in regions with high livestock densities and limited land availability. Nutrient recycling offers an attractive solution for dealing with manure excesses and is one main objective of the European commission-funded project “BioEcoSIM”. Phosphate salts (“P-Salt” were recovered from the separated liquid manure fraction. The solid fraction was dried and carbonized to biochar. This study compared the fertilizing performance of P-Salt and conventional phosphate fertilizer and determined whether additional biochar application further increased biomass yields. The fertilizers and biochar were tested in pot experiments with spring barley and faba beans using two nutrient-poor soils. The crops were fertilized with P-Salt at three levels and biochar in two concentrations. Biomass yield was determined after six weeks. Plant and soil samples were analysed for nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium contents. The P-Salt had similar or even better effects than mineral fertilizer on growth in both crops and soils. Slow release of nutrients can prevent leaching, rendering P-Salt a particularly suitable fertilizer for light sandy soils. Biochar can enhance its fertilizing effect, but the underlying mechanisms need further investigation. These novel products are concluded to be promising candidates for efficient fertilization strategies.

  11. Tetracalcium phosphate: Synthesis, properties and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseke, C; Gbureck, U

    2010-10-01

    Monoclinic tetracalcium phosphate (TTCP, Ca(4)(PO(4))(2)O), also known by the mineral name hilgenstockite, is formed in the (CaO-P(2)O(5)) system at temperatures>1300 degrees C. TTCP is the only calcium phosphate with a Ca/P ratio greater than hydroxyapatite (HA). It appears as a by-product in plasma-sprayed HA coatings and shows moderate reactivity and concurrent solubility when combined with acidic calcium phosphates such as dicalcium phosphate anhydrous (DCPA, monetite) or dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD, brushite). Therefore it is widely used in self-setting calcium phosphate bone cements, which form HA under physiological conditions. This paper aims to review the synthesis and properties of TTCP in biomaterials applications such as cements, sintered ceramics and coatings on implant metals.

  12. Insight into biological phosphate recovery from sewage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yuanyao; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Liu, Yiwen; Zhang, Xinbo; Guo, Jianbo; Ni, Bing-Jie; Chang, Soon Woong; Nguyen, Dinh Duc

    2016-10-01

    The world's increasing population means that more food production is required. A more sustainable supply of fertilizers mainly consisting of phosphate is needed. Due to the rising consumption of scarce resources and limited natural supply of phosphate, the recovery of phosphate and their re-use has potentially high market value. Sewage has high potential to recover a large amount of phosphate in a circular economy approach. This paper focuses on utilization of biological process integrated with various subsequent processes to concentrate and recycle phosphate which are derived from liquid and sludge phases. The phosphate accumulation and recovery are discussed in terms of mechanism and governing parameters, recovery efficiency, application at plant-scale and economy.

  13. Application of Calcium Phosphate Materials in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabr S. Al-Sanabani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate materials are similar to bone in composition and in having bioactive and osteoconductive properties. Calcium phosphate materials in different forms, as cements, composites, and coatings, are used in many medical and dental applications. This paper reviews the applications of these materials in dentistry. It presents a brief history, dental applications, and methods for improving their mechanical properties. Notable research is highlighted regarding (1 application of calcium phosphate into various fields in dentistry; (2 improving mechanical properties of calcium phosphate; (3 biomimetic process and functionally graded materials. This paper deals with most common types of the calcium phosphate materials such as hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate which are currently used in dental and medical fields.

  14. Vibrational spectroscopic study of the phosphate mineral kryzhanovskite and in comparison with reddingite-implications for the molecular structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Ray L.; Scholz, Ricardo; Wang, Lina

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the phosphate mineral kryzhanovskite (Fe3+,Mn2+)3(PO4)2(OH,H2O) which is a member of the phosphoferrite mineral group using a combination of scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive spectroscopy and Raman and infrared spectroscopy. Chemical analysis shows the presence of P, Mn and Fe and confirms the formula given above. The presence of hydroxyl units in the structure is indicative of ferric iron in the formula that is an oxidised product. Raman spectroscopy coupled with infrared spectroscopy supports the concept of phosphate, hydrogen phosphate and dihydrogen phosphate units in the structure of kryzhanovskite -phosphoferrite. Infrared and Raman bands attributed to water and hydroxyl stretching modes are identified. Vibrational spectroscopy adds useful information to the molecular structure of kryzhanovskite -phosphoferrite.

  15. Matrix Extracellular Phosphoglycoprotein Inhibits Phosphate Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Marks, J; Churchill, L J; Debnam, E. S.; Unwin, R J

    2008-01-01

    The role of putative humoral factors, known as phosphatonins, in phosphate homeostasis and the relationship between phosphate handling by the kidney and gastrointestinal tract are incompletely understood. Matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE), one of several candidate phosphatonins, promotes phosphaturia, but whether it also affects intestinal phosphate absorption is unknown. Here, using the in situ intestinal loop technique, we demonstrated that short-term infusion of MEPE inhibits...

  16. Solvent extraction of heptavalent technetium and rhenium by tributyl phosphate. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program and Basic Energy Sciences Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pruett, D.J.

    1984-12-01

    The literature pertaining to the solvent extraction of heptavalent technetium and rhenium from aqueous solution by tributyl phosphate (TBP) has been compiled, critically evaluated, and supplemented with new data in some areas. The effects of adding mineral acids, alkali metal nitrates, alkali metal chlorides, uranyl nitrate, thorium nitrate, and plutonium(IV) nitrate to these systems were also examined. Discussions of the possible nature of the organic-phase complexes are presented, along with values of ..delta..G, ..delta..H, ..delta..S, and the equilibrium constant for the extraction reaction in several systems. Mathematical models correlating the distribution behavior over a wide range of conditions were also developed. Equations are given for calculating the distribution coefficients for the extraction of Re(VII) or Tc(VII) from 0.2 to 4 M HCl by 0.339 to 2.90 M TBP at 298 to 333/sup 0/K. Equations are given for calculating the distribution coefficients under the same conditions, but with HNO/sub 3/ (instead of HCl) present in the aqueous phase. 28 references, 27 figures, 3 tables.

  17. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of D-galactose-6-phosphate isomerase complexed with substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Suk Jung

    Full Text Available D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26, which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD, catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi. Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays.

  18. Distrontium trimanganese(II) bis-(hydro-gen-phosphate) bis-(ortho-phosphate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmiyas, Jamal; Assani, Abderrazzak; Saadi, Mohamed; El Ammari, Lahcen

    2013-01-01

    The title compound, Sr2Mn3(HPO4)2(PO4)2, was synthesized under hydro-thermal conditions. In the structure, one of two Mn atoms is located on an inversion centre, whereas all others atoms are located in general positions. The framework structure is built up from two types of MnO6 octa-hedra (one almost undistorted, one considerably distorted), one PO3OH and one PO4 tetra-hedron. The centrosymmetric MnO6 octa-hedron is linked to two other MnO6 octa-hedra by edge-sharing, forming infinite zigzag chains parallel to [010]. The PO3OH and PO4 tetra-hedra connect these chains through common vertices or edges, resulting in the formation of sheets parallel to (100). The Sr(2+) cation is located in the inter-layer space and is bonded to nine O atoms in form of a distorted polyhedron and enhances the cohesion of the layers. Additional stabilization is achieved by a strong inter-layer O-H⋯O hydrogen bond between the PO3OH and PO4 units. The structure of the title phosphate is isotypic to that of Pb2Mn3(HPO4)2(PO4)2.

  19. Crystal structure of hydrazine iron(III) phosphate, the first transition metal phosphate containing hydrazine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Renald

    2015-12-01

    The title compound, poly[(μ2-hydrazine)(μ4-phosphato)iron(III)], [Fe(PO4)(N2H4)] n , was prepared under hydro-thermal conditions. Its asymmetric unit contains one Fe(III) atom located on an inversion centre, one P atom located on a twofold rotation axis, and two O, one N and two H atoms located on general positions. The Fe(III) atom is bound to four O atoms of symmetry-related PO4 tetra-hedra and to two N atoms of two symmetry-related hydrazine ligands, resulting in a slightly distorted FeO4N2 octa-hedron. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional hydrazine/iron phoshate framework whereby each PO4 tetra-hedron bridges four Fe(III) atoms and each hydrazine ligand bridges two Fe(III) atoms. The H atoms of the hydrazine ligands are also involved in moderate N-H⋯O hydrogen bonding with phosphate O atoms. The crystal structure is isotypic with the sulfates [Co(SO4)(N2H4)] and [Mn(SO4)(N2H4)].

  20. Crystal structure of hydrazine iron(III phosphate, the first transition metal phosphate containing hydrazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renald David

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, poly[(μ2-hydrazine(μ4-phosphatoiron(III], [Fe(PO4(N2H4]n, was prepared under hydrothermal conditions. Its asymmetric unit contains one FeIII atom located on an inversion centre, one P atom located on a twofold rotation axis, and two O, one N and two H atoms located on general positions. The FeIII atom is bound to four O atoms of symmetry-related PO4 tetrahedra and to two N atoms of two symmetry-related hydrazine ligands, resulting in a slightly distorted FeO4N2 octahedron. The crystal structure consists of a three-dimensional hydrazine/iron phoshate framework whereby each PO4 tetrahedron bridges four FeIII atoms and each hydrazine ligand bridges two FeIII atoms. The H atoms of the hydrazine ligands are also involved in moderate N—H...O hydrogen bonding with phosphate O atoms. The crystal structure is isotypic with the sulfates [Co(SO4(N2H4] and [Mn(SO4(N2H4].

  1. Dynamics of hydrogen in hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ranber Singh; S Prakash

    2003-07-01

    The problem of hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) is studied semiclassically. It is found that the local hydrogen concentration fluctuations-induced extra potential wells, if intense enough, lead to the localized electronic states in a-Si:H. These localized states are metastable. The trapping of electrons and holes in these states leads to the electrical degradation of the material. These states also act as recombination centers for photo-generated carriers (electrons and holes) which in turn may excite a hydrogen atom from a nearby Si–H bond and breaks the weak (strained) Si–Si bond thereby apparently enhancing the hydrogen diffusion and increasing the light-induced dangling bonds.

  2. Hydrogen transport membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  3. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  4. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  5. Preparation of porous lanthanum phosphate with templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoda, Hiroaki, E-mail: onoda@kpu.ac.jp [Department of Informatics and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, Kyoto Prefectural University, 1-5, Shimogamo Nakaragi-cyo, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8522 (Japan); Ishima, Yuya [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, 1-1-1, Nojihigashi, Kusatsu, Shiga 525-8577 (Japan); Takenaka, Atsushi [Department of Materials Science, Yonago National College of Technology, 4448, Hikona-cho, Yonago, Tottori 683-8502 (Japan); Tanaka, Isao [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2009-08-05

    Malonic acid, propionic acid, glycine, n-butylamine, and urea were added to the preparation of lanthanum phosphate from lanthanum nitrate and phosphoric acid solutions. All additives were taken into lanthanum phosphate particles. The additives that have a basic site were easy to contain in precipitates. The addition of templates improved the specific surface area of lanthanum phosphate. The amount of pore, with radius smaller than 4 nm, increased with the addition of templates. The remained additives had influence on the acidic properties of lanthanum phosphate.

  6. Mineral induced formation of sugar phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitsch, S.; Eschenmoser, A.; Gedulin, B.; Hui, S.; Arrhenius, G.

    1995-01-01

    Glycolaldehyde phosphate, sorbed from highly dilute, weakly alkaline solution into the interlayer of common expanding sheet structure metal hydroxide minerals, condenses extensively to racemic aldotetrose-2, 4-diphophates, and aldohexose-2, 4, 6-triphosphates. The reaction proceeds mainly through racemic erythrose-2, 4-phosphate, and terminates with a large fraction of racemic altrose-2, 4, 6-phosphate. In the absence of an inductive mineral phase, no detectable homogeneous reaction takes place in the concentration- and pH range used. The reactant glycolaldehyde phosphate is practically completely sorbed within an hour from solutions with concentrations as low as 50 micron; the half-time for conversion to hexose phosphates is of the order of two days at room temperature and pH 9.5. Total production of sugar phosphates in the mineral interlayer is largely independent of the glycolaldehyde phosphate concentration in the external solution, but is determined by the total amount of GAP offered for sorption up to the capacity of the mineral. In the presence of equimolar amounts of rac-glyceraldehyde-2-phosphate, but under otherwise similar conditions, aldopentose-2, 4, -diphosphates also form, but only as a small fraction of the hexose-2, 4, 6-phosphates.

  7. Study of Viability of Phosphate Solubilizing Bacteria in Phosphate granules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hajar rajabi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: sustainable development and the environment are interconnected. Sustainable agriculture is continuous utilization of a farm with respect to various aspects of environmental conditions by using fewer inputs (other than Bio-fertilizers. Phosphorus is one of the essential elements for the plants. Management of soil is possible by using biological fertilizers pillar of sustainable agriculture and providing some of the phosphorus needed by plants via bio-fertilizers. Phosphorus deficiency is extremely effective on the plant growth and productivity. The application of phosphorus fertilizers is expensive and dangerous. In addition, phosphorus in the soilmay become insoluble and will be unavailable to the plants. Studies showed that phosphate solubilizing bacteria in the soil rhizosphere are active and by root exudates solve insoluble phosphates such as tricalcium phosphate, and form absorbable P for plant. Consequently, the use of microbial fertilizers could reduce excessive use of chemical fertilizers and lead to decrease their harmful effects and protect the environment and conservation of available resources. The biological phosphate fertilizer industry uses sugar beet molasses as a binder and drying granules at high temperatures. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the durability of the bacteria in molasses at high temperature. Materials and Methods: This study was designed as completely randomized design in a factorial arrangement.10 isolates were selected and the ratios of 50%, 25%, 15% and 10% of the apatite, organic matter, sulfur and soluble granule (ratio 1: 1 and 2: 1 bacteria and molasses, respectively, for each isolate was prepared. The final product was dried at 28 and 40 °C and remained for 4 months and population counted at first day and 10, 20, 30, 60, 90 and 120 days after the preparing. The population was counted by the serial dilution technique and cultured at Sperber media. Results and Discussion:Comparing the

  8. Infrared Multiphoton Dissociation Spectroscopy of a Gas-Phase Complex of Uranyl and 3-Oxa-Glutaramide: An Extreme Red-Shift of the [O=U=O]²⁺ Asymmetric Stretch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gibson, John K.; Hu, Hanshi; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Berden, Giel; Oomens, Jos; Li, Jun

    2015-04-09

    The gas-phase complex UO₂(TMOGA)₂²⁺ (TMOGA = tetramethyl-3-oxa-glutaramide) prepared by electrospray ionization was characterized by infrared multiphoton dissociation (IRMPD) spectroscopy. The IRMPD spectrum from 700–1800 cm⁻¹ was interpreted using a computational study based on density functional theory. The predicted vibrational frequencies are in good agreement with the measured values, with an average deviation of only 8 cm⁻¹ (<1%) and a maximum deviation of 21 cm⁻¹ (<2%). The only IR peak assigned to the linear uranyl moiety was the asymmetric ν₃ mode, which appeared at 965 cm⁻¹ and was predicted by DFT as 953 cm⁻¹. This ν₃ frequency is red-shifted relative to bare uranyl, UO₂²⁺, by ca. 150 cm⁻¹ due to electron donation from the TMOGA ligands. Based on the degree of red-shifting, it is inferred that two TMOGA oxygen-donor ligands have a greater effective gas basicity than the four monodentate acetone ligands in UO₂(acetone)₄²⁺. The uranyl ν₃ frequency was also computed for uranyl coordinated by two TMGA ligands, in which the central Oether of TMOGA has been replaced by CH₂. The computed ν₃ for UO₂(TMGA)₂²⁺, 950 cm⁻¹, is essentially the same as that for UO₂(TMOGA)₂²⁺, suggesting that electron donation to uranyl from the Oether of TMOGA is minor. The computed ν₃ asymmetric stretching frequencies for the three actinyl complexes, UO₂(TMOGA)₂²⁺, NpO₂(TMOGA)₂²⁺ and PuO₂(TMOGA)₂²⁺, are comparable. This similarity is discussed in the context of the relationship between ν₃ and intrinsic actinide-oxygen bond energies in actinyl complexes.

  9. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  10. Phosphate-binding protein from Polaromonas JS666: purification, characterization, crystallization and sulfur SAD phasing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pegos, Vanessa R.; Hey, Louis; LaMirande, Jacob; Pfeffer, Rachel; Lipsh, Rosalie; Amitay, Moshe; Gonzalez, Daniel; Elias, Mikael (JCT-Israel); (UMM); (CNRS-UMR)

    2017-05-25

    Phosphate-binding proteins (PBPs) are key proteins that belong to the bacterial ABC-type phosphate transporters. PBPs are periplasmic (or membrane-anchored) proteins that capture phosphate anions from the environment and release them to the transmembrane transporter. Recent work has suggested that PBPs have evolved for high affinity as well as high selectivity. In particular, a short, unique hydrogen bond between the phosphate anion and an aspartate residue has been shown to be critical for selectivity, yet is not strictly conserved in PBPs. Here, the PBP fromPolaromonasJS666 is focused on. Interestingly, this PBP is predicted to harbor different phosphate-binding residues to currently known PBPs. Here, it is shown that the PBP fromPolaromonasJS666 is capable of binding phosphate, with a maximal binding activity at pH 8. Its structure is expected to reveal its binding-cleft configuration as well as its phosphate-binding mode. Here, the expression, purification, characterization, crystallization and X-ray diffraction data collection to 1.35 Å resolution of the PBP fromPolaromonasJS666 are reported.

  11. Effects of phosphate addition on methane fermentation in the batch and upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Sho; Shintani, Masaki; Sanchez, Zoe Kuizon; Kimura, Kohei; Numata, Mitsuru; Yamazoe, Atsushi; Kimbara, Kazuhide

    2015-12-01

    Ammonia inhibition of methane fermentation is one of the leading causes of failure of anaerobic digestion reactors. In a batch anaerobic digestion reactor with 429 mM NH3-N/L of ammonia, the addition of 25 mM phosphate resulted in an increase in methane production rate. Similar results were obtained with the addition of disodium phosphate in continuous anaerobic digestion using an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor. While methane content and production rate decreased in the presence of more than 143 mM NH3-N/L of ammonium chloride in UASB, the addition of 5 mM disodium phosphate suppressed ammonia inhibition at 214 mM NH3-N/L of ammonium chloride. The addition prevented acetate/propionate accumulation, which might be one of the effects of the phosphate on the ammonia inhibition. The effects on the microbial community in the UASB reactor was also assessed, which was composed of Bacteria involved in hydrolysis, acidogenesis, acetogenesis, and dehydrogenation, as well as Archaea carrying out methanogenesis. The change in the microbial community was observed by ammonia inhibition and the addition of phosphate. The change indicates that the suppression of ammonia inhibition by disodium phosphate addition could stimulate the activity of methanogens, reduce shift in bacterial community, and enhance hydrogen-producing bacteria. The addition of phosphate will be an important treatment for future studies of methane fermentation.

  12. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...

  13. Biological hydrogen photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Y. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Following are the major accomplishments of the 6th year`s study of biological hydrogen photoproduction which were supported by DOE/NREL. (1) We have been characterizing a biological hydrogen production system using synchronously growing aerobically nitrogen-fixing unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. Miami BG 043511. So far it was necessary to irradiate the cells to produce hydrogen. Under darkness they did not produce hydrogen. However, we found that, if the cells are incubated with oxygen, they produce hydrogen under the dark. Under 80% argon + 20% oxygen condition, the hydrogen production activity under the dark was about one third of that under the light + argon condition. (2) Also it was necessary so far to incubate the cells under argon atmosphere to produce hydrogen in this system. Argon treatment is very expensive and should be avoided in an actual hydrogen production system. We found that, if the cells are incubated at a high cell density and in a container with minimum headspace, it is not necessary to use argon for the hydrogen production. (3) Calcium ion was found to play an important role in the mechanisms of protection of nitrogenase from external oxygen. This will be a clue to understand the reason why the hydrogen production is so resistant to oxygen in this strain. (4) In this strain, sulfide can be used as electron donor for the hydrogen production. This result shows that waste water can be used for the hydrogen production system using this strain.

  14. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao

    1999-01-01

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  15. Quantum mechanical calculation of aqueuous uranium complexes: carbonate, phosphate, organic and biomolecular species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jha Prashant

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quantum mechanical calculations were performed on a variety of uranium species representing U(VI, U(V, U(IV, U-carbonates, U-phosphates, U-oxalates, U-catecholates, U-phosphodiesters, U-phosphorylated N-acetyl-glucosamine (NAG, and U-2-Keto-3-doxyoctanoate (KDO with explicit solvation by H2O molecules. These models represent major U species in natural waters and complexes on bacterial surfaces. The model results are compared to observed EXAFS, IR, Raman and NMR spectra. Results Agreement between experiment and theory is acceptable in most cases, and the reasons for discrepancies are discussed. Calculated Gibbs free energies are used to constrain which configurations are most likely to be stable under circumneutral pH conditions. Reduction of U(VI to U(IV is examined for the U-carbonate and U-catechol complexes. Conclusion Results on the potential energy differences between U(V- and U(IV-carbonate complexes suggest that the cause of slower disproportionation in this system is electrostatic repulsion between UO2 [CO3]35- ions that must approach one another to form U(VI and U(IV rather than a change in thermodynamic stability. Calculations on U-catechol species are consistent with the observation that UO22+ can oxidize catechol and form quinone-like species. In addition, outer-sphere complexation is predicted to be the most stable for U-catechol interactions based on calculated energies and comparison to 13C NMR spectra. Outer-sphere complexes (i.e., ion pairs bridged by water molecules are predicted to be comparable in Gibbs free energy to inner-sphere complexes for a model carboxylic acid. Complexation of uranyl to phosphorus-containing groups in extracellular polymeric substances is predicted to favor phosphonate groups, such as that found in phosphorylated NAG, rather than phosphodiesters, such as those in nucleic acids.

  16. Carbonated ferric green rust as a new material for efficient phosphate removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthélémy, K; Naille, S; Despas, C; Ruby, C; Mallet, M

    2012-10-15

    Phosphate uptake from aqueous solutions by a recently discovered ferric oxyhydroxide is investigated. Carbonated ferric green rust {GR(CO(3)(2-))*} is prepared by varying two synthesis parameters, which are (1) the aging period after the ferrous-ferric green rust {GR(CO(3)(2-))} synthesis step and (2) the rate of the hydrogen peroxide addition to oxidize GR(CO(3)(2-)) into GR(CO(3)(2-))*. These two parameters permit the control of the size, morphology and cristallinity of the synthesized particles. As prepared GR* samples are then evaluated, in batch experiments, as possible low-cost efficient phosphate removal materials. Firstly, kinetic experiments reveal that a fast sorption step initially occurs and equilibrium is reached at ~500 min. The adsorption kinetics data at pH=7 can be adequately fitted to a pseudo-second order model. Secondly, the Freundlich model provides the best correlation and effectively describes phosphate sorption isotherms for all GR(CO(3)(2-))* samples synthesized. Finally, the phosphate adsorption capacity decreases when pH increases. The highest adsorption capacity is 64.8 mg g(-1) at pH=4 and corresponds to the GR(CO(3)(2-))* sample displaying the smallest and least crystallized particles thus reflecting the importance of the synthesis conditions. Overall, all sorption capacities are higher than the main iron oxide minerals, making GR(CO(3)(2-))* a potentially attractive phosphate adsorbent.

  17. On the Pressure-Induced Loss of Crystallinity in Zinc- and Calcium-Phosphates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shakhvorostov, D.; Mosey, N; Munoz-Paniagua, D; Pereira, G; Song, Y; Kasrai, M; Norton, P; Müser, M

    2008-01-01

    A recently suggested mechanism for the stress memory of various metal phosphates is investigated experimentally. Based on first-principles simulations [N. J. Mosey et al., Science 307, 1612 (2005)], it had been argued that atoms with flexible coordination, such as zinc or heavy-metal cations, act as network-forming agents, undergoing irreversible pressure-induced changes in bonding that lead to increased connectivity between phosphate anions. In the present study, orthophosphates of zinc and calcium were exposed to high pressures on surfaces and in diamond anvil cells. An additional set of first-principles simulations was accomplished on ?-orthophosphate of zinc, which suggested that this material was already cross-linked before compression but that it nevertheless underwent a reversible coordination change under pressure in agreement with the experimental results presented here. Raman spectra indicate an irreversible, pressure-induced loss of long-range crystallinity. The pressures required to induce these changes are around 7 GPa for the zinc phosphates, while they are close to 21 GPa for the calcium phosphates. Hydrogenation of the metal phosphate lowers the threshold pressure by approximately 2-3 GPa in both cases. Moreover, ?-orthophosphate of zinc could be partially amorphisized under nonisotropic pressure on copper foils.

  18. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael [Longmont, CO; Xie, Xiaobing [Foster City, CA; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul [Longmont, CO; Wright, Harold [Longmont, CO

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  19. Multi-scale study of the interaction mechanisms of aquo-uranyl ions with titanium oxide surfaces (powders and monocrystals); Etude multi-echelle des mecanismes d'interaction des ions aquo uranyle avec les surfaces de l'oxyde de titane (poudres et monocristaux)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenborre, J

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this work is the study, at a molecular scale, of the sorption mechanisms corresponding to UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} /TiO{sub 2} system. The first step of the study is the hydrated solid characterization and the second step is the sorption mechanisms study. The work is performed using a multi-scale approach, which is composed by three parts. At first, we have obtained macroscopic data corresponding to the uranyl retention on the solid. Moreover, we have used CD-MUSIC model in order to calculate the surface acidity constants of the hydrated solid. In a second part, we have performed a multi-spectroscopic study (TRLFS, XPS, DRIFT, SHG) in order to characterize the system at a molecular scale. Finally, all these results were obtained on the solid TiO{sub 2} under different forms (rutile or anatase phases and (110), (001), (111) rutile single crystals). From the structural results, we have determined that there are two sorption sites towards the free uranyl ion onto the titania surface, whatever the studied solid (powder and single crystal). Moreover, these two reactive sorption sites don't present the same reactivity towards free uranyl ion: the more reactive sorption site is assigned to a bridging-bridging oxygen atoms and the less reactive sorption site is assigned to a bridging-top oxygen atoms. Thus, using this methodology, we can conclude that it is possible to understand the powder surface properties using the single crystals surface results. Finally, with the multi-scale approach, we have used the spectroscopic results obtained on UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}/TiO{sub 2} system as constraints during macroscopic data simulation using a surface complexation model (CCM). (author)

  20. Antiwear and antioxidant studies of cardanol phosphate ester additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzetto, S.E.; Oliveira, L.D.M.; Lomonaco, D.; Veloso, P.A., E-mail: selma@ufc.br [Lab. de Produtos e Tecnologia em Processos (LPT), Dept. de Quimica Organica e Inorganica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    In the search for new applications and products derived from Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNSL), we report herein the synthesis and characterization (GC/MS and {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C, and {sup 31}P NMR) of four phosphate esters derived from hydrogenated cardanol, including their applications as antiwear additives for diesel (S500) and as antioxidant additives for mineral oils, evaluated through the HFRR test and oxidative stability analyses, respectively. The results obtained showed very good to excellent performances promoted by the bioadditives evaluated, especially for the thiophosphorylated derivative, which notably reduced the sludge residue and the acidity index of the oxidized oil (0.52 mg NaOH/g sample) and also improved the diesel lubricity, reducing the wear of metal parts by more than 50% (330 {Mu}m). Keywords: Cardanol; Antiwear; Antioxidant; Diesel; Mineral oil. (author)

  1. Antiwear and antioxidant studies of cardanol phosphate ester additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Mazzetto

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the search for new applications and products derived from Cashew Nut Shell Liquid (CNSL, we report herein the synthesis and characterization (GC/MS and ¹H, 13C, and 31P NMR of four phosphate esters derived from hydrogenated cardanol, including their applications as antiwear additives for diesel (S500 and as antioxidant additives for mineral oils, evaluated through the HFRR test and oxidative stability analyses, respectively. The results obtained showed very good to excellent performances promoted by the bio-additives evaluated, especially for the thiophosphorylated derivative, which notably reduced the sludge residue and the acidity index of the oxidized oil (0.52 mg NaOH/g sample and also improved the diesel lubricity, reducing the wear of metal parts by more than 50% (330 μm.

  2. Materials for hydrogen storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Züttel

    2003-09-01

    The goal is to pack hydrogen as close as possible, i.e. to reach the highest volumetric density by using as little additional material as possible. Hydrogen storage implies the reduction of an enormous volume of hydrogen gas. At ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure, 1 kg of the gas has a volume of 11 m3. To increase hydrogen density, work must either be applied to compress the gas, the temperature decreased below the critical temperature, or the repulsion reduced by the interaction of hydrogen with another material.

  3. Solar Hydrogen Reaching Maturity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongé Jan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly vast research efforts are devoted to the development of materials and processes for solar hydrogen production by light-driven dissociation of water into oxygen and hydrogen. Storage of solar energy in chemical bonds resolves the issues associated with the intermittent nature of sunlight, by decoupling energy generation and consumption. This paper investigates recent advances and prospects in solar hydrogen processes that are reaching market readiness. Future energy scenarios involving solar hydrogen are proposed and a case is made for systems producing hydrogen from water vapor present in air, supported by advanced modeling.

  4. Drug-pyridoxal phosphate interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebadi, M; Gessert, C F; Al-Sayegh, A

    1982-01-01

    phosphate. Some interesting relationships are pointed out between vitamin B6, picolinic acid, and zinc. It is postulated that the intestinal absorption of zinc is facilitated by picolinic acid, a metabolite of tryptophan. The derivation of picolinic acid from tryptophan depends on the action of the enzyme kynureninase, which is dependent on pyridoxal phosphate; therefore, the adequate absorption of zinc is indirectly dependent on an adequate supply of vitamin B6. The formation of pyridoxal phosphate, on the other hand, appears to be indirectly dependent on Zn2++ which activates pyridoxal kinase.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  5. Hydrogen energy assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salzano, F J; Braun, C [eds.

    1977-09-01

    The purpose of this assessment is to define the near term and long term prospects for the use of hydrogen as an energy delivery medium. Possible applications of hydrogen are defined along with the associated technologies required for implementation. A major focus in the near term is on industrial uses of hydrogen for special applications. The major source of hydrogen in the near term is expected to be from coal, with hydrogen from electric sources supplying a smaller fraction. A number of potential applications for hydrogen in the long term are identified and the level of demand estimated. The results of a cost benefit study for R and D work on coal gasification to hydrogen and electrolytic production of hydrogen are presented in order to aid in defining approximate levels of R and D funding. A considerable amount of data is presented on the cost of producing hydrogen from various energy resources. A key conclusion of the study is that in time hydrogen is likely to play a role in the energy system; however, hydrogen is not yet competitive for most applications when compared to the cost of energy from petroleum and natural gas.

  6. Phosphate recycling in the phosphorus industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, W.J.; Klapwijk, A.; Potjer, A.; Rulkens, W.H.; Temmink, B.G.; Kiestra, F.D.G.; Lijmbach, A.C.M.

    2001-01-01

    The feasibility of phosphate recycling in the white phosphorus production process is discussed. Several types of materials may be recycled, provided they are dry inorganic materials, low in iron, copper and zinc. Sewage sludge ash may be used if no iron is used for phosphate precipitation in the tre

  7. Phosphate recycling in the phosphorus industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, W.J.; Klapwijk, A.; Potjer, B.; Rulkens, W.H.; Temmink, B.G.; Kiestra, F.D.G.; Lijmbach, A.C.M.

    2004-01-01

    The article describes the potential and limitations for recovery of phosphate from secondary materials in the production process for white phosphorus. This thermal process involves the feeding of phosphate rock, cokes and pebbles to a furnace. The reducing conditions in the furnace promote the forma

  8. Stable Development of Phosphate Fertilizer Sector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The rapid growth of China's economy in recent years gave rise to a sound external environment for the development of the phosphate fertilizer industry. With quite a few state agricultural incentives, the initiative of farmers in grain production is much higher, and consumption of phosphate fertilizers has increased constantly.

  9. Electrochemical phosphate recovery from nanofiltration concentrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kappel, C.; Yasadi, K.; Temmink, B.G.; Metz, S.J.; Kemperman, A.J.B.; Nijmeijer, K.; Zwijnenburg, A.; Witkamp, G.J.; Rijnaarts, H.

    2013-01-01

    The high total phosphorus content of raw domestic wastewater with its significant eutrophication potential offers an excellent possibility for phosphate recovery. Continuous recirculation of NF concentrate to an MBR and simultaneous phosphate recovery from the NF concentrate can be applied to produc

  10. 21 CFR 520.823 - Erythromycin phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... (a) Specifications. Erythromycin phosphate is the phosphate salt of the antibiotic substance produced by the growth of Streptomyces erythreus or the same antibiotic substance produced by any other means... chickens—(i) Amount. 0.500 gram per gallon. (ii) Indications for use. As an aid in the control of...

  11. Adsorption of Phosphate on Variable Charge Soils

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUGUO-SONG; ZHUZU-XIANG; 等

    1992-01-01

    The study about the adsorption of phosphate on four variable charge soils and some minerals revealed that two stage adsorption appeared in the adsorption isothems of phosphate on 4 soils and there was a maximum adsorption on Al-oxide-typed surfaces between pH 3.5 to pH 5.5 as suspension pH changed from 2 to 9,but the adsorption amount of phosphate decreased continually as pH rose on Fe-oxide typed surfaces.The adsorption amount of phosphate and the maximum phosphate adsorption pH decreased in the order of yellow-red soil> lateritic red soil> red soil> paddy soil,which was coincided with the content order of amorphous Al oxide.The removement of organic matter and Fe oxide made the maximum phosphate adsorption pH rise from 4.0 to 5.0 and 4.5,respectively.The desorption curves with pH of four soils showed that phosphate desorbed least at pH 5.Generally the desorption was contrary to the adsorption with pH changing.There was a good accordance between adsorption or desorption and the concentration of Al in the suspension.The possible mechanisms of phosphate adsorption are discussed.

  12. Hydrogen energy for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book highlights the outstanding role of hydrogen in energy processes, where it is the most functional element due to its unique peculiarities that are highlighted and emphasized in the book. The first half of the book covers the great natural hydrogen processes in biology, chemistry, and physics, showing that hydrogen is a trend that can unite all natural sciences. The second half of the book is devoted to the technological hydrogen processes that are under research and development with the aim to create the infrastructure for hydrogen energetics. The book describes the main features of hydrogen that make it inalienable player in processes such as fusion, photosynthesis, and metabolism. It also covers the methods of hydrogen production and storage, highlighting at the same time the exclusive importance of nanotechnologies in those processes.

  13. Photobiological hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Y; Miyake, J

    1999-01-01

    The principles and recent progress in the research and development of photobiological hydrogen production are reviewed. Cyanobacteria produce hydrogen gas using nitrogenase and/or hydrogenase. Hydrogen production mediated by native hydrogenases in cyanobacteria occurs under in the dark under anaerobic conditions by degradation of intracellular glycogen. In vitro and in vivo coupling of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic system with a clostridial hydrogenase via cyanobacterial ferredoxin was demonstrated in the presence of light. Genetic transformation of Synechococcus PCC7942 with the hydrogenase gene from Clostridium pasteurianum was successful; the active enzyme was expressed in PCC7942. The strong hydrogen producers among photosynthetic bacteria were isolated and characterized. Coculture of Rhodobacter and Clostriudium was applied for hydrogen production from glucose. A mutant strain of Rhodobacter sphaeroides RV whose light-harvesting proteins were altered was obtained by UV irradiation. Hydrogen productivity by the mutant was improved when irradiated with monochromatic light of some wavelengths. The development of photobioreactors for hydrogen production is also reviewed.

  14. Enantioselective Brønsted acid catalyzed transfer hydrogenation: organocatalytic reduction of imines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueping, Magnus; Sugiono, Erli; Azap, Cengiz; Theissmann, Thomas; Bolte, Michael

    2005-08-18

    The first enantioselective Brønsted acid catalyzed reduction of imines has been developed. This new organocatalytic transfer hydrogenation of ketimines with Hantzsch dihydropyridine as the hydrogen source offers a mild method to various chiral amines with high enantioselectivity. The stereochemistry of the chiral amines can be rationalized by a stereochemical model derived from an X-ray crystal structure of a chiral BINOL phosphate catalyst. [reaction: see text

  15. Phosphate Biomineralization of Cambrian Microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, David S.; Rozanov, Alexei Yu.; Hoover, Richard B.; Westall, Frances

    1998-01-01

    As part of a long term study of biological markers (biomarkers), we are documenting a variety of features which reflect the previous presence of living organisms. As we study meteorites and samples returned from Mars, our main clue to recognizing possible microbial material may be the presence of biomarkers rather than the organisms themselves. One class of biomarkers consists of biominerals which have either been precipitated directly by microorganisms, or whose precipitation has been influenced by the organisms. Such microbe-mediated mineral formation may include important clues to the size, shape, and environment of the microorganisms. The process of fossilization or mineralization can cause major changes in morphologies and textures of the original organisms. The study of fossilized terrestrial organisms can help provide insight into the interpretation of mineral biomarkers. This paper describes the results of investigations of microfossils in Cambrian phosphate-rich rocks (phosphorites) that were found in Khubsugul, Northern Mongolia.

  16. Determination of the extractive capacity of para-tert butyl calix[8]arene octa-phosphinoylated towards uranyl ions from an aqueous-acidic-salty medium; Determinacion de la capacidad extractiva del p-ter-butilocalix[8]areno octa-fosfinoilado hacia iones uranilo de un medio acuo-acido salino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano V, E. C.

    2011-07-01

    The extraction properties of octa-phosphinoylated para-tert butyl calix[8]arene (prepared in the laboratory) in chloroform towards uranyl ions from an aqueous-acidic-salty medium (HNO{sub 3}-3.5 NaNO{sub 3}) containing uranyl nitrate salt, was investigated. Two spectroscopic techniques UV/Vis and Luminescence were used for this study. The latter permitted analyze the fluorescence from the uranyl ions influenced by the surrounding medium. Both permitted to learn about the power of this calixarene as extractant towards the mentioned ions. Its extraction ability or capability using this calixarene at 5.91 x 10{sup -4} M towards the uranyl ions was 400% as determined by UV/Vis while fluorescence revealed 100% of uranyl ion extraction. A closed analysis of the results obtained by using these techniques revealed that the stoichiometry of the main extracted species was 1calixarene:2 uranyl ions. The loading capacity of the calixarene ligand towards the uranyl ions was also investigated using both techniques. UV/Vis resulted to be inadequate for quantifying exactly the loading capacity of the calixarene whereas luminescence was excellent indeed, using a 5.91 x 10{sup -4} M calixarene concentration, its loading capacity was 0.157 M of free uranyl ions from 0.161 M of uranyl ions present in the aqueous-acidic-salty medium. The extracts from the ability and capacity studies were concentrated to dryness, purified and the dried extracts were analyzed by infrared and neutron activation analysis. By these techniques it was demonstrated that during the extraction of the uranyl ions by the calixarene ligand they form thermodynamically and kinetically stable complexes, since in the solid state, the 1:2, calixarene; uranyl ions stoichiometry was kept with the minimum formula: (UO{sub 2}){sub 2}B{sub 8}bL{sup 8}(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}CHCl{sub 3}(CH{sub 3}OH){sub 3} the methanol molecules come from its purification. It is proposed that B{sub 8}bL{sup 8} calixarene in

  17. Genetics Home Reference: pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... All Close All Description Pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent epilepsy is a condition that involves seizures beginning soon ...

  18. Potential Application of Biohydrogen Production Liquid Waste as Phosphate Solubilizing Agent-A Study Using Soybean Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarma, Saurabh Jyoti; Brar, Satinder Kaur; LeBihan, Yann; Buelna, Gerardo

    2016-03-01

    With CO2 free emission and a gravimetric energy density higher than gasoline, diesel, biodiesel, and bioethanol, biohydrogen is a promising green renewable energy carrier. During fermentative hydrogen production, 60-70 % of the feedstock is converted to different by-products, dominated by organic acids. In the present investigation, a simple approach for value addition of hydrogen production liquid waste (HPLW) containing these compounds has been demonstrated. In soil, organic acids produced by phosphate solubilizing bacteria chelate the cations of insoluble inorganic phosphates (e.g., Ca3 (PO4)2) and make the phosphorus available to the plants. Organic acid-rich HPLW, therefore, has been evaluated as soil phosphate solubilizer. Application of HPLW as soil phosphate solubilizer was found to improve the phosphorus uptake of soybean plants by 2.18- to 2.74-folds. Additionally, 33-100 % increase in seed germination rate was also observed. Therefore, HPLW has the potential to be an alternative for phosphate solubilizing biofertilizers available in the market. Moreover, the strategy can be useful for phytoremediation of phosphorus-rich soil.

  19. Hydrolysis of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate to hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulmer, M T; Brown, P W

    1998-04-01

    Dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) was hydrolysed in water and in 1 M Na2HPO4 solution at temperatures from 25-60 degrees C. Hydrolysis was incomplete in water. At 25 degrees C, DCPD partially hydrolysed to hydroxyapatite (HAp). Formation of HAp is indicative of incongruent DCPD dissolution. At the higher temperatures, hydrolysis to HAp was more extensive and was accompanied by the formation of anhydrous dicalcium phosphate (DCP). Both of these processes are endothermic. When hydrolysis was carried out in 1 M Na2HPO4 solution, heat absorption was greater at any given temperature than for hydrolysis in water. Complete hydrolysis to HAp occurred in this solution. The hydrolysis of DCPD to HAp in sodium phosphate solution was also endothermic. The complete conversion of DCPD to HAp in sodium phosphate solution would not be expected if the only effect of this solution was to cause DCPD dissolution to become congruent. Because of the buffering capacity of a dibasic sodium phosphate solution, DCPD hydrolysed completely to HAp. Complete conversion to HAp was accompanied by the conversion of dibasic sodium phosphate to monobasic sodium phosphate. The formation of DCP was not observed indicating that the sodium phosphate solution precluded the DCPD-to-DCP dehydration reaction. In addition to affecting the extent of hydrolysis, reaction in the sodium phosphate solution also caused a morphological change in the HAp which formed. HAp formed by hydrolysis in water was needle-like to globular while that formed in the sodium phosphate solution exhibited a florette-like morphology.

  20. Relationship of the vibrational frequency of the uranyl ion with the uranium electronegativity; Relacion de la frecuencia vibracional del ion uranilo con la electronegatividad del uranio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez S, A.; Martinez Q, E

    1990-07-15

    It has been demonstrated that the vibrational asymmetric frequency of the uranyl ion, it experiences a consistent spectrochemical displacement with the variations of electronegativity of the uranium in their complexes. The values of the electronegativity of the uranium they were dear by means of calculations that it involves measures of those lengths of the connection uranium-oxygen, obtained by vibrational spectroscopy, effective nuclear charges and the Allred and Rochow equation. The results show the evidence of a natural order that relates to the vibrational frequency with the electronegativity of the uranium atom; settling down that if the electronegativity is graph against it bond length to the oxygen or to it frequency value, a simple relationship is obtained as a form to obtain clear responses in absence of complementary information. (Author)

  1. Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 μg/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 μg/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 μg/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 μg/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  2. Study of the degree of deuteration on the microhardness of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baoan Liu; Shaotao Sun; Bo Wang; Xun Sun; Zhengping Wang; Xinguang Xu

    2015-08-01

    A series of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) crystals with different degrees of deuteration are grown from aqueous solution by the point-seed technique. The microhardness of (100), (001) and so-called ‘tripler’ faces for these DKDP crystals were measured. Initially the hardness number of (001) face for each crystal increases with the increase of the applied load until it reaches 25 g. With further increase in load, the hardness number decreases gradually. The hardness numbers decline with the increase in deuterium content. These composition dependences are expected since the bond strength is weakened by the substitution of deuterium for hydrogen. The hydrogen bond is considered to play the key role in effecting the crystal’s hardness. The visible hardness anisotropy of the different faces is attributed to the inhomogeneous distribution of the oxygen–hydrogen bond on these faces.

  3. Dominant oceanic bacteria secure phosphate using a large extracellular buffer

    OpenAIRE

    M. V. Zubkov; Martin, A. P.; Hartmann, M.; Grob, C.; Scanlan, D.J.

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitous SAR11 and Prochlorococcus bacteria manage to maintain a sufficient supply of phosphate in phosphate-poor surface waters of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre. Furthermore, it seems that their phosphate uptake may counter-intuitively be lower in more productive tropical waters, as if their cellular demand for phosphate decreases there. By flow sorting 33P-phosphate-pulsed 32P-phosphate-chased cells, we demonstrate that both Prochlorococcus and SAR11 cells exploit an extracellul...

  4. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  5. Hydrogen Filling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehm, Robert F; Sabacky, Bruce; Anderson II, Everett B; Haberman, David; Al-Hassin, Mowafak; He, Xiaoming; Morriseau, Brian

    2010-02-24

    Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. The Freedom CAR and Freedom FUEL initiatives emphasize the importance of hydrogen as a future transportation fuel. Presently, Las Vegas has one hydrogen fueling station powered by natural gas. However, the use of traditional sources of energy to produce hydrogen does not maximize the benefit. The hydrogen fueling station developed under this grant used electrolysis units and solar energy to produce hydrogen fuel. Water and electricity are furnished to the unit and the output is hydrogen and oxygen. Three vehicles were converted to utilize the hydrogen produced at the station. The vehicles were all equipped with different types of technologies. The vehicles were used in the day-to-day operation of the Las Vegas Valley Water District and monitoring was performed on efficiency, reliability and maintenance requirements. The research and demonstration utilized for the reconfiguration of these vehicles could lead to new technologies in vehicle development that could make hydrogen-fueled vehicles more cost effective, economical, efficient and more widely used. In order to advance the development of a hydrogen future in Southern Nevada, project partners recognized a need to bring various entities involved in hydrogen development and deployment together as a means of sharing knowledge and eliminating duplication of efforts. A road-mapping session was held in Las Vegas in June 2006. The Nevada State Energy Office, representatives from DOE, DOE contractors and LANL, NETL, NREL were present. Leadership from the National hydrogen Association Board of Directors also attended. As a result of this session, a roadmap for hydrogen development was created. This roadmap has the ability to become a tool for use by other road-mapping efforts in the hydrogen community. It could also become a standard template for other states or even countries to approach planning for a hydrogen

  6. Ultrafast phosphate hydration dynamics in bulk H{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costard, Rene, E-mail: costard@mbi-berlin.de; Tyborski, Tobias; Fingerhut, Benjamin P., E-mail: fingerhut@mbi-berlin.de; Elsaesser, Thomas [Max-Born-Institut für Nichtlineare Optik und Kurzzeitspektroskopie, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-06-07

    Phosphate vibrations serve as local probes of hydrogen bonding and structural fluctuations of hydration shells around ions. Interactions of H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup −} ions and their aqueous environment are studied combining femtosecond 2D infrared spectroscopy, ab-initio calculations, and hybrid quantum-classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Two-dimensional infrared spectra of the symmetric (ν{sub S}(PO{sub 2}{sup −})) and asymmetric (ν{sub AS}(PO{sub 2}{sup −})) PO{sub 2}{sup −} stretching vibrations display nearly homogeneous lineshapes and pronounced anharmonic couplings between the two modes and with the δ(P-(OH){sub 2}) bending modes. The frequency-time correlation function derived from the 2D spectra consists of a predominant 50 fs decay and a weak constant component accounting for a residual inhomogeneous broadening. MD simulations show that the fluctuating electric field of the aqueous environment induces strong fluctuations of the ν{sub S}(PO{sub 2}{sup −}) and ν{sub AS}(PO{sub 2}{sup −}) transition frequencies with larger frequency excursions for ν{sub AS}(PO{sub 2}{sup −}). The calculated frequency-time correlation function is in good agreement with the experiment. The ν(PO{sub 2}{sup −}) frequencies are mainly determined by polarization contributions induced by electrostatic phosphate-water interactions. H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup −}/H{sub 2}O cluster calculations reveal substantial frequency shifts and mode mixing with increasing hydration. Predicted phosphate-water hydrogen bond (HB) lifetimes have values on the order of 10 ps, substantially longer than water-water HB lifetimes. The ultrafast phosphate-water interactions observed here are in marked contrast to hydration dynamics of phospholipids where a quasi-static inhomogeneous broadening of phosphate vibrations suggests minor structural fluctuations of interfacial water.

  7. Adsorption of gluconate and uranyl on C-S-H phases: Combination of wet chemistry experiments and molecular dynamics simulations for the binary systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androniuk, Iuliia; Landesman, Catherine; Henocq, Pierre; Kalinichev, Andrey G.

    2017-06-01

    As a first step in developing better molecular scale understanding of the effects of organic additives on the adsorption and mobility of radionuclides in cement under conditions of geological nuclear waste repositories, two complementary approaches, wet chemistry experiments and molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations, were applied to study the sorption behaviour of two simple model systems: gluconate and uranyl on calcium silicate hydrate phases (C-S-H) - the principal mineral component of hardened cement paste (HCP). Experimental data on sorption and desorption kinetics and isotherms of adsorption for gluconate/C-S-H and U(VI)/C-S-H binary systems were collected and quantitatively analysed for C-S-H samples synthesised with various Ca/Si ratios (0.83, 1.0, 1.4) corresponding to various stages of HCP aging and degradation. Gluconate labelled with 14C isotope was used in order to improve the sensitivity of analytical detection technique (LSC) at particularly low concentrations (10-8-10-5 mol/L). There is a noticeable effect of Ca/Si ratio on the gluconate sorption on C-S-H, with stronger sorption at higher Ca/Si ratios. Sorption of organic anions on C-S-H is mediated by the presence of Ca2+ at the interface and strongly depends on the surface charge and Ca2+ concentration. In parallel, classical MD simulations of the same model systems were performed in order to identify specific surface sorption sites most actively involved in the sorption of gluconate and uranyl on C-S-H and to clarify molecular mechanisms of adsorption.

  8. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies

    1998-08-01

    In this progress report (covering the period May 1997--May 1998), the authors summarize results from ongoing technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Generally, the goal of their research is to illuminate possible pathways leading from present hydrogen markets and technologies toward wide scale use of hydrogen as an energy carrier, highlighting important technologies for RD and D. Over the past year they worked on three projects. From May 1997--November 1997, the authors completed an assessment of hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles, as compared to methanol and gasoline. Two other studies were begun in November 1997 and are scheduled for completion in September 1998. The authors are carrying out an assessment of potential supplies and demands for hydrogen energy in the New York City/New Jersey area. The goal of this study is to provide useful data and suggest possible implementation strategies for the New York City/ New Jersey area, as the Hydrogen Program plans demonstrations of hydrogen vehicles and refueling infrastructure. The authors are assessing the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy systems. The goals of this work are (a) to understand the implications of CO{sub 2} sequestration for hydrogen energy system design; (b) to understand the conditions under which CO{sub 2} sequestration might become economically viable; and (c) to understand design issues for future low-CO{sub 2} emitting hydrogen energy systems based on fossil fuels.

  9. Application of Potential Phosphate-Solubilizing Bacteria and Organic Acids on Phosphate Solubilization from Phosphate Rock in Aerobic Rice

    OpenAIRE

    Qurban Ali Panhwar; Shamshuddin Jusop; Umme Aminun Naher; Radziah Othman; Mohd Ismail Razi

    2013-01-01

    A study was conducted at Universiti Putra Malaysia to determine the effect of phosphate-solubilizing bacteria (PSB) and organic acids (oxalic & malic) on phosphate (P) solubilization from phosphate rock (PR) and growth of aerobic rice. Four rates of each organic acid (0, 10, 20, and 30 mM), and PSB strain (Bacillus sp.) were applied to aerobic rice. Total bacterial populations, amount of P solubilization, P uptake, soil pH, and root morphology were determined. The results of the study showed ...

  10. Uranyl Nitrate Flow Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ladd-Lively, Jennifer L [ORNL

    2008-10-01

    The objectives of the work discussed in this report were to: (1) develop a flow loop that would simulate the purified uranium-bearing aqueous stream exiting the solvent extraction process in a natural uranium conversion plant (NUCP); (2) develop a test plan that would simulate normal operation and disturbances that could be anticipated in an NUCP; (3) use the flow loop to test commercially available flowmeters for use as safeguards monitors; and (4) recommend a flowmeter for production-scale testing at an NUCP. There has been interest in safeguarding conversion plants because the intermediate products [uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}), uranium tetrafluoride (UF{sub 4}), and uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6})] are all suitable uranium feedstocks for producing special nuclear materials. Furthermore, if safeguards are not applied virtually any nuclear weapons program can obtain these feedstocks without detection by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Historically, IAEA had not implemented safeguards until the purified UF{sub 6} product was declared as feedstock for enrichment plants. H. A. Elayat et al. provide a basic definition of a safeguards system: 'The function of a safeguards system on a chemical conversion plant is in general terms to verify that no useful nuclear material is being diverted to use in a nuclear weapons program'. The IAEA now considers all highly purified uranium compounds as candidates for safeguarding. DOE is currently interested in 'developing instruments, tools, strategies, and methods that could be of use to the IAEA in the application of safeguards' for materials found in the front end of the nuclear fuel cycle-prior to the production of the uranium hexafluoride or oxides that have been the traditional starting point for IAEA safeguards. Several national laboratories, including Oak Ridge, Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Brookhaven, have been involved in developing tools or techniques for safeguarding conversion plants. This study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) NA-241, Office of Dismantlement and Transparency.

  11. Hydrogen Fuelling Stations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothuizen, Erasmus Damgaard

    This thesis concerns hydrogen fuelling stations from an overall system perspective. The study investigates thermodynamics and energy consumption of hydrogen fuelling stations for fuelling vehicles for personal transportation. For the study a library concerning the components in a hydrogen fuelling...... station has been developed in Dymola. The models include the fuelling protocol (J2601) for hydrogen vehicles made by Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the thermodynamic property library CoolProp is used for retrieving state point. The components in the hydrogen fuelling library are building up....... A system consisting of one high pressure storage tank is used to investigate the thermodynamics of fuelling a hydrogen vehicle. The results show that the decisive parameter for how the fuelling proceeds is the pressure loss in the vehicle. The single tank fuelling system is compared to a cascade fuelling...

  12. Scandinavian hydrogen highway partnership

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sloth, M.; Hansen, J. [H2 Logic A/S, Herning (Denmark); Wennike, F. [Hydrogen Link Denmark Association, Ringkoebing (Denmark)

    2009-07-01

    The Scandinavian Hydrogen Highway Partnership (SHHP) was launched in an effort to build hydrogen filling stations in Scandinavian countries by 2012 in order to enable hydrogen powered vehicles to operate and refuel when needed. Three hydrogen refueling stations are currently in operation in Scandinavia to fuel a fleet of 15 hydrogen-fuelled cars. It is anticipated that by the end of 2009, there will be 14 hydrogen refueling stations and more than 70 vehicles in operation. Beyond 2012, the number of filling stations and vehicles is expected to increase significantly through large scale demonstration, where SHHP aims to attract funding from the European Union. The current activities of SHHP are co-funded by national and regional authorities. The SHHP network is funded by Nordic Energy Research.

  13. Aging dynamics in ferroelectric deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, Rachel; Cieszymski, Samuel F.; Colla, Eugene V.; Weissman, M. B.

    2017-09-01

    Anomalously large dielectric aging is found in the high-susceptibility plateau ferroelectric regime of nominally ˜95 % deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP). Much less aging is found in nondeuterated KDP throughout most of its plateau region. Optical images of the DKDP domain structure show no dramatic change during aging. Small changes in electric field restore the preaged susceptibility, but the previous aging almost recovers after returning to a respective aging field. Susceptibility vs field can show memory of at least two prior aging fields. Aging effects are not fully erased even by brief heating above the Curie point, indicating a role for diffusion of hydrogen to the domain walls, leaving changes in disorder that can survive temporary absence of domain walls. Asymmetrical nonlinear susceptibility develops for fields slightly above or below a prior aging field and during field sweeps, with the dependence of the second-harmonic magnitude on sweep rate giving a characteristic time comparable to the time for hydrogen to diffuse a domain-wall width.

  14. Hydrogen storage container

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jy-An John; Feng, Zhili; Zhang, Wei

    2017-02-07

    An apparatus and system is described for storing high-pressure fluids such as hydrogen. An inner tank and pre-stressed concrete pressure vessel share the structural and/or pressure load on the inner tank. The system and apparatus provide a high performance and low cost container while mitigating hydrogen embrittlement of the metal tank. System is useful for distributing hydrogen to a power grid or to a vehicle refueling station.

  15. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Steinbugler, M.; Dennis, E. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    For several years, researchers at Princeton University`s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies have carried out technical and economic assessments of hydrogen energy systems. Initially, we focussed on the long term potential of renewable hydrogen. More recently we have explored how a transition to renewable hydrogen might begin. The goal of our current work is to identify promising strategies leading from near term hydrogen markets and technologies toward eventual large scale use of renewable hydrogen as an energy carrier. Our approach has been to assess the entire hydrogen energy system from production through end-use considering technical performance, economics, infrastructure and environmental issues. This work is part of the systems analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program. In this paper we first summarize the results of three tasks which were completed during the past year under NREL Contract No. XR-11265-2: in Task 1, we carried out assessments of near term options for supplying hydrogen transportation fuel from natural gas; in Task 2, we assessed the feasibility of using the existing natural gas system with hydrogen and hydrogen blends; and in Task 3, we carried out a study of PEM fuel cells for residential cogeneration applications, a market which might have less stringent cost requirements than transportation. We then give preliminary results for two other tasks which are ongoing under DOE Contract No. DE-FG04-94AL85803: In Task 1 we are assessing the technical options for low cost small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas, considering (a) steam reforming, (b) partial oxidation and (c) autothermal reforming, and in Task 2 we are assessing potential markets for hydrogen in Southern California.

  16. Liquid hydrogen in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasumi, S. [Iwatani Corp., Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Overseas Business Development

    2009-07-01

    Japan's Iwatani Corporation has focused its attention on hydrogen as the ultimate energy source in future. Unlike the United States, hydrogen use and delivery in liquid form is extremely limited in the European Union and in Japan. Iwatani Corporation broke through industry stereotypes by creating and building Hydro Edge Co. Ltd., Japan's largest liquid hydrogen plant. It was established in 2006 as a joint venture between Iwatani and Kansai Electric Power Group in Osaka. Hydro Edge is Japan's first combined liquid hydrogen and ASU plant, and is fully operational. Liquid oxygen, liquid nitrogen and liquid argon are separated from air using the cryogenic energy of liquefied natural gas fuel that is used for power generation. Liquid hydrogen is produced efficiently and simultaneously using liquid nitrogen. Approximately 12 times as much hydrogen in liquid form can be transported and supplied as pressurized hydrogen gas. This technology is a significant step forward in the dissemination and expansion of hydrogen in a hydrogen-based economy.

  17. Triethylammonium hydrogen chloranilate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuma Gotoh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the crystal structure of the title compound (systematic name: triethylammonium 2,5-dichloro-4-hydroxy-3,6-dioxocyclohexa-1,4-dien-1-olate, C6H16N+·C6HCl2O4−, two hydrogen chloranilate anions are connected by a pair of bifurcated O—H...O hydrogen bonds into a dimeric unit. The triethylammonium cations are linked on both sides of the dimer via bifurcated N—H...O hydrogen bonds into a centrosymmetric 2:2 aggregate. The 2:2 aggregates are further linked by intermolecular C—H...O hydrogen bonds.

  18. Sphingosine 1-phosphate and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyne, Nigel J; El Buri, Ashref; Adams, David R; Pyne, Susan

    2017-09-15

    The bioactive lipid, sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is produced by phosphorylation of sphingosine and this is catalysed by two sphingosine kinase isoforms (SK1 and SK2). Here we discuss structural functional aspects of SK1 (which is a dimeric quaternary enzyme) that relate to coordinated coupling of membrane association with phosphorylation of Ser225 in the 'so-called' R-loop, catalytic activity and protein-protein interactions (e.g. TRAF2, PP2A and Gq). S1P formed by SK1 at the plasma-membrane is released from cells via S1P transporters to act on S1P receptors to promote tumorigenesis. We discuss here an additional novel mechanism that can operate between cancer cells and fibroblasts and which involves the release of the S1P receptor, S1P2 in exosomes from breast cancer cells that regulates ERK-1/2 signalling in fibroblasts. This novel mechanism of signalling might provide an explanation for the role of S1P2 in promoting metastasis of cancer cells and which is dependent on the micro-environmental niche. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    The Florida Hydrogen Initiative (FHI) was a research, development and demonstration hydrogen and fuel cell program. The FHI program objectives were to develop Florida?s hydrogen and fuel cell infrastructure and to assist DOE in its hydrogen and fuel cell activities The FHI program funded 12 RD&D projects as follows: Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure and Rental Car Strategies -- L. Lines, Rollins College This project analyzes strategies for Florida's early stage adaptation of hydrogen-powered public transportation. In particular, the report investigates urban and statewide network of refueling stations and the feasibility of establishing a hydrogen rental-car fleet based in Orlando. Methanol Fuel Cell Vehicle Charging Station at Florida Atlantic University ? M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The project objectives were to design, and demonstrate a 10 kWnet proton exchange membrane fuel cell stationary power plant operating on methanol, to achieve an electrical energy efficiency of 32% and to demonstrate transient response time of less than 3 milliseconds. Assessment of Public Understanding of the Hydrogen Economy Through Science Center Exhibits, J. Newman, Orlando Science Center The project objective was to design and build an interactive Science Center exhibit called: ?H2Now: the Great Hydrogen Xchange?. On-site Reformation of Diesel Fuel for Hydrogen Fueling Station Applications ? A. Raissi, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed an on-demand forecourt hydrogen production technology by catalytically converting high-sulfur hydrocarbon fuels to an essentially sulfur-free gas. The removal of sulfur from reformate is critical since most catalysts used for the steam reformation have limited sulfur tolerance. Chemochromic Hydrogen Leak Detectors for Safety Monitoring ? N. Mohajeri and N. Muradov, Florida Solar Energy Center This project developed and demonstrated a cost-effective and highly selective chemochromic (visual) hydrogen leak detector for safety

  20. Electrochemical hydrogen Storage Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Digby Macdonald

    2010-08-09

    As the global need for energy increases, scientists and engineers have found a possible solution by using hydrogen to power our world. Although hydrogen can be combusted as a fuel, it is considered an energy carrier for use in fuel cells wherein it is consumed (oxidized) without the production of greenhouse gases and produces electrical energy with high efficiency. Chemical storage of hydrogen involves release of hydrogen in a controlled manner from materials in which the hydrogen is covalently bound. Sodium borohydride and aminoborane are two materials given consideration as chemical hydrogen storage materials by the US Department of Energy. A very significant barrier to adoption of these materials as hydrogen carriers is their regeneration from 'spent fuel,' i.e., the material remaining after discharge of hydrogen. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) formed a Center of Excellence for Chemical Hydrogen Storage, and this work stems from that project. The DOE has identified boron hydrides as being the main compounds of interest as hydrogen storage materials. The various boron hydrides are then oxidized to release their hydrogen, thereby forming a 'spent fuel' in the form of a lower boron hydride or even a boron oxide. The ultimate goal of this project is to take the oxidized boron hydrides as the spent fuel and hydrogenate them back to their original form so they can be used again as a fuel. Thus this research is essentially a boron hydride recycling project. In this report, research directed at regeneration of sodium borohydride and aminoborane is described. For sodium borohydride, electrochemical reduction of boric acid and sodium metaborate (representing spent fuel) in alkaline, aqueous solution has been investigated. Similarly to literature reports (primarily patents), a variety of cathode materials were tried in these experiments. Additionally, approaches directed at overcoming electrostatic repulsion of borate anion from the cathode, not