WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrogen trapping mechanism

  1. Evaluation of hydrogen trapping mechanisms during performance of different hydrogen fugacity in a lean duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverstein, R., E-mail: barrav@post.bgu.ac.il [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Eliezer, D. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Glam, B.; Eliezer, S.; Moreno, D. [Soreq Nuclear Research Center, Yavne, 81800 (Israel)

    2015-11-05

    Hydrogen trapping behavior in a lean duplex stainless steel (LDS) is studied by means of thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS). The susceptibility of a metal to hydrogen embrittlement is directly related to the trap characteristics: source or sink (reversible or irreversible, respectively). Since trapping affects the metal's diffusivity, it has a major influence on the hydrogen assisted cracking (HAC) phenomenon. It is known from previously published works that the susceptibility will depend on the competition between reversible and irreversible traps; meaning a direct relation to the hydrogen's initial state in the steel. In this research the trapping mechanism of LDS, exposed to different hydrogen charging environments, is analyzed by means of TDS. The TDS analysis was supported and confirmed by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), hydrogen quantitative measurements and microstructural observations. It was found that gaseous charging (which produces lower hydrogen fugacity) creates ∼22% higher activation energy for hydrogen trapping compared with cathodic charging (which produces higher hydrogen fugacity). These results are due to the different effects on the hydrogen behavior in LDS which causes a major difference in the hydrogen contents and different hydrogen assisted phase transitions. The highest activation energy value in the cathodic charged sample was ascribed to the dominant phase transformation of γ → γ{sup ∗}, whereas in the gaseous charged sample it was ascribed to the dominant formation of intermetallic compound, sigma (σ). The relation between hydrogen distribution in LDS and hydrogen trapping mechanism is discussed in details. - Highlights: • The relation between hydrogen distribution and trapping in LDS is discussed. • Hydrogen's initial state in LDS causes different microstructural changes. • Gaseous charged LDS creates higher trapping energy compared to cathodic charged LDS. • The dominant phase transformation in

  2. Influence of metallurgical heterogeneities on the mechanisms of hydrogen diffusion and trapping of in nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudriss, Abdelali

    2012-01-01

    A thorough investigation on the influence of several metallurgical defects on the hydrogen diffusion and trapping was conducted on nickel. This work was conducted towards two scientific orientations. A first approach was to assess the impact of intrinsic defects, especially grain boundaries and geometrically necessary dislocations on the hydrogen transport and segregation mechanisms. Combining microstructural characterizations with electrochemical permeation tests and thermal desorption spectroscopy, it has established that the grain boundaries with ordered structure called 'special grain boundaries' are preferential areas for hydrogen segregation. On the other hand, a second category of grain boundaries called 'general' or 'random' with high free volume and disordered structure are promoters for hydrogen diffusion, and they represent the main sources of the phenomena short circuit diffusion reported in the face-centered cubic materials. The second approach of this work consisted in the study of the interaction of hydrogen with the plastic deformation heterogeneities. The electrochemical permeation tests performed on microstructures obtained by deformation showed that for the traction monotonous, the equiaxed cells and walls of dislocations are the potential traps for hydrogen and they slow its transport, this latter is mainly provided by the interstitial diffusion mechanism. In addition, for fatigue microstructure, rapid diffusivity of hydrogen was recorded, and suggesting that a phenomenon similar to short-circuit diffusion is involved in the transport of hydrogen. On two approaches, the results suggest a contribution of hydrogen in the formation of vacancies. (author) [fr

  3. New elements to understand hydrogen diffusion and trapping mechanisms in quenched and tempered HSLA martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frappart, S.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen Embrittlement is a complex phenomenon responsible of metal degradation. It mainly depends on the material (chemical composition, heat treatment), the environment or the mechanical state. The main goal of this study is to give new elements to understand hydrogen diffusion and trapping mechanisms in High Strength Low Alloy martensitic steels used in the field of 'Oil and Gas' applications and nuclear industry. In this way, the purpose is to identify hydrogen trapping sites related to microstructural features as a basis for a better knowledge concerning hydrogen embrittlement. Thus, accurate electrochemical permeation set-up (with or without a mechanical state) were developed as well as a procedure to thoroughly analyze experimental data. An original approach on how to interpret electrochemical permeation results has been therefore performed. Afterward, the effect of different critical parameters has been assessed i.e. the membrane thickness, the surface state of the detection side as well as the microstructure and the mechanical state. The relationship between physical parameters associated to diffusion and trapping with the microstructure evolution will give rise to a first thought 'toward the embrittlement'

  4. Hydrogen solubility, diffusivity and trapping in a tempered Fe–C–Cr martensitic steel under various mechanical stress states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frappart, S.; Feaugas, X.; Creus, J.; Thebault, F.; Delattre, L.; Marchebois, H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Engineering elasticity is divided into three mechanical behaviours. ► Apparent diffusion coefficient is affected in the generalized plasticity domain. ► Plasticity increases irreversibly trapped H related to dislocation creation. ► A local elastic distortion seems to affect hydrogen lattice concentration. ► Elastic field around precipitates seems to be reversible trapping sites. - Abstract: Electrochemical permeation test under stress conditions was carried out to determine the consequences of lattice distortion and defects on hydrogen solubility, diffusivity and trapping in a quenched and tempered martensitic steel. We focused our attention within the “engineering” elastic domain which can be divided into three domains: elasticity, micro-plasticity and generalized plasticity. The local elastic distortion associated with hydrogen atoms in lattice sites and residual vacancies seems to affect hydrogen lattice concentration. The hydrogen trapped in elastic fields shows a complex behaviour as a function of stress related to a possible internal relaxation of stresses around precipitates with the occurrence of plasticity. The plastic deformation caused a substantial increase of irreversible trapping sites in relation with the dislocation multiplication. Apparent diffusion coefficient decreased in this deformation domain in agreement with classical trapping models.

  5. Trapping and spectroscopy of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cesar, Claudio Lenz

    1997-01-01

    I review the results and techniques used by the MIT H↑ group to achieve a fractional resolution of 2 parts in 10 12 in the 1S-2S transition in hydrogen [Cesar, D. Fried, T. Killian, A. Polcyn, J. Sandberg, I.A. Yu, T. Greytak, D. Kleppner and J. Doyle, Two-photon spectroscopy of trapped atomic hydrogen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 255.] With some improvements, this system should deliver 100 times higher resolution with an improved signal count rate getting us closer to an old advertised goal of a precision of 1 part in 10 18 . While these developments are very important for the proposed test of the CPT theorem through the comparison with anti-hydrogen, some of the techniques used with hydrogen are not applicable to anti-hydrogen and I discuss some difficulties and alternatives for the trapping and spectroscopy of anti-hydrogen

  6. Differential saturation study of radial and angular modulation mechanisms of electron spin--lattice relaxation for trapped hydrogen atoms in sulfuric acid glasses. [X radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plonka, A; Kevan, L

    1976-11-01

    A differential ESR saturation study of allowed transitions and forbidden proton spin-flip satellite transitions for trapped hydrogen atoms in sulfuric acid glasses indicates that angular modulation dominates the spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms and suggests that the modulation arises from motion of the H atom.

  7. Dissolving, trapping and detrapping mechanisms of hydrogen in bcc and fcc transition metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei You

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available First-principles calculations are performed to investigate the dissolving, trapping and detrapping of H in six bcc (V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Mo, W and six fcc (Ni, Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au metals. We find that the zero-point vibrations do not change the site-preference order of H at interstitial sites in these metals except Pt. One vacancy could trap a maximum of 4 H atoms in Au and Pt, 6 H atoms in V, Nb, Ta, Cr, Ni, Pd, Cu and Ag, and 12 H atoms in Mo and W. The zero-point vibrations never change the maximum number of H atoms trapped in a single vacancy in these metals. By calculating the formation energy of vacancy-H (Vac-Hn complex, the superabundant vacancy in V, Nb, Ta, Pd and Ni is demonstrated to be much more easily formed than in the other metals, which has been found in many metals including Pd, Ni and Nb experimentally. Besides, we find that it is most energetically favorable to form Vac-H1 complex in Pt, Cu, Ag and Au, Vac-H4 in Cr, Mo and W, and Vac-H6 in V, Nb, Ta, Pd and Ni. At last, we examine the detrapping behaviors of H atoms in a single vacancy and find that with the heating rate of 10 K/min a vacancy could accommodate 4, 5 and 6 H atoms in Cr, Mo and W at room temperature, respectively. The detrapping temperatures of all H atoms in a single vacancy in V, Nb, Ta, Ni, Pd, Cu and Ag are below room temperature.

  8. Experimental investigation of the trapping and energy loss mechanisms of intense relativistic electron rings in hydrogen gas and plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.C. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an experimental study on the trapping and energy loss mechanisms of intense, relativistic electron rings confined in Astron-like magnetic field geometries are presented. The work is subdivided into four sections: gas trapping; average ring electron energetics; plasma trapping, and hollow-beam cusp-injection into gas and plasma. The mechanisms by which the injected beam coalesces into a current ring in the existing Cornell RECE-Berta facility are considered. To investigate the nature of ring electron energy loss mechanisms following completion of the trapping process, a diagnostic was developed utilizing multi-foil X-ray absorption spectroscopy to analyze the Bremsstrahlung generated by the electrons as they impinge upon a thin tungsten wire target suspended in the circulating current. Finally, a set of preliminary experimental results is presented in which an annular electron beam was passed through a coaxial, non-adiabatic magnetic cusp located at one end of a magnetic mirror well

  9. Inelastic collision rates of trapped metastable hydrogen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landhuis, D; Matos, L; Moss, SC; Steinberger, JK; Vant, K; Willmann, L; Greytak, TJ; Kleppner, D

    We report the first detailed decay studies of trapped metastable (2S) hydrogen. By two-photon excitation of ultracold H samples, we have produced clouds of at least 5x10(7) magnetically trapped 2S atoms at densities greater than 4x10(10) cm(-3) and temperatures below 100 muK. At these densities and

  10. Hydrogen and deuterium trapping in iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, H H; Lin, R W

    1981-02-01

    The research described is directed at present almost exclusively to hydrogen transport, including both chemical and physical trapping, in iron and iron-base alloys. Some attention is directed to isotope effects. Efforts are made to clarify and understand hydrogen-related phenomena which are believed to be of direct importance to practical performance.

  11. Hydrogen Transport and Trapping in ODS-EUROFER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteban, G.A.; Pena, A.; Legarda, F.; Lindau, R.

    2006-01-01

    Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) EUROFER is a candidate structural material to be used in the design of several blanket options [R. Lindau et al. Fusion Eng. Des. 75 - 79 (2005) 989]. This type of material allows higher temperature performance (650 o C) than standard RAFM steels and shows improved mechanical properties like superior tensile and creep properties in comparison to the base material EUROFER [R. Lindau, A. Moeslang, M. Schirra, P. Schlossmacher, M. Klimenkov, J. Nucl. Mater. 307-311 (2002) 769]. Together with mechanical and activation properties, the characterization of hydrogen isotope transport properties in any fusion technology material is compulsory because they affect important issues of the blanket concept using a specific collection of materials, such as the fuel economy, plasma stability and the radiological security of the fusion reactor. The hydrogen interaction properties of permeability, diffusivity and Sieverts' constant in ODS-EUROFER are experimentally evaluated by using the gas evolution permeation technique. The results are analysed together with the properties of the base material in order to study the influence of the particular microstructure of ODS in the hydrogen transport. Higher permeability of hydrogen in ODS-EUROFER has been obtained in comparison to the base material EUROFER. The effect of trapping showing a high time lag for non steady-state permeation has been noticed in the low temperature range. The trapping phenomena is identified to be the cause of such effect and the presence of nanoparticles of Yttria the reason for the source of additional trapping sites. The concluding remark is a decrease in the diffusivity and an increase in the solubility of hydrogen in the material at low temperature. All the hydrogen transport parameters obtained for ODS-EUROFER are compared to the properties of base material and available data corresponding to other RAFM steels of the same kind. (author)

  12. Hydrogen in trapping states innocuous to environmental degradation of high-strength steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Kenichi

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen in trapping states innocuous to environmental degradation of the mechanical properties of high-strength steels has been separated and extracted using thermal desorption analysis (TDA) and slow strain rate test (SSRT). The high-strength steel occluding only hydrogen desorbed at low temperature (peak 1), as determined by TDA, decreases in maximum stress and plastic elongation with increasing occlusion time of peak 1 hydrogen. Thus the trapping state of peak 1 hydrogen is directly associated with environmental degradation. The trap activation energy for peak 1 hydrogen is 23.4 kJ/mol, so the peak 1 hydrogen corresponds to weaker binding states and diffusible states at room temperature. In contrast, the high-strength steel occluding only hydrogen desorbed at high temperature (peak 2), by TDA, maintains the maximum stress and plastic elongation in spite of an increasing content of peak 2 hydrogen. This result indicates that the peak 2 hydrogen trapping state is innocuous to environmental degradation, even though the steel occludes a large amount of peak 2 hydrogen. The trap activation energy for peak 2 hydrogen is 65.0 kJ/mol, which indicates a stronger binding state and nondiffusibility at room temperature. The trap activation energy for peak 2 hydrogen suggests that the driving force energy required for stress-induced, diffusion during elastic and plastic deformation, and the energy required for hydrogen dragging by dislocation mobility during plastic deformation are lower than the binding energy between hydrogen and trapping sites. The peak 2 hydrogen, therefore, is believed to not accumulate in front of the crack tip and to not cause environmental degradation in spite of being present in amounts as high as 2.9 mass ppm. (author)

  13. Effect of trapping and temperature on the hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of alloy 718

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galliano, Florian; Andrieu, Eric; Blanc, Christine; Cloue, Jean-Marc; Connetable, Damien; Odemer, Gregory, E-mail: gregory.odemer@ensiacet.fr

    2014-08-12

    Ni-based alloy 718 is widely used to manufacture structural components in the aeronautic and nuclear industries. Numerous studies have shown that alloy 718 may be sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement. In the present study, the susceptibilities of three distinct metallurgical states of alloy 718 to hydrogen embrittlement were investigated to identify both the effect of hydrogen trapping on hydrogen embrittlement and the role of temperature in the hydrogen-trapping mechanism. Cathodic charging in a molten salt bath was used to saturate the different hydrogen traps of each metallurgical state. Tensile tests at different temperatures and different strain rates were carried out to study the effect of hydrogen on mechanical properties and failure modes, in combination with hydrogen content measurements. The results demonstrated that Ni-based superalloy 718 was strongly susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement between 25 °C and 300 °C, and highlighted the dominant roles played by the hydrogen solubility and the hydrogen trapping on mechanical behavior and fracture modes.

  14. Electron spin-lattice relaxation mechanisms of radiation produced trapped electrons and hydrogen atoms in aqueous and organic glassy matrices. Modulation of electron nuclear dipolar interaction by tunnelling modes in a glassy matrix. [. gamma. rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, M K; Kevan, L [Wayne State Univ., Detroit, Mich. (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1977-01-01

    The spin lattice relaxation of trapped electrons in aqueous and organic glasses and trapped hydrogen atoms in phosphoric acid glass has been directly studied as a function of temperature by the saturation recovery method. Below 50 to 100 K, the major spin lattice relaxation mechanism involves modulation of the electron nuclear dipolar (END) interaction with nuclei in the radical's environment by tunnelling of those nuclei between two or more positions. This relaxation mechanism occurs with high efficiency and has a characteristic linear temperature dependence. The tunnelling nuclei around trapped electrons do not seem to involve the nearest neighbor nuclei which are oriented by the electron in the process of solvation. Instead the tunnelling nuclei typically appear to be next nearest neighbors to the trapped electron. The identities of the tunnelling nuclei have been deduced by isotopic substitution and are attributed to: Na in 10 mol dm/sup -3/ NaOH aqueous glass, ethyl protons in ethanol glass, methyl protons in methanol glass and methyl protons in MTHF glass. For trapped hydrogen atoms in phosphoric acid, the phosphorus nuclei appear to be the effective tunnelling nuclei. Below approximately 10 K the spin lattice relaxation is dominated by a temperature independent cross relaxation term for H atoms in phosphoric acid glass and for electrons in 10 mol dm/sup -3/ NaOH aqueous glass, but not for electrons in organic glasses. This is compared with recent electron-electron double resonance studies of cross relaxation in these glasses. The spin lattice relaxation of O/sup -/ formed in 10 mol dm/sup -3/ NaOH aqueous glass was also studied and found to be mainly dominated by a Raman process with an effective Debye temperature of about 100 K.

  15. Hydrogenation of the ``new oxygen donor'' traps in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzlein, K.; Pensl, G.; Schulz, M.; Johnson, N. M.

    1986-04-01

    Hydrogenation was performed at moderate temperatures (≤300 °C) on Czochralski-grown Si samples that contained high concentrations of the oxygen-related ``new donor'' (ND) traps. From deep level transient spectroscopy, a comparison of spectra from untreated reference and hydrogenated material reveals that two different types of defect states contribute to the continuous energy distribution of the ND traps. The experimental and theoretical results further establish the ``SiOx interface'' model for the ND defects.

  16. Trapping hydrogen atoms from a neon-gas matrix: a theoretical simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, S; Zhang, P; Kharchenko, V; Dalgarno, A

    2009-08-07

    Hydrogen is of critical importance in atomic and molecular physics and the development of a simple and efficient technique for trapping cold and ultracold hydrogen atoms would be a significant advance. In this study we simulate a recently proposed trap-loading mechanism for trapping hydrogen atoms released from a neon matrix. Accurate ab initio quantum calculations are reported of the neon-hydrogen interaction potential and the energy- and angular-dependent elastic scattering cross sections that control the energy transfer of initially cold atoms are obtained. They are then used to construct the Boltzmann kinetic equation, describing the energy relaxation process. Numerical solutions of the Boltzmann equation predict the time evolution of the hydrogen energy distribution function. Based on the simulations we discuss the prospects of the technique.

  17. Origins of hole traps in hydrogenated nanocrystalline and amorphous silicon revealed through machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Tim; Johlin, Eric; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2014-03-01

    Genetic programming is used to identify the structural features most strongly associated with hole traps in hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon with very low crystalline volume fraction. The genetic programming algorithm reveals that hole traps are most strongly associated with local structures within the amorphous region in which a single hydrogen atom is bound to two silicon atoms (bridge bonds), near fivefold coordinated silicon (floating bonds), or where there is a particularly dense cluster of many silicon atoms. Based on these results, we propose a mechanism by which deep hole traps associated with bridge bonds may contribute to the Staebler-Wronski effect.

  18. Thermodesorption examination of interaction of hydrogen with traps in silver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabis, I.E.; Kurdyumov, A.A.; Ovsvannikova, T.A.

    1992-01-01

    The authors have previously examined the interaction of hydrogen with silver by the methods of thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) and hydrogen permeability. The results showed that the TDS spectra contained a high-temperature phase linked with hydrogen which left the volume of the specimen during heating. It was assumed that hydrogen was captured and released by structural defects acting as traps. These traps can be represented by vacancies and their clusters. In this work, the high-temperature desorption of hydrogen from silver was studied. The experimental setup consisted of an all-metal vacuum system, a time-of-flight mass spectrometer, a DVK-2M computing system, and a Camac system. The described model of a local equilibrium should be regarded only as a first approximation. The results provide unambiguous information on the processes of permeability and desorption, and make it possible to assume that the formation of the high-temperature phase in TD spectra was caused by the generation of hydrogen from the traps. The parameters of the interaction of hydrogen with the traps were determined by the concentration wave method. 7 refs., 2 figs

  19. Trapping and detrapping of hydrogen in graphite materials exposed to hydrogen gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atsumi, Hisao; Iseki, Michio; Shikama, Tatsuo.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of hydrogen solubility have been performed for several unirradiated and neutron-irradiated graphite (and CFC) samples at temperatures between 973 and 1323 K under a ∼10 kPa hydrogen atmosphere. The hydrogen dissolution process has been studied and it is discussed here. The values of hydrogen solubility vary substantially among the samples up to about a factor of 16. A strong correlation has been observed between the values of hydrogen solubility and the degrees of graphitization determined by X-ray diffraction technique. The relation can be extended even for the neutron irradiated samples. Hydrogen dissolution into graphite can be explained with the trapping of hydrogen at defect sites (e.g. dangling carbon bonds) considering an equilibrium reaction between hydrogen molecules and the trapping sites. The migration of hydrogen in graphite is speculated to result from a sequence of detrapping and retrapping events with high energy activation processes. (author)

  20. Neutralizing trapped electrons on the hydrogenated surface of a diamond amplifier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyun Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss our investigation of electron trapping in a diamond amplifier (DA. Our previous work demonstrated that some electrons reaching the DA’s hydrogenated surface are not emitted. The state and the removal of these electrons is important for DA applications. We found that these stopped electrons are trapped, and cannot be removed by a strong reversed-polarity electric field; to neutralize this surface charge, holes must be sent to the hydrogenated surface to recombine with the trapped electrons through the Shockley-Read-Hall surface-recombination mechanism. We measured the time taken for such recombination on the hydrogenated surface, viz. the recombination time, as less than 5 ns, limited by the resolution of our test system. With this measurement, we demonstrated that DA could be operated in an rf cavity with frequency of a few hundred megahertz.

  1. Trapping of hydrogen isotopes in molybdenum and niobium predamaged by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bottiger, J.; Picraux, S.T.; Rud, N.; Laursen, T.

    1977-01-01

    The trapping of hydrogen isotopes at defects in Mo and Nb have been studied. Ion beams of 11- and 18-keV He + , 55-keV O + and Ne + , and 500-keV Bi + were used to create defects. Subsequently H or D was injected at room temperature by use of molecular beams of 16-keV H + 2 and D + 2 . Appreciable enhancements were observed in the amount of H and D retained within the near-surface region of predamaged samples compared to samples with no prior damage. The total amount of D retained within the near-surface region was measured by means of the nuclear reaction D( 3 He,p) 4 He, and H depth profiles were measured via a resonance in the nuclear reaction 1 H( 19 F,αγ) 16 O. The H profiles correlate with the predicted predamaging ion profiles; however, appreciable tails to deeper depths for the hydrogen profiles are observed for the heavier predamaging ions. For a given predamage ion fluence, the amount of trapped deuterium increases linearly with incident deuterium fluence until a saturation in the enhancement is reached. The amount of deuterium trapped when saturation occurs increases with increasing predamage fluence. The experiments indicate that lighter ions, which create fewer primary displacements, are more effective per displacement in trapping hydrogen. An appreciable release of hydrogen is obtained upon annealing at 200 and 300 degreeC, and a preannealing experiment indicates this is due to detrapping rather than to any loss of traps. These temperatures suggest a much higher binding energy for the trapped hydrogen isotopes (approx.1.5 eV) than the available evidence gives for simple H-defect binding energies (approximately-less-than0.3 eV). The detailed trapping mechanism is not known. However, it is suggested on the basis of the high binding energies and the high concentrations of hydrogen which can be trapped that clusters of hydrogen may be formed

  2. Hydrogen trapping energy levels and hydrogen diffusion at high and low strain rates (~10{sup 5} s{sup −1} and 10{sup −7} s{sup −1}) in lean duplex stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverstein, R., E-mail: barrav@post.bgu.ac.il; Eliezer, D.

    2016-09-30

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) alloys are high strength steels combined with ductility and excellent resistance to stress corrosion cracking, which makes them attractive for the pressure vessels or underwater pipelines industries. Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is caused by the action of hydrogen in combination with residual or applied stress and can lead to the mechanical degradation of a material. Dynamic and quasi-static experiments were conducted at room temperature and strain rates of 10{sup 5} s{sup −1} and 10{sup −7} s{sup −1} on gas-phase hydrogen charged DSS. Hydrogen trapping in the various defects and its effect on the mechanical properties are discussed in details. A linear model of Lee and Lee was applied to calculate the trap activation energies. It was found that lower strain rates (~10{sup −7} s{sup −1}) will create less deep hydrogen trapping energies values; ~40% lower than in non-loaded sample. In addition, higher dynamic pressure will create higher trapping energy sites for hydrogen. Based on our experimental studies we developed an analytical model for hydrogen trapping. We have found that the strain rate has a direct influence on both hydrogen diffusion and hydrogen potential trapping sites. During deformation processes created at low strain rates (~10{sup −7} s{sup −1}) hydrogen has enough time to migrate with dislocations from deeper potential trapping sites to lower potential trapping sites.

  3. Negative hydrogen ion production mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacal, M. [UPMC, LPP, Ecole Polytechnique, UMR CNRS 7648, Palaiseau (France); Wada, M. [School of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyoto 610-0321 (Japan)

    2015-06-15

    Negative hydrogen/deuterium ions can be formed by processes occurring in the plasma volume and on surfaces facing the plasma. The principal mechanisms leading to the formation of these negative ions are dissociative electron attachment to ro-vibrationally excited hydrogen/deuterium molecules when the reaction takes place in the plasma volume, and the direct electron transfer from the low work function metal surface to the hydrogen/deuterium atoms when formation occurs on the surface. The existing theoretical models and reported experimental results on these two mechanisms are summarized. Performance of the negative hydrogen/deuterium ion sources that emerged from studies of these mechanisms is reviewed. Contemporary negative ion sources do not have negative ion production electrodes of original surface type sources but are operated with caesium with their structures nearly identical to volume production type sources. Reasons for enhanced negative ion current due to caesium addition to these sources are discussed.

  4. Energy transfer in a mechanically trapped exciplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosterman, Jeremy K; Iwamura, Munetaka; Tahara, Tahei; Fujita, Makoto

    2009-07-15

    Host-guest complexes involving M(6)L(4) coordination cages can display unusual photoreactivity, and enclathration of the very large fluorophore bisanthracene resulted in an emissive, mechanically trapped intramolecular exciplex. Mechanically linked intramolecular exciplexes are important for understanding the dependence of energy transfer on donor-acceptor distance, orientation, and electronic coupling but are relatively unexplored. Steady-state and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements have revealed that selective excitation of the encapsulated guest fluorophore results in efficient energy transfer from the excited guest to an emissive host-guest exciplex state.

  5. Modelling the influence of austenitisation temperature on hydrogen trapping in Nb containing martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Peter; Rath, Markus; Kozeschnik, Ernst; Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, Pedro E.J.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen trapping behaviour is investigated by means of thermokinetic simulations in a martensitic steel. The heat treatment consists of austenitisation followed by quenching and tempering. The model prescribes a minimum in hydrogen trapping at an austenitisation temperature of 1050 °C. Below this temperature, austenite grain boundaries are the prevailing trap, whereas niobium atoms in solid solution are the main traps above 1050 °C. The model describes precisely the experimental results

  6. Determination of trapping parameters and the chemical diffusion coefficient from hydrogen permeation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svoboda, J.; Mori, G.; Prethaler, A.; Fischer, F.D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A modeling study for diffusion of hydrogen with traps is presented. • Introduction of a new chemical diffusion coefficient. • Density of traps and average depth of traps can be determined. • Lattice diffusion and sub-surface concentration of atomic hydrogen can be determined. - Abstract: An improved diffusion theory accounting for trapping effects is applied to evaluation of hydrogen permeation experiments performed for pure iron and pearlitic and martensitic steels. The trapping parameters as molar volume and depth of traps are determined by fitting experiments by simulations based on the theory. The concentration-dependent chemical diffusion coefficient of hydrogen is extracted indicating that the trapping effect on diffusion in pure iron and pearlitic steel is negligible. However, it is significant for martensitic steel, for which the chemical diffusion coefficient cannot be considered as concentration-independent as it is established in current standards

  7. Dependence of hydrogen-induced lattice defects and hydrogen embrittlement of cold-drawn pearlitic steels on hydrogen trap state, temperature, strain rate and hydrogen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doshida, Tomoki; Takai, Kenichi

    2014-01-01

    The effects of the hydrogen state, temperature, strain rate and hydrogen content on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility and hydrogen-induced lattice defects were evaluated for cold-drawn pearlitic steel that absorbed hydrogen in two trapping states. Firstly, tensile tests were carried out under various conditions to evaluate hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. The results showed that peak 2 hydrogen, desorbed at temperatures above 200 °C as determined by thermal desorption analysis (TDA), had no significant effect on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. In contrast, hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased in the presence of peak 1 hydrogen, desorbed from room temperature to 200 °C as determined by TDA, at temperatures higher than −30 °C, at lower strain rates and with higher hydrogen content. Next, the same effects on hydrogen-induced lattice defects were also evaluated by TDA using hydrogen as a probe. Peak 2 hydrogen showed no significant effect on either hydrogen-induced lattice defects or hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. It was found that hydrogen-induced lattice defects formed under the conditions where hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased. This relationship indicates that hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility was higher under the conditions where the formation of hydrogen-induced lattice defects tended to be enhanced. Since hydrogen-induced lattice defects formed by the interaction between hydrogen and strain were annihilated by annealing at a temperature of 200 °C, they were presumably vacancies or vacancy clusters. One of the common atomic-level changes that occur in cold-drawn pearlitic steel showing higher hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility is the formation of vacancies and vacancy clusters

  8. Caution on the use of liquid nitrogen traps in stable hydrogen isotope-ratio mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.; Qi, Haiping

    2010-01-01

    An anomalous stable hydrogen isotopic fractionation of 4 ‰ in gaseous hydrogen has been correlated with the process of adding liquid nitrogen (LN2) to top off the dewar of a stainless-steel water trap on a gaseous hydrogen-water platinum equilibration system. Although the cause of this isotopic fractionation is unknown, its effect can be mitigated by (1) increasing the capacity of any dewars so that they do not need to be filled during a daily analytic run, (2) interspersing isotopic reference waters among unknowns, and (3) applying a linear drift correction and linear normalization to isotopic results with a program such as Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes. With adoption of the above guidelines, measurement uncertainty can be substantially improved. For example, the long-term (months to years) δ2H reproducibility (1& sigma; standard deviation) of nine local isotopic reference waters analyzed daily improved substantially from about 1‰ to 0.58 ‰. This isotopically fractionating mechanism might affect other isotope-ratio mass spectrometers in which LN2 is used as a moisture trap for gaseous hydrogen

  9. (Anti)hydrogen recombination studies in a nested Penning trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quint, W.; Kaiser, R.; Hall, D.; Gabrielse, G.

    1993-01-01

    Extremely cold antiprotons, stored in Penning trap at 4 K, open the way toward the production and study of cold antihydrogen. We have begun experimentally investigating the possibility to recombine cold positrons and antiprotons within nested Penning traps. Trap potentials are adjusted to allow cold trapped protons (and positive helium ions) to pass through cold trapped electrons. Electrons, protons and ions are counted by ejecting them to a cold channel plate and by nondestructive radiofrequency techniques. The effect of the space charge of one trapped species upon another trapped species passing through is clearly observed. (orig.)

  10. Role of vanadium carbide traps in reducing the hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of high strength alloy steels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, G.L.; Duquette, D.J.

    1998-08-01

    High strength alloy steels typically used for gun steel were investigated to determine their susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Although AISI grade 4340 was quite susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement, ASTM A723 steel, which has identical mechanical properties but slightly different chemistries, was not susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement when exposed to the same conditions. The degree of embrittlement was determined by conducting notched tensile testing on uncharged and cathodically charged specimens. Chemical composition was modified to isolate the effect of alloying elements on hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. Two steels-Modified A723 (C increased from 0.32% to 0.40%) and Modified 4340 (V increased from 0 to O.12%) were tested. X-ray diffraction identified the presence of vanadium carbide, V{sub 4}C{sub 3}, in A-23 steels, and subsequent hydrogen extraction studies evaluated the trapping effect of vanadium carbide. Based on these tests, it was determined that adding vanadium carbide to 4340 significantly decreased hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility because vanadium carbide traps ties up diffusible hydrogen. The effectiveness of these traps is examined and discussed in this paper.

  11. Rupture mechanics of metallic alloys for hydrogen transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moro, I.; Briottet, L.; Lemoine, P.; Andrieu, E.; Blanc, C.

    2007-01-01

    With the aim to establish a cheap hydrogen distribution system, the transport by pipelines is a solution particularly interesting. Among the high limit of elasticity steels, the X80 has been chosen for hydrogen transport. Its chemical composition and microstructure are given. Important microstructural changes have been revealed in the sheet thickness: the microstructure is thinner and richer in perlite in surface than in bulk. In parallel to this microstructural evolution, a microhardness gradient has been observed: the material microhardness is stronger in surface than in bulk of the sheet. The use of this material for hydrogen transport requires to study its resistance to hydrogen embrittlement. The main aim of this work is to develop an easy rupture mechanics test allowing to qualify the studied material in a gaseous hydrogen environment, to determine the sensitivity of the studied material to the hydrogen embrittlement and to better understand the mechanisms of the hydrogen embrittlement for ferritic materials. Two experimental tests have been used for: the first one is a traction machine coupled to an autoclave; the second one allows to carry out disk rupture tests. The toughness of the material in a gaseous hydrogen environment has thus been determined. The resistance of the material to hydrogen embrittlement has been characterized and by simulation, it has been possible to identify the areas with a strong concentration in hydrogen. The second aim of this work is to study the influence of the steel microstructure on the hydrogen position in the material and on the resistance of the material to the hydrogen embrittlement. The preferential trapping sites on the material not mechanically loaded have at first been identified, as well as the hydrogen position on the different phases and at the ferrite/cementite interface. The interaction between the mechanical loads, the position and the trapping of the hydrogen have been studied then. At last, has been

  12. Hydrogen diffusion and trapping in bcc and fcc metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, D.

    1979-01-01

    The fundamental aspects of the metal--hydrogen systems are described. The large number of anomalous properties are the reason for continuous scientific effort. The time scale of hydrogen motion is extremely short. The characteristic frequencies of the localized modes of hydrogen in Ta, Nb, or V are in the order of 10 -14 sec (energies between 0.1 to 0.2 eV); the jump frequencies for H-diffusion at elevated temperatures in those systems are between 10 +12 to 10 +13 sec -1 . They are comparable with the correlation times for diffusion in liquids and more than ten orders of magnitude larger than the jump times for nitrogen in Nb. Out of the large number of experimental data this paper will survey only some recent results on representative fcc and bcc metals for dilute H solutions. The nature of the elementary step in H-diffusion is described. Here the temperature and isotope dependence of the H-diffusion coefficient gives hints to the mechanism involved. The experimental results are discussed in terms of semiclassical and quantum mechanical diffusion theories

  13. A trap activation model for hydrogen retention and isotope exchange in some refractory materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brice, D.K.; Doyle, B.L.

    1982-01-01

    Our recently-developed Local Mixing Model (LMM) has been successful in describing and predicting the properties of hydrogen retention and isotope exchange for a variety of refractory materials. For some materials, however, the detailed predictions of the LMM are not observed. A Trap Activation Model (TAM) is proposed here to account for the observed departures from the LMM. Comparison of experimental room temperature saturation depth profiles for H + →Si with the predictions of TAM suggests that the hydrogen traps are multiple-vacancy complexes in this system. The observed profiles result from a beam-induced competition between trap creation/annihilation and H-trapping/detrapping. (orig.)

  14. Trapping and re-emission of energetic hydrogen and helium ions in materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Sadae

    1981-01-01

    The experimental results on the trapping and re-emission of energetic hydrogen and helium ions in materials are explained. The trapping of deuterium and helium in graphite saturates at the concentration of 10 18 ions/cm 2 . The trapping rate of hydrogen depends on the kinds of target materials. In the case of the implantation in Mo over 3 x 10 16 H/cm 2 , hydrogen is hardly trapped. On the other hand, the trapping of hydrogen in Ti, Zr and Ta which form solid solution is easily made. The hydrogen in these metals can diffuse toward the inside of metals. The deuterium retained in 316 SS decreased with time. The trapping rate reached saturation more rapidly at higher implantation temperature. The effective diffusion constant for the explanation of the re-emission process is 1/100 as small as the ordinary value. The radiation damage due to helium irradiation affects on the trapping of deuterium in Mo. The temperature dependence of the trapping rate can be explained by the diffusion model based on the Sievert's law. The re-emission of helium was measured at various temperature. At low temperature, the re-emission was low at first, then the rate increased. At high temperature, the re-emission rate was high from the beginning. (Kato, T.)

  15. Hydrogen transport in solids with traps in the case of continuum distribution of detrapping energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, S I; Smirnov, R D; Marenkov, E D; Pisarev, A A

    2014-01-01

    Tritium retention in the first wall material is one of the key issues in the performance of future fusion reactors. Transport of hydrogenic species in these materials is most commonly treated as diffusion affected by trapping/detrapping processes. Usually only several trap types differing in their activation energies of hydrogen release are considered (up to three types in the TMAP7 code). We suggest that in some cases (e.g. highly damaged or disordered media) the hydrogen trapping/detrapping process is better characterized by a continuum distribution of traps over their detrapping energies. Within a random walk model we show that this assumption leads to qualitative changes in hydrogen transport in solids. Using this model we explain experimental findings on temporal dependence of deuterium outgassing from tokamaks, first wall. (paper)

  16. The design and commissioning of cold trap purifying system of hydrogen meter sodium loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Zhaoyi; Jia Baoshan; Chen Xiaoming; Pan Fengguo

    1993-01-01

    The design feature and parameters of cold trap purifying system of hydrogen meter sodium loop and its commissioning results are reported and discussed. In order to adjust the flow easily,. the cold trap purifying system is arranged in the exit of the electromagnetic pump. It is composed of regenerator and the cold trap. The regenerator is above the cold trap. The high temperature sodium in the main-loop flows through the regenerator, in the entrance of the cold trap, its temperature is reduced to 180 degree C. After entering into the cold trap, the sodium flows to the purifying region by side, when it arrives the bottom of the trap, its temperature is reduced to 110 degree C. The cold trap is cooled by air. The temperature of the clean sodium rises nearby the main-loop's by the regenerator, and then it returns to the entrance of the electromagnetic pump. According to the commissioning results, the sodium's temperature of the cold trap could be reduced to 110 degree C by reducing the flow of the cold trap purifying system and the temperature of the main-loop, or increasing the air flow and cutting off the power supply of its heating. The authors think that the latter is more conformable with the design stipulation and with the requirement of the hydrogen meter experiment, and it can meet the requirements of the operation of the Nuclear Power Plant

  17. Magnesium mechanical alloys for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, E.; Konstanchuk, I.; Stepanov, A.; Boldyrev, V.

    1985-01-01

    Metal hybrides are currently being used to store and handle hydrogen and its isotopes. They are also being tested in hydrogen compressors and in heat energy, refrigerators and in hydrogen and thermal storage devices. Metal hydrides have been proposed as one of the possible media for hydrogen storage to overcome the limitations of other techniques in regard to safety hydrogen weight and volume ration. The suitability of metal hybrides as a hydrogen storage media depends on a number of factors such as storage capacity, reactivity with hydrogen at various pressures and temperatures, and the cost of base materials. Magnesium based alloys are promising materials for storing hydrogen. They are generally made by argon melting and no attention has been payed to other fabrication techniques such as mechanical alloying or powder technique

  18. Mechanism for hydrogen diffusion in amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biswas, R.; Li, Q.; Pan, B.C.; Yoon, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Tight-binding molecular-dynamics calculations reveal a mechanism for hydrogen diffusion in hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Hydrogen diffuses through the network by successively bonding with nearby silicons and breaking their Si endash Si bonds. The diffusing hydrogen carries with it a newly created dangling bond. These intermediate transporting states are densely populated in the network, have lower energies than H at the center of stretched Si endash Si bonds, and can play a crucial role in hydrogen diffusion. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  19. Hydrogen study in melt inclusions trapped in quartz with nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosbah, M.; Tirira, J.; Gosset, J.; Massiot, P.

    1990-01-01

    Elastic recoil spectrometry induced by 3 MeV helium-4 microbeam has been used to determine hydrogen distribution within melt inclusions trapped in quartz. These minerals were selected from different geological environments: Guadeloupe (West Indies), Pantelleria Island (South Sicily - Italy) and San Pietro (South Sardinia - Italy). Bulk hydrogen contents are calculated (H assumed to be in H 2 O form). The knowledge of hydrogen distribution assists both in a better understanding and in the establishment of volcanic dynamism hypotheses. Finally, fluid hydrogen rich inclusions are evidenced and H concentration profile is simulated and reported for the first time in glass inclusion

  20. Theoretical examination of the trapping of ion-implanted hydrogen in metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, S.M.; Nordlander, P.; Besenbacher, F.; Norskov, J.K.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical analysis of the defect trapping of ion-implanted hydrogen in metals has been extended in two respects. A new transport formalism has been developed which takes account not only of the diffusion, trapping, and surface release of the hydrogen, which were included in earlier treatments, but also the diffusion, recombination, agglomeration, and surface annihilation of the vacancy and interstitial traps. In addition, effective-medium theory has been used to examine multiple hydrogen occupancy of the vacancy, and, for the fcc structure, appreciable binding enthalpies relative to the solution site have been found for occupancies of up to six. These extensions have been employed to model the depth distribution of ion-implanted hydrogen in Ni and Al during linear ramping of temperature, and the results have been used to interpret previously published data from these metals. The agreement between theory and experiment is good for both systems. In the case of Ni, the two experimentally observed hydrogen-release stages are both accounted for in terms of trapping at vacancies with a binding enthalpy that depends upon occupancy in accord with effective-medium theory

  1. Macroscopic rate equation modeling of trapping/detrapping of hydrogen isotopes in tungsten materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodille, E.A., E-mail: etienne.hodille@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Bonnin, X. [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, F-93430 Villetaneuse (France); Bisson, R.; Angot, T. [Aix-Marseille Université, PIIM, CNRS, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France); Becquart, C.S. [Université Lille I, UMET, UMR 8207, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq cédex France (France); Layet, J.M. [Aix-Marseille Université, PIIM, CNRS, UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France); Grisolia, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2015-12-15

    Relevant parameters for trapping of Hydrogen Isotopes (HIs) in polycrystalline tungsten are determined with the MHIMS code (Migration of Hydrogen Isotopes in MaterialS) which is used to reproduce Thermal Desorption Spectrometry experiments. Three types of traps are found: two intrinsic traps (detrapping energy of 0.87 eV and 1.00 eV) and one extrinsic trap created by ion irradiation (detrapping energy of 1.50 eV). Then MHIMS is used to simulate HIs retention at different fluences and different implantation temperatures. Simulation results agree well with experimental data. It is shown that at 300 K the retention is limited by diffusion in the bulk. For implantation temperatures above 500 K, the retention is limited by trap creation processes. Above 600 K, the retention drops by two orders of magnitude as compared to the retention at 300 K. With the determined detrapping energies, HIs outgassing at room temperature is predicted. After ions implantation at 300 K, 45% of the initial retention is lost to vacuum in 300 000 s while during this time the remaining trapped HIs diffuse twice as deep into the bulk. - Highlights: • Code development to solve numerically the model equations of diffusion and trapping of hydrogen in metals. • Parametrization of the model trapping parameters (detrapping energies and density): fitting of experimental TDS spectrum. • Confrontation model/experiment: evolution of retention with fluence and implantation temperature. • Investigation of period of rest between implantation and TDS on retention and depth profile.

  2. Model for hydrogen isotope backscattering, trapping and depth profiles in C and a-Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.; McCracken, G.M.

    1979-03-01

    A model of low energy hydrogen trapping and backscattering in carbon and a-silicon is described. Depth profiles are calculated and numerical results presented for various incident angular and energy distributions. The calculations yield a relation between depth profiles and the incident ion energy distribution. The use of this model for tokamak plasma diagnosis is discussed

  3. Hydrogen treatment as a detergent of electronic trap states in lead chalcogenide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voros, Marton; Brawand, Nicholas; Galli, Giulia

    Lead chalcogenide (PbX) nanoparticles are promising materials for solar energy conversion. However, the presence of trap states in their electronic gap limits their usability, and developing a universal strategy to remove trap states is a persistent challenge. Using calculations based on density functional theory, we show that hydrogen acts as an amphoteric impurity on PbX nanoparticle surfaces; hydrogen atoms may passivate defects arising from ligand imbalance or off-stoichiometric surface terminations, irrespective of whether they originate from cation or anion excess. In addition, we show, using constrained density functional theory calculations, that hydrogen treatment of defective nanoparticles is also beneficial for charge transport in films. We also find that hydrogen adsorption on stoichiometric nanoparticles leads to electronic doping, preferentially n-type. Our findings suggest that post-synthesis hydrogen treatment of lead chalcogenide nanoparticle films is a viable approach to reduce electronic trap states or to dope well-passivated films. Work supported by the Center for Advanced Solar Photophysics, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (NB) and U.S. DOE under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 (MV).

  4. Hydrogen isotopes mobility and trapping in V-Cr-Ti alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budylkin, N.; Voloschin, L.; Mironova, E.; Riazantseva, N.; Tebus, V.

    1996-01-01

    In the last years the V-Ti-Cr alloys were considered as candidate materials for different structures of fusion reactors (blanket, first wall, divertor and so on) due to their advantages over other structure materials. Mobility and trapping parameters of hydrogen are essential characteristics for an assessment of using the V-Ti-Cr alloys in FR. In this paper: hydrogen problems for V-Ti-Cr alloys are formulated; V-H system data base is analyzed; study results of the hydrogen mobility and trapping in V-4Ti-4Cr and V-10Ti-5Cr alloys are given; the classification of V-alloys as radioactive waste according to the Russian Federation waste management rules is developed taking into account the residual amount of tritium ('inventory'). (orig.)

  5. Mechanisms of wet oxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    A research programme is currently under way at BNL and MEL to investigate the possible use of Hydrogen Peroxide with metal ion catalysts as a wet oxidation treatment system for CEGB organic radioactive wastes. The published literature relating to the kinetics and mechanism of oxidation and decomposition reactions of hydrogen peroxide is reviewed and the links with practical waste management by wet oxidation are examined. Alternative wet oxidation systems are described and the similarities to the CEGB research effort are noted. (author)

  6. Control of entanglement following the photoionization of trapped, hydrogen-like ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radtke, Thomas; Fritzsche, Stephan; Surzhykov, Andrey

    2005-01-01

    Density matrix theory is applied to re-investigate the entanglement in the spin state of pairs of electrons following the photoionization of trapped, hydrogen-like ions. For the ionization of one out of two non-interacting atoms, in particular, we analyzed how the entanglement between the electrons is changed owing to their interaction with the radiation field. Detailed calculations on the concurrence of the final spin-state of the electrons have been performed for the photoionization of hydrogen as well as for hydrogen-like Xe 53+ and U 91+ ions. From these computations it is shown that the degree of entanglement, which is quite well preserved for neutral hydrogen, will be strongly affected by relativistic and non-dipole effects of the radiation field as the nuclear charge of the ions is increased

  7. Effects of Plasma Hydrogenation on Trapping Properties of Dislocations in Heteroepitaxial InP/GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringel, S. A.; Chatterjee, B.

    1994-01-01

    In previous work, we have demonstrated the effectiveness of a post-growth hydrogen plasma treatment for passivating the electrical activity of dislocations in metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown InP on GaAs substrates by a more than two order of magnitude reduction in deep level concentration and an improvement in reverse bias leakage current by a factor of approx. 20. These results make plasma hydrogenation an extremely promising technique for achieving high efficiency large area and light weight heteroepitaxial InP solar cells for space applications. In this work we investigate the carrier trapping process by dislocations in heteroepitaxial InP/GaAs and the role of hydrogen passivation on this process. It is shown that the charge trapping kinetics of dislocations after hydrogen passivation are significantly altered, approaching point defect-like behavior consistent with a transformation from a high concentration of dislocation-related defect bands within the InP bandgap to a low concentration of individual deep levels after hydrogen passivation. It is further shown that the "apparent" activation energies of dislocation related deep levels, before and after passivation, reduce by approx. 70 meV as DLTS fill pulse times are increased from 1 usec. to 1 msec. A model is proposed which explains these effects based on a reduction of Coulombic interaction between individual core sites along the dislocation cores by hydrogen incorporation. Knowledge of the trapping properties in these specific structures is important to develop optimum, low loss heteroepitaxial InP cells.

  8. Mechanisms of dispersion during liquid hydrogen leakage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proust, C.; Gaston, D.

    2000-01-01

    INERIS conducts research programs with a mission of assessing and preventing accidental and chronic risks to people and the environment due to industrial plants, chemical substances and underground operation. This paper is a study of the dispersion mechanism of cryogenic hydrogen and the mechanisms of flame propagation in clouds of hydrogen. The objective is to contribute to the industrial control implementation of significant storage of hydrogen liquid that has pressure close to the atmospheric pressure. Within the framework of this program, the only interest is with the risk presented by escape of significant flow. This corresponds to accidental ruptures in tanks. The following four phases are looked at: the escape incident and the determination of the leak flow; the formation of the liquid layer and the vaporization of the hydrogen; the formation of the Hydrogen cloud in air; and the explosive ignition in the atmosphere, propagation of the explosive flame and evaluation of the pressure wave. This situation has been limited to dispersion in free air and does not consider the impact of containment

  9. Hydrogen and helium trapping in tungsten deposition layers formed by RF plasma sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazunari Katayama; Kazumi Imaoka; Takayuki Okamura; Masabumi Nishikawa

    2006-01-01

    Understanding of tritium behavior in plasma facing materials is an important issue for fusion reactor from viewpoints of fuel control and radiation safety. Tungsten is used as a plasma facing material in the divertor region of ITER. However, investigation of hydrogen isotope behavior in tungsten deposition layer is not sufficient so far. It is also necessary to evaluate an effect of helium on a formation of deposition layer and an accumulation of hydrogen isotopes because helium generated by fusion reaction exists in fusion plasma. In this study, tungsten deposition layers were formed by sputtering method using hydrogen and helium RF plasma. An erosion rate and a deposition rate of tungsten were estimated by weight measurement. Hydrogen and helium retention were investigated by thermal desorption method. Tungsten deposition was performed using a capacitively-coupled RF plasma device equipped with parallel-plate electrodes. A tungsten target was mounted on one electrode which is supplied with RF power at 200 W. Tungsten substrates were mounted on the other electrode which is at ground potential. The plasma discharge was continued for 120 hours where pressure of hydrogen or helium was controlled to be 10 Pa. The amounts of hydrogen and helium released from deposition layers was quantified by a gas chromatograph. The erosion rate of target tungsten under helium plasma was estimated to be 1.8 times larger than that under hydrogen plasma. The deposition rate on tungsten substrate under helium plasma was estimated to be 4.1 times larger than that under hydrogen plasma. Atomic ratio of hydrogen to tungsten in a deposition layer formed by hydrogen plasma was estimated to be 0.17 by heating to 600 o C. From a deposition layer formed by helium plasma, not only helium but also hydrogen was released by heating to 500 o C. Atomic ratios of helium and hydrogen to tungsten were estimated to be 0.080 and 0.075, respectively. The trapped hydrogen is probably impurity hydrogen

  10. Towards a Measurement of the n=2 Lamb Shift in Hydrogen-like Nitrogen Using an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosaka, K.; Crosby, D. N.; Gaarde-Widdowson, K.; Smith, C. J.; Silver, J. D.; Myers, E. G.; Kinugawa, T.; Ohtani, S.

    2003-01-01

    Using a 14 C 16 O 2 laser the 2s 1/2 -2p 3/2 (fine structure - Lamb shift) transition has been induced in 14 N 6+ ions trapped in an electron beam ion trap. Prospects for a measurement of the Lamb shift in hydrogen-like nitrogen are discussed.

  11. Hydrogen passivation of electron trap in amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanyu, Yuichiro; Domen, Kay; Nomura, Kenji; Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Kamiya, Toshio; Kumomi, Hideya; Hosono, Hideo

    2013-01-01

    We report an experimental evidence that some hydrogens passivate electron traps in an amorphous oxide semiconductor, a-In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO). The a-IGZO thin-film transistors (TFTs) annealed at 300 °C exhibit good operation characteristics; while those annealed at ≥400 °C show deteriorated ones. Thermal desorption spectra (TDS) of H 2 O indicate that this threshold annealing temperature corresponds to depletion of H 2 O desorption from the a-IGZO layer. Hydrogen re-doping by wet oxygen annealing recovers the good TFT characteristic. The hydrogens responsible for this passivation have specific binding energies corresponding to the desorption temperatures of 300–430 °C. A plausible structural model is suggested

  12. Hydrogen passivation of electron trap in amorphous In-Ga-Zn-O thin-film transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanyu, Yuichiro, E-mail: y-hanyu@lucid.msl.titech.ac.jp; Domen, Kay [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Nomura, Kenji [Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Hiramatsu, Hidenori; Kamiya, Toshio [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Kumomi, Hideya [Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Hosono, Hideo [Materials and Structures Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Frontier Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2013-11-11

    We report an experimental evidence that some hydrogens passivate electron traps in an amorphous oxide semiconductor, a-In-Ga-Zn-O (a-IGZO). The a-IGZO thin-film transistors (TFTs) annealed at 300 °C exhibit good operation characteristics; while those annealed at ≥400 °C show deteriorated ones. Thermal desorption spectra (TDS) of H{sub 2}O indicate that this threshold annealing temperature corresponds to depletion of H{sub 2}O desorption from the a-IGZO layer. Hydrogen re-doping by wet oxygen annealing recovers the good TFT characteristic. The hydrogens responsible for this passivation have specific binding energies corresponding to the desorption temperatures of 300–430 °C. A plausible structural model is suggested.

  13. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-12-09

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO{sub 2}{sup +} with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H{sub 2} densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH{sup +}, CH{sub 2}{sup +}, and CH{sub 4}{sup +} have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  14. On the combination of a low energy hydrogen atom beam with a cold multipole ion trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borodi, Gheorghe

    2008-01-01

    The first part of the activities of this thesis was to develop a sophisticated ion storage apparatus dedicated to study chemical processes with atomic hydrogen. The integration of a differentially pumped radical beam source into an existing temperature variable 22- pole trapping machine has required major modifications. Since astrophysical questions have been in the center of our interest, the introduction first gives a short overview of astrophysics and -chemistry. The basics of ion trapping in temperature variable rf traps is well-documented in the literature; therefore, the description of the basic instrument (Chapter 2) is kept rather short. Much effort has been put into the development of an intense and stable source for hydrogen atoms the kinetic energy of which can be changed. Chapter 3 describes this module in detail with emphasis on the integration of magnetic hexapoles for guiding the atoms and special treatments of the surfaces for reducing H-H recombination. Due to the unique sensitivity of the rf ion trapping technique, this instrument allows one to study a variety of reactions of astrochemical and fundamental interest. The results of this work are summarized in Chapter 4. Reactions of CO 2 + with hydrogen atoms and molecules have been established as calibration standard for in situ determination of H and H 2 densities over the full temperature range of the apparatus (10 K-300 K). For the first time, reactions of H- and D-atoms with the ionic hydrocarbons CH + , CH 2 + , and CH 4 + have been studied at temperatures of interstellar space. A very interesting, not yet fully understood collision system is the interaction of protonated methane with H. The outlook presents some ideas, how to improve the new instrument and a few reaction systems are mentioned which may be studied next. (orig.)

  15. The Role of κ-Carbides as Hydrogen Traps in High-Mn Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias A. Timmerscheidt

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Since the addition of Al to high-Mn steels is known to reduce their sensitivity to hydrogen-induced delayed fracture, we investigate possible trapping effects connected to the presence of Al in the grain interior employing density-functional theory (DFT. The role of Al-based precipitates is also investigated to understand the relevance of short-range ordering effects. So-called E21-Fe3AlC κ-carbides are frequently observed in Fe-Mn-Al-C alloys. Since H tends to occupy the same positions as C in these precipitates, the interaction and competition between both interstitials is also investigated via DFT-based simulations. While the individual H–H/C–H chemical interactions are generally repulsive, the tendency of interstitials to increase the lattice parameter can yield a net increase of the trapping capability. An increased Mn content is shown to enhance H trapping due to attractive short-range interactions. Favorable short-range ordering is expected to occur at the interface between an Fe matrix and the E21-Fe3AlC κ-carbides, which is identified as a particularly attractive trapping site for H. At the same time, accumulation of H at sites of this type is observed to yield decohesion of this interface, thereby promoting fracture formation. The interplay of these effects, evident in the trapping energies at various locations and dependent on the H concentration, can be expressed mathematically, resulting in a term that describes the hydrogen embrittlement.

  16. Single trapped cold ions: a testing ground for quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maniscalco, S

    2005-01-01

    In this article I review some results obtained during my PhD work in the group of Professor Messina, at the University of Palermo. I discuss some proposals aimed at exploring fundamental issues of quantum theory, e.g. entanglement and quantum superpositions, in the context of single trapped ions. This physical context turns out to be extremely well suited both for studying fundamental features of quantum mechanics, such as the quantum-classical border, and for technological applications such as quantum logic gates and quantum registers. I focus on some procedures for engineering nonclassical states of the vibrational motion of the centre of mass of the ion. I consider both the case in which the ion interacts with classical laser beams and the case of interaction with a quantized mode of light. In particular, I discuss the generation of Schroedinger cat-like states, Bell states and Greenberger-Horn-Zeilinger states. The schemes for generating nonclassical states stem from two different quantum processes: the parity effect and the quantum state manipulation via quantum non-demolition measurement. Finally, I consider a microscopic theory of the interaction of a quantum harmonic oscillator (the centre of mass of the ion in the trapped ion context) with a bosonic thermal environment. Using an exact approach to the dynamics, I discuss a quantum theory of heating of trapped ions able to describe both the short time non-Markovian regime and the thermalization process. I conclude showing briefly how the trapped ion systems can be used as simulators of key models of open quantum systems such as the Caldeira-Leggett model. (phd tutorial)

  17. Hydrogen traps in the oxide/alloy interface region of Zr-Nb alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatamian, D.

    1995-03-01

    In this study the 1 H( 15 N,αγ) 12 C nuclear reaction has been used to measure hydrogen profiles of anodically oxidized Zr-Nb specimens containing various amounts of niobium. The profiles have been correlated with oxygen profiles, obtained using a Scanning Auger Microprobe (SAM), and with X-ray diffraction patterns. In addition, unoxidized Zr-2.5Nb (Zr-2.5 wt% Nb) samples were implanted with oxygen and hydrogen to study the interaction between these two species when dissolved in the alloy. All the anodically oxidized specimens, except the pure Zr and the single-phase β-Zr (Zr-20Nb) samples, displayed hydrogen peaks beneath the oxide layer. These results, in conjunction with the results from the implanted specimens, indicate that the hydrogen moves under the influence of a stress gradient to the sub-oxide region, where the metal lattice has been expanded due to superficial oxide growth. The results show that dissolved oxygen sites in Zr-2.5Nb alloy do not trap hydrogen. (author). 16 refs., 6 figs

  18. Trapping and stabilization of hydrogen atoms in intracrystalline voids. Defected calcium fluorides and Y zeolite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iton, L.E.; Turkevich, J.

    1978-01-01

    Using EPR spectroscopy, it has been established that H. atoms are absorbed from the gas phase when CaF 2 powder is exposed to H 2 gas in which a microwave discharge is sustained, being trapped in sites that provide unusual thermal stability. The disposition of the trapped atoms is determined by the occluded water content of the CaF 2 . For ultrapure CaF 2 , atoms are trapped in interstitial sites having A 0 = 1463 MHz; for increasing water content, two types of trapped H. atoms are discriminated, with preferential trapping in void sites (external to the regular fluorite lattice) that are associated with the H 2 O impurity. Characterization of these ''extra-lattice'' H. (and D.) atoms is presented, and their EPR parameters and behavior are discussed in detail. Failure to effect H.-D. atom exchange with D 2 gas suggests that atoms are not stabilized on the CaF 2 surface. H. atoms are trapped exclusively in ''extra-lattice'' sites when the water-containing CaF 2 is γ irradiated at 77 or 298 K indicating that the scission product atoms do not escape from the precursor void region into the regular lattice. It is concluded that the thermal stability of the ''extra-lattice'' atoms, like that of the interstitial atoms, is determined ultimately by the high activation energy for diffusion of the H. atom through the CaF 2 lattice. For comparison, results obtained from H. atoms trapped in γ-irradiated rare earth ion-exchanged Y zeolites are presented and discussed also; these ''surface'' trapped atoms do not exhibit great thermalstability. Distinctions in the H. atom formation mechanisms between the fluorides and the zeolites were deduced from the accompanying paramagnetic species formed. The intracavity electric fields in the Y zeolites have been estimated from the H. atoms hfsc contractions, and are found to be very high, about 1 V/A

  19. Dependence of hydrogen storage characteristics of mechanically milled carbon materials on their host structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindo, K.; Kondo, T.; Sakurai, Y.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether the hydrogen storage characteristics of carbon materials prepared by mechanical milling in an H 2 atmosphere were dependent on their host structures. We used natural graphite (NG) and activated carbon fibers (ACF) and compared them with activated carbon (AC) powders. The XRD patterns of NG and ACF milled for over 20 h and SEM images of these samples milled for 80 h were almost the same as those of AC. The hydrogen storage capacities of NG and ACF estimated by the inert gas fusion-thermal conductivity method increased with the mechanical milling time up to 10 h and showed little milling time dependence thereafter. The capacities of NG and ACF reached about 3.0 wt.% and were similar to that of AC. However, it should be noted that the hydrogen storage mechanism of NG and ACF mechanically milled in an H 2 atmosphere might be different because the changes in their specific surface areas with milling time were opposite. Thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDS) revealed that the desorption spectra of the hydrogen molecules (mass number=2) of NG and ACF milled for 10 h in the same way as AC contained two peaks at about 500 and 800 deg. C. The desorption activation energies of hydrogenated NG and ACF at these peaks calculated from a Kissinger plot were almost with the same as those of hydrogenated AC. This suggests that the state of the hydrogen trapped in the structural defects in NG introduced by the mechanical milling may be almost the same as that of AC. In addition, we assumed the possibility that the state of the hydrogen in ACF hydrogenated by mechanical milling could be almost the same as that in hydrogenated AC. We considered that the nanocarbon materials hydrogenated under our milling conditions had very similar physical shapes and hydrogen storage capacities, independent of their host structures

  20. Formation of hydrogen-related traps in electron-irradiated n-type silicon by wet chemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokuda, Yutaka; Shimada, Hitoshi

    1998-01-01

    Interaction of hydrogen atoms and vacancy-related defects in 10 MeV electron-irradiated n-type silicon has been studied by deep-level transient spectroscopy. Hydrogen has been incorporated into electron-irradiated n-type silicon by wet chemical etching. The reduction of the concentration of the vacancy-oxygen pair and divacancy occurs by the incorporation of hydrogen, while the formation of the NH1 electron trap (E c - 0.31 eV) is observed. Further decrease of the concentration of the vacancy-oxygen pair and further increase of the concentration of the NH1 trap are observed upon subsequent below-band-gap light illumination. It is suggested that the trap NH1 is tentatively ascribed to the vacancy-oxygen pair which is partly saturated with hydrogen

  1. Changes in mechanical properties following cyclic prestressing of martensitic steel containing vanadium carbide in presence of nondiffusible hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneko, Mao; Doshida, Tomoki [Graduate School of Science and Technology, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan); Takai, Kenichi, E-mail: takai@me.sophia.ac.jp [Department of Engineering and Applied Science, Sophia University, Tokyo 102-8554 (Japan)

    2016-09-30

    Changes in the states of nondiffusible hydrogen and mechanical properties after cyclic prestressing in the presence of only nondiffusible hydrogen were examined for martensitic steel containing vanadium carbide. The relationship between the change in the state of nondiffusible hydrogen and mechanical properties was also investigated. The hydrogen desorption profile in the high-temperature range decreased and that in the low-temperature range increased with increasing stress amplitude during cyclic prestressing in the presence of only nondiffusible hydrogen. Thus, the application of cyclic prestressing changed the state of hydrogen from a stable to an unstable one because of vacancies and their clusters. Hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility after cyclic prestressing increased with increasing stress amplitude and number of prestressing cycles in the presence of only nondiffusible hydrogen. This relationship indicates that hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility increased with the increasing amount of hydrogen detrapped from trap sites of nondiffusible hydrogen during cyclic prestressing. These results revealed that nondiffusible hydrogen easily detrapped from vanadium carbide due to the application of cyclic prestress and probably interacted with vacancies and their clusters, thus increasing hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility. The change of nondiffusible hydrogen to diffusible hydrogen and accumulation of vacancies and their clusters during cyclic prestressing are concluded to be the dominant factors in hydrogen embrittlement after the application of cyclic prestress.

  2. X-ray spectroscopy of hydrogen-like ions in an electron beam ion trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarbutt, M.R.; Crosby, D.; Silver, J.D. [Univ. of Oxford, Clarendon Lab. (United Kingdom); Myers, E.G. [Dept. of Physics, Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Nakamura, N.; Ohtani, S. [ICORP, JST, Chofu, Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The X-ray emission from highly charged hydrogen-like ions in an electron beam ion trap is free from the problems of satellite contamination and Doppler shifts inherent in fast-beam sources. This is a favourable situation for the measurement of ground-state Lamb shifts in these ions. We present recent progress toward this goal, and discuss a method whereby wavelength comparison between transitions in hydrogenlike ions of different nuclear charge Z, enable the measurement of QED effects without requiring an absolute calibration.

  3. Double vacancy on BN layer: A natural trap for Hydrogen Molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arellano, J S

    2015-01-01

    A pair of vacancies, one of boron and other of nitrogen atom at a flat layer becomes a natural trap to capture a hydrogen molecule at the center of the cavity defined by the empty space left by the lack of a nitrogen and a boron atom at the perfect BN layer formed by 16 N atoms and 16 B atoms. The adsorption of the hydrogen molecule is compared with the equivalent graphene layer with a pair of carbon vacancies. The little increase in the BN cell parameter respect to the graphene cell parameter, besides the differences between N, B and C atoms helps to explain the easier adsorption on the defective BN layer

  4. Clay minerals trap hydrogen in the Earth's crust: Evidence from the Cigar Lake uranium deposit, Athabasca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truche, Laurent; Joubert, Gilles; Dargent, Maxime; Martz, Pierre; Cathelineau, Michel; Rigaudier, Thomas; Quirt, David

    2018-07-01

    Hydrogen (H2)-rich fluids are observed in a wide variety of geologic settings including gas seeps in serpentinized ultramafic rocks, sub-seafloor hydrothermal vents, fracture networks in crystalline rocks from continental and oceanic crust, and volcanic gases. Natural hydrogen sources can sustain deep microbial ecosystems, induce abiotic hydrocarbons synthesis and trigger the formation of prebiotic organic compounds. However, due to its extreme mobility and small size, hydrogen is not easily trapped in the crust. If not rapidly consumed by redox reactions mediated by bacteria or suitable mineral catalysts it diffuses through the rocks and migrates toward the surface. Therefore, H2 is not supposed to accumulate in the crust. We challenge this view by demonstrating that significant amount of H2 may be adsorbed by clay minerals and remain trapped beneath the surface. Here, we report for the first time H2 content in clay-rich rocks, mainly composed of illite, chlorite, and kaolinite from the Cigar Lake uranium ore deposit (northern Saskatchewan, Canada). Thermal desorption measurements reveal that H2 is enriched up to 500 ppm (i.e. 0.25 mol kg-1 of rock) in these water-saturated rocks having a very low total organic content (reported elsewhere for pure clay minerals or shales. Sudoite (Al-Mg di-trioctahedral chlorite) is probably the main mineral responsible for H2 adsorption in the present case. The presence of multiple binding sites in interlinked nanopores between crystal layers of illite-chlorite particles offers the ideal conditions for hydrogen sorption. We demonstrate that 4 to 17% of H2 produced by water radiolysis over the 1.4-Ga-lifetime of the Cigar Lake uranium ore deposit has been trapped in the surrounding clay alteration haloes. As a result, sorption processes on layered silicates must not be overlooked as they may exert an important control on the fate and mobility of H2 in the crust. Furthermore, the high capacity of clay minerals to sorb molecular

  5. Positron-trapping mechanism at dislocations in Zn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hidalgo, Carlos; Linderoth, Søren; Diego, Nieves de

    1987-01-01

    the average lifetime and the intensity of the long component decrease with increasing temperature. The experimental results are very well described in terms of a generalized trapping model where it is assumed that positrons become trapped in deep traps (jogs) via shallow traps (dislocation lines......). The temperature dependence of the positron-lifetime spectra below 120 K is attributed to the temperature dependence of the trapping rate to the dislocation line. The experimental results have demonstrated that detrapping processes from the dislocation line take place above 120 K. The positron binding energy...

  6. Towards a Measurement of the n=2 Lamb Shift in Hydrogen-like Nitrogen Using an Electron Beam Ion Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosaka, K.; Crosby, D. N.; Gaarde-Widdowson, K.; Smith, C. J.; Silver, J. D. [University of Oxford, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Myers, E. G. [Florida State University (United States); Kinugawa, T.; Ohtani, S. [University of Electro-Communications, Cold Trapped Ions Project, JST (Japan)

    2003-03-15

    Using a {sup 14}C{sup 16}O{sub 2} laser the 2s{sub 1/2}-2p{sub 3/2} (fine structure - Lamb shift) transition has been induced in {sup 14}N{sup 6+} ions trapped in an electron beam ion trap. Prospects for a measurement of the Lamb shift in hydrogen-like nitrogen are discussed.

  7. Reverse mechanical after effect during hydrogenation of zone refined iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spivak, L.V.; Skryabina, N.E.; Kurmaeva, L.D.; Smirnov, L.V. (Permskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ. (USSR); AN SSSR, Sverdlovsk. Inst. Fiziki Metallov)

    1984-12-01

    The relationship between the process of hydrogenation and the reverse mechanical after effect (RMA) microplastic deformation in the zone refined iron has been studied. Metallographic investigations and mechanical testing of the samples hydrogenated under torsional strain have been performed. It is shown that in the zone refined iron the formation of voids responsible for irreversible hydrogen embrittlement does not occur, but the hydrogen-initiated RMA strain is conserved, i. e. the RMA effects are independent of the presence of discontinuities.

  8. A coupled model of transport-reaction-mechanics with trapping. Part I - Small strain analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadori, A.; McMeeking, R.; Grazioli, D.; Magri, M.

    2018-05-01

    A fully coupled model for mass and heat transport, mechanics, and chemical reactions with trapping is proposed. It is rooted in non-equilibrium rational thermodynamics and assumes that displacements and strains are small. Balance laws for mass, linear and angular momentum, energy, and entropy are stated. Thermodynamic restrictions are identified, based on an additive strain decomposition and on the definition of the Helmholtz free energy. Constitutive theory and chemical kinetics are studied in order to finally write the governing equations for the multi-physics problem. The field equations are solved numerically with the finite element method, stemming from a three-fields variational formulation. Three case-studies on vacancies redistribution in metals, hydrogen embrittlement, and the charge-discharge of active particles in Li-ion batteries demonstrate the features and the potential of the proposed model.

  9. Rupture mechanics of metallic alloys for hydrogen transport; Mecanique de la rupture des alliages metalliques pour le transport de l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, I.; Briottet, L.; Lemoine, P. [CEA Grenoble (DRT/LITEN/DTH/LEV), 38 (France); Andrieu, E.; Blanc, C. [Centre Interuniversitaire de Recherche et d' Ingenierie des Materiaux (ENSIACET/CIRIMAT), 31 - Toulouse (France)

    2007-07-01

    With the aim to establish a cheap hydrogen distribution system, the transport by pipelines is a solution particularly interesting. Among the high limit of elasticity steels, the X80 has been chosen for hydrogen transport. Its chemical composition and microstructure are given. Important microstructural changes have been revealed in the sheet thickness: the microstructure is thinner and richer in perlite in surface than in bulk. In parallel to this microstructural evolution, a microhardness gradient has been observed: the material microhardness is stronger in surface than in bulk of the sheet. The use of this material for hydrogen transport requires to study its resistance to hydrogen embrittlement. The main aim of this work is to develop an easy rupture mechanics test allowing to qualify the studied material in a gaseous hydrogen environment, to determine the sensitivity of the studied material to the hydrogen embrittlement and to better understand the mechanisms of the hydrogen embrittlement for ferritic materials. Two experimental tests have been used for: the first one is a traction machine coupled to an autoclave; the second one allows to carry out disk rupture tests. The toughness of the material in a gaseous hydrogen environment has thus been determined. The resistance of the material to hydrogen embrittlement has been characterized and by simulation, it has been possible to identify the areas with a strong concentration in hydrogen. The second aim of this work is to study the influence of the steel microstructure on the hydrogen position in the material and on the resistance of the material to the hydrogen embrittlement. The preferential trapping sites on the material not mechanically loaded have at first been identified, as well as the hydrogen position on the different phases and at the ferrite/cementite interface. The interaction between the mechanical loads, the position and the trapping of the hydrogen have been studied then. At last, has been

  10. Trapping of hydrogen and helium at an {110}<111> edge dislocation in tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Hongxian, E-mail: hongxianxie@163.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300132 (China); Tianjin Key Laboratory of Materials Laminating Fabrication and Interface Control Technology, Tianjin 300132 (China); Xu, Ke [School of Physics & Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Lu, Guang-Hong, E-mail: LGH@buaa.edu.cn [School of Physics & Nuclear Energy Engineering, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Yu, Tao [Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Yin, Fuxing [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Materials Laminating Fabrication and Interface Control Technology, Tianjin 300132 (China); Research Institute for Energy Equipment Materials, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300132 (China)

    2017-02-15

    We have performed an atomistic simulation to investigate energetics and dynamic behaviour of hydrogen (H) and helium (He) at an {110}<111> edge dislocation in tungsten (W). The edge dislocation is shown to attract H/He at the tensile stress region according to the negative interaction energy of H/He at the tensile stress region, which implies that the dislocation is energetically beneficial to accommodate both H and He. Dynamically both H and He are easy to diffuse into the dislocation core, indicating the ‘down-hill’ diffusion due to the presence of the dislocation serving as a trapping center for both H and He. Further, He exhibits much lower interaction energy and much faster diffusion into the dislocation core region as compared with H owing to the close shell electronic structure of He. The results suggest the edge dislocation as a trapping center facilitates the H/He accumulation, contributing to the understanding the role of the dislocation on the H/He accumulation and bubble formation in W.

  11. Hydrogen trapping in and release from tungsten: modeling and comparison with graphite with regard to its use as fusion reactor material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzen, P.; Garcia-Rosales, C.; Plank, H.; Alimov, V.Kh.

    1997-01-01

    Trapping and release of deuterium implanted in tungsten is investigated by modeling the results of reemission, thermal and isothermal desorption experiments. Rate coefficients and activation energies for diffusion, trapping and detrapping are derived. Hydrogen atoms are able to diffuse deep into tungsten, establishing a solute amount of the same order of magnitude as the trapped one. This 'diffusion zone' exceeds the implantation zone by more than two orders of magnitude, even at room temperature. The solute amount of hydrogen in tungsten depends only slightly on the incident ion energy, but scales with implantation fluence. This high amount of solute hydrogen is the main difference of tungsten compared to graphite where nearly all hydrogen is trapped in the implantation zone, the solute amount being orders of magnitude lower. The resulting unlimited accumulation of hydrogen in tungsten deep in the material down to the backward surface disadvantages tungsten as fusion reactor material with regard to hydrogen recycling properties. (orig.)

  12. Anelastic mechanical loss spectrometry of hydrogen in austenitic stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagodzinskyy, Y.; Andronova, E.; Ivanchenko, M.; Haenninen, H.

    2009-01-01

    Atomic distribution of hydrogen, its elemental diffusion jumps and its interaction with dislocations in a number of austenitic stainless steels are studied with anelastic mechanical loss (AML) spectrometry in combination with the hydrogen thermal desorption method. Austenitic stainless steels of different chemical composition, namely, AISI 310, AISI 201, and AISI 301LN, as well as LDX 2101 duplex stainless steel are studied to clarify the role of different alloying elements on the hydrogen behavior. Activation analyses of the hydrogen Snoek-like peaks are performed with their decomposition to sets of Gaussian components. Fine structure of the composite hydrogen peaks is analyzed under the assumption that each component corresponds to diffusion transfer of hydrogen between octahedral positions with certain atomic compositions of the nearest neighbouring lattice sites. An additional component originating from hydrogen-dislocation interaction is considered. Binding energies for hydrogen-dislocation interaction are also estimated for the studied austenitic stainless steels.

  13. Magneto-mechanical trapping systems for biological target detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Fuquan; Kodzius, Rimantas; Gooneratne, Chinthaka P.; Foulds, Ian G.; Kosel, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a magnetic microsystem capable of detecting nucleic acids via the size difference between bare magnetic beads and bead compounds. The bead compounds are formed through linking nonmagnetic beads and magnetic beads by the target nucleic acids. The system comprises a tunnel magneto-resistive (TMR) sensor, a trapping well, and a bead-concentrator. The TMR sensor detects the stray field of magnetic beads inside the trapping well, while the sensor output depends on the number of beads. The size of the bead compounds is larger than that of bare magnetic beads, and fewer magnetic beads are required to fill the trapping well. The bead-concentrator, in turn, is capable of filling the trap in a controlled fashion and so to shorten the assay time. The bead-concentrator includes conducting loops surrounding the trapping well and a conducting line underneath. The central conducting line serves to attract magnetic beads in the trapping well and provides a magnetic field to magnetize them so to make them detectable by the TMR sensor. This system excels by its simplicity in that the DNA is incubated with magnetic and nonmagnetic beads, and the solution is then applied to the chip and analyzed in a single step. In current experiments, a signal-to-noise ratio of 40.3 dB was obtained for a solution containing 20.8 nM of DNA. The sensitivity and applicability of this method can be controlled by the size or concentration of the nonmagnetic bead, or by the dimension of the trapping well. (author)

  14. Magneto-mechanical trapping systems for biological target detection

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Fuquan

    2014-03-29

    We demonstrate a magnetic microsystem capable of detecting nucleic acids via the size difference between bare magnetic beads and bead compounds. The bead compounds are formed through linking nonmagnetic beads and magnetic beads by the target nucleic acids. The system comprises a tunnel magneto-resistive (TMR) sensor, a trapping well, and a bead-concentrator. The TMR sensor detects the stray field of magnetic beads inside the trapping well, while the sensor output depends on the number of beads. The size of the bead compounds is larger than that of bare magnetic beads, and fewer magnetic beads are required to fill the trapping well. The bead-concentrator, in turn, is capable of filling the trap in a controlled fashion and so to shorten the assay time. The bead-concentrator includes conducting loops surrounding the trapping well and a conducting line underneath. The central conducting line serves to attract magnetic beads in the trapping well and provides a magnetic field to magnetize them so to make them detectable by the TMR sensor. This system excels by its simplicity in that the DNA is incubated with magnetic and nonmagnetic beads, and the solution is then applied to the chip and analyzed in a single step. In current experiments, a signal-to-noise ratio of 40.3 dB was obtained for a solution containing 20.8 nM of DNA. The sensitivity and applicability of this method can be controlled by the size or concentration of the nonmagnetic bead, or by the dimension of the trapping well.

  15. Two different mechanisms of immune-complex trapping in the mouse spleen during immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yoshida, K.; van den Berg, T. K.; Dijkstra, C. D.

    1993-01-01

    The capacity of immune-complex (IC) trapping was examined using purified horse radish peroxidase (HRP)-anti-HRP (PAP) on frozen sections of mouse spleen in vitro. We investigated the trapping mechanisms by applying the IC with or without fresh mouse serum added on the spleen sections of naive as

  16. The interstellar carbonaceous aromatic matter as a trap for molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauzat, F.; Lattelais, M.; Ellinger, Y.; Minot, C.

    2011-04-01

    We report a theoretical study of the physisorption of molecular hydrogen, H2, on a major component of the interstellar dust, namely, the polyaromatic carbonaceous grains. Going beyond the model of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon freeflyers and its theoretical treatment within the super molecule approach, we consider the graphene surface in a Density Functional Theory periodic approach using plane-wave expansions. The physisorption energy of isolated H2 on that flat and rigid support is determined to be attractive by ˜0.75 kcal mol-1 and practically independent of the orientation with respect to the infinite surface. Since this energy is also not affected by the position (over a ring centre, a carbon atom or the middle of a carbon-carbon bond), we can conclude that H2 is able to move freely like a ball rolling on the graphene support. We also investigate the conditions for multiple physisorption. It leads to a monolayer of H2 molecules where the corresponding interaction energy per H2 amounts to a potential depth of ˜1 kcal mol-1, close to the available experimental estimates ranging from 1.1 to 1.2 kcal mol-1. We show that the most energetically favourable coverage, which corresponds to an arrangement of the H2 molecules, the closest possible to the dimer configuration, leads to a surface density of ˜0.8 × 1015 molecule cm-2. Finally, assuming that 15-20 per cent of the interstellar carbon is locked in aromatic systems, one obtains ˜10-5 of the interstellar hydrogen trapped as H2 on such types of surfaces.

  17. Hydrogen atom trapping in a self-organized one-dimensional dimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuyoshi Takami

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs have attracted widespread attention owing to their unusual structure and properties produced by their nanospaces. However, many MOFs possess the similar three-dimensional frameworks, limiting their structural variety and operating capacity for hydrogen storage under ambient conditions. Here we report the synthesis and structural characterization of a single-crystal one-dimensional dimer whose structure, operating capacity, and physical mechanism contrast with those of existing MOFs. The hydrogen storage capacity of 2.6 wt.% is comparable to the highest capacity achieved by existing MOFs at room temperature. This exceptional storage capacity is realized by self-organization during crystal growth using a weak base.

  18. Hydrogen isotope in erbium oxide: Adsorption, penetration, diffusion, and vacancy trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao, Wei; Chikada, Takumi; Suzuki, Akihiro; Terai, Takayuki; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • H adsorption on cubic Er 2 O 3 surface results in electron transfer from H to the surface. • The H penetration energy of at least 1.6 eV is required for cubic Er 2 O 3 surface. • The dominated mechanisms of H diffusion in bulk Er 2 O 3 are elucidated. • H diffusion near or at vacancies in Er 2 O 3 is an exothermic reaction. - Abstract: In this study, we report results using first-principles density functional theory calculations for four critical aspects of the interaction: H adsorption on Er 2 O 3 surface, surface-to-subsurface penetration of H into Er 2 O 3 , bulk diffusion of H in Er 2 O 3 , and trapping of H at vacancies. We identify surface stable adsorption positions and find that H prefers to transfer electrons to the surfaces and form covalent bonds with the nearest neighboring four oxygen atoms. For low surface coverage of H as in our case (0.89 × 10 14 H/cm 2 ), a penetration energy of at least 1.60 eV is required for cubic Er 2 O 3 surfaces. Further, the H diffusion barrier between the planes defined by Er 2 O 3 units along the favorable <1 1 1> direction is found to be very small – 0.16 eV – whereas higher barriers of 0.41 eV and 1.64 eV are required for diffusion across the planes, somewhat higher than the diffusion energy barrier of 0.20 eV observed experimentally at 873 K. In addition, we predict that interstitial H is exothermically trapped when it approaches a vacancy with the vacancy defect behaving as an electron trap since the H-vacancy defect is found to be more stable than the intrinsic defect

  19. Data on trapping and re-emission of energetic hydrogen isotopes and helium in materials, supplement 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Sadae; Sugizaki, Yasuaki; Ozawa, Kunio; Nakai, Yohta.

    1984-05-01

    This is the supplement to the data on trapping and re-emission of energetic hydrogen isotopes and helium in materials (JAERI-M 82-118). It contains 32 data up to end of 1982, dividing it into following 6 sections: 1) Dose Dependence, 2) Target Material Dependence, 3) Target Temperature Dependence, 4) Incident Energy Dependence, 5) Damage Effects and 6) Ion-Induced Release. (author)

  20. Hydrogen uptake characteristics of mechanically alloyed Ti-V-Ni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cauceglia, Dorian; Hampton, Michael D.; Lomness, Janice K.; Slattery, Darlene K.; Resan, Mirna

    2006-01-01

    It has been well established that hydrogen will react directly and reversibly with a large number of metals and alloys to form metallic hydrides. Extensive research has been done over the years to improve properties of these hydrogen purification and recovery media and in developing new compounds for this purpose. In the present study, the hydrogen uptake characteristics of mechanically alloyed titanium-vanadium-nickel have been studied. Thermal and composition data were obtained for the Ti-V-Ni system prepared by mechanical alloying at a ball-to-powder mass ratio of 10:1. It was found that this material would absorb up to approximately 1.0 wt% hydrogen at near ambient temperature and ambient pressure of hydrogen

  1. RNA-Seq reveals the molecular mechanism of trapping and killing of root-knot nematodes by nematode-trapping fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Ramesh; Patel, Reena; Patel, Namrata; Bhatt, Vaibhav; Joshi, Chaitanya; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Kunjadia, Anju

    2017-04-01

    Nematode-trapping fungi are well known for their inherent potential to trap and kill nematodes using specialized trapping devices. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the trapping and subsequent processes are still unclear. Therefore, in this study, we examined differential genes expression in two nematode-trapping fungi after baiting with nematode extracts. In Arthrobotrys conoides, 809 transcripts associated with diverse functions such as signal transduction, morphogenesis, stress response and peroxisomal proteins, proteases, chitinases and genes involved in the host-pathogen interaction showed differential expression with fold change (>±1.5 fold) in the presence of nematode extract with FDR (p-value nematode-trapping fungi for its host. The findings illustrate the molecular mechanism of fungal parasitism in A. conoides which may be helpful in developing a potential biocontrol agent against parasitic nematodes.

  2. Hydrogen isotope in erbium oxide: Adsorption, penetration, diffusion, and vacancy trapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Wei, E-mail: mao@nuclear.jp [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); The University Museum, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Chikada, Takumi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Shizuoka University, 836 Ohya, Suruga-ku, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Suzuki, Akihiro [Nuclear Professional School, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-22, Shirakata-shirane, Tokai, Naka 319-1188, Ibaraki (Japan); Terai, Takayuki [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki [The University Museum, The University of Tokyo, 2-11-16 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • H adsorption on cubic Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface results in electron transfer from H to the surface. • The H penetration energy of at least 1.6 eV is required for cubic Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface. • The dominated mechanisms of H diffusion in bulk Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} are elucidated. • H diffusion near or at vacancies in Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} is an exothermic reaction. - Abstract: In this study, we report results using first-principles density functional theory calculations for four critical aspects of the interaction: H adsorption on Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface, surface-to-subsurface penetration of H into Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, bulk diffusion of H in Er{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and trapping of H at vacancies. We identify surface stable adsorption positions and find that H prefers to transfer electrons to the surfaces and form covalent bonds with the nearest neighboring four oxygen atoms. For low surface coverage of H as in our case (0.89 × 10{sup 14} H/cm{sup 2}), a penetration energy of at least 1.60 eV is required for cubic Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} surfaces. Further, the H diffusion barrier between the planes defined by Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} units along the favorable <1 1 1> direction is found to be very small – 0.16 eV – whereas higher barriers of 0.41 eV and 1.64 eV are required for diffusion across the planes, somewhat higher than the diffusion energy barrier of 0.20 eV observed experimentally at 873 K. In addition, we predict that interstitial H is exothermically trapped when it approaches a vacancy with the vacancy defect behaving as an electron trap since the H-vacancy defect is found to be more stable than the intrinsic defect.

  3. Conduction Mechanism in a Molecular Hydrogen Contact

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Kristian Sommer; Jacobsen, Karsten Wedel

    2005-01-01

    We present first principles calculations for the conductance of a hydrogen molecule bridging a pair of Pt electrodes. The transmission function has a wide plateau with Tapproximate to1 which extends across the Fermi level and indicates the existence of a single, robust conductance channel with ne...... allow us to derive a resonant-level model for the system with all parameters determined from the fully self-consistent Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian....

  4. Hydrogen embrittlement of titanium tested with fracture mechanics specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aho-Mantila, I.; Rahko, P.

    1990-11-01

    Titanium is one of the possible canister materials for spent nuclear fuel. The aim of this study is to determine whether the hydrogen embrittlement of titanium could be a possible deterioration mechanism of titanium canisters. This experimental study was preceded by a literature review and an experimental study on crack nucleation. Tests in this study were carried out with hydrogen charged fracture mechanics specimens. The studied hydrogen contents were as received, 100 ppm, 200 ppm, 500 ppm and 700 ppm and the types of the studied titanium were ASTM Grades 2 and 12. Test methods were slow tensile test (0.027 mm/h) and fatigue test (stress ratio 0.7 or 0.8 and frequency 5 Hz). According to the literature titanium may be embrittled by hydrogen at slow strain rates and cracking may occur under sustained load. In this study no evidence of hydrogen embrittlement was noticed in slow strain rate tension with bulk hydrogen contents up to 700 ppm. The fatigue tests of titanium Grades 2 and 12 containing 700 ppm hydrogen showed even slower crack growth compared to the as received condition. Very high hydrogen contents well in eccess of 700 ppm on the surface of titanium can, however, facilitate surface crack nucleation and crack growth, as shown in the previous study

  5. Charge transport model in nanodielectric composites based on quantum tunneling mechanism and dual-level traps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Guochang; Chen, George, E-mail: gc@ecs.soton.ac.uk, E-mail: sli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); School of Electronic and Computer Science, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Li, Shengtao, E-mail: gc@ecs.soton.ac.uk, E-mail: sli@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2016-08-08

    Charge transport properties in nanodielectrics present different tendencies for different loading concentrations. The exact mechanisms that are responsible for charge transport in nanodielectrics are not detailed, especially for high loading concentration. A charge transport model in nanodielectrics has been proposed based on quantum tunneling mechanism and dual-level traps. In the model, the thermally assisted hopping (TAH) process for the shallow traps and the tunnelling process for the deep traps are considered. For different loading concentrations, the dominant charge transport mechanisms are different. The quantum tunneling mechanism plays a major role in determining the charge conduction in nanodielectrics with high loading concentrations. While for low loading concentrations, the thermal hopping mechanism will dominate the charge conduction process. The model can explain the observed conductivity property in nanodielectrics with different loading concentrations.

  6. Nonextensive statistical mechanics approach to electron trapping in degenerate plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebrouk, Khireddine; Gougam, Leila Ait; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-06-01

    The electron trapping in a weakly nondegenerate plasma is reformulated and re-examined by incorporating the nonextensive entropy prescription. Using the q-deformed Fermi-Dirac distribution function including the quantum as well as the nonextensive statistical effects, we derive a new generalized electron density with a new contribution proportional to the electron temperature T, which may dominate the usual thermal correction (∼T2) at very low temperatures. To make the physics behind the effect of this new contribution more transparent, we analyze the modifications arising in the propagation of ion-acoustic solitary waves. Interestingly, we find that due to the nonextensive correction, our plasma model allows the possibility of existence of quantum ion-acoustic solitons with velocity higher than the Fermi ion-sound velocity. Moreover, as the nonextensive parameter q increases, the critical temperature Tc beyond which coexistence of compressive and rarefactive solitons sets in, is shifted towards higher values.

  7. Hybrid Hydrogen and Mechanical Distributed Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Ubertini

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Effective energy storage technologies represent one of the key elements to solving the growing challenges of electrical energy supply of the 21st century. Several energy storage systems are available, from ones that are technologically mature to others still at a research stage. Each technology has its inherent limitations that make its use economically or practically feasible only for specific applications. The present paper aims at integrating hydrogen generation into compressed air energy storage systems to avoid natural gas combustion or thermal energy storage. A proper design of such a hybrid storage system could provide high roundtrip efficiencies together with enhanced flexibility thanks to the possibility of providing additional energy outputs (heat, cooling, and hydrogen as a fuel, in a distributed energy storage framework. Such a system could be directly connected to the power grid at the distribution level to reduce power and energy intermittence problems related to renewable energy generation. Similarly, it could be located close to the user (e.g., office buildings, commercial centers, industrial plants, hospitals, etc.. Finally, it could be integrated in decentralized energy generation systems to reduce the peak electricity demand charges and energy costs, to increase power generation efficiency, to enhance the security of electrical energy supply, and to facilitate the market penetration of small renewable energy systems. Different configurations have been investigated (simple hybrid storage system, regenerate system, multistage system demonstrating the compressed air and hydrogen storage systems effectiveness in improving energy source flexibility and efficiency, and possibly in reducing the costs of energy supply. Round-trip efficiency up to 65% can be easily reached. The analysis is conducted through a mixed theoretical-numerical approach, which allows the definition of the most relevant physical parameters affecting the system

  8. On the hydrogenation mechanism in magnesium I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.S.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1985-01-01

    The first time hydriding of spherical magnesium particles covered by a thin oxide layer and sieve-fractionated into narrow size distributions within the range 40–90 μm was followed by microgravimetry. The size distributions of the fractions were determined by semiautomatic image analysis....... The hydridings were run at 402°C and 3 MPa hydrogen pressure after heating in helium. A dependence of the rate of hydriding on the heat treatment prior to reaction was observed and it is proposed that the heat treatment causes oxygen atoms to diffuse into the bulk metal and thereby break up the protective oxide...... generalizing results from the hydriding of magnesium powders....

  9. Mechanism of vacancy formation induced by hydrogen in tungsten

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Nan Liu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We report a hydrogen induced vacancy formation mechanism in tungsten based on classical molecular dynamics simulations. We demonstrate the vacancy formation in tungsten due to the presence of hydrogen associated directly with a stable hexagonal self-interstitial cluster as well as a linear crowdion. The stability of different self-interstitial structures has been further studied and it is particularly shown that hydrogen plays a crucial role in determining the configuration of SIAs, in which the hexagonal cluster structure is preferred. Energetic analysis has been carried out to prove that the formation of SIA clusters facilitates the formation of vacancies. Such a mechanism contributes to the understanding of the early stage of the hydrogen blistering in tungsten under a fusion reactor environment.

  10. Spectral response of crystalline acetanilide and N -methylacetamide: Vibrational self-trapping in hydrogen-bonded crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edler, Julian; Hamm, Peter

    2004-06-01

    Femtosecond pump-probe and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is applied to compare the spectral response of the amide I band and the NH-stretching band of acetanilide (ACN) and N -methylacetamide (NMA), as well as their deuterated derivatives. Both molecules form hydrogen-bonded molecular crystals that are regarded to be model systems for polypeptides and proteins. The amide I bands of both ACN and NMA show a temperature-dependent sideband, while the NH bands are accompanied by a sequence of equidistantly spaced satellite peaks. These spectral anomalies are interpreted as a signature of vibrational self-trapping. Two different types of states can be identified in both crystals in the pump-probe signal: a delocalized free-exciton state and a set of localized self-trapped states. The phonons that mediate self-trapping in ACN and deuterated ACN are identified by their temperature dependence, confirming our previous results. The study shows that the substructure of the NH band in NMA (amide A and amide B bands) originates, at least partly, from vibrational self-trapping and not, as often assumed, from a Fermi resonance.

  11. Trapping proton transfer intermediates in the disordered hydrogen-bonded network of cryogenic hydrofluoric acid solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayotte, Patrick; Plessis, Sylvain; Marchand, Patrick

    2008-08-28

    A molecular-level description of the structural and dynamical aspects that are responsible for the weak acid behaviour of dilute hydrofluoric acid solutions and their unusual increased acidity at near equimolar concentrations continues to elude us. We address this problem by reporting reflection-absorption infrared spectra (RAIRS) of cryogenic HF-H(2)O binary mixtures at various compositions prepared as nanoscopic films using molecular beam techniques. Optical constants for these cryogenic solutions [n(omega) and k(omega)] are obtained by iteratively solving Fresnel equations for stratified media. Modeling of the experimental RAIRS spectra allow for a quantitative interpretation of the complex interplay between multiple reflections, optical interference and absorption effects. The evolution of the strong absorption features in the intermediate 1000-3000 cm(-1) range with increasing HF concentration reveals the presence of various ionic dissociation intermediates that are trapped in the disordered H-bonded network of cryogenic hydrofluoric acid solutions. Our findings are discussed in light of the conventional interpretation of why hydrofluoric acid is a weak acid revealing molecular-level details of the mechanism for HF ionization that may be relevant to analogous elementary processes involved in the ionization of weak acids in aqueous solutions.

  12. Ultrahigh-Q mechanical oscillators through optical trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, D E; Ni, K-K; Painter, O; Kimble, H J

    2012-01-01

    Rapid advances are being made toward optically cooling a single mode of a micro-mechanical system to its quantum ground state and observing the quantum behavior at macroscopic scales. Reaching this regime in room-temperature environments requires a stringent condition on the mechanical quality factor Q m and frequency f m , Q m f m ≳ k B T bath /h, which so far has been marginally satisfied only in a small number of systems. Here we propose and analyze a new class of systems that should enable one to obtain unprecedented Q-frequency products. The technique is based on the use of optical forces to ‘trap’ and stiffen the motion of a tethered mechanical structure, thereby freeing the resulting mechanical frequencies and decoherence rates from the underlying material properties. (paper)

  13. Short hydrogen bonds in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The survey of crystallographic data from the Protein Data Bank for 37 structures of trypsin and other serine proteases at a resolution of 0.78–1.28 Å revealed the presence of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the enzymes, which are formed between the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues and are on average 2.7 Å long. This is the typical bond length for normal hydrogen bonds. The geometric properties of the hydrogen bonds in the active site indicate that the H atom is not centered between the heteroatoms of the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues in the active site. Taken together, these findings exclude the possibility that short “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds are formed in the ground state structure of the active sites examined in this work. Some time ago, it was suggested by Cleland that the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis is operative in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases, and requires the presence of short hydrogen bonds around 2.4 Å long in the active site, with the H atom centered between the catalytic heteroatoms. The conclusions drawn from this work do not exclude the validity of the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis at all, but they merely do not support it in this particular case, with this particular class of enzymes.

  14. Development of a load cell for mechanical testing in hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCabe, L.P.

    1982-01-01

    Mechanical testing in hydrogen environments is performed on materials to determine hydrogen compatibility. Many tests are performed on small test samples in pressure vessels where monitoring of actual sample load is difficult. A method was developed to monitor small samples by placing inside the vessel a miniature load cell which is capable of measuring loads of less than 100 lbs. The load cell monitors load by means of a Wheatstone Bridge circuit composed of four strain gages. Two of the gages are mounted on a stainless steel stub which becomes part of the vessel load string; the others are wired outside the pressure vessel. Previously, load cells have been short-lived because of hydrogen diffusion into the epoxy-phenolic adhesive used to attach the strain gages to the stub. The use of a flame-sprayed ceramic, however, rather than an organic epoxy to mount the strain gages appears to produce a load cell resistant to the hydrogen test environment

  15. Theoretical analysis of hydrogen spillover mechanism on carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosalba eJuarez Mosqueda

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The spillover mechanism of molecular hydrogen on carbon nanotubes in the presence of catalytically active platinum clusters was critically and systematically investigated by using density-functional theory. Our simulation model includes a Pt4 cluster for the catalyst nanoparticle and curved and planar circumcoronene for two exemplary single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT, the (10,10 CNT and one of large diameter, respectively. Our results show that the H2 molecule dissociates spontaneously on the Pt4 cluster. However, the dissociated H atoms have to overcome a barrier of more than 2 eV to migrate from the catalyst to the CNT, even if the Pt4 cluster is at full saturation with six adsorbed and dissociated hydrogen molecules. Previous investigations have shown that the mobility of hydrogen atoms on the CNT surface is hindered by a barrier. We find that instead the Pt4 catalyst may move along the outer surface of the CNT with activation energy of only 0.16 eV, and that this effect offers the possibility of full hydrogenation of the CNT. Thus, although we have not found a low-energy pathway to spillover onto the CNT, we suggest, based on our calculations and calculated data reported in the literature, that in the hydrogen-spillover process the observed saturation of the CNT at hydrogen background pressure occurs through mobile Pt nanoclusters, which move on the substrate more easily than the substrate-chemisorbed hydrogens, and deposit or reattach hydrogens in the process. Initial hydrogenation of the carbon substrate, however, is thermodynamically unfavoured, suggesting that defects should play a significant role.

  16. Interface passivation and trap reduction via hydrogen fluoride for molybdenum disulfide on silicon oxide back-gate transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yaoqiao; San Yip, Pak; Tang, Chak Wah; Lau, Kei May; Li, Qiang

    2018-04-01

    Layered semiconductor molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has recently emerged as a promising material for flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices because of its finite bandgap and high degree of gate control. Here, we report a hydrogen fluoride (HF) passivation technique for improving the carrier mobility and interface quality of chemical vapor deposited monolayer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate. After passivation, the fabricated MoS2 back-gate transistors demonstrate a more than double improvement in average electron mobility, a reduced gate hysteresis gap of 3 V, and a low interface trapped charge density of ˜5.8 × 1011 cm-2. The improvements are attributed to the satisfied interface dangling bonds, thus a reduction of interface trap states and trapped charges. Surface x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis and first-principles simulation were performed to verify the HF passivation effect. The results here highlight the necessity of a MoS2/dielectric passivation strategy and provides a viable route for enhancing the performance of MoS2 nano-electronic devices.

  17. Conduction mechanism of leakage current due to the traps in ZrO2 thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Yohan; Lee, Sangyouk; An, Ilsin; Jeong, Heejun; Song, Chulgi

    2009-01-01

    In this work, a metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor with zirconium oxide (ZrO 2 ) gate dielectric was fabricated by an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique and the leakage current characteristics under negative bias were studied. From the result of current–voltage curves there are two possible conduction mechanisms to explain the leakage current in the ZrO 2 thin film. The dominant mechanism is the space charge limited conduction in the high-electric field region (1.5–5.0 MV cm −1 ) while the trap-assisted tunneling due to the existence of traps is prevailed in the low-electric field region (0.8–1.5 MV cm −1 ). Conduction caused by the trap-assisted tunneling is found from the experimental results of a weak temperature dependence of current, and the trap barrier height is obtained. The space charge limited conduction is evidenced, for different temperatures, by Child's law dependence of current density versus voltage. Child's law dependence can be explained by considering a single discrete trapping level and we can obtain the activation energy of 0.22 eV

  18. Conduction mechanism of leakage current due to the traps in ZrO2 thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Yohan; Lee, Sangyouk; An, Ilsin; Song, Chulgi; Jeong, Heejun

    2009-11-01

    In this work, a metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor with zirconium oxide (ZrO2) gate dielectric was fabricated by an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique and the leakage current characteristics under negative bias were studied. From the result of current-voltage curves there are two possible conduction mechanisms to explain the leakage current in the ZrO2 thin film. The dominant mechanism is the space charge limited conduction in the high-electric field region (1.5-5.0 MV cm-1) while the trap-assisted tunneling due to the existence of traps is prevailed in the low-electric field region (0.8-1.5 MV cm-1). Conduction caused by the trap-assisted tunneling is found from the experimental results of a weak temperature dependence of current, and the trap barrier height is obtained. The space charge limited conduction is evidenced, for different temperatures, by Child's law dependence of current density versus voltage. Child's law dependence can be explained by considering a single discrete trapping level and we can obtain the activation energy of 0.22 eV.

  19. A mechanism for the hydrogen uptake process in zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, B.

    1999-01-01

    Hydrogen uptake data for thin Zircaloy-2 specimens in steam at 300-400 C have been analysed to show that there is a decrease in the rate of uptake with respect to the rate of oxidation when the terminal solid solubility (TSS) of hydrogen in the metal is exceeded. In order for TSS to be reached during pre-transition oxidation a very thin 0.125 mm Zircaloy sheet was used. The specimens had been pickled initially removing all Zr 2 (Fe/Ni) particles from the initial surfaces, yet the initial hydrogen uptake rates were still much higher than for Zircaloy-4 or a binary Zr/Fe alloy that did not contain phases that dissolve readily during pickling. Cathodic polarisation at room temperature in CuSO 4 solution showed that small cracks or pores formed the cathodic sites in pre-transition oxide films. Some were at pits resulting from the initial dissolution of the Zr 2 (Fe/Ni) phase; others were not; none were at the remaining intermetallics in the original surface. These small cracks are thought to provide the ingress routes for hydrogen. A microscopic steam starvation process at the bottoms of these small cracks or pores, leading to the accumulation of hydrogen adjacent to the oxide/metal interface, and causing breakdown of the passive oxide forming at the bottom of the flaw, is thought to provide the mechanism for the hydrogen uptake process during both pre-transition and post-transition oxidation. (orig.)

  20. Hydrogen trapping ability of the pyridine-lithium⁺ (1:1) complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattaraj, Saparya; Srinivasu, K; Mondal, Sukanta; Ghosh, Swapan K

    2015-03-26

    Theoretical studies have been carried out at different levels of theory to verify the hydrogen adsorption characteristics of pyridine-lithium ion (1:1) complexes. The nature of interactions associated with the bonding between pyridine and lithium as well as that between lithium and adsorbed molecular hydrogen is studied through the calculation of electron density and electron-density-based reactivity descriptors. The pyridine-lithium ion complex has been hydrogenated systematically around the lithium site, and each lithium site is found to adsorb a maximum of four hydrogen molecules with an interaction energy of ∼-4.0 kcal/mol per molecule of H2. The fate of the hydrogen adsorbed in a pyridine-lithium ion complex (corresponding to the maximum adsorption) is studied in the course of a 2 ps time evolution through ab initio molecular dynamics simulation at different temperatures. The results reveal that the complex can hold a maximum of four hydrogen molecules at a temperature of 77 K, whereas it can hold only two molecules of hydrogen at 298 K.

  1. Regeneration of the cold trap of the PEC mechanism testing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caponetti, R.; Petrazzuolo, F.

    1984-01-01

    Experimentation on prototypes of PEC reactor blocking mechanisms is presently in course at Casaccia Cre in the experimental engineering division of the fast reactor department. After a brief description of the experimental cycle of the components, this repor shows the design criteria of a selected method for the regeneration of mechenism testing plant cold trap

  2. Mechanism of calcium oxide excitation by atom hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharlamov, V.F.

    1991-01-01

    Heterogeneous recombination of hydrogen atoms on the surface of calcium oxide proceeds according to the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism with participation of atoms in two different states, belonging to adsorption centres of the same type. CaO excitation is broughty about by vibration-electron transitions during associative desorption of H 2 molecules

  3. Mechanisms of hydrogen induced delayed cracking in hydride forming materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, R.; Nuttall, K.; Puls, M.P.; Simpson, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanisms which have been formulated to describe delayed hydrogen cracking in hydride-forming metals are reviewed and discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the commercial alloy Zr--2.5% Nb (Cb) which is extensively used in nuclear reactor core components. A quantitative model for hydrogen cracking in this material is presented and compared with available experimental data. The kinetics of crack propagation are controlled by the growth of hydrides at the stressed crack tip by the diffusive ingress of hydrogen into this region. The driving force for the diffusion flux is provided by the local stress gradient which interacts with both hydrogen atoms in solution and hydrogen atoms being dissolved and reprecipitated at the crack tip. The model is developed using concepts of elastoplastic fracture mechanics. Stage I crack growth is controlled by hydrides growing in the elastic stress gradient, while Stage II is controlled by hydride growth in the plastic zone at the crack tip. Recent experimental observations are presented which indicate that the process occurs in an intermittent fashion; hydride clusters accumulate at the crack tip followed by unstable crack advance and subsequent crack arrest in repeated cycles

  4. Mechanisms of hydrogen induced delayed cracking in hydride forming materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutton, R.; Nuttall, K.; Puls, M.P.; Simpson, L.A.

    1977-01-01

    Mechanisms which have been formulated to describe delayed hydrogen cracking in hydride-forming metals are reviewed and discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the commercial alloy Zr-2.5 pct Nb which is extensively used in nuclear reactor core components. A quantitative model for hydrogen cracking in this material is presented and compared with available experimental data. The kinetics of crack propagation are controlled by the growth of hydrides at the stressed crack tip by the diffusive ingress of hydrogen into this region. The driving force for the diffusion flux is provided by the local stress gradient which interacts with both hydrogen atoms in solution and hydrogen atoms being dissolved and reprecipitated at the crack tip. The model is developed using concepts of elastoplastic fracture mechanics. Stage I crack growth is controlled by hydrides growing in the elastic stress gradient, while Stage II is controlled by hydride growth in the plastic zone at the crack tip. Recent experimental observations are presented which indicate that the process occurs in an intermittent fashion; hydride clusters accumulate at the crack tip followed by unstable crack advance and subsequent crack arrest in repeated cycles. 55 refs., 6 figs

  5. Determination of trapping parameters and the chemical diffusion coefficient from hydrogen permeation experiments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Svoboda, Jiří; Mori, G.; Prethaler, A.; Fischer, F. D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 82, MAY (2014), s. 93-100 ISSN 0010-938X Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Steel * Electrochemical calculation * Modeling studies * Hydrogen permeation * Kinetic parameters Subject RIV: BJ - Thermodynamics Impact factor: 4.422, year: 2014

  6. Mass sensors with mechanical traps for weighing single cells in different fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Yaochung; Delgado, Francisco Feijó; Son, Sungmin; Burg, Thomas P; Wasserman, Steven C; Manalis, Scott R

    2011-12-21

    We present two methods by which single cells can be mechanically trapped and continuously monitored within the suspended microchannel resonator (SMR) mass sensor. Since the fluid surrounding the trapped cell can be quickly and completely replaced on demand, our methods are well suited for measuring changes in cell size and growth in response to drugs or other chemical stimuli. We validate our methods by measuring the density of single polystyrene beads and Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells with a precision of approximately 10(-3) g cm(-3), and by monitoring the growth of single mouse lymphoblast cells before and after drug treatment.

  7. Plans for laser spectroscopy of trapped cold hydrogen-like HCI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winters, D.F.A.; Abdulla, A.M.; Castrejon Pita, J.R.; Lange, A. de; Segal, D.M.; Thompson, R.C.

    2005-01-01

    Laser spectroscopy studies are being prepared to measure the 1s ground state hyperfine splitting in trapped cold highly charged ions. The purpose of such experiments is to test quantum electrodynamics in the strong electric field regime. These experiments form part of the HITRAP project at GSI. A brief review of the planned experiments is presented

  8. Nonlinearity from quantum mechanics: Dynamically unstable Bose-Einstein condensate in a double-well trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javanainen, Juha

    2010-01-01

    We study theoretically an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate in a double-well trap, both quantum-mechanically and classically, under conditions such that in the classical model an unstable equilibrium dissolves into large-scale oscillations of the atoms between the potential wells. Quantum mechanics alone does not exhibit such nonlinear dynamics, but measurements of the atom numbers in the potential wells may nevertheless cause the condensate to behave essentially classically.

  9. Two size-selective mechanisms specifically trap bacteria-sized food particles in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang-Yen, Christopher; Avery, Leon; Samuel, Aravinthan D T

    2009-11-24

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a filter feeder: it draws bacteria suspended in liquid into its pharynx, traps the bacteria, and ejects the liquid. How pharyngeal pumping simultaneously transports and filters food particles has been poorly understood. Here, we use high-speed video microscopy to define the detailed workings of pharyngeal mechanics. The buccal cavity and metastomal flaps regulate the flow of dense bacterial suspensions and exclude excessively large particles from entering the pharynx. A complex sequence of contractions and relaxations transports food particles in two successive trap stages before passage into the terminal bulb and intestine. Filtering occurs at each trap as bacteria are concentrated in the central lumen while fluids are expelled radially through three apical channels. Experiments with microspheres show that the C. elegans pharynx, in combination with the buccal cavity, is tuned to specifically catch and transport particles of a size range corresponding to most soil bacteria.

  10. Quantum mechanical calculation of diffusion of hydrogen isotopes in vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshinari, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Diffusion of H isotopes in V was investigated with a quantum mechanical calculation. • Calculated diffusion coefficients quantitatively agreed with the experimental data. • H in V jumps via quantum mechanical tunneling between the two tetrahedral sites. • H tunneling between ground states is dominant at low temperatures. • H tunneling between exited states becomes important at higher temperatures. -- Abstract: Diffusion of hydrogen isotopes in vanadium was investigated by a quantum mechanical calculation. Wave functions and the corresponding eigen energies (E) for hydrogen isotopes were obtained as a function of hydrogen position along the diffusion path (ξ) by solving the three dimensional Schrödinger equation. Hydrogen potential was calculated by using a first principles method with a nudged elastic band technique. By analyzing the E–ξ curves, the tunneling matrix elements were obtained for the coincidence states between two neighboring tetrahedral sites. It was clarified that the tunneling between ground states was dominant at low temperatures, whereas the contribution of that between the first exited states becomes larger at higher temperatures. The transition temperature of the dominant tunneling decreases with the isotope mass. The calculated temperature dependence of the diffusion for the V–H system quantitatively agreed with the experimental data in the literature, although those for the V–D and –T systems were somewhat underestimated

  11. Reforming water to generate hydrogen using mechanical alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pena F, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research was to generate a hydrogen production system by means of mechanical milling, in which 0.1 g of magnesium were weighed using a volume of 300 μL for each water solvent (H_2O) and methanol (CH_3OH) in a container to start mechanical milling for 2, 4 and 6 h. Once the mechanical milling was finished, the hydrogen that was produced every two hours was measured to determine the appropriate milling time in the production, also in each period of time samples of the powders produced during the milling of Mg were taken, in this process we used characterization techniques such as: X-ray diffraction at an angle of 2θi 5 and 2θf 90 degrees and scanning electron microscopy, taking micrographs of 100, 500, 1000 and 5000 magnifications. According to the mechanical milling results hydrogen was obtained when using water, as well as with methanol. In the techniques of X-ray diffraction characterization different results were obtained before and after the milling, since by the diffractogram s is possible to observe how the magnesium to be put in the mechanical milling along with the water and methanol was diminishing to be transformed into hydroxide and magnesium oxide, as well as in the micrographs taken with scanning electron microscopy the change in the magnesium morphology to hydroxide and magnesium oxide is observed. (Author)

  12. Quantum-mechanical approach to the state of hydrogen in b. c. c. metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukai, Y; Sugimoto, H

    1980-01-01

    A first step towards consistent understanding of various properties of interstitial hydrogen in b.c.c. metals has been made by solving a Schroedinger equation for hydrogen atoms in the field of interaction with surrounding metal atoms. Properties investigated include the nature of self-trapped states, the relative stability of self-trapped configurations, the average stress field (P-tensor), the excitation energy to be determined by neutron spectroscopy, etc. Calculations were performed on hydrogen isotopes (H, D, T) in group-V metals (V, Nb, Ta), and good agreement was obtained with many different kinds of observations. Some predictions and tentative explanations are also presented.

  13. Quantum-mechanical approach to the state of hydrogen in B. C. C. metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukai, Y; Sugimoto, H [Chuo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1980-01-01

    A first step towards consistent understanding of various properties of interstitial hydrogen in B.C.C. metals has been made by solving a Schroedinger equation for hydrogen atoms in the field of interaction with surrounding metal atoms. Properties investigated include a nature of self-trapped states, a relative stability of self-trapped configurations, the average stress field (P-tensor), the excitation energy to be determined by neutron spectroscopy, etc. Calculations were performed on hydrogen isotopes (H, D, T) in group-V metals (V, Nb, Ta), and good agreement was obtained with many different kinds of observations. Some predictions and tentative explanations are also presented.

  14. Trapping of hydrogen isotopes in radiation defects formed in tungsten by neutron and ion irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatano, Y., E-mail: hatano@ctg.u-toyama.ac.jp [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Shimada, M. [Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Alimov, V.Kh.; Shi, J.; Hara, M.; Nozaki, T. [Hydrogen Isotope Research Center, University of Toyama, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Oya, Y.; Kobayashi, M.; Okuno, K. [Faculty of Science, Shizuoka University, Shizuoka 422-8529 (Japan); Oda, T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Management, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Cao, G. [Department of Engineering Physics, The University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Yoshida, N.; Futagami, N. [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Kasuga 816-8580 (Japan); Sugiyama, K.; Roth, J.; Tyburska-Püschel, B.; Dorner, J. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Takagi, I. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Hatakeyama, M.; Kurishita, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai 311-1313 (Japan); and others

    2013-07-15

    Retention of D in neutron-irradiated W and desorption were examined after plasma exposure at 773 K. Deuterium was accumulated at a relatively high concentration up to a large depth of 50–100 μm due to the trapping effects of defects uniformly induced in the bulk. A significant D release in a vacuum continued to temperatures ⩾1173 K because of the small effective diffusion coefficient and the long diffusion distance. Exposure of ion-irradiated W to D{sub 2} gas showed a clear correlation between concentrations of trapped and solute D as determined by the trapping–detrapping equilibrium. These observations indicated that the accumulation of tritium in high concentrations is possible even at high temperatures if the concentration of solute tritium is high, and baking at moderate temperatures is ineffective for removal of tritium deeply penetrating into the bulk. Nevertheless, clear enhancement of D release was observed under the presence of solute H.

  15. With a flick of the lid: a novel trapping mechanism in Nepenthes gracilis pitcher plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Bauer

    Full Text Available Carnivorous pitcher plants capture prey with modified leaves (pitchers, using diverse mechanisms such as 'insect aquaplaning' on the wet pitcher rim, slippery wax crystals on the inner pitcher wall, and viscoelastic retentive fluids. Here we describe a new trapping mechanism for Nepenthes gracilis which has evolved a unique, semi-slippery wax crystal surface on the underside of the pitcher lid and utilises the impact of rain drops to 'flick' insects into the trap. Depending on the experimental conditions (simulated 'rain', wet after 'rain', or dry, insects were captured mainly by the lid, the peristome, or the inner pitcher wall, respectively. The application of an anti-slip coating to the lower lid surface reduced prey capture in the field. Compared to sympatric N. rafflesiana, N. gracilis pitchers secreted more nectar under the lid and less on the peristome, thereby directing prey mainly towards the lid. The direct contribution to prey capture represents a novel function of the pitcher lid.

  16. Study into the mechanisms of hydrogen contamination of niobium as a material for superconducting radiofrequency cavities. Molecular dynamics studies for simulation of the hydrogen diffusion processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roux, B.

    1993-01-01

    Superconducting radiofrequency cavities were chosen for most of the future particle accelerators. In the case of pure niobium cavities, several laboratories have observed degradation of superconducting properties related to the conditions of the cooling down process. This effect seems to stem from hydrogen contamination which occurs during surface treatments. With the aim to study the influence of different surface treatments on the hydrogen contamination depth concentration profiling of the near surface region (the first 200 nm) was first carried out by the classical ERDA technique with 30 nm depth resolution. In order to better localize hydrogen, the initial particle selecting device (Teflon foil) was replaced by an electromagnetic (ExB) filter improving then the depth resolution by a factor three. This study reveals an hydrogen segregation at the niobium surface. Such a result is in contradiction with the relative high experimental value of the hydrogen diffusion coefficient given by the literature. To understand the trapping mechanism of hydrogen, a simulation by molecular dynamics of this impurity diffusion process was performed. This approach requires the knowledge of the interatomic potential. The potential parameters were fitted with static and dynamic tests. Nb-Nb interaction is based on many body potential. Nb-H is represented by two body potential. The Arrhenius diagram of the diffusion coefficient achieved by dynamic for a single crystal provides too small activation energy in comparison with experimental results. However, in presence of defects, a simulation proves a large increase of these values. It is only around 1000 K that the diffusion of hydrogen is not altered by defects. This conclusion confirms the experimental results concerning a good characteristic of superconducting cavities after thermal treatments. (orig.)

  17. Evidence for hydrogen-assisted recovery of cold-worked palladium: hydrogen solubility and mechanical properties studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Ferrer

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence of hydrogen as an agent to accelerate the thermal recovery of cold-worked palladium has been investigated. The techniques used to characterize the effects of hydrogen on the thermal recovery of palladium were hydrogen solubility and mechanical property measurements. Results show that the presence of modest amounts of hydrogen during annealing of cold-worked palladium does enhance the degree of thermal recovery, with a direct correlation between the amount of hydrogen during annealing and the degree of recovery. The results indicate that the damage resulting from cold-working palladium can be more effectively and efficiently reversed by suitable heat treatments in the presence of appropriate amounts of hydrogen, as compared to heat treatment in vacuum. The somewhat novel technique of using changes in the hydrogen solubility of palladium as an indicator of thermal recovery has been validated and complements the more traditional technique of mechanical property measurements.

  18. Self-trapping mechanisms in the dynamics of three coupled Bose-Einstein condensates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzosi, Roberto; Penna, Vittorio

    2002-01-01

    We formulate the dynamics of three coupled Bose-Einstein condensates within a semiclassical scenario based on the standard boson coherent states. We compare such a picture with that of K. Nemoto et al. [Phys. Rev. A 63, 013604 (2001)] and show how our approach entails a simple formulation of the dimeric regime therein studied. This allows us to recognize the parameters that govern the bifurcation mechanism causing self-trapping, and paves the way to the construction of analytic solutions

  19. Two Size-Selective Mechanisms Specifically Trap Bacteria-Sized Food Particles in Caenorhabditis elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Fang-Yen, Christopher M.; Avery, Leon; Samuel, Aravinthan DT

    2009-01-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is a filter feeder: it draws bacteria suspended in liquid into its pharynx, traps the bacteria, and ejects the liquid. How pharyngeal pumping simultaneously transports and filters food particles has been poorly understood. Here, we use high-speed video microscopy to define the detailed workings of pharyngeal mechanics. The buccal cavity and metastomal flaps regulate the flow of dense bacterial suspensions and exclude excessively large particles from entering the pharyn...

  20. A study of sodium oxide crystallization mechanisms and kinetics in cold traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latge, C.

    1984-04-01

    After showing up the present lack of data on crystallization mechanisms and kinetics, a number of tests were conducted on a sodium test loop equipped with two experimental cold traps. The effects of several geometric and thermohydraulic parameters on purification efficiency were also studied. The test results were used to develop a simulation model. An optimization code based on the model can be used to determine the nucleation and growth kinetics

  1. Hydrogen desorption from mechanically milled carbon micro coils hydrogenated at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshio Furuya; Shuichi Izumi; Seiji Motojima; Yukio Hishikawa

    2005-01-01

    Carbon micro coils (CMC) have been prepared by the catalytic pyrolysis of acetylene at 750-800 C. The as grown coils have an almost amorphous structure and contain about 1 mass% hydrogen. They have 0.1 - 10 mm coil length, 1-5 μm coil diameter, 0.1-0.5 μm coil pitch and about 100 m 2 /g specific surface area. They were graphitized, as maintaining the morphology of the coils, by heat-treating at a higher temperature than 2500 C in Ar atmosphere. The layer space (d) of graphitized CMC was determined to be 0.341 nm, forming a 'herringbone' structure with an inclination of 10-40 degree versus the coiled fiber axis, having a specific surface area of about 8 m 2 /g. The hydrogen absorption behaviors of CMC were investigated from RT to 1200 C by a thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) using a quadrupole mass analyzer. In TDS measurements, pre-existing hydrogen, which was due to the residual acetylene incorporated into CMC on its growing, desorbed from 700 C and peaked at about 900 C. The increment in the main peak of desorbed hydrogen in the as-grown CMC heat-treated at 500 C for 1 h under high pressure of hydrogen gas (1.9 or 8.9 MPa) was not remarkable as is shown in Fig.1. While, in the CMC samples milled mechanically for 1 h at RT using a planetary ball mill, the increase of desorbed hydrogen became to be great with the hydrogen pressure (up to 8.9 MPa) on heat-treating at 500 C, as is shown in Fig.2. In these CMC samples, the building up temperature of the hydrogen desorption was shifted to a lower one and the temperature range of desorption became to be wider than those in the as-grown CMC because of the appearance of another desorption peak at about 600 C in addition to the peak ranging from 850 C to 900 C. The same kind of peak was also slightly observed in as-grown CMC (Fig.1). It is clear that this desorption at about 600 C has contributed to the remarkable increase of desorbed hydrogen in the milled CMC. In this work, values of more than 2 mass% were obtained

  2. A robust single-beam optical trap for a gram-scale mechanical oscillator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altin, P A; Nguyen, T T-H; Slagmolen, B J J; Ward, R L; Shaddock, D A; McClelland, D E

    2017-11-06

    Precise optical control of microscopic particles has been mastered over the past three decades, with atoms, molecules and nano-particles now routinely trapped and cooled with extraordinary precision, enabling rapid progress in the study of quantum phenomena. Achieving the same level of control over macroscopic objects is expected to bring further advances in precision measurement, quantum information processing and fundamental tests of quantum mechanics. However, cavity optomechanical systems dominated by radiation pressure - so-called 'optical springs' - are inherently unstable due to the delayed dynamical response of the cavity. Here we demonstrate a fully stable, single-beam optical trap for a gram-scale mechanical oscillator. The interaction of radiation pressure with thermo-optic feedback generates damping that exceeds the mechanical loss by four orders of magnitude. The stability of the resultant spring is robust to changes in laser power and detuning, and allows purely passive self-locking of the cavity. Our results open up a new way of trapping and cooling macroscopic objects for optomechanical experiments.

  3. Investigation on de-trapping mechanisms related to non-monotonic kink pattern in GaN HEMT devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandan Sharma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This article reports an experimental approach to analyze the kink effect phenomenon which is usually observed during the GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT operation. De-trapping of charge carriers is one of the prominent reasons behind the kink effect. The commonly observed non-monotonic behavior of kink pattern is analyzed under two different device operating conditions and it is found that two different de-trapping mechanisms are responsible for a particular kink behavior. These different de-trapping mechanisms are investigated through a time delay analysis which shows the presence of traps with different time constants. Further voltage sweep and temperature analysis corroborates the finding that different de-trapping mechanisms play a role in kink behavior under different device operating conditions.

  4. Investigation on de-trapping mechanisms related to non-monotonic kink pattern in GaN HEMT devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Chandan; Laishram, Robert; Amit, Rawal, Dipendra Singh; Vinayak, Seema; Singh, Rajendra

    2017-08-01

    This article reports an experimental approach to analyze the kink effect phenomenon which is usually observed during the GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) operation. De-trapping of charge carriers is one of the prominent reasons behind the kink effect. The commonly observed non-monotonic behavior of kink pattern is analyzed under two different device operating conditions and it is found that two different de-trapping mechanisms are responsible for a particular kink behavior. These different de-trapping mechanisms are investigated through a time delay analysis which shows the presence of traps with different time constants. Further voltage sweep and temperature analysis corroborates the finding that different de-trapping mechanisms play a role in kink behavior under different device operating conditions.

  5. Ab-initio calculations of the hydrogen-uranium system: Surface phenomena, absorption, transport and trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, Christopher D.; Scott Lillard, R.

    2009-01-01

    Density functional theory was applied to the initial steps of uranium hydriding: surface phenomena, absorption, bulk transport and trapping. H adsorbs exothermically to the (0 0 1) surface, yet H absorption into the bulk is endothermic, with off-center octahedral absorption having the lowest absorption energy of 0.39 eV, relative to molecular H 2 . H absorption in interstitial sites causes a local softening of the bulk modulus. Diffusion of H in unstrained α-U has a barrier of 0.6 eV. The energy of H absorption adjacent to the chemical impurities C, S, Si was lowered by an amount proportional to the size of the impurity atom, and the resulting lattice strain Si > S > C. Thus, impurities may promote hydriding by providing surfaces or prestrained zones for H uptake.

  6. Charge trapping and carrier transport mechanism in silicon-rich silicon oxynitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Zhenrui; Aceves, Mariano; Carrillo, Jesus; Lopez-Estopier, Rosa

    2006-01-01

    The charge-trapping and carrier transport properties of silicon-rich silicon oxynitride (SRO:N) were studied. The SRO:N films were deposited by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. Infrared (IR) and transmission electron microscopic (TEM) measurements were performed to characterize their structural properties. Capacitance versus voltage and current versus voltage measurements (I-V) were used to study the charge-trapping and carrier transport mechanism. IR and TEM measurements revealed the existence of Si nanodots in SRO:N films. I-V measurements revealed that there are two conduction regimes divided by a threshold voltage V T . When the applied voltage is smaller than V T , the current is dominated by the charge transfer between the SRO:N and substrate; and in this regime only dynamic charging/discharging of the SRO:N layer is observed. When the voltage is larger than V T , the current increases rapidly and is dominated by the Poole-Frenkel mechanism; and in this regime, large permanent trapped charge density is obtained. Nitrogen incorporation significantly reduced the silicon nanodots or defects near the SRO:N/Si interface. However, a significant increase of the density of silicon nanodot in the bulk of the SRO:N layer is obtained

  7. Reaction between peroxynitrite and boronates: EPR spin-trapping, HPLC analyses, and quantum mechanical study of the free radical pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikora, Adam; Zielonka, Jacek; Lopez, Marcos; Dybala-Defratyka, Agnieszka; Joseph, Joy; Marcinek, Andrzej; Kalyanaraman, Balaraman

    2013-01-01

    Recently we showed that peroxynitrite (ONOO−) reacts directly and rapidly with aromatic and aliphatic boronic acids (k ≈ 106 M−1s−1). Product analyses and substrate consumption data indicated that ONOO− reacts stoichiometrically with boronates, yielding the corresponding phenols as the major product (~85–90%), and the remaining products (10–15%) were proposed to originate from free radical intermediates (phenyl and phenoxyl radicals). Here we investigated in detail the minor, free radical pathway of boronate reaction with ONOO−. The electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping technique was used to characterize the free radical intermediates formed from the reaction between boronates and ONOO−. Using 2-methyl-2-nitrosopropane (MNP) and 5-diethoxyphosphoryl-5-methyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DEPMPO) spin traps, phenyl radicals were trapped and detected. Although phenoxyl radicals were not detected, the positive effects of molecular oxygen, and inhibitory effects of hydrogen atom donors (acetonitrile, and 2-propanol) and general radical scavengers (GSH, NADH, ascorbic acid and tyrosine) on the formation of phenoxyl radical-derived nitrated product, suggest that phenoxyl radical was formed as the secondary species. We propose that the initial step of the reaction involves the addition of ONOO− to the boron atom in boronates. The anionic intermediate undergoes both heterolytic (major pathway) and homolytic (minor pathway) cleavage of the peroxy (O-O) bond to form phenol and nitrite as a major product (via a non-radical mechanism), or a radical pair PhB(OH)2O•−…•NO2 as a minor product. It is conceivable that phenyl radicals are formed by the fragmentation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion. According to the DFT quantum mechanical calculations, the energy barrier for the dissociation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion to form phenyl radicals is only a few kcal/mol, suggesting rapid and spontaneous fragmentation of PhB(OH)2O•− radical anion

  8. Experiments on continuum electron capture in atomic hydrogen and collisional interaction of trapped ions. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellin, I.A.; Elston, S.B.

    1981-01-01

    This section describes the background and scope of as well as progress made on experiments designed to test the present theory of charge exchange to continuum for the case of bare nuclei on atomic hydrogen. The charge transfer process is well known to be an essential ingredient of any attempt to understand the ionization of gaseous media traversed by highly-charged energetic ions. Surprisingly, a sometimes dominant contribution to such ionization remained undiscovered until the past decade. This process, known as charge transfer to the continuum, involves the ionization of electrons from the target species into unbound states closely matched in exit direction and speed to the charged particles which generate them. Subsequent measurements of the resultant forward electron production, performed by University of Tennessee searchers at Oak Ridge and Brookhaven National Laboratories, were unique in employing more highly charged projectiles than previously

  9. Dislocation/hydrogen interaction mechanisms in hydrided nanocrystalline palladium films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amin-Ahmadi, Behnam; Connétable, Damien; Fivel, Marc; Tanguy, Döme; Delmelle, Renaud; Turner, Stuart; Malet, Loic; Godet, Stephane; Pardoen, Thomas; Proost, Joris; Schryvers, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    The nanoscale plasticity mechanisms activated during hydriding cycles in sputtered nanocrystalline Pd films have been investigated ex-situ using advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques. The internal stress developing within the films during hydriding has been monitored in-situ. Results showed that in Pd films hydrided to β-phase, local plasticity was mainly controlled by dislocation activity in spite of the small grain size. Changes of the grain size distribution and the crystallographic texture have not been observed. In contrast, significant microstructural changes were not observed in Pd films hydrided to α-phase. Moreover, the effect of hydrogen loading on the nature and density of dislocations has been investigated using aberration-corrected TEM. Surprisingly, a high density of shear type stacking faults has been observed after dehydriding, indicating a significant effect of hydrogen on the nucleation energy barriers of Shockley partial dislocations. Ab-initio calculations of the effect of hydrogen on the intrinsic stable and unstable stacking fault energies of palladium confirm the experimental observations.

  10. Visualization of hydrogen in steels by secondary ion mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takai, Kenichi

    2000-01-01

    Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) enables us to visualize hydrogen trapping sites in steels. Information about the hydrogen trapping sites in high-strength steels by SIMS is very important to discuss environmental embrittlement mechanism for developing steels with a high resistance to the environmental embrittlement. Secondary ion image analysis by SIMS has made possible to visualize the hydrogen and deuterium trapping sites in the steels. Hydrogen in tempered martensite steels containing Ca tends to accumulate on inclusions, at grain boundaries, and in segregation bands. Visualization of hydrogen desorption process by secondary ion image analysis confirms that the bonding between the inclusions and the hydrogen is strong. Cold-drawn pearlite steels trap hydrogen along cold-drawing direction. Pearlite phase absorbs the hydrogen more than ferrite phase does. This article introduces the principle of SIMS, its feature, analysis method, and results of hydrogen visualization in steels. (author)

  11. Mechanical alloying of a hydrogenation catalyst used for the remediation of contaminated compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Jacqueline W. (Inventor); Clausen, Christian A. (Inventor); Geiger, Cherie L. (Inventor); Aitken, Brian S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A hydrogenation catalyst including a base material coated with a catalytic metal is made using mechanical milling techniques. The hydrogenation catalysts are used as an excellent catalyst for the dehalogenation of contaminated compounds and the remediation of other industrial compounds. Preferably, the hydrogenation catalyst is a bimetallic particle including zero-valent metal particles coated with a catalytic material. The mechanical milling technique is simpler and cheaper than previously used methods for producing hydrogenation catalysts.

  12. Energy storage and dispersion of surface acoustic waves trapped in a periodic array of mechanical resonators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dühring, Maria Bayard; Laude, Vincent; Khelif, Abdelkrim

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown previously that surface acoustic waves can be efficiently trapped and slowed by steep ridges on a piezoelectric substrate, giving rise to two families of shear-horizontal and vertically polarized surface waves. The mechanisms of energy storage and dispersion are explored by using...... the finite element method to model surface acoustic waves generated by high aspect ratio electrodes. A periodic model is proposed including a perfectly matched layer to simulate radiation conditions away from the sources, from which the modal distributions are found. The ratio of the mechanical energy...... confined to the electrode as compared to the total mechanical energy is calculated and is found to be increasing for increasing aspect ratio and to tend to a definite limit for the two families of surface waves. This observation is in support of the interpretation that high aspect ratio electrodes act...

  13. Deuterium trapping in carbon fiber composites under high fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Airapetov, A.A.; Begrambekov, L.B.; Kuzmin, A.A.; Shigin, P.A.; Zakharov, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper is devoted to investigation of deuterium trapping in CFC, dance graphite MPG-8 and pyrolytic graphite (PG) under plasma ion- and electron irradiation. Number of specific features of deuterium trapping and retention under plasma ion and electron irradiation is presented and discussed. In particular it is shown that 1) deuterium trapping takes place even when energy of impinging ions approaches zero; 2) deuterium is trapped under irradiation by plasma electrons; 3) under irradiation at equal fluences deuterium trapping is higher, when ion flux is smaller. High energy ion penetrating the surfaces are trapped in the traps created at the expense of their kinetic energy. The process may be named 'kinetic trapping'. Under low energy (smaller than 200 eV) electron and/or ion irradiation the energy of inelastic interaction on the surface provides creation of active centers, which initiate dissociation of deuterium sorbed on the surface, penetration of deuterium atoms into graphite and their trapping in specific low energy traps. The term 'potential trapping' is proposed for this type of trapping. Under high energy irradiation such atoms can fill the traps formed through kinetic mechanism. Origination of moveable deuterium atoms from the layer of surface sorption seems to be time dependent process and it is a reason of increase of trapping along with irradiation time. New features of deuterium trapping and retention in graphite evaluated in this study offer new opportunities for analysis and correct estimation of hydrogen isotope trapping and retention in tokamaks having graphite tiles. (authors)

  14. Hydrogen sulfide increases nitric oxide production from endothelial cells by an Akt-dependent mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arturo J Cardounel

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S and nitric oxide (NO are both gasotransmitters that can elicit synergistic vasodilatory responses in the in the cardiovascular system, but the mechanisms behind this synergy are unclear. In the current study we investigated the molecular mechanisms through which H2S regulates endothelial NO production. Initial studies were performed to establish the temporal and dose-dependent effects of H2S on NO generation using EPR spin trapping techniques. H2S stimulated a two-fold increase in NO production from endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS, which was maximal 30 min after exposure to 25-150 µM H2S. Following 30 min H2S exposure, eNOS phosphorylation at Ser 1177 was significantly increased compared to control, consistent with eNOS activation. Pharmacological inhibition of Akt, the kinase responsible for Ser 1177 phosphorylation, attenuated the stimulatory effect of H2S on NO production. Taken together, these data demonstrate that H2S up-regulates NO production from eNOS through an Akt-dependent mechanism. These results implicate H2S in the regulation of NO in endothelial cells, and suggest that deficiencies in H2S signaling can directly impact processes regulated by NO.

  15. Evidence of interfacial charge trapping mechanism in polyaniline/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Rakibul; Brun, Jean-François; Roussel, Frederick, E-mail: frederick.roussel@univ-lille1.fr [University of Lille, Sciences & Technologies, Unité Matériaux et Transformations (UMET), UMR CNRS 8207, U.F.R. de Physique, P5, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); COMUE Lille Nord de France, BP 50458-59658 Villeneuve d' Ascq Cedex (France); Papathanassiou, Anthony N. [Physics Department, Solid State Physics Section, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, GR15784 Zografos, Athens (Greece); Chan Yu King, Roch [Science Division, University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma, Chickasha, Oklahoma 73018 (United States)

    2015-08-03

    Relaxation mechanisms in polyaniline (PANI)/Reduced Graphene Oxide (RGO) nanocomposites are investigated using broad band dielectric spectroscopy. The multilayered nanostructural features of the composites and the intimate interactions between PANI and RGO are evidenced by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Increasing the RGO fraction in the composites results in a relaxation process observed at a frequency of ca. 5 kHz. This mechanism is associated with an electrical charge trapping phenomenon occurring at the PANI/RGO interfaces. The dielectric relaxation processes are interpreted according to the Sillars approach and the results are consistent with the presence of conducting prolate spheroids (RGO) embedded into a polymeric matrix (PANI). Dielectric permittivity data are analyzed within the framework of the Kohlrausch-William-Watts model, evidencing a Debye-like relaxation process.

  16. Excited hydrogen bonds in the molecular mechanism of muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bespalova, S V; Tolpygo, K B

    1991-11-21

    The mechanism of muscle contraction is considered. The hydrolysis of an ATP molecule is assumed to produce the excitation of hydrogen bonds A--H...B between electronegative atoms A and B, which are contained in the myosin head and actin filament. This excitation energy epsilon f depends on the interatomic distance AB = R and generates the tractive force f = -delta epsilon f/delta R, that makes atoms AB approach each other. The swing of the myosin head results in macroscopic mutual displacement of actin and myosin polymers. The motion of the actin filament under the action of this force is studied. The conditions under which a considerable portion of the excitation energy converts into the potential tension energy of the actin filament are analysed, and the probability of higher muscle efficiency existence is discussed.

  17. Structures and mechanisms in clay nanopore trapping of structurally-different fluoroquinolone antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okaikue-Woodi, Fanny E K; Kelch, Sabrina E; Schmidt, Michael P; Enid Martinez, Carmen; Youngman, Randall E; Aristilde, Ludmilla

    2018-03-01

    Smectite clay nanoparticles are implicated in the retention of antimicrobials within soils and sediments; these clays are also inspected as drug carriers in physiological systems. Cation exchange is considered the primary adsorption mechanism of antimicrobials within smectite nanopores. However, a dual role of acid-base chemistry and adsorptive structures is speculated by recent studies. Using the prototypical smectite clay montmorillonite, we employed a combination of X-ray diffraction (XRD), nuclear magnetic resonance, attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interlayer nanopore trapping of two structurally-different fluoroquinolone (FQ) antimicrobials with similar acid-base chemistry: ciprofloxacin (a first-generation FQ) and moxifloxacin (a third-generation FQ). Greater sorption at pH 5.0 than at pH 7.0 for both FQs was consistent with cation-exchange of positively-charged species. However, the clay exhibited a near twofold higher sorption capacity for moxifloxacin than for ciprofloxacin. This difference was shown by the XRD data to be accompanied by enhanced trapping of moxifloxacin within the clay interlayers. Using the XRD-determined nanopore sizes, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of thermodynamically-favorable model adsorbates, which revealed that ciprofloxacin was adsorbed parallel to the clay surface but moxifloxacin adopted a tilted conformation across the nanopore. These conformations resulted in more slowly-exchanged than quickly-exchanged Na complexes with ciprofloxacin compared with moxifloxacin. These different Na populations were also captured by 23 Na nuclear magnetic resonance. Furthermore, the simulated adsorbates uncovered different complexation interactions that were corroborated by infrared spectroscopy. Therefore, beyond acid-base chemistry, our findings imply that distinct adsorbate structures control antimicrobial trapping within clay nanopores

  18. Hydrogen induced surface effects on the mechanical properties of type 304 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, T.C.V. da; Pascual, R.; Miranda, P.E.V. de.

    1983-01-01

    The possibilities of modifying the mechanical properties of type 304 stainless steel by cathodic hydrogen charging were studied. The situations analysed included hydrogen embrittlement itself in tensile tests of hydrogen containing samples and the effects of delayed cracks in fatigue tests of hydrogenated and outgassed samples. SEM and TEM observations were also performed. It was found that hydrogen induced surface delayed cracks appear in great quantity during outgassing (of the order of several millions in a square centimeter). Hydrogen embrittlement was responsible for drastic losses in ductility in tension, while surface cracks severely reduced fatigue life. (author) [pt

  19. Comprehensive Understanding of Ductility Loss Mechanisms in Various Steels with External and Internal Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takakuwa, Osamu; Yamabe, Junichiro; Matsunaga, Hisao; Furuya, Yoshiyuki; Matsuoka, Saburo

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogen-induced ductility loss and related fracture morphologies are comprehensively discussed in consideration of the hydrogen distribution in a specimen with external and internal hydrogen by using 300-series austenitic stainless steels (Types 304, 316, 316L), high-strength austenitic stainless steels (HP160, XM-19), precipitation-hardened iron-based super alloy (A286), low-alloy Cr-Mo steel (JIS-SCM435), and low-carbon steel (JIS-SM490B). External hydrogen is realized by a non-charged specimen tested in high-pressure gaseous hydrogen, and internal hydrogen is realized by a hydrogen-charged specimen tested in air or inert gas. Fracture morphologies obtained by slow-strain-rate tensile tests (SSRT) of the materials with external or internal hydrogen could be comprehensively categorized into five types: hydrogen-induced successive crack growth, ordinary void formation, small-sized void formation related to the void sheet, large-sized void formation, and facet formation. The mechanisms of hydrogen embrittlement are broadly classified into hydrogen-enhanced decohesion (HEDE) and hydrogen-enhanced localized plasticity (HELP). In the HEDE model, hydrogen weakens interatomic bonds, whereas in the HELP model, hydrogen enhances localized slip deformations. Although various fracture morphologies are produced by external or internal hydrogen, these morphologies can be explained by the HELP model rather than by the HEDE model.

  20. Improving accuracy and precision of ice core δD(CH4 analyses using methane pre-pyrolysis and hydrogen post-pyrolysis trapping and subsequent chromatographic separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bock

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Firn and polar ice cores offer the only direct palaeoatmospheric archive. Analyses of past greenhouse gas concentrations and their isotopic compositions in air bubbles in the ice can help to constrain changes in global biogeochemical cycles in the past. For the analysis of the hydrogen isotopic composition of methane (δD(CH4 or δ2H(CH4 0.5 to 1.5 kg of ice was hitherto used. Here we present a method to improve precision and reduce the sample amount for δD(CH4 measurements in (ice core air. Pre-concentrated methane is focused in front of a high temperature oven (pre-pyrolysis trapping, and molecular hydrogen formed by pyrolysis is trapped afterwards (post-pyrolysis trapping, both on a carbon-PLOT capillary at −196 °C. Argon, oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, unpyrolysed methane and krypton are trapped together with H2 and must be separated using a second short, cooled chromatographic column to ensure accurate results. Pre- and post-pyrolysis trapping largely removes the isotopic fractionation induced during chromatographic separation and results in a narrow peak in the mass spectrometer. Air standards can be measured with a precision better than 1‰. For polar ice samples from glacial periods, we estimate a precision of 2.3‰ for 350 g of ice (or roughly 30 mL – at standard temperature and pressure (STP – of air with 350 ppb of methane. This corresponds to recent tropospheric air samples (about 1900 ppb CH4 of about 6 mL (STP or about 500 pmol of pure CH4.

  1. Study and Development of Face-Contact, Bellows Mechanical Seal for Liquid Hydrogen Turbopump

    OpenAIRE

    NOSAKA, Masataka; SUZUKI, Mineo; MIYAKAWA, Yukio; KAMIJO, Kenjiro; KIKUCHI, Masataka; MORI, Masahiro; 野坂, 正隆; 鈴木, 峰男; 宮川, 行雄; 上絛, 謙二郎; 菊池, 正孝; 森, 雅裕

    1981-01-01

    The development of a 10-ton thrust liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen (LOX and LH2) rocket engine is under way at the National Space Development Agency. In advance of the development of a liquid hydrogen turbopump, the National Aerospace Laboratory carried out study and development of a face-contact, bellows mechanical seal for a liquid hydrogen turbopump in co-operation with the National Space Development Agency. The present report describes the fundamental experiments of the mechanical seal ...

  2. Hydrogen trapping by VC precipitates and structural defects in a high strength Fe–Mn–C steel studied by small-angle neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malard, B.; Remy, B.; Scott, C.; Deschamps, A.; Chêne, J.; Dieudonné, T.; Mathon, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► SANS was used to study the interaction between H and a Fe–Mn–C steel containing V. ► No interaction between H and V in solid solution has been detected. ► A reversible interaction between H and structural defects has been measured. ► 5 ppm wt. of H can be trapped in the VC nanoprecipitates. - Abstract: The trapping of hydrogen by VC precipitates and structural defects in high strength Fe–Mn–C steel was studied by small angle neutron scattering. No interaction between H and V in solid solution has been detected but a significant interaction between H and structural defects introduced by plastic deformation has been measured. This last effect was reversible upon outgassing of the H. Moreover a significant interaction between H and VC precipitates has been measured; 5 ppm wt. of H could be trapped in the precipitates. This is consistent with the homogeneous trapping of H within the precipitates rather than at the precipitate/matrix interface.

  3. A Hydrogen Ignition Mechanism for Explosions in Nuclear Facility Piping Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leishear, Robert A.

    2013-09-18

    Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein. Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions may occur. Pipe ruptures in nuclear reactor cooling systems were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents, an ignition source for hydrogen was not clearly demonstrated, but these accidents demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. A new theory to identify an ignition source and explosion cause is presented here, and further research is recommended to fully understand this explosion mechanism.

  4. The control mechanism of surface traps on surface charge behavior in alumina-filled epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Chuanyang; Hu, Jun; Lin, Chuanjie; He, Jinliang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the role surface traps play in the charge injection and transfer behavior of alumina-filled epoxy composites, surface traps with different trap levels are introduced by different surface modification methods which include dielectric barrier discharges plasma, direct fluorination, and Cr 2 O 3 coating. The resulting surface physicochemical characteristics of experimental samples were observed using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The surface potential under dc voltage was detected and the trap level distribution was measured. The results suggest that the surface morphology of the experimental samples differs dramatically after treatment with different surface modification methods. Different surface trap distributions directly determine the charge injection and transfer property along the surface. Shallow traps with trap level of 1.03–1.11 eV and 1.06–1.13 eV introduced by plasma and fluorination modifications are conducive for charge transport along the insulating surface, and the surface potential can be modified, producing a smoother potential curve. The Cr 2 O 3 coating can introduce a large number of deep traps with energy levels ranging from 1.09 to 1.15 eV. These can prevent charge injection through the reversed electric field formed by intensive trapped charges in the Cr 2 O 3 coatings. (paper)

  5. Probing matrix and tumor mechanics with in situ calibrated optical trap based active microrheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Jack Rory; Vieira, Wilfred; Tanner, Kandice; Tissue Morphodynamics Unit Team

    Aberrant extracellular matrix deposition and vascularization, concomitant with proliferation and phenotypic changes undergone by cancer cells, alter mechanical properties in the tumor microenvironment during cancer progression. Tumor mechanics conversely influence progression, and the identification of physical biomarkers promise improved diagnostic and prognostic power. Optical trap based active microrheology enables measurement of forces up to 0.5 mm within a sample, allowing interrogation of in vitro biomaterials, ex vivo tissue sections, and small organisms in vivo. We fabricated collagen I hydrogels exhibiting distinct structural properties by tuning polymerization temperature Tp, and measured their shear storage and loss moduli at frequencies 1-15k Hz at multiple amplitudes. Lower Tp gels, with larger pore size but thicker, longer fibers, were stiffer than higher Tp gels; decreasing strain increased loss moduli and decreased storage moduli at low frequencies. We subcutanously injected probes with metastatic murine melanoma cells into mice. The excised tumors displayed storage and loss moduli 40 Pa and 10 Pa at 1 Hz, increasing to 500 Pa and 1 kPa at 15 kHz, respectively.

  6. Mechanism of the hydrogen reduction of molybdenum oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulmeyer, W.V.; Ortner, H.M.

    2001-01-01

    The two stages of the hydrogen reduction of MoO 3 to Mo were investigated in a thermal balance under well defined reaction conditions. Starting with different grain and agglomerate sizes for both stages, the influence of a set of parameters (temperature, local partial pressure of H 2 O, gas flow, etc.) on the reaction progress and the final result were studied in detail. Depending on the set of parameters used, different reaction mechanisms like pseudomorphic transformation or chemical vapor transport (CVT) were observed. Taking into account that grains and agglomerates deviate from a spherical shape and a definite grain size, the extent of reaction is well described by standard theoretical gas-solid-reaction models such as the shrinking core model (SCM) or the crackling core model (CCM). Thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA), x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), surface area measurements (BET-method) and laser diffraction were used for these studies. Under all conditions, the first stage shows a reaction path MoO 3 → Mo 4 O 11 → MoO 2 via chemical vapor transport (CVT). The reaction extent follows the crackling core model (Park/Levenspiel). Depending on the local partial pressure of H 2 O during reduction, the formed Mo 4 O 11 and MoO 2 exhibit different size distributions and shapes of the grains. The extent of reaction of the second stage develops according to the shrinking core model (Yagi/Kunii). Depending on the local dew point, two different reaction paths can occur: pseudomorphic transformation at low dew points and transformation via chemical vapor transport at high dew points. This paper is an extract from the Ph.D. thesis of W.V. Schulmeyer 'Mechanismen der Wasserstoffreduktion von Molybdaenoxiden', 1998, Darmstadt University of Technology, Institute of Material Science, Department of Chemical Analytics, FRG. It therefor focuses on a phenomenological description of the most important results. (author)

  7. Mechanism of negative hydrogen ion emission from heated saline hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Hiroyuki; Serizawa, Naoshi; Takeda, Makiko; Hasegawa, Seiji [Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan). Faculty of Science

    1997-02-01

    To find a clue to the mechanism of negative hydrogen ion emission from a heated sample ({approx}10 mg) of powdery saline hydride (LiH or CaH{sub 2}) deposited on a molybdenum ribbon ({approx}0.1 cm{sup 2}), both the ionic and electronic emission currents were measured as a function of sample temperature ({approx}700 - 800 K), thereby yielding {approx}10{sup -15} - 10{sup -12} A of H{sup -} after mass analysis and {approx}10{sup -7} - 10{sup -5} A of thermal electron. Thermophysical analysis of these data indicates that the desorption energy (E{sup -}) of H{sup -} and work function ({phi}) of the emitting sample surface are 5.1 {+-} 0.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.2 eV for LiH, respectively, while E{sup -} is 7.7 {+-} 0.3 eV and {phi} is 5.0 {+-} 0.2 eV for CaH{sub 2}. Thermochemical analysis based on our simple model on the emissions indicates that the values of E{sup -} - {phi} are 2.35 and 2.31 eV for LiH and CaH{sub 2}, respectively, which are in fair agreement with the respective values (2.1 {+-} 0.3 and 2.6 {+-} 0.3 eV) determined experimentally. This agreement indicates that the emission of H{sup -} is reasonably explained by our model from the viewpoint of reaction energy. (author)

  8. Mechanisms of hydrogen exchange in proteins from nuclear magnetic resonance studies of individual tryptophan indole NH hydrogens in lysozyme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wedin, R.E.; Delepierre, M.; Dobson, C.M.; Poulsen, F.M.

    1982-01-01

    The individual rates of solvent exchange of the six tryptophan indole NH hydrogens of lysozyme in 2 H 2 O have been measured over a wide range of temperatures by using 1 H NMR. Two distinct mechanisms for exchange have been identified, one characterized by a high activation energy and the other by a much lower activation energy. The high-energy process has been shown to be associated directly with the cooperative thermal unfolding of the protein and is the dominant mechanism for exchange of the most slowly exchanging hydrogen even 15 0 C below the denaturation temperature. Rate constants and activation energies for the folding and unfolding reactions were obtained from the experimental exchange rates. At low temperatures, a lower activation energy mechanism is dominant for all hydrogens, and this can be associated with local fluctuations in the protein structure which allow access of solvent. The relative exchange rates and activation energies can only qualitatively be related to the different environments of the residues in the crystal structure. There is provisional evidence that a mechanism intermediate between these two extremes may be significant for some hydrogens under restricted conditions

  9. Hydrogen transport in 4130 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kass, W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The solubility data indicate that under glow discharge conditions hydrogen entering the lattice is already dissociated in the gas phase. Since subsequent diffusion is expected to be no longer limited by a surface process, the remaining anomalous low temperature diffusion behavior may be related to a bulk process such as trapping. The normal permeation behavior is consistent with a trapping mechanism since the steady state permeation rate is not affected by trapping. Consequently, in normal permeation measurements it appears that both perturbations to simple diffusion occur, the hydrogen dissociation is influenced by a slow surface step and the bulk diffusion is perturbed by trapping sites. Promising future work should be the analysis of the transient diffusion behavior under glow discharge conditions via the model of McNabb and Foster to determine if meaningful trapping parameters may be elicited

  10. Trapped antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, E., E-mail: eoin.butler@cern.ch [CERN, Physics Department (Switzerland); Andresen, G. B. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Ashkezari, M. D. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Baquero-Ruiz, M. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Bertsche, W. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Bowe, P. D. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Cesar, C. L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil); Chapman, S. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Charlton, M.; Deller, A.; Eriksson, S. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Fajans, J. [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Friesen, T.; Fujiwara, M. C. [University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Gill, D. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Gutierrez, A. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hangst, J. S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Hardy, W. N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hayden, M. E. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Humphries, A. J. [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only {approx}1 T ({approx}0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be 'born' inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 10{sup 4} times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been trapped for at least 172 ms and then released-the first instance of a purely antimatter atomic system confined for any length of time (Andresen et al., Nature 468:673, 2010). We present a description of the main components of the ALPHA traps and detectors that were key to realising this result. We discuss how the antihydrogen atoms were identified and how they were discriminated from the background processes. Since the results published in Andresen et al. (Nature 468:673, 2010), refinements in the antihydrogen production technique have allowed many more antihydrogen atoms to be trapped, and held for much longer times. We have identified antihydrogen atoms that have been trapped for at least 1,000 s in the apparatus (Andresen et al., Nature Physics 7:558, 2011). This is more than sufficient time to interrogate the atoms spectroscopically, as well as to ensure that they have relaxed to their ground state.

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of nitrobenzene hydrogenation to phenylhydroxylamine in rhenium thiocomplexes solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenyako, G.I.; Belousov, V.M.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made on kinetics of nitrobenzene hydrogenation to phenylhydroxylamine in dimethylformamide solutions of rhenium thiocomplexes. The mechanism of hydrogenation was suggested. Formation of hydride catalyst complex represents the first stage of the process. Kinetic equation derived on the basis of suggested mechanism corresponds satisfactorily with experimental results. Thermodynamic parameters of separate process stages calculated on the basis of equilibrium constant values testify as well to the benefit of suggested mechanism

  12. Sequential Modular Position and Momentum Measurements of a Trapped Ion Mechanical Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flühmann, C.; Negnevitsky, V.; Marinelli, M.; Home, J. P.

    2018-04-01

    The noncommutativity of position and momentum observables is a hallmark feature of quantum physics. However, this incompatibility does not extend to observables that are periodic in these base variables. Such modular-variable observables have been suggested as tools for fault-tolerant quantum computing and enhanced quantum sensing. Here, we implement sequential measurements of modular variables in the oscillatory motion of a single trapped ion, using state-dependent displacements and a heralded nondestructive readout. We investigate the commutative nature of modular variable observables by demonstrating no-signaling in time between successive measurements, using a variety of input states. Employing a different periodicity, we observe signaling in time. This also requires wave-packet overlap, resulting in quantum interference that we enhance using squeezed input states. The sequential measurements allow us to extract two-time correlators for modular variables, which we use to violate a Leggett-Garg inequality. Signaling in time and Leggett-Garg inequalities serve as efficient quantum witnesses, which we probe here with a mechanical oscillator, a system that has a natural crossover from the quantum to the classical regime.

  13. Kinematics and Mechanics analysis of trap-jaw ant Odontomachus monticola

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wenteng; Yao, Guang; Zhang, Xiangyu; Zhang, Deyuan

    2018-03-01

    Trap-jaw ants of the genus Odontomachus exhibit spectacularly rapid predatory and fugitive strikes. In order to reveal the extraordinary impact resistance of the apical teeth material, we analyzed the kinematics and mechanics of the closing mandibles. Odontomachus monticola is an Odontomachus species and extensive in China. We video-recorded jaw-strikes to measure the closing velocity and acceleration. The experimental results showed that O. monticola’s mandibles closed at a highest velocity of 35.42 m/s and a highest acceleration of 750,000 m/s2 within an average duration of 0.16 ms. In addition, in order to measure the strike force, we developed an extraordinary measuring method with poly (vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) piezoelectric film. First, the dynamic calibration of the PVDF piezoelectric film was conducted, then the calibrated piezoelectric film was struck by O. monticola. Finally, the mandible strike force was calculated according to the calibration result and the output signal. The measurements results demonstrated that the strike force ranges from 102.2 N to 235.2 N, which is impressive contrast with O. monticola’s body weight.

  14. Effect of silver addition on the mechanical and field trapping properties of Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Nariki, S; Matsui, M; Murakami, M

    2002-01-01

    The effect of Ag addition on the microstructure and the mechanical and field trapping properties of Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductor has been investigated. The single grain Gd-Ba-Cu-O bulk superconductors 32 mm in diameter were fabricated with 0-30 mass%Ag/sub 2/O additions by the melt growth method under controlled oxygen partial pressure of 1.0%. From microscopic observations, it was found that the macro- cracks in the a-b plane decreased with Ag addition. The three-point bending test showed that the average strength of Ag-free bulk was 69 MPa at room temperature, while the strength was dramatically improved to 110-115 MPa with 10-30 mass%Ag/sub 2/O additions. The trapped magnetic field of Ag-free bulk sample was 1.3 T at 77 K. The trapped field of bulk Gd-Ba-Cu-O samples with 10-20 mass%Ag/sub 2/O exhibited high values of 1.8-2.0 T at 77 K. However, the trapped field of the sample with 30 mass%Ag/sub 2/O addition was lowered to 1.1 T with decreasing the critical current density. The trapped field of Ag- adde...

  15. Mechanism of the electrochemical hydrogen reaction on smooth tungsten carbide and tungsten electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesener, K.; Winkler, E.; Schneider, W.

    1985-01-01

    The course of the electrochemical hydrogen reaction on smooth tungsten-carbide electrodes in hydrogen saturated 2.25 M H 2 SO 4 follows a electrochemical sorption-desorption mechanism in the potential range of -0.4 to +0.1 V. At potentials greater than +0.1 V the hydrogen oxidation is controlled by a preliminary chemical sorption step. Concluding from the similar behaviour of tungsten-carbide and tungsten electrodes after cathodic pretreatment, different tungsten oxides should be involved in the course of the hydrogen reaction on tungsten carbide electrodes. (author)

  16. Trapping mechanisms in scattering of beams at grazing incidence from crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, R.; O'Connor, D.J.; Felsobuki, E.I. von-Nagy

    1993-01-01

    The trajectories of grazing incidence, 1 keV beams of Si incident on Cu{111} are investigated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and the conditions under which atoms in the beam can be trapped in the surface binding potential are investigated. The binding potentials for the Cu-Si dimers are calculated using ab initio methods for the neutral, anion and cation. These calculations estimate the binding potential and equilibrium separation for the potential used for the MD calculations. It is found that at 4 o incidence to the Cu{111} face, no trapping occurs for a perfect crystal surface undergoing no thermal vibrations. Trapping can occur for the Si neutral if thermal vibrations are included in the model. Trapping is predicted to occur near steps on the Cu{111} face but these are fairly rare events for the Si - particles. (Author)

  17. The first direct observation of hydrogen trapping sites in TiC precipitation-hardening steel through atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Jun; Kawakami, Kazuto; Kobayashi, Yukiko; Tarui, Toshimi

    2010-01-01

    For the first time ever, atomic-scale direct observation of deuterium atoms trapping at nano-sized titanium carbide (TiC) precipitates in steel was successfully achieved using atom probe tomography (APT). Deuterium gas charging into the needle specimen and subsequently quenching were conducted in our designed chamber attached to three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP). The deuterium atoms were definitely observed on the broad surface of TiC platelets, which indicated that the broad interface between the matrix and TiC was the main trapping site.

  18. Kinetic evidence for the formation of discrete 1,4-dehydrobenzene intermediates. Trapping by inter- and intramolecular hydrogen atom transfer and observation of high-temperature CIDNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockhart, Thomas P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Comita, Paul B. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States); Bergman, Robert G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); California Inst. of Technology (CalTech), Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1981-07-01

    Upon heating, alkyl-substituted cis-1,2-diethynyl olefins undergo cyclization to yield reactive 1,4-dehydrobenzenes; the products isolated may be derived from either unimolecular or bimolecular reactions of the intermediate. (Z)-4,5-Diethynyl-4-octene (4) undergoes rearrangement to yield 2,3-di-n-propyl-1,4-dehydrobenzene (17). Solution pyrolysis of 4 in inert aromatic solvents produces three unimolecular products, (Z)-dodeca-4,8-diyn-6-ene (7), benzocyclooctene (9), and o-allyl-n-propylbenzene (10), in high yield. When 1,4-cyclohexadiene is added to the pyrolysis solution as a trapping agent, high yields of the reduced product o-di-n-propylbenzene (12) are obtained. The kinetics of solution pyrolysis of 4 in the presence and absence of trapping agent establish that 2,3-di-n-propyl-1,4-dehydrobenzene is a discrete intermediate on the pathway leading to products. When the reaction was run in the heated probe of an NMR spectrometer, CIDNP was observed in 10. This observation, along with kinetic and chemical trapping evidence, indicates the presence of two additional intermediates, formed from 17 by sequential intramolecular [1,5] hydrogen transfer, on the pathway to products. The observation of CIDNP, coupled with the reactivity exhibited by 17 and the other two intermediates, implicate a biradical description of these molecules. Biradical 17 has been estimated to have a lifetime of about 10-9 s at 200°C and to lie in a well of about 5 kcal/mol with respect to the lowest energy unimolecular pathway ([1,5] hydrogen transfer). Ring opening (expected to be the lowest energy process for 1,4-dehydrobenzenes in which intramolecular hydrogen transfer is unlikely) to the isomeric diethynyl olefin 7 appears to have an activation enthalpy of about 10 kcal/moL Upon thermal reaction in the gas phase (400°C) or in solution in inert solvents (Z)-hexa-2,3-diethyl-1,5-diyn-3-ene (5) rearranges in good yield to the isomeric diethynyl olefin (Z)-deca-3,7-diyn-5-ene (8

  19. Ab initio study of structural and mechanical property of solid molecular hydrogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yingting; Yang, Li; Yang, Tianle; Nie, Jinlan; Peng, Shuming; Long, Xinggui; Zu, Xiaotao; Du, Jincheng

    2015-06-01

    Ab initio calculations based on density functional theory (DFT) were performed to investigate the structural and the elastic properties of solid molecular hydrogens (H2). The influence of molecular axes of H2 on structural relative stabilities of hexagonal close-packed (hcp) and face-centered cubic (fcc) structured hydrogen molecular crystals were systematically investigated. Our results indicate that for hcp structures, disordered hydrogen molecule structure is more stable, while for fcc structures, Pa3 hydrogen molecular crystal is most stable. The cohesive energy of fcc H2 crystal was found to be lower than hcp. The mechanical properties of fcc and hcp hydrogen molecular crystals were obtained, with results consistent with previous theoretical calculations. In addition, the effects of zero point energy (ZPE) and van der Waals (vdW) correction on the cohesive energy and the stability of hydrogen molecular crystals were systematically studied and discussed.

  20. Crystal Structures of Nitroalkane Oxidase: Insights into the Reaction Mechanism of a Covalent Complex of the Flavoenzyme Trapped During Turnover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal,A.; Valley, M.; Fitzpatrick, P.; Orville, A.

    2006-01-01

    Nitroalkane oxidase (NAO) from Fusarium oxysporum catalyzes the oxidation of neutral nitroalkanes to the corresponding aldehydes or ketones with the production of H2O2 and nitrite. The flavoenzyme is a new member of the acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD) family, but it does not react with acyl-CoA substrates. We present the 2.2 Angstroms resolution crystal structure of NAO trapped during the turnover of nitroethane as a covalent N5-FAD adduct (ES*). The homotetrameric structure of ES* was solved by MAD phasing with 52 Se-Met sites in an orthorhombic space group. The electron density for the N5-(2-nitrobutyl)-1,5-dihydro-FAD covalent intermediate is clearly resolved. The structure of ES* was used to solve the crystal structure of oxidized NAO at 2.07 Angstroms resolution. The c axis for the trigonal space group of oxidized NAO is 485 Angstroms, and there are six subunits (11/2 holoenzymes) in the asymmetric unit. Four of the active sites contain spermine (EI), a weak competitive inhibitor, and two do not contain spermine (E{sup ox}). The active-site structures of E{sup ox}, EI, and ES* reveal a hydrophobic channel that extends from the exterior of the protein and terminates at Asp402 and the N5 position on the re face of the FAD. Thus, Asp402 is in the correct position to serve as the active-site base, where it is proposed to abstract the {alpha} proton from neutral nitroalkane substrates. The structures for NAO and various members of the ACAD family overlay with root-mean-square deviations between 1.7 and 3.1 Angstroms. The homologous region typically spans more than 325 residues and includes Glu376, which is the active-site base in the prototypical member of the ACAD family. However, NAO and the ACADs exhibit differences in hydrogen-bonding patterns between the respective active-site base, substrate molecules, and FAD. These likely differentiate NAO from the homologues and, consequently, are proposed to result in the unique reaction mechanism of NAO.

  1. Loss and source mechanisms of Jupiter's radiation belts near the inner boundary of trapping regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Costa, Daniel; Bolton, Scott J.; Becker, Heidi N.; Clark, George; Kollmann, Peter; Paranicas, Chris; Mauk, Barry; Joergensen, John L.; Adriani, Alberto; Thorne, Richard M.; Bagenal, Fran; Janssen, Mike A.; Levin, Steve M.; Oyafuso, Fabiano A.; Williamson, Ross; Adumitroaie, Virgil; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Kurth, Bill; Connerney, John E. P.

    2017-04-01

    We have merged a set of physics-based and empirical models to investigate the energy and spatial distributions of Jupiter's electron and proton populations in the inner and middle magnetospheric regions. Beyond the main source of plasma (> 5 Rj) where interchange instability is believed to drive the radial transport of charged particles, the method originally developed by Divine and Garrett [J. Geophys. Res., 88, 6889-6903, 1983] has been adapted. Closer to the planet where field fluctuations control the radial transport, a diffusion theory approach is used. Our results for the equatorial and mid-latitude regions are compared with Pioneer and Galileo Probe measurements. Data collected along Juno's polar orbit allow us to examine the features of Jupiter's radiation environment near the inner boundary of trapping regions. Significant discrepancies between Juno (JEDI keV energy particles and high energy radiation environment measurements made by Juno's SRU and ASC star cameras and the JIRAM infrared imager) and Galileo Probe data sets and models are observed close to the planet. Our simulations of Juno MWR observations of Jupiter's electron-belt emission confirm the limitation of our model to realistically depict the energy and spatial distributions of the ultra-energetic electrons. In this paper, we present our modeling approach, the data sets and resulting data-model comparisons for Juno's first science orbits. We describe our effort to improve our models of electron and proton belts. To gain a physical understanding of the dissimilarities with observations, we revisit the magnetic environment and the mechanisms of loss and source in our models.

  2. Deuterium ion irradiation damage and deuterium trapping mechanism in candidate stainless steel material (JPCA2) for fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashizuka, Norihiro; Kurita, Takaaki; Yoshida, Naoaki; Fujiwara, Tadashi; Muroga, Takeo

    1987-01-01

    An improved austenitic stainless steel (JPCA), a candidate material for fusion reactor, is irradiated at room temperature with deuterium ion beams. Desorption spectra of deuterium gas is measured at various increased temperatures and defects formed under irradiation are observed by transmission electron microscopy to determine the mechanism of the thermal release of deuteriums and the characteristics of irradiation-induced defects involved in the process. In the deuterium deportion spectra observed, five release stages are found to exist at 90 deg C, 160 deg C, 220 deg C, 300 deg C and 400 deg C, referred to as Stage I, II, III, IV and V, respectively. Stage I is interpreted as representing the release of deuteriums trapped in point defects (presumably vacancies) formed under irradiation. The energy of desorption from the trapping sites is estimated at 0.8 eV. Stage II is concluded to be associated with the release of deuteriums trapped in a certain kind of existing defects. Stage III involves the release of deuteriums that are trapped in dislocations, dislocation loops or dislocated portions of stacking fault tetrahedra. This release occurs significantly in processed materials and other materials irradiated with high energy ion beams that may cause cascade damage. Stage IV is interpreted in terms of thermal decomposition of small deuterium clusters. Stage V is associated with the decomposition of rather large deuterium clusters grown on the {111} plane. (Nogami, K.)

  3. The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide: II. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen sulfide oxidation catalyzed by sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Derks, F.; Verloop, A.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by molecular oxygen have been studied in the temperature range 20–250 °C. The primary reaction product is sulfur which may undergo further oxidation to SO2 at temperatures above 200 °C. From the kinetics of this autocatalytic reaction we

  4. Structure and dynamics of ion clusters in linear octupole traps: Phase diagrams, chirality, and melting mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurtsever, E.; Onal, E. D.; Calvo, F.

    2011-01-01

    The stable structures and melting dynamics of clusters of identical ions bound by linear octupole radiofrequency traps are theoretically investigated by global optimization methods and molecular dynamics simulations. By varying the cluster sizes in the range of 10-1000 ions and the extent of trap anisotropy by more than one order of magnitude, we find a broad variety of stable structures based on multiple rings at small sizes evolving into tubular geometries at large sizes. The binding energy of these clusters is well represented by two contributions arising from isotropic linear and octupolar traps. The structures generally exhibit strong size effects, and chiral arrangements spontaneously emerge in many crystals. Sufficiently large clusters form nested, coaxial tubes with different thermal stabilities. As in isotropic octupolar clusters, the inner tubes melt at temperatures that are lower than the overall melting point.

  5. Review of thermodinamic and mechanical properties of hydrogen-transition metal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathias, H.; Katz, Y.

    1978-04-01

    A large body of fundamental and empirical knowledge has been acquired during many years of research concerning the interactions between hydrogen and metals, the location of hydrogen in metal structures, its mobility in metals and its influence on mechanical properties of metals. Much progress has been made in the understanding of related phenomena, and various theories have been proposed, but considerable disagreement still exist about basic mechanisms involved. The growing interest in these subjects and their important role in science and technology are well documented by many reviews and symposia. A general survey of these topics with reference to experimental results and theories related to thermodynamic and mechanical properties of hydrogen-transition metal systems, such as H-Pd, H-Ti, H-Fe etc. is given in the present review. Special emphasis is given to hydrogen embrittlement of metals

  6. Hydrogen diffusion at moderate temperatures in p-type Czochralski silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Y.L.; Ma, Y.; Job, R.; Ulyashin, A.G.

    2004-01-01

    In plasma-hydrogenated p-type Czochralski silicon, rapid thermal donor (TD) formation is achieved, resulting from the catalytic support of hydrogen. The n-type counter doping by TD leads to a p-n junction formation. A simple method for the indirect determination of the diffusivity of hydrogen via applying the spreading resistance probe measurements is presented. Hydrogen diffusion in silicon during both plasma hydrogenation and post-hydrogenation annealing is investigated. The impact of the hydrogenation duration, annealing temperature, and resistivity of the silicon wafers on the hydrogen diffusion is discussed. Diffusivities of hydrogen are determined in the temperature range 270-450 deg. C. The activation energy for the hydrogen diffusion is deduced to be 1.23 eV. The diffusion of hydrogen is interpreted within the framework of a trap-limited diffusion mechanism. Oxygen and hydrogen are found to be the main traps

  7. Hydrogen storage in hybrid of layered double hydroxides/reduced graphene oxide using spillover mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Jafari-Asl, Mehdi; Nabiyan, Afshin; Rezaei, Behzad; Dinari, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    New efficient hydrogen storage hybrids were fabricated based on hydrogen spillover mechanism, including chemisorptions and dissociation of H_2 on the surface of LDH (layered double hydroxides) and diffusion of H to rGO (reduced graphene oxide). The structures and compositions of all of the hybrids (LDHs/rGO) have been verified using different methods including transmission electron microscopy, X ray diffraction spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller analysis. Then, the abilities of the LDHs/rGOs, as hydrogen spillover, were investigated by electrochemical methods. In addition, the LDHs/rGOs were decorated with palladium, using redox replacement process, and their hydrogen spillover properties were studied. The results showed that the hydrogen adsorption/desorption kinetics, hydrogen storage capacities and stabilities of Pd"#LDH/rGOs are better than Pd/rGO. Finally presence of different polymers (synthesis with monomers, 4–aminophenol, 4–aminothiophenol, o-phenylenediamine and p-phenylenediamine) at the surface of the Pd#LDH/rGOs on hydrogen storage were studied. The results showed that presence of o-phenylenediamine and p-phenylenediamine improves the kinetics of the hydrogen adsorption/desorption and increase the capacity of the hydrogen storage. - Highlights: • Efficient hydrogen storage sorbents are introduced. • The sorbents are synthesized based on hybrids of layered double hydroxide. • The compositions of all of the hybrids are verified using different methods. • Pd nanoparticles modified nanohybrids are investigated for hydrogen storage. • Presence of different polymers beside the hydrogen sorbents are investigated.

  8. Effect of high pressure hydrogen on the mechanical characteristics of single carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sang Koo; Kwon, Oh Heon; Jang, Hoon-Sik; Ryu, Kwon Sang; Nahm, Seung Hoon

    2018-02-01

    In this study, carbon fiber was exposed to a pressure of 7 MPa for 24 h in high pressure chamber. The tensile test for carbon fiber was conducted to estimate the effect on the high pressure hydrogen in the atmosphere. To determine the tensile strength and Weibull modulus, approximately thirty carbon fiber samples were measured in all cases, and carbon fiber exposed to high pressure argon was evaluated to verify only the effect of hydrogen. Additionally, carbon fiber samples were annealed at 1950 °C for 1 h for a comparison with normal carbon fiber and then tested under identical conditions. The results showed that the tensile strength scatter of normal carbon fiber exposed to hydrogen was relatively wider and the Weibull modulus was decreased. Moreover, the tensile strength of the annealed carbon fiber exposed to hydrogen was increased, and these samples indicated a complex Weibull modulus because the hydrogen stored in the carbon fiber influenced the mechanical characteristic.

  9. Effect of hydrogen on the microstructure, mechanical properties and phase transformations in austenitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.Y.; Xing, Z.S.

    1989-01-01

    Effect of high-pressure hydrogen charging on the microstructure, mechanical properties and phase transformations in austenitic steels has been investigated and discussed. The results show that the strength and impact toughness of the steels increase slightly and that the ductility decreases after hydrogen charging. The existence of δ-ferrite deteriorates the resistance to hydrogen embrittlement (HE) of the steels. The occurrence of carbide in the steel resulted from aging reduces the ductility of the steel and makes the steel sensitive to HE. The existence of sufficient hydrogen promotes the ε-martensitic transformation and suppresses the α'-martensitic transformation. The permeabilities and diffusivities of hydrogen in the steels have also been determined. (orig.)

  10. Population trapping: The mechanism for the lost resonance lines in Pm-like ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Daiji; Sakaue, Hiroyuki A.; Murakami, Izumi; Nakamura, Nobuyuki

    2017-10-01

    We report a population kinetics study on line emissions of the Pm-like Bi22+ performed by using a collisional-radiative (CR) model. Population rates of excited levels are analyzed to explain the population trapping in the 4f135s2 state which causes the loss of the 5s - 5p resonance lines in emission spectra. Based on the present analysis, we elucidate why the population trapping is not facilitated for a meta-stable excited level of the Sm-like Bi21+. The emission line spectra are calculated for the Pm-like isoelectronic sequence from Au18+ through W13+ and compared with experimental measurements by electron-beam-ion-traps (EBITs). Structures of the spectra are similar for all of the cases except for calculated W13+ spectra. The calculated spectra are hardly reconciled with the measured W13+ spectrum using the compact electron-beam-ion-trap (CoBIT) [Phys. Rev. A 92 (2015) 022510].

  11. Stress corrosion mechanisms of alloy-600 polycrystals and monocrystals in primary water: effect of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foct, F.

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study is to identify the mechanisms involved in Alloy 600 primary water stress corrosion cracking. Therefore, this work is mainly focussed on the two following points. The first one is to understand the influence of hydrogen on SCC of industrial Alloy 600 and the second one is to study the crack initiation and propagation on polycrystals and single crystals. A cathodic potential applied during slow strain rate tests does not affect crack initiation but increases the slow crack growth rate by a factor 2 to 5. Cathodic polarisation, cold work and 25 cm 3 STP/kg hydrogen content increase the slow CGR so that the K ISCC (and therefore fast CGR) is reached. The influence of hydrogenated primary water has been studied for the first time on Alloy 600 single crystals. Cracks cannot initiate on tensile specimens but they can propagate on pre-cracked specimens. Transgranular cracks present a precise crystallographic aspect which is similar to that of 316 alloy in MgCl 2 solutions. Moreover, the following results improve the description of the cracking conditions. Firstly, the higher the hydrogen partial pressure, the lower the Alloy 600 passivation current transients. Since this result is not correlated with the effect of hydrogen on SCC, cracking is not caused by a direct effect of dissolved hydrogen on dissolution. Secondly, hydrogen embrittlement of Alloy 600 disappears at temperatures above 200 deg.C. Thirdly, grain boundary sliding (GBS) does not directly act on SCC but shows the mechanical weakness of grain boundaries. Regarding the proposed models for Alloy 600 SCC, it is possible to draw the following conclusions. Internal oxidation or absorbed hydrogen effects are the most probable mechanisms for initiation. Dissolution, internal oxidation and global hydrogen embrittlement models cannot explain crack propagation. On the other hand, the Corrosion Enhanced Plasticity Model gives a good description of the SCC propagation. (author)

  12. Quantum statistical mechanics of dense partially ionized hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, H. E.; Rogers, F. J.

    1972-01-01

    The theory of dense hydrogenic plasmas beginning with the two component quantum grand partition function is reviewed. It is shown that ionization equilibrium and molecular dissociation equilibrium can be treated in the same manner with proper consideration of all two-body states. A quantum perturbation expansion is used to give an accurate calculation of the equation of state of the gas for any degree of dissociation and ionization. In this theory, the effective interaction between any two charges is the dynamic screened potential obtained from the plasma dielectric function. We make the static approximation; and we carry out detailed numerical calculations with the bound and scattering states of the Debye potential, using the Beth-Uhlenbeck form of the quantum second virial coefficient. We compare our results with calculations from the Saha equation.

  13. Thermodynamical study of the vanadium-hydrogen system. The hydrogen effect on the mechanical properties of V-4Cr-4Ti and V-5Cr-5Ti alloys; Etude thermodynamique du systeme vanadium-hydrogene. Effets de l'hydrogene sur les proprietes mecaniques des alliages V-4Cr-4Ti et V-5Cr-5Ti

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulombeaux, O

    1998-07-01

    In the framework of the international research programs on fusion reactors, the vanadium alloys are among the most appropriate candidate to constitute the first wall. The author deals with the specific alloys V-4Cr-4Ti and V-5Cr-5Ti and study the hydrogen diffusion. Experimental results show that the induced hydrogen concentration in the sample by diffusion is higher, for the same partial pressure of exposure, in the case of the alloy than for the pure vanadium. He shows that this result can be explainedby the trapping for which the hydrogen is trapped by the titanium. (A.L.B.)

  14. Interfacial trapping mechanism of He in Cu–Nb multilayer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McPhie, M.G., E-mail: mathieu.mcphie@georgiatech-metz.fr [UMI 2958, Georgia Tech-CNRS, 2-3 rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); Capolungo, L. [UMI 2958, Georgia Tech-CNRS, 2-3 rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405 (United States); Dunn, A.Y. [UMI 2958, Georgia Tech-CNRS, 2-3 rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); Cherkaoui, M. [UMI 2958, Georgia Tech-CNRS, 2-3 rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); G.W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0405 (United States)

    2013-06-15

    He atom trapping in hetero-interphase materials is studied by atomistic simulations, focusing on the KS1 and KSmin interfaces in Cu–Nb. If the bulk crystalline materials are defect free, single He atoms eventually become absorbed into the interfacial region via one of two different processes. In the first process, all He atoms arriving at the interface from the Cu side of the interface and some He atoms arriving from the Nb side, are trapped via the formation of a helium-vacancy (HeV) cluster in the second or third interfacial planes of the copper crystal. The immobile HeV cluster is found to be stable against dissociation and recombination. In the second case the He atoms are absorbed as interstitial atoms in one of the terminal planes. This process is dependent on the interstitial content of the interface and is found to be weak in the case of the KS1 interface.

  15. Isolated, slowly evolving, and dynamical trapping horizons: Geometry and mechanics from surface deformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Booth, Ivan; Fairhurst, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    We study the geometry and dynamics of both isolated and dynamical trapping horizons by considering the allowed variations of their foliating two-surfaces. This provides a common framework that may be used to consider both their possible evolutions and their deformations as well as derive the well-known flux laws. Using this framework, we unify much of what is already known about these objects as well as derive some new results. In particular we characterize and study the ''almost isolated'' trapping horizons known as slowly evolving horizons. It is for these horizons that a dynamical first law holds and this is analogous and closely related to the Hawking-Hartle formula for event horizons

  16. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Butler, E; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kemp, S L; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision spectroscopic comparison of hydrogen and antihydrogen holds the promise of a sensitive test of the Charge-Parity-Time theorem and matter-antimatter equivalence. The clearest path towards realising this goal is to hold a sample of antihydrogen in an atomic trap for interrogation by electromagnetic radiation. Achieving this poses a huge experimental challenge, as state-of-the-art magnetic-minimum atom traps have well depths of only ∼1 T (∼0.5 K for ground state antihydrogen atoms). The atoms annihilate on contact with matter and must be ‘born’ inside the magnetic trap with low kinetic energies. At the ALPHA experiment, antihydrogen atoms are produced from antiprotons and positrons stored in the form of non-neutral plasmas, where the typical electrostatic potential energy per particle is on the order of electronvolts, more than 104 times the maximum trappable kinetic energy. In November 2010, ALPHA published the observation of 38 antiproton annihilations due to antihydrogen atoms that had been ...

  17. Dual mechanical behaviour of hydrogen in stressed silicon nitride thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpi, F.; Braccini, M.; Pasturel, A.; Devos, A.; Raymond, G.; Morin, P.

    2014-01-01

    In the present article, we report a study on the mechanical behaviour displayed by hydrogen atoms and pores in silicon nitride (SiN) films. A simple three-phase model is proposed to relate the physical properties (stiffness, film stress, mass density, etc.) of hydrogenated nanoporous SiN thin films to the volume fractions of hydrogen and pores. This model is then applied to experimental data extracted from films deposited by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition, where hydrogen content, stress, and mass densities range widely from 11% to 30%, −2.8 to 1.5 GPa, and 2.0 to 2.8 g/cm 3 , respectively. Starting from the conventional plotting of film's Young's modulus against film porosity, we first propose to correct the conventional calculation of porosity volume fraction with the hydrogen content, thus taking into account both hydrogen mass and concentration. The weight of this hydrogen-correction is found to evolve linearly with hydrogen concentration in tensile films (in accordance with a simple “mass correction” of the film density calculation), but a clear discontinuity is observed toward compressive stresses. Then, the effective volume occupied by hydrogen atoms is calculated taking account of the bond type (N-H or Si-H bonds), thus allowing a precise extraction of the hydrogen volume fraction. These calculations applied to tensile films show that both volume fractions of hydrogen and porosity are similar in magnitude and randomly distributed against Young's modulus. However, the expected linear dependence of the Young's modulus is clearly observed when both volume fractions are added. Finally, we show that the stiffer behaviour of compressive films cannot be only explained on the basis of this (hydrogen + porosity) volume fraction. Indeed this stiffness difference relies on a dual mechanical behaviour displayed by hydrogen atoms against the film stress state: while they participate to the stiffness in compressive films, hydrogen atoms mainly

  18. Effect of trap states and microstructure on charge carrier conduction mechanism through semicrystalline poly(vinyl alcohol) granular film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A. K.; Bhowmik, R. N.; Meikap, A. K.

    2018-05-01

    We report a comprehensive study on hysteresis behaviour of current-voltage characteristic and impedance spectroscopy of granular semicrystalline poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) film. The charge carrier conduction mechanism and charge traps of granular PVA film by measuring and analyzing the temperature dependent current-voltage characteristic indicate a bi-stable electronic state in the film. A sharp transformation of charge carrier conduction mechanism from Poole-Frenkel emission to space charge limited current mechanism has been observed. An anomalous oscillatory behaviour of current has been observed due to electric pulse effect on the molecular chain of the polymer. Effect of microstructure on charge transport mechanism has been investigated from impedance spectroscopy analysis. An equivalent circuit model has been proposed to explain the result.

  19. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  20. Observation of ESR spin flip satellite lines of trapped hydrogen atoms in solid H2 at 4.2 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo; Iwata, Nobuchika; Fueki, Kenji; Hase, Hirotomo

    1990-01-01

    ESR spectra of H atoms, produced in γ-irradiated solid H 2 , were studied at 4.2 K. Two main lines of the ESR spectra of H atoms that are separated by about 500 G accompanied two weak satellite lines. Both satellite lines and main lines decrease with the same decay rate. In the D 2 -H 2 mixtures, the satellite-line intensity depends upon the number of matrix protons. The spacing of the satellites from the main lines is equal to that of the NMR proton resonance frequency. It was concluded that the satellite lines were not ascribable to paired atoms but to spin flip lines due to an interaction of H atoms with matrix protons. The analysis of the spin flip lines and the main lines suggests that H atoms in solid H 2 are trapped in the substitutional site

  1. Hydrogen production by hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea: mechanisms for reductant disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaart, Marcel R A; Bielen, Abraham A M; van der Oost, John; Stams, Alfons J M; Kengen, Servé W M

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen produced from biomass by bacteria and archaea is an attractive renewable energy source. However, to make its application more feasible, microorganisms are needed with high hydrogen productivities. For several reasons, hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea are promising is this respect. In addition to the high polysaccharide-hydrolysing capacities of many of these organisms, an important advantage is their ability to use most of the reducing equivalents (e.g. NADH, reduced ferredoxin) formed during glycolysis for the production of hydrogen, enabling H2/hexose ratios of between 3.0 and 4.0. So, despite the fact that the hydrogen-yielding reactions, especially the one from NADH, are thermodynamically unfavourable, high hydrogen yields are obtained. In this review we focus on three different mechanisms that are employed by a few model organisms, viz. Caldicellulosiruptor saccharolyticus and Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, Thermotoga maritima, and Pyrococcus furiosus, to efficiently produce hydrogen. In addition, recent developments to improve hydrogen production by hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea are discussed.

  2. Sinkholes - a trapping mechanism for oil and gas in the Ordovician of Kent an Essex counties, Ontario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cochrane, R. O.

    1997-06-01

    The stratigraphy and lithology of the Trenton and Black River carbonates were described and the geological and physical processes for the formation of caves and sinkholes were reviewed, using modern examples. The existence of sinkholes was demonstrated with three examples from wells drilled into the Trenton and Black River groups. Using this information as the basis, the sequence of events for the accumulation of hydrocarbons in the brecciated (fragmented rock) segment of a sinkhole was presented. It was concluded that sinkholes provide an excellent trapping mechanism for hydrocarbons. 13 refs., 23 figs.

  3. Acclimation of green algae to sulfur deficiency: underlying mechanisms and application for hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antal, Taras K; Krendeleva, Tatyana E; Rubin, Andrew B

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen is definitely one of the most acceptable fuels in the future. Some photosynthetic microorganisms, such as green algae and cyanobacteria, can produce hydrogen gas from water by using solar energy. In green algae, hydrogen evolution is coupled to the photosynthetic electron transport in thylakoid membranes via reaction catalyzed by the specific enzyme, (FeFe)-hydrogenase. However, this enzyme is highly sensitive to oxygen and can be quickly inhibited when water splitting is active. A problem of incompatibility between the water splitting and hydrogenase reaction can be overcome by depletion of algal cells of sulfur which is essential element for life. In this review the mechanisms underlying sustained hydrogen photoproduction in sulfur deprived C. reinhardtii and the recent achievements in studying of this process are discussed. The attention is focused on the biophysical and physiological aspects of photosynthetic response to sulfur deficiency in green algae.

  4. Charge transport mechanisms and density of interface traps in MnZnO/p-Si diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taşçıoğlu, İlke; Farooq, W.A.; Turan, Raşit; Altındal, Şemsettin; Yakuphanoglu, Fahrettin

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The undoped and Mn doped ZnO films were deposited on p-Si substrates by sol–gel method. • The effect of Mn incorporation into ZnO on the electrical properties of ZnO/p-Si diodes were investigated. • The leakage current decreases and the rectification ratio increases with Mn doping. • The D it value was lowered by Mn dopant. -- Abstract: MnZnO films were grown onto p-Si substrate by sol–gel spin coating method. The electrical properties of the diodes were investigated at room temperature via the current–voltage (I–V), capacitance–voltage–frequency (C–V–f), and conductance—voltage–frequency (G–V–f) methods by considering the effect of the interface trap density (D it ) and series resistance (R s ) of the diodes. The rectifying ratio (RR) values of undoped and Mn-doped ZnO/p-Si diodes (at ±4 V) were found to be 275 and 2031, respectively. Mn doping decreases leakage current and increases shunt resistance (R sh ). Also, the reasons of discrepancies in barrier height values determined from different methods were discussed. The C–V and G–V measurements were performed at various frequencies. We observe additional contribution to the capacitance at low frequencies due to interface traps which can follow the ac test signal easily. The density of interface traps (D it ) determined from Hill–Coleman method was also presented for making comparison. The D it values vary from 9.24 × 10 11 to 1.67 × 10 13 eV −1 cm −2 and 2.06 × 10 11 to 2.54 × 10 12 eV −1 cm −2 for undoped and Mn-doped ZnO/p-Si diodes, respectively

  5. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  6. A new mechanism of hydrogen absorption in water-water reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gann, V.V.; Gann, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    The spectrum of fast protons, generated in water by fast neutrons of WWER-1000 reactor core, has been calculated using the code MCNPX. The main mechanism of fast proton generation in the moderator is found to be elastic scattering of fast neutrons on hydrogen nuclei. Fast protons with mean energy 1 MeV flow towards the surface of cladding material at flux density ∼ 0.1 μA/cm 2 . Proton range distribution profile in cladding material is calculated. The range of fast protons in zirconium averages 20 μm, the maximal proton range is larger than 200 μm. The rate of hydrogen deposition in 40 μm layer amounts to 5 x 10 -5 H/n/μ. A role of the suggested mechanism in process of zirconium clad hydrogenation during reactor irradiation is discussed.

  7. Hydrogen bond dynamics governs the effective photoprotection mechanism of plant phenolic sunscreens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fang; Du, Likai; Lan, Zhenggang; Gao, Jun

    2017-02-15

    Sinapic acid derivatives are important sunscreen species in natural plants, which could provide protection from solar UV radiation. Using a combination of ultrafast excited state dynamics, together with classical molecular dynamics studies, we demonstrate that there is direct coupling of hydrogen bond motion with excited state photoprotection dynamics as part of the basic mechanism in solution. Beyond the intra-molecular degree of freedom, the inter-molecular motions on all timescales are potentially important for the photochemical or photophysical events, ranging from the ultrafast hydrogen bond motion to solvent rearrangements. This provides not only an enhanced understanding of the anomalous experimental spectroscopic results, but also the key idea in the development of sunscreen agents with improved photo-chemical properties. We suggest that the hydrogen bond dynamics coupled excited state photoprotection mechanism may also be possible in a broad range of bio-related molecules in the condensed phase.

  8. Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanism in Fatigue Behaviour of Austenitic and Martensitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brück Sven

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the influence of hydrogen on the fatigue behaviour of the high strength martensitic stainless steel X3CrNiMo13-4 and the metastable austenitic stainless steels X2Crni19-11 with various nickel contents was examined in the low and high cycle fatigue regime. The focus of the investigations was the changes in the mechanisms of short crack propagation. The aim of the ongoing investigation is to determine and quantitatively describe the predominant processes of hydrogen embrittlement and their influence on the short fatigue crack morphology and crack growth rate. In addition, simulations were carried out on the short fatigue crack growth, in order to develop a detailed insight into the hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms relevant for cyclic loading conditions.

  9. Mechanical tunability via hydrogen bonding in metal-organic frameworks with the perovskite architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wei; Thirumurugan, A; Barton, Phillip T; Lin, Zheshuai; Henke, Sebastian; Yeung, Hamish H-M; Wharmby, Michael T; Bithell, Erica G; Howard, Christopher J; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2014-06-04

    Two analogous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with the perovskite architecture, [C(NH2)3][Mn(HCOO)3] (1) and [(CH2)3NH2][Mn(HCOO)3] (2), exhibit significantly different mechanical properties. The marked difference is attributed to their distinct modes of hydrogen bonding between the A-site amine cation and the anionic framework. The stronger cross-linking hydrogen bonding in 1 gives rise to Young's moduli and hardnesses that are up to twice those in 2, while the thermal expansion is substantially smaller. This study presents clear evidence that the mechanical properties of MOF materials can be substantially tuned via hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  10. ATRAP - Progress Towards Trapped Antihydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grzonka, D.; Goldenbaum, F.; Oelert, W.; Sefzick, T.; Zhang, Z.; Comeau, D.; Hessels, E.A.; Storry, C.H.; Gabrielse, G.; Larochelle, P.; Lesage, D.; Levitt, B.; Speck, A.; Haensch, T.W.; Pittner, H.; Walz, J.

    2005-01-01

    The ATRAP experiment at the CERN antiproton decelerator AD aims for a test of the CPT invariance by a high precision comparison of the 1s-2s transition in the hydrogen and the antihydrogen atom.Antihydrogen production is routinely operated at ATRAP and detailed studies have been performed in order to optimize the production efficiency of useful antihydrogen.For high precision measurements of atomic transitions cold antihydrogen in the ground state is required which must be trapped due to the low number of available antihydrogen atoms compared to the cold hydrogen beam used for hydrogen spectroscopy. To ensure a reasonable antihydrogen trapping efficiency a magnetic trap has to be superposed the nested Penning trap. First trapping tests of charged particles within a combined magnetic/Penning trap have started at ATRAP

  11. ATRAP Progress Towards Trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Grzonka, D; Gabrielse, G; Goldenbaum, F; Hänsch, T W; Hessels, E A; Larochelle, P; Le Sage, D; Levitt, B; Oelert, W; Pittner, H; Sefzick, T; Speck, A; Storry, C H; Walz, J; Zhang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The ATRAP experiment at the CERN antiproton decelerator AD aims for a test of the CPT invariance by a high precision comparison of the 1s‐2s transition in the hydrogen and the antihydrogen atom. Antihydrogen production is routinely operated at ATRAP and detailed studies have been performed in order to optimize the production efficiency of useful antihydrogen. For high precision measurements of atomic transitions cold antihydrogen in the ground state is required which must be trapped due to the low number of available antihydrogen atoms compared to the cold hydrogen beam used for hydrogen spectroscopy. To ensure a reasonable antihydrogen trapping efficiency a magnetic trap has to be superposed the nested Penning trap. First trapping tests of charged particles within a combined magnetic/Penning trap have started at ATRAP.

  12. Mechanical behavior of NiTi arc wires under pseudoelastic cycling and cathodically hydrogen charging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarraj, R.; Hassine, T.; Gamaoun, F.

    2018-01-01

    NiTi wires are mainly used to design orthodontic devices. However, they may be susceptible to a delayed fracture while they are submitted to cyclic loading with the presence of hydrogen in the oral cavity. Hydrogen may cause the embrittlement of the structure, leading to lower ductility and to a change in transformation behavior. The aim of the present study is to predict the NiTi behavior under cyclic loading with hydrogen charging. One the one hand, samples are submitted to superelastic cyclic loading, which results in investigating their performance degradations. On the other hand, after hydrogen charging, cyclic tensile aging tests are carried out on NiTi orthodontic wires at room temperature in the air. During cyclic loading, we notice that the critical stress for the martensite transformation evolves, the residual strain is accumulated in the structure and the hysteresis loop changes. Thus, via this work, we can assume that the embrittlement is due to the diffusion of hydrogen and the generation of dislocations after aging. The evolution of mechanical properties of specimens becomes more significant with hydrogen charging rather than without it.

  13. Quantum mechanical electronic structure calculation reveals orientation dependence of hydrogen bond energy in proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Abhisek; Datta, Saumen

    2017-06-01

    Hydrogen bond plays a unique role in governing macromolecular interactions with exquisite specificity. These interactions govern the fundamental biological processes like protein folding, enzymatic catalysis, molecular recognition. Despite extensive research work, till date there is no proper report available about the hydrogen bond's energy surface with respect to its geometric parameters, directly derived from proteins. Herein, we have deciphered the potential energy landscape of hydrogen bond directly from the macromolecular coordinates obtained from Protein Data Bank using quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations. The findings unravel the hydrogen bonding energies of proteins in parametric space. These data can be used to understand the energies of such directional interactions involved in biological molecules. Quantitative characterization has also been performed using Shannon entropic calculations for atoms participating in hydrogen bond. Collectively, our results constitute an improved way of understanding hydrogen bond energies in case of proteins and complement the knowledge-based potential. Proteins 2017; 85:1046-1055. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Electrical trapping mechanism of single-microparticles in a pore sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihide Arima

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanopore sensing via resistive pulse technique are utilized as a potent tool to characterize physical and chemical property of single –molecules and –particles. In this article, we studied the influence of particle trajectory to the ionic conductance through a pore. We performed the optical/electrical simultaneous sensing of electrophoretic capture dynamics of single-particles at a pore using a microchannel/nanopore system. We detected ionic current drops synchronous to a fluorescently dyed particle being electrophoretically drawn and become immobilized at a pore in the optical imaging. We also identified anomalous trapping events wherein particles were captured at nanoscale pin-holes formed unintentionally in a SiN membrane that gave rise to relatively small current drops. This method is expected to be a useful platform for testing novel nanopore sensor design wherein current behaves in unpredictable manner.

  15. Effect of hydrogen on formation of Fe-Al nanoparticles by mechanical milling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukáč, F.; Čížek, J.; Jirásková, Yvonna; Procházka, I.; Vlček, M.; Švec, P.; Janičkovič, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 29, Dec. (2014), s. 23-28 ISSN 1661-9897 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1350; GA MŠk 7AMB12SK009 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Fe-Al alloy * defects * mechanical alloying * hydrogen Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  16. Investigation on H-containing shallow trap of hydrogenated TiO2 with in situ Fourier transform infrared diffuse reflection spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Hang Hu, Yun

    2017-07-28

    A novel technique, high temperature high pressure in situ Fourier transform infrared diffuse reflection spectroscopy, was successfully used to investigate the formation and stability of shallow trap states in P25 TiO 2 nanoparticles. Two types of shallow traps (with and without H atoms) were identified. The H-containing shallow trap can be easily generated by heating in H 2 atmosphere. However, the trap is unstable in vacuum at 600 °C. In contrast, the H-free shallow trap, which can be formed by heating in vacuum, is stable even at 600 °C. The energy gaps between shallow trap states and the conduction band are 0.09 eV for H-containing shallow trap and 0.13 eV for H-free shallow trap, indicating that the H-containing shallow trap state is closer to the conduction band than that without H.

  17. Hydrogen Embrittlement Mechanism in Fatigue Behavior of Austenitic and Martensitic Stainless Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven Brück

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the influence of hydrogen on the fatigue behavior of the high strength martensitic stainless steel X3CrNiMo13-4 and the metastable austenitic stainless steels X2Crni19-11 with various nickel contents was examined in the low and high cycle fatigue regime. The focus of the investigations were the changes in the mechanisms of short crack propagation. Experiments in laboratory air with uncharged and precharged specimen and uncharged specimen in pressurized hydrogen were carried out. The aim of the ongoing investigation was to determine and quantitatively describe the predominant processes of hydrogen embrittlement and their influence on the short fatigue crack morphology and crack growth rate. In addition, simulations were carried out on the short fatigue crack growth, in order to develop a detailed insight into the hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms relevant for cyclic loading conditions. It was found that a lower nickel content and a higher martensite content of the samples led to a higher susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. In addition, crack propagation and crack path could be simulated well with the simulation model.

  18. Mechanical alloying of TiFe intermetallic for hydrogen storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vega, L.E.R.; Leiva, D.R.; Silva, W.B.; Ishikawa, T.T.; Botta, W.J.; Leal Neto, R.M.

    2016-01-01

    Elementary powders of Ti and Fe in the stoichiometric ratio 50:50 were submitted to mechanical alloying for 2, 6, 10 and 20 h in a planetary ball mill. The synthesis of TiFe intermetallic with high yield was achieved for all milling times. The structural characterization of the samples revealed the trend of the particles to form agglomerates and the formation of cracks. H-absorption capacities of 0,74; 0,90; 0,97 and 0,95 wt. % (at room temperature and 20 bar of H2) were obtained for processing times of 2, 6, 10 and 20 h, respectively, without using a thermal activation process after milling. (author)

  19. Anti-hydrogen: The cusp between quantum mechanics and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyes, H.P.

    1992-09-01

    We argue that the crossing (CPT) symmetry of relativistic quantum mechanics requires that both the coulombic and the Newtonian force between pairs of particles will reverse when one is replaced by its anti-particle. For consistency, this requires a theory in which both the equivalence principles and gauge invariance are abandoned. thus whether anti-hydrogen ''falls'' up or down will provide an experiment crusis separating general relativity and gauge invariance from this version of quantum mechanics

  20. Numerical comparison of hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for unsteady shockinduced combustion applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, P. Pradeep; Kim, Kui Soon; Oh, Se Jong; Choi, Jeong Yeol [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    An unsteady shock-induced combustion (SIC) is characterized by the regularly oscillating combustion phenomenon behind the shock wave supported by the blunt projectile flying around the speed of Chapman-Jouguet detonation wave. The SIC is the coupling phenomenon between the hypersonic flow and the chemical kinetics, but the effects of chemical kinetics have been rarely reported. We compared hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for the shock-induced combustion to demonstrate the importance of considering the reaction mechanisms for such complex flows. Seven hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms were considered, those available publically and used in other researches. As a first step in the comparison of the hydrogen combustion, ignition delay time of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures was compared at various initial conditions. Laminar premixed flame speed was also compared with available experimental data and at high pressure conditions. In addition, half-reaction length of ZND (Zeldovich-Neumann-Doering) detonation structure accounts for the length scale in SIC phenomena. Oscillation frequency of the SIC is compared by running the time-accurate 3rd-order Navier-Stokes CFD code fully coupled with the detailed chemistry by using four levels of grid resolutions.

  1. Numerical comparison of hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for unsteady shockinduced combustion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, P. Pradeep; Kim, Kui Soon; Oh, Se Jong; Choi, Jeong Yeol

    2015-01-01

    An unsteady shock-induced combustion (SIC) is characterized by the regularly oscillating combustion phenomenon behind the shock wave supported by the blunt projectile flying around the speed of Chapman-Jouguet detonation wave. The SIC is the coupling phenomenon between the hypersonic flow and the chemical kinetics, but the effects of chemical kinetics have been rarely reported. We compared hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms for the shock-induced combustion to demonstrate the importance of considering the reaction mechanisms for such complex flows. Seven hydrogen-air reaction mechanisms were considered, those available publically and used in other researches. As a first step in the comparison of the hydrogen combustion, ignition delay time of hydrogen-oxygen mixtures was compared at various initial conditions. Laminar premixed flame speed was also compared with available experimental data and at high pressure conditions. In addition, half-reaction length of ZND (Zeldovich-Neumann-Doering) detonation structure accounts for the length scale in SIC phenomena. Oscillation frequency of the SIC is compared by running the time-accurate 3rd-order Navier-Stokes CFD code fully coupled with the detailed chemistry by using four levels of grid resolutions.

  2. Hydrogen--deuterium exchanges in nucleosides and nucleotides. A mechanism for exchange of the exocyclic amino hydrogens of adenosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, D.G.; Brown, A.; Fisher, H.F.

    1975-01-01

    The pH dependence of the apparent first-order rate constant for the exchange of the exocyclic amino hydrogens of adenosine with deuterium from the solvent was measured by stopped-flow ultraviolet spectroscopy. This dependence shows acid catalysis, base catalysis, and spontaneous exchange at neutral pH values. A study of the effect of several buffers on the rates of exchange reveals both general acid and general base catalytic behavior for the exchange process. We propose a general mechanism for the exchange which requires N-1 protonated adenosine as an intermediate for the acid-catalyzed exchange and amidine anion for the base-catalyzed exchange. In both cases the rate-limiting step is the base-catalyzed abstraction of a proton from the exocyclic amino moiety. Evaluation of the rate constants predicts the equilibrium for the exocyclic amino/imino tautomers to be 6.3 x 10 3 :1. (U.S.)

  3. Analysis of Conduction and Charging Mechanisms in Atomic Layer Deposited Multilayered HfO2/Al2O3 Stacks for Use in Charge Trapping Flash Memories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad Novkovski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Method for characterization of electrical and trapping properties of multilayered high permittivity stacks for use in charge trapping flash memories is proposed. Application of the method to the case of multilayered HfO2/Al2O3 stacks is presented. By applying our previously developed comprehensive model for MOS structures containing high-κ dielectrics on the J-V characteristics measured in the voltage range without marked degradation and charge trapping (from −3 V to +3 V, several parameters of the structure connected to the interfacial layer and the conduction mechanisms have been extracted. We found that the above analysis gives precise information on the main characteristics and the quality of the injection layer. C-V characteristics of stressed (with write and erase pulses structures recorded in a limited range of voltages between −1 V and +1 V (where neither significant charge trapping nor visible degradation of the structures is expected to occur were used in order to provide measures of the effect of stresses with no influence of the measurement process. Both trapped charge and the distribution of interface states have been determined using modified Terman method for fresh structures and for structures stressed with write and erase cycles. The proposed method allows determination of charge trapping and interface state with high resolution, promising a precise characterization of multilayered high permittivity stacks for use in charge trapping flash memories.

  4. Oxidation mechanism of porous Zr_2Fe used as a hydrogen getter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, Dror; Nahmani, Moshe; Rafailov, Genadi; Attia, Smadar; Shamish, Zorik; Landau, Miron; Merchuk, Jose; Zeiri, Yehuda

    2016-01-01

    We determined the oxidation mechanism of porous ST-198, which mainly comprises Zr_2Fe. Oxidation kinetics depended on temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and oxidation extent. The passivation role of oxidation in hydrogen scavenging is probably due to the development of a surface oxide, independent of oxygen concentration. Zr_2Fe would be a superior hydrogen getter in oxygen-contaminated environments at high temperatures, as most oxygen will be consumed at the outer shell by mass transfer limitations, protecting the bulk of the getter for hydrogen scavenging. - Highlights: • Porous Zr_2Fe–O_2 interactions are characterized in detail. • Gettering efficiency at low temperature is hampered by oxide layer formation. • Gettering is better at high temperatures as outer shell consumes maximum oxygen.

  5. Air Trapping Mechanism in Artificial Salvinia-Like Micro-Hairs Fabricated via Direct Laser Lithography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Tricinci

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Salvinia leaves represent an extraordinary example of how nature found a strategy for the long term retainment of air, and thus oxygen, on a surface, the so-called ‘Salvinia effect’, thanks to the peculiar three-dimensional and hierarchical shape of the hairs covering the leaves. Here, starting from the natural model, we have microfabricated hairs inspired by those present on the Salvinia molesta leaves, by means of direct laser lithography. Artificial hairs, like their natural counterpart, are composed of a stalk and a crown-like head, and have been reproduced in the microscale since this ensures, if using a proper design, an air-retaining behavior even if the bulk structural material is hydrophilic. We have investigated the capability of air retainment inside the heads of the hairs that can last up to 100 h, demonstrating the stability of the phenomenon. For a given dimension of the head, the greater the number of filaments, the greater the amount of air that can be trapped inside the heads since the increase in the number of solid–air interfaces able to pin the liquid phase. For this reason, such type of pattern could be used for the fabrication of surfaces for controlled gas retainment and gas release in liquid phases. The range of applications would be quite large, including industrial, medical, and biological fields.

  6. Mechanisms of Furfural Reduction on Metal Electrodes: Distinguishing Pathways for Selective Hydrogenation of Bioderived Oxygenates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadderdon, Xiaotong H.; Chadderdon, David J.; Matthiesen, John E.

    2017-01-01

    Electrochemical reduction of biomass-derived platform molecules is an emerging route for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. Understanding gaps between reaction conditions, underlying mechanisms, and product selectivity have limited the rational design of active, stable, and selective catalyst systems. Here, the mechanisms of electrochemical reduction of furfural, an important biobased platform molecule and model for aldehyde reduction, are explored through a combination of voltammetry, preparative electrolysis, thiol-electrode modifications, and kinetic isotope studies. It is demonstrated that two distinct mechanisms are operable on metallic Cu electrodes in acidic electrolytes: (i) electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) and (ii) direct electroreduction. The contributions of each mechanism to the observed product distribution are clarified by evaluating the requirement for direct chemical interactions with the electrode surface and the role of adsorbed hydrogen. Further analysis reveals that hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis products are generated by parallel ECH pathways. By understanding the underlying mechanisms it enables the manipulation of furfural reduction by rationally tuning the electrode potential, electrolyte pH, and furfural concentration to promote selective formation of important biobased polymer precursors and fuels.

  7. Mechanisms of Furfural Reduction on Metal Electrodes: Distinguishing Pathways for Selective Hydrogenation of Bioderived Oxygenates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadderdon, Xiaotong H; Chadderdon, David J; Matthiesen, John E; Qiu, Yang; Carraher, Jack M; Tessonnier, Jean-Philippe; Li, Wenzhen

    2017-10-11

    Electrochemical reduction of biomass-derived platform molecules is an emerging route for the sustainable production of fuels and chemicals. However, understanding gaps between reaction conditions, underlying mechanisms, and product selectivity have limited the rational design of active, stable, and selective catalyst systems. In this work, the mechanisms of electrochemical reduction of furfural, an important biobased platform molecule and model for aldehyde reduction, are explored through a combination of voltammetry, preparative electrolysis, thiol-electrode modifications, and kinetic isotope studies. It is demonstrated that two distinct mechanisms are operable on metallic Cu electrodes in acidic electrolytes: (i) electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) and (ii) direct electroreduction. The contributions of each mechanism to the observed product distribution are clarified by evaluating the requirement for direct chemical interactions with the electrode surface and the role of adsorbed hydrogen. Further analysis reveals that hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis products are generated by parallel ECH pathways. Understanding the underlying mechanisms enables the manipulation of furfural reduction by rationally tuning the electrode potential, electrolyte pH, and furfural concentration to promote selective formation of important biobased polymer precursors and fuels.

  8. The influence of hydrogen on the chemical, mechanical, optical/electronic, and electrical transport properties of amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nordell, Bradley J.; Karki, Sudarshan; Nguyen, Thuong D.; Rulis, Paul; Caruso, A. N.; Paquette, Michelle M.; Purohit, Sudhaunshu S.; Li, Han; King, Sean W.; Dutta, Dhanadeep; Gidley, David; Lanford, William A.

    2015-01-01

    Because of its high electrical resistivity, low dielectric constant (κ), high thermal neutron capture cross section, and robust chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties, amorphous hydrogenated boron carbide (a-B x C:H y ) has garnered interest as a material for low-κ dielectric and solid-state neutron detection applications. Herein, we investigate the relationships between chemical structure (atomic concentration B, C, H, and O), physical/mechanical properties (density, porosity, hardness, and Young's modulus), electronic structure [band gap, Urbach energy (E U ), and Tauc parameter (B 1/2 )], optical/dielectric properties (frequency-dependent dielectric constant), and electrical transport properties (resistivity and leakage current) through the analysis of a large series of a-B x C:H y thin films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition from ortho-carborane. The resulting films exhibit a wide range of properties including H concentration from 10% to 45%, density from 0.9 to 2.3 g/cm 3 , Young's modulus from 10 to 340 GPa, band gap from 1.7 to 3.8 eV, Urbach energy from 0.1 to 0.7 eV, dielectric constant from 3.1 to 7.6, and electrical resistivity from 10 10 to 10 15 Ω cm. Hydrogen concentration is found to correlate directly with thin-film density, and both are used to map and explain the other material properties. Hardness and Young's modulus exhibit a direct power law relationship with density above ∼1.3 g/cm 3 (or below ∼35% H), below which they plateau, providing evidence for a rigidity percolation threshold. An increase in band gap and decrease in dielectric constant with increasing H concentration are explained by a decrease in network connectivity as well as mass/electron density. An increase in disorder, as measured by the parameters E U and B 1/2 , with increasing H concentration is explained by the release of strain in the network and associated decrease in structural disorder. All of these correlations in a

  9. Development of a new reduced hydrogen combustion mechanism with NO_x and parametric study of hydrogen HCCI combustion using stochastic reactor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurya, Rakesh Kumar; Akhil, Nekkanti

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • PDF based stochastic reactor model used for study of hydrogen HCCI engine. • New reduced hydrogen combustion mechanism with NOx developed (30 species and 253 reactions). • Mechanism predicts cylinder pressure and captures NO_x emission trend with sufficient accuracy. • Parametric study of hydrogen HCCI engine over wide range of speed and load conditions. • Hydrogen HCCI operating range increases with compression ratio & decreases with engine speed. - Abstract: Hydrogen is a potential alternative and renewable fuel for homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine to achieve higher efficiency and zero emissions of CO, unburned hydrocarbons as well as other greenhouse gases such as CO_2 and CH_4. In this study, a detailed hydrogen oxidation mechanism with NO_x was developed by incorporating additional species and NO_x reactions to the existing hydrogen combustion mechanism (10 species and 40 reactions). The detailed hydrogen combustion mechanism used in this study consists of 39 species and 311 reactions. A reduced mechanism consisting 30 species and 253 reactions was also developed by using directed relation graph (DRG) method from detailed mechanism. Developed mechanisms were validated with experimental data by HCCI engine simulation using stochastic reactor model. Sensitivity analysis was performed to identify the most important reactions in hydrogen combustion and NO_x formation in HCCI engine. Pathway analysis was also performed to analyze the important reaction pathways at different temperatures. Results revealed that H2 + HO2 [=] H + H2O2 and O2 + NNH [=] N2 + HO2 are the most significant reactions in the hydrogen HCCI combustion and NO_x formation respectively. Detailed parametric study of HCCI combustion was conducted using developed chemical kinetic model. Numerical simulations are performed at different engine operating condition by varying engine speed (1000–3000 rpm), intake air temperature (380–460 K), and compression

  10. Capacitive MEMS-based sensors : thermo-mechanical stability and charge trapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Essen, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are generally characterized as miniaturized systems with electrostatically driven moving parts. In many cases, the electrodes are capacitively coupled. This basic scheme allows for a plethora of specifications and functionality. This technology has presently

  11. Hydrogen atom in the phase-space formulation of quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gracia-Bondia, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Using a coordinate transformation which regularizes the classical Kepler problem, we show that the hydrogen-atom case may be analytically solved via the phase-space formulation of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. The problem is essentially reduced to that of a four-dimensional oscillator whose treatment in the phase-space formulation is developed. Furthermore, the method allows us to calculate the Green's function for the H atom in a surprisingly simple way

  12. Hydrogen absorption mechanisms and hydrogen interactions - defects: implications to stress corrosion of nickel based alloys in pressurized water reactors primary water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jambon, F.

    2012-01-01

    Since the late 1960's, a special form of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been identified for Alloy 600 exposed to pressurized water reactors (PWR) primary water: intergranular cracks develop during the alloy exposure, leading, progressively, to the complete ruin of the structure, and to its replacement. The main goal of this study is therefore to evaluate in which proportions the hydrogen absorbed by the alloy during its exposure to the primary medium can be responsible for SCC crack initiation and propagation. This study is aimed at better understanding of the hydrogen absorption mechanism when a metallic surface is exposed to a passivating PWR primary medium. A second objective is to characterize the interactions of the absorbed hydrogen with the structural defects of the alloy (dislocations, vacancies...) and evaluate to what extent these interactions can have an embrittling effect in relation with SCC phenomenon. Alloy 600-like single-crystals were exposed to a simulated PWR medium where the hydrogen atoms of water or of the pressuring hydrogen gas were isotopically substituted with deuterium, used as a tracer. Secondary ion mass spectrometry depth-profiling of deuterium was performed to characterize the deuterium absorption and localization in the passivated alloy. The results show that the hydrogen absorption during the exposure of the alloy to primary water is associated with the water molecules dissociation during the oxide film build-up. In an other series of experiments, structural defects were created in recrystallized samples, and finely characterized by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy, before or after the introduction of cathodic hydrogen. These analyses exhibited a strong hydrogen/defects interaction, evidenced by their structural reorganization under hydrogenation (coalescence, migrations). However, thermal desorption spectroscopy analyses indicated that these interactions are transitory, and dependent on

  13. Kinetics and the mass transfer mechanism of hydrogen sulfide removal by biochar derived from rice hull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Guofeng; Liu, Liang; Chen, Ping; Shen, Guoqing; Li, Qiwu

    2016-05-01

    The biochar derived from rice hull was evaluated for its abilities to remove hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from gas phase. The surface area and pH of the biochar were compared. The biochar derived from rice hull was evaluated for its abilities to remove hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from gas phase. The surface area and pH of the biochar were compared. The different pyrolysis temperature has great influence on the adsorption of H2S. At the different pyrolysis temperature, the H2S removal efficiency of rice hull-derived biochar was different. The adsorption capacities of biochar were 2.09 mg·g(-1), 2.65 mg·g(-1), 16.30 mg·g(-1), 20.80 mg·g(-1), and 382.70 mg·g(-1), which their pyrolysis temperatures were 100 °C, 200 °C, 300 °C, 400 °C and 500 °C respectively. Based on the Yoon-Nelson model, it analyzed the mass transfer mechanism of hydrogen sulfide adsorption by biochar. The paper focuses on the biochar derived from rice hull-removed hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from gas phase. The surface area and pH of the biochar were compared. The different pyrolysis temperatures have great influence on the adsorption of H2S. At the different pyrolysis temperatures, the H2S removal efficiency of rice hull-derived biohar was different. The adsorption capacities of biochar were 2.09, 2.65, 16.30, 20.80, and 382.70 mg·g(-1), and their pyrolysis temperatures were 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 °C, respectively. Based on the Yoon-Nelson model, the mass transfer mechanism of hydrogen sulfide adsorption by biochar was analyzed.

  14. Capacitive MEMS-based sensors : thermo-mechanical stability and charge trapping

    OpenAIRE

    van Essen, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) are generally characterized as miniaturized systems with electrostatically driven moving parts. In many cases, the electrodes are capacitively coupled. This basic scheme allows for a plethora of specifications and functionality. This technology has presently matured and is widely employed in industry. A voltage across the electrodes will attract the movable part. This relation between electric field and separation (or capacitance) can be conveniently em...

  15. Fluctuations of electrical and mechanical properties of diamond induced by interstitial hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Chun-Qiang; Liu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    While experimental evidence demonstrates that the presence of hydrogen (H) impurities in diamond films plays a significant role in determining their physical properties, the small radius of the H atom makes detecting such impurities quite a challenging task. In the present work, first-principles calculations were employed to provide an insight into the effects of the interstitial hydrogen on the electrical and mechanical properties of diamond crystals at the atomic level. The migrated pathways of the interstitial hydrogen are dictated by energetic considerations. Some new electronic states are formed near the Fermi level. The interstitial hydrogen markedly narrows the bandgap of the diamond and weakens the diamond crystal. The obvious decrement of the critical strain clearly implies the presence of an H-induced embrittlement effect. Project supported by the Project of Construction of Innovative Teams and Teacher Career Development for Universities and Colleges under Beijing Municipality, China (Grant No. IDHT20140504), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 51402009), and the Foundation for Young Scholars of Beijing University of Technology, China.

  16. Mechanical test of E110 cladding material oxidized in hydrogen rich steam atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windberg, P.; Perez-Fero, E.

    2005-01-01

    The behavior of the fuel cladding under accidental conditions has been studied at the AEKI for more than a decade. Earlier, the effect of oxygen and hydrogen content on the mechanical properties was studied separately. The present experiments can help to understand what kind of processes took place in the cleaning tank at Paks NPP (2003). The purpose of our experiments was to investigate high temperature oxidation of E110 cladding in steam + hydrogen mixture. A high temperature tube furnace was used for oxidation of the samples. The oxidation was carried out at three different temperatures (900 0 C, 1000 0 C, 1100 0 C). The hydrogen content in the steam was varied between 19-36 vol%. The oxygen content of the sample was defined as oxidation ratio. Two sizes (length: 2 and 8 mm) of cladding rings and 100 mm long E110 cladding tubes were oxidized. After the oxidation we made compression and tensile tests for rings, and ballooning experiments for 100 mm long tube. The most important conclusions were the following. Oxidation in H-rich steam atmosphere need longer time to get the same oxidation ratio compared to the steam oxidation without hydrogen. The shorter oxidation time results in a more compact oxide layer. The longer oxidation time leads to a cracked oxide layer. (author)

  17. Influence of thermo hydrogen treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-fei Ren

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermo hydrogen treatment (THT of titanium is a process in which hydrogen is used as a temporary alloying element in titanium alloys. It is an attractive approach for controlling the microstructure and thereby improving the final mechanical properties. In the present study, the microstructure of the original (non-hydrogenated sample has only α phase and the grains is coarse with an average size of ~ 650 μm. While the grain size of thermo hydrogen treated Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI alloy became finer and the mechanical properties were improved significantly. When the hydrogen content of the hydrogenated Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI alloy is 0.321wt.%, β phase and δ titanium hydride appear. Also the average grain size decreases to 450 μm. When the hydrogen content is 0.515wt.%, the grain size decreases to 220 μm. The mechanical properties were tested after dehydrogenation, and the mechanical properties improved significantly compared to the unhydrogenated specimens. The tensile strength of the Ti-5Al-2.5Sn ELI alloy improved by 17.7% when the hydrogen content increased to 0.920wt.%, at the same time the percentage reduction of area (Z increased by 33% and the impact toughness increased by 37%.

  18. Constraints on Transport and Emplacement Mechanisms of Labile Fractions in Lunar Cold Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, D.; Gertsch, L.

    2014-01-01

    Sustaining the scientific exploration of the Solar System will require a significant proportion of the necessary fuels and propellants, as well as other bulk commodities, to be produced from local raw materials [1]. The viability of mineral production depends on the ability to locate and characterize mineable deposits of the necessary feedstocks. This requires, among other things, a workable understanding of the mechanisms by which such deposits form, which is the subject of Economic Geology. Multiple deposition scenarios are possible for labile materials on the Moon. This paper suggests labile fractions moved diffusely through space; deposits may grow richer with depth until low porosity rock; lateral transport is likely to have occurred with the regolith, at least for short distances; crystalline ice may not exist; the constituent phases could be extremely complex. At present we can constrain the sources only mildly; once on the Moon, the transport mechanisms inherently mix and therefore obscure the origins. However, the importance of expanding our understanding of ore-forming processes on the Moon behooves us to make the attempt. Thus begins a time of new inquiry for Economic Geology.

  19. Hydrogen Permeation in Cold-Rolled High-Mn Twinning-Induced Plasticity Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Do Kyeong; Hwang, A. In; Byeon, Woo Jun; Noh, Seung Jeong; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogen permeation is investigated in cold-rolled Fe-0.6C-18Mn-(1.5Al) alloys. The hydrogen mobility is lower in cold-rolled alloys compared with annealed alloys. Al-containing alloy shows less deceleration of hydrogen mobility compared with the Al-free alloy. This is attributed to the reduced formation of mechanical twins and dislocations. Mechanical twins trap hydrogen strongly but are vulnerable to crack initiation; suppression of these is thought to be a major favorable influence of Al on hydrogen-induced mechanical degradation.

  20. Nickel-hydrogen battery self-discharge mechanism and methods for its inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visintin, Arnaldo; Anani, Anaba; Srinivasan, Supramaniam; Appleby, A. J.; Lim, Hong S.

    1992-01-01

    A review of our studies on the elucidation of the self-discharge mechanism of the Ni/H2 battery and methods to inhibit this phenomena is presented. The results show that (1) the rate of heat generation from nickel hydroxide powders and from electrodes increases with increase of hydrogen pressure, simultaneously, the open-circuit potential of the nickel hydroxide electrode is shifted in a negative direction more rapidly, indicating the transformation of NiOOH to Ni(OH)2; (2) heat generation rates measured in the microcalorimeter are considerably faster for electrolyte starved electrodes than for electrolyte-flooded electrodes; (3) there is a good correlation between the extent of self-discharge, as determined by heat generation in microcalorimetric measurement and capacity change; and (4) the self-discharge in Ni/H2 battery occurs via direct reduction of the active material by pressurized hydrogen. The addition of cadmium to the electrode reduces the self-discharge.

  1. Quantum-mechanical interference in charge exchange between hydrogen and graphene-like surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romero, M; Iglesias-García, A; Goldberg, E C

    2012-01-01

    The neutral to negative charge fluctuation of a hydrogen atom in front of a graphene surface is calculated by using the Anderson model within an infinite intra atomic Coulomb repulsion approximation. We perform an ab initio calculation of the Anderson hybridization function that allows investigation of the effect of quantum-mechanical interference related to the Berry phase inherent to the graphene band structure. We find that consideration of the interaction of hydrogen on top of many C atoms leads to a marked asymmetry of the imaginary part of the hybridization function with respect to the Fermi level. Consequently, Fano factors larger than one and strongly dependent on the energy around the Fermi level are predicted. Moreover, the suppression of the hybridization for energies above the Fermi level can explain the unexpected large negative ion formation measured in the scattering of protons by graphite-like surfaces. (paper)

  2. Role of hydrogen bonds in the reaction mechanism of chalcone isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jez, Joseph M; Bowman, Marianne E; Noel, Joseph P

    2002-04-23

    In flavonoid, isoflavonoid, and anthocyanin biosynthesis, chalcone isomerase (CHI) catalyzes the intramolecular cyclization of chalcones into (S)-flavanones with a second-order rate constant that approaches the diffusion-controlled limit. The three-dimensional structures of alfalfa CHI complexed with different flavanones indicate that two sets of hydrogen bonds may possess critical roles in catalysis. The first set of interactions includes two conserved amino acids (Thr48 and Tyr106) that mediate a hydrogen bond network with two active site water molecules. The second set of hydrogen bonds occurs between the flavanone 7-hydroxyl group and two active site residues (Asn113 and Thr190). Comparison of the steady-state kinetic parameters of wild-type and mutant CHIs demonstrates that efficient cyclization of various chalcones into their respective flavanones requires both sets of contacts. For example, the T48A, T48S, Y106F, N113A, and T190A mutants exhibit 1550-, 3-, 30-, 7-, and 6-fold reductions in k(cat) and 2-3-fold changes in K(m) with 4,2',4'-trihydroxychalcone as a substrate. Kinetic comparisons of the pH-dependence of the reactions catalyzed by wild-type and mutant enzymes indicate that the active site hydrogen bonds contributed by these four residues do not significantly alter the pK(a) of the intramolecular cyclization reaction. Determinations of solvent kinetic isotope and solvent viscosity effects for wild-type and mutant enzymes reveal a change from a diffusion-controlled reaction to one limited by chemistry in the T48A and Y106F mutants. The X-ray crystal structures of the T48A and Y106F mutants support the assertion that the observed kinetic effects result from the loss of key hydrogen bonds at the CHI active site. Our results are consistent with a reaction mechanism for CHI in which Thr48 polarizes the ketone of the substrate and Tyr106 stabilizes a key catalytic water molecule. Hydrogen bonds contributed by Asn113 and Thr190 provide additional

  3. Influence of hydrogen and temperature on the mechanical behaviour in an austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamani, Emil; Jouinot, Patrice

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of an austenitic stainless steel has been studied in this work, by means of two techniques: disk pressure embrittlement test (French standard NF E 29-723) and special biaxial tensile test. Specimens for both techniques are embedded disks, loaded by a continuously increasing gas pressure until rupture. Tests have been performed at various temperatures, between 18 o C and 655 o C, with loading speeds from 0.06 to 7 MPa/min. Their main results have been recorded as relationships between gas pressure and specimen deflection until its burst or cracking. Other observations (fracture, microstructure, etc.) are performed to assess the structural evolution with the temperature. The influence of hydrogen is evaluated by the comparison of the rupture parameters of specimens tested similarly under helium and hydrogen. The embrittlement index, E.I is determined as the ratio of the rupture pressures under helium and hydrogen taking into account also the effects of the loading speed and the gas purity. It has been noticed that the mechanical behaviour of the steel is strongly influenced by the apparition of a second phase in the austenitic structure: the deformation induced martensite, α, which presence is identified by microscopic observations and X-ray diffraction. At room temperature, the steel presents a relatively high sensitivity to the hydrogen embrittlement (2.20 ≤ E.I ≤ 2.40), while, with the temperature increasing, together with the reduction of the martensitic transformation, it was observed a rapid diminution of this sensitivity. Obtained results allow to define the performance of this steel for thin walls applications, as it is the case of expansions bellows in the chemical industry. (Original)

  4. Study of the mechanism of the gamma radiolysis of saccharose and its derivatives in aqueous or solid phase. Study by spin trapping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Triolet, J.

    1991-01-01

    Powder or aqueous solutions of saccharose, deoxysaccharose and fructanes are irradiated. Radicals created during gamma radiolysis are converted into sugar-nitroxide radicals by reaction with 2 methyl 2 nitroso-propane. They are stable enough to be studied in solution by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) coupled or not to high performance liquid chromatography. EPR spectra obtained are simulated with the Voyons program for the determination of spectrocopic characteristics of trapped species. The study of glucosides, disaccharides and sugar labelled with carbon 13 allows to suggest a chemical structure for 5 out of the 7 species trapped during saccharose radiolysis. Influence of irradiation conditions is studied and mechanisms are proposed [fr

  5. Diffusion and bulk flow in phloem loading: A theoretical analysis of the polymer trap mechanism for sugar transport in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dölger, Julia; Rademaker, Hanna; Liesche, Johannes; Schulz, Alexander; Bohr, Tomas

    2014-10-01

    Plants create sugar in the mesophyll cells of their leaves by photosynthesis. This sugar, mostly sucrose, has to be loaded via the bundle sheath into the phloem vascular system (the sieve elements), where it is distributed to growing parts of the plant. We analyze the feasibility of a particular loading mechanism, active symplasmic loading, also called the polymer trap mechanism, where sucrose is transformed into heavier sugars, such as raffinose and stachyose, in the intermediary-type companion cells bordering the sieve elements in the minor veins of the phloem. Keeping the heavier sugars from diffusing back requires that the plasmodesmata connecting the bundle sheath with the intermediary cell act as extremely precise filters, which are able to distinguish between molecules that differ by less than 20% in size. In our modeling, we take into account the coupled water and sugar movement across the relevant interfaces, without explicitly considering the chemical reactions transforming the sucrose into the heavier sugars. Based on the available data for plasmodesmata geometry, sugar concentrations, and flux rates, we conclude that this mechanism can in principle function, but that it requires pores of molecular sizes. Comparing with the somewhat uncertain experimental values for sugar export rates, we expect the pores to be only 5%-10% larger than the hydraulic radius of the sucrose molecules. We find that the water flow through the plasmodesmata, which has not been quantified before, contributes only 10%-20% to the sucrose flux into the intermediary cells, while the main part is transported by diffusion. On the other hand, the subsequent sugar translocation into the sieve elements would very likely be carried predominantly by bulk water flow through the plasmodesmata. Thus, in contrast to apoplasmic loaders, all the necessary water for phloem translocation would be supplied in this way with no need for additional water uptake across the plasma membranes of the

  6. Hydrogen-Bonded Polymer-Small Molecule Complexes with Tunable Mechanical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tianqi; Peng, Xin; Chen, Ya-Nan; Bai, Qing-Wen; Shang, Cong; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Huiliang

    2018-03-13

    A novel type of polymeric material with tunable mechanical properties is fabricated from polymers and small molecules that can form hydrogen-bonded intermolecular complexes (IMCs). In this work, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA)-glycerol hydrogels are first prepared, and then they are dried to form IMCs. The tensile strengths and moduli of IMCs decrease dramatically with increasing glycerol content, while the elongations increase gradually. The mechanical properties are comparable with or even superior to those of common engineering plastics and rubbers. The IMCs with high glycerol content also show excellent flexibility and cold-resistance at subzero temperatures. Cyclic tensile and stress relaxation tests prove that there is an effective energy dissipation mechanism in IMCs and dynamic mechanical analysis confirms their physical crosslinking nature. FTIR and NMR characterizations prove the existence of hydrogen bonding between glycerol and PVA chains, which suppresses the crystallization of PVA from X-ray diffraction measurement. These PVA-glycerol IMCs may find potential applications in barrier films, biomedical packaging, etc., in the future. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Influence of segregations and hydrogen flakes on the mechanical properties of forged RPV steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiselt, C.C.; May, J.; Hein, H.

    2013-01-01

    In the frame of relevant 1970s/80s German research programs (e.g. FKS research program on component safety and others), many investigations on large forgings manufactured from Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) materials such as 20 MnMoNi 5 5 and 22 NiMoCr 3 7 have been performed. Lately, after ultrasonic testing hydrogen flakes in connection with segregation zones have been observed in a few RPV forgings. The earlier R and D programs contained a number of special heats, which covered a defined defect state (lower bound heats) with relevance to the recent observations of numerous UT indications in RPV forgings of two PWRs. Therefore, the results of these former research programs were now reviewed. The studies included an evaluation of the effects of macro/micro segregations as well as hydrogen flakes on the mechanical properties. As part of the mechanical technological experiments Charpy impact tests in different orientations (e.g. L-T, T-L and S-T) together with fracture mechanics and large scale tensile tests were carried out in segregated and non segregated material zones. In this context the letters L,T,S indicate the longitudinal, transversal and short transverse (thickness) direction with respect to rolling direction of the forging axis. The first letter indicates the direction of the principal stress, while the second letter stands for the crack propagation direction [1]. Furthermore the irradiation behavior of segregated material regions was analyzed and compared to non segregated material regions. Key results of these analyses indicate that in most cases upper shelf levels are lowered in segregated material parts compared to non segregated areas. In addition the segregations cause a larger scattering of impact energies. A high hydrogen content in combination with segregations has overall detrimental effects on the mechanical properties. However, there seems to be no specific segregation influence on the materials' irradiation reaction.

  8. Measurement of percent hydrogen in the mechanical vacuum pump gas stream during BWR startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Susan E.; Odell, Andrew D.; Giannelli, Joseph F.

    2012-09-01

    All U.S BWRs use a Mechanical Vacuum Pump (MVP) to establish condenser vacuum during start-ups, normally from the initial heat-up to the point where sufficient reactor steam pressure and flow is available to place the Steam Jet Air Ejector (SJAE) and off-gas treatment system in service. MVP operation is restricted to <5% power and gas stream concentrations of <4% H 2 , the lower flammability limit (LFL) for hydrogen/air mixtures. For a particular plant startup prior to hydrogen injection for hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), the MVP %H 2 would depend on the air in-leakage rate, the H 2 gas generation rate from radiolysis and the gas/steam transport rate from the reactor vessel to the main condenser. The radiolysis rate at low power, which is not precisely known and has not been modeled for the BWR, is normally assumed to increase in proportion to thermal power. Two thirds of the radiolytic gas by volume would be H 2 and one third O 2 . The MVP is not equipped with %H 2 sampling and measurement capability, and many MVP systems include no flow measurement. No U.S plant or literature data on MVP %H 2 were found. The industry-first Early Hydrogen Water Chemistry (EHWC) demonstration at the Peach Bottom 3 nuclear power plant involved hydrogen gas injection into the reactor vessel during startup while the MVP was in service. To support the EHWC project, it was necessary to collect baseline MVP %H 2 data during a startup without hydrogen injection and to monitor MVP %H 2 during the startup with EHWC. The MVP system had no normal sample point, but included test taps in the suction and discharge piping. A sampling method and apparatus was invented (EPRI patent pending), designed, built and applied to obtain %H 2 measurements in the MVP gas stream. The apparatus allowed a gas sample stream to be taken from either the suction (vacuum) or discharge side of the MVP. The gas sample stream was preconditioned to remove moisture (the MVP uses water as a liquid compressant), flowed to

  9. Structural Changes in Isometrically Contracting Insect Flight Muscle Trapped following a Mechanical Perturbation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shenping; Liu, Jun; Perz-Edwards, Robert J.; Tregear, Richard T.; Winkler, Hanspeter; Franzini-Armstrong, Clara; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Goldman, Yale E.; Reedy, Michael K.; Taylor, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    The application of rapidly applied length steps to actively contracting muscle is a classic method for synchronizing the response of myosin cross-bridges so that the average response of the ensemble can be measured. Alternatively, electron tomography (ET) is a technique that can report the structure of the individual members of the ensemble. We probed the structure of active myosin motors (cross-bridges) by applying 0.5% changes in length (either a stretch or a release) within 2 ms to isometrically contracting insect flight muscle (IFM) fibers followed after 5–6 ms by rapid freezing against a liquid helium cooled copper mirror. ET of freeze-substituted fibers, embedded and thin-sectioned, provides 3-D cross-bridge images, sorted by multivariate data analysis into ∼40 classes, distinct in average structure, population size and lattice distribution. Individual actin subunits are resolved facilitating quasi-atomic modeling of each class average to determine its binding strength (weak or strong) to actin. ∼98% of strong-binding acto-myosin attachments present after a length perturbation are confined to “target zones” of only two actin subunits located exactly midway between successive troponin complexes along each long-pitch helical repeat of actin. Significant changes in the types, distribution and structure of actin-myosin attachments occurred in a manner consistent with the mechanical transients. Most dramatic is near disappearance, after either length perturbation, of a class of weak-binding cross-bridges, attached within the target zone, that are highly likely to be precursors of strong-binding cross-bridges. These weak-binding cross-bridges were originally observed in isometrically contracting IFM. Their disappearance following a quick stretch or release can be explained by a recent kinetic model for muscle contraction, as behaviour consistent with their identification as precursors of strong-binding cross-bridges. The results provide a detailed model

  10. The investigation of structure, chemical composition, hydrogen isotope trapping and release processes in deposition layers on surfaces exposed to DIII-D divertor plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzhinskij, O.I.; Opimach, I.V.; Barsuk, V.A.; Arkhipov, I.I.; Whyte, D.; Wampler, W.R.

    1998-05-01

    The exposure of ATG graphite sample to DIII-D divertor plasma was provided by the DiMES (Divertor Material Evaluation System) mechanism. The graphite sample arranged to receive the parallel heat flux on a small region of the surface was exposed to 600ms of outer strike point plasma. The sample was constructed to collect the eroded material directed downward into a trapping zone onto s Si disk collector. The average heat flux onto the graphite sample during the exposure was about 200W/cm 2 , and the parallel heat flux was about 10 KW/cm 2 . After the exposure the graphite sample and Si collector disk were analyzed using SEM, NRA, RBS, Auger spectroscopy. IR and Raman spectroscopy. The thermal desorption was studied also. The deposited coating on graphite sample is amorphous carbon layer. Just upstream of the high heat flux zone the redeposition layer has a globular structure. The deposition layer on Si disk is composed also from carbon but has a diamond-like structure. The areal density of C and D in the deposited layer on Si disk varied in poloidal and toroidal directions. The maximum D/C areal density ratio is about 0.23, maximum carbon density is about 3.8 x 10 18 cm -2 , maximum D area density is about 3 x 10 17 cm 2 . The thermal desorption spectrum had a peak at 1,250K

  11. Influence of solubilizer PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil on carbopol gels’ structural-mechanical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye. V. Gladukh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Rheological properties affect all stages of the drug development – from development to production, the characteristics of the final products and stability. A lot of substances have complex rheological properties; their viscosity and elasticity can vary depending on conditions acting from the outside, such as stress, deformation, time factor and temperature. Concentration, stability and composition also significantly affect the rheological properties of drugs. One of the current trends in modern pharmacy is the development of drugs in the form of gels. The rheological properties of gels are significantly influenced by surface-active substances, stabilizers, solubilizers, stabilizing their structure. A special group of stabilizers are hydrogenated vegetable oils and their compounds with polymers, which have the ability to structure formation in interphase layers and in the volume of phases. For this purpose, PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil is widely used. The aim of this work is to study the effect of hydrogenated castor oil, used as an emulsifier, solubilizer, viscosity modifier and solvent in the technology of semisolid dosage forms, on the structural and mechanical properties of carbopol gels. Materials and methods. 1% gel carbopol with additives PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil in the concentration range from 1 to 5 % was investigated as experimental samples of the gel base. A 10 % propylene glycol additive was used as humectant and plasticizer. Structural and mechanical studies were carried out using a rotational viscometer «RheolabQC», Anton Paar (Austria with coaxial cylinders CCC27/SS. The graphs of the gels were automatically plotted using the computer program. Results. Analysis of the rheological parameters of the carbopol with PEG-40 hydrogenated castor oil gel base shows that the solubilizer has an active influence on the structural and mechanical properties of the base. Addition of PEG-40 GMM to the carbopol gel increases the yield

  12. Electron traps and scintillation mechanism in YAlO3:Ce and LuAlO3:Ce scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wojtowicz, A.J.; Glodo, J.; Drozdowski, W.; Przegietka, K.R.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of thermoluminescence, isothermal decay and scintillation light yield measurements on two isostructural scintillator materials, YAlO 3 :Ce and LuAlO 3 :Ce. In addition to the variety of deep traps identified by thermoluminescence and isothermal decays, scintillation light yield experiments demonstrate the presence in both materials of a number of relatively shallow traps. While the deep traps may reduce the scintillation light yield, they do not influence the kinetics of the process. The shallow traps, on the other hand, by interfering with the process of radiative recombination of charge carriers via Ce 3+ ions, can strongly affect not only the yield of the scintillation process but its kinetics as well. The presence of shallow traps provides a consistent explanation for a number of poorly understood relationships between the two scintillator materials, including a higher room temperature scintillation light yield and longer scintillation decay time in YAlO 3 :Ce, and a longer scintillation rise time in LuAlO 3 :Ce. Theoretical analysis indicates that elimination of these traps would make the two materials nearly identical in scintillator performance. Although the specific identity of all traps remains elusive, the performance of both scintillator materials is now, in practical terms, fully understood. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  13. Hydrogenation Behaviors of MgH{sub x}-Graphene Composites by Reactive Mechanical Grinding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Min-hyuk; Park, So-Hyun; Hong, Tae-Whan [Korea National University of Transportation, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    In order to mitigate the disadvantage of the Mg hydrides, several studies have been conducted that have used MgH{sub x} intermixed with carbon. Graphene is a kind of carbon allotrope that is easily subject to a desorption reaction at low temperatures because such a reaction is exothermic. In this work, an MgH{sub x}-graphene mixture has been prepared by reactive mechanical grinding. The synthesized powder was characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and simultaneous thermogravimetric (TG) and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) analyses. The hydrogenation behaviors were evaluated using a Sievert’s type automatic pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) apparatus without activation treatment. From the characteristics of the absorption kinetics and the curves observed, the role of graphene as a catalyst in hydrogen absorption was determined. According to the results of the PCI curve, the available hydrogen storage amounts for MgH{sub x}-5 wt% graphene composites had maximum values of 3.69, 5.09, and 5.72 wt% at 423, 523, and 623 K, respectively. Those values for MgH{sub x}-10 wt% graphene were 5.08, 5.45, and 5.83 wt% at 423, 523, and 673K, respectively.

  14. Insights into the mechanism of acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu(111) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Minhua; Yao, Rui; Jiang, Haoxi; Li, Guiming; Chen, Yifei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The scission of C–OH bond of acetic acid is the rate-determined step in acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu(111). • Acetic acid adsorption and reaction barrier of C–OH scission of acetic acid are factors related to acetic acid conversion. • Acetaldehyde adsorption and reaction barriers of O–H formation of C_2–oxygenates are factors related to ethanol selectivity. - Abstract: Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to theoretically explain the reaction mechanism of acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu catalyst. The activation barriers of key elementary steps and the adsorption configurations of key intermediates involved in acetic acid hydrogenation on Cu(111) surface were investigated. The results indicated that the direct dissociation of acetic acid to acetyl (CH_3COOH → CH_3CO + OH) is the rate-determined step. The activation barrier of acetic acid scission to acetyl and the adsorption energy of acetic acid are two descriptors which could determine the conversion of acetic acid. The descriptors might have effects on the ethanol selectivity including: the adsorption energy of acetaldehyde and the activation barriers for O−H bond formation of C_2-oxygenates (CH_3CO + H → CH_3COH, CH_3CHO + H → CH_3CHOH and CH_3CH_2O + H → CH_3CH_2OH). These proposed descriptors could be used as references to design new Cu-based catalysts that have excellent catalytic performance.

  15. Theoretical description of quantum mechanical permeation of graphene membranes by charged hydrogen isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuca, James W.; Haut, Nathaniel K.

    2018-06-01

    It has been recently shown that in the presence of an applied voltage, hydrogen and deuterium nuclei can be separated from one another using graphene membranes as a nuclear sieve, resulting in a 10-fold enhancement in the concentration of the lighter isotope. While previous studies, both experimental and theoretical, have attributed this effect mostly to differences in vibrational zero point energy (ZPE) of the various isotopes near the membrane surface, we propose that multi-dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling of nuclei through the graphene membrane influences this proton permeation process in a fundamental way. We perform ring polymer molecular dynamics calculations in which we include both ZPE and tunneling effects of various hydrogen isotopes as they permeate the graphene membrane and compute rate constants across a range of temperatures near 300 K. While capturing the experimentally observed separation factor, our calculations indicate that the transverse motion of the various isotopes across the surface of the graphene membrane is an essential part of this sieving mechanism. An understanding of the multi-dimensional quantum mechanical nature of this process could serve to guide the design of other such isotopic enrichment processes for a variety of atomic and molecular species of interest.

  16. Theoretical description of quantum mechanical permeation of graphene membranes by charged hydrogen isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuca, James W; Haut, Nathaniel K

    2018-06-14

    It has been recently shown that in the presence of an applied voltage, hydrogen and deuterium nuclei can be separated from one another using graphene membranes as a nuclear sieve, resulting in a 10-fold enhancement in the concentration of the lighter isotope. While previous studies, both experimental and theoretical, have attributed this effect mostly to differences in vibrational zero point energy (ZPE) of the various isotopes near the membrane surface, we propose that multi-dimensional quantum mechanical tunneling of nuclei through the graphene membrane influences this proton permeation process in a fundamental way. We perform ring polymer molecular dynamics calculations in which we include both ZPE and tunneling effects of various hydrogen isotopes as they permeate the graphene membrane and compute rate constants across a range of temperatures near 300 K. While capturing the experimentally observed separation factor, our calculations indicate that the transverse motion of the various isotopes across the surface of the graphene membrane is an essential part of this sieving mechanism. An understanding of the multi-dimensional quantum mechanical nature of this process could serve to guide the design of other such isotopic enrichment processes for a variety of atomic and molecular species of interest.

  17. Automated Quantum Mechanical Predictions of Enantioselectivity in a Rhodium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yanfei; Wheeler, Steven E

    2017-07-24

    A computational toolkit (AARON: An automated reaction optimizer for new catalysts) is described that automates the density functional theory (DFT) based screening of chiral ligands for transition-metal-catalyzed reactions with well-defined reaction mechanisms but multiple stereocontrolling transition states. This is demonstrated for the Rh-catalyzed asymmetric hydrogenation of (E)-β-aryl-N-acetyl enamides, for which a new C 2 -symmetric phosphorus ligand is designed. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Effect of hydrogen charging on the mechanical properties of medium strength aluminium alloys 2091 and 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandopadhyay, A.; Ambat, Rajan; Dwarakadasa, E.S.

    1992-01-01

    Cathodic hydrogen charging in 3.5% NaCl solution altered the mechanical properties of 2091-T351 (Al-Cu-Li-Mg-Zr) determined by a slow (10(-3)/s) strain rate tensile testing technique. UTS and YS decreased in the caw of 2091-T351 and 2014-T6(Al-Cu-Mn-Si-Mg) with increase in charging current density....... Elongation showed a decrease with increase in charging current density for both the alloys. However, elongation occurring throughout the gauge length in uncharged specimens changed over to localized deformation, thus increasing the reduction in area in charged specimens. A transition in fracture mode from...

  19. Development mechanisms of microorganisms oxidizing the hydrogen: role and consequences in the industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gales, G.

    2004-10-01

    It is possible to observe a bacterial development in a ultra-pure water basin containing irradiating wastes. This ecosystem has the particularity to contain dissolved molecular hydrogen produced by radiolysis as well as oxygen in non negligible quantities. After having studied the physico-chemical properties of this ecosystem, bio-film and water have been sampled in different parts of the basin. The aim of this work was to identify the different populations of bacteria which are present, to know their origin and to understand their development mechanisms. The water and bio-film samples have been cultivated in order to isolate the chemo-litho-trophic bacteria which oxidize the hydrogen, and on nutritive agar-agar. These bacteria have been identified by partial determination of the DNAr 16S sequences. The DNA has also been extracted of the bio-films in order to carry out a study of the molecular diversity of the bacterial populations (determination of the sequences of the DNAr 16S). Surprisingly, at the surface of the basin, the DNAr 16S sequences of the autotrophic strains are the same as the sequences detected by the method of sequences determination. Most of bacteria of this medium have then been isolated. The comparison between the bacteria isolated from different parts of the basin allows to say that the make-up waters of the basin are the main source of contamination and to propose a scenario for this contamination. The hydrogen metabolism of most of the bacteria has been studied by gaseous exchange mass spectrometry: those isolated make the 'knallgas reaction' (H 2 + 1/2O 2 → H 2 O) and fix carbon dioxide in these conditions. In the studied basin are then a bacterial community based on hydrogen and whose primary producers make the 'knallgas' reaction. Most of the bacteria, mainly a (Ralstonia sp. GGLH002) tolerate the oxidizing stress generated by radiolysis. (O.M.)

  20. Understanding the mechanism of DNA deactivation in ion therapy of cancer cells: hydrogen peroxide action*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatnytskyi, Dmytro V.; Zdorevskyi, Oleksiy O.; Perepelytsya, Sergiy M.; Volkov, Sergey N.

    2015-11-01

    Changes in the medium of biological cells under ion beam irradiation has been considered as a possible cause of cell function disruption in the living body. The interaction of hydrogen peroxide, a long-lived molecular product of water radiolysis, with active sites of DNA macromolecule was studied, and the formation of stable DNA-peroxide complexes was considered. The phosphate groups of the macromolecule backbone were picked out among the atomic groups of DNA double helix as a probable target for interaction with hydrogen peroxide molecules. Complexes consisting of combinations including: the DNA phosphate group, H2O2 and H2O molecules, and Na+ counterion, were considered. The counterions have been taken into consideration insofar as under the natural conditions they neutralise DNA sugar-phosphate backbone. The energy of the complexes have been determined by considering the electrostatic and the Van der Waals interactions within the framework of atom-atom potential functions. As a result, the stability of various configurations of molecular complexes was estimated. It was shown that DNA phosphate groups and counterions can form stable complexes with hydrogen peroxide molecules, which are as stable as the complexes with water molecules. It has been demonstrated that the formation of stable complexes of H2O2-Na+-PO4- may be detected experimentally by observing specific vibrations in the low-frequency Raman spectra. The interaction of H2O2 molecule with phosphate group of the double helix backbone can disrupt DNA biological function and induce the deactivation of the cell genetic apparatus. Thus, the production of hydrogen peroxide molecules in the nucleus of living cells can be considered as an additional mechanism by which high-energy ion beams destroy tumour cells during ion beam therapy. Contribution to the Topical Issue "COST Action Nano-IBCT: Nano-scale Processes Behind Ion-Beam Cancer Therapy", edited by Andrey Solov'yov, Nigel Mason, Gustavo García, Eugene

  1. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN MOLYBDENUM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abd El Keriem, M.S.; van der Werf, D.P.; Pleiter, F

    1993-01-01

    Vacancy-hydrogen interaction in molybdenum was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. The complex InV2 turned out to trap up to two hydrogen atoms: trapping of a single hydrogen atom gives rise to a decrease of the quadrupole

  2. Study of mechanism of hydrogen diffusion in separation devices. Progress report for 1980-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.H.

    1983-01-01

    For the purpose of studying the mechanisms of hydrogen diffusion in separation devices e.g. transition-metal membranes, we have developed a microscopic dynamic model appropriate for describing the nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of hydrogen-in-a-metal. Using this model we have carried out a detailed analysis to obtain the autocorrelation function of density fluctuations in the model. Our model is built on the physical idea that, at low temperatures, spin clusters are the basic units or aggregates of transport. Our work can explain the reversed isotope effect in diffusion. We have also obtained an expression for the relative diffusivity, verifiable by experiments with tritium in metals. Our notion of spin clusters is novel. There is some evidence of their existence. The interstitial spin clusters are comparable to atomic and nuclear spin clusters, the only other natural spin clusters. Our demonstration of a long-time tail in the autocorrelation function is also novel. Diffusion can be anomalous if long time tails exist, a current topic in nonlinear behavior of fluids and solids. Our progress has been made possible by our development in the mathematical method of solving the generalized Langevin equation. This method is applicable to any time-dependent quantum many-body model. The underlying basis of this method is our discovery of a new orthogonalization process in Hilbert space, first since Gram and Schmidt over 100 years ago. Our process is simpler if Hilbert space is realized as is for all physical problems. To demonstrate the power and utility of our method we considered a well established model of metals, thereby discovering the existence of a low-frequency electronic mobility. This kind of intrinsic conductivity should exist in ensembles of all light particles, hence also relevant to hydrogen and its isotopes in metals

  3. A detailed study of CO2-brine capillary trapping mechanisms as applied to geologic carbon storage. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildenschild, Dorthe [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2017-04-06

    The proposed research focuses on improved fundamental understanding of the efficiency of physical trapping mechanisms, and as such will provide the basis for subsequent upscaling efforts. The overarching hypothesis of the proposed research is that capillary pressure plays a significant role in capillary trapping of CO2, especially during the water imbibition stage of the sequestration process. We posit that the relevant physics of the sequestration process is more complex than is currently captured in relative permeability models, which are often based on so-called trapping models to represent relative permeability hysteresis. Our 4 main questions, guiding the 4 main tasks of the proposed research, are as follows: (1) What is the morphology of capillary trapped CO2 at the pore scale as a function of temperature, pressure, brine concentration, interfacial tension, and pore-space morphology under injection and subsequent imbibition? (2) Is it possible to describe the capillary trapping process using formation-dependent, but otherwise unique continuum-scale functions in permeability-capillary pressure, interfacial area and saturation space, rather than hysteretic functions in permeability-saturation or capillary pressure-saturation space? (3) How do continuum-scale relationships between kr-Pc-S-Anw developed based on pore-scale observations compare with traditional models incorporating relative permeability hysteresis (such as Land’s and other models,) and with observations at the core (5-10cm) scale? (4) How can trapped CO2 volume be optimized via engineered injection and sweep strategies, and as a function of formation type (incl. heterogeneity)?

  4. Relativistic quantum mechanic calculation of photoionization cross-section of hydrogenic and non-hydrogenic states using analytical potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, R.; Gil, J.M.; Rubiano, J.G.; Florido, R.; Martel, P.; Minguez, E.

    2005-01-01

    Photoionization process is a subject of special importance in many areas of physics. Numerical methods must be used in order to obtain photoionization cross-sections for non-hydrogenic levels. The atomic data required to calculate them is huge so self-consistent calculations increase computing time considerably. Analytical potentials are a useful alternative because they avoid the iterative procedures typical in self-consistent models. In this work, we present a relativistic quantum calculation of photoionization cross-sections for isolated ions based on an analytical potential to obtain the required atomic data, which is valid both for hydrogenic and non-hydrogenic ions. Comparisons between our results and others obtained using either widely used analytical expressions for the cross-sections or more sophisticated calculations are done

  5. Hydrogen bond networks determine emergent mechanical and thermodynamic properties across a protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallakyan Sargis

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gram-negative bacteria use periplasmic-binding proteins (bPBP to transport nutrients through the periplasm. Despite immense diversity within the recognized substrates, all members of the family share a common fold that includes two domains that are separated by a conserved hinge. The hinge allows the protein to cycle between open (apo and closed (ligated conformations. Conformational changes within the proteins depend on a complex interplay of mechanical and thermodynamic response, which is manifested as an increase in thermal stability and decrease of flexibility upon ligand binding. Results We use a distance constraint model (DCM to quantify the give and take between thermodynamic stability and mechanical flexibility across the bPBP family. Quantitative stability/flexibility relationships (QSFR are readily evaluated because the DCM links mechanical and thermodynamic properties. We have previously demonstrated that QSFR is moderately conserved across a mesophilic/thermophilic RNase H pair, whereas the observed variance indicated that different enthalpy-entropy mechanisms allow similar mechanical response at their respective melting temperatures. Our predictions of heat capacity and free energy show marked diversity across the bPBP family. While backbone flexibility metrics are mostly conserved, cooperativity correlation (long-range couplings also demonstrate considerable amount of variation. Upon ligand removal, heat capacity, melting point, and mechanical rigidity are, as expected, lowered. Nevertheless, significant differences are found in molecular cooperativity correlations that can be explained by the detailed nature of the hydrogen bond network. Conclusion Non-trivial mechanical and thermodynamic variation across the family is explained by differences within the underlying H-bond networks. The mechanism is simple; variation within the H-bond networks result in altered mechanical linkage properties that directly affect

  6. On the mechanism of hydrogen evolution catalysis by proteins: A case study with bovine serum albumin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doneux, Th., E-mail: tdoneux@ulb.ac.b [Chimie Analytique et Chimie des Interfaces, Faculte des Sciences, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Boulevard du Triomphe 2, CP 255, B-1050 Bruxelles (Belgium); Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Ostatna, Veronika [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Palecek, Emil, E-mail: palecek@ibp.cz [Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: > Proteins catalyse hydrogen evolution at mercury electrodes. > The adsorbed protein is the mediator and the buffer proton donor is the substrate. > The characteristics of the catalytic peak are connected to the protein properties. - Abstract: The catalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) by proteins has been known for decades but was only recently found to be useful for electroanalytical purposes. The mechanism of the catalytic process is investigated at hanging mercury drop electrodes by cyclic voltammetry, with bovine serum albumin as a model system. It is shown that the catalyst is the protein in the adsorbed state. The influence of various parameters such as the accumulation time, scan rate or buffer concentration is studied, and interpreted in the framework of a surface catalytic mechanism. Under the experimental conditions used in the work, a 'total catalysis' phenomenon takes place, the rate of HER being limited by the diffusion of the proton donor. The adequacy of the existing models is discussed, leading to a call for the development of more refined models.

  7. The effects of low fugacity hydrogen in duplex- and beta-annealed Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tal-Gutelmacher, E.; Eliezer, D.; Eylon, D.

    2004-01-01

    Due to its excellent combination of a high strength/weight ratio and good corrosion behavior, Ti-6Al-4V alloys are ranked among the most important advanced materials for a variety of aerospace, chemical engineering, biomaterials, marine and commercial applications. However, in many of these technological applications, this alloy is exposed to environments which can act as sources of hydrogen, and severe problems may arise based on its susceptibility to hydrogen embrittlement. Even small hydrogen concentrations might lead to failure. Consequently, a comprehensive knowledge of hydrogen-trapping interactions is necessary to better understand the trapping mechanisms, the types of the trap sites, the trapped hydrogen content, in order to determine the safe service conditions of this alloy in the aerospace industry. The objective of this paper is to investigate the role of microstructure on hydrogen absorption/desorption behavior in Ti-6Al-4V alloy, with specific emphasis on the nature of the interaction between microstructural traps and hydrogen atoms. The effect of low fugacity hydrogen on the microstructure is studied using X-ray diffraction (XRD), and electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), while the absorption and desorption characteristics are determined by means of a hydrogen determinator and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS), respectively. The role of microstructure on hydrogen absorption and desorption behavior is discussed in detail

  8. Resonant quantum transitions in trapped antihydrogen atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amole, C; Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Capra, A; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Donnan, P H; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Isaac, C A; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Little, A; Madsen, N; McKenna, J T K; Menary, S; Napoli, S C; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Pusa, P; Rasmussen, C Ø; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Shields, C R; Silveira, D M; Stracka, S; So, C; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S

    2012-03-07

    The hydrogen atom is one of the most important and influential model systems in modern physics. Attempts to understand its spectrum are inextricably linked to the early history and development of quantum mechanics. The hydrogen atom's stature lies in its simplicity and in the accuracy with which its spectrum can be measured and compared to theory. Today its spectrum remains a valuable tool for determining the values of fundamental constants and for challenging the limits of modern physics, including the validity of quantum electrodynamics and--by comparison with measurements on its antimatter counterpart, antihydrogen--the validity of CPT (charge conjugation, parity and time reversal) symmetry. Here we report spectroscopy of a pure antimatter atom, demonstrating resonant quantum transitions in antihydrogen. We have manipulated the internal spin state of antihydrogen atoms so as to induce magnetic resonance transitions between hyperfine levels of the positronic ground state. We used resonant microwave radiation to flip the spin of the positron in antihydrogen atoms that were magnetically trapped in the ALPHA apparatus. The spin flip causes trapped anti-atoms to be ejected from the trap. We look for evidence of resonant interaction by comparing the survival rate of trapped atoms irradiated with microwaves on-resonance to that of atoms subjected to microwaves that are off-resonance. In one variant of the experiment, we detect 23 atoms that survive in 110 trapping attempts with microwaves off-resonance (0.21 per attempt), and only two atoms that survive in 103 attempts with microwaves on-resonance (0.02 per attempt). We also describe the direct detection of the annihilation of antihydrogen atoms ejected by the microwaves.

  9. Theoretical model for the hydrogen-material interaction as a basis for prediction of the material mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indeitsev, D.A.; Polyanskiy, V.A.; Sukhanov, A.A.; Belyaev, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    The natural law concentration of hydrogen inside the materials has a distribution over the different binding energies. This distribution is changing under the mechanical tension. The model of interaction of the small hydrogen concentration with materials provides one with an instrument for modeling the materials fatigue and destruction, as well as the prediction of material properties during exploitation. The well-known models are of the phenomenological nature. However if one takes into account the physical mechanism then one obtains an accurate model and the instrument for the reliable prediction. The two-continuum model of the solid material is a substantiation for the present study. This model describes the interaction between the low concentration of hydrogen and the material. The redistribution of the hydrogen between the different binding energy levels is taken into account, too

  10. Hydrogen effect on mechanical properties and flake formation in the 10KhSND steel rolled plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradova, R G; Zakharov, V A; Kuzin, A P; Gol' tsov, V A; Podgajskij, M S [Donetskij Politekhnicheskij Inst. (Ukrainian SSR); Donetskij Nauchno-Issledovatel' skij Inst. Chernoj Metallurgii (Ukrainian SSR))

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on mechanical properties of the 10KhSND steel rolled plates during natural aging is studied. Optimum period of metal acceptance tests, which are advisable to conduct after 5-7 day natural aging of finished products, are found out. The technique is worked out and a safe hydrogen content to prevent flake formation in the 10KhSND steel is determined. It is shown that a safe hydrogen content is dependent on the experiment conditions (sample dimensions, conditions of cooling, and prehistory).

  11. Hydrogen effect on mechanical properties and flake formation in the 10KhSND steel rolled plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muradova, R.G.; Zakharov, V.A.; Kuzin, A.P.; Gol'tsov, V.A.; Podgajskij, M.S.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on mechanical properties of the 10KhSND steel rolled plates during natural aging is studied. Optimum period of metal acceptance tests, which are advisable to conduct after 5-7 day natural aging of finished products, are found out. The technique is worked out and a safe hydrogen content to prevent flake formation in the 10KhSND steel is determined. It is shown that a safe hydrogen content is dependent on the experiment conditions (sample dimensions, conditions of cooling, and prehistory)

  12. Superoxide anions and hydrogen peroxide induce hepatocyte death by different mechanisms : Involvement of JNK and ERK MAP kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conde de la Rosa, L; Schoemaker, MH; Vrenken, TE; Buist-Homan, M; Havinga, R; Jansen, PLM; Moshage, H

    Background/Aims: In liver diseases, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in cell death and liver injury, but the mechanisms are not completely elucidated. To elucidate the mechanisms of hepatocyte cell death induced by the ROS superoxide anions and hydrogen peroxide, primary cultures of

  13. Superoxide anions and hydrogen peroxide induce hepatocyte death by different mechanisms: involvement of JNK and ERK MAP kinases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Conde de la Rosa, Laura; Schoemaker, Marieke H.; Vrenken, Titia E.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Havinga, Rick; Jansen, Peter L. M.; Moshage, Han

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS: In liver diseases, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in cell death and liver injury, but the mechanisms are not completely elucidated. To elucidate the mechanisms of hepatocyte cell death induced by the ROS superoxide anions and hydrogen peroxide, primary cultures of

  14. Intermediate Scale Laboratory Testing to Understand Mechanisms of Capillary and Dissolution Trapping during Injection and Post-Injection of CO2 in Heterogeneous Geological Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illangasekare, Tissa [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Trevisan, Luca [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Agartan, Elif [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Mori, Hiroko [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Vargas-Johnson, Javier [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Gonzalez-Nicolas, Ana [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Cihan, Abdullah [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Birkholzer, Jens [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States); Zhou, Quanlin [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-03-31

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) represents a technology aimed to reduce atmospheric loading of CO2 from power plants and heavy industries by injecting it into deep geological formations, such as saline aquifers. A number of trapping mechanisms contribute to effective and secure storage of the injected CO2 in supercritical fluid phase (scCO2) in the formation over the long term. The primary trapping mechanisms are structural, residual, dissolution and mineralization. Knowledge gaps exist on how the heterogeneity of the formation manifested at all scales from the pore to the site scales affects trapping and parameterization of contributing mechanisms in models. An experimental and modeling study was conducted to fill these knowledge gaps. Experimental investigation of fundamental processes and mechanisms in field settings is not possible as it is not feasible to fully characterize the geologic heterogeneity at all relevant scales and gathering data on migration, trapping and dissolution of scCO2. Laboratory experiments using scCO2 under ambient conditions are also not feasible as it is technically challenging and cost prohibitive to develop large, two- or three-dimensional test systems with controlled high pressures to keep the scCO2 as a liquid. Hence, an innovative approach that used surrogate fluids in place of scCO2 and formation brine in multi-scale, synthetic aquifers test systems ranging in scales from centimeter to meter scale developed used. New modeling algorithms were developed to capture the processes controlled by the formation heterogeneity, and they were tested using the data from the laboratory test systems. The results and findings are expected to contribute toward better conceptual models, future improvements to DOE numerical codes, more accurate assessment of storage capacities, and optimized placement strategies. This report presents the experimental and modeling methods

  15. Universal Expression of Efficiency at Maximum Power: A Quantum-Mechanical Brayton Engine Working with a Single Particle Confined in a Power-Law Trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye Zhuo-Lin; Li Wei-Sheng; Lai Yi-Ming; He Ji-Zhou; Wang Jian-Hui

    2015-01-01

    We propose a quantum-mechanical Brayton engine model that works between two superposed states, employing a single particle confined in an arbitrary power-law trap as the working substance. Applying the superposition principle, we obtain the explicit expressions of the power and efficiency, and find that the efficiency at maximum power is bounded from above by the function: η_+ = θ/(θ + 1), with θ being a potential-dependent exponent. (paper)

  16. Irreversible traps, their influence on the embrittlement of high strength steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mariano, I; Mansilla, G

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen (H) can be trapped in lattice defects such as vacancies, dislocations, grain boundaries and interfaces between the matrix and precipitates. The effect on the mechanical properties depends on factors inherent in materials such as the activation energy of irreversible traps (H trapped in Network Places) and its sensitivity to embrittlement. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) allows the study of those processes in which enthalpy variation occurs. The purpose is to record the difference in enthalpy change that occurs in the sample as a function of temperature or time. This work represents a study of H embrittlement of high strength steel resulfurized

  17. Surface spintronics enhanced photo-catalytic hydrogen evolution: Mechanisms, strategies, challenges and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyan; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Xuqiang; Li, Zhen; Lu, Gongxuan

    2018-03-01

    Hydrogen is a green energy carrier with high enthalpy and zero environmental pollution emission characteristics. Photocatalytic hydrogen evolution (HER) is a sustainable and promising way to generate hydrogen. Despite of great achievements in photocatalytic HER research, its efficiency is still limited due to undesirable electron transfer loss, high HER over-potential and low stability of some photocatalysts, which lead to their unsatisfied performance in HER and anti-photocorrosion properties. In recent years, many spintronics works have shown their enhancing effects on photo-catalytic HER. For example, it was reported that spin polarized photo-electrons could result in higher photocurrents and HER turn-over frequency (up to 200%) in photocatalytic system. Two strategies have been developed for electron spin polarizing, which resort to heavy atom effect and magnetic induction respectively. Both theoretical and experimental studies show that controlling spin state of OHrad radicals in photocatalytic reaction can not only decrease OER over-potential (even to 0 eV) of water splitting, but improve stability and charge lifetime of photocatalysts. A convenient strategy have been developed for aligning spin state of OHrad by utilizing chiral molecules to spin filter photo-electrons. By chiral-induced spin filtering, electron polarization can approach to 74%, which is significantly larger than some traditional transition metal devices. Those achievements demonstrate bright future of spintronics in enhancing photocatalytic HER, nevertheless, there is little work systematically reviewing and analysis this topic. This review focuses on recent achievements of spintronics in photocatalytic HER study, and systematically summarizes the related mechanisms and important strategies proposed. Besides, the challenges and developing trends of spintronics enhanced photo-catalytic HER research are discussed, expecting to comprehend and explore such interdisciplinary research in

  18. Mechanisms of improving the cyclic stability of V-Ti-based hydrogen storage electrode alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miao He; Wang Weiguo

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → The corrosion resistance of V-based phase is much lower than that of C14 Laves phase of V-Ti-based alloys. → The addition of Cr which mostly distributes in V-based phase can effectively increase the anti-corrosion ability of V-Ti-based alloys. → The addition of Cr which mostly distributes in V-based phase can effectively increase the anti-corrosion ability of V-Ti-based alloys. - Abstract: In this work, the mechanisms of improving the cyclic stability of V-Ti-based hydrogen storage electrode alloys were investigated systemically. Several key factors for example corrosion resistance, pulverization resistance and oxidation resistance were evaluated individually. The V-based solid solution phase has much lower anti-corrosion ability than C14 Laves phase in KOH solution, and the addition of Cr in V-Ti-based alloys can suppress the dissolution of the main hydrogen absorption elements of the V-based phase in the alkaline solution. During the charge/discharge cycling, the alloy particles crack or break into several pieces, which accelerates their corrosion/oxidation and increases the contact resistance of the alloy electrodes. Proper decreasing the Vickers hardness and enhancing the fracture toughness can increase the pulverization resistance of the alloy particles. The oxidation layer thickness on the alloy particle surface obviously increases during charge/discharge cycling. This deteriorates their electro-catalyst activation to the electrochemical reaction, and leads to a quick degradation. Therefore, enhancing the oxide resistance can obviously improve the cyclic stability of V-Ti-based hydrogen storage electrode alloys.

  19. Insights into the mechanism of acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu(111) surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Minhua; Yao, Rui; Jiang, Haoxi; Li, Guiming [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China); Chen, Yifei, E-mail: yfchen@tju.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Technology of Ministry of Education, R& D Center for Petrochemical Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin 300072 (China)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • The scission of C–OH bond of acetic acid is the rate-determined step in acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu(111). • Acetic acid adsorption and reaction barrier of C–OH scission of acetic acid are factors related to acetic acid conversion. • Acetaldehyde adsorption and reaction barriers of O–H formation of C{sub 2}–oxygenates are factors related to ethanol selectivity. - Abstract: Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to theoretically explain the reaction mechanism of acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu catalyst. The activation barriers of key elementary steps and the adsorption configurations of key intermediates involved in acetic acid hydrogenation on Cu(111) surface were investigated. The results indicated that the direct dissociation of acetic acid to acetyl (CH{sub 3}COOH → CH{sub 3}CO + OH) is the rate-determined step. The activation barrier of acetic acid scission to acetyl and the adsorption energy of acetic acid are two descriptors which could determine the conversion of acetic acid. The descriptors might have effects on the ethanol selectivity including: the adsorption energy of acetaldehyde and the activation barriers for O−H bond formation of C{sub 2}-oxygenates (CH{sub 3}CO + H → CH{sub 3}COH, CH{sub 3}CHO + H → CH{sub 3}CHOH and CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}O + H → CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}OH). These proposed descriptors could be used as references to design new Cu-based catalysts that have excellent catalytic performance.

  20. Mechanism and kinetics of the electrocatalytic reaction responsible for the high cost of hydrogen fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tao; Goddard, William A; An, Qi; Xiao, Hai; Merinov, Boris; Morozov, Sergey

    2017-01-25

    The sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is a major impediment to the economic use of hydrogen fuel cells in transportation. In this work, we report the full ORR reaction mechanism for Pt(111) based on Quantum Mechanics (QM) based Reactive metadynamics (RμD) simulations including explicit water to obtain free energy reaction barriers at 298 K. The lowest energy pathway for 4 e - water formation is: first, *OOH formation; second, *OOH reduction to H 2 O and O*; third, O* hydrolysis using surface water to produce two *OH and finally *OH hydration to water. Water formation is the rate-determining step (RDS) for potentials above 0.87 Volt, the normal operating range. Considering the Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanism involving protons from the solvent, we predict the free energy reaction barrier at 298 K for water formation to be 0.25 eV for an external potential below U = 0.87 V and 0.41 eV at U = 1.23 V, in good agreement with experimental values of 0.22 eV and 0.44 eV, respectively. With the mechanism now fully understood, we can use this now validated methodology to examine the changes upon alloying and surface modifications to increase the rate by reducing the barrier for water formation.

  1. Insights into the mechanism of acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu(111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minhua; Yao, Rui; Jiang, Haoxi; Li, Guiming; Chen, Yifei

    2017-08-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to theoretically explain the reaction mechanism of acetic acid hydrogenation to ethanol on Cu catalyst. The activation barriers of key elementary steps and the adsorption configurations of key intermediates involved in acetic acid hydrogenation on Cu(111) surface were investigated. The results indicated that the direct dissociation of acetic acid to acetyl (CH3COOH → CH3CO + OH) is the rate-determined step. The activation barrier of acetic acid scission to acetyl and the adsorption energy of acetic acid are two descriptors which could determine the conversion of acetic acid. The descriptors might have effects on the ethanol selectivity including: the adsorption energy of acetaldehyde and the activation barriers for Osbnd H bond formation of C2-oxygenates (CH3CO + H → CH3COH, CH3CHO + H → CH3CHOH and CH3CH2O + H → CH3CH2OH). These proposed descriptors could be used as references to design new Cu-based catalysts that have excellent catalytic performance.

  2. Standard Test Method for Mechanical Hydrogen Embrittlement Evaluation of Plating/Coating Processes and Service Environments

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This test method describes mechanical test methods and defines acceptance criteria for coating and plating processes that can cause hydrogen embrittlement in steels. Subsequent exposure to chemicals encountered in service environments, such as fluids, cleaning treatments or maintenance chemicals that come in contact with the plated/coated or bare surface of the steel, can also be evaluated. 1.2 This test method is not intended to measure the relative susceptibility of different steels. The relative susceptibility of different materials to hydrogen embrittlement may be determined in accordance with Test Method F1459 and Test Method F1624. 1.3 This test method specifies the use of air melted AISI E4340 steel per SAE AMS-S-5000 (formerly MIL-S-5000) heat treated to 260 – 280 ksi (pounds per square inch x 1000) as the baseline. This combination of alloy and heat treat level has been used for many years and a large database has been accumulated in the aerospace industry on its specific response to exposure...

  3. Hydrogen storage properties in the Mg_0_._7_5Ta_0_._2_5 system prepared by mechanical milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez G, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium and most of its mixtures have slow sorption-desorption kinetics of hydrogen, which limits their technological application and their viability from the economic view point. Recently, has been observed that by the synthesis of advanced materials, using the mechanical milling technique, positive changes in the kinetics are introduced. In order to improve the sorption-desorption hydrogen properties, in the present work a mixture consisting of Mg_0_._7_5Ta_0_._2_5 was prepared using methanol as process control agent. To this end, the first methodological step was to carry out, by means of the mechanical milling technique, the synthesis of the mixture Mg_0_._7_5Ta_0_._2_5 in a Spex type vibratory mill at times of 6, 12, 18 and 24 h. Subsequently, the material was characterized by different analytical techniques such as scanning electron microscopy with elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction and N_2 physisorption analysis. Subsequently, hydrogen sorption experiments were carried out in a Parr reactor to evaluate the hydrogen storage capacity of the mixture, varying temperature parameters, pressure and time, in order to determine the optimal parameters of hydrogen sorption. The characterization of the hydrogen storage capacity was analyzed by the thermogravimetric analysis/differential scanning calorimetry technique coupled to a mass spectrometer. X ray diffraction analysis reveals that there is a mixture between the starting compounds, with an important refinement of the microstructure as a consequence of the mechanical milling process. The results of the hydrogen sorption tests at 1, 5 and 10 cycles showed that the storage of hydrogen in the Mg_0_._7_5Ta_0_._2_5 mixture can be carried out at a temperature of 25 degrees Celsius with a pressure of 2 atm and a contact time of 1 h. (Author)

  4. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of an API X80 ferrito-pearlitic steel; Fragilisation par l'hydrogene gazeux d'un acier ferrito-perlitique de grade API X80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, I.

    2009-11-15

    This work deals with hydrogen embrittlement, at ambient temperature and under a high pressure gaseous way, of an API X80 high elasticity limit steel used for pipelines construction, and with the understanding of the associated physical mechanisms of the embrittlement. At first has been described a bibliographic study of the adsorption, absorption, diffusion, transport and trapping of hydrogen in the steels. Then has been carried out an experimental and numerical study concerning the implantation in the finite element code CASTEM3M of a hydrogen diffusion model coupled to mechanical fields. The hydrogen influence on the mechanical characteristics of the X80 steel, of a ferrito-pearlitic microstructure has been studied with tensile tests under 300 bar of hydrogen and at ambient temperature. The sensitivity of the X80 steel to hydrogen embrittlement has been analyzed by tensile tests at different deformation velocities and under different hydrogen pressures on axisymmetrical notched test specimens. These studies show that the effect of the hydrogen embrittlement vary effectively with the experimental conditions. Moreover, correlated with the results of the tests simulations, it has been shown too that in these experimental conditions and for that steel, the hydrogen embrittlement is induced by three different hydrogen populations: the hydrogen trapped at the ferrite/perlite interfaces, the hydrogen adsorbed on surface and the reticular hydrogen trapped in the material volume. At last, the tensile and rupture tests of specimens, during which atmosphere changes have been carried out, have shown a strong reversibility of the hydrogen embrittlement, associated with its initiation as soon as hydrogen is introduced in the atmosphere. At last, three hydrogen mechanisms, depending of the different hydrogen populations are presented and discussed. (O.M.)

  5. Quantum mechanics on phase space: The hydrogen atom and its Wigner functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, P.; Martins, M. G. R.; Fernandes, M. C. B.; Vianna, J. D. M.

    2018-03-01

    Symplectic quantum mechanics (SQM) considers a non-commutative algebra of functions on a phase space Γ and an associated Hilbert space HΓ, to construct a unitary representation for the Galilei group. From this unitary representation the Schrödinger equation is rewritten in phase space variables and the Wigner function can be derived without the use of the Liouville-von Neumann equation. In this article the Coulomb potential in three dimensions (3D) is resolved completely by using the phase space Schrödinger equation. The Kustaanheimo-Stiefel(KS) transformation is applied and the Coulomb and harmonic oscillator potentials are connected. In this context we determine the energy levels, the amplitude of probability in phase space and correspondent Wigner quasi-distribution functions of the 3D-hydrogen atom described by Schrödinger equation in phase space.

  6. Thermal detection mechanism of SiC based hydrogen resistive gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Timothy J.; Wolan, John T.; Lloyd Spetz, Anita; Reyes, Meralys; Saddow, Stephen E.

    2006-10-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) resistive hydrogen gas sensors have been fabricated and tested. Planar NiCr contacts were deposited on a thin 3C-SiC epitaxial film grown on thin Si wafers bonded to polycrystalline SiC substrates. At 673K, up to a 51.75±0.04% change in sensor output current and a change in the device temperature of up to 163.1±0.4K were demonstrated in response to 100% H2 in N2. Changes in device temperature are shown to be driven by the transfer of heat from the device to the gas, giving rise to a thermal detection mechanism.

  7. Thermal, mechanical, optical and dielectric properties of piperazinium hydrogen phosphite monohydrate NLO single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, R.; Praveen Kumar, P.

    2018-05-01

    Optical transparent crystal of piperazinium hydrogen phosphite monohydrate (PHPM) was grown by slow evaporation method. The grown crystal was characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and the crystal belongs to monoclinic system. The functional groups present in PHPM crystal were confirmed by FTIR analysis. UV-Visible spectrum shows that the PHPM crystal is transparent in the visible region. The mechanical behavior of PHPM crystal was characterized by Vickers hardness test. Thermal stability of PHPM crystal was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis. Dielectric studies were also carried out for the grown crystal. The third-order nonlinear parameters such as nonlinear refractive index and nonlinear absorption coefficient have been calculated using Z scan technique.

  8. Degradation of the Mechanical Properties of Zirconium-base alloys due to Interaction with Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolino, Graciela

    2001-01-01

    Security aspects and the purpose to extend the nuclear power plants lifetime motivate the renovated interest on the influence of the environment and radiation on the mechanical properties of in-reactor materials.Zirconium based alloys are the family of alloys most extensively used in nuclear core components.A consequence of the interaction of the in-reactor environment with these alloys is the formation of brittle phase Zr hydride, a process that greatly affects the component integrity.In this work we present a experimental study of the hydrogen influence on the Z ry-4 mechanical properties at different temperatures.As a complement we also present results of a finite elements simulations of the fracture process.We performed standard metallurgical and mechanical characterization in commercial Z ry-4 samples to obtain their basic properties. Different hydrogen pickup techniques were applied to obtain H concentration of charged samples between 10 and 2000 ppm, homogeneous or mainly localized at the crack tip zone.To obtain the fracture toughness of the alloys specimens were tested using elastoplastic fracture mechanics techniques.Specifically we implement J-integral methodology with partial unloading compliance measurements.Tests were performed in a temperature range of 20 to 200 o C.The negative influence of the H content on material toughness probed to be important even at very small concentrations, with an effect that decreases when temperature increases.While there was observed no change in the fracture mechanism in homogeneous charged samples, specimens charged under a superimposed stress field fractured by brittle mode when were tested at 20 to 70 o C. SEM observations of the crack growth, the fracture surface morphology and precipitates content showed the influence of the precipitates on fracture at different H concentrations.At least three stages with different fracture behavior depending on H content were identified.Complementary to the experimental work we

  9. Hydrogen production by hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea: mechanisms for reductant disposal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhaart, M.R.A.; Bielen, A.A.M.; Oost, van der J.; Stams, A.J.M.; Kengen, S.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen produced from biomass by bacteria and archaea is an attractive renewable energy source. However, to make its application more feasible, microorganisms are needed with high hydrogen productivities. For several reasons, hyperthermophilic and extremely thermophilic bacteria and archaea are

  10. High Electrocatalytic Response of a Mechanically Enhanced NbC Nanocomposite Electrode Towards Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Coy, Emerson

    2017-08-22

    Resistant and efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) are desired to replace scarce and commercially expensive platinum electrodes. Thin film electrodes of metal-carbides are a promising alternative due to their reduced price and similar catalytic properties. However, most of the studied structures to date neglect long lasting chemical and structural stability, focusing only on electrochemical efficiency. Herein we report on a new approach to easily deposit and control the micro/nanostructure of thin film electrodes based on niobium carbide (NbC) and their electrocatalytic response. We will show that, by improving the mechanical properties of the NbC electrodes, microstructure and mechanical resilience can be obtained whilst maintaining high electro catalytic response. We also address the influence of other parameters such as conductivity and chemical composition on the overall performance of the thin film electrodes. Finally, we show that nanocomposite NbC electrodes are promising candidates towards HER , and furthermore, that the methodology presented here is suitable to produce other transition metal carbides (TM-C) with improved catalytic and mechanical properties.

  11. Changing the Mechanism for CO 2 Hydrogenation Using Solvent-Dependent Thermodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess, Samantha A. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Appel, Aaron M. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Linehan, John C. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA; Wiedner, Eric S. [Catalysis Science Group, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999 Richland WA 99352 USA

    2017-10-23

    A critical scientific challenge for utilization of CO2 is the development of catalyst systems that do not depend upon expensive or environmentally unfriendly reagents, such as precious metals, strong organic bases, and organic solvents. We have used thermodynamic insights to predict and demonstrate that the HCoI(dmpe)2 catalyst system, previously described for use in organic solvents, can hydrogenate CO2 to formate in water with bicarbonate as the only added reagent. Replacing tetrahydrofuran as the solvent with water changes the mechanism for catalysis by altering the thermodynamics for hydride transfer to CO2 from a key dihydride intermediate. The need for a strong organic base was eliminated by performing catalysis in water due to the change in mechanism. These studies demonstrate that the solvent plays a pivotal role in determining the reaction thermodynamics and thereby catalytic mechanism and activity. The research was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  12. Mechanical ball-milling preparation of fullerene/cobalt core/shell nanocomposites with high electrochemical hydrogen storage ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Di; Gao, Peng; Shen, Xiande; Chang, Cheng; Wang, Longqiang; Wang, Ying; Chen, Yujin; Zhou, Xiaoming; Sun, Shuchao; Li, Guobao; Yang, Piaoping

    2014-02-26

    The design and synthesis of new hydrogen storage nanomaterials with high capacity at low cost is extremely desirable but remains challenging for today's development of hydrogen economy. Because of the special honeycomb structures and excellent physical and chemical characters, fullerenes have been extensively considered as ideal materials for hydrogen storage materials. To take the most advantage of its distinctive symmetrical carbon cage structure, we have uniformly coated C60's surface with metal cobalt in nanoscale to form a core/shell structure through a simple ball-milling process in this work. The X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), Raman spectra, high-solution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (EDX) elemental mappings, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements have been conducted to evaluate the size and the composition of the composites. In addition, the blue shift of C60 pentagonal pinch mode demonstrates the formation of Co-C chemical bond, and which enhances the stability of the as-obtained nanocomposites. And their electrochemical experimental results demonstrate that the as-obtained C60/Co composites have excellent electrochemical hydrogen storage cycle reversibility and considerably high hydrogen storage capacities of 907 mAh/g (3.32 wt % hydrogen) under room temperature and ambient pressure, which is very close to the theoretical hydrogen storage capacities of individual metal Co (3.33 wt % hydrogen). Furthermore, their hydrogen storage processes and the mechanism have also been investigated, in which the quasi-reversible C60/Co↔C60/Co-Hx reaction is the dominant cycle process.

  13. In-situ investigation of the hydrogen release mechanism in bulk Mg2NiH4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Xuan Quy; McDonald, Stuart D.; Gu, Qinfen; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Shigematsu, Koji; Aso, Kohei; Tanaka, Eishi; Matsumura, Syo; Nogita, Kazuhiro

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen storage is an important aspect to enable the so-called hydrogen economy. Mg-Ni alloys are among the most promising candidates for solid-state hydrogen storage systems yet many questions remain unanswered regarding the hydriding/dehydriding mechanism of the alloys. Mg2NiH4 particularly has received much attention both for its potential as a hydrogen storage medium and also exhibits interesting properties relating to its different polymorphs. Here, the dehydriding mechanism in bulk Mg2NiH4 is investigated using in-situ ultra-high voltage transmission electron microscopy (TEM) combined with Synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction (XRPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). We find that the hydrogen release is based on a mechanism of nucleation and growth of Mg2NiHx (x∼0-0.3) solid solution grains and is greatly enhanced in the presence of crystal defects occurring as a result of the polymorphic phase transformation. Also importantly, with atomic resolution TEM imaging a high density of stacking faults is identified in the dehydrided Mg2NiHx (x∼0-0.3) lattices.

  14. Ultratrace determination of lead by hydride generation in-atomizer trapping atomic absorption spectrometry: Optimization of plumbane generation and analyte preconcentration in a quartz trap-and-atomizer device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratzer, Jan, E-mail: jkratzer@biomed.cas.cz

    2012-05-15

    A compact trap-and-atomizer device and a preconcentration procedure based on hydride trapping in excess of oxygen over hydrogen in the collection step, both constructed and developed previously in our laboratory, were employed to optimize plumbane trapping in this device and to develop a routine method for ultratrace lead determination subsequently. The inherent advantage of this preconcentration approach is that 100% preconcentration efficiency for lead is reached in this device which has never been reported before using quartz or metal traps. Plumbane is completely retained in the trap-and-atomizer device at 290 Degree-Sign C in oxygen-rich atmosphere and trapped species are subsequently volatilized at 830 Degree-Sign C in hydrogen-rich atmosphere. Effect of relevant experimental parameters on plumbane trapping and lead volatilization are discussed, and possible trapping mechanisms are hypothesized. Plumbane trapping in the trap-and-atomizer device can be routinely used for lead determination at ultratrace levels reaching a detection limit of 0.21 ng ml{sup -1} Pb (30 s preconcentration, sample volume 2 ml). Further improvement of the detection limit is feasible by reducing the blank signal and increasing the trapping time. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In-atomizer trapping HG-AAS was optimized for Pb. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A compact quartz trap-and-atomizer device was employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Generation, preconcentration and atomization steps were investigated in detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 100% preconcentration efficiency for lead was reached. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Routine analytical method was developed for Pb determination (LOD of 0.2 ng ml{sup -1} Pb).

  15. Towards a quantification of stress corrosion mechanisms: numerical simulations of hydrogen-dislocations at the very crack tip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chateau, J.P.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the respective roles played by anodic dissolution and hydrogen in SCC mechanisms of f.c.c. materials, by studying the fracture of copper in nitrite for which we compare the results with that previously obtained in 316L steel in hot chloride. It is surprising to note that even the crystallographies at the scale of the micron are different, the macroscopic inclination of the fracture surfaces are the same. In the case of 316L steel, the formation of strong pile-ups in the presence of hydrogen leads to a zigzag fracture along alternated slip planes in the most general case. In the absence of hydrogen, as in copper, this mechanism effectively disappears. Furthermore, numerical simulations of crack shielding by dislocations emitted on one plane predict the macroscopic inclination. It shows that it is due to the mere dissolution which confines slip activity at the very crack tip in f.c.c. materials. In order to quantify the mechanism involved in 316L steel, we developed simulations which numerically solve the coupled diffusion and elasticity equations for hydrogen in the presence of a crack and shielding dislocations. They reproduce the mechanisms of hydrogen segregation on edge dislocations and of a localised softening effect by decreasing pair interactions. These mechanisms lead to i) a localisation of hydrogen embrittlement along the activated slip planes, ii) an increase of the dislocation density in pile-ups, and iii) a decrease of the cross slip probability. These three factors enhance micro-fracture at the head of a pile-up, which is responsible of the zigzag fracture. Introducing the free surface effects for hydrogen, we point out a new mechanism: the inhibition of dislocation sources at the crack tip, which is relevant with the brittle fracture surfaces observed in some cases in 316L steel. The quantification of these different mechanisms allows to give a relation between the local fracture possibility and the macroscopic parameters. A general law for

  16. Nematode-Trapping Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Xingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Nematode-trapping fungi are a unique and intriguing group of carnivorous microorganisms that can trap and digest nematodes by means of specialized trapping structures. They can develop diverse trapping devices, such as adhesive hyphae, adhesive knobs, adhesive networks, constricting rings, and nonconstricting rings. Nematode-trapping fungi have been found in all regions of the world, from the tropics to Antarctica, from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems. They play an important ecological role in regulating nematode dynamics in soil. Molecular phylogenetic studies have shown that the majority of nematode-trapping fungi belong to a monophyletic group in the order Orbiliales (Ascomycota). Nematode-trapping fungi serve as an excellent model system for understanding fungal evolution and interaction between fungi and nematodes. With the development of molecular techniques and genome sequencing, their evolutionary origins and divergence, and the mechanisms underlying fungus-nematode interactions have been well studied. In recent decades, an increasing concern about the environmental hazards of using chemical nematicides has led to the application of these biological control agents as a rapidly developing component of crop protection.

  17. Mechanism of nucleation and growth of hydrogen porosity in solidifying A356 aluminum alloy: an analytical solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, K.-D.; Chang, Edward

    2004-01-01

    This study derives an analytical solution for the mechanism of nucleation and growth of hydrogen pore in the solidifying A356 aluminum alloy. A model of initial transient hydrogen redistribution in the growing dendritic grain is used to modify the lever rule for the mechanism of nucleation of pore. The model predicts the fraction of solid at nucleation, the temperature range of nucleation, the radius of hydrogen diffusion cell, and the supersaturation of hydrogen needed for nucleation. The role of solidus velocity in nucleation is explained. The parameters calculated from the model of nucleation are used for analyzing the mechanism of kinetic diffusion-controlled growth of pore, in which the mathematical transformations of variables are introduced. With the transformations, it is argued that the diffusion problem involving the liquid and solid phases during solidification could be treated as a classic problem of precipitation in the single-phase medium treated by Ham or Avrami. The analytical solution for the nucleation of pore is compared with the mechanism of macrosegregation. The predicted volume percent of porosity and radius of pore based on the mechanism of growth of pore is discussed with respect to the thermodynamic solution, the published experimental data, the numerical solutions, and the role of interdendritic fluid flow governed by Darcy's law

  18. Effect of hydrogenation pressure on microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy produced by powder metallurgy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvaizem, Jose Helio; Galdino, Gabriel Souza; Bressiani, Ana Helena; Faria Junior, Rubens Nunes de; Takiishi, Hidetoshi

    2009-01-01

    The effects of the hydrogenation stage on microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-13Nb-13Zr alloy produced by powder metallurgy have been studied. Powder alloys have been produced by hydrogenation with 250 MPa or 1 GPa and via high energy planetary ball milling. Samples were isostatically pressed at 200 MPa and sintered at 1150 deg C for 7, 10 and 13 hours. Elastic modulus and microhardness were determined using a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA) and a Vickers microhardness tester. Density of the samples was measured using a liquid displacement system. Microstructure and phases presents were analyzed employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Elastic modulus were 81.3 ± 0.8 and 62.6 ± 0.6 GPa for samples produced by 250 MPa and 1 GPa hydrogenation, respectively when sintered for 7h. (author)

  19. Antibacterial Properties and Mechanism of Activity of a Novel Silver-Stabilized Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy L Martin

    Full Text Available Huwa-San peroxide (hydrogen peroxide; HSP is a NSF Standard 60 (maximum 8 mg/L(-1 new generation peroxide stabilized with ionic silver suitable for continuous disinfection of potable water. Experiments were undertaken to examine the mechanism of HSP against planktonic and biofilm cultures of indicator bacterial strains. Contact/kill time (CT relationships that achieve effective control were explored to determine the potential utility in primary disinfection. Inhibitory assays were conducted using both nutrient rich media and a medium based on synthetic wastewater. Assays were compared for exposures to three disinfectants (HSP, laboratory grade hydrogen peroxide (HP and sodium hypochlorite at concentrations of 20 ppm (therefore at 2.5 and 5 times the NSF limit for HP and sodium hypochlorite, respectively and at pH 7.0 and 8.5 in dechlorinated tap water. HSP was found to be more or equally effective as hypochlorite or HP. Results from CT assays comparing HSP and HP at different bacterial concentrations with neutralization of residual peroxide with catalase suggested that at a high bacterial concentration HSP, but not HP, was protected from catalase degradation possibly through sequestration by bacterial cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, at a low bacterial cell density residual HSP was more effectively neutralized as less HSP was associated with bacteria and therefore accessible to catalase. Silver in HSP may facilitate this association through electrostatic interactions at the cell surface. This was supported by experiments where the addition of mono (K(+ and divalent (Ca(+2 cations (0.005-0.05M reduced the killing efficacy of HSP but not HP. Experiments designed to distinguish any inhibitory effect of silver from that of peroxide in HSP were carried out by monitoring the metabolic activity of established P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. Concentrations of 70-500 ppm HSP had a pronounced effect on metabolic activity while the equivalent

  20. Mechanism of conformational coupling in SecA: Key role of hydrogen-bonding networks and water interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milenkovic, Stefan; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta

    2016-02-01

    SecA uses the energy yielded by the binding and hydrolysis of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to push secretory pre-proteins across the plasma membrane in bacteria. Hydrolysis of ATP occurs at the nucleotide-binding site, which contains the conserved carboxylate groups of the DEAD-box helicases. Although crystal structures provide valuable snapshots of SecA along its reaction cycle, the mechanism that ensures conformational coupling between the nucleotide-binding site and the other domains of SecA remains unclear. The observation that SecA contains numerous hydrogen-bonding groups raises important questions about the role of hydrogen-bonding networks and hydrogen-bond dynamics in long-distance conformational couplings. To address these questions, we explored the molecular dynamics of SecA from three different organisms, with and without bound nucleotide, in water. By computing two-dimensional hydrogen-bonding maps we identify networks of hydrogen bonds that connect the nucleotide-binding site to remote regions of the protein, and sites in the protein that respond to specific perturbations. We find that the nucleotide-binding site of ADP-bound SecA has a preferred geometry whereby the first two carboxylates of the DEAD motif bridge via hydrogen-bonding water. Simulations of a mutant with perturbed ATP hydrolysis highlight the water-bridged geometry as a key structural element of the reaction path. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Mechanical Properties of Super Duplex Stainless Steel 2507 after Gas Phase Thermal Precharging with Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Marchi, C.; Somerday, B. P.; Zelinski, J.; Tang, X.; Schiroky, G. H.

    2007-11-01

    Thermal precharging of super duplex stainless steel 2507 with 125 wppm hydrogen significantly reduced tensile ductility and fracture toughness. Strain-hardened 2507 exhibited more severe ductility loss compared to the annealed microstructure. The reduction of area (RA) was between 80 and 85 pct for both microstructures in the noncharged condition, while reductions of area were 25 and 46 pct for the strain-hardened and annealed microstructures, respectively, after hydrogen precharging. Similar to the effect of internal hydrogen on tensile ductility, fracture toughness of strain-hardened 2507 was lowered from nearly 300 MPa m1/2 in the noncharged condition to less than 60 MPa m1/2 in the hydrogen-precharged condition. While precharging 2507 with hydrogen results in a considerable reduction in ductility and toughness, the absolute values are similar to high-strength austenitic steels that have been tested under the same conditions, and which are generally considered acceptable for high-pressure hydrogen gas systems. The fracture mode in hydrogen-precharged 2507 involved cleavage cracking of the ferrite phase and ductile fracture along oblique planes in the austenite phase, compared to 100 pct microvoid coalescence in the absence of hydrogen. Predictions from a strain-based micromechanical fracture toughness model were in good agreement with the measured fracture toughness of hydrogen-precharged 2507, implying a governing role of austenite for resistance to hydrogen-assisted fracture.

  2. Promotion of atomic hydrogen recombination as an alternative to electron trapping for the role of metals in the photocatalytic production of H2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Ji Bong; Dillon, Robert; Lee, Ilkeun; Yin, Yadong; Bardeen, Christopher J; Zaera, Francisco

    2014-06-03

    The production of hydrogen from water with semiconductor photocatalysts can be promoted by adding small amounts of metals to their surfaces. The resulting enhancement in photocatalytic activity is commonly attributed to a fast transfer of the excited electrons generated by photon absorption from the semiconductor to the metal, a step that prevents deexcitation back to the ground electronic state. Here we provide experimental evidence that suggests an alternative pathway that does not involve electron transfer to the metal but requires it to act as a catalyst for the recombination of the hydrogen atoms made via the reduction of protons on the surface of the semiconductor instead.

  3. Correlation of magnetic and mechanical properties of hydrogenated, compositionally modulated, amorphous Fe80Zr20 films (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rengarajan, S.; Yun, E.J.; Lee, B.H.; Cho, B.I.; Walser, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that large amounts of hydrogen can be electrolytically incorporated in amorphous, compositionally modulated (CM) FeZr films. The first irreversible changes in the magnetic state of an electrolytically hydrogenated iron-rich amorphous alloy were observed. The hydrogen-induced changes in the magnetization were interpreted in terms of specific structural rearrangements. In this work, simultaneous measurements of the variations in the magnetization and mechanical properties of these films were measured as a function of hydrogen charging to further clarify the hydrogen-induced structure changes. The Young close-quote s moduli E and internal friction d of as-deposited, and as-hydrogenated CM Fe 80 Zr 20 thin films were calculated from the displacements of a vibrating composite cantilever, measured using a laser heterodyne interferometer (LHI) having a displacement sensitivity of ∼0.01 A. E and d were measured using the resonant frequency method. CM films with thickness 1390 A and modulation wavelength ∼10 A were deposited on glass cantilevers (5 mm long, 2 mm wide, and 150 μm thick) by sequentially sputtering (rf diode) elemental Fe and Zr targets. The samples were electrolytically hydrogenated for various times in 2 N phosphoric acid with a current density of 26.3 mA/cm 2 . The maximum change in magnetization of the film (from 71.5 to 551 emu/cm 3 ) was observed after 5 min. During this time, E increased 18-fold from 535 GPa to 9.63 TPa. The unusually high Young close-quote s modulus of the as-deposited CM film is comparable to those previously observed in other CM films. The change is three times larger than the change in the E of carbon steel at the martensitic transformation, and nine times larger than the hydrogen induced increase in E of pure single crystals of iron. (Abstract Truncated)

  4. Mechanism of obtaining carbon monoxide and hydrogen during brown coal radiolysis. [Gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rustamov, V R; Kurbanov, M A; Dzantiev, B T; Kerimov, V K; Musaeva, P F

    1982-05-01

    This article analyzes effects of gamma radiation on the yield of products of coal gasification: hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Samples of brown coal from the Kansk-Achins basin were treated by gamma radiation with cobalt 60 radiation source. Analyses show that accumulation of hydrogen and carbon monoxide in brown coal under influence of gamma radiation is characterized by a constant rate. Yields of carbon monoxide and hydrogen amount to 0.16 molecule/100 electro volt and 0.21 molecule/electro volt respectively. Reducing radiation dose from 2.5 to 0.7 millirad/h reduces yields of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Increasing temperature of vacuum brown coal pyrolysis from 200 to 600 C causes decrease of hydrogen yield. Hydrogen yield decrease during temperature increase is caused by a high content of aromatic nuclei in the samples used in the radiolysis. (5 refs.)

  5. AEgIS antihydrogen production trap

    CERN Multimedia

    Caraban Gonzalez, Noemi

    2017-01-01

    During technical stop 2017 the AEgIS experiment was open for upgrades and maintenance. We had the opportunity to take some 360 images from inside and see where antiprotons are ¨trapped¨ and anti-Hydrogen produced.

  6. Hydrogen adsorption and desorption in carbon nanotube systems and its mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, M.; Takenobu, T.; Ata, M. [Materials Laboratories, SONY Corporation, Shin-Sakuragaoka 2-1-1, Hodogaya-ku, 240-0036, Yokohama (Japan); Kataura, H. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minami-Osawa, Hachioji, 192-0397, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-04-01

    The hydrogen physisorption properties in single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) based materials were characterized. The SWNTs were highly purified and three useful pores for hydrogen physisorption were activated. Hydrogen was physisorbed in intra-tube pores at room temperature and the capacity was estimated to be about 0.3-0.4 wt. % at room temperature. The adsorption capacity can be explained by the Langmuir model. The intra-tube pores have large adsorption potential and this induces hydrogen physisorption at comparatively higher temperatures. This fact indicates the importance of fabricating sub-nanometer ordered pores for this phenomena. (orig.)

  7. Mixtures of Charged Bosons Confined in Harmonic Traps and Bose-Einstein Condensation Mechanism for Low-Energy Nuclear Reactions and Transmutation Processes in Condensed Matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeong E.; Zubarev, Alexander L.

    2006-02-01

    A mixture of two different species of positively charged bosons in harmonic traps is considered in the mean-field approximation. It is shown that depending on the ratio of parameters, the two components may coexist in same regions of space, in spite of the Coulomb repulsion between the two species. Application of this result is discussed for the generalization of the Bose-Einstein condensation mechanism for low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) and transmutation processes in condensed matters. For the case of deutron-lithium (d + Li) LENR, the result indicates that (d + 6Li) reactions may dominate over (d + d) reactions in LENR experiments.

  8. Mixtures of charged bosons confined in harmonic traps and Bose-Einstein condensation mechanism for low-energy nuclear reactions and transmutation processes in condensed matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeong, E. Kim; Zubarev, Alexander L. [Purdue Nuclear and Many-Body Theory Group (PNMBTG) Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2006-07-01

    A mixture of two different species of positively charged bosons in harmonic traps is considered in the mean-field approximation. It is shown that depending on the ratio of parameters, the two components may coexist in some regions of space, in spite of the Coulomb repulsion between the two species. Application of this result is discussed for the generalization of the Bose-Einstein condensation mechanism for low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) and transmutation processes in condensed matters. For the case of deuteron-lithium (d + Li) LENR, the result indicates that (d + {sup 6}Li) reactions may dominate over (d + d) reactions in LENR experiments. (authors)

  9. Mixtures of charged bosons confined in harmonic traps and Bose-Einstein condensation mechanism for low-energy nuclear reactions and transmutation processes in condensed matters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeong, E. Kim; Zubarev, Alexander L.

    2006-01-01

    A mixture of two different species of positively charged bosons in harmonic traps is considered in the mean-field approximation. It is shown that depending on the ratio of parameters, the two components may coexist in some regions of space, in spite of the Coulomb repulsion between the two species. Application of this result is discussed for the generalization of the Bose-Einstein condensation mechanism for low-energy nuclear reaction (LENR) and transmutation processes in condensed matters. For the case of deuteron-lithium (d + Li) LENR, the result indicates that (d + 6 Li) reactions may dominate over (d + d) reactions in LENR experiments. (authors)

  10. Mechanism of Sporicidal Activity for the Synergistic Combination of Peracetic Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, Mark J; Schwarz, J Spencer; Burke, Peter A; McDonnell, Gerald; Denyer, Stephen P; Maillard, Jean-Yves

    2016-02-15

    There is still great interest in controlling bacterial endospores. The use of chemical disinfectants and, notably, oxidizing agents to sterilize medical devices is increasing. With this in mind, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and peracetic acid (PAA) have been used in combination, but until now there has been no explanation for the observed increase in sporicidal activity. This study provides information on the mechanism of synergistic interaction of PAA and H2O2 against bacterial spores. We performed investigations of the efficacies of different combinations, including pretreatments with the two oxidizers, against wild-type spores and a range of spore mutants deficient in the spore coat or small acid-soluble spore proteins. The concentrations of the two biocides were also measured in the reaction vessels, enabling the assessment of any shift from H2O2 to PAA formation. This study confirmed the synergistic activity of the combination of H2O2 and PAA. However, we observed that the sporicidal activity of the combination is largely due to PAA and not H2O2. Furthermore, we observed that the synergistic combination was based on H2O2 compromising the spore coat, which was the main spore resistance factor, likely allowing better penetration of PAA and resulting in the increased sporicidal activity. Copyright © 2016 Leggett et al.

  11. Coupling mechanism between wear and oxidation processes of 304 stainless steel in hydrogen peroxide environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Conglin; Yuan, Chengqing; Bai, Xiuqin; Li, Jian; Qin, Honglin; Yan, Xinping

    2017-05-24

    Stainless steel is widely used in strongly oxidizing hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) environments. It is crucial to study its wear behaviour and failure mode. The tribological properties and oxidation of 304 stainless steel were investigated using a MMW-1 tribo-tester with a three-electrode setup in H 2 O 2 solutions with different concentrations. Corrosion current densities (CCDs), coefficients of frictions (COFs), wear mass losses, wear surface topographies, and metal oxide films were analysed and compared. The results show that the wear process and oxidation process interacted significantly with each other. Increasing the concentration of H 2 O 2 or the oxidation time was useful to form a layer of integrated, homogeneous, compact and thick metal oxide film. The dense metal oxide films with higher mechanical strengths improved the wear process and also reduced the oxidation reaction. The wear process removed the metal oxide films to increase the oxidation reaction. Theoretical data is provided for the rational design and application of friction pairs in oxidation corrosion conditions.

  12. Overview on recent developments in energy storage: Mechanical, electrochemical and hydrogen technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amirante, Riccardo; Cassone, Egidio; Distaso, Elia; Tamburrano, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • World energy demand is analyzed. • Promising energy storage systems are shown to explore their potentials. • Different storage are considered and compared. • The efficiency and costs of each are shown. • Easy guidelines for selection of energy storage are provided. - Abstract: Energy production is changing in the world because of the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, to reduce the dependence on carbon/fossil sources and to introduce renewable energy sources. Despite the great amount of scientific efforts, great care to energy storage systems is necessary to overcome the discontinuity in the renewable production. A wide variety of options and complex characteristic matrices make it difficult and so in this paper the authors show a clear picture of the available state-of-the-art technologies. The paper provides an overview of mechanical, electrochemical and hydrogen technologies, explaining operation principles, performing technical and economic features. Finally a schematic comparison among the potential utilizations of energy storage systems is presented.

  13. Mechanisms of charge-state determination in hydrogen-based impurity complexes in crystalline germanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, J.

    1984-01-01

    Recent experiments suggest that hydrogen may become bound to, and then tunnel around, substitutional carbon, silicon, or oxygen impurities in crystalline germanium. All these complexes are electrically active; [H,C] and [H,Si] are shallow acceptors, while [H,O] is a shallow donor. This paper attempts to elucidate the basic physical mechanisms controlling the charge state of such complexes as a function of the choice of the substitutional atom. A minimal-basis Bethe-cluster approach is used with the cluster comprising the ten-atom tetrahedral cage (including the substitutional atom) and enclosed H site, the latter coupled to all ten atoms of the cage. The important local correlation effect which tends to favor single occupation of the H site is modeled with a Hubbard-type term at that site. The charge state of the [H,C], [H,Si], and [H,O] complexes is associated with double occupation of the H site. Four aspects of the model are involved in favoring double occupation: (1) a low value of the H-site energy, (2) a reduced local correlation effect at the H site, (3) small hybridization between the H site and cage, and (4) a low value of the substitutional-site energy relative to that of the host. Results for the charge state for H at the cage center and for H near the substitutional atom are discussed in detail. Several useful formal results for local self-energies and local Green's functions are presented

  14. Hydrogen sulfide: a new endogenous player in an old mechanism of plant tolerance to high salinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane J. da-Silva

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT High salinity affects plants due to stimulation of osmotic stress. Cell signaling triggered by nitric oxide (NO and hydrogen sulfide (H2S activates a cascade of biochemical events that culminate in plant tolerance to abiotic and biotic stresses. For instance, the NO/H2S-stimulated biochemical events that occur in plants during response to high salinity include the control of reactive oxygen species, activation of antioxidant system, accumulation of osmoprotectants in cytosol, induction of K+ uptake and Na+ cell extrusion or its vacuolar compartmentation among others. This review is a compilation of what we have learned in the last 10 years about NO participation during cell signaling in response to high salinity as well as the role of H2S, a new player in the mechanism of plant tolerance to salt stress. The main sources of NO and H2S in plant cells is also discussed together with the evidence of interplay between both signaling molecules during response to stress.

  15. Molecular mechanisms underlying the protective effects of hydrogen-saturated saline on noise-induced hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liwei; Han, Mingkun; Lu, Yan; Chen, Daishi; Sun, Xuejun; Yang, Shiming; Sun, Wei; Yu, Ning; Zhai, Suoqiang

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to explore the molecular mechanism of the protective effects of hydrogen-saturated saline on NIHL. Guinea pigs were divided into three groups: hydrogen-saturated saline; normal saline; and control. For saline administration, the guinea pigs were given daily abdominal injections 3 d before and 1 h before noise exposure. ABR were tested to examine cochlear physiology changes. The changes of 8-hydroxy-desoxyguanosine (8-HOdG), interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-10 (IL-10), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and high mobility group box-1 protein (HMGB1) in the cochlea were also examined. The results showed that pre-treatment with hydrogen-saturated saline could significantly attenuate noise-induced hearing loss. The concentration of 8-HOdG was also significantly decreased in the hydrogen-saturated saline group compared with the normal saline group. After noise exposure, the concentrations of IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α, and ICAM-1 in the cochlea of guinea pigs in the hydrogen-saturated saline group were dramatically reduced compared to those in the normal saline group. The concentrations of HMGB-1 and IL-10 in the hydrogen-saturated saline group were significantly higher than in those in the normal saline group immediately and at 7 d after noise exposure. This study revealed for the first time the protective effects of hydrogen-saturated saline on noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) are related to both the anti-oxidative activity and anti-inflammatory activity.

  16. Reforming water to generate hydrogen using mechanical alloy; El reformado del agua para generar hidrogeno mediante aleado mecanico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pena F, D. L.

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this research was to generate a hydrogen production system by means of mechanical milling, in which 0.1 g of magnesium were weighed using a volume of 300 μL for each water solvent (H{sub 2}O) and methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) in a container to start mechanical milling for 2, 4 and 6 h. Once the mechanical milling was finished, the hydrogen that was produced every two hours was measured to determine the appropriate milling time in the production, also in each period of time samples of the powders produced during the milling of Mg were taken, in this process we used characterization techniques such as: X-ray diffraction at an angle of 2θi 5 and 2θf 90 degrees and scanning electron microscopy, taking micrographs of 100, 500, 1000 and 5000 magnifications. According to the mechanical milling results hydrogen was obtained when using water, as well as with methanol. In the techniques of X-ray diffraction characterization different results were obtained before and after the milling, since by the diffractogram s is possible to observe how the magnesium to be put in the mechanical milling along with the water and methanol was diminishing to be transformed into hydroxide and magnesium oxide, as well as in the micrographs taken with scanning electron microscopy the change in the magnesium morphology to hydroxide and magnesium oxide is observed. (Author)

  17. Comparison of thermally and mechanically induced Si layer transfer in hydrogen-implanted Si wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoechbauer, T.; Misra, A.; Nastasi, M.; Henttinen, K.; Suni, T.; Suni, I.; Lau, S.S.; Ensinger, W.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen ion-implantation into Si and subsequent heat treatment has been shown to be an effective means of cleaving thin layer of Si from its parent wafer. This process has been called Smart Cut TM or ion-cut. We investigated the cleavage process in H-implanted silicon samples, in which the ion-cut was provoked thermally and mechanically, respectively. A oriented p-type silicon wafer was irradiated at room temperature with 100 keV H 2 + -ions to a dose of 5 x 10 16 H 2 /cm 2 and subsequently joined to a handle wafer. Ion-cutting was achieved by two different methods: (1) thermally by annealing to 350 deg. C and (2) mechanically by insertion of a razor blade sidewise into the bonded wafers near the bond interface. The H-concentration and the crystal damage depth profiles before and after the ion-cut were investigated through the combined use of elastic recoil detection analysis and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). The location at which the ion-cut occurred was determined by RBS in channeling mode and cross-section transmission electron spectroscopy. The ion-cut depth was found to be independent on the cutting method. The gained knowledge was correlated to the depth distribution of the H-platelet density in the as-implanted sample, which contains two separate peaks in the implantation zone. The obtained results suggest that the ion-cut location coincides with the depth of the H-platelet density peak located at a larger depth

  18. A study of the chemical, mechanical, and surface properties of thin films of hydrogenated amorphous carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandentop, G.J.

    1990-07-01

    Amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) films were studied with the objective of elucidating the nucleation and growth mechanisms, and the origin of their unique physical properties. The films were deposited onto Si(100) substrates both on the powered (negatively self-biased) and on the grounded electrodes from methane in an rf plasma (13.56 MHz) at 65 mTorr and 300 to 370 K. The films produced at the powered electrode exhibited superior mechanical properties, such as high hardness. A mass spectrometer was used to identify neutral species and positive ions incident on the electrodes from the plasma, and also to measure ion energies. The effect of varying ion energy flux on the properties of a-C:H films was investigated using a novel pulsed biasing technique. It was demonstrated that ions were not the dominant deposition species as the total ion flux measured was insufficient to account for the observed deposition rate. The interface between thin films of a-C:H and silicon substrates was investigated using angle resolved x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A silicon carbide layer was detected at the interface of a hard a-C:H film formed at the powered electrode. At the grounded electrode, where the kinetic energy is low, no interfacial carbide layer was observed. Scanning tunneling microscopy and high energy electron energy loss spectroscopy was used to investigate the initial stages of growth of a-C:H films. On graphite substrates, films formed at the powered electrode were observed to nucleate in clusters approximately 50 {Angstrom} in diameter, while at the grounded electrode no cluster formation was observed. 58 figs.

  19. Energy of charged states in the acetanilide crystal: Trapping of charge-transfer states at vacancies as a possible mechanism for optical damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiaousis, D.; Munn, R. W.

    2004-04-01

    Calculations for the acetanilide crystal yield the effective polarizability (16.6 Å3), local electric field tensor, effective dipole moment (5.41 D), and dipole-dipole energy (-12.8 kJ/mol). Fourier-transform techniques are used to calculate the polarization energy P for a single charge in the perfect crystal (-1.16 eV); the charge-dipole energy WD is zero if the crystal carries no bulk dipole moment. Polarization energies for charge-transfer (CT) pairs combine with the Coulomb energy EC to give the screened Coulomb energy Escr; screening is nearly isotropic, with Escr≈EC/2.7. For CT pairs WD reduces to a term δWD arising from the interaction of the charge on each ion with the change in dipole moment on the other ion relative to the neutral molecule. The dipole moments calculated by density-functional theory methods with the B3LYP functional at the 6-311++G** level are 3.62 D for the neutral molecule, changing to 7.13 D and 4.38 D for the anion and cation, relative to the center of mass. Because of the large change in the anion, δWD reaches -0.9 eV and modifies the sequence of CT energies markedly from that of Escr, giving the lowest two CT pairs at -1.98 eV and -1.41 eV. The changes in P and WD near a vacancy are calculated; WD changes for the individual charges because the vacancy removes a dipole moment and modifies the crystal dielectric response, but δWD and EC do not change. A vacancy yields a positive change ΔP that scatters a charge or CT pair, but the change ΔWD can be negative and large enough to outweigh ΔP, yielding traps with depths that can exceed 150 meV for single charges and for CT pairs. Divacancies yield traps with depths nearly equal to the sum of those produced by the separate vacancies and so they can exceed 300 meV. These results are consistent with a mechanism of optical damage in which vacancies trap optically generated CT pairs that recombine and release energy; this can disrupt the lattice around the vacancy, thereby favoring

  20. The study of microplasticity mechanism in Ti-50 wt.%Nb alloy with high hydrogen content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golovin, I.S.; Kollerov, M.U.; Schinaeva, E.V.

    1996-01-01

    The upper yield point (∼ 700 MPa) appears at the compression test curves (ε=0.024 sec -1 ) of b.c.c. Nb-50 wt.%Ti due to the increase of hydrogen content from 0 to 0.2 wt.% and more and leads to the non monotonous increase in compressive lower yield stress from 400 to 550 MPa. Taking into account close connection between macro- and microplasticity of metallic materials the low frequency (∼ 2 Hz) amplitude dependent internal friction (ADIF) spectrum (γ = 1. 60.10 -5 ) in hydrogenized Nb-50 wt.% Ti and Nb samples are studied. The ADIF investigation of the closed hysteresis loop ''loading-unloading'' shows the dependence of its width from the hydrogen content which evidences the fact of dislocation unpinning from hydrogen atmospheres in the 1/2 cycle of loading. The study of ADIF spectrum for samples with different hydrogen content before and after torsion deformation (γ ∼ 2%) shows the sharp increase of IF level at γ = 1. 10.10 -5 after ∼1 hour of natural ageing. At that time the ADIF curves change its shape from Γ-shape to U-shape. The amplitude range of the IF increase depends on the hydrogen content. It is the interaction of hydrogen atoms with dislocations that caused the above mentioned effect which has not been observed in hydrogen free samples. The time estimation for the formation of thermodynamically stable hydrogen atmospheres on dislocations shows that hydrogen atmospheres could not follow the dislocation during compressive tests and that leads to the upper yield point appearance. (orig.)

  1. The Effect of Hydrogen on the Mechanical Properties of Cast Irons and ADI with Various Carbon Equivalent and Graphite Morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong Gi; Lee, Kyung Sub

    1989-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the mechanical properties of cast irons, flake, CV graphite cast iron ductile iron and ADI have been investigated. The effects of various carbon equivalent, graphite morphology and matrix have been analyzed to determine the predominant factor which influences on the hydrogen embrittlement. The effect of various carbon equivalent on the embrittlement was little in the similar graphite morphology. The embrittlement of ferrite matrix changed by heat treatment was less than that of pearlite matrix. In the case of ADI, the tendency of hydrogen embrittlement of lower bainite matrix was less remarkable than that of upper banite matrix. As the result of hydrogen charging, the tendency of interface decohesion between matrix-graphite was increased in flake G.C.I., and the trend from ductile fracture mode to brittle fracture mode was observed in CV G.C.I and ductile iron. Lower bainite in ADI showed the ductile fracture mode. Hydrogen solubility of lower bainite was higher than that of upper bainite

  2. Magnetic traps with a sperical separatrix: Tornado traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregood, B.P.; Lehnert, B.

    1979-11-01

    A review is given on the features of magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix, with special emphesis on Tornado spiral coil configurations. The confinement and heating of static plasmas in Tornado traps is treated, including the topology of the magnetic field structure, the magneto-mechanical properties of the magnetic coil system, as well as the particle orbits and plasma behaviour in these traps. In additio, the mode of rotating plasma operation by crossed electric and magnetic fields is being described. The results of experiments on static and rotating plasmas are summarized, and conclusions are drawn about future possibilities of Tornado traps for the creation and containment of hot plasmas. (author)

  3. Magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix: Tornado traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peregood, B.P.; Lehnert, B.

    1981-01-01

    A review is given on the features of magnetic traps with a spherical separatrix, with special emphasis on Tornado spiral coil configurations. The confinement and heating of static plasms in Tornado traps is treated, including the topology of the magnetic field structure, the magneto-mechanical properties of the magnetic coil system, as well as the particle orbits and plasma behaviour in these traps. In addition, the mode of rotating plasma operation by crossed electric and magnetic fields is described. The results of experiments on static and rotating plasmas are summarized, and conclusions are drawn about future possibilities of Tornado traps in the creation and containment of hot plasmas. (orig.)

  4. SISGR - Hydrogen Caged in Carbon-Exploration of Novel Carbon-Hydrogen Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueking, Angela [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Badding, John [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States); Crespi, Vinent [Pennsylvania State Univ., State College, PA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen trapped in a carbon cage, captured through repulsive interactions, is a novel concept in hydrogen storage. Trapping hydrogen via repulsive interactions borrows an idea from macroscale hydrogen storage (i.e. compressed gas storage tanks) and reapplies these concepts on the nanoscale in specially designed molecular containers. Under extreme conditions of pressure, hydrogen solubility in carbon materials is expected to increase and carbon is expected to restructure to minimize volume via a mixed sp2/sp3 hydrogenated state. Thermodynamics dictate that pre-formed C-H structures will rearrange with increased pressure, yet the final carbon-hydrogen interactions may be dependent upon the mechanism by which hydrogen is introduced. Gas “trapping” is meant to denote gas present in a solid in a high density, adsorbed-like state, when the external pressure is much less than that necessary to provide a comparable fluid density. Trapping thus denotes a kinetically metastable state rather than thermodynamic equilibrium. This project probed mechanochemical means to polymerize select hydrocarbons in the presence of gases, in an attempt to form localized carbon cages that trap gases via repulsive interactions. Aromatic, polyaromatic, and hydroaromatic molecules expected to undergo cyclo-addition reactions were polymerized at high (~GPa) pressures to form extended hydrogenated amorphous carbon networks. Notably, aromatics with a pre-existing internal free volume (such as Triptycene) appeared to retain an internal porosity upon application of pressure. However, a high photoluminescence background after polymerization precluded in situ identification of trapped gases. No spectroscopic evidence was found after depressurization that would be indicative of pockets of trapped gases in a localized high-pressure environment. Control studies suggested this measurement may be insensitive to gases at low pressure. Similarly, no spectral fingerprint was found for gas-imbued spherical

  5. An experimental and numerical study of nitrogen oxide formation mechanisms in ammonia-hydrogen-air flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Praveen

    The demand for sustainable alternative fuels is ever-increasing in the power generation, transportation, and energy sectors due to the inherent non-sustainable characteristics and political constraints of current energy resources. A number of alternative fuels derived from cellulosic biomass, algae, or waste are being considered, along with the conversion of electricity to non-carbon fuels such as hydrogen or ammonia (NH3). The latter is receiving attention recently because it is a non-carbon fuel that is readily produced in large quantities, stored and transported with current infrastructure, and is often a byproduct of biomass or waste conversion processes. However, pure or anhydrous ammonia combustion is severely challenging due to its high auto-ignition temperature (650 °C), low reactivity, and tendency to promote NOx formation. As such, the present study focuses on two major aspects of the ammonia combustion. The first is an applied investigation of the potential to achieve pure NH3 combustion with low levels of emissions in flames of practical interest. In this study, a swirl-stabilized flame typically used in fuel-oil home-heating systems is optimized for NH3 combustion, and measurements of NO and NH3 are collected for a wide range of operating conditions. The second major focus of this work is on fundamental investigation of NO x formation mechanisms in flames with high levels of NH3 in H2. For laminar premixed and diffusion jet flames, experimental measurements of flame speeds, exhaust-gas sampling, and in-situ NO measurements (NO PLIF) are compared with numerically predicted flames using complex chemical kinetics within CHEMKIN and reacting CFD codes i.e., UNICORN. From the preliminary testing of the NOx formation mechanisms, (1) Tian (2) Konnov and (3) GRI-Mech3.0 in laminar premixed H2/NH 3 flames, the Tian and Konnov mechanisms are found to capture the reduction in measured flame speeds with increasing NH3 in the fuel mixture, both qualitatively and

  6. Ion beam investigation of hydrogen implanted in magnesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chami, A.-C.

    1977-01-01

    The diffusion mechanism for hydrogen implanted in magnesium was investigated by nuclear reaction analysis or channeling. The hydrogen introduced is then in the presence of radiation defects created by implantation. The H( 11 B,α) reaction used allowed the profiles of implanted hydrogen to be drawn. The Winterbon calculations derived from LSS theory (Lindhard, Scharff, Schiott) were used. LSS profiles folding and the excitation curve unfolding give very same results. An analysis of the profile of the defects and the evaluation of the total number of Frenkel pairs produced show that the defects are isolated when low energy light elements are implanted, and hydrogen interactions are effected through point defects. A channeling analysis shows that hydrogen occupies tetrahedral sites as far as the temperature remains lower that the migration temperature (about 100K). Beyonds this temperature, the hydrogen migrates and is trapped on motionless defects [fr

  7. High Electrocatalytic Response of a Mechanically Enhanced NbC Nanocomposite Electrode Towards Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    KAUST Repository

    Coy, Emerson; Yate, Luis; Valencia, Drochss P; Aperador, Willian; Siuzdak, Katarzyna; Torruella, Pau; Azanza, Eduardo; Estrade, Sonia; Iatsunskyi, Igor; Peiró , Francesca; Zhang, Xixiang; Tejada, Javier; Ziolo, Ronald F.

    2017-01-01

    Resistant and efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) are desired to replace scarce and commercially expensive platinum electrodes. Thin film electrodes of metal-carbides are a promising alternative due to their reduced

  8. First-Principles Studies on Deoxidizing Mechanism of V2O5 via Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanning; Jin, Mengting

    With its high melting point, good plasticity and good corrosion resistance at low temperatures, vanadium has been widely used in the industries of iron and steel, aviation, energy storage, etc. However, the traditional manufacturing technologies of pure vanadium are usually connected with complex manufacturing processes, high costs and serious environment pollution, which more or less hindered its further applications. Recently, hydrogen gas has been considered as a promising reducing agent of V2O5, but experimental studies of deoxidization process of V2O5 single crystal surfaces were found to be extremely difficult. In this work, we perform extensive ab initio studies on the structural and electronic properties of different V2O5 surfaces, as well as the adsorption sites, diffusion and desorption processes of H on these surfaces as a dependence of depth. We found that H atoms adsorb at oxygen site to form surface hydroxyl (OH-) and further to form H2O on V2O5(010) surfaces, and the latter is easier to be desorbed compared with the former. But the desorption of H2O causes significant surface reconstructions, which makes the further deoxidization of V2O5 difficult, particularly on the V2O5 single-layer. Our theoretical results are instructive for understandings of the reduction mechanism of V2O5 by using a green agent of H2, and furthermore for the design of new experiments. Work was supported by the startup fund of China Thousand Young Talents, and National Basic Research Program of China (973 program, No: 2013CB934700). The calculations were supported by Tianhe2-JK in Beijing Computational Science Research Center.

  9. Demonstration of a chamber for strain mapping of steel specimens under mechanical load in a hydrogen environment by synchrotron radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Matthew; Park, Jun-Sang; Bradley, Peter; Lauria, Damian; Slifka, Andrew; Drexler, Elizabeth

    2018-06-01

    We demonstrate a hydrogen gas chamber suitable for lattice strain measurements and capturing radiographs of a steel specimen under a mechanical load using high energy synchrotron x-rays. The chamber is suitable for static and cyclic mechanical loading. Experiments were conducted at the 1-ID-E end station of the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. Diffraction patterns show a high signal-to-noise ratio suitable for lattice strain measurements for the specimen and with minimal scattering and overlap from the gas chamber manufactured from aluminum. In situ radiographs of a specimen in the hydrogen chamber show the ability to track a growing crack and to map the lattice strain around the crack with high spatial and strain resolution.

  10. On the ways of improving mechanical properties of boiler steels subject to hydrogen effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, V.I.; Litvin, A.K.; Zvezdin, Yu.I.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of oxygen on the strength properties of boiler steels Kh15M2 and 48TS subjected to heat treatment and preliminary plastic deformation has been studied. It is shown that changes in the strength properties of the steel are determined by the heterogeneity of its structure. Treatment which contributes to homogenization of the metal structure increases the resistance of the steel to detrimental effect of hydrogen. Absorption of hydrogen during cathode polarization at various current densities is shown

  11. Application of microscopy methods to the understanding of mechanisms involved in ilmenite reduction by hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Vries, M.; Grey, I.; Fitzgerald, J.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Titania pigment is one of the major drivers of the mineral sands industry with production of over 4 million tpa in 2002 for paints, plastics, paper and ceramics applications. The main feedstock for titania pigment production is ilmenite, FeTiO 3 . It is used either directly or after it has been upgraded to a higher titania content. The major commercial upgrading processes are electro smelting (titania slag) or high temperature char reduction followed by iron removal (synthetic rutile SR). Future ilmenite upgrading processes are likely to use low temperature hydrogen reduction according to reaction, followed by aeration of the metallic iron and acid leaching to produce a high grade SR (Nicholson et al, 2000). The commercial application of such a process requires a detailed knowledge of the kinetics of reaction. FeTiO 3 + H 2 = Fe(m) + TiO 2 + H 2 O. The kinetics of ilmenite reduction has been studied at CSIRO Minerals using a specially designed thermogravimetric apparatus built around a Cahn pressurised symmetrical beam balance. The kinetics have been measured as a function of different operating parameters such as temperature, gas velocity and pressure. The parameters were set so as to minimise mass transport effects and increase chemical reaction control and to ensure the reduction kinetics are outside the gas starvation region. Small samples were used that had been sintered at close to melting point to form large grains with low unconnected porosity. High flow rates of reactant gas were also used. The application of a range of microscopy techniques to the reduced samples at various stages of reaction conversion has been critical to the development of an understanding of the reaction mechanisms. From analysis of TEM, IFESEM and optical microscopy results it appears that initially, chemical reaction is rate controlling at the surface and as the reaction proceeds topochemically inwards then diffusion mechanisms increase their control. Reaction proceeds

  12. Mechanism of reduction in hydrogen atmosphere and thermal transformation of synthetic ferrihydrite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masina, C.J., E-mail: colani.masina@nmmu.ac.za [Centre for HRTEM, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Neethling, J.H.; Olivier, E.J. [Centre for HRTEM, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, P.O. Box 77000, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Ferg, E. [Department of Chemistry, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Manzini, S.; Lodya, L.; Mohlala, P.; Ngobeni, M.W. [Sasol Technology R and D, 1 Klasie Havenga Road, Sasolburg (South Africa)

    2015-01-10

    Highlights: • Magnetic measurements used to study thermal transformation of ferrihydrite. • Reduction mechanisms of ferrihydrite were monitored by TPR, MS, and in-situ XRD. • Nanocrystalline Fe was produced by the reducing ferrihydrite in H{sub 2}. • The presence of SiO{sub 2} in ferrihydrite alters the reduction pathway of ferrihydrite. - Abstract: The thermal transformation under vacuum and the reduction behavior in hydrogen atmosphere of 2- and 6-line ferrihydrite (FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O) as well as 2-line FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O deposited onto silica are reported. The investigation methods include magnetization measurements, temperature programmed reduction, in-situ X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The thermal transformation of FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O to hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) was monitored through changes in the magnetization as a function of temperature; it appears to proceed through the loss of the lattice water and sintering accompanied by improved crystallinity and structural changes. Such a transformation is initiated at T ∼ 580 K for 2-line and 6-line FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O and at T ∼ 660 K for 2-line FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2}, i.e., the presence of SiO{sub 2} appears to inhibit the transformation. SiO{sub 2} also tends to prevent the increase of the crystallite size above a certain threshold value. Reduction reactions are initiated at relatively lower temperatures (∼480 K) implying that a gaseous environment facilitates the thermal dehydration/dehydroxylation process. Three different reduction mechanisms of FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O to metallic iron (α-Fe) are observed: a two-stage process via magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) as an intermediate phase for 2-line FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O, a three-step reduction involving Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and wüstite (FeO) as intermediate phases for 2-line FeOOH·nH{sub 2}O/SiO{sub 2} and a thermal transformation to α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} followed by a two-step reduction via Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} intermediate for 6-line Fe

  13. Mechanism of reduction in hydrogen atmosphere and thermal transformation of synthetic ferrihydrite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masina, C.J.; Neethling, J.H.; Olivier, E.J.; Ferg, E.; Manzini, S.; Lodya, L.; Mohlala, P.; Ngobeni, M.W.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Magnetic measurements used to study thermal transformation of ferrihydrite. • Reduction mechanisms of ferrihydrite were monitored by TPR, MS, and in-situ XRD. • Nanocrystalline Fe was produced by the reducing ferrihydrite in H 2 . • The presence of SiO 2 in ferrihydrite alters the reduction pathway of ferrihydrite. - Abstract: The thermal transformation under vacuum and the reduction behavior in hydrogen atmosphere of 2- and 6-line ferrihydrite (FeOOH·nH 2 O) as well as 2-line FeOOH·nH 2 O deposited onto silica are reported. The investigation methods include magnetization measurements, temperature programmed reduction, in-situ X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy. The thermal transformation of FeOOH·nH 2 O to hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ) was monitored through changes in the magnetization as a function of temperature; it appears to proceed through the loss of the lattice water and sintering accompanied by improved crystallinity and structural changes. Such a transformation is initiated at T ∼ 580 K for 2-line and 6-line FeOOH·nH 2 O and at T ∼ 660 K for 2-line FeOOH·nH 2 O/SiO 2 , i.e., the presence of SiO 2 appears to inhibit the transformation. SiO 2 also tends to prevent the increase of the crystallite size above a certain threshold value. Reduction reactions are initiated at relatively lower temperatures (∼480 K) implying that a gaseous environment facilitates the thermal dehydration/dehydroxylation process. Three different reduction mechanisms of FeOOH·nH 2 O to metallic iron (α-Fe) are observed: a two-stage process via magnetite (Fe 3 O 4 ) as an intermediate phase for 2-line FeOOH·nH 2 O, a three-step reduction involving Fe 3 O 4 and wüstite (FeO) as intermediate phases for 2-line FeOOH·nH 2 O/SiO 2 and a thermal transformation to α-Fe 2 O 3 followed by a two-step reduction via Fe 3 O 4 intermediate for 6-line FeOOH·nH 2 O. It is inferred that SiO 2 interacts with Fe species to form Fe–O–Fe structures which tend

  14. ATRAP on the way to trapped Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Grzonka, D; Gabrielse, G; Goldenbaum, F; Hänsch, T W; Hessels, E A; Larochelle, P; Le Sage, D; Levitt, B; Oelert, W; Pittner, H; Sefzick, T; Speck, A; Storry, C H; Walz, J; Zhang, Z

    2005-01-01

    The ATRAP experiment at the CERN antiproton decelerator AD aims for a test of the CPT invariance by a high precision comparison of the 1s‐2s transition in the hydrogen and the antihydrogen atom. Antihydrogen production is routinely operated at ATRAP and detailed studies have been performed in order to optimize the production efficiency of useful antihydrogen. The shape parameters of the antiproton and positron clouds, the n‐state distribution of the produced Rydberg antihydrogen atoms and the antihydrogen velocity have been studied. Furthermore an alternative method of laser controlled antihydrogen production was successfully applied. For high precision measurements of atomic transitions cold antihydrogen in the ground state is required which must be trapped due to the low number of available antihydrogen atoms compared to the cold hydrogen beam used for hydrogen spectroscopy. To ensure a reasonable antihydrogen trapping efficiency a magnetic trap has to be superposed the nested Penning trap. First trappi...

  15. Antiphospholipid Antibodies Promote the Release of Neutrophil Extracellular Traps: A New Mechanism of Thrombosis in the Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Gould, Travis J.; Rao, Ashish N.; Mazza, Levi F.; Morris, Alexandra E.; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos; Hernández-Ramírez, Diego; Bockenstedt, Paula L.; Liaw, Patricia C.; Cabral, Antonio R.; Knight, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL), especially those targeting beta-2-glycoprotein I (β2GPI), are well known to activate endothelial cells, monocytes, and platelets, with prothrombotic implications. In contrast, the interaction of aPL with neutrophils has not been extensively studied. Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) have recently been recognized as an important activator of the coagulation cascade, as well as an integral component of arterial and venous thrombi. Here, we hypothesized that aPL might activate neutrophils to release NETs, thereby predisposing to the arterial and venous thrombosis inherent to the antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Methods Neutrophils, sera, and plasma were prepared and characterized from patients with primary APS (n=52), or from healthy volunteers. No patient carried a concomitant diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus. Results Sera and plasma from patients with primary APS have elevated levels of both cell-free DNA and NETs, as compared to healthy volunteers. Freshly-isolated APS neutrophils are predisposed to high levels of spontaneous NET release. Further, APS-patient sera, as well as IgG purified from APS patients, stimulate NET release from control neutrophils. Human aPL monoclonals, especially those targeting β2GPI, also enhance NET release. The induction of APS NETs can be abrogated with inhibitors of reactive oxygen species formation and toll-like receptor 4 signaling. Highlighting the potential clinical relevance of these findings, APS NETs promote thrombin generation. Conclusion Neutrophil NET release warrants further investigation as a novel therapeutic target in APS. PMID:26097119

  16. Reactions of plutonium dioxide with water and oxygen-hydrogen mixtures: Mechanisms for corrosion of uranium and plutonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haschke, John M.; Allen, Thomas H.; Morales, Luis A.

    1999-06-18

    Investigation of the interactions of plutonium dioxide with water vapor and with an oxygen-hydrogen mixture show that the oxide is both chemically reactive and catalytically active. Correspondence of the chemical behavior with that for oxidation of uranium in moist air suggests that similar catalytic processes participate in the mechanism of moisture-enhanced corrosion of uranium and plutonium. Evaluation of chemical and kinetic data for corrosion of the metals leads to a comprehensive mechanism for corrosion in dry air, water vapor, and moist air. Results are applied in confirming that the corrosion rate of Pu in water vapor decreases sharply between 100 and 200 degrees C.

  17. Hydrogen inhalation reduced epithelial apoptosis in ventilator-induced lung injury via a mechanism involving nuclear factor-kappa B activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chien-Sheng [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Taipei-Veterans General Hospital and National Yang-Ming University School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Kawamura, Tomohiro; Peng, Ximei [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tochigi, Naobumi [Department of Pathology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, PA (United States); Shigemura, Norihisa [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Billiar, Timothy R. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Nakao, Atsunori, E-mail: anakao@imap.pitt.edu [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Toyoda, Yoshiya [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2011-05-06

    Highlights: {yields} Hydrogen is a regulatory molecule with antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic protective effects. {yields} There is very limited information on the pathways regulated in vivo by the hydrogen. {yields} Antiapoptotic abilities of hydrogen were explained by upregulation of the antiapoptotic gene. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated antiapoptotic protein. {yields} NF{kappa}B activation associated with increase Bcl-2 may contribute to cytoprotection of hydrogen. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated the inhalation of hydrogen gas, a novel medical therapeutic gas, ameliorates ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI); however, the molecular mechanisms by which hydrogen ameliorates VILI remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated whether inhaled hydrogen gas modulates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF{kappa}B) signaling pathway. VILI was generated in male C57BL6 mice by performing a tracheostomy and placing the mice on a mechanical ventilator (tidal volume of 30 ml/kg or 10 ml/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure). The ventilator delivered either 2% nitrogen or 2% hydrogen in balanced air. NF{kappa}B activation, as indicated by NF{kappa}B DNA binding, was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hydrogen gas inhalation increased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 1 h of ventilation and decreased NF{kappa}B DNA binding after 2 h of ventilation, as compared with controls. The early activation of NF{kappa}B during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased levels of Bax. Hydrogen inhalation increased oxygen tension, decreased lung edema, and decreased the expression of proinflammatory mediators. Chemical inhibition of early NF{kappa}B activation using SN50 reversed these protective effects. NF{kappa}B activation and an associated increase in the expression of Bcl-2 may contribute, in part, to the

  18. Hydrogen inhalation reduced epithelial apoptosis in ventilator-induced lung injury via a mechanism involving nuclear factor-kappa B activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Chien-Sheng; Kawamura, Tomohiro; Peng, Ximei; Tochigi, Naobumi; Shigemura, Norihisa; Billiar, Timothy R.; Nakao, Atsunori; Toyoda, Yoshiya

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Hydrogen is a regulatory molecule with antiinflammatory and antiapoptotic protective effects. → There is very limited information on the pathways regulated in vivo by the hydrogen. → Antiapoptotic abilities of hydrogen were explained by upregulation of the antiapoptotic gene. → NFκB activation during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated antiapoptotic protein. → NFκB activation associated with increase Bcl-2 may contribute to cytoprotection of hydrogen. -- Abstract: We recently demonstrated the inhalation of hydrogen gas, a novel medical therapeutic gas, ameliorates ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI); however, the molecular mechanisms by which hydrogen ameliorates VILI remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated whether inhaled hydrogen gas modulates the nuclear factor-kappa B (NFκB) signaling pathway. VILI was generated in male C57BL6 mice by performing a tracheostomy and placing the mice on a mechanical ventilator (tidal volume of 30 ml/kg or 10 ml/kg without positive end-expiratory pressure). The ventilator delivered either 2% nitrogen or 2% hydrogen in balanced air. NFκB activation, as indicated by NFκB DNA binding, was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Hydrogen gas inhalation increased NFκB DNA binding after 1 h of ventilation and decreased NFκB DNA binding after 2 h of ventilation, as compared with controls. The early activation of NFκB during hydrogen treatment was correlated with elevated levels of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 and decreased levels of Bax. Hydrogen inhalation increased oxygen tension, decreased lung edema, and decreased the expression of proinflammatory mediators. Chemical inhibition of early NFκB activation using SN50 reversed these protective effects. NFκB activation and an associated increase in the expression of Bcl-2 may contribute, in part, to the cytoprotective effects of hydrogen against apoptotic and inflammatory signaling pathway

  19. Role of hydrogen in the intergranular cracking mechanism by stress corrosion in primary medium of nickel based alloys 600 and 690

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odemer, G.; Coudurier, A.; Jambon, F.; Chene, J.; Odemer, G.; Coudurier, A.; Chene, J.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this work is to characterize the sensitivity to hydrogen embrittlement of alloys 600 and 690 in order to better understand the eventual role of hydrogen in the stress corrosion mechanism which affects these alloys when they are exposed in PWR primary medium. (O.M.)

  20. Ripple Trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    3 April 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the margin of a lava flow on a cratered plain in the Athabasca Vallis region of Mars. Remarkably, the cratered plain in this scene is essentially free of bright, windblown ripples. Conversely, the lava flow apparently acted as a trap for windblown materials, illustrated by the presence of the light-toned, wave-like texture over much of the flow. That the lava flow surface trapped windblown sand and granules better than the cratered plain indicates that the flow surface has a rougher texture at a scale too small to resolve in this image. Location near: 10.7oN, 204.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Winter

  1. Theoretical study on platinum-catalyzed isotope exchange reaction mechanism of hydrogen and liquid water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Sheng; Wang Heyi; Luo Shunzhong

    2009-04-01

    Based on electron and vibration approximate means and the density function theory B3LYP, the ΔG degree and equilibrium pressures of adsorption and dissociation reactions of H 2 and water vapor on Pt surface have been calculated. The adsorption, dissociation and coadsorption actions of H 2 and water were analyzed. According to the ΔG degree, hydrogen molecule combines with metal atoms in single atom, and water vapor molecule has no tendency to dissociate on Pt surface. The dissociation of hydrogen molecule would hold back the direct adsorption of water vapor molecules on Pt surface. The structures of Pt-H (OH 2 ) n + (n=1, 2, 3) hydroniums were optimized. According to the mulliken overlap populations, Pt-H (OH 2 ) + is not stable or produced. Hydrogen isotope exchange occurs between hydration layer and D atoms which adsorb on Pt surface via intermediates (H 2 O) n D + (ads) (n≥2). (authors)

  2. PmaCO2 Project: Porosity and CO2 Trapping Mechanisms The Utrillas Formation in SD-1 borehole (Tejada - Burgos): Porosity and Porous Media Modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, R.; Barrios, I.; Gonzalez, A. M.

    2013-02-01

    The aim of PmaCO 2 project, supported by the Secretary of State and Research MINECO (CGL2011-24768) is to increase the knowledge of the microstructure of porous storage formations and thus contribute to the viability of CO 2 sequestration in geological formations. The microporous structure plays an important role not only in the prevalence of a particular trapping mechanism, but also on the amount of CO 2 immobilized. Utrillas facies are investigated in this project as representatives of a deep saline aquifer storage. This publication is a summary of the work done in the first year of the project. We present a study on microstructure of sandstones Utrillas, sampled in borehole, by applying the mercury intrusion porosimetry technique for the experimental determination of porosity and associated parameters. The porous medium was modeled with the PoreCor simulation code based in intrusion-extrusion curves. (Author) 78 refs.

  3. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps in the Amniotic Cavity of Women with Intra-Amniotic Infection: A New Mechanism of Host Defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; Romero, Roberto; Xu, Yi; Miller, Derek; Unkel, Ronald; Shaman, Majid; Jacques, Suzanne M; Panaitescu, Bogdan; Garcia-Flores, Valeria; Hassan, Sonia S

    2017-08-01

    Neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) control microbial infections through their antimicrobial activities attributed to DNA, histones, granules, and cytoplasmic proteins (eg, elastase). Intra-amniotic infection is characterized by the influx of neutrophils into the amniotic cavity; therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether amniotic fluid neutrophils form NETs in this inflammatory process. Amniotic fluid samples from women with intra-amniotic infection (n = 15) were stained for bacteria detection using fluorescent dyes. Amniotic fluid neutrophils were purified by filtration. As controls, neutrophils from maternal blood samples (n = 3) were isolated by density gradients. Isolated neutrophils were plated onto glass cover slips for culture with and without 100 nM of phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA). NET formation was assessed by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining and scanning electron microscopy. Different stages of NET formation were visualized using antibodies against elastase and histone H3, in combination with DAPI staining, by confocal microscopy. Finally, maternal or neonatal neutrophils were added to amniotic fluid samples from women without intra-amniotic infection (n = 4), and NET formation was evaluated by DAPI staining. (1) NETs were present in the amniotic fluid of women with intra-amniotic infection; (2) all of the amniotic fluid samples had detectable live and dead bacteria associated with the presence of NETs; (3) in contrast to neutrophils from the maternal circulation, amniotic fluid neutrophils did not require PMA stimulation to form NETs; (4) different stages of NET formation were observed by co-localizing elastase, histone H3, and DNA in amniotic fluid neutrophils; and (5) neither maternal nor neonatal neutrophils form NETs in the amniotic fluid of women without intra-amniotic infection. NETs are detectable in the amniotic fluid of women with intra-amniotic infection.

  4. Kinetics, isotope effects, and mechanism for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on supported nickel catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, T.; Masuda, H.; Imai, H.; Miyamoto, A.; Baba, S.; Murakami, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Kinetics and hydrogen-deuterium isotope effects in the methanation of adsorbed CO molecules on a Ni/SiO 2 catalyst were precisely measured by using pulse surface reaction rate analysis (PSRA). When a CO pulse was injected into flowing hydrogen, it was immediately adsorbed on the catalyst and gradually hydrogenated to CH 4 and H 2 O. The amounts of CH 4 and H 2 O produced by the hydrogenation of the adsorbed CO were determined up to various times, and it was found that CH 4 and H 2 O were produced at the same rate. When O 2 instead of CO was injected, H 2 O was immediately produced. From these results, the rate-determining step of the reaction was found to be C-O bond dissociation of an adsorbed CO molecule or a partially hydrogenated CO species. By PSRA, the rate constant for the C-O bond dissocition process per adsorbed CO molecule (k/sub H/) was determined at various temperatures, and the Arrhenius parameters of the rate constant were obtained. The rate constant in flowing deuterium (k/sub D/) was also determined. it was found that k/sub D/ is considerably larger than k/sub H/, indicating an inverse isotope effect. The average value of k/sub H//k/sub D/ was 0.75. From these results, it was concluded that adsorbed CO is not directly dissociated to surface carbon and oxygen atoms but it is partially hydrogenated before C-O bond dissociation under the conditions of the PSRA experiment. 8 figures

  5. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  6. Effects of neutral sodium hydrogen phosphate on setting reaction and mechanical strength of hydroxyapatite putty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, K; Miyamoto, Y; Takechi, M; Ueyama, Y; Suzuki, K; Nagayama, M; Matsumura, T

    1999-03-05

    The setting reaction and mechanical strength in terms of diametral tensile strength (DTS) of hydroxyapatite (HAP) putty made of tetracalcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate anhydrous, and neutral sodium hydrogen phosphate (Na1.8H1.2PO4) solution containing 8 wt % sodium alginate were evaluated as a function of the Na1.8H1.2PO4 concentration. In one condition, HAP putty was placed in an incubator kept at 37 degrees C and 100% relative humidity. In the other condition, immediately after mixing HAP putty was immersed in serum kept at 37 degrees C. Longer setting times and lower DTS values were observed when HAP putty was immersed in serum regardless of the Na1.8H1.2PO4 concentration. The setting times of the HAP putty in both conditions became shorter with an increase in the Na1. 8H1.2PO4 concentration, reaching approximately 7-13 min when the Na1. 8H1.2PO4 concentration was 0.6 mol/L or higher. The DTS value of HAP putty was relatively constant (10 MPa) regardless of the Na1.8H1. 2PO4 concentration (0.2-1.0 mol/L) when HAP putty was kept in an incubator. In contrast, when HAP putty was immersed in serum, the DTS value was dependent on the Na1.8H1.2PO4 concentration. It increased with the Na1.8H1.2PO4 concentration and reached approximately 5 MPa when the Na1.8H1.2PO4 concentration was 0.6 mol/L, after which it showed a relatively constant DTS value. We therefore would recommend a HAP putty that uses 0.6 mol/L Na1.8H1. 2PO4 since at that concentration the putty's setting time (approximately 10 min) is proper for clinical use and it shows good DTS value (approximately 5 MPa) even when it is immersed in serum immediately after mixing. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  7. A quantum mechanical model of Rabi oscillations between two interacting harmonic oscillator modes and the interconversion of modes in a Penning trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kretzschmar, Martin

    1999-01-01

    When a Penning trap is operated with an additional quadrupole driving field with a frequency that equals a suitable combination (sum or difference) of the frequencies of the fundamental modes of motion (modified cyclotron, magnetron and axial frequency), then a periodic conversion of the participating modes into each other is observed, strongly resembling the Rabi oscillations in a 2-level atom driven by a laser field tuned to the transition frequency. This investigation attempts to understand on a fundamental level how and why the motion of a classical particle in a macroscopic apparatus can be truely analogous to the oscillations of states of quantum mechanical 2-level systems (2-level atom or magnetic resonance). Ion motion in a Penning trap with an additional quadrupole driving field is described in a quantum mechanical frame work. The Heisenberg equations of motion for the creation and annihilation operators of the interacting oscillators have been explicitly solved, the time development operator of the Schroedinger picture has been determined. The driving field provides for two types of intermode interaction: Type I preserves the total number of excitation quanta present in the two interacting modes, the system oscillates between the modes with a frequency corresponding to the Rabi frequency in two-level systems. Type II preserves the difference of the numbers of excitation quanta present in the two interacting modes, it causes the ion motion to become unbounded. The two types of interaction are associated in a natural way with a SU(2) and a SU(1,1) Lie algebra. The three generators of these algebras form a vector operator that we denote as the Bloch vector operator. The Hilbert space decomposes in a natural way into invariant subspaces, finite dimensional in the case of type I interaction (SU(2)-algebra) and infinite dimensional in the case of type II interaction (SU(1,1)-algebra). The physics of the 2-level atom in the laser field can be described in the 2

  8. Migration of the guinea pig sperm membrane protein PH-20 from one localized surface domain to another does not occur by a simple diffusion-trapping mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowan, A E; Myles, D G; Koppel, D E

    1991-03-01

    The redistribution of membrane proteins on the surface of cells is a prevalent feature of differentiation in a variety of cells. In most cases the mechanism responsible for such redistribution is poorly understood. Two potential mechanisms for the redistribution of surface proteins are: (1) passive diffusion coupled with trapping, and (2) active translocation. We have studied the process of membrane protein redistribution for the PH-20 protein of guinea pig sperm, a surface protein required for sperm binding to the egg zona pellucida (P. Primakoff, H. Hyatt, and D. G. Myles (1985). J. Cell Biol. 101, 2239-2244). PH-20 protein is localized to the posterior head plasma menbrane of the mature sperm cell. Following the exocytotic acrosome reaction, PH-20 protein moves into the newly incorporated inner acrosomal membrane (IAM), placing it in a position favorable for a role in binding sperm to the egg zona pellucida (D. G. Myles, and P. Primakoff (1984), J. Cell Biol. 99, 1634-1641). To analyze the mechanistic basis for this protein migration, we have used fluorescence microscopy and digital image processing to characterize PH-20 protein migration in individual cells. PH-20 protein was observed to move against a concentration gradient in the posterior head plasma membrane. This result argues strongly against a model of passive diffusion followed by trapping in the IAM, and instead suggests that an active process serves to concentrate PH-20 protein toward the boundary separating the posterior head and IAM regions. A transient gradient of PH-20 concentration observed in the IAM suggests that once PH-20 protein reaches the IAM, it is freely diffusing. Additionally, we observed that migration of PH-20 protein was calcium dependent.

  9. Mechanical measurement of hydrogen bonded host-guest systems under non-equilibrium, near-physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Teresa; Cerrón, Fernando; Nieto-Ortega, Belén; Latorre, Alfonso; Somoza, Álvaro; Ibarra, Borja; Pérez, Emilio M

    2017-09-01

    Decades after the birth of supramolecular chemistry, there are many techniques to measure noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, under equilibrium conditions. As ensembles of molecules rapidly lose coherence, we cannot extrapolate bulk data to single-molecule events under non-equilibrium conditions, more relevant to the dynamics of biological systems. We present a new method that exploits the high force resolution of optical tweezers to measure at the single molecule level the mechanical strength of a hydrogen bonded host-guest pair out of equilibrium and under near-physiological conditions. We utilize a DNA reporter to unambiguously isolate single binding events. The Hamilton receptor-cyanuric acid host-guest system is used as a test bed. The force required to dissociate the host-guest system is ∼17 pN and increases with the pulling rate as expected for a system under non-equilibrium conditions. Blocking one of the hydrogen bonding sites results in a significant decrease of the force-to-break by 1-2 pN, pointing out the ability of the method to resolve subtle changes in the mechanical strength of the binding due to the individual H-bonding components. We believe the method will prove to be a versatile tool to address important questions in supramolecular chemistry.

  10. Proposed formation mechanism and active species of hydrogen molecules generated from a novel magnesium-citric acid-hydroxypropyl cellulose coating (MgCC) material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Shigeki; Chikuma, Toshiyuki; Chiba, Kazuyoshi; Tsuchiya, Daisuke; Hirai, Tomomitsu

    2016-02-01

    The presence of acids is known to accelerate the reaction (Mg + 2H2O = Mg(OH)2 + H2). We developed a novel Mg-citric acid coating (MgCC) material produced by milling Mg powder coated with hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC); because of its H2 generation, this material could be used in antioxidant therapy and antiaging applications. After milling in the presence of citric acid, this material produced H2-rich water upon addition to cooled water. Although the reaction was considered to involve a two-electron transfer from Mg to 2H2O, the role of the acid in H2 generation remains incompletely understood. To clarify the reaction mechanism, we performed studies on the deuterium kinetic isotope effects (KIE) and electron spin resonance (ESR). We observed differences in the concentration ratios, such as H2/D2 > 1 and H2/(H2 + D2 + HD) > 1, involved in H2, D2, and (H2 + D2 + HD) production, and found that adducts with hydrogen atoms (Hrad) were not obtained from the spin-trapping reaction between 5-(2, 2-Dimethyl-1,3-propoxy cyclophosphoryl)-5-methyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (CYPMPO) and the MgCC material. The H2, D2, and HD produced from MgCC were identified by using a gas chromatograph connected to a mass spectrometer. The spin-trapping techniques showed that the Hrad adducts formed by the reaction of NaBH4 with CYPMPO could not be observed from reaction of MGCC with CYPMPO in H2O. The data suggest that the rate-controlling step and proposed transition state (TS) exist in the reaction pathway of the O-H bond cleavage and H-H bond formation. A TS of a structure such as [Mg(OH2)2]∗ could be expected in the reaction pathway between Mg and 2H2O by density functional theory calculations. Also, these results show that H2 generation is accelerated in the presence of acids because the activation energy of the TS is significantly smaller than that of H2O.

  11. Structural, optical, mechanical and density functional theory studies of 1H-pyrazol-2-ium hydrogen oxalate crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devi, P. Karthiga, E-mail: karthvi19@gmail.com; Venkatachalam, K.

    2016-11-01

    In the present work, we have grown 1H- pyrazol-2-ium hydrogen oxalate single crystal by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The lattice parameters are determined from single crystal X ray diffraction studies. The functional groups present in the compound are confirmed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. UV-Vis analysis shows that the crystal has a wide transparency window. Vicker's hardness test has been carried out to estimate the stiffness constant, fracture toughness, brittleness index and yield strength of the crystal. Density functional study B3LYP method at 6-31 G (d, p) has been performed to study the optimized structure, HOMO-LUMO energy gap, hyperpolarizability and thermodynamic properties. - Highlights: • The title compound was analyzed using FTIR and UV–Vis spectroscopy. • Mechanical study was carried out using Vicker's hardness test. • Optimized molecular geometry was determined using DFT method. • Hydrogen bonding interaction was studied through NBO analysis.

  12. Practical Aspects and Mechanism of Asymmetric Hydrogenation with Chiral Half-Sandwich Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Václavík, J.; Šot, P.; Vilhanová, B.; Pecháček, J.; Kuzma, Marek; Kačer, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 6 (2013), s. 6804-6828 ISSN 1420-3049 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/1497; GA ČR GAP106/12/1276 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : asymmetric hydrogenation * ruthenium * reaction conditions Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.095, year: 2013

  13. Interaction of hydrogen and oxygen with bulk defects and surfaces of metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besenbacher, F.

    1994-05-01

    The thesis deals with the interaction of hydrogen with defects in metals and the interaction of hydrogen and oxygen with metal surfaces studied by ion-beam techniques and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), respectively. The first part of the thesis discusses the interaction of hydrogen with simple defects in transition metals. The trap-binding enthalpies and the lattice location of hydrogen trapped to vacancies have been determined, and an extremely simple and versatile picture of the hydrogen-metal interaction has evolved, in which the trap strength is mainly determined by the local electron density. Any dilution of the lattice will lead to a trap, vacancies and voids being the strongest trap. It is found that hydrogen trapped to vacancies in fcc metals is quantum-mechanically delocalized, and the excitation energies for the hydrogen in the vacancy potential are a few MeV only. The interaction of hydrogen with metal surfaces is studied by the transmission channeling (TC) technique. It is found that hydrogen chemisorbs in the highest-coordinated sites on the surfaces, and that there is a direct relationship between the hydrogen-metal bond length and the coordination number for the hydrogen. In the final part of the thesis the dynamics of the chemisorption process for oxygen and hydrogen on metal surfaces is studied by STM, a fascinating and powerful technique for exploring the atomic-scale realm of surfaces. It is found that there is a strong coupling between the chemisorption process and the distortion of the metal surface. The adsorbates induce a surface reconstruction, i.e. metal-metal bond breaks and metal-adsorbate bounds form. Whereas hydrogen interacts weakly with the metals and induces reconstructions where only nnn metals bonds are broken, oxygen interacts strongly with the metal, and the driving force for the O-induced reconstructions appears to be the formation of low-coordinated metal-O rows, formed by breaking of nn metal bonds. Finally it is shown

  14. Stable carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis of methyl tert-butyl ether and tert-amyl methyl ether by purge and trap-gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry: method evaluation and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawinski, Dorothea M; Stephan, Manuel; Jochmann, Maik A; Krajenke, Karen; Haas, Joe; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2010-01-01

    In order to monitor the behaviour of contaminants in the aqueous environment effective enrichment techniques often have to be employed due to their low concentrations. In this work a robust and sensitive purge and trap-gas chromatography-isotope ratio mass spectrometry method for carbon and hydrogen isotope analysis of fuel oxygenates in water is presented. The method evaluation included the determination of method detection limits, accuracy and reproducibility of deltaD and delta(13)C values. Lowest concentrations at which reliable delta(13)C values could be determined were 5 microg L(-1) and 28 microg L(-1) for TAME and MTBE, respectively. Stable deltaD values for MTBE and TAME could be achieved for concentrations as low as 25 and 50 microg L(-1). Good long-term reproducibility of delta(13)C and deltaD values was obtained for all target compounds. But deltaD values varying more than 5 per thousand were observed using different thermal conversion tubes. Thus, a correction of deltaD values in the analysis of groundwater samples was necessary to guarantee comparability of the results. The applicability of this method was shown by the analysis of groundwater samples from a gasoline contaminated site. By two dimensional isotope analysis two locations within this site were identified at which anaerobic and aerobic degradation of methyl tert-butyl ether occurred.

  15. Gate-bias controlled charge trapping as a mechanism for NO2 detection with field-effect transistors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andringa, A.-M.; Meijboom, J.R.; Smits, E.C.P.; Mathijssen, S.G.J.; Blom, P.W.M.; Leeuw, D.M. de

    2011-01-01

    Detection of nitrogen dioxide, NO2, is required to monitor the air-quality for human health and safety. Commercial sensors are typically chemiresistors, however field-effect transistors are being investigated. Although numerous investigations have been reported, the NO2 sensing mechanism is not

  16. Spin resonance with trapped ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunderlich, Ch; Balzer, Ch; Hannemann, T; Mintert, F; Neuhauser, W; Reiss, D; Toschek, P E [Institut fuer Laser-Physik, Universitaet Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 9, 20355 Hamburg (Germany)

    2003-03-14

    A modified ion trap is described where experiments (in particular related to quantum information processing) that usually require optical radiation can be carried out using microwave or radio frequency electromagnetic fields. Instead of applying the usual methods for coherent manipulation of trapped ions, a string of ions in such a modified trap can be treated like a molecule in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments taking advantage of spin-spin coupling. The collection of trapped ions can be viewed as an N-qubit molecule with adjustable spin-spin coupling constants. Given N identically prepared quantum mechanical two-level systems (qubits), the optimal strategy to estimate their quantum state requires collective measurements. Using the ground state hyperfine levels of electrodynamically trapped {sup 171}Yb{sup +}, we have implemented an adaptive algorithm for state estimation involving sequential measurements on arbitrary qubit states.

  17. Spin resonance with trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wunderlich, Ch; Balzer, Ch; Hannemann, T; Mintert, F; Neuhauser, W; Reiss, D; Toschek, P E

    2003-01-01

    A modified ion trap is described where experiments (in particular related to quantum information processing) that usually require optical radiation can be carried out using microwave or radio frequency electromagnetic fields. Instead of applying the usual methods for coherent manipulation of trapped ions, a string of ions in such a modified trap can be treated like a molecule in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments taking advantage of spin-spin coupling. The collection of trapped ions can be viewed as an N-qubit molecule with adjustable spin-spin coupling constants. Given N identically prepared quantum mechanical two-level systems (qubits), the optimal strategy to estimate their quantum state requires collective measurements. Using the ground state hyperfine levels of electrodynamically trapped 171 Yb + , we have implemented an adaptive algorithm for state estimation involving sequential measurements on arbitrary qubit states

  18. Phenomenological study and modeling of tritium trapping in tritiated waste drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le-Floch, Anais

    2016-01-01

    ITER (International Tokamak Experimental Reactor) is a fusion machine which should demonstrate scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy by means of D-T fusion reaction. Therefore, most of the solid radioactive waste produced during operation and dismantling phase (around 34000 tons) will result not only from activation by 14 MeV neutrons, but also from contamination by tritium. One of the main issues in tritiated waste management is the confinement of tritium which presents a good ability to diffusion. One of the solutions is to trap the tritium directly in waste drums. In containers tritium is under gaseous form (HT and T_2), tritiated water vapor (HTO and T_2O) and organic bounded tritium species (OBT). as an hydrogen isotope, HT and T_2 trapping and conversion is possible thanks to a reaction with a mix of metal oxides MnO_2 and Ag_2O, which can be used for hydrogen hazards mitigation. an experimental study was conducted at the CEA on the study of tritium trapping by a mixture of 90% of manganese oxide and 10% of silver oxide. The tests showed that the addition of Pt and Pd catalysts did not improve the trapping capacity of the powder mixture, such as impregnation of the powder mixture when preparing the mixture, with solutions of KOH or NaOH. Crystal-chemical analysis revealed the formation of a mixed oxide in the preparation of powders, questioning the mechanisms previously established. Two new mechanisms have been proposed and a model on the trapping kinetics was presented. The results of modeling the competition between the trapping phenomenon and the diffusion of tritium through the wall of the waste package showed that the trapper decreased the value of the quantity of tritiated hydrogen degassed from the package. (author) [fr

  19. Influence of trap location on the efficiency of trapping in dendrimers and regular hyperbranched polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Zhongzhi

    2013-03-07

    The trapping process in polymer systems constitutes a fundamental mechanism for various other dynamical processes taking place in these systems. In this paper, we study the trapping problem in two representative polymer networks, Cayley trees and Vicsek fractals, which separately model dendrimers and regular hyperbranched polymers. Our goal is to explore the impact of trap location on the efficiency of trapping in these two important polymer systems, with the efficiency being measured by the average trapping time (ATT) that is the average of source-to-trap mean first-passage time over every staring point in the whole networks. For Cayley trees, we derive an exact analytic formula for the ATT to an arbitrary trap node, based on which we further obtain the explicit expression of ATT for the case that the trap is uniformly distributed. For Vicsek fractals, we provide the closed-form solution for ATT to a peripheral node farthest from the central node, as well as the numerical solutions for the case when the trap is placed on other nodes. Moreover, we derive the exact formula for the ATT corresponding to the trapping problem when the trap has a uniform distribution over all nodes. Our results show that the influence of trap location on the trapping efficiency is completely different for the two polymer networks. In Cayley trees, the leading scaling of ATT increases with the shortest distance between the trap and the central node, implying that trap's position has an essential impact on the trapping efficiency; while in Vicsek fractals, the effect of location of the trap is negligible, since the dominant behavior of ATT is identical, respective of the location where the trap is placed. We also present that for all cases of trapping problems being studied, the trapping process is more efficient in Cayley trees than in Vicsek fractals. We demonstrate that all differences related to trapping in the two polymer systems are rooted in their underlying topological structures.

  20. Hydrogen transport behavior of beryllium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderl, R.A.; Hankins, M.R.; Longhurst, G.R.; Pawelko, R.J. (Idaho National Engineering Lab., EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Macaulay-Newcombe, R.G. (Dept. of Engineering Physics, Univ. Hamilton, ON (Canada))

    1992-12-01

    Beryllium is being evaluated for use as a plasma-facing material in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). One concern in the evaluation is the retention and permeation of tritium implanted into the plasma-facing surface. We performed laboratory-scale studies to investigate mechanisms that influence hydrogen transport and retention in beryllium foil specimens of rolled powder metallurgy product and rolled ingot cast beryllium. Specimen characterization was accomplished using scanning electron microscopy. Auger electron spectroscopy, and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) techniques. Hydrogen transport was investigated using ion-beam permeation experiments and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA). Results indicate that trapping plays a significant role in permeation, re-emission, and retention, and that surface processes at both upstream and downstream surfaces are also important. (orig.).

  1. Trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Andresen, G B; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Jonsell, S; Jørgensen, L V; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Seif el Nasr, S; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2010-01-01

    Antimatter was first predicted in 1931, by Dirac. Work with highenergy antiparticles is now commonplace, and anti-electrons are used regularly in the medical technique of positron emission tomography scanning. Antihydrogen, the bound state of an antiproton and a positron, has been produced at low energies at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) since 2002. Antihydrogen is of interest for use in a precision test of nature’s fundamental symmetries. The charge conjugation/parity/time reversal (CPT) theorem, a crucial part of the foundation of the standard model of elementary particles and interactions, demands that hydrogen and antihydrogen have the same spectrum. Given the current experimental precision of measurements on the hydrogen atom (about two parts in 1014 for the frequency of the 1s-to-2s transition), subjecting antihydrogen to rigorous spectroscopic examination would constitute a compelling, model-independent test of CPT. Antihydrogen could also be used to study the gravitational be...

  2. Passivation mechanism in silicon heterojunction solar cells with intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligiannis, Dimitrios; van Vliet, Jeroen; Vasudevan, Ravi; van Swaaij, René A. C. M. M.; Zeman, Miro

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we use intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon oxide layers (a-SiOx:H) with varying oxygen content (cO) but similar hydrogen content to passivate the crystalline silicon wafers. Using our deposition conditions, we obtain an effective lifetime (τeff) above 5 ms for cO ≤ 6 at. % for passivation layers with a thickness of 36 ± 2 nm. We subsequently reduce the thickness of the layers using an accurate wet etching method to ˜7 nm and deposit p- and n-type doped layers fabricating a device structure. After the deposition of the doped layers, τeff appears to be predominantly determined by the doped layers themselves and is less dependent on the cO of the a-SiOx:H layers. The results suggest that τeff is determined by the field-effect rather than by chemical passivation.

  3. Injection into electron plasma traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorgadze, Vladimir; Pasquini, Thomas A.; Fajans, Joel; Wurtele, Jonathan S.

    2003-01-01

    Computational studies and experimental measurements of plasma injection into a Malmberg-Penning trap reveal that the number of trapped particles can be an order of magnitude higher than predicted by a simple estimates based on a ballistic trapping model. Enhanced trapping is associated with a rich nonlinear dynamics generated by the space-charge forces of the evolving trapped electron density. A particle-in-cell simulation is used to identify the physical mechanisms that lead to the increase in trapped electrons. The simulations initially show strong two-stream interactions between the electrons emitted from the cathode and those reflected off the end plug of the trap. This is followed by virtual cathode oscillations near the injection region. As electrons are trapped, the initially hollow longitudinal phase-space is filled, and the transverse radial density profile evolves so that the plasma potential matches that of the cathode. Simple theoretical arguments are given that describe the different dynamical regimes. Good agreement is found between simulation and theory

  4. On the mechanism of hydrogen evolution catalysis by proteins: A case study with bovine serum albumin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Doneux, T.; Ostatná, Veronika; Paleček, Emil

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 25 (2011), s. 9337-9343 ISSN 0013-4686 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ME09038; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Grant - others:GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/11/2055 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : hydrogen evolution reaction * mediated catalysis * proton transfer Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.832, year: 2011

  5. Study of mechanisms of hydrogen diffusion in separation devices. Third annual report, 1979-1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M.H.

    1980-01-01

    The main results are in the following three areas: (1) examination of a diffusion model for PdH system, (2) connection between the diffusion model and other physical models, (3) related problems. Advances made during the third year of this project, particularly in understanding the physical model for hydrogen diffusion, make it possible to begin to meet some of the long-range objectives described in the initial proposals of 1977-1978

  6. Electron beam exposure mechanisms in hydrogen silsesquioxane investigated by vibrational spectroscopy and in-situ electron beam induced desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olynick, D.L.; Cord, B.; Schipotinin, A.; Ogletree, D.F.; Schuck, P.J.

    2009-11-13

    Hydrogen Silsesquioxane (HSQ) is used as a high-resolution resist with resolution down below 10nm half-pitch. This material or materials with related functionalities could have widespread impact in nanolithography and nanoscience applications if the exposure mechanism was understood and instabilities controlled. Here we have directly investigated the exposure mechanism using vibrational spectroscopy (both Raman and Fourier transform Infrared) and electron beam desorption spectrocscopy (EBDS). In the non-networked HSQ system, silicon atoms sit at the corners of a cubic structure. Each silicon is bonded to a hydrogen atom and bridges 3 oxygen atoms (formula: HSiO3/2). For the first time, we have shown, via changes in the Si-H2 peak at ~;;2200 cm -1 in the Raman spectra and the release of SiHx products in EBID, that electron-bam exposed materials crosslinks via a redistribution reaction. In addition, we observe the release of significantly more H2 than SiH2 during EBID, which is indicative of additional reaction mechanisms. Additionally, we compare the behavior of HSQ in response to both thermal and electron-beam induced reactions.

  7. Microstructure factor and mechanical and electronic properties of hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin-films for microelectromechanical systems applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouro, J.; Gualdino, A.; Chu, V.; Conde, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Thin-film silicon allows the fabrication of MEMS devices at low processing temperatures, compatible with monolithic integration in advanced electronic circuits, on large-area, low-cost, and flexible substrates. The most relevant thin-film properties for applications as MEMS structural layers are the deposition rate, electrical conductivity, and mechanical stress. In this work, n + -type doped hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin-films were deposited by RF-PECVD, and the influence of the hydrogen dilution in the reactive mixture, the RF-power coupled to the plasma, the substrate temperature, and the deposition pressure on the structural, electrical, and mechanical properties of the films was studied. Three different types of silicon films were identified, corresponding to three internal structures: (i) porous amorphous silicon, deposited at high rates and presenting tensile mechanical stress and low electrical conductivity, (ii) dense amorphous silicon, deposited at intermediate rates and presenting compressive mechanical stress and higher values of electrical conductivity, and (iii) nanocrystalline silicon, deposited at very low rates and presenting the highest compressive mechanical stress and electrical conductivity. These results show the combinations of electromechanical material properties available in silicon thin-films and thus allow the optimized selection of a thin silicon film for a given MEMS application. Four representative silicon thin-films were chosen to be used as structural material of electrostatically actuated MEMS microresonators fabricated by surface micromachining. The effect of the mechanical stress of the structural layer was observed to have a great impact on the device resonance frequency, quality factor, and actuation force

  8. Microstructure factor and mechanical and electronic properties of hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin-films for microelectromechanical systems applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouro, J.; Gualdino, A.; Chu, V. [Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores – Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias (INESC-MN) and IN – Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal); Conde, J. P. [Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores – Microsistemas e Nanotecnologias (INESC-MN) and IN – Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal); Department of Bioengineering, Instituto Superior Técnico (IST), 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2013-11-14

    Thin-film silicon allows the fabrication of MEMS devices at low processing temperatures, compatible with monolithic integration in advanced electronic circuits, on large-area, low-cost, and flexible substrates. The most relevant thin-film properties for applications as MEMS structural layers are the deposition rate, electrical conductivity, and mechanical stress. In this work, n{sup +}-type doped hydrogenated amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon thin-films were deposited by RF-PECVD, and the influence of the hydrogen dilution in the reactive mixture, the RF-power coupled to the plasma, the substrate temperature, and the deposition pressure on the structural, electrical, and mechanical properties of the films was studied. Three different types of silicon films were identified, corresponding to three internal structures: (i) porous amorphous silicon, deposited at high rates and presenting tensile mechanical stress and low electrical conductivity, (ii) dense amorphous silicon, deposited at intermediate rates and presenting compressive mechanical stress and higher values of electrical conductivity, and (iii) nanocrystalline silicon, deposited at very low rates and presenting the highest compressive mechanical stress and electrical conductivity. These results show the combinations of electromechanical material properties available in silicon thin-films and thus allow the optimized selection of a thin silicon film for a given MEMS application. Four representative silicon thin-films were chosen to be used as structural material of electrostatically actuated MEMS microresonators fabricated by surface micromachining. The effect of the mechanical stress of the structural layer was observed to have a great impact on the device resonance frequency, quality factor, and actuation force.

  9. Influence of hydrogen and test temperature on mechanical properties of vanadium and niobium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoloff, N.S.; Ashok, S.; Xiao, P.

    1981-01-01

    The influence of hydrogen on fatigue life of niobium and vanadium is described. In tests carried out under stress control conditions on unnotched material hydrogen extends fatigue life of both metals. However, in stress controlled tests on notched bars and in strain control tests on unnotched bars hydrogen is detrimental to fatigue life. Hydrided alloys are much more sensitive to notches than are the unalloyed metals. Frequency effects on fatigue life also are much more severe in hydrided alloys, lower frequency leading to shorter life. The results of delayed failure, creep tests and elevated temperature fatigue tests also are reported. Niobium and vanadium reveal reduced fatigue lives at elevated temperatures for tests carried out in vacuum. The results of limited hold time and low frequency tests on strain controlled fatigue life also are reported. Increasing hold time increases fatigue life of niobium in the range 450 to 650 0 C. Fractographic features change from striations in unalloyed metals to cleavage in the hydrided alloys tested at room temperature

  10. Hydrogenation Properties of Mg-5 wt.% TiCr_10NbX (x=1,3,5) Composites by Mechanical Alloying Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyeong-Il; Hong, Tae-Whan

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen and hydrogen energy have been recognized as clean energy sources and high energy carrier. Mg and Mg alloys are attractive hydrogen storage materials because of their lightweight and low cost materials with high hydrogen capacity (about 7.6 wt.%). However, the commercial applications of the Mg hydrides are currently hinder by its high absorption/desorption temperature, and very slow reaction kinetics. However, Ti and Ti based hydrogen storage alloys have been thought to be the third generation of alloys with a high hydrogen capacity, which makes it difficult to handle because of high reactivity. One of the most methods to develop kinetics was addition of transition metal. Therefore, Mg-Ti-Cr-Nb alloy was fabricated to add TiCrNb by hydrogen induced mechanical alloying. TiCrNb systems have included transition metals, low operating temperatures and hydrogen storage materials. As-received specimens were characterized using X-ray Diffraction analysis (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Thermo Gravimetric analysis/Differential Scanning Calorimetry (TG/DSC). Mg-TiCr_10Nb systems were evaluated for hydrogen kinetics by Sievert’s type Pressure-Composition-Isotherm (PCI) equipment. The operating temperature range was 473, 523, 573 and 623 K.

  11. Experiments on cold trap regeneration by NaH decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPheeters, C.C.; Skladzien, S.B.; Raue, D.J.

    1979-10-01

    Cold trap regeneration may be very important in future LMFBRs because of the expected high hydrogen source from the steam generators. This hydrogen precipitates as NaH in the cold trap and may fill the trap within one year of operation. Several methods of cold trap regeneration were considered, but the simplest and least expensive appears to be decomposition of NaH under vacuum at elevated temperatures. Experiments were done to assess the feasibility of this method for cold trap regeneration. Small-scale simulated cold traps (SCT) were located with NaH and NaH plus Na 2 O, and were heated both under vacuum and under a sweep gas at 100 kPa. The evolved hydrogen was converted to water by a CuO bed and collected in a weighting tube

  12. Hypothesis for the mechanism of negative ion production in the surface-plasma negative hydrogen ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiskes, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    An analysis of the surface-plasma negative hydrogen ion source has shown that the tungsten cathode supports approximately a monolayer of cesium. The backscattering of protons from the cathode as energetic neutrals and the subsequent backscattering of these neutrals from the anode provides for a flux of energetic atoms incident upon the cathode which is comparable to the ion flux. A hypothesis is proposed for the generation of negative ions during the collision of these energetic atoms with the cathode. Several mechanisms for negative ion production by proton collision with the surface are discussed. (U.S.)

  13. Sediment Trapping in Estuaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchard, Hans; Schuttelaars, Henk M.; Ralston, David K.

    2018-01-01

    Estuarine turbidity maxima (ETMs) are generated by a large suite of hydrodynamic and sediment dynamic processes, leading to longitudinal convergence of cross-sectionally integrated and tidally averaged transport of cohesive and noncohesive suspended particulate matter (SPM). The relative importance of these processes for SPM trapping varies substantially among estuaries depending on topography, fluvial and tidal forcing, and SPM composition. The high-frequency dynamics of ETMs are constrained by interactions with the low-frequency dynamics of the bottom pool of easily erodible sediments. Here, we use a transport decomposition to present processes that lead to convergent SPM transport, and review trapping mechanisms that lead to ETMs at the landward limit of the salt intrusion, in the freshwater zone, at topographic transitions, and by lateral processes within the cross section. We use model simulations of example estuaries to demonstrate the complex concurrence of ETM formation mechanisms. We also discuss how changes in SPM trapping mechanisms, often caused by direct human interference, can lead to the generation of hyperturbid estuaries.

  14. Density functional theory study of hydrogenation mechanism in Fe-doped Mg(0 0 0 1) surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Guangxin; Zhang Jieyu; Wu Yongquan; Li Qian; Chou Kuochih; Bao Xinhua

    2009-01-01

    Using density functional theory (DFT) in combination with nudged elastic band (NEB) method, the dissociative chemisorptions and diffusion processes of hydrogen on both pure and Fe-doped Mg(0 0 0 1) surfaces are studied. Firstly, the dissociation pathway of H 2 and the relative barrier were investigated. The calculated dissociation barrier (1.08 eV) of hydrogen molecule on a pure Mg(0 0 0 1) surface is in good agreement with comparable experimental and theoretical studies. For the Fe-doped Mg(0 0 0 1) surface, the activated barrier decreases to 0.101 eV due to the strong interaction between the s orbital of H and the d orbital of Fe. Then, the diffusion processes of atomic hydrogen on pure and Fe-doped Mg(0 0 0 1) are presented. The obtained diffusion barrier to the first subsurface is 0.45 eV and 0.98 eV, respectively. Finally, Chou method was used to investigate the hydrogen sorption kinetic mechanism of pure MgH 2 and Mg mixed with 5 at.% Fe atoms composites. The obtained activation energies are 0.87 ± 0.02 and 0.31 ± 0.01 eV for H 2 dissociation on the pure surface and H atom diffusion in Fe-doped Mg surfaces, respectively. It suggests that the rate-controlling step is dissociation of H 2 on the pure Mg surface while it is diffusion of H atom in the Fe-doped Mg surface. And both of fitting data are matching well with our calculation results.

  15. Quantum chemical elucidation of the mechanism for hydrogenation of TiO2 anatase crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghunath, P.; Huang, W. F.; Lin, M. C.

    2013-04-01

    Hydrogenation of TiO2 is relevant to hydrogen storage and water splitting. We have carried out a detailed mechanistic study on TiO2 hydrogenation through H and/or H2 diffusion from the surface into subsurface layers of anatase TiO2 (101) by periodic density functional theory calculations implementing on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT + U). Both H atoms and H2 molecules can migrate from the crystal surface into TiO2 near subsurface layer with 27.8 and 46.2 kcal/mol energy barriers, respectively. The controlling step for the former process is the dissociative adsorption of H2 on the surface which requires 47.8 kcal/mol of energy barrier. Both hydrogen incorporation processes are expected to be equally favorable. The barrier energy for H2 migration from the first layer of the subsurface Osub1 to the 2nd layer of the subsurface oxygen Osub2 requires only 6.6 kcal. The presence of H atoms on the surface and inside the subsurface layer tends to promote both H and H2 penetration into the subsurface layer by reducing their energy barriers, as well as to prevent the escape of the H2 from the cage by increasing its escaping barrier energy. The H2 molecule inside a cage can readily dissociate and form 2HO-species exothermically (ΔH = -31.0 kcal/mol) with only 26.2 kcal/mol barrier. The 2HO-species within the cage may further transform into H2O with a 22.0 kcal/mol barrier and 19.3 kcal/mol exothermicity relative to the caged H2 molecule. H2O formation following the breaking of Ti-O bonds within the cage may result in the formation of O-vacancies and surface disordering as observed experimentally under a high pressure and moderately high temperature condition. According to density of states analysis, the projected density of states of the interstitial H, H2, and H2O appear prominently within the TiO2 band gap; in addition, the former induces a shift of the band gap position notably towards the conduction band. The thermochemistry for formation of the most stable sub

  16. X-ray Imaging and preliminary studies of the X-ray self-emission from an innovative plasma-trap based on the Bernstein waves heating mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliri, C.; Romano, F. P.; Mascali, D.; Gammino, S.; Musumarra, A.; Castro, G.; Celona, L.; Neri, L.; Altana, C.

    2013-10-01

    Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Sources (ECRIS) are based on ECR heated plasmas emitting high fluxes of X-rays. Here we illustrate a pilot study of the X-ray emission from a compact plasma-trap in which an off-resonance microwave-plasma interaction has been attempted, highlighting a possible Bernstein-Waves based heating mechanism. EBWs-heating is obtained via the inner plasma EM-to-ES wave conversion and enables to reach densities much larger than the cut-off ones. At LNS-INFN, an innovative diagnostic technique based on the design of a Pinhole Camera (PHC) coupled to a CCD device for X-ray Imaging of the plasma (XRI) has been developed, in order to integrate X-ray traditional diagnostics (XRS). The complementary use of electrostatic probes measurements and X-ray diagnostics enabled us to gain knowledge about the high energy electrons density and temperature and about the spatial structure of the source. The combination of the experimental data with appropriate modeling of the plasma-source allowed to estimate the X-ray emission intensity in different energy domains (ranging from EUV up to Hard X-rays). The use of ECRIS as X-ray source for multidisciplinary applications, is now a concrete perspective due to the intense fluxes produced by the new plasma heating mechanism.

  17. Study of Hydrogen Pumping through Condensed Argon in Cryogenic pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jadeja, K A; Bhatt, S B

    2012-01-01

    In ultra high vacuum (UHV) range, hydrogen is a dominant residual gas in vacuum chamber. Hydrogen, being light gas, pumping of hydrogen in this vacuum range is limited with widely used UHV pumps, viz. turbo molecular pump and cryogenic pump. Pre condensed argon layers in cryogenic pump create porous structure on the surface of the pump, which traps hydrogen gas at a temperature less than 20° K. Additional argon gas injection in the cryogenic pump, at lowest temperature, generates multiple layers of condensed argon as a porous frost with 10 to 100 A° diameters pores, which increase the pumping capacity of hydrogen gas. This pumping mechanism of hydrogen is more effective, to pump more hydrogen gas in UHV range applicable in accelerator, space simulation etc. and where hydrogen is used as fuel gas like tokamak. For this experiment, the cryogenic pump with a closed loop refrigerator using helium gas is used to produce the minimum cryogenic temperature as ∼ 14° K. In this paper, effect of cryosorption of hydrogen is presented with different levels of argon gas and hydrogen gas in cryogenic pump chamber.

  18. Quantitative proteomics revealed partial fungistatic mechanism of ammonia against conidial germination of nematode-trapping fungus Arthrobotrys oligospora ATCC24927.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Tian, Dong-Wei; Zou, Li-Juan; Liu, Fang-Yu; Can, Qi-Yan; Yang, Jin-Kui; Xu, Jian-Ping; Huang, Xiao-Wei; Xi, Jia-Qin; Zhu, Ming-Liang; Mo, Ming-He; Zhang, Ke-Qin

    2018-05-01

    Ammonia is one of the fungistatic factors in soil that can suppress conidial germination, but the molecular mechanism underlying the suppression is unknown. In this study, the proteomes of fungistatic conidia, fresh conidia and germinated conidia of Arthrobotrys oligospora ATCC24927 were determined and quantified. The protein expression profile of fungistatic conidia was significantly different from those in the other two conditions. 281 proteins were down expressed in fungistatic conidia and characterized by GO annotation. Gene transcription analysis and inhibition of puromycin (a protein translation inhibitor) on conidial germination suggested that down expression of 33 protein translation related proteins might well result in repression of protein synthesis and inhibition of conidial germination. In addition, 16 down-expressed proteins were mapped to the Ras/mitogen-activated protein (Ras/MAP) regulatory networks which regulate conidial DNA synthesis. The conidial DNA synthesis was found to be definitely inhibited under by ammonia, and function studies of two Ras/MAP proteins by using knock-out strains provided partial evidence that Ras/MAP pathway regulate the conidial germination. These results suggested that down-expression of Ras/MAP related proteins might result in inhibition of DNA synthesis and finally result in inhibition conidial germination. This study revealed partial fungistatic mechanism of ammonia against conidial germination. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermally-generated reactive intermediates: Trapping of the parent ferrocene-based o-quinodimethane and reactions of diradicals generated by hydrogen-atom transfers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferguson, John Michael [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    Ferrocenocyclobutene is prepared by flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of the N-amino-2-phenylaziridine hydrazone of 2-methylferrocenealdehyde. In the second section of this dissertation, a series of hydrocarbon rearrangements were observed. FVP of o-allyltoluene at 0.1 Torr (700--900 C) gives 2-methylindan and indene, accompanied by o-propenyltoluene. FVP of 2-methyl-2`-vinylbiphenyl gives 9-methyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, which fits the proposed mechanism. However, FVP of 2-(o-methylbenzyl)styrene gives mainly anthracene and 1-methylanthracene. This cyclization reaction was also successful with o-allylphenol and o-(2-methylallyl)phenol.

  20. Thermally-generated reactive intermediates: Trapping of the parent ferrocene-based o-quinodimethane and reactions of diradicals generated by hydrogen-atom transfers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, J.M.

    1993-01-01

    Ferrocenocyclobutene is prepared by flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of the N-amino-2-phenylaziridine hydrazone of 2-methylferrocenealdehyde. In the second section of this dissertation, a series of hydrocarbon rearrangements were observed. FVP of o-allyltoluene at 0.1 Torr (700--900 C) gives 2-methylindan and indene, accompanied by o-propenyltoluene. FVP of 2-methyl-2'-vinylbiphenyl gives 9-methyl-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene, which fits the proposed mechanism. However, FVP of 2-(o-methylbenzyl)styrene gives mainly anthracene and 1-methylanthracene. This cyclization reaction was also successful with o-allylphenol and o-(2-methylallyl)phenol

  1. Hydrogen release at metal-oxide interfaces: A first principle study of hydrogenated Al/SiO{sub 2} interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jianqiu, E-mail: jianqiu@vt.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Tea, Eric; Li, Guanchen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Hin, Celine [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road - MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Department of Material Science and Engineering, Virginia Tech, Goodwin Hall, 635 Prices Fork Road-MC 0238, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogen release process at the Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface has been investigated. • A mathematical model that estimates the hydrogen release potential has been proposed. • Al atoms, Al−O bonds, and Si−Al bonds are the major hydrogen traps at the Al/SiO{sub 2} interface. • Hydrogen atoms are primarily release from Al−H and O−H bonds at the Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface. - Abstract: The Anode Hydrogen Release (AHR) mechanism at interfaces is responsible for the generation of defects, that traps charge carriers and can induce dielectric breakdown in Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors. The AHR has been extensively studied at Si/SiO{sub 2} interfaces but its characteristics at metal-silica interfaces remain unclear. In this study, we performed Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations to study the hydrogen release mechanism at the typical Al/SiO{sub 2} metal-oxide interface. We found that interstitial hydrogen atoms can break interfacial Al−Si bonds, passivating a Si sp{sup 3} orbital. Interstitial hydrogen atoms can also break interfacial Al−O bonds, or be adsorbed at the interface on aluminum, forming stable Al−H−Al bridges. We showed that hydrogenated O−H, Si−H and Al−H bonds at the Al/SiO{sub 2} interfaces are polarized. The resulting bond dipole weakens the O−H and Si−H bonds, but strengthens the Al−H bond under the application of a positive bias at the metal gate. Our calculations indicate that Al−H bonds and O−H bonds are more important than Si−H bonds for the hydrogen release process.

  2. Influence of post-hydrogenation upon electrical, optical and structural properties of hydrogen-less sputter-deposited amorphous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke, S., E-mail: sebastian.gerke@uni-konstanz.de [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, 78457 (Germany); Becker, H.-W.; Rogalla, D. [RUBION — Central Unit for Ion Beams and Radioisotopes, University of Bochum, Bochum, 44780 (Germany); Singer, F.; Brinkmann, N.; Fritz, S.; Hammud, A.; Keller, P.; Skorka, D.; Sommer, D. [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, 78457 (Germany); Weiß, C. [Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, Heidenhofstraße 2, 79110 Freiburg (Germany); Flege, S. [Department of Materials Science, TU Darmstadt, Darmstadt 64287 (Germany); Hahn, G. [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, 78457 (Germany); Job, R. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Münster University of Applied Sciences, Steinfurt 48565 (Germany); Terheiden, B. [Department of Physics, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, 78457 (Germany)

    2016-01-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) is common in the production of technical devices and can be deposited by several techniques. In this study intrinsic and doped, hydrogen-less amorphous silicon films are RF magnetron sputter deposited and post-hydrogenated in a remote hydrogen plasma reactor at a temperature of 370 °C. Secondary ion mass spectrometry of a boron doped (p) a-Si layer shows that the concentration of dopants in the sputtered layer becomes the same as present in the sputter-target. Improved surface passivation of phosphorous doped 5 Ω cm, FZ, (n) c-Si can be achieved by post-hydrogenation yielding a minority carrier lifetime of ~ 360 μs finding an optimum for ~ 40 nm thin films, deposited at 325 °C. This relatively low minority carrier lifetime indicates high disorder of the hydrogen-less sputter deposited amorphous network. Post-hydrogenation leads to a decrease of the number of localized states within the band gap. Optical band gaps (Taucs gab as well as E{sub 04}) can be determined to ~ 1.88 eV after post-hydrogenation. High resolution transmission electron microscopy and optical Raman investigations show that the sputtered layers are amorphous and stay like this during post-hydrogenation. As a consequence of the missing hydrogen during deposition, sputtered a-Si forms a rough surface compared to CVD a-Si. Atomic force microscopy points out that the roughness decreases by up to 25% during post-hydrogenation. Nuclear resonant reaction analysis permits the investigation of hydrogen depth profiles and allows determining the diffusion coefficients of several post-hydrogenated samples from of a model developed within this work. A dependency of diffusion coefficients on the duration of post-hydrogenation indicates trapping diffusion as the main diffusion mechanism. Additional Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements show that hardly any interstitial hydrogen exists in the post-hydrogenated a-Si layers. The results of this study open the way for

  3. The ALPHA Experiment a Cold Antihydrogen Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Chartier, M; Deutsch, A; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D; Gomberoff, K; Grote, D P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jenkins, M; Jørgensen, L V; Madsen, N; Miranda, D; Nolan, P; Ochanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Posada, L G C; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Telle, H H; Vay, J L; Wurtele, J; van der Werf, D P; Yamazaki, Y

    2005-01-01

    The ALPHA experiment aims to trap antihydrogen as the next crucial step towards a precise CPT test, by a spectroscopic comparison of antihydrogen with hydrogen. The experiment will retain the salient techniques developed by the ATHENA collaboration during the previous phase of antihydrogen experiments at the antiproton decelerator (AD) at CERN. The collaboration has identified the key problems in adding a neutral antiatom trap to the previously developed experimental configuration. The solutions identified by ALPHA are described in this paper.

  4. Hydrogen oxidation mechanisms on Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia anodes: Separation of reaction pathways by geometry variation of pattern electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppler, M. C.; Fleig, J.; Bram, M.; Opitz, A. K.

    2018-03-01

    Nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrodes are affecting the overall performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) in general and strongly contribute to the cell resistance in case of novel metal supported SOFCs in particular. The electrochemical fuel conversion mechanisms in these electrodes are, however, still only partly understood. In this study, micro-structured Ni thin film electrodes on YSZ with 15 different geometries are utilized to investigate reaction pathways for the hydrogen electro-oxidation at Ni/YSZ anodes. From electrodes with constant area but varying triple phase boundary (TPB) length a contribution to the electro-catalytic activity is found that does not depend on the TPB length. This additional activity could clearly be attributed to a yet unknown reaction pathway scaling with the electrode area. It is shown that this area related pathway has significantly different electrochemical behavior compared to the TPB pathway regarding its thermal activation, sulfur poisoning behavior, and H2/H2O partial pressure dependence. Moreover, possible reaction mechanisms of this reaction pathway are discussed, identifying either a pathway based on hydrogen diffusion through Ni with water release at the TPB or a path with oxygen diffusion through Ni to be a very likely explanation for the experimental results.

  5. High Resolution Crystal Structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase with Trapped Intermediates Provide Insights into Catalytic Mechanism and Inhibition by Aldehydes∥,‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jarrod B.; Cen, Yana; Sauve, Anthony A.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-01-01

    Nicotinamidases are salvage enzymes that convert nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are essential for the recycling of nicotinamide into NAD+ in most prokaryotes, most single cell and multicellular eukaryotes, but not in mammals. The significance of these enzymes for nicotinamide salvage and for NAD+ homeostasis has increased interest in nicotinamidases as possible antibiotic targets. Nicotinamidases are also regulators of intracellular nicotinamide concentrations, thereby regulating signaling of downstream NAD+ consuming enzymes, such as the NAD+-dependent deacetylases (sirtuins). Here, we report several high resolution crystal structures of the nicotinamidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic) in unliganded and ligand-bound forms. The structure of the C136S mutant in complex with nicotinamide provides details about substrate binding while a trapped nicotinoyl-thioester complexed with SpNic reveals the structure of the proposed thioester reaction intermediate. Examination of the active site of SpNic reveals several important features including a metal ion that coordinates the substrate and the catalytically relevant water molecule, and an oxyanion hole which both orients the substrate and offsets the negative charge that builds up during catalysis. Structures of this enzyme with bound nicotinaldehyde inhibitors elucidate the mechanism of inhibition and provide further details about the catalytic mechanism. In addition, we provide a biochemical analysis of the identity and role of the metal ion that orients the ligand in the active site and activates the water molecule responsible for hydrolysis of the substrate. These data provide structural evidence for several proposed reaction intermediates and allow for a more complete understanding of the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme. PMID:20853856

  6. High-resolution crystal structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae nicotinamidase with trapped intermediates provide insights into the catalytic mechanism and inhibition by aldehydes .

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Jarrod B; Cen, Yana; Sauve, Anthony A; Ealick, Steven E

    2010-10-12

    Nicotinamidases are salvage enzymes that convert nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are essential for the recycling of nicotinamide into NAD(+) in most prokaryotes and most single-cell and multicellular eukaryotes, but not in mammals. The significance of these enzymes for nicotinamide salvage and for NAD(+) homeostasis has stimulated interest in nicotinamidases as possible antibiotic targets. Nicotinamidases are also regulators of intracellular nicotinamide concentrations, thereby regulating signaling of downstream NAD(+)-consuming enzymes, such as the NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases (sirtuins). Here, we report several high-resolution crystal structures of the nicotinamidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic) in unliganded and ligand-bound forms. The structure of the C136S mutant in complex with nicotinamide provides details about substrate binding, while a trapped nicotinoyl thioester in a complex with SpNic reveals the structure of the proposed thioester reaction intermediate. Examination of the active site of SpNic reveals several important features, including a metal ion that coordinates the substrate and the catalytically relevant water molecule and an oxyanion hole that both orients the substrate and offsets the negative charge that builds up during catalysis. Structures of this enzyme with bound nicotinaldehyde inhibitors elucidate the mechanism of inhibition and provide further details about the catalytic mechanism. In addition, we provide a biochemical analysis of the identity and role of the metal ion that orients the ligand in the active site and activates the water molecule responsible for hydrolysis of the substrate. These data provide structural evidence of several proposed reaction intermediates and allow for a more complete understanding of the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme.

  7. High-Resolution Crystal Structures of Streptococcus pneumoniae Nicotinamidase with Trapped Intermediates Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism and Inhibition by Aldehydes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, Jarrod B.; Cen, Yana; Sauve, Anthony A.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Weill-Med)

    2010-11-11

    Nicotinamidases are salvage enzymes that convert nicotinamide to nicotinic acid. These enzymes are essential for the recycling of nicotinamide into NAD{sup +} in most prokaryotes and most single-cell and multicellular eukaryotes, but not in mammals. The significance of these enzymes for nicotinamide salvage and for NAD{sup +} homeostasis has stimulated interest in nicotinamidases as possible antibiotic targets. Nicotinamidases are also regulators of intracellular nicotinamide concentrations, thereby regulating signaling of downstream NAD{sup +}-consuming enzymes, such as the NAD{sup +}-dependent deacetylases (sirtuins). Here, we report several high-resolution crystal structures of the nicotinamidase from Streptococcus pneumoniae (SpNic) in unliganded and ligand-bound forms. The structure of the C136S mutant in complex with nicotinamide provides details about substrate binding, while a trapped nicotinoyl thioester in a complex with SpNic reveals the structure of the proposed thioester reaction intermediate. Examination of the active site of SpNic reveals several important features, including a metal ion that coordinates the substrate and the catalytically relevant water molecule and an oxyanion hole that both orients the substrate and offsets the negative charge that builds up during catalysis. Structures of this enzyme with bound nicotinaldehyde inhibitors elucidate the mechanism of inhibition and provide further details about the catalytic mechanism. In addition, we provide a biochemical analysis of the identity and role of the metal ion that orients the ligand in the active site and activates the water molecule responsible for hydrolysis of the substrate. These data provide structural evidence of several proposed reaction intermediates and allow for a more complete understanding of the catalytic mechanism of this enzyme.

  8. Mechanisms Underpinning Degradation of Protective Oxides and Thermal Barrier Coatings in High Hydrogen Content (HHC) - Fueled Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mumm, Daniel

    2013-08-31

    The overarching goal of this research program has been to evaluate the potential impacts of coal-derived syngas and high-hydrogen content fuels on the degradation of turbine hot-section components through attack of protective oxides and thermal barrier coatings. The primary focus of this research program has been to explore mechanisms underpinning the observed degradation processes, and connections to the combustion environments and characteristic non-combustible constituents. Based on the mechanistic understanding of how these emerging fuel streams affect materials degradation, the ultimate goal of the program is to advance the goals of the Advanced Turbine Program by developing materials design protocols leading to turbine hot-section components with improved resistance to service lifetime degradation under advanced fuels exposures. This research program has been focused on studying how: (1) differing combustion environments – relative to traditional natural gas fired systems – affect both the growth rate of thermally grown oxide (TGO) layers and the stability of these oxides and of protective thermal barrier coatings (TBCs); and (2) how low levels of fuel impurities and characteristic non-combustibles interact with surface oxides, for instance through the development of molten deposits that lead to hot corrosion of protective TBC coatings. The overall program has been comprised of six inter-related themes, each comprising a research thrust over the program period, including: (i) evaluating the role of syngas and high hydrogen content (HHC) combustion environments in modifying component surface temperatures, heat transfer to the TBC coatings, and thermal gradients within these coatings; (ii) understanding the instability of TBC coatings in the syngas and high hydrogen environment with regards to decomposition, phase changes and sintering; (iii) characterizing ash deposition, molten phase development and infiltration, and associated corrosive

  9. Towards a quantification of stress corrosion mechanisms: numerical simulations of hydrogen-dislocations at the very crack tip; Vers une quantification des mecanismes de corrosion sous contrainte: simulations numeriques des interactions hydrogene-dislocations en pointe de fissure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chateau, J.P

    1999-01-05

    We discuss the respective roles played by anodic dissolution and hydrogen in SCC mechanisms of f.c.c. materials, by studying the fracture of copper in nitrite for which we compare the results with that previously obtained in 316L steel in hot chloride. It is surprising to note that even the crystallographies at the scale of the micron are different, the macroscopic inclination of the fracture surfaces are the same. In the case of 316L steel, the formation of strong pile-ups in the presence of hydrogen leads to a zigzag fracture along alternated slip planes in the most general case. In the absence of hydrogen, as in copper, this mechanism effectively disappears. Furthermore, numerical simulations of crack shielding by dislocations emitted on one plane predict the macroscopic inclination. It shows that it is due to the mere dissolution which confines slip activity at the very crack tip in f.c.c. materials. In order to quantify the mechanism involved in 316L steel, we developed simulations which numerically solve the coupled diffusion and elasticity equations for hydrogen in the presence of a crack and shielding dislocations. They reproduce the mechanisms of hydrogen segregation on edge dislocations and of a localised softening effect by decreasing pair interactions. These mechanisms lead to i) a localisation of hydrogen embrittlement along the activated slip planes, ii) an increase of the dislocation density in pile-ups, and iii) a decrease of the cross slip probability. These three factors enhance micro-fracture at the head of a pile-up, which is responsible of thezigzag fracture. Introducing the free surface effects for hydrogen, we point out a new mechanism: the inhibition of dislocation sources at the crack tip, which is relevant with the brittle fracture surfaces observed in some cases in 316L steel. The quantification of these different mechanisms allows to give a relation between the local fracture possibility and the macroscopic parameters. A general law for

  10. The hydrogen tunneling splitting in malonaldehyde: A full-dimensional time-independent quantum mechanical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Feng; Ren, Yinghui; Bian, Wensheng, E-mail: bian@iccas.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-08-21

    The accurate time-independent quantum dynamics calculations on the ground-state tunneling splitting of malonaldehyde in full dimensionality are reported for the first time. This is achieved with an efficient method developed by us. In our method, the basis functions are customized for the hydrogen transfer process which has the effect of greatly reducing the size of the final Hamiltonian matrix, and the Lanczos method and parallel strategy are used to further overcome the memory and central processing unit time bottlenecks. The obtained ground-state tunneling splitting of 24.5 cm{sup −1} is in excellent agreement with the benchmark value of 23.8 cm{sup −1} computed with the full-dimensional, multi-configurational time-dependent Hartree approach on the same potential energy surface, and we estimate that our reported value has an uncertainty of less than 0.5 cm{sup −1}. Moreover, the role of various vibrational modes strongly coupled to the hydrogen transfer process is revealed.

  11. Study of formation of deep trapping mechanism by UV, beta and gamma irradiated Eu(3+) activated SrY2O4 and Y4Al2O9 phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Vikas; Kaur, Jagjeet; Parganiha, Yogita; Suryanarayana, N S; Murthy, K V R

    2016-04-01

    This paper reports the thermoluminescence properties of Eu(3+) doped different host matrix phosphors (SrY2O4 and Y4Al2O9). The phosphor is prepared by high temperature solid state reaction method. The method is suitable for large scale production and fixed concentration of boric acid using as a flux. The prepared samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction technique and the crystallite size calculated by Scherer's formula. The prepared phosphor characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopic (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR), Energy Dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), thermoluminescence (TL) and Transmission Electron Microscopic (TEM) techniques. The prepared phosphors for different concentration of Eu(3+) ions were examined by TL glow curve for UV, beta and gamma irradiation. The UV 254nm source used for UV irradiation, Sr(90) source was used for beta irradiation and Co(60) source used for gamma irradiation. SrY2O4:Eu(3+)and Y4Al2O9:Eu(3+) phosphors which shows both higher temperature peaks and lower temperature peaks for UV, beta and gamma irradiation. Here UV irradiated sample shows the formation of shallow trap (surface trapping) and the gamma irradiated sample shows the formation of deep trapping. The estimation of trap formation was evaluated by knowledge of trapping parameters. The trapping parameters such as activation energy, order of kinetics and frequency factor were calculated by peak shape method. Here most of the peak shows second order of kinetics. The effect of gamma, beta and UV exposure on TL studies was also examined and it shows linear response with dose which indicate that the samples may be useful for TL dosimetry. Formation of deep trapping mechanism by UV, beta and gamma irradiated Eu(3+) activated SrY2O4 and Y4Al2O9 phosphors is discussed in this paper. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantum chemical elucidation of the mechanism for hydrogenation of TiO{sub 2} anatase crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raghunath, P.; Huang, W. F.; Lin, M. C. [Center for Interdisciplinary Molecular Science, Department of Applied Chemistry, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2013-04-21

    Hydrogenation of TiO{sub 2} is relevant to hydrogen storage and water splitting. We have carried out a detailed mechanistic study on TiO{sub 2} hydrogenation through H and/or H{sub 2} diffusion from the surface into subsurface layers of anatase TiO{sub 2} (101) by periodic density functional theory calculations implementing on-site Coulomb interactions (DFT + U). Both H atoms and H{sub 2} molecules can migrate from the crystal surface into TiO{sub 2} near subsurface layer with 27.8 and 46.2 kcal/mol energy barriers, respectively. The controlling step for the former process is the dissociative adsorption of H{sub 2} on the surface which requires 47.8 kcal/mol of energy barrier. Both hydrogen incorporation processes are expected to be equally favorable. The barrier energy for H{sub 2} migration from the first layer of the subsurface O{sub sub1} to the 2nd layer of the subsurface oxygen O{sub sub2} requires only 6.6 kcal. The presence of H atoms on the surface and inside the subsurface layer tends to promote both H and H{sub 2} penetration into the subsurface layer by reducing their energy barriers, as well as to prevent the escape of the H{sub 2} from the cage by increasing its escaping barrier energy. The H{sub 2} molecule inside a cage can readily dissociate and form 2HO-species exothermically ({Delta}H =-31.0 kcal/mol) with only 26.2 kcal/mol barrier. The 2HO-species within the cage may further transform into H{sub 2}O with a 22.0 kcal/mol barrier and 19.3 kcal/mol exothermicity relative to the caged H{sub 2} molecule. H{sub 2}O formation following the breaking of Ti-O bonds within the cage may result in the formation of O-vacancies and surface disordering as observed experimentally under a high pressure and moderately high temperature condition. According to density of states analysis, the projected density of states of the interstitial H, H{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O appear prominently within the TiO{sub 2} band gap; in addition, the former induces a shift of the

  13. Escaping the tolerance trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammoudeh, S.; Madan, V.

    1994-01-01

    In order to examine the implications of the weakening of OPEC's responsiveness in adjusting its production levels, this paper explicitly incorporates rigidity in the quantity adjustment mechanism, thereby extending previous research which assumed smooth quantity adjustments. The rigidity is manifested in a tolerance range for the discrepancy between the declared target price and that of the market. This environment gives rise to a 'tolerance trap' which impedes the convergence process and inevitably brings the market to a standstill before its reaches the targeted price and revenue objectives. OPEC's reaction to the standstill has important implications for the achievement of the target-based equilibrium and for the potential collapse of the market price. This paper examines OPEC's policy options in the tolerance trap and reveals that the optional policy in order to break this impasse and move closer to the equilibrium point is gradually to reduce output and not to flood the market. (Author)

  14. Hydrogen in tungsten as plasma-facing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Joachim; Schmid, Klaus

    2011-12-01

    Materials facing plasmas in fusion experiments and future reactors are loaded with high fluxes (1020-1024 m-2 s-1) of H, D and T fuel particles at energies ranging from a few eV to keV. In this respect, the evolution of the radioactive T inventory in the first wall, the permeation of T through the armour into the coolant and the thermo-mechanical stability after long-term exposure are key parameters determining the applicability of a first wall material. Tungsten exhibits fast hydrogen diffusion, but an extremely low solubility limit. Due to the fast diffusion of hydrogen and the short ion range, most of the incident ions will quickly reach the surface and recycle into the plasma chamber. For steady-state operation the solute hydrogen for the typical fusion reactor geometry and wall conditions can reach an inventory of about 1 kg. However, in short-pulse operation typical of ITER, solute hydrogen will diffuse out after each pulse and the remaining inventory will consist of hydrogen trapped in lattice defects, such as dislocations, grain boundaries and irradiation-induced traps. In high-flux areas the hydrogen energies are too low to create displacement damage. However, under these conditions the solubility limit will be exceeded within the ion range and the formation of gas bubbles and stress-induced damage occurs. In addition, simultaneous neutron fluxes from the nuclear fusion reaction D(T,n)α will lead to damage in the materials and produce trapping sites for diffusing hydrogen atoms throughout the bulk. The formation and diffusive filling of these different traps will determine the evolution of the retained T inventory. This paper will concentrate on experimental evidence for the influence different trapping sites have on the hydrogen inventory in W as studied in ion beam experiments and low-temperature plasmas. Based on the extensive experimental data, models are validated and applied to estimate the contribution of different traps to the tritium inventory in

  15. Hydrogen storage properties of Mg-23.3wt.%Ni eutectic alloy prepared via hydriding combustion synthesis followed by mechanical milling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquan Li; Yunfeng Zhu; Xiaofeng Liu

    2006-01-01

    A Mg-23.3wt.%Ni eutectic alloy was prepared by the process of hydriding combustion synthesis followed by mechanical milling (HCS+MM). The product showed a high hydriding rate at 373 K and the dehydrogenation started at temperature as low as 423 K. Several reasons contributing to the improvement in hydrogen storage properties were presented. The result of this study will provide attractive information for mobile applications of magnesium hydrogen storage materials, and the process of HCS+MM developed in this study showed its potential for synthesizing magnesium based hydrogen storage materials with novel hydriding/de-hydriding properties. (authors)

  16. Effect of hydrogen on mechanical fluence during storage in dry; Efecto del hidrogeno en la fluencia mecanica durante el almacenamiento en seco

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feria, F.; Herranz, L. E.

    2011-07-01

    One of the challenges in the field of the mechanical fluence modeling is to include the effect of hydrogen as an additional hardening factor associated with reactor irradiation. For this it is necessary to identify the weight of each variable in the factor hardening of the classical laws of mechanics fluence.

  17. Globalisation Trapped

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Caraça

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The promise of making society progress through the direct applications of science was finally fulfilled in the mid-20th century. Science progressed immensely, propelled by the effects of the two world wars. The first science-based technologies saw the daylight during the 1940s and their transformative power was such that neither the military, nor subsequently the markets, allowed science to return intact to its curiosity-driven nest. Technoscience was born then and (being progressively pulled away from curiosity-driven science was able to grow enormously, erecting a formidable structure of networks of institutions that impacted decisively on the economy. It is a paradox, or maybe a trap, that the fulfillment of science’s solemn promise of ‘transforming nature’ means seeing ourselves and our Western societies entangled in crises after crises with no clear outcome in view. A redistribution of geopolitical power is under way, along with the deployment of information and communication technologies, forcing dominant structures to oscillate, as knowledge about organization and methods, marketing, design, and software begins to challenge the role of technoscience as the main vector of economic growth and wealth accumulation. What ought to be done?

  18. Quantum mechanical calculation of the adsorption of hydrogen isotopes on metallic nickel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Zhenghe; Liu Youcheng; Wang Hongyan; Jiang Gang; Tan Mingliang

    1998-01-01

    The electronic ground state of NiH, NiD and NiT is derived to be 2 Σ + based on atomic and molecular reaction statics, then, energy E, heat capacity at constant volume C V and entropy S of these molecules have been calculated using QCISD/6-311G ** method. considering the characteristics of different motion types, the electronic and vibrational energy or entropy of molecule are assumed to be the corresponding values of their solid states. Then, it is easy to calculate ΔH degree, ΔS degree, ΔG degree and equilibrium pressure and examine the isotopic effect. The present method is somehow applicable to theoretical study on the storage-hydrogen materials

  19. Vanadium purification by transformation to the tetrachloride and reduction by hydrogen. Study of the reduction mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Val, Christian

    1968-01-01

    The problem studied here is the production of very high purity metallic vanadium. By analogy with the method used for silicon or germanium production in electronics, the one employed here involves preparing the tetrachloride from the impure metal, purifying it by distillation, an easy process, and finally reducing this tetrachloride with hydrogen to obtain the pure metal. By this technique it has been possible to reduce the impurity content from about 5000 ppm to under 500 ppm and, in particular, to eliminate almost completely the nitrogen which is not removed by the normal purification methods. The author has studied the changes in the morphology of the deposit obtained as a function of the operational conditions. He has determined in particular the conditions leading to the formation of a compact deposit. He has shown that the deposition kinetics are very probably governed by an adsorbed phase reaction at the metal surface, (author) [fr

  20. Hydrogen interactions in aluminum-lithium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. W.; Scully, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    A program is described which seeks to develop an understanding of the effects of dissolved and trapped hydrogen on the mechanical properties of selected Al-Li-Cu-X alloys. A proposal is made to distinguish hydrogen (H2) induced EAC from aqueous dissolution controlled EAC, to correlate H2 induced EAC with mobile and trapped concentrations, and to identify significant trap sites and hydride phases (if any) through use of model alloys and phases. A literature review shows three experimental factors which have impeded progress in the area of H2 EAC for this class of alloys. These are as listed: (1) inter-subgranular fracture in Al-Li alloys when tested in the S-T orientation in air or vacuum make it difficult to readily detect H2 induced fracture based on straight forward changes in fractography; (2) the inherently low H2 diffusivity and solubility in Al alloys is further compounded by a native oxide which acts as a H2 permeation barrier; and (3) H2 effects are masked by dissolution assisted processes when mechanical testing is performed in aqueous solutions.

  1. Determination of diffusible and total hydrogen concentration in coated and uncoated steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mabho, Nonhlangabezo

    2010-09-23

    The new trend in the steel industry demands thin, flexible, high strength steels with low internal embrittlement. It is a well known fact that the atomic hydrogen which is picked up during production, fabrication and service embrittles the steel. This has led to an extensive research towards the improvement of the quality of metallic materials by focusing on total and diffusible hydrogen concentrations which are responsible for hydrogen embrittlement. Since the internal embrittlement cannot be foreseen, the concentrations of diffusible hydrogen work as indicators while the total hydrogen characterizes the absorbed quantities and quality of that particular product. To meet these requirements, the analytical chemistry methods which include the already existing carrier gas melt (fusion) extraction methods that use infrared and thermal conductivity for total hydrogen detection were applied. The newly constructed carrier gas thermal desorption mass spectroscopy was applied to monitor the diffusible concentration at specific temperatures and desorption rates of hydrogen which will contribute towards the quality of materials during service. The TDMS method also involved the characterization of the energy quantity (activation energy) required by hydrogen to be removed from traps of which irreversible traps are preferred because they enhance the stability of the product by inhibiting the mobility of hydrogen which is detrimental to the metallic structures. The instrumentation for TDMS is quite simple, compact, costs less and applicable to routine analysis. To determine total and diffusible hydrogen, the influence of the following processes: chemical and mechanical zinc coating removal, sample cleaning with organic solvents, conditions for hydrogen absorption by electrolytic hydrogen charging, conditions of hydrogen desorption by storing the sample at room temperature, solid CO{sub 2} and at temperatures of the drier was analysed. The contribution of steel alloys towards

  2. A cohesive zone model to simulate the hydrogen embrittlement effect on a high-strength steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Gobbi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to model the fracture mechanical behavior of a high-strength low carbon steel, AISI 4130 operating in hydrogen contaminated environment. The study deals with the development of 2D finite element cohesive zone model (CZM reproducing a toughness test. Along the symmetry plane over the crack path of a C(T specimen a zero thickness layer of cohesive elements are implemented in order to simulate the crack propagation. The main feature of this kind of model is the definition of a traction-separation law (TSL that reproduces the constitutive response of the material inside to the cohesive elements. Starting from a TSL calibrated on hydrogen non-contaminated material, the embrittlement effect is simulated by reducing the cohesive energy according to the total hydrogen content including the lattice sites (NILS and the trapped amount. In this perspective, the proposed model consists of three steps of simulations. First step evaluates the hydrostatic pressure. It drives the initial hydrogen concentration assigned in the second step, a mass diffusion analysis, defining in this way the contribution of hydrogen moving across the interstitial lattice sites. The final stress analysis, allows getting the total hydrogen content, including the trapped amount, and evaluating the new crack initiation and propagation due to the hydrogen presence. The model is implemented in both plane strain and plane stress configurations; results are compared in the discussion. From the analyses, it resulted that hydrogen is located only into lattice sites and not in traps, and that the considered steel experiences a high hydrogen susceptibility. By the proposed procedure, the developed numerical model seems a reliable and quick tool able to estimate the mechanical behavior of steels in presence of hydrogen.

  3. A Trapped Covalent Intermediate of a Glycoside Hydrolase on the Pathway to Transglycosylation. Insights from Experiments and Quantum Mechanics/Molecular Mechanics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raich, Lluís; Borodkin, Vladimir; Fang, Wenxia; Castro-López, Jorge; van Aalten, Daan M F; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramón; Rovira, Carme

    2016-03-16

    The conversion of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) into transglycosylases (TGs), i.e., from enzymes that hydrolyze carbohydrates to enzymes that synthesize them, represents a promising solution for the large-scale synthesis of complex carbohydrates for biotechnological purposes. However, the lack of knowledge about the molecular details of transglycosylation hampers the rational design of TGs. Here we present the first crystallographic structure of a natural glycosyl-enzyme intermediate (GEI) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Gas2 in complex with an acceptor substrate and demonstrate, by means of quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics metadynamics simulations, that it is tuned for transglycosylation (ΔG(⧧) = 12 kcal/mol). The 2-OH···nucleophile interaction is found to be essential for catalysis: its removal raises the free energy barrier significantly (11 and 16 kcal/mol for glycosylation and transglycosylation, respectively) and alters the conformational itinerary of the substrate (from (4)C1 → [(4)E](⧧) → (1,4)B/(4)E to (4)C1 → [(4)H3](⧧) → (4)C1). Our results suggest that changes in the interactions involving the 2-position could have an impact on the transglycosylation activity of several GHs.

  4. Effect of high hydrogen content on metallurgical and mechanical properties of zirconium alloy claddings after heat-treatment at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turque, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Under hypothetical loss-of-coolant accident conditions, fuel cladding tubes made of zirconium alloys can be exposed to steam at high temperature (HT, up 1200 C) before being cooled and then quenched in water. In some conditions, after burst occurrence the cladding can rapidly absorb a significant amount of hydrogen (secondary hydriding), up to 3000 wt.ppm locally, during steam exposition at HT. The study deals with the effect, poorly studied up to date, of high contents of hydrogen on the metallurgical and mechanical properties of two zirconium alloys, Zircaloy-4 and M5, during and after cooling from high temperatures, at which zirconium is in its β phase. A specific facility was developed to homogeneously charge in hydrogen up to ∼ 3000 wt.ppm cladding tube samples of several centimeters in length. Phase transformations, chemical element partitioning and hydrogen precipitation during cooling from the β temperature domain of zirconium were studied by using several techniques, for the materials containing up to ∼ 3000 wt.ppm of hydrogen in average: in-situ neutron diffraction upon cooling from 700 C, X-ray diffraction, μ-ERDA, EPMA and electron microscopy in particular. The results were compared to thermodynamic predictions. In order to study the effect of high hydrogen contents on the mechanical behavior of the (prior-)μ phase of zirconium, axial tensile tests were performed at various temperatures between 20 and 700 C upon cooling from the β temperature domain, on samples with mean hydrogen contents up to ∼ 3000 wt.ppm. The results show that metallurgical and mechanical properties of the (prior-)β phase of zirconium alloys strongly depend on temperature and hydrogen content. (author) [fr

  5. Investigation of microstructure changes in ODS-EUROFER after hydrogen loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emelyanova, O.V.; Ganchenkova, M.G.; Malitskii, E.; Yagodzinskyy, Y.N.; Klimenkov, M.; Borodin, V.A.; Vladimirov, P.V.; Lindau, R.; Möslang, A.; Hänninen, H.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of hydrogen on the microstructure of mechanically tested ODS-EUROFER steel was investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy, thermal desorption spectroscopy, and atomistic simulations. The presence of yttrium oxide particles notably increases hydrogen uptake in ODS-EUROFER steel as compared to ODS-free EUROFER 97. Under tensile loading, hydrogen accumulation promotes the loss of cohesion at the oxide particle interfaces. First-principles molecular dynamics simulations indicate that hydrogen can be trapped at nanoparticle/matrix interface, creating OH-groups. The accumulation of hydrogen atoms at the oxide particle surface can be the reason for the observed hydrogen-induced oxide/matrix interface weakening and de-cohesion under the action of external tensile stress.

  6. Cryogenic surface ion traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermayr, M.

    2015-01-01

    Microfabricated surface traps are a promising architecture to realize a scalable quantum computer based on trapped ions. In principle, hundreds or thousands of surface traps can be located on a single substrate in order to provide large arrays of interacting ions. To this end, trap designs and fabrication methods are required that provide scalable, stable and reproducible ion traps. This work presents a novel surface-trap design developed for cryogenic applications. Intrinsic silicon is used as the substrate material of the traps. The well-developed microfabrication and structuring methods of silicon are utilized to create simple and reproducible traps. The traps were tested and characterized in a cryogenic setup. Ions could be trapped and their life time and motional heating were investigated. Long ion lifetimes of several hours were observed and the measured heating rates were reproducibly low at around 1 phonon per second at a trap frequency of 1 MHz. (author) [de

  7. Mechanism of anticlinal trap formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuliev, G.G; Kasimova, S.M; Kulieva, G.Z.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Geo dynamic development of sedimentary basin in accompanied in different stages by significant changes of stressed states. These changes can cover the upper layers as well as deep inner layers of geological stack. In certain levels, called critical level, in consequence of exhausting the feasibility of slow constant deformation, change of regular structures Equilibrium State and folding formation may occur. In total with horizontal component of geo static pressure and tectonic stress, in both cases these compressive loads may be enough to form folding by means of regular structure Equilibrium State instability loss and change to more stable Equilibrium State with curved structure. In this report there are the results of investigation of given problem within non-classical linearized 3D theoretical geomechanical model. Symmetric and asymmetric forms of change to more stable Equilibrium State when modeling deformed medium in kind of an isotropic and anisotropic material, in case of small elastic deformation were investigated. So, results permit us to conclude that only owing to submersion, different forms of structural curvature may occur in geological stack and that parameters of these structural form-changing are considered more accurate within non-classical linearized 3D geo dynamical model.Analogous results were obtained in case of compressive stress occurrence in consequence of density differentiation of rocks. From the obtains results it follows that Equilibrium State of half-plane in irregular compression proves to be unstable when assigning on free half-plane surface dead as well as tracking loads. The increase of intensity value of different surface loads exerts contrary influence on values of critical loads of stability loss depending on modeling of their character of influence. So, the increase of intensity of dead surface loads leads to decrease, but increase of tracking surface loads leads to increase of equilibrium state loss critical force value

  8. Use of nuclear reactions and ion channeling techniques for depth profiling hydrogen isotopes in solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, B.R.

    1979-01-01

    Hydrogen has always played a preeminent role in materials science because it so readily alters the physical and chemical properties of materials. However, it is often difficult to determine its role because it is one of the most elusive constituents to detect. More recently hydrogen detection has become necessary in numerous energy-related fields. In fusion energy one must understand plasma particle (hydrogen isotope) recycling, trapping and reemission, as well as the effects of hydrogen on the materials properties of first wall structures in plasma devices (i.e., hydrogen embrittlement, sputtering, blistering, etc.). In geology the presence of hydrogen in various forms alters the mechanical properties of many minerals in the earth's crust and enters directly into studies of tectonic processes. Evaluation of hydrogen in moon rocks increases our understanding of solar wind activity. In solar energy, hydrogen plays an important role in amorphous silicon used in fabricating solar cells. Detection of hydrogen is clearly important in the fossil fuel area. Many of the conventional elemental analysis techniques are not directly applicable to hydrogen determination and others can only detect hydrogen when it is in combination with other elements (i.e., H 2 O, OH, etc.). In this paper we discuss the use of ion beam techniques for obtaining quantitative depth information on hydrogen in materials and discuss the application of these techniques to several problems important in some of the areas mentioned

  9. Evaluation of Detrimental Effects on Mechanical Properties of Zry-4 Due to Hydrogen Absorption by means of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) In-Situ Observation of Crack Propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, L; Fernandez, G.E; Bertolino, G; Meyer, G

    2001-01-01

    The study of mechanical properties degradation of zirconium alloys due to hydrides assumes fundamental importance in the nuclear industry.During normal nuclear reactors operation, structural parts absorbed hydrogen generated from radiolysis of water, causing detrimental effects on mechanical properties.As a consequence, these materials are easily cracked in the presence of mechanical solicitation due to loss of ductility of the hydride-phase.The presence of cracks indicates fracture mechanic as the most suitable methodology in the study of mechanical properties degradation.In this work we used the crack tip opening displacement (CTOD) criteria to evaluate the detrimental effects on mechanical properties with the observation in SEM of crack propagation.The samples used were SEN (B) of Zry-4 and cathodic homogenous charged with hydrogen concentrations lower than 400 ppm

  10. Influence of hydrogenation and mechanical grinding on the structural and ferromagnetic properties of GdFeSi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevalier, Bernard; Duttine, Mathieu; Wattiaux, Alain [Universite de Bordeaux, CNRS ICMCB, Pessac (France)

    2016-08-01

    Hydrogen insertion into GdFeSi induces (i) a structural transition from a tetragonal CeFeSi-type to a tetragonal ZrCuSiAs-type, (ii) an anisotropic expansion of the unit cell parameters because the a parameter decreases, whereas the c parameter increases, and (iii) a decrease in Curie temperature from 121 to 20 K. On the contrary, an amorphous ferromagnet (T{sub C} = 65 K) is obtained by mechanical grinding of GdFeSi. The three compounds (GdFeSi, GdFeSiH, and amorphous GdFeSi) were investigated by {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. At 4.2 K, this study has revealed that the magnetically ordered Gd substructure produces a small transferred hyperfine magnetic field at the {sup 57}Fe nucleus.

  11. Synthesis, growth, structural, optical, thermal, electrical and mechanical properties of hydrogen bonded organic salt crystal: Triethylammonium-3, 5-dinitrosalicylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Madhu; Chandramohan, Angannan

    2017-04-01

    Triethylammonium-3, 5-dinitrosalicylate, an organic salt was synthesized and single crystals grown by slow solvent evaporation solution growth technique using methanol as a solvent. The presence of various functional groups and mode of vibrations has been confirmed by FT-IR spectroscopic technique. The UV-vis-NIR Spectrum was recorded in the range 200-1200 nm to find optical transmittance window and lower cut off wavelength of the title crystal. The formation of the salt and the molecular structure was confirmed by NMR spectroscopic technique. Crystal system, crystalline nature, cell parameters and hydrogen bonding interactions of the grown crystal were determined by single crystal x-ray diffraction analysis. The thermal characteristics of grown crystal were analyzed by thermo gravimetric and differential thermal analyses. Dielectric studies were carried out to study the distribution of charges within the crystal. The mechanical properties of the title crystal were studied by Vicker's microhardness technique.

  12. Mechanisms of hydrogen retention in metallic beryllium and beryllium oxide and properties of ion-induced beryllium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oberkofler, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of this thesis laboratory experiments on atomically clean beryllium surfaces were performed. They aim at a basic understanding of the mechanisms occurring upon interaction of a fusion plasma with a beryllium first wall. The retention and the temperature dependent release of implanted deuterium ions are investigated. An atomistic description is developed through simulations and through the comparison with calculations based on density functional theory. The results of these investigations are compared to the behaviour of hydrogen upon implantation into thermally grown beryllium oxide layers. Furthermore, beryllium nitride is produced by implantation of nitrogen into metallic beryllium and its properties are investigated. The results are interpreted with regard to the use of beryllium in a fusion reactor. (orig.)

  13. Modification of the quantum mechanical flux formula for electron-hydrogen ionization through Bohm's velocity field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randazzo, J. M.; Ancarani, L. U.

    2015-12-01

    For the single differential cross section (SDCS) for hydrogen ionization by electron impact (e -H problem), we propose a correction to the flux formula given by R. Peterkop [Theory of Ionization of Atoms by Electron Impact (Colorado Associated University Press, Boulder, 1977)]. The modification is based on an alternative way of defining the kinetic energy fraction, using Bohm's definition of velocities instead of the usual asymptotic kinematical, or geometrical, approximation. It turns out that the solution-dependent, modified energy fraction is equally related to the components of the probability flux. Compared to what is usually observed, the correction yields a finite and well-behaved SDCS value in the asymmetrical situation where one of the continuum electrons carries all the energy while the other has zero energy. We also discuss, within the S -wave model of the e -H ionization process, the continuity of the SDCS derivative at the equal energy sharing point, a property not so clearly observed in published benchmark results obtained with integral and S -matrix formulas with unequal final states.

  14. Final Report: Cathode Catalysis in Hydrogen/Oxygen Fuel Cells: New Catalysts, Mechanism, and Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gewirth, Andrew A. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Kenis, Paul J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Nuzzo, Ralph G. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Rauchfuss, Thomas B. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-01-18

    In this research, we prosecuted a comprehensive plan of research directed at developing new catalysts and new understandings relevant to the operation of low temperature hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells. The focal point of this work was one centered on the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR), the electrochemical process that most fundamentally limits the technological utility of these environmentally benign energy conversion devices. Over the period of grant support, we developed new ORR catalysts, based on Cu dimers and multimers. In this area, we developed substantial new insight into design rules required to establish better ORR materials, inspired by the three-Cu active site in laccase which has the highest ORR onset potential of any material known. We also developed new methods of characterization for the ORR on conventional (metal-based) catalysts. Finally, we developed a new platform to study the rate of proton transfer relevant to proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) reactions, of which the ORR is an exemplar. Other aspects of work involved theory and prototype catalyst testing.

  15. The Effect of Ion Energy and Substrate Temperature on Deuterium Trapping in Tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszell, John Patrick Town

    Tungsten is a candidate plasma facing material for next generation magnetic fusion devices such as ITER and there are major operational and safety issues associated with hydrogen (tritium) retention in plasma facing components. An ion gun was used to simulate plasma-material interactions under various conditions in order to study hydrogen retention characteristics of tungsten thus enabling better predictions of hydrogen retention in ITER. Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) was used to measure deuterium retention from ion irradiation while modelling of TDS spectra with the Tritium Migration Analysis Program (TMAP) was used to provide information about the trapping mechanisms involved in deuterium retention in tungsten. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) were used to determine the depth resolved composition of specimens used for irradiation experiments. Carbon and oxygen atoms will be among the most common contaminants within ITER. C and O contamination in polycrystalline tungsten (PCW) specimens even at low levels (˜0.1%) was shown to reduce deuterium retention by preventing diffusion of deuterium into the bulk of the specimen. This diffusion barrier was also responsible for the inhibition of blister formation during irradiations at 500 K. These observations may provide possible mitigation techniques for problems associated with tritium retention and mechanical damage to plasma facing components caused by hydrogen implantation. Deuterium trapping in PCW and single crystal tungsten (SCW) was studied as a function of ion energy and substrate temperature. Deuterium retention was shown to decrease with decreasing ion energy below 100 eV/D+. Irradiation of tungsten specimens with 10 eV/D+ ions was shown to retain up to an order of magnitude less deuterium than irradiation with 500 eV/D+ ions. Furthermore, the retention mechanism for deuterium was shown to be consistent across the entire energy range studied (10-500 e

  16. Formation of polyhedral ceria nanoparticles with enhanced catalytic CO oxidation activity in thermal plasma via a hydrogen mediated shape control mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Jie; Zhang Yaohua; Song Xubo; Li Xingguo

    2011-01-01

    Ceria nanoparticles with well defined facets are prepared in argon–hydrogen thermal plasma followed by controlled oxidation. With increasing hydrogen fraction in the plasma, a clear sphere-to-polyhedron shape transition is observed. The heat released during the hydrogenation of cerium, which significantly enhances the species mobility on the surface, favors the growth of well defined facets. The polyhedron ceria nanoparticles, though lower in specific surface area, exhibit superior catalytic performance for CO oxidation over the round particles, which is attributed to the higher density of the reactive {200} and {220} facets on the surface. The hydrogen mediated shape control mechanism provides new insights into the shape control of nanoparticles during thermal plasma processing.

  17. The kinetics of hydrogen removal from liquid sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gwyther, J.R.; Whittingham, A.C.

    1981-01-01

    The rates of hydrogen removal from liquid sodium-sodium hydride mixtures have been measured as a function of sodium stirring rate at temperatures up to 420 0 C. Two techniques have been employed - removal under continuous evacuation in which hydrogen flow rates were measured using a capillary flow technique and by argon purging in which hydrogen concentrations in the argon carrier gas were measured by gas chromatography. The results have been used to assess the feasibility of thermal decomposition of sodium hydride for the regeneration of hydride-laden LMFBR cold traps. Studies on the kinetics of desorption of hydrogen from solution in liquid sodium at temperatures up to 400 0 C are also presented and possible kinetic mechanisms discussed. (orig.)

  18. Optical and thermal energy discharge from tritiated solid hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnotta, F.; Mapoles, E.R.; Collins, G.W.; Souers, P.C.

    1991-01-01

    The authors are investigating mechanisms of energy storage and release in tritiated solid hydrogens, by a variety of techniques including ESR, NMR and thermal and optical emission. The nuclear decay of a triton in solid hydrogen initiates the conversion of nuclear energy into stored chemical energy by producing unpaired hydrogen atoms which are trapped within the molecular lattice. The ability to store large quantities of atoms in this manner has been demonstrated and can serve as a basis for new forms of high energy density materials. This paper presents preliminary results of a study of the optical emission from solid hydrogen containing tritium over the visible and near infrared (NIR) spectral regions. Specifically, they have studied optical emission from DT and T 2 using CCD, silicon diode and germanium diode arrays. 8 refs., 6 figs

  19. Flaw preparations for HSST program vessel fracture mechanics testing: mechanical-cyclic pumping and electron-beam weld-hydrogen-charge cracking schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holz, P.P.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of the document is to present schemes for flaw preparations in heavy section steel. The ability of investigators to grow representative sharp cracks of known size, location, and orientation is basic to representative field testing to determine data for potential flaw propagation, fracture behavior, and margin against fracture for high-pressure-, high-temperature-service steel vessels subjected to increasing pressurization and/or thermal shock. Gaging for analytical stress and strain procedures and ultrasonic and acoustic emission instrumentation can then be applied to monitor the vessel during testing and to study crack growth. This report presents flaw preparations for HSST fracture mechanics testing. Cracks were grown by two techniques: (1) a mechanical method wherein a premachined notch was sharpened by pressurization and (2) a method combining electron-beam welds and hydrogen charging to crack the chill zone of a rapidly placed autogenous weld. The mechanical method produces a naturally occurring growth shape controlled primarily by the shape of the machined notch; the welding-electrochemical method produces flaws of uniform depth from the surface of a wall or machined notch. Theories, details, discussions, and procedures are covered for both of the flaw-growing schemes

  20. Quantum-mechanical study of ionization in slow collisions of antiprotons with hydrogen atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakimoto, Kazuhiro

    2004-01-01

    The cross sections for the ionization p+H→p+p+e at low collision energies are computed with a complete quantum-mechanical method of time-dependent wave-packet propagation, which was applied to the protonium formation (→pp+e) by the present author [Phys. Rev. A 65, 012706 (2002)]. The ionization process shows very large cross sections even near threshold energy. An impact-parameter semiclassical method, in which the trajectory bending is taken into account by the introduction of the adiabatic potential, is also examined for the calculation of the ionization cross section. The semiclassical results are in good agreement with the quantum-mechanical results

  1. HYDROGEN VACANCY INTERACTION IN TUNGSTEN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRANSENS, [No Value; ELKERIEM, MSA; PLEITER, F

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen-vacancy interaction in tungsten was investigated by means of the perturbed angular correlation technique, using the isotope In-111 as a probe. Hydrogen trapping at an In-111-vacancy cluster manifests itself as a change of the local electric field gradient, which gives rise to an observable

  2. On the Mechanism of In Nanoparticle Formation by Exposing ITO Thin Films to Hydrogen Plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Zheng; Maurice, Jean-Luc; Chen, Wanghua; Guilet, Stéphane; Cambril, Edmond; Lafosse, Xavier; Couraud, Laurent; Merghem, Kamel; Yu, Linwei; Bouchoule, Sophie; Roca I Cabarrocas, Pere

    2017-10-31

    We present our systematic work on the in situ generation of In nanoparticles (NPs) from the reduction of ITO thin films by hydrogen (H 2 ) plasma exposure. In contrast to NP deposition from the vapor phase (i.e., evaporation), the ITO surface can be considered to be a solid reservoir of In atoms thanks to H 2 plasma reduction. On one hand, below the In melting temperature, solid In NP formation is governed by the island-growth mode, which is a self-limiting process because the H 2 plasma/ITO interaction will be gradually eliminated by the growing In NPs that cover the ITO surface. On the other hand, we show that above the melting temperature In droplets prefer to grow along the grain boundaries on the ITO surface and dramatic coalescence occurs when the growing NPs connect with each other. This growth-connection-coalescence behavior is even strengthened on In/ITO bilayers, where In particles larger than 10 μm can be formed, which are made of evaporated In atoms and in situ released ones. Thanks to this understanding, we manage to disperse dense evaporated In NPs under H 2 plasma exposure when inserting an ITO layer between them and substrate like c-Si wafer or glass by modifying the substrate surface chemistry. Further studies are needed for more precise control of this self-assembling method. We expect that our findings are not limited to ITO thin films but could be applicable to various metal NPs generation from the corresponding metal oxide thin films.

  3. The mechanism of hydrogen storage in single-walled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Shiying; Yang Ziqin

    2012-01-01

    The C-H bong energy, 1.88 eV, and the bond length, 0.113 nm, are obtained from the calculation with Gaussian03 program. It is known that the H-H bong energy is 4.748 eV and the bond length is 0.074 nm. Obviously, H-H bond energy is greater than the C-H bond energy. So the hydrogen storage of carbon nanotube is due mainly to the physisorption and the chemisorption almost doesn't happen at moderate temperatures and pressures. In addition, LJ potential has been used to calculate the potential between a H 2 molecule and the carbon nanotube. The H 2 molecule is placed in three radial distributions: (a) above the center of a hexagon surrounded by 6 C atoms, (b) above the center of a C-C bond, (c) above the center of a C atom. The result shows that whether the H 2 molecule is adsorbed into and outside the nanotube or to the center and the end of the nanotube, there is the lowest potential when the H 2 molecule is above the center of a hexagon surrounded by 6 C atoms. When the H 2 molecule is absorbed to the center of nanotube, the equilibrium distances between it and the nanotube wall for H2 adsorbed into and outside the nanotube are 0.320 nm and 0. 309 nm, respectively. While in the case that it is adsorbed to the end of the nanotube, the two corresponding distances are 0.324 nm and 0.314 nm, respectively. (authors)

  4. Hydrogen Permeation, and Mechanical and Tribological Behavior, of CrNx Coatings Deposited at Various Bias Voltages on IN718 by Direct Current Reactive Sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Egor B. Kashkarov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the current work, the microstructure, hydrogen permeability, and properties of chromium nitride (CrNx thin films deposited on the Inconel 718 superalloy using direct current reactive sputtering are investigated. The influence of the substrate bias voltage on the crystal structure, mechanical, and tribological properties before and after hydrogen exposure was studied. It was found that increasing the substrate bias voltage leads to densification of the coating. X-ray diffraction (XRD results reveal a change from mixed fcc-CrN + hcp-Cr2N to the approximately stoichiometric hcp-Cr2N phase with increasing substrate bias confirmed by wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS. The texture coefficients of (113, (110, and (111 planes vary significantly with increasing substrate bias voltage. The hydrogen permeability was measured by gas-phase hydrogenation. The CrN coating deposited at 60 V with mixed c-CrN and (113 textured hcp-Cr2N phases exhibits the lowest hydrogen absorption at 873 K. It is suggested that the crystal orientation is only one parameter influencing the permeation resistance of the CrNx coating together with the film structure, the presence of mixing phases, and the packing density of the structure. After hydrogenation, the hardness increased for all coatings, which could be related to the formation of a Cr2O3 oxide film on the surface, as well as the defect formation after hydrogen loading. Tribological tests reveal that hydrogenation leads to a decrease of the friction coefficient by up to 40%. The lowest value of 0.25 ± 0.02 was reached for the CrNx coating deposited at 60 V after hydrogenation.

  5. Effect of Hydrogen Exposure on Mechanical and Tribological Behavior of CrxN Coatings Deposited at Different Pressures on IN718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksei Obrosov

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, the properties of the CrxN coatings deposited on the Inconel 718 superalloy using direct current reactive magnetron sputtering are investigated. The influence of working pressure on the microstructure, mechanical, and tribological properties of the CrxN coatings before and after high-temperature hydrogen exposure is studied. The cross-sectional scanning electron micrographs indicate the columnar structure of the coatings, which changes from dense and compact columns to large columns with increasing working pressure. The Cr/N ratio increases from 1.4 to 1.9 with increasing working pressure from 300 to 900 mPa, respectively. X-ray diffraction analysis reveals a change from mixed hcp-Cr2N and fcc-CrN structure to approximately stoichiometric Cr2N phase. After gas-phase hydrogenation, the coating deposited at 300 mPa exhibits the lowest hydrogen absorption at 600 °C of all investigated coatings. The results indicate that the dense mixed cubic and hexagonal structure is preferential for hydrogen permeation resistance due to the presence of cubic phase with higher packing density in comparison to the hexagonal structure. After hydrogenation, no changes in phase composition were observed; however, a small amount of hydrogen is accumulated in the coatings. An increase of coating hardness and elastic modulus was observed after hydrogen exposure. Tribological tests reveal that hydrogenation leads to a decrease of the friction coefficient up to 20%–30%. The best value of 0.25 was reached for hydrogen exposed CrxN coating deposited at 300 mPa.

  6. Mechanism of phosphorus passivation of near-interface oxide traps in 4H–SiC MOS devices investigated by CCDLTS and DFT calculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayawardena, Asanka; Shen, X.; Mooney, P. M.; Dhar, Sarit

    2018-06-01

    Interfacial charge trapping in 4H–SiC MOS capacitors with P doped SiO2 or phospho-silicate glass (PSG) as a gate dielectric has been investigated with temperature dependent capacitance–voltage measurements and constant capacitance deep level transient spectroscopy (CCDLTS) measurements. The measurements indicate that P doping in the dielectric results in significant reduction of near-interface electron traps that have energy levels within 0.5 eV of the 4H–SiC conduction band edge. Extracted trap densities confirm that the phosphorus induced near-interface trap reduction is significantly more effective than interfacial nitridation, which is typically used for 4H–SiC MOSFET processing. The CCDLTS measurements reveal that the two broad near-interface trap peaks, named ‘O1’ and ‘O2’, with activation energies around 0.15 eV and 0.4 eV below the 4H–SiC conduction band that are typically observed in thermal oxides on 4H–SiC, are also present in PSG devices. Previous atomic scale ab initio calculations suggested these O1 and O2 traps to be carbon dimers substituted for oxygen dimers (CO=CO) and interstitial Si (Sii) in SiO2, respectively. Theoretical considerations in this work suggest that the presence of P in the near-interfacial region reduces the stability of the CO=CO defects and reduces the density of Sii defects through the network restructuring. Qualitative comparison of results in this work and reported work suggest that the O1 and O2 traps in SiO2/4H–SiC MOS system negatively impact channel mobility in 4H–SiC MOSFETs.

  7. Positive effect of hydrogen-induced vacancies on mechanical alloying of Fe and Al

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čížek, J.; Lukáč, F.; Procházka, I.; Vlček, M.; Jirásková, Yvonna; Švec, P.; Janičkovič, D.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 629, APR (2015), s. 22-26 ISSN 0925-8388 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/1350 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Nanostructured materials * Mechanical alloying * Vacancy formation * Positron spectroscopies * Mössbauer spectroscopy * X-ray diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.014, year: 2015

  8. Observation of Hyperfine Transitions in Trapped Ground-State Antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Olin, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the first observation of stimulated magnetic resonance transitions between the hyperfine levels of trapped ground state atomic antihydrogen, confirming its presence in the ALPHA apparatus. Our observations show that these transitions are consistent with the values in hydrogen to within 4~parts~in~$10^3$. Simulations of the trapped antiatoms in a microwave field are consistent with our measurements.

  9. Towards Antihydrogen Confinement with the ALPHA Antihydrogen Trap

    CERN Document Server

    Fujiwara, M.C.; Bertsche, W.; Boston, A.; Bowe, P.D.; Cesar, C.L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Chartier, M.; Deutsch, A.; Fajans, J.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D.R.; Gomberoff, K.; Hangst, J.S.; Hardy, W.N.; Hayano, R.S.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M.J.; Jorgensen, L.V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Page, R.D.; Povilus, A.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; Silveira, D.M.; Storey, J.W.; Thompson, R.I.; van der Werf, D.P.; Wurtele, J.S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2006-01-01

    ALPHA is an international project that has recently begun experimentation at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator (AD) facility. The primary goal of ALPHA is stable trapping of cold antihydrogen atoms with the ultimate goal of precise spectroscopic comparisons with hydrogen. We discuss the status of the ALPHA project and the prospects for antihydrogen trapping.

  10. Observation of hyperfine transitions in trapped ground-state antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collaboration: A. Olin for the ALPHA Collaboration

    2015-08-15

    This paper discusses the first observation of stimulated magnetic resonance transitions between the hyperfine levels of trapped ground state atomic antihydrogen, confirming its presence in the ALPHA apparatus. Our observations show that these transitions are consistent with the values in hydrogen to within 4 parts in 10{sup 3}. Simulations of the trapped antiatoms in a microwave field are consistent with our measurements.

  11. Multiscale study on hydrogen mobility in metallic fusion divertor material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinola, K.

    2010-01-01

    For achieving efficient fusion energy production, the plasma-facing wall materials of the fusion reactor should ensure long time operation. In the next step fusion device, ITER, the first wall region facing the highest heat and particle load, i.e. the divertor area, will mainly consist of tiles based on tungsten. During the reactor operation, the tungsten material is slowly but inevitably saturated with tritium. Tritium is the relatively short-lived hydrogen isotope used in the fusion reaction. The amount of tritium retained in the wall materials should be minimized and its recycling back to the plasma must be unrestrained, otherwise it cannot be used for fueling the plasma. A very expensive and thus economically not viable solution is to replace the first walls quite often. A better solution is to heat the walls to temperatures where tritium is released. Unfortunately, the exact mechanisms of hydrogen release in tungsten are not known. In this thesis both experimental and computational methods have been used for studying the release and retention of hydrogen in tungsten. The experimental work consists of hydrogen implantations into pure polycrystalline tungsten, the determination of the hydrogen concentrations using ion beam analyses (IBA) and monitoring the out-diffused hydrogen gas with thermodesorption spectrometry (TDS) as the tungsten samples are heated at elevated temperatures. Combining IBA methods with TDS, the retained amount of hydrogen is obtained as well as the temperatures needed for the hydrogen release. With computational methods the hydrogen-defect interactions and implantation-induced irradiation damage can be examined at the atomic level. The method of multiscale modelling combines the results obtained from computational methodologies applicable at different length and time scales. Electron density functional theory calculations were used for determining the energetics of the elementary processes of hydrogen in tungsten, such as diffusivity and

  12. Mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) action on synaptic transmission at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerasimova, E; Lebedeva, J; Yakovlev, A; Zefirov, A; Giniatullin, R; Sitdikova, G

    2015-09-10

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is a widespread gasotransmitter also known as a powerful neuroprotective agent in the central nervous system. However, the action of H2S in peripheral synapses is much less studied. In the current project we studied the modulatory effects of the H2S donor sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) on synaptic transmission in the mouse neuromuscular junction using microelectrode technique. Using focal recordings of presynaptic response and evoked transmitter release we have shown that NaHS (300 μM) increased evoked end-plate currents (EPCs) without changes of presynaptic waveforms which indicated the absence of NaHS effects on sodium and potassium currents of motor nerve endings. Using intracellular recordings it was shown that NaHS increased the frequency of miniature end-plate potentials (MEPPs) without changing their amplitudes indicating a pure presynaptic effect. Furthermore, NaHS increased the amplitude of end-plate potentials (EPPs) without influencing the resting membrane potential of muscle fibers. L-cysteine, a substrate of H2S synthesis induced, similar to NaHS, an increase of EPC amplitudes whereas inhibitors of H2S synthesis (β-cyano-L-alanine and aminooxyacetic acid) had the opposite effect. Inhibition of adenylate cyclase using MDL 12,330A hydrochloride (MDL 12,330A) or elevation of cAMP level with 8-(4-chlorophenylthio)-adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (pCPT-cAMP) completely prevented the facilitatory action of NaHS indicating involvement of the cAMP signaling cascade. The facilitatory effect of NaHS was significantly diminished when intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) was buffered by 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester (BAPTA-AM) and ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid acetoxymethyl ester (EGTA-AM). Activation of ryanodine receptors by caffeine or ryanodine increased acetylcholine release and prevented further action of NaHS on transmitter release, likely due to

  13. Generation mechanism of hydrogen peroxide in dc plasma with a liquid electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Nozomi; Ishibashi, Naoto

    2018-04-01

    The production mechanism of liquid-phase H2O2 in dc driven plasma in O2 and Ar with a water electrode was investigated. When a water anode was used, the concentration of H2O2 increased linearly with the treatment time. The production rate was proportional to the discharge current, and there was no dependence on the gap distance. On the other hand, the production rate was much smaller with a water anode. We concluded that the production of gas-phase H2O2 in the cathode sheath just above a water cathode and diffusion of this H2O2 into the water constitute the key mechanism in the production of liquid-phase H2O2.

  14. Mechanism of fast lattice diffusion of hydrogen in palladium: Interplay of quantum fluctuations and lattice strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimizuka, Hajime; Ogata, Shigenobu; Shiga, Motoyuki

    2018-01-01

    Understanding the underlying mechanism of the nanostructure-mediated high diffusivity of H in Pd is of recent scientific interest and also crucial for industrial applications. Here, we present a decisive scenario explaining the emergence of the fast lattice-diffusion mode of interstitial H in face-centered cubic Pd, based on the quantum mechanical natures of both electrons and nuclei under finite strains. Ab initio path-integral molecular dynamics was applied to predict the temperature- and strain-dependent free energy profiles for H migration in Pd over a temperature range of 150-600 K and under hydrostatic tensile strains of 0.0%-2.4%; such strain conditions are likely to occur in real systems, especially around the elastic fields induced by nanostructured defects. The simulated results revealed that, for preferential H location at octahedral sites, as in unstrained Pd, the activation barrier for H migration (Q ) was drastically increased with decreasing temperature owing to nuclear quantum effects. In contrast, as tetrahedral sites increased in stability with lattice expansion, nuclear quantum effects became less prominent and ceased impeding H migration. This implies that the nature of the diffusion mechanism gradually changes from quantum- to classical-like as the strain is increased. For H atoms in Pd at the hydrostatic strain of ˜2.4 % , we determined that the mechanism promoted fast lattice diffusion (Q =0.11 eV) of approximately 20 times the rate of conventional H diffusion (Q =0.23 eV) in unstrained Pd at a room temperature of 300 K.

  15. Hydrogen influence on metals behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tison, P.

    1984-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes are used in order to investigate the influence of natural oxides and trapping on the permeability of low alloys steels, and martensitic, ferritic, austenitic stainless steels. The permeability of superficial oxides is investigated by reducing and reoxidising the upstream and downstream surfaces (gas ingoing and outgoing faces). The simultaneous or successive use of hydrogen and deuterium enables a direct demonstration of trapping during permeation measurements and a study of the interactions between the diffusing gas and hydrogen absorbed during steel making and processing [fr

  16. Research in Hydrogen Passivation of Defects and Impurities in Silicon: Final Report, 2 May 2000-2 July 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashok, S.

    2004-01-01

    This subcontract report describes hydrogenating Si samples by different methods such as low-energy implantation, electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma, and thermal diffusion. The samples were provided through NREL. The experimental work, carried out at Penn State, involved the study of hydrogen interaction with defects, trapping, migration, and formation of complexes. The principal vehicle for the latter study was ion implantation, and the intent to understand mechanisms of defect passivation and activation by hydrogen. NREL implemented a study of hydrogen passivation of impurities and defects in silicon solar cells. The work included theoretical and experimental components performed at different universities. The theoretical studies consisted of the calculation of the structure and parameters related to hydrogen diffusion and interactions of hydrogen with transition-metal impurities in silicon. Experimental studies involved measurements of hydrogen and hydrogen-impurity complexes, and diffusion properties of various species of hydrogen in Si. The experimental work at Penn State included introduction of hydrogen in a variety of PV Si by ECR plasma, low-energy ion implantation, and thermal diffusion. The specific tasks were the evaluation of hydrogen interaction with defects engineered by ion implantation; defect passivation, activation, and migration in hydrogenated Si under thermal anneal; and electrical activity of hydrogen-impurity complexes. Electrical characterization entailed I-V and C-V measurements, spreading resistance, and deep-level transient spectroscopy (DLTS)

  17. Influence of hydrogen on the behaviour of metals - Mechanical and kinetic properties of fatigue cracking of steady (ZXNCTD-26-15) and unsteady (Z2CN-18-10) austenitic stainless steels. Role of heat treatments and of cathodic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huwarts, Pascale; Habashi, Mahmoud

    1984-01-01

    In a context which is characterized by an increased demand in high resistance stainless steels, austenitic stainless steels with structural hardening have been notably studied. These are ductile materials in over-hardened state, therefore machinable, and can be hardened by ageing heat treatment after machining. The author reports the study of the tensile and resilience mechanical behaviour, and of the kinetic fatigue cracking of three austenitic stainless steels in presence of hydrogen. One of them is unsteady and belongs to the 300 family, whereas the two others are grades of a steady steel with structural hardening (26 pc Ni - 15 pc Cr). The author more particularly focused on the influence of thermal treatments and of phase transformation on hydrogen-induced embrittlement of these steels. After a bibliographical study on austenitic stainless steels and on their behaviour with respect to hydrogen, the author reports a detailed analysis of the studied steels. He reports tests and their results, and discusses the role of microstructure in the mechanical behaviour of these steels in presence and in absence of cathodic hydrogen [fr

  18. Trapped Inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Daniel; Horn, Bart; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Senatore, Leonardo; /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /Harvard U., Phys. Dept. /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Silverstein, Eva; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2009-06-19

    We analyze a distinctive mechanism for inflation in which particle production slows down a scalar field on a steep potential, and show how it descends from angular moduli in string compactifications. The analysis of density perturbations - taking into account the integrated effect of the produced particles and their quantum fluctuations - requires somewhat new techniques that we develop. We then determine the conditions for this effect to produce sixty e-foldings of inflation with the correct amplitude of density perturbations at the Gaussian level, and show that these requirements can be straightforwardly satisfied. Finally, we estimate the amplitude of the non-Gaussianity in the power spectrum and find a significant equilateral contribution.

  19. Improved hydrogen storage properties of LiAlH4 by mechanical milling with TiF3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Lei; Cai, Jiaxing; Zhao, Lipeng; Gao, Wenhong; Liu, Jian; Wang, Yijing

    2015-01-01

    Dehydrogenation behavior of LiAlH 4 (lithium alanate) admixed with TiF 3 is investigated by pressure-composition-temperature (PCT), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The TiF 3 addition enhances kinetics of LiAlH 4 and decreases the decomposition temperature. The LiAlH 4 -2 mol % TiF 3 sample starts to release hydrogen at about 35 °C and the dehydrogenation rate reaches a maximum value at 108.4 °C, compared with 145 °C and 179.9 °C for the as-received LiAlH 4 . As for the dehydrogenation kinetics, the LiAlH 4 -2 mol % TiF 3 sample releases about 7.0 wt % H 2 at 140 °C within 80 min. In comparison, the as-received LiAlH 4 sample releases only 0.8 wt % hydrogen under the same conditions. The existence of proposed catalyst, Al 3 Ti formed in-situ in the process of dehydrogenation, has been confirmed experimentally by XRD measurements. The activation energy of LiAlH 4 -2 mol % TiF 3 composite is deduced to be 66.76 kJ mol −1 and 88.21 kJ mol −1 for the first and second reaction stages of LiAlH 4 dehydrogenation. - Highlights: • TiF 3 considerably enhances the dehydrogenation kinetics of LiAlH 4 . • TiF 3 -doped LiAlH 4 dehydrogenates even at room temperature. • Low activation energy of the dehydrogenation reaction. • Al 3 Ti formed in-situ helps to explain the dehydrogenation mechanism

  20. The dynamics of highly excited hydrogen atoms in microwave fields: Application of the Floquet picture of quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holthaus, M.

    1990-04-01

    The study of short-time phenomena in strongly interacting quantum systems requires on the theoretical side the development of methods, which are both non-perturbative and 'dynamical', which thus regard the change of outer parameters in the slope of time. For systems with a periodic, fast and a further slow, parametric time dependence both requirements are fulfilled by the Floquet picture of quantum mechanics. This picture, which starts from the adiabatic evolution on effective quasi-energy surfaces, is presented in the first chapter of the present thesis, whereby especially the term of the adiabaticity for periodically time dependent systems is explained. In the second chapter the Floquet theory is applied to the description of microwave experiments with highly excited hydrogen atoms. Here it is shown that the Floquet picture permits to understand a manifold of experimental observations under a unified point of view. Really these microwave experiments offer an ideal possibility for the test of the Floquet picture: On the one hand there is the strength of the outer field of the same order of magnitude as that of the nuclear field, by which the highly excited electron is bound, on the other hand in the experiment an extremely precise control of amplitude, frequency, and pulse shape is possible, so that the conditions for a detailed comparison of theory and experiment are given. The insights, which model calculations yield in the dynamics of highly excited hydrogen atoms in strong alternating fields, allow a prediction of further effects, for which it is to be looked for in new experiments. In the following third chapter some further aspects of these model calculations are discussed, whereby also common properties of the dynamics of excited atoms in microwave fields and that of atoms under the influence of strong laser pulses are discussed. (orig./HSI) [de

  1. Exchange reaction between hydrogen and deuterium. II - Proposal for an heterogeneous initiation mechanism of gaseous phase reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marteau, Chantal; Gaillard-Cusin, Francoise; James, Henri [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France). Centre de Recherches sur la Chimie de Combustion et des Hautes Temperatures

    1978-05-01

    Investigation of experimental data related to evolution period exhibited by H/sub 2/-D/sub 2/ exchange process requires to take into account the variation against time of every atomic species -adsorbed or not- implied in the reaction mechanism. The formation of first chain carriers involves: - chemisorption of either gaseous reactant on the surface active centres (..sigma..), e.g.: ..sigma.. + 1/2 H/sub 2/ reversible ..sigma..H; - consecutive generation of atomic species through hetero-homogeneous transfer between chemisorbed species (..sigma..H) and gaseous molecules: ..sigma..H+H/sub 2/..--> sigma..+H/sub 2/+H/sup 0/, ..sigma..H+D/sub 2/..--> sigma..+HD+D/sup 0/. Therefore, it can be shown that the heterogeneous initiation process of a gas phase reaction identifies to a chain linear mechanism. Such an heterogeneous sequence conditions the further proceeding of the homogeneous chain reaction; both evolutions being kinematically connected. Rate constant of hydrogen adsorption on silica glass: ksub(a1) approximately 10/sup 14/ exp(-47/RT)Isup(0,5).molesup(-0,5).S/sup -1/ has been evaluated.

  2. Reaction mechanisms and evaluation of effective process operation for catalytic oxidation and coagulation by ferrous solution and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.H.; Moon, H.J.; Kim, Y.M. [Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Sangmyung Univ., Cheonan (Korea); Bae, W.K. [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hanyang Univ., Ansan, Kyounggi (Korea)

    2003-07-01

    This research was carried out to evaluate the removal efficiencies of COD{sub cr} and colour for the dyeing wastewater by ferrous solution and the different dosage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in Fenton process. In the case of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} divided dosage, 7:3 was more effective than 3:7 to remove COD{sub cr} and colour. The results showed that COD was mainly removed by Fenton coagulation, where the ferric ions are formed in the initial step of Fenton reaction. On the other hand colour was removed by Fenton oxidation rather than Fenton coagulation. This paper also aims at pursuing to investigate the effective removal mechanisms using ferrous ion coagulation, ferric ion coagulation and Fenton oxidation process. The removal mechanism of COD{sub cr} and colour was mainly coagulation by ferrous ion, ferric ion and Fenton oxidation. The removal efficiencies were dependent on the ferric ion amount at the beginning of the reaction. However the final removal efficiency of COD and colour was in the order of Fenton oxidation, ferric ion coagulation and ferrous ion coagulation. The reason of the highest removal efficiency by Fenton oxidation can be explained by the chain reactions with ferrous solution, ferric ion and hydrogen peroxide. (orig.)

  3. Toxic effects and possible mechanisms of hydrogen sulfide and/or ammonia on porcine oocyte maturation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei-Lei; Zhao, Yong; Luo, Shi-Ming; Ma, Jun-Yu; Ge, Zhao-Jia; Shen, Wei; Yin, Shen

    2018-03-15

    Previous studies suggest that hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and ammonia (NH 3 ) are two major air pollutants which can cause damage to porcine health. However, the mechanisms underlying toxic effects of these compounds on porcine oocyte maturation are not clear. To clarify the mechanism, we evaluated the oocyte quality by detecting some events during oocytes maturation. In our study, porcine oocytes were cultured with different concentrations of Na 2 S and/or NH 4 Cl in vitro and the rate of the first polar body extrusion decreased significantly. Also, actin filament was seriously disrupted to damage the cytoskeleton which resulted in reduced rate of oocyte maturation. We explored the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and found that the ROS level was increased significantly after Na 2 S treatment but not after NH 4 Cl treatment. Moreover, early stage apoptosis rate was significantly increased and autophagy protein LC3 B expression level was higher in oocytes treated with Na 2 S and/or NH 4 Cl, which might be caused by ROS elevation. Additionally, exposure to Na 2 S and/or NH 4 Cl also caused ROS generation and early apoptosis in cumulus cells, which might further affect oocyte maturation in vitro. In summary, our data suggested that exposure to H 2 S and/or NH 3 decreased porcine oocyte maturation in vitro, which might be caused by actin disruption, ROS generation, early apoptosis and autophagy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Computational study of hydrogen shifts and ring-opening mechanisms in α-pinene ozonolysis products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kurtén, Theo; Rissanen, Matti P.; Mackeprang, Kasper

    2015-01-01

    , sterically unhindered) H-shifts of all four peroxy radicals formed in the ozonolysis of α-pinene using density functional (ωB97XD) and coupled cluster [CCSD(T)-F12] theory. In contrast to the related but chemically simpler cyclohexene ozonolysis system, none of the calculated H-shifts have rate constants...... products in the α-pinene ozonolysis system, additional ring-opening reaction mechanisms breaking the cyclobutyl ring are therefore needed. We further investigate possible uni- and bimolecular pathways for opening the cyclobutyl ring in the α-pinene ozonolysis system....

  5. Radiolytic and thermolytic bubble gas hydrogen composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodham, W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-12-11

    This report describes the development of a mathematical model for the estimation of the hydrogen composition of gas bubbles trapped in radioactive waste. The model described herein uses a material balance approach to accurately incorporate the rates of hydrogen generation by a number of physical phenomena and scale the aforementioned rates in a manner that allows calculation of the final hydrogen composition.

  6. Reaction Mechanism of Tar Evolution in Biomass Steam Gasification for Hydrogen Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shingo Katayama; Masahiro Suzuki; Atsushi Tsutsumi

    2006-01-01

    Reaction mechanism of tar evolution in steam gasification of biomass was investigated with a continuous cross-flow moving bed type differential reactor, in which tar and gases can be fractionated according to reaction time. We estimated that time profile of tar and gas evolution in the gasification of cellulose, xylan, and lignin, and compared it with experimental product time profile of real biomass gasification. The experimental tar evolution rate is different from estimated tar evolution rate. The estimated tar evolution rate has a peak at 20 s. On the other hand, the experimental tar evolution rate at 20 s is little, and tar at initial stage includes more water-soluble and water-insoluble compounds. It can be concluded that in the real biomass steam gasification the evolution of tar from cellulose and lignin component was found to be precipitated by that from hemi-cellulose component. (authors)

  7. Effect of oxygen, nitrogen, and hydrogen on the mechanical properties of Nb-752

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahoney, W.M.; Paton, N.E.

    1974-01-01

    Uniaxial tensile properties of the Nb-base alloy Nb-752 were determined as a function of O, N and H content from -196 to 200 0 C. Each of these impurities increased the temperature at which a ductile-brittle transition occurs. Although ductility was severely reduced, strength parameters were relatively unchanged, making detection of embrittlement by hardness testing difficult. Impurity levels for embrittlement were sufficiently low and the affinity of Nb-752 for contamination sufficiently great that processing operations require strict control. Rhe mechanism of this impurity embrittlement is not well understood. However, observations of fracture surfaces of brittle failures reveal mixed intergranular cleavage with a uniform distribution of precipitates throughout grain boundaries. These observations are discussed in the light of current theories. (U.S.)

  8. On the mechanism of hydrogen-promoted gold-catalyzed CO oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Quinet, Elodie

    2009-12-10

    The kinetics of CO oxidation, H2 oxidation and preferential CO oxidation (PrOx) over Au/Al2O3 catalysts have been investigated. The catalysts with the smallest particles (∼2 nm) are the most active for all three reactions. As previously observed, the presence of H2 greatly promotes CO oxidation, which becomes faster than CO-free H2 oxidation at low temperature. From these results and on the basis of previous works, we propose a complete PrOx mechanism. The reaction involves Au-OOH, Au-OH and Au-H intermediates, also involved in H2 oxidation, and benefits from the presence of low-coordination sites. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. On the mechanism of hydrogen-promoted gold-catalyzed CO oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Quinet, Elodie; Piccolo, Laurent; Morfin, Franck; Avenier, Priscilla; Diehl, Fabrice; Caps, Valerie; Rousset, Jean Luc

    2009-01-01

    The kinetics of CO oxidation, H2 oxidation and preferential CO oxidation (PrOx) over Au/Al2O3 catalysts have been investigated. The catalysts with the smallest particles (∼2 nm) are the most active for all three reactions. As previously observed, the presence of H2 greatly promotes CO oxidation, which becomes faster than CO-free H2 oxidation at low temperature. From these results and on the basis of previous works, we propose a complete PrOx mechanism. The reaction involves Au-OOH, Au-OH and Au-H intermediates, also involved in H2 oxidation, and benefits from the presence of low-coordination sites. © 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fast and slow border traps in MOS devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleetwood, D.M.

    1996-01-01

    Convergent lines of evidence are reviewed which show that near-interfacial oxide traps (border traps) that exchange charge with the Si can strongly affect the performance, radiation response, and long-term reliability of MOS devices. Observable effects of border traps include capacitance-voltage (C-V) hysteresis, enhanced l/f noise, compensation of trapped holes, and increased thermally stimulated current in MOS capacitors. Effects of faster (switching times between ∼10 -6 s and ∼1 s) and slower (switching times greater than ∼1 s) border traps have been resolved via a dual-transistor technique. In conjunction with studies of MOS electrical response, electron paramagnetic resonance and spin dependent recombination studies suggest that E' defects (trivalent Si centers in SiO 2 associated with O vacancies) can function as border traps in MOS devices exposed to ionizing radiation or high-field stress. Hydrogen-related centers may also be border traps

  11. Shrew trap efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gambalemoke, Mbalitini; Mukinzi, Itoka; Amundala, Drazo

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the efficiency of four trap types (pitfall, Sherman LFA, Victor snap and Museum Special snap traps) to capture shrews. This experiment was conducted in five inter-riverine forest blocks in the region of Kisangani. The total trapping effort was 6,300, 9,240, 5,280 and 5,460 trap......, our results indicate that pitfall traps are the most efficient for capturing shrews: not only do they have a higher efficiency (yield), but the taxonomic diversity of shrews is also higher when pitfall traps are used....

  12. The mechanism of persistent photoconductivity induced by minority carrier trapping effect in ultraviolet photo-detector made of polycrystalline diamond film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lanxi; Chen Xuekang; Wu Gan; Guo Wantu; Cao Shengzhu; Shang Kaiwen; Han Weihua

    2011-01-01

    Performances of long persistent photoconductivity, high responsivity and high photoconductive gain were observed in a metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet photo-detector fabricated on a microcrystalline diamond film. Charge-based deep level transient spectroscopy measurement confirmed that a shallow level with activation energy of 0.21 eV and capture cross section of 9.9 × 10 −20 cm 2 is presented in the band gap of the diamond film. The shallow level may not act as effective recombination center due to the so small activation energy according to Schockly-Read-Hall statistics. The persistent photoconductivity relaxation fits in with the so called “barrier-limited recombination” model, which may be a minority carrier trapping effect related recombination process. The photo-induced minority carriers (electrons in this paper) may be trapped by the shallow level during light irradiation process and then de-trap slowly via thermal excitation or tunneling effect after removing the light source, which contributes to the persistent photoconductivity. The trapping effect can also reduce the probability of carrier recombination, resulting in the high responsivity and the high gain.

  13. Modelling of fatigue crack propagation assisted by gaseous hydrogen in metallic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriconi, C.

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies in a hydrogenous environment indicate that hydrogen created by surface reactions, then drained into the plastic zone, leads to a modification of deformation and damage mechanisms at the fatigue crack tip in metals, resulting in a significant decrease of crack propagation resistance. This study aims at building a model of these complex phenomena in the framework of damage mechanics, and to confront it with the results of fatigue crack propagation tests in high pressure hydrogen on a 15-5PH martensitic stainless steel. To do so, a cohesive zone model was implemented in the finite element code ABAQUS. A specific traction-separation law was developed, which is suitable for cyclic loadings, and whose parameters depend on local hydrogen concentration. Furthermore, hydrogen diffusion in the bulk material takes into account the influence of hydrostatic stress and trapping. The mechanical behaviour of the bulk material is elastic-plastic. It is shown that the model can qualitatively predict crack propagation in hydrogen under monotonous loadings; then, the model with the developed traction-separation law is tested under fatigue loading. In particular, the simulated crack propagation curves without hydrogen are compared to the experimental crack propagation curves for the 15-5PH steel in air. Finally, simulated fatigue crack propagation rates in hydrogen are compared to experimental measurements. The model's ability to assess the respective contributions of the different damage mechanisms (HELP, HEDE) in the degradation of the crack resistance of the 15-5PH steel is discussed. (author)

  14. Effect of the 718 alloy metallurgical status on hydrogen embrittlement; Effet de l'etat metallurgique de l'alliage 718 sur la fragilisation par l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvano, F.; Andrieu, E.; Blanc, Ch.; Odemer, G.; Ter-Ovanessian, B.; Cocheteau, N.; Holstein, A.; Reboul, Ch. [Universite de Toulouse, CIRIMAT, UPS/CNRS/INPT, 31 - Toulouse (France); Clouez, J.M. [AREVA NP 69 - Lyon (France)

    2010-03-15

    The Inconel 718 is a nickel superalloy which is widely used in the nuclear industry, but is sensitive to hydrogen embrittlement induced by corrosion and stress corrosion cracking phenomena, and by the presence of dissolved hydrogen in pressurized water reactor environments. As this alloy is hardened by precipitation of different intermetallic phases, it appeared that the presence of these precipitates has a strong influence on the hydrogen embrittlement. The authors report the study of the nature and effect of the different traps (intermetallic phases, carbides or their interfaces) on the hydrogen embrittlement susceptibility of the 718 alloy, and more particularly on the observed failure modes. Experiments are performed on tensile samples in which hydrogen content can be measured. The type and grain size of the observed microstructures are given with respect with the thermal treatment, as well as the mechanical properties with or without hydrogen loading

  15. Hydrogen fuel. Uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darkrim-Lamari, F.; Malbrunot, P.

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen is a very energetic fuel which can be used in combustion to generate heat and mechanical energy or which can be used to generate electricity and heat through an electrochemical reaction with oxygen. This article deals with the energy conversion, the availability and safety problems linked with the use of hydrogen, and with the socio-economical consequences of a generalized use of hydrogen: 1 - hydrogen energy conversion: hydrogen engines, aerospace applications, fuel cells (principle, different types, domains of application); 2 - hydrogen energy availability: transport and storage (gas pipelines, liquid hydrogen, adsorbed and absorbed hydrogen in solid materials), service stations; 3 - hazards and safety: flammability, explosibility, storage and transport safety, standards and regulations; 4 - hydrogen economy; 5 - conclusion. (J.S.)

  16. St. Croix trap study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data set contains detailed information about the catch from 600 trap stations around St. Croix. Data fields include species caught, size data, trap location...

  17. Gaseous Mediators Nitric Oxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in the Mechanism of Gastrointestinal Integrity, Protection and Ulcer Healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Magierowski

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO and hydrogen sulfide (H2S are known as biological messengers; they play an important role in human organism and contribute to many physiological and pathophysiological processes. NO is produced from l-arginine by constitutive NO synthase (NOS and inducible NOS enzymatic pathways. This gaseous mediator inhibits platelet aggregation, leukocyte adhesion and contributes to the vessel homeostasis. NO is known as a vasodilatory molecule involved in control of the gastric blood flow (GBF and the maintenance of gastric mucosal barrier integrity in either healthy gastric mucosa or that damaged by strong irritants. Biosynthesis of H2S in mammals depends upon two enzymes cystathionine-β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase. This gaseous mediator, similarly to NO and carbon monoxide, is involved in neuromodulation, vascular contractility and anti-inflammatory activities. For decades, H2S has been known to inhibit cytochrome c oxidase and reduce cell energy production. Nowadays it is generally considered to act through vascular smooth muscle ATP-dependent K+ channels, interacting with intracellular transcription factors and promote sulfhydration of protein cysteine moieties within the cell, but the mechanism of potential gastroprotective and ulcer healing properties of H2S has not been fully explained. The aim of this review is to compare current results of the studies concerning the role of H2S and NO in gastric mucosa protection and outline areas that may pose new opportunities for further development of novel therapeutic targets.

  18. Hydrogen peroxide increases depolarization-induced contraction of mechanically skinned slow twitch fibres from rat skeletal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, David R; Lynch, Gordon S; Williams, David A

    2002-03-15

    The effect of exogenous hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) on excitation-contraction (E-C) coupling and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) function was compared in mechanically skinned slow twitch fibres (prepared from the soleus muscles) and fast twitch fibres (prepared from the extensor digitorum longus; EDL muscles) of adult rats. Equilibration (5 min) with 1 mM H(2)O(2) diminished the ability of the Ca(2+)-depleted SR to reload Ca(2+) in both slow (P fast twitch fibres (P fast twitch fibres by 24 +/- 5 % (P slow twitch fibres. Treatment with 1 mM H(2)O(2) also increased the peak force of low [caffeine] contracture by approximately 45% in both fibre types compared to control (P slow twitch fibres, compared to control (no H(2)O(2); P fast twitch fibres was not altered by 1 mM H(2)O(2) treatment. Equilibration with 5 mM H(2)O(2) induced a spontaneous force response in both slow and fast twitch fibres, which could be partly reversed by 2 min treatment with 10 mM DTT. Peak DICR was also increased approximately 40% by 5 mM H(2)O(2) in slow twitch fibres compared to control (no H(2)O(2); P slow but not fast twitch fibres. The increase in depolarization-induced contraction in slow twitch fibres might be mediated by an increased SR Ca(2+) release during contraction and/or an increase in Ca(2+) sensitivity.

  19. Synthesis, crystal growth, optical, thermal, and mechanical properties of a nonlinear optical single crystal: ammonium sulfate hydrogen sulphamate (ASHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, K.; Nandhini, S.; Muniyappan, S.; Arumanayagam, T.; Vivek, P.; Murugakoothan, P.

    2018-04-01

    Ammonium sulfate hydrogen sulphamate (ASHS), an inorganic nonlinear optical crystal, was grown from the aqueous solution by slow evaporation solution growth technique. The single-crystal XRD confirms that the grown single crystal belongs to the orthorhombic system with the space group of Pna21. Powder XRD confirms the crystalline nature and the diffraction planes were indexed. Crystalline perfection of grown crystal was analysed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction rocking curve technique. UV-Vis-NIR studies revealed that ASHS crystal has optical transparency 65% and lower cut-off wavelength at 218 nm. The violet light emission of the crystal was identified by photoluminescence studies. The particle size-dependent second-harmonic generation efficiency for ASHS crystal was evaluated by Kurtz-Perry powder technique using Nd:YAG laser which established the existence of phase matching. Surface laser damage threshold value was evaluated using Nd:YAG laser. Optical homogeneity of the crystal was evaluated using modified channel spectrum method through birefringence study. Thermal analysis reveals that ASHS crystal is stable up to 213 °C. The mechanical behaviour of the ASHS crystal was analysed using Vickers microhardness study.

  20. Angular trap for macroparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aksyonov, D.S.

    2013-01-01

    Properties of angular macroparticle traps were investigated in this work. These properties are required to design vacuum arc plasma filters. The correlation between trap geometry parameters and its ability to absorb macroparticles were found. Calculations allow one to predict the behaviour of filtering abilities of separators which contain such traps in their design. Recommendations regarding the use of angular traps in filters of different builds are given.

  1. Action mechanism of hydrogen gas on deposition of HfC coating using HfCl{sub 4}-CH{sub 4}-H{sub 2}-Ar system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yalei, E-mail: yaleipm@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); School of Metallurgy and Environment, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Li, Zehao [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Xiong, Xiang, E-mail: xiongx@csu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Li, Xiaobin [School of Metallurgy and Environment, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China); Chen, Zhaoke; Sun, Wei [State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha, 410083 (China)

    2016-12-30

    Highlights: • HfC coatings were deposited on C/C composites by LPCVD using HfCl4-CH4-H2-Ar system. • Action mechanism of H2 on structure and growth behavior of HfC coating was studied. • Increased H2 concentration leads to transformation in growth mechanism of coating. - Abstract: Hafnium carbide coatings were deposited on carbon/carbon composites by low pressure chemical vapor deposition using HfCl{sub 4}-CH{sub 4}-H{sub 2}-Ar system. The microstructure, mechanical and ablation resistance performance of HfC coatings deposited with various H{sub 2} concentrations were investigated. The effect of hydrogen gas on the deposition of HfC coating was also discussed. Results show that all of the deposited coatings are composed of single cubic HfC phase, the hydrogen gas acted as a crucial role in determining the preferred orientation, microstructure and growth behavior of HfC coatings. During the deposition process, the gas phase supersaturation of the reaction species can be controlled by adjusting the hydrogen gas concentration. When deposited with low hydrogen gas concentration, the coating growth was dominated by the nucleation of HfC, which results in the particle-stacked structure of HfC coating. Otherwise, the coating growth was dominated by the crystal growth at high hydrogen gas concentration, which leads to the column-arranged structure of HfC coating. Under the ablation environment, the coating C2 exhibits better configurational stability and ablation resistance. The coating structure has a significant influence on the mechanical and ablation resistance properties of HfC coating.

  2. Kinetics and mechanism of the furan peroxide formation in the reaction of furfural with hydrogen peroxide in the presence and absence of sodium molybdate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grunskaya, E.P.; Badovskaya, L.A.; Kaklyugina, T.Ya.; Poskonin, V.V.

    2000-01-01

    Kinetics of the initial stage of the reaction of furfural with hydrogen peroxide are studied in the presence of Na 2 MoO 4 in water and without catalytic additions in n-butanol. Organic peroxide having in its disposal Mo(6), which is the only product on the initial stage of the reaction, is formed since the first minutes of oxidation of furfural by hydrogen peroxide with the presence of Na 2 MoO 4 . The mechanisms of conversion of furfural in the Na 2 MoO 4 - H 2 O system and its oxidation by peroxide without sodium molybdate are discussed. Schemes of formation of furfural complexes based on the results of kinetic studies are suggested. Comparison of obtained data demonstrates that presence of the sodium molybdates in the reaction medium trends to change of reaction procedure in the hydrogen peroxide [ru

  3. Hydrogen Generation from Ammonia Borane and Water Through the Combustion Reactions with Mechanically Alloyed Al/Mg Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-11

    the production, storage, and distribution of hydrogen. However, in order to have a competitive hydrogen energy market , its economy has to be as good...Energy.” In addition, some improvements to an algorithm named UCG -MEEE were accomplished during this internship. In May 2012, Daniel received his B.S

  4. Quantum mechanics models of the methanol dimer: OH⋯O hydrogen bonds of β-d-glucose moieties from crystallographic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cintrón, Michael Santiago; Johnson, Glenn P; French, Alfred D

    2017-04-18

    The interaction of two methanol molecules, simplified models of carbohydrates and cellulose, was examined using a variety of quantum mechanics (QM) levels of theory. Energy plots for hydrogen bonding distance (H⋯O) and angle (OH⋯O) were constructed. All but two experimental structures were located in stabilized areas on the vacuum phase energy plots. Each of the 399 models was analyzed with Bader's atoms-in-molecules (AIM) theory, which showed a widespread ability by the dimer models to form OH⋯O hydrogen bonds that have bond paths and Bond Critical Points. Continuum solvation calculations suggest that a portion of the energy-stabilized structures could occur in the presence of water. A survey of the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) for all donor-acceptor interactions in β-D-glucose moieties examined the similarities and differences among the hydroxyl groups and acetal oxygen atoms that participate in hydrogen bonds. Comparable behavior was observed for the O2H, O3H, O4H, and O6H hydroxyls, acting either as acceptors or donors. Ring O atoms showed distinct hydrogen bonding behavior that favored mid-length hydrogen bonds. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Improved hydrogen storage properties of LiAlH{sub 4} by mechanical milling with TiF{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zang, Lei; Cai, Jiaxing; Zhao, Lipeng; Gao, Wenhong; Liu, Jian, E-mail: liujian@nankai.eud.cn; Wang, Yijing

    2015-10-25

    Dehydrogenation behavior of LiAlH{sub 4} (lithium alanate) admixed with TiF{sub 3} is investigated by pressure-composition-temperature (PCT), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). The TiF{sub 3} addition enhances kinetics of LiAlH{sub 4} and decreases the decomposition temperature. The LiAlH{sub 4}-2 mol % TiF{sub 3} sample starts to release hydrogen at about 35 °C and the dehydrogenation rate reaches a maximum value at 108.4 °C, compared with 145 °C and 179.9 °C for the as-received LiAlH{sub 4}. As for the dehydrogenation kinetics, the LiAlH{sub 4}-2 mol % TiF{sub 3} sample releases about 7.0 wt % H{sub 2} at 140 °C within 80 min. In comparison, the as-received LiAlH{sub 4} sample releases only 0.8 wt % hydrogen under the same conditions. The existence of proposed catalyst, Al{sub 3}Ti formed in-situ in the process of dehydrogenation, has been confirmed experimentally by XRD measurements. The activation energy of LiAlH{sub 4}-2 mol % TiF{sub 3} composite is deduced to be 66.76 kJ mol{sup −1} and 88.21 kJ mol{sup −1} for the first and second reaction stages of LiAlH{sub 4} dehydrogenation. - Highlights: • TiF{sub 3} considerably enhances the dehydrogenation kinetics of LiAlH{sub 4}. • TiF{sub 3}-doped LiAlH{sub 4} dehydrogenates even at room temperature. • Low activation energy of the dehydrogenation reaction. • Al{sub 3}Ti formed in-situ helps to explain the dehydrogenation mechanism.

  6. Study of the irreversible trapping of dihydrogen with the use of a MnO2/Ag2O mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galliez, K.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrogen risk generated by radiolysis of organic compounds during a nuclear waste transport is a major issue. The use of irreversible getters is considered to limit this risk. The aim of this work is to study one of these getters, MnO 2 /Ag 2 O, in order to better understand the trapping phenomenon and to ensure its reliability. Initially several parameters affecting the trapping kinetics were studied. It has been shown that among all MnO 2 allotropic phases, the nsutite has the best trapping kinetics. Moreover, specific surface area and defect amount in MnO 2 can enhance trapping performances. Ag 2 O weight percentage (acting as promotor) has been determined at 13% to have the best trapping kinetics. Chemisorption of H 2 , which is required for its application, has been shown by using several characterization techniques such as magnetometry, infrared spectroscopy and electronic energy loss spectroscopy. The trapping irreversibility and the regeneration of the getter have been demonstrated respectively under nitrogen or air at 150 C. Finally, proton insertion mechanism in MnO 2 has been elucidated by pairs distribution function analysis through the development of a model to simulate the complex structure of MnO 2 . It has been shown that Ag 2 O is turned into Ag 2 CO 3 during the preparation of the getter under water, which has never been demonstrated. (author) [fr

  7. Final report of “A Detailed Study of the Physical Mechanisms Controlling CO2-Brine Capillary Trapping in the Subsurface” (University of Arizona, DE-SC0006696)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaap, Marcel G. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)

    2016-07-25

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) of carbon dioxide emissions generated by production or combustion of fossil fuels is a technologically viable means to reduce the build-up of CO2 in the atmosphere and oceans. Using advantages of scale and location, CCS is particularly suitable for large point sources near ubiquitous deep saline aquifers, depleted gas reservoirs, or at production reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In the BES-funded research project, Oregon State University (OSU) carried out capillary trapping experiments with proxy fluids that mimic the properties of the scCO2/brine system under ambient temperatures and pressures, and successfully developed a unique and novel x-ray compatible, high-pressure, elevated temperature setup to study the scCO2/brine system under challenging reservoir conditions. Both methodologies were applied to a variety of porous media, including synthetic (glass bead) and geologic (Bentheimer sandstone) materials. The University of Arizona (UA) developed pore-scale lattice Boltzmann (LB) models which are able to handle the experimental conditions for proxy fluids, as well as the scCO2/brine system, that are capable of simulating permeability in volumes of tens of millions of fluid elements. We reached the following summary findings (main institute indicated): 1. (OSU/UA) To understand capillary trapping in a multiphase fluid-porous medium system, the system must be analyzed from a pore-scale force balance perspective; trapping can be enhanced by manipulating wetting and nonwetting phase fluid properties. 2. (OSU) Pore-scale fluid connectivity and topology has a clear and direct effect on nonwetting phase capillary trapping efficiency. 3. (OSU) Rock type and flow regime also have a pronounced effects on capillary trapping. 4. (OSU/UA) There is a predictable relationship between NWP connectivity and NWP saturation, which allows for development of injection strategies that optimize trapping. The commonly used Land model (Land

  8. Hydrogen energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    This book consists of seven chapters, which deals with hydrogen energy with discover and using of hydrogen, Korean plan for hydrogen economy and background, manufacturing technique on hydrogen like classification and hydrogen manufacture by water splitting, hydrogen storage technique with need and method, hydrogen using technique like fuel cell, hydrogen engine, international trend on involving hydrogen economy, technical current for infrastructure such as hydrogen station and price, regulation, standard, prospect and education for hydrogen safety and system. It has an appendix on related organization with hydrogen and fuel cell.

  9. The kinetic and mechanical aspects of hydrogen-induced failure in metals. Ph.D. Thesis, 1971

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    Premature hydrogen-induced failure observed to occur in many metal systems involves three stages of fracture: (1) crack initiation, (2) stable slow crack growth, and (3) unstable rapid crack growth. The presence of hydrogen at some critical location on the metal surface or within the metal lattice was shown to influence one or both of the first two stages of brittle fracture but has a negligible effect on the unstable rapid crack growth stage. The relative influence of the applied parameters of time, temperature, etc., on the propensity of a metal to exhibit hydrogen induced premature failure was investigated.

  10. Modeling the Thermal Mechanical Behavior of a 300 K Vacuum Vessel that is Cooled by Liquid Hydrogen in Film Boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, S.Q.; Green, M.A.; Lau, W.

    2004-01-01

    This report discusses the results from the rupture of a thin window that is part of a 20-liter liquid hydrogen vessel. This rupture will spill liquid hydrogen onto the walls and bottom of a 300 K cylindrical vacuum vessel. The spilled hydrogen goes into film boiling, which removes the thermal energy from the vacuum vessel wall. This report analyzes the transient heat transfer in the vessel and calculates the thermal deflection and stress that will result from the boiling liquid in contact with the vessel walls. This analysis was applied to aluminum and stainless steel vessels

  11. A study on the degradation mechanism of InGaZnO thin-film transistors under simultaneous gate and drain bias stresses based on the electronic trap characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chan-Yong; Lee, Daeun; Song, Sang-Hun; Kwon, Hyuck-In; Kim, Jong In; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the device degradation mechanism of amorphous indium–gallium–zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs) under simultaneous gate and drain bias stresses based on the electronic trap characterization results. The transfer curve exhibits an apparent negative shift as the stress time increases, and a formation of hump is observed in the transfer curve after stresses. A notable increase of the frequency dispersion is observed after stresses in both gate-to-drain capacitance–voltage (C GD –V G ) and gate-to-source capacitance–voltage (C GS –V G ) curves, which implies that the subgap states are generated by simultaneous gate and drain bias stresses, and the damaged location is not limited to the drain side of TFTs. The larger frequency dispersion is observed in C GD –V G  curves after stresses in a wider channel device, which implies that the heat is an important factor in the generation of the subgap states under simultaneous gate and drain bias stresses in a-IGZO TFTs. Based on the electronic trap characterization results, we conclude that the impact ionization near the drain side of the device is not a dominant mechanism causing the generation of subgap states and device degradation in a-IGZO TFTs under simultaneous gate and drain bias stresses. The generation of oxygen vacancy-related donor-like traps near the conduction band edge is considered as a possible mechanism causing the device degradation under simultaneous gate and drain bias stresses in a-IGZO TFTs. (paper)

  12. Influence of hydrogen on metals behavior. 1 - Mechanical behavior of Ti 6 pc Al 6 pc V 2 pc Sn titanium alloy versus hydrogen: influence of heat treatment and of oxygen content; Influence de l'hydrogene sur le comportement des metaux. 1 - comportement mecanique de l'alliage de titane T A6 V6 E2 vis-a-vis de l'hydrogene: influence du traitement thermique et de la teneur en oxygene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaller, Bernard

    1972-06-26

    The mechanical behavior of Ti 6 pc Al 6 pc V Sn alloy during dynamic testing has been investigated versus hydrogen and oxygen content. The hydrogen susceptibility depends only slightly on its microstructure, acicular or equi-axed: it depends much more on conditions of hydrogen contamination and on the thermal history afterward. When the alloy has been stabilized by annealing in {alpha} - {beta} and provided hydrogen absorption does not induce phase transformations, hydrogen sensitivity is relatively low: brittleness occurs suddenly but at a high concentration threshold (2000 ppm H), which coincides with hydrogen saturation of {beta} phase. When the alloy includes unstabilized phases, its response to hydrogen changes whether it has been finally annealed or not, in the 300 - 500 C temperature area, prone to {omega} phase formation. In the absence of such an annealing, a reduction in ductility only occurs at high concentrations (> 1500 ppm H). In the other and, after annealing at 400 C, alloy hardening and a ductility decrease start even at the lowest hydrogen amounts: then hydrogen susceptibility is very high. Low oxygen concentration (up to 2000 ppm) do not sensibly affect the good hydrogen tolerance of this alloy. Beyond 2500 ppm, oxygen, while improving tensile strength, yet severely decreases ductility. [French] Le comportement mecanique de l'alliage TA6-V6-E2 lors d'un essai dynamique a ete etudie en fonction de la teneur en hydrogene et en oxygene. La sensibilite vis-a-vis de l'hydrogene ne depend que tres faiblement de sa structure migrographique, aciculaire ou equiaxe; elle depend bien plus des conditions de contamination par l'hydrogene et de son histoire thermique apres contamination. Lorsque l'alliage a ete stabilise par un recuit dans le domaine biphase, et a condition que l'absorption d'hydrogene n'entraine pas de modification structurale, la sensibilite vis-a-vis de l'hydrogene est relativement faible: la fragilite apparait brutalement mais pour un

  13. Quantized motion of trapped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbach, J.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with a theoretical and numerical study of the preparation and coherent manipulation of quantum states in the external and internal degrees of freedom of trapped ions. In its first part, this thesis proposes and investigates schemes for generating several nonclassical states for the quantized vibrational motion of a trapped ion. Based on dark state preparation specific laser excitation configurations are presented which, given appropriately chosen initial states, realize the desired motional states in the steady-state, indicated by the cessation of the fluorescence emitted by the ion. The focus is on the SU(1,1) intelligent states in both their single- and two-mode realization, corresponding to one- and two-dimensional motion of the ion. The presented schemes are also studied numerically using a Monte-Carlo state-vector method. The second part of the thesis describes how two vibrational degrees of freedom of a single trapped ion can be coupled through the action of suitably chosen laser excitation. Concentrating on a two-dimensional ion trap with dissimilar vibrational frequencies a variety of quantized two-mode couplings are derived. The focus is on a linear coupling that takes excitations from one mode to another. It is demonstrated how this can result in a state rotation, in which it is possible to coherently transfer the motional state of the ion between orthogonal directions without prior knowledge of that motional state. The third part of this thesis presents a new efficient method for generating maximally entangled internal states of a collection of trapped ions. The method is deterministic and independent of the number of ions in the trap. As the essential element of the scheme a mechanism for the realization of a controlled NOT operation that can operate on multiple ions is proposed. The potential application of the scheme for high-precision frequency standards is explored. (author)

  14. [The study of the protective effect and its mechanism of Edaravone to neurons with hydrogen peroxide stimulated].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Hao; Zhang, Ning; Fan, Jin; Li, Qing-qing; Li, Yi-ming; Tang, Jian; Cheng, Gang; Yin, Guo-yong; Cai, Wei-hua

    2013-03-01

    To prove the protective effect of Edaravone to neurons and to study the particular mechanism. Neurons were collected from 18-day fetal rat brains and a culture of almost pure neurons was obtained after 14-day culture, then the cells were randomly assigned to one of the three groups: control group, hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂)-treated group, and Edaravone-treated group. In H₂O₂-treated group, 300 µmol/L H₂O₂ was added to the medium, followed by returning to the normal culture for the presupposition of time. In Edaravone-treated group, 500 µmol/L Edaravone was prophylactically added to the medium for 30 minutes before the insult. Morphology of mitochondria was visualized by transmission electron microscopy. The rate of apoptotic cells was detected by flow cytometry analysis. The relationships between the proteins and the key proteins expressions were observed by immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting. Compared to the Edaravone-treated group, mitochondria in H₂O₂-treated group displayed more vesicular matrix compartments at the same time. Percentage of apoptotic cells in H₂O₂-treated group after 0.5, 2, 6 and 12 h were 14.40% ± 1.23%, 45.50% ± 2.81%, 56.40% ± 3.53%, 62.50% ± 4.23%, which were higher than control group (F = 274.8, P Edaravone-treated group were 0.90% ± 0.07%, 1.10% ± 0.08%, 3.50% ± 1.90%, 12.60% ± 1.10%, which were lower than H₂O₂-treated group (F = 362.7, P Edaravone-treated group. As a free radical scavenger, the Edaravone could protect neurons by inhibiting the activity of JNK, the disassociation of BAD from 14-3-3 and the translocation of BAX from the cytosol to mitochondria.

  15. Activation of rho is involved in the mechanism of hydrogen-peroxide-induced lung edema in isolated perfused rabbit lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Y; Ishii, Y; Kitamura, S; Sugiyama, Y

    2001-09-01

    Acute lung injury is attributed primarily to increased vascular permeability caused by reactive oxygen species derived from neutrophils, such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Increased permeability is accompanied by the contraction and cytoskeleton reorganization of endothelial cells, resulting in intercellular gap formation. The Rho family of Ras-like GTPases is implicated in the regulation of the cytoskeleton and cell contraction. We examined the role of Rho in H2O2-induced pulmonary edema with the use of isolated perfused rabbit lungs. To our knowledge, this is the first study to examine the role of Rho in increased vascular permeability induced by H2O2 in perfused lungs. Vascular permeability was evaluated on the basis of the capillary filtration coefficient (Kfc, ml/min/cm H2O/100 g). We found that H2O2 (300 microM) increased lung weight, Kfc, and pulmonary capillary pressure. These effects of H2O2 were abolished by treatment with Y-27632 (50 microM), an inhibitor of the Rho effector p160 ROCK. In contrast, the muscular relaxant papaverine inhibited the H2O2-induced rise in pulmonary capillary pressure, but did not suppress the increases in lung weight and Kfc. These findings indicate that H2O2 causes pulmonary edema by elevating hydrostatic pressure and increasing vascular permeability. Y-27632 inhibited the formation of pulmonary edema by blocking both of these H2O2-induced effects. Our results suggest that Rho-related pathways have a part in the mechanism of H2O2-induced pulmonary edema. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  16. Theoretical analysis of geometry and NMR isotope shift in hydrogen-bonding center of photoactive yellow protein by combination of multicomponent quantum mechanics and ONIOM scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanematsu, Yusuke; Tachikawa, Masanori [Quantum Chemistry Division, Yokohama City University, Seto 22-2, Kanazawa-ku, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan)

    2014-11-14

    Multicomponent quantum mechanical (MC-QM) calculation has been extended with ONIOM (our own N-layered integrated molecular orbital + molecular mechanics) scheme [ONIOM(MC-QM:MM)] to take account of both the nuclear quantum effect and the surrounding environment effect. The authors have demonstrated the first implementation and application of ONIOM(MC-QM:MM) method for the analysis of the geometry and the isotope shift in hydrogen-bonding center of photoactive yellow protein. ONIOM(MC-QM:MM) calculation for a model with deprotonated Arg52 reproduced the elongation of O–H bond of Glu46 observed by neutron diffraction crystallography. Among the unique isotope shifts in different conditions, the model with protonated Arg52 with solvent effect reasonably provided the best agreement with the corresponding experimental values from liquid NMR measurement. Our results implied the availability of ONIOM(MC-QM:MM) to distinguish the local environment around hydrogen bonds in a biomolecule.

  17. The Influence of Irradiation Regimes on Retention Hydrogen Isotopes in Structural Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaluzhnyi, A.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: In the present work was investigated the influence of irradiation regimes on retention hydrogen isotopes in samples of austenitic steel during heating. The samples of studied materials were irradiated both in the reactor and by hydrogen isotopes ions of different energies and fluencies bombardment in an accelerator. Kinetic of hydrogen release from the samples worked with deuterium plasma was investigated. The following results were obtained. Heating the irradiate d samples of steel (irradiated in the reactor or by hydrogen isotopes ions bombardment), which have been kept in normal temperature during quite a long period after the irradiation, a shift of the diffusion peak of hydrogen release to higher temperatures, comparing to no irradiated samples, was observed. It means that atoms of hydrogen in the irradiated sample were caught by radiation defects, which are very effective as traps for hydrogen atoms till quite high temperatures (700 K). The worked out analysis of the received results supposes that vacancy complexes. On thermodesorption curves of hydrogen release from irradiated samples of austenitic steels a high temperature peak (900-1000 K) was observed because of dissociation of hydrogen containing compounds in micro pores. During investigations of hydrogen release from irradiated samples of austenitic steel, after it had been saturated with hydrogen plasma, abnormally big blisters were registered with cover thickness of about 1 mkm. Three peaks were observed on the thermodesorption curves of hydrogen release from irradiated samples, contained blisters. The low temperature spike (∼500 K) was showed to correspond to hydrogen release because of its resolution from blisters, where it was in molecular form. The high temperature peak (∼900 K) corresponds to hydrogen release from dissociating blisters, which contain hydrocarbons. The mechanism of abnormal blisters generation is offered. Inasmuch methane is not soluble in

  18. Study of the microstructural and mechanical properties of titanium-niobium-zirconium based alloys processed with hydrogen and powder metallurgy for use in dental implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duvaizem, Jose Helio

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen has been used as pulverization agent in alloys based on rare earth and transition metals due to its extremely high diffusion rate even on low temperatures. Such materials are used on hydrogen storage dispositives, generation of electricity or magnetic fields, and are produced by a process which the first step is the transformation of the alloy in fine powder by miling. Besides those, hydrogenium is also being used to obtain alloys based on titanium - niobium - zirconium in the pulverization. Powder metallurgy is utilized on the production of these alloys, making it possible to obtain structures with porous surface as result, requirement for its application as biomaterials. Other advantages of powder metallurgy usage include better surface finish and better microstructural homogeneity. In this work samples were prepared in the Ti-13Nb-13Zr composition. The hydrogenation was performed at 700 degree C, 600 degree C, and 500 degree C for titanium, niobium and zirconium respectively. After hydrogenation, the milling stage was carried out on high energy planetary ball milling with 200rpm during 90 minutes, and also in conventional ball milling for 30 hours. Samples were pressed in uniaxial press, followed by isostatic cold press, and then sintered at 1150 degree C for 7-13 hours. Microstructural properties of the samples were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) and x-ray diffraction. Mechanical and structural properties determined were density, microhardness and moduli of elasticity. The sample sintered at 1150 degree C for 7h, hydrogenated using 10.000 mbar and produced by milling on high energy planetary ball milling presented the best mechanical properties and microstructural homogeneity. (author)

  19. Catalysis mechanism of Pd-promoted γ-alumina in the thermal decomposition of methane to hydrogen: A density functional theory study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salam, M. Abdus; Abdullah, Bawadi

    2017-01-01

    Thermo-catalytic methane decomposition to elemental hydrogen mechanism in transitional metals (Pd, Ni & Mo) promoted Al_2O_3 (001) catalyst have been studied using the density functional theory (DFT). Decomposition reactions are spontaneous and favourable above 775 K for all promoter. Pd-promoted Al_2O_3 (001) catalyst demonstrates a breakthrough decomposition activity in hydrogen production as compared to Ni− and Mo-promoted Al_2O_3 (001) catalysts. The activation energy (E_a) range of the catalysis for Pd promoted Al_2O_3 (001) catalysts is 0.003–0.34 eV. Whereas, Ni and Mo promoted Al_2O_3 (001) catalysts display activation energy E_a in the range of 0.63–1.15 eV and 0.04–5.98 eV, respectively. Pd-promoted catalyst also shows a higher adsorption energy (−0.68 eV) and reactivity than that of Ni and Mo promoted Al_2O_3 (001) catalysts. The rates of successive decomposition of methane are found to be 16.15 × 10"1"2, 15.95 × 10"1"2 and 16.09 × 10"1"2 s"−"1 for the promoter of Pd, Ni and Mo, respectively. Pd promoted Al_2O_3 (001) catalyst reduces the methane decomposition temperature (775 K) and deactivation rate significantly. The catalytic conditions and catalyst is promising in producing hydrogen to support hydrogen economy. - Highlights: • Transition metals (Pd, Ni & Mo) promoted γ-alumina catalysts are designed successfully. • Pd-promoted catalyst showed breakthrough activity in methane decomposition to hydrogen. • DFT study explored the catalysis mechanism of methane decomposition at atomic level. • Pd-promoted catalyst reduced temperature and activation barrier of methane decomposition reaction significantly.

  20. Modified semiclassical approximation for trapped Bose gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukalov, V.I.

    2005-01-01

    A generalization of the semiclassical approximation is suggested allowing for an essential extension of its region of applicability. In particular, it becomes possible to describe Bose-Einstein condensation of a trapped gas in low-dimensional traps and in traps of low confining dimensions, for which the standard semiclassical approximation is not applicable. The result of the modified approach is shown to coincide with purely quantum-mechanical calculations for harmonic traps, including the one-dimensional harmonic trap. The advantage of the semiclassical approximation is in its simplicity and generality. Power-law potentials of arbitrary powers are considered. The effective thermodynamic limit is defined for any confining dimension. The behavior of the specific heat, isothermal compressibility, and density fluctuations is analyzed, with an emphasis on low confining dimensions, where the usual semiclassical method fails. The peculiarities of the thermodynamic characteristics in the effective thermodynamic limit are discussed

  1. Development mechanisms of microorganisms oxidizing the hydrogen: role and consequences in the industry; Mecanismes de developpement de microorganismes oxydant l'hydrogene: role et consequences dans l'industrie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gales, G

    2004-10-15

    It is possible to observe a bacterial development in a ultra-pure water basin containing irradiating wastes. This ecosystem has the particularity to contain dissolved molecular hydrogen produced by radiolysis as well as oxygen in non negligible quantities. After having studied the physico-chemical properties of this ecosystem, bio-film and water have been sampled in different parts of the basin. The aim of this work was to identify the different populations of bacteria which are present, to know their origin and to understand their development mechanisms. The water and bio-film samples have been cultivated in order to isolate the chemo-litho-trophic bacteria which oxidize the hydrogen, and on nutritive agar-agar. These bacteria have been identified by partial determination of the DNAr 16S sequences. The DNA has also been extracted of the bio-films in order to carry out a study of the molecular diversity of the bacterial populations (determination of the sequences of the DNAr 16S). Surprisingly, at the surface of the basin, the DNAr 16S sequences of the autotrophic strains are the same as the sequences detected by the method of sequences determination. Most of bacteria of this medium have then been isolated. The comparison between the bacteria isolated from different parts of the basin allows to say that the make-up waters of the basin are the main source of contamination and to propose a scenario for this contamination. The hydrogen metabolism of most of the bacteria has been studied by gaseous exchange mass spectrometry: those isolated make the 'knallgas reaction' (H{sub 2} + 1/2O{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2}O) and fix carbon dioxide in these conditions. In the studied basin are then a bacterial community based on hydrogen and whose primary producers make the 'knallgas' reaction. Most of the bacteria, mainly a (Ralstonia sp. GGLH002) tolerate the oxidizing stress generated by radiolysis. (O.M.)

  2. Hydrogen storage performances of LaMg{sub 11}Ni + x wt% Ni (x = 100, 200) alloys prepared by mechanical milling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanghuan, E-mail: zhangyh59@sina.com [Key Laboratory of Integrated Exploitation of Baiyun Obo Multi-Metal Resources, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010 (China); Department of Functional Material Research, Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Wang, Haitao [Key Laboratory of Integrated Exploitation of Baiyun Obo Multi-Metal Resources, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010 (China); Department of Functional Material Research, Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhai, Tingting; Yang, Tai; Yuan, Zeming; Zhao, Dongliang [Department of Functional Material Research, Central Iron and Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2015-10-05

    Highlights: • Amorphous and nanostructured alloys were prepared by mechanical milling. • The maximum discharge capacity of ball milled alloys reaches to 1053.5 mA h/g. • The addition of Ni significantly increases the discharge capacity. • Increasing milling time reduces the kinetic performances of ball milled alloys. - Abstract: In order to improve the hydrogen storage performances of Mg-based materials, LaMg{sub 11}Ni alloy was prepared by vacuum induction melting. Then the nanocrystalline/amorphous LaMg{sub 11}Ni + x wt% Ni (x = 100, 200) hydrogen storage alloys were synthesized by ball milling technology. The structure characterizations of the alloys were carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electrochemical hydrogen storage characteristics were tested by using programmed control battery testing system. The electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS), potentiodynamic polarization curves and potential-step curves were also plotted by an electrochemical workstation (PARSTAT 2273). The results indicate that the as-milled alloys exhibit a nanocrystalline and amorphous structure, and the amorphization degree of the alloys visibly increases with extending milling time. Prolonging the milling duration markedly enhances the electrochemical discharge capacity and cyclic stability of the alloys. The electrochemical kinetics, including high rate discharge ability (HRD), charge transfer rate, limiting current density (I{sub L}), hydrogen diffusion coefficient (D), monotonously decrease with milling time prolonging.

  3. Ion Trap Quantum Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    variations of ion traps, including (1) the cylindrically symmetric 3D ring trap; (2) the linear trap with a combination of cavity QED; (#) the symmetric...concepts of quantum information. The major demonstration has been the test of a Bell inequality as demonstrated by Rowe et al. [50] and a decoherence...famous physics experiment [62]. Wolfgang Paul demonstrated a similar apparatus during his Nobel Prize speech [63]. This device is hyperbolic- parabolic

  4. Progress towards microwave spectroscopy of trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Ashkezari, M D; Baquero-Ruiz, M; Bertsche, W; Bowe, P D; Butler, E; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Deller, A; Eriksson, S; Fajans, J; Friesen, T; Fujiwara, M C; Gill, D R; Gutierrez, A; Hangst, J S; Hardy, W N; Hayano, R S; Hayden, M E; Humphries, A J; Hydomako, R; Jonsell, S; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Menary, S; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Povilus, A; Pusa, P; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; So, C; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki,Y

    2012-01-01

    Precision comparisons of hyperfine intervals in atomic hydrogen and antihydrogen are expected to yield experimental tests of the CPT theorem. The CERN-based ALPHA collaboration has initiated a program of study focused on microwave spectroscopy of trapped ground-state antihydrogen atoms. This paper outlines some of the proposed experiments, and summarizes measurements that characterize microwave fields that have been injected into the ALPHA apparatus.

  5. Progress towards microwave spectroscopy of trapped antihydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashkezari, Mohammad D., E-mail: mdehghan@cern.ch [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Andresen, Gorm B. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Baquero-Ruiz, Marcelo [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Bertsche, Wil [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Bowe, Paul D. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Butler, Eoin [CERN, Physics Department (Switzerland); Cesar, Claudio L. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Fisica (Brazil); Chapman, Steve [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Charlton, Michael; Deller, Adam; Eriksson, Stefan [Swansea University, Department of Physics (United Kingdom); Fajans, Joel [University of California, Department of Physics (United States); Friesen, Tim; Fujiwara, Makoto C. [University of Calgary, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Gill, Dave R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Gutierrez, Andrea [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hangst, Jeffrey S. [Aarhus University, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Denmark); Hardy, Walter N. [University of British Columbia, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Hayano, Ryugo S. [University of Tokyo, Department of Physics (Japan); Hayden, Michael E. [Simon Fraser University, Department of Physics (Canada); Collaboration: ALPHA Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15

    Precision comparisons of hyperfine intervals in atomic hydrogen and antihydrogen are expected to yield experimental tests of the CPT theorem. The CERN-based ALPHA collaboration has initiated a program of study focused on microwave spectroscopy of trapped ground-state antihydrogen atoms. This paper outlines some of the proposed experiments, and summarizes measurements that characterize microwave fields that have been injected into the ALPHA apparatus.

  6. The Influence of Chemical Surface Modification of Kenaf Fiber using Hydrogen Peroxide on the Mechanical Properties of Biodegradable Kenaf Fiber/Poly(Lactic Acid Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Inani Abdul Razak

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bleaching treatment of kenaf fiber was performed in alkaline medium containing hydrogen peroxide solution maintained at pH 11 and 80 °C for 60 min. The bleached kenaf fiber was analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR and X-ray Diffraction (XRD analysis. The bleached kenaf fiber was then compounded with poly-(lactic acid (PLA via a melt blending method. The mechanical (tensile, flexural and impact performance of the product was tested. The fiber treatment improved the mechanical properties of PLA/bleached kenaf fiber composites. Scanning electron micrograph (SEM morphological analysis showed improvement of the interfacial adhesion between the fiber surface and polymer matrix.

  7. A Study of the Mechanism of the Hydrogen Evolution Reaction on Nickel by Surface Interrogation Scanning Electrochemical Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Zhenxing; Ahn, Hyun S; Bard, Allen J

    2017-04-05

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) on Ni in alkaline media was investigated by scanning electrochemical microscopy under two operating modes. First, the substrate generation/tip collection mode was employed to extract the "true" cathodic current associated with the HER from the total current in the polarization curve. Compared to metallic Ni, the electrocatalytic activity of the HER is improved in the presence of the low-valence-state oxide of Ni. This result is in agreement with a previous claim that the dissociative adsorption of water can be enhanced at the Ni/Ni oxide interface. Second, the surface-interrogation scanning electrochemical microscopy (SI-SECM) mode was used to directly measure the coverage of the adsorbed hydrogen on Ni at given potentials. Simulation indicates that the hydrogen coverage follows a Frumkin isotherm with respect to the applied potential. On the basis of the combined analysis of the Tafel slope and surface hydrogen coverage, the rate-determining step is suggested to be the adsorption of hydrogen (Volmer step) in the investigated potential window.

  8. Experiments on cold-trap regeneration by NaH decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPheeters, C.C.; Skladzien, S.B.; Raue, D.J.

    1980-06-01

    Cold-trap regeneration may be very important in future LMFBRs because of the expected high hydrogen source from the steam generators. This hydrogen precipitates as NaH in the cold trap and may fill the trap within one year of operation. Several methods of cold-trap regeneration were considered, but the simplest and least expensive appears to be decomposition of NaH under vacuum at elevated temperatures. Experiments were done to assess the feasibility of this method for cold-trap regeneration. Small-scale simulated cold traps (SCT) were loaded with NaH and NaH plus Na 2 O, and were heated both under vacuum and under a sweep gas at 100 kPa. The evolved hydrogen was converted to water by a CuO bed and collected in a weighing tube

  9. Combustion of alternative fuels in vortex trapped combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghenai, Chaouki; Zbeeb, Khaled; Janajreh, Isam

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► We model the combustion of alternative fuels in trapped vortex combustor (TVC). ► We test syngas and hydrogen/hydrocarbon mixture fuels. ► We examine the change in combustion performance and emissions of TVC combustor. ► Increasing the hydrogen content of the fuel will increase the temperature and NO x emissions. ► A high combustor efficiency is obtained for fuels with different compositions and LHV. - Abstract: Trapped vortex combustor represents an efficient and compact combustor for flame stability. Combustion stability is achieved through the use of cavities in which recirculation zones of hot products generated by the direct injection of fuel and air are created and acting as a continuous source of ignition for the incoming main fuel–air stream. Computational Fluid Dynamics analysis was performed in this study to test the combustion performance and emissions from the vortex trapped combustor when natural gas fuel (methane) is replaced with renewable and alternative fuels such as hydrogen and synthetic gas (syngas). The flame temperature, the flow field, and species concentrations inside the Vortex Trapped Combustor were obtained. The results show that hydrogen enriched hydrocarbon fuels combustion will result in more energy, higher temperature (14% increase when methane is replaced with hydrogen fuels) and NO x emissions, and lower CO 2 emissions (50% decrease when methane is replaced with methane/hydrogen mixture with 75% hydrogen fraction). The NO x emission increases when the fraction of hydrogen increases for methane/hydrogen fuel mixture. The results also show that the flame for methane combustion fuel is located in the primary vortex region but it is shifted to the secondary vortex region for hydrogen combustion.

  10. Towards trapped antihydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Jorgensen, L V; Bertsche, W; Boston, A; Bowe, P D; Cesar, C L; Chapman, S; Charlton, M; Fajans, J; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Gill, D R; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Hydomako, R; Jenkins, M J; Kurchaninov, L; Madsen, N; Nolan, P; Olchanski, K; Olin, A; Page, R D; Povilus, A; Robicheaux, F; Sarid, E; Silveira, D M; Storey, J W; Thompson, R I; van der Werf, D P; Wurtele, J S; Yamazaki, Y

    2008-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made in the last few years in the nascent field of antihydrogen physics. The next big step forward is expected to be the trapping of the formed antihydrogen atoms using a magnetic multipole trap. ALPHA is a new international project that started to take data in 2006 at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator facility. The primary goal of ALPHA is stable trapping of cold antihydrogen atoms to facilitate measurements of its properties. We discuss the status of the ALPHA project and the prospects for antihydrogen trapping.

  11. Trap-induced photoconductivity in singlet fission pentacene diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, Xianfeng, E-mail: qiaoxianfeng@hotmail.com; Zhao, Chen; Chen, Bingbing; Luan, Lin [WuHan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics and School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wu Han 430074 (China)

    2014-07-21

    This paper reports a trap-induced photoconductivity in ITO/pentacene/Al diodes by using current-voltage and magneto-conductance measurements. The comparison of photoconductivity between pentacene diodes with and without trap clearly shows that the traps play a critical role in generating photoconductivity. It shows that no observable photoconductivity is detected for trap-free pentacene diodes, while significant photoconductivity is observed in diodes with trap. This is because the initial photogenerated singlet excitons in pentacene can rapidly split into triplet excitons with higher binding energy prior to dissociating into free charge carriers. The generated triplet excitons react with trapped charges to release charge-carriers from traps, leading to a trap-induced photoconductivity in the single-layer pentacene diodes. Our studies elucidated the formation mechanisms of photoconductivity in pentacene diodes with extremely fast singlet fission rate.

  12. Dynamic investigation of electron trapping and charge decay in electron-irradiated Al sub 2 O sub 3 in a scanning electron microscope: Methodology and mechanisms

    CERN Document Server

    Fakhfakh, S; Belhaj, M; Fakhfakh, Z; Kallel, A; Rau, E I

    2002-01-01

    The charging and discharging of polycrystalline Al sub 2 O sub 3 submitted to electron-irradiation in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) are investigated by means of the displacement current method. To circumvent experimental shortcomings inherent to the use of the basic sample holder, a redesign of the latter is proposed and tests are carried out to verify its operation. The effects of the primary beam accelerating voltage on charging, flashover and discharging phenomena during and after electron-irradiation are studied. The experimental results are then analyzed. In particular, the divergence between the experimental data and those predicted by the total electron emission yield approach (TEEYA) is discussed. A partial discharge was observed immediately after the end of the electron-irradiation exposure. The experimental data suggests, that the discharge is due to the evacuation to the ground, along the insulator surface, of released electrons from shallow traps at (or in the close vicinity of) the insulat...

  13. The Penning trap system used by the BASE experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcastel, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    A cut-away schematic of the Penning trap system used by BASE. The experiment receives antiprotons from CERN's AD; negative hydrogen ions are formed during injection into the apparatus. The set-up works with only a pair of particles at a time, while a cloud of a few hundred others are held in the reservoir trap, for future use. Here, an antiproton is in the measurement trap, while the negative hydyrogen ion is in held by the downstream park electrode. When the antiproton has been measured, it is moved to the upstream park electrode and the hydrogen ion is brought in to the measurement trap. This is repeated thousands of times, enabling a high-precision comparison of the charge-to-mass ratios of the two particles.

  14. Introduction to hydrogen in alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westlake, D.G.

    1980-01-01

    Substitutional alloys, both those that form hydrides and those that do not, are discussed, but with more emphasis on the former than the latter. This overview includes the following closely related subjects: (1) the significant effects of substitutional solutes on the pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) equilibria of metal-hydrogen systems, (2) the changes in thermodynamic properties resulting from differences in atom size and from modifications of electronic structure, (3) attractive and repulsive interactions between H and solute atoms and the effects of such interactions on the pressure dependent solubility for H, (4) H trapping in alloys of Group V metals and its effect on the terminal solubility for H (TSH), (5) some other mechanisms invoked to explain the enhancement (due to alloying) of the (TSH) in Group V metals, and (6) H-impurity complexes in alloys of the metals Ni, Co, and Fe. Some results showing that an enhanced TSH may ameliorate the resistance of a metal to hydrogen embrittlement are presented

  15. Computer analysis of sodium cold trap design and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McPheeters, C.C.; Raue, D.J.

    1983-11-01

    Normal steam-side corrosion of steam-generator tubes in Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) results in liberation of hydrogen, and most of this hydrogen diffuses through the tubes into the heat-transfer sodium and must be removed by the purification system. Cold traps are normally used to purify sodium, and they operate by cooling the sodium to temperatures near the melting point, where soluble impurities including hydrogen and oxygen precipitate as NaH and Na 2 O, respectively. A computer model was developed to simulate the processes that occur in sodium cold traps. The Model for Analyzing Sodium Cold Traps (MASCOT) simulates any desired configuration of mesh arrangements and dimensions and calculates pressure drops and flow distributions, temperature profiles, impurity concentration profiles, and impurity mass distributions

  16. Investigation of the Mechanism of Electron Capture and Electron Transfer Dissociation of Peptides with a Covalently Attached Free Radical Hydrogen Atom Scavenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Chang Ho; Yin, Sheng; Peng, Ivory; Loo, Joseph A; Beauchamp, J L

    2015-11-15

    The mechanisms of electron capture and electron transfer dissociation (ECD and ETD) are investigated by covalently attaching a free-radical hydrogen atom scavenger to a peptide. The 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidin-l-oxyl (TEMPO) radical was chosen as the scavenger due to its high hydrogen atom affinity (ca. 280 kJ/mol) and low electron affinity (ca. 0.45 ev), and was derivatized to the model peptide, FQX TEMPO EEQQQTEDELQDK. The X TEMPO residue represents a cysteinyl residue derivatized with an acetamido-TEMPO group. The acetamide group without TEMPO was also examined as a control. The gas phase proton affinity (882 kJ/mol) of TEMPO is similar to backbone amide carbonyls (889 kJ/mol), minimizing perturbation to internal solvation and sites of protonation of the derivatized peptides. Collision induced dissociation (CID) of the TEMPO tagged peptide dication generated stable odd-electron b and y type ions without indication of any TEMPO radical induced fragmentation initiated by hydrogen abstraction. The type and abundance of fragment ions observed in the CID spectra of the TEMPO and acetamide tagged peptides are very similar. However, ECD of the TEMPO labeled peptide dication yielded no backbone cleavage. We propose that a labile hydrogen atom in the charge reduced radical ions is scavenged by the TEMPO radical moiety, resulting in inhibition of N-C α backbone cleavage processes. Supplemental activation after electron attachment (ETcaD) and CID of the charge-reduced precursor ion generated by electron transfer of the TEMPO tagged peptide dication produced a series of b + H (b H ) and y + H (y H ) ions along with some c ions having suppressed intensities, consistent with stable O-H bond formation at the TEMPO group. In summary, the results indicate that ECD and ETD backbone cleavage processes are inhibited by scavenging of a labile hydrogen atom by the localized TEMPO radical moiety. This observation supports the conjecture that ECD and ETD processes involve long

  17. Versatile electrostatic trap

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veldhoven, J.; Bethlem, H.L.; Schnell, M.; Meijer, G.

    2006-01-01

    A four electrode electrostatic trap geometry is demonstrated that can be used to combine a dipole, quadrupole, and hexapole field. A cold packet of ND315 molecules is confined in both a purely quadrupolar and hexapolar trapping field and additionally, a dipole field is added to a hexapole field to

  18. Liquid metal cold trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hundal, R.

    1976-01-01

    A cold trap assembly for removing impurities from a liquid metal is described. A hole between the incoming impure liquid metal and purified outgoing liquid metal acts as a continuous bleed means and thus prevents the accumulation of cover gases within the cold trap assembly

  19. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of alkenes and silanes by hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) and a novel application of electrospray mass spectrometry to study the hydrolysis of MTO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Haisong [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-11-08

    Conjugated dienes were oxidized by hydrogen peroxide with methylrhenium trioxide (MTO) as catalyst. Methylrhenium bis-peroxide was the major reactive catalyst present. Hydroxyalkenes and trisubstituted silane were also tested. Mechanisms for each of these reactions are presented.

  20. Neutron Crystallography, Molecular Dynamics, and Quantum Mechanics Studies of the Nature of Hydrogen Bonding in Cellulose I beta

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the crystal structure of cellulose Ibeta, disordered hydrogen (H) bonding can be represented by the average of two mutually exclusive H bonding schemes that have been designated A and B. An unanswered question is whether A and B interconvert dynamically, or whether they are static but present in ...

  1. Are the hydrogen bonds of RNA (.U) stronger than those of DNA (A.T)? A quantum mechanics study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pérez, A.; Šponer, Jiří; Jurečka, Petr; Hobza, Pavel; Luque, Javier F.; Orozco, Modesto

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 17 (2005), s. 5062-5066 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : density functional calculations * DNA * hydrogen bonds Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 4.907, year: 2005

  2. β-Molybdenum nitride: synthesis mechanism and catalytic response in the gas phase hydrogenation of p-chloronitrobenzene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cárdenas-Lizana, F.; Gómez-Quero, S.; Perret, N.; Kiwi-Minsker, L.; Keane, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    A temperature programmed treatment of MoO3 in flowing N2 + H2 has been employed to prepare β-phase molybdenum nitride (β-Mo2N) which has been used to promote, for the first time, the catalytic hydrogenation of p-chloronitrobenzene. The reduction/nitridation synthesis steps have been monitored in

  3. Hydration of excess electrons trapped in charge pockets on molecular surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.; Del Castillo, R.; Adamowicz, Ludwik

    2007-01-01

    In this work we strive to design a novel electron trap located on a molecular surface. The process of electron trapping involves hydration of the trapped electron. Previous calculations on surface electron trapping revealed that clusters of OH groups can form stable hydrogen-bonded networks on one side of a hydrocarbon surface (i.e. cyclohexane sheets), while the hydrogen atoms on the opposite side of the surface form pockets of positive charge that can attract extra negative charge. The excess electron density on such surfaces can be further stabilized by interactions with water molecules. Our calculations show that these anionic systems are stable with respect to vertical electron detachment (VDE).

  4. Deuterium trapping in tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Michael

    Tungsten is one of the primary material candidates being investigated for use in the first-wall of a magnetic confinement fusion reactor. An ion accelerator was used to simulate the type of ion interaction that may occur at a plasma-facing material. Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was the primary tool used to analyze the effects of the irradiation. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) was used to determine the distribution of trapped D in the tungsten specimen. The tritium migration analysis program (TMAP) was used to simulate thermal desorption profiles from the D depth distributions. Fitting of the simulated thermal desorption profiles with the measured TDS results provided values of the D trap energies. Deuterium trapping in single crystal tungsten was studied as a function of the incident ion fluence, ion flux, irradiation temperature, irradiation history, and surface impurity levels during irradiation. The results show that deuterium was trapped at vacancies and voids. Two deuterium atoms could be trapped at a tungsten vacancy, with trapping energies of 1.4 eV and 1.2 eV for the first and second D atoms, respectively. In a tungsten vo