WorldWideScience

Sample records for hydrogen terminal solid

  1. Muonic processes in solid hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, G.M.; Beveridge, J.L. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bailey, J.M. [Chester Technology, Chester (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Maier, M.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Porcelli, T.A. [University of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Mulhauser, F.; Schaller, L.A. [University of Fribourg, Fribourg (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, Berkeley, California (United States); Kim, S.K. [Jeonbuk National University, Jeonju City, S. (Korea); Kunselman, A.R. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming (United States); Petitjean, C. [PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Zmeskal, J. [IMEP, Vienna (Austria)

    1998-08-01

    Muonic hydrogen participates in many different interactions, including muon induced fusion of hydrogen nuclei. Conventional experimental techniques cannot always unravel and separate the processes of interest. Some of the most important measurements may be more reliably accomplished with the use of a unique and versatile target consisting of layers of different solid hydrogen isotope mixtures. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Characterization of solid hydrogen targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, M.C. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Bailey, J.M.; Mulhauser, F. [Chester Technology (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Douglas, J.L.; Knowles, P.E.; Maier, M.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Porcelli, T.A. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). TRIUMF Facility; Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kim, S.K. [Jeonbuk National Univ., Jeonju City (Korea, Republic of); Kunselman, A.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States); Martoff, C.J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Zmeskal, J. [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria)

    1996-10-01

    In experiments using the TRIUMF solid hydrogen target system, the knowledge of the target thickness and uniformity is often essential in order to extract physical parameters from the data. We have characterized the thickness and uniformity of frozen targets using the energy loss of alpha particles. An accuracy of {approx}5% was achieved, a limit imposed by the uncertainty in the stopping powers. The details of the method are described, and the thickness calibration of the target is presented. (orig.). 11 refs.

  3. Study of radiation chemistry in solids using solid hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumada, Takayuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-03-01

    Having simple and highly symmetric structure, solid hydrogen is a useful matrix on the study of radiation-chemical processes in solid phase which have been less understood in previous studies. We have found three outstanding findings: resonance effects on the tunneling reaction H+H{sub 2} {yields} H{sub 2} + H, effects of pressure on the dissociation and recombination of H{sub 2} molecules in solid hydrogen, and high-resolution ESR spectroscopy using a solid parahydrogen matrix. (author)

  4. Solid Aluminum Borohydrides for Prospective Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovgaliuk, Iurii; Safin, Damir A; Tumanov, Nikolay A; Morelle, Fabrice; Moulai, Adel; Černý, Radovan; Łodziana, Zbigniew; Devillers, Michel; Filinchuk, Yaroslav

    2017-12-08

    Metal borohydrides are intensively researched as high-capacity hydrogen storage materials. Aluminum is a cheap, light, and abundant element and Al 3+ can serve as a template for reversible dehydrogenation. However, Al(BH 4 ) 3 , containing 16.9 wt % of hydrogen, has a low boiling point, is explosive on air and has poor storage stability. A new family of mixed-cation borohydrides M[Al(BH 4 ) 4 ], which are all solid under ambient conditions, show diverse thermal decomposition behaviors: Al(BH 4 ) 3 is released for M=Li + or Na + , whereas heavier derivatives evolve hydrogen and diborane. NH 4 [Al(BH 4 ) 4 ], containing both protic and hydridic hydrogen, has the lowest decomposition temperature of 35 °C and yields Al(BH 4 ) 3 ⋅NHBH and hydrogen. The decomposition temperatures, correlated with the cations' ionic potential, show that M[Al(BH 4 ) 4 ] species are in the most practical stability window. This family of solids, with convenient and versatile properties, puts aluminum borohydride chemistry in the mainstream of hydrogen storage research, for example, for the development of reactive hydride composites with increased hydrogen content. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Solid Hydrogen Particles Analyzed for Atomic Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2001-01-01

    Solid hydrogen particles have been selected as a means of storing atomic propellants in future launch vehicles (refs. 1 to 2). In preparation for this, hydrogen particle formation in liquid helium was tested experimentally. These experiments were conducted to visually characterize the particles and to observe their formation and molecular transformations (aging) while in liquid helium. The particle sizes, molecular transformations, and agglomeration times were estimated from video image analyses. The experiments were conducted at the NASA Glenn Research Center in the Supplemental Multilayer Insulation Research Facility (SMIRF, ref. 3). The facility has a vacuum tank, into which the experimental setup was placed. The vacuum tank prevented heat leaks and subsequent boiloff of the liquid helium, and the supporting systems maintained the temperature and pressure of the liquid helium bath where the solid particles were created. As the operation of the apparatus was developed, the hydrogen particles were easily visualized. The figures (ref. 1) show images from the experimental runs. The first image shows the initial particle freezing, and the second image shows the particles after the small particles have agglomerated. The particles finally all clump, but stick together loosely. The solid particles tended to agglomerate within a maximum of 11 min, and the agglomerate was very weak. Because the hydrogen particles are buoyant in the helium, the agglomerate tends to compact itself into a flat pancake on the surface of the helium. This pancake agglomerate is easily broken apart by reducing the pressure above the liquid. The weak agglomerate implies that the particles can be used as a gelling agent for the liquid helium, as well as a storage medium for atomic boron, carbon, or hydrogen. The smallest particle sizes that resulted from the initial freezing experiments were about 1.8 mm. About 50 percent of the particles formed were between 1.8 to 4.6 mm in diameter. These very

  6. Conversion of municipal solid waste to hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, J.H.; Rogers, R.S.; Thorsness, C.B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    LLNL and Texaco are cooperatively developing a physical and chemical treatment method for the conversion of municipal solid waste (MSW) to hydrogen via the steps of hydrothermal pretreatment, gasification and purification. LLNL`s focus has been on hydrothermal pretreatment of MSW in order to prepare a slurry of suitable viscosity and heating value to allow efficient and economical gasification and hydrogen production. The project has evolved along 3 parallel paths: laboratory scale experiments, pilot scale processing, and process modeling. Initial laboratory-scale MSW treatment results (e.g., viscosity, slurry solids content) over a range of temperatures and times with newspaper and plastics will be presented. Viscosity measurements have been correlated with results obtained at MRL. A hydrothermal treatment pilot facility has been rented from Texaco and is being reconfigured at LLNL; the status of that facility and plans for initial runs will be described. Several different operational scenarios have been modeled. Steady state processes have been modeled with ASPEN PLUS; consideration of steam injection in a batch mode was handled using continuous process modules. A transient model derived from a general purpose packed bed model is being developed which can examine the aspects of steam heating inside the hydrothermal reactor vessel. These models have been applied to pilot and commercial scale scenarios as a function of MSW input parameters and have been used to outline initial overall economic trends. Part of the modeling, an overview of the MSW gasification process and the modeling of the MSW as a process material, was completed by a DOE SERS (Science and Engineering Research Semester) student. The ultimate programmatic goal is the technical demonstration of the gasification of MSW to hydrogen at the laboratory and pilot scale and the economic analysis of the commercial feasibility of such a process.

  7. Production of hydrogen from municipal solid waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, S.L.

    1995-11-01

    The Gasification of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) includes gasification and the process for producing a gasificable slurry from raw MSW by using high pressures of steam. A potential energy source, MSW is a composite of organic materials such as: paper, wood, food waste, etc. There are different paper grades producing different results with low-quality paper forming better slurries than high-quality papers; making MSW a difficult feedstock for gasification. The objective of the bench-scale laboratory work has been to establish operating conditions for a hydrothermal pre-processing scheme for municipal solid waste (MSW) that produces a good slurry product that can be pumped and atomized to the gasifier for the production of hydrogen. Batch reactors are used to determine product yields as a function of hydrothermal treatment conditions. Various ratios of water-to-paper were used to find out solid product, gas product, and soluble product yields of MSW. Experimental conditions covered were temperature, time, and water to feed ratio. Temperature had the strongest effect on product yields.

  8. Hydrogen storage in carbon derived from solid endosperm of coconut

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Viney; Bhatnagar, Ashish; Shahi, R. R.; T.P. Yadav; Srivastava, O.N.

    2014-01-01

    Carbons are being widely investigated as hydrogen storage material owing to their light weight, fast hydrogen adsorption kinetics and cost effectiveness. However, these materials suffer from low hydrogen storage capacity, particularly at room temperature. The aim of the present study is to develop carbon-based material from natural bio-precursor which shows at least moderate hydrogen storage at room temperature. For this purpose, hydrogenation characteristics of carbon derived from solid endo...

  9. Compact solid source of hydrogen gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester, Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2004-06-08

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  10. Solid-State Autocatalysis and Oscillatory Reactions in Thermally Processed Hydrogen Loaded Germanosilicate Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canning, John; Sørensen, Henrik Rokkjær; Kristensen, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Solid-state autocatalysis leading to oscillatory behaviour in GeOH and SiOH formation is demonstrated in optical fibres processed at 500o C. The results confirm the proposed view that hydrogen accelerates change in processed optical fibres principally through autocatalysis. Diffusion of OH through...... hydrogen hopping is thought to be instrumental in terminating this process. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of solid-state autocatalysis in a non-decomposing medium. The demonstration of complexity offers potentially much more sophisticated tailoring of thermally processed and UV processed...... device properties....

  11. Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Availability of a safe, low-pressure, lightweight, compact hydrogen storage system is an enabling technology for hydrogen electric fuel cell usage for space...

  12. Solid Hydrogen Particles and Flow Rates Analyzed for Atomic Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2003-01-01

    The experiments were conducted at Glenn's Small Multipurpose Research Facility (SMIRF, ref. 5). The experimental setup was placed in the facility's vacuum tank to prevent heat leaks and subsequent boiloff of the liquid helium. Supporting systems maintained the temperature and pressure of the liquid helium bath where the solid particles were created. Solid hydrogen particle formation was tested from February 23 to April 2, 2001. Millimeter-sized solid-hydrogen particles were formed in a Dewar of liquid helium as a prelude to creating atomic fuels and propellants for aerospace vehicles. Atomic fuels or propellants are created when atomic boron, carbon, or hydrogen is stored in solid hydrogen particles. The current testing characterized the solid hydrogen particles without the atomic species, as a first step to creating a feed system for the atomic fuels and propellants. This testing did not create atomic species, but only sought to understand the solid hydrogen particle formation and behavior in the liquid helium. In these tests, video images of the solid particle formation were recorded, and the total mass flow rate of the hydrogen was measured. The mass of hydrogen that went into the gaseous phase was also recorded using a commercially available residual gas analyzer. The temperatures, pressures, and flow rates of the liquids and gases in the test apparatus were recorded as well. Testing conducted in 1999 recorded particles as small as 2 to 5 mm in diameter. The current testing extended the testing conditions to a very cold Dewar ullage gas of about 20 to 90 K above the 4 K liquid helium. With the very cold Dewar gas, the hydrogen freezing process took on new dimensions, in some cases creating particles so small that they seemed to be microscopic, appearing as infinitesimally small scintillations on the videotaped images.

  13. Sputtering of solid neon by keV hydrogen ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Ole; Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    1986-01-01

    Sputtering of solid Ne with the hydrogen ions H+1, H+2 and H+3 in the energy range 1–10 keV/atom has been studied by means of a quartz microbalance technique. No enhancement in the yield per atom for molecular ions was found. The results for hydrogen ions are compared with data for keV electrons....

  14. The hydrogen bond in the solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Thomas

    2002-01-04

    The hydrogen bond is the most important of all directional intermolecular interactions. It is operative in determining molecular conformation, molecular aggregation, and the function of a vast number of chemical systems ranging from inorganic to biological. Research into hydrogen bonds experienced a stagnant period in the 1980s, but re-opened around 1990, and has been in rapid development since then. In terms of modern concepts, the hydrogen bond is understood as a very broad phenomenon, and it is accepted that there are open borders to other effects. There are dozens of different types of X-H.A hydrogen bonds that occur commonly in the condensed phases, and in addition there are innumerable less common ones. Dissociation energies span more than two orders of magnitude (about 0.2-40 kcal mol(-1)). Within this range, the nature of the interaction is not constant, but its electrostatic, covalent, and dispersion contributions vary in their relative weights. The hydrogen bond has broad transition regions that merge continuously with the covalent bond, the van der Waals interaction, the ionic interaction, and also the cation-pi interaction. All hydrogen bonds can be considered as incipient proton transfer reactions, and for strong hydrogen bonds, this reaction can be in a very advanced state. In this review, a coherent survey is given on all these matters.

  15. 76 FR 23569 - Termination of the Suspension Agreement on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-27

    ... International Trade Administration Termination of the Suspension Agreement on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium... (``AD'') Investigation on Solid Fertilizer Grade Ammonium Nitrate from the Russian Federation (``the... determine whether imports of solid fertilizer grade ammonium nitrate (``ammonium nitrate'') from Russia were...

  16. Phonons in quantum solids with defects. [lattice vacancies and interstitials in solid helium and metallic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, N.; Zmuidzinas, J. S.

    1974-01-01

    A formalism was developed for temperature-dependent, self-consistent phonons in quantum solids with defects. Lattice vacancies and interstitials in solid helium and metallic hydrogen, as well as electronic excitations in solid helium, were treated as defects that modify properties of these systems. The information to be gained from the modified phonon spectrum is discussed.

  17. Optimising hydrogen bonding in solid wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang

    2009-01-01

    The chemical bonds of wood are both covalent bonds within the wood polymers and hydrogen bonds within and between the polymers. Both types of bonds are responsible for the coherence, strength and stiffness of the material. The hydrogen bonds are more easily modified by changes in load, moisture...... and temperature distorting the internal bonding state. A problem arises when studying hydrogen bonding in wood since matched wood specimens of the same species will have very different internal bonding states. Thus, possible changes in the bonding state due to some applied treatment such as conditioning...... maintaining 100 % moisture content of the wood. The hypothesis was that this would enable a fast stress relaxation as a result of reorganization of bonds, since moisture plasticizes the material and temperature promotes faster kinetics. Hereby, all past bond distortions caused by various moisture, temperature...

  18. Ablation of Solid Hydrogen in a Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard

    1979-01-01

    Several hydrogen pellet ablation models based on the formation of a shielding neutral cloud have been reported by different authors. The predicted ablation rates are shown to follow almost the same scaling law and this is used to explain the authors' ablation experiment....

  19. Ramsauer-Townsend Effect in Solid Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulhauser, F. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Adamczak, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (Poland); Beer, G. A. [University of Victoria (Canada); Bystritsky, V. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Filipowicz, M. [Institute of Physics and Nuclear Techniques (Poland); Fujiwara, M. C. [University of Tokyo (Japan); Huber, T. M. [Gustavus Adolphus College (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Kim, S. K. [Jeonbuk National University (Korea, Republic of); Knowles, P. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Kunselman, A. R. [University of Wyoming (United States); Maier, M. [University of Victoria (Canada); Markushin, V. E. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Marshall, G. M. [TRIUMF (Canada); Olin, A. [University of Victoria (Canada); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Porcelli, T. A. [University of Northen British Columbia (Canada); Stolupin, V. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Wozniak, J. [Institute of Physics and Nuclear Techniques (Poland)

    2001-12-15

    The TRIUMF E742 experiment has measured the energy dependence of the scattering cross-sections of muonic deuterium and tritium on hydrogen molecules for collisions in the energy range 0.1-45 eV. The experimental setup permits the creation of muonic atom ({mu}d or {mu}t) beams. The multilayered target system gives the possibility to choose the type of interactions to study and to isolate a particular interaction. The scattering of {mu}d or {mu}t beams on H{sub 2} is analyzed via the muon transfer reaction to neon. The time-of-flight method is used to measure the scattering cross section as a function of the energy of the muonic atom beam. The results are compared, using Monte Carlo simulations, with theoretical calculations which have been recently performed with high accuracy.

  20. Adsorption of gold on hydrogen terminated Si(0 0 1): Formation of chain structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Bikash C., E-mail: bikashc.gupta@visva-bharati.ac.in [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India); Konar, Shyamal; Bose, Rudra P. [Department of Physics, Visva-Bharati, Santiniketan 731235 (India)

    2009-10-30

    Possible formation of stable Au atomic wire on the hydrogen terminated Si(0 0 1): 3x1 surface is investigated under the density functional formalism. The hydrogen terminated Si(0 0 1): 3x1 surface is patterned in two different ways by removing selective hydrogen atoms from the surface. The adsorption of Au on such surfaces is studied at different sub-monolayer coverages. At 4/9 monolayer (ML) coverage, zigzag continuous Au chains are found to be stable on the patterned hydrogen terminated Si(0 0 1): 3x1 surface. The reason for the stability of the wire structures at 4/9 ML coverage is explained. It is to be noted that beyond 4/9 ML coverage, the additional Au atoms may introduce clusters on the surface. The continuous atomic gold chains on the substrate may be useful for the fabrication of atomic scale devices.

  1. Ultrafast X-Ray Diffraction of Heterogeneous Solid Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitan, Abraham [Olin College of Engineering, Needham, MA (United States)

    2015-08-19

    Angularly resolved x-ray diffraction at 5.5 keV establishes the structure of a 5 µm diameter solid hydrogen jet, providing a foundation for analysis of hydrogen in a warm dense matter state. The jet was composed of approximately 65 % ± 5% HCP and 35 % ± 5% FCC by volume with an average crystallite size on the order of hundreds of nanometers. Broadening in the angularly resolved spectrum provided strong evidence for anisotropic strain up to approximately 3 % in the HCP lattice. Finally, we found no evidence for orientational ordering of the crystal domains.

  2. Electrolytic hydrogen fuel production with solid polymer electrolyte technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titterington, W. A.; Fickett, A. P.

    1973-01-01

    A water electrolysis technology based on a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) concept is presented for applicability to large-scale hydrogen production in a future energy system. High cell current density operation is selected for the application, and supporting cell test performance data are presented. Demonstrated cell life data are included to support the adaptability of the SPE system to large-size hydrogen generation utility plants as needed for bulk energy storage or transmission. The inherent system advantages of the acid SPE electrolysis technology are explained. System performance predictions are made through the year 2000, along with plant capital and operating cost projections.

  3. Solid pellets for hydrogen storage; Des pastilles solides pour stocker l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lepetit, V.

    2006-01-01

    Five researchers from the technical university of Denmark (DTU) have developed magnesium chloride salt pellets which can absorb ammonia (NH{sub 3}) in hexamine form at ambient temperature and pressure. These pellets can store up to the equivalent of 52% of their mass in ammonia (9% of hydrogen). The release of ammonia is obtained by heating the salt at 300 deg. C. In the presence of an iron-based catalyst, ammonia is transformed into nitrogen and hydrogen. This is probably the safest way invented so far to store hydrogen. Short paper. (J.S.)

  4. Standardized Testing Program for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Michael A. [Southwest Research Institute; Page, Richard A. [Southwest Research Institute

    2012-07-30

    In the US and abroad, major research and development initiatives toward establishing a hydrogen-based transportation infrastructure have been undertaken, encompassing key technological challenges in hydrogen production and delivery, fuel cells, and hydrogen storage. However, the principal obstacle to the implementation of a safe, low-pressure hydrogen fueling system for fuel-cell powered vehicles remains storage under conditions of near-ambient temperature and moderate pressure. The choices for viable hydrogen storage systems at the present time are limited to compressed gas storage tanks, cryogenic liquid hydrogen storage tanks, chemical hydrogen storage, and hydrogen absorbed or adsorbed in a solid-state material (a.k.a. solid-state storage). Solid-state hydrogen storage may offer overriding benefits in terms of storage capacity, kinetics and, most importantly, safety.The fervor among the research community to develop novel storage materials had, in many instances, the unfortunate consequence of making erroneous, if not wild, claims on the reported storage capacities achievable in such materials, to the extent that the potential viability of emerging materials was difficult to assess. This problem led to a widespread need to establish a capability to accurately and independently assess the storage behavior of a wide array of different classes of solid-state storage materials, employing qualified methods, thus allowing development efforts to focus on those materials that showed the most promise. However, standard guidelines, dedicated facilities, or certification programs specifically aimed at testing and assessing the performance, safety, and life cycle of these emergent materials had not been established. To address the stated need, the Testing Laboratory for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage Technologies was commissioned as a national-level focal point for evaluating new materials emerging from the designated Materials Centers of Excellence (MCoE) according to

  5. Ultrafast XRD of Heterogeneous Solid Hydrogen at LCLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitan, Abraham; Fletcher, Luke; MacDonald, Michael; Glenzer, Siegfried

    2015-11-01

    The high intensity and short pulse duration of the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) at SLAC allows for single shot x-ray scattering studies from a jet of frozen hydrogen. The high repetition rate of LCLS allows us to build a detailed understanding of the cold structure of this jet. This provides a strong foundation for analysis of time resolved scattering data from the laser heated hydrogen jet. Angularly resolved x-ray diffraction at 5 . 5keV is used to establish the structure of the cold 5 μm diameter solid hydrogen jet. The jet was composed of approximately 65 % +/- 5 % HCP and 35 % +/- 5 % FCC by volume with an average crystallite size on the order of hundreds of nanometers. Broadening in the angularly resolved spectrum provided strong evidence for anisotropic strain up to approximately 3 % in the HCP lattice. Finally, we found no evidence for orientational ordering of the crystal domains. Funding through the DOE SULI program.

  6. Electronic excitations and metallization of dense solid hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, R. E.; Naumov, Ivan I.; Hemley, Russell J.

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and an assessment of recent experimental results for dense solid hydrogen lead to a unique scenario for the metallization of hydrogen under pressure. The existence of layered structures based on graphene sheets gives rise to an electronic structure related to unique features found in graphene that are well studied in the carbon phase. The honeycombed layered structure for hydrogen at high density, first predicted in molecular calculations, produces a complex optical response. The metallization of hydrogen is very different from that originally proposed via a phase transition to a close-packed monoatomic structure, and different from simple metallization recently used to interpret recent experimental data. These different mechanisms for metallization have very different experimental signatures. We show that the shift of the main visible absorption edge does not constrain the point of band gap closure, in contrast with recent claims. This conclusion is confirmed by measured optical spectra, including spectra obtained to low photon energies in the infrared region for phases III and IV of hydrogen. PMID:23904476

  7. Reactivity of a Molecular Magnesium Hydride Featuring a Terminal Magnesium-Hydrogen Bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Silvia; Spaniol, Thomas P; Okuda, Jun

    2016-12-19

    The reactivity of the molecular magnesium hydride [Mg(Me3TACD·Al(i)Bu3)H] (1) featuring a terminal magnesium-hydrogen bond and an NNNN-type macrocyclic ligand, Me3TACD ((Me3TACD)H = Me3[12]aneN4 = 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane), can be grouped into protonolysis, oxidation, hydrometalation, (insertion), and hydride abstraction. Protonolysis of 1 with weak Brønsted acids HX such as terminal acetylenes, amines, silanols, and silanes gave the corresponding derivatives [Mg(Me3TACD·Al(i)Bu3)X] (X = C≡CPh, 3; HN(3,5-Me2-C6H3), 4; OSiMe3, 5; OSiPh3, 6; Cl, 7; Br, 8). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction of anilide 4 showed a square-pyramidal coordination geometry for magnesium. No correlation with the pKa values of the acids was detected. Oxidation of 1 with elemental iodine gave the iodide [Mg(Me3TACD·Al(i)Bu3)I] (9), and oxidation with nitrous oxide afforded the μ-oxo-bridged compound [{Mg(Me3TACD·Al(i)Bu3)}2(μ-O)] (10) with a linear Mg-O-Mg core, as characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The Mg-H bond reacted with benzaldehyde, benzophenone, fluorenone, and CO2 under insertion but not with the olefins 1,1,2-triphenylethylene, tert-butylethylene, and cyclopentene. The unstable formate, prepared also by salt metathesis of iodide 9 with potassium formate, revealed κO,κO' coordination in the solid state. Hydride abstraction with triphenylborane gave the ion pair [Mg(Me3TACD·Al(i)Bu3)(thf)][HBPh3] (16), which catalyzed the hydroboration of polar substrates by pinacolborane.

  8. Hydrogen and deuterium NMR of solids by magic angle spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckman, Richard Raymond [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1982-10-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance of solids has long been characterized by very large spectral broadening which arises from internuclear dipole-dipole coupling or the nuclear electric quadrupole interaction. These couplings can obscure the smaller chemical shift interaction and make that information unavailable. Two important and difficult cases are that of hydrogen and deuterium. For example, the homonuclear dipolar broadening, HD, for hydrogen is usually several tens of kilohertz. For deuterium, HD is relatively small; however, the quadrupole interaction causes a broadening which can be hundreds of kilohertz in polycrystalline or amorphous solids. The development of cross polarization, heteronuclear radiofrequency decoupling, and coherent averaging of nuclear spin interactions has provided measurement of chemical shift tensors in solids. Recently, double quantum NMR and double quantum decoupling have led to measurement of deuterium and proton chemical shift tensors, respectively. A general problem of these experiments is the overlapping of the tensor powder pattern spectra of magnetically distinct sites which cannot be resolved. In this work, high resolution NMR of hydrogen and deuterium in solids is demonstrated. For both nuclei, the resonances are narrowed to obtain liquid-like isotropic spectra by high frequency rotation of the sample about an axis inclined at the magic angle, βm = Arccos(3-1/2), with respect to the direction of the external magnetic field. Two approaches have been developed for each nucleus. For deuterium, the powder spectra were narrowed by over three orders of magnitude by magic angle rotation with precise control of β. A second approach was the observation of deuterium double quantum transitions under magic angle rotation. For hydrogen, magic angle rotation alone could be applied to obtain the isotropic spectrum when HD was small. This often occurs naturally when the nuclei are semi-dilute or involved in

  9. Solid-phase microextraction may catalize hydrogenation when using hydrogen as carrier in gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, D; Boarelli, M C

    2016-07-01

    When hydrogen is used as carrier gas, carbon-carbon double bonds may be hydrogenated in the hot gas chromatograph (GC) injector if introduced by solid-phase microextraction (SPME). SPME fibers coated with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/carboxen/divinylbenzene (DVB), PDMS/carboxen, polyacrylate, PDMS/DVB and PDMS on fused silica, stableflex or metal alloy core have been tested with fatty acid methyl esters (FAMEs) from olive oil. Using coatings containing DVB, hydrogenation took place with high conversion rates (82.0-92.9%) independently of the core material. With all fibers having a metal core, hydrogenation was observed to a certain extent (27.4-85.3%). PDMS, PDMS/carboxen and polyacrylate coated fibers with a fused silica or stableflex core resulted in negligible hydrogenation (0.2-2.5%). The occurrence of hydrogenation was confirmed also with other substances containing carbon-carbon double bonds (n-alkenes, alkenoic acids, mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acid methyl and ethyl esters). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Dynamic nuclear polarization of high-density atomic hydrogen in solid mixtures of molecular hydrogen isotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheludiakov, S; Ahokas, J; Järvinen, J; Zvezdov, D; Vainio, O; Lehtonen, L; Vasiliev, S; Mao, S; Khmelenko, V V; Lee, D M

    2014-12-31

    We report on magnetic resonance studies of high-density atomic hydrogen and deuterium in solid hydrogen matrices at temperatures below 1 K. Average concentrations of H atoms ≈3×10(19)  cm(-3) are obtained in chemical tunneling reactions of isotope exchange with D atoms. The products of these reactions are closely located pairs of H atoms near D2 molecules with strong exchange interactions. We discovered a dynamic nuclear polarization effect on H atoms created by pumping the center of the H electron spin resonance spectrum, similar to the Overhauser effect in metals. Our results indicate that H atoms may be arranged inside molecular matrices at separations equivalent to local concentrations of 2.6×10(21)  cm(-3). This opens up a way to build a metallic state of atomic hydrogen at zero pressure.

  11. Hydrogen-bonding directed crystal engineering of some molecular solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Feng

    2000-10-01

    The design of crystalline clathrates and microporous solids is a contemporary goal in crystal engineering, in which hydrogen bonds play a central role because of their strength, directionality and flexibility. We have constructed various layer- and channel-type host structures by using hydrogen-bonding interactions. A novel hydrogen-bonded supramolecular rosette structure is generated from guanidinium and hydrogen carbonate ions in (1) and ( 2). The rosettes are fused into linear ribbons, which are cross-linked by terephthalate or 4-nitrobenzoate ions functioning as hydrogen-bond acceptors, resulting in anionic host layers with tetra-n-butylammonium guest species sandwiched between them. In (3) ˜ (6), new crystalline adducts of tetraalkylammonium terephthalate/trimesate with urea and water molecules result from hydrogen-bond directed assembly of complementary acceptors and donors that generate anionic channel- and layer-type host lattices for the accommodation of bulky hydrophobic cations. Some 4,4'-disubstituted biphenyls manifest their robustness and flexibility as supramolecular building blocks to construct host structures. 4,4'-biphenyl dicarboxylate ion has a strong tendency in generating ladder-type structure in (7) ˜ (10) due to its rigidity and effectiveness as a bifunctional hydrogen-bond acceptor. In (11) ˜ (15), 4,4 '-dicyanobiphenyl, 4,4'-bipyridine-N,N '-dioxide and 4,4'-dinitrobiphenyl exhibit a constructive interplay of strong and weak hydrogen bond functionalities that generate robust synthons. 4-Tritylbenzoic acid crystallizes via the carboxyl dimer supramolecular synthon to produce a wheel-and-axle host lattice that includes different aromatic solvents in its microporous framework in (16) ˜ (25 ), in which the host architecture is robust and yet adaptive. Based on the trigonal symmetry of 2,4,6-tris-4-(halo-phenoxy)-1,3,5-triazines (halo = chloro, bromo) and the Br3 or Cl3 supramolecular synthon, a new hexagonal host lattice has been designed

  12. Solid hydrogen target for laser driven proton acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, J. P.; Garcia, S.; Chatain, D.; Margarone, D.

    2015-05-01

    The development of very high power lasers opens up new horizons in various fields, such as laser plasma acceleration in Physics and innovative approaches for proton therapy in Medicine. Laser driven proton acceleration is commonly based on the so-called Target Normal Sheath Acceleration (TNSA) mechanisms: a high power laser is focused onto a solid target (thin metallic or plastic foil) and interact with matter at very high intensity, thus generating a plasma; as a consequence "hot" electrons are produced and move into the forward direction through the target. Protons are generated at the target rear side, electrons try to escape from the target and an ultra-strong quasi-electrostatic field (~1TV/m) is generated. Such a field can accelerate protons with a wide energy spectrum (1-200 MeV) in a few tens of micrometers. The proton beam characteristics depend on the laser parameters and on the target geometry and nature. This technique has been validated experimentally in several high power laser facilities by accelerating protons coming from hydrogenated contaminant (mainly water) at the rear of metallic target, however, several research groups are investigating the possibility to perform experiments by using "pure" hydrogen targets. In this context, the low temperature laboratory at CEA-Grenoble has developed a cryostat able to continuously produce a thin hydrogen ribbon (from 40 to 100 microns thick). A new extrusion concept, without any moving part has been carried out, using only the thermodynamic properties of the fluid. First results and perspectives are presented in this paper.

  13. Theoretical realization of cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials based on terminated carbon atomic chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chun-Sheng; An, Hui; Guo, Ling-Ju; Zeng, Zhi; Ju, Xin

    2011-01-14

    The capacity of carbon atomic chains with different terminations for hydrogen storage is studied using first-principles density functional theory calculations. Unlike the physisorption of H(2) on the H-terminated chain, we show that two Li (Na) atoms each capping one end of the odd- or even-numbered carbon chain can hold ten H(2) molecules with optimal binding energies for room temperature storage. The hybridization of the Li 2p states with the H(2)σ orbitals contributes to the H(2) adsorption. However, the binding mechanism of the H(2) molecules on Na arises only from the polarization interaction between the charged Na atom and the H(2). Interestingly, additional H(2) molecules can be bound to the carbon atoms at the chain ends due to the charge transfer between Li 2s2p (Na 3s) and C 2p states. More importantly, dimerization of these isolated metal-capped chains does not affect the hydrogen binding energy significantly. In addition, a single chain can be stabilized effectively by the C(60) fullerenes termination. With a hydrogen uptake of ∼10 wt.% on Li-coated C(60)-C(n)-C(60) (n = 5, 8), the Li(12)C(60)-C(n)-Li(12)C(60) complex, keeping the number of adsorbed H(2) molecules per Li and stabilizing the dispersion of individual Li atoms, can serve as better building blocks of polymers than the (Li(12)C(60))(2) dimer. These findings suggest a new route to design cluster-assembled hydrogen storage materials based on terminated sp carbon chains.

  14. Hydrogen in all its states: from solid to gas and liquid; L'hydrogene dans tous ses etats: du solide au gaz en passant par le liquide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latroche, M.; Joubert, J.M.; Cuevas, F.; Paul-Boncour, V.; Percheron-Guegan, A. [Institut de Chimie et des Materiaux Paris-Est, Chimie Metallurgique des Terres Rares (CMTR-ICMPE-UMR 7182), CNRS, 94 - Thiais (France)

    2007-07-01

    Hydrogen is considered as one of the future energy vector. Several means of hydrogen storage are presented here: physical solutions (compression, liquefaction) and chemical solutions (adsorption in porous solids and absorption in chemical hydrides). Each of these means presents advantages and disadvantages according to economical, energetic, specific capacity, safety and sorption/desorption kinetics criteria. (O.M.)

  15. Plasma Density Measurements on Refuelling by Solid Hydrogen Pellets in a Rotating Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma.......The authors used laser interferometry to directly measure the increase in plasma density caused by the ablation of a solid hydrogen pellet situated in a rotating plasma....

  16. Durability of solid oxide electrolysis cells for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauch, A.; Hoejgaard Jensen, S.; Dalgaard Ebbesen, S.

    2007-05-15

    In the perspective of the increasing interest in renewable energy and hydrogen economy, the reversible solid oxide cells (SOCs) is a promising technology as it has the potential of providing efficient and cost effective hydrogen production by high temperature electrolysis of steam (HTES). Furthermore development of such electrolysis cells can gain from the results obtained within the R and D of SOFCs. For solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) to become interesting from a technological point of view, cells that are reproducible, high performing and long-term stable need to be developed. In this paper we address some of the perspectives of the SOEC technology i.e. issues such as a potential H2 production price as low as 0.71 US dollar/kg H{sub 2} using SOECs for HTES; is there a possible market for the electrolysers? and what R and D steps are needed for the realisation of the SOEC technology? In the experimental part we present electrolysis test results on SOCs that have been optimized for fuel cell operation but applied for HTES. The SOCs are produced on a pre-pilot scale at Risoe National Laboratory. These cells have been shown to have excellent initial electrolysis performance, but the durability of such electrolysis cells are not optimal and examples of results from SOEC tests over several hundreds of hours are given here. The long-term tests have been run at current densities of -0.5 A/cm{sup 2} and -1 A/cm{sup 2}, temperatures of 850 deg. C and 950 deg. C and p(H{sub 2}O)/p(H{sub 2}) of 0.5/0.5 and 0.9/0.1. Long-term degradation rates are shown to be up to 5 times higher for SOECs compared to similar SOFC testing. Furthermore, hydrogen and synthetic fuel production prices are calculated using the experimental results from long-term electrolysis test as input and a short outlook for the future work on SOECs will be given as well. (au)

  17. Direct Evidence for Solid-like Hydrogen in a Nanoporous Carbon Hydrogen Storage Material at Supercritical Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, Valeska P; Ramirez-Cuesta, Anibal J; Bimbo, Nuno; Sharpe, Jessica E; Noguera-Diaz, Antonio; Presser, Volker; Rudic, Svemir; Mays, Timothy J

    2015-08-25

    Here we report direct physical evidence that confinement of molecular hydrogen (H2) in an optimized nanoporous carbon results in accumulation of hydrogen with characteristics commensurate with solid H2 at temperatures up to 67 K above the liquid-vapor critical temperature of bulk H2. This extreme densification is attributed to confinement of H2 molecules in the optimally sized micropores, and occurs at pressures as low as 0.02 MPa. The quantities of contained, solid-like H2 increased with pressure and were directly evaluated using in situ inelastic neutron scattering and confirmed by analysis of gas sorption isotherms. The demonstration of the existence of solid-like H2 challenges the existing assumption that supercritical hydrogen confined in nanopores has an upper limit of liquid H2 density. Thus, this insight offers opportunities for the development of more accurate models for the evaluation and design of nanoporous materials for high capacity adsorptive hydrogen storage.

  18. Desorption of cryogenic layers of the solid hydrogens by electron bombardment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Tratnik, Herbert; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte

    2008-01-01

    For solid hydrogenic films in the thickness range from similar to 50 ML to similar to 500 ML the desorption yield falls off inversely proportional to the thickness for both H-2 and D-2 films. This behavior is common for data obtained at CERN for solid H-2 and at Riso National Laboratory for solid...

  19. Combined Solid State and High Pressure Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grube, Elisabeth; Jensen, Torben René

    Presented at The First European Early Stage Researcher's Conference on Hydrogen Storage in Belgrade, Serbia.......Presented at The First European Early Stage Researcher's Conference on Hydrogen Storage in Belgrade, Serbia....

  20. Indications of chemical bond contrast in AFM images of a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labidi, Hatem; Koleini, Mohammad; Huff, Taleana; Salomons, Mark; Cloutier, Martin; Pitters, Jason; Wolkow, Robert A

    2017-02-13

    The origin of bond-resolved atomic force microscope images remains controversial. Moreover, most work to date has involved planar, conjugated hydrocarbon molecules on a metal substrate thereby limiting knowledge of the generality of findings made about the imaging mechanism. Here we report the study of a very different sample; a hydrogen-terminated silicon surface. A procedure to obtain a passivated hydrogen-functionalized tip is defined and evolution of atomic force microscopy images at different tip elevations are shown. At relatively large tip-sample distances, the topmost atoms appear as distinct protrusions. However, on decreasing the tip-sample distance, features consistent with the silicon covalent bonds of the surface emerge. Using a density functional tight-binding-based method to simulate atomic force microscopy images, we reproduce the experimental results. The role of the tip flexibility and the nature of bonds and false bond-like features are discussed.

  1. Orientationally ordered ridge structures of aluminum films on hydrogen terminated silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quaade, Ulrich; Pantleon, Karen

    2006-01-01

    > directions on the silicon substrate. The ridge structure appears when the film thickness is above 500 nm, and increasing the film thickness makes the structure more distinct. Anodic oxidation enhances the structure even further. X-ray diffraction indicates that grains in the film have mostly (110) facets......Films of aluminum deposited onto Si(100) substrates show a surface structure of parallel ridges. On films deposited on oxidized silicon substrates the direction of the ridges is arbitrary, but on films deposited on hydrogen-terminated Si(100) the ridges are oriented parallel to the

  2. General inverse solid-phase synthesis method for C-terminally modified peptide mimetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasubilli, Ramakrishna; Gutheil, William G

    2004-01-01

    Peptide mimetics are of considerable interest as bioactive agents and drugs. C-terminally modified peptide mimetics are of particular interest given the synthetic versatility of the carboxyl group and its derivatives. A general approach to C-terminally modified peptide mimetics, based on a urethane attachment strategy and amino acid t-butyl ester-based N-to-C peptide synthesis, is described. This approach is compatible with the reaction conditions generally employed for solution-phase peptide mimetic synthesis. To develop and demonstrate this approach, it was employed for the solid-phase synthesis of peptide trifluoromethyl ketones, peptide boronic acids, and peptide hydroxamic acids. The development of a versatile general approach to C-terminally modified peptides using readily available starting materials provides a basis for the combinatorial and parallel solid-phase synthesis of these peptide mimetic classes for bioactive agent screening and also provides a basis for the further development of solid-phase C-terminal functional group elaboration strategies.

  3. Secondary Electron Emission from Solid Hydrogen and Deuterium Resulting from Incidence of keV Electrons and Hydrogen Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, H.

    1977-01-01

    The secondary electron emission (SEE) coefficient δ was measured for solid hydrogen and deuterium resulting from the normal incidence of 0.5–3‐keV electrons and 4–10‐keV H+, H2+, H3+, and D3+ ions. The SEE coefficients for solid hydrogen are 60–70% of those for solid deuterium, and the coefficients...... or the stopping power of the incident particles. Measurements were also made for oblique incidence of H+ ions on solid deuterium for angles of incidence up to 75°. A correction could be made for the emission of secondary ions by also measuring the current calorimetrically. At largest energies, the angular....... The losses to molecular states will be largest for hydrogen, so that the SEE coefficients are smallest for solid hydrogen, as was observed. For the incidence of ions, the values of δ for the different molecular ions agree when the number of secondary electrons per incident atom is plotted versus the velocity...

  4. Range Measurements of keV Hydrogen Ions in Solid Oxygen and Carbon Monoxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.; Andersen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    Ranges of 1.3–3.5 keV/atom hydrogen and deuterium molecular ions have been measured by a thin-film reflection method. The technique, used here for range measurements in solid oxygen and carbon monoxide targets, is identical to the one used previously for range measurements in hydrogen and nitrogen....... The main aim was to look for phase-effects, i.e. gas-solid differences in the stopping processes. While measured ranges in solid oxygen were in agreement with known gas data, the ranges in solid carbon monoxide were up to 50% larger than those calculated from gas-stopping data. The latter result agrees...

  5. Kinetics study of solid ammonia borane hydrogen release--modeling and experimental validation for chemical hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Joon; Rönnebro, Ewa C E; Rassat, Scot; Karkamkar, Abhi; Maupin, Gary; Holladay, Jamie; Simmons, Kevin; Brooks, Kriston

    2014-05-07

    Ammonia borane (AB), NH3BH3, is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage with 19.6 wt% gravimetric hydrogen capacity of which maximum 16.2 wt% hydrogen can be released via an exothermic thermal decomposition below 200 °C. We have investigated the kinetics of hydrogen release from AB and from an AB-methyl cellulose (AB/MC) composite at temperatures of 160-300 °C using both experiments and modeling. The hydrogen release rate at 300 °C is twice as fast as at 160 °C. The purpose of our study was to show safe hydrogen release without thermal runaway effects and to validate system model kinetics. AB/MC released hydrogen at ∼20 °C lower than neat AB and at a faster release rate in that temperature range. Based on the experimental results, the kinetics equations were revised to better represent the growth and nucleation process during decomposition of AB. We explored two different reactor concepts; auger and fixed bed. The current auger reactor concept turned out to not be appropriate, however, we demonstrated safe self-propagation of the hydrogen release reaction of solid AB/MC in a fixed bed reactor.

  6. Hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste in the two-stage fermentation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lui, D.; Liu, D.; Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong

    2006-01-01

    A two-stage process combined hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste was demonstrated working successfully. The yield of 43 mL H-2/g volatile solid (VS) added was generated in the first hydrogen production stage and the methane production in the second stage was 500 mL CH4/g VS....... The optimum PH range for hydrogen production in this system was in the range from 5 to 5.5. The short hydraulic retention time (2 days) applied in the first stage was enough to separate acidogenesis from methanogenesis. No additional control for preventing methanogenesis in the first stage was necessary...

  7. Crystal Properties and Radiation Effects in Solid Molecular Hydrogens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozioiziemski, B

    2000-09-01

    The crystal lattice structure, growth shapes and helium generated by beta-decay of solid deuterium-tritium (D-T) mixtures have been studied. Understanding of these D-T properties is important for predicting and optimizing the target design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Raman spectroscopy showed the D-T crystal structure is hexagonal close packed, common to the non-tritiated isotopes. The isotopic mixtures of both tritiated and non-tritiated species broadens the rotational transitions, especially of the lighter species in the mixture. The vibrational frequencies of each isotope is shifted to higher energy in the mixture than the pure components. The J = 1-0 population decreases exponentially with a 1/e time constant which rapidly increases above 10.5 K for both D{sub 2} and T{sub 2} in D-T. The conversion rate is nearly constant from 5 K to 10 K for both D{sub 2} and T{sub 2} at 7.1 hours and 2.1 hours, respectively. The smoothing of D-T layers by beta decay heating is limited by the crystal surface energy. Deuterium and hydrogen-deuteride crystals were grown at a number of temperatures below the triple point to determine the surface energy and roughening transition. Several distinct crystal shapes were observed on a number of different substrates. The a facet roughens between 0.9 T{sub TP} and T{sub TP}, while the c facet persists up to the melting temperature. This is very different from the behavior of the other rare gas crystals which grow completely rounded above 0.8 T{sub TP}. Helium bubbles formed as a product of the beta decay were observed using optical microscopy and the diffusion of smaller bubbles measured with dynamic light scattering. Bubble diffusion coefficients as high as 2.0 x 10{sup -16} m{sup 2}/s were measured for 10-50 nm bubbles. The bubbles move in response to a thermal gradient, with speeds between 1 {micro}m/hour and 100 {micro}m/hour for thermal gradients and temperatures appropriate to NIF targets.

  8. Current Development in Treatment and Hydrogen Energy Conversion of Organic Solid Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hang-Sik

    2008-02-01

    This manuscript summarized current developments on continuous hydrogen production technologies researched in Korea advanced institute of science and technology (KAIST). Long-term continuous pilot-scale operation of hydrogen producing processes fed with non-sterile food waste exhibited successful results. Experimental findings obtained by the optimization processes of growth environments for hydrogen producing bacteria, the development of high-rate hydrogen producing strategies, and the feasibility tests for real field application could contribute to the progress of fermentative hydrogen production technologies. Three major technologies such as controlling dilution rate depending on the progress of acidogenesis, maintaining solid retention time independently from hydraulic retention time, and decreasing hydrogen partial pressure by carbon dioxide sparging could enhance hydrogen production using anaerobic leaching beds reactors and anaerobic sequencing batch reactors. These findings could contribute to stable, reliable and effective performances of pilot-scale reactors treating organic wastes.

  9. Solid State NMR Characterization of Complex Metal Hydrides systems for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Son-Jong Hwang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Solid state NMR is widely applied in studies of solid state chemistries for hydrogen storage reactions. Use of 11B MAS NMR in studies of metal borohydrides (BH4 is mainly focused, revisiting the issue of dodecaborane formation and observation of 11B{1H} Nuclear Overhauser Effect.

  10. Solid NMR characterization of hydrogen solid storage matrices; Caracterisation par RMN du solide des matrices de stockage solide de l'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilette, M.A.; Charpentier, T.; Berthault, P. [CEA Saclay, Dept. de Recherche sur l' Etat Condense, les Atomes et les Molecules, Lab. de Structure et Dynamique par Resonance Magnetique Lab. Claude Frejacques - CEA/CNRS URA 331, DSM/DRECAM/SCM, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work is to develop and validate characterization tools by NMR imagery and spectroscopy of the structure of materials for hydrogen storage, and of their evolution during load/unload cycles. The two main topics of this work are in one hand the analysis of the local structure of the materials and the understanding of their eventual modifications, and in another hand, the in-situ analysis of the distribution and diffusion of hydrogen inside the storage material. (O.M.)

  11. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Hydrogen in Disordered and Amorphous Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Bowman, Robert

    1986-01-01

    This is the second volume in the NATO ASI series dealing with the topic of hydrogen in solids. The first (V. B76, Metal Hydrides) appeared five years ago and focussed primarily on crystalline phases of hydrided metallic systems. In the intervening period, the amorphous solid state has become an area of intense research activity, encompassing both metallic and non-metallic, e.g. semiconducting, systems. At the same time the problem of storage of hydrogen, which motivated the first ASI, continues to be important. In the case of metallic systems, there were early indications that metallic glasses and disordered alloys may be more corrosion resistant, less susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and have a higher hydrogen mobility than ordered metals or intermetallics. All of these properties are desirable for hydrogen storage. Subsequent research has shown that thermodynamic instability is a severe problem in many amorphous metal hydrides. The present ASI has provided an appropriate forum to focus on these issu...

  12. Review of Solid State Hydrogen Storage Methods Adopting Different Kinds of Novel Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renju Zacharia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Overview of advances in the technology of solid state hydrogen storage methods applying different kinds of novel materials is provided. Metallic and intermetallic hydrides, complex chemical hydride, nanostructured carbon materials, metal-doped carbon nanotubes, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs, metal-doped metal organic frameworks, covalent organic frameworks (COFs, and clathrates solid state hydrogen storage techniques are discussed. The studies on their hydrogen storage properties are in progress towards positive direction. Nevertheless, it is believed that these novel materials will offer far-reaching solutions to the onboard hydrogen storage problems in near future. The review begins with the deficiencies of current energy economy and discusses the various aspects of implementation of hydrogen energy based economy.

  13. Complex Metal Hydrides for hydrogen storage and solid-state ion conductors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payandeh GharibDoust, SeyedHosein

    and electricity in batteries. However, both hydrogen and electricity must be stored in a very dense way to be useful, e.g. for mobile applications. Complex metal hydrides have high hydrogen density and have been studied during the past twenty years in hydrogen storage systems. Moreover, they have shown high ionic...... conductivities which promote their application as solid electrolytes in batteries. This dissertation presents the synthesis and characterization of a variety of complex metal hydrides and explores their hydrogen storage properties and ionic conductivity. Five halide free rare earth borohydrides RE(BH4)3, (RE...

  14. CHALLENGES IN GENERATING HYDROGEN BY HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS USING SOLID OXIDE CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. S. Sohal; J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; J. S. Herring; E. A. Harvego

    2008-03-01

    Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) high temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells is presented in this paper. The research results reported here have been obtained in a laboratory-scale apparatus. These results and common scale-up issues also indicate that for the technology to be successful in a large industrial setting, several technical, economical, and manufacturing issues have to be resolved. Some of the issues related to solid oxide cells are stack design and performance optimization, identification and evaluation of cell performance degradation parameters and processes, integrity and reliability of the solid oxide electrolysis (SOEC) stacks, life-time prediction and extension of the SOEC stack, and cost reduction and economic manufacturing of the SOEC stacks. Besides the solid oxide cells, balance of the hydrogen generating plant also needs significant development. These issues are process and ohmic heat source needed for maintaining the reaction temperature (~830°C), high temperature heat exchangers and recuperators, equal distribution of the reactants into each cell, system analysis of hydrogen and associated energy generating plant, and cost optimization. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. These issues need interdisciplinary research effort of federal laboratories, solid oxide cell manufacturers, hydrogen consumers, and other such stakeholders. This paper discusses research and development accomplished by INL on such issues and highlights associated challenges that need to

  15. Kinetics Study of Solid Ammonia Borane Hydrogen Release – Modeling and Experimental Validation for Chemical Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yong-Joon; Ronnebro, Ewa; Rassat, Scot D.; Karkamkar, Abhijeet J.; Maupin, Gary D.; Holladay, Jamelyn D.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Brooks, Kriston P.

    2014-02-24

    Ammonia borane (AB), NH3BH3, is a promising material for chemical hydrogen storage with 19.6 wt% gravimetric hydrogen capacity of which 16.2 wt% hydrogen can be utilized below 200°C. We have investigated the kinetics of hydrogen release from AB and from an AB-methyl cellulose (AB/MC) composite at temperatures of 160-300°C using both experiments and modeling. The purpose of our study was to show safe hydrogen release without thermal runaway effects and to validate system model kinetics. AB/MC released hydrogen at ~20°C lower than neat AB and at a rate that is two times faster. Based on the experimental results, the kinetics equations were revised to better represent the growth and nucleation process during decomposition of AB. We explored two different reactor concepts; Auger and fixed bed. The current Auger reactor concept turned out to not be appropriate, however, we demonstrated safe self-propagation of the hydrogen release reaction of solid AB/MC in a fixed bed reactor.

  16. Low-Temperature Carrier Transport in Ionic-Liquid-Gated Hydrogen-Terminated Silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasama, Yosuke; Yamaguchi, Takahide; Tanaka, Masashi; Takeya, Hiroyuki; Takano, Yoshihiko

    2017-11-01

    We fabricated ionic-liquid-gated field-effect transistors on the hydrogen-terminated (111)-oriented surface of undoped silicon. Ion implantation underneath electrodes leads to good ohmic contacts, which persist at low temperatures down to 1.4 K. The sheet resistance of the channel decreases by more than five orders of magnitude as the gate voltage is changed from 0 to -1.6 V at 220 K. This is caused by the accumulation of hole carriers. The sheet resistance shows thermally activated behavior at temperatures below 10 K, which is attributed to hopping transport of the carriers. The activation energy decreases towards zero with increasing carrier density, suggesting the approach to an insulator-metal transition. We also report the variation of device characteristics induced by repeated sweeps of the gate voltage.

  17. Hydrogen generation due to water splitting on Si - terminated 4H-Sic(0001) surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qingfang; Li, Qiqi; Yang, Cuihong; Rao, Weifeng

    2018-02-01

    The chemical reactions of hydrogen gas generation via water splitting on Si-terminated 4H-SiC surfaces with or without C/Si vacancies were studied by using first-principles. We studied the reaction mechanisms of hydrogen generation on the 4H-SiC(0001) surface. Our calculations demonstrate that there are major rearrangements in surface when H2O approaches the SiC(0001) surface. The first H splitting from water can occur with ground-state electronic structures. The second H splitting involves an energy barrier of 0.65 eV. However, the energy barrier for two H atoms desorbing from the Si-face and forming H2 gas is 3.04 eV. In addition, it is found that C and Si vacancies can form easier in SiC(0001)surfaces than in SiC bulk and nanoribbons. The C/Si vacancies introduced can enhance photocatalytic activities. It is easier to split OH on SiC(0001) surface with vacancies compared to the case of clean SiC surface. H2 can form on the 4H-SiC(0001) surface with C and Si vacancies if the energy barriers of 1.02 and 2.28 eV are surmounted, respectively. Therefore, SiC(0001) surface with C vacancy has potential applications in photocatalytic water-splitting.

  18. Flash lamp annealing of spray coated films containing oxidized or hydrogen terminated silicon nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidel, Falko, E-mail: falko.seidel@physik.tu-chemnitz.de [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Toader, Iulia G. [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Koth, Stephan [Institute for Print and Media Technology, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Fritzsche, Ronny [Coordination Chemistry, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Schäfer, Philipp; Bülz, Daniel [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Büchter, Benjamin [Coordination Chemistry, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Gordan, Ovidiu D.; Freitag, Hans [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Jakob, Alexander; Buschbeck, Roy [Inorganic Chemistry, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz,Germany (Germany); Hietschold, Michael [Solid Surface Analysis, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Lang, Heinrich [Inorganic Chemistry, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz,Germany (Germany); Mehring, Michael [Coordination Chemistry, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Baumann, Reinhard [Institute for Print and Media Technology, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany); Zahn, Dietrich R.T. [Semiconductor Physics, Technische Universität Chemnitz, D-09107 Chemnitz (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    A variety of silicon nanoparticle (Si NP) powders is studied with diffuse-reflectance infrared Fourier-transform spectroscopy before and after treatment with hydrofluoric acid. As received Si NPs and surface passivated Si NPs are dispersed in organic dispersion media such ethanol. A spray coating system is used to spray the Si NPs onto molybdenum substrates under nitrogen atmosphere. During film growth an in-line spectroscopic ellipsometer monitors the deposition process. In addition, a Xe-lamp enables to flash films in order to melt Si NPs together. Si NP films are then investigated using atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy. Eventually, a difference in surface termination (e.g. state of surface oxidation and hydrogen passivation) between Si NP amounts of three selected providers was found. Furthermore, the dispersion stability of Si NP powder in dry ethanol (> 99%), the film roughness after processing, and the melting of Si NP films is found to depend strongly on the surface termination of the NPs. - Highlights: • Silicon nanoparticle suspensions are spray coated on molybdenum substrates. • Spectroscopic ellipsometry and atomic force microscopy watch the deposition. • After deposition a light flash anneals the sample to fuse silicon nanoparticles. • Silicon nanoparticle surface oxidation correlates with the effects of annealing.

  19. Recent Advances in the Use of Sodium Borohydride as a Solid State Hydrogen Store

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Mao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of new practical hydrogen storage materials with high volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen densities is necessary to implement fuel cell technology for both mobile and stationary applications. NaBH4, owing to its low cost and high hydrogen density (10.6 wt%, has received extensive attention as a promising hydrogen storage medium. However, its practical use is hampered by its high thermodynamic stability and slow hydrogen exchange kinetics. Recent developments have been made in promoting H2 release and tuning the thermodynamics of the thermal decomposition of solid NaBH4. These conceptual advances offer a positive outlook for using NaBH4-based materials as viable hydrogen storage carriers for mobile applications. This review summarizes contemporary progress in this field with a focus on the fundamental dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation pathways and properties and on material design strategies towards improved kinetics and thermodynamics such as catalytic doping, nano-engineering, additive destabilization and chemical modification.

  20. Tank designs for combined high pressure gas and solid state hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea

    Many challenges have still to be overcome in order to establish a solid ground for significant market penetration of fuel cell hydrogen vehicles. The development of an effective solution for on-board hydrogen storage is one of the main technical tasks that need to be tackled. The present thesis...... for each storage solution investigated in this work. Attention is given to solutions that involve high-pressure solid-state and gas hydrogen storage with an integrated passive cooling system. A set of libraries is implemented in the modeling platform to select among different material compositions, kinetic...... compressed-hydrogen vessel respectively. For the former, these models are used to quantify the main design parameter, being the critical metal hydride thickness, for the tank/heat-exchanger system. For the metal hydride tank, the tubular layout in a shell and tube configuration with 2 mm inner diameter tubes...

  1. Investigation of solid nitrogen for cryogenic thermal storage in superconducting cable terminations for enhanced resiliency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suttell, N.; Zhang, Z.; Kweon, J.; Nes, T.; Kim, C. H.; Pamidi, S.; Ordonez, J. C.

    2017-12-01

    Low heat capacity of helium makes the helium gas cooled high temperature superconducting (HTS) power devices susceptible to large temperature rises during unexpected heat loads such as electrical faults or cryogenic system failures. Cryogenic thermal storage in the form of solid nitrogen designed in the terminations is explored as a means to increase the thermal stability and operational time of HTS power cables in the event of unexpected heat loads. An external tank containing activated charcoal is used as an adsorption buffer tank for nitrogen gas. The use of activated charcoal minimizes the volume of the buffer tank and prevents pressure rises during melting and boiling of the solid nitrogen. Calculations of the cryogenic thermal storage needed and a description of the experimental setup used to understand the design constraints are discussed.

  2. Covalent attachment of bacteriorhodopsin monolayer to bromo-terminated solid supports: preparation, characterization, and protein stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yongdong; Girshevitz, Olga; Friedman, Noga; Ron, Izhar; Cahen, David; Sheves, Mordechai

    2008-07-07

    The interfacing of functional proteins with solid supports and the study of related protein-adsorption behavior are promising and important for potential device applications. In this study, we describe the preparation of bacteriorhodopsin (bR) monolayers on Br-terminated solid supports through covalent attachment. The bonding, by chemical reaction of the exposed free amine groups of bR with the pendant Br group of the chemically modified solid surface, was confirmed both by negative AFM results obtained when acetylated bR (instead of native bR) was used as a control and by weak bands observed at around 1610 cm(-1) in the FTIR spectrum. The coverage of the resultant bR monolayer was significantly increased by changing the pH of the purple-membrane suspension from 9.2 to 6.8. Although bR, which is an exceptionally stable protein, showed a pronounced loss of its photoactivity in these bR monolayers, it retained full photoactivity after covalent binding to Br-terminated alkyls in solution. Several characterization methods, including atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact potential difference (CPD) measurements, and UV/Vis and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, verified that these bR monolayers behaved significantly different from native bR. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements (and optical absorption spectroscopy) suggest that the retinal chromophore is probably still present in the protein, whereas the UV/Vis spectrum suggests that it lacks the characteristic covalent protonated Schiff base linkage. This finding sheds light on the unique interactions of biomolecules with solid surfaces and may be significant for the design of protein-containing device structures.

  3. Flight demonstration of flight termination system and solid rocket motor ignition using semiconductor laser initiated ordnance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Norman R.; Maxfield, B.; Boucher, C.

    1995-01-01

    Solid State Laser Initiated Ordnance (LIO) offers new technology having potential for enhanced safety, reduced costs, and improved operational efficiency. Concerns over the absence of programmatic applications of the technology, which has prevented acceptance by flight programs, should be abated since LIO has now been operationally implemented by the Laser Initiated Ordnance Sounding Rocket Demonstration (LOSRD) Program. The first launch of solid state laser diode LIO at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) occurred on March 15, 1995 with all mission objectives accomplished. This project, Phase 3 of a series of three NASA Headquarters LIO demonstration initiatives, accomplished its objective by the flight of a dedicated, all-LIO sounding rocket mission using a two-stage Nike-Orion launch vehicle. LIO flight hardware, made by The Ensign-Bickford Company under NASA's first Cooperative Agreement with Profit Making Organizations, safely initiated three demanding pyrotechnic sequence events, namely, solid rocket motor ignition from the ground and in flight, and flight termination, i.e., as a Flight Termination System (FTS). A flight LIO system was designed, built, tested, and flown to support the objectives of quickly and inexpensively putting LIO through ground and flight operational paces. The hardware was fully qualified for this mission, including component testing as well as a full-scale system test. The launch accomplished all mission objectives in less than 11 months from proposal receipt. This paper concentrates on accomplishments of the ordnance aspects of the program and on the program's implementation and results. While this program does not generically qualify LIO for all applications, it demonstrated the safety, technical, and operational feasibility of those two most demanding applications, using an all solid state safe and arm system in critical flight applications.

  4. Active Edge Sites Engineering in Nickel Cobalt Selenide Solid Solutions for Highly Efficient Hydrogen Evolution

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan

    2017-01-06

    An effective multifaceted strategy is demonstrated to increase active edge site concentration in NiCoSe solid solutions prepared by in situ selenization process of nickel cobalt precursor. The simultaneous control of surface, phase, and morphology result in as-prepared ternary solid solution with extremely high electrochemically active surface area (C = 197 mF cm), suggesting significant exposure of active sites in this ternary compound. Coupled with metallic-like electrical conductivity and lower free energy for atomic hydrogen adsorption in NiCoSe, identified by temperature-dependent conductivities and density functional theory calculations, the authors have achieved unprecedented fast hydrogen evolution kinetics, approaching that of Pt. Specifically, the NiCoSe solid solutions show a low overpotential of 65 mV at -10 mV cm, with onset potential of mere 18 mV, an impressive small Tafel slope of 35 mV dec, and a large exchange current density of 184 μA cm in acidic electrolyte. Further, it is shown that the as-prepared NiCoSe solid solution not only works very well in acidic electrolyte but also delivers exceptional hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) performance in alkaline media. The outstanding HER performance makes this solid solution a promising candidate for mass hydrogen production.

  5. Translational vibrations between chains of hydrogen-bonded molecules in solid-state aspirin form I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Masae; Ishikawa, Yoichi

    2013-06-01

    We perform dispersion-corrected first-principles calculations, and far-infrared (terahertz) spectroscopic experiments at 4 K, to examine translational vibrations between chains of hydrogen-bonded molecules in solid-state aspirin form I. The calculated frequencies and relative intensities reproduce the observed spectrum to accuracy of 11 cm-1 or less. The stronger one of the two peaks assigned to the translational mode includes the stretching vibration of the weak hydrogen bond between the acetyl groups of a neighboring one-dimensional chain. The calculation of aspirin form II performed for comparison gives the stretching vibration of the weak hydrogen bond in one-dimensional chain.

  6. Hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste in the two-stage fermentation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dawei; Liu, Dapeng; Zeng, Raymond J; Angelidaki, Irini

    2006-06-01

    A two-stage process combined hydrogen and methane production from household solid waste was demonstrated working successfully. The yield of 43 mL H(2)/g volatile solid (VS) added was generated in the first hydrogen production stage and the methane production in the second stage was 500 mL CH(4)/g VS added. This figure was 21% higher than the methane yield from the one-stage process, which was run as control. Sparging of the hydrogen reactor with methane gas resulted in doubling of the hydrogen production. pH was observed as a key factor affecting fermentation pathway in hydrogen production stage. The optimum pH range for hydrogen production in this system was in the range from 5 to 5.5. The short hydraulic retention time (2 days) applied in the first stage was enough to separate acidogenesis from methanogenesis. No additional control for preventing methanogenesis in the first stage was necessary. Furthermore, this study also provided direct evidence in the dynamic fermentation process that, hydrogen production increase was reflected by acetate to butyrate ratio increase in liquid phase.

  7. Electrochemical characterisation of solid oxide cell electrodes for hydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernuy-Lopez, Carlos; Knibbe, Ruth; He, Zeming

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen electrodes and steam electrodes are designed and tested to develop improved solid oxide electrolysis cells for H2 production with the cell support on the oxygen electrode. The electrode performance is evaluated by impedance spectroscopy testing of symmetric cells at open circuit voltage (OCV...

  8. PENETRATION DEPTH OF 0.5-3-KEV ELECTRONS IN SOLID HYDROGEN AND DEUTERIUM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    1978-01-01

    The mirror-substrate method was used for measuring the penetration depth of 0. 5-3-keV electrons in solid hydrogen and deuterium. The penetration depth was found to be 0. 53 multiplied by 10**1**8E**1**. **7**2 molecules/cm**2 with the energy given in keV. There was satisfactory agreement...... with other data. The measurements also showed that the escape depth for true secondary electrons from solid deuterium is less than 50 A, which agrees well with the small values for the secondary-electron-emission coefficient found for solid deuterium. Results were furthermore obtained for the electron...

  9. Opto-electronic properties of adamantane and hydrogen-terminated sila- and germa-adamantane: A comparative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsusi, Farah; Mirabbaszadeh, Kavoos; Ali Mansoori, G.

    2009-06-01

    We present the opto-electronic properties of adamantane (C 10H 16) compared to hydrogen-terminated sila- and germa-adamantane (Si 10H 16 and Ge 10H 16) as calculated by the density functional theory. We have shown that the electronic properties of adamantane in comparison to sila- and germa-adamantane are more affected by hydrogen atoms. Our calculations show that the electron affinity of C 10H 16 is negative, while those of Si 10H 16 and Ge 10H 16 are positive. Electronic properties and optical gaps resulting from hybrid functionals are in close agreement with quantum Monte Carlo results.

  10. Durable solid oxide electrolysis cells for hydrogen production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xiufu; Chen, Ming; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2014-01-01

    Solid oxide cell (SOC) for electrolysis application has attracted great interest in recent years due to its high power-to-gas efficiency and capability of co-electrolysis of H2O and CO2 for syngas (H2 + CO) production. The demonstration of durable solid oxide electrolysis cell operation for fuel...... production is required for promoting commercialization of the SOEC technology. In this work, we report a recent 4400 hours test of a state-of-the-art Ni-YSZ electrode supported SOEC cell. The cell consists of a Ni-YSZ (YSZ: yttria stabilized zirconia) support and active fuel electrode, an YSZ electrolyte...... layer, a CGO (Gd doped ceria) inter-diffusion barrier layer and a LSCF-CGO (LSCF: lanthanum ferrite doped with strontium and cobalt) oxygen electrode layer. The electrolysis test was carried out at 800 °C under 1 A/cm2 with 90 % H2O + 10 % H2 supplied to Ni-YSZ electrode compartment. The results show...

  11. Solution and solid-state models of peptide CH...O hydrogen bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baures, Paul W; Beatty, Alicia M; Dhanasekaran, Muthu; Helfrich, Brian A; Pérez-Segarra, Waleska; Desper, John

    2002-09-25

    Fumaramide derivatives were analyzed in solution by (1)H NMR spectroscopy and in the solid state by X-ray crystallography in order to characterize the formation of CH...O interactions under each condition and to thereby serve as models for these interactions in peptide and protein structure. Solutions of fumaramides at 10 mM in CDCl(3) were titrated with DMSO-d(6), resulting in chemical shifts that moved downfield for the CH groups thought to participate in CH...O=S(CD(3))(2) hydrogen bonds concurrent with NH...O=S(CD(3))(2) hydrogen bonding. In this model, nonparticipating CH groups under the same conditions showed no significant change in chemical shifts between 0.0 and 1.0 M DMSO-d(6) and then moved upfield at higher DMSO-d(6) concentrations. At concentrations above 1.0 M DMSO-d(6), the directed CH...O=S(CD(3))(2) hydrogen bonds provide protection from random DMSO-d(6) contact and prevent the chemical shifts for participating CH groups from moving upfield beyond the original value observed in CDCl(3). X-ray crystal structures identified CH...O=C hydrogen bonds alongside intermolecular NH...O=C hydrogen bonding, a result that supports the solution (1)H NMR spectroscopy results. The solution and solid-state data therefore both provide evidence for the presence of CH...O hydrogen bonds formed concurrent with NH...O hydrogen bonding in these structures. The CH...O=C hydrogen bonds in the X-ray crystal structures are similar to those described for antiparallel beta-sheet structure observed in protein X-ray crystal structures.

  12. Immobilization of Reduced Graphene Oxide on Hydrogen-Terminated Silicon Substrate as a Transparent Conductive Protector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yudi; Utsunomiya, Toru; Kokufu, Sho; Soga, Masahiro; Ichii, Takashi; Sugimura, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-17

    Silicon is a promising electrode material for photoelectrochemical and photocatalytic reactions. However, the chemically active surface of silicon will be easily oxidized when exposed to the oxidation environment. We immobilized graphene oxide (GO) onto hydrogen-terminated silicon (H-Si) and reduced it through ultraviolet (UV) and vacuum-ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation. This acted as an ultrathin conductive layer to protect H-Si from oxidation. The elemental evolution of GO was studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and it was found that GO was partially reduced soon after the deposition onto H-Si and further reduced after UV or VUV light irradiation. The VUV photoreduction demonstrated ca. 100 times higher efficiency compared to the UV reduction based on the irradiation dose. The saturated oxygen-to-carbon ratio (RO/C) of the reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was 0.21 ± 0.01, which is lower than the photoreduction of GO on SiO2 substrate. This indicated the H-Si played an important role in assisting the photoreduction of GO. No obvious exfoliation of rGO was observed after sonicating the rGO-covered H-Si sample in water, which indicated rGO was immobilized on H-Si. The electrical conductivity of H-Si surface was maintained in the rGO-covered region while the exposed H-Si region became insulating, which was observed by conductive atomic force microscopy. The rGO was verified capable to protect the active H-Si against the oxidation under an ambient environment.

  13. High-resolution NMR of hydrogen in organic solids by DNP enhanced natural abundance deuterium spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, Aaron J; Schlagnitweit, Judith; Lesage, Anne; Emsley, Lyndon

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate that high field (9.4 T) dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) at cryogenic (∼100 K) sample temperatures enables the rapid acquisition of natural abundance (1)H-(2)H cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid-state NMR spectra of organic solids. Spectra were obtained by impregnating substrates with a solution of the stable DNP polarizing agent TEKPol in tetrachloroethane. Tetrachloroethane is a non-solvent for the solids, and the unmodified substrates are then polarized through spin diffusion. High quality natural abundance (2)H CPMAS spectra of histidine hydrochloride monohydrate, glycylglycine and theophylline were acquired in less than 2h, providing direct access to hydrogen chemical shifts and quadrupolar couplings. The spectral resolution of the (2)H solid-state NMR spectra is comparable to that of (1)H spectra obtained with state of the art homonuclear decoupling techniques. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Infrared reflectance measurements of the insulator-metal transition in solid hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, H. K.; Hemley, R. J.; Hanfland, M.

    1990-01-01

    Reflectance measurements on solid hydrogen to 177 GPa (1.77 Mbar) have been performed from near-infrared to ultraviolet wavelengths (0.5 to 3 eV). Above 150 GPa characteristic free-electron behavior in the infrared region is observed to increase sharply with increasing pressure. Analysis of volume dependence of the plasma frequency obtained from Drude-model fits to the spectra indicates that the pressure of the insulator-metal transition is 149 (+ or - 10) GPa at 295 K. The measurements are consistent with metallization by closure of an indirect gap in the molecular solid.

  15. Phonons in Solid Hydrogen and Deuterium Studied by Inelastic Coherent Neutron Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits

    1973-01-01

    Phonon dispersion relations have been measured by coherent neutron scattering in solid para-hydrogen and ortho-deuterium. The phonon energies are found to be nearly equal in the two solids, the highest energy in each case lying close to 10 meV. The pressure and temperature dependence of the phonon...... energies have been measured in ortho-deuterium and the lattice change determined by neutron diffraction. When a pressure of 275 bar is applied, the phonon energies are increased by about 10%, and heating the crystal to near the melting point decreases them by about 7%. The densities of states, the specific...

  16. Solid Catalyst with Ionic Liquid Layer (SCILL). A concept to improve the selectivity of selective hydrogenations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jess, A.; Korth, W. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Chair of Chemical Engineering

    2011-07-01

    Catalytic hydrogenations are important for refinery processes, petrochemical applications as well as for numerous processes of the fine chemicals industry. In some cases, hydrogenations consist of a sequence of consecutive reactions, and the desired product is the intermediate. An important goal is then a high yield and selectivity to the intermediate, if possible at a high conversion degree. The selectivity to an intermediate primarily depends on the chemical nature of the catalyst, but may also be influenced by diffusion processes. Ionic liquids (ILs) are low melting salts (< 100 C) and represent a promising solvent class. This paper focuses on the concept of a Solid Catalyst with Ionic Liquid Layer (SCILL), where the solid catalyst is coated with a thin IL layer to improve the selectivity. (orig.)

  17. Sputtering of solid nitrogen and oxygen by keV hydrogen ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, O.; Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.

    1994-01-01

    that for nitrogen. The energy distributions of the sputtered N2 and O2 molecules were measured for hydrogen ions in this energy regime as well. The yields from both solids turn out to depend on the sum of the stopping power of all atoms in the ion. The yield increases as a quadratic function of the stopping power......Electronic sputtering of solid nitrogen and oxygen by keV hydrogen ions has been studied at two low-temperature setups. The yield of the sputtered particles has been determined in the energy regime 4-10 keV for H+, H-2+ and H-3+ ions. The yield for oxygen is more than a factor of two larger than...... for oxygen, but slightly slower for nitrogen. The energy distributions do not exhibit strong features, but are similar to those published earlier for electron sputtering....

  18. Study of hydrogen in coals, polymers, oxides, and muscle water by nuclear magnetic resonance; extension of solid-state high-resolution techniques. [Hydrogen molybdenum bronze

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryan, L.M.

    1981-10-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been an important analytical and physical research tool for several decades. One area of NMR which has undergone considerable development in recent years is high resolution NMR of solids. In particular, high resolution solid state /sup 13/C NMR spectra exhibiting features similar to those observed in liquids are currently achievable using sophisticated pulse techniques. The work described in this thesis develops analogous methods for high resolution /sup 1/H NMR of rigid solids. Applications include characterization of hydrogen aromaticities in fossil fuels, and studies of hydrogen in oxides and bound water in muscle.

  19. Life Time Performance Characterization of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells for Hydrogen Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xiufu; Chen, Ming; Liu, Yi-Lin

    2015-01-01

    generation SOEC cells produced at DTU are able to be operated at current density up to ~-0.9 A/cm2, in order to achieve a commercialization target of 5 years lifetime (for continuous electrolysis operation of hydrogen production). The cells can be operated at even higher current density, if the hydrogen......Globally the amount of electricity generated from renewable energy sources such as wind or solar energy is increasing. To integrate high amount of fluctuating renewable energy into the existing energy grid, efficient and cost competitive conversion of electricity into other kinds of energy carriers...... is needed. Solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) offer a promising technological solution for efficient energy conversion and production of hydrogen or syngas (mixture of H2 and CO) using excess electricity from renewable energy sources. For SOECs to become commercially interesting, performance, durability...

  20. A combined deuterium NMR and quantum chemical investigation of inequivalent hydrogen bonds in organic solids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Renee; Penner, Glenn H

    2012-01-01

    Deuterium magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations are used to investigate organic solids in which inequivalent hydrogen bonds are present. The use of (2)H MAS allows one to measure the chemical shift, δ, quadrupolar coupling constant, C(Q), and asymmetry in the quadrupolar interaction, η(Q), for each type of hydrogen bond present in the system. Quantum chemical calculations of the magnetic shielding (σ, which can be related to δ) and the electric field gradient (EFG, which can be related to C(Q)) are compared to the experimental results and are discussed with respect to the relative strengths of the hydrogen bonds within each system. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Ion-Induced Emission of Charged Particles from Solid Hydrogen and Deuterium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børgesen, P.; Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    1980-01-01

    Measurements have been made of the emission of both positive and negative particles from solid hydrogen and deuterium for normal incidence of H+, H2+, H+3, D2H+, D3+ and He+ ions up to 10 keV. For positive particles the emission coefficient increased with increasing energy of incidence to reach...... a value of 0.08 per atom for 10 keV H+ onto hydrogen. Apparently the positive particles are sputtered ones. The negative particles emitted are predominantly electrons. The emission coefficient per incident atom as a function of the velocity of the incident particle agrees fairly well with results...... published earlier for incidence of hydrogen and deuterium ions. However, systematic differences of up to 10% are now observed between the coefficients for the different types of ions....

  2. A Methodology for Assessing the Sustainability of Hydrogen Production from Solid Fuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirmal V. Gnanapragasam

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available A methodology for assessing the sustainability of hydrogen production using solid fuels is introduced, in which three sustainability dimensions (ecological, sociological and technological are considered along with ten indicators for each dimension. Values for each indicator are assigned on a 10-point scale based on a high of 1 and a low of 0, depending on the characteristic of the criteria associated with each element or process, utilizing data reported in the literature. An illustrative example is presented to compare two solid fuels for hydrogen production: coal and biomass. The results suggest that qualitative sustainability indicators can be reasonably defined based on evaluations of system feasibility, and that adequate flexibility and comprehensiveness is provided through the use of ten indicators for each of the dimensions for every process or element involved in hydrogen production using solid fuels. Also, the assessment index values suggest that biomasses have better sustainability than coals, and that it may be advantageous to use coals in combination with biomass to increase their ecological and social sustainability. The sustainability assessment methodology can be made increasingly quantitative, and is likely extendable to other energy systems, but additional research and development is needed to lead to a more fully developed approach.

  3. Diffusion of plasticizer in a solid propellant based on hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Libardi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to determine the dioctyl azelate (DOZ plasticizer diffusion coefficient (D for samples containing the interfaces of rubber, liner and solid composite propellant based on hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB. The samples used in the diffusion study were aged up to 31 days after the cure period at 80 °C. A computer program implementing a mathematical model of Fick's second Law of diffusion was developed to calculate the diffusion coefficient based on concentration data obtained from gas chromatographic analyses. The effects of the diffusion phenomenon were also investigated by Shore A hardness and scanning electron microscope (SEM techniques. These analyses were carried out using samples aged at room temperature and at 80 °C. The hardness results showed an increasing trend for the samples aged at room temperature; however in the tests carried out at 80 °C they showed the opposite trend. The SEM analyses detected meaningful changes in the surface morphology of the propellant for both aging temperatures.

  4. Electric field-induced metallic transition of (3,3) carbon nanotube supported on patterned hydrogen-terminated Si(001):1 Multiplication-Sign 1 surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Bikash C., E-mail: bikashc.gupta@visva-bharati.ac.in [Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Physics (United States); Konar, Shyamal [Visva-Bharati, Department of Physics (India); Jena, Puru [Virginia Commonwealth University, Department of Physics (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Using density functional theory, we systematically investigate the adsorption geometries and electrical properties of (3,3) carbon nanotube (CNT) integrated on hydrogen-terminated Si(001):1 Multiplication-Sign 1 surface. Prior to adsorption of the CNT, the surface is patterned in two different ways by desorbing selective hydrogen atoms from the surface. The (3,3) CNT which is metallic in nature becomes semiconducting with a band gap around the fermi level when it is supported on patterned hydrogen-terminated Si(001):1 Multiplication-Sign 1 surface. However, the band gap is reduced when a transverse electric field is applied, allowing the (3,3) CNT on the patterned hydrogen-terminated Si(001):1 Multiplication-Sign 1 to become metallic at a critical field strength. The tuning of electrical properties of the (3,3) CNT integrated with Si surface may have potential technological applications.

  5. Rapid surface functionalization of hydrogen-terminated silicon by alkyl silanols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escorihuela Fuentes, J.; Zuilhof, H.

    2017-01-01

    Surface functionalization of inorganic semiconductor substrates, particularly silicon, has focused attention toward many technologically important applications, involving photovoltaic energy, biosensing and catalysis. For such modification processes, oxide-free (H-terminated) silicon surfaces are

  6. Hydrogen and deuterium NMR of solids by magic-angle spinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckman, R.R.

    1982-10-01

    The nuclear magnetic resonance of solids has long been characterized by very large specral broadening which arises from internuclear dipole-dipole coupling or the nuclear electric quadrupole interaction. These couplings can obscure the smaller chemical shift interaction and make that information unavailable. Two important and difficult cases are that of hydrogen and deuterium. The development of cross polarization, heteronuclear radiofrequency decoupling, and coherent averaging of nuclear spin interactions has provided measurement of chemical shift tensors in solids. Recently, double quantum NMR and double quantum decoupling have led to measurement of deuterium and proton chemical shift tensors, respectively. A general problem of these experiments is the overlapping of the tensor powder pattern spectra of magnetically distinct sites which cannot be resolved. In this work, high resolution NMR of hydrogen and deuterium in solids is demonstrated. For both nuclei, the resonances are narrowed to obtain liquid-like isotropic spectra by high frequency rotation of the sample about an axis inclined at the magic angle, ..beta../sub m/ = Arccos (3/sup -1/2/), with respect to the direction of the external magnetic field. For deuterium, the powder spectra were narrowed by over three orders of magnitude by magic angle rotation with precise control of ..beta... A second approach was the observation of deuterium double quantum transitions under magic angle rotation. For hydrogen, magic angle rotation alone could be applied to obtain the isotropic spectrum when H/sub D/ was small. This often occurs naturally when the nuclei are semi-dilute or involved in internal motion. In the general case of large H/sub D/, isotropic spectra were obtained by dilution of /sup 1/H with /sup 2/H combined with magic angle rotation. The resolution obtained represents the practical limit for proton NMR of solids.

  7. A topological study of chemical bonds under pressure: solid hydrogen as a model case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riffet, Vanessa; Labet, Vanessa; Contreras-García, Julia

    2017-10-04

    It is now well recognized that a fundamental understanding of the rules that govern chemistry under pressure is still lacking. Hydrogen being the "simplest" element as well as a central core to high pressure physics, we undertake a general study of the changes in the chemical bonding under pressure. We start from a simple trimer unit that has been found in high pressure phases, whose behavior has been found to reveal the basics of hydrogen polymerization under pressure. Making use of bond analysis tools, mainly the NCI (noncovalent interactions) index, we show that polymerization takes place in three steps: dipolar attraction, repulsion and bond formation. The use of a 1D Wigner-Seitz radius allowed us to extend the conclusions to 3D networks and to analyze their degree of polymerization. On the one hand, this approach provides new insight into the polymerization of hydrogen. On the other hand, it shows that complicated molecular solids can be understood from cluster models, where correlated methods can be applied, main differences in solid state arising at the transition points, where breaking/forming of bonds happens at once instead of continuously like in the cluster model.

  8. Characterization of All Solid State Hydrogen Ion Selective Electrode Based on PVC-SR Hybrid Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Bo Shim

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen ion selective membranes formulated with 3140 RTV silicone rubber (SR in PVC were studied to extend the life time of solid state ion sensors through improved membrane adhesion. All solid state hydrogen ion selective electrodes were prepared by incorporation of tridodecyl amine (TDDA as an ionophore, potassium tetrakis[3.5-bis(p-chlorophenylborate (KTpClPB as a lipophilic additive, bis(2-ethylhexyladipate (DOA as a plasticizer. Their linear dynamic range was pH 2.0-11.0 and showed the near Nernstian slope of 55.1±0.2 mV/pH (r=0.999. The ifluences from alkali and alkaline earth metal ions were studied for the response of the final ISE membrane composition. Impedance spectroscopic data showed that the resistance was increased by increasing SR content in PVC. Brewster Angle Microscopy (BAM image showed clear differences according to the SR compositions in PVC. Life time of the all solid state membrane electrode was extended to about 2 months by preparing the membrane with PVC and SR. The standard reference material from NIST (2181 HEPES Free acid and 2182 NaHEPESate was tested for the ISE and it gave good result.

  9. H atom, e{sup -}, and H{sub 6}{sup +} ions produced in irradiated solid hydrogens: An electron spin resonance study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumada, Takayuki [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan)], E-mail: kumada.takayuki@jaea.go.jp; Shimizu, Yuta; Ushida, Takahiro; Kumagai, Jun [Department of Applied Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2008-10-15

    We carried out electron spin resonance (ESR) study of irradiated solid H{sub 2} and para-H{sub 2}. H-atom, e{sup -}, and H{sub 6}{sup +} lines were observed. The H-atom radicals diffuse in solid H{sub 2} by the tunneling chemical reaction H+H{sub 2}{yields}H{sub 2}+H below 4 K, and by the thermally activated process above 5 K. These decay via H-H recombination. Yield of trapped electrons e{sup -} produced by the radiolysis of solid para-H{sub 2} increases with increase in the concentration of added isotopic hydrogen, HD or D{sub 2}. These decay via geminate recombination with positive ions with a half-life of 8 h at 4 K. H{sub 6}{sup +} ion is an ionic hydrogen radical whose spectrum has firstly been observed in irradiated solid para-H{sub 2}. H{sub 6}{sup +} ions diffuse in solid H{sub 2} by sequence of H{sub 6}{sup +}+H{sub 2}{yields}H{sub 2}+H{sub 6}{sup +} reactions, and terminate by the isotope-exchange reaction H{sub 6}{sup +}+HD{yields}H{sub 5}D{sup +}+H{sub 2} or H{sub 6}{sup +}+D{sub 2}{yields}H{sub 4}D{sub 2}{sup +}+H{sub 2}. Unlike H{sub 6}{sup +}, isotopically substituted H{sub 5}D{sup +} and H{sub 4}D{sub 2}{sup +} cannot diffuse in solid para-H{sub 2}. Rate-determining step of their decay is charge recombination with e{sup -}.

  10. Muon molecular formation and transfer rate in solid hydrogen-deuterium mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland); Bailey, J.M. [Chester Technology (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Mulhauser, F. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). TRIUMF Facility; Fujiwara, M.C. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J. [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria); Kunselman, A.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States); Martoff, C.J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Wozniak, J. [Akademia Gorniczo-Hutnicza, Cracow (Poland). Inst. of Physics and Nuclear Technology

    1996-10-01

    In an experiment at TRIUMF to study muon-catalyzed fusion and associated atomic and molecular effects, negative muons were stopped in a solid protium hydrogen layer containing a small amount of deuterium. Most of the resulting {mu}H atoms disappeared by formation of HH{mu} molecules or by muon transfer to a deuteron. The {mu}D can drift almost freely through the hydrogen layer due to the Ramsauer-Townsend effect and may even leave the layer. If a thin neon layer is frozen atop the hydrogen, the exiting muonic atoms will very rapidly release their muon to a neon atom. The analysis of the time structure of the neon X-rays is used to determine the rates of the slower processes involved in the evolution of the {mu}H. This analysis has been performed with the help of Monte Carlo calculations, which simulate the kinetics of both {mu}H and {mu}D atoms in the hydrogen mixtures. (orig.). 23 refs.

  11. Life Time Performance Characterization of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells for Hydrogen Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Xiufu; Chen, Ming; Liu, Yi-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) offer a promising technological solution for efficient energy conversion and production of hydrogen or syngas. The commercialization of the SOEC technology can be promoted if SOECs can be operated at high current density with stable performance over ~5 years...... - 3 years (continuous operation, setting 1.5 V as the upper voltage defining “end of life”). The results provide technological input to future design of electrolysis plants for hydrogen production. © 2015 ECS - The Electrochemical Society....... In this work, long-term durability of Ni/yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) supported planar SOECs was investigated at 800 oC for electrolysis of steam at different current densities from 0 to -1.25 A/cm2. The SOEC cells are able to be operated at current density up to ~-1 A/cm2, with a predicted life time of 2...

  12. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  13. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Tanabe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  14. Shape-Dependent Activity of Ceria for Hydrogen Electro-Oxidation in Reduced-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiaofeng; Luo, Ting; Meng, Xie; Wu, Hao; Li, Junliang; Liu, Xuejiao; Ji, Xiaona; Wang, Jianqiang; Chen, Chusheng; Zhan, Zhongliang

    2015-11-04

    Single crystalline ceria nanooctahedra, nanocubes, and nanorods are hydrothermally synthesized, colloidally impregnated into the porous La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.8Mg0.2O3-δ (LSGM) scaffolds, and electrochemically evaluated as the anode catalysts for reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Well-defined surface terminations are confirmed by the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy--(111) for nanooctahedra, (100) for nanocubes, and both (110) and (100) for nanorods. Temperature-programmed reduction in H2 shows the highest reducibility for nanorods, followed sequentially by nanocubes and nanooctahedra. Measurements of the anode polarization resistances and the fuel cell power densities reveal different orders of activity of ceria nanocrystals at high and low temperatures for hydrogen electro-oxidation, i.e., nanorods > nanocubes > nanooctahedra at T ≤ 450 °C and nanooctahedra > nanorods > nanocubes at T ≥ 500 °C. Such shape-dependent activities of these ceria nanocrystals have been correlated to their difference in the local structure distortions and thus in the reducibility. These findings will open up a new strategy for design of advanced catalysts for reduced-temperature SOFCs by elaborately engineering the shape of nanocrystals and thus selectively exposing the crystal facets. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Degradation mechanism of hydrogen-terminated porous silicon in the presence and in the absence of light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangzhou Xu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Si is well-known semiconductor that has a fundamental bandgap energy of 1.12 eV. Its photogenerated electrons in the conduction band can react with the ubiquitous oxygen molecules to yield ⋅O2− radicals, but the photogenerated holes in the valance band can’t interact with OH− to produce ⋅OH radicals. In this paper, we study the degradation of methyl orange (MO by hydrogen-terminated porous Si (H-PSi in the presence and in the absence of light. The absorption spectra of the degraded MO solutions indicated that the H-PSi had superior degradation ability. In the dark, the reduction of dye occurs simply by hydrogen transfer. Under room light, however, some of the dye molecules can be reduced by hydrogen transfer first and then decomposed in the conduction and valance bands. This result should be ascribed to its wide band gap energies centered at 1.79-1.94 eV.

  16. Effect of Li Termination on the Electronic and Hydrogen Storage Properties of Linear Carbon Chains: A TAO-DFT Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seenithurai, Sonai; Chai, Jeng-Da

    2017-07-10

    Accurate prediction of the electronic and hydrogen storage properties of linear carbon chains (C n ) and Li-terminated linear carbon chains (Li2C n ), with n carbon atoms (n = 5-10), has been very challenging for traditional electronic structure methods, due to the presence of strong static correlation effects. To meet the challenge, we study these properties using our newly developed thermally-assisted-occupation density functional theory (TAO-DFT), a very efficient electronic structure method for the study of large systems with strong static correlation effects. Owing to the alteration of the reactivity of C n and Li2C n with n, odd-even oscillations in their electronic properties are found. In contrast to C n , the binding energies of H2 molecules on Li2C n are in (or close to) the ideal binding energy range (about 20 to 40 kJ/mol per H2). In addition, the H2 gravimetric storage capacities of Li2C n are in the range of 10.7 to 17.9 wt%, satisfying the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) ultimate target of 7.5 wt%. On the basis of our results, Li2C n can be high-capacity hydrogen storage materials that can uptake and release hydrogen at temperatures well above the easily achieved temperature of liquid nitrogen.

  17. Hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous hydrogen chloride partitioning in a cloud contaminated by solid rocket exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Bendura, R. J.; Wornom, D. E.

    1980-01-01

    Partitioning of hydrogen chloride between hydrochloric acid aerosol and gaseous HCl in the lower atmosphere was experimentally investigated in a solid rocket exhaust cloud diluted with humid ambient air. Airborne measurements were obtained of gaseous HCl, total HCl, relative humidity and temperature to evaluate the conditions under which aerosol formation occurs in the troposphere in the presence of hygroscopic HCl vapor. Equilibrium predictions of HCl aerosol formation accurately predict the measured HCl partitioning over a range of total HCl concentrations from 0.6 to 16 ppm.

  18. Subsurface hydrogen bonds at the polar Zn-terminated ZnO(0001) surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellström, Matti; Beinik, Igor; Broqvist, Peter

    2016-01-01

    techniques, we find that the polar Zn-terminated ZnO(0001) surface becomes excessively Zn deficient during high-temperature annealing (780 K) in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). The Zn vacancies align themselves into rows parallel to the [10-10] direction, and the remaining surface Zn ions alternately occupy wurtzite...

  19. Controlling factors of tunneling reactions in solid hydrogen at very low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazaki, Tetsuo E-mail: miyamiya@apchem.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Kumagai, Jun; Kumada, Takayuki

    2001-07-01

    The recent studies on tunneling reactions of our group are auto-reviewed. The local structure around reactants, the new temperature effect, and the impurity effect are pointed out as important controlling factors of tunneling reactions in the solid phase. The distances between H(D) atoms and H{sub 2}(HD, D{sub 2}) molecules in solid hydrogen and solid argon were estimated by ESR, electron nuclear double resonance (ENDOR), and electron spin echo (ESE). The new temperature effects on tunneling reaction were observed in a reaction D+HD{yields}D{sub 2}+H in solid HD. A mechanism of a vacancy-assisted tunneling reaction has been proposed to account for the temperature effect. The strange temperature dependence of a tunneling electron-transfer-reaction H{sub 2}{sup -}+H{sub 2}{yields}H{sub 2}+H{sub 2}{sup -} was explained in terms of the phonon-scattering effect and the impurity effect on the tunneling reaction. The rate constant for a tunneling reaction H+p-H{sub 2}{yields}p-H{sub 2}+H in solid para-H{sub 2} (p-H{sub 2}) decreases with the increase in the concentration of ortho-H{sub 2} (o-H{sub 2}). The results were explained by the model that the orientational defects by o-H{sub 2} molecules affect the tunneling reaction H+p-H{sub 2}. A tunneling reaction at very low temperature gives a surprising example in control of a reaction that a small amount of energy as such 2 cal mol{sup -1} can affect the rate of a reaction. The tunneling reaction in the solid phase, which can be considered as a multidimensional tunneling phenomenon, is affected significantly by the condition surrounding reactants. (author)

  20. Proton Acceleration Driven by a Nanosecond Laser from a Cryogenic Thin Solid-Hydrogen Ribbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Margarone

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A high-power pulsed laser is focused onto a solid-hydrogen target to accelerate forward a collimated stream of protons in the range 0.1–1 MeV, carrying a very high energy of about 30 J (∼5% laser-ion conversion efficiency and extremely large charge of about ∼0.1  mC per laser pulse. This result is achieved for the first time through the combination of a sophisticated target system (H_{2} thin ribbon operating at cryogenic temperature (∼10  K and a very hot H plasma (∼300  keV “hot electron” temperature generated by a subnanosecond laser with an intensity of ∼3×10^{16}  W/cm^{2}. Both the H plasma and the accelerated proton beam are fully characterized by in situ and ex situ diagnostics. Results obtained using the ELISE (experiments on laser interaction with solid hydrogen H_{2} target delivery system at PALS (Prague kJ-class laser facility are presented and discussed along with potential multidisciplinary applications.

  1. Lipid carbonyl groups terminate the hydrogen bond network of membrane-bound water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Backus, Ellen H G; Hsieh, Cho-Shuen; Sulpizi, Marialore; Bonn, Mischa; Nagata, Yuki

    2015-11-19

    We present a combined experimental sum-frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations study to clarify the structure and orientation of water at zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid and amine N-oxide (AO) surfactant monolayers. Simulated O-H stretch SFG spectra of water show good agreement with the experimental data. The SFG response at the PC interface exhibits positive peaks, whereas both negative and positive bands are present for the similar zwitterionic AO interface. The positive peaks at the water/PC interface are attributed to water interacting with the lipid carbonyl groups, which act as efficient hydrogen bond acceptors. This allows the water hydrogen bond network to reach, with its (up-oriented) O-H groups, into the headgroup of the lipid, a mechanism not available for water underneath the AO surfactant. This highlights the role of the lipid carbonyl group in the interfacial water structure at the membrane interface, namely, stabilizing the water hydrogen bond network.

  2. Hydrogen Production Performance of a 10-Cell Planar Solid-Oxide Electrolysis Stack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James O& #39; Brien; Carl Stoots; Steve Herring; J. Hartvigsen

    2005-05-01

    An experimental study is under way to assess the performance of solid-oxide cells operating in the steam electrolysis mode for hydrogen production over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. Results presented in this paper were obtained from a ten-cell planar electrolysis stack, with an active area of 64 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrolytesupported, with scandia-stabilized zirconia electrolytes (~140 µm thick), nickel-cermet steam/hydrogen electrodes, and manganite air-side electrodes. The metallic interconnect plates are fabricated from ferritic stainless steel. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 - 0.6), gas flow rates (1000 - 4000 sccm), and current densities (0 to 0.38 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Hydrogen production rates up to 100 Normal liters per hour were demonstrated. Values of area-specific resistance and stack internal temperatures are presented as a function of current density. Stack performance is shown to be dependent on inlet steam flow rate.

  3. The hydrogen state: from the solid to the gas taking into account the liquid; L'hydrogene dans tous ses etats: du solide au gaz en passant par le liquide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latroche, M.; Joubert, J.M.; Cuevas, F.; Paul-Boncour, V.; Percheron-Guegan, A. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Institut de Chimie et des Materiaux Paris-Est (CMTR-ICMPE-UMR7182), 94 - Thiais (France)

    2007-07-01

    Hydrogen is considered as a future energy vector. To become a viable solution, the hydrogen storage processes must be safe, economic and adapted to the use possibilities. Today many storage modes offer interesting possibilities but need also more researches before realization of prototypes. These modes are described taking into account the physical (compression, liquefaction) and chemical (adsorption in porous solids and absorption in chemical hydrides) solutions. (A.L.B.)

  4. A model for oxidation kinetics in air at room temperature of hydrogen-terminated (1 0 0) Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerofolini, G. F.; Mascolo, D.; Vlad, M. O.

    2006-09-01

    A quantitative model is proposed for the description of the oxidation kinetics in air at room temperature of single crystalline, hydrogen-terminated, (1 0 0) silicon. The theory separates the growth kinetics of the interfacial suboxide from those of the outer stoichiometric oxide. The theory proceeds assuming that the suboxide grows along the surface at the border of oxidized-silicon clusters, while the formation of the stoichiometric oxide takes place on the top of the suboxide at a rate decaying exponentially with the oxide thickness. In these hypotheses the kinetics of suboxide formation are found to depend on the initial concentration of (defective) oxo groups, while the growth of the stoichiometric oxide is described by the Elovich equation both in the short- and long-time limits.

  5. Measurement and calculation of the differential reflectance spectrum of hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces having different crystal orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagaki, K; Okada, N; Noda, T; Endo, K; Hirose, K

    2007-09-12

    The differential reflectance spectrum between the (001) and the (111) hydrogen-terminated Si surfaces without native oxidation is investigated. Careful measurements using developed apparatus and an ultra-clean process are performed. The measured spectrum is compared with the reported one (Chongsawangvirod and Irene 1991 J. Electrochem. Soc. 138 1748-52), and is shown to be roughly identical even though a native oxidation effect exists. The theoretical calculation based on density-functional theory (DFT) and local density approximation (LDA) is also performed. The peak positions in the calculated and the measured spectra are in good accordance with each other, while the magnitudes of the peaks are in relatively worse agreement. Although the inclusion of advanced approximations would provide more accurate results, a qualitative reproduction is achieved in this study as well. It is concluded that the origin of the spectrum is mainly in the deformation of the bulk states induced by surface perturbation.

  6. Hydrogen-terminated diamond vertical-type metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors with a trench gate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inaba, Masafumi, E-mail: inaba-ma@ruri.waseda.jp; Muta, Tsubasa; Kobayashi, Mikinori; Saito, Toshiki; Shibata, Masanobu; Matsumura, Daisuke; Kudo, Takuya; Hiraiwa, Atsushi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kawarada, Hiroshi [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Kagami Memorial Laboratory for Materials Science and Technology, Waseda University, 2-8-26 Nishiwaseda, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-0051 (Japan)

    2016-07-18

    The hydrogen-terminated diamond surface (C-H diamond) has a two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG) layer independent of the crystal orientation. A 2DHG layer is ubiquitously formed on the C-H diamond surface covered by atomic-layer-deposited-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Using Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as a gate oxide, C-H diamond metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) operate in a trench gate structure where the diamond side-wall acts as a channel. MOSFETs with a side-wall channel exhibit equivalent performance to the lateral C-H diamond MOSFET without a side-wall channel. Here, a vertical-type MOSFET with a drain on the bottom is demonstrated in diamond with channel current modulation by the gate and pinch off.

  7. Hydrogen-terminated diamond vertical-type metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors with a trench gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Masafumi; Muta, Tsubasa; Kobayashi, Mikinori; Saito, Toshiki; Shibata, Masanobu; Matsumura, Daisuke; Kudo, Takuya; Hiraiwa, Atsushi; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    The hydrogen-terminated diamond surface (C-H diamond) has a two-dimensional hole gas (2DHG) layer independent of the crystal orientation. A 2DHG layer is ubiquitously formed on the C-H diamond surface covered by atomic-layer-deposited-Al2O3. Using Al2O3 as a gate oxide, C-H diamond metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) operate in a trench gate structure where the diamond side-wall acts as a channel. MOSFETs with a side-wall channel exhibit equivalent performance to the lateral C-H diamond MOSFET without a side-wall channel. Here, a vertical-type MOSFET with a drain on the bottom is demonstrated in diamond with channel current modulation by the gate and pinch off.

  8. The calculation of specific heats for some important solid components in hydrogen production process based on CuCl cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avsec Jurij

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is one of the most promising energy sources of the future enabling direct production of power and heat in fuel cells, hydrogen engines or furnaces with hydrogen burners. One of the last remainder problems in hydrogen technology is how to produce a sufficient amount of cheap hydrogen. One of the best options is large scale thermochemical production of hydrogen in combination with nuclear power plant. copper-chlorine (CuCl cycle is the most promissible thermochemical cycle to produce cheap hydrogen.This paper focuses on a CuCl cycle, and the describes the models how to calculate thermodynamic properties. Unfortunately, for many components in CuCl cycle the thermochemical functions of state have never been measured. This is the reason that we have tried to calculate some very important thermophysical properties. This paper discusses the mathematical model for computing the thermodynamic properties for pure substances and their mixtures such as CuCl, HCl, Cu2OCl2 important in CuCl hydrogen production in their fluid and solid phase with an aid of statistical thermodynamics. For the solid phase, we have developed the mathematical model for the calculation of thermodynamic properties for polyatomic crystals. In this way, we have used Debye functions and Einstein function for acoustical modes and optical modes of vibrations to take into account vibration of atoms. The influence of intermolecular energy we have solved on the basis of Murnaghan equation of state and statistical thermodynamics.

  9. Modular Coils with Low Hydrogen Content Especially for MRI of Dry Solids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timon Eichhorn

    Full Text Available Recent advances have enabled fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of solid materials. This development has opened up new applications for MRI, but, at the same time, uncovered new challenges. Previously, MRI-invisible materials like the housing of MRI detection coils are now readily depicted and either cause artifacts or lead to a decreased image resolution. In this contribution, we present versatile, multi-nuclear single and dual-tune MRI coils that stand out by (1 a low hydrogen content for high-resolution MRI of dry solids without artifacts; (2 a modular approach with exchangeable inductors of variable volumes to optimally enclose the given object; (3 low cost and low manufacturing effort that is associated with the modular approach; (4 accurate sample placement in the coil outside of the bore, and (5 a wide, single- or dual-tune frequency range that covers several nuclei and enables multinuclear MRI without moving the sample.The inductors of the coils were constructed from self-supporting copper sheets to avoid all plastic materials within or around the resonator. The components that were mounted at a distance from the inductor, including the circuit board, coaxial cable and holder were manufactured from polytetrafluoroethylene.Residual hydrogen signal was sufficiently well suppressed to allow 1H-MRI of dry solids with a minimum field of view that was smaller than the sensitive volume of the coil. The SNR was found to be comparable but somewhat lower with respect to commercial, proton-rich quadrature coils, and higher with respect to a linearly-polarized commercial coil. The potential of the setup presented was exemplified by 1H/23Na high-resolution zero echo time (ZTE MRI of a model solution and a dried human molar at 9.4 T. A full 3D image dataset of the tooth was obtained, rich in contrast and similar to the resolution of standard cone-beam computed tomography.

  10. Hydrogenation of organic matter as a terminal electron sink sustains high CO 2 :CH 4 production ratios during anaerobic decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Rachel M.; Tfaily, Malak M.; Rich, Virginia I.; Keller, Jason K.; Bridgham, Scott D.; Zalman, Cassandra Medvedeff; Meredith, Laura; Hanson, Paul J.; Hines, Mark; Pfeifer-Meister, Laurel; Saleska, Scott R.; Crill, Patrick; Cooper, William T.; Chanton, Jeff P.; Kostka, Joel E.

    2017-10-01

    Once inorganic electron acceptors are depleted, organic matter in anoxic environments decomposes by hydrolysis, fermentation, and methanogenesis, requiring syntrophic interactions between microorganisms to achieve energetic favorability. In this classic anaerobic food chain, methanogenesis represents the terminal electron accepting (TEA) process, ultimately producing equimolar CO2 and CH4 for each molecule of organic matter degraded. However, CO2:CH4 production in Sphagnum-derived, mineral-poor, cellulosic peat often substantially exceeds this 1:1 ratio, even in the absence of measureable inorganic TEAs. Since the oxidation state of C in both cellulose-derived organic matter and acetate is 0, and CO2 has an oxidation state of +4, if CH4 (oxidation state -4) is not produced in equal ratio, then some other compound(s) must balance CO2 production by receiving 4 electrons. Here we present evidence for ubiquitous hydrogenation of diverse unsaturated compounds that appear to serve as organic TEAs in peat, thereby providing the necessary electron balance to sustain CO2:CH4 >1. While organic electron acceptors have previously been proposed to drive microbial respiration of organic matter through the reversible reduction of quinone moieties, the hydrogenation mechanism that we propose, by contrast, reduces C-C double bonds in organic matter thereby serving as 1) a terminal electron sink, 2) a mechanism for degrading complex unsaturated organic molecules, 3) a potential mechanism to regenerate electron-accepting quinones, and, in some cases, 4) a means to alleviate the toxicity of unsaturated aromatic acids. This mechanism for CO2 generation without concomitant CH4 production has the potential to regulate the global warming potential of peatlands by elevating CO2:CH4 production ratios.

  11. Quantum Diffusion-Controlled Chemistry: Reactions of Atomic Hydrogen with Nitric Oxide in Solid Parahydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzi, Mahmut; Anderson, David T

    2015-12-17

    Our group has been working to develop parahydrogen (pH2) matrix isolation spectroscopy as a method to study low-temperature condensed-phase reactions of atomic hydrogen with various reaction partners. Guided by the well-defined studies of cold atom chemistry in rare-gas solids, the special properties of quantum hosts such as solid pH2 afford new opportunities to study the analogous chemical reactions under quantum diffusion conditions in hopes of discovering new types of chemical reaction mechanisms. In this study, we present Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic studies of the 193 nm photoinduced chemistry of nitric oxide (NO) isolated in solid pH2 over the 1.8 to 4.3 K temperature range. Upon short-term in situ irradiation the NO readily undergoes photolysis to yield HNO, NOH, NH, NH3, H2O, and H atoms. We map the postphotolysis reactions of mobile H atoms with NO and document first-order growth in HNO and NOH reaction products for up to 5 h after photolysis. We perform three experiments at 4.3 K and one at 1.8 K to permit the temperature dependence of the reaction kinetics to be quantified. We observe Arrhenius-type behavior with a pre-exponential factor of A = 0.036(2) min(-1) and Ea = 2.39(1) cm(-1). This is in sharp contrast to previous H atom reactions we have studied in solid pH2 that display definitively non-Arrhenius behavior. The contrasting temperature dependence measured for the H + NO reaction is likely related to the details of H atom quantum diffusion in solid pH2 and deserves further study.

  12. McPhy-Energy’s proposal for solid state hydrogen storage materials and systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jehan, Michel, E-mail: michel.jehan@mcphy.com [McPhy Energy SA, ZA Retière, 26190 La Motte-Fanjas (France); Fruchart, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.fruchart@grenoble.cnrs.fr [McPhy Energy SA, ZA Retière, 26190 La Motte-Fanjas (France); Institut Néel and CRETA, CNRS, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: •Mechanical alloying with nano-structurizing highly reactive magnesium metal hydrides particles. •Solid reversible hydrogen storage at scale of kg to tons of hydrogen using MgH{sub 2} composite discs. •Natural Expanded Graphite draining heat of reaction during sorption. •Change Phase Material storing reversibly heat of reaction within tank storage as adiabatic system. •Technology fully adapted for renewable energy storage and network energy peak shavings through H{sub 2}. -- Abstract: The renewable resources related, for instance, to solar energies exhibit two main characteristics. They have no practical limits in regards to the efficiency and their various capture methods. However, their intermittence prevents any direct and immediate use of the resulting power. McPhy-Energy proposes solutions based on water electrolysis for hydrogen generation and storage on reversible metal hydrides to efficiently cover various energy generation ranges from MW h to GW h. Large stationary storage units, based on MgH{sub 2}, are presently developed, including both the advanced materials and systems for a total energy storage from ∼70 to more than 90% efficient. Various designs of MgH{sub 2}-based tanks are proposed, allowing the optional storage of the heat of the Mg–MgH{sub 2} reaction in an adjacent phase changing material. The combination of these operations leads to the storage of huge amounts of hydrogen and heat in our so-called adiabatic-tanks. Adapted to intermittent energy production and consumption from renewable sources (wind, sun, tide, etc.), nuclear over-production at night, or others, tanks distribute energy on demand for local applications (on-site domestic needs, refueling stations, etc.) via turbine or fuel cell electricity production.

  13. Experimental investigation of solid hydrogen pellet ablation in high-temperature plasmas using holographic interferometry and other diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Jr., C. E.

    1981-03-01

    The technology currently most favored for the refueling of fusion reactors is the high-velocity injection of solid hydrogen pellets. Design details are presented for a holographic interferometer/shadowgraph used to study the microscopic characteristics of a solid hydrogen pellet ablating in an approx. 1-keV plasma. Experimental data are presented for two sets of experiments in which the interferometer/shadowgraph was used to study approx. 1-mm-diam solid hydrogen pellets injected into the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at velocities of 1000 m/s. In addition to the use of the holographic interferometer, the pellet ablation process is diagnosed by studying the emission of Balmer-alpha photons and by using the available tokamak diagnostics (Thomson scattering, microwave/far-infrared interferometer, pyroelectric radiometer, hard x-ray detector).

  14. Hydrogen Peroxide Sensing Based on Inner Surfaces Modification of Solid-State Nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Libo; Gu, Dejian; Liu, Quanjun

    2017-06-01

    There are many techniques for the detection of molecules. But detection of molecules through solid-state nanopore in a solution is one of the promising, high-throughput, and low-cost technology used these days. In the present investigation, a solid-state nanopore platform was fabricated for the detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which is not only a label free product but also a significant participant in the redox reaction. We have successfully fabricated silicon nitride (Si3N4) nanopores with diameters of 50 nm by using a focused Ga ion beam, the inner surface of the nanopore has been modified with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) by employing carbodiimide coupling chemistry. The immobilized HRP enzymes have ability to induce redox reactions in a single nanopore channel. Moreover, a real-time single aggregated ABTS•+ molecular translocation events were monitored and investigated. The designed solid-state nanopore biosensor is reversible and can be applied to detect H2O2 multiple times.

  15. Nanostructured materials for solid-state hydrogen storage: A review of the achievement of COST Action MP1103

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callini, Elsa; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo-Francois; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action MP1103 Nanostructured Materials for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage were synthesized, characterized and modeled. This Action dealt with the state of the art of energy storage and set up a competitive and coordinated...... the structure from bulk to thin film, nanoparticles and nanoconfined composites improved the hydrogen sorption properties and opened the perspective to new technological applications. Direct imaging of the hydrogenation reactions and in situ measurements under operando conditions have been carried out...

  16. Kinetic Studies on State of the Art Solid Oxide Cells – A Comparison between Hydrogen/Steam and Reformate Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njodzefon, Jean-Claude; Graves, Christopher R.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2015-01-01

    /steam and reformate fuels hydrogen/carbon-dioxide and hydrogen/methane/steam. It was found that the kinetics at the fuel electrode were exactly the same in both reformates. The hydrogen/steam fuel displayed slightly faster kinetics than the reformate fuels. Furthermore the gas conversion impedance in the hydrogen...... into a single process as the gas conversion was reduced. The SOC with finer electrode microstructure displayed improved kinetics.......Electrochemical reaction kinetics at the electrodes of Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) were investigated at 700 °C for two cells with different fuel electrode microstructures as well as on a third cell with a reduced active electrode area. Three fuel mixtures were investigated – hydrogen...

  17. Influence of storage, heat treatment, and solids composition on the bleaching of whey with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaomeng E; Campbell, Rachel E; Fox, Aaron J; Gerard, Patrick D; Drake, MaryAnne

    2012-07-01

    The residual annatto colorant in liquid whey is bleached to provide a desired neutral color in dried whey ingredients. This study evaluated the influence of starter culture, whey solids and composition, and spray drying on bleaching efficacy. Cheddar cheese whey with annatto was manufactured with starter culture or by addition of lactic acid and rennet. Pasteurized fat-separated whey was ultrafiltered (retentate) and spray dried to 34% whey protein concentrate (WPC34). Aliquots were bleached at 60 °C for 1 h (hydrogen peroxide, 250 ppm), before pasteurization, after pasteurization, after storage at 3 °C and after freezing at -20 °C. Aliquots of retentate were bleached analogously immediately and after storage at 3 or -20 °C. Freshly spray dried WPC34 was rehydrated to 9% (w/w) solids and bleached. In a final experiment, pasteurized fat-separated whey was ultrafiltered and spray dried to WPC34 and WPC80. The WPC34 and WPC80 retentates were diluted to 7 or 9% solids (w/w) and bleached at 50 °C for 1 h. Freshly spray-dried WPC34 and WPC80 were rehydrated to 9 or 12% solids and bleached. Bleaching efficacy was measured by extraction and quantification of norbixin. Each experiment was replicated 3 times. Starter culture, fat separation, or pasteurization did not impact bleaching efficacy (P > 0.05) while cold or frozen storage decreased bleaching efficacy (P whey or 34% (w/w) protein liquid retentate (P whey. Optimization of whey bleaching conditions is important to reduce the negative effects of bleaching on the flavor of dried whey ingredients. This study established that liquid storage and whey composition are critical processing points that influence bleaching efficacy. © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists®

  18. Anisotropic intermolecular interactions and rotational ordering in hydrogen containing solids. Final report, January 1, 1972--June 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.

    1978-01-01

    Thermodynamic properties, order-disorder phenomena, optical, electric and magnetic properties of hydrogen-containing molecular solids have been investigated. A summary of the findings of this 6 year research program is presented here. The approach in these studies was (a) thermodynamic and transport studies extending to very low temperatures, (b) pulsed NMR studies for determination of structural parameters important to spin-lattice relaxation, and (c) pulsed laser studies for the investigation of excitations and energy transfer mechanisms in solids. (GHT)

  19. A batch assay to measure microbial hydrogen sulfide production from sulfur-containing solid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Mei, E-mail: msun8@uncc.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7908, Raleigh, NC (United States); Sun, Wenjie, E-mail: wsun@smu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7908, Raleigh, NC (United States); Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Southern Methodist University, PO Box 750340, Dallas, TX (United States); Barlaz, Morton A., E-mail: barlaz@ncsu.edu [Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7908, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Large volumes of sulfur-containing wastes enter municipal solid waste landfills each year. Under the anaerobic conditions that prevail in landfills, oxidized forms of sulfur, primarily sulfate, are converted to sulfide. Hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) is corrosive to landfill gas collection and treatment systems, and its presence in landfill gas often necessitates the installation of expensive removal systems. For landfill operators to understand the cost of managing sulfur-containing wastes, an estimate of the H{sub 2}S production potential is needed. The objective of this study was to develop and demonstrate a biochemical sulfide potential (BSP) test to measure the amount of H{sub 2}S produced by different types of sulfur-containing wastes in a relatively fast (30 days) and inexpensive (125 mL serum bottles) batch assay. This study confirmed the toxic effect of H{sub 2}S on both sulfate reduction and methane production in batch systems, and demonstrated that removing accumulated H{sub 2}S by base adsorption was effective for mitigating inhibition. H{sub 2}S production potentials of coal combustion fly ash, flue gas desulfurization residual, municipal solid waste combustion ash, and construction and demolition waste were determined in BSP assays. After 30 days of incubation, most of the sulfate in the wastes was converted to gaseous or aqueous phase sulfide, with BSPs ranging from 0.8 to 58.8 mL H{sub 2}S/g waste, depending on the chemical composition of the samples. Selected samples contained solid phase sulfide which contributed to the measured H{sub 2}S yield. A 60 day incubation in selected samples resulted in 39–86% additional sulfide production. H{sub 2}S production measured in BSP assays was compared with that measured in simulated landfill reactors and that calculated from chemical analyses. H{sub 2}S production in BSP assays and in reactors was lower than the stoichiometric values calculated from chemical composition for all wastes tested, demonstrating

  20. [Solid state isotope hydrogen exchange for deuterium and tritium in human gene-engineered insulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotarev, Yu A; Dadayan, A K; Kozik, V S; Gasanov, E V; Nazimov, I V; Ziganshin, R Kh; Vaskovsky, B V; Murashov, A N; Ksenofontov, A L; Haribin, O N; Nikolaev, E N; Myasoedov, N F

    2014-01-01

    The reaction of high temperature solid state catalytic isotope exchange in peptides and proteins under the action of catalyst-activated spillover hydrogen was studied. The reaction of human gene-engineered insulin with deuterium and tritium was conducted at 120-140° C to produce insulin samples containing 2-6 hydrogen isotope atoms. To determine the distribution of the isotope label over tritium-labeled insulin's amino acid residues, oxidation of the S-S bonds of insulin by performic acid was performed and polypeptide chains isolated; then their acid hydrolysis, amino acid analysis and liquid scintillation counts of tritium in the amino acids were conducted. The isotope label was shown to be incorporated in all amino acids of the protein, with the peptide fragment FVNQHLCGSHLVE of the insulin β-chain showing the largest incorporation. About 45% of the total protein isotope label was incorporated in His5 and His10 of this fragment. For the analysis of isotope label distribution in labeled insulin's peptide fragments, the recovery of the S-S bonds by mercaptoethanol, the enzymatic hydrolysis by glutamyl endopeptidase from Bacillus intermedius and HPLC division of the resulting peptides were carried out. Attribution of the peptide fragments formed due to hydrolysis at the Glu-X bond in the β-chain was accomplished by mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry analysis data of the deuterium-labeled insulin samples' isotopomeric composition showed that the studied solid state isotope exchange reaction equally involved all the protein molecules. Biological studying of tritium-labeled insulin showed its physiological activity to be completely retained.

  1. Hydrogen production by electrochemical decomposition of formic acid via solid polymer electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilic, Ebru Oender [KOSGEB Bursa Business Development Center, Besevler Kucuk Sanayi Sitesi 16149 Nilufer/Bursa (Turkey); Koparal, Ali Savas; Oeguetveren, Uelker Bakir [Anadolu University, Iki Eylul Campus, Applied Research Center for Environmental Problems 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey); Anadolu University, Iki Eylul Campus, Department of Environmental Engineering, 26555 Eskisehir (Turkey)

    2009-01-15

    The aim of this work is to investigate the feasibility of simultaneous hydrogen production by electrochemical decomposition of formic acid via solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) in an electrochemical reactor. Titanium oxide coated with iridium oxide as anode and carbon fibre with Pt catalyst as cathode were used in the experiments. Effects of applied current density, flow rates and temperature of formic acid solution, concentration of supporting electrolyte and pH of the solution on performance of the process have been investigated. The effect of membrane thickness has also been examined. The results suggest that electrolysis using SPE is a promising method for the treatment of organic pollutants. Hydrogen with purity of 99.999% at ambient temperature by using carbon fibre cathode with Pt catalyst can be produced simultaneously and COD removal efficiency of 95% has been achieved not requiring any chemical addition and temperature increase. Also complete electrochemical oxidation of formic acid at the original pH to CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O without production of intermediate has been proved by HPLC analysis. (author)

  2. Hydrogen-deuterium substitution in solid ethanol by surface reactions at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Osaka, Kazuya; Chigai, Takeshi; Kouchi, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki

    2016-10-01

    Ethanol (CH3CH2OH) is one of the most abundant complex organic molecules in star-forming regions. Despite its detection in the gas phase only, ethanol is believed to be formed by low-temperature grain-surface reactions. Methanol, the simplest alcohol, has been a target for observational, experimental, and theoretical studies in view of its deuterium enrichment in the interstellar medium; however, the deuterium chemistry of ethanol has not yet been an area of focus. Recently, deuterated dimethyl ether, a structural isomer of ethanol, was found in star-forming regions, indicating that deuterated ethanol can also be present in those environments. In this study, we performed laboratory experiments on the deuterium fractionation of solid ethanol at low temperatures through a reaction with deuterium (D) atoms at 10 K. Hydrogen (H)-D substitution, which increases the deuteration level, was found to occur on the ethyl group but not on the hydroxyl group. In addition, when deuterated ethanol (e.g. CD3CD2OD) solid was exposed to H atoms at 10 K, D-H substitution that reduced the deuteration level occurred on the ethyl group. Based on the results, it is likely that deuterated ethanol is present even under H-atom-dominant conditions in the interstellar medium.

  3. Tailoring the properties of ammine metal borohydrides for solid-state hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jepsen, Lars H; Ley, Morten B; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R

    2015-04-24

    A series of halide-free ammine manganese borohydrides, Mn(BH4 )2 ⋅nNH3 , n=1, 2, 3, and 6, a new bimetallic compound Li2 Mn(BH4 )4 ⋅6NH3 , and the first ammine metal borohydride solid solution Mg1-x Mnx (BH4 )2 ⋅6NH3 are presented. Four new crystal structures have been determined by synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction and the thermal decomposition is systematically investigated for all the new compounds. The solid-gas reaction between Mn(BH4 )2 and NH3 provides Mn(BH4 )2 ⋅6NH3 . The number of NH3 per Mn has been varied by mechanochemical treatment of Mn(BH4 )2 ⋅6NH3 -Mn(BH4 )2 mixtures giving rise to increased hydrogen purity for n/m≤1 for M(BH4 )m ⋅nNH3 . The structures of Mg(BH4 )2 ⋅3NH3 and Li2 Mg(BH4 )4 ⋅6NH3 have been revisited and new structural models are presented. Finally, we demonstrate that ammonia destabilizes metal borohydrides with low electronegativity of the metal (χp ∼1.6) are generally stabilized. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Nanostructured materials for solid-state hydrogen storage: A review of the achievement of COST Action MP1103

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Callini, Elsa; Aguey-Zinsou, Kondo Francois; Ahuja, Rajeev; Ares, Jos Ramon; Bals, Sara; Biliskov, Nikola; Chakraborty, Sudip; Charalambopoulou, Georgia; Chaudhary, Anna Lisa; Cuevas, Fermin; Dam, Bernard; de Jongh, Petra; Dornheim, Martin; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Novakovic, Jasmina G.; Hirscher, Michael; Hirscher, M.; Jensen, Torben R.; Jensen, Peter Bjerre; Novakovic, Nikola; Lai, Qiwen; Leardini, Fabrice; Gattia, Daniele Mirabile; Pasquini, Luca; Steriotis, Theodore; Turner, Stuart; Vegge, Tejs; Zuttel, Andreas; Montone, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of the European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) Action MP1103 Nanostructured Materials for Solid-State Hydrogen Storage were synthesized, characterized and modeled. This Action dealt with the state of the art of energy storage and set up a competitive and coordinated

  5. Re-fermentation os spent solids from dark fermentation allows for a substantial increase of hydrogen production from the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Paez, K. M.; Pareja-Camacho, J.; Rios-Leal, E.; Valdez-Vazquez, I.; Poggi Varaldo, H. M.

    2009-07-01

    In the last 10 years, interest on bio hydrogen has resurrected, particularly the research on dark fermentation of solid wastes. In effect, in a context of scarce and expensive fossil fuels, hydrogen can be considered the best energy alternative because it can be produced by biological means, it has the highest energy density, it is versatile since can be used both as a primary or secondary energy source, it is compatible with electrochemical and combustion-based energy conversion processes, and it is environmentally-friendly since water is its main combustion product and no aggressive pollutants are generated. (Author)

  6. NMR-based untargeted metabolomic study of hydrogen peroxide-induced development and diapause termination in brine shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ming-Chang; Ding, Shangwu; Lin, Cheng-Chi; Chu, Tah-Wei; Chiu, Kuo-Hsun

    2017-12-01

    Artemia diapause has been extensively studied in embryonic biology for a long time. It has been demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can increase the hatching rate in the development and diapause termination of Artemia cysts. This study used an untargeted 1H NMR-based metabolomic approach to explore the physiological regulation of H2O2 in initiating the development and terminating the diapause of Artemia cysts. This experiment was divided into two parts. In the first part, we analyzed three groups with or without H2O2 as control-0h, control-5h and H2O2 (180μM)-5h; in the second part, after 7-d incubation, the non-hatching cysts were treated with different H2O2 concentrations as low as 180μM and as high 1800μM. The results showed that arginine and proline metabolism were up-regulated after 5h, and H2O2 up-regulated valine, leucine and isoleucine biosynthesis in the development of cysts. In the second part, low H2O2 (180μM) showed alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolism, but high H2O2 (1800μM) also up-regulated arginine and proline metabolism, as in the control group without H2O2 stimulus. These results suggest that enough H2O2 can catalyze cell transcription and translation in Artemia cysts, and it improves the cell growth rate, thus allowing embryo cells to grow again. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ferrocene-terminated monolayers covalently bound to hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces. Toward the development of charge storage and communication devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabre, Bruno

    2010-12-21

    The combination of monocrystalline silicon's well-defined structure and the ability to prepare hydrogen-terminated surfaces (Si-H) easily and reproducibly has made this material a very attractive substrate for immobilizing functional molecules. The functionalization of Si-H using the covalent attachment of organic monolayers has received intense attention due to the numerous potential applications of controlled and robust organic/Si interfaces. Researchers have investigated these materials in diverse fields such as molecular electronics, chemistry, and bioanalytical chemistry. Applications include the preparation of surface insulators, the incorporation of chemical or biochemical functionality at interfaces for use in photovoltaic conversion, and the development of new chemical and biological sensing devices. Unlike those of gold, silicon's electronic properties are tunable, and researchers can directly integrate silicon-based devices within electronic circuitry. Moreover, the technological processes used for the micro- and nanopatterning of silicon are numerous and mature enough for producing highly miniaturized functional electronic components. In this Account, we describe a powerful approach that integrates redox-active molecules, such as ferrocene, onto silicon toward electrically addressable systems devoted to information storage or transfer. Ferrocene exhibits attractive electrochemical characteristics: fast electron-transfer rate, low oxidation potential, and two stable redox states (neutral ferrocene and oxidized ferrocenium). Accordingly, ferrocene-modified silicon surfaces could be used as charge storage components with the bound ferrocene center as the memory element. Upon application of a positive potential to silicon, ferrocene is oxidized to its corresponding ferrocenium form. This redox change is equivalent to the change of a bit of information from the "0" to "1" state. To erase the stored charge and return the device to its initial state, a low

  8. An Overview of Natural Gas Conversion Technologies for Co-Production of Hydrogen and Value-Added Solid Carbon Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dagle, Robert A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dagle, Vanessa [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bearden, Mark D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Holladay, Jamelyn D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Krause, Theodore R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ahmed, Shabbir [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-11-16

    This report was prepared in response to the U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Office Congressional Appropriation language to support research on carbon-free production of hydrogen using new chemical processes that utilize natural gas to produce solid carbon and hydrogen. The U.S. produces 9-10 million tons of hydrogen annually with more than 95% of the hydrogen produced by steam-methane reforming (SMR) of natural gas. SMR is attractive because of its high hydrogen yield; but it also converts the carbon to carbon dioxide. Non-oxidative thermal decomposition of methane to carbon and hydrogen is an alternative to SMR and produces CO2-free hydrogen. The produced carbon can be sold as a co-product, thus providing economic credit that reduces the delivered net cost of hydrogen. The combination of producing hydrogen with potentially valuable carbon byproducts has market value in that this allows greater flexibility to match the market prices of hydrogen and carbon. That is, the higher value product can subsidize the other in pricing decisions. In this report we highlight the relevant technologies reported in the literature—primarily thermochemical and plasma conversion processes—and recent research progress and commercial activities. Longstanding technical challenges include the high energetic requirements (e.g., high temperatures and/or electricity requirements) necessary for methane activation and, for some catalytic processes, the separation of solid carbon product from the spent catalyst. We assess current and new carbon product markets that could be served given technological advances, and we discuss technical barriers and potential areas of research to address these needs. We provide preliminary economic analysis for these processes and compare to other emerging (e.g., electrolysis) and conventional (e.g., SMR) processes for hydrogen production. The overarching conclusion of this study is that the cost of hydrogen can be potentially

  9. Kelvin probe force microscopy studies of the charge effects upon adsorption of carbon nanotubes and C60 fullerenes on hydrogen-terminated diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölsch, S.; Fritz, F.; Fenner, M. A.; Kurch, S.; Wöhrl, N.; Mayne, A. J.; Dujardin, G.; Meyer, C.

    2018-01-01

    Hydrogen-terminated diamond is known for its unusually high surface conductivity that is ascribed to its negative electron affinity. In the presence of acceptor molecules, electrons are expected to transfer from the surface to the acceptor, resulting in p-type surface conductivity. Here, we present Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) measurements on carbon nanotubes and C60 adsorbed onto a hydrogen-terminated diamond(001) surface. A clear reduction in the Kelvin signal is observed at the position of the carbon nanotubes and C60 molecules as compared with the bare, air-exposed surface. This result can be explained by the high positive electron affinity of carbon nanotubes and C60, resulting in electron transfer from the surface to the adsorbates. When an oxygen-terminated diamond(001) is used instead, no reduction in the Kelvin signal is obtained. While the presence of a charged adsorbate or a difference in work function could induce a change in the KPFM signal, a charge transfer effect of the hydrogen-terminated diamond surface, by the adsorption of the carbon nanotubes and the C60 fullerenes, is consistent with previous theoretical studies.

  10. Formation of stable Si–O–C submonolayers on hydrogen-terminated silicon(111 under low-temperature conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yit Lung Khung

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this letter, we report results of a hydrosilylation carried out on bifunctional molecules by using two different approaches, namely through thermal treatment and photochemical treatment through UV irradiation. Previously, our group also demonstrated that in a mixed alkyne/alcohol solution, surface coupling is biased towards the formation of Si–O–C linkages instead of Si–C linkages, thus indirectly supporting the kinetic model of hydrogen abstraction from the Si–H surface (Khung, Y. L. et al. Chem. – Eur. J. 2014, 20, 15151–15158. To further examine the probability of this kinetic model we compare the results from reactions with bifunctional alkynes carried out under thermal treatment (<130 °C and under UV irradiation, respectively. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements showed that under thermal conditions, the Si–H surface predominately reacts to form Si–O–C bonds from ethynylbenzyl alcohol solution while the UV photochemical route ensures that the alcohol-based alkyne may also form Si–C bonds, thus producing a monolayer of mixed linkages. The results suggested the importance of surface radicals as well as the type of terminal group as being essential towards directing the nature of surface linkage.

  11. Critical evaluation of factors required to terminate the postclosure monitoring period at solid waste landfills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlaz, M.A.; Rooker, A.P.; Kjeldsen, Peter

    2002-01-01

    for an investigation of whether postclosure monitoring can be terminated at a landfill. Parameters evaluated include leachate composition and leachate and gas production. Estimates of leachate production from closed landfills are used to assess the potential environmental impacts of a hypothetical release to surface...... and impact analysis should provide an effective strategy to manage closed landfills....... water or groundwater. The acceptability of gaseous releases should be evaluated against criteria for odors, the potential for subsurface migration, and greenhouse gas and ozone precursor emissions. The approach presented here must be tested on a site-specific basis to identify additional data...

  12. A Reversible Planar Solid Oxide Fuel-Fed Electrolysis Cell and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Hydrogen and Electricity Production Operating on Natural Gas/Biomass Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Greg, G.

    2007-03-31

    A solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis technique was developed to co-generate hydrogen and electricity directly from a fuel at a reduced cost of electricity. Solid oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis cells (SOFECs), which were comprised of 8YSZ electrolytes sandwiched between thick anode supports and thin cathodes, were constructed and experimentally evaluated at various operation conditions on lab-level button cells with 2 cm2 per-cell active areas as well as on bench-scale stacks with 30 cm2 and 100 cm2 per-cell active areas. To reduce the concentration overpotentials, pore former systems were developed and engineered to optimize the microstructure and morphology of the Ni+8YSZ-based anodes. Chemically stable cathode materials, which possess good electronic and ionic conductivity and exhibit good electrocatalytic properties in both oxidizing and reducing gas atmospheres, were developed and materials properties were investigated. In order to increase the specific hydrogen production rate and thereby reduce the system volume and capital cost for commercial applications, a hybrid system that integrates the technologies of the SOFEC and the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC), was developed and successfully demonstrated at a 1kW scale, co-generating hydrogen and electricity directly from chemical fuels.

  13. CN radical hydrogenation from solid H2 reactions, an alternative way of HCN formation in the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borget, Fabien; Müller, Sandra; Grote, Dirk; Theulé, Patrice; Vinogradoff, Vassilissa; Chiavassa, Thierry; Sander, Wolfram

    2017-02-01

    Context. Molecular hydrogen (H2) is the most abundant molecule of the interstellar medium (ISM) in gas phase and it has been assumed to exist in solid state or as coating on grains. Aims: Our goal is to show that solid H2 can act as a hydrogenation agent, reacting with CN radicals to form HCN. Methods: In a H2 matrix, we studied the hydrogenation of the CN radical generated from the vacuum ultraviolet photolysis (VUV-photolysis) of C2N2 at 3.8 K. We modified the wavelengths and the host gas in order to be sure that CN radicals can abstract H from H2 molecules. Results: HCN monomers, dimers, and oligomers have been characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). H2CN as well as CN radicals have also been clearly observed during the photolysis performed at 3.8 K. Conclusions: H2 is a hydrogenation reagent towards CN radicals producing HCN. This type of reaction should be taken into account for the reactivity at low temperature in contaminated H2 ice macro-particles (CHIMPs), H2 flakes or in the first sublayers of grains where solid H2 has accumulated.

  14. Distillation Kinetics of Solid Mixtures of Hydrogen Peroxide and Water and the Isolation of Pure Hydrogen Peroxide in Ultrahigh Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teolis, B. D.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2006-01-01

    We present results of the growth of thin films of crystalline H2O2 and H2O2.2H2O (dihydrate) in ultrahigh vacuum by distilling an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide. We traced the process using infrared reflectance spectroscopy, mass loss on a quartz crystal microbalance, and in a few cases ultraviolet-visible reflectance. We find that the different crystalline phases-water, dihydrate, and hydrogen peroxide-have very different sublimation rates, making distillation efficient to isolate the less volatile component, crystalline H2O2.

  15. A batch assay to measure microbial hydrogen sulfide production from sulfur-containing solid wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mei; Sun, Wenjie; Barlaz, Morton A

    2016-05-01

    Large volumes of sulfur-containing wastes enter municipal solid waste landfills each year. Under the anaerobic conditions that prevail in landfills, oxidized forms of sulfur, primarily sulfate, are converted to sulfide. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is corrosive to landfill gas collection and treatment systems, and its presence in landfill gas often necessitates the installation of expensive removal systems. For landfill operators to understand the cost of managing sulfur-containing wastes, an estimate of the H2S production potential is needed. The objective of this study was to develop and demonstrate a biochemical sulfide potential (BSP) test to measure the amount of H2S produced by different types of sulfur-containing wastes in a relatively fast (30days) and inexpensive (125mL serum bottles) batch assay. This study confirmed the toxic effect of H2S on both sulfate reduction and methane production in batch systems, and demonstrated that removing accumulated H2S by base adsorption was effective for mitigating inhibition. H2S production potentials of coal combustion fly ash, flue gas desulfurization residual, municipal solid waste combustion ash, and construction and demolition waste were determined in BSP assays. After 30days of incubation, most of the sulfate in the wastes was converted to gaseous or aqueous phase sulfide, with BSPs ranging from 0.8 to 58.8mLH2S/g waste, depending on the chemical composition of the samples. Selected samples contained solid phase sulfide which contributed to the measured H2S yield. A 60day incubation in selected samples resulted in 39-86% additional sulfide production. H2S production measured in BSP assays was compared with that measured in simulated landfill reactors and that calculated from chemical analyses. H2S production in BSP assays and in reactors was lower than the stoichiometric values calculated from chemical composition for all wastes tested, demonstrating the importance of assays to estimate the microbial sulfide production

  16. The production of hydrogen by dark fermentation of municipal solid wastes and slaughterhouse waste: A two-phase process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, X.; Moran, A.; Cuetos, M.J.; Sanchez, M.E. [Institute of Natural Resources, Avda de Portugal 41, University of Leon, Leon 24071 (Spain)

    2006-07-03

    A two-phase fermentation process for the treatment of waste, intended for the recovery of hydrogen for energy use, was investigated in its initial fermentation phase. Hydrogen production was obtained from a mixed culture based on an active mesophilic inoculum without any selective treatment being applied. The liquid stream generated by the hydrogen fermentation process was stabilized in the following, methanogenic, phase for the recovery of methane and further breaking down of the waste stream. The whole process was carried out at a temperature in the mesophilic range (34{sup o}C). The substrate used was an unsterilized mixture of the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (OFMSW) and slaughterhouse waste from a poultry-processing plant. The hydrogen-producing phase was capable of stable performance under the hydraulic retention times (HRTs) evaluated (3 and 5 days). No methane was detected in the first phase at any point during the whole period of the experiment and the hydrogen yield showed no symptoms of declining as time elapsed. The amount of hydrogen obtained from the fermentation process was in the range of 52.5-71.3NLkg{sup -1}VS{sub rem}. (author)

  17. The production of hydrogen by dark fermentation of municipal solid wastes and slaughterhouse waste: A two-phase process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, X.; Morán, A.; Cuetos, M. J.; Sánchez, M. E.

    A two-phase fermentation process for the treatment of waste, intended for the recovery of hydrogen for energy use, was investigated in its initial fermentation phase. Hydrogen production was obtained from a mixed culture based on an active mesophilic inoculum without any selective treatment being applied. The liquid stream generated by the hydrogen fermentation process was stabilized in the following, methanogenic, phase for the recovery of methane and further breaking down of the waste stream. The whole process was carried out at a temperature in the mesophilic range (34 °C). The substrate used was an unsterilized mixture of the organic fraction of municipal solid wastes (OFMSW) and slaughterhouse waste from a poultry-processing plant. The hydrogen-producing phase was capable of stable performance under the hydraulic retention times (HRTs) evaluated (3 and 5 days). No methane was detected in the first phase at any point during the whole period of the experiment and the hydrogen yield showed no symptoms of declining as time elapsed. The amount of hydrogen obtained from the fermentation process was in the range of 52.5-71.3 N L kg -1 VS rem.

  18. Key study on the potential of hydrazine bisborane for solid- and liquid-state chemical hydrogen storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pylypko, Sergii; Petit, Eddy; Yot, Pascal G; Salles, Fabrice; Cretin, Marc; Miele, Philippe; Demirci, Umit B

    2015-05-04

    Hydrazine bisborane N2H4(BH3)2 (HBB; 16.8 wt %) recently re-emerged as a potential hydrogen storage material. However, such potential is controversial: HBB was seen as a hazardous compound up to 2010, but now it would be suitable for hydrogen storage. In this context, we focused on fundamentals of HBB because they are missing in the literature and should help to shed light on its effective potential while taking into consideration any risk. Experimental/computational methods were used to get a complete characterization data sheet, including, e.g., XRD, NMR, FTIR, Raman, TGA, and DSC. From the reported results and discussion, it is concluded that HBB has potential in the field of chemical hydrogen storage given that both thermolytic and hydrolytic dehydrogenations were analyzed. In solid-state chemical hydrogen storage, it cannot be used in the pristine state (risk of explosion during dehydrogenation) but can be used for the synthesis of derivatives with improved dehydrogenation properties. In liquid-state chemical hydrogen storage, it can be studied for room-temperature dehydrogenation, but this requires the development of an active and selective metal-based catalyst. HBB is a thus a candidate for chemical hydrogen storage.

  19. Ranges, Reflection and Secondary Electron Emission for keV Hydrogen Ions Incident on Solid N2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børgesen, P.; Sørensen, H.; Hao-Ming, Chen

    1983-01-01

    Ranges were measured for 0.67–3.3 keV/amu hydrogen and deuterium ions in solid N2. Comparisons with similar results for N2-gas confirm the previously observed large phase effect in the stopping cross section. Measurements of the secondary electron emission coefficient for bulk solid N2 bombarded...... by 0.67–9 keV/amu ions also seem to support such a phase effect. It is argued that we may also extract information about the charge state of reflected projectiles....

  20. Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pier, M.

    1943-02-19

    A transcript is presented of a speech on the history of the development of hydrogenation of coal and tar. Apparently the talk had been accompanied by the showing of photographic slides, but none of the pictures were included with the report. In giving the history, Dr. Pier mentioned the dependence of much of the development of hydrogenation upon previous development in the related areas of ammonia and methanol syntheses, but he also pointed out several ways in which equipment appropriate for hydrogenation differed considerably from that used for ammonia and methanol. Dr. Pier discussed the difficulties encountered with residue processing, design of the reaction ovens, manufacture of ovens and preheaters, heating of reaction mixtures, development of steels, and development of compressor pumps. He described in some detail his own involvement in the development of the process. In addition, he discussed the development of methods of testing gasolines and other fuels. Also he listed some important byproducts of hydrogenation, such as phenols and polycyclic aromatics, and he discussed the formation of iso-octane fuel from the butanes arising from hydrogenation. In connection with several kinds of equipment used in hydrogenation (whose pictures were being shown), Dr. Pier gave some of the design and operating data.

  1. Composition variability of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste and effects on hydrogen and methane production potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibardi, Luca; Cossu, Raffaello

    2015-02-01

    The composition of the Organic Fraction of Municipal Solid Waste (OFMSW) strongly depends on the place and time of collection for a specific municipality or area. Moreover synthetic food waste or organic waste from cafeterias and restaurants may not be representative of the overall OFMSW received at treatment facilities for source-separated waste. This work is aimed at evaluating the composition variability of OFMSW, the potential productions of hydrogen and methane from specific organic waste fractions typically present in MSW and the effects of waste composition on overall hydrogen and methane yields. The organic waste fractions considered in the study were: bread-pasta, vegetables, fruits, meat-fish-cheese and undersieve 20mm. Composition analyses were conducted on samples of OFMSW that were source segregated at household level. Batch tests for hydrogen and methane productions were carried out under mesophilic conditions on selected fractions and OFMSW samples. Results indicated that the highest production of hydrogen was achieved by the bread-pasta fraction while the lowest productions were measured for the meat-fish-cheese fraction. The results indicated that the content of these two fractions in organic waste had a direct influence on the hydrogen production potentials of OFMSW. The higher the content of bread-pasta fraction, the higher the hydrogen yields were while the contrary was observed for the meat-fish-cheese fraction. The definition of waste composition therefore represents fundamental information to be reported in scientific literature to allow data comparison. The variability of OFMSW and its effects on hydrogen potentials might also represents a problematic issue in the management of pilot or full-scale plants for the production of hydrogen by dark fermentation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Operating Point Optimization of a Hydrogen Fueled Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Steam Turbine (SOFC-ST Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juanjo Ugartemendia

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a hydrogen powered hybrid solid oxide fuel cell-steam turbine (SOFC-ST system and studies its optimal operating conditions. This type of installation can be very appropriate to complement the intermittent generation of renewable energies, such as wind generation. A dynamic model of an alternative hybrid SOFC-ST configuration that is especially suited to work with hydrogen is developed. The proposed system recuperates the waste heat of the high temperature fuel cell, to feed a bottoming cycle (BC based on a steam turbine (ST. In order to optimize the behavior and performance of the system, a two-level control structure is proposed. Two controllers have been implemented for the stack temperature and fuel utilization factor. An upper supervisor generates optimal set-points in order to reach a maximal hydrogen efficiency. The simulation results obtained show that the proposed system allows one to reach high efficiencies at rated power levels.

  3. Experimental limits on the velocities of sodium atoms sputtered from solid surfaces by hydrogen ions. [Na cloud production around Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, J. O., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Optical emission at 589.0 nm by sodium atoms sputtered from solid targets by hydrogen molecular ions was observed, and no accompanying broadening or shifts of this line could be detected relative to that from a laboratory lamp. This allowed an upper limit of about 500,000 cm/sec on the mean speed of ejected sodium atoms to be calculated. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the atomic sodium cloud surrounding Io is produced by this mechanism.

  4. Side-chain anchoring strategy for solid-phase synthesis of peptide acids with C-terminal cysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barany, George; Han, Yongxin; Hargittai, Balazs; Liu, Rong-Qiang; Varkey, Jaya T

    2003-01-01

    Many naturally occurring peptide acids, e.g., somatostatins, conotoxins, and defensins, contain a cysteine residue at the C-terminus. Furthermore, installation of C-terminal cysteine onto epitopic peptide sequences as a preliminary to conjugating such structures to carrier proteins is a valuable tactic for antibody preparation. Anchoring of N(alpha)-Fmoc, S-protected C-terminal cysteine as an ester onto the support for solid-phase peptide synthesis is known to sometimes occur in low yields, has attendant risks of racemization, and may also result in conversion to a C-terminal 3-(1-piperidinyl)alanine residue as the peptide chain grows by Fmoc chemistry. These problems are documented for several current strategies, but can be circumvented by the title anchoring strategy, which features the following: (a). conversion of the eventual C-terminal cysteine residue, with Fmoc for N(alpha)-amino protection and tert-butyl for C(alpha)-carboxyl protection, to a corresponding S-xanthenyl ((2)XAL(4)) preformed handle derivative; and (b). attachment of the resultant preformed handle to amino-containing supports. This approach uses key intermediates that are similar to previously reported Fmoc-XAL handles, and builds on earlier experience with Xan and related protection for cysteine. Implementation of this strategy is documented here with syntheses of three small model peptides, as well as the tetradecapeptide somatostatin. Anchoring occurs without racemization, and the absence of 3-(1-piperidinyl)alanine formation is inferred by retention of chains on the support throughout the cycles of Fmoc chemistry. Fully deprotected peptides, including free sulfhydryl peptides, are released from the support in excellent yield by using cocktails containing a high concentration (i.e., 80-90%) of TFA plus appropriate thiols or silanes as scavengers. High-yield release of partially protected peptides is achieved by treatment with cocktails containing a low concentration (i.e., 1-5%) of TFA. In

  5. Metallization of solid molecular hydrogen in two dimensions: Mott-Hubbard-type transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biborski, Andrzej; Kådzielawa, Andrzej P.; Spałek, Józef

    2017-08-01

    We analyze the pressure-induced metal-insulator transition in a two-dimensional vertical stack of H2 molecules in (x-y) plane, and show that it represents a striking example of the Mott-Hubbard-type transition. Our combined exact diagonalization approach, formulated and solved in the second quantization formalism, includes also simultaneous ab initio readjustment of the single-particle wave functions, contained in the model microscopic parameters. The system is studied as a function of applied side force (generalized pressure), both in the H2-molecular and H-quasiatomic states. Extended Hubbard model is taken at the start, together with longer-range electron-electron interactions incorporated into the scheme. The stacked molecular plane transforms discontinuously into a (quasi)atomic state under the applied force via a two-step transition: the first between molecular insulating phases and the second from the molecular to the quasiatomic metallic phase. No quasiatomic insulating phase occurs. All the transitions are accompanied by abrupt changes of the bond length and the intermolecular distance (lattice parameter), as well as by discontinuous changes of the principal electronic properties, which are characteristic of the Mott-Hubbard transition here associated with the jumps of the predetermined equilibrium lattice parameter and the effective bond length. The phase transition can be interpreted in terms of the solid hydrogen metallization under pressure exerted by, e.g., the substrate covered with a monomolecular H2 film of the vertically stacked molecules. Both the Mott and Hubbard criteria at the insulator to metal transition are discussed.

  6. Solid substrate anaerobic fermentation of municipal and juice fruit-industry solid wastes for the production of bio hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz-Paez, K.; Pareja-Camacho, J.; Rios-Leal, E.; Ponce-Noyola, M. T.; Esparza-Garcia, F. J.; Garcia Mena, J.; Poggi-Varaldo, H. M.

    2009-07-01

    Use and abuse of fossil fuels has lead to decreased supply, increasing energy costs and negative environmental and health impacts. Thus, renewable and environmentally-friendly sources of energy are attracting increased attention in recent years. Hydrogen has been targeted as the fuel of the future because of its high calorific heat and clean combustion. (Author)

  7. A novel design of solid-state NaBH 4 composite as a hydrogen source for 2 W PEMFC applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Chan-Li; Liu, Cheng-Hong; Chen, Bing-Hung; Lee, Ming-San; Chen, Cheng-Yen; Lu, Yu-Wen; Tsau, Fanghei; Ku, Jie-Ren

    Hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (NaBH 4) is a promising method for on-board hydrogen supply to polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). This article presents an attempt to design a novel solid-state NaBH 4 composite, which is made up of NaBH 4 powder, Co 2+/IR-120 catalyst and silicone rubber, for hydrogen generator. The silicone rubber can act as a stabilizer in the solid-state NaBH 4 composite because of its surface hydrophobicity leading to reduced diffusion rate of water into the composite. The solid-state NaBH 4 composite can produce hydrogen stably near 25 mL min -1 for at least 2 h without employment of any mechanical control system. Using the hydrogen generated from the solid-state NaBH 4 composite, a 2 W PEMFC stack is successfully operated to power a cellular phone.

  8. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  9. Predicting Protein Aggregation during Storage in Lyophilized Solids Using Solid State Amide Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange with Mass Spectrometric Analysis (ssHDX-MS)

    OpenAIRE

    Moorthy, Balakrishnan S.; Schultz, Steven G.; Kim, Sherry G.; Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Solid state amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis (ssHDX-MS) was used to assess the conformation of myoglobin (Mb) in lyophilized formulations, and the results correlated with the extent of aggregation during storage. Mb was colyophilized with sucrose (1:1 or 1:8 w/w), mannitol (1:1 w/w), or NaCl (1:1 w/w) or in the absence of excipients. Immediately after lyophilization, samples of each formulation were analyzed by ssHDX-MS and Fourier transform infrared spectros...

  10. Photocatalytic hydrogen production over solid solutions between BiFeO{sub 3} and SrTiO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Lingwei; Lv, Meilin [Shanghai Key Lab of Chemical Assessment and Sustainability, Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai, 200092 (China); Liu, Gang [Shenyang National laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Science, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xu, Xiaoxiang, E-mail: xxxu@tongji.edu.cn [Shanghai Key Lab of Chemical Assessment and Sustainability, Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai, 200092 (China)

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: We have successfully prepared a series of SrTiO{sub 3}-BiFeO{sub 3} solid solutions. These materials own strong visible light absorption and demonstrate appealing photocatalytic activity under both full range and visible light irradiation. - Highlights: • Band gap values can be tuned by adjusting molar ratios between SrTiO{sub 3} and BiFeO{sub 3}. • Photocatalytic activity is greatly improved after constituting solid solutions. • Photocatalytic activity is influenced by surface area and light absorption. • Fe plays an important role for band gap reduction and catalytic activity. - Abstract: Constituting solid solutions has been an appealing means to gain control over various physicochemical properties. In this work, we synthesized a series of SrTiO{sub 3}-BiFeO{sub 3} solid solutions and systematically explored their structural, optical and photocatalytic properties. Our results show that all solid solutions crystallize in a primitive cubic structure and their band gap values can be easily tuned by adjusting molar ratios between SrTiO{sub 3} and BiFeO{sub 3}. Photocatalytic hydrogen production under both full range and visible light irradiation is greatly improved after forming solid solutions. The highest hydrogen production rate obtained is ∼180 μmol/h under full range irradiation (λ ≥ 250 nm) and ∼4.2 μmol/h under visible light irradiation (λ ≥ 400 nm), corresponding to apparent quantum efficiency ∼2.28% and ∼0.10%, respectively. The activity is found to be strongly influenced by surface area and light absorption. Theoretical calculation suggests that Fe contributes to the formation of spin-polarized bands in the middle of original band gap and is responsible for the band gap reduction and visible light photocatalytic activity.

  11. Hydrogen-induced nanotunnel structure on the C-terminated β-SiC(0 0 1)-c(2 × 2) surface investigated by ab-initio calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosso, E.F. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Baierle, R.J., E-mail: rbaierle@smail.ufsm.br [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, 97105-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Orellana, W. [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andres Bello, República 220, 837-0134 Santiago (Chile); Miwa, R.H. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Uberlândia, 38408-100, Uberlândia, MG (Brazil)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • β-SiC(0 0 1) surface. • Hydrogenation. • DFT calculations – PBE and HSE06 functional for the exchange correlation term. • Nanotunnel formation. • Electronic confinement. - Abstract: The structural and electronic properties of pristine and H-passivated C-terminated β-SiC(0 0 1)-c(2 × 2) surface are addressed by ab initio calculations. Here, we verify the formation of C chains composed by double-bonded dimers rows (C=C), separated by triple-bonded bridged dimers (C≡C). The surface states near the bandgap are confined along the C=C dimer rows, with no electronic contribution from the C≡C bridged dimers. After hydrogenation, the C-chains are strongly modified, forming subsurface voids or nanotunnel (NT) structures. By considering a plausible set of energy release steps for increasing hydrogenation, we obtain a C-rich NT ruled by the C=C dimer rows. Somewhat similar to that recently reported on the Si-rich termination, but 0.8 eV lower in energy. The electronic band structures of both Si-rich and C-rich NTs have been examined within the hybrid HSE06 functional, which are compared with those previously reported using a semilocal functional.

  12. Structure and dynamics of hydrogen in nanocomposite solid acids for fuel cell applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, F.M.; Chan, W.K.

    The transition to sustainable energy sources is inevitable. A possible future scenario could be the hydrogen economy, where the fuel cell plays an important role in the conversion of hydrogen back to electricity. The technology behind the fuel cell however, still has significant room for

  13. Hydrogenated carbon clusters produced by highly charged ion impact on solid C-84

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlatholter, T; Newman, MW; Niedermayr, TR; Machicoane, GA; McDonald, JW; Schenkel, T; Hoekstra, R; Hamza, AV

    2000-01-01

    The emission of small (hydrogenated) carbon cluster ions: CnHm+ (n = 2-22) upon highly charged Xeq+ (q = 20- 14) impact on C-84 surfaces is studied by means of time-of-flight secundary ion mass spectrometry. The respective stage of hydrogenation/protonation of a certain carbon cluster ion C-n(+) is

  14. Structure and dynamics of hydrogen in nanocomposite solid acids for fuel cell applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chan, W.K.

    2011-01-01

    The transition to sustainable energy sources is inevitable. A possible future scenario could be the hydrogen economy, where the fuel cell plays an important role in the conversion of hydrogen back to electricity. The technology behind the fuel cell however, still has significant room for

  15. Hydrogen storage and stability properties of Pd-Pt solid-solution nanoparticles revealed via atomic and electronic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumara, Loku Singgappulige Rosantha; Sakata, Osami; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Song, Chulho; Kohara, Shinji; Ina, Toshiaki; Yoshimoto, Toshiki; Yoshioka, Satoru; Matsumura, Syo; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2017-11-06

    Bimetallic Pd1-x Pt x solid-solution nanoparticles (NPs) display charging/discharging of hydrogen gas, which has relevance for fuel cell technologies; however, the constituent elements are immiscible in the bulk phase. We examined these material systems using high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption fine structure and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. Recent studies have demonstrated the hydrogen storage properties and catalytic activities of Pd-Pt alloys; however, comprehensive details of their structural and electronic functionality at the atomic scale have yet to be reported. Three-dimensional atomic-scale structure results obtained from the pair distribution function (PDF) and reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) methods suggest the formation of a highly disordered structure with a high cavity-volume-fraction for low-Pt content NPs. The NP conduction band features, as extracted from X-ray absorption near-edge spectra at the Pd and Pt L III -edge, suggest that the Pd conduction band is filled by Pt valence electrons. This behaviour is consistent with observations of the hydrogen storage capacity of these NPs. The broadening of the valence band width and the down-shift of the d-band centre away from the Fermi level upon Pt substitution also provided evidence for enhanced stability of the hydride (ΔH) features of the Pd1-x Pt x solid-solution NPs with a Pt content of 8-21 atomic percent.

  16. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  17. Solid-state structure of gelatin-mono epoxy terminated polydimethylsiloxane polymer: effect of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Xia, Yongmei; Qiao, Cong-De; Zhu, Weiyue; Wang, Yuexia; Li, Tian-Duo

    2014-11-01

    In this study, a hybrid synthetic gelatin-mono epoxy terminated polydimethylsiloxane polymer (PDMS-E grafted gelatin (PGG)) was successfully synthesized on a large scale. Supramolecular structure of gelatin, which was decided by the sophisticated inter- and intra-molecular interactions, significantly affected the self-assembly and phase behavior of PGG. Interestingly, the supramolecular organization of PGG could be tuned finely by negatively charged surfactants, such as sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and sodium tetradecyl sulfonate (STSo), as revealed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), light microscopy (LM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). SEM images exhibited the presence of spherical aggregates in PGG/SDS films while hexagonal array was observed in PGG/STSo films. The results of LM revealed that when PGG/STSo solution was dried, a successive structural transformation from spheres to hexagons, via sticks and butterfly-shaped aggregates as intermediates, was observed. However, the morphologies of the aggregates formed in PGG/SDS system did not exhibit any obvious change upon drying. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared spectra combined with AFM observations indicated that the secondary structure and aggregation behavior of gelatin was modified with the change in the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, leading to the formation of diversified solid-state structures of PGG. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute toxicity study of tilmicosin-loaded hydrogenated castor oil-solid lipid nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Shuyu

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our previous studies demonstrated that tilmicosin-loaded hydrogenated castor oil solid lipid nanoparticles (Til-HCO-SLN are a promising formulation for enhanced pharmacological activity and therapeutic efficacy in veterinary use. The purpose of this work was to evaluate the acute toxicity of Til-HCO-SLN. Methods Two nanoparticle doses were used for the study in ICR mice. The low dose (766 mg/kg.bw with tilmicosin 7.5 times of the clinic dosage and below the median lethal dose (LD50 was subcutaneously administered twice on the first and 7th day. The single high dose (5 g/kg.bw was the practical upper limit in an acute toxicity study and was administered subcutaneously on the first day. Blank HCO-SLN, native tilmicosin, and saline solution were included as controls. After medication, animals were monitored over 14 days, and then necropsied. Signs of toxicity were evaluated via mortality, symptoms of treatment effect, gross and microscopic pathology, and hematologic and biochemical parameters. Results After administration of native tilmicosin, all mice died within 2 h in the high dose group, in the low dose group 3 died after the first and 2 died after the second injections. The surviving mice in the tilmicosin low dose group showed hypoactivity, accelerated breath, gloomy spirit and lethargy. In contrast, all mice in Til-HCO-SLN and blank HCO-SLN groups survived at both low and high doses. The high nanoparticle dose induced transient clinical symptoms of treatment effect such as transient reversible action retardation, anorexy and gloomy spirit, increased spleen and liver coefficients and decreased heart coefficients, microscopic pathological changes of liver, spleen and heart, and minor changes in hematologic and biochemical parameters, but no adverse effects were observed in the nanoparticle low dose group. Conclusions The results revealed that the LD50 of Til-HCO-SLN and blank HCO-SLN exceeded 5 g/kg.bw and thus the

  19. Solid hydrides as hydrogen storage reservoirs; Hidruros solidos como acumuladores de hidrogeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez, A.; Sanchez, C.; Friedrichs, O.; Ares, J. R.; Leardini, F.; Bodega, J.; Fernandez, J. F.

    2010-07-01

    Metal hydrides as hydrogen storage materials are briefly reviewed in this paper. Fundamental properties of metal-hydrogen (gas) system such as Pressure-Composition-Temperature (P-C-T) characteristics are discussed on the light of the metal-hydride thermodynamics. Attention is specially paid to light metal hydrides which might have application in the car and transport sector. The pros and cons of MgH{sub 2} as a light material are outlined. Researches in course oriented to improve the behaviour of MgH{sub 2} are presented. Finally, other very promising alternative materials such as Al compounds (alanates) or borohydrides as light hydrogen accumulators are also considered. (Author)

  20. Methane and Hydrogen Production from Anaerobic Fermentation of Municipal Solid Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takuro; Lee, Dong-Yeol; Xu, Kaiqin; Li, Yu-You; Inamori, Yuhei

    Methane and hydrogen production was investigated in batch experiments of thermophilic methane and hydrogen fermentation, using domestic garbage and food processing waste classified by fat/carbohydrate balance as a base material. Methane production per unit of VS added was significantly positively correlated with fat content and negatively correlated with carbohydrate content in the substrate, and the average value of the methane production per unit of VS added from fat-rich materials was twice as large as that from carbohydrate-rich materials. By contrast, hydrogen production per unit of VS added was significantly positively correlated with carbohydrate content and negatively correlated with fat content. Principal component analysis using the results obtained in this study enable an evaluation of substrates for methane and hydrogen fermentation based on nutrient composition.

  1. Modeling the Solid-Liquid Equilibrium in Pharmaceutical-Solvent Mixtures: Systems with Complex Hydrogen Bonding Behvaior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsivintzelis, Ioannis; Economou, Ioannis; Kontogeorgis, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    simpler molecules of similar chemical structure and/or are fitted to Hansen's partial solubility parameters. The methodology is applied to modeling the solubility of three pharmaceuticals, namely acetanilide, phenacetin, and paracetamol, using the nonrandom hydrogen bonding (NRHB) EoS. In all cases......, accurate correlations were obtained. The prediction ability of the approach was evaluated against predictions from the COSMO-RS model. A thorough discussion is made for the appropriate modeling of solid solubility considering the effect of the difference of the heat capacities of the solute in liquid...

  2. Study and development of a hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell in solid polymer electrolyte technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosdale, R.

    1992-10-29

    The hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell appears today as the best candidate to the replacing of the internal combustion engine for automobile traction. This system uses the non explosive electrochemical recombination of hydrogen and oxygen. It is a clean generator whom only reactive product is water. This thesis shows a theoretical study of this system, the synthesis of different kinds of used electrodes and finally an analysis of water movements in polymer electrolyte by different original technologies. 70 refs., 73 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. A spin-Seebeck diode with a negative differential spin-Seebeck effect in a hydrogen-terminated zigzag silicene nanoribbon heterojunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Hua-Hua; Gu, Lei; Wu, Dan-Dan

    2016-05-14

    The spin-Seebeck effect (SSE), the central topic of spin caloritronics, provides a new direction for future low power consumption technology. To realize device applications of SSE, a spin-Seebeck diode (SSD) with a negative differential SSE is very desirable. To this end, we constructed a spin caloritronics device that was composed of a ferromagnetic double-single-hydrogen-terminated zigzag silicene nanoribbon (ZSiNR-H2-H) and an antiferromagnetic double-double-hydrogen-terminated zigzag silicene nanoribbon (ZSiNR-H2-H2). By using ab initio calculations combined with nonequilibrium Green's function technique, we found that thermally driven spin current through the heterojunction featured the SSD effect and negative differential SSE. The former originates from the asymmetrical thermal-driven conducting electrons and holes, and the latter ascribes to the thermal spin compensation effect. Their physical mechanisms are much different from the previous ones mainly relying on the spin-wave excitations in the interface between metals and magnetic insulators, supporting our study that puts forward a new route to realize the SSD with a negative differential SSE.

  4. Development of tantalum–zirconium alloy for hydrogen purification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sanjay, E-mail: sanjay.barc@gmail.com [Fusion Reactor Materials Section, MG, BARC, Mumbai 85 (India); IAMR, Hiroshima University, Higashihiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Singh, Anamika [GSASM Hiroshima University, Higashihiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Jain, Uttam; Dey, Gautam Kumar [Fusion Reactor Materials Section, MG, BARC, Mumbai 85 (India)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Terminal solid solubility of Ta increases with Zr addition. • Increase in lattice parameters of Ta due to Zr addition may be the possible reason. • Enhance H solubility could also be explained on the change in e-DOS of Ta–Zr alloys. • Ta–Zr alloys could be possible combination for hydrogen purification membrane. - Abstract: Terminal solid solubility of hydrogen in Ta–Zr alloys has been studied in connection with the development of tantalum based metallic membrane for hydrogen/tritium purification. The alloys were prepared by vacuum arc melting technique and subsequently cold rolled to 0.2 mm thickness. The terminal solid solubility of hydrogen in these cold rolled samples was investigated in a modified Sieverts apparatus. The terminal solid solubility of hydrogen was marginally increased with zirconium content. The change in the lattices parameter of tantalum upon zirconium addition and the higher affinity of zirconium for hydrogen as compared to tantalum could be the possible reasons.

  5. Possible correlation effects of surface state electrons on a solid hydrogen film

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mugele, Friedrich Gunther; Albrecht, Uwe; Leiderer, Paul; Kono, Kimitoshi

    1992-01-01

    We have investigated the transport properties of surface state electrons on thin quench-condensed hydrogen films for various electron densities. The surface state electron mobility showed a continuous dependence on the plasma parameter Gamma in the range from 20 to 130, indicating a strong influence

  6. Emission of fast hydrogen atoms at a plasma–solid interface in a low density plasma containing noble gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchuk, O.; Brandt, C.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Reinhart, M.; Brezinsek, S.; Unterberg, B.; Dickheuer, S.

    2018-01-01

    The source of the broad radiation of fast hydrogen atoms in plasmas containing noble gases remains one of the most discussed problems relating to plasma–solid interface. In this paper, we present a detailed study of Balmer lines emission generated by fast hydrogen and deuterium atoms in an energy range between 40 and 300 eV in a linear magnetised plasma. The experiments were performed in gas mixtures containing hydrogen or deuterium and one of the noble gases (He, Ne, Ar, Kr or Xe). In the low-pressure regime (0.01–0.1 Pa) of plasma operation emission is detected by using high spectral and spatial resolution spectrometers at different lines-of-sight for different target materials (C, Fe, Rh, Pd, Ag and W). We observed the spatial evolution for H α , H β and H γ lines with a resolution of 50 μm in front of the targets, proving that emission is induced by reflected atoms only. The strongest radiation of fast atoms was observed in the case of Ar–D or Ar–H discharges. It is a factor of five less in Kr–D plasma and an order of magnitude less in other rare gas mixture plasmas. First, the present work shows that the maximum of emission is achieved for the kinetic energy of 70–120 eV/amu of fast atoms. Second, the emission profile depends on the target material as well as surface characteristics such as the particle reflection, e.g. angular and energy distribution, and the photon reflectivity. Finally, the source of emission of fast atoms is narrowed down to two processes: excitation caused by collisions with noble gas atoms in the ground state, and excitation transfer between the metastable levels of argon and the excited levels of hydrogen or deuterium.

  7. Probing hydrogen in ZnO nanorods using solid-state 1H nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Li Q.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Windisch, Charles F.; Yao, Chunhua; Pederson, Larry R.; Zhou, Xiao Dong

    2007-04-23

    We have developed a low-temperature reflux method to synthesize large quantities of well-dispersed free-standing ZnO nanorods using a simple and mild aqueous solution route. In this approach, different surfactants were used to control nanostructure morphologies. Bound proton states in these ZnO nanorods were characterized for the first time by high resolution solid-state 1H magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR. In contrast to commercially available ZnO nano- or micro-particles, our uniform ZnO nanorods show a surprisingly sharp 1H NMR resonance. The feature is maintained upon heating to 500 oC, which suggests that an unusually stable proton species exists, most likely associated with lattice defects within the ZnO framework. Work here has demonstrated a new approach for probing a small amount of proton species associated with defects in nano-crystalline solids using high resolution solid-state 1H MAS NMR.

  8. Density functional theory (DFT) studies of hydrogen rich solids and boron carbide under extreme conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamp, Andrew James

    Since the first prediction that compressed hydrogen would metallize in 1935 and the further prediction that the metallic allotrope would be a superconductor at high temperatures, metallic hydrogen has been termed the "holy grail" of high-pressure science. A tremendous amount of theoretical and experimental research has been carried out, with the ultimate goal of metallizing hydrogen via the application of external pressure. It has been previously proposed that doping hydrogen with another element can lower the pressure at which metallization occurs. A number of experimental and theoretical studies have investigated doping hydrogen by either a group XIII or XIV element. Experiments in diamond anvil cells have illustrated that it is indeed possible to synthesize hydrogen-rich phases under conditions of extreme pressures, and SiH4 (H2)2, GeH4(H2) n, and Xe(H2)n have been shown to behave as true compounds. The focus herein is on the theoretical exploration of hydrogen-rich phases with novel stoichiometries, which contain a dopant element up to pressures of 350 GPa. In particular, the alkali-metal and alkaline Earth metal polyhydrides (MHn where n > 1) have been considered. Within this thesis the XtalOpt evolutionary algorithm was employed in order to complete this work, and predict the most stable structures of cesium and beryllium polyhydrides under pressure. In addition, we explore the possibility of mixing excess hydrogen with an electronegative element, iodine and phosphorus. The phases found are examined via detailed first principles calculations. In addition, because of its outstanding hardness, thermodynamic stability, low density, electronic properties, thermal stability, and high melting point boron carbide has many uses: i.e. as a refractory material, in abrasive powders and ballistics, as a neutron radiation absorbent, and in electronic applications. However, little is known about the behavior of boron carbide when under the external stress of pressure. The

  9. Structural properties of hydrogen isotopes in solid phase in the context of inertial confinement fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guerrero Carlo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Quality of Deuterium-Tritium capsules is a critical aspect in Inertial Confinement Fusion. In this work, we present a Quantum Molecular Dynamics methodology able to model hydrogen isotopes and their structural molecular organisation at extreme pressures and cryogenic temperatures (< 15 K. Our study sets up the basis for a future analysis on the mechanical and structural properties of DT-ice in inertial confinement fusion (ICF target manufacturing conditions.

  10. Session 4: Solid solution sulfide photo-catalysts for hydrogen evolution under visible light irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, I.; Kato, H. [Tokyo Univ., Faculty of Science, Dept. of Applied Chemistry (Japan); Kudo, A.; Kobayashi, H. [Kurashiki Univ. of Science and the Arts, (Japan); Kudo, A. [Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    In the present study, we tried to make a new visible-light driven photo-catalyst for H{sub 2} evolution by making solid solutions between ZnS photo-catalyst with a wide band gap, and AgInS{sub 2} and CuInS{sub 2} with narrow band gaps. The photophysical and photo-catalytic properties of (MIn){sub x}Zn{sub 2(1-x)}S{sub 2} (M=Cu, Ag) solid solutions were investigated. (authors)

  11. Investigations of charge-changing processes for light proton-rich nuclei on carbon and solid-hydrogen targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawahata, K. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Ozawa, A., E-mail: ozawa@tac.tsukuba.ac.jp [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Saito, Y.; Abe, Y.; Ichikawa, Y.; Inaba, N.; Ishibashi, Y. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Kitagawa, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Matsunaga, S. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Moriguchi, T.; Nagae, D.; Okada, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Sato, S. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, S. [Institute of Physics, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8571 (Japan); Suzuki, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, T. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama 338-8570 (Japan); Zenihiro, J. [RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2017-05-15

    We investigated charge-changing processes (total charge-changing cross sections and partial charge-changing cross sections) for light proton-rich nuclei ({sup 34–36}Ar, {sup 33}Cl, {sup 25–28}Si) at around 300A MeV on carbon and solid-hydrogen targets. We estimated the nuclear proton point radii of {sup 33}Cl and {sup 25,26,27}Si from the observed total charge-changing cross sections by using Glauber-model calculations with a phenomenological correction factor. Furthermore, we estimated the proton skin thickness for {sup 33}Cl coupled with its previously observed matter radius. From investigations of the partial charge-changing cross sections, clear zigzag pattern was observed for all isotopes. The present studies suggest that the pattern may be common in the proton-rich side, and depends on the odd–even nature of the fragment charge.

  12. Hydrogen Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    A unit for producing hydrogen on site is used by a New Jersey Electric Company. The hydrogen is used as a coolant for the station's large generator; on-site production eliminates the need for weekly hydrogen deliveries. High purity hydrogen is generated by water electrolysis. The electrolyte is solid plastic and the control system is electronic. The technology was originally developed for the Gemini spacecraft.

  13. Amplified terminal protection assay of small molecule/protein interactions via a highly characteristic solid-state Ag/AgCl process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiong; Jiang, Bingying; Xu, Jin; Xie, Jiaqing; Xiang, Yun; Yuan, Ruo; Chai, Yaqin

    2013-05-15

    In this work, we describe a new sensitive strategy for electrochemical detection of protein via small molecule/protein interactions. This assay is based on a terminal protection mechanism that small molecule-linked single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) is protected against hydrolysis by exonuclease I when the target protein is captured by the corresponding small molecule recognition element. Positively charged gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are attached to the termini-protected and negatively charged ssDNA through electrostatic interactions. Subsequent AuNP-catalyzed silver enhancement followed by a highly characteristic and sensitive solid-state Ag/AgCl process is introduced to the sensing platform to amplify the signal output. By combining the amplification ability resulting from the silver deposition on the surface-captured AuNPs with the inherent high sensitivity of the electrochemical solid-state Ag/AgCl process, our method expands its range to the detection of macromolecules that bind to specific small molecules and enables low picomolar detection of protein. As a model of biotin/streptavidin interaction, a detection limit of 10 pM for streptavidin is readily achieved with desirable sensitivity and specificity, which indicates that the terminal protection assay coupled with the electrochemical solid-state Ag/AgCl process can offer a promising platform for the determination of various of types of proteins or small molecule-protein interactions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Conversion of organic solid waste to hydrogen and methane by two-stage fermentation system with reuse of methane fermenter effluent as diluting water in hydrogen fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung-Won; Moon, Chungman; Cho, Si-Kyung; Kim, Sang-Hyoun; Shin, Hang-Sik; Kim, Dong-Hoon

    2013-07-01

    In this study, a two-stage system converting organic solid waste (food waste+sewage sludge) to H2 and CH4 was operated. In the first stage of dark fermentative hydrogen production (DFHP), a recently proposed method that does not require external inoculum, was applied. In the second stage, anaerobic sequencing batch reactor (ASBR) and an up-flow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor (UASBr) were followed to treat H2 fermenter effluent. (H2+CH4-ASBR) system showed better performance in terms of total biogas conversion (78.6%), while higher biogas production rate (2.03 L H2/Lsystem/d, 1.96 L CH4/Lsystem/d) was achieved in (H2+CH4-UASBr) system. To reduce the alkali addition requirement in DFHP process, CH4 fermenter effluent was tested as a diluting water. Both the ASBR and UASBr effluent was effective to keep the pH above 6 without CH4 production. In case of using ASBR effluent, H2 production dropped by 15%, but alkali addition requirement was reduced by 50%. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Mechanism of H{sub 2}{sup -} formation in solid hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichikawa, Tsuneki; Tachikawa, Hiroto [Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan); Kumagai, Jun; Kumada, Takayuki; Miyazaki, Tetsuo

    1998-02-01

    The singlet and the triplet ESR lines with the common g-factor of 2.0023 and the hyperfine coupling constant of 20.3 mT observed after {gamma}-irradiation of crystalline para hydrogen at 4.2 K agreed with the expected ESR spectra of the radical anions of the para and the ortho hydrogen molecules, respectively. A novel model has been proposed for explaining the formation and stabilization of H{sub 2}{sup -} in crystalline H{sub 2}. The model assumes H{sub 2}{sup -} to be located at the center of a cavity which has previously been occupied by a trapped electron. The excess electron of H{sub 2}{sup -} is forced to be attached on one H{sub 2} in the cavity due to strong repulsive interactions between the excess electron and H{sub 2} molecules surrounding the cavity. A quantum-mechanical calculation shows that an electron trapped in the vacancy of crystalline H{sub 2} automatically converts to H{sub 2}{sup -} by drawing one of the surrounding H{sub 2} molecules into the center of the vacancy. (author)

  16. An animal model of Miller Fisher syndrome: Mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide is produced by the autoimmune attack of nerve terminals and activates Schwann cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodella, Umberto; Scorzeto, Michele; Duregotti, Elisa; Negro, Samuele; Dickinson, Bryan C; Chang, Christopher J; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Rigoni, Michela; Montecucco, Cesare

    2016-12-01

    The neuromuscular junction is a tripartite synapse composed of the presynaptic nerve terminal, the muscle and perisynaptic Schwann cells. Its functionality is essential for the execution of body movements and is compromised in a number of disorders, including Miller Fisher syndrome, a variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome: this autoimmune peripheral neuropathy is triggered by autoantibodies specific for the polysialogangliosides GQ1b and GT1a present in motor axon terminals, including those innervating ocular muscles, and in sensory neurons. Their binding to the presynaptic membrane activates the complement cascade, leading to a nerve degeneration that resembles that caused by some animal presynaptic neurotoxins. Here we have studied the intra- and inter-cellular signaling triggered by the binding and complement activation of a mouse monoclonal anti-GQ1b/GT1a antibody to primary cultures of spinal cord motor neurons and cerebellar granular neurons. We found that a membrane attack complex is rapidly assembled following antibody binding, leading to calcium accumulation, which affects mitochondrial functionality. Consequently, using fluorescent probes specific for mitochondrial hydrogen peroxide, we found that this reactive oxygen species is rapidly produced by mitochondria of damaged neurons, and that it triggers the activation of the MAP kinase pathway in Schwann cells. These results throw light on the molecular and cellular pathogenesis of Miller Fisher syndrome, and may well be relevant to other pathologies of the motor axon terminals, including some subtypes of the Guillain Barré syndrome. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Predicting protein aggregation during storage in lyophilized solids using solid state amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis (ssHDX-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorthy, Balakrishnan S; Schultz, Steven G; Kim, Sherry G; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2014-06-02

    Solid state amide hydrogen/deuterium exchange with mass spectrometric analysis (ssHDX-MS) was used to assess the conformation of myoglobin (Mb) in lyophilized formulations, and the results correlated with the extent of aggregation during storage. Mb was colyophilized with sucrose (1:1 or 1:8 w/w), mannitol (1:1 w/w), or NaCl (1:1 w/w) or in the absence of excipients. Immediately after lyophilization, samples of each formulation were analyzed by ssHDX-MS and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to assess Mb conformation, and by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC) to determine the extent of aggregation. The remaining samples were then placed on stability at 25 °C and 60% RH or 40 °C and 75% RH for up to 1 year, withdrawn at intervals, and analyzed for aggregate content by SEC and DLS. In ssHDX-MS of samples immediately after lyophilization (t = 0), Mb was less deuterated in solids containing sucrose (1:1 and 1:8 w/w) than in those containing mannitol (1:1 w/w), NaCl (1:1 w/w), or Mb alone. Deuterium uptake kinetics and peptide mass envelopes also indicated greater Mb structural perturbation in mannitol, NaCl, or Mb-alone samples at t = 0. The extent of deuterium incorporation and kinetic parameters related to rapidly and slowly exchanging amide pools (Nfast, Nslow), measured at t = 0, were highly correlated with the extent of aggregation on storage as measured by SEC. In contrast, the extent of aggregation was weakly correlated with FTIR band intensity and peak position measured at t = 0. The results support the use of ssHDX-MS as a formulation screening tool in developing lyophilized protein drug products.

  18. Hydrogen Atomic Positions of O-H···O Hydrogen Bonds in Solution and in the Solid State: The Synergy of Quantum Chemical Calculations with ¹H-NMR Chemical Shifts and X-ray Diffraction Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siskos, Michael G; Choudhary, M Iqbal; Gerothanassis, Ioannis P

    2017-03-07

    The exact knowledge of hydrogen atomic positions of O-H···O hydrogen bonds in solution and in the solid state has been a major challenge in structural and physical organic chemistry. The objective of this review article is to summarize recent developments in the refinement of labile hydrogen positions with the use of: (i) density functional theory (DFT) calculations after a structure has been determined by X-ray from single crystals or from powders; (ii) ¹H-NMR chemical shifts as constraints in DFT calculations, and (iii) use of root-mean-square deviation between experimentally determined and DFT calculated ¹H-NMR chemical shifts considering the great sensitivity of ¹H-NMR shielding to hydrogen bonding properties.

  19. Hydrogen Atomic Positions of O–H···O Hydrogen Bonds in Solution and in the Solid State: The Synergy of Quantum Chemical Calculations with 1H-NMR Chemical Shifts and X-ray Diffraction Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Siskos

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The exact knowledge of hydrogen atomic positions of O–H···O hydrogen bonds in solution and in the solid state has been a major challenge in structural and physical organic chemistry. The objective of this review article is to summarize recent developments in the refinement of labile hydrogen positions with the use of: (i density functional theory (DFT calculations after a structure has been determined by X-ray from single crystals or from powders; (ii 1H-NMR chemical shifts as constraints in DFT calculations, and (iii use of root-mean-square deviation between experimentally determined and DFT calculated 1H-NMR chemical shifts considering the great sensitivity of 1H-NMR shielding to hydrogen bonding properties.

  20. The calculation of specific heats for some important solid components in hydrogen production process based on CuCl cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Avsec Jurij

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen is one of the most promising energy sources of the future enabling direct production of power and heat in fuel cells, hydrogen engines or furnaces with hydrogen burners. One of the last remainder problems in hydrogen technology is how to produce a sufficient amount of cheap hydrogen. One of the best options is large scale thermochemical production of hydrogen in combination with nuclear power plant. copper-chlorine (CuCl) cycle is the most promissi...

  1. Amyloid Hydrogen Bonding Polymorphism Evaluated by (15)N{(17)O}REAPDOR Solid-State NMR and Ultra-High Resolution Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Juan; Antzutkin, Oleg N; Filippov, Andrei V; Iuga, Dinu; Lam, Pui Yiu; Barrow, Mark P; Dupree, Ray; Brown, Steven P; O'Connor, Peter B

    2016-04-12

    A combined approach, using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS) and solid-state NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance), shows a high degree of polymorphism exhibited by Aβ species in forming hydrogen-bonded networks. Two Alzheimer's Aβ peptides, Ac-Aβ(16-22)-NH2 and Aβ(11-25), selectively labeled with (17)O and (15)N at specific amino acid residues were investigated. The total amount of peptides labeled with (17)O as measured by FTICR-MS enabled the interpretation of dephasing observed in (15)N{(17)O}REAPDOR solid-state NMR experiments. Specifically, about one-third of the Aβ peptides were found to be involved in the formation of a specific >C═(17)O···H-(15)N hydrogen bond with their neighbor peptide molecules, and we hypothesize that the rest of the molecules undergo ± n off-registry shifts in their hydrogen bonding networks.

  2. Hydrogen and synthetic fuel production using pressurized solid oxide electrolysis cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Højgaard; Sun, Xiufu; Ebbesen, Sune

    2010-01-01

    Wind and solar power is troubled by large fluctuations in delivery due to changing weather. The surplus electricity can be used in a Solid Oxide Electrolyzer Cell (SOEC) to split CO2 + H2O into CO + H2 (+O2). The synthesis gas (CO + H2) can subsequently be catalyzed into various types of synthetic...... fuels using a suitable catalyst. As the catalyst operates at elevated pressure the fuel production system can be simplified by operating the SOEC at elevated pressure. Here we present the results of a cell test with pressures ranging from 0.4 bar to 10 bar. The cell was tested both as an SOEC...

  3. [Clinical Value of "iEat®" in Terminal Cancer Patients Who Have Difficulty with Oral Intake of a Solid Diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabata, Ryohei; Iseki, Chihiro; Kimura, Yutaka; Yoshikawa, Masato; Kameda, Chizu; Matsumura, Tae; Won, Masayo; Koga, Chikato; Murakami, Masahiro; Hirota, Masaki; Noura, Shingo; Ikenaga, Masakazu; Shimizu, Junzo; Hasegawa, Junichi

    2015-11-01

    The usefulness of "iEatR" was explored in a study of 13 terminal cancer patients who had difficulty ingesting a solid diet, but could ingest a liquid diet. The patients were given a questionnaire on the flavor, appearance, and ease of consumption after sampling 2 kinds of "iEatR". Patients wishing to continue consuming this diet were able to purchase "iEatR" at their own expense and were then surveyed regarding their ongoing consumption of "iEatR". The types of cancers were esophageal in 3 patients, gastric in 7, and pancreatic in 3. In the questionnaire, 10 of the 13 patients rated the flavor as good and 12 rated the appearance and ease of eating as good. Eleven of the 13 patients purchased "iEatR", and 61.5% of patients were still consuming "iEatR" at least 2 times per week 2 weeks after the sampling. No change in the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events grade was seen in any of the patients."iEatR", which emphasizes appearance and taste, is associated with improved satisfaction in terminal cancer patients who have difficulty ingesting solids, suggesting it is useful as a diet for these patients.

  4. Extensive de novo solid-state NMR assignments of the 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habenstein, Birgit [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France); Wasmer, Christian [Harvard Medical School (United States); Bousset, Luc; Sourigues, Yannick [UPR 3082 CNRS, Laboratoire d' Enzymologie et Biochimie Structurales (France); Schuetz, Anne [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Loquet, Antoine [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry (Germany); Meier, Beat H., E-mail: beme@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Physical Chemistry (Switzerland); Melki, Ronald, E-mail: melki@lebs.cnrs-gif.fr [UPR 3082 CNRS, Laboratoire d' Enzymologie et Biochimie Structurales (France); Boeckmann, Anja, E-mail: a.bockmann@ibcp.fr [UMR 5086 CNRS/Universite de Lyon 1, Institut de Biologie et Chimie des Proteines (France)

    2011-11-15

    We present the de novo resonance assignments for the crystalline 33 kDa C-terminal domain of the Ure2 prion using an optimized set of five 3D solid-state NMR spectra. We obtained, using a single uniformly {sup 13}C, {sup 15}N labeled protein sample, sequential chemical-shift information for 74% of the N, C{alpha}, C{beta} triples, and for 80% of further side-chain resonances for these spin systems. We describe the procedures and protocols devised, and discuss possibilities and limitations of the assignment of this largest protein assigned today by solid-state NMR, and for which no solution-state NMR shifts were available. A comparison of the NMR chemical shifts with crystallographic data reveals that regions with high crystallographic B-factors are particularly difficult to assign. While the secondary structure elements derived from the chemical shift data correspond mainly to those present in the X-ray crystal structure, we detect an additional helical element and structural variability in the protein crystal, most probably originating from the different molecules in the asymmetric unit, with the observation of doubled resonances in several parts, including entire stretches, of the protein. Our results provide the point of departure towards an atomic-resolution structural analysis of the C-terminal Ure2p domain in the context of the full-length prion fibrils.

  5. Elastic and Inelastic Scattering of 8He Using a Solid Hydrogen Target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holl, Matthias; Kanungo, Ritu; Alcorta, Martin; Connolly, Devin; Davids, Barry; Diaz Varela, Alejandra; Hackman, Greg; Henderson, Jack; Ishimoto, Shigeru; Ihsan Kilic, Ali; Krücken, Reiner; Lennarz, Annika; Liang, Johnson; Measures, James; Mittig, Wolfgang; Paetkau, Owen; Psaltus, Athanasios; Singh Randhawa, Jaspreet; Smallcombe, James; Williams, Matt

    2017-09-01

    The nucleus 8He is the most neutron-rich nucleus known. Its structure, consisting of a 4He core surrounded by four neutrons makes it an ideal case to study phenomena in highly neutron-proton asymmetric systems. An experiment studying elastic and inelastic scattering of 8He has been carried out at the IRIS setup at ISAC-II at TRIUMF. It utilized the novel IRIS solid H2 target in combination with a low pressure ionization chamber for the identification of the incoming beam and two ΔE - E telescopes to measure the reaction products. The current status of the analysis will be shown, including the optical model analysis of the elastic scattering compared to global potentials and the analysis of excited states in 8He from inelastic scattering. Support Limit from Canada Foundation for Innovation, Nova Scotia Research and Innovation Trust and NSERC.

  6. Biosurfactant-enhanced hydrogen production from organic fraction of municipal solid waste using co-culture of E. coli and Enterobacter aerogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Preeti; Melkania, Uma

    2017-11-01

    The effect of biosurfactants (surfactin and saponin) on the hydrogen production from organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) was investigated using co-culture of facultative anaerobes Enterobacter aerogenes and E. coli. The biosurfactants were applied in the concentration ranges of 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, 2.5, 3.0, 3.5 and 5.0% each. Cumulative hydrogen production (P), maximum hydrogen production rate (Rmax) and lag phases (λ) were analyzed using modified Gompertz model. Results revealed that both the biosurfactants were effective in hydrogen production enhancement. The maximum cumulative hydrogen production of 743.5±14.4ml and 675.6±12.1ml and volumetric hydrogen production of 2.12L H2 /L substrate and 1.93L H2 /L substrate was recorded at 3.5% surfactin and 3.0% saponin respectively. Corresponding highest hydrogen yields were 79.2mlH 2 /gCarbo initial and 72.0mlH 2 /gCarbo initial respectively. Lag phase decreased from 12.5±2.0h at control to a minimum of 9.0±2.8h and 9.5±2.1h at 3.5% surfactin and 3.0% saponin respectively. Volatile fatty acid generation was increased with biosurfactants addition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A Fmoc-compatible Method for the Solid-Phase Synthesis of Peptide C-Terminal (alpha)-Thioesters based on the Safety-Catch Hydrazine Linker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camarero, J A; Hackel, B J; de Yoreo, J J; Mitchell, A R

    2003-11-22

    C-terminal peptide thioesters are key intermediates for the synthesis/semisynthesis of proteins and for the production of cyclic peptides by native chemical ligation. They can be synthetically prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) methods or biosynthetically by protein splicing techniques. Until recently, the chemical synthesis of C-terminal a-thioester peptides by SPPS was largely restricted to the Boc/Benzyl methodology because of the poor stability of the thioester bond to the basic conditions employed for the deprotection of the N{sup {alpha}}-Fmoc group. In the present work, we describe a new method for the SPPS of C-terminal thioesters by Fmoc/t-Bu chemistry. This method is based on the use of an aryl hydrazide linker, which is totally stable to the Fmoc-SPPS conditions. Once the peptide synthesis has been completed, activation of the linker can be achieved by mild oxidation. This step transforms the hydrazide group into a highly reactive diazene intermediate which can react with different H-AA-SEt to yield the corresponding {alpha}-thioester peptide in good yields. This method has been successfully used for the generation of different thioester peptides, circular peptides and a fully functional SH3 protein domain.

  8. Hydrogen Fueled Hybrid Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine (SOFC-GT) System for Long-Haul Rail Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Justin Jeff

    Freight movement of goods is the artery for America's economic health. Long-haul rail is the premier mode of transport on a ton-mile basis. Concerns regarding greenhouse gas and criteria pollutant emissions, however, have motivated the creation of annually increasing locomotive emissions standards. Health issues from diesel particulate matter, especially near rail yards, have also been on the rise. These factors and the potential to raise conventional diesel-electric locomotive performance warrants the investigation of using future fuels in a more efficient system for locomotive application. This research evaluates the dynamic performance of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine (SOFC-GT) Hybrid system operating on hydrogen fuel to power a locomotive over a rail path starting from the Port of Los Angeles and ending in the City of Barstow. Physical constraints, representative locomotive operation logic, and basic design are used from a previous feasibility study and simulations are performed in the MATLAB Simulink environment. In-house controls are adapted to and expanded upon. Results indicate high fuel-to-electricity efficiencies of at least 54% compared to a conventional diesel-electric locomotive efficiency of 35%. Incorporation of properly calibrated feedback and feed-forward controls enables substantial load following of difficult transients that result from train kinematics while maintaining turbomachinery operating requirements and suppressing thermal stresses in the fuel cell stack. The power split between the SOFC and gas turbine is deduced to be a deterministic factor in the balance between capital and operational costs. Using hydrogen results in no emissions if renewable and offers a potential of 24.2% fuel energy savings for the rail industry.

  9. Sonochemical synthesis of Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S solid solutions for application in photocatalytic reforming of glycerol to produce hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Paula A.L., E-mail: paulaaparecida_lopes@hotmail.com [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus de Ondina, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Mascarenhas, Artur J.S., E-mail: artur@ufba.br [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus de Ondina, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia, INCT, de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-290 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Silva, Luciana A., E-mail: las@ufba.br [Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Campus de Ondina, 40170-115 Salvador, BA (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia, INCT, de Energia e Ambiente, Universidade Federal da Bahia, 40170-290 Salvador, BA (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    A simple sonochemical method for the preparation of Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S solid solutions was successfully applied. The sonochemical method has shown to be fast, with low energy demand and allowed to obtain nano-sized particles. The obtained materials were characterized by XRD, EDX, SEM and DRS UV/vis. The Pt-loaded photocatalysts were evaluated in photoinduced reforming of glycerol under visible light irradiation (λ > 418 nm). Pure CdS and solid solutions obtained by sonochemical method have shown photocatalytic activity with respect to hydrogen gas production. The maximum hydrogen evolution rate achieved was 239 μmol g{sup −1} h{sup −1}, when the solid solution Cd{sub 0.6}Zn{sub 0}.{sub 4}S contaminated with γ-Zn(OH){sub 2} was irradiated with visible light. - Highlights: • Cd{sub 1−x}Zn{sub x}S solid solutions were successfully prepared by a sonochemical method. • The solid solutions are active in photocatalytic reforming of glycerol. • The solid solution Cd{sub 0.6}Zn{sub 0.4}S contaminated with γ-Zn(OH){sub 2} was the more active photocatalyst.

  10. Thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with food waste (FW): Enhancement of bio-hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angeriz-Campoy, Rubén; Álvarez-Gallego, Carlos J; Romero-García, Luis I

    2015-10-01

    Bio-hydrogen production from dry thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion (55°C and 20% total solids) of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and food waste (FW) was studied. OFMSW coming from mechanical-biological treatment plants (MBT plants) presents a low organic matter concentration. However, FW has a high organic matter content but several problems by accumulation of volatile fatty acids (VFAs) and system acidification. Tests were conducted using a mixture ratio of 80:20 (OFSMW:FW), to avoid the aforementioned problems. Different solid retention times (SRTs) - 6.6, 4.4, 2.4 and 1.9 days - were tested. It was noted that addition of food waste enhances the hydrogen production in all the SRTs tested. Best results were obtained at 1.9-day SRT. It was observed an increase from 0.64 to 2.51 L H2/L(reactor) day in hydrogen productivity when SRTs decrease from 6.6 to 1.9 days. However, the hydrogen yield increases slightly from 33.7 to 38 mL H2/gVS(added). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Study of wet-chemically-prepared hydrogen-terminated silicon (111) surfaces and a novel implementation of a high-resolution interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Hui

    This thesis summarizes my graduate study under the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Atom-Based Dimensional Metrology Project, in which we are developing methods for measuring sub-micrometer dimensions including directly counting atom spacings on a silicon-surface lattice. Atomically flat, hydrogen-terminated Si(111) surfaces are prepared using wet chemistry. The surface morphology after the wet-chemistry preparation was found to be dependent on both the initial etching time and wafer miscut. These two factors have been neglected in literature. To produce a morphology of uniform, long-range steps and terraces, the miscut angle has to be larger than a certain angle. The development and dynamics of the surface morphology was explained by preferential etching. A kinetic Monte-Carlo simulation was used to quantitatively study some of the key aspects of the surface-morphology evolution, such as step flow, pit expansion, and step-pit collision. The hydrogen-terminated silicon surfaces prepared using wet-chemical etching method were used as substrates to create nanometer-scale patterns using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM)-probe-induced surface modification in both ultra-high vacuum (UHV) and low-vacuum environments. Patterns created in UHV have linewidths below 10 nm, while patterns created in low vacuum had a minimum linewidth of nominally 20 nm. The pattern created in a low vacuum environment was further processed using SF6 reactive-ion etching, resulting in patterns whose aspect ratio had increased more than 5 times. To enable accurate measurement of atom spacings, a Michelson interferometer of novel design was implemented in this research, based on the principle that during operation, the interference-fringe signal is locked at a zero point by tuning the laser frequency, thus transferring the displacement measurement into a laser-frequency measurement and greatly increasing the measurement resolution. The interferometer is designed to be

  12. Enantioselective synthesis of aziridines using asymmetric transfer hydrogenation as a precursor for chiral derivatives used as bonding agent for rocket solid propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecida M. Kawamoto

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available A rapid, expedient and enantioselective method for the synthesis of beta-hydroxy amines and monosubstituted aziridines in up to 99% e.e., via asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of a-amino ketones and cyclisation through treatment with tosyl chloride and base, is described. (1R,2R-N-(para-toluenesulfonyl-1,2-ethylenediamine with formic acid has been utilised as a ligand for the Ruthenium (II catalysed enantioselective transfer hydrogenation of the ketones.The chiral 2-methyl aziridine, which is a potentially more efficient bonding agent for Rocket Solid Propellant has been successfully achieved.

  13. Cooperative catalysis of metal and O-H···O/sp3-C-H···O two-point hydrogen bonds in alcoholic solvents: Cu-catalyzed enantioselective direct alkynylation of aldehydes with terminal alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Takaoki; Watanabe, Ryo; Moriya, Toshimitsu; Ohmiya, Hirohisa; Mori, Seiji; Sawamura, Masaya

    2013-09-27

    Catalyst-substrate hydrogen bonds in artificial catalysts usually occur in aprotic solvents, but not in protic solvents, in contrast to enzymatic catalysis. We report a case in which ligand-substrate hydrogen-bonding interactions cooperate with a transition-metal center in alcoholic solvents for enantioselective catalysis. Copper(I) complexes with prolinol-based hydroxy amino phosphane chiral ligands catalytically promoted the direct alkynylation of aldehydes with terminal alkynes in alcoholic solvents to afford nonracemic secondary propargylic alcohols with high enantioselectivities. Quantum-mechanical calculations of enantiodiscriminating transition states show the occurrence of a nonclassical sp(3)-C-H···O hydrogen bond as a secondary interaction between the ligand and substrate, which results in highly directional catalyst-substrate two-point hydrogen bonding. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Measurement of muon transfer from proton to triton and {ital pp}{mu} molecular formation in solid hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulhauser, F.; Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M. [TRIUMF, 4004 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A3 (CANADA); Bailey, J.M. [Chester Technology, Chester (England); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A. [University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, V8W 2Y2 (CANADA); Fujiwara, M.C. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 2A6 (CANADA); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus College, St. Peter, Minnesota 56082 (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Institut de Physique, Universite de Fribourg, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, A-1090 Vienna (Austria); Kim, S.K. [Jeonbuk National University, Jeonju City 560-756, South (Korea); Kunselman, A.R. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States); Markushin, V.E. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow 123182 (Russia); Martoff, C.J. [Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19122 (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Institute, PSI, CH-5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    1996-05-01

    An alternate approach was used to study the reactions of muonic atoms and molecules in solid layers of hydrogen isotopes. Muons stopped in a protium layer with a small admixture of tritium producing {mu}{ital p} atoms. Muon transfer from a proton to a triton generated {mu}{ital t} atoms, which were emitted into a deuterium layer. Subsequent epithermal {ital dt}{mu} molecular formation followed by {ital dt} fusion gave a prompt signal for the {mu}{ital t} emission. Fusion time spectra at various tritium concentrations were measured by detecting neutrons and {alpha} particles and the {mu}{ital p} disappearance rates were determined. The rates of {mu}{ital p}{r_arrow}{mu}{ital t} transfer and {ital pp}{mu} formation were measured to be {lambda}{sub {ital pt}}=[5.86{plus_minus}(0.10){sub {ital stat}}{plus_minus}(0.15){sub {ital syst}}({sub {minus}0}{sup +0.30}){sub {ital model}}]{times}10{sup 9} s{sup {minus}1} and {lambda}{sub {ital pp}}{sub {mu}}=[3.21 {plus_minus}(0.10){sub {ital stat}}{plus_minus}(0.14){sub {ital syst}}({sub {minus}0.06}{sup +0}){sub {ital model}(}]{times}10{sup 6} s{sup {minus}1}, respectively. Comparisons are made with the most recent theoretical values. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  15. Potential sputtering of protons from hydrogen- and H sub 2 O-terminated Si(1 0 0) surfaces with slow highly charged ions

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroki, K; Yamazaki, Y

    2003-01-01

    A potential sputtering mechanism of hydrogen has been studied for impacts of slow highly charged Xe sup q sup + ions (<5 keV, q=4-12) on well-defined H-terminated and water-saturated Si(1 0 0) surfaces. It was found that the sputtering yields of protons were proportional to q supgamma (gamma approx 5) for both the Si(1 0 0)2x1-H and Si(1 0 0)1x1-H surfaces, although the absolute yield for the Si(1 0 0)1x1-H surface was 10 times larger than that for the Si(1 0 0)2x1-H surface, i.e. the sputtering efficiency per one H-Si bond for the Si(1 0 0)1x1-H surface is five times larger that for the Si(1 0 0)2x1-H surface. The proton sputtering efficiency from a H-O-Si bond was extracted from measurements of the water-saturated surface, which was approx 8 times larger than the H-Si bond of the Si(1 0 0)2x1-H surface. An effective distance of the proton from its substrate was proposed to be the key parameter to govern the yield, which also influences the energy distributions of sputtered protons. These findings are con...

  16. Hydrogen Production from Water by Photolysis, Sonolysis and Sonophotolysis with Solid Solutions of Rare Earth, Gallium and Indium Oxides as Heterogeneous Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Penconi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we present the hydrogen production by photolysis, sonolysis and sonophotolysis of water in the presence of newly synthesized solid solutions of rare earth, gallium and indium oxides playing as catalysts. From the experiments of photolysis, we found that the best photocatalyst is the solid solution Y0.8Ga0.2InO3 doped by sulphur atoms. In experiments of sonolysis, we optimized the rate of hydrogen production by changing the amount of water, adding ethanol and tuning the power of our piezoelectric transducer. Finally, we performed sonolysis and sonophotolysis experiments in the presence of S:Y0.8Ga0.2InO3 finding a promising synergistic effect of UV-visible electromagnetic waves and 38 kHz ultrasound waves in producing H2.

  17. A Dde resin based strategy for inverse solid-phase synthesis of amino terminated peptides, peptide mimetics and protected peptide intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Aman; Gutheil, William G

    2005-02-01

    This report describes a Dde resin based attachment strategy for inverse solid-phase peptide synthesis (ISPPS). This attachment strategy can be used for the synthesis of amino terminated peptides with side chains and the carboxyl terminus either protected or deprotected. Amino acid t-butyl esters were attached through their free amino group to the Dde resin. The t-butyl carboxyl protecting group was removed by 50% TFA, and inverse peptide synthesis cycles performed using an HATU/TMP based coupling method. Protected peptides were cleaved from the resin with dilute hydrazine. Side chain protecting groups could then be removed by treatment with TFMSA/TFA. The potential of this approach was demonstrated by the synthesis of several short protected and unprotected peptides in good yield and with low epimerization. Its potential for peptide mimetic synthesis was demonstrated by the synthesis of two peptide trifluoromethylketones. Copyright 2004 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Anaerobic digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste combining two pretreatment modalities, high temperature microwave and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahriari, Haleh; Warith, Mostafa; Hamoda, Mohamed; Kennedy, Kevin J

    2012-01-01

    In order to enhance anaerobic digestion (AD) of the organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW), pretreatment combining two modalities, microwave (MW) heating in presence or absence of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) were investigated. The main pretreatment variables affecting the characteristics of the OFMSW were temperature (T) via MW irradiation and supplemental water additions of 20% and 30% (SWA20 and SW30). Subsequently, the focus of this study was to evaluate mesophilic batch AD performance in terms of biogas production, as well as changes in the characteristics of the OFMSW post digestion. A high MW induced temperature range (115-175°C) was applied, using sealed vessels and a bench scale MW unit equipped with temperature and pressure controls. Biochemical methane potential (BMP) tests were conducted on the whole OFMSW as well as the liquid fractions. The whole OFMSW pretreated at 115°C and 145°C showed 4-7% improvement in biogas production over untreated OFMSW (control). When pretreated at 175°C, biogas production decreased due to formation of refractory compounds, inhibiting the digestion. For the liquid fraction of OFMSW, the effect of pretreatment on the cumulative biogas production (CBP) was more pronounced for SWA20 at 145°C, with a 26% increase in biogas production after 8days of digestion, compared to the control. When considering the increased substrate availability in the liquid fraction after MW pretreatment, a 78% improvement in biogas production vs. the control was achieved. Combining MW and H(2)O(2) modalities did not have a positive impact on OFMSW stabilization and enhanced biogas production. In general, all samples pretreated with H(2)O(2) displayed a long lag phase and the CBP was usually lower than MW irradiated only samples. First order rate constant was calculated. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Reactions of atomic hydrogen with formic acid and carbon monoxide in solid parahydrogen I: Anomalous effect of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Leif O; Mutunga, Fredrick M; Follett, Shelby E; Anderson, David T

    2014-09-11

    Low-temperature condensed phase reactions of atomic hydrogen with closed-shell molecules have been studied in rare gas matrices as a way to generate unstable chemical intermediates and to study tunneling-driven chemistry. Although parahydrogen (pH2) matrix isolation spectroscopy allows these reactions to be studied equally well, little is known about the analogous reactions conducted in a pH2 matrix host. In this study, we present Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies of the 193 nm photoinduced chemistry of formic acid (HCOOH) isolated in a pH2 matrix over the 1.7 to 4.3 K temperature range. Upon short-term irradiation the HCOOH readily undergoes photolysis to yield CO, CO2, HOCO, HCO and H atoms. Furthermore, after photolysis at 1.9 K tunneling reactions between migrating H atoms and trapped HCOOH and CO continue to produce HOCO and HCO, respectively. A series of postphotolysis kinetic experiments at 1.9 K with varying photolysis conditions and initial HCOOH concentrations show the growth of HOCO consistently follows single exponential (k = 4.9(7)x10(-3) min(-1)) growth kinetics. The HCO growth kinetics is more complex displaying single exponential growth under certain conditions, but also biexponential growth at elevated CO concentrations and longer photolysis exposures. By varying the temperature after photolysis, we show the H atom reaction kinetics qualitatively change at ∼2.7 K; the reaction that produces HOCO stops at higher temperatures and is only observed at low temperature. We rationalize these results using a kinetic mechanism that involves formation of an H···HCOOH prereactive complex. This study clearly identifies anomalous temperature effects in the reaction kinetics of H atoms with HCOOH and CO in solid pH2 that deserve further study and await full quantitative theoretical modeling.

  20. Indications of the formation of an oversaturated solid solution during hydrogenation of Mg-Ni based nanocomposite produced by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, D. [Departamento de Ingenieria en Metalurgia, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Atacama y Centro Regional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Sustentable de Atacama, CRIDESAT, Av. Copayapu 485, Copiapo (Chile); Ordonez, S. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Santiago de Chile, Av. Lib. Bernardo O' Higgins 3363, Santiago (Chile); Fernandez, J.F.; Sanchez, C. [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco 28049, Madrid (Spain); Serafini, D. [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Santiago de Chile and Center for Interdisciplinary Research in Materials, CIMAT, Av. Lib. Bernardo O' Higgins 3363, Santiago (Chile); Rojas, P.A. [Escuela de Ingenieria Mecanica, Facultad de Ingenieria, Av. Los Carrera 01567, Quilpue, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, PUCV (Chile); Aguilar, C. [Instituto de Materiales y Procesos Termomecanicos, Facultad de Ciencias de la Ingenieria, Universidad Austral de Chile, Av. General Lagos 2086, Valdivia (Chile)

    2009-07-15

    An oversaturated solid solution of H in a nanocomposite material formed mainly by nanocrystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni, some residual nanocrystalline Ni and an Mg rich amorphous phase has been found for the first time. The nanocomposite was produced by mechanical alloying starting from Mg and Ni elemental powders, using a SPEX 8000D mill. The hydriding characterization of the nanocomposite was carried out by solid-gas reaction method in a Sievert's type apparatus. The maximum hydrogen content reached in a period of 21 Ks without prior activation was 2.00 wt.% H under hydrogen pressure of 2 MPa at 363 K. The X-ray diffraction analysis showed the presence of an oversaturated solid solution between nanocrystalline Mg{sub 2}Ni and H without any sign of Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} hydride formation. The dehydriding behaviour was studied by differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetry. The results showed the existence of two desorption peaks, the first one associated with the transformation of the oversaturated solid solution into Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4}, and the second one with the Mg{sub 2}NiH{sub 4} desorption. (author)

  1. Development of a Novel Efficient Solid-Oxide Hybrid for Co-generation of Hydrogen and Electricity Using Nearby Resources for Local Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Greg, G.; Virkar, Anil, V.; Bandopadhyay, Sukumar; Thangamani, Nithyanantham; Anderson, Harlan, U.; Brow, Richard, K.

    2009-06-30

    Developing safe, reliable, cost-effective, and efficient hydrogen-electricity co-generation systems is an important step in the quest for national energy security and minimized reliance on foreign oil. This project aimed to, through materials research, develop a cost-effective advanced technology cogenerating hydrogen and electricity directly from distributed natural gas and/or coal-derived fuels. This advanced technology was built upon a novel hybrid module composed of solid-oxide fuel-assisted electrolysis cells (SOFECs) and solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), both of which were in planar, anode-supported designs. A SOFEC is an electrochemical device, in which an oxidizable fuel and steam are fed to the anode and cathode, respectively. Steam on the cathode is split into oxygen ions that are transported through an oxygen ion-conducting electrolyte (i.e. YSZ) to oxidize the anode fuel. The dissociated hydrogen and residual steam are exhausted from the SOFEC cathode and then separated by condensation of the steam to produce pure hydrogen. The rationale was that in such an approach fuel provides a chemical potential replacing the external power conventionally used to drive electrolysis cells (i.e. solid oxide electrolysis cells). A SOFC is similar to the SOFEC by replacing cathode steam with air for power generation. To fulfill the cogeneration objective, a hybrid module comprising reversible SOFEC stacks and SOFC stacks was designed that planar SOFECs and SOFCs were manifolded in such a way that the anodes of both the SOFCs and the SOFECs were fed the same fuel, (i.e. natural gas or coal-derived fuel). Hydrogen was produced by SOFECs and electricity was generated by SOFCs within the same hybrid system. A stand-alone 5 kW system comprising three SOFEC-SOFC hybrid modules and three dedicated SOFC stacks, balance-of-plant components (including a tailgas-fired steam generator and tailgas-fired process heaters), and electronic controls was designed, though an overall

  2. Infrared Spectra of the 1-CHLOROMETHYL-1-METHYLALLYL and 1-CHLOROMETHYL-2-METHYLALLYL Radicals Isolated in Solid Para-Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amicangelo, Jay C.; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2017-06-01

    The reaction of chlorine atoms (Cl) with isoprene (C_5H_8) in solid para-hydrogen (p-H_2) matrices at 3.2 K has been studied using infrared spectroscopy. Mixtures of C_5H_8 and Cl_2 were co-deposited in p-H_2 at 3.2 K, followed by irradiation at 365 nm to cause the photodissociation of Cl_2 and the subsequent reaction of Cl atoms with C_5H_8. Upon 365 nm photolysis, a series of new lines appeared in the infrared spectrum, with the strongest appearing at 807.8 and 796.7 \\wn. To determine the grouping of lines to distinct chemical species, secondary photolysis was performed using a low-pressure Hg lamp in combination with various filters. Based on the secondary photolysis behavior, it was determined that the majority of the new lines belong to two distinct chemical species, designated as set A (3047.2, 1482.2, 1459.5, 1396.6, 1349.6, 1268.2, 1237.9, 1170.3, 1108.8, 807.8, 754.1, 605.6, 526.9, 472.7 \\wn) and set B (3112.7, 1487.6, 1382.6, 1257.7, 1229.1, 1034.8, 975.8, 942.4, 796.7, 667.9, 569.7 \\wn). The most likely reactions to occur between Cl and C_5H_8 under the low temperature conditions in solid p-H_2 are the addition of the Cl atom to the four distinct alkene carbon atoms to produce the corresponding chlorine atom addition radicals (ClC_5H_8). Quantum-chemical calculations were performed at the B3PW91/6-311++G(2d,2p) level of theory for the four possible ClC_5H_8 radicals in order to determine the relative energetics and the predicted harmonic vibrational spectra for each radical. The calculations predict that the addition of Cl to each of the four carbons is exothermic, with relative energies of 0.0, 74.5, 67.4, and 7.9 kJ/mol for the addition to carbons 1 - 4, respectively. When the lines of set A and B are compared to the scaled harmonic vibrational spectra for all four of the possible Cl addition radicals, it is found that the best agreement for set A is with the radical produced by the addition to carbon 4 (1-chloromethyl-2-methylallyl radical) and the

  3. Solvent fractionation of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L. kernel fat for production of non-hydrogenated solid fat: Influence of time and solvent type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Busakorn Mahisanunt

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study performed isothermal (25 °C solvent fractionation of rambutan (Nephelium lappaceum L. kernel fat (RKF to obtain the fat fraction that had melting properties comparable to a commercial hydrogenated solid fat. The effect of two fractionation parameters, holding time (12, 18 and 24 h and solvent types (acetone and ethanol, on the properties of fractionated fat were investigated. The results showed that a fractionation time increase caused an increased yield and decreased iodine value for the high melting or stearin fractions. The thermal behaviors and solid fat index (SFI of these stearin fractions were different from the original fat, especially for stearin from acetone fractionation. The major fatty acid in this stearin fraction was arachidic acid (C20:0 consisting of more than 90%. Overall, we demonstrated that acetone fractionation of RKF at 25 °C for 24 h is effective for producing a solid fat fraction, which has comparable crystallizing and melting properties to commercial hydrogenated fat. The fractionated rambutan fat obtained by this process may lead to its potential use in specific food products.

  4. Enhancement in hydrogen production by thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste and sewage sludge--optimization of treatment conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, Vinay Kumar; Angériz Campoy, Rubén; Álvarez-Gallego, C J; Romero García, L I

    2014-07-01

    Batch dry-thermophilic anaerobic co-digestion (55°C) of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and sewage sludge (SS) for hydrogen production was studied under several sludge combinations (primary sludge, PS; waste activated sludge, WAS; and mixed sludge, MS), TS concentrations (10-25%) and mixing ratios of OFMSW and SS (1:1, 2.5:1, 5:1, 10:1). The co-digestion of OFMSW and SS showed a 70% improvement in hydrogen production rate over the OFMSW fermentation only. The co-digestion of OFMSW with MS showed 47% and 115% higher hydrogen production potential as compared with OFMSW+PS and OFMSW+WAS, respectively. The maximum hydrogen yield of 51 mL H2/g VS consumed was observed at TS concentration of 20% and OFMSW to MS mixing ratio of 5:1, respectively. The acetic and butyric acids were the main acids in VFAs evolution; however, the higher butyric acid evolution indicated that the H2 fermentation was butyrate type fermentation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Impact of furan derivatives and phenolic compounds on hydrogen production from organic fraction of municipal solid waste using co-culture of Enterobacter aerogenes and E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Preeti; Melkania, Uma

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, the effect of furan derivatives (furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural) and phenolic compounds (vanillin and syringaldehyde) on hydrogen production from organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) was investigated using co-culture of facultative anaerobes Enterobacter aerogenes and E. coli. The inhibitors were applied in the concentration ranges of 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2 and 5g/L each. Inhibition coefficients of phenolic compounds were higher than those of furan derivatives and vanillin exhibited maximum inhibition coefficients correspondingly lowest hydrogen yield among all inhibitors. Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural addition resulted in an average decrease of 26.99% and 37.16% in hydrogen yield respectively, while vanillin and syringaldehyde resulted in 49.40% and 42.26% average decrease in hydrogen yield respectively. Further analysis revealed that Furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural were completely degraded up to concentrations of 1g/L, while vanillin and syringaldehyde were degraded completely up to the concentration of 0.5g/L. Volatile fatty acid generation decreased with inhibitors addition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Measurement of muon transfer rate {lambda}{sub pt} and molecular formation rate {lambda}{sub pp{mu}} in solid hydrogen targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulhauser, F.; Beveridge, J.L.; Douglas, J.L.; Maier, M.; Marshall, G.M. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada). TRIUMF Facility; Bailey, J.M. [EA Technology, Capenhurst (United Kingdom); Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Porcelli, T.A. [Victoria Univ., BC (Canada); Fujiwara, M.C. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus Coll., St. Peter, MN (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Fribourg Univ. (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Kim, S.K. [Jeonbuk National Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of); Kunselman, A.R. [Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (United States); Markushin, V.E. [Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol`zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. Atomnoj Ehnergii; Martoff, C.J. [Temple Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Zmeskal, J. [Oesterreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Vienna (Austria)

    1996-10-01

    The knowledge of muon transfer from protium to tritium is essentially theoretical and the different theoretical values disagree partially. Using solid hydrogen-tritium targets, with different tritium concentrations, we obtained precise experimental results for the transfer rate to tritium and the HH{mu} molecular formation rate. The time spectra of neutrons and alpha particles produced after DT{mu} fusion are used to determine the transfer rate {lambda}{sub pt} and the molecule formation rate {lambda}{sub pp{mu}}. (orig.). 27 refs.

  7. Terminal ballistics

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    This book comprehensively discusses essential aspects of terminal ballistics, combining experimental data, numerical simulations and analytical modeling. Employing a unique approach to numerical simulations as a measure of sensitivity for the major physical parameters, the new edition also includes the following features: new figures to better illustrate the problems discussed; improved explanations for the equation of state of a solid and for the cavity expansion process; new data concerning the Kolsky bar test; and a discussion of analytical modeling for the hole diameter in a thin metallic plate impacted by a shaped charge jet. The section on thick concrete targets penetrated by rigid projectiles has now been expanded to include the latest findings, and two new sections have been added: one on a novel approach to the perforation of thin concrete slabs, and one on testing the failure of thin metallic plates using a hydrodynamic ram.

  8. Development of simulation approach for two-dimensional chiral molecular self-assembly driven by hydrogen bond at the liquid/solid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yuan; Yao, Man; Hao, Ce; Wan, Lijun; Wang, Yunhe; Chen, Ting; Wang, Dong; Wang, Xudong; Chen, Yonggang

    2017-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) chiral self-assembly system of 5-(benzyloxy)-isophthalic acid derivative/(S)-(+)-2-octanol/highly oriented pyrolytic graphite was studied. A combined density functional theory/molecular mechanics/molecular dynamics (DFT/MM/MD) approach for system of 2D chiral molecular self-assembly driven by hydrogen bond at the liquid/solid interface was thus proposed. Structural models of the chiral assembly were built on the basis of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images and simplified for DFT geometry optimization. Merck Molecular Force Field (MMFF) was singled out as the suitable force field by comparing the optimized configurations of MM and DFT. MM and MD simulations for hexagonal unit model which better represented the 2D assemble network were then preformed with MMFF. The adhesion energy, evolution of self-assembly process and characteristic parameters of hydrogen bond were obtained and analyzed. According to the above simulation, the stabilities of the clockwise and counterclockwise enantiomorphous networks were evaluated. The calculational results were supported by STM observations and the feasibility of the simulation method was confirmed by two other systems in the presence of chiral co-absorbers (R)-(-)-2-octanol and achiral co-absorbers 1-octanol. This theoretical simulation method assesses the stability trend of 2D enantiomorphous assemblies with atomic scale and can be applied to the similar hydrogen bond driven 2D chirality of molecular self-assembly system.

  9. Selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene from crude C{sub 4} cracker stream with a solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer (SCILL). DSC and solubility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangartz, T.; Korth, W.; Kern, C.; Jess, A. [Bayreuth Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2013-11-01

    In petroleum as well as in fine chemical industry, selective catalytic hydrogenation is an important reaction. The selective hydrogenation of 1,3-butadiene (BD) to butene (trans-,1- and cis-butene) from the crude C4 steam cracker fraction represents one example, but under today's technical conditions undesired butane forms inevitably in relevant amounts. To increase the butene yield, the concept of Solid Catalyst with Ionic Liquid Layer (SCILL) was employed. The SCILL catalyst, in contrast to the uncoated catalyst, yielded a remarkably high selectivity to butenes (S{sub butenes} > 99 %) even at high residence times or at high hydrogen partial pressure. Nearly no butane (S{sub butane} {approx} 0 %) was analytically detected. We expected that due to different solubility, the poorer soluble compounds discharged from the ionic liquid and, thus, caused the shift in selectivity to a great extent. Temperature dependent solubility measurements in the used ionic liquid ([DMIM][DMP]) revealed that the order of increasing solubility is 1,3-butadiene > butenes > butane which matches the assumption. However, since differences in solubility cannot explain this SCILL effect satisfyingly, ionic liquids are expected to affect the surface of the catalyst (side-specific ligand-type effect). Investigations using spectroscopic methods (e.g. FTIR) confirmed this suggestion. (orig.)

  10. An All-Solid-State pH Sensor Employing Fluorine-Terminated Polycrystalline Boron-Doped Diamond as a pH-Insensitive Solution-Gate Field-Effect Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintani, Yukihiro; Kobayashi, Mikinori; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2017-05-05

    A fluorine-terminated polycrystalline boron-doped diamond surface is successfully employed as a pH-insensitive SGFET (solution-gate field-effect transistor) for an all-solid-state pH sensor. The fluorinated polycrystalline boron-doped diamond (BDD) channel possesses a pH-insensitivity of less than 3mV/pH compared with a pH-sensitive oxygenated channel. With differential FET (field-effect transistor) sensing, a sensitivity of 27 mv/pH was obtained in the pH range of 2-10; therefore, it demonstrated excellent performance for an all-solid-state pH sensor with a pH-sensitive oxygen-terminated polycrystalline BDD SGFET and a platinum quasi-reference electrode, respectively.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of a Sr0.95Y0.05TiO3-δ-based hydrogen electrode for reversible solid oxide cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ling, Yihan

    2015-01-01

    Reversible solid oxide cells (RSOCs) can generate electricity as solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) facing a shortage of electricity and can also store the electricity as solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC) at the time of excessive electricity. The composite Sr0.95Y0.05TiO3-δ-Sm0.2Ce0.8O1.9 (SYT-SDC) as the hydrogen electrode provides a promising alternative for a conventional Ni/YSZ. The possible charge compensation mechanism of SYT is described as Sr0.95Y0.05Ti0.95-2δ 4+Ti2δ+0.05 3+O3-δ. The Ti3+ is approximately 11.73% in the reduced SYT by XRD Rietveld refinement, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and thermogravimetry (TG) analysis. Voltage-current curves and impedance spectra are measured as a function of applied voltages to characterize the cells. The bulk resistance (Ro) and the electrode polarization resistance (Rp) at open circuit voltages (OCV) at 750 °C are 9.06 Ω cm2 and 10.57 Ω cm2, respectively. The Ro values have a small amount of changes with small slopes both in the SOFC (-0.29 Ω cm2 V-1) and SOEC mode (0.5 Ω cm2 V-1), whereas the Rp values decrease all the time with the increasing voltages at both the SOFC (-2.59 Ω cm2 V-1) and SOEC mode (-9.65 Ω cm2 V-1), indicating that the electrical conductivity and electro-catalytic property of the SYT-based hydrogen electrode can be improved under the SOEC mode. This journal is

  12. Hydrogen bonding versus van der Waals interactions: competitive influence of noncovalent interactions on 2D self-assembly at the liquid-solid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Kunal S; Lava, Kathleen; Binnemans, Koen; De Feyter, Steven

    2010-12-27

    The structures of the self-assembled monolayers of various 4-alkoxybenzoic acids physisorbed at the liquid-solid interface were established by employing scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM). This study has been essentially undertaken to explore the competitive influence of van der Waals and hydrogen-bonding interactions on the process of two-dimensional self-assembly. These acid derivatives form hydrogen-bonded dimers as expected; however, the dimers organise themselves in the form of relatively complex lamellae. The characteristic feature of these lamellae is the presence of regular discommensurations or kinks along the lamella propagation direction. The formation of kinked lamellae is discussed in light of the registry mechanism of the alkyl chains with the underlying graphite substrate. The location of the kinks along a lamella depends on the number (odd or even) of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain. This result indicates that concerted van der Waals interactions of the alkyl chain units introduce the odd/even chain-length effect on the surface-assembled supramolecular patterns. The odd/even effects are retained even upon complexation with a hydrogen-bond acceptor. However, as the solvent is changed from 1-phenyloctane to 1-octanoic acid, the kinked lamellae as well as the odd/even effects disappear. This solvent-induced convergence of supramolecular patterns is attained by means of co-crystallisation of octanoic acid molecules in the 2D crystal lattice, which is evident from high-resolution STM images. The solvent co-adsorption phenomenon is discussed in terms of competing van der Waals and hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  13. Resorcinol-templated head-to-head photodimerization of a thiophene in the solid state and unusual edge-to-face stacking in a discrete hydrogen-bonded assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Kristin M; Sumrak, Joseph C; MacGillivray, Leonard R

    2014-02-21

    A head-to-head photodimerization of a β-substituted thiophene stacked face-to-face in the solid state using a ditopic hydrogen-bond-donor template is reported. The face-to-face stacking is attributed to contributions of intertemplate forces, which contrasts an assembly wherein the same thiophenes stack edge-to-face yet maintain a discrete hydrogen-bonded structure.

  14. Photocatalytic degradation of H2S aqueous media using sulfide nanostructured solid-solution solar-energy-materials to produce hydrogen fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashgari, Mohsen; Ghanimati, Majid

    2017-11-06

    H2S is a corrosive, flammable and noxious gas, which can be neutralized by dissolving in alkaline media and employed as H2-source by utilizing inside semiconductor-assisted/photochemical reactors. Herein, through a facile hydrothermal route, a ternary nanostructured solid-solution of iron, zinc and sulfur was synthesized in the absence and presence of Ag-dopant, and applied as efficient photocatalyst of hydrogen fuel production from H2S media. The effect of pH on the photocatalyst performance was scrutinized and the maximum activity was attained at pH=11, where HS(-) concentration is high. BET, diffuse reflectance and photoluminescence studies indicated that the ternary solid-solution photocatalyst, in comparison to its solid-solvent (ZnS), has a greater surface area, stronger photon absorption and less charge recombination, which justify its superiority. Moreover, the effect of silver-dopant on the photocatalyst performance was examined. The investigations revealed that although silver could boost the absorption of photons and increase the surface area, it could not appreciably enhance the photocatalyst performance due to its weak influence on retarding the charge-recombination process. Finally, the phenomenon was discussed in detail from mechanistic viewpoint. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Reversible Poisoning of the Nickel/Zirconia Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Anodes by Hydrogen Chloride in Coal Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marina, Olga A.; Pederson, Larry R.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Coyle, Christopher A.; Yoon, Kyung J.

    2010-10-15

    The performance of anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) was evaluated in synthetic coal gas containing HCl in the temperature range 650 to 850oC. Exposure to up to 800 ppm HCl resulted in reversible poisoning of the Ni/zirconia anode by chlorine species adsorption, the magnitude of which decreased with increased temperature. Performance losses increased with the concentration of HCl to ~100 ppm, above which losses were insensitive to HCl concentration. Cell voltage had no effect on poisoning. No evidence was found for long-term degradation that can be attributed to HCl exposure. Similarly, no evidence of microstructural changes or formation of new solid phases as a result of HCl exposure was found. From thermodynamic calculations, solid nickel chloride phase formation was shown to be highly unlikely in coal gas. Further, the presence of HCl at even the highest anticipated concentrations in coal gas would minimally increase the volatility of nickel.

  16. Effect of particle size and microstructure on the hydrogen storage property in a V-Ti-Cr solid solution system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Hanjung; Yoo, Jeong-Hyun; Roh, Ki-Min; Suh, Chang-Yul; Kim, Won-Baek [Mineral Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, 124 Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Sung-Wook, E-mail: cho@kigam.re.kr [Mineral Resources Research Division, Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, 124 Gwahang-no, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-350 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer V-Ti-Cr nano-particles were prepared via the electric explosion of wire. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two kinds of particles with different size were formed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hydrogen storage capacity of nano-particles decreased due to increased surface area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Plateau pressure was higher in the particle with smaller lattice parameter. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hysteresis in P-C isotherm was larger in the particle with lower strain. - Abstract: Nano-particles of V-Ti and V-Ti-Cr alloys with a BCC (Body Centered Cubic) structure were prepared via the EEW (electric explosion of wire) method. However, due to the formation of chromium oxide (CrO{sub 0.87}) and/or vanadium oxide (V{sub 16}O{sub 3}) during the explosion, the exploded particles were deficient in Cr and V content, contrary to the anticipated composition, and micro-particles also formed in addition to the nano-particles. The hydrogen storage capacity of the exploded particles decreased compared to that of mechanically crushed particles from ingots, because the number of interstitial sites for hydrogen in the lattice was reduced due to the increased surface area and also because the BCC phase decreased as a result of the formation of oxide phases. As the lattice parameters of the alloys became small, the plateau pressure in the P-C isotherm increased because it was more difficult for hydrogen to diffuse through the lattice. It was also found that the strain induced by adding other elements in the V lattice reduced the hysteresis in the P-C isotherm.

  17. Unprecedented Multifunctionality of Grubbs and Hoveyda–Grubbs Catalysts: Competitive Isomerization, Hydrogenation, Silylation and Metathesis Occurring in Solution and on Solid Phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitena Martinez-Amezaga

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This contribution showcases the interplay of several non-metathetic reactions (isomerization, silylation and “hydrogen-free” reduction with metathesis in systems comprising a functionalized olefin and a soluble or resin-immobilized silane. These competing, one-pot reactions occur under activation by second-generation Ru-alkylidene catalysts. Different olefinic substrates were used to study the influence of the substitution pattern on the reaction outcome. Emphasis is placed upon the rarely reported yet important transformations implying a solid phase-supported silane reagent. Catalytic species involved in and reaction pathways accounting for these concurrent processes are evidenced. An unexpected result of this research was the clearly proved partial binding of the olefin to the resin, thereby removing it from the reacting ensemble.

  18. A straightforward method for Vacuum-Ultraviolet flux measurements: The case of the hydrogen discharge lamp and implications for solid-phase actinometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulvio, D., E-mail: daniele.fulvio@uni-jena.de, E-mail: dfu@oact.inaf.it; Brieva, A. C.; Jäger, C. [Laboratory Astrophysics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Institute of Solid State Physics, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Cuylle, S. H.; Linnartz, H. [Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Astrophysics, Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. box 9513, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Henning, T. [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-07-07

    Vacuum-Ultraviolet (VUV) radiation is responsible for the photo-processing of simple and complex molecules in several terrestrial and extraterrestrial environments. In the laboratory such radiation is commonly simulated by inexpensive and easy-to-use microwave-powered hydrogen discharge lamps. However, VUV flux measurements are not trivial and the methods/devices typically used for this purpose, mainly actinometry and calibrated VUV silicon photodiodes, are not very accurate or expensive and lack of general suitability to experimental setups. Here, we present a straightforward method for measuring the VUV photon flux based on the photoelectric effect and using a gold photodetector. This method is easily applicable to most experimental setups, bypasses the major problems of the other methods, and provides reliable flux measurements. As a case study, the method is applied to a microwave-powered hydrogen discharge lamp. In addition, the comparison of these flux measurements to those obtained by O{sub 2} actinometry experiments allow us to estimate the quantum yield (QY) values QY{sub 122} = 0.44 ± 0.16 and QY{sub 160} = 0.87 ± 0.30 for solid-phase O{sub 2} actinometry.

  19. Comparative analysis of the electroactive area of Pt/C PEMFC electrodes in liquid and solid polymer contact by underpotential hydrogen adsorption/desorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaparro, A.M.; Martin, A.J.; Folgado, M.A.; Gallardo, B. [Dep. de Energia, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Daza, L. [Dep. de Energia, CIEMAT, Avda. Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-06-15

    Because of the different experimental conditions found in literature for the measurement of the electroactive area of Pt/C electrodes of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) by means of underpotential hydrogen adsorption (H{sub UPD}) voltammetry, specially concerning sweep rate and temperature, it was found necessary to perform an analysis of these parameters. With this aim, the electroactive area of PEMFC electrodes has been measured by means of H{sub UPD} voltammetry at different sweep rates and temperatures, in liquid electrolyte and solid polymer contact. Both configurations show that H{sub UPD} adsorption and desorption charges are strongly dependent on sweep rate voltage and temperature. The most common behaviour observed is a maximum in H{sub UPD} desorption charge, typically in the 100-10 mV s{sup -1} sweep rate range, whereas H{sub UPD} adsorption charge shows continuous increase with decreasing sweep rate. The decrease of desorption charge at low sweep rates is attributed to adsorbing species related with carbon support reactivity. These processes are also responsible for the increase in desorption H{sub UPD} charge at low sweep rate. At high sweep rate, both adsorption and desorption H{sub UPD} charges decrease due to limiting diffusion of protons through the microporous electrode. As a consequence, it is found that the closest approximation to the real electroactive area (i.e. the area accessible to protons) corresponds to the maximum in the H{sub UPD} desorption charge in the range of 10-100 mV s{sup -1} sweep rate. The influence of measuring temperature is also tested in the range 25 C-80 C. A dependence of the adsorption and desorption hydrogen charges is found, due to thermodynamic and kinetics factors. We observe that the processes competing with hydrogen adsorption, i.e. generation and adsorption of carbon species are enhanced with temperature, so a low measuring temperature is found as most appropriate. (author)

  20. Mechanism of soft x-ray continuum radiation from low-energy pinch discharges of hydrogen and ultra-low field ignition of solid fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, R.; Lotoski, J.; Lu, Y.

    2017-09-01

    EUV continuum radiation (10-30 nm) arising only from very low energy pulsed pinch gas discharges comprising some hydrogen was first observed at BlackLight Power, Inc. and reproduced at the Harvard Center for Astrophysics (CfA). The source was determined to be due to the transition of H to the lower-energy hydrogen or hydrino state H(1/4) whose emission matches that observed wherein alternative sources were eliminated. The identity of the catalyst that accepts 3 · 27.2 eV from the H to cause the H to H(1/4) transition was determined to HOH versus 3H. The mechanism was elucidated using different oxide-coated electrodes that were selective in forming HOH versus plasma forming metal atoms as well as from the intensity profile that was a mismatch for the multi-body reaction required during 3H catalysis. The HOH catalyst was further shown to give EUV radiation of the same nature by igniting a solid fuel comprising a source of H and HOH catalyst by passing a low voltage, high current through the fuel to produce explosive plasma. No chemical reaction can release such high-energy light. No high field existed to form highly ionized ions that could give radiation in this EUV region that persisted even without power input. This plasma source serves as strong evidence for the existence of the transition of H to hydrino H(1/4) by HOH as the catalyst and a corresponding new power source wherein initial extraordinarily brilliant light-emitting prototypes are already producing photovoltaic generated electrical power. The hydrino product of a catalyst reaction of atomic hydrogen was analyzed by multiple spectroscopic techniques. Moreover, the mH catalyst was identified to be active in astronomical sources such as the Sun, stars and interstellar medium wherein the characteristics of hydrino match those of the dark matter of the Universe.

  1. Reversible poisoning of nickel/zirconia solid oxide fuel cell anodes by hydrogen chloride in coal gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marina, O.A.; Thomsen, E.C.; Coyle, C.A.; Yoon, K.J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Pederson, L.R. [North Dakota State University, Fargo, ND (United States)

    2010-10-15

    The performance of anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) was evaluated in synthetic coal gas containing HCl in the temperature range 650-850 C. Exposure to up to 800 ppm HCl resulted in reversible poisoning of the Ni/zirconia anode by chlorine species adsorption, the magnitude of which decreased with increased temperature. Performance losses increased with the concentration of HCl to {proportional_to}100 ppm, above which losses were insensitive to HCl concentration. Neither cell potential, nor current density had any effect on the extent of poisoning. No evidence was found for long-term degradation that can be attributed to HCl exposure. Similarly, no evidence of microstructural changes or formation of new solid phases as a result of HCl exposure was found. From thermodynamic calculations, solid nickel chloride phase formation was shown to be highly unlikely in coal gas containing HCl. The presence of HCl at even the highest anticipated concentrations in coal gas would minimally increase the volatility of nickel. (author)

  2. Key factors affecting on bio-hydrogen production from co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste and kitchen wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Ahmed; El-Qelish, Mohamed

    2014-09-01

    The effects of sludge residence time (SRT) and dilution ratio (DR) on the continuous H2 production (HP) from co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) and kitchen wastewater (KWW) via mesophilic anaerobic baffled reactor (ABR) was investigated. Increasing DR from 1:2 to 1:3 significantly (P<0.1) increased the H2 yield (HY) from 116.5±76 to 142.5±54 ml H2/g CODremoved d, respectively. However, at a DR of 1:4, the HY was dropped to 114.5±65 ml H2/g CODremoved d. Likewise, HY increased from 83±37 to 95±24 ml H2/g CODremoved d, when SRT increased from 3.6 to 4.0 d. Further increase in HY of 148±42 ml H2/g CODremoved d, was occurred at a SRT of 5.6d. Moreover, hydrogen fermentation facilitated carbohydrate, lipids, protein and volatile solids removal efficiencies of 87±5.8%, 74.3±9.12%, 76.4±11.3% and 84.8±4.1%, respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of pH and hydraulic retention time on hydrogen production versus methanogenesis during anaerobic fermentation of organic household solid waste under extreme-thermophilic temperature (70ºC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dawei; Zeng, Raymond Jianxiong; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Two continuously stirred tank reactors were operated with household solid waste at 70°C, for hydrogen and methane production. The individual effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT as 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 days) at pH 7 or pH (5, 5.5, 6, 6.5, 7) at 3-day HRT was investigated on the hydrogen production...... versus methanogenesis. It was found that at pH 7, the maximum hydrogen yield was 107 mL-H2/g VSadded (volatile solid added) but no stable hydrogen production was obtained as after some time methanogenesis was initiated at all tested HRTs. This demonstrated that sludge retention time alone was not enough...... for washing out the methanogens at pH 7 under extreme-thermophilic conditions. Oppositely, we showed that keeping the pH level at 5.5 was enough to inhibit methane and produce hydrogen stably at 3-day HRT. However, the maximum stable hydrogen yield was low at 21 mL-H2/g VSadded. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2008...

  4. Determination of a partial electronic conduction parameter of solid electrolytes for an oxygen sensor by using AC two terminals method. Koryu 2 tanshi ho ni yoru sanso sensor yo kotai denkaishitsu no denshi dendo sei parameter no sokutei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasabe, M. (Chiba Inst. of Tech., Chiba (Japan)); Miyashita, M. (Toshiba Tungalloy Co. Ltd., Kawasaki (Japan)); Hua, J.Z. (Harbin Inst. of Tech., Harbin (China)); Senoo, H. (Osaka Sanso Kogyo Ltd., Osaka (Japan))

    1991-06-01

    An oxygen sensor with a built-in oxygen concentration cell using solid zirconia electrolyte can measure oxygen activity by immersing it in molten steel for ten and some seconds. For measuring oxygen in molten steel, the value of partial electronic conduction parameter of solid electrolyte is important. So far the swinkels method using the polarization electromotive force has been used for measurement, but it has several problematical points. In this research, in order to solve them, a new measuring method of electroconductive parameters of solid electrolyte by the AC two terminal method was designed and measurement was done on various zirconia based solid electrolytes. It was clarified that this method has the following features: The measured values by this method agree with those by the swinkels method which had so far been the sole measuring method. The sufficient size of the electrolyte for the measurement is 2mm in diameter and 10mm in length or more, and in comparison with the swinkels method, a fairly small specimen can be meamsured. There is no restriction on the shape of electrolyte and this method does not dirty solid electrolyte. Its measuring time is shorter than the swinkels method. 17 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Experimental study of an oxygen-hydrogen diffusion flame laden with solid alumina particles; Etude experimentale d'une flamme de diffusion oxygene-hydrogene ensemencee en particules solides d'alumine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labor, S.

    2003-07-15

    Monocrystalline sapphire microspheres are generated through the melting of alumina (AL{sub 2}O{sub 3}) particles in a flame. The alumina particles are injected in a very peculiar O{sub 2}/H{sub 2} confined diffusion flame as it is a downwards vertical flame having fuel in periphery of a central powdered oxygen jet. Quantitative measurements were carried out (ADL, PIV) and supplemented by a numerical study (N3S-Natur). (1) The laminar behavior of the isothermal conditions is kept through reactive flow. Therefore, particles will mainly collide due to speed gradients. (2) It has been shown that an axial particle will have a transit time int the high temperature zone very different to that of an off-line one. (3) The PIV date proved that the particle density was not homogeneous. (4) The hydrogen jet hardly influences the flame aerodynamic structure. Conversely, the central oxygen jet is at premium due to its effect on both the flame speed and temperature distribution. (author)

  6. Effect of off-cut angle of hydrogen-terminated diamond(111) substrate on the quality of AlN towards high-density AlN/diamond(111) interface hole channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imura, Masataka; Banal, Ryan G.; Liao, Meiyong; Liu, Jiangwei; Aizawa, Takashi; Tanaka, Akihiro; Iwai, Hideo; Mano, Takaaki; Koide, Yasuo

    2017-01-01

    Single-crystal AlN/diamond heterojunction with high-density interface hole channel is successfully obtained by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. The AlN layer is epitaxially grown on hydrogen-terminated (H-)diamond(111) substrate. The thermal treatment of diamond substrate just before AlN growth under hydrogen and ammonia mixture environment at 1250 °C leads to surface sheet hole density as high as ˜1.0 × 1014 cm-2 without structural reconstruction of diamond surface. In addition, the use of smaller off-cut angle (0.20 ± 0.25°) H-diamond(111) substrate combined with this treatment enables to obtain single-crystal epitaxial AlN layer, which simultaneously acts as passivation of the surface hole channel with such a high density. The AlN/H-diamond(111) heterojunction reveals type-II staggered energy band configuration with valence band offset of ˜2.0 eV, which is suitable for the fabrication of p-channel field-effect transistor using AlN-gate-insulator/diamond heterojunction. These results are promising for the development of AlN/diamond hybrid power electronic devices.

  7. Mononuclear and terminal zirconium and hafnium methylidenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamitani, Masahiro; Pinter, Balazs; Chen, Chun-Hsing; Pink, Maren; Mindiola, Daniel J

    2014-10-06

    The dimethyl aryloxide complexes [(PNP)M(CH3)2(OAr)] (M=Zr or Hf; PNP(-)=N[2-P(CHMe2)2-4-methylphenyl]2); Ar=2,6-iPr2C6H3), which were readily prepared from [(PNP)M(CH3)3] by alcoholysis with HOAr, undergo photolytically induced α-hydrogen abstraction to cleanly produce complexes [(PNP)M=CH2(OAr)] with terminal methylidene ligands. These unique systems have been fully characterized, including the determination of a solid-state structure in the case of M=Zr. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Evaluation of biodegradable plastics as solid hydrogen donors for the reductive dechlorination of fthalide by Dehalobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Naoko; Ye, Lizhen; Liu, Fengmao; Li, Zhiling; Katayama, Arata

    2013-02-01

    Biodegradable plastics (BPs) were evaluated for their applicability as sustainable and solid H(2) donors for microbial reductive dechlorination of 4,5,6,7-tetrachlorophthalide (fthalide). After a screening test of several BPs, the starch-based plastic (SP) that produced the highest levels of H(2) was selected for its use as the sole H(2) donor in this reaction. Fthalide dechlorination was successfully accomplished by combining an H(2)-producing SP culture and a KFL culture containing Dehalobacter species, supplemented with 0.13% and 0.5% SP, respectively. The efficiency of H(2) use in dechlorination was evaluated in a combined culture containing the KFL culture and strain Clostridium sp. Ma13, a new isolate that produces H(2) from SP. Results obtained with this culture indicated increased H(2)-fraction for fthalide dechlorination much more in this culture than in compared with a KFL culture supplemented with 20mM lactate, which are 0.75 H(2)·glucose(-1) and 0.015 H(2)·lactate(-1) in mol ratio, respectively. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Hydrogen analysis in solid samples by utilizing He metastable atoms induced by TEA CO{sub 2} laser plasma in He gas at 1 atm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramli, Muliadi [Program of Nuclear Power and Energy Safety Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Idris, Nasrullah [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Syiah Kuala University, Darussalam, Banda Aceh, Aceh 23111 (Indonesia); Fukumoto, Kenichi; Niki, Hideaki [Program of Nuclear Power and Energy Safety Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Sakan, Fujio [Department of Material Science, Faculty of Engineering, University of Fukui, Fukui 910-8507 (Japan); Maruyama, Tadashi [Integrated Research Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuda-cho, Midori-ku Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Kurniawan, Koo Hendrik; Lie, Tjung Jie [Research Center of Maju Makmur Mandiri Foundation, 40 Srengseng Raya, Kembangan, Jakarta Barat 11630 (Indonesia); Kagawa, Kiichiro [Department of Physics, Faculty of Education and Regional Studies, University of Fukui (Japan)], E-mail: kagawa@edu00.f-edu.fukui-u.ac.jp

    2007-12-15

    A TEA CO{sub 2} laser (350 mJ-1.5 J, 10.6 {mu}m, 200 ns, 10 Hz) was focused onto a metal sub-target under He as host gas at 1 atmospheric pressure with a small amount of impurity gas, such as water and ethanol vapors. It was found that the TEA CO{sub 2} laser with the help of the metal sub-target is favorable for generating a strong, large volume helium gas breakdown plasma at 1 atmospheric pressure, in which the helium metastable-excited state was then produced overwhelmingly. While the metal sub-target itself was never ablated. The helium metastable-excited state produced after the strong helium gas breakdown plasma was considered to play an important role in exciting the atoms. This was confirmed by the specific characteristics of the detected H{alpha} emission, namely the strong intensity with low background, narrow spectral width, and the long lifetime. This technique can be used for gas and solid samples analysis. For nonmetal solid analysis, a metal mesh was introduced in front of the nonmetal sample surface to help initiation of the helium gas breakdown plasma. For metal sample, analysis can be carried out by combining the TEA CO{sub 2} laser and an Nd-YAG laser where the Nd-YAG laser is used to ablate the metal sample. The ablated atoms from the metal sample are then sent into the region of helium gas breakdown plasma induced by the TEA CO{sub 2} laser to be excited through the helium metastable-excited state. This technique can be extended to the analysis of other elements, not limited only to hydrogen, such as halogens.

  10. Synthesis of high-purity Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6} powder by solid state reaction under hydrogen atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin-mura, Kiyoto; Otani, Yu; Ogawa, Seiya [Course of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Niwa, Eiki; Hashimoto, Takuya [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, 3-8-1 Sakurajousui, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan); Hoshino, Tsuyoshi [Breeding Functional Materials Development Group, Department of Blanket Systems Research, Rokkasho Fusion Institute, Sector of Fusion Research and Development, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-166 Obuchi, Omotedate, Rokkasho-mura, Kamikita-gun, Aomori 039-3212 (Japan); Sasaki, Kazuya, E-mail: k_sasaki@tokai-u.ac.jp [Course of Mechanical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan); Department of Prime Mover Engineering, School of Engineering, Tokai University, 4-1-1 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka, Kanagawa 259-1292 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • A fine pure Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6} powder was synthesized by using Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} via a solid state reaction. • Influences on the purity of product powder, lattice defect, and crystal orientation were revealed. • The suitable synthesis conditions of the fine and high purity Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6} powder were found. • The reaction process of the synthesis of Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6} was estimated. - Abstract: Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6} contains a large amount of Li and has a significant potential as a tritium breeder. However, few syntheses of fine-grain, high-purity Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6} powder have been reported. In this study, a high-purity powder of Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6} was synthesized by solid state reaction under hydrogen atmosphere combined with an effective lithium source and a suitable initial Li:Zr molar ratio. Mixed powders of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2} were fired at around 630 °C in H{sub 2} for several hours and several firing cycles. The low firing temperature inhibited the vaporization of Li during the heating, so that excessive amounts of Li were not needed for the synthesis, and the Li:Zr ratio in the starting material was 10:1 (mol:mol). In this synthesis, Li{sub 2}O was generated via the decomposition of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} during firing in H{sub 2}, and reacted with ZrO{sub 2} to form Li{sub 6}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, which reacted with itself to form Li{sub 8}ZrO{sub 6}.

  11. Dry anaerobic co-digestion of organic fraction of municipal waste with paperboard mill sludge and gelatin solid waste for enhancement of hydrogen production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsamadony, M; Tawfik, A

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the bio-H2 production via dry anaerobic co-fermentation of organic fraction of municipal solid waste (OFMSW) with protein and calcium-rich substrates such as gelatin solid waste (GSW) and paperboard mill sludge (PMS). Co-fermentation of OFMSW/GSW/PMS significantly enhanced the H2 production (HP) and H2 yield (HY). The maximum HP of 1082.5±91.4 mL and HY of 144.9±9.8 mL/gVSremoved were achieved at a volumetric ratio of 70% OFMSW:20% GSW:10% PMS. COD, carbohydrate, protein and lipids conversion efficiencies were 60.9±4.4%, 71.4±3.5%, 22.6±2.3% and 20.5±1.8% respectively. Co-fermentation process reduced the particle size distribution which is favorably utilized by hydrogen producing bacteria. The mean particle size diameters for feedstock and the digestate were 939.3 and 115.2μm, respectively with reduction value of 8.15-fold in the mixtures. The volumetric H2 production increased from 4.5±0.3 to 7.2±0.6 L(H2)/L(substrate) at increasing Ca(+2) concentrations from 1.8±0.1 to 6.3±0.5 g/L respectively. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Firing Tests of Thrust Controllable Solid Rocket Motors Part 1:300-mm-Diameter End-Burning Grain Motors

    OpenAIRE

    GODAI, Tomifumi; SHIMIZU, Morio; Ito, Katsuya; Tanemura, Toshiharu; Fujiwara, Tsutomu; KUSAKA, Kazuo; Kisara, Katsuto; Sato, Masahiro; Takahashi, Mamoru; Izumikawa, Muneo; 五代, 富文; 清水, 盛生; 伊藤, 克弥; 種村, 利春; 藤原, 勉

    1980-01-01

    300-mm-diameter thrust controllable solid rocket motors were successfully fired under atmospheric conditions. Thrust magnitude control was attained by changing the flow rate of the hydrogen peroxide decomposition gas injected into the solid rocket motor. Incomplete combustion termination that occurred earlier than expected was due to the excessive heat flux irradiated from the hot surfaces of the ablative insulation liner towards the extinguished propellant surface. More effective liner mater...

  13. Hydrogen bond replacement--unearthing a novel molecular mechanism of surface solid dispersion for enhanced solubility of a drug for veterinary use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Deshvir; Pathak, Kamla

    2013-01-30

    The project was aimed to enhance the solubility of ivermectin using surface solid dispersion (SSD), elucidate the mechanism of drug release and to develop its tablet that can draw rapid clinical effects on dogs for controlling Ascaris parasites. Superdisintegrants and adsorbents were used to formulate SSDs by co-evaporation method. Formulation 9th that constituted from drug:aerosil (1:10) was selected after solubility and in vitro dissolution evaluation, and characterized by DSC, XRPD, DRS and SEM analysis. In vitro evaluation and in vivo efficacy of its tablet on dogs (fecal egg and tick counting studies) were compared with marketed tablets. This formulation enhanced the solubility of ivermectin to 456.25±1.70% and released 93.55±0.47% in 60 min. DRS spectral analysis unearthed a novel molecular mechanism of hydrogen bond replacement that drifts the drug into the medium from the surface of the SSD particles. Reduced crystallinity was confirmed by XRPD and supported by SEM. During in vitro and in vivo studies, the formulated tablet showed superiority over marketed tablet with higher parasite inhibition (p<0.001). Thus SSD is a promising technique for enhancing IVM solubility at molecular level enabling its rapid oral delivery to control endo- as well as ectoparasites for veterinary purpose. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sulfate and organic matter concentration in relation to hydrogen sulfide generation at inert solid waste landfill site - Limit value for gypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    In order to suggest a limit value for gypsum (CaSO4) for the suppression of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) generation at an inert solid waste landfill site, the relationship between raw material (SO4 and organic matter) for H2S generation and generated H2S concentration, and the balance of raw material (SO4) and product (H2S) considering generation and outflow were investigated. SO4 concentration should be less than approximately 100mg-SO4/L in order to suppress H2S generation to below 2000ppm. Total organic carbon (TOC) concentration should be less than approximately 200mg-C/L assuming a high SO4 concentration. The limit value for SO4 in the ground is 60mg-SO4/kg with 0.011wt% as gypsum dihydrate, i.e., approximately 1/10 of the limit value in inert waste as defined by the EU Council Decision (560mg-SO4/kg-waste). The limit value for SO4 in inert waste as defined by the EU Council Decision is high and TOC is strictly excluded. The cumulative amount of SO4 outflow through the liquid phase is much larger than that through the gas phase. SO4 concentration in pore water decreases with time, reaching half the initial concentration around day 100. SO4 reduction by rainfall can be expected in the long term. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pathways to Metallic Hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Silvera, Isaac F.; Deemyad, Shanti

    2008-01-01

    The traditional pathway that researchers have used in the goal of producing atomic metallic hydrogen is to compress samples with megabar pressures at low temperature. A number of phases have been observed in solid hydrogen and its isotopes, but all are in the insulating phase. The results of experiment and theory for this pathway are reviewed. In recent years a new pathway has become the focus of this challenge of producing metallic hydrogen, namely a path along the melting line. It has bee...

  16. Magnetic levitation of condensed hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, C. G.; Seidel, G. M.

    1991-01-01

    Liquid and solid molecular hydrogen has been levitated using a pair of small superconducting solenoids. The hydrogen samples, up to 3 mm in dimension, were trapped in a magnetic potential having either a discrete minimum or a minimum in the form of a ring 1 cm in diameter. The hydrogen could be moved about in the magnetic trap by applying an electric field.

  17. (15)N and (1)H Solid-State NMR Investigation of a Canonical Low-Barrier Hydrogen-Bond Compound: 1,8-Bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Paul B; Hong, Mei

    2015-09-03

    Strong or low-barrier hydrogen bonds have often been proposed in proteins to explain enzyme catalysis and proton-transfer reactions. So far (1)H chemical shifts and scalar couplings have been used as the main NMR spectroscopic signatures for strong H-bonds. In this work, we report simultaneous measurements of (15)N and (1)H chemical shifts and N-H bond lengths by solid-state NMR in (15)N-labeled 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (DMAN), which contains a well-known strong NHN H-bond. We complexed DMAN with three different counteranions to examine the effects of the chemical environment on the H-bond lengths and chemical shifts. All three DMAN compounds exhibit significantly elongated N-H distances compared to the covalent bond length, and the (1)H(N) chemical shifts are larger than ∼17 ppm, consistent with strong NHN H-bonds in the DMAN cation. However, the (15)N and (1)H chemical shifts and the precise N-H distances differ among the three compounds, and the (15)N chemical shifts show opposite dependences on the proton localization from the general trend in organic compounds, indicating the significant effects of the counteranions on the electronic structure of the H-bond. These data provide useful NMR benchmarks for strong H-bonds and caution against the sole reliance on chemical shifts for identifying strong H-bonds in proteins since neighboring side chains can exert influences on chemical shifts similar to those of the bulky organic anions in DMAN. Instead, N-H bond lengths should be measured, in conjunction with chemical shifts, as a more fundamental parameter of H-bond strength.

  18. Electron-Stimulated Production of Molecular Oxygen in Amorphous Solid Water on Pt(111): Precursor Transport Through the Hydrogen Bonding Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrik, Nikolay G.; Kavetski, Alexandre G.; Kimmel, Greg A.

    2006-09-28

    The low-energy, electron-stimulated production of molecular oxygen from thin amorphous solid water (ASW) films adsorbed on Pt(111) is investigated. For ASW coverages less than {approx}60 monolayers (ML), the O2 ESD yield depends on coverage in a manner that is very similar to the H2 ESD yield. In particular, both the O2 and H2 ESD yields have a pronounced maximum at {approx}20 ML due to reactions at the Pt/water interface. The O2 yield is dose-dependent and several precursors (OH, H2O2 and HO2) are involved in the O2 production. Layered films of H216O and H218O are used to profile the spatial distribution of the electron-stimulated reactions leading to oxygen within the water films. Independent of the ASW film thickness, the final reactions leading to O2 occur at or near the ASW/vacuum interface. However for ASW coverages less than {approx}40 ML, the results indicate that dissociation of water molecules at the ASW/Pt interface contributes to the O2 production at the ASW/vacuum interface presumably via the generation of OH radicals near the Pt substrate. The OH (or possibly OH-) segregates to the vacuum interface where it contributes to the reactions at that interface. The electron-stimulated migration of precursors to the vacuum interface occurs via transport through the hydrogen bond network of the ASW without motion of the oxygen atoms. A simple kinetic model of the non-thermal reactions leading to O2, which was previously used to account for reactions in thick ASW films, is modified to account for the electron-stimulated migration of precursors.

  19. Chlorine-35/37 NMR spectroscopy of solid amino acid hydrochlorides: refinement of hydrogen-bonded proton positions using experiment and theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryce, David L; Sward, Gregory D

    2006-12-28

    Trends in the chlorine chemical shift (CS) tensors of amino acid hydrochlorides are investigated in the context of new data obtained at 21.1 T and extensive quantum chemical calculations. The analysis of chlorine-35/37 NMR spectra of solid L-tryptophan hydrochloride obtained at two magnetic field strengths yields the chlorine electric field gradient (EFG) and CS tensors, and their relative orientations. The chlorine CS tensor is also determined for the first time for DL-arginine hydrochloride monohydrate. The drastic influence of 1H decoupling at 21.1 T on the spectral features of salts with particularly small 35Cl quadrupolar coupling constants (CQ) is demonstrated. The chlorine CS tensor spans (Omega) of hydrochloride salts of hydrophobic amino acids are found to be larger than those for salts of hydrophilic amino acids. A new combined experimental-theoretical procedure is described in which quantum chemical geometry optimizations of hydrogen-bonded proton positions around the chloride ions in a series of amino acid hydrochlorides are cross-validated against the experimental chlorine EFG and CS tensor data. The conclusion is reached that the relatively computationally inexpensive B3LYP/3-21G* method provides proton positions which are suitable for subsequent higher-level calculations of the chlorine EFG tensors. The computed value of is less sensitive to the proton positions. Following this cross-validation procedure, /CQ(35Cl)/ is generally predicted within 15% of the experimental value for a range of HCl salts. The results suggest the applicability of chlorine NMR interaction tensors in the refinement of proton positions in structurally similar compounds, e.g., chloride ion channels, for which neutron diffraction data are unavailable.

  20. Terminating supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levendosky, Alytia A; Hopwood, Christopher J

    2017-03-01

    The focus of this paper is on the termination of clinical supervision. Although clinical supervision is considered the backbone of most mental health training programs, it gets relatively little theoretical or empirical attention. The termination of supervision has received even less attention. In this paper, we describe an approach to terminating supervision in our treatment team, which integrates intensive assessment with a relational perspective in a clinical science training program (Levendosky & Hopwood, 2016). We describe our established conceptual framework, review empirical evidence, and provide verbatim examples from final supervision meetings on our team to elaborate the importance of conceptualizing individual differences across trainees and parallels between supervision and psychotherapy dynamics. We conclude by emphasizing the need for research on supervision in general and supervision termination in particular. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Flight Termination Systems Commonality Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    EFI exploding foil initiator EFTR enhanced flight termination receiver EFTS enhanced flight termination system ELS equivalent level of safety EMC ...account shielding effectiveness of the vehicle. 3.3.13 Other Environments An FTS component shall satisfy all of its performance requirements and not...solid-state power transfer switches, and arm-and-enable circuits. 3.9.6 Circuit Isolation, Shielding , and Grounding The circuitry of an FTS

  2. Functionalization of hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene with ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... hydroxyl value and microstructure of the parent HTPB. The formation of hydrogen bonding between the terminal hydroxyl groups and the nitrogen atoms of triazine moiety is the driving force for the terminal attachment chemistry. The functionalized HTPB (HTPB–CBDT) shows a strong fluorescence emission at 385 nm.

  3. Correlation between hydrogen production rate, current, and electrode overpotential in a solid oxide electrolysis cell with La0.6Sr0.4FeO3-δ thin-film cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walch, Gregor; Opitz, Alexander Karl; Kogler, Sandra; Fleig, Jürgen

    A solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) with a model-type La0.6Sr0.4FeO3-δ thin-film cathode (working electrode) on an yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte and a porous La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ counterelectrode was operated in wet argon gas at the cathode. The hydrogen formation rate in the cathode compartment was quantified by mass spectrometry. Determination of the current as well as outlet gas composition revealed the electrochemical reduction of some residual oxygen in the cathodic compartment. Quantitative correlation between gas composition changes and current flow was possible. At 640 °C a water-to-hydrogen conversion rate of ca. 4 % was found at -1.5 V versus a reversible counterelectrode in 1 % oxygen. Onset of hydrogen formation could already be detected at voltages as low as -0.3 V. This reflects a fundamental difference between steam electrolysis and electrolysis of liquid water: substantial hydrogen production in a SOEC is already possible at pressures much below ambient. This causes difficulties in determining the cathodic overpotential of such a cell.

  4. The role of nano-Ni catalyst in MgH2 obtained by reactive mechanical milling method for solid hydrogen storage application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalil, Zulkarnain; Rahwanto, Adi; Handoko, Erfan; Mustanir

    2017-03-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is regarded as one of the candidate material for absorbing hydrogen, because theoretically, has the ability to absorb hydrogen in the large quantities (7.6 wt%). However, Mg has shortage, namely its kinetic reaction is very slow, it takes time to absorb hydrogen at least 60 minutes with very high operating temperatures (300-400°C). The aim of this study is to improve the hydrogen desorption temperature of Mg-based hydrogen storage material. In this work, we used nano-nickel (Ni) as catalyst in MgH2 and obtained by reactive mechanical milling method. The duration of milling was done in 2 hours (soft milling) with the 2 mol% Ni catalyst and milled under hydrogen atmosphere (10 bar). As the results, small amount of 2 mol% Ni in nanometer scale acts as a suitable catalyst for improvement the kinetics of MgH2 which could absorp 5.5 wt% of hydrogen within 10 minutes at 300°C. It is obvious that small amount has much better as catalyst in nanoparticle size and at the same time allowed to reduce the milling process in short time.

  5. Synthetic nanocomposite MgH2/5 wt. % TiMn2 powders for solid-hydrogen storage tank integrated with PEM fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Eskandarany, M Sherif; Shaban, Ehab; Aldakheel, Fahad; Alkandary, Abdullah; Behbehani, Montaha; Al-Saidi, M

    2017-10-16

    Storing hydrogen gas into cylinders under high pressure of 350 bar is not safe and still needs many intensive studies dedic ated for tank's manufacturing. Liquid hydrogen faces also severe practical difficulties due to its very low density, leading to larger fuel tanks three times larger than traditional gasoline tank. Moreover, converting hydrogen gas into liquid phase is not an economic process since it consumes high energy needed to cool down the gas temperature to -252.8 °C. One practical solution is storing hydrogen gas in metal lattice such as Mg powder and its nanocomposites in the form of MgH2. There are two major issues should be solved first. One related to MgH2 in which its inherent poor hydrogenation/dehydrogenation kinetics and high thermal stability must be improved. Secondly, related to providing a safe tank. Here we have succeeded to prepare a new binary system of MgH2/5 wt. % TiMn2 nanocomposite powder that show excellent hydrogenation/dehydrogenation behavior at relatively low temperature (250 °C) with long cycle-life-time (1400 h). Moreover, a simple hydrogen storage tank filled with our synthetic nanocomposite powders was designed and tested in electrical charging a battery of a cell phone device at 180 °C through a commercial fuel cell.

  6. Study of some characteristic Mediterranean vegetation species best suited for renaturalization of terminal-phase municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills in Puglia (Southern Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Mei, Massimiliano; Di Mauro, Mariaida

    2006-07-01

    Natural recovery of worked-out or closed municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills is a current topic, but knowledge about the adaptability of Mediterranean vegetation species to such stressful conditions is still quite poor. Autochthonous plants were selected to withstand the stresses such as hot climate and drought typical of Mediterranean areas; this characteristic potentially allows the plants an easier, efficient adaptation. Our aim was to provide information in order to obtain an adequate quality of environmental renewal of a landfill and a reduced management cost while ensuring rehabilitation to an acceptable naturalistic state. The investigation lasted 3 years; some Mediterranean scrub native plant species were selected and monitored in their morphological (total and relative height, basal diameter, number of inter-nodes) and physiological (photosynthetic rate and water potential) activity. In order to test dependence on CO 2 concentration, different meteorological parameters were also monitored. Ceratonia siliqua, Phillyrea latifolia, Olea europaea and Quercus ilex showed considerable adaptability, reacting positively to every improvement in environmental conditions, particularly those of a meteorological nature. Survival and growth was satisfactory in Hedysarum coronarium, Medicago sativa, Lotus corniculatus, Rosmarinus officinalis, Myrtus communis and Viburnum tinus. Fraxinus ornus and Acer campestre suffered stress during the summer dry period and recovered quickly when atmospheric conditions improved. A drop irrigation system to ensure a satisfactory soil moisture during summer dry periods was the fundamental element for survival.

  7. Metastable ultracondensed hydrogenous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellis, W. J.

    2017-12-01

    The primary purpose of this paper is to stimulate theoretical predictions of how to retain metastably hydrogenous materials made at high pressure P on release to ambient. Ultracondensed metallic hydrogen has been made at high pressures in the fluid and reported made probably in the solid. Because the long quest for metallic hydrogen is likely to be concluded in the relatively near future, a logical question is whether another research direction, comparable in scale to the quest for metallic H, will arise in high pressure research. One possibility is retention of metastable solid metallic hydrogen and other hydrogenous materials on release of dynamic and static high pressures P to ambient. If hydrogenous materials could be retained metastably on release, those materials would be a new class of materials for scientific investigations and technological applications. This paper is a review of the current situation with the synthesis of metallic hydrogen, potential technological applications of metastable metallic H and other hydrogenous materials at ambient, and general background of published experimental and theoretical work on what has been accomplished with metastable phases in the past and thus what might be accomplished in the future.

  8. Constructor Graphs as Useful Tools for the Classification of Hydrogen Bonded Solids: The Case Study of the Cationic (Dimethylphosphorylmethanaminium (dpmaH+ Tecton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido J. Reiss

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The structural chemistry of a series of dpmaH (dpmaH = (dimethylphosphorylmethanaminium salts has been investigated using constructor graph representations to visualize structural dependencies, covering the majority of known dpmaH salts. It is shown that the structurally related α-aminomethylphosphinic acid can be integrated in the systematology of the dpmaH salts. Those dpmaH salts with counter anions that are weak hydrogen bond acceptors (ClO4−, SnCl62−, IrCl62−,I− tend to form head-to-tail hydrogen bonded moieties purely consisting of dpmaH+ cations as the primarily structural motif. In structures with weak to very weak hydrogen bonds between the dpmaH+ cations and the counter anions, the anions fill the gaps in the structures. In salts with medium to strong hydrogen bond acceptor counter ions (Cl−, NO3−, PdCl42−, the predominant structural motif is a double head-to-tail hydrogen bonded (dpmaH+2 dimer. These dimeric units form further NH···X hydrogen bonds to neighboring counter anions X, which results in one-dimensional and two-dimensional architectures.

  9. Terminal Ballistics

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Zvi

    2012-01-01

    This book covers the important issues of terminal ballistics in a comprehensive way combining experimental data, numerical simulations and analytical modeling. The first chapter reviews the experimental equipment which are used for ballistic tests and the diagnostics for material characterization under impulsive loading conditions. The second chapter covers essential features of the codes which are used for terminal ballistics such as the Euler vs. Lagrange schemes and meshing techniques, as well as the most popular material models. The third chapter, devoted to the penetration mechanics of rigid penetrators, brings the update of modeling in this field. The fourth chapter deals with plate perforation and the fifth chapter deals with the penetration mechanics of shaped charge jets and eroding long rods. The last two chapters discuss several techniques for the disruption and defeating of the main threats in armor design. Throughout the book the authors demonstrate the advantages of numerical simulations in unde...

  10. Probing the global potential energy minimum of (CH2O)2: THz absorption spectrum of (CH2O)2 in solid neon and para-hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, J; Voute, A; Mihrin, D; Heimdal, J; Berg, R W; Torsson, M; Wugt Larsen, R

    2017-06-28

    The true global potential energy minimum configuration of the formaldehyde dimer (CH2O)2, including the presence of a single or a double weak intermolecular CH⋯O hydrogen bond motif, has been a long-standing subject among both experimentalists and theoreticians as two different energy minima conformations of Cs and C2h symmetry have almost identical energies. The present work demonstrates how the class of large-amplitude hydrogen bond vibrational motion probed in the THz region provides excellent direct spectroscopic observables for these weak intermolecular CH⋯O hydrogen bond motifs. The combination of concentration dependency measurements, observed isotopic spectral shifts associated with H/D substitutions and dedicated annealing procedures, enables the unambiguous assignment of three large-amplitude infrared active hydrogen bond vibrational modes for the non-planar Cs configuration of (CH2O)2 embedded in cryogenic neon and enriched para-hydrogen matrices. A (semi)-empirical value for the change of vibrational zero-point energy of 5.5 ± 0.3 kJ mol-1 is proposed for the dimerization process. These THz spectroscopic observations are complemented by CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc-pV5Z (electronic energies) and MP2/aug-cc-pVQZ (force fields) electronic structure calculations yielding a (semi)-empirical value of 13.7 ± 0.3 kJ mol-1 for the dissociation energy D0 of this global potential energy minimum.

  11. A large-scale biomass bulk terminal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the possibility of a large-scale bulk terminal in West Europe dedicated to handle solid and liquid biomass materials. Various issues regarding the conceptual design of such a terminal have been investigated and demonstrated in this research: the potential biomass materials

  12. A large-scale biomass bulk terminal

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the possibility of a large-scale bulk terminal in West Europe dedicated to handle solid and liquid biomass materials. Various issues regarding the conceptual design of such a terminal have been investigated and demonstrated in this research: the potential biomass materials that will be the major international trade flows in the future, the characteristics of these potential biomass materials, the interaction between the material properties and terminal equipment, the pe...

  13. Biomimetic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krassen, Henning

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogenases catalyze the reduction of protons to molecular hydrogen with outstanding efficiency. An electrode surface which is covered with active hydrogenase molecules becomes a promising alternative to platinum for electrochemical hydrogen production. To immobilize the hydrogenase on the electrode, the gold surface was modified by heterobifunctional molecules. A thiol headgroup on one side allowed the binding to the gold surface and the formation of a self-assembled monolayer. The other side of the molecules provided a surface with a high affinity for the hydrogenase CrHydA1 from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. With methylviologen as a soluble energy carrier, electrons were transferred from carboxy-terminated electrodes to CrHydA1 and conducted to the active site (H-cluster), where they reduce protons to molecular hydrogen. A combined approach of surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy, gas chromatography, and surface plasmon resonance allowed quantifying the hydrogen production on a molecular level. Hydrogen was produced with a rate of 85 mol H{sub 2} min{sup -1} mol{sup -1}. On a 1'- benzyl-4,4'-bipyridinum (BBP)-terminated surface, the electrons were mediated by the monolayer and no soluble electron carrier was necessary to achieve a comparable hydrogen production rate (approximately 50% of the former system). The hydrogen evolution potential was determined to be -335 mV for the BBP-bound hydrogenase and -290 mV for the hydrogenase which was immobilized on a carboxy-terminated mercaptopropionic acid SAM. Therefore, both systems significantly reduce the hydrogen production overpotential and allow electrochemical hydrogen production at an energy level which is close to the commercially applied platinum electrodes (hydrogen evolution potential of -270 mV). In order to couple hydrogen production and photosynthesis, photosystem I (PS1) from Synechocystis PCC 6803 and membrane-bound hydrogenase (MBH) from Ralstonia eutropha were bound to each other

  14. Electrochemical Hydrogen Compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lipp, Ludwig [FuelCell Energy, Inc., Torrington, CT (United States)

    2016-01-21

    Conventional compressors have not been able to meet DOE targets for hydrogen refueling stations. They suffer from high capital cost, poor reliability and pose a risk of fuel contamination from lubricant oils. This project has significantly advanced the development of solid state hydrogen compressor technology for multiple applications. The project has achieved all of its major objectives. It has demonstrated capability of Electrochemical Hydrogen Compression (EHC) technology to potentially meet the DOE targets for small compressors for refueling sites. It has quantified EHC cell performance and durability, including single stage hydrogen compression from near-atmospheric pressure to 12,800 psi and operation of EHC for more than 22,000 hours. Capital cost of EHC was reduced by 60%, enabling a path to meeting the DOE cost targets for hydrogen compression, storage and delivery ($2.00-2.15/gge by 2020).

  15. Solid electrolyte membranes and the system to produce hydrogen from thermally decomposed water by solar energy; Taiyo energy riyo ni yoru mizu no chokusetsu netsubunkai kara no suiso seizoyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nigara, K.; Watanabe, K.; Kawamura, K.; Kawada, T.; Mizusaki, J.; Ishigame, M. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Research Institute for Scientific Measurements

    1996-10-27

    For conversion of solar heat to transportable energy, hydrogen production by direct thermal decomposition of water using concentrated high-temperature solar heat was studied. Water vapor is injected into the tubular target with high melting point and high oxygen permeability at high temperature while heating the target by concentrated solar heat over 2000K. Oxygen in decomposed gas is discharged through an oxygen permeable membrane to extract hydrogen. Solid electrolyte is used as one of the target materials. Oxygen gas in the high-oxygen partial pressure site changes into oxygen ion by accepting two electrons at the target surface, and returns to neutral oxygen gas in the low-oxygen partial pressure site by discharging two electrons at the surface after permeation through oxygen vacancy. In the case of n-type solid electrolyte, to obtain constant permeation of a large amount of oxygen, flow of a large amount of electrons is indispensable in the opposite direction to oxygen ion. Among [(ZrO2)(1-x)(CeO2)x](0.9)(CaO)(0.1), materials of 0.4-0.5 in x seems to be useful as the target material. 7 refs., 7 figs.

  16. HySDeP: a computational platform for on-board hydrogen storage systems – hybrid high-pressure solid-state and gaseous storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzucco, Andrea; Rokni, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    A computational platform is developed in the Modelica® language within the DymolaTM environment to provide a tool for the design and performance comparison of on-board hydrogen storage systems. The platform has been coupled with an open source library for hydrogen fueling stations to investigate ...... to a storage capacity four times larger than a tube-in-tube solution of the same size. The volumetric and gravimetric densities of the shell and tube are 2.46% and 1.25% respectively. The dehydriding ability of this solution is proven to withstand intense discharging conditions....

  17. Probing the global potential energy minimum of (CH2O)2: THz absorption spectrum of (CH2O)2 in solid neon and para-hydrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jonas; Voute, A.; Mihrin, Dmytro

    2017-01-01

    )2 embedded in cryogenic neon and enriched para-hydrogen matrices. A (semi)-empirical value for the change of vibrational zero-point energy of 5.5 ± 0.3 kJ mol−1 is proposed for the dimerization process. These THz spectroscopic observations are complemented by CCSD(T)-F12/aug-cc-pV5Z (electronic...

  18. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  19. Versatile supramolecular reactivity of zinc-tetra(4-pyridylporphyrin in crystalline solids: Polymeric grids with zinc dichloride and hydrogen-bonded networks with mellitic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Lipstman

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Crystal engineering studies confirm that the zinc-tetra(4-pyridylporphyrin building block reveals versatile supramolecular chemistry. In this work, it was found to be reactive in the assembly of both (a a 2D polymeric array by a unique combination of self-coordination and coordination through external zinc dichloride linkers and (b an extended heteromolecular hydrogen-bonded network with mellitic acid sustained by multiple connectivity between the component species.

  20. Metal ammine complexes for hydrogen storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Claus H.; Sørensen, Rasmus Zink; Johannessen, Tue

    2005-01-01

    The hopes of using hydrogen as an energy carrier are severely dampened by the fact that there is still no safe, high-density method available for storing hydrogen. We investigate the possibility of using metal ammine complexes as a solid form of hydrogen storage. Using Mg(NH3)(6)Cl-2 as the example...

  1. Rate-controlling steps in a three-phase (solid-liquid-gas) photoreactor: a phenomenological approach applied to hydrogen photoproduction using Pt-TiO/sub 2/ aqueous suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escudero, J.C.; Simarro, R.; Cervera-March, S.; Gimenez, J.

    1989-01-01

    Water photolysis has been studied using a three-phase solid-liquid-gas photoreactor, continuous with respect to the gas phase. The Pt-TiO/sub 2/ catalytic powders were kept suspended in water by means of gas bubbling through the liquid. In this case the hydrogen production rate can be controlled by luminic and dark (chemical or mass-transfer) processes. The relative importance of each of these processes depends on the lamp-photoreactor system used, the nature and physical characteristics of the photocatalysts, and the operating (fluidodynamic) conditions. A description of the steps involved in the overall photocatalytic process is given. The importance of mass transfer in limiting the process yield is demonstrated, showing that this step has to be considered in the development of photocatalysts even at early stages.

  2. Engineered, Solid-State Processes for Enhanced Biosolar Hydrogen Production and Exploitation of Solar Energy with Tailored Light-Harvesting Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-30

    efficiency and hydrogen production.     Diffusion Properties of Gels. We used divalent  nickel  (Ni2+), Cu(II)EDTA,  methyl  orange, and dichromate  to...recently, we used DNA microarray analyses to characterize stress responses of wild-type Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells encapsulated in different gel...project. Annual reports previously submitted to AFOSR are  incorporated herein by reference. Most recently, we used  DNA  microarray analyses to

  3. Optimal Integration of a Solid-Oxide Electrolyser Cell into a Direct Steam Generation Solar Tower Plant for Zero-Emission Hydrogen Production

    OpenAIRE

    Sanz Bermejo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Tesis Doctoral leída en la Universidad Rey Juan Carlos de Madrid en 2015. Director de la Tesis: Manuel Romero Álvarez. Co-director: Javier Muñoz Antón. Tutor: Raúl Sanz Martín Electrolysis systems have a great potential for CO2-free hydrogen production because its relative simplicity facilitates the interconnection with renewable electrical energy systems like wind and solar. Additionally, this hybridization makes it possible to interconnect power and fuel networks (natural gas and transpo...

  4. Room-temperature synthesis of Zn(0.80)Cd(0.20)S solid solution with a high visible-light photocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong-Hong; Wang, Lei; Xu, An-Wu

    2012-03-21

    Visible light photocatalytic H(2) production from water splitting is of great significance for its potential applications in converting solar energy into chemical energy. In this study, a series of Zn(1-x)Cd(x)S solid solutions with a nanoporous structure were successfully synthesized via a facile template-free method at room temperature. The obtained solid solutions were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and N(2) adsorption-desorption analysis. The solid solutions show efficient photocatalytic activity for H(2) evolution from aqueous solutions containing sacrificial reagents S(2-) and SO(3)(2-) under visible-light irradiation without a Pt cocatalyst, and loading of the Pt cocatalyst further improves the visible-light photocatalytic activity. The optimal photocatalyst with x = 0.20 prepared at pH = 7.3 displays the highest activity for H(2) evolution. The bare and 0.25 wt% Pt loaded Zn(0.80)Cd(0.20)S nanoparticles exhibit a high H(2) evolution rate of 193 μmol h(-1) and 458 μmol h(-1) under visible-light irradiation (λ ≥ 420 nm), respectively. In addition, the bare and 0.25 wt% Pt loaded Zn(0.80)Cd(0.20)S catalysts show a high H(2) evolution rate of 252 and 640 μmol h(-1) under simulated solar light irradiation, respectively. Moreover, the Zn(0.80)Cd(0.20)S catalyst displays a high photocatalytic stability for H(2) evolution under long-term light irradiation. The incorporation of Cd in the solid solution leads to the visible light absorption, and the high content of Zn in the solid solution results in a relatively negative conduction band, a modulated band gap and a rather wide valence bandwidth, which are responsible for the excellent photocatalytic performance of H(2) production and for the high photostability

  5. Application of mixed-mode, solid-phase extraction in environmental and clinical chemistry. Combining hydrogen-bonding, cation-exchange and Van der Waals interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, M.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Pedersen, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Silica- and styrene-divinylbenzene-based mixed-mode resins that contain C8, C18 and sulphonated cation-exchange groups were compared for their efficiency in isolation of neutral triazine compounds from water and of the basic drug, benzoylecgonine, from urine. The triazine compounds were isolated by a combination of Van der Waals and hydrogen-bonding interactions, and benzoylecgonine was isolated by Van der Waals interactions and cation exchange. All analytes were eluted with a polar organic solvent contaning 2% ammonium hydroxide. Larger recoveries (95%) were achieved on copolymerized mixed-mode resins where C18 and sulfonic acid are in closer proximity than on 'blended' mixed-mode resins (60-70% recovery).

  6. Electrocatalysts for hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Losiewicz, Bozena

    2015-01-01

    This special topic volume deals with the development of novel solid state electrocatalysts of a high performance to enhance the rates of the hydrogen or oxygen evolution. It contains a description of various types of metals, alloys and composites which have been obtained using electrodeposition in aqueous solutions that has been identified to be a technologically feasible and economically superior technique for the production of the porous electrodes. The goal was to produce papers that would be useful to both the novice and the expert in hydrogen technologies. This volume is intended to be us

  7. Formation of noble-gas hydrides and decay of solvated protons revisited: diffusion-controlled reactions and hydrogen atom losses in solid noble gases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanskanen, Hanna; Khriachtchev, Leonid; Lignell, Antti; Räsänen, Markku; Johansson, Susanna; Khyzhniy, Ivan; Savchenko, Elena

    2008-02-07

    UV photolysis and annealing of C2H2/Xe, C2H2/Xe/Kr, and HBr/Xe matrices lead to complicated photochemical processes and reactions. The dominating products in these experiments are noble-gas hydrides with general formula HNgY (Ng = noble-gas atom, Y = electronegative fragment). We concentrate on distinguishing the local and global mobility and losses of H atoms, barriers of the reactions, and the decay of solvated protons. Different deposition temperatures change the amount of lattice imperfections and thus the amount of traps for H atoms. The averaged distance between reacting species influencing the reaction kinetics is controlled by varying the precursor concentration. A number of solid-state processes connected to the formation of noble-gas hydrides and decay of solvated protons are discussed using a simple kinetic model. The most efficient formation of noble-gas hydrides is connected with global (long-range) mobility of H atoms leading to the H + Xe + Y reaction. The highest concentration of noble-gas hydrides was obtained in matrices of highest optical quality, which probably have the lowest concentration of defects and H-atom losses. In matrices with high amount of geometrical imperfections, the product formation is inefficient and dominated by a local (short-range) process. The decay of solvated protons is rather local than a global process, which is different from the formation of noble-gas molecules. However, the present data do not allow distinguishing local proton and electron mobilities. Our previous results indicate that these are electrons which move to positively-charged centers and neutralize them. It is believed that the image obtained here for solid xenon is applicable to solid krypton whereas the case of argon deserves special attention.

  8. Hydrogen maser clocks in space for solid-Earth research and time-transfer applications: Experiment overview and evaluation of Russian miniature sapphire loaded cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busca, G.; Bernier, L. G.; Silvestrin, P.; Feltham, S.; Gaygerov, B. A.; Tatarenkov, V. M.

    1994-05-01

    The Observatoire Cantonal de Neuchatel (ON) is developing for ESTEC a compact H-maser for space use based upon a miniature sapphire loaded microwave cavity, a technique pioneered at VNIIFTRI. Various contacts between West-European parties, headed by ESA, and the Russian parties, headed by ESA, led to the proposal for flying two H-masers on Meteor 3M, a Russian meteorology satellite in low polar orbit. The experiment will include two masers, one provided by ON and the other by VNIIFTRI. T/F transfer and precise positioning will be performed by both a microwave link, using PRARE equipment, and an optical link, using LASSO-like equipment. The main objectives of the experiment are precise orbit determination and point positioning for geodetic/geophysical research, ultra-accurate time comparison and dissemination as well as in-orbit demonstration of operation and performance of H-masers. Within the scope of a preliminary space H-maser development phase performed for ESTEC at ON in preparation to the joint experiment, a Russian miniature sapphire loaded microwave cavity, on loan from VNIIFTRI, was evaluated in a full-size EFOS hydrogen maser built by ON. The experimental evaluation confirmed the theoretical expectation that with a hydrogen storage volume of only 0.65 liter an atomic quality factor of 1.5 x 10(exp 9) can be obtained for a -105 dBm output power. This represents a theoretical Allan deviation of 1.7 x 10(exp -15) averaged on a 1000 s time interval. From a full-size design to a compact one, therefore, the sacrifice in performance due to the reduction of the storage volume is very small.

  9. Hydrogen embrittlement and stress corrosion cracking in metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Suk; Cheong, Yong Mu; Im, Kyung Soo

    2004-10-15

    The objective of this report is to elucidate the mechanism for hydrogen embrittlement (HE) and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in metals. To this end, we investigate the common features between delayed hydride cracking (DHC) in zirconium alloys and HE in metals with no precipitation of hydrides including Fe base alloys, Nickel base alloys, Cu alloys and Al alloys. Surprisingly, as with the crack growth pattern for the DHC in zirconium alloy, the metals mentioned above show a discontinuous crack growth, striation lines and a strong dependence of yield strength when exposed to hydrogen internally and externally. This study, for the first time, analyzes the driving force for the HE in metals in viewpoints of Kim's DHC model that a driving force for the DHC in zirconium alloys is a supersaturated hydrogen concentration coming from a hysteresis of the terminal solid solubility of hydrogen, not by the stress gradient, As with the crack growing only along the hydride habit plane during the DHC in zirconium alloys, the metals exposed to hydrogen seem to have the crack growing by invoking the dislocation slip along the preferential planes as a result of some interactions of the dislocations with hydrogen. Therefore, it seems that the hydrogen plays a role in inducing the slip only on the preferential planes so as to cause a strain localization at the crack tip. Sulfur in metals is detrimental in causing a intergranular cracking due to a segregation of the hydrogens at the grain boundaries. In contrast, boron in excess of 500 ppm added to the Ni3Al intermetallic compound is found to be beneficial in suppressing the HE even though further details of the mechanism for the roles of boron and sulfur are required. Carbon, carbides precipitating semi-continuously along the grain boundaries and the CSL (coherent site lattice) boundaries is found to suppress the intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in Alloy 600. The higher the volume fraction of twin boundaries, the

  10. Innovative direct energy conversion systems using electronic adiabatic processes of electron fluid in solid conductors: new plants of electrical power and hydrogen gas resources without environmental pollutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondoh, Y.; Kondo, M.; Shimoda, K.; Takahashi, T. [Gunma Univ., Dept. of Electronic Engineering, Kiryu, Gunma (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    It is shown that using a novel recycling process of the environmental thermal energy, innovative permanent auto-working direct energy converter systems (PA-DEC systems) from the environmental thermal to electrical and/or chemical potential (TE/CP) energies, abbreviated as PA-TE/CP-DEC systems, can be used for new auto-working electrical power plants and the plants of the compressible and conveyable hydrogen gas resources at various regions in the whole world, with contributions to the world peace and the economical development in the south part of the world. It is shown that the same physical mechanism by free electrons and electrical potential determined by temperature in conductors, which include semiconductors, leads to the Peltier effect and the Seebeck one. It is experimentally clarified that the long distance separation between two {pi} type elements of the heat absorption (HAS) and the production one (HPS) of the Peltier effect circuit system or between the higher temperature side (HTS) and the lower one (LTS) of the Seebeck effect circuit one does not change in the whole for the both effects. By using present systems, we do not need to use petrified fuels such as coals, oils, and natural gases in order to decrease the greenhouse effect by the CO{sub 2} surrounding the earth. Furthermore, we do not need plats of nuclear fissions that left radiating wastes, i.e., with no environmental pollutions. The PA-TE/CP-DEC systems can be applicable for several km scale systems to the micro ones, such as the plants of the electrical power, the compact transportable hydrogen gas resources, a large heat energy container, which can be settled at far place from thermal energy absorbing area, the refrigerators, the air conditioners, home electrical apparatuses, and further the computer elements. It is shown that the simplest PA-TE/CP-DEC system can be established by using only the Seebeck effect components and the resolving water ones. It is clarified that the externally

  11. Metallic nanostructure formation limited by the surface hydrogen on silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Kathryn A; Teplyakov, Andrew V

    2010-08-03

    Constant miniaturization of electronic devices and interfaces needed to make them functional requires an understanding of the initial stages of metal growth at the molecular level. The use of metal-organic precursors for metal deposition allows for some control of the deposition process, but the ligands of these precursor molecules often pose substantial contamination problems. One of the ways to alleviate the contamination problem with common copper deposition precursors, such as copper(I) (hexafluoroacetylacetonato) vinyltrimethylsilane, Cu(hfac)VTMS, is a gas-phase reduction with molecular hydrogen. Here we present an alternative method to copper film and nanostructure growth using the well-defined silicon surface. Nearly ideal hydrogen termination of silicon single-crystalline substrates achievable by modern surface modification methods provides a limited supply of a reducing agent at the surface during the initial stages of metal deposition. Spectroscopic evidence shows that the Cu(hfac) fragment is present upon room-temperature adsorption and reacts with H-terminated Si(100) and Si(111) surfaces to deposit metallic copper. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) are used to follow the initial stages of copper nucleation and the formation of copper nanoparticles, and X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (XEDS) confirms the presence of hfac fragments on the surfaces of nanoparticles. As the surface hydrogen is consumed, copper nanoparticles are formed; however, this growth stops as the accessible hydrogen is reacted away at room temperature. This reaction sets a reference for using other solid substrates that can act as reducing agents in nanoparticle growth and metal deposition.

  12. Hydrogen utilization potential in subsurface sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adhikari, Rishi Ram; Glombitza, Clemens; Nickel, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Subsurface microbial communities undertake many terminal electron-accepting processes, often simultaneously. Using a tritium-based assay, we measured the potential hydrogen oxidation catalyzed by hydrogenase enzymes in several subsurface sedimentary environments (Lake Van, Barents Sea, Equatorial...... Pacific, and Gulf of Mexico) with different predominant electron-acceptors. Hydrogenases constitute a diverse family of enzymes expressed by microorganisms that utilize molecular hydrogen as a metabolic substrate, product, or intermediate. The assay reveals the potential for utilizing molecular hydrogen...

  13. Molecular and Metallic Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    Livermore Laboratory, Dr. J. C. Raich of the Colorado State University, and Dr. R. H. Wentorf, Jr., of the General Electric Company for their reviews...investigated by Raich and Etters [8], who have made ground-state energy calculations for hydrogen molecules retaining the orientation dependence of the...consistent with work of Raich and Etters [8], who have made similar calculations during the course of their work on the rotational transition in solid

  14. Capillary moving-boundary isotachophoresis with electrospray ionization mass-spectrometric detection and hydrogen ion used as essential terminator: Methodology for sensitive analysis of hydroxyderivatives of s-triazine herbicides in waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malá, Zdena; Gebauer, Petr

    2017-10-06

    Capillary isotachophoresis (ITP) is an electrophoretic technique offering high sensitivity due to permanent stacking of the migrating analytes. Its combination with electrospray-ionization mass-spectrometric (ESI-MS) detection is limited by the narrow spectrum of ESI-compatible components but can be compensated by experienced system architecture. This work describes a methodology for sensitive analysis of hydroxyderivatives of s-triazine herbicides, based on implementation of the concepts of moving-boundary isotachophoresis and of H+ as essential terminating component into cationic ITP with ESI-MS detection. Theoretical description of such kind of system is given and equations for zone-related boundary mobilities are derived, resulting in a much more general definition of the effective mobility of the terminating H+ zone than used so far. Explicit equations allowing direct calculation for selected simple systems are derived. The presented theory allows prediction of stacking properties of particular systems and easy selection of suitable electrolyte setups. A simple ESI-compatible system composed of acetic acid and ammonium with H+ and ammonium as a mixed terminator was selected for the analysis of 2-hydroxyatrazine and 2-hydroxyterbutylazine, degradation products of s-triazine herbicides. The proposed method was tested with direct injection without any sample pretreatment and provided excellent linearity and high sensitivity with limits of detection below 100ng/L (0.5nM). Example analyses of unspiked and spiked drinking and river water are shown. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The Montreal hydrogen airport project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, T.K. [Hydrogen Research Inst., Trois-Rivieres, Quebec (Canada)

    2004-07-01

    'Full text:' The transition to a hydrogen economy presents a unique opportunity for Canada. It spells growth and investment opportunities for Canadian industry and offers a sustainable solution to climate change and pollution, particularly in our cities. The H{sub 2}EA program set forth by the government of Canada fosters the development and early introduction into the market place in Canada of multiple hydrogen technologies that support the transition to a hydrogen economy. A group of leading suppliers, manufacturers and users of hydrogen and hydrogen compatible technologies intend to demonstrate various applications for hydrogen in the area of power generation and transportation. The project will take place at the Pierre-Elliot-Trudeau Airport in Montreal in collaboration with Aeroport de Montreal (ADM). ADM has already invested approximately $50 million in environment related initiatives and The Montreal Hydrogen Airport project will further demonstrate its leadership in this area. The project will be divided into 14 sub-projects, which are: 1. Hydrogen internal combustion engine (HICE) shuttle buses. 2. Fuel cell shuttle bus. 3. Air terminal people movers powered by H2 fuel cell technologies. 4. HICE powered tugs and luggage carts. 5. H2 fuelling station. 6. H2 filling station. 7. Mobile hydrogen auxiliary power units for ADM vehicles. 8. Stationary hydrogen auxiliary power units for airport facilities. 9. ADM truck conversion to HICE. 10. Maintenance and certification centre. 11. Project promotion. 12. Training. 13. Compliance testing and project impact analysis. 14. Project management. This project is undoubtedly ambitious and yet realistic. Set in the second largest airport in the country, it can play the double role of showcasing the Canadian hydrogen industry to the entire world while implementing the strategic elements of the hydrogen economy in the second largest population centre in Canada. (author)

  16. Introduction of 5'-terminal functional groups into synthetic oligonucleotides for selective immobilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, Rainer; Coull, J.M.; Regnier, F.E.

    1987-01-01

    Oligodeoxyribonucleotides terminating in a 5'-primary amine group are synthesized using solid-phase supported phosphoramidite chemistry. The 5'-terminal amine group in the deprotected oligomers is further derivatized with either succinic anhydride to give 5'-carboxylic acid or with

  17. Hydrogen Embrittlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Stephen; Lee, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) is a process resulting in a decrease in the fracture toughness or ductility of a metal due to the presence of atomic hydrogen. In addition to pure hydrogen gas as a direct source for the absorption of atomic hydrogen, the damaging effect can manifest itself from other hydrogen-containing gas species such as hydrogen sulfide (H2S), hydrogen chloride (HCl), and hydrogen bromide (HBr) environments. It has been known that H2S environment may result in a much more severe condition of embrittlement than pure hydrogen gas (H2) for certain types of alloys at similar conditions of stress and gas pressure. The reduction of fracture loads can occur at levels well below the yield strength of the material. Hydrogen embrittlement is usually manifest in terms of singular sharp cracks, in contrast to the extensive branching observed for stress corrosion cracking. The initial crack openings and the local deformation associated with crack propagation may be so small that they are difficult to detect except in special nondestructive examinations. Cracks due to HE can grow rapidly with little macroscopic evidence of mechanical deformation in materials that are normally quite ductile. This Technical Memorandum presents a comprehensive review of experimental data for the effects of gaseous Hydrogen Environment Embrittlement (HEE) for several types of metallic materials. Common material screening methods are used to rate the hydrogen degradation of mechanical properties that occur while the material is under an applied stress and exposed to gaseous hydrogen as compared to air or helium, under slow strain rates (SSR) testing. Due to the simplicity and accelerated nature of these tests, the results expressed in terms of HEE index are not intended to necessarily represent true hydrogen service environment for long-term exposure, but rather to provide a practical approach for material screening, which is a useful concept to qualitatively evaluate the severity of

  18. Use of deuterium labeling by high-temperature solid-state hydrogen-exchange reaction for mass spectrometric analysis of bradykinin biotransformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopylov, Arthur T; Myasoedov, Nikolay F; Dadayan, Alexander K; Zgoda, Victor G; Medvedev, Alexei E; Zolotarev, Yurii A

    2016-06-15

    Studies of molecular biodegradation by mass spectrometry often require synthetic compounds labeled with stable isotopes as internal standards. However, labeling is very expensive especially when a large number of compounds are needed for analysis of biotransformation. Here we describe an approach for qualitative and quantitative analysis using bradykinin (BK) and its in vitro degradation metabolites as an example. Its novelty lies in the use of deuterated peptides which are obtained by a high-temperature solid-state exchange (HSCIE) reaction. Deuterated and native BK were analyzed by positive electrospray ionization high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-HRMS) using an Orbitrap Fusion mass spectrometer. High-energy collision-induced dissociation (HCD) experiments were performed on [M+H](+) and [M+2H](2+) ions in targeted-MS(2) mode with adjusted normalized HCD value. After the HSCIE reaction, each amino acid residue of the deuterated peptide contained deuterium atoms and the average degree of substitution was 5.5 atoms per the peptide molecule. The deuterated peptide demonstrated the same chromatographic mobility as the unlabeled counterpart, and lack of racemization during substitution with deuterium. Deuterium-labeled and unlabeled BKs were incubated with human plasma and their corresponding fragments BK(1-5) and BK(1-7), well known as the major metabolites, were detected. Quantitative assays demonstrated applicability of the heavy peptide for both sequencing and quantification of generated fragments. Applicability of the HSCIE deuterated peptide for analysis of routes of its degradation has been shown in in vitro experiments. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Intermodal freight terminals : terminal business planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, Peter; Wiegmans, Bart W.

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for existing- and newly proposedinter-modal freight terminals in their business planning process. This framework is importantfor constructing- and improving the central terminal service portfolio of handling (loading,discharging, and

  20. Magnetic refrigerator for hydrogen liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, K; Kondo, T [Department of Physics, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Yoshioka, S; Kamiya, K; Numazawa, T [Tsukuba Magnet Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science, 3-13 Sakura, Tsukuba 305-0003 (Japan)], E-mail: kmatsu@kenroku.kanazawa-u.ac.jp

    2009-02-01

    Magnetic refrigeration which is based on the magnetocaloric effect of solids has the potential to achieve high thermal efficiency for hydrogen liquefaction. We have been developing a magnetic refrigerator for hydrogen liquefaction which cools down hydrogen gas from liquid natural gas temperature and liquefies at 20 K. The magnetic liquefaction system consists of two magnetic refrigerators: Carnot magnetic refrigerator (CMR) and active magnetic regenerator (AMR) device. CMR with Carnot cycle succeeded in liquefying hydrogen at 20K. Above liquefaction temperature, a regenerative refrigeration cycle should be necessary to precool hydrogen gas, because adiabatic temperature change of magnetic material is reduced due to a large lattice specific heat of magnetic materials. We have tested an AMR device as the precooling stage. It was confirmed for the first time that AMR cycle worked around 20 K.

  1. Résonance magnétique nucléaire 1H basse résolution. Le meilleur outil pour une détermination précise de la teneur en hydrogène des produits pétroliers Low Resolution 1h Nmr. The Ultimate Tool for Accurate Determination of Hydrogen Content in Petroleum Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gautier S.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Un spectromètre RMN basse résolution à impulsions a été utilisé pour déterminer la teneur totale en hydrogène d'une large gamme de fractions pétrolières. On a constaté une excellente cohérence avec la teneur théorique en hydrogène de plusieurs composés purs; la répétabilité de la méthode est de 0,03%. La validation de cette méthode a été effectuée sur une vaste gamme de produits pétroliers comprenant notamment : distillats moyens de distillation directe, de craquage, d'hydrotraitement ou d'hydrocraquage, gazoles sous vide, bruts lourds, résidus atmosphériques de distillation directe ou d'hydrotraitement, soit au total 121 échantillons. Cette méthode s'est avérée la plus précise pour le calcul de la consommation d'hydrogène sur unités d'hydrotraitement, pour un domaine allant de 0,1 à 2,5 % pds. A low resolution pulsed NMR spectrometer has been used to determine total hydrogen content for a wide range of petroleum cuts. Excellent agreement has been found with the theoritical amount of hydrogen on pure compounds and the repeatability of the method is 0. 03%. The validation of the method has been done on a very large range of petroleum products, including straight run, cracked, hydrotreated and hydrocracked mid-distillates, vacuum gasoils, heavy crudes, straight run and hydrotreated atmospheric residues, representing 121 samples and a hydrogen consumption range during processing from 0,1 to 2. 5 wt.

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  3. Terminated Multifamily Mortgages Database

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  20. Hydrogen Bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    The Hydrogen Bibliography is a compilation of research reports that are the result of research funded over the last fifteen years. In addition, other documents have been added. All cited reports are contained in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Hydrogen Program Library.

  1. Hydrogen exchange

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Foged; Rand, Kasper Dyrberg

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen exchange (HX) monitored by mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for investigation of protein conformation and dynamics. HX-MS monitors isotopic exchange of hydrogen in protein backbone amides and thus serves as a sensitive method for probing protein conformation...... and dynamics along the entire protein backbone. This chapter describes the exchange of backbone amide hydrogen which is highly quenchable as it is strongly dependent on the pH and temperature. The HX rates of backbone amide hydrogen are sensitive and very useful probes of protein conformation......, as they are distributed along the polypeptide backbone and form the fundamental hydrogen-bonding networks of basic secondary structure. The effect of pressure on HX in unstructured polypeptides (poly-dl-lysine and oxidatively unfolded ribonuclease A) and native folded proteins (lysozyme and ribonuclease A) was evaluated...

  2. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage - New perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ley, Morten B.; Jepsen, Lars H.; Lee, Young-Su

    2014-01-01

    , as discussed in this review, but a range of new lightweight hydrogen-containing materials has been discovered with fascinating properties. State-of-the-art and future perspectives for hydrogen-containing solids will be discussed, with a focus on metal borohydrides, which reveal significant structural...

  3. Ablation of Hydrogen Pellets in Hydrogen and Helium Plasmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L W; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard; Øster, Flemming

    1975-01-01

    Measurements on the interaction between solid hydrogen pellets and rotating plasmas are reported. The investigations were carried out because of the possibility of refuelling fusion reactors by the injection of pellets. The ablation rate found is higher than expected on the basis of a theory...

  4. Biogas as a fuel for solid oxide fuel cells and synthesis gas production: effects of ceria-doping and hydrogen sulfide on the performance of nickel-based anode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, Christian J; Staniforth, John Z; Ormerod, R Mark

    2011-05-28

    tolerance of Ni/YSZ, however, in the presence of H(2)S ceria did not promote the reverse Boudouard reaction and at high temperatures carbon deposition was greater over ceria-doped Ni/YSZ. In order to further study the effects of ceria-doping, a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) was constructed with a ceria-doped anode cermet and its electrical performance on simulated biogas compared to hydrogen was tested. This fuel cell was subsequently ran for 1000 h on simulated biogas with no degradation in its overall electrical performance.

  5. Florida Hydrogen Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, David L

    2013-06-30

    . Politano, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL This project developed a hydrogen and fuel cell technology academic program at Florida Institute of Technology in Melbourne, Florida. Design and Development of an Advanced Hydrogen Storage System using Novel Materials ? E. Stefanakos, University of South Florida The goal of this project was to design and develop novel conducting polymeric nanomaterials for on-board hydrogen storage. The project approach was to examine synthesis of polyaniline solid state hydrogen storage materials. Advanced HiFoil ? Bipolar Plates ? J. Braun, M. Fuchs, EnerFuel, Inc. The goal of this project was to provide a durable, low cost bipolar plate for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The project results produced a durable, low cost bipolar plate with very high in-plane thermal conductivity.

  6. Intermodal freight terminals : terminal business planning

    OpenAIRE

    Nijkamp, Peter; Bart W Wiegmans

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for existing- and newly proposedinter-modal freight terminals in their business planning process. This framework is importantfor constructing- and improving the central terminal service portfolio of handling (loading,discharging, and transhipping) and storage of containerised cargo. Supportive activities (e.g. administration, customs) are taken into account as well.In particular, its aim is to investigate whether business planning offer...

  7. Boron-Based Hydrogen Storage: Ternary Borides and Beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vajo, John J. [HRL Laboratories, LLC, Malibu, CA (United States)

    2016-04-28

    DOE continues to seek reversible solid-state hydrogen materials with hydrogen densities of ≥11 wt% and ≥80 g/L that can deliver hydrogen and be recharged at moderate temperatures (≤100 °C) and pressures (≤100 bar) enabling incorporation into hydrogen storage systems suitable for transportation applications. Boron-based hydrogen storage materials have the potential to meet the density requirements given boron’s low atomic weight, high chemical valance, and versatile chemistry. However, the rates of hydrogen exchange in boron-based compounds are thus far much too slow for practical applications. Although contributing to the high hydrogen densities, the high valance of boron also leads to slow rates of hydrogen exchange due to extensive boron-boron atom rearrangements during hydrogen cycling. This rearrangement often leads to multiple solid phases occurring over hydrogen release and recharge cycles. These phases must nucleate and react with each other across solid-solid phase boundaries leading to energy barriers that slow the rates of hydrogen exchange. This project sought to overcome the slow rates of hydrogen exchange in boron-based hydrogen storage materials by minimizing the number of solid phases and the boron atom rearrangement over a hydrogen release and recharge cycle. Two novel approaches were explored: 1) developing matched pairs of ternary borides and mixed-metal borohydrides that could exchange hydrogen with only one hydrogenated phase (the mixed-metal borohydride) and only one dehydrogenated phase (the ternary boride); and 2) developing boranes that could release hydrogen by being lithiated using lithium hydride with no boron-boron atom rearrangement.

  8. Change in lattice parameter of tantalum due to dissolved hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gyanendra P. Tiwari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The volume expansion of tantalum due to the dissolved hydrogen has been determined using Bragg equation. The hydrogen was dissolved in the pure tantalum metal at constant temperature (360 °C and constant pressure (132 mbar by varying the duration of hydrogen charging. The amount of dissolved hydrogen was within the solid solubility limit. The samples with different hydrogen concentration were analyzed by X-ray diffraction technique. Slight peak shifts as well as peak broadening were observed. The relative changes of lattice parameters plotted against the hydrogen concentration revealed that the lattice parameters varied linearly with the hydrogen concentration.

  9. Hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donath, E.

    1942-10-16

    This report mentioned that not very severe demands for purity were made on the hydrogen used in hydrogenation of coal or similar raw materials, because the catalysts were not very sensitive to poisoning. However, the hydrogenation plants tried to remove most impurities anyway by means of oil washes. The report included a table giving the amount of wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil used up and the amount of hydrogen lost by dissolving into the wash oil in order to remove 1% of various impurities from 1000 m/sup 3/ of the circulating gas. The amounts of wash oil used up were 1.1 m/sup 3/ for removing 1% nitrogen, 0.3 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide, 0.03 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane. The amount of hydrogen lost was 28 m/sup 3/ for 1% nitrogen, 9 m/sup 3/ for 1% methane and ranged from 9 m/sup 3/ to 39 m/sup 3/ for 1% carbon monoxide and 1 m/sup 3/ to 41 m/sup 3/ for carbon dioxide depending on whether the removal was done in liquid phase or vapor phase and with or without reduction of the oxide to methane. Next the report listed and described the major processes used in German hydrogenation plants to produce hydrogen. Most of them produced water gas, which then had its carbon monoxide changed to carbon dioxide, and the carbon oxides washed out with water under pressure and copper hydroxide solution. The methods included the Winkler, Pintsch-Hillebrand, and Schmalfeldt-Wintershall processes, as well as roasting of coke in a rotating generator, splitting of gases formed during hydrogenation, and separation of cokery gas into its components by the Linde process.

  10. 29 CFR 4043.24 - Termination or partial termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Termination or partial termination. 4043.24 Section 4043.24....24 Termination or partial termination. (a) Reportable event. A reportable event occurs when the Secretary of the Treasury determines that there has been a termination or partial termination of a plan...

  11. Hydrogen program summary Fiscal Year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1995-03-01

    The annual program summary provides stakeholders within the hydrogen community with a snapshop of important advances that have occurred in the National Hydrogen Program over the fiscal year, including industry interactions and cooperation. The document will also be used to encourage additional potential industrial partners to join the Hydrogen Program Team. Fiscal Year 1994 marked a turning point for the Hydrogen Program, with a budget that grew significantly. The focus of the program was broadened to include development of hydrogen production technologies using municipal solid waste and biomass, in addition to an increased emphasis on industrial involvement and near-term demonstration projects. In order to maintain its near- and long-term balance, the Hydrogen Program will continue with basic, fundamental research that provides the long-term, high-risk, high-payoff investment in hydrogen as an energy carrier.

  12. Mixture including hydrogen and hydrocarbon having pressure-temperature stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Wendy L. (Inventor); Mao, Ho-Kwang (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The invention relates to a method of storing hydrogen that employs a mixture of hydrogen and a hydrocarbon that can both be used as fuel. In one embodiment, the method involves maintaining a mixture including hydrogen and a hydrocarbon in the solid state at ambient pressure and a temperature in excess of about 10 K.

  13. Volume 1: The Solid-Gas Singlet Delta Oxygen Generator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alfano, Angelo

    2004-01-01

    ...: a) construction of a Raman diagnostic system for the simultaneous measurement of excited and ground state oxygen in gas-solid reactions between solid peroxides and hydrogen halides or chlorine gas, b...

  14. The electronic structures of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Coles, B R

    2013-01-01

    The Electronic Structures of Solids aims to provide students of solid state physics with the essential concepts they will need in considering properties of solids that depend on their electronic structures and idea of the electronic character of particular materials and groups of materials. The book first discusses the electronic structure of atoms, including hydrogen atom and many-electron atom. The text also underscores bonding between atoms and electrons in metals. Discussions focus on bonding energies and structures in the solid elements, eigenstates of free-electron gas, and electrical co

  15. Prospects for hydrogen storage in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozzini, Valentina; Pellegrini, Vittorio

    2013-01-07

    Hydrogen-based fuel cells are promising solutions for the efficient and clean delivery of electricity. Since hydrogen is an energy carrier, a key step for the development of a reliable hydrogen-based technology requires solving the issue of storage and transport of hydrogen. Several proposals based on the design of advanced materials such as metal hydrides and carbon structures have been made to overcome the limitations of the conventional solution of compressing or liquefying hydrogen in tanks. Nevertheless none of these systems are currently offering the required performances in terms of hydrogen storage capacity and control of adsorption/desorption processes. Therefore the problem of hydrogen storage remains so far unsolved and it continues to represent a significant bottleneck to the advancement and proliferation of fuel cell and hydrogen technologies. Recently, however, several studies on graphene, the one-atom-thick membrane of carbon atoms packed in a honeycomb lattice, have highlighted the potentialities of this material for hydrogen storage and raise new hopes for the development of an efficient solid-state hydrogen storage device. Here we review on-going efforts and studies on functionalized and nanostructured graphene for hydrogen storage and suggest possible developments for efficient storage/release of hydrogen under ambient conditions.

  16. Shape-dependent hydrogen-storage properties in Pd nanocrystals: which does hydrogen prefer, octahedron (111) or cube (100)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guangqin; Kobayashi, Hirokazu; Dekura, Shun; Ikeda, Ryuichi; Kubota, Yoshiki; Kato, Kenichi; Takata, Masaki; Yamamoto, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Syo; Kitagawa, Hiroshi

    2014-07-23

    Pd octahedrons and cubes enclosed by {111} and {100} facets, respectively, have been synthesized for investigation of the shape effect on hydrogen-absorption properties. Hydrogen-storage properties were investigated using in situ powder X-ray diffraction, in situ solid-state (2)H NMR and hydrogen pressure-composition isotherm measurements. With these measurements, it was found that the exposed facets do not affect hydrogen-storage capacity; however, they significantly affect the absorption speed, with octahedral nanocrystals showing the faster response. The heat of adsorption of hydrogen and the hydrogen diffusion pathway were suggested to be dominant factors for hydrogen-absorption speed. Furthermore, in situ solid-state (2)H NMR detected for the first time the state of (2)H in a solid-solution (Pd + H) phase of Pd nanocrystals at rt.

  17. Sputtering of the most volatile solids: The solid hydrogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.; Ellegaard, O.

    1995-01-01

    -film yield can be approximated fairly well by a quadratic function of the stopping power except for a somewhat steeper dependence for proton-bombarded deuterium. The yield increases strongly with decreasing sublimation energy from one isotope to another. No existing theory can account for the dependence...... of the yield on the electronic stopping power as well as the sublimation energy....

  18. CONTAINER TERMINALS IN EUROPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart W. WIEGMANS

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims to address the linkage between logistics (in particular, the management of marketing channel flows and transport markets, while also the interaction between these two markets and intermodal container terminals is analysed. The marketing channel theory is used to describe all relevant actors and flows that run through marketing channels, starting with customer needs and ending with customer satisfaction. Porter's theory of competitive advantages is used to review competitive forces in both markets. Finally, a competitor analysis is performed for the logistics and transport market. These theories are applied so as to be able to determine the competitive position of intermodal container terminals with a view to the management of marketing channel flows and the physical transport of freight flows. Hence, the central question of this paper is: Which markets are served by intermodal container terminals and with whom are they competing? At present, neither the maritime container terminals nor the continental container terminals appear to have a significant influence in the logistics service market; they concentrate mainly on the physical movement of containers (transshipment. Furthermore, maritime container terminals and continental container terminals are not dominant players in the transport service market. Our conclusion is that continental terminals are predominantly competing with unimodal road transport, with neighbouring continental terminals and with barge transport companies.

  19. Hydrogen in an oscillating porous vycor glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondo, Y.; Schindler, M.; Pobell, F. [Universitaet Bayreuth (Germany)

    1995-10-01

    The authors investigate hydrogen in porous Vycor glass with a torsional oscillator technique. Although our primary purpose is searching for a superfluid transition of hydrogen supercooled in Vycor, we find that hydrogen molecules which are adsorbed and liquefied in Vycor at T > T{sub 3} (triple point of bulk H{sub 2}) leave the Vycor when decreasing the temperature to below a characteristic value T{sub c} < T{sub 3}. We discuss this phenomenon in terms of a free enregy balance between solid/liquid hydrogen inside and outside the Vycor.

  20. Formation of an Ion-Pair Molecule with a Single NH+...Cl- Hydrogen Bond: Raman spectra of 1,1,3,3-Tetramethylguanidinium chloride in the solid state, in solution and in the vapor phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    scattering spectra are presented and assigned, by comparing to the quantum mechanical calculations. It is concluded that dimeric molecular ion pairs with four N-H+ · · · Cl- hydrogen bonds probably exist in the solutions and are responsible for the relatively high solubility of the “salt” in ethanol......- hydrogen bond, the stretching band of which is causing the band....

  1. Hydrogen program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gronich, S. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Utility Technologies

    1997-12-31

    This paper consists of viewgraphs which summarize the following: Hydrogen program structure; Goals for hydrogen production research; Goals for hydrogen storage and utilization research; Technology validation; DOE technology validation activities supporting hydrogen pathways; Near-term opportunities for hydrogen; Market for hydrogen; and List of solicitation awards. It is concluded that a full transition toward a hydrogen economy can begin in the next decade.

  2. Organizational Relationship Termination Competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Thomas; Geersbro, Jens

    2011-01-01

    that a firm's percentage of unwanted customers decreases significantly as acceptance of termination increases, if the firm's definition of unwanted customers is well understood, and if a firm has clear termination routines. In addition, general focus on profitability and external constraints on relationship...

  3. Hydrogen usage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1942-10-22

    This short tabular report listed the number of m/sup 3/ of hydrogen required for a (metric) ton of product for various combinations of raw material and product in a hydrogenation procedure. In producing auto gasoline, bituminous coal required 2800 m/sup 3/, brown coal required 2400 m/sup 3/, high-temperature-carbonization tar required 2100 m/sup 3/, bituminous coal distillation tar required 1300 m/sup 3/, brown-coal low-temperature-carbonization tar required 850 m/sup 3/, petroleum residues required 900 m/sup 3/, and gas oil required 500 m/sup 3/. In producing diesel oil, brown coal required 1900 m/sup 3/, whereas petroleum residues required 500 m/sup 3/. In producing diesel oil, lubricants, and paraffin by the TTH (low-temperature-hydrogenation) process, brown-coal low-temperature-carbonization tar required 550 m/sup 3/. 1 table.

  4. Effect of vegetable oil oxidation on the hydrogenation reaction process

    OpenAIRE

    Kalantari, Faranak; Bahmaei, Manochehr; Ameri, Majid; Shoaei, Ehsan

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogenation has been carried out in a batch reactor with three different oxidized bleached oils in order to discover the effect of oxidation on the hydrogenation reaction process. Specifications of hydrogenated oils such as melting point, Iodine value, solid fat content and fatty acid composition of the oxidized oils were compared with their un-oxidized reference oils. Oxidized bleached sunflower oil was hydrogenated to target melting points (34, 39 and 42°C) at higher iodine values vs. its...

  5. Detroit Commuter Hydrogen Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Jerry; Prebo, Brendan

    2010-07-31

    This project was undertaken to demonstrate the viability of using hydrogen as a fuel in an internal combustion engine vehicle for use as a part of a mass transit system. The advantages of hydrogen as a fuel include renew-ability, minimal environmental impact on air quality and the environment, and potential to reduce dependence on foreign energy sources for the transportation sector. Recognizing the potential for the hydrogen fuel concept, the Southeast Michigan Congress of Governments (SEMCOG) determined to consider it in the study of a proposed regional mass transit rail system for southeast Michigan. SEMCOG wanted to evaluate the feasibility of using hydrogen fueled internal combustion engine (H2ICE) vehicles in shuttle buses to connect the Detroit Metro Airport to a proposed, nearby rail station. Shuttle buses are in current use on the airport for passenger parking and inter-terminal transport. This duty cycle is well suited to the application of hydrogen fuel at this time because of the ability to re-fuel vehicles at a single nearby facility, overcoming the challenge of restricted fuel availability in the undeveloped hydrogen fuel infrastructure. A cooperative agreement between SEMCOG and the DOE was initiated and two H2ICE buses were placed in regular passenger service on March 29, 2009 and operated for six months in regular passenger service. The buses were developed and built by the Ford Motor Company. Wayne County Airport Authority provided the location for the demonstration with the airport transportation contractor, Metro Cars Inc. operating the buses. The buses were built on Ford E450 chassis and incorporated a modified a 6.8L V-10 engine with specially designed supercharger, fuel rails and injectors among other sophisticated control systems. Up to 30 kg of on-board gaseous hydrogen were stored in a modular six tank, 350 bar (5000 psi) system to provide a 150 mile driving range. The bus chassis and body were configured to carry nine passengers with

  6. Versatile Hydrogen

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hydrogen is probably the most intriguing ele- ment in the periodic table. Although it is only the seventh most abundant element on earth, it is the most abundant element in the uni- verse. It combines with almost all the ele- ments of the periodic table, except for a few transition elements, to form binary compounds of the type E.

  7. Hydrogen Uptake of DPB Getter Pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Herberg, J L; Saab, A P; Weigle, J; Chinn, S C; Maxwell, R S; McLean II, W

    2008-05-30

    The physical and chemical properties of 1,4-diphenylbutadiyne (DPB) blended with carbon-supported Pd (DPB-Pd/C) in the form of pellets during hydrogenation were investigated. A thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) was employed to measure the kinetics of the hydrogen uptake by the DPB getter pellets. The kinetics obtained were then used to develop a semi-empirical model, based on gas diffusion into solids, to predict the performance of the getter pellets under various conditions. The accuracy of the prediction model was established by comparing the prediction models with independent experimental data on hydrogen pressure buildup in sealed systems containing DPB getter pellets and subjected to known rates of hydrogen input. The volatility of the hydrogenated DPB products and its effects on the hydrogen uptake kinetics were also analyzed.

  8. Comsat's TDMA traffic terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, M. C.; Bogaert, W. M.

    1985-06-01

    Comsat has installed two traffic terminals in the Etam earth-station and is currently installing a third in the new Roaring Creek earth-station to access the Intelsat TDMA network. This paper describes the Comsat TDMA traffic terminal equipment from the supergroup interface to the antenna. Comsat's 1: N redundancy approach for terrestrial interface equipment and DSI unit back-up is described as well as electrical path length, amplitude and group delay equalization techniques, special on-line RF monitoring and failure reporting facilities and the operation and maintenance center which can operate and perform diagnostic testing on up to four traffic terminals from a central location.

  9. Nanolithography on hydrogen terminateed silicon by scanning probe microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schönenberger, Christian; Kramer, Niels; Kramer, N.

    1996-01-01

    Scanning-probe microscopes (SPM), i.e. the scanning-tunneling and force microscopes, can be used to locally oxidize hydrogen-terminated silicon and hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Because of its reliability and potential for pattern transfer, this lithography process has found great attention and

  10. Hydrogen in metals

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Carter, TJ

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The effects of hydrogen on various metals and the use of metal hydrides for hydrogen storage are discussed. The mechanisms of, and differences between, hydrogen embrittlement and hydrogen attack of ferritic steels are compared, common sources...

  11. Terminated Multifamily Mortgages Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — This dataset includes all terminated HUD Multifamily mortgages except those from the Hospital Mortgage Insurance Program. It includes the Holder and Servicer at the...

  12. Antecedents of Customer Relationship Termination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Geersbro, Jens; Ritter, Thomas

    relationships as a managerial task. This paper contributes by (1) developing a conceptualization of relationship termination competence and (2) analyzing its antecedents. The empirical results identify termination acceptance, definition non-customers, organizational relationship termination routines...

  13. Development of Advanced Small Hydrogen Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sapru, Krishna; Tan, Zhaosheng; Chao, Ben

    2010-09-30

    The main objective of the project is to develop advanced, low cost conversions of small (< 25 hp) gasoline internal combustion engines (ICEs) to run on hydrogen fuel while maintaining the same performance and durability. This final technical report summarizes the results of i) the details of the conversion of several small gasoline ICEs to run on hydrogen, ii) the durability test of a converted hydrogen engine and iii) the demonstration of a prototype bundled canister solid hydrogen storage system. Peak power of the hydrogen engine achieves 60% of the power output of the gasoline counterpart. The efforts to boost the engine power with various options including installing the over-sized turbocharger, retrofit of custom-made pistons with high compression ratio, an advanced ignition system, and various types of fuel injection systems are not realized. A converted Honda GC160 engine with ACS system to run with hydrogen fuel is successful. Total accumulative runtime is 785 hours. A prototype bundled canister solid hydrogen storage system having nominal capacity of 1.2 kg is designed, constructed and demonstrated. It is capable of supporting a wide range of output load of a hydrogen generator.

  14. Effective hydrogen storage: a strategic chemistry challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, William I F

    2011-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of the current status and future potential of hydrogen storage from a chemistry perspective and is based on the concluding presentation of the Faraday Discussion 151--Hydrogen Storage Materials. The safe, effective and economical storage of hydrogen is one of the main scientific and technological challenges in the move towards a low-carbon economy. One key sector is transportation where future vehicles will most likely be developed around a balance of battery-electric and hydrogen fuel-cell electric technologies. Although there has been a very significant research effort in solid-state hydrogen storage, high-pressure gas storage combined with conventional metal hydrides is still seen as the current intermediate-term candidate for car manufacturers. Significant issues have arisen in the search for improved solid-state hydrogen storage materials; for example, facile reversibility has been a major challenge for many recently studied complex hydrides while physisorption in porous structures is still restricted to cryogenic temperatures. However, many systems fulfil the majority of necessary criteria for improved hydrogen storage--indeed, the discovery of reversibility in multicomponent hydride systems along with recent chemistry breakthroughs in off-board and solvent-assisted regeneration suggest that the goal of both improved on-board reversible and off-board regenerated hydrogen storage systems can be achieved.

  15. The hydrogen; L'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The hydrogen as an energy system represents nowadays a main challenge (in a scientific, economical and environmental point of view). The physical and chemical characteristics of hydrogen are at first given. Then, the challenges of an hydrogen economy are explained. The different possibilities of hydrogen production are described as well as the distribution systems and the different possibilities of hydrogen storage. Several fuel cells are at last presented: PEMFC, DMFC and SOFC. (O.M.)

  16. Hydrogen storage by physisorption on porous materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panella, B.

    2006-09-13

    A great challenge for commercializing hydrogen powered vehicles is on-board hydrogen storage using economic and secure systems. A possible solution is hydrogen storage in light-weight solid materials. Here three principle storage mechanisms can be distinguished: i) absorption of hydrogen in metals ii) formation of compounds with ionic character, like complex hydrides and iii) physisorption (or physical adsorption) of hydrogen molecules on porous materials. Physical adsorption exhibits several advantages over chemical hydrogen storage as for example the complete reversibility and the fast kinetics. Two classes of porous materials were investigated for physical hydrogen storage, i.e. different carbon nanostructures and crystalline metal-organic frameworks possessing extremely high specific surface area. Hydrogen adsorption isotherms were measured using a Sieverts' apparatus both at room temperature and at 77 K at pressures up to the saturation regime. Additionally, the adsorption sites of hydrogen in these porous materials were identified using thermal desorption spectroscopy extended to very low temperatures (down to 20 K). Furthermore, the adsorbed hydrogen phase was studied in various materials using Raman spectroscopy at different pressures and temperatures. The results show that the maximum hydrogen storage capacity of porous materials correlates linearly with the specific surface area and is independent of structure and composition. In addition the pore structure of the adsorbent plays an important role for hydrogen storage since the adsorption sites for H2 could be assigned to pores possessing different dimensions. Accordingly it was shown that small pores are necessary to reach high storage capacities already at low pressures. This new understanding may help to tailor and optimize new porous materials for hydrogen storage. (orig.)

  17. Carbon Dioxide-Free Hydrogen Production with Integrated Hydrogen Separation and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Stefan; Müller, Michael; Jorschick, Holger; Helmin, Marta; Bösmann, Andreas; Palkovits, Regina; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-01-10

    An integration of CO2 -free hydrogen generation through methane decomposition coupled with hydrogen/methane separation and chemical hydrogen storage through liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) systems is demonstrated. A potential, very interesting application is the upgrading of stranded gas, for example, gas from a remote gas field or associated gas from off-shore oil drilling. Stranded gas can be effectively converted in a catalytic process by methane decomposition into solid carbon and a hydrogen/methane mixture that can be directly fed to a hydrogenation unit to load a LOHC with hydrogen. This allows for a straight-forward separation of hydrogen from CH4 and conversion of hydrogen to a hydrogen-rich LOHC material. Both, the hydrogen-rich LOHC material and the generated carbon on metal can easily be transported to destinations of further industrial use by established transport systems, like ships or trucks. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Proteome analysis of vaccinia virus IHD-W-infected HEK 293 cells with 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-PSD-TOF MS of on solid phase support N-terminally sulfonated peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartel Sebastian

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the successful eradication of smallpox by the WHO-led vaccination programme, pox virus infections remain a considerable health threat. The possible use of smallpox as a bioterrorism agent as well as the continuous occurrence of zoonotic pox virus infections document the relevance to deepen the understanding for virus host interactions. Since the permissiveness of pox infections is independent of hosts surface receptors, but correlates with the ability of the virus to infiltrate the antiviral host response, it directly depends on the hosts proteome set. In this report the proteome of HEK293 cells infected with Vaccinia Virus strain IHD-W was analyzed by 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis and MALDI-PSD-TOF MS in a bottom-up approach. Results The cellular and viral proteomes of VACV IHD-W infected HEK293 cells, UV-inactivated VACV IHD-W-treated as well as non-infected cells were compared. Derivatization of peptides with 4-sulfophenyl isothiocyanate (SPITC carried out on ZipTipμ-C18 columns enabled protein identification via the peptides' primary sequence, providing improved s/n ratios as well as signal intensities of the PSD spectra. The expression of more than 24 human proteins was modulated by the viral infection. Effects of UV-inactivated and infectious viruses on the hosts' proteome concerning energy metabolism and proteins associated with gene expression and protein-biosynthesis were quite similar. These effects might therefore be attributed to virus entry and virion proteins. However, the modulation of proteins involved in apoptosis was clearly correlated to infectious viruses. Conclusions The proteome analysis of infected cells provides insight into apoptosis modulation, regulation of cellular gene expression and the regulation of energy metabolism. The confidence of protein identifications was clearly improved by the peptides' derivatization with SPITC on a solid phase support. Some of the identified proteins

  19. Termination of a toxic Alexandrium bloom with hydrogen peroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burson, A.; Matthijs, H.C.P.; Bruijne, de W.; Talens, R.; Hoogenboom, L.A.P.; Gerssen, A.; Visser, P.M.; Stomp, M.; Steur, K.; Scheppingen, van Y.; Huisman, J.

    2014-01-01

    The dinoflagellate Alexandrium ostenfeldii is a well-known harmful algal species that can potentially cause paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP). Usually A. ostenfeldii occurs in low background concentrations only, but in August of 2012 an exceptionally dense bloom of more than 1 million cells L-1

  20. Regio- and stereoselective hydrosilylation of immobilized terminal alkynes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Palle Jacob; Henriksen, Jonas; Gotfredsen, Charlotte Held

    2008-01-01

    Regio- and stereoselective hydrosilylation of terminal alkynes on solid support using diisopropyl hydrosilanes yielding b-(E)-vinyl silanes with excellent selectivity is reported. The hydrosilylation is catalyzed by Pt(DVDS)/P(iBuNCH2CH2)3N (DVDS = 1,3-divinyl-1,1,3,3-tetramethyl-disiloxane), in ......Regio- and stereoselective hydrosilylation of terminal alkynes on solid support using diisopropyl hydrosilanes yielding b-(E)-vinyl silanes with excellent selectivity is reported. The hydrosilylation is catalyzed by Pt(DVDS)/P(iBuNCH2CH2)3N (DVDS = 1,3-divinyl-1,1,3,3-tetramethyl...

  1. Coal terminal guide 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-08-01

    IBJ`s third edition of its annual guide to the world`s multi-user coal terminals includes comprehensive details of terminals in 44 countries. The guide sets out information for rapid and easy reference comprising contact, full address and communication details as well as berth dimensions and constraints, loading equipment and daily loading rate, annual loading capacity, daily discharge rate, annual discharge capacity, annual throughput capacity, storage facilities, stockyard capacity and equipment, processing facilities and so on. All information has been compiled from specific questionnaires and is presented alphabetically in country order.

  2. Windows Terminal Servers Orchestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bukowiec, Sebastian; Gaspar, Ricardo; Smith, Tim

    2017-10-01

    Windows Terminal Servers provide application gateways for various parts of the CERN accelerator complex, used by hundreds of CERN users every day. The combination of new tools such as Puppet, HAProxy and Microsoft System Center suite enable automation of provisioning workflows to provide a terminal server infrastructure that can scale up and down in an automated manner. The orchestration does not only reduce the time and effort necessary to deploy new instances, but also facilitates operations such as patching, analysis and recreation of compromised nodes as well as catering for workload peaks.

  3. EXTREME AND TERMINAL STATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.F. Litvitsky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Author brings modern conception of extreme and terminal states, their types, likenesses and differences, etiology, key common chains of pathogenesis, principles and methods of their treatment. Pathophysiological data on one of extreme states — collapse — is described in details. Next publications will present the data on shock and coma.Key words: extreme and terminal states, vicious circle of pathogenesis, extreme regulation, principles of treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(3:74-80

  4. Electrical termination techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oakey, W. E.; Schleicher, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    A technical review of high reliability electrical terminations for electronic equipment was made. Seven techniques were selected from this review for further investigation, experimental work, and preliminary testing. From the preliminary test results, four techniques were selected for final testing and evaluation. These four were: (1) induction soldering, (2) wire wrap, (3) percussive arc welding, and (4) resistance welding. Of these four, induction soldering was selected as the best technique in terms of minimizing operator errors, controlling temperature and time, minimizing joint contamination, and ultimately producing a reliable, uniform, and reusable electrical termination.

  5. Terminal oxidases of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, S E; Schlarb-Ridley, B G; Bendall, D S; Howe, C J

    2005-08-01

    The respiratory chain of cyanobacteria appears to be branched rather than linear; furthermore, respiratory and photosynthetic electron-transfer chains co-exist in the thylakoid membrane and even share components. This review will focus on the three types of terminal respiratory oxidases identified so far on a genetic level in cyanobacteria: aa3-type cytochrome c oxidase, cytochrome bd-quinol oxidase and the alternative respiratory terminal oxidase. We summarize here their genetic, biochemical and biophysical characterization to date and discuss their interactions with electron donors as well as their physiological roles.

  6. Hydrogen storage in complex metal hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BORISLAV BOGDANOVIĆ

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex metal hydrides such as sodium aluminohydride (NaAlH4 and sodium borohydride (NaBH4 are solid-state hydrogen-storage materials with high hydrogen capacities. They can be used in combination with fuel cells as a hydrogen source thus enabling longer operation times compared with classical metal hydrides. The most important point for a wide application of these materials is the reversibility under moderate technical conditions. At present, only NaAlH4 has favourable thermodynamic properties and can be employed as a thermally reversible means of hydrogen storage. By contrast, NaBH4 is a typical non- -reversible complex metal hydride; it reacts with water to produce hydrogen.

  7. Japan's New Sunshine Project. 1998 Annual summary of hydrogen energy R and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    Summarized herein are the reports on R and D efforts on hydrogen energy, as part of the FY 1998 New Sunshine Project. For production of hydrogen, characteristics related to transport number were investigated for steam electrolysis at high temperature, in which a sintered ceramic powder was used as the electrolyte and the cell was equipped with platinum electrodes. For utilization of hydrogen, energy conversion techniques were investigated using hydrogen occluding alloys for testing methods for alloy microstructures and hydrogenation characteristics, and preparation of and performance testing methods for the cathodes charged with the aid of hydrogen gas. For analysis/assessment for development of hydrogen-related techniques, the investigated items included water electrolysis with solid polymer electrolytes, hydrogen transport techniques using metal hydrides, hydrogen storing techniques using metal hydrides, hydrogen engines, and techniques for preventing hydrogen embrittlement. Analysis/assessment for development of hydrogen turbines was also investigated as one of the 12 R and D themes reported herein. (NEDO)

  8. The challenge of storage in the hydrogen energy cycle: nanostructured hydrides as a potential solution

    OpenAIRE

    Hanlon, James M.; Reardon, Hazel; Tapia-Ruiz, Nuria; Gregory, Duncan H.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen has the capacity to provide society with the means to carry ‘green’ energy between the point of generation and the point of use. A sustainable energy society in which a hydrogen economy predominates will require renewable generation provided, for example, by artificial photosynthesis and clean, efficient energy conversion effected, for example, by hydrogen fuel cells. Vital in the hydrogen cycle is the ability to store hydrogen safely and effectively. Solid-state storage in hydrides ...

  9. Settings for Terminal Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corless, Inge B.

    1988-01-01

    Examines topics related to delivery of terminal care services: ability of various hospice programs to survive financially, contributions of various models of hospice care, impact of Medicare legislation on hospice movement, demonstration of unique hospice intervention, integration of spiritual care into hospice, and role of hospice in care of…

  10. Termination of protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuite, M F; Stansfield, I

    1994-05-01

    One of three mRNA codons--UAA, UAG and UGA--is used to signal to the elongating ribosome that translation should be terminated at this point. Upon the arrival of the stop codon at the ribosomal acceptor(A)-site, a protein release factor (RF) binds to the ribosome resulting in the peptidyl transferase centre of the ribosome switching to a hydrolytic function to remove the completed polypeptide chain from the peptidyl-tRNA bound at the adjacent ribosomal peptidyl(P)-site. In this review recent advances in our understanding of the mechanism of termination in the bacterium Escherichia coli will be summarised, paying particular attention to the roles of 16S ribosomal RNA and the release factors RF-1, RF-2 and RF-3 in stop codon recognition. Our understanding of the translation termination process in eukaryotes is much more rudimentary with the identity of the single eukaryotic release factor (eRF) still remaining elusive. Finally, several examples of how the termination mechanism can be subverted either to expand the genetic code (e.g. selenocysteine insertion at UGA codons) or to regulate the expression of mammalian retroviral or plant viral genomes will be discussed.

  11. Making Wireless Terminals Simpler

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Søren Skovgaard; Popovski, Petar; De Carvalho, Elisabeth

    2005-01-01

    The exponential growth of user demands and the limitations of 3G systems have brought researchers and industry to propose solutions for the next generation. Among the requirements are higher bit rates and cheaper deployment. In this paper we focus on a terminal complexity problem related to channel...

  12. Advantages and Limitations of Solid Layer Experiments in Muon Catalyzed Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, G. M., E-mail: Glen.Marshall@triumf.ca [TRIUMF (Canada); Adamczak, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (Poland); Bailey, J. M. [Chester Technology (United Kingdom); Beveridge, J. L. [TRIUMF (Canada); Beer, G. A. [University of Victoria, Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Brewer, J. H. [University of British Columbia, Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Bystritsky, V. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Faifman, M. P. [Russian Research Center ' , Kurchatov Institute' (Russian Federation); Forster, B. M.; Fujiwara, M. C. [University of British Columbia, Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Huber, T. M. [Gustavus Adolphus College, Physics (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [University of Fribourg, Physics Department (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (United States); Kendall, K. R. [TRIUMF (Canada); Kherani, N. P. [Ontario Hydro (Canada); Kim, S. K. [Jeonbuk National University (Korea, Republic of); Knowles, P. E. [University of Victoria, Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Kunselman, A. R. [Jeonbuk National University (Korea, Republic of); Maier, M. [University of Victoria, Physics and Astronomy (Canada); Markushin, V. E. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland)

    2001-12-15

    Since the discovery that muonic deuterium at energies near a few eV could travel distances of the order of 1 mm in condensed hydrogen, and in particular that muonic tritium and muonic deuterium could emerge from the surface of a solid hydrogen layer, the advantages of solid targets have enabled the study of several processes important in muon catalyzed fusion. A review of the results is presented, emphasizing the strengths and limitations of the use of solid hydrogen layer targets.

  13. Solid Matter

    CERN Document Server

    Angelo, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Supported by a generous quantity of full-color illustrations and interesting sidebars, Solid Matter introduces the basic characteristics and properties of solid matter. It briefly describes the cosmic connection of the elements, leading readers through several key events in human pre-history that resulted in more advanced uses of matter in the solid state. Chapters include:. -Solid Matter: An Initial Perspective. -Physical Behavior of Matter. -The Gravity of Matter. -Fundamentals of Materials Science. -Rocks and Minerals. -Metals. -Building Materials. -Carbon Earth's Most Versatile Element. -S

  14. Calculations of Total and Differential Solid Angles for a Proton Recoil Solid State Detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konijn, J.; Lauber, A.; Tollander, B.

    1963-08-15

    The solid angles have been computed for a proton recoil counter consisting of a circular hydrogenous foil viewed by an isotropic neutron point source at different distances from the target foil. Tables are given for the total subtended solid angle as well as the differential energy distribution function of the proton recoil spectrum. The influence of finite foil thickness has also been studied.

  15. Metallic Hydrogen: The Most Powerful Rocket Fuel Yet To Exist

    OpenAIRE

    Silvera, Isaac F.; Cole, John W.

    2010-01-01

    Wigner and Huntington first predicted that pressures of order 25 GPa were required for the transition of solid molecular hydrogen to the atomic metallic phase. Later it was predicted that metallic hydrogen might be a metastable material so that it remains metallic when pressure is released. Experimental pressures achieved on hydrogen have been more than an order of magnitude higher than the predicted transition pressure and yet it remains an insulator. We discuss the applications of metast...

  16. Ice age terminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R Lawrence; Broecker, Wallace S; Denton, George H; Kong, Xinggong; Wang, Yongjin; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Xianfeng

    2009-10-09

    230Th-dated oxygen isotope records of stalagmites from Sanbao Cave, China, characterize Asian Monsoon (AM) precipitation through the ends of the third- and fourthmost recent ice ages. As a result, AM records for the past four glacial terminations can now be precisely correlated with those from ice cores and marine sediments, establishing the timing and sequence of major events. In all four cases, observations are consistent with a classic Northern Hemisphere summer insolation intensity trigger for an initial retreat of northern ice sheets. Meltwater and icebergs entering the North Atlantic alter oceanic and atmospheric circulation and associated fluxes of heat and carbon, causing increases in atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic temperatures that drive the termination in the Southern Hemisphere. Increasing CO2 and summer insolation drive recession of northern ice sheets, with probable positive feedbacks between sea level and CO2.

  17. Modeling the Hydrogen Bond within Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lykos, Peter

    2004-01-01

    The structure of a hydrogen bond is elucidated within the framework of molecular dynamics based on the model of Rahman and Stillinger (R-S) liquid water treatment. Thus, undergraduates are exposed to the powerful but simple use of classical mechanics to solid objects from a molecular viewpoint.

  18. STUDIES ON SOLVENT EXTRACTION OF FREE HYDROGEN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    industries, metal plating, and extraction of gold and silver from low grade ores. Other sources include emission from municipal solid waste incinerators, biomass burning, fossil fuel combustion including fuel emission, fumigation operation, production of coke and in cigarette smoke. In air, it is present as gaseous hydrogen ...

  19. Hydrogen Pellet-Rotating Plasma Interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L. W.; Sillesen, Alfred Hegaard; Øster, Flemming

    1977-01-01

    Spectroscopic measurements on the interaction between solid hydrogen pellets and rotating plasmas are reported. It was found that the light emitted is specific to the pellet material, and that the velocity of the ablated H-atoms is of the order of l0^4 m/s. The investigation was carried out...

  20. Equilibrium and Termination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Oury

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a reduction of the termination problem for a Turing machine (in the simplified form of the Post correspondence problem to the problem of determining whether a continuous-time Markov chain presented as a set of Kappa graph-rewriting rules has an equilibrium. It follows that the problem of whether a computable CTMC is dissipative (ie does not have an equilibrium is undecidable.

  1. Coal terminal project report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-03-01

    Malaysia is building the necessary infrastructure to cope with an increasing demand for electricity. Its restructured energy policy has led to construction of the 2,100 MW Manjung coal-fired power plant in the state of Perak, for which coal has to be imported via the new Lekiv Bulk Terminal (LBT) adjacent to the plant. Contracts for the LBC and the TNBJ coal stockyard were awarded to the Koch Consortium. The article describes equipment for handling and storing coal. 4 photos.

  2. Terminal Satisfiability in GSTE

    OpenAIRE

    Yongsheng Xu; Guowu Yang; Zhengwei Chang; Desheng Zheng; Wensheng Guo

    2014-01-01

    Generalized symbolic trajectory evaluation (GSTE) is an extension of symbolic trajectory evaluation (STE) and a method of model checking. GSTE specifications are given as assertion graphs. There are four efficient methods to verify whether a circuit model obeys an assertion graph in GSTE, Model Checking Strong Satisfiability (SMC), Model Checking Normal Satisfiability (NMC), Model Checking Fair Satisfiability (FMC), and Model Checking Terminal Satisfiability (TMC). SMC, NMC, and FMC have been...

  3. Generation of the Ultracold Muonic Hydrogen Flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bystritsky, V. M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Adamczak, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (Poland); Beer, G. A. [University of Victoria (Canada); Filipowicz, M. [Institute of Physics and Nuclear Techniques (Poland); Fujiwara, M. C. [University of Tokyo (Japan); Huber, T. M. [Gustavus Adolphus College (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States); Kim, S. K. [Jeonbuk National University (Korea, Republic of); Knowles, P. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Kunselman, A. R. [University of Wyoming (United States); Maier, M. [University of Victoria (Canada); Markushin, V. E. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Marshall, G. M. [TRIUMF (Canada); Mulhauser, F. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Olin, A. [University of Victoria (Canada); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Porcelli, T. A. [University of Northen British Columbia (Canada); Stolupin, V. A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Wozniak, J. [Institute of Physics and Nuclear Techniques (Poland)

    2001-12-15

    We present the study of {mu}p atom scattering in solid hydrogen. Anomalously large emission of E{sub p{mu}{<=}1}.9 meV {mu}p's from a solid H{sub 2} layer was observed for the first time. This three times greater {mu}p atom yield is due to non-elastic phonon scattering. As a result, it becomes possible to generate an ultracold flux of {mu}p atoms. The recent calculations of the total and differential cross sections agree with all experimental results of {mu}p atom scattering in solid H{sub 2}.

  4. Comparative costs and benefits of hydrogen vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, G.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The costs and benefits of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel are compared to gasoline, natural gas, and battery-powered vehicles. Costs, energy, efficiency, and tail-pipe and full fuel cycle emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases were estimated for hydrogen from a broad range of delivery pathways and scales: from individual vehicle refueling systems to large stations refueling 300 cars/day. Hydrogen production from natural gas, methanol, and ammonia, as well as water electrolysis based on alkaline or polymer electrolytes and steam electrolysis using solid oxide electrolytes are considered. These estimates were compared to estimates for competing fuels and vehicles, and used to construct oil use, air pollutant, and greenhouse gas emission scenarios for the U.S. passenger car fleet from 2005-2050. Fuel costs need not be an overriding concern in evaluating the suitability of hydrogen as a fuel for passenger vehicles. The combined emissions and oil import reduction benefits of hydrogen cars are estimated to be significant, valued at up to {approximately}$400/yr for each hydrogen car when primarily clean energy sources are used for hydrogen production. These benefits alone, however, become tenuous as the basis supporting a compelling rationale for hydrogen fueled vehicles, if efficient, advanced fossil-fuel hybrid electric vehicles (HEV`s) can achieve actual on-road emissions at or below ULEV standards in the 2005-2015 timeframe. It appears a robust rationale for hydrogen fuel and vehicles will need to also consider unique, strategic, and long-range benefits of hydrogen vehicles which can be achieved through the use of production, storage, delivery, and utilization methods for hydrogen which are unique among fuels: efficient use of intermittent renewable energy sources, (e,g, wind, solar), small-scale feasibility, fuel production at or near the point of use, electrolytic production, diverse storage technologies, and electrochemical conversion to electricity.

  5. The Ethics of Terminal Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agich, George J.

    1978-01-01

    Need for a critical and analytical approach to ethics of terminal care is suggested by considering a series of unexamined questions regarding justification of terminal care. If terminal care is a moral and ethical enterprise, such considerations must be given a more prominent place in discussions of the hospice movement. (Author)

  6. Scattering of muonic hydrogen atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulhauser, F. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Adamczak, A. [Institute of Nuclear Physics (Poland); Beer, G.A. [University of Victoria (Canada); Bystritsky, V.M. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Filipowicz, M. [Institute of Physics and Nuclear Techniques (Poland); Fujiwara, M.C. [University of British Columbia (Canada); Huber, T.M. [Gustavus Adolphus College (United States); Jacot-Guillarmod, R. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Kammel, P. [University of California (United States); Kim, S.K. [Jeonbuk National University (Korea, Republic of); Knowles, P. [Universite de Fribourg (Switzerland); Kunselman, A.R. [University of Wyoming (United States); Maier, M. [University of Victoria (Canada); Markushin, V.E. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Marshall, G.M. [TRIUMF (Canada); Olin, A. [University of Victoria (Canada); Petitjean, C. [Paul Scherrer Institute (Switzerland); Porcelli, T.A. [University of Victoria (Canada); Stolupin, V.A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Wozniak, J. [Institute of Physics and Nuclear Techniques (Poland)] (and others)

    1999-06-15

    Our measurement compares the energy dependence of the scattering cross-sections of muonic deuterium and tritium on hydrogen molecules for collisions in the energy range 0.1-45 eV. A time-of-flight method was used to measure the scattering cross-section as a function of the muonic atom beam energy and shows clearly the Ramsauer-Townsend effect. The results are compared with theoretical calculations by using Monte Carlo simulations. The molecular pd{mu} and pt{mu} formation creates background processes. We measure the formation rates in solid hydrogen by detecting the 5.5 MeV (pd{mu}) and 19.8 MeV (pt{mu}) {gamma}-rays emitted during the subsequent nuclear fusion processes.

  7. Hydrogen generation via anaerobic fermentation of paper mill wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez-Vazquez, Idania; Sparling, Richard; Risbey, Derek; Rinderknecht-Seijas, Noemi; Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor M

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the hydrogen production from paper mill wastes using microbial consortia of solid substrate anaerobic digesters. Inocula from mesophilic, continuous solid substrate anaerobic digestion (SSAD) reactors were transferred to small lab scale, batch reactors. Milled paper (used as a surrogate paper waste) was added as substrate and acetylene or 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) was spiked for methanogenesis inhibition. In the first phase of experiments it was found that acetylene at 1% v/v in the headspace was as effective as BES in inhibiting methanogenic activity. Hydrogen gas accumulated in the headspace of the bottles, reaching a plateau. Similar final hydrogen concentrations were obtained for reactors spiked with acetylene and BES. In the second phase of tests the headspace of the batch reactors was flushed with nitrogen gas after the first plateau of hydrogen was reached, and subsequently incubated, with no further addition of inhibitor nor substrate. It was found that hydrogen production resumed and reached a second plateau, although somewhat lower than the first one. This procedure was repeated a third time and an additional amount of hydrogen was obtained. The plateaux and initial rates of hydrogen accumulation decreased in each subsequent incubation cycle. The total cumulative hydrogen harvested in the three cycles was much higher (approx. double) than in the first cycle alone. We coined this procedure as IV-SSAH (intermittently vented solid substrate anaerobic hydrogen generation). Our results point out to a feasible strategy for obtaining higher hydrogen yields from the fermentation of industrial solid wastes, and a possible combination of waste treatment processes consisting of a first stage IV-SSAH followed by a second SSAD stage. Useful products of this approach would be hydrogen, organic acids or methane, and anaerobic digestates that could be used as soil amenders after post-treatment.

  8. Hydrogen-powered lawn mower: 14 years of operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yvon, K.; Lorenzoni, J.-L. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, 24 Quai Ernest Ansermet, University of Geneva, 1211-Geneve 4 (Switzerland)

    2006-09-15

    Our hydrogen-powered lawn mower [Yvon K, Lorenzoni J-L. Hydrogen powered lawn mower. Int J Hydrogen Energy 1993; 18, 345-48] has been operated without major interruption during the past 14 years. The commercial model was originally running on gasoline and was adapted to hydrogen by making small adjustments to the carburettor and by installing a hydrogen reservoir containing solid-state metal hydrides. During the evaluation period the only maintenance work was changing the lubricating oil of the engine once a year, and reactivating the metal hydride powder by external heating after an accidental inlet of air into the reservoir. There occurred no technical failure, and there was no safety incident, neither during operation nor during recharging of hydrogen. This demonstrates that a hydrogen-operated device of this type is mature for use by greater public. Cost and marketing issues are discussed. (author)

  9. Interface effects in NaAlH4-carbon nanocomposites for hydrogen storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, Jinbao|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/315029633; Ngene, Peter|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/314121684; Herrich, Monika; Xia, Wei; Gutfleisch, Oliver; Muhler, Martin; De Jong, Krijn P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/06885580X; De Jongh, Petra E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/186125372

    2014-01-01

    For practical solid-state hydrogen storage, reversibility under mild conditions is crucial. Complex metal hydrides such as NaAlH4 and LiBH4 have attractive hydrogen contents. However, hydrogen release and especially uptake after desorption are sluggish and require high temperatures and pressures.

  10. A hydrogen ice cube

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, C.J.; Schoonman, J.; Schrauwers, A.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen is considered to be a highly promising energy carrier. Nonetheless, before hydrogen can become the fuel of choice for the future a number of slight problems will have to be overcome. For example, how can hydrogen be safely stored? Motor vehicles running on hydrogen may be clean in concept

  11. GAT 4 production and storage of hydrogen. Report July 2004; GAT 4 procduction et stockage de l'hydrogene. Rapport juillet 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This paper concerns two aspects of the hydrogen: the production and the storage. For both parts the challenges and a state of the art are presented. It discusses also the hydrogen production by renewable energies, by solar energy, the hydrogen of hydrocarbons reforming purification, active phases development, thermal transfer simulation. Concerning the hydrogen storage the hydrogen adsorption by large surface solid, the storage by metallic hydrides, the alanates and light hydrides, the adsorption on carbon nano-tubes, the storage in nano-structures, the thermal and mechanical simulation of the hydrogen are presented. (A.L.B.)

  12. Removal of hydrogen sulfide from drilling fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilligan Jr., T. J.

    1985-10-22

    The present invention relates to a process for scavenging hydrogen sulfide which frequently becomes entrained in drilling fluid during the course of drilling operations through subterranean formations. The process consists of introducing a solid oxidant in powdered form into the circulating drilling fluid when hydrogen sulfide is encountered. The solid oxidants are selected from the group consisting of calcium hypochlorite (Ca-(OCl)/sub 2/), sodium perborate (NaBO/sub 3/), potassium permanganate (KMnO/sub 4/), and potassium peroxydisulfate (K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/). The solid oxidants are soluble in the drilling fluid, promoting fast and complete scavenging reactions without adversely altering the drilling fluid rheology.

  13. Loss and terminal illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoliel, J Q

    1985-06-01

    The experience of terminal illness can best be viewed as a situation of multiple losses involving the dying person, family members and friends, and the health care providers engaged in offering services to them. It is a major transition during which the central participants must cope with the personal meanings of the forthcoming death as well as other losses brought about by the disease process, medical treatments, and the need to provide care for the dying person. How families adapt to the stresses and changes imposed by the experience of living with dying depends on their previous experiences with death, their established patterns of communication about serious matters, and their decision-making practices. Some individuals and families are at greater risk than others for developing maladaptive responses and behaviors during and after the experience of terminal illness. Risk factors to be considered in making hypotheses about the potential for maladaptive reactions include the strength of the attachment to the dying person, uncontrollable and distressing symptoms, and coping limitations associated with age and other factors contributing to increased vulnerability to the demands of continuous change. Working effectively with different kinds of families during the transition of terminal illness can best be accomplished within a conceptual framework built upon knowledge about people undergoing change. The concept of safe conduct can serve as an overall guide for the creation of nursing services designed to offer personalized care and accessibility of professional help at times of maximum need by the family. Assisting dying patients and their families toward the achievement of their personal goals is fundamental to the idea of safe conduct. The delivery of nursing care in terminal illness requires an orientation to assessment as an ongoing process that makes use of knowledge about disease processes, medical treatments, individual and group adaptations to loss, risk

  14. Integrated Mirco-Machined Hydrogen Gas Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank DiMeoJr. Ing--shin Chen

    2005-12-15

    The widespread use of hydrogen as both an industrial process gas and an energy storage medium requires fast, selective detection of hydrogen gas. This report discusses the development of a new type of solid-state hydrogen gas sensor that couples novel metal hydride thin films with a MEMS (Micro-Electro-Mechanical System) structure known as a micro-hotplate. In this project, Micro-hotplate structures were overcoated with engineered multilayers that serve as the active hydrogen-sensing layer. The change in electrical resistance of these layers when exposed to hydrogen gas was the measured sensor output. This project focused on achieving the following objectives: (1) Demonstrating the capabilities of micro-machined H2 sensors; (2) Developing an understanding of their performance; (3) Critically evaluating the utility and viability of this technology for life safety and process monitoring applications. In order to efficiently achieve these objectives, the following four tasks were identified: (1) Sensor Design and Fabrication; (2) Short Term Response Testing; (3) Long Term Behavior Investigation; (4) Systems Development. Key findings in the project include: The demonstration of sub-second response times to hydrogen; measured sensitivity to hydrogen concentrations below 200 ppm; a dramatic improvement in the sensor fabrication process and increased understanding of the processing properties and performance relationships of the devices; the development of improved sensing multilayers; and the discovery of a novel strain based hydrogen detection mechanism. The results of this program suggest that this hydrogen sensor technology has exceptional potential to meet the stringent demands of life safety applications as hydrogen utilization and infrastructure becomes more prevalent.

  15. Acetylene terminated matrix resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, I. J.; Lee, Y. C.; Arnold, F. E.; Helminiak, T. E.

    1985-01-01

    The synthesis of resins with terminal acetylene groups has provided a promising technology to yield high performance structural materials. Because these resins cure through an addition reaction, no volatile by-products are produced during the processing. The cured products have high thermal stability and good properties retention after exposure to humidity. Resins with a wide variety of different chemical structures between the terminal acetylene groups are synthesized and their mechanical properties studied. The ability of the acetylene cured polymers to give good mechanical properties is demonstrated by the resins with quinoxaline structures. Processibility of these resins can be manipulated by varying the chain length between the acetylene groups or by blending in different amounts of reactive deluents. Processing conditions similar to the state-of-the-art epoxy can be attained by using backbone structures like ether-sulfone or bis-phenol-A. The wide range of mechanical properties and processing conditions attainable by this class of resins should allow them to be used in a wide variety of applications.

  16. Termination: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedberg, Ahron L

    2015-12-01

    In this article I posit and examine certain criteria and qualities for ending an analysis. The case study describes the end phase of a four-year psychoanalysis in which the patient's decision to move to another area forced the end of his analysis. We continued to explore and work through his core neurotic conflicts that included issues of competitive rivalry, dominance and submission, control, and anxiety about birth and death. A shift in the transference from me as a negative father to me as a supportive but competitive older brother was also examined in the context of ending treatment as well as other aspects of the transference. In addition, we analyzed the meaning of his ending treatment based on an extra-analytic circumstance. In discussing this phase of treatment, the definition and history of the term "termination" and its connotations are reviewed. Various criteria for completing an analysis are examined, and technical observations about this phase of treatment are investigated. It was found that while a significant shift in the transference occurred in this phase of the patient's analysis, conflicts related to the transference were not "resolved" in the classical sense. Terminating treatment was considered as a practical matter in which the patient's autonomy and sense of choice were respected and analyzed.

  17. Hydrogen-bromine fuel cell advance component development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charleston, Joann; Reed, James

    1988-01-01

    Advanced cell component development is performed by NASA Lewis to achieve improved performance and longer life for the hydrogen-bromine fuel cells system. The state-of-the-art hydrogen-bromine system utilizes the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) technology, similar to the SPE technology developed for the hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell system. These studies are directed at exploring the potential for this system by assessing and evaluating various types of materials for cell parts and electrode materials for Bromine-hydrogen bromine environment and fabricating experimental membrane/electrode-catalysts by chemical deposition.

  18. Early forest fire detection using low-energy hydrogen sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Nörthemann

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Most huge forest fires start in partial combustion. In the beginning of a smouldering fire, emission of hydrogen in low concentration occurs. Therefore, hydrogen can be used to detect forest fires before open flames are visible and high temperatures are generated. We have developed a hydrogen sensor comprising of a metal/solid electrolyte/insulator/semiconductor (MEIS structure which allows an economical production. Due to the low energy consumption, an autarkic working unit in the forest was established. In this contribution, first experiments are shown demonstrating the possibility to detect forest fires at a very early stage using the hydrogen sensor.

  19. Why hydrogen; Pourquoi l'hydrogene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-02-01

    The energy consumption increase and the associated environmental risks, led to develop new energy sources. The authors present the potentialities of the hydrogen in this context of energy supply safety. They detail the today market and the perspectives, the energy sources for the hydrogen production (fossils, nuclear and renewable), the hydrogen transport, storage, distribution and conversion, the application domains, the associated risks. (A.L.B.)

  20. LANL Virtual Center for Chemical Hydrogen Storage: Chemical Hydrogen Storage Using Ultra-high Surface Area Main Group Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan M. Kauzlarich; Phillip P. Power; Doinita Neiner; Alex Pickering; Eric Rivard; Bobby Ellis, T. M.; Atkins, A. Merrill; R. Wolf; Julia Wang

    2010-09-05

    The focus of the project was to design and synthesize light element compounds and nanomaterials that will reversibly store molecular hydrogen for hydrogen storage materials. The primary targets investigated during the last year were amine and hydrogen terminated silicon (Si) nanoparticles, Si alloyed with lighter elements (carbon (C) and boron (B)) and boron nanoparticles. The large surface area of nanoparticles should facilitate a favorable weight to volume ratio, while the low molecular weight elements such as B, nitrogen (N), and Si exist in a variety of inexpensive and readily available precursors. Furthermore, small NPs of Si are nontoxic and non-corrosive. Insights gained from these studies will be applied toward the design and synthesis of hydrogen storage materials that meet the DOE 2010 hydrogen storage targets: cost, hydrogen capacity and reversibility. Two primary routes were explored for the production of nanoparticles smaller than 10 nm in diameter. The first was the reduction of the elemental halides to achieve nanomaterials with chloride surface termination that could subsequently be replaced with amine or hydrogen. The second was the reaction of alkali metal Si or Si alloys with ammonium halides to produce hydrogen capped nanomaterials. These materials were characterized via X-ray powder diffraction, TEM, FTIR, TG/DSC, and NMR spectroscopy.

  1. Hydrogen nanobubble at normal hydrogen electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakabayashi, S.; Shinozaki, R.; Senda, Y.; Yoshikawa, H. Y.

    2013-05-01

    Electrochemically formed hydrogen nanobubbles at a platinum rotating disk electrode (RDE) were detected by re-oxidation charge. The dissolution time course of the hydrogen nanobubbles was measured by AFM tapping topography under open-circuit conditions at stationary platinum and gold single-crystal electrodes. The bubble dissolution at platinum was much faster than that at gold because two types of diffusion, bulk and surface diffusion, proceeded at the platinum surface, whereas surface diffusion was prohibited at the gold electrode. These findings indicated that the electrochemical reaction of normal hydrogen electrode partly proceeded heterogeneously on the three-phase boundary around the hydrogen nanobubble.

  2. Hydrogen utilization potential in subsurface sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Ram Adhikari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subsurface microbial communities undertake many terminal electron-accepting processes, often simultaneously. Using a tritium-based assay, we measured the potential hydrogen oxidation catalyzed by hydrogenase enzymes in several subsurface sedimentary environments (Lake Van, Barents Sea, Equatorial Pacific and Gulf of Mexico with different predominant electron-acceptors. Hydrogenases constitute a diverse family of enzymes expressed by microorganisms that utilize molecular hydrogen as a metabolic substrate, product or intermediate. The assay reveals the potential for utilizing molecular hydrogen and allows qualitative detection of microbial activity irrespective of the predominant electron-accepting process. Because the method only requires samples frozen immediately after recovery, the assay can be used for identifying microbial activity in subsurface ecosystems without the need to preserve live material.We measured potential hydrogen oxidation rates in all samples from multiple depths at several sites that collectively span a wide range of environmental conditions and biogeochemical zones. Potential activity normalized to total cell abundance ranges over five orders of magnitude and varies, dependent upon the predominant terminal electron acceptor. Lowest per-cell potential rates characterize the zone of nitrate reduction and highest per-cell potential rates occur in the methanogenic zone. Possible reasons for this relationship to predominant electron acceptor include (i increasing importance of fermentation in successively deeper biogeochemical zones and (ii adaptation of H2ases to successively higher concentrations of H2 in successively deeper zones.

  3. Hydrogen Utilization Potential in Subsurface Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Rishi R; Glombitza, Clemens; Nickel, Julia C; Anderson, Chloe H; Dunlea, Ann G; Spivack, Arthur J; Murray, Richard W; D'Hondt, Steven; Kallmeyer, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Subsurface microbial communities undertake many terminal electron-accepting processes, often simultaneously. Using a tritium-based assay, we measured the potential hydrogen oxidation catalyzed by hydrogenase enzymes in several subsurface sedimentary environments (Lake Van, Barents Sea, Equatorial Pacific, and Gulf of Mexico) with different predominant electron-acceptors. Hydrogenases constitute a diverse family of enzymes expressed by microorganisms that utilize molecular hydrogen as a metabolic substrate, product, or intermediate. The assay reveals the potential for utilizing molecular hydrogen and allows qualitative detection of microbial activity irrespective of the predominant electron-accepting process. Because the method only requires samples frozen immediately after recovery, the assay can be used for identifying microbial activity in subsurface ecosystems without the need to preserve live material. We measured potential hydrogen oxidation rates in all samples from multiple depths at several sites that collectively span a wide range of environmental conditions and biogeochemical zones. Potential activity normalized to total cell abundance ranges over five orders of magnitude and varies, dependent upon the predominant terminal electron acceptor. Lowest per-cell potential rates characterize the zone of nitrate reduction and highest per-cell potential rates occur in the methanogenic zone. Possible reasons for this relationship to predominant electron acceptor include (i) increasing importance of fermentation in successively deeper biogeochemical zones and (ii) adaptation of H2ases to successively higher concentrations of H2 in successively deeper zones.

  4. Hydrogen energy systems studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, J.M.; Kreutz, T.G.; Steinbugler, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    In this report the authors describe results from technical and economic assessments carried out during the past year with support from the USDOE Hydrogen R&D Program. (1) Assessment of technologies for small scale production of hydrogen from natural gas. Because of the cost and logistics of transporting and storing hydrogen, it may be preferable to produce hydrogen at the point of use from more readily available energy carriers such as natural gas or electricity. In this task the authors assess near term technologies for producing hydrogen from natural gas at small scale including steam reforming, partial oxidation and autothermal reforming. (2) Case study of developing a hydrogen vehicle refueling infrastructure in Southern California. Many analysts suggest that the first widespread use of hydrogen energy is likely to be in zero emission vehicles in Southern California. Several hundred thousand zero emission automobiles are projected for the Los Angeles Basin alone by 2010, if mandated levels are implemented. Assuming that hydrogen vehicles capture a significant fraction of this market, a large demand for hydrogen fuel could evolve over the next few decades. Refueling a large number of hydrogen vehicles poses significant challenges. In this task the authors assess near term options for producing and delivering gaseous hydrogen transportation fuel to users in Southern California including: (1) hydrogen produced from natural gas in a large, centralized steam reforming plant, and delivered to refueling stations via liquid hydrogen truck or small scale hydrogen gas pipeline, (2) hydrogen produced at the refueling station via small scale steam reforming of natural gas, (3) hydrogen produced via small scale electrolysis at the refueling station, and (4) hydrogen from low cost chemical industry sources (e.g. excess capacity in refineries which have recently upgraded their hydrogen production capacity, etc.).

  5. 77 FR 38817 - Credit Watch Termination Initiative; Termination of Direct Endorsement (DE) Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Credit Watch Termination Initiative; Termination of Direct Endorsement (DE) Approval.... SUMMARY: This notice advises of the cause and effect of termination of Direct Endorsement (DE) Approval... procedures for terminating Underwriting Authority of Direct Endorsement mortgagees. Termination of Direct...

  6. Resolution and termination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina FOLTIŞ

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The resolution, the termination and the reduction of labour conscription are regulated by articles 1549-1554 in the new Civil Code, which represents the common law in this matter. We appreciate that the new regulation does not conclusively clarify the issue related to whether the existence of liability in order to call upon the resolution is necessary or not, because the existence of this condition has been inferred under the previous regulation from the fact that the absence of liability shifts the inexecution issue on the domain of fortuitous impossibility of execution, situation in which the resolution of the contract is not in question, but that of the risk it implies.

  7. Hydrogen in semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Pankove, Jacques I

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen plays an important role in silicon technology, having a profound effect on a wide range of properties. Thus, the study of hydrogen in semiconductors has received much attention from an interdisciplinary assortment of researchers. This sixteen-chapter volume provides a comprehensive review of the field, including a discussion of hydrogenation methods, the use of hydrogen to passivate defects, the use of hydrogen to neutralize deep levels, shallow acceptors and shallow donors in silicon, vibrational spectroscopy, and hydrogen-induced defects in silicon. In addition to this detailed cove

  8. Hydrogen Car Cartridges: A New Strategy for Hydrogen Storage, Delivering and Refueling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prosini, Pier Paolo

    2007-07-01

    The purpose of the project is to introduce a sustainable model in the automotive field, guarantying the Kyoto agreements. The aim of the project is to develop an innovative hydrogen tank able to power an hydrogen fuel cell car with the same performance of liquid fuelled cars. Most of the system performance are expected to satisfy the Department of Energy (DOE) goals for 2015. The hydrogen releasing system is based on solid NaBH4 which is hydrolyzed with water or steam to obtain hydrogen. Sodium borate is obtained as by-product and it has to be recycled. Pure and humidified hydrogen, ready to be utilized in a fuel cell, is obtained by a simple and sure way. Hydrogen is produced only when it is requested and therefore there is never pressurized hydrogen or hydrogen overproduction The system works at atmospheric pressure avoiding the problems related to handling and storing pressurized gas. The car fuelling could be performed in area like the present service stations. The used cartridges can be removed and substituted by new cartridges. Contemporarily a water tank should be refilled. To improve the total energetic yield it was also proposed a NaBH4 regeneration process directly starting from the products of hydrolysis. (auth)

  9. Enhancing the hydrogen bond between the bridged hydrogen atom of diborane and ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Zhang, Xueying; Meng, Lingpeng; Zeng, Yanli

    2015-09-01

    The character of the bridged hydrogen atom (Hb) of B2H6 has become a hot issue in recent years. In this work, the complexes B2H6 · · · NH3, B2H2X4 · · · nNH3 (n = 1, 2) and 2HF · · · B2H2X4 · · · 2NH3 (X = Cl, Br, I) were constructed and studied based on the M06-2X calculations to investigate how to enhance the Hb · · · N hydrogen-bonded interaction. When the terminal hydrogen atoms (Ht) of B2H6 were replaced by X (X = Cl, Br, I) atoms, the Hb · · · N hydrogen bond were strengthened. According to the electrostatic potentials in B2H2X4, two HF molecules were added to the interspace of the B-H-B-H four-membered ring of the B2H2X4 · · · 2NH3 complexes, and H · · · X hydrogen bond formed, resulting in further enhancing effect of Hb · · · N hydrogen bond. As a result, the positive cooperative effect of Hb · · · N hydrogen bond and H · · · X hydrogen bond do enhance the interactions of each other. The two measures not only enhance the strength of Hb · · · N hydrogen bond, but also achieve the goal to make the Hb · · · N hydrogen bond perpendicular to B · · · B direction.

  10. Solid electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Kuzhikalail M.; Alamgir, Mohamed

    1993-06-15

    This invention pertains to Li ion (Li.sup.+) conductive solid polymer electrolytes composed of solvates of Li salts immobilized (encapsulated) in a solid organic polymer matrix. In particular, this invention relates to solid polymer electrolytes derived by immobilizing complexes (solvates) formed between a Li salt such as LiAsF.sub.6, LiCF.sub.3 SO.sub.3 or LiClO.sub.4 and a mixture of aprotic organic solvents having high dielectric constants such as ethylene carbonate (EC) (dielectric constant=89.6) and propylene carbonate (PC) (dielectric constant=64.4) in a polymer matrix such as polyacrylonitrile, poly(tetraethylene glycol diacrylate), or poly(vinyl pyrrolidinone).

  11. Proceedings of the 1996 U.S. DOE hydrogen program review. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The 29 papers contained in Volume 1 are related to systems analysis and hydrogen production. Papers in the systems analysis section discuss utility markets, comparison of hydrogen with other alternative fuels, hydrogen vehicles, renewable hydrogen production, storage, and detection, and hydrogen storage systems development. Hydrogen production methods include the use of algae, photosynthesis, glucose dehydrogenase, syngas, photoelectrochemical reactions, photovoltaics, water electrolysis, solar photochemical reactions, pyrolysis, catalytic steam reforming, municipal solid wastes, thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas, and plasma reformers. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. Mobile termination and mobile penetration

    OpenAIRE

    Hurkens, Sjaak; Jeon, Doh-Shin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we study how access pricing affects network competition when subscription demand is elastic and each network uses non-linear prices and can apply termination-based price discrimination. In the case of a fixed per minute termination charge, we find that a reduction of the termination charge below cost has two oppos- ing effects: it softens competition but helps to internalize network externalities. The former reduces mobile penetration while the latter boosts it. We find that fi...

  13. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01

    maximize plant output is needed in order to address the DOE turbine goal for 20-30% reduction of combined cycle cost from the baseline. A customer advisory board was instituted during Phase 1 to obtain important feedback regarding the future direction of the project. he technologies being developed for the Hydrogen Turbine will also be utilized, as appropriate, in the 2010 time frame engine and the FutureGen Plant. These new technologies and concepts also have the potential to accelerate commercialization of advanced coal-based IGCC plants in the U. S. and around the world, thereby reducing emissions, water use, solid waste production and dependence on scarce, expensive and insecure foreign energy supplies. Technology developments accomplished in Phase 1 provide a solid foundation for ensuring successful completion in Phase 2 and providing that the challenging program goals will be achieved.

  14. Handbook of hydrogen energy

    CERN Document Server

    Sherif, SA; Stefanakos, EK; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2014-01-01

    ""This book provides an excellent overview of the hydrogen economy and a thorough and comprehensive presentation of hydrogen production and storage methods.""-Scott E. Grasman, Rochester Institute of Technology, New York, USA

  15. Center for Hydrogen Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The main goals of this project were to (1) Establish a Center for Hydrogen Storage Research at Delaware State University for the preparation and characterization of selected complex metal hydrides and the determination their suitability for hydrogen ...

  16. Hydrogen production by Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaudhuri Surabhi

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The limited fossil fuel prompts the prospecting of various unconventional energy sources to take over the traditional fossil fuel energy source. In this respect the use of hydrogen gas is an attractive alternate source. Attributed by its numerous advantages including those of environmentally clean, efficiency and renew ability, hydrogen gas is considered to be one of the most desired alternate. Cyanobacteria are highly promising microorganism for hydrogen production. In comparison to the traditional ways of hydrogen production (chemical, photoelectrical, Cyanobacterial hydrogen production is commercially viable. This review highlights the basic biology of cynobacterial hydrogen production, strains involved, large-scale hydrogen production and its future prospects. While integrating the existing knowledge and technology, much future improvement and progress is to be done before hydrogen is accepted as a commercial primary energy source.

  17. Hydrogen transport membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael V.

    2005-05-31

    Composite hydrogen transport membranes, which are used for extraction of hydrogen from gas mixtures are provided. Methods are described for supporting metals and metal alloys which have high hydrogen permeability, but which are either too thin to be self supporting, too weak to resist differential pressures across the membrane, or which become embrittled by hydrogen. Support materials are chosen to be lattice matched to the metals and metal alloys. Preferred metals with high permeability for hydrogen include vanadium, niobium, tantalum, zirconium, palladium, and alloys thereof. Hydrogen-permeable membranes include those in which the pores of a porous support matrix are blocked by hydrogen-permeable metals and metal alloys, those in which the pores of a porous metal matrix are blocked with materials which make the membrane impervious to gases other than hydrogen, and cermets fabricated by sintering powders of metals with powders of lattice-matched ceramic.

  18. FLUSH - PREDICTION OF FLOW PARAMETERS OF SLUSH HYDROGEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, T.

    1994-01-01

    Slush hydrogen, a mixture of the solid and liquid phases of hydrogen, is a possible source of fuel for the National Aerospace Plane (NASP) Project. Advantages of slush hydrogen over liquid hydrogen include greater heat capacity and greater density. However, practical use of slush hydrogen as a fuel requires systems of lines, valves, etc. which are designed to deliver the fuel in slush form with minimal solid loss as a result of pipe heating or flow friction. Engineers involved with the NASP Project developed FLUSH to calculate the pressure drop and slush hydrogen solid fraction loss for steady-state, one-dimensional flow. FLUSH solves the steady-state, one-dimensional energy equation and the Bernoulli equation for pipe flow. The program performs these calculations for each two-node element--straight pipe length, elbow, valve, fitting, or other part of the piping system--specified by the user. The user provides flow rate, upstream pressure, initial solid hydrogen fraction, element heat leak, and element parameters such as length and diameter. For each element, FLUSH first calculates the pressure drop, then figures the slush solid fraction exiting the element. The code employs GASPLUS routines to calculate thermodynamic properties for the slush hydrogen. FLUSH is written in FORTRAN IV for DEC VAX series computers running VMS. An executable is provided on the tape. The GASPLUS physical properties routines which are required for building the executable are included as one object library on the program media (full source code for GASPLUS is available separately as COSMIC Program Number LEW-15091). FLUSH is available in DEC VAX BACKUP format on a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape (standard media) or on a TK50 tape cartridge. FLUSH was developed in 1989.

  19. Solar hydrogen generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebacher, D. I.; Sabol, A. P. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus, using solar energy to manufacture hydrogen by dissociating water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen molecules is described. Solar energy is concentrated on a globe containing water thereby heating the water to its dissociation temperature. The globe is pervious to hydrogen molecules permitting them to pass through the globe while being essentially impervious to oxygen molecules. The hydrogen molecules are collected after passing through the globe and the oxygen molecules are removed from the globe.

  20. Hydrogen Technologies Safety Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivkin, C. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burgess, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Buttner, W. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this guide is to provide basic background information on hydrogen technologies. It is intended to provide project developers, code officials, and other interested parties the background information to be able to put hydrogen safety in context. For example, code officials reviewing permit applications for hydrogen projects will get an understanding of the industrial history of hydrogen, basic safety concerns, and safety requirements.

  1. Is Lake Tahoe Terminal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coats, R. N.; Reuter, J.; Heyvaert, A.; Lewis, J.; Sahoo, G. B.; Schladow, G.; Thorne, J. H.

    2014-12-01

    ) the climatic water deficit will increase, especially at high elevations that will be most affected by the loss of snow, with likely consequences for existing vegetation and fire frequency. Hydrologically, Lake Tahoe is intermittently terminal; in a medical sense it is not yet terminal, but its condition—especially its valued clarity and deep blue color--is serious.

  2. Spin-State Effects on the Thermal Dihydrogen Release from Solid-State [MH(η2-H2)dppe2]+ (M = Fe, Ru, Os) Organometallic Complexes for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy, experimental thermodynamic measurements, and computational studies were performed to investigate the properties of molecular hydrogen binding to the organometallic fragments [MHdppe2]+ (M = Fe, Ru, Os; dppe =1,2-bis(diphenylphosphino)ethane) to form the dihydrogen complex fragments [MH(η2-H2)dppe2]+. Mössbauer spectroscopy showed that the dehydrogenated complex [FeHdppe2]+ adopts a geometry consistent with the triplet spin state, transitioning to a singlet state complex upon addition of the dihydrogen molecule in a manner similar to the previously studied dinitrogen complexes. From simulations, this spin transition behavior was found to be responsible for the strong binding behavior experimentally observed in the iron complex. Spin-singlet to spin-singlet transitions were found to exhibit thermodynamics consistent with the 5d > 3d > 4d binding trend observed for other transition metal dihydrogen complexes. Finally, the method for distinguishing between dihydrogen and dihydride complexes based on partial quadrupole splittings observed in Mössbauer spectra was confirmed, providing a tool for further characterization of these unique species for Mössbauer active compounds. PMID:24803973

  3. Magnesium for Hydrogen Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigeholm, B.; Kjøller, John; Larsen, Bent

    1980-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen with commercially pure magnesium powder (above 99.7%) was investigated in the temperature range 250–400 °C. Hydrogen is readily sorbed above the dissociation pressure. During the initial exposure the magnesium powder sorbs hydrogen slowly below 400 °C but during the second...

  4. Biological hydrogen photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemoto, Y. [Univ. of Miami, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Following are the major accomplishments of the 6th year`s study of biological hydrogen photoproduction which were supported by DOE/NREL. (1) We have been characterizing a biological hydrogen production system using synchronously growing aerobically nitrogen-fixing unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. Miami BG 043511. So far it was necessary to irradiate the cells to produce hydrogen. Under darkness they did not produce hydrogen. However, we found that, if the cells are incubated with oxygen, they produce hydrogen under the dark. Under 80% argon + 20% oxygen condition, the hydrogen production activity under the dark was about one third of that under the light + argon condition. (2) Also it was necessary so far to incubate the cells under argon atmosphere to produce hydrogen in this system. Argon treatment is very expensive and should be avoided in an actual hydrogen production system. We found that, if the cells are incubated at a high cell density and in a container with minimum headspace, it is not necessary to use argon for the hydrogen production. (3) Calcium ion was found to play an important role in the mechanisms of protection of nitrogenase from external oxygen. This will be a clue to understand the reason why the hydrogen production is so resistant to oxygen in this strain. (4) In this strain, sulfide can be used as electron donor for the hydrogen production. This result shows that waste water can be used for the hydrogen production system using this strain.

  5. Terminal Satisfiability in GSTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Generalized symbolic trajectory evaluation (GSTE is an extension of symbolic trajectory evaluation (STE and a method of model checking. GSTE specifications are given as assertion graphs. There are four efficient methods to verify whether a circuit model obeys an assertion graph in GSTE, Model Checking Strong Satisfiability (SMC, Model Checking Normal Satisfiability (NMC, Model Checking Fair Satisfiability (FMC, and Model Checking Terminal Satisfiability (TMC. SMC, NMC, and FMC have been proved and applied in industry, but TMC has not. This paper gives a six-tuple definition and presents a new algorithm for TMC. Based on these, we prove that our algorithm is sound and complete. It solves the SMC’s limitation (resulting in false negative without extending from finite specification to infinite specification. At last, a case of using TMC to verify a realistic hardware circuit round-robin arbiter is achieved. Avoiding verifying the undesired paths which are not related to the specifications, TMC makes it possible to reduce the computational complexity, and the experimental results suggest that the time cost by SMC is 3.14× with TMC in the case.

  6. Acetylene-Terminated Polyimide Siloxanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    St. Clair, Terry L.; Maudgal, Shubba

    1987-01-01

    Siloxane-containing addition polyimides yield toughened high-temperature adhesives and matrix resins. Addition polyimide made by reaction of aromatic tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride with aromatic diamine in presence of ethynyl-substituted aromatic monoamine. Acetylene-terminated siloxane imide cured by heating to yield acetylene-terminated polyimide siloxane.

  7. Selection of Air Terminal Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    This paper discusses the selection of the air terminal device for the experiments and numerical prediction in the International Energy Agency Annex 20 work: Air Flow Pattern within Buildings,......This paper discusses the selection of the air terminal device for the experiments and numerical prediction in the International Energy Agency Annex 20 work: Air Flow Pattern within Buildings,...

  8. Kinetic Studies on State of the Art Solid Oxide Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njodzefon, Jean-Claude; Graves, Christopher R.; Hjelm, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC), which converts hydrogen as well as hydrocarbon fuels directly into electricity, has demonstrated almost comparable performance when operated reversely as Solid Oxide Electrolyser Cell (SOEC) for electrical energy storage as fuels. In both application...

  9. Sputtering of solid deuterium by He-ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.; Pedrys, R.

    2001-01-01

    Sputtering of solid deuterium by bombardment of 3He+ and 4He+ ions was studied. Some features are similar to hydrogen ion bombardment of solid deuterium, but for the He-ions a significant contribution of elastic processes to the total yield can be identified. The thin-film enhancement is more...

  10. Hydrogen separation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundschau, Michael [Longmont, CO; Xie, Xiaobing [Foster City, CA; Evenson, IV, Carl; Grimmer, Paul [Longmont, CO; Wright, Harold [Longmont, CO

    2011-05-24

    A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for separating a hydrogen-rich product stream from a feed stream comprising hydrogen and at least one carbon-containing gas, comprising feeding the feed stream, at an inlet pressure greater than atmospheric pressure and a temperature greater than 200.degree. C., to an integrated water gas shift/hydrogen separation membrane system wherein the hydrogen separation membrane system comprises a membrane that is selectively permeable to hydrogen, and producing a hydrogen-rich permeate product stream on the permeate side of the membrane and a carbon dioxide-rich product raffinate stream on the raffinate side of the membrane. A method for pretreating a membrane, comprising: heating the membrane to a desired operating temperature and desired feed pressure in a flow of inert gas for a sufficient time to cause the membrane to mechanically deform; decreasing the feed pressure to approximately ambient pressure; and optionally, flowing an oxidizing agent across the membrane before, during, or after deformation of the membrane. A method of supporting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising selecting a hydrogen separation membrane system comprising one or more catalyst outer layers deposited on a hydrogen transport membrane layer and sealing the hydrogen separation membrane system to a porous support.

  11. Safe venting of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, W.F.; Dewart, J.M.; Edeskuty, F.J.

    1990-01-01

    The disposal of hydrogen is often required in the operation of an experimental facility that contains hydrogen. Whether the vented hydrogen can be discharged to the atmosphere safely depends upon a number of factors such as the flow rate and atmospheric conditions. Calculations have been made that predict the distance a combustible mixture can extend from the point of release under some specified atmospheric conditions. Also the quantity of hydrogen in the combustible cloud is estimated. These results can be helpful in deciding of the hydrogen can be released directly to the atmosphere, or if it must be intentionally ignited. 15 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Terminal Interface Conformations Modulate Dimer Stability Prior to Amino Terminal Autoprocessing of HIV-1 Protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agniswamy, Johnson; Sayer, Jane M.; Weber, Irene T.; Louis, John M. (GSU); (NIH)

    2012-04-17

    The HIV-1 protease (PR) mediates its own release (autoprocessing) from the polyprotein precursor, Gag-Pol, flanked by the transframe region (TFR) and reverse transcriptase at its N- and C-termini, respectively. Autoprocessing at the N-terminus of PR mediates stable dimer formation essential for catalytic activity, leading to the formation of infectious virus. An antiparallel {beta}-sheet interface formed by the four N- and C-terminal residues of each subunit is important for dimer stability. Here, we present the first high-resolution crystal structures of model protease precursor-clinical inhibitor (PI darunavir or saquinavir) complexes, revealing varying conformations of the N-terminal flanking (S{sup -4}FNF{sup -1}) and interface residues (P{sup 1}QIT{sup 4}). A 180{sup o} rotation of the T{sup 4}-L{sup 5} peptide bond is accompanied by a new Q{sup 2}-L{sup 5} hydrogen bond and complete disengagement of PQIT from the {beta}-sheet dimer interface, which may be a feature for intramolecular autoprocessing. This result is consistent with drastically lower thermal stability by 14-20 C of PI complexes of precursors and the mature PR lacking its PQIT residues (by 18.3 C). Similar to the TFR-PR precursor, this deletion also results in a darunavir dissociation constant (2 x 10{sup 4})-fold higher and a markedly increased dimer dissociation constant relative to the mature PR. The terminal {beta}-sheet perturbations of the dimeric structure likely account for the drastically poorer inhibition of autoprocessing of TFR-PR relative to the mature PR, even though significant differences in active site-PI interactions in these structures were not observed. The novel conformations of the dimer interface may be exploited to target selectively the protease precursor prior to its N-terminal cleavage.

  13. Nuclear momentum distribution in solid and liquid HF from ab initio calculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzystyniak, M

    2010-10-14

    A calculation of nuclear momentum distribution of liquid and solid hydrogen fluoride was performed. In both systems, density functional theory generalized gradient approximation functional of Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof was used for the calculation: for liquid hydrogen fluoride, using an atom centered basis set for an isolated molecule with optimized geometry, and for solid hydrogen fluoride using plane-wave basis sets on optimized orthorhombic crystal cell. For liquid hydrogen fluoride, a semiclassical approach was adopted with the vibrational contribution to momentum distribution obtained from the density functional theory calculation and translational and rotational contributions calculated classically. Nuclear momentum distribution in the solid hydrogen fluoride was calculated entirely quantum mechanically using phonon dispersion and vibrational density of states calculated in the framework of plane-wave density functional theory. Theoretical results were contrasted with recently obtained results of Compton (deep inelastic) neutron scattering on liquid and solid hydrogen fluoride. In case of liquid hydrogen fluoride, almost a perfect agreement between theory and experiment was achieved within the harmonic Born-Oppenheimer approximation. For the solid system under investigation, the harmonic approximation leads to small (4%) overestimation of the square root of the second moment indicating that neutron Compton scattering technique is sensitive to proton delocalization due to hydrogen bonding in solid hydrogen fluoride.

  14. Metallic hydrogen: The most powerful rocket fuel yet to exist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvera, Isaac F [Lyman Laboratory of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Cole, John W, E-mail: silvera@physics.harvard.ed [NASA MSFC, Huntsville, AL 35801 (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Wigner and Huntington first predicted that pressures of order 25 GPa were required for the transition of solid molecular hydrogen to the atomic metallic phase. Later it was predicted that metallic hydrogen might be a metastable material so that it remains metallic when pressure is released. Experimental pressures achieved on hydrogen have been more than an order of magnitude higher than the predicted transition pressure and yet it remains an insulator. We discuss the applications of metastable metallic hydrogen to rocketry. Metastable metallic hydrogen would be a very light-weight, low volume, powerful rocket propellant. One of the characteristics of a propellant is its specific impulse, I{sub sp}. Liquid (molecular) hydrogen-oxygen used in modern rockets has an Isp of {approx}460s; metallic hydrogen has a theoretical I{sub sp} of 1700s. Detailed analysis shows that such a fuel would allow single-stage rockets to enter into orbit or carry economical payloads to the moon. If pure metallic hydrogen is used as a propellant, the reaction chamber temperature is calculated to be greater than 6000 K, too high for currently known rocket engine materials. By diluting metallic hydrogen with liquid hydrogen or water, the reaction temperature can be reduced, yet there is still a significant performance improvement for the diluted mixture.

  15. Hydrogen energy for beginners

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book highlights the outstanding role of hydrogen in energy processes, where it is the most functional element due to its unique peculiarities that are highlighted and emphasized in the book. The first half of the book covers the great natural hydrogen processes in biology, chemistry, and physics, showing that hydrogen is a trend that can unite all natural sciences. The second half of the book is devoted to the technological hydrogen processes that are under research and development with the aim to create the infrastructure for hydrogen energetics. The book describes the main features of hydrogen that make it inalienable player in processes such as fusion, photosynthesis, and metabolism. It also covers the methods of hydrogen production and storage, highlighting at the same time the exclusive importance of nanotechnologies in those processes.

  16. Cyclooctanaminium hydrogen succinate monohydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaz Khorasani

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In the title hydrated salt, C8H18N+·C4H5O4−·H2O, the cyclooctyl ring of the cation is disordered over two positions in a 0.833 (3:0.167 (3 ratio. The structure contains various O—H.·O and N—H...O interactions, forming a hydrogen-bonded layer of molecules perpendicular to the c axis. In each layer, the ammonium cation hydrogen bonds to two hydrogen succinate anions and one water molecule. Each hydrogen succinate anion hydrogen bonds to neighbouring anions, forming a chain of molecules along the b axis. In addition, each hydrogen succinate anion hydrogen bonds to two water molecules and the ammonium cation.

  17. Atomic hydrogen as a launch vehicle propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of several atomic hydrogen launch vehicles was conducted. A discussion of the facilities and the technologies that would be needed for these vehicles is also presented. The Gross Liftoff Weights (GLOW) for two systems were estimated; their specific impulses (I sub sp) were 750 and 1500 lb(sub f)/s/lb(sub m). The atomic hydrogen launch vehicles were also compared to the currently planned Advanced Launch System design concepts. Very significant GLOW reductions of 52 to 58 percent are possible over the Advanced Launch System designs. Applying atomic hydrogen propellants to upper stages was also considered. Very high I(sub sp) (greater than 750 lb(sub f)/s/lb(sub m)) is needed to enable a mass savings over advanced oxygen/hydrogen propulsion. Associated with the potential benefits of high I(sub sp) atomic hydrogen are several challenging problems. Very high magnetic fields are required to maintain the atomic hydrogen in a solid hydrogen matrix. The magnetic field strength was estimated to be 30 kilogauss (3 Tesla). Also the storage temperature of the propellant is 4 K. This very low temperature will require a large refrigeration facility for the launch vehicle. The design considerations for a very high recombination rate for the propellant are also discussed. A recombination rate of 210 cm/s is predicted for atomic hydrogen. This high recombination rate can produce very high acceleration for the launch vehicle. Unique insulation or segmentation to inhibit the propellant may be needed to reduce its recombination rate.

  18. Artificial photosynthetic systems for production of hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2015-04-01

    The rapid consumption of fossil fuels has caused unacceptable environmental problems such as the greenhouse effect, which may lead to disastrous climatic consequences. Because fossil fuels are the products of long-term photosynthesis, it is highly desirable to develop artificial photosynthetic systems for the production of renewable and clean energy such as hydrogen. This article summarizes recent advances on studies of artificial photosynthetic systems for photocatalytic production of hydrogen with hydrogenases and their functional mimics including hybrids of natural and artificial components. Because it is highly desired to convert gaseous H2 to an easily storable form, recent progress on storage of hydrogen as liquid or solid form has also been described in this article. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jack T.

    Solid oxide fuel cells offer the potential for high efficiency, low cost electric power plants for many applications. The fuel cell generator Itself is an all solid state reactor operating at about 1000°C, which produces direct current electricity from the conversion of the energy in gaseous fuel by an electrochemical reaction with the oxygen in air. System studies have shown 50-60 percent efficiency can be obtained in multi-megawatt all electric power plants in which the high quality exhaust heat is used to produce electricity In a bottoming cycle. Alternatively the exhaust heat can be used in Industrial and commercial co-generation systems for space cooling or raising high pressure steam. Space based and military applications for electric power plants have been proposed with high power per unit weight and volume designs which use hydrogen fuel and pure oxygen. Truly significant accomplishments have been made in the 1980's in the technological development of the special materials and processes for producing them for the various cell designs and in the conception of device designs. These advancements were due to the fundamental work of the several decades earlier. In 1986 through 1988 experimental test units in the several hundred to several thousand watt sizes have been designed, fabricated, shipped, and tested for thousands of hours by user organizations in the United States and Japan. The extent of the commercial market for Solid Oxide fuel cells for various applications, vis-a-vis alternate electrical generation options, will depend on what system capital cost can be achieved.

  20. Hydrogen storage methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Züttel, Andreas

    Hydrogen exhibits the highest heating value per mass of all chemical fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen is regenerative and environmentally friendly. There are two reasons why hydrogen is not the major fuel of today's energy consumption. First of all, hydrogen is just an energy carrier. And, although it is the most abundant element in the universe, it has to be produced, since on earth it only occurs in the form of water and hydrocarbons. This implies that we have to pay for the energy, which results in a difficult economic dilemma because ever since the industrial revolution we have become used to consuming energy for free. The second difficulty with hydrogen as an energy carrier is its low critical temperature of 33 K (i.e. hydrogen is a gas at ambient temperature). For mobile and in many cases also for stationary applications the volumetric and gravimetric density of hydrogen in a storage material is crucial. Hydrogen can be stored using six different methods and phenomena: (1) high-pressure gas cylinders (up to 800 bar), (2) liquid hydrogen in cryogenic tanks (at 21 K), (3) adsorbed hydrogen on materials with a large specific surface area (at Tchemically bonded in covalent and ionic compounds (at ambient pressure), or (6) through oxidation of reactive metals, e.g. Li, Na, Mg, Al, Zn with water. The most common storage systems are high-pressure gas cylinders with a maximum pressure of 20 MPa (200 bar). New lightweight composite cylinders have been developed which are able to withstand pressures up to 80 MPa (800 bar) and therefore the hydrogen gas can reach a volumetric density of 36 kg.m-3, approximately half as much as in its liquid state. Liquid hydrogen is stored in cryogenic tanks at 21.2 K and ambient pressure. Due to the low critical temperature of hydrogen (33 K), liquid hydrogen can only be stored in open systems. The volumetric density of liquid hydrogen is 70.8 kg.m-3, and large volumes, where the thermal losses are small, can cause hydrogen to reach a